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Sample records for microwave tissue coagulator

  1. Resection of meningiomas with implantable microwave coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, X.P.; Xie, Q.L.; Liu, J.M.; Yue, Z.J.; Cai, K.H.

    1996-05-01

    Implantable microwave coagulation was used to perform resection on 62 patients that had intracranial meningiomas. When 20--60 W microwave power was applied for 15 s, the temperature at the center of the tumor tissue was 43--63 C; 30 mm from the center, the temperature was under 40 C. Histological changes in the center of the tumor showed coagulative necrosis, diminished nuclei, and obliterated blood vessels. The changes at 10--20 mm from the center of the tumor showed coagulative necrosis and degeneration and, 30--50 mm from the center of the tumor, showed normal cell morphology after microwave coagulation. The thermal field in brain tumor has an effective diameter of about 40 mm. No side effects on the normal brain tissues were observed. The amount of blood loss during the operation was minimal while the meningioma was coagulated, especially when the meningioma was located at the skull base or in the parasagittal or cerebral convexity region. After microwave coagulation, the entire tumor could easily be removed. Among the 62 surgically treated cases, gross total tumor excision was 85%. No postoperative complications occurred after microwave coagulation, and there was no operative mortality in the series. The authors believe that this new technique has the advantage of simplicity, less blood loss, and smooth postoperative procedures. Hemostatic effects during the operation are satisfactory, and blood transfusion can be reduced by 50--60%.

  2. Coagulant Activity of Leukocytes. TISSUE FACTOR ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Niemetz, J.

    1972-01-01

    Peritoneal leukocytes harvested from rabbits which have received two spaced doses of endotoxin have significantly greater (10-fold) coagulant activity than leukocytes from control rabbits. The coagulant activity accelerates the clotting of normal plasma and activates factor X in the presence of factor VII and calcium and is therefore regarded as tissue factor. A total of 40-80 mg tissue factor activity was obtained from the peritoneal cavity of single endotoxin-treated rabbits. In leukocyte subcellular fractions, separated by centrifugation, the specific tissue factor activity sedimented mainly at 14,500 g and above. The procoagulant activity was destroyed after heating for 10 min at 65°C but was preserved at lower temperatures. Polymyxin B, when given with the first dose of endotoxin, reduced both the number of peritoneal leukocytes and their tissue factor activity by two-thirds. When given immediately before the second dose of endotoxin, polymyxin B had no inhibitory effect. PMID:4333021

  3. Tissue Factor in Coagulation: Which? Where? When?

    PubMed Central

    Butenas, Saulius; Orfeo, Thomas; Mann, Kenneth G.

    2009-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is an integral membrane protein, normally separated from the blood by the vascular endothelium, which plays a key role in the initiation of blood coagulation. With a perforating vascular injury, TF becomes exposed to blood and binds plasma factor VIIa. The resulting complex initiates a series of enzymatic reactions leading to clot formation and vascular sealing. In some pathologic states, circulating blood cells express TF as a result of exposure to an inflammatory stimulus leading to intravascular clotting, vessel occlusion and thrombotic pathology. Numerous controversies have arisen related to the influence of structural features of TF, its presentation and its function. There are contradictory reports about the synthesis and presentation of TF on blood cells and the presence (or absence) of functionally active TF circulating in normal blood either on microparticles or as a soluble protein. In this review we discuss TF structure-function relationships and the role of TF during various phases of the blood coagulation process. We also highlight controversies concerning the expression/presence of TF on various cells and in blood in normal and pathologic states. PMID:19592470

  4. Theoretical analysis of the light interaction with coagulated tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jerath, Maya R.; Welch, Ashley J.

    1992-08-01

    During laser treatment, coagulation affects the optical properties of the tissue. In particular, the formation of a white lesion increases the scattering coefficient significantly. This change in the optical properties in turn affects the laser light distribution in the tissue. For example, what is the effect of the white lesion formed during photocoagulation of the retina upon reflection and fluence rate? This problem was simulated on a model medium consisting of a thin absorbing black paint layer covered with a 1 cm thick layer of fresh egg white. The egg white layer was subdivided into coagulated (white) and uncoagulated (clear) layers. The optical properties of coagulated and uncoagulated egg white were determined. These values were used to model light distribution in the medium for varying thicknesses of the coagulated egg white layer using the one dimensional Adding Doubling method. Our results show that the fluence reaching the paint layer increase until the coagulated layer reaches 100 micrometers , after which it falls off exponentially. It was also found that the total reflected light increases almost linearly at first as the coagulated layer thickens, and then begins to level off to an R(infinity ) at a coagulation thickness of 2 mm. Experimental measurements of reflection from a lesion with a CCD camera confirm the computed trends. These results provide a theoretical foundation for control of lesion thickness using reflectance images.

  5. In situ non-ischemic enucleation of multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma using a microwave coagulator.

    PubMed

    Kagebayashi, Y; Hirao, Y; Samma, S; Fukui, Y; Hirohashi, R

    1995-11-01

    A case of multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma is reported, in which nephron-sparing surgery was done using microwave tissue coagulation. A 37-year-old man was referred to our outpatient clinic for a multilocular cystic tumor, 4.5 cm in diameter, in the middle-lower portion of the right kidney, which was detected by ultrasound during a health checkup. The patient had been found to have the same cystic mass on a CT done during another health checkup 1.5 years before. The tumor showed no growth during the 1.5-year period. With a diagnosis of multilocular cystic renal cell carcinoma, T2N0M0, in situ non-ischemic tumor enucleation was done using a microwave tissue coagulator (Microtaze, Heiwa Electronics Industry Inc., Tokyo). Operation time was 150 minutes and blood loss was 135 cc. The histological diagnosis was renal cell carcinoma, T2N0M0V0, cystic type, clear cell subtype, grade 1. Diagnostic imaging done postoperatively showed no sign of damage to renal function. In this report, the characteristics of multilocular cystic renal carcinoma are reviewed from the literature, and the advantages of nephron-sparing surgery for this type of renal tumor are discussed. In addition, an operative technique of tumor enucleation used in this case and the characteristics of Microtaze are introduced. PMID:8749956

  6. Role of adipose tissue in haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Faber, D R; de Groot, Ph G; Visseren, F L J

    2009-09-01

    Obesity is associated with an increased incidence of insulin resistance (IR), type 2 diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular diseases. The increased risk for cardiovascular diseases could partly be caused by a prothrombotic state that exists because of abdominal obesity. Adipose tissue induces thrombocyte activation by the production of adipose tissue-derived hormones, often called adipokines, of which some such as leptin and adiponectin have been shown to directly interfere with platelet function. Increased adipose tissue mass induces IR and systemic low-grade inflammation, also affecting platelet function. It has been demonstrated that adipose tissue directly impairs fibrinolysis by the production of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 and possibly thrombin-activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor. Adipose tissue may contribute to enhanced coagulation by direct tissue factor production, but hypercoagulability is likely to be primarily caused by affecting hepatic synthesis of the coagulation factors fibrinogen, factor VII, factor VIII and tissue factor, by releasing free fatty acids and pro-inflammatory cytokines (tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta and interleukin-6) into the portal circulation and by inducing hepatic IR. Adipose tissue dysfunction could thus play a causal role in the prothrombotic state observed in obesity, by directly and indirectly affecting haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:19460118

  7. Dose control for noncontact laser coagulation of tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roggan, Andre; Albrecht, Hansjoerg; Bocher, Thomas; Rygiel, Reiner; Winter, Harald; Mueller, Gerhard J.

    1995-01-01

    Nd:YAG lasers emitting at 1064 nm are often used for coagulation of tissue in a non-contact mode, i.e. the treatment of verrucae, endometriosis, tumor coagulation and hemostasis. During this process an uncontrolled temperature rise of the irradiated area leads to vaporization and, finally, to a carbonization of the tissue surface. To prevent this, a dose controlled system was developed using an on-line regulation of the output laser power. The change of the backscattered intensity (remission) of the primary beam was used as a dose dependent feedback parameter. Its dependence on the temperature was determined with a double integrating sphere system and Monte-Carlo simulations. The remission of the tissue was calculated in slab geometry from diffusion theory and Monte-Carlo simulations. The laser control was realized with a PD-circuit and an A/D-converter, enabling the direct connection to the internal bus of the laser system. Preliminary studies with various tissues revealed the practicability of the system.

  8. Endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis.

    PubMed

    Umano, Yasukazu; Horiuchi, Tetsuya; Inoue, Masaya; Shono, Yoshiharu; Oku, Yoshimasa; Tanishima, Hiroyuki; Tsuji, Takeshi; Tabuse, Katsuyoshi

    2005-01-01

    We experienced three cases of postoperative hemorrhage from a stapled gastrointestinal anastomosis, and established endoscopic microwave coagulation therapy (EMCT) with a cylinder-type electrode. We were able to treat postoperative hemorrhage over the entire circumference of stapled anastomosis successfully. Two patients had undergone a lower third thoracic esophagogastrectomy through a left thoraco-abdominal approach for gastric cancer in the cardia, while the other case had undergone Billroth I gastrectomy. They each had fresh bleeding from the stapled anastomosis after the operation. Emergency endoscopic examination was immediately performed. Endoscopy revealed bleeding on the suture line. We performed hemostasis endoscopically with microwave coagulation therapy safely. They were discharged from the hospital without complications such as leakage and stenosis. Since EMCT with the cylinder-type electrode can coagulate shallowly and widely, it is very effective for hemorrhage from a stapled anastomosis. PMID:16334775

  9. Optical changes of porcine brain tissue after thermal coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarzmaier, Hans-Joachim; Goldbach, Thomas; Yaroslavsky, Ilya V.; Ulrich, Frank; Bettag, Martin; Kahn, Thomas; Kaufmann, Raimund

    1995-05-01

    Porcine brain tissue is a model for human brain structures in laser induced thermo-therapy. However, its optical properties including possible heat-related changes were basically unknown so far. To simulate laser coagulation, 12 specimens (6 grey and 6 white matter) were heated in a saline bath (80°C, 2 hours) and compared to 11 untreated samples (5 grey and 6 white matter). The optical constants were obtained from transmission (total and collimated) and reflection (diffuse) measurements using the inverse Monte-Carlo method. The absorption coefficient ((mu) a) of untreated grey substance decreased from 0.35 +/- 0.06/mm (340 nm) to 0.03 +/- 0.02/mm (800 nm). The scattering coefficient ((mu) s) varied between 20.42 +/- 3.65/mm (340 nm) and 6.85 +/- 2.07/mm (800 nm). The anisotropy factor (g) increased from 0.848 +/- 0.013 (340 nm) to 0.889 +/- 0.009 (800 nm). Coagulation increased (mu) a up to a factor of 2 (340-540 nm; p < 0.05), and (mu) s by a factor up to 3 (340-800 nm, all data p < 0.001) while g was decreased up to 18% (340-560 nm; p < 0.05). White substance exhibited a (mu) a between 0.24 +/- 0.07/mm (340 nm) and 0.04 +/- 0.02/mm (800 nm) while (mu) s varied between 26.72 +/- 9.10/mm (340 nm) and 21.78 +/- 3.88/mm (800 nm). The g-value increased from 0.561 +/- 0.180 (340 nm) to 0.834 +/- 0.068 (800 nm). Coagulation increased (mu) a by a factor up to 2 (340-800 nm; all data p < 0.05) while (mu) s and g remained unchanged. Thermal denaturation changes the absorption and scattering properties of porcine brain significantly.

  10. Laser probes for noninvasive coagulation of subsurface tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Chia-Chun; Permpongkosol, Sompol; Varkarakis, Ioannis M.; Lima, Guilherme; Franco, Nicholas; Hayman, Michael H.; Nicol, Theresa; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2006-02-01

    Previous ex vivo tissue studies utilizing deep laser heating combined with contact cooling of the tissue surface produced noninvasive thermal destruction of subsurface tissue structures in skin and liver samples. This study describes the design and preliminary in vivo testing of two integrated laser/cooling probes for simultaneous Nd:YAG laser irradiation and sapphire contact cooling of liver and skin tissues in an in vivo, acute porcine model for potential use in laparoscopic and endoscopic surgery. Nd:YAG laser radiation with a wavelength of 1.06 μm, power of 20 W, 7.5-mm-diameter spot, 500-ms pulse length, and repetition rate of 0.625 Hz, was delivered to the tissue with a total irradiation time of 16 s. The tissue surface was continuously cooled with a sapphire plate maintained at -5 °C, and with pre- and post-ablation cooling times measuring 120 s and 30 s, resulting in a total operation time of 166 s per a lesion. Thermal lesions were created in liver and skin at a 1-mm depth below the tissue surface and with a 3-4 mm diameter. The laser parameters and lesion dimensions were comparable to previous ex vivo tissue studies. Preliminary in vivo animal studies demonstrate noninvasive creation of subsurface thermal lesions in tissue using Nd:YAG laser irradiation in conjunction with sapphire contact cooling. Chronic wound healing studies will be necessary to optimize the laser and cooling parameters. Potential clinical applications include endoscopic laser treatment of female stress urinary incontinence and thermal coagulation of early stage bladder tumors.

  11. Effects of microwave radiation on living tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Surrell, J.A.; Alexander, R.C.; Cohle, S.D.; Lovell, F.R. Jr.; Wehrenberg, R.A.

    1987-08-01

    Prompted by an alleged case of child abuse resulting from microwave oven burns and the discovery of one other case, an animal model was chosen to explore microwave burn characteristics upon living, perfusing tissue. Anesthetized piglets were exposed to radiation from a standard household microwave oven for varying lengths of time, sufficient to result in full-thickness skin and visceral burns. Characteristic burn patterns were grossly identified. Biopsies studied with both light and electron microscopy demonstrated a pattern of relative layered tissue sparing. Layered tissue sparing is characterized by burned skin and muscle, with relatively unburned subcutaneous fat between these two layers. These findings have important forensic and patient care implications.

  12. Sequential coagulation factor VIIa domain binding to tissue factor

    SciTech Connect

    Oesterlund, Maria; Persson, Egon; Freskgard, Per-Ola . E-mail: msv@ifm.liu.se

    2005-12-02

    Vessel wall tissue factor (TF) is exposed to blood upon vascular damage which enables association with factor VIIa (FVIIa). This leads to initiation of the blood coagulation cascade through localization and allosteric induction of FVIIa procoagulant activity. To examine the docking pathway of the FVIIa-TF complex, various residues in the extracellular part of TF (sTF) that are known to interact with FVIIa were replaced with cysteines labelled with a fluorescent probe. By using stopped-flow fluorescence kinetic measurements in combination with surface plasmon resonance analysis, we studied the association of the resulting sTF variants with FVIIa. We found the docking trajectory to be a sequence of events in which the protease domain of FVIIa initiates contact with sTF. Thereafter, the two proteins are tethered via the first epidermal growth factor-like and finally the {gamma}-carboxyglutamic acid (Gla) domain. The two labelled sTF residues interacting with the protease domain of FVIIa bind or become eventually ordered at different rates, revealing kinetic details pertinent to the allosteric activation of FVIIa by sTF. Moreover, when the Gla domain of FVIIa is removed the difference in the rate of association for the remaining domains is much more pronounced.

  13. The histological features of microwave coagulation therapy: an assessment of a new applicator design

    PubMed Central

    Swift, Benjamin; Strickland, Andrew; West, Kevin; Clegg, Peter; Cronin, Nigel; Lloyd, David

    2003-01-01

    Microwave ablation of tumours within the liver may become an adjunct or alternative to resection in patients with primary or secondary cancers. This technique combines the benefits of a large, localized coagulative effect with a single insertion of the applicator, in a significantly shorter time than comparable treatments. A new range of microwave applicators were developed and tested in animal models and both ex-vivo and in-vivo specimens of human liver at resection. At laparotomy, the applicator tip was inserted into normal liver parenchyma and tumours, with each specimen subjected to irradiation for 180 s or more and at varying power outputs. On sectioning an area of spherical blanching was observed around the applicator cavity. Microscopically a zone of coagulative necrosis was seen adjacent to the site of probe insertion. Damage to blood vessels and bile ducts occurred distal to the probe cavity suggesting the passage of heated fluid, a finding that was diminished by temporary occlusion of the hepatic vasculature (a Pringle manoeuvre). Ultra-structural damage was confirmed within the burn zone and selected liver enzymes were shown to be functioning beyond this region. We suggest this indicates the surrounding liver parenchyma is functioning normally and therefore the volume of microwave-induced damage is controllable. We are confident that the new applicator design will allow the effective treatment of larger tumours in a safe and controlled manner with a single application of energy. PMID:12694484

  14. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Plan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings, by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds. Using microwave energy to seal wounds has a number of advantages over lasers, which are currently in experimental use in some hospitals. Laser tissue welding is unsuitable for emergency use because its large, bulky

  15. Matriptase activation connects tissue factor-dependent coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling.

    PubMed

    Le Gall, Sylvain M; Szabo, Roman; Lee, Melody; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Craik, Charles S; Bugge, Thomas H; Camerer, Eric

    2016-06-23

    The coagulation cascade is designed to sense tissue injury by physical separation of the membrane-anchored cofactor tissue factor (TF) from inactive precursors of coagulation proteases circulating in plasma. Once TF on epithelial and other extravascular cells is exposed to plasma, sequential activation of coagulation proteases coordinates hemostasis and contributes to host defense and tissue repair. Membrane-anchored serine proteases (MASPs) play critical roles in the development and homeostasis of epithelial barrier tissues; how MASPs are activated in mature epithelia is unknown. We here report that proteases of the extrinsic pathway of blood coagulation transactivate the MASP matriptase, thus connecting coagulation initiation to epithelial proteolysis and signaling. Exposure of TF-expressing cells to factors (F) VIIa and Xa triggered the conversion of latent pro-matriptase to an active protease, which in turn cleaved the pericellular substrates protease-activated receptor-2 (PAR2) and pro-urokinase. An activation pathway-selective PAR2 mutant resistant to direct cleavage by TF:FVIIa and FXa was activated by these proteases when cells co-expressed pro-matriptase, and matriptase transactivation was necessary for efficient cleavage and activation of wild-type PAR2 by physiological concentrations of TF:FVIIa and FXa. The coagulation initiation complex induced rapid and prolonged enhancement of the barrier function of epithelial monolayers that was dependent on matriptase transactivation and PAR2 signaling. These observations suggest that the coagulation cascade engages matriptase to help coordinate epithelial defense and repair programs after injury or infection, and that matriptase may contribute to TF-driven pathogenesis in cancer and inflammation. PMID:27114461

  16. Two-wavelength approach for control of coagulation depth during laser tissue soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehner, Martin; Aden, Mirko; Toedter, Nina; Rosenkranz, Beate

    2015-03-01

    In laser tissue soldering (LTS) protein solutions are used for closing of incisions or fixation of wound dressings. During coagulation and thermal denaturation of the protein solutions their morphology changes significantly such that light is strongly scattered. When scattering becomes major component extinction increases and the optical penetration depth shrinks which could lead to unsufficient coagulation and bonding. For adaption of extinction during coagulation we are investigating a two-wavelength approach. A strongly absorbed laser wavelength (1540 nm) and weakly absorbed wavelength (980 nm) can be applied simultaneously. Simulation of beam propagation is performed in natural and coagulated state of the solder. The model describes a three-layer system consisting of membrane, solder and phantom. The optical properties are determined by spectrometric measurements both in natural and coagulated state. The absorption coefficient μa, scattering coefficient μs and anisotropy factor γ are determined by numerical analysis from the spectrometric data. Beam propagation is simulated for 980 nm and 1540 nm radiation with ZEMAX® software based on the Monte Carlo method. For both wavelengths the beginning of the process with a clear solder layer, and the final state characterized by a coagulated solder layer are examined. The optical penetration depth depends mainly on the optical properties of the solder, which change in the course of coagulation process. The coagulation depth can be varied between 1.5 mm to 3.5 mm by changing the proportion of both laser sources. This leads to concepts for minimizing heat input while maintaining a constant coagulation depth.

  17. Microwave Tissue Soldering for Immediate Wound Closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey; Ngo, Phong H.; Phan, Chau T.; Byerly, Diane; Dusl, John; Sognier, Marguerite A.; Carl, James

    2011-01-01

    A novel approach for the immediate sealing of traumatic wounds is under development. A portable microwave generator and handheld antenna are used to seal wounds, binding the edges of the wound together using a biodegradable protein sealant or solder. This method could be used for repairing wounds in emergency settings by restoring the wound surface to its original strength within minutes. This technique could also be utilized for surgical purposes involving solid visceral organs (i.e., liver, spleen, and kidney) that currently do not respond well to ordinary surgical procedures. A miniaturized microwave generator and a handheld antenna are used to deliver microwave energy to the protein solder, which is applied to the wound. The antenna can be of several alternative designs optimized for placement either in contact with or in proximity to the protein solder covering the wound. In either case, optimization of the design includes the matching of impedances to maximize the energy delivered to the protein solder and wound at a chosen frequency. For certain applications, an antenna could be designed that would emit power only when it is in direct contact with the wound. The optimum frequency or frequencies for a specific application would depend on the required depth of penetration of the microwave energy. In fact, a computational simulation for each specific application could be performed, which would then match the characteristics of the antenna with the protein solder and tissue to best effect wound closure. An additional area of interest with potential benefit that remains to be validated is whether microwave energy can effectively kill bacteria in and around the wound. Thus, this may be an efficient method for simultaneously sterilizing and closing wounds.

  18. Thermal effects of X-band microwaves on skin tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Kyo D.; Yoon, Hargsoon; Lee, Kunik; Kim, Jaehwan; Choi, Sang H.

    2012-04-01

    Microwave can be used as a power carrier to implanted medical devices wirelessly, which is regarded as one of the attractive features for medical applications. The loss mechanism of microwave transmission through lossy media often appears as a thermal effect due to the absorption of microwave. Such a thermal effect on human tissue has not rigorously studied yet. The thermal effect on living tissues was experimentally tested with animal skins to understand the absorption characteristics of microwave. In this paper, the frequency range of microwave used for the tests was from 6 GHz to 13 GHz.

  19. Microwave imaging of tissue blood content changes.

    PubMed

    Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; Jofre, L; Bolomey, J C; Gaboriaud, G

    1991-05-01

    Active microwave imaging gives information on the dielectric properties of of the body, allowing the collection of data that are distinct from, but complementary to, those available from other imaging methods based on different radiations. Two types of microwave imaging systems have been developed. The first is a planar system that irradiates the object with a plane wave and collects scattered phase and amplitude data at 1024 points on a parallel plane. The data can be reconstructed using a back propagation technique to give an image of the object. The second type of system is a tomographic scanner, consisting of a multiplexed 64-element circular array of waveguides. The waveguides are electronically scanned, alternately as sources and receivers, to give a complete scan of the object with no mechanical movement. A tomographic 'slice' of the object is reconstructed using spectral domain interpolation. Both systems work at 2.45 GHz with an incident power less than 1 mW cm-2 at the object and require a coupling medium (usually water) between the object and the source/receiver. Imaging parameters are appropriate for clinical use: a spatial resolution of 1 cm, measurement time of a few seconds and contrast resolution of around 1%. The effects of changes in perfusion on images of isolated animal organs are presented. Images have also been obtained, with both systems, of the internal dielectric structure of the forearm and of variations in dielectric properties due to changes of tissue blood content effected by application and release of tourniquets to the upper arm. Results show that these changes are well demonstrated by microwave imaging, and possible clinical applications are discussed. PMID:1870328

  20. Laser tissue coagulation and concurrent optical coherence tomography through a double-clad fiber coupler.

    PubMed

    Beaudette, Kathy; Baac, Hyoung Won; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Villiger, Martin; Godbout, Nicolas; Bouma, Brett E; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-04-01

    Double-clad fiber (DCF) is herein used in conjunction with a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) to enable simultaneous and co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser tissue coagulation. The DCF allows a single channel fiber-optic probe to be shared: i.e. the core propagating the OCT signal while the inner cladding delivers the coagulation laser light. We herein present a novel DCFC designed and built to combine both signals within a DCF (>90% of single-mode transmission; >65% multimode coupling). Potential OCT imaging degradation mechanisms are also investigated and solutions to mitigate them are presented. The combined DCFC-based system was used to induce coagulation of an ex vivo swine esophagus allowing a real-time assessment of thermal dynamic processes. We therefore demonstrate a DCFC-based system combining OCT imaging with laser coagulation through a single fiber, thus enabling both modalities to be performed simultaneously and in a co-registered manner. Such a system enables endoscopic image-guided laser marking of superficial epithelial tissues or laser thermal therapy of epithelial lesions in pathologies such as Barrett's esophagus. PMID:25909013

  1. Self-production of tissue factor-coagulation factor VII complex by ovarian cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Yokota, N; Koizume, S; Miyagi, E; Hirahara, F; Nakamura, Y; Kikuchi, K; Ruf, W; Sakuma, Y; Tsuchiya, E; Miyagi, Y

    2009-01-01

    Background: Thromboembolic events are a major complication in ovarian cancer patients. Tissue factor (TF) is frequently overexpressed in ovarian cancer tissue and correlates with intravascular thrombosis. TF binds to coagulation factor VII (fVII), changing it to its active form, fVIIa. This leads to activation of the extrinsic coagulation cascade. fVII is produced by the liver and believed to be supplied from blood plasma at the site of coagulation. However, we recently showed that ovarian cancer cells express fVII transcripts under normoxia and that this transcription is inducible under hypoxia. These findings led us to hypothesise that ovarian cancer cells are intrinsically associated with TF-fVIIa coagulation activity, which could result in thrombosis. Methods: In this study, we examined whether ectopically expressed fVII could cause thrombosis by means of immunohistochemistry, RT–PCR, western blotting and flow cytometry. Results: Ectopic fVII expression occurs frequently in ovarian cancers, particularly in clear cell carcinoma. We further showed that ovarian cancer cells express TF-fVIIa on the cell surface under normoxia and that this procoagulant activity is enhanced by hypoxic stimuli. Moreover, we showed that ovarian cancer cells secrete microparticles (MPs) with TF-fVIIa activity. Production of this procoagulant secretion is enhanced under hypoxia. Conclusion: These results raise the possibility that cancer cell-derived TF-fVIIa could cause thrombotic events in ovarian cancer patients. PMID:19904262

  2. Laser tissue coagulation and concurrent optical coherence tomography through a double-clad fiber coupler

    PubMed Central

    Beaudette, Kathy; Baac, Hyoung Won; Madore, Wendy-Julie; Villiger, Martin; Godbout, Nicolas; Bouma, Brett E.; Boudoux, Caroline

    2015-01-01

    Double-clad fiber (DCF) is herein used in conjunction with a double-clad fiber coupler (DCFC) to enable simultaneous and co-registered optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser tissue coagulation. The DCF allows a single channel fiber-optic probe to be shared: i.e. the core propagating the OCT signal while the inner cladding delivers the coagulation laser light. We herein present a novel DCFC designed and built to combine both signals within a DCF (>90% of single-mode transmission; >65% multimode coupling). Potential OCT imaging degradation mechanisms are also investigated and solutions to mitigate them are presented. The combined DCFC-based system was used to induce coagulation of an ex vivo swine esophagus allowing a real-time assessment of thermal dynamic processes. We therefore demonstrate a DCFC-based system combining OCT imaging with laser coagulation through a single fiber, thus enabling both modalities to be performed simultaneously and in a co-registered manner. Such a system enables endoscopic image-guided laser marking of superficial epithelial tissues or laser thermal therapy of epithelial lesions in pathologies such as Barrett’s esophagus. PMID:25909013

  3. Modeling and analysis of coagulated liver tissue and its interaction with a scalpel blade.

    PubMed

    Leong, Florence; Huang, Wei-Hsuan; Chui, Chee-Kong

    2013-06-01

    Radiofrequency-assisted methods have been used in hepatectomy--the resection process of removing liver tissue which encapsulates the tumor from the liver organ. A prototype was built to enable smooth surgical transition between radiofrequency ablation and liver resection. There is a lack of literature on mechanical properties of radiofrequency-ablated liver tissue and the tool-tissue interaction during cutting. This led to our study on coagulated tissue mechanical properties and modeling of its dynamic interaction with a scalpel blade. A novel mechanical model was proposed to mimic the mechanical behavior of radiofrequency-ablated liver tissue. The model is able to account for the viscoelastic behavior of the ablated tissue in both compression and relaxation tests. Experiments were performed to validate the proposed model. In addition, a knife blade-tissue interaction model is proposed to demonstrate the potential of integrating the proposed model for application in device design. PMID:23361342

  4. MICROWAVE IRRADIATION FOR RAPID KILLING AND FIXING OF PLANT TISSUE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Irradiation by microwaves allow for rapid billing and fixing of plant tissue, with excellent cellular integrity for histological examination. One or two exposures to microwaves for three seconds in formalin/acetic acid/alcohol gave good preservation of nuclei, chloroplasts and ot...

  5. Physiological levels of blood coagulation factors IX and X control coagulation kinetics in an in vitro model of circulating tissue factor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tormoen, Garth W.; Khader, Ayesha; Gruber, András; McCarty, Owen J. T.

    2013-06-01

    Thrombosis significantly contributes to cancer morbidity and mortality. The mechanism behind thrombosis in cancer may be circulating tissue factor (TF), as levels of circulating TF are associated with thrombosis. However, circulating TF antigen level alone has failed to predict thrombosis in patients with cancer. We hypothesize that coagulation factor levels regulate the kinetics of circulating TF-induced thrombosis. Coagulation kinetics were measured as a function of individual coagulation factor levels and TF particle concentration. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 4:6 with PBS. Clotting times increased when pooled plasma was mixed at or above a ratio of 8:2 with factor VII-depleted plasma, 7:3 with factor IX- or factor X-depleted plasmas, or 2:8 with factor II-, V- or VIII-depleted plasmas. Addition of coagulation factors VII, X, IX, V and II to depleted plasmas shortened clotting and enzyme initiation times, and increased enzyme generation rates in a concentration-dependent manner. Only additions of factors IX and X from low-normal to high-normal levels shortened clotting times and increased enzyme generation rates. Our results demonstrate that coagulation kinetics for TF particles are controlled by factor IX and X levels within the normal physiological range. We hypothesize that individual patient factor IX and X levels may be prognostic for susceptibility to circulating TF-induced thrombosis.

  6. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues.

    PubMed

    Kletsov, Andrey; Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-10-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  7. Microwave non-contact imaging of subcutaneous human body tissues

    PubMed Central

    Chernokalov, Alexander; Khripkov, Alexander; Cho, Jaegeol; Druchinin, Sergey

    2015-01-01

    A small-size microwave sensor is developed for non-contact imaging of a human body structure in 2D, enabling fitness and health monitoring using mobile devices. A method for human body tissue structure imaging is developed and experimentally validated. Subcutaneous fat tissue reconstruction depth of up to 70 mm and maximum fat thickness measurement error below 2 mm are demonstrated by measurements with a human body phantom and human subjects. Electrically small antennas are developed for integration of the microwave sensor into a mobile device. Usability of the developed microwave sensor for fitness applications, healthcare, and body weight management is demonstrated. PMID:26609415

  8. Coagulation and ablation patterns of high-intensity focused ultrasound on a tissue-mimicking phantom and cadaveric skin.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hee-Jin; Kim, Han Gu; Zheng, Zhenlong; Park, Hyoun Jun; Yoon, Jeung Hyun; Oh, Wook; Lee, Cheol Woo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2015-12-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) can be applied noninvasively to create focused zones of tissue coagulation on various skin layers. We performed a comparative study of HIFU, evaluating patterns of focused tissue coagulation and ablation upon application thereof. A tissue-mimicking (TM) phantom was prepared with bovine serum albumin and polyacrylamide hydrogel to evaluate the geometric patterns of HIFU-induced thermal injury zones (TIZs) for five different HIFU devices. Additionally, for each device, we investigated histologic patterns of HIFU-induced coagulation and ablation in serial sections of cadaveric skin of the face and neck. All HIFU devices generated remarkable TIZs in the TM phantom, with different geometric values of coagulation for each device. Most of the TIZs seemed to be separated into two or more tiny parts. In cadaveric skin, characteristic patterns of HIFU-induced ablation and coagulation were noted along the mid to lower dermis at the focal penetration depth of 3 mm and along subcutaneous fat to the superficial musculoaponeurotic system or the platysma muscle of the neck at 4.5 mm. Additionally, remarkable pre-focal areas of tissue coagulation were observed in the upper and mid dermis at the focal penetration depth of 3 mm and mid to lower dermis at 4.5 mm. For five HIFU devices, we outlined various patterns of HIFU-induced TIZ formation along pre-focal, focal, and post-focal areas of TM phantom and cadaveric skin of the face and neck. PMID:26341380

  9. Inflammation and the coagulation system in tuberculosis: Tissue Factor leads the dance.

    PubMed

    Caccamo, Nadia; Dieli, Francesco

    2016-02-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the causative agent of tuberculosis, drives the formation of granulomas, structures in which both immune cells and the bacterial pathogen cohabit. The most abundant cells in granulomas are macrophages, which contribute as both cells with bactericidal activity and as targets for M. tuberculosis infection and proliferation during the entire course of infection. The mechanisms and factors involved in the regulation and control of macrophage microenvironment-specific polarization and plasticity are not well understood, as some granulomas are able to control bacteria growth and others fail to do so, permitting bacterial spread. In this issue of the European Journal of Immunology, Venkatasubramanian et al. [Eur. J. Immunol. 2016. 46: 464-479] show that mice lacking the tissue factor gene in myeloid cells have augmented M. tuberculosis growth and increased inflammation in the lungs. This suggests that tissue factor, an initiator of coagulation, is important for the generation of fibrin, which supports granuloma formation. This article demonstrates for the first time the involvement of tissue factor in inducing effective immunity against M. tuberculosis, and sheds new lights on the complex interplay between host inflammatory response, the coagulation system, and the control of M. tuberculosis infection. PMID:26763085

  10. Heating of tissues by microwaves: a model analysis.

    PubMed

    Foster, K R; Lozano-Nieto, A; Riu, P J; Ely, T S

    1998-01-01

    We consider the thermal response times for heating of tissue subject to nonionizing (microwave or infrared) radiation. The analysis is based on a dimensionless form of the bioheat equation. The thermal response is governed by two time constants: one (tau1) pertains to heat convection by blood flow, and is of the order of 20-30 min for physiologically normal perfusion rates; the second (tau2) characterizes heat conduction and varies as the square of a distance that characterizes the spatial extent of the heating. Two idealized cases are examined. The first is a tissue block with an insulated surface, subject to irradiation with an exponentially decreasing specific absorption rate, which models a large surface area of tissue exposed to microwaves. The second is a hemispherical region of tissue exposed at a spatially uniform specific absorption rate, which models localized exposure. In both cases, the steady-state temperature increase can be written as the product of the incident power density and an effective time constant tau(eff), which is defined for each geometry as an appropriate function of tau1 and tau2. In appropriate limits of the ratio of these time constants, the local temperature rise is dominated by conductive or convective heat transport. Predictions of the block model agree well with recent data for the thresholds for perception of warmth or pain from exposure to microwave energy. Using these concepts, we developed a thermal averaging time that might be used in standards for human exposure to microwave radiation, to limit the temperature rise in tissue from radiation by pulsed sources. We compare the ANSI exposure standards for microwaves and infrared laser radiation with respect to the maximal increase in tissue temperature that would be allowed at the maximal permissible exposures. A historical appendix presents the origin of the 6-min averaging time used in the microwave standard. PMID:9771585

  11. Microwave Ablation Compared with Radiofrequency Ablation for Breast Tissue in an Ex Vivo Bovine Udder Model

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, Toshihiro; Westphal, Saskia; Isfort, Peter; Braunschweig, Till; Penzkofer, Tobias Bruners, Philipp; Kichikawa, Kimihiko; Schmitz-Rode, Thomas Mahnken, Andreas H.

    2012-08-15

    Purpose: To compare the effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation with radiofrequency (RF) ablation for treating breast tissue in a nonperfused ex vivo model of healthy bovine udder tissue. Materials and Methods: MW ablations were performed at power outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W using a 915-MHz frequency generator and a 2-cm active tip antenna. RF ablations were performed with a bipolar RF system with 2- and 3-cm active tip electrodes. Tissue temperatures were continuously monitored during ablation. Results: The mean short-axis diameters of the coagulation zones were 1.34 {+-} 0.14, 1.45 {+-} 0.13, and 1.74 {+-} 0.11 cm for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W. For RF ablation, the corresponding values were 1.16 {+-} 0.09 and 1.26 {+-} 0.14 cm with electrodes having 2- and 3-cm active tips, respectively. The mean coagulation volumes were 2.27 {+-} 0.65, 2.85 {+-} 0.72, and 4.45 {+-} 0.47 cm{sup 3} for MW ablation at outputs of 25W, 35W, and 45W and 1.18 {+-} 0.30 and 2.29 {+-} 0.55 cm{sup 3} got RF ablation with 2- and 3-cm electrodes, respectively. MW ablations at 35W and 45W achieved significantly longer short-axis diameters than RF ablations (P < 0.05). The highest tissue temperature was achieved with MW ablation at 45W (P < 0.05). On histological examination, the extent of the ablation zone in MW ablations was less affected by tissue heterogeneity than that in RF ablations. Conclusion: MW ablation appears to be advantageous with respect to the volume of ablation and the shape of the margin of necrosis compared with RF ablation in an ex vivo bovine udder.

  12. Methods and apparatus for microwave tissue welding for wound closure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Phan, Chau T. (Inventor); Byerly, Diane L. (Inventor); Dusl, John R. (Inventor); Sognier, Marguerite A. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    Methods and apparatus for joining biological tissue together are provided. In at least one specific embodiment, a method for joining biological tissue together can include applying a biological solder on a wound. A barrier layer can be disposed on the biological solder. An antenna can be located in proximate spatial relationship to the barrier layer. An impedance of the antenna can be matched to an impedance of the wound. Microwaves from a signal generator can be transmitted through the antenna to weld two or more biological tissue pieces of the wound together. A power of the microwaves can be adjusted by a control circuit disposed between the antenna and the signal generator. The heating profile within the tissue may be adjusted and controlled by the placement of metallic microspheres in or around the wound.

  13. High-energy pulsed Raman fiber laser for biological tissue coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Baac, Hyoung Won; Uribe-Patarroyo, Néstor; Bouma, Brett E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a high-energy pulsed Raman fiber laser (RFL) with an emission wavelength of 1.44 μm, corresponding to an absorption peak of water. Microsecond pulses with >20 mJ/pulse and >40 W peak power were generated, well above the threshold for tissue coagulation and ablation. Here, we focus on the optical characterization and optimization of high-energy and high-power RFLs excited by an ytterbium fiber laser, comparing three configurations that use different Raman gain fibers, but all of which were prepared with a one-side opened, free-run mode without output mirrors. We show that the free-run configuration can generate sufficiently high energy without requiring a closed cavity design. Experimental RFL characteristics corresponded well with numerical simulations. We discuss the Stokes beam generation process in our system and loss mechanisms mainly associated with fiber Bragg gratings. PMID:24664059

  14. Silicon micromachined ultrasonic scalpel for the dissection and coagulation of tissue.

    PubMed

    Lockhart, R; Friedrich, F; Briand, D; Margairaz, P; Sandoz, J-P; Brossard, J; Keppner, H; Olson, W; Dietz, T; Tardy, Y; Meyer, H; Stadelmann, P; Robert, C; Boegli, A; Farine, P-A; de Rooij, N F; Burger, J

    2015-08-01

    This work presents a planar, longitudinal mode ultrasonic scalpel microfabricated from monocrystalline silicon wafers. Silicon was selected as the material for the ultrasonic horn due to its high speed of sound and thermal conductivity as well as its low density compared to commonly used titanium based alloys. Combined with a relatively high Young's modulus, a lighter, more efficient design for the ultrasonic scalpel can be implemented which, due to silicon batch manufacturing, can be fabricated at a lower cost. Transverse displacement of the piezoelectric actuators is coupled into the planar silicon structure and amplified by its horn-like geometry. Using finite element modeling and experimental displacement and velocity data as well as cutting tests, key design parameters have been identified that directly influence the power efficiency and robustness of the device as well as its ease of controllability when driven in resonance. Designs in which the full- and half-wave transverse modes of the transducer are matched or not matched to the natural frequencies of the piezoelectric actuators have been evaluated. The performance of the Si micromachined scalpels has been found to be comparable to existing commercial titanium based ultrasonic scalpels used in surgical operations for efficient dissection of tissue as well as coaptation and coagulation of tissue for hemostasis. Tip displacements (peak-to-peak) of the scalpels in the range of 10-50 μm with velocities ranging from 4 to 11 m/s have been achieved. The frequency of operation is in the range of 50-100 kHz depending on the transverse operating mode and the length of the scalpel. The cutting ability of the micromachined scalpels has been successfully demonstrated on chicken tissue. PMID:26153517

  15. Optical properties of selected native and coagulated human brain tissues in vitro in the visible and near infrared spectral range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaroslavsky, A. N.; Schulze, P. C.; Yaroslavsky, I. V.; Schober, R.; Ulrich, F.; Schwarzmaier, H.-J.

    2002-06-01

    Medical laser applications require knowledge about the optical properties of target tissue. In this study, the optical properties of selected native and coagulated human brain structures were determined in vitro in the spectral range between 360 and 1100 nm. The tissues investigated included white brain matter, grey brain matter, cerebellum and brainstem tissues (pons, thalamus). In addition, the optical properties of two human tumours (meningioma, astrocytoma WHO grade II) were determined. Diffuse reflectance, total transmittance and collimated transmittance of the samples were measured using an integrating-sphere technique. From these experimental data, the absorption coefficients, the scattering coefficients and the anisotropy factors of the samples were determined employing an inverse Monte Carlo technique. The tissues investigated differed from each other predominantly in their scattering properties. Thermal coagulation reduced the optical penetration depth substantially. The highest penetration depths for all tissues investigated were found in the wavelength range between 1000 and 1100 nm. A comparison with data from the literature revealed the importance of the employed tissue preparation technique and the impact of the theoretical model used to extract the optical coefficients from the measured quantities.

  16. Microwave radiometric signatures of temperature anomalies in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kelly, Patrick; Sobers, Tamara; St. Peter, Benjamin; Siqueira, Paul; Capraro, Geoffrey

    2012-03-01

    Because of its ability to measure the temperature-dependent power of electromagnetic radiation emitted from tissue down to several centimeters beneath the skin, microwave radiometry has long been of interest as a means for identifying the internal tissue temperature anomalies that arise from abnormalities in physiological parameters such as metabolic and blood perfusion rates. However, the inherent lack of specificity and resolution in microwave radiometer measurements has limited the clinical usefulness of the technique. The idea underlying this work is to make use of information (assumed to be available from some other modality) about the tissue configuration in the volume of interest to study and improve the accuracy of anomaly detection and estimation from radiometric data. In particular, knowledge of the specific anatomy and the properties of the overall measurement system enable determination of the signatures of localized physiological abnormalities in the radiometry data. These signatures are used to investigate the accuracy with which the location of an anomaly can be determined from radiometric measurements. Algorithms based on matches to entries in a signature dictionary are developed for anomaly detection and estimation. The accuracy of anomaly identification is improved when the coupling of power from the body to the sensor is optimized. We describe the design of a radiometer waveguide having dielectric properties appropriate for biomedical applications.

  17. Microwave-heating-coupled photoacoustic radar for tissue diagnostic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Wei; Mandelis, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    An investigation of microwave (MW) heating effects on biotissue for enhancing photoacoustic radar (PAR) signals was conducted. Localized tissue heating generated by MWs was used to improve PAR imaging depth and signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). Elevated temperatures were measured with thermocouples in ex vivo bovine muscle. The measured temperature rise on the heated spot surface by MWs was in agreement with theoretical predictions. The study showed localized MW heating can increase the photoacoustic imaging depth by 11%, and the SNR by 5% in ex vivo bovine muscle.

  18. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A.; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  19. Tissue factor is induced by interleukin-33 in human endothelial cells: a new link between coagulation and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Stojkovic, Stefan; Kaun, Christoph; Basilio, Jose; Rauscher, Sabine; Hell, Lena; Krychtiuk, Konstantin A; Bonstingl, Cornelia; de Martin, Rainer; Gröger, Marion; Ay, Cihan; Holnthoner, Wolfgang; Eppel, Wolfgang; Neumayer, Christoph; Huk, Ihor; Huber, Kurt; Demyanets, Svitlana; Wojta, Johann

    2016-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the primary trigger of coagulation. Elevated levels of TF are found in atherosclerotic plaques, and TF leads to thrombus formation when released upon plaque rupture. Interleukin (IL)-33 was previously shown to induce angiogenesis and inflammatory activation of endothelial cells (ECs). Here, we investigated the impact of IL-33 on TF in human ECs, as a possible new link between inflammation and coagulation. IL-33 induced TF mRNA and protein in human umbilical vein ECs and coronary artery ECs. IL-33-induced TF expression was ST2- and NF-κB-dependent, but IL-1-independent. IL-33 also increased cell surface TF activity in ECs and TF activity in ECs-derived microparticles. IL-33-treated ECs reduced coagulation time of whole blood and plasma but not of factor VII-deficient plasma. In human carotid atherosclerotic plaques (n = 57), TF mRNA positively correlated with IL-33 mRNA expression (r = 0.691, p < 0.001). In this tissue, IL-33 and TF protein was detected in ECs and smooth muscle cells by immunofluorescence. Furthermore, IL-33 and TF protein co-localized at the site of clot formation within microvessels in plaques of patients with symptomatic carotid stenosis. Through induction of TF in ECs, IL-33 could enhance their thrombotic capacity and thereby might impact on thrombus formation in the setting of atherosclerosis. PMID:27142573

  20. Study of laser-induced thermoelastic deformation of native and coagulated ex-vivo bovine liver tissues for estimating their optical and thermomechanical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soroushian, Behrouz; Whelan, William M.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2010-11-01

    Several studies have explored the potential of optoacoustic imaging for monitoring thermal therapies, yet the origin of the contrast in the images is not well understood. A technique is required to measure the changes in the optical and thermomechanical properties of tissues upon coagulation to better understand this contrast. An interferometric method is presented for measuring simultaneously the optical and thermomechanical properties of native and coagulated ex-vivo bovine tissue samples based on analysis of the surface displacement of irradiated samples. Surface displacements are measured after irradiation by short laser pulses at 750 nm. A 51% decrease in the optical attenuation depth is observed for coagulated liver samples compared to native samples. No significant differences in the Grüneisen coefficient are measured in the native and coagulated tissue samples. A mean value of 0.12 for the Grüneisen coefficient is measured for both native and coagulated liver tissues. The displacement profiles exhibit consistent differences between the two tissue types. To assess the changes in the sample mechanical properties, the experimental data also are compared to numerical solutions of the equation for thermoelastic deformation. The results demonstrate that differences in the tissue expansion dynamics arise from higher values of elastic modulus for coagulated liver samples compared to native ones.

  1. Study of laser-induced thermoelastic deformation of native and coagulated ex-vivo bovine liver tissues for estimating their optical and thermomechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Soroushian, Behrouz; Whelan, William M; Kolios, Michael C

    2010-01-01

    Several studies have explored the potential of optoacoustic imaging for monitoring thermal therapies, yet the origin of the contrast in the images is not well understood. A technique is required to measure the changes in the optical and thermomechanical properties of tissues upon coagulation to better understand this contrast. An interferometric method is presented for measuring simultaneously the optical and thermomechanical properties of native and coagulated ex-vivo bovine tissue samples based on analysis of the surface displacement of irradiated samples. Surface displacements are measured after irradiation by short laser pulses at 750 nm. A 51% decrease in the optical attenuation depth is observed for coagulated liver samples compared to native samples. No significant differences in the Grüneisen coefficient are measured in the native and coagulated tissue samples. A mean value of 0.12 for the Grüneisen coefficient is measured for both native and coagulated liver tissues. The displacement profiles exhibit consistent differences between the two tissue types. To assess the changes in the sample mechanical properties, the experimental data also are compared to numerical solutions of the equation for thermoelastic deformation. The results demonstrate that differences in the tissue expansion dynamics arise from higher values of elastic modulus for coagulated liver samples compared to native ones. PMID:21198166

  2. Radiofrequency and microwave ablation in combination with transarterial chemoembolization induce equivalent histopathologic coagulation necrosis in hepatocellular carcinoma patients bridged to liver transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Ginsburg, Michael; Ahmed, Osman; Doshi, Taral; Hart, John; Te, Helen; Van Ha, Thuong Gustav

    2016-01-01

    Background Bridging therapy plays an increasingly important role in the management of patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) awaiting liver transplantation (LT). Combination therapy with drug-eluting bead transarterial chemoembolization (DEB-TACE) and percutaneous thermal ablation, such as radiofrequency ablation (RFA) or microwave ablation (MWA), has shown success at prolonging survival and bridging patients to LT. However, few studies have evaluated the two combination therapy regimens head-to-head at a single institution, and fewer have compared histopathology. This retrospective study compares tumor coagulation on explanted livers in patients with HCC treated with DEB-TACE sequentially combined with RFA versus MWA. Methods From 2005 to 2015, 42 sequential patients underwent combination therapy prior to LT by Milan criteria, with 11 patients (11 tumors; mean, 2.9 cm; range, 1.8–4.3 cm) in the DEB-TACE/RFA cohort and 31 patients (40 tumors; mean, 2.4 cm; range, 1.1–5.4 cm) in the DEB-TACE/MWA cohort. The mean TACE procedures in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 1.3 (range, 1–2) and 1.3 (range, 1–3), respectively. The mean thermal ablations in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 1.2 (range, 1–2) and 1.3 (range, 1–3), respectively. Tumor coagulation was evaluated on explanted livers. Results Mean tumor coagulation in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 88.9% (range, 0–100%) and 90.5% (range, 30–100%), respectively (P=0.82). Rates of complete tumor coagulation in the RFA and MWA cohorts were 45% and 53%, respectively (P=0.74). No difference in tumor coagulation was found between the cohorts when separating tumors <3 cm (P=0.21) and >3 cm (P=0.09). Among all 51 tumors, the 36 in complete response (CR) on imaging at LT demonstrated mean tumor coagulation of 95.8%. No correlation was found between tumor coagulation and initial tumor size or time interval to LT. No tumor seeding was seen along the ablation tracts. Conclusions RFA and MWA in sequential combination

  3. Physical techniques for delivering microwave energy to tissues.

    PubMed Central

    Hand, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    Some of the physical aspects of delivering microwave energy to tissues have been discussed. Effective penetration of a few cm may be achieved with external applicators whilst small coaxial or cylindrical devices can induce localized heating in sites accessible to catheters or to direct invasion. To heat deep tissue sites in general, systems of greater complexity involving a number of applicators with particular phase relationships between them are required. The problems of thermometry in the presence of electromagnetic fields fall outside the scope of this article. Their solution, however, is no less important to the future of clinical hyperthermia than the development of heating techniques. Finally, it should be remembered that physiological parameters such as blood flow have appreciable effects in determining the efficacy of the physical techniques described above. PMID:6950781

  4. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Shabbir A.; Pendurthi, Usha R.; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L. Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  5. Monocyte tissue factor–dependent activation of coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys is inhibited by simvastatin

    PubMed Central

    Owens, A. Phillip; Passam, Freda H.; Antoniak, Silvio; Marshall, Stephanie M.; McDaniel, Allison L.; Rudel, Lawrence; Williams, Julie C.; Hubbard, Brian K.; Dutton, Julie-Ann; Wang, Jianguo; Tobias, Peter S.; Curtiss, Linda K.; Daugherty, Alan; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Luyendyk, James P.; Moriarty, Patrick M.; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Furie, Barbara C.; Furie, Bruce; Johns, Douglas G.; Temel, Ryan E.; Mackman, Nigel

    2012-01-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. It also is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which increases morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia produces a procoagulant state remain undefined. Atherosclerosis is associated with accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins within atherosclerotic lesions. Small quantities of oxidized lipoproteins are also present in the circulation of patients with coronary artery disease. We therefore hypothesized that hypercholesterolemia leads to elevated levels of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in plasma and that this induces expression of the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF) in monocytes. In support of this hypothesis, we report here that oxLDL induced TF expression in human monocytic cells and monocytes. In addition, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia had elevated levels of plasma microparticle (MP) TF activity. Furthermore, a high-fat diet induced a time-dependent increase in plasma MP TF activity and activation of coagulation in both LDL receptor–deficient mice and African green monkeys. Genetic deficiency of TF in bone marrow cells reduced coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice, consistent with a major role for monocyte-derived TF in the activation of coagulation. Similarly, a deficiency of either TLR4 or TLR6 reduced levels of MP TF activity. Simvastatin treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys reduced oxLDL, monocyte TF expression, MP TF activity, activation of coagulation, and inflammation, without affecting total cholesterol levels. Our results suggest that the prothrombotic state associated with hypercholesterolemia is caused by oxLDL-mediated induction of TF expression in monocytes via engagement of a TLR4/TLR6 complex. PMID:22214850

  6. The Role of Putative Phosphatidylserine-Interactive Residues of Tissue Factor on Its Coagulant Activity at the Cell Surface.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Shabbir A; Pendurthi, Usha R; Sen, Prosenjit; Rao, L Vijaya Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS) on the outer leaflet of the cell membrane is thought to play a critical role in tissue factor (TF) decryption. Recent molecular dynamics simulation studies suggested that the TF ectodomain may directly interact with PS. To investigate the potential role of TF direct interaction with the cell surface phospholipids on basal TF activity and the enhanced TF activity following the decryption, one or all of the putative PS-interactive residues in the TF ectodomain were mutated and tested for their coagulant activity in cell systems. Out of the 9 selected TF mutants, five of them -TFS160A, TFS161A, TFS162A, TFK165A, and TFD180A- exhibited a similar TF coagulant activity to that of the wild-type TF. The specific activity of three mutants, TFK159A, TFS163A, and TFK166A, was reduced substantially. Mutation of the glycine residue at the position 164 markedly abrogated the TF coagulant activity, resulting in ~90% inhibition. Mutation of all nine lipid binding residues together did not further decrease the activity of TF compared to TFG164A. A similar fold increase in TF activity was observed in wild-type TF and all TF mutants following the treatment of THP-1 cells with either calcium ionomycin or HgCl2, two agents that are commonly used to decrypt TF. Overall, our data show that a few select TF residues that are implicated in interacting with PS contribute to the TF coagulant activity at the cell surface. However, our data also indicate that TF regions outside of the putative lipid binding region may also contribute to PS-dependent decryption of TF. PMID:27348126

  7. Monocyte tissue factor-dependent activation of coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys is inhibited by simvastatin.

    PubMed

    Owens, A Phillip; Passam, Freda H; Antoniak, Silvio; Marshall, Stephanie M; McDaniel, Allison L; Rudel, Lawrence; Williams, Julie C; Hubbard, Brian K; Dutton, Julie-Ann; Wang, Jianguo; Tobias, Peter S; Curtiss, Linda K; Daugherty, Alan; Kirchhofer, Daniel; Luyendyk, James P; Moriarty, Patrick M; Nagarajan, Shanmugam; Furie, Barbara C; Furie, Bruce; Johns, Douglas G; Temel, Ryan E; Mackman, Nigel

    2012-02-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for atherosclerosis. It also is associated with platelet hyperactivity, which increases morbidity and mortality from cardiovascular disease. However, the mechanisms by which hypercholesterolemia produces a procoagulant state remain undefined. Atherosclerosis is associated with accumulation of oxidized lipoproteins within atherosclerotic lesions. Small quantities of oxidized lipoproteins are also present in the circulation of patients with coronary artery disease. We therefore hypothesized that hypercholesterolemia leads to elevated levels of oxidized LDL (oxLDL) in plasma and that this induces expression of the procoagulant protein tissue factor (TF) in monocytes. In support of this hypothesis, we report here that oxLDL induced TF expression in human monocytic cells and monocytes. In addition, patients with familial hypercholesterolemia had elevated levels of plasma microparticle (MP) TF activity. Furthermore, a high-fat diet induced a time-dependent increase in plasma MP TF activity and activation of coagulation in both LDL receptor-deficient mice and African green monkeys. Genetic deficiency of TF in bone marrow cells reduced coagulation in hypercholesterolemic mice, consistent with a major role for monocyte-derived TF in the activation of coagulation. Similarly, a deficiency of either TLR4 or TLR6 reduced levels of MP TF activity. Simvastatin treatment of hypercholesterolemic mice and monkeys reduced oxLDL, monocyte TF expression, MP TF activity, activation of coagulation, and inflammation, without affecting total cholesterol levels. Our results suggest that the prothrombotic state associated with hypercholesterolemia is caused by oxLDL-mediated induction of TF expression in monocytes via engagement of a TLR4/TLR6 complex. PMID:22214850

  8. A comparative study of tissue factor and kaolin on blood coagulation assays using rotational thromboelastometry and thromboelastography.

    PubMed

    Peng, Henry T; Grodecki, Richard; Rizoli, Sandro; Shek, Pang N

    2016-01-01

    Rotational thromboelastometry (ROTEM) and thromboelastography (TEG) have been increasingly used to diagnose acute coagulopathy and guide blood transfusion. The tests are routinely performed using different triggering activators such as tissue factor and kaolin, which activate different pathways yielding different results. To optimize the global blood coagulation assays using ROTEM and TEG, we conducted a comparative study on the activation methods employing tissue factor and kaolin at different concentrations as well as standard reagents as recommended by the manufacturer of each device. Key parameter values were obtained at various assay conditions to evaluate and compare coagulation and fibrinolysis profiles of citrated whole blood collected from healthy volunteers. It was found that tissue factor reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R, and increased ROTEM clot formation time and TEG K in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, tissue factor affected ROTEM alpha angle, and maximum clot firmness, especially in the absence of kaolin activation, whereas both ROTEM and TEG clot lysis (LI30, CL30, and LY30) remained unaffected. Moreover, kaolin reduced ROTEM clotting time and TEG R and K, but to a lesser extent than tissue factor, in-tem and ex-tem. Correlations in all corresponding parameters between ROTEM and TEG were observed, when the same activators were used in the assays compared with lesser correlations between standard kaolin TEG and ROTEM (INTEM/EXTEM). The two types of viscoelastic point-of-care devices provide different results, depending on the triggering reagent used to perform the assay. Optimal assay condition was obtained to reduce assay time and improve assay accuracy. PMID:26340454

  9. Tissue Factor in Dermatitis Herpetiformis and Bullous Pemphigoid: Link between Immune and Coagulation System in Subepidermal Autoimmune Bullous Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Zebrowska, Agnieszka; Wagrowska-Danilewicz, Malgorzata; Danilewicz, Marian; Wieczfinska, Joanna; Pniewska, Ewa; Zebrowski, Michal; Waszczykowska, Elzbieta; Wozniacka, Anna; Eusebio, Makandjou-Ola; Pietruczuk, Miroslawa; Pawliczak, Rafal

    2015-01-01

    Dermatitis herpetiformis (DH) and bullous pemphigoid (BP) are skin diseases associated with eosinophilic and neutrophilic infiltrations. Although chemokines are critical for the selective accumulation and activation of various leukocyte subsets in the inflammatory process, there are few findings concerning inflammatory cells and production of coagulation factors in blistering diseases. Skin biopsies were taken from 14 patients with DH, 27 with BP, and 20 control subjects. The localization and expression of tissue factor (TF) in skin lesions and perilesional skin were studied by immunohistochemistry and confirmed by Western Blot. Moreover the plasma concentrations of TF were measured by immunoassays. D dimers, fibrinogen, and selected coagulation parameters were measured by routine methods. Expression of TF in the epidermis and in inflammatory influxed cells in dermis was detected in skin biopsies from BP patients. Examined TF expression was detected in perilesional skin of all BP patients too. The expression of TF was not observed in biopsies from healthy people and DH patients. The findings of the study show an increased expression of tissue factor in the lesional and perilesional skin of patients with bullous pemphigoid. The difference in chemokine pattern expression and variations in the cellular infiltration in BP and DH cause variable expression of TF. PMID:27057091

  10. Automatic Multiple-Needle Surgical Planning of Robotic-Assisted Microwave Coagulation in Large Liver Tumor Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Shaoli; Xia, Zeyang; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Jing; Ren, He; Lu, Tong; Yang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    The “robotic-assisted liver tumor coagulation therapy” (RALTCT) system is a promising candidate for large liver tumor treatment in terms of accuracy and speed. A prerequisite for effective therapy is accurate surgical planning. However, it is difficult for the surgeon to perform surgical planning manually due to the difficulties associated with robot-assisted large liver tumor therapy. These main difficulties include the following aspects: (1) multiple needles are needed to destroy the entire tumor, (2) the insertion trajectories of the needles should avoid the ribs, blood vessels, and other tissues and organs in the abdominal cavity, (3) the placement of multiple needles should avoid interference with each other, (4) an inserted needle will cause some deformation of liver, which will result in changes in subsequently inserted needles’ operating environment, and (5) the multiple needle-insertion trajectories should be consistent with the needle-driven robot’s movement characteristics. Thus, an effective multiple-needle surgical planning procedure is needed. To overcome these problems, we present an automatic multiple-needle surgical planning of optimal insertion trajectories to the targets, based on a mathematical description of all relevant structure surfaces. The method determines the analytical expression of boundaries of every needle “collision-free reachable workspace” (CFRW), which are the feasible insertion zones based on several constraints. Then, the optimal needle insertion trajectory within the optimization criteria will be chosen in the needle CFRW automatically. Also, the results can be visualized with our navigation system. In the simulation experiment, three needle-insertion trajectories were obtained successfully. In the in vitro experiment, the robot successfully achieved insertion of multiple needles. The proposed automatic multiple-needle surgical planning can improve the efficiency and safety of robot-assisted large liver tumor

  11. Automatic Multiple-Needle Surgical Planning of Robotic-Assisted Microwave Coagulation in Large Liver Tumor Therapy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaoli; Xia, Zeyang; Liu, Jianhua; Xu, Jing; Ren, He; Lu, Tong; Yang, Xiangdong

    2016-01-01

    The "robotic-assisted liver tumor coagulation therapy" (RALTCT) system is a promising candidate for large liver tumor treatment in terms of accuracy and speed. A prerequisite for effective therapy is accurate surgical planning. However, it is difficult for the surgeon to perform surgical planning manually due to the difficulties associated with robot-assisted large liver tumor therapy. These main difficulties include the following aspects: (1) multiple needles are needed to destroy the entire tumor, (2) the insertion trajectories of the needles should avoid the ribs, blood vessels, and other tissues and organs in the abdominal cavity, (3) the placement of multiple needles should avoid interference with each other, (4) an inserted needle will cause some deformation of liver, which will result in changes in subsequently inserted needles' operating environment, and (5) the multiple needle-insertion trajectories should be consistent with the needle-driven robot's movement characteristics. Thus, an effective multiple-needle surgical planning procedure is needed. To overcome these problems, we present an automatic multiple-needle surgical planning of optimal insertion trajectories to the targets, based on a mathematical description of all relevant structure surfaces. The method determines the analytical expression of boundaries of every needle "collision-free reachable workspace" (CFRW), which are the feasible insertion zones based on several constraints. Then, the optimal needle insertion trajectory within the optimization criteria will be chosen in the needle CFRW automatically. Also, the results can be visualized with our navigation system. In the simulation experiment, three needle-insertion trajectories were obtained successfully. In the in vitro experiment, the robot successfully achieved insertion of multiple needles. The proposed automatic multiple-needle surgical planning can improve the efficiency and safety of robot-assisted large liver tumor therapy

  12. Comparison of Prostatic Tissue Processed by Microwave and Conventional Technique Using Morphometry

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Promil; Kumar, Sanjay; Arora, B; Singh, Sneh; Chabbra, Sonia; Sen, Rajeev

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Rapid processing of histopathological specimens and decreased turnaround time is important to fulfill the needs of clinicians treating sick patients, so the present study was conducted to compare the time taken and quality of sections in processing of prostatic tissue by rapid microwave and conventional techniques using morphometry. Methods: Four to five mm thick paired prostate tissue pieces of fifty cases of prostatectomy specimens were taken. One tissue piece of the pair was processed routinely overnight by conventional tissue processing and the other by microwave processing. Time taken for processing by both conventional technique and microwave technique was noted and compared. Then, both were stained with conventional method of hematoxylin and eosin staining and examined for histological typing and grading. Morphometric study was done on slides of prostatic tissue processed by both conventional and microwave technique. Result: The prostatectomy specimens included both benign (86%) and malignant (14%) prostatic lesions in the age range of 46-85 years. The time taken for steps of dehydration, clearing and impregnation in microwave technique was significantly less as compared to histoprocessing done by conventional technique. Morphology, staining patterns of prostatic tissue processed within minutes by microwave technique, whether benign or malignant, were comparable to those sections which were processed in days using standard technique. Conclusion: Domestic microwave oven can be used for histoprocessing to accelerate the processing with preservation of morphology and is cheaper than commercially available microwave ovens and processing time was considerably reduced from days to minutes. PMID:26516319

  13. Microwave dielectric measurements and tissue characteristics of the human brain: potential in localizing intracranial tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Axer, Hubertus; Gräßel, David; Steinhauer, Matthias; Stöhr, Peter; John, Andreas; Coenen, Volker A.; Jansen, Rolf H.; Keyserlingk, Diedrich Graf v.

    2002-05-01

    This study describes the measurements of dielectric properties in the microwave range to differentiate various human central nervous structures. Using a vector network analyser transmission and reflection coefficients were measured from 500 MHz to 18 GHz in four human formalin fixed human brains. The positions of the electrodes were marked, and the tissue was histologically stained to visualize the myelo- and the cytoarchitecture as well as the nerve fibre orientation at the electrodes. The profiles of the transmission coefficients showed a characteristic minimum peak. In order to describe this peak, a mathematical function was fitted. Parameters derived from digital image processing were used to characterize the myelo- and cytoarchitecure of the tissue at the electrodes. A multiple regression model, with the frequency at the transmission peak minimum as a dependent variable and two tissue characteristics at the two electrodes as independent variables, showed a multiple regression coefficient of 0.765. A neural network model was able to estimate the frequency at the transmission peak minimum from the tissue characteristics at the electrode. The measurements of dielectric properties are well suited to differentiate distinct intracerebral structures. The method could be used for online monitoring of the needle's position during a stereotactic intervention in neurosurgery.

  14. Moojenactivase, a novel pro-coagulant PIIId metalloprotease isolated from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, activates coagulation factors II and X and induces tissue factor up-regulation in leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Sartim, Marco A; Costa, Tassia R; Laure, Helen J; Espíndola, Milena S; Frantz, Fabiani G; Sorgi, Carlos A; Cintra, Adélia C O; Arantes, Eliane C; Faccioli, Lucia H; Rosa, José C; Sampaio, Suely V

    2016-05-01

    Coagulopathies following snakebite are triggered by pro-coagulant venom toxins, in which metalloproteases play a major role in envenomation-induced coagulation disorders by acting on coagulation cascade, platelet function and fibrinolysis. Considering this relevance, here we describe the isolation and biochemical characterization of moojenactivase (MooA), a metalloprotease from Bothrops moojeni snake venom, and investigate its involvement in hemostasis in vitro. MooA is a glycoprotein of 85,746.22 Da, member of the PIIId group of snake venom metalloproteases, composed of three linked disulfide-bonded chains: an N-glycosylated heavy chain, and two light chains. The venom protease induced human plasma clotting in vitro by activating on both blood coagulation factors II (prothrombin) and X, which in turn generated α-thrombin and factor Xa, respectively. Additionally, MooA induced expression of tissue factor (TF) on the membrane surface of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), which led these cells to adopt pro-coagulant characteristics. MooA was also shown to be involved with production of the inflammatory mediators TNF-α, IL-8 and MCP-1, suggesting an association between MooA pro-inflammatory stimulation of PBMC and TF up-regulation. We also observed aggregation of washed platelets when in presence of MooA; however, the protease had no effect on fibrinolysis. Our findings show that MooA is a novel hemostatically active metalloprotease, which may lead to the development of coagulopathies during B. moojeni envenomation. Moreover, the metalloprotease may contribute to the development of new diagnostic tools and pharmacological approaches applied to hemostatic disorders. PMID:26026608

  15. Ultrasound for noninvasive control of laser-induced tissue heating and coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleffner, Bernhard; Kriegerowski, Martin; Oltrup, Theo; Bende, Thomas; Jean, Benedikt J.

    1996-05-01

    The application of lasers to achieve localized thermal tissue damage is a common technique in minimally invasive surgery. Currently, there is no control during these treatments. In glaucoma therapy the laser energy applied and the beam direction are estimated prior to treatment, according to clinical experience and anatomic norm values. This lack of on-line control may limit success and lead to side effects. Precision and efficiency of treatment could be improved markedly by analysis of spatially resolved, temperature-dependent data obtained by Ultrasound Reflectometry. Thermally induced changes, as well as their localization were detected qualitatively in B-scan. Quantification was achieved by integration of high frequency RF-signals with the following resolution: spatial 50 micrometers , temporal 200 microsecond(s) , temperature 0.5 degree(s). The presented method is suitable for a non-invasive on-line therapy control.

  16. Histology-directed microwave assisted enzymatic protein digestion for MALDI MS analysis of mammalian tissue.

    PubMed

    Taverna, Domenico; Norris, Jeremy L; Caprioli, Richard M

    2015-01-01

    This study presents on-tissue proteolytic digestion using a microwave irradiation and peptide extraction method for in situ analysis of proteins from spatially defined regions of a tissue section. The methodology utilizes hydrogel discs (1 mm diameter) embedded with trypsin solution. The enzyme-laced hydrogel discs are applied to a tissue section, directing enzymatic digestion to a spatially confined area of the tissue. By applying microwave radiation, protein digestion is performed in 2 min on-tissue, and the extracted peptides are then analyzed by matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). The reliability and reproducibility of the microwave assisted hydrogel mediated on-tissue digestion is demonstrated by the comparison with other on-tissue digestion strategies, including comparisons with conventional heating and in-solution digestion. LC-MS/MS data were evaluated considering the number of identified proteins as well as the number of protein groups and distinct peptides. The results of this study demonstrate that rapid and reliable protein digestion can be performed on a single thin tissue section while preserving the relationship between the molecular information obtained and the tissue architecture, and the resulting peptides can be extracted in sufficient abundance to permit analysis using LC-MS/MS. This approach will be most useful for samples that have limited availability but are needed for multiple analyses, especially for the correlation of proteomics data with histology and immunohistochemistry. PMID:25427280

  17. Microwave imaging for tissue assessment: initial evaluation in multitarget tissue-equivalent phantoms.

    PubMed

    Meaney, P M; Paulsen, K D; Hartov, A; Crane, R K

    1996-09-01

    A prototype microwave imaging system is evaluated for its ability to recover two-dimensional (2-D) electrical property distributions under transverse magnetic (TM) illumination using multitarget tissue equivalent phantoms. Experiments conducted in a surrounding lossy saline tank demonstrate that simultaneous recovery of both the real and imaginary components of the electrical property distribution is possible using absolute imaging procedures over a frequency range of 300-700 MHz. Further, image reconstructions of embedded tissue-equivalent targets are found to be quantitative not only with respect to geometrical factors such as object size and location but also electrical composition. Quantitative assessments based on full-width half-height criteria reveal that errors in diameter estimates of reconstructed targets are less than 10 mm in all cases, whereas, positioning errors are less than 1 mm in single object experiments but degrade to 4-10 mm when multiple targets are present. Recovery of actual electrical properties is found to be frequency dependent for the real and imaginary components with background values being typically within 10-20% of their correct size and embedded object having similar accuracies as a percentage of the electrical contrast, although errors as high as 50% can occur. The quantitative evaluation of imaging performance has revealed potential advantages in a two-tiered receiver antenna configuration whose measured field values are more sensitive to target region changes than the typical tomographic type of approach which uses reception sites around the full target region perimeter. This measurement strategy has important implications for both the image reconstruction algorithm where there is a premium on minimizing problem size without sacrificing image quality and the hardware system design which seeks to economize on the amount of measured data required for quantitative image reconstruction while maximizing its sensitivity to target

  18. Hemophilia as a defect of the tissue factor pathway of blood coagulation: Effect of factors VIII and IX on factor X activation in a continuous-flow reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Repke, D.; Gemmell, C.H.; Guha, A.; Turitto, V.T.; Nemerson, Y. ); Broze, G.J. Jr. )

    1990-10-01

    The effect of factors VIII and IX on the ability of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex to activate factor X was studied in a continuous-flow tubular enzyme reactor. Tissue factor immobilized in a phospholipid bilayer on the inner surface of the tube was exposed to a perfusate containing factors VIIa, VIII, IX, and X flowing at a wall shear rate of 57, 300, or 1130 sec{sup {minus}1}. The addition of factors VIII and IX at their respective plasma concentrations resulted in a further 2{endash}-to 3{endash}fold increase. The direct activation of factor X by tissue factor-factor VIIa could be virtually eliminated by the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor. These results suggest that the tissue factor pathway, mediated through factors VIII and IX, produces significant levels of factor Xa even in the presence of an inhibitor of the tissue factor-factor VIIa complex; moreover, the activation is dependent on local shear conditions. These findings are consistent both with a model of blood coagulation in which initiation of the system results from tissue factor and with the bleeding observed in hemophilia.

  19. Minimum wound size for clotting: flowing blood coagulates on a single collagen fiber presenting tissue factor and von Willebrand factor.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shu; Tomaiuolo, Maurizio; Diamond, Scott L

    2016-08-01

    It is unknown if a lower size limit exists for human blood coagulation under flow over physiological vessel wall triggers as small as a single collagen fiber. Prior determinations of the smallest sized surface stimuli necessary for clotting of human blood, defined as the patch size threshold, have not deployed whole blood, hemodynamic flow, and platelet adhesive stimuli. For whole blood perfused in microfluidic devices, we report that steady venous flow (wall shear rate, 100 s(-1)) was sufficient to drive platelet deposition on 20 micron long zones of collagen fibers or on a single fiber. With tissue factor (TF)-coated collagen, flowing blood generated robust platelet deposits, platelet-localized thrombin, and fibrin on a single collagen fiber, thus demonstrating the absence of a physiological patch size threshold under venous flow. In contrast, at arterial wall shear rate (1000 s(-1)) with TF present, essentially no platelet or fibrin deposition occurred on 20 micron collagen zones or on a single collagen fiber, demonstrating a patch threshold, which was overcome by pre-coating the collagen with von Willebrand factor (vWF). For venous flows, human blood can clot on one of the smallest biological units of a single collagen fiber presenting TF. For arterial flows, vWF together with TF allows human blood to generate thrombin and fibrin on a patch stimulus as limited as a single collagen fiber. vWF-dependent platelet adhesion represents a particle-based sensing mechanism of micron-scale stimuli that then allows amplification of the molecular components of TF-driven thrombin and fibrin production under arterial flow. PMID:27339024

  20. Airway tissue factor-dependent coagulation activity in response to sulfur mustard analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide

    PubMed Central

    Rancourt, Raymond C.; Veress, Livia A.; Guo, XiaoLing; Jones, Tara N.; Hendry-Hofer, Tara B.

    2012-01-01

    Acute lung injury is a principal cause of morbidity and mortality in response to mustard gas (SM) inhalation. Obstructive, fibrin-containing airway casts have recently been reported in a rat inhalation model employing the SM analog 2-chloroethyl ethyl sulfide (CEES). The present study was designed to identify the mechanism(s) causing activation of the coagulation cascade after CEES-induced airway injury. Here we report that CEES inhalation elevates tissue factor (TF) activity and numbers of detached epithelial cells present in lavage fluid (BALF) from rats after exposure (18 h). In vitro studies using 16HBE cells, or with rat BALF, indicated that detached epithelial cells could convert factor X (FX) to the active form FXa when incubated with factor VII and could elicit rapid clotting of plasma. In addition, immunocytochemical analysis demonstrated elevated cell surface (TF) expression on CEES-exposed 16HBE cells as a function of time. However, total cell TF expression did not increase. Since membrane surfaces bearing TF are important determinants of clot initiation, anticoagulants directed against these entities were tested for ability to limit plasma clotting or FX activation capacity of BALF or culture media. Addition of tifacogin, a TF pathway inhibitor, effectively blocked either activity, demonstrating that the procoagulant actions of CEES were TF pathway dependent. Lactadherin, a protein capable of competing with clotting factors for phospholipid-binding sites, was partially effective in limiting these procoagulant actions. These findings indicate that TF pathway inhibition could be an effective strategy to prevent airway obstruction after SM or CEES inhalation. PMID:21964405

  1. Dual-sided electrosurgery handpiece for simultaneous tissue cutting and coagulation: first report on a conceptual design validated by an animal experiment

    PubMed Central

    Tawfik, Hatem A; Fouad, Yousef A; Hafez, Rashad

    2015-01-01

    Objective To introduce and evaluate the safety of a novel dual-sided electrosurgery handpiece design for simultaneous tissue cutting and coagulation. Methods We designed a prototype double-sided handpiece allowing automatic switching between two electrodes with a simple handpiece flip. The concept of the system as a surgical instrument was assessed by an animal experiment. Results The skin of 15 Wistar albino white rats could be successfully incised and coagulated using both ends of the handpiece, thereby confirming the prospects and clinical applications of the system. Conclusion The dual-sided electrosurgery handpiece is a simple and safe alternative to the traditional electrosurgery pencil, allowing the simultaneous use of two electrodes without the hassle of frequent electrode replacement. PMID:26316827

  2. Microwave irradiation of human brain tissue: production of microscopic slides within one day.

    PubMed Central

    Boon, M E; Marani, E; Adriolo, P J; Steffelaar, J W; Bots, G T; Kok, L P

    1988-01-01

    A three step method using microwave irradiation enabled microscopic slides of human brain tissue to be obtained within one working day: steps 1 and 2 hardened and solidified brain tissue; step 3 completed formalin fixation. The efficacy and precision of the method was compared with slides of conventionally processed brain tissue that had been fixed in formalin for six weeks. The microscopic quality of the sections was excellent with good presentation of brain tissue and equalled that of conventionally processed slides. Images Fig 1 Fig 2 Fig 3 PMID:3290268

  3. Microwave-Assisted Solvent Extraction and Analysis of Shikimic Acid from Plant Tissues

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple method using microwave-assisted extraction (MWAE) using water as the extraction solvent was developed for the determination of shikimic acid in plant tissue of Brachiaria decumbens Stapf, an important Poaceae forage and weed species widely spread in agricultural and non-agricultural areas t...

  4. The tissue effect of argon-plasma coagulation with prior submucosal injection (Hybrid-APC) versus standard APC: A randomized ex-vivo study

    PubMed Central

    Neugebauer, Alexander; Scharpf, Marcus; Braun, Kirsten; May, Andrea; Ell, Christian; Fend, Falko; Enderle, Markus D

    2014-01-01

    Background Thermal ablation for Barrett’s oesophagus has widely been established in gastrointestinal endoscopy during the last decade. The mainly used methods of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) and argon-plasma coagulation (APC) carry a relevant risk of stricture formation of up to 5–15%. Newer ablation techniques that are able to overcome this disadvantage would therefore be desirable. The aim of the present study was to compare the depth of tissue injury of the new method of Hybrid-APC versus standard APC within a randomized study in a porcine oesophagus model. Methods Using a total of eight explanted pig oesophagi, 48 oesophageal areas were ablated either by standard or Hybrid-APC (APC with prior submucosal fluid injection) using power settings of 50 and 70 W. The depth of tissue injury to the oesophageal wall was analysed macroscopically and histopathologically. Results Using 50 W, mean coagulation depth was 937 ± 469 µm during standard APC, and 477 ± 271 µm during Hybrid-APC (p = 0.064). Using 70 W, coagulation depth was 1096 ± 320 µm (standard APC) and 468 ± 136 µm (Hybrid-APC; p = 0.003). During all settings, damage to the muscularis mucosae was observed. Using standard APC, damage to the submucosal layer was observed in 4/6 (50 W) and 6/6 cases (70 W). During Hybrid-APC, coagulation of the submucosal layer occurred in 2/6 (50 W) and 1/6 cases (70 W). The proper muscle layer was only damaged during conventional APC (50 W: 1/6; 70 W: 3/6). Limitations Ex-vivo animal study with limited number of cases. Conclusions Hybrid-APC reduces coagulation depth by half in comparison with standard APC, with no thermal injury to the proper muscle layer. It may therefore lead to a lower rate of stricture formation during clinical application. PMID:25360316

  5. I. Microwave Apparatus for Exposing Tissue and the Effect of the Radiation on Skin Respiration

    PubMed Central

    Lawrence, J. C.

    1968-01-01

    An apparatus was designed which enabled small pieces of skin to be exposed to a uniform field of microwaves at χ-band (8,730 MHz). This was used to investigate the effect of these microwaves at selected energy levels on the metabolism of skin. It was shown that skin cultured in vitro exhibited a graded response to microwave energy, and a doseresponse curve was constructed from this data. The ED50 of this curve was 4,740 mW./sq. cm. applied for 1 second. Microscopical examination of three-day cultures of skin showed that histological abnormalities occurred if the specimens were exposed to intensities of microwaves causing more than 30% respiratory damage. The energy level at the ED30 was 2,880 mW./sq. cm. applied for 1 second. Results were consistent with the hypothesis that tissue damage caused by irradiation with microwaves was due to the energy absorbed by the specimen being converted to heat. PMID:5663427

  6. Microwave Radar Imaging of Heterogeneous Breast Tissue Integrating A Priori Information

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Thomas N.; Sarafianou, Mantalena; Craddock, Ian J.

    2014-01-01

    Conventional radar-based image reconstruction techniques fail when they are applied to heterogeneous breast tissue, since the underlying in-breast relative permittivity is unknown or assumed to be constant. This results in a systematic error during the process of image formation. A recent trend in microwave biomedical imaging is to extract the relative permittivity from the object under test to improve the image reconstruction quality and thereby to enhance the diagnostic assessment. In this paper, we present a novel radar-based methodology for microwave breast cancer detection in heterogeneous breast tissue integrating a 3D map of relative permittivity as a priori information. This leads to a novel image reconstruction formulation where the delay-and-sum focusing takes place in time rather than range domain. Results are shown for a heterogeneous dense (class-4) and a scattered fibroglandular (class-2) numerical breast phantom using Bristol's 31-element array configuration. PMID:25435861

  7. Microwave oven-based technique for immunofluorescent staining of paraffin-embedded tissues

    PubMed Central

    Buggs, Colleen

    2011-01-01

    Immunohistochemical analysis of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues can be challenging due to potential modifications of protein structure by exposure to formalin. Heat-induced antigen retrieval techniques can reverse reactions between formalin and proteins that block antibody recognition. Interactions between antibodies and antigens are further enhanced by microwave irradiation, which has simplified immunohistochemical staining protocols. In this report, we modify a technique for antigen retrieval and immunofluorescent staining of formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues by showing that it works well with several antibodies and buffers. This microwave-assisted method for antigen retrieval and immunofluorescent staining eliminates the need for blocking reagents and extended washes, which greatly simplifies the protocol allowing one to complete the analysis in less than 3 h. PMID:17653827

  8. Average dielectric property analysis of complex breast tissue with microwave transmission measurements.

    PubMed

    Garrett, John D; Fear, Elise C

    2015-01-01

    Prior information about the average dielectric properties of breast tissue can be implemented in microwave breast imaging techniques to improve the results. Rapidly providing this information relies on acquiring a limited number of measurements and processing these measurement with efficient algorithms. Previously, systems were developed to measure the transmission of microwave signals through breast tissue, and simplifications were applied to estimate the average properties. These methods provided reasonable estimates, but they were sensitive to multipath. In this paper, a new technique to analyze the average properties of breast tissues while addressing multipath is presented. Three steps are used to process transmission measurements. First, the effects of multipath were removed. In cases where multipath is present, multiple peaks were observed in the time domain. A Tukey window was used to time-gate a single peak and, therefore, select a single path through the breast. Second, the antenna response was deconvolved from the transmission coefficient to isolate the response from the tissue in the breast interior. The antenna response was determined through simulations. Finally, the complex permittivity was estimated using an iterative approach. This technique was validated using simulated and physical homogeneous breast models and tested with results taken from a recent patient study. PMID:25585106

  9. The Eph Tyrosine Kinase Receptors EphB2 and EphA2 Are Novel Proteolytic Substrates of Tissue Factor/Coagulation Factor VIIa*

    PubMed Central

    Eriksson, Oskar; Ramström, Margareta; Hörnaeus, Katarina; Bergquist, Jonas; Mokhtari, Dariush; Siegbahn, Agneta

    2014-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) binds the serine protease factor VIIa (FVIIa) to form a proteolytically active complex that can trigger coagulation or activate cell signaling. Here we addressed the involvement of tyrosine kinase receptors (RTKs) in TF/FVIIa signaling by antibody array analysis and subsequently found that EphB2 and EphA2 of the Eph RTK family were cleaved in their ectodomains by TF/FVIIa. We used N-terminal Edman sequencing and LC-MS/MS analysis to characterize the cleaved Eph isoforms and identified a key arginine residue at the cleavage site, in agreement with the tryptic serine protease activity of FVIIa. Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) signaling and downstream coagulation activity was non-essential in this context, in further support of a direct cleavage by TF/FVIIa. EphB2 was cleaved by FVIIa concentrations in the subnanomolar range in a number of TF expressing cell types, indicating that the active cellular pool of TF was involved. FVIIa caused potentiation of cell repulsion by the EphB2 ligand ephrin-B1, demonstrating a novel proteolytical event to control Eph-mediated cell segregation. These results define Eph RTKs as novel proteolytical targets of TF/FVIIa and provide new insights into how TF/FVIIa regulates cellular functions independently of PAR2. PMID:25281742

  10. Microwave Sintered 3D Printed Tricalcium Phosphate Scaffolds for Bone Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Tarafder, Solaiman; Balla, Vamsi Krishna; Davies, Neal M.; Bandyopadhyay, Amit; Bose, Susmita

    2014-01-01

    We report here the fabrication of three dimensional (3D) interconnected macro porous tricalcium phosphate (TCP) scaffolds with controlled internal architecture by direct 3D printing (3DP), and high mechanical strength by microwave sintering. TCP scaffolds with 27%, 35% and 41% designed macro porosity having pore sizes of 500 μm, 750 μm, and 1000 μm, respectively, have been fabricated via direct 3DP. These scaffolds are then sintered at 1150 °C and 1250 °C in conventional electric muffle furnace as well as microwave furnace. Total open porosity between 42% and 63% is obtained in the sintered scaffolds due to the presence of intrinsic micro pores along with the designed pores. A significant increase in compressive strength, between 46% and 69%, is achieved by microwave sintering as compared to conventional sintering as a result of efficient densification. A maximum compressive strength of 10.95 ± 1.28 MPa and 6.62 ± 0.67 MPa is achieved for scaffolds with 500 μm designed pores (~400 μm after sintering) sintered in microwave and conventional furnaces, respectively. An increase in cell density with a decrease in macro pore size is observed during in vitro cell-material interactions using human osteoblast cells. Histomorphological analysis reveals that the presence of both micro and macro pores facilitated osteoid like new bone formation when tested in the femoral defect on Sprague-Dawley rats. Our results show that bioresorbable 3D printed TCP scaffolds have great potential in tissue engineering applications for bone tissue repair and regeneration. PMID:22396130

  11. Initial experience of surgical microwave tissue precoagulation in liver resection for hepatocellular carcinoma in cirrhotic liver.

    PubMed

    Abdelraouf, A; Hamdy, H; El Erian, A M; Elsebae, M; Taha, S; Elshafey, H E; Ismail, S; Hassany, M

    2014-08-01

    Surgical hepatic resection has been considered as the first-line treatment which is most effective and radical treatment for HCC, however, HCC is usually associated with poor liver function owing to chronic hepatitis or liver cirrhosis. Techniques that can eradicate the tumor and also preserve liver function are needed. Moreover, hepatic resection, in the presence of cirrhosis, raises special problem of high risk as hemorrhage and liver failure, thus, good clinical results can only be achieved by minimizing operative blood loss, time of the intervention as well as the hepatic reserve. The tremendous progress in microwave technology has recently attracted considerable attention. This study evaluated the feasibility of this new liver transection technique demonstrating the high performance of this procedure, the accuracy in terms of squeeze effect on veins and portal branch and in terms of reducing the intra operative blood loss, and minimizing the operative time for safe hepatectomy. Twenty-six consecutive patients a first-time diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) on top of liver cirrhosis were recruited for the study, from August 2011 to January 2013. All patients were subjected to full clinical examination, laboratory investigations, abdomen ultrasound (U/S), triphasic computed tomographic liver scan (CT) and dynamic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in some doubtful cases. Inclusion requirements were presence of resectable disease without vascular invasion or extrahepatic spread at imaging, Child-Pugh class A & B (Score 7) liver cirrhosis, (INR) < 1.6 or platelet count) 60 000/mm3 with no previous treatment. Patients were treated by applying pre-coagulation of the liver transection lines using microwave probe positioned in parallel to the line of resection by open approach after intra-operative U/S assessment for localization of the tumor and line of resection. The procedures were performed under general anesthesia. Mobilization of the liver was not

  12. Planar Microwave Sensor for Theranostic Therapy of Organic Tissue Based on Oval Split Ring Resonators.

    PubMed

    Reimann, Carolin; Puentes, Margarita; Maasch, Matthias; Hübner, Frank; Bazrafshan, Babak; Vogl, Thomas J; Damm, Christian; Jakoby, Rolf

    2016-01-01

    Microwave sensors in medical environments play a significant role due to the contact-less and non-invasive sensing mechanism to determine dielectric properties of tissue. In this work, a theranostic sensor based on Split Ring Resonators (SRRs) is presented that provides two operation modes to detect and treat tumor cells, exemplary in the liver. For the detection mode, resonance frequency changes due to abnormalities are evaluated, and in the treatment mode, microwave ablation is performed. The planar sensor structure can be integrated into a needle like a surgery tool that evokes challenges concerning size limitations and biocompatibility. To meet the size requirements and provide a reasonable operating frequency, properties of oval shaped SRRs are investigated. By elongating the radius of the SRR in one direction, the resonance frequency can be decreased significantly compared to circular SRR by a factor of two below 12 GHz. In order to validate the detection and treatment characteristics of the sensor, full wave simulations and measurements are examined. Clear resonance shifts are detected for loading the sensor structures with phantoms mimicking healthy and malignant tissue. For treatment mode evaluation, ex vivo beef liver tissue was ablated leading to a lesion zone 1.2 cm × 1 cm × 0.3 cm with a three minute exposure of maximum 2.1 W. PMID:27618050

  13. Changes of amino acid gradients in brain tissues induced by microwave irradiation and other means

    SciTech Connect

    Baxter, C.F.; Parsons, J.E.; Oh, C.C.; Wasterlain, C.G.; Baldwin, R.A. )

    1989-09-01

    Focused microwave irradiation to the head (FMI) has been used extensively by neurochemists for rapid inactivation of enzymatic activity in brain tissues and the preservation, for in vitro analysis, of in vivo substrate concentrations. Periodically the suitability of this technique for regional studies has been questioned. Evidence has now been obtained, on the basis of altered concentration gradients for GABA and taurine from the Substantia Nigra (SN) to an Adjacent Dorsal Area (ADJ), that FMI not only inactivates enzymes, but also facilitates rapid diffusion of small molecules from areas of high concentrations to adjacent areas of lower concentration. To a lesser extent, the implantation of plastic injection cannulas also decreased these concentration gradients. These results offer clear evidence that FMI is ill suited and unreliable for studies designed to map and compare the in vivo regional concentrations of diffusible organic molecules (such as amino acids) in brain tissues. Any invasive technique that compromises membrane barriers is likely to produce smaller similar effects.

  14. CT imaging during microwave ablation: Analysis of spatial and temporal tissue contraction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Dong; Brace, Christopher L.

    2014-11-01

    Purpose: To analyze the spatial distribution and temporal development of liver tissue contraction during high-temperature ablation by using intraprocedural computed tomography (CT) imaging. Methods: A total of 46 aluminum fiducial markers were positioned in a 60 × 45 mm grid, in a single plane, around a microwave ablation antenna in each of six ex vivo bovine liver samples. Ablations were performed for 10 min at 100 W. CT data of the liver sample were acquired every 30 s during ablation. Fiducial motion between acquisitions was tracked in postprocessing and used to calculate measures of tissue contraction and contraction rates. The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of contraction were analyzed. Results: Fiducial displacement indicated that the zone measured postablation was 8.2 ± 1.8 mm (∼20%) smaller in the radial direction and 7.1 ± 1.0 mm (∼10%) shorter in the longitudinal direction than the preablation tissue dimension. Therefore, the total ablation volume was reduced from its preablation value by approximately 45%. Very little longitudinal contraction was noted in the distal portion of the ablation zone. Central tissues contracted more than 60%, which was near an estimated limit of ∼70% based on initial water content. More peripheral tissues contracted only 15% in any direction. Contraction rates peaked during the first 60 s of heating with a roughly exponential decay over time. Conclusions: Ablation zones measured posttreatment are significantly smaller than the pretreatment tissue dimensions. Tissue contraction is spatially dependent, with the greatest effect occurring in the central ablation zone. Contraction rate peaks early and decays over time.

  15. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture: 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Carney, S. A.; Lawrence, J. C.; Ricketts, C. R.

    1970-01-01

    Carney, S. A., Lawrence, J. C., and Ricketts, C. R. (1970).Brit. J. industr. Med.,27, 72-76. Effect of microwaves at X-band on guinea-pig skin in tissue culture. 3. Effect of pulsed microwaves on skin respiration and biochemistry. Small pieces of guinea-pig skin were exposed to known power densities of pulsed microwaves at X-band (9·6 GHz). The pulse duration was 0·25 microsecond and the pulse repetition frequency 4 KHz. The peak power was thus 1,000 times the mean power. Otherwise conditions were closely comparable with those of previous experiments using continuous microwaves. After exposure the skin was maintained on a nutrient medium in vitro. The respiration of the skin and the uptake of 35S-sulphate, 32P-phosphate, and 14C-L-proline into skin constituents were reduced by exposure. The reduction was very similar to that observed after exposure to the same mean power density of continuous microwaves. The effects are believed to be attributable to heating of the skin. PMID:5418922

  16. Imaging of Conductivity Changes of Excitable Tissues Based on Focused Passive Microwave

    PubMed Central

    Karanasiou, Irene

    2015-01-01

    Aims: Modeling of ionic distribution fluctuations of excitable tissues based on data elicited using focused microwave radiometry. Methodology: Focused Microwave Radiometry implemented to carry out measurements of in depth body temperature distributions, may provide the capability of sensing local electrical conductivity fluctuations during the cycle of actions potentials in the case of brain excitable cell clusters. An analog beamformer consisting of a conductive inner-surface ellipsoidal cavity is used to focus the chaotic-black body radiation emerging from human tissues by providing convergence of the electromagnetic energy from one focus area where the phantom or subject is placed, to the other where the antennas of sensitive radiometric receivers are positioned. During the past 10 years numerous phantom, animal and human volunteer experiments have been performed with the focused radiometry imaging system. The results show that the detected changes of the output radiometric voltage are attributed to temperature and/or conductivity changes that occur locally concentrated at the areas of interest under measurement. Theoretical and experimental studies are continuously carried out at various frequency bands in conjunction with the use of matching materials placed around the human head or phantom to improve focusing and detection depth. It seems that the manipulation of the focusing area in the tissue in terms of detection depth and spatial resolution is feasible depending on the suitable combination of operation frequencies and matching material. In this paper, theoretical analysis of ion charge diffusion during the cycle of action potentials, propagating along the axons in case of measurements of specific cortical regions is presented. The ion charge diffusion modeling is based on electromagnetic diffusion analogies in the effort to explain the observed experimental results obtained under various psychophysiological conditions in the case of human volunteer

  17. Coherent time-reversal microwave imaging for the detection and localization of breast tissue malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hossain, Md. Delwar; Mohan, Ananda Sanagavarapu

    2015-02-01

    This paper deals with the coherent processing of time-reversal operator for microwave imaging in the frequency domain. In frequency domain time-reversal imaging approach, images obtained for different frequency bins over ultrawideband are incoherently processed. In highly dense and cluttered medium, the signal subspace over each narrow frequency bin varies from that obtained using the complete ultrawideband. As a result, the detection and localization from noncoherent imaging approach is often inconclusive. In order to improve the stability of time-reversal microwave imaging, we propose coherent processing using novel focusing matrix approach. The proposed focusing matrix makes possible the time-reversal imaging technique to coherently process each frequency bin to yield a consistent signal subspace. The performance of coherent focusing is investigated when combined with time-reversal robust Capon beamformer (TR-RCB). We have used numerical experiments on breast cancer detection using finite difference time domain employing anatomically realistic numerical breast phantoms that contain varying amounts of dense fibroglandular tissue content. The imaging results indicate that the proposed coherent-TR-RCB could overcome the limitations of time-reversal imaging in a highly heterogeneous and cluttered medium.

  18. Detection of vesicoureteral reflux using microwave radiometry-system characterization with tissue phantoms.

    PubMed

    Arunachalam, Kavitha; Maccarini, Paolo; De Luca, Valeria; Tognolatti, Piero; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent; Stauffer, Paul

    2011-06-01

    Microwave (MW) radiometry is proposed for passive monitoring of kidney temperature to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of urine that is externally heated by a MW hyperthermia device and thereafter reflows from the bladder to kidneys during reflux. Here, we characterize in tissue-mimicking phantoms the performance of a 1.375 GHz radiometry system connected to an electromagnetically (EM) shielded microstrip log spiral antenna optimized for VUR detection. Phantom EM properties are characterized using a coaxial dielectric probe and network analyzer (NA). Power reflection and receive patterns of the antenna are measured in layered tissue phantom. Receiver spectral measurements are used to assess EM shielding provided by a metal cup surrounding the antenna. Radiometer and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying volumes (10-30 mL) and temperaturesg (40-46°C) of the urine phantom at 35 mm depth surrounded by 36.5°C muscle phantom. Directional receive pattern with about 5% power spectral density at 35 mm target depth and better than -10 dB return loss from tissue load are measured for the antenna. Antenna measurements demonstrate no deterioration in power reception and effective EM shielding in the presence of the metal cup. Radiometry power measurements are in excellent agreement with the temperature of the kidney phantom. Laboratory testing of the radiometry system in temperature-controlled phantoms supports the feasibility of passive kidney thermometry for VUR detection. PMID:21257366

  19. Detection of Vesicoureteral Reflux using Microwave Radiometry – System Characterization with Tissue Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Maccarini, Paolo; De Luca, Valeria; Tognolatti, Piero; Bardati, Fernando; Snow, Brent; Stauffer, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Microwave (MW) radiometry is proposed for passive monitoring of kidney temperature to detect vesicoureteral reflux (VUR) of urine that is externally heated by a MW hyperthermia device and thereafter reflows from the bladder to kidneys during reflux. Here we characterize in tissue-mimicking phantoms the performance of a 1.375 GHz radiometry system connected to an electromagnetically (EM) shielded microstrip log spiral antenna optimized for VUR detection. Phantom EM properties are characterized using a coaxial dielectric probe and network analyzer (NA). Power reflection and receive patterns of the antenna are measured in layered tissue phantom. Receiver spectral measurements are used to assess EM shielding provided by a metal cup surrounding the antenna. Radiometer and fiberoptic temperature data are recorded for varying volumes (10–30 mL) and temperatures (40–46°C) of the urine phantom at 35 mm depth surrounded by 36.5°C muscle phantom. Directional receive pattern with about 5% power spectral density at 35 mm target depth and better than −10dB return loss from tissue load are measured for the antenna. Antenna measurements demonstrate no deterioration in power reception and effective EM shielding in the presence of the metal cup. Radiometry power measurements are in excellent agreement with the temperature of the kidney phantom. Laboratory testing of the radiometry system in temperature controlled phantoms supports the feasibility of passive kidney thermometry for VUR detection. PMID:21257366

  20. Disseminated intravascular coagulation.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Levi, Marcel; Toh, Cheng-Hock

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is an acquired syndrome characterized by widespread intravascular activation of coagulation that can be caused by infectious insults (such as sepsis) and non-infectious insults (such as trauma). The main pathophysiological mechanisms of DIC are inflammatory cytokine-initiated activation of tissue factor-dependent coagulation, insufficient control of anticoagulant pathways and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1-mediated suppression of fibrinolysis. Together, these changes give rise to endothelial dysfunction and microvascular thrombosis, which can cause organ dysfunction and seriously affect patient prognosis. Recent observations have pointed to an important role for extracellular DNA and DNA-binding proteins, such as histones, in the pathogenesis of DIC. The International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis (ISTH) established a DIC diagnostic scoring system consisting of global haemostatic test parameters. This scoring system has now been well validated in diverse clinical settings. The theoretical cornerstone of DIC management is the specific and vigorous treatment of the underlying conditions, and DIC should be simultaneously managed to improve patient outcomes. The ISTH guidance for the treatment of DIC recommends treatment strategies that are based on current evidence. In this Primer, we provide an updated overview of the pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of DIC and discuss the future directions of basic and clinical research in this field. PMID:27250996

  1. Discovery of a Highly Potent, Selective, and Orally Bioavailable Macrocyclic Inhibitor of Blood Coagulation Factor VIIa-Tissue Factor Complex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojun; Glunz, Peter W; Johnson, James A; Jiang, Wen; Jacutin-Porte, Swanee; Ladziata, Vladimir; Zou, Yan; Phillips, Monique S; Wurtz, Nicholas R; Parkhurst, Brandon; Rendina, Alan R; Harper, Timothy M; Cheney, Daniel L; Luettgen, Joseph M; Wong, Pancras C; Seiffert, Dietmar; Wexler, Ruth R; Priestley, E Scott

    2016-08-11

    Inhibitors of the tissue factor (TF)/factor VIIa complex (TF-FVIIa) are promising novel anticoagulants which show excellent efficacy and minimal bleeding in preclinical models. Starting with an aminoisoquinoline P1-based macrocyclic inhibitor, optimization of the P' groups led to a series of highly potent and selective TF-FVIIa inhibitors which displayed poor permeability. Fluorination of the aminoisoquinoline reduced the basicity of the P1 group and significantly improved permeability. The resulting lead compound was highly potent, selective, and achieved good pharmacokinetics in dogs with oral dosing. Moreover, it demonstrated robust antithrombotic activity in a rabbit model of arterial thrombosis. PMID:27455395

  2. Dual-mode antenna design for microwave heating and noninvasive thermometry of superficial tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Jacobsen, S; Stauffer, P R; Neuman, D G

    2000-11-01

    Hyperthermia therapy of superficial skin disease has proven clinically useful, but current heating equipment is somewhat clumsy and technically inadequate for many patients. The present effort describes a dual-purpose, conformal microwave applicator that is fabricated from thin, flexible, multilayer printed circuit board (PCB) material to facilitate heating of surface areas overlaying contoured anatomy. Preliminary studies document the feasibility of combining Archimedean spiral microstrip antennas, located concentrically within the central region of square dual concentric conductor (DCC) annular slot antennas. The motivation is to achieve homogeneous tissue heating simultaneously with noninvasive thermometry by radiometric sensing of blackbody radiation from the target tissue under the applicator. Results demonstrate that the two antennas have complimentary regions of influence. The DCC ring antenna structure produces a peripherally enhanced power deposition pattern with peaks in the outer corners of the aperture and a broad minimum around 50% of maximum centrally. In contrast, the Archimedean spiral radiates (or receives) energy predominantly along the boresight axis of the spiral, thus confining the region of influence to tissue located within the central broad minimum of the DCC pattern. Analysis of the temperature-dependent radiometer signal (brightness temperature) showed linear correlation of radiometer output with test load temperature using either the spiral or DCC structure as the receive antenna. The radiometric performance of the broadband Archimedean antenna was superior compared to the DCC, providing improved temperature resolution (0.1 degree C-0.2 degree C) and signal sensitivity (0.3 degree C-0.8 degree C/degree C) at all four 500 MHz integration bandwidths tested within the frequency range from 1.2 to 3.0 GHz. PMID:11077744

  3. Antenna design and tissue parameters considerations for an improved modelling of microwave ablation in the liver.

    PubMed

    Karampatzakis, Andreas; Kühn, Sven; Tsanidis, George; Neufeld, Esra; Samaras, Theodoros; Kuster, Niels

    2013-05-21

    Microwave ablation is a technique used in treating hepatocellular carcinoma, especially in cases where surgical removal is impossible. In the present study we are investigating the effects of design characteristics of a coaxial slot antenna (single- versus double-slot, slot-to-tip distance and slot size) on the ablation zone characteristics (dimensions and shape). The specific absorption rate field and the temperature rises are calculated for a variety of application times and powers. A plateau in the ablation zone dimensions in healthy and cirrhotic liver models is predicted, but not in malignant ones. It is found that the value of the perfusion rate (which is different for each clinical case) is of crucial importance in order to correctly estimate the ablation zone. An underestimation of dimensions is expected, if higher perfusion rates are used (i.e., values for healthy tissue rather than malignant). In contrast, an exact determination of the values of relative permittivity and conductivity is less significant for predicting the ablation zone. PMID:23603829

  4. A Directional Interstitial Antenna for Microwave Tissue Ablation: Theoretical and Experimental Investigation.

    PubMed

    McWilliams, Brogan T; Schnell, Emily E; Curto, Sergio; Fahrbach, Thomas M; Prakash, Punit

    2015-09-01

    Microwave ablation (MWA) is a minimally invasive thermal therapy modality increasingly employed for the treatment of tumors and benign disease. For successful treatment, complete thermal coverage of the tumor and margin of surrounding healthy tissue must be achieved. Currently available interstitial antennas for MWA have cylindrically symmetric radiation patterns. Thus, when treating targets in proximity to critical structures, caution must be taken to prevent unintended thermal damage. A novel coaxial antenna design for MWA with an asymmetrical cylindrical heating pattern is presented in this paper. This radiation pattern is achieved by employing a hemicylindrical reflector positioned at a critical distance from a conventional coaxial monopole antenna. Finite-element method simulations were employed to optimize the geometric dimensions of the antenna with the objective of minimizing the antenna reflection coefficient at the 2.45-GHz operating frequency, and maximizing volume of the ablation zone. Prototype antennas were fabricated and experimentally evaluated. Simulations indicated an optimal S11 of -32 dB at 2.45 GHz in close agreement with experimental measurements of -29 dB. Ex vivo experiments were performed to validate simulations and observe effects to the antennas' heating pattern with the varying input power and geometry of the reflector. Ablation zones up to 20 mm radially were observed in the forward direction, with minimal heating (less than 4 mm) behind the reflector. PMID:25794385

  5. Microwave Therapy for Bone Tumors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takakuda, Kazuo; Inaoka, Shuken; Saito, Hirokazu; Hassan, Moinuddin; Koyama, Yoshikazu; Kuroda, Hiroshi; Kanaya, Tomohiro; Kosaka, Toshifumi; Tanaka, Shigeo; Miyairi, Hiroo; Shinomiya, Kenichi

    In vivo microwave treatments for bone tumor are designed, which enable us to conserve the activity and functionality of the matrix of living tissues. This treatment is composed of two steps. In the first step, the tumor was coagulated by the application of microwaves emitted from the antenna inserted into the tumor tissue, and then removed. In the second step, the surrounding tissue suspected to be invaded with transformed cells was covered with hydro gels and heated similarly. The tissue itself was heated by the conduction from the gels. The tissue temperature should be kept at 60°C for 30 minutes. This treatment should kill the whole cells within the tissues, but the mechanical strength and the biochemical activity of the matrix should be left intact. The matrix preserves the mechanical functions and ensures the maximum regeneration ability of the tissue. In this study, various hydro gels were examined and the most promising one was selected. Animal experiments were carried out and successful heating verified the applicability of the treatment.

  6. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000573.htm Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Disseminated intravascular coagulation is a serious disorder in which the proteins ...

  7. Dual-slot antennas for microwave tissue heating: Parametric design analysis and experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Brace, Christopher L.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Design and validate an efficient dual-slot coaxial microwave ablation antenna that produces an approximately spherical heating pattern to match the shape of most abdominal and pulmonary tumor targets.Methods: A dual-slot antenna geometry was utilized for this study. Permutations of the antenna geometry using proximal and distal slot widths from 1 to 10 mm separated by 1–20 mm were analyzed using finite-element electromagnetic simulations. From this series, the most optimal antenna geometry was selected using a two-term sigmoidal objective function to minimize antenna reflection coefficient and maximize the diameter-to-length aspect ratio of heat generation. Sensitivities to variations in tissue properties and insertion depth were also evaluated in numerical models. The most optimal dual-slot geometry of the parametric analysis was then fabricated from semirigid coaxial cable. Antenna reflection coefficients at various insertion depths were recorded in ex vivo bovine livers and compared to numerical results. Ablation zones were then created by applying 50 W for 2–10 min in simulations and ex vivo livers. Mean zone diameter, length, aspect ratio, and reflection coefficients before and after heating were then compared to a conventional monopole antenna using ANOVA with post-hoc t-tests. Statistical significance was indicated for P < 0.05.Results: Antenna performance was highly sensitive to dual-slot geometry. The best-performing designs utilized a proximal slot width of 1 mm, distal slot width of 4 mm ± 1 mm and separation of 8 mm ± 1 mm. These designs were characterized by an active choking mechanism that focused heating to the distal tip of the antenna. A dual-band resonance was observed in the most optimal design, with a minimum reflection coefficient of −20.9 dB at 2.45 and 1.25 GHz. Total operating bandwidth was greater than 1 GHz, but the desired heating pattern was achieved only near 2.45 GHz. As a result, antenna performance was

  8. Thermal Ablation of Lung Tissue: In Vivo Experimental Comparison of Microwave and Radiofrequency

    SciTech Connect

    Crocetti, Laura Bozzi, Elena; Faviana, Pinuccia; Cioni, Dania; Della Pina, Clotilde; Sbrana, Alberto; Fontanini, Gabriella; Lencioni, Riccardo

    2010-08-15

    This study was designed to compare feasibility, safety, and effectiveness of microwave (MW) ablation versus radiofrequency (RF) ablation of lung tissue in a rabbit model. Twenty New Zealand White rabbits were submitted to MW (n = 10, group A) or RF ablation (n = 10, group B). The procedures were performed with a prototype MW ablation device with a 1.6-cm radiating section antenna (Valleylab MW Ablation System) and with a 2-cm exposed-tip RF electrode (Cool-tip RF Ablation System). At immediate computed tomography increase in density, maximum diameters (D1-D3) of ablation zones were measured and ablation volume was calculated. Histopathologic assessment was performed 3 and 7 days after the procedure. Technical success was achieved in nine of 10 rabbits in each group. One death occurred in group B. Complications included pneumothorax (group A, n = 4; group B, n = 4), abscess (group A, n = 1; group B, n = 1), and thoracic wall burn (group A, n = 4). No significant differences were demonstrated in attenuation increase (P = 0.73), dimensions (P = 0.28, 0.86, 0.06, respectively, comparing D1-D3) and volume (P = 0.17). At histopathology, ablation zones were similar, with septal necrosis, edema, hemorrhage, and peripheral lymphocytic infiltrate. Complete thrombosis of more than 90% of vessels up to 2 mm in diameter was depicted at the periphery of the ablation zone in group A specimens. In group B specimens, complete thrombosis was depicted in 20% of vessels. Feasibility and safety of MW and RF ablation are similar in a lung rabbit model. MW ablation produces a greater damage to peripheral small vessels inducing thrombosis.

  9. Optimization of microwave-assisted extraction for six inorganic and organic arsenic species in chicken tissues using response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenfeng; Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2015-09-01

    Response surface methodology was applied to optimize the parameters for microwave-assisted extraction of six major inorganic and organic arsenic species (As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone) from chicken tissues, followed by detection using a high-performance liquid chromatography with inductively coupled mass spectrometry detection method, which allows the simultaneous analysis of both inorganic and organic arsenic species in the extract in a single run. Effects of extraction medium, solution pH, liquid-to-solid ratio, and the temperature and time of microwave-assisted extraction on the extraction of the targeted arsenic species were studied. The optimum microwave-assisted extraction conditions were: 100 mg of chicken tissue, extracted by 5 mL of 22% v/v methanol, 90 mmol/L (NH4 )2 HPO4 , and 0.07% v/v trifluoroacetic acid (with pH adjusted to 10.0 by ammonium hydroxide solution), ramping for 10 min to 71°C, and holding for 11 min. The method has good extraction performance for total arsenic in the spiked and nonspiked chicken tissues (104.0 ± 13.8% and 91.6 ± 7.8%, respectively), except for the ones with arsenic contents close to the quantitation limits. Limits of quantitation (S/N = 10) for As(III), As(V), dimethyl arsenic acid, monomethyl arsenic acid, p-arsanilic acid, and roxarsone in chicken tissues using this method were 0.012, 0.058, 0.039, 0.061, 0.102, and 0.240 mg/kg (dry weight), respectively. PMID:26106064

  10. Microwaves create larger ablations than radiofrequency when controlled for power in ex vivo tissue

    PubMed Central

    Andreano, A.; Huang, Yu; Meloni, M. Franca; Lee, Fred T.; Brace, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To compare ablation zones created with equal amounts of 2.45 GHz microwave and 480 kHz radiofrequency (RF) energy in ex vivo liver and lung. Methods: A total of 38 ablations were performed in ex vivo liver and lung for 10 min each. Nineteen RF ablations (nine liver, ten lung) were performed with a 480 kHz system (200 W max, impedance-based pulsing) and cooled electrode while measuring the average RF power applied. Nineteen microwave ablations (nine liver, ten lung) were then created using a cooled triaxial antenna to deliver 2.45 GHz at the same power level as in RF experiments. Ablation zones were then sectioned and measured for minimum, maximum and mean diameters, and circularity. Measurements were compared using t-tests, with P<0.05 indicating statistical significance. Results: Mean diameters of microwave ablations were greater than RF ablations in both liver and lung (4.4±0.3 vs 3.3±0.2 cm in liver; 2.45±0.3 vs 1.6±0.5 cm in lungs; P<0.0005 all comparisons). There was no significant difference in the mean power applied during microwave or RF ablations in either organ (54.44±1.71 W vs 56.4±6.7 W in liver, P>0.05; 40±0.95 W vs 44.9±7.1 W in lung, P>0.05). Conclusions: Using a single cooled applicator, microwave energy at 2.45 GHz produces larger ablations than an equivalent amount of 480 kHz RF energy in normal liver and lung. This was more apparent in lung, likely due to the high baseline impedance which limits RF, but not microwave power delivery. PMID:20632609

  11. Micro-quantity tissue digestion for metal measurements by use of a microwave acid-digestion bomb.

    PubMed

    Nicholson, J R; Savory, M G; Savory, J; Wills, M R

    1989-03-01

    We describe a simple and convenient method for processing small amounts of tissue samples for trace-metal measurements by atomic absorption spectrometry, by use of a modified Parr microwave digestion bomb. Digestion proceeds rapidly (less than or equal to 90 s) in a sealed Teflon-lined vessel that eliminates contamination or loss from volatilization. Small quantities of tissue (5-100 mg dry weight) are digested in high-purity nitric acid, yielding concentrations of analyte that can be measured directly without further sample manipulation. We analyzed National Institute of Standards and Technology bovine liver Standard Reference Material to verify the accuracy of the technique. We assessed the applicability of the technique to analysis for aluminum in bone by comparison with a dry ashing procedure. PMID:2537690

  12. Polyphosphate, Platelets, and Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Travers, Richard J.; Smith, Stephanie A.; Morrissey, James H.

    2015-01-01

    While we have understood the basic outline of the enzymes and reactions that make up the traditional blood coagulation cascade for many years, recently our appreciation of the complexity of these interactions has greatly increased. This has resulted in unofficial “revisions” of the coagulation cascade to include new amplification pathways and connections between the standard coagulation cascade enzymes, as well as the identification of extensive connections between the immune system and the coagulation cascade. The discovery that polyphosphate is stored in platelet dense granules and is secreted during platelet activation has resulted in a recent burst of interest in the role of this ancient molecule in human biology. Here we review the increasingly complex role of platelet polyphosphate in hemostasis, thrombosis, and inflammation that has been uncovered in recent years, as well as novel therapeutics centered on modulating polyphosphate’s roles in coagulation and inflammation. PMID:25976958

  13. Application of microwave-assisted micro-solid-phase extraction for determination of parabens in human ovarian cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Sajid, Muhammad; Basheer, Chanbasha; Narasimhan, Kothandaraman; Choolani, Mahesh; Lee, Hian Kee

    2015-09-01

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are widely used as preservatives in food, cosmetics and pharmaceutical products. However, weak estrogenicity of some parabens has been reported in several studies, which provided the impetus for this work. Here, a simple and efficient analytical method for quantifying parabens in cancer tissues has been developed. This technique involves the simultaneous use of microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and micro-solid phase extraction (μ-SPE), in tandem with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC/UV) analysis for the determination of parabens. The pollutants studied included four parabens (methyl, ethyl, propyl and butyl parabens). Optimization of the experimental parameters for MASE and μ-SPE was performed. Good relative standard deviation (%RSD) ranged from 0.09 to 2.81% and high enrichment factors (27-314) were obtained. Coefficients of determination (r(2)) up to 0.9962 were obtained across a concentration range of 5.0-200ngg(-1). The method detection limits for parabens ranged from 0.005 to 0.0244ngg(-1). The procedure was initially tested on prawn samples to demonstrate its feasibility on a complex biological matrix. Preliminary studies on human ovarian cancer (OC) tissues showed presence of parabens. Higher levels of parabens were detected in malignant ovarian tumor tissues compared to benign tumor tissue samples. PMID:26245364

  14. Coagulation, Protease Activated Receptors and Viral Myocarditis

    PubMed Central

    Antoniak, Silvio; Mackman, Nigel

    2013-01-01

    The coagulation protease cascade plays an essential role in hemostasis. In addition, a clot contributes to host defense by limiting the spread of pathogens. Coagulation proteases induce intracellular signaling by cleavage of cell surface receptors called protease-activated receptors (PARs). These receptors allow cells to sense changes in the extracellular environment, such as infection. Viruses activate the coagulation cascade by inducing tissue factor expression and by disrupting the endothelium. Virus infection of the heart can cause myocarditis, cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Recent studies using a mouse model have shown that tissue factor, thrombin and PAR-1 signaling all positively regulate the innate immune during viral myocarditis. In contrast, PAR-2 signaling was found to inhibit interferon-β expression and the innate immune response. These observations suggest that anticoagulants may impair the innate immune response to viral infection and that inhibition of PAR-2 may be a new target to reduce viral myocarditis.. PMID:24203054

  15. Changes in the dielectric properties of rat tissue as a function of age at microwave frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peyman, A.; Rezazadeh, A. A.; Gabriel, C.

    2001-06-01

    The dielectric properties of ten rat tissues at six different ages were measured at 37 °C in the frequency range of 130 MHz to 10 GHz using an open-ended coaxial probe and a computer controlled network analyser. The results show a general decrease of the dielectric properties with age. The trend is more apparent for brain, skull and skin tissues and less noticeable for abdominal tissues. The variation in the dielectric properties with age is due to the changes in the water content and the organic composition of tissues. The percentage decrease in the dielectric properties of certain tissues in the 30 to 70 day old rats at cellular phone frequencies have been tabulated. These data provide an important input in the provision of rigorous dosimetry in lifetime-exposure animal experiments. The results provide some insight into possible differences in the assessment of exposure for children and adults.

  16. Dust coagulation in ISM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chokshi, Arati; Tielens, Alexander G. G. M.; Hollenbach, David

    1989-01-01

    Coagulation is an important mechanism in the growth of interstellar and interplanetary dust particles. The microphysics of the coagulation process was theoretically analyzed as a function of the physical properties of the coagulating grains, i.e., their size, relative velocities, temperature, elastic properties, and the van der Waal interaction. Numerical calculations of collisions between linear chains provide the wave energy in individual particles and the spectrum of the mechanical vibrations set up in colliding particles. Sticking probabilities are then calculated using simple estimates for elastic deformation energies and for the attenuation of the wave energy due to absorption and scattering processes.

  17. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  18. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  19. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  20. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  1. 21 CFR 878.4400 - Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and....4400 Electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories. (a) Identification. An electrosurgical cutting and coagulation device and accessories is a device intended to remove tissue and...

  2. Dual mode microwave tool for dielectric analysis and thermal ablation treatment of organic tissue.

    PubMed

    Puentes, Margarita; Bashir, Fahed; Schüssler, Martin; Jakoby, Rolf

    2012-01-01

    A dual mode tool design to analyze organic tissue and locally perform thermal ablation treatment is presented. The tool is made of an array of split-ring resonators. It can operate on a sensing mode to track the relative dielectric changes from the organic tissue and on a treatment mode to perform thermal ablation at different input powers. The measurements were done with phantoms of human tissue. The tool is able to focus a hot spot of approximately 0.2mm with a temperature of 109 °C at an input power of 10W. PMID:23366811

  3. The Mechanisms of Coagulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurtz, Richard; Jesty, Jolyon

    1994-01-01

    Several topics such as heart disease, strokes, biochemical reactions, blood components, and genetics can be related to blood clotting. Introduces a simple, safe and inexpensive hands-on demonstration using bovine (cattle) blood plasma of normal and abnormal coagulation. (ZWH)

  4. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jr, Silberstein LE, et al, eds. Hematology: Basic Principles and Practice . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2013:chap 141. Thachil J, Toh CH. Current concepts in the management of disseminated intravascular coagulation. Thromb Res . 2012;129 ...

  5. Stable microwave radiometry system for long term monitoring of deep tissue temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-02-01

    Background: There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods: We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain onaxis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3-5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results: We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of +0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions: A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  6. Stable Microwave Radiometry System for Long Term Monitoring of Deep Tissue Temperature

    PubMed Central

    Stauffer, Paul R.; Rodriques, Dario B.; Salahi, Sara; Topsakal, Erdem; Oliveira, Tiago R.; Prakash, Aniruddh; D'Isidoro, Fabio; Reudink, Douglas; Snow, Brent W.; Maccarini, Paolo F.

    2013-01-01

    Background There are numerous clinical applications for non-invasive monitoring of deep tissue temperature. We present the design and experimental performance of a miniature radiometric thermometry system for measuring volume average temperature of tissue regions located up to 5cm deep in the body. Methods We constructed a miniature sensor consisting of EMI-shielded log spiral microstrip antenna with high gain on-axis and integrated high-sensitivity 1.35GHz total power radiometer with 500 MHz bandwidth. We tested performance of the radiometry system in both simulated and experimental multilayer phantom models of several intended clinical measurement sites: i) brown adipose tissue (BAT) depots within 2cm of the skin surface, ii) 3–5cm deep kidney, and iii) human brain underlying intact scalp and skull. The physical models included layers of circulating tissue-mimicking liquids controlled at different temperatures to characterize our ability to quantify small changes in target temperature at depth under normothermic surface tissues. Results We report SAR patterns that characterize the sense region of a 2.6cm diameter receive antenna, and radiometric power measurements as a function of deep tissue temperature that quantify radiometer sensitivity. The data demonstrate: i) our ability to accurately track temperature rise in realistic tissue targets such as urine refluxed from prewarmed bladder into kidney, and 10°C drop in brain temperature underlying normothermic scalp and skull, and ii) long term accuracy and stability of ∓0.4°C over 4.5 hours as needed for monitoring core body temperature over extended surgery or monitoring effects of brown fat metabolism over an extended sleep/wake cycle. Conclusions A non-invasive sensor consisting of 2.6cm diameter receive antenna and integral 1.35GHz total power radiometer has demonstrated sufficient sensitivity to track clinically significant changes in temperature of deep tissue targets underlying normothermic surface

  7. Microwave distillation-solid phase adsorbent trapping device for the determination of off-flavors, geosmin and methylisoborneol, in catfish tissue below their rejection levels

    SciTech Connect

    Conte, E.D.; Shen, C.Y.; Miller, D.W.; Perschbacher, P.W.

    1996-08-01

    Described is a rapid microwave-mediated steam distillation device for determining two predominant off-flavor compounds, geosmin and methylisoborneol, in catfish tissue. A microwave on-time of 10 min is needed to efficiently remove these off-flavor compounds from the sample matrix and trap them on a solid phase adsorbent. A minimal amount of organic solvent is used to elute the trapped compounds. The extract is then analyzed by gas chromatography with ion trap detection in the selective ion storage mode. Detection limits in the sub-parts-per-billion range are obtained with this method. 11 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and the Coagulation System.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Young; Cho, Seong H; Takabayashi, Tetsuji; Schleimer, Robert P

    2015-09-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common chronic diseases in adults and severely affects quality of life in patients. Although various etiologic and pathogenic mechanisms of CRS have been proposed, the causes of CRS remain uncertain. Abnormalities in the coagulation cascade may play an etiologic role in many diseases, such as asthma and other inflammatory conditions. While studies on the relationship between asthma and dysregulated coagulation have been reported, the role of the coagulation system in the pathogenesis of CRS has only been considered following recent reports. Excessive fibrin deposition is seen in nasal polyp (NP) tissue from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyp (CRSwNP) and is associated with activation of thrombin, reduction of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and upregulation of coagulation factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), all events that can contribute to fibrin deposition and crosslinking. These findings were reproduced in a murine model of NP that was recently established. Elucidation of the mechanisms of fibrin deposition may enhance our understanding of tissue remodeling in the pathophysiology of NP and provide new targets for the treatment of CRSwNP. PMID:26122502

  9. Chronic Rhinosinusitis and the Coagulation System

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dong-Young; Cho, Seong H.; Takabayashi, Tetsuji

    2015-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) is one of the most common chronic diseases in adults and severely affects quality of life in patients. Although various etiologic and pathogenic mechanisms of CRS have been proposed, the causes of CRS remain uncertain. Abnormalities in the coagulation cascade may play an etiologic role in many diseases, such as asthma and other inflammatory conditions. While studies on the relationship between asthma and dysregulated coagulation have been reported, the role of the coagulation system in the pathogenesis of CRS has only been considered following recent reports. Excessive fibrin deposition is seen in nasal polyp (NP) tissue from patients with chronic rhinosinusitis with nasal polyp (CRSwNP) and is associated with activation of thrombin, reduction of tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) and upregulation of coagulation factor XIII-A (FXIII-A), all events that can contribute to fibrin deposition and crosslinking. These findings were reproduced in a murine model of NP that was recently established. Elucidation of the mechanisms of fibrin deposition may enhance our understanding of tissue remodeling in the pathophysiology of NP and provide new targets for the treatment of CRSwNP. PMID:26122502

  10. Numerical 3D modeling of heat transfer in human tissues for microwave radiometry monitoring of brown fat metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigues, Dario B.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Salahi, Sara; Colebeck, Erin; Topsakal, Erdem; Pereira, Pedro J. S.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2013-01-01

    Background Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in whole body metabolism and could potentially mediate weight gain and insulin sensitivity. Although some imaging techniques allow BAT detection, there are currently no viable methods for continuous acquisition of BAT energy expenditure. We present a non-invasive technique for long term monitoring of BAT metabolism using microwave radiometry. Methods A multilayer 3D computational model was created in HFSS™ with 1.5 mm skin, 3–10 mm subcutaneous fat, 200 mm muscle and a BAT region (2–6 cm3) located between fat and muscle. Based on this model, a log-spiral antenna was designed and optimized to maximize reception of thermal emissions from the target (BAT). The power absorption patterns calculated in HFSS™ were combined with simulated thermal distributions computed in COMSOL® to predict radiometric signal measured from an ultra-low-noise microwave radiometer. The power received by the antenna was characterized as a function of different levels of BAT metabolism under cold and noradrenergic stimulation. Results The optimized frequency band was 1.5–2.2 GHz, with averaged antenna efficiency of 19%. The simulated power received by the radiometric antenna increased 2–9 mdBm (noradrenergic stimulus) and 4–15 mdBm (cold stimulus) corresponding to increased 15-fold BAT metabolism. Conclusions Results demonstrated the ability to detect thermal radiation from small volumes (2–6 cm3) of BAT located up to 12 mm deep and to monitor small changes (0.5 °C) in BAT metabolism. As such, the developed miniature radiometric antenna sensor appears suitable for non-invasive long term monitoring of BAT metabolism. PMID:24244831

  11. Microwave-assisted fibrous decoration of mPE surface utilizing Aloe vera extract for tissue engineering applications

    PubMed Central

    Balaji, Arunpandian; Jaganathan, Saravana Kumar; Supriyanto, Eko; Muhamad, Ida Idayu; Khudzari, Ahmad Zahran Md

    2015-01-01

    Developing multifaceted, biocompatible, artificial implants for tissue engineering is a growing field of research. In recent times, several works have been reported about the utilization of biomolecules in combination with synthetic materials to achieve this process. Accordingly, in this study, the ability of an extract obtained from Aloe vera, a commonly used medicinal plant in influencing the biocompatibility of artificial material, is scrutinized using metallocene polyethylene (mPE). The process of coating dense fibrous Aloe vera extract on the surface of mPE was carried out using microwaves. Then, several physicochemical and blood compatibility characterization experiments were performed to disclose the effects of corresponding surface modification. The Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed characteristic vibrations of several active constituents available in Aloe vera and exhibited peak shifts at far infrared regions due to aloe-based mineral deposition. Meanwhile, the contact angle analysis demonstrated a drastic increase in wettability of coated samples, which confirmed the presence of active components on glazed mPE surface. Moreover, the bio-mimic structure of Aloe vera fibers and the influence of microwaves in enhancing the coating characteristics were also meticulously displayed through scanning electron microscopy micrographs and Hirox 3D images. The existence of nanoscale roughness was interpreted through high-resolution profiles obtained from atomic force microscopy. And the extent of variations in irregularities was delineated by measuring average roughness. Aloe vera-induced enrichment in the hemocompatible properties of mPE was established by carrying out in vitro tests such as activated partial thromboplastin time, prothrombin time, platelet adhesion, and hemolysis assay. In conclusion, the Aloe vera-glazed mPE substrate was inferred to attain desirable properties required for multifaceted biomedical implants. PMID:26425089

  12. Numerical 3D modeling of heat transfer in human tissues for microwave radiometry monitoring of brown fat metabolism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Dario B.; Maccarini, Paolo F.; Salahi, Sara; Colebeck, Erin; Topsakal, Erdem; Pereira, Pedro J. S.; Limão-Vieira, Paulo; Stauffer, Paul R.

    2013-02-01

    Background: Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in whole body metabolism and could potentially mediate weight gain and insulin sensitivity. Although some imaging techniques allow BAT detection, there are currently no viable methods for continuous acquisition of BAT energy expenditure. We present a non-invasive technique for long term monitoring of BAT metabolism using microwave radiometry. Methods: A multilayer 3D computational model was created in HFSSTM with 1.5 mm skin, 3-10 mm subcutaneous fat, 200 mm muscle and a BAT region (2-6 cm3) located between fat and muscle. Based on this model, a log-spiral antenna was designed and optimized to maximize reception of thermal emissions from the target (BAT). The power absorption patterns calculated in HFSSTM were combined with simulated thermal distributions computed in COMSOL® to predict radiometric signal measured from an ultra-low-noise microwave radiometer. The power received by the antenna was characterized as a function of different levels of BAT metabolism under cold and noradrenergic stimulation. Results: The optimized frequency band was 1.5-2.2 GHz, with averaged antenna efficiency of 19%. The simulated power received by the radiometric antenna increased 2-9 mdBm (noradrenergic stimulus) and 4-15 mdBm (cold stimulus) corresponding to increased 15-fold BAT metabolism. Conclusions: Results demonstrated the ability to detect thermal radiation from small volumes (2-6 cm3) of BAT located up to 12 mm deep and to monitor small changes (0.5 °C) in BAT metabolism. As such, the developed miniature radiometric antenna sensor appears suitable for non-invasive long term monitoring of BAT metabolism.

  13. [Work strain by anaesthetic gas and surgical smoke due to tissue coagulation as well as safety measures in surgical operating rooms - what the surgeon needs to know].

    PubMed

    Boeckelmann, I; Sammito, S; Meyer, F

    2013-02-01

    Exposure of the respiratory tract during surgical interventions is an important topic of occupational medicine, which has only rarely been investigated. Based on a literature search, relevant information on the possible health risk is summarised. Within the operating room, an exposure of the respiratory tract to gas (volatile anaesthetics) and aerosols (smoking gas by coagulation) can occur. This exposure needs to be considered as a potential health risk if safety measures are not sufficient. Health risks comprise possible disturbances of gravidity and fertility, neurotoxicity and cancer generation. Such health risks can be prevented with primary preventive measures and can be early recognised/diagnosed by preventive investigations of occupational medicine (secondary prevention). Safety measures are developed according to the STOP principle (substitution, technical, organisatory and personal measures). Assessment of the potential danger begins with an appropriate description of the working procedure and detection of the toxic features of the drugs and medical products, which helps to determine individual exposure and to estimate risk potential. Required occupational safety measures can be derived from this and, subsequently, the work organisation can be optimised. In addition, employees in the operating room are to be instructed about the indicated preventive mode of behaviour. Due to better implementation of the above-mentioned basic principles, introduction of novel narcotics and technological developments, potential exposure of the respiratory tract within the operating room has been reduced over the last 10 years. Thus, risks for gravidity and possible disturbances of fertility by exposure to volatile narcotics are currently assessed to be low. However, available data on health risks of the chronic exposure to smoking gases are still deficient although toxic and cancerogenic organic pyrolysis products are generated. The protection effect of modern air

  14. Coagulation Factor XIIIa Substrates in Human Plasma

    PubMed Central

    Nikolajsen, Camilla Lund; Dyrlund, Thomas F.; Poulsen, Ebbe Toftgaard; Enghild, Jan J.; Scavenius, Carsten

    2014-01-01

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a transglutaminase with a well defined role in the final stages of blood coagulation. Active FXIII (FXIIIa) catalyzes the formation of ϵ-(γ-glutamyl)lysine isopeptide bonds between specific Gln and Lys residues. The primary physiological outcome of this catalytic activity is stabilization of the fibrin clot during coagulation. The stabilization is achieved through the introduction of cross-links between fibrin monomers and through cross-linking of proteins with anti-fibrinolytic activity to fibrin. FXIIIa additionally cross-links several proteins with other functionalities to the clot. Cross-linking of proteins to the clot is generally believed to modify clot characteristics such as proteolytic susceptibility and hereby affect the outcome of tissue damage. In the present study, we use a proteomic approach in combination with transglutaminase-specific labeling to identify FXIIIa plasma protein substrates and their reactive residues. The results revealed a total of 147 FXIIIa substrates, of which 132 have not previously been described. We confirm that 48 of the FXIIIa substrates were indeed incorporated into the insoluble fibrin clot during the coagulation of plasma. The identified substrates are involved in, among other activities, complement activation, coagulation, inflammatory and immune responses, and extracellular matrix organization. PMID:24443567

  15. A microwave antigen retrieval method using two heating steps for enhanced immunostaining on aldehyde-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue sections.

    PubMed

    Gu, Ling; Cong, Jing; Zhang, Jie; Tian, Ying-Ying; Zhai, Xiao-Yue

    2016-06-01

    Antigen retrieval is an immunohistochemical procedure that results in better exposure of target antigens in aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue sections to antibodies. However, the commercially recommended or conventional protocols for antigen retrieval do not always succeed in expressing the target antigen. Here, an improved method was developed for antigen retrieval from aldehyde-fixed, paraffin-embedded histological sections. Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), tight junction proteins Claudin-2 and Claudin-7, and water channel aquaporins in kidney tissue were selected as test antigens. Typically, PCNA and Claudin-2 and Claudin-7 show negative, weak, or nonspecific immunoreactions with conventional antigen retrieval methods using microwave heating. In the present study, microwave heating was performed twice with an interval of 30 min between the two steps to allow the buffer solution to cool. Sodium citrate buffer (10 mM sodium citrate, pH 6.0) was used for PCNA, and Tris-EDTA buffer (10 mM Tris, 1 mM EDTA, pH 9.0) was used for the Claudins. Compared with conventionally prepared tissues, the tissues exhibited both enhanced and specific immunostaining, and well-preserved morphology. In conclusion, the conventional protocol could be supplemented with a second microwave heating step to improve the expression of antigens that do not respond well to the conventional method. PMID:27002723

  16. Coagulation abnormalities in sepsis.

    PubMed

    Tsao, Cheng-Ming; Ho, Shung-Tai; Wu, Chin-Chen

    2015-03-01

    Although the pathophysiology of sepsis has been elucidated with the passage of time, sepsis may be regarded as an uncontrolled inflammatory and procoagulant response to infection. The hemostatic changes in sepsis range from subclinical activation of blood coagulation to acute disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). DIC is characterized by widespread microvascular thrombosis, which contributes to multiple organ dysfunction/failure, and subsequent consumption of platelets and coagulation factors, eventually causing bleeding manifestations. The diagnosis of DIC can be made using routinely available laboratory tests, scoring algorithms, and thromboelastography. In this cascade of events, the inhibition of coagulation activation and platelet function is conjectured as a useful tool for attenuating inflammatory response and improving outcomes in sepsis. A number of clinical trials of anticoagulants were performed, but none of them have been recognized as a standard therapy because recombinant activated protein C was withdrawn from the market owing to its insufficient efficacy in a randomized controlled trial. However, these subgroup analyses of activated protein C, antithrombin, and thrombomodulin trials show that overt coagulation activation is strongly associated with the best therapeutic effect of the inhibitor. In addition, antiplatelet drugs, including acetylsalicylic acid, P2Y12 inhibitors, and glycoprotein IIb/IIIa antagonists, may reduce organ failure and mortality in the experimental model of sepsis without a concomitant increased bleeding risk, which should be supported by solid clinical data. For a state-of-the-art treatment of sepsis, the efficacy of anticoagulant and antiplatelet agents needs to be proved in further large-scale prospective, interventional, randomized validation trials. PMID:25544351

  17. [Effects of Interaction of Ozonation and Coagulation on Coagulation Results].

    PubMed

    Liu, Hai-long; Guo, Xue-feng; Wang, Min-hui; Jiao, Ru-yuan; Shi, Jian

    2015-09-01

    Two strategies, ozonation-coagulation combination (OCC, ozone and coagulant dosed at meantime) and preozonation coagulation (PC, coagulant dosed after ozone died away) were used to treat synthesized water. Different effects of oxidation and coagulation, disinfection by-products formation potentials (DBPFP) in the same water were detected in order to study the influence of interaction of ozonation and coagulation (IOC) on treated water characteristics. Results show that there are remarkable differences between OCC and PC. IOC effects take place during OCC process, which results in variations of the distribution of hydrolyzed species of coagulant. And this is an important reason which impairs efficiency of coagulation. Turbidity after OCC was higher than that of PC. One of the main reasons is that ozone reduced the content of Alb species which was built during coagulant hydrolyzation. Cl-DBPFP in OCC outlet water were lower than those in PC because oxidized destruction of DBP precursors were enhanced by catalyzed ozonation by AlCl3 along with its other hydrolyzed species. Removals of MCAA and CF formation potentials by OCC were significantly higher than those by PC, MCAAFP were 5. 6 µg . L-1 and 16. 9 µg . L-1 respectively, and CFFP were 12. 5 µg . L-1 and 24. 1 µg . L-1 respectively. Coagulation results and DBP formations are significantly affected by interaction of ozonation and coagulation; and it should be a noticeable point of water safety if ozonation and coagulation are employed together. Thus times and spots between ozone and coagulant should be defined clearly in correlational researches and water treatment application. PMID:26717689

  18. A frequent human coagulation Factor VII mutation (A294V, c152) in loop 140s affects the interaction with activators, tissue factor and substrates.

    PubMed Central

    Toso, Raffaella; Pinotti, Mirko; High, Katherine A; Pollak, Eleanor S; Bernardi, Francesco

    2002-01-01

    Activated Factor VII (FVIIa) is a vitamin-K-dependent serine protease that initiates blood clotting after interacting with its cofactor tissue factor (TF). The complex FVIIa-TF is responsible for the activation of Factor IX (FIX) and Factor X (FX), leading ultimately to the formation of a stable fibrin clot. Activated FX (FXa), a product of FVIIa enzymic activity, is also the most efficient activator of zymogen FVII. Interactions of FVII/FVIIa with its activators, cofactor and substrates have been investigated extensively to define contact regions and residues involved in the formation of the complexes. Site-directed mutagenesis and inhibition assays led to the identification of sites removed from the FVIIa active site that influence binding specificity and affinity of the enzyme. In this study we report the characterization of a frequent naturally occurring human FVII mutant, A294V (residue 152 in the chymotrypsin numbering system), located in loop 140s. This region undergoes major rearrangements after FVII activation and is relevant to the development of substrate specificity. FVII A294V shows delayed activation by FXa as well as reduced activity towards peptidyl and macromolecular substrates without impairing the catalytic efficiency of the triad. Also, the interaction of this FVII variant with TF was altered, suggesting that this residue, and more likely loop 140s, plays a pivotal role not only in the recognition of FX by the FVIIa-TF complex, but also in the interaction of FVII with both its activators and cofactor TF. PMID:11931672

  19. Coagulation alterations due to local fibrinolytic therapy with recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in patients with peripheral arterial occlusive disease

    SciTech Connect

    Rauber, Klaus; Heidinger, Kathrin S.; Kemkes-Matthes, Bettina

    1997-05-15

    Purpose. To determine the systemic effects of local fibrinolytic therapy with low-dose recombinant tissue-type plasminogen activator (rt-PA). Methods. Ten patients received intrathrombal infusion of 20 mg rt-PA and heparin for local thrombolysis and had subsequent percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA). Eight controls underwent PTA and received heparin alone. We measured t-PA, D-Dimer, and fibrinogen levels before, directly after, and 20, 40, and 60 min and 24 hr after therapy. Results. In the thrombolysis group the t-PA level peaked immediately after infusion and then declined within 1 hr. D-Dimer increased and remained elevated, whereas in the control group only t-PA levels increased, and only after 24 hr. Fibrinogen remained within the normal range in both groups. Eight of ten patients in the thrombolysis group and seven of eight with PTA had clinical improvement after the procedure. Conclusions. The increase in D-Dimer in the rt-PA group indicates a good local fibrinolytic effect. The fact that fibrinogen levels remained unchanged indicates that there is a lack of systemic fibrinogenolysis.

  20. [Samples in Coagulation Test].

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Yutaka

    2015-12-01

    An understanding and ability to develop a strategy to prevent pre-analytical errors of laboratory tests in the hemostasis area are two of the most important skills of medical technologists and related doctors. Recently, the working group for standardization of sampling in coagulation tests is working towards a consensus. This article reviews a summary of the consensus: (1) The anticoagulant for coagulation tests is 3.13-3.2% sodium citrate at a ratio of 1:9 to whole blood and the accuracy of the ratio is within 10%. (2) Blood sampling is achieved with the use of a 21-23G needle and coagulation. Blood sampling can be achieved by both a syringe and vacuum tube system. After taking blood, laboratory tests such as of the prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) should be completed within one hour and the storage temperature should be at room temperature, not ice-cold conditions. 3) To prepare a plasma sample, citrated blood is centrifuged at 1,500 x g for 15 min at room temperature to minimize the remaining platelets in plasma (below 10,000/microL at least). PMID:27089656

  1. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, J.D.; McCabe, C.W.

    1985-02-08

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radiofrequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery. 4 figs.

  2. Electrosurgical device for both mechanical cutting and coagulation of bleeding

    DOEpatents

    Doss, James D.; McCabe, Charles W.

    1987-01-01

    Bipolar electrical coagulation of tissue using radio-frequency energy is combined with the functions of conventional surgical pressure tissue cutting instruments without significant modification thereof in a single instrument with the result that a surgeon can perform both procedures without having to redirect his attention from the area of the surgery.

  3. Arsenic removal by coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, K.N.; Green, J.F.; Do, H.D.; McLean, S.J.

    1995-04-01

    This study evaluated the removal of naturally occurring arsenic in a full-scale (106-mgd) conventional treatment plant. When the source water was treated with 3--10 mg/L of ferric chloride or 6, 10, or 20 mg/L of alum, arsenic removal was 81--96% (ferric chloride) and 23--71% (alum). Metal concentrations in the sludge produced during this study were below the state`s current hazardous waste levels at all coagulant dosages. No operational difficulties were encountered.

  4. Thermophoretically Dominated Aerosol Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosner, Daniel E.; Arias-Zugasti, Manuel

    2011-01-01

    A theory of aerosol coagulation due to size-dependent thermophoresis is presented. This previously overlooked effect is important when local temperature gradients are large, the sol population is composed of particles of much greater thermal conductivity than the carrier gas, with mean diameters much greater than the prevailing gas mean free path, and an adequate “spread” in sizes (as in metallurgical mists or fumes). We illustrate this via a population-balance analysis of the evolution of an initially log-normal distribution when this mechanism dominates ordinary Brownian diffusion.

  5. [Interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hyperplasia].

    PubMed

    Muschter, R; Hessel, S; Hofstetter, A; Keiditsch, E; Rothenberger, K H; Schneede, P; Frank, F

    1993-07-01

    We report on the new method of interstitial laser coagulation for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). The procedure is based on the interstitial application of Nd:YAG laser irradiation, delivered through a new light guide system. Such light applicators coagulate constant tissue volumes in a homogeneous manner, as proven by in vitro studies in different tissues, including surgically removed prostate adenoma. The extent of the coagulation is determined by laser power and irradiation time. At 5 W, for example, and during a 10-min period, this zone reached a diameter of up to 20 mm. Temperatures generated in the process were over 100 degrees C, as measured by time/space resolution. These results were confirmed by in vivo studies in canine prostates. In the course of 7 weeks, the coagulated areas formed scars with degeneration and fibrosis, accompanied by marked shrinking. Neighbouring organs were not affected. The method was successfully transferred to clinical practice. The application of the light guides to the lateral lobes was performed percutaneously from the perineum under transrectal ultrasound guidance. The median lobe was punctured transurethrally under direct vision. Twenty-seven patients with an average age of 67.7 years were treated between July 1991 and March 1992. At the time of evaluation 15 patients had a follow-up of more than 2 months. They experienced a mean increase of peak flow rate from 6.6 to 15.2 ml/s and a mean decrease of residual volume from 206 to 38 ml. This was accompanied by a marked lessening of symptoms. The average prostate weight decreased from 63 to 44 g. Sexually active patients did not experience retrograde ejaculation.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7690498

  6. Numerical study of the effect of blood vessel on the microwave ablation shape.

    PubMed

    Nie, Xiaohui; Nan, Qun; Guo, Xuemei; Tian, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    The existence of large blood vessels seriously impacts the results of microwave ablation on heat transfer of surrounding tissue, and the research of influences about large blood vessels could be essential and significant. The temperature distribution in the tissue was analyzed with a microwave heating source by finite element method. The model, where the blood vessel is parallel to antenna, has different distances from antenna to blood vessel. As distance was greater than 20mm, the effect of blood vessel that was parallel to antenna was ignored and the ablation area was elliptical-like. When distance was less than 10mm, the part of asymmetrical coagulated area was on the right side of blood vessel. Therefore, the temperature contour by different conditions could provide numerical references, which is whether to block blood vessel or not, to achieve the aim of guiding the clinical practice, according to the locations of tumor and blood vessel. PMID:26406011

  7. Partial microwave-assisted wet digestion of animal tissue using a baby-bottle sterilizer for analyte determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matos, Wladiana O.; Menezes, Eveline A.; Gonzalez, Mário H.; Costa, Letícia M.; Trevizan, Lilian C.; Nogueira, Ana Rita A.

    2009-06-01

    A procedure for partial digestion of bovine tissue is proposed using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) micro-vessels inside a baby-bottle sterilizer under microwave radiation for multi-element determination by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP OES). Samples were directly weighed in laboratory-made polytetrafluoroethylene vessels. Nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide were added to the uncovered vessels, which were positioned inside the baby-bottle sterilizer, containing 500 mL of water. The hydrogen peroxide volume was fixed at 100 µL. The system was placed in a domestic microwave oven and partial digestion was carried out for the determination of Ca, Cu, Fe, Mg, Mn and Zn by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The single-vessel approach was used in the entire procedure, to minimize contamination in trace analysis. Better recoveries and lower residual carbon content (RCC) levels were obtained under the conditions established through a 2 4-1 fractional factorial design: 650 W microwave power, 7 min digestion time, 50 µL nitric acid and 50 mg sample mass. The digestion efficiency was ascertained according to the residual carbon content determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry. The accuracy of the proposed procedure was checked against two certified reference materials.

  8. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... the NHLBI on Twitter. How Is Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Treated? Treatment for disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) depends ... and treat the underlying cause. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation People who have acute DIC may have severe ...

  9. Coagulant modulates the hypocholesterolemic effect of tofu (coagulated soymilk).

    PubMed

    Oboh, Ganiyu

    2007-06-01

    The recent increase in soymilk and tofu (coagulated soymilk) consumption, especially in Western countries, is due to the recognition of the health benefits of soy foods; consumption of soybean would prevent heart diseases. Since the amount and the type of coagulated biomolecules (such as isoflavones) will vary with the type of coagulant, this will inevitably alter their biological activity. This study sought to assess the effect of some coagulants (calcium chloride, alum, and steep water from pap production) commonly used in the production of tofu in Nigeria on the serum cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein (HDL), and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) levels in albino rats fed tofu for 14 days. The results of this study revealed that there was a significant difference (P < .05) in the total phenol [calcium chloride (0.9%), alum (0.8%), and steep water (1.2%)] content of all the tofu produced. Furthermore, feeding albino rats with tofu and water ad libitum for 14 days caused a significant decrease (P < .05) in serum cholesterol and LDL when compared with the control. Conversely, there was a significant increase (P < .05) in serum HDL when compared with the control. However, rats fed steep water-coagulated tofu had the lowest serum levels of cholesterol and LDL, followed by those fed alum- and calcium chloride-coagulated tofu, respectively, while those fed with alum-coagulated tofu had the highest serum HDL level, closely followed by those fed steep water-coagulated tofu. It was therefore concluded that of all the coagulants, steep water appeared to be the most promising coagulant with regard to the production of tofu with a high hypocholesterolemic effect based on the low serum cholesterol and LDL levels and high HDL level. PMID:17651081

  10. Histology assessment of bipolar coagulation and argon plasma coagulation on digestive tract

    PubMed Central

    Garrido, Teresa; Baba, Elisa R; Wodak, Stephanie; Sakai, Paulo; Cecconello, Ivan; Maluf-Filho, Fauze

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To analyze the effect of bipolar electrocoagulation and argon plasma coagulation on fresh specimens of gastrointestinal tract. METHODS: An experimental evaluation was performed at Hospital das Clinicas of the University of São Paulo, on 31 fresh surgical specimens using argon plasma coagulation and bipolar electrocoagulation at different time intervals. The depth of tissue damage was histopathologically analyzed by single senior pathologist unaware of the coagulation method and power setting applied. To analyze the results, the mucosa was divided in superficial mucosa (epithelial layer of the esophagus and superficial portion of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) intermediate mucosa (until the lamina propria of the esophagus and until the bottom of the glandular layer of the stomach and colon) and muscularis mucosa. Necrosis involvement of the layers was compared in several combinations of power and time interval. RESULTS: Involvement of the intermediate mucosa of the stomach and of the muscularis mucosa of the three organs was more frequent when higher amounts of energy were used with argon plasma. In the esophagus and in the colon, injury of the intermediate mucosa was frequent, even when small amounts of energy were used. The use of bipolar electrocoagulation resulted in more frequent involvement of the intermediate mucosa and of the muscularis mucosa of the esophagus and of the colon when higher amounts of energy were used. In the stomach, these involvements were rare. The risk of injury of the muscularis propria was significant only in the colon when argon plasma coagulation was employed. CONCLUSION: Tissue damage after argon plasma coagulation is deeper than bipolar electrocoagulation. Both of them depend on the amount of energy used. PMID:25031789

  11. Novel microwave applicators for thermal therapy, ablation, and hemostasis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ryan, Thomas P.; Clegg, Peter

    2009-02-01

    Microwave applicators are becoming more prevalent in cancer ablation therapy due to factors of penetration, high power, and shortened treatment time. These applicators create the largest zones of necrosis of available energy sources. Progress has been made both with interstitial applicators for surgical, laparoscopic, or radiological approaches, as well as surface applicators that provide hemostasis or precoagulation prior to resection. Most commonly, the applicators operate at 915 MHz or 2450 MHz, and are well matched to tissue. Surgical applicators are as large as 5.6 mm and have the capability to operate at 100-200 W. With smaller applicators, internal cooling may be required to avoid heating sensitive skin surfaces if used percutaneously or laparoscopically. With the interstitial applicators, animal studies have shown a strong relationship between power and ablation volume, including reaching a steady-state plateau in performance based more on power level and less on time. As shown in-vivo, MW surface applicators are very efficient in surface coagulation for hemostasis or precoagulation and in the treatment of surface breaking lesions. These applicators are also capable of deep penetration as applied from the surface. Characteristic treatment times for interstitial applicators are four minutes and for surface applicators, one minute or less is sufficient. Examples will be shown of multi-organ results with surface coagulation using high-power microwaves. Finally, future trends will be discussed that include treatment planning, multiple applicators, and navigation.

  12. Coagulation products and their uses.

    PubMed

    Shord, S S; Lindley, C M

    2000-08-01

    The indications, pharmacokinetics, and therapeutic guidelines for available coagulation products are reviewed. Patients with hemophilia, von Willebrand's disease (VWD), or acquired inhibitors to antihemophilic factor (AHF) cannot spontaneously stop an acute hemorrhage. Coagulation products used to manage bleeding in patients with these disorders include AHF concentrates, factor IX concentrates, factor VIIa concentrate, factor IX complexes, anti-inhibitor coagulant complexes, and desmopressin acetate. Typically, these commercially available products are used to manage acute bleeding or to prevent excessive bleeding during surgery. The dosage of the coagulation products and the duration of therapy depend on many variables, including the severity of the hemorrhage, the pharmacokinetics of the coagulation products, and patient-specific factors. Product purity and viral attenuation are also important considerations in determining an appropriate dosage regimen. Recombinant versions of some coagulant factors are available and can eliminate the risk of viral transmission. A thorough understanding of each coagulation product can guide product selection, dosing, and treatment duration and can reduce the risk of viral transmission. PMID:10938981

  13. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Syndromes in Obstetrics.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, F Gary; Nelson, David B

    2015-11-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a syndrome that can be initiated by a myriad of medical, surgical, and obstetric disorders. Also known as consumptive coagulopathy, DIC is a common contributor to maternal morbidity and mortality and is associated with up to 25% of maternal deaths. The etiopathogenesis of DIC is complex and currently thought to be initiated by tissue factor or thromboplastin, which is released from trophoblastic or fetal tissue, or maternal decidua or endothelium. Tissue factor activates the coagulation sequence to cause fibrin clotting and its dissolution by the fibrinolysin system. The result of this process can range from mild, clinically insignificant laboratory derangements to marked coagulopathy with bleeding at sites of minimal trauma. Although clinical recognition varies by disease severity, several organizations have attempted to standardize the diagnosis through development of scoring systems. Several important--albeit not necessarily common--obstetric disorders associated with DIC include placental abruption, amniotic fluid embolism, sepsis syndrome, and acute fatty liver of pregnancy. More common disorders include severe preeclampsia, hemolysis, elevated liver enzymes, and low platelet count syndrome, and massive obstetric hemorrhage. Importantly, many of these disorders either cause or are associated with substantive obstetric hemorrhage. Treatment of DIC is centered on two principles. The first is identification and treatment of the underlying disorder. Because many women with consumptive coagulopathy also have massive hemorrhage, the second tenet of treatment is that obstetric complications such as uterine atony or lacerations must be controlled simultaneously with prompt blood and component replacement for a salutary outcome. PMID:26444122

  14. Thymoquinone Modulates Blood Coagulation in Vitro via Its Effects on Inflammatory and Coagulation Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan-Chari, Vandhana; Kim, Jaehan; Abuawad, Ahlam; Naeem, Mubeena; Cui, Huadong; Mousa, Shaker A.

    2016-01-01

    Thymoquinone (THQ) is a major component of black seeds. Given that both THQ and black seeds exhibit anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory activities, we hypothesized that THQ will affect cancer-associated thrombosis (CAT), which is primarily triggered by tissue factor (TF) and inflammation. The effect of both black seed-extracted and purchased (“pure”) THQ on normal blood coagulation was tested with in vitro thromboelastography (TEG) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT) coagulation assays. The effect of pure THQ on CAT was tested with aPTT assay using pancreatic cancer cell lines that are either positive or negative for TF, and with TEG assay using lipopolysaccharide as an inflammatory trigger. Additionally, the direct effect of THQ on the inactivation of factors IIa and Xa was assessed. Since TNF-α facilitates crosstalk between inflammation and thrombosis by triggering the NF-κB pathway, we tested THQ’s ability to interfere with this communication with a luciferase assay. Both extracted and pure THQ had minimal effects on normal blood coagulation. Pure THQ reversed CAT initiated by both TF and inflammation to basal levels (p < 0.001). Mechanistically, while THQ had minimal to no effect on factor IIa and Xa inactivation, it strongly reduced the effects of TNF-α on NF-κB elements (p < 0.001). THQ has a minimal effect on basal coagulation and can reverse CAT in vitro, possibly by interfering with the crosstalk between inflammation and coagulation. This study suggests the utility of THQ as a preventative anticoagulant and/or as a supplement to existing chemotherapies and anticoagulant therapies. PMID:27043539

  15. Microwave-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis followed by extraction with restricted access nanocomposites for rapid analysis of glucocorticoids residues in liver tissue.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianan; Liu, Xiaodan; Li, Yan; Duan, Gengli

    2016-10-01

    We developed a novel, simple and fast method for the determination of glucocorticoids residues in liver tissue by combining microwave-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis and restricted access matrix dispersive solid phase extraction (RAM-dSPE) followed with liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis. Firstly, microwave-assisted enzymatic hydrolysis was introduced in order to obtain a maximum amount of unconjugated parent drug in a short time (8s), while the traditional method commonly needs 4-12h. Secondly, further cleanup was carried out by RAM-dSPE based on the graphene@mSiO2-C8 nanomaterials which were synthesized by coating mesoporous silica onto hydrophilic graphene nano-sheets through a surfactant-mediated co-condensation sol-gel process. The enzymatic hydrolysis influencing factors (pH of the buffer, microwave radiation power, incubation time) and the experimental conditions of RAM-dSPE (sorbents amount, type and volume of the elution solvent, adsorption and desorption time) were optimized. Three glucocorticoids (prednisolone (PREL), betamethasone (BE) and dexamethasone (DE)) were selected as models to evaluate the feasibility of the method. According to the results, the developed method provided low detection limit (S/N=3) of 0.01-0.05μgkg(-1) and good linearity range of 0.25-800μgkg(-1) (R(2)>0.996) for glucocorticoids. The limit of quantification (S/N=10) range from 0.03 to 0.19μgkg(-1). Compared with other traditional methods, the developed method could provide similar or even better results in a greatly reduced analysis time. PMID:27474293

  16. Analysis of dextromethorphan and dextrorphan in decomposed skeletal tissues by microwave assisted extraction, microplate solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (MAE-MPSPE-GCMS).

    PubMed

    Fraser, Candice D; Cornthwaite, Heather M; Watterson, James H

    2015-08-01

    Analysis of decomposed skeletal tissues for dextromethorphan (DXM) and dextrorphan (DXT) using microwave assisted extraction (MAE), microplate solid-phase extraction (MPSPE) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is described. Rats (n = 3) received 100 mg/kg DXM (i.p.) and were euthanized by CO2 asphyxiation roughly 20 min post-dose. Remains decomposed to skeleton outdoors and vertebral bones were recovered, cleaned, and pulverized. Pulverized bone underwent MAE using methanol as an extraction solvent in a closed microwave system, followed by MPSPE and GC-MS. Analyte stability under MAE conditions was assessed and found to be stable for at least 60 min irradiation time. The majority (>90%) of each analyte was recovered after 15 min. The MPSPE-GCMS method was fit to a quadratic response (R(2)  > 0.99), over the concentration range 10-10 000 ng⋅mL(-1) , with coefficients of variation <20% in triplicate analysis. The MPSPE-GCMS method displayed a limit of detection of 10 ng⋅mL(-1) for both analytes. Following MAE for 60 min (80 °C, 1200 W), MPSPE-GCMS analysis of vertebral bone of DXM-exposed rats detected both analytes in all samples (DXM: 0.9-1.5 µg⋅g(-1) ; DXT: 0.5-1.8 µg⋅g(-1) ). PMID:25487525

  17. Quantification of Paraquat, MPTP, and MPP+ in brain tissue using microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Winnik, Bozena; Barr, Dana B.; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Montesano, M. Angela; Richfield, Eric K.; Buckley, Brian

    2014-01-01

    Animal models, consistent with the hypothesis of direct interaction of paraquat (PQ) and 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP) with specific areas of the central nervous system have been developed to study Parkinson’s disease (PD) in mice. These models have necessitated the creation of an analytical method for unambiguous identification and quantitation of PQ and structurally similar MPTP and 1-Methyl-4-phenylpyridinium ion (MPP+) in brain tissue. A method for determination of these compounds was developed using microwave-assisted solvent extraction (MASE) and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Extraction solvent and microwave conditions such as power and time were optimized to produce recoveries of 90% for PQ 78% for MPTP and 97% for its metabolite MPP+. The chromatographic separation was performed on a C8, column and detection was carried out using an ion trap as an analyzer with electrospray ionization. Mass spectrometer parameters such as heated capillary temperature, spray voltage, capillary voltage and others were also optimized for each analyte. Analysis was done in Selective Ion Monitoring (SIM) mode using 186 m/z for PQ, m/z 174 for MPTP, and m/z 170 for MPP+. The method detection limit for paraquat in matrix was 100 pg and 40 pg for MPTP and 20 pg MPP+. PMID:19618168

  18. EXTRINSIC COAGULATION BLOCKADE ATTENUATES LUNG INJURY AND PROINFLAMMATORY CYTOKINE RELEASE AFTER INTRATRACHEAL LIPOPOLYSACCHARIDE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Initiation of coagulation by tissue factor (TF) is a potentially powerful regulator of local inflammatory responses. We hypothesized that blockade of TF-factor VIIa (FVIIa) complex would decrease lung inflammation and proinflammatory cytokine release after tracheal instillation o...

  19. Principles of dielectric blood coagulometry as a comprehensive coagulation test.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Brun, Marc-Aurèle; Machida, Kenzo; Nagasawa, Masayuki

    2015-10-01

    Dielectric blood coagulometry (DBCM) is intended to support hemostasis management by providing comprehensive information on blood coagulation from automated, time-dependent measurements of whole blood dielectric spectra. We discuss the relationship between the series of blood coagulation reactions, especially the aggregation and deformation of erythrocytes, and the dielectric response with the help of clot structure electron microscope observations. Dielectric response to the spontaneous coagulation after recalcification presented three distinct phases that correspond to (P1) rouleau formation before the onset of clotting, (P2) erythrocyte aggregation and reconstitution of aggregates accompanying early fibrin formation, and (P3) erythrocyte shape transformation and/or structure changes within aggregates after the stable fibrin network is formed and platelet contraction occurs. Disappearance of the second phase was observed upon addition of tissue factor and ellagic acid for activation of extrinsic and intrinsic pathways, respectively, which is attributable to accelerated thrombin generation. A series of control experiments revealed that the amplitude and/or quickness of dielectric response reflect platelet function, fibrin polymerization, fibrinolysis activity, and heparin activity. Therefore, DBCM sensitively measures blood coagulation via erythrocytes aggregation and shape changes and their impact on the dielectric permittivity, making possible the development of the battery of assays needed for comprehensive coagulation testing. PMID:26368847

  20. Platelets and coagulation in infection

    PubMed Central

    Davis, Rachelle P; Miller-Dorey, Sarah; Jenne, Craig N

    2016-01-01

    Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) is a frequent complication in sepsis that is associated with worse outcomes and higher mortality in patients. In addition to the uncontrolled generation of thrombi throughout the patient's vasculature, DIC often consumes large quantities of clotting factors leaving the patient susceptible to hemorrhaging. Owing to these complications, patients often receive anticoagulants to treat the uncontrolled clotting, often with mixed outcomes. This lack of success with the current array of anticoagulants can be partly explained by the fact that during sepsis clotting is often initiated by the immune system. Systemic inflammation has the capacity to activate and amplify coagulation and, as such, potential therapies for the treatment of sepsis-associated DIC need to address the interaction between inflammation and coagulation. Recent studies have suggested that platelets and neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) are the key mediators of infection-induced coagulation. This review explores current anticoagulant therapies and discusses the development of future therapies to target platelet and NET-mediated coagulation. PMID:27525062

  1. Ultrasonic measurement of milk coagulation time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakkali, F.; Moudden, A.; Faiz, B.; Amghar, A.; Maze, G.; Montero de Espinosa, F.; Akhnak, M.

    2001-12-01

    Using a pulse reflection technique an ultrasonic system has been developed to monitor in situ the coagulation process of rennetted milk. The velocity and attenuation of ultrasonic waves through coagulating milk were continuously monitored. The observed changes in ultrasonic velocity during coagulation were used to predict the coagulation time. The coagulation time is indicative of the transition from the enzymatic phase to the physicochemical phase. The determination of coagulation time has a decisive role in determining the qualities of the end product in cheesemaking.

  2. Ultrasonic detection of photothermal interaction of lasers with tissue using a pulsed Doppler system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ying, Hao; Azeemi, Aamer; Hartley, Craig J.; Motamedi, Massoud; Bell, Brent A.; Rastegar, Sohi; Sheppard, L. C.

    1995-05-01

    Thermal therapy using various heating sources such as lasers or microwaves to destroy benign and malignant lesions has recently gained widespread acceptance. However, the accurate prediction of thermal damage in tissue according to theoretical or computer modeling is difficult and unreliable due to target variability with respect to physical properties, geometry, and blood perfusion. Thus, one of the major obstacles to application of thermal therapies has been the lack of a noninvasive, real-time method that could determine the extent and geometry of treated tissue. To evaluate the effects of laser heating on tissue, we have developed an analog-digital hybrid Doppler ultrasound system to measure the phase and amplitude of ultrasonic echoes returned from the heated tissue. The system consists of an eight-gate pulsed Doppler detector, a 16-channel 12-bit A/D converter, and a signal analysis and visualization software package. In vitro studies using canine liver showed two distinct types of modulation of the echoes along the ultrasound beam path during laser irradiation using an 810 nm diode laser. Type 1 signals showed a small and slow variation in amplitude and phase, and were attributed to tissue coagulation. Type 1 signals showed a small and slow variation in amplitude and phase, and were attributed to tissue coagulation. Type 2 signals showed large and rapid variations in amplitude and phase which usually appeared after tissue surface explosion and were indicative of tissue ablation. We hypothesize that the observed phase changes in type 1 signals are due to thermal effects within the tissue consistent with tissue expansion and contraction while the phase changes in type 2 signals are likely due to formation and motion of gas bubbles in the tissue. A further development of the Doppler ultrasound technique could lead to the generation of feedback information needed for monitoring and automatic control of thermal treatment using various heating modalities such as

  3. The use of microwave tissue fixation to demonstrate the in vivo phosphorylation of an acidic 80,000 molecular weight protein in the rat neocortex following treatment with soman

    SciTech Connect

    Mobley, P.L.; Gonzalez, N.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies were conducted to determine if soman, a cholinesterase inhibitor, could activate the protein kinase C system in the rat neocortex. Using microwave radiation for rapid tissue fixation, it was demonstrated that treatment with soman increased {sup 32}P incorporation into an acidic 80,000 molecular weight, heat-stable protein in vivo. Based on relative molecular weight and isoelectric point this protein appears to be identical to a protein identified as a substrate for protein kinase C. Additionally, a protein of the same molecular weight and isoelectric point could be phosphorylated in tissue slices prepared from the neocortex by cholinergic dependent mechanisms. Also, treatment with soman decreased protein kinase C in the soluble fraction of this brain region; however, no corresponding increase was observed in the particulate fraction. These results suggest that soman can activate protein kinase C in vivo, and demonstrate the utility of using microwave tissue fixation to study protein phosphorylation events in vivo.

  4. Enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, R.C.; Liang, S.; Wang, H.C.; Beuhler, M.D. )

    1994-09-01

    The possible use of enhanced coagulation for arsenic removal was examined at the facilities of a California utility in 1992 and 1993. The tests were conducted at bench, pilot, and demonstration scales, with two source waters. Alum and ferric chloride, with cationic polymer, were investigated at various influence arsenic concentrations. The investigators concluded that for the source waters tested, enhanced coagulation could be effective for arsenic removal and that less ferric chloride than alum, on a weight basis, is needed to achieve the same removal.

  5. Freeze drying reduces the extractability of organochlorine pesticides in fish muscle tissue by microwave-assisted method.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanyan; Lin, Nan; Su, Shu; Shen, Guofeng; Chen, Yuanchen; Yang, Chunli; Li, Wei; Shen, Huizhong; Huang, Ye; Chen, Han; Wang, Xilong; Liu, Wenxin; Tao, Shu

    2014-08-01

    Samples of animal origin are usually dried before solvent extraction for analysis of organic contaminants. The freeze drying technique is preferred for hydrophobic organic compounds in practice. In this study, it was shown that the concentration of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) extracted from fish muscle tissue significantly decreased after the samples were freeze dried. And the reason for this reduced extractability seemed to be the resistance of OCPs associated with freeze-dried muscle protein to solvent extraction. The extractability can be recovered by adding water prior to extraction. It suggests that the dietary exposure risk of OCPs from fish might be underestimated if freeze-dried samples are used. PMID:24838024

  6. Interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate: experimental studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Steger, Adrian C.; Bown, Stephen G.; O'Donoghue, Neil

    1991-07-01

    A percutaneous, low power, interstitial method of controlled tissue coagulation by laser light has been developed and assessed as a possible alternative to existing therapy for benign and malignant prostatic disease. For prostate cancer this technique may be of importance when the tumor volume is small and well defined, particularly as these tumors can increasingly be identified by transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) and are unlikely to have metastasised. The possibility therefore arises of destruction of such small lesions in situ, thereby avoiding the need for radical surgery or radiotherapy. Using the male beagle prostate model, one or more 150-400 micron fibers was implanted within the substance of the prostate through which a Yttrium Aluminum Garnet (YAG) laser energy could be transmitted. Using long exposures and lower powers than used in routine endoscopic laser therapy, well-defined areas of coagulative necrosis could be created without extensive tissue charring or damage to the fiber. For an energy dose of 1000J a lesion approximately 1 cm in diameter results at four days. The ultrasound scanning methods can detect the fiber(s) and the area(s) of coagulation. At 6/52 months following treatment, healing was by fibrosis or cystic degeneration. There were no ill effects on the subjects following coagulation of the prostate. Multiple fiber experiments produced larger volume lesions relevant to more extensive cancer or for the coagulation of benign adenomatous hyperplasia causing outflow symptoms. Ultrasound guided clinical treatments in patients with cutaneous metastases or hepatic and pancreatic tumors have confirmed the experimental results so far obtained. The technique may prove of value for the destruction of early, small, focal tumors of the prostate and for the treatment of moderate benign enlargement. Clinical trial for both benign and malignant disease has commenced.

  7. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-11-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging.

  8. Optical coherence tomography-guided laser microsurgery for blood coagulation with continuous-wave laser diode

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Feng-Yu; Tsai, Meng-Tsan; Wang, Zu-Yi; Chi, Chun-Kai; Lee, Cheng-Kuang; Yang, Chih-Hsun; Chan, Ming-Che; Lee, Ya-Ju

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation is the clotting and subsequent dissolution of the clot following repair to the damaged tissue. However, inducing blood coagulation is difficult for some patients with homeostasis dysfunction or during surgery. In this study, we proposed a method to develop an integrated system that combines optical coherence tomography (OCT) and laser microsurgery for blood coagulation. Also, an algorithm for positioning of the treatment location from OCT images was developed. With OCT scanning, 2D/3D OCT images and angiography of tissue can be obtained simultaneously, enabling to noninvasively reconstruct the morphological and microvascular structures for real-time monitoring of changes in biological tissues during laser microsurgery. Instead of high-cost pulsed lasers, continuous-wave laser diodes (CW-LDs) with the central wavelengths of 450 nm and 532 nm are used for blood coagulation, corresponding to higher absorption coefficients of oxyhemoglobin and deoxyhemoglobin. Experimental results showed that the location of laser exposure can be accurately controlled with the proposed approach of imaging-based feedback positioning. Moreover, blood coagulation can be efficiently induced by CW-LDs and the coagulation process can be monitored in real-time with OCT. This technology enables to potentially provide accurate positioning for laser microsurgery and control the laser exposure to avoid extra damage by real-time OCT imaging. PMID:26568136

  9. Microwave diagnostics of atmospheric plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, David

    Plasma treatment of biological tissues has tremendous potential due to the wide range of applications. Most plasmas have gas temperatures which greatly exceed room temperature. These are often utilized in electro-surgery for cutting and coagulating tissue. Another type of plasma, referred to as cold atmospheric plasma, or CAP, is characterized by heavy particle temperatures which are at or near room temperature. Due to this lack of thermal effect, CAP may provide less invasive medical procedures. Additionally, CAP have been demonstrated to be effective at targeting cancer cells while minimizing damage to the surrounding tissue. A recently fabricated Microwave Electron Density Device (MEDD) utilizes microwave scattering on small atmospheric plasmas to determine the electron plasma density. The MEDD can be utilized on plasmas which range from a fraction of a millimeter to several centimeters at atmospheric pressure when traditional methods cannot be applied. Microwave interferometry fails due to the small size of the plasma relative to the microwave wavelength which leads to diffraction and negligible phase change; electrostatic probes introduce very strong perturbation and are associated with difficulties of application in strongly-collisional atmospheric conditions; and laser Thomson scattering is not sensitive enough to measure plasma densities less than 1012 cm-3. The first part of this dissertation provides an overview of two types of small atmospheric plasma objects namely CAPs and plasmas utilized in the electro-surgery. It then goes on to describe the fabrication, testing and calibration of the MEDD facility. The second part of this dissertation is focused on the application of the MEDD and other diagnostic techniques to both plasma objects. A series of plasma images that illustrate the temporal evolution of a discharge created by an argon electrosurgical device operating in the coagulation mode and its behavior was analyzed. The discharge of the argon

  10. Gene Therapy for Coagulation Disorders.

    PubMed

    Swystun, Laura L; Lillicrap, David

    2016-04-29

    Molecular genetic details of the human coagulation system were among the first successes of the genetic revolution in the 1980s. This information led to new molecular diagnostic strategies for inherited disorders of hemostasis and the development of recombinant clotting factors for the treatment of the common inherited bleeding disorders. A longer term goal of this knowledge has been the establishment of gene transfer to provide continuing access to missing or defective hemostatic proteins. Because of the relative infrequency of inherited coagulation factor disorders and the availability of safe and effective alternative means of management, the application of gene therapy for these conditions has been slow to realize clinical application. Nevertheless, the tools for effective and safe gene transfer are now much improved, and we have started to see examples of clinical gene therapy successes. Leading the way has been the use of adeno-associated virus-based strategies for factor IX gene transfer in hemophilia B. Several small phase 1/2 clinical studies using this approach have shown prolonged expression of therapeutically beneficial levels of factor IX. Nevertheless, before the application of gene therapy for coagulation disorders becomes widespread, several obstacles need to be overcome. Immunologic responses to the vector and transgenic protein need to be mitigated, and production strategies for clinical grade vectors require enhancements. There is little doubt that with the development of more efficient and facile strategies for genome editing and the application of other nucleic acid-based approaches to influence the coagulation system, the future of genetic therapies for hemostasis is bright. PMID:27126652

  11. Coagulation Changes During Graded Orhostatic Stress and Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goswami, Nandu; Cvirn, Gerhard; Schlagenhauf, Aaxel; Leschnik, Bettina; Koestenberger, Martin; Roessler, Andreas; Jantscher, Andreas; Waha, James Elvis; Wolf, Sabine; Vrecko, Karoline; Juergens, Guenther; Hinghofer-Szalkay, Helmut

    2013-02-01

    Background: Orthostatic stress has been introduced as a novel paradigm for activating the coagulation system. We examined whether graded orthostatic stress (using head up tilt, HUT + lower body negative pressure, LBNP) until presyncope leads to anti / pro-coagulatory changes and how rapidly they return to baseline during recovery. Methodology: Eight male subjects were enrolled in this study. Presyncopal runs were carried out using HUT + LBNP. At minute zero, the tilt table was brought from 0° (supine) to 70 ° head-up position for 4 min, after which pressure in the LBNP chamber was reduced to -15, -30, and -45 mm Hg every 4 min. At presyncope, the subjects were returned to supine position. Coagulatory responses and plasma mass density (for volume changes) were measured before, during and 20 min after the orthostatic stress. Whole blood coagulation was examined by means of thrombelastometry. Platelet aggregation in whole blood was examined by using impedance aggregometry. Thrombin generation parameters, prothrombin levels, and markers of endothelial activation were measured in plasma samples. Results: At presyncope, plasma volume was 20 % below the initial supine value. Blood cell counts, prothrombin levels, thrombin peak, endogenous thrombin potential (ETP), and tissue factor pathway inhibitor (TFPI) levels increased during the protocol, commensurate with hemoconcentration. The markers of endothelial activation (tissue factor, TF, tissue plasminogen activator, t-PA) and the markers of thrombin generation (Prothrombin fragments 1 and 2, F1+2, and thrombin-antithrombin complex, TAT) increased significantly. During recovery, all the coagulation parameters returned to initial supine values except F1 +2 and TAT. Conclusion: Head-up tilt/LBNP leads to activation of the coagulation system. Some of the markers of thrombin formation are still at higher than supine levels during recovery.

  12. Comparison of coagulation performance and floc properties using a novel zirconium coagulant against traditional ferric and alum coagulants.

    PubMed

    Jarvis, Peter; Sharp, Emma; Pidou, Marc; Molinder, Roger; Parsons, Simon A; Jefferson, Bruce

    2012-09-01

    Coagulation in drinking water treatment has relied upon iron (Fe) and aluminium (Al) salts throughout the last century to provide the bulk removal of contaminants from source waters containing natural organic matter (NOM). However, there is now a need for improved treatment of these waters as their quality deteriorates and water quality standards become more difficult to achieve. Alternative coagulant chemicals offer a simple and inexpensive way of doing this. In this work a novel zirconium (Zr) coagulant was compared against traditional Fe and Al coagulants. The Zr coagulant was able to provide between 46 and 150% lower dissolved organic carbon (DOC) residual in comparison to the best traditional coagulant (Fe). In addition floc properties were significantly improved with larger and stronger flocs forming when the Zr coagulant was used with the median floc sizes being 930 μm for Zr; 710 μm for Fe and 450 μm for Al. In pilot scale experiments, a similar improved NOM and particle removal was observed. The results show that when optimised for combined DOC removal and low residual turbidity, the Zr coagulant out-performed the other coagulants tested at both bench and pilot scale. PMID:22627114

  13. Microwave Ovens

    MedlinePlus

    ... Required Reports for the Microwave Oven Manufacturers or Industry Exemption from Certain Reporting and Recordkeeping Requirements for ... Microwave Ovens (PDF) (PDF - 2.5MB) FDA eSubmitter Industry Guidance - Documents of Interest Notifications to Industry (PDF ...

  14. [Cellular model of blood coagulation process].

    PubMed

    Bijak, Michał; Rzeźnicka, Paulina; Saluk, Joanna; Nowak, Paweł

    2015-07-01

    Blood coagulation is a process which main objective is the prevention of blood loss when the integrity of the blood vessel is damaged. Over the years, have been presented a number of concepts characterizing the mechanism of thrombus formation. Since the 60s of last century was current cascade model of the coagulation wherein forming of the fibrin clot is determined by two pathways called extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. In the nineties of the last century Monroe and Hoffman presented his concept of blood coagulation process which complement the currently valid model of cells participation especially of blood platelets which aim is to provide a negatively charged phospholipid surface and thereby allow the coagulation enzymatic complexes formation. Developed conception they called cellular model of coagulation. The aim of this work was to present in details of this blood coagulation, including descriptions of its various phases. PMID:26277170

  15. A `triangle' of interconnected coagulation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovski, P. B.

    1999-02-01

    A number of new coagulation models depending on a parameter is derived. The dependence is considered in two different ways. If the parameter takes its maximal value then in the first case we obtain a new discrete kinetic equation. We demonstrate that its continuous version is simply the Oort-Hulst's coagulation model. In the second case, the maximum of the corresponding parameter yields the Smoluchowski coagulation equation. At the minimal values of both parameters we arrive at another new kinetic equation. These three models form a `triangle' connecting the two known coagulation equations `situated' in its vertexes (Smoluchowski and Oort-Hulst equations) via an alteration of the parameters. Also, a comparative analysis of these three models is presented. As an advantage of the Oort-Hulst approach we compute the coagulation front and establish a connection between the infringement of the mass conservation law and convergence of the coagulation front to infinity.

  16. Usefulness of human coagulation and fibrinolysis assays in domestic pigs.

    PubMed

    Münster, Anna-Marie Bloch; Olsen, Aage Kristian; Bladbjerg, Else-Marie

    2002-02-01

    Pigs are often used as animal models in research on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis. The usefulness of the assays applied within this field, and the knowledge of reference intervals are therefore essential and of utmost importance. In the study reported here, we investigated the applicability of commercial human coagulation and fibrinolysis assays for use with porcine plasma. In total, 22 functional and immunologic assays were applied to plasma obtained from domestic pigs, and the following blood coagulation and fibrinolysis variables were measured: prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, factor VII, protein C, protein S, prothrombin fragment 1+2, antithrombin, thrombin-antithrombin complexes, fibrinogen, soluble fibrin, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, plasmin inhibitor, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1, and D-dimer. We found that 11 of 12 functional assays, but only 3 of 10 immunoassays, were applicable to porcine plasma, and we determined the normal range of these variables. We conclude that human functional assays are useful in porcine plasma, whereas only a few immunologic assays can be used. However, precautions must be taken in interpretation of the results and in extrapolation toward human results because possible differences between porcine and human values can be due to species variations and/or methodologic errors. PMID:11900411

  17. The role of coagulation/fibrinolysis during Streptococcus pyogenes infection

    PubMed Central

    Loof, Torsten G.; Deicke, Christin; Medina, Eva

    2014-01-01

    The hemostatic system comprises platelet aggregation, coagulation and fibrinolysis and is a host defense mechanism that protects the integrity of the vascular system after tissue injury. During bacterial infections, the coagulation system cooperates with the inflammatory system to eliminate the invading pathogens. However, pathogenic bacteria have frequently evolved mechanisms to exploit the hemostatic system components for their own benefit. Streptococcus pyogenes, also known as Group A Streptococcus, provides a remarkable example of the extraordinary capacity of pathogens to exploit the host hemostatic system to support microbial survival and dissemination. The coagulation cascade comprises the contact system (also known as the intrinsic pathway) and the tissue factor pathway (also known as the extrinsic pathway), both leading to fibrin formation. During the early phase of S. pyogenes infection, the activation of the contact system eventually leads to bacterial entrapment within a fibrin clot, where S. pyogenes is immobilized and killed. However, entrapped S. pyogenes can circumvent the antimicrobial effect of the clot by sequestering host plasminogen on the bacterial cell surface that, after conversion into its active proteolytic form, plasmin, degrades the fibrin network and facilitates the liberation of S. pyogenes from the clot. Furthermore, the surface-localized fibrinolytic activity also cleaves a variety of extracellular matrix proteins, thereby enabling S. pyogenes to migrate across barriers and disseminate within the host. This review summarizes the knowledge gained during the last two decades on the role of coagulation/fibrinolysis in host defense against S. pyogenes as well as the strategies developed by this pathogen to evade and exploit these host mechanisms for its own benefit. PMID:25309880

  18. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  19. Transcatheter Antenna For Microwave Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Karasack, Vincent G. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Pieper, Carl F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 Gigahertz and 12 Gigahertz is applied to monopole microwave radiation having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may he used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  20. Coagulative and ablative characteristics of a novel diode laser system (1470nm) for endonasal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betz, C. S.; Havel, M.; Janda, P.; Leunig, A.; Sroka, R.

    2008-02-01

    Introduction: Being practical, efficient and inexpensive, fibre guided diode laser systems are preferable over others for endonasal applications. A new medical 1470 nm diode laser system is expected to offer good ablative and coagulative tissue effects. Methods: The new 1470 nm diode laser system was compared to a conventional 940 nm system with regards to laser tissue effects (ablation, coagulation, carbonization zones) in an ex vivo setup using fresh liver and muscle tissue. The laser fibres were fixed to a computer controlled stepper motor, and the light was applied using comparable power settings and a reproducible procedure under constant conditions. Clinical efficacy and postoperative morbidity was evaluated in two groups of 10 patients undergoing laser coagulation therapy of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. Results: In the experimental setup, the 1470 nm laser diode system proved to be more efficient in inducing tissue effects with an energy factor of 2-3 for highly perfused hepatic tissue to 30 for muscular tissue. In the clinical case series, the higher efficacy of the 1470 nm diode laser system led to reduced energy settings as compared to the conventional system with comparable clinical results. Postoperative crusting was less pronounced in the 1470 nm laser group. Conclusion: The 1470 nm diode laser system offers a highly efficient alternative to conventional diode laser systems for the coagulation of hyperplastic nasal turbinates. According to the experimental results it can be furthermore expected that it disposes of an excellent surgical potential with regards to its cutting abilities.

  1. Virus inactivation in aluminum and polyaluminum coagulation.

    PubMed

    Matsui, Yoshihiko; Matsushita, Taku; Sakuma, Satoru; Gojo, Takahito; Mamiya, Teppei; Suzuoki, Hiroshi; Inoue, Takanobu

    2003-11-15

    Inorganic aluminum salts, such as aluminum sulfate, are coagulants that cause small particles, such as bacteria and viruses as well as inorganic particles, to destabilize and combine into larger aggregates. In this investigation, batch coagulation treatments of water samples spiked with Qbeta, MS2, T4, and P1 viruses were conducted with four different aluminum coagulants. The total infectious virus concentration in the suspension of floc particles that eventually formed by dosing with coagulant was measured after the floc particles were dissolved by raising the pH with an alkaline beef extract solution. The virus concentrations were extremely reduced after the water samples were dosed with aluminum coagulants. Viruses mixed with and adsorbed onto preformed aluminum hydroxide floc were, however, completely recovered after the floc dissolution. These results indicated that the aluminum coagulation process inactivates viruses. Virucidal activity was most prominent with the prehydrolyzed aluminum salt coagulant, polyaluminum chloride (PACl). Virucidal activity was lower in river water than in ultrapure water--natural organic matter in the river water depressed the virucidal activity. Mechanisms and kinetics of the virus inactivation were discussed. Our results suggest that intermediate polymers formed during hydrolysis of the aluminum coagulants sorbed strongly to viruses, either rendering them inactive or preventing infectivity. PMID:14655704

  2. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  3. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  4. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  5. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices § 864.5400 Coagulation instrument. (a) Identification. A coagulation instrument is an automated...

  6. Textile wastewater purification through natural coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Rodríguez-Sánchez, M. T.

    2011-09-01

    A new coagulant obtained through polymerization of Acacia mearnsii de Wild tannin extract has been characterized in the removal of two dangerous dye pollutants: Alizarin Violet 3R and Palatine Fast Black WAN. This coagulant is lab-synthesized according to the etherification of tannins with glycidyltrimethylammonium chloride and formaldehyde and its performance in dye removal in terms of efficiency was high. Reasonably low coagulant dosages (ca. 50 mg L-1) reaches high capacity levels (around 0.8 for Alizarin Violet 3R and 1.6 for Palatine Fast Black WAN mg dye mg-1 of coagulant) and pH and temperature are not extremely affecting variables. The systems coagulant dyes were successfully modeled by applying the Langmuir hypothesis. q max and b parameters were obtained with an adjusted correlation factor ( r 2) above 0.8.

  7. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    McEachron, Troy A; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L; Church, Frank C; Mackman, Nigel

    2010-12-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  8. Protease-activated receptors mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis

    PubMed Central

    McEachron, Troy A.; Pawlinski, Rafal; Richards, Kristy L.; Church, Frank C.

    2010-01-01

    The coagulation and fibrinolytic systems contribute to malignancy by increasing angiogenesis, tumor growth, tumor invasion, and tumor metastasis. Oncogenic transformation increases the expression of tissue factor (TF) that results in local generation of coagulation proteases and activation of protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR-2. We compared the PAR-dependent expression of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) and plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI)-1 in 2 murine mammary adencocarcinoma cell lines: metastatic 4T1 cells and nonmetastatic 67NR cells. 4T1 cells expressed TF, PAR-1 and PAR-2 whereas 67NR cells expressed TF and PAR-1. We also silenced PAR-1 or PAR-2 expression in the 4T1 cells. We discovered 2 distinct mechanisms for PAR-dependent expression of uPA and PAI-1. First, we found that factor Xa or thrombin activation of PAR-1 led to a rapid release of stored intracellular uPA into the culture supernatant. Second, thrombin transactivation of a PAR-1/PAR-2 complex resulted in increases in PAI-1 mRNA and protein expression. Cells lacking PAR-2 failed to express PAI-1 in response to thrombin and factor Xa did not activate the PAR-1/PAR-2 complex. Our results reveal how PAR-1 and PAR-2 on tumor cells mediate crosstalk between coagulation and fibrinolysis. PMID:20736455

  9. Interstitial laser coagulation therapy for benign prostatic hyperplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNicholas, Thomas A.; Alsudani, Mohammed

    1996-05-01

    Alternatives to the side-firing laser method include controlled destruction of prostatic adenoma by an atraumatic saline cooled laser fiber introduced endoscopically into the prostate under visual and transrectal ultrasound (TRUS) control. Laser light produces intense heating and interstitial laser coagulation (ILC) occurs with characteristic TRUS changes which are used to control the volume of tissue destruction. The prostatic urethral lining is preserved which may reduce laser side effects). Thirty-six men with symptomatic BPH were treated by ILC between April 1994 and September 1995. All were discharged home on the first post-operative day and reviewed periodically to 12 months post-treatment with measurement of IPSS, flow rate (FR), residual volume, complications, potency and TRUS. Seventeen men (47%) voided immediately, 15 (42%) performed intermittent self-catheterization (ISC) for 3.5 days (2 - 5). Four men (11%) required catheterization for 1/52. Thirty-five men tolerated the treatment well, requiring only mild oral analgesia. One man developed dysuria and required early transurethral resection revealing a large volume of coagulative necrosis. Improvement in symptoms and flow rate developed from 1 - 30 days later. There were no significant complications. Hyperechoic and cystic zones developed at the ILC site which persisted to 12 months. This clinical study indicates the feasibility and safety of intense heating by ILC with visible and ultrasound control to coagulate the adenoma while preserving the urethra. Changes are easily seen on TRUS, symptomatic improvement is good and there have been minimal urethral symptoms or complications.

  10. Blood coagulation reactions on nanoscale membrane surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pureza, Vincent S.

    Blood coagulation requires the assembly of several membrane-bound protein complexes composed of regulatory and catalytic subunits. The biomembranes involved in these reactions not only provide a platform for these procoagulant proteins, but can also affect their function. Increased exposure of acidic phospholipids on the outer leaflet of the plasma membrane can dramatically modulate the catalytic efficiencies of such membrane-bound enzymes. Under physiologic conditions, however, these phospholipids spontaneously cluster into a patchwork of membrane microdomains upon which membrane binding proteins may preferentially assemble. As a result, the membrane composition surrounding these proteins is largely unknown. Through the development and use of a nanometer-scale bilayer system that provides rigorous control of the phospholipid membrane environment, I investigated the role of phosphatidylserine, an acidic phospholipid, in the direct vicinity (within nanometers) of two critical membrane-bound procoagulant protein complexes and their respective natural substrates. Here, I present how the assembly and function of the tissue factor˙factor VIIa and factor Va˙factor Xa complexes, the first and final cofactor˙enzyme complexes of the blood clotting cascade, respectively, are mediated by changes in their immediate phospholipid environments.

  11. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  12. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  13. Coagulation problems in human pregnancy.

    PubMed Central

    Redman, C. W.

    1979-01-01

    Coagulation problems in pregnancy are primarily associated with overactivity of the intrinsic clotting system. This accounts for the increased incidence of thrombo-embolism during pregnancy. Where specific obstetric complications cause clotting problems the common underlying feature is usually placental pathology as in abruptio placentae, pre-eclampsia or hydatidiform mole. Abnormal activation of the clotting system is an early, and occasionally the first detectable feature of pre-eclampsia, but there is no evidence that this is a primary change. Therefore the role of anticoagulant treatment in the management of pre-eclampsia remains questionable. A new test for estimating factor VIII consumption is proving to be a sensitive index of early activation of the clotting system and can be used for the diagnosis of early pre-eclampsia. PMID:382170

  14. Enhanced coagulation for high alkalinity and micro-polluted water: the third way through coagulant optimization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Mingquan; Wang, Dongsheng; Qu, Jiuhui; Ni, Jinren; Chow, Christopher W K

    2008-04-01

    Conventional coagulation is not an effective treatment option to remove natural organic matter (NOM) in water with high alkalinity/pH. For this type of water, enhanced coagulation is currently proposed as one of the available treatment options and is implemented by acidifying the raw water and applying increased doses of hydrolyzing coagulants. Both of these methods have some disadvantages such as increasing the corrosive tendency of water and increasing cost of treatment. In this paper, an improved version of enhanced coagulation through coagulant optimization to treat this kind of water is demonstrated. A novel coagulant, a composite polyaluminum chloride (HPAC), was developed with both the advantages of polyaluminum chloride (PACl) and the additive coagulant aids: PACl contains significant amounts of highly charged and stable polynuclear aluminum hydrolysis products, which is less affected by the pH of the raw water than traditional coagulants (alum and ferric salts); the additives can enhance both the charge neutralization and bridging abilities of PACl. HPAC exhibited 30% more efficiency than alum and ferric salts in dissolved organic carbon (DOC) removal and was very effective in turbidity removal. This result was confirmed by pilot-scale testing, where particles and organic matter were removed synergistically with HPAC as coagulant by sequential water treatment steps including pre-ozonation, coagulation, flotation and sand filtration. PMID:18206207

  15. Stability, sterility, coagulation, and immunologic studies of salmon coagulation proteins with potential use for mammalian wound healing and cell engineering.

    PubMed

    Laidmäe, Ivo; McCormick, Margaret E; Herod, Julia L; Pastore, Jennifer J; Salum, Tiit; Sawyer, Evelyn S; Janmey, Paul A; Uibo, Raivo

    2006-12-01

    Fibrin sealants made by polymerization of fibrinogen activated by the protease thrombin have many applications in hemostasis and wound healing. In treatments of acute injury or surgical wounds, concentrated fibrin preparations mimic the initial matrix that normally prevents bleeding and acts as a scaffold for cells that initiate tissue repair. However risks of infectious disease, immunogenic reaction, and the high cost of purified human or other mammalian blood proteins limit widespread use of these materials. Purified coagulation proteins from Atlantic salmon represent a potentially safer, equally effective, and less costly alternative in part because of the low ambient temperature of these farmed animals and the absence of endogenous agents known to be infectious in mammalian hosts. This study reports rheologic measurements of lyophilized salmon fibrinogen and thrombin that demonstrate stability to prolonged storage and gamma irradiation sufficient to reduce viral loads by over five orders of magnitude. Coagulation and immunologic studies in rats and rabbits treated intraperitoneally with salmon fibrin show no deleterious effects on coagulation profiles and no cross reactivity with host fibrinogen or thrombin. The results support the potential of salmon fibrin as an alternative to mammalian proteins in clinical applications. PMID:16919721

  16. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    Recent studies have resulted in the development of a novel agglomeration process for upgrading ultrafine coal. This process, which is known as selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC), is based on the new finding that hydrophobic coal particles can be selectively coagulated in the presence of dispersed mineral matter. The driving force for the coagulation is believed to be due to the structural arrangement of water molecules near the coal surface. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of the coal particles and (2) effectively disperse the particles of mineral matter. During the past quarter, several important aspects of the SHC process were examined. Direct measurements of the surface forces which control the selective coagulation process were conducted using a Mark 4 surface force apparatus. These preliminary measurements have provided irrefutable evidence for the existence of the hydrophobic force. Key expressions have been presented for a population balance model describing the hydrophobic coagulation process. In order to validate this model, experimental measurements of the size distributions of coal coagulation have been initiated. The liberation characteristics of samples obtained from the Elkhorn No. 3 and Pittsburgh No. 8 coal seams were determined using a SEM-IPS image processing system. Mixing studies were carried out to determine the effects of mixer-impeller configurations on the coagula size distributions. Bench-scale continuous testing has also been initiated during the past quarter using a rotating drum screen and sedimentation tank. 25 figs., 8 tabs.

  17. Transfusion and coagulation management in liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Clevenger, Ben; Mallett, Susan V

    2014-05-28

    There is wide variation in the management of coagulation and blood transfusion practice in liver transplantation. The use of blood products intraoperatively is declining and transfusion free transplantations take place ever more frequently. Allogenic blood products have been shown to increase morbidity and mortality. Primary haemostasis, coagulation and fibrinolysis are altered by liver disease. This, combined with intraoperative disturbances of coagulation, increases the risk of bleeding. Meanwhile, the rebalancing of coagulation homeostasis can put patients at risk of hypercoagulability and thrombosis. The application of the principles of patient blood management to transplantation can reduce the risk of transfusion. This includes: preoperative recognition and treatment of anaemia, reduction of perioperative blood loss and the use of restrictive haemoglobin based transfusion triggers. The use of point of care coagulation monitoring using whole blood viscoelastic testing provides a picture of the complete coagulation process by which to guide and direct coagulation management. Pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include the use of anti-fibrinolytic drugs to reduce fibrinolysis, and rarely, the use of recombinant factor VIIa. Factor concentrates are increasingly used; fibrinogen concentrates to improve clot strength and stability, and prothrombin complex concentrates to improve thrombin generation. Non-pharmacological methods to reduce blood loss include surgical utilisation of the piggyback technique and maintenance of a low central venous pressure. The use of intraoperative cell salvage and normovolaemic haemodilution reduces allogenic blood transfusion. Further research into methods of decreasing blood loss and alternatives to blood transfusion remains necessary to continue to improve outcomes after transplantation. PMID:24876736

  18. Hi-tech of the prostate: interstitial laser coagulation of benign prostatic hypertrophy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muschter, Rolf; Hofstetter, Alfons G.; Hessel, Stefan F. F.; Keiditsch, Ernst; Rothenberger, Karl-Heinz; Schneede, Peter; Frank, Klaus H.

    1992-06-01

    We report on the new technique of interstitial laser coagulation of the prostate (ILCP) in the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Basic experiments by use of a Nd:YAG laser in combination with a newly designed fiber tip homogeneously distributing the laser irradiation have been performed in potato, muscle, liver, and surgically removed human BPH-tissue to determine the volume of coagulation. The coagulation zone surrounding the probe was well defined and homogeneous. The size was dependent on laser power and irradiation time. Carbonization was never present except in darker tissues irradiated with high energy. Volume and time resolved measurements correlated well with the size of coagulation. 10 W and 5 minutes, for example, resulted in a coagulation zone of 17 X 15 mm. Comparable results have been seen in in-vivo experiments in surgically exposed canine prostates. Specimen for macroscopic and microscopic examination were taken immediately after treatment and after 5 and 35 days. The well demarked coagulation necrosis of the early stage resulted in cystic degeneration and fibrosis in the later stages. This was combined with shrinkage and reduction in volume. The urothelium of the urethra, the external sphincter and the rectum showed no damage. Until now, 15 patients suffering from obstructive symptoms due to BPH have been treated with interstitial laser coagulation. The probes were inserted from the perineum into the center of each lateral lobe of the prostate by transrectal ultrasound guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic guidance, while the median lobe was treated by urethroscopic control. Dependent on the size of the prostate irradiation, time was 5 to 10 minutes per lobe at a power setting of 5 to 10 W.

  19. Targeting the coagulation factor fibrinogen for arthritis therapy.

    PubMed

    Raghu, Harini; Flick, Matthew J

    2011-09-01

    Fibrinogen is a provisional matrix protein of the coagulation system that following proteolytic cleavage by the protease thrombin polymerizes to form fibrin, the structural basis of the blood clot. Fibrin polymer formation at sites of vessel injury is critical to normal hemostasis. However, fibrin deposition within damaged tissues is also a common pathological feature of inflammatory diseases, including rheumatoid arthritis. Fibrin deposition has been readily detected along articular surfaces, within inflamed hyperplastic synovial tissue, and as a component of insoluble "rice bodies" within the synovial fluid of arthritic joints. Recent data has suggested that fibrin deposition within inflamed tissues is not simply a reflection of a disease process but rather actively contributes to disease pathogenesis. One mechanism that has been demonstrated to directly link fibrin(ogen) to the regulation of inflammation is the ability of fibrin(ogen) to serve as a ligand for cell-surface receptors, particularly integrins. Indeed, engagement of fibrin(ogen) by the leukocyte integrin receptor αMβ2 appears to be a common and fundamental event driving local inflammation. Recent studies have demonstrated that eliminating fibrin(ogen)-αMβ2 interactions can significantly limit the progression of multiple inflammatory diseases, including arthritis, without compromising the ability of fibrinogen to function in coagulation. These exciting findings have opened the door to new opportunities for targeting fibrinogen as an inflammatory mediator while leaving intact its hemostatic properties. PMID:21401516

  20. The singular coagulation equation with multiple fragmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saha, Jitraj; Kumar, Jitendra

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we prove the global existence and uniqueness of the solutions to the initial-value problem for the coagulation-fragmentation equation with singular coagulation kernel and multiple fragmentation kernel. The solution obtained in this case also satisfies the mass conservation law. The proof is based on strong convergence methods applied to suitably chosen unbounded coagulation kernels having singularities in both the coordinate axes and satisfying certain growth conditions, which can possibly reach up to a quadratic growth at infinity, and the fragmentation kernel covers a very large class of unbounded functions.

  1. Coagulation and fragmentation with discrete mass loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blair, Pamela N.; Lamb, Wilson; Stewart, Iain W.

    2007-05-01

    A nonlinear integro-differential equation that models a coagulation and multiple fragmentation process in which discrete fragmentation mass loss can occur is examined using the theory of strongly continuous semigroups of operators. Under the assumptions that the coagulation kernel is bounded and the fragmentation rate function a satisfies a linear growth condition, global existence and uniqueness of solutions that lose mass in accordance with the model are established. In the case when no coagulation is present and the fragmentation process is governed by power-law kernels, an explicit formula is given for the substochastic semigroup associated with the resulting mass-loss fragmentation equation.

  2. Acute Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation in Neuroendocrine Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Teh, Ru-Wen; Tsoi, Daphne T.

    2012-01-01

    Malignancy is a common cause of disseminated intravascular coagulation and usually presents as a chronic disorder in solid organ tumours. We present a rare case of recurrent acute disseminated intravascular coagulation in neuroendocrine carcinoma after manipulation, firstly, by core biopsy and, later, by cytotoxic therapy causing a release of procoagulants and cytokines from lysed tumour cells. This is reminiscent of tumour lysis syndrome where massive quantities of intracellular electrolytes and nucleic acid are released, causing acute metabolic imbalance and renal failure. This case highlights the potential complication of acute disseminated intravascular coagulation after trauma to malignant cells. PMID:23139666

  3. Endosulfan activates the extrinsic coagulation pathway by inducing endothelial cell injury in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lianshuang; Wei, Jialiu; Guo, Fangzi; Duan, Junchao; Li, Yanbo; Shi, Zhixiong; Yang, Yumei; Zhou, Xianqing; Sun, Zhiwei

    2015-10-01

    Endosulfan, a persistent organic pollutant, is widely used in agriculture as a pesticide. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the blood toxicity of different doses of endosulfan in Wistar rats. The experimental sample was composed of four groups, a control group that did not receive endosulfan and three endosulfan-exposed groups that respectively received 1, 5, or 10 mg/kg/day (doses below LD50), of endosulfan for 21 days. The results showed that endosulfan significantly decreased the prothrombin time (PT) and upregulated the activated coagulation factors VIIa, Xa, and XIIIa; thrombin-antithrombin complex (TAT); and P-selectin. Plasma levels of tissue factor (TF) and malondialdehyde (MDA) were increased in the endosulfan groups. The activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) and the level of activated coagulation factor IXa showed no obvious changes. Immunohistochemical results showed increased expression of von Willebrand factor (vWF) and the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1β in the groups exposed to endosulfan. The pathology and electron microscopy results showed impaired vascular tissue accompanied by the exfoliation of endothelial cells and mitochondrial damage in the endosulfan-exposed groups. In summary, our results suggest that endosulfan damages endothelial cells via oxidative stress and the inflammatory response, leading to the release of TF and vWF into the blood. The TF and vWF in the blood may activate extrinsic coagulation factors and platelets, thus triggering the extrinsic coagulation pathway. There were no obvious effects on the intrinsic coagulation pathway. PMID:26028348

  4. A theoretical comparison of energy sources--microwave, ultrasound and laser--for interstitial thermal therapy.

    PubMed

    Skinner, M G; Iizuka, M N; Kolios, M C; Sherar, M D

    1998-12-01

    A number of heating sources are available for minimally invasive thermal therapy of tumours. The purpose of this work was to compare, theoretically, the heating characteristics of interstitial microwave, laser and ultrasound sources in three tissue sites: breast, brain and liver. Using a numerical method, the heating patterns, temperature profiles and expected volumes of thermal damage were calculated during standard treatment times with the condition that tissue temperatures were not permitted to rise above 100 degrees C (to ensure tissue vaporization did not occur). Ideal spherical and cylindrical applicators (200 microm and 800 microm radii respectively) were modelled for each energy source to demonstrate the relative importance of geometry and energy attenuation in determining heating and thermal damage profiles. The theoretical model included the effects of the collapse of perfusion due to heating. Heating patterns were less dependent on the energy source when small spherical applicators were modelled than for larger cylindrical applicators due to the very rapid geometrical decrease in energy with distance for the spherical applicators. For larger cylindrical applicators, the energy source was of greater importance. In this case, the energy source with the lowest attenuation coefficient was predicted to produce the largest volume of thermally coagulated tissue, in each tissue site. PMID:9869030

  5. Effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency of coagulants recovery by acidification.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Jui; Wang, Wen-May; Wei, Ming-Jun; Chen, Jiann-Long; He, Ju-Liang; Chiang, Kung-Yuh; Wu, Chih-Chao

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of Al-coagulant sludge characteristics on the efficiency ofcoagulant recovery by acidification with H2SO4. Two sludge characteristics were studied: types of coagulant and textures of the suspended solid in raw water. The coagulant types are aluminium sulphate and polyaluminium chloride (PACl); the textures of the suspended solid are sand-based and clay-based. Efficiency of aluminium recovery at a pH of 2 was compared for different sludges obtained from water treatment plants in Taiwan. The results showed that efficiency of aluminium recovery from sludge containing clayey particles was higher than that from sludge containing sandy particles. As for the effect of coagulant types, the aluminium recovery efficiency for sludge using PACl ranged between 77% and 100%, whereas it ranged between 65% and 72% for sludge using aluminium sulphate as the coagulant. This means using PACl as the coagulant could result in higher recovery efficiency of coagulant and be beneficial for water treatment plants where renewable materials and waste reduction as the factors for making decisions regarding plant operations. However, other metals, such as manganese, could be released with aluminium during the acidification process and limit the use of the recovered coagulants. It is suggested that the recovered coagulants be used in wastewater treatment processes. PMID:23437650

  6. Disseminated intravascular coagulation after multiple honeybee stings.

    PubMed

    V, Dharma Rao; Bodepudi, Sravan Kumar; Krishna, Murali

    2014-01-01

    Honeybee venom contains apitoxin which can cause anaphylaxis, cardiovascular collapse and death. Disseminated intravascular coagulation is rare following honeybee stings. We describe the case of a farmer who developed this complication. PMID:25668084

  7. ARSENIC REMOVAL BY SOFTENING AND COAGULATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Drinking water regulations for arsenic (As) and disinfection by-product precursor materials (measured as TOC) are becoming increasingly stringent. Among the modifications to conventional treatment that can improve removal of As and TOC, precipitative softening and coagulation are...

  8. Toward a better understanding of coagulation for dissolved organic nitrogen using polymeric zinc-iron-phosphate coagulant.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guocheng; Wang, Qian; Yin, Jun; Li, Zhongwu; Zhang, Peng; Ren, Bozhi; Fan, Gongduan; Wan, Peng

    2016-09-01

    The increase of agricultural related activities and the lack of effective waste control has led to an increase of organic nitrogen in water. The development of coagulants to effectively remove dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) is a high priority in the water treatment industry. We developed a polymeric zinc-iron-phosphate (ZnFeP) coagulant and investigated its coagulation effect on DON removal. Optimum coagulant for coagulation for DON and TDN removals was characterized by the dense convex-concave packing structure differing from other zinc-based coagulant, polycrystalline structure and high content colloidal species, which could account up to 87% of the total colloidal species. Coagulation experiments showed the DON removal rate to vary greatly depending on principal components and their interaction with metals, phosphate and hydroxyl. DON removal efficiency increased with the increase of colloidal species. The coagulation was also dependent on coagulant dosage and water quality parameters: Coagulation efficiency increased with coagulant dosage in the investigated range of 1-16 mg/l, and a pH of 6 was found to be superior for the coagulation. DON removal efficiency was also higher than and linearly correlated with total dissolved nitrogen (TDN) removal, which implies that an effective coagulation for TDN is also effective for DON. The findings in this study indicate that coagulation of DON is largely influenced by coagulant composition and species. We also found the removal of DON by our newly developed polymeric ZnFeP coagulant to be effective. PMID:27192355

  9. Transcatheter Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, Dickey G. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  10. Dust Coagulation in Protoplanetary Accretion Disks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmitt, W.; Henning, Th.; Mucha, R.

    1996-01-01

    The time evolution of dust particles in circumstellar disk-like structures around protostars and young stellar objects is discussed. In particular, we consider the coagulation of grains due to collisional aggregation. The coagulation of the particles is calculated by solving numerically the non-linear Smoluchowski equation. The different physical processes leading to relative velocities between the grains are investigated. The relative velocities may be induced by Brownian motion, turbulence and drift motion. Starting from different regimes which can be identified during the grain growth we also discuss the evolution of dust opacities. These opacities are important for both the derivation of the circumstellar dust mass from submillimeter/millimeter continuum observations and the dynamical behavior of the disks. We present results of our numerical studies of the coagulation of dust grains in a turbulent protoplanetary accretion disk described by a time-dependent one-dimensional (radial) alpha-model. For several periods and disk radii, mass distributions of coagulated grains have been calculated. From these mass spectra, we determined the corresponding Rosseland mean dust opacities. The influence of grain opacity changes due to dust coagulation on the dynamical evolution of a protostellar disk is considered. Significant changes in the thermal structure of the protoplanetary nebula are observed. A 'gap' in the accretion disk forms at the very frontier of the coagulation, i.e., behind the sublimation boundary in the region between 1 and 5 AU.

  11. Perioperatively acquired disorders of coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Grottke, Oliver; Fries, Dietmar; Nascimento, Bartolomeu

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To provide an overview of acquired coagulopathies that can occur in various perioperative clinical settings. Also described are coagulation disturbances linked to antithrombotic medications and currently available strategies to reverse their antithrombotic effects in situations of severe hemorrhage. Recent findings Recent studies highlight the link between low fibrinogen and decreased fibrin polymerization in the development of acquired coagulopathy. Particularly, fibrin(ogen) deficits are observable after cardiopulmonary bypass in cardiac surgery, on arrival at the emergency room in trauma patients, and with ongoing bleeding after child birth. Regarding antithrombotic therapy, although new oral anticoagulants offer the possibility of efficacy and relative safety compared with vitamin K antagonists, reversal of their anticoagulant effect with nonspecific agents, including prothrombin complex concentrate, has provided conflicting results. Specific antidotes, currently being developed, are not yet licensed for clinical use, but initial results are promising. Summary Targeted hemostatic therapy aims to correct coagulopathies in specific clinical settings, and reduce the need for allogeneic transfusions, thus preventing massive transfusion and its deleterious outcomes. Although there are specific guidelines for reversing anticoagulation in patients treated with antiplatelet agents or warfarin, there is currently little evidence to advocate comprehensive recommendations to treat drug-induced coagulopathy associated with new oral anticoagulants. PMID:25734869

  12. Coagulation algorithms with size binning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Statton, David M.; Gans, Jason; Williams, Eric

    1994-01-01

    The Smoluchowski equation describes the time evolution of an aerosol particle size distribution due to aggregation or coagulation. Any algorithm for computerized solution of this equation requires a scheme for describing the continuum of aerosol particle sizes as a discrete set. One standard form of the Smoluchowski equation accomplishes this by restricting the particle sizes to integer multiples of a basic unit particle size (the monomer size). This can be inefficient when particle concentrations over a large range of particle sizes must be calculated. Two algorithms employing a geometric size binning convention are examined: the first assumes that the aerosol particle concentration as a function of size can be considered constant within each size bin; the second approximates the concentration as a linear function of particle size within each size bin. The output of each algorithm is compared to an analytical solution in a special case of the Smoluchowski equation for which an exact solution is known . The range of parameters more appropriate for each algorithm is examined.

  13. Characterization and literature review of bowel perforation injuring using argon beam coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Kelli S.; Merchel, Renée. A.; Taylor, Kenneth D.

    2015-03-01

    INTRODUCTION: Argon Beam Coagulation (ABC®) technology is used in conjunction with the ConMed ABCFlex® Probe to provide non-contact hemostasis, coagulation, and tissue devitalization during endoscopic procedures. ABC provides a superficial tissue effect; however, there is a risk of bowel perforation. To better understand the settings that lead to perforation, this study reviews the literature and provides an ex vivo characterization of the ABCFlex Probe tissue effect at different settings when used at small distances. METHODS: Depth of thermal tissue effect was characterized to determine the effect of three parameters: power (W), distance from probe tip to tissue (mm) and application duration (s). 3 ABCFlex Probes were used to create 15 samples on ex vivo porcine small intestine for each combination of parameters. The depth of tissue effect for each sample was measured using a light microscope. RESULTS: Depth of tissue effect increases as power and application time increases. An increase of distance from the probe tip to the tissue results in a decrease in depth of tissue effect from a near contact to 1mm distance. Depth of tissue effect doesn't significantly change from 1mm to 3mm distance. CONCLUSION: ABCFlex Probe can be used to achieve hemostasis in endoscopic procedures. Increasing power and application time increases the depth of thermal effect while increasing distance from the probe time to the surface of the tissue decreases the depth of tissue effect.

  14. Development and experimental in-vivo evaluation of mathematical modeling of coagulation by laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beacco, Claire; Mordon, Serge R.; Brunetaud, Jean Marc

    1992-08-01

    Most clinical procedures using lasers are based on thermal laser-tissue interactions resulting in tissue damage. A mathematical model allowing temperature and damage prediction would be a useful tool to choose laser parameters able to produce the damage required. This study aimed at the development of a model called HELIOS. The capability of the model to predict thermal coagulation was evaluated by comparison with experimental in-vivo results. Conversion of laser light in tissue was studied using a beam broadening model, which is typically a modification of Beer-Lambert's law and takes into account scattering of light in tissue. HELIOS was validated making experimental studied in-vivo on liver (homogeneous tissue) of rats using a CW Nd:YAG laser, a CO2 laser, and an Argon laser. For a given set of laser parameters, temperature measurements were performed using an infrared camera (Agema, Sweden). The histological examination was carried out on samples to quantify the depth of coagulation necrosis. Experimental data obtained in-vivo were compared with those calculated previously using HELIOS and similar sets of parameters. The difference between the predicted temperature evolution on tissue surface and that measured by the infrared camera was less than 5 degree(s)C in all cases. The difference between the predicted coagulation necrosis depth and the corresponding experimental one was less than 10%. In conclusion, HELIOS allows good prediction of tissue temperature and coagulation necrosis. This model appears sufficiently precise for clinical applications and so should be well adapted to control thermal action of lasers in biological tissues.

  15. Microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Kwan, T.J.T.; Snell, C.M.

    1987-03-31

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit there through effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators. 6 figs.

  16. Global coagulation in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    PubMed

    Tripodi, Armando; Chantarangkul, Veena; Gianniello, Francesca; Clerici, Marigrazia; Lemma, Laura; Padovan, Lidia; Gatti, Loredana; Mannucci, Pier Mannuccio; Peyvandi, Flora

    2013-12-01

    In spite of their recognized risk of thrombosis, patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) show little or no abnormalities of traditional coagulation tests, perhaps because these are unable to represent the balance between pro- and anticoagulants nor the effect of platelets and blood cells. We investigated whether global tests such as thrombin generation in platelet-rich plasma (PRP) or thromboelastometry in whole blood were able to detect signs of procoagulant imbalance in MPN. The endogenous thrombin potential (ETP) of 111 patients and 89 controls was measured in PRP with platelet count adjusted to the original patient- or control-count. Testing was performed with and without thrombomodulin (the physiological protein C activator) and results were expressed as ETP ratios (with/without thrombomodulin). High ETP ratios reflect resistance to thrombomodulin and were taken as indexes of procoagulant imbalance. Patients were also investigated by thromboelastometry that provides such parameters as the clot formation time (CFT) and maximal clot firmness (MCF). Short CFT or high MCF were taken as indexes of procoagulant imbalance. ETP ratios were higher in patients than in controls and were directly correlated with platelet counts and inversely with the plasma levels of free protein S, protein C and antithrombin. Patients on hydroxyurea had lower ETP ratios than those on other treatments. CFT was shorter and MCF was greater in patients than controls; CFT and MCF were correlated with platelet counts. In conclusion, patients with MPN display a procoagulant imbalance detectable by thrombin generation and thromboelastometry. These tests might be useful in the frame of clinical trials to assess their association with the occurrence of thrombosis and with the effect of therapeutic strategies in MPN. PMID:23820940

  17. Extracellular protein disulfide isomerase regulates coagulation on endothelial cells through modulation of phosphatidylserine exposure

    PubMed Central

    Popescu, Narcis I.; Lupu, Cristina

    2010-01-01

    Tissue factor (TF) is the cellular receptor for plasma protease factor VIIa (FVIIa), and the TF-FVIIa complex initiates coagulation in both hemostasis and thrombosis. Cell surface-exposed TF is mainly cryptic and requires activation to fully exhibit the procoagulant potential. Recently, the protein disulfide isomerase (PDI) has been hypothesized to regulate TF decryption through the redox switch of an exposed disulfide in TF extracellular domain. In this study, we analyzed PDI contribution to coagulation using an in vitro endothelial cell model. In this model, extracellular PDI is detected by imaging and flow cytometry. Inhibition of cell surface PDI induces a marked increase in TF procoagulant function, whereas exogenous addition of PDI inhibits TF decryption. The coagulant effects of PDI inhibition were sensitive to annexin V treatment, suggesting exposure of phosphatidylserine (PS), which was confirmed by prothrombinase assays and direct labeling. In contrast, exogenous PDI addition enhanced PS internalization. Analysis of fluorescent PS revealed that PDI affects both the apparent flippase and floppase activities on endothelial cells. In conclusion, we identified a new mechanism for PDI contribution to coagulation on endothelial cells, namely, the regulation of PS exposure, where PDI acts as a negative regulator of coagulation. PMID:20448108

  18. Modification of a commercial thromboelastography instrument to measure coagulation dynamics with three-dimensional biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Hawker, Morgan J; Olver, Christine S; Fisher, Ellen R

    2016-06-01

    Three-dimensional synthetic constructs with complex geometries have immense potential for use in a multitude of blood-contacting applications. Understanding coagulation phenomena is arguably the most critical aspect for applications involving synthetic biomaterials; however, real-time evaluation of the clot formation while interfacing with these materials is difficult to achieve in a reproducible and robust manner. Here, work representing first steps toward addressing this deficit is presented, wherein modified consumables for a clinical instrument (a Thromboelastograph(®)) have been fabricated. Thromboelastography (TEG) measures viscoelastic properties throughout clot formation and therefore provides clinically relevant coagulation measurements in real time (i.e., kinetics and strength of clot formation). Through our modification, TEG consumables can readily accommodate three-dimensional materials (e.g., those for regenerative tissue applications). The authors performed proof-of-concept experiments using polymer scaffolds with a range of surface properties and demonstrated that variations in surface properties resulted in differences in blood plasma coagulation dynamics. For example, the maximum rate of thrombus generation ranged from 22.2 ± 2.2 (dyn/cm(2))/s for fluorocarbon coated scaffolds to 8.7 ± 1.0 (dyn/cm(2))/s for nitrogen-containing scaffolds. Through this work, the ability to make real-time coagulation activity measurements during constant coagulation factor interface with biomedically relevant materials is demonstrated. PMID:27126596

  19. [Enzymatic activity of some tissues and blood serum from animals and humans exposed to microwaves and hypothesis on the possible role of free radical processes in the nonlinear effects and modification of emotional behavior of animals].

    PubMed

    Akoev, I G; Pashovkina, M S; Dolgacheva, L P; Semenova, T P; Kalmykov, V L

    2002-01-01

    The dependence of activities of actomyosin ATPase, alkaline phosphatase, aspartataminotranspherase, monoaminoxidase and that of affective rat behavior on frequency of modulation of microwaves (0.8-10 microW/cm2) was explored at short-time actions. Series of nonlinear phenomenons, inexplicable from positions of the energy approaches are revealed, The working hypothesis explaining opportunity of high performance of weak and super-weak microwaves and other revealed phenomena by resonance interaction of such electromagnetic radiofrequency radiation with paramagnetic molecules of biological tissues was proposed. This resonance interaction activate free radicals and initiate auto-supporting and auto-intensifying of chain chemical reactions. The spontaneous autocatalytic oxidation of catecholamines enlarges a common pool of free radicals, capable to participate in such enhanced generating. The protective role of monoaminoxidase is postulated. Monoaminoxidase is basically located on an outer surface of mitochondrias and it is deaminating monoamines. The deaminating prevents penetration of catecholamines inside of mitochondrias and their quinoid oxidation there with formation of free-radical semi-quinons, capable to destroy system of ATP synthesis. These inferences are obliquely confirmed by the experimentally revealed correlation between activity of monoaminoxidase and integrative activity of the rat brain. PMID:12125273

  20. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Murase, Kenya Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-23

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl{sub 2} to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The “MPI value” was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  1. Magnetic particle imaging of blood coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murase, Kenya; Song, Ruixiao; Hiratsuka, Samu

    2014-06-01

    We investigated the feasibility of visualizing blood coagulation using a system for magnetic particle imaging (MPI). A magnetic field-free line is generated using two opposing neodymium magnets and transverse images are reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals received by a gradiometer coil, using the maximum likelihood-expectation maximization algorithm. Our MPI system was used to image the blood coagulation induced by adding CaCl2 to whole sheep blood mixed with magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). The "MPI value" was defined as the pixel value of the transverse image reconstructed from the third-harmonic signals. MPI values were significantly smaller for coagulated blood samples than those without coagulation. We confirmed the rationale of these results by calculating the third-harmonic signals for the measured viscosities of samples, with an assumption that the magnetization and particle size distribution of MNPs obey the Langevin equation and log-normal distribution, respectively. We concluded that MPI can be useful for visualizing blood coagulation.

  2. Microwave dissolution of plant tissue and the subsequent determination of trace lanthanide and actinide elements by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Alvarado, J.S.; Neal, T.J.; Smith, L.L.; Erickson, M.D.

    1997-08-01

    Recently there has been much concern with the ability of plants to uptake heavy metals from their surroundings. With the development of instrumental techniques with low detection limits such as inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), attention is shifting toward achieving faster and more elegant ways of oxidizing the organic material inherent in environmental samples. Closed-vessel microwave dissolution was compared with conventional methods for the determination of concentrations of cerium, samarium, europium, terbium, uranium and thorium in a series of samples from the National Institute of Standards and Technology and from fields in Idaho. The ICP-MS technique exhibited detection limits in parts-per-trillion and linear calibration plots over three orders of magnitude for the elements under study. The results obtained by using nitric acid and hydrogen peroxide in a microwave digestion system for the analysis of reference materials showed close agreement with the accepted values. These values were compared with results obtained from dry- and wet-ashing procedures. The findings from an experiment comparing radiometric techniques for the determination of actinide elements to ICP-MS are reported.

  3. Fibrinolysis and the control of blood coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Chapin, John C.; Hajjar, Katherine A.

    2014-01-01

    Fibrin plays an essential role in hemostasis as both the primary product of the coagulation cascade and the ultimate substrate for fibrinolysis. Fibrinolysis efficiency is greatly influenced by clot structure, fibrinogen isoforms and polymorphisms, the rate of thrombin generation, the reactivity of thrombus-associated cells such as platelets, and the overall biochemical environment. Regulation of the fibrinolytic system, like that of the coagulation cascade, is accomplished by a wide array of cofactors, receptors, and inhibitors. Fibrinolytic activity can be generated either on the surface of a fibrin-containing thrombus, or on cells that express profibrinolytic receptors. In a widening spectrum of clinical disorders, acquired and congenital defects in fibrinolysis contribute to disease morbidity, and new assays of global fibrinolysis now have potential predictive value in multiple clinical settings. Here, we summarize the basic elements of the fibrinolytic system, points of interaction with the coagulation pathway, and some recent clinical advances. PMID:25294122

  4. Alterations in coagulation following major liver resection.

    PubMed

    Mallett, S V; Sugavanam, A; Krzanicki, D A; Patel, S; Broomhead, R H; Davidson, B R; Riddell, A; Gatt, A; Chowdary, P

    2016-06-01

    The international normalised ratio is frequently raised in patients who have undergone major liver resection, and is assumed to represent a potential bleeding risk. However, these patients have an increased risk of venous thromboembolic events, despite conventional coagulation tests indicating hypocoagulability. This prospective, observational study of patients undergoing major hepatic resection analysed the serial changes in coagulation in the early postoperative period. Thrombin generation parameters and viscoelastic tests of coagulation (thromboelastometry) remained within normal ranges throughout the study period. Levels of the procoagulant factors II, V, VII and X initially fell, but V and X returned to or exceeded normal range by postoperative day five. Levels of factor VIII and Von Willebrand factor were significantly elevated from postoperative day one (p < 0.01). Levels of the anticoagulants, protein C and antithrombin remained significantly depressed on postoperative day five (p = 0.01). Overall, the imbalance between pro- and anticoagulant factors suggested a prothrombotic environment in the early postoperative period. PMID:27030945

  5. Coagulation-membrane filtration of Chlorella vulgaris.

    PubMed

    Lee, Duu-Jong; Liao, Guan-Yu; Chang, Yin-Ru; Chang, Jo-Shu

    2012-03-01

    Filtration-based separation of Chlorella vulgaris, a species with excellent potential for CO(2) capture and lipid production, was investigated using a surface-modified hydrophilic polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) membrane. Coagulation using polyaluminum chloride (PACl) attained maximum turbidity removal at 200 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3). The membrane filtration flux at 1 bar increased as the PACl dose increased, regardless of overdosing in the coagulation stage. The filtered cake at the end of filtration tests peaked in solid content at 10 mg L(-1) as Al(2)O(3), reaching 34% w/w, roughly two times that of the original suspension. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) tests demonstrate that the cake with minimum water-solid binding strength produced the driest filter cake. Coagulation using 10 mg L(-1) PACl as Al(2)O(3), followed by PTFE membrane filtration at 1 bar, is an effective process for harvesting C. vulgaris from algal froth. PMID:22261659

  6. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, Jr., Harold D.; Janney, Mark A.; Ferber, Mattison K.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy.

  7. Microwave furnace having microwave compatible dilatometer

    DOEpatents

    Kimrey, H.D. Jr.; Janney, M.A.; Ferber, M.K.

    1992-03-24

    An apparatus for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of a sample being heated by microwave energy is described. The apparatus comprises a microwave heating device for heating a sample by microwave energy, a microwave compatible dilatometer for measuring and monitoring a change in the dimension of the sample being heated by microwave energy without leaking microwaves out of the microwave heating device, and a temperature determination device for measuring and monitoring the temperature of the sample being heated by microwave energy. 2 figs.

  8. Post-treatment of sanitary landfill leachate by coagulation-flocculation using chitosan as primary coagulant.

    PubMed

    Nascimento, Inara Oliveira do Carmo; Guedes, Ana Rosa Pinto; Perelo, Louisa Wessels; Queiroz, Luciano Matos

    2016-01-01

    Chitosan was chosen as an alternative primary coagulant in a complementary coagulation-flocculation treatment of sanitary landfill leachate with the aim of removing recalcitrant organic matter. In order to optimize the process conditions, central composite design and response surface methodology were applied. To evaluate the performance of the process using chitosan, we also carried out tests with aluminium sulphate (Al(2) (SO(4))(3).14 H(2)O) as coagulant. In addition, acute toxicity tests were carried using the duckweed Lemna minor and the guppy fish Poecilia reticulata as test organisms. The analytic hierarchy process was employed for selecting the most appropriate coagulant. Mean values of true colour removal efficiency of 80% and turbidity removal efficiency of 91.4% were reached at chitosan dosages of 960 mg L(-1) at pH 8.5. The acute toxicity tests showed that organisms were sensitive to all samples, mainly after coagulation-flocculation using chitosan. CE(50) for L. minor was not determined because there was no inhibition of the average growth rate and biomass production; LC(50) for P. reticulata was 23% (v v(-1)). Multi-criteria analysis showed that alum was the most appropriate coagulant. Therefore, chitosan as primary coagulant was not considered to be a viable alternative in the post-treatment of landfill leachate. PMID:27387003

  9. Coagulation characteristics of titanium (Ti) salt coagulant compared with aluminum (Al) and iron (Fe) salts.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y X; Gao, B Y; Shon, H K; Cao, B C; Kim, J-H

    2011-01-30

    In this study, the performance of titanium tetrachloride (TiCl(4)) coagulation and flocculation is compared with commonly used coagulants such as aluminum sulfate (Al(2)(SO(4))(3)), polyaluminum chloride (PACl), iron chloride (FeCl(3)), and polyferric sulfate (PFS) in terms of water quality parameters and floc properties. TiCl(4) flocculation achieved higher removal of UV(254) (98%), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) (84%) and turbidity (93%) than other conventional coagulants. Charge neutralization and physical entrapment of colloids within coagulant precipitates and adsorption, seemed to play a significant role during TiCl(4) flocculation, while the main mechanism for conventional coagulants was bridge-aggregation and adsorption. The aggregated flocs after TiCl(4) flocculation showed the fastest growth rate compared to the other coagulants, with the largest floc size (801 μm) occurring within 8 min. The floc strength factor of PACl, Al(2)(SO(4))(3), PFS, FeCl(3) and TiCl(4) was 34, 30, 29, 26 and 29, respectively, while the floc recovery factor of the TiCl(4) coagulant was the lowest. Based on the results of the above study, it is concluded that the TiCl(4) flocculation can reduce the hydraulic retention time of slow and rapid mixing, however, careful handling of sludge is required due to the low recoverability of the aggregated floc. PMID:21075521

  10. Application of psyllium husk as coagulant and coagulant aid in semi-aerobic landfill leachate treatment.

    PubMed

    Al-Hamadani, Yasir A J; Yusoff, Mohd Suffian; Umar, Muhammad; Bashir, Mohammed J K; Adlan, Mohd Nordin

    2011-06-15

    Landfill leachate is a heavily polluted and a likely hazardous liquid that is produced as a result of water infiltration through solid wastes generated industrially and domestically. This study investigates the potential of using psyllium husk as coagulant and coagulant aid for the treatment of landfill leachate. Psyllium husk has been tested as primary coagulant and as coagulant aid with poly-aluminum chloride (PACl) and aluminum sulfate (alum). As primary coagulant, the optimum dosage and pH for PACl were 7.2 and 7.5 g/L, respectively, with removal efficiencies of 55, 80 and 95% for COD, color and TSS, respectively. For alum, the optimum conditions were 11 g/L alum dosage and pH 6.5 with removal efficiencies of 58, 79 and 78% for COD, color and TSS, respectively. The maximum removal efficiencies of COD, color and TSS were 64, 90 and 96%, respectively, when psyllium husk was used as coagulant aid with PACl. Based on the results, psyllium husk was found to be more effective as coagulant aid with PACl in the removal of COD, color and TSS as compared to alum. Zeta potential test was carried out for leachate, PACl, alum and psyllium husk before and after running the jar test to enhance the results of the jar test experiments. PMID:21507572

  11. [Relationship among coagulation effect of Al-based coagulant, content and speciation of residual aluminum].

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhong-Lian; Gao, Bao-Yu; Yue, Qin-Yan; Jiang, Yi-Shuai

    2010-06-01

    The application of AlCl3, Al2 (SO4)3 and poly-aluminum chloride (PAC) in humic acid-kaolin simulated water was studied in this article. It is intended to discuss the relationship among coagulation effect of Al-based coagulants in humic acid-kaolin simulated water and content and speciation of residual aluminum. It was found that, the turbidity removal efficiency and UV254 removal efficiency could reach about 90% at the tested dosage. At higher dosage, PAC gave better coagulation effect. The residual total aluminum content and residual aluminum ratio of PAC, which was 0.9 mg/L and - 3.0% or so respectively, were greatly lower than those of AlCl3 and Al2 (SO4)3. The residual total dissolved aluminum was the predominant content in the effluent after coagulation and sedimentation by the three Al-based coagulants. For the total dissolved aluminum, the proportion of dissolved organic aluminum was significantly higher than that of other aluminum speciation. With respect to humic acid-kaolin simulated water, the content of residual total aluminum in the effluent after coagulation and sedimentation by PAC decreased obviously compared to AlCl3 and Al2 (SO4)3. PAC could effectively decrease the content of residual dissolved aluminum speciation which has higher toxicity. The content of residual total dissolved aluminum in the effluent after coagulation and sedimentation by PAC was about 0.6 mg/L. PMID:20698270

  12. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this project is to develop an economical method for producing low-sulfur and low-ash coals using the selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process. This work has been divided into three tasks: (1) project planning and sample acquisition; (2) studies of the fundamental mechanism(s) of the selective coagulation process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from both the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur; and (3) bench-scale process development test work to establish the best possible method(s) of separating the hydrophobic and coagula from the dispersed mineral matter.

  13. Comparative Histology of Plasma Treated Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rick, Kyle

    2009-10-01

    Atmospheric plasmas applied in surgical settings have unique characteristics found in histological results from animal tissue studies. This is evident in both ex vivo bench tissue tests and in vivo fresh tissue. Examples of these histological features are presented as results of a comparative study between plasma treated, common medical argon coagulation, and electrosurgery.

  14. Asphyxia by Drowning Induces Massive Bleeding Due To Hyperfibrinolytic Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Schwameis, Michael; Schober, Andreas; Schörgenhofer, Christian; Sperr, Wolfgang Reinhard; Schöchl, Herbert; Janata-Schwatczek, Karin; Kürkciyan, Erol Istepan; Sterz, Fritz

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To date, no study has systematically investigated the impact of drowning-induced asphyxia on hemostasis. Our objective was to test the hypothesis that asphyxia induces bleeding by hyperfibrinolytic disseminated intravascular coagulation. Design: Observational study. Setting: A 2,100-bed tertiary care facility in Vienna, Austria, Europe. Patients: All cases of drowning-induced asphyxia (n = 49) were compared with other patients with cardiopulmonary resuscitation (n = 116) and to patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (n = 83). Six drowning victims were investigated prospectively. To study the mechanism, a forearm-ischemia model was used in 20 volunteers to investigate whether hypoxia releases tissue plasminogen activator. Interventions: None. Measurements and Main Results: Eighty percent of patients with drowning-induced asphyxia developed overt disseminated intravascular coagulation within 24 hours. When compared with nondrowning cardiac arrest patients, drowning patients had a 13 times higher prevalence of overt disseminated intravascular coagulation at admission (55% vs 4%; p < 0.001). Despite comparable disseminated intravascular coagulation scores, acute promyelocytic leukemia patients had higher fibrinogen but lower d-dimer levels and platelet counts than drowning patients (p < 0.001). Drowning victims had a three-fold longer activated partial thromboplastin time (124 s; p < 0.001) than both nondrowning cardiac arrest and acute promyelocytic leukemia patients. Hyperfibrinolysis was reflected by up to 1,000-fold increased d-dimer levels, greater than 5-fold elevated plasmin antiplasmin levels, and a complete absence of thrombelastometric clotting patterns, which was reversed by antifibrinolytics and heparinase. Thirty minutes of forearm-ischemia increased tissue plasminogen activator 31-fold (p < 0.001). Conclusions: The vast majority of drowning patients develops overt hyperfibrinolytic disseminated intravascular coagulation, partly caused by

  15. Evaluation of microwave digestion and solvent extraction for the determination of trace amounts of selenium in feeds and plant and animal tissues by electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hocquellet, P; Candillier, M P

    1991-05-01

    A sensitive method for the accurate determination of Se in agricultural products at sub-ppm levels is described. The proposed procedure involves the wet oxidation of samples by using a mixture of nitric, sulphuric and perchloric acids, co-extraction of Se and added Pd with diethylammonium N,N-diethyldithiocarbamate in chloroform, and electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric determination of Se in the organic extract. Atomization and extraction conditions are discussed. Special attention is given to the wet oxidation step, and its advantages in speed and simplicity over conventional heating have been evaluated using an automated microwave digestion system. The results reported, obtained from several reference materials, confirm the accuracy of the method with which a detection limit of 0.002 micrograms g-1 of Se can be achieved. PMID:1877754

  16. Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2009-02-01

    Male sterilization (vasectomy) is more successful, safer, less expensive, and easier to perform than female sterilization (tubal ligation). However, female sterilization is more popular, due to male fear of vasectomy complications (e.g. incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain). The development of a completely noninvasive vasectomy technique may allay some of these concerns. Ytterbium fiber laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.7 W, 1-s pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen cooling of the scrotal skin surface in canine tissue for a treatment time of 60 s. Vas thermal lesion dimensions measured 2.0 +/- 0.3 mm diameter by 3.0 +/- 0.9 mm length, without skin damage. The coagulated vas bursting pressure measured 295 +/- 72 mm Hg, significantly higher than typical vas ejaculation pressures of 136 + 29 mm Hg. Noninvasive thermal coagulation and occlusion of the vas is feasible.

  17. Coagulation and innate immune responses: can we view them separately?

    PubMed

    Delvaeye, Mieke; Conway, Edward M

    2009-09-17

    The horseshoe crab is often referred to as a "living fossil," representative of the oldest classes of arthropods, almost identical to species in existence more than 500 million years ago. Comparative analyses of the defense mechanisms used by the horseshoe crab that allowed it to survive mostly unchanged throughout the millennia reveal a common ancestry of the coagulation and innate immune systems that are totally integrated-indeed, almost inseparable. In human biology, we traditionally view the hemostatic pathways and those regulating innate immune responses to infections and tissue damage as entirely separate entities. But are they? The last couple of decades have revealed a remarkable degree of interplay between these systems, and the linking cellular and molecular mechanisms are rapidly being delineated. In this review, we present some of the major points of intersection between coagulation and innate immunity. We attempt to highlight the potential impact of these findings by identifying recently established paradigms that will hopefully result in the emergence of new strategies to treat a range of inflammatory and hemostatic disorders. PMID:19584396

  18. Effect of taurine on platelets and the plasma coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Miglis, Mitchell; Wilder, Donna; Reid, Thomas; Bakaltcheva, Irina

    2002-02-01

    It is not yet clear what exact mechanisms are at work in hibernating animals that prevent clot formation and maintain tissue perfusion under conditions of very slow blood flow and increased blood viscosity brought about by the low temperatures. It has been shown that the total amino acid pool increases more then two fold in hibernating animals with taurine accounting for about 50% of this increase [Storey et al., Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1988; 85(21): 8350-4]. This work investigates the effect of taurine on platelets and the plasma coagulation system. Taurine was added at different concentrations in the range between 5 and 25 mM to donor plasma. Using STA/STA Compact coagulation analyzer the following tests were performed: prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), and thrombin time (TT). At the highest concentration tested (25 mM) taurine prolonged TT by 9%. The prolongation was statistically significant but not clinically significant retaining TT within normal limits (16.7-20.7 s). PT and APTT remained unchanged by taurine. The effect of taurine on platelets was assessed by platelet aggregation by thrombin, extent of platelet shape change (ESC) induced by ADP, and thrombelastography. Taurine at 5 mM final concentration inhibited platelet aggregation by 10%. Increasing taurine concentration to 25 mM did not result in a further augmentation of the inhibitory effect. ESC was unaffected by taurine. Clot strength determined by thrombelastography also remained unchanged by taurine. PMID:11918831

  19. 1984 IEEE MTT-S international microwave symposium digest

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1984-01-01

    This book presents the papers given at a symposium which considered the use of microwave radiation in medical applications. Topics covered at the symposium included a three-band microwave radiometer for noninvasive temperature measurement, microwave and infrared thermograms of hot spots in tissue, injection locked magnetrons, medical microwave thermography, specific absorption rate distribution in a model of man, monitoring changes in tumor blood flow, a slot antenna radiating in muscle, and a microstrip spiral antenna for local hyperthermia.

  20. Nanoparticle coagulation in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas

    SciTech Connect

    Nunomura, Shota; Kondo, Michio; Shiratani, Masaharu; Koga, Kazunori; Watanabe, Yukio

    2008-08-15

    The kinetics of nanoparticle coagulation has been studied in fractionally charged and charge fluctuating dusty plasmas. The coagulation occurs when the mutual collision frequency among nanoparticles exceeds their charging and decharging/neutralization frequency. Interestingly, the coagulation is suppressed while a fraction (several percent) of nanoparticles are negatively charged in a plasma, in which stochastic charging plays an important role. A model is developed to predict a phase diagram of the coagulation and its suppression.

  1. Microwave Treatment for Cardiac Arrhythmias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernandez-Moya, Sonia

    2009-01-01

    NASA seeks to transfer the NASA developed microwave ablation technology, designed for the treatment of ventricular tachycardia (irregular heart beat), to industry. After a heart attack, many cells surrounding the resulting scar continue to live but are abnormal electrically; they may conduct impulses unusually slowly or fire when they would typically be silent. These diseased areas might disturb smooth signaling by forming a reentrant circuit in the muscle. The objective of microwave ablation is to heat and kill these diseased cells to restore appropriate electrical activity in the heart. This technology is a method and apparatus that provides for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about six gigahertz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna, frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In comparison with other methods that involve direct-current pulses or radio frequencies below 1 GHz, this method may prove more effective in treating ventricular tachycardia. This is because the present method provides for greater control of the location, cross-sectional area, and depth of a lesion via selection of the location and design of the antenna and the choice of microwave power and frequency.

  2. Directional microwave applicator and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Lin, Greg Y. (Inventor); Chu, Andrew W. (Inventor); Dobbins, Justin A. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A miniature microwave antenna is disclosed which may be utilized for biomedical applications such as, for example, radiation induced hyperthermia through catheter systems. One feature of the antenna is that it possesses azimuthal directionality despite its small size. This directionality permits targeting of certain tissues while limiting thermal exposure of adjacent tissue. One embodiment has an outer diameter of about 0.095'' (2.4 mm) but the design permits for smaller diameters.

  3. Weak solutions to the continuous coagulation equation with multiple fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    Giri, Ankik Kumar; Laurençot, Philippe; Warnecke, Gerald

    2012-01-01

    The existence of weak solutions to the continuous coagulation equation with multiple fragmentation is shown for a class of unbounded coagulation and fragmentation kernels, the fragmentation kernel having possibly a singularity at the origin. This result extends previous ones where either boundedness of the coagulation kernel or no singularity at the origin for the fragmentation kernel was assumed. PMID:22389550

  4. Gelation and mass conservation in coagulation-fragmentation models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, M.; Laurençot, Ph.; Mischler, S.; Perthame, B.

    The occurrence of gelation and the existence of mass-conserving solutions to the continuous coagulation-fragmentation equation are investigated under various assumptions on the coagulation and fragmentation rates, thereby completing the already known results. A non-uniqueness result is also established and a connection to the modified coagulation model of Flory is made.

  5. Coagulation Activation in Children with Sickle Cell Disease Is Associated with Cerebral Small Vessel Vasculopathy

    PubMed Central

    Colombatti, Raffaella; De Bon, Emiliano; Bertomoro, Antonella; Casonato, Alessandra; Pontara, Elena; Omenetto, Elisabetta; Saggiorato, Graziella; Steffan, Agostino; Damian, Tamara; Cella, Giuseppe; Teso, Simone; Manara, Renzo; Rampazzo, Patrizia; Meneghetti, Giorgio; Basso, Giuseppe; Sartori, Maria Teresa; Sainati, Laura

    2013-01-01

    Background Thrombotic complications in Sickle Cell Disease (SCD) arise since infancy, but the role of the coagulation system in children has been poorly explored. To determine its role in the development of clinical complications in childhood we measured coagulation and endothelial parameters in children with SCD at steady state. Methods Markers of thrombin generation, fibrin dissolution and endothelial activation were evaluated in 38 children with SS-Sβ°, 6 with SC disease and 50 age and blood group matched controls. Coagulation variables were correlated with markers of hemolysis and inflammation, with the presence of cerebral and lung vasculopathy and with the frequency of clinical complications. Results SS-Sβ° patients presented higher levels of factor VIII, von Willebrand factor antigen (VWF:Ag) and collagen binding activity, tissue plasminogen activator antigen (t-PA:Ag), D-dimer, p-selectin, prothrombin fragment1+2 (F1+2) and lower ADAMTS-13:activity/VWF:Ag (p<0.05) compared to controls and SC patients. In SS-Sβ° patients coagulation variables correlated positively with markers of inflammation, hemolysis, and negatively with HbF (p<0.05). Patients with cerebral silent infarcts showed significant decrease in t-PA:Ag and ADAMTS-13 Antigen and a tendency toward higher D-dimer, F1+2, TAT compared to patients without them. D-dimer was associated with a six fold increased risk of cerebral silent infarcts. No correlation was found between coagulation activation and large vessel vasculopathy or other clinical events except for decreased t-PA:Ag in patients with tricuspid Rigurgitant Velocity >2.5m/sec. Conclusions SS-Sβ° disease is associated with extensive activation of the coagulation system at steady state since young age. ADAMTS-13 and t-PA:Ag are involved in the development of cerebral silent infarcts. PMID:24205317

  6. Roles for vitamin K beyond coagulation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent interest in vitamin K has been motivated by evidence of physiological roles beyond that of coagulation. Vitamin K and vitamin K-dependent proteins may be involved in regulation of calcification, energy metabolism, and inflammation. However, the evidence for many of these proposed roles in the...

  7. Development of the selective hydrophobic coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy. The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (i) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (ii) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. The technical work program was initiated on July 1, 1992. Force-distance curves were generated for DDOA Br-coated mica surfaces in water and used to calculate hydrophobicity constants and decay lengths for this system; and a new device for the measurement of water contact angles, similar to the Wilhelmy plate balance, has been built 225 kg samples of Pittsburgh No. 8 and Elkhom No. 3 seam coals were obtained; a static mixer test facility for the study of coagula growth was set up and was undergoing shakedown tests at the end of the quarter; a bench-scale lamella thickener was being constructed; and preliminary coagula/ mineral separation tests were being conducted in a bench-scale continuous drum filter.

  8. Development of the Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-01-01

    A novel technique for selectively coagulating and separating coal from dispersed mineral matter has been developed at Virginia Tech. The process, Selective Hydrophobic Coagulation (SHC), has been studied since 1986 under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy (Contracts AC22-86PC91221 and AC22-90PC90174). The SHC process differs from oil agglomeration, shear or polymer flocculation, and electrolytic coagulation processes in that it does not require reagents or additives to induce the formation of coagula. In most cases, simple pH control is all that is required to (1) induce the coagulation of coal particles and (2) effectively disperse particles of mineral matter. If the coal is oxidized, a small dosage of reagents can be used to enhance the process. During the quarter, the Anutech Mark IV surface force apparatus was used to generate surface force-distance data for the mica/dodecylamine hydrochloride system (Task 2.1.1). Work to characterize the hydrophobicity of this system and the mica/DDOA[sup [minus

  9. Bacteria under stress by complement and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Berends, Evelien T M; Kuipers, Annemarie; Ravesloot, Marietta M; Urbanus, Rolf T; Rooijakkers, Suzan H M

    2014-11-01

    The complement and coagulation systems are two related protein cascades in plasma that serve important roles in host defense and hemostasis, respectively. Complement activation on bacteria supports cellular immune responses and leads to direct killing of bacteria via assembly of the Membrane Attack Complex (MAC). Recent studies have indicated that the coagulation system also contributes to mammalian innate defense since coagulation factors can entrap bacteria inside clots and generate small antibacterial peptides. In this review, we will provide detailed insights into the molecular interplay between these protein cascades and bacteria. We take a closer look at how these pathways are activated on bacterial surfaces and discuss the mechanisms by which they directly cause stress to bacterial cells. The poorly understood mechanism for bacterial killing by the MAC will be reevaluated in light of recent structural insights. Finally, we highlight the strategies used by pathogenic bacteria to modulate these protein networks. Overall, these insights will contribute to a better understanding of the host defense roles of complement and coagulation against bacteria. PMID:25065463

  10. 21 CFR 864.5400 - Coagulation instrument.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Coagulation instrument. 864.5400 Section 864.5400 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES HEMATOLOGY AND PATHOLOGY DEVICES Automated and Semi-Automated Hematology Devices §...

  11. Point of Care Assessment of Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Hyatt, Clare E; Brainard, Benjamin M

    2016-03-01

    Disorders of hemostasis can be difficult to fully elucidate but can severely affect patient outcome. The optimal therapy for coagulopathies is also not always clear. Point of care (POC) testing in veterinary medicine can assist in the diagnosis of hemostatic disorders and also direct treatment. Advantages of POC testing include rapid turnaround times, ease of use, and proximity to the patient. Disadvantages include differences in analytic performance compared with reference laboratory devices, the potential for operator error, and limited test options per device. Conventional coagulation tests such as prothrombin time, activated partial thromboplastin time, and activated clotting time can be measured by POC devices and can accurately diagnose hypocoagulability, but they cannot detect hypercoagulability or disorders of fibrinolysis. Viscoelastic POC coagulation testing more accurately evaluates in vivo coagulation, and can detect hypocoagulability, hypercoagulability, and alterations in fibrinolysis. POC platelet function testing methodologies can detect platelet adhesion abnormalities including von Willebrand disease, and can be used to monitor the efficacy of antiplatelet drugs. It is unlikely that a single test would be ideal for assessing the complete coagulation status of all patients; therefore, the ideal combination of tests for a specific patient needs to be determined based on an understanding of the underlying disease, and protocols must be standardized to minimize interoperator and interinstitutional variability. PMID:27451044

  12. Could light meal jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests?

    PubMed Central

    Lima-Oliveira, Gabriel; Salvagno, Gian Luca; Lippi, Giuseppe; Danese, Elisa; Gelati, Matteo; Montagnana, Martina; Picheth, Geraldo; Guidi, Gian Cesare

    2014-01-01

    Background: Presently the necessity of fasting time for coagulation tests is not standardized. Our hypothesis is that this can harm patient safety. This study is aimed at evaluating whether a light meal (i.e. breakfast) can jeopardize laboratory coagulation tests. Materials and methods: A blood sample was firstly collected from 17 fasting volunteers (12 h). Immediately after blood collection, the volunteers consumed a light meal. Then samples were collected at 1, 2 and 4 h after the meal. Coagulation tests included: activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), fibrinogen (Fbg), antithrombin III (AT), protein C (PC) and protein S (PS). Differences between samples were assessed by Wilcoxon ranked-pairs test. The level of statistical significance was set at P < 0.05. Mean % differences were determined and differences between and baseline and 1, 2 and 4h samples were compared with reference change value (RCV). Results: A significantly higher % activity of AT was observed at 1 h and 4 h after meal vs. baseline specimen [113 (104–117) and 111 (107–120) vs. 109 (102–118), respectively; P = 0.029 and P = 0.016]. APTT at 2 h was found significantly lower than baseline samples [32.0 (29.9–34.8) vs. 34.1 (32.2–35.2), respectively; P = 0.041]. The results of both Fbg and PS tests were not influenced by a light meal. Furthermore, no coagulation tests had significant variation after comparison with RCV. Conclusion: A light meal does not influence the laboratory coagulation tests we assessed, but we suggest that the laboratory quality managers standardize the fasting time for all blood tests at 12 hours, to completely metabolize the lipids intake. PMID:25351352

  13. Novel Ion-Exchange Coagulants Remove More Low Molecular Weight Organics than Traditional Coagulants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Huazhang; Wang, Lei; Hanigan, David; Westerhoff, Paul; Ni, Jinren

    2016-04-01

    Low molecular weight (MW) charged organic matter is poorly removed by conventional coagulants but contributes to disinfection byproduct formation during chlorination of drinking waters. We hypothesized that CIEX, a new Al-based hybrid coagulant with ion-exchange functional groups, would be new mechanistic approach to remove low MW organic matter during coagulation and would perform better than polyaluminum chloride (PACl) or metal-salt based coagulants. We measured coagulation performance using dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in a high hardness surface water. CIEX achieved excellent turbidity removal and removed 20% to 46% more DOC than FeCl3, Al2(SO4)3, or PACl, depending on dose. The improved DOC removal was attributable to better removal of low MW organic matter (<2 kDa). We further studied removal mechanisms in a model water containing a low MW organic acid (salicylic acid (SA)). CIEX achieved high removal of organic acids (>90% of SA) independent of pH, whereas removal by metal salts was lower (<15%) and was strongly pH dependent. CIEX ion-exchange capability is facilitated by its covalently bound quaternary ammonium group, which conventional coagulants lack. Plus, unlike other cationic polymers that react with chloramines to form N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA), CIEX has a low molar yield (9.3 × 10(-7) mol NDMA per mol CIEX-N). PMID:26974542

  14. Use of the diode laser (805 nm) and an angled fiber for coagulation/vaporization of the prostate in the dog

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartels, Kenneth E.; Stair, Ernest L.; Dickey, D. Thomas; Hurd, John S.; Powell, Ronald; Schafer, Steven A.; Nordquist, Robert E.; Willis, Randall J.; Hults, Donald F.

    1996-05-01

    This study evaluates tissue coagulation and ablation effects in the prostate gland of the canine model when a diode laser (805 nm-Diomed 25R-Surgimedics/ESP, The Woodlands, Texas) and an angled fiber configuration (1000 (mu) 20 degree bent-Surgimedics/ESP, The Woodlands, Texas were used at specified power densities. Comparisons of therapeutic modalities included animals treated with noncontact coagulation alone, contact ablation alone, and noncontact coagulation and contact ablation in combination. The principal objective was to validate the effectiveness of coagulating prostatic tissue in a noncontact mode at a lower power, followed immediately with contact ablation of the prostatic urethra at a higher energy level. Applying laser energy with the fiber tip in noncontact mode created a deeper zone of coagulative necrosis with an increased level of cellular destruction (lower power 15 - 20 watts delivered to four quadrants for 200 seconds/quadrant) than did higher power modalities alone. An increased luminal diameter, which prevented immediate postoperative urodynamic abnormalities (stranguria, dysuria, and severe hematuria) in this model, was produced by ablating the prostatic urethra with the fiber tip in a contact mode (higher power: 23 - 60 watts for an additional 120 - 200 seconds for the ablative process) immediately following the coagulative procedure. Additionally, semen evaluations performed before and after laser surgery (8 weeks after coagulation/ablation) were performed on one dog and found to be normal with respect to number of spermatozoa and motility.

  15. In Vivo Simulator for Microwave Treatment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor); Karasack, Vincent G. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Pieper, Carl F. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided for propagating microwave energy into heart tissues to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally ablating arrhythmogenic cardiac tissue to treat ventricular tachycardia and other arrhythmias while preventing excessive heating of surrounding tissues, organs, and blood. A wide bandwidth double-disk antenna is effective for this purpose over a bandwidth of about 6 GHz. A computer simulation provides initial screening capabilities for an antenna such as antenna. frequency, power level, and power application duration. The simulation also allows optimization of techniques for specific patients or conditions. In operation, microwave energy between about 1 GHz and 12 GHz is applied to monopole microwave radiator having a surface wave limiter. A test setup provides physical testing of microwave radiators to determine the temperature profile created in actual heart tissue or ersatz heart tissue. Saline solution pumped over the heart tissue with a peristaltic pump simulates blood flow. Optical temperature sensors disposed at various tissue depths within the heart tissue detect the temperature profile without creating any electromagnetic interference. The method may be used to produce a desired temperature profile in other body tissues reachable by catheter such as tumors and the like.

  16. Characteristics of frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven

    SciTech Connect

    Jones, L.R.; Taylor, A.W.; Hines, H.C.

    1987-09-01

    Use of a microwave oven to thaw frozen colostrum was evaluated. Colostrum was collected from nine cows, four of which were immunized to produce specific colostral antibodies. Colostrum from each cow was frozen, subsequently thawed, and pooled. One-liter aliquots of the pooled colostrum were frozen and assigned randomly to three thawing treatments. Colostrum was thawed using one of three regimens: 10 min in a microwave oven at full power (650 W), 17 min in a microwave oven at half power (325 W), and 25 min in 45 degrees C water. Colostrum thawed in the microwave oven was slightly coagulated and had lower volume and total protein content than colostrum thawed in water. Casein and pH were not different among treatments. Both concentration and total content of immunoglobulin A were higher in the control than in microwave treatments. Neither amount nor concentration of immunoglobulin G and immunoglobulin M were different among treatments. Immunological activity, measured by a hemolytic test, was lower for microwave treatments than the control but did not differ between microwave treatments. Frozen colostrum thawed in a microwave oven should provide a reasonable source of colostrum when fresh high quality colostrum is not available.

  17. The removal of anionic surfactants from water in coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Kaleta, Jadwiga; Elektorowicz, Maria

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a laboratory study on the effectiveness of the coagulation process in removing surfactants from water. The application of traditional coagulants (aluminium sulfate and iron chlorides) has not brought satisfactory results, the reduction in anionic surfactant (AS) content reached 7.6% and 10%, respectively. Adding cationic polyelectrolyte (Zetag-50) increased the removal efficiency to 24%. Coagulation using a polyelectrolyte alone proved to be more efficient, the reduction in surfactant content fluctuated at a level of about 50%. Complete surfactant removal was obtained when powdered activated carbon was added 5 minutes before the basic coagulant to the coagulation process. The efficiency of surfactant coagulation also increased after the application of powdered clinoptilolite, but to a smaller degree. Then the removal of AS was found to be improved by dosing powdered clinoptilolite simultaneously or with short delay after the addition of the basic coagulant. PMID:23837351

  18. MF/UF performance with and without coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Robert, C.; Taylor, J.S.; Reiss, C.R.

    1999-07-01

    Although size-exclusion membrane processes produce superior water quality relative to conventional surface water treatment, fouling can significantly limit the use of these membrane processes. Coagulation can reduce organic, particulate and biological fouling, and was investigated as a pretreatment process to microfiltration (MF) and ultrafiltration (UF) membrane processes. Varying coagulants, coagulant pH and dose and variation of conventional coagulation pretreatment processes including coagulation-sedimentation-filtration (CSF), coagulation-sedimentation (CS) and in-line coagulation (ILC) for varying dose and pH were investigated. The Hillsborough River, a highly organic productive subtropical surface water in Tampa, Florida and the Maumee River, a moderately productive northern US surface water were used as water sources for this study.

  19. Activation of Coagulation by Administration of Recombinant Factor VIIa Elicits Interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 Release in Healthy Human Subjects

    PubMed Central

    de Jonge, Evert; Friederich, Philip W.; Vlasuk, George P.; Rote, William E.; Vroom, Margaretha B.; Levi, Marcel; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-01-01

    The activation of coagulation has been shown to contribute to proinflammatory responses in animal and in vitro experiments. Here we report that the activation of coagulation in healthy human subjects by the administration of recombinant factor VIIa also elicits a small but significant increase in the concentrations of interleukin 6 (IL-6) and IL-8 in plasma. This increase was absent when the subjects were pretreated with recombinant nematode anticoagulant protein c2, the inhibitor of tissue factor-factor VIIa. PMID:12738659

  20. Coagulating activity of the blood, vascular wall, and myocardium under hypodynamia conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrovskiy, B. V. (Editor); Chazov, E. I. (Editor); Andreyev, S. V. (Editor)

    1980-01-01

    In order to study the effects of hypodynamia on the coagulating properties of the blood, vascular wall, and myocardium, chinchilla rabbits were kept for varying periods in special cages which restricted their movements. At the end of the experiment, blood samples were taken and the animals were sacrificed. Preparations were made from the myocardium venae cavae, and layers of the aorta. Two resultant interrelated and mutually conditioned syndromes were discovered: thrombohemorrhagic in the blood and hemorrago-thrombotic in the tissues.

  1. Testicular Seminoma With Pseudocyst and Coagulation Necrosis Like Burned-out Tumor: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Hoshii, Tatsuhiko; Hasegawa, Go; Ikeda, Yohei; Nishiyama, Tsutomu

    2016-07-01

    Testicular seminoma is a relatively common testicular cancer; however, testicular seminoma with pseudocyst is an extremely rare. The 'burned-out' phenomenon in germ cell tumors refers to a germ cell tumor in extra-gonadal tissues with spontaneous regression of an intra-gonadal tumor. We present a case of the testicular seminoma with pseudocyst and coagulation necrosis like burned-out tumor without metastasis. PMID:27335779

  2. Coagulation factors and recurrence of ischemic and bleeding adverse events in patients with acute coronary syndromes.

    PubMed

    Campo, Gianluca; Pavasini, Rita; Pollina, Alberto; Tebaldi, Matteo; Ferrari, Roberto

    2013-08-01

    In the last years, management and prognosis of patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS) are significantly improved. Nowadays antithrombotic (antiplatelet plus anticoagulant drugs) therapy represents the main treatment of ACS patients. Anticoagulant drugs are particularly helpful in the acute phase of ACS, whereas in the chronic phase are maintained only in selected cases. Many studies demonstrate that exists a significant variability in the coagulation factor levels between patients affected by ACS. This variation on coagulation factors levels is due to environmental (smoking, inflammation, sex, oral contraceptive, triglycerides, diabetes mellitus) and genetic determinants. Particularly several gene polymorphisms have been selected and clearly associated with significant variations in the coagulation factors values. The heightened levels of tissue factor, factor VII and fibrinogen are related with a "hypercoagulable status" and with a higher occurrence of ischemic complications after ACS and/or PCI. On the contrary, less data are available regarding the relationship between coagulation factors levels (or their gene polymorphisms) and bleeding complications. Recently, new anticoagulant drugs have been developed. They show less side effects and a better tolerability and, probably, their selected use in patients with a "hypercoagulable status" may improve the clinical outcome after ACS. In this review we analyze the current available data and we discuss how this finding may be useful for planning future studies to optimize the treatment of ACS patients. PMID:23827698

  3. Microscopic correlates of macroscopic optical property changes during thermal coagulation of myocardium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomsen, Sharon L.; Jacques, Steven L.; Flock, Stephen T.

    1990-06-01

    The effects of thermal coagulation on the macroscopic optical transport parameters that govern the distribution of light in tissues were studied. The optical absorption coefficients, pa, and the reduced scattering coefficients, j.ts (1-g), were deduced from measurements of total transmission and total reflectance of HeNe laser radiation ( = 633 and 594 nm) directed to thin slices of dog myocardium heated in vitro. The first optical changes were detected at 45°and, at temperatures above 65°, there was a 2-fold increase in absorption and a 7-fold increase in scattering. Transmission electron microscopy of laser-induced thermally coagulated lesions in rat myocardium (cw argon ion, = 514 nm) revealed ultrastructural alterations that were considered responsible for the increased scattering based on Mie theory. These microscopic alterations included disruption of mitochondria to form aggregates of electron dense granules and granular transformation of thermally coagulated proteins of the sarcomeres and cytoplasm. Our preliminary analyses suggest that the mitochondrial granules and the protein granules contribute to the increased scattering oflight in thermally coagulated myocardium.

  4. Preparation of magnetic indole-3-acetic acid imprinted polymer beads with 4-vinylpyridine and β-cyclodextrin as binary monomer via microwave heating initiated polymerization and their application to trace analysis of auxins in plant tissues.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Yuanwen; Hu, Yuling; Li, Gongke; Chen, Yueqin

    2010-11-19

    Auxin is a crucial phytohormone for precise control of growth and development of plants. Due to its low concentration in plant tissues which are rich in interfering substances, the accurate determination of auxins remains a challenge. In this paper, a new strategy for isolation and enrichment of auxins from plant tissues was obtained by the magnetic molecularly imprinted polymer (mag-MIP) beads, which were prepared by microwave heating initiated suspension polymerization using indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) as template. In order to obtain higher selective recognition cavities, an enhanced imprinting method based on binary functional monomers, 4-vinylpyridine (4-VP) and β-cyclodextrin (β-CD), was adopted for IAA imprinting. The morphological and magnetic characteristics of the mag-MIP beads were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy and vibrating sample magnetometry. A majority of resultant beads were within the size range of 80-150μm. Porous surface morphology and good magnetic property were observed. Furthermore, the mag-MIP beads fabricated with 4-VP and β-CD as binary functional monomers exhibited improved recognition ability to IAA, as compared with the mag-MIP beads prepared with the individual monomer separately. Competitive rebinding experiment results revealed that the mag-MIP beads exhibited a higher specific recognition for the template than the non-imprinted polymer (mag-NIP) beads. An extraction method by mag-MIP beads coupled with high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was developed for determination of IAA and indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) in plant tissues. Linear ranges for IAA and IBA were in the range of 7.00-100.0μgL(-1) and 10.0-100.0μgL(-1), and the detection limits were 3.9 and 7.4μgL(-1), respectively. The analytical performance was also estimated by seedlings or immature embryos samples from three different plant tissues, pea, rice and wheat. Recoveries were in the range of 70

  5. Blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in aortic valve stenosis: links with inflammation and calcification.

    PubMed

    Natorska, J; Undas, A

    2015-08-01

    Aortic valve stenosis (AS) increasingly afflicts our aging population. However, the pathobiology of the disease is still poorly understood and there is no effective pharmacotherapy for treating those at risk for clinical progression. The progression of AS involves complex inflammatory and fibroproliferative processes that resemble to some extent atherosclerosis. Accumulating evidence indicates that several coagulation proteins and its inhibitors, including tissue factor, tissue factor pathway inhibitor, prothrombin, factor XIII, von Willebrand factor, display increased expression within aortic stenotic valves, predominantly on macrophages and myofibroblasts around calcified areas. Systemic impaired fibrinolysis, along with increased plasma and valvular expression of plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, has also been observed in patients with AS in association with the severity of the disease. There is an extensive cross-talk between inflammation and coagulation in stenotic valve tissue which contributes to the calcification and mineralisation of the aortic valve leaflets. This review summarises the available data on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis in AS with the emphasis on their interactions with inflammation and calcification. PMID:25809537

  6. The coagulation characteristics of humic acid by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and chitosan coagulant mixtures.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chih-Yu; Wu, Chung-Yu; Chung, Ying-Chien

    2015-01-01

    Chitosan is a potential substitute for traditional aluminium salts in water treatment systems. This study compared the characteristics of humic acid (HA) removal by using acid-soluble chitosan, water-soluble chitosan, and coagulant mixtures of chitosan with aluminium sulphate (alum) or polyaluminium chloride (PACl). In addition, we evaluated their respective coagulation efficiencies at various coagulant concentrations, pH values, turbidities, and hardness levels. Furthermore, we determined the size and settling velocity of flocs formed by these coagulants to identify the major factors affecting HA coagulation. The coagulation efficiency of acid- and water-soluble chitosan for 15 mg/l of HA was 74.4% and 87.5%, respectively. The optimal coagulation range of water-soluble chitosan (9-20 mg/l) was broader than that of acid-soluble chitosan (4-8 mg/l). Notably, acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum coagulant mixtures exhibited a higher coagulation efficiency for HA than for PACl or alum alone. Furthermore, these coagulant mixtures yielded an acceptable floc settling velocity and savings in both installation and operational expenses. Based on these results, we confidently assert that coagulant mixtures with a 1:1 mass ratio of acid-soluble chitosan/PACl and water-soluble chitosan/alum provide a substantially more cost-effective alternative to using chitosan alone for removing HA from water. PMID:25362971

  7. Links between coagulation, inflammation, regeneration, and fibrosis in kidney pathology.

    PubMed

    Suárez-Álvarez, Beatriz; Liapis, Helen; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2016-04-01

    Acute kidney injury (AKI) involves nephron injury leading to irreversible nephron loss, ie, chronic kidney disease (CKD). Both AKI and CKD are associated with distinct histological patterns of tissue injury, but kidney atrophy in CKD involves tissue remodeling with interstitial inflammation and scarring. No doubt, nephron atrophy, inflammation, fibrosis, and renal dysfunction are associated with each other, but their hierarchical relationships remain speculative. To better understand the pathophysiology, we provide an overview of the fundamental danger response programs that assure host survival upon traumatic injury from as early as the first multicellular organisms, ie, bleeding control by coagulation, infection control by inflammation, epithelial barrier restoration by re-epithelialization, and tissue stabilization by mesenchymal repair. Although these processes assure survival in the majority of the populations, their dysregulation causes kidney disease in a minority. We discuss how, in genetically heterogeneous population, genetic variants shift balances and modulate danger responses toward kidney disease. We further discuss how classic kidney disease entities develop from an insufficient or overshooting activation of these danger response programs. Finally, we discuss molecular pathways linking, for example, inflammation and regeneration or inflammation and fibrosis. Understanding the causative and hierarchical relationships and the molecular links between the danger response programs should help to identify molecular targets to modulate kidney injury and to improve outcomes for kidney disease patients. PMID:26752746

  8. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper discusses the following topics on microwave processing of ceramics: Microwave-material interactions; anticipated advantage of microwave sintering; ceramic sintering; and ceramic joining. 24 refs., 4 figs. (LSP)

  9. Coagulation of dust particles in a plasma

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horanyi, M.; Goertz, C. K.

    1990-01-01

    The electrostatic charge of small dust grains in a plasma in which the temperature varies in time is discussed, pointing out that secondary electron emission might introduce charge separation. If the sign of the charge on small grains is opposite to that on big ones, enhanced coagulation can occur which will affect the size distribution of grains in a plasma. Two scenarios where this process might be relevant are considered: a hot plasma environment with temperature fluctuations and a cold plasma environment with transient heating events. The importance of the enhanced coagulation is uncertain, because the plasma parameters in grain-producing environments such as a molecular cloud or a protoplanetary disk are not known. It is possible, however, that this process is the most efficient mechanism for the growth of grains in the size range of 0.1-500 microns.

  10. Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation Induced with Leukocyte Procoagulant

    PubMed Central

    Kociba, Gary J.; Griesemer, Richard A.

    1972-01-01

    The procoagulant activity of rabbit peritoneal leukocytes significantly increased when the leukocytes were incubated in suspension cultures at 37 C for 24 hours. Intravenous infusions of Iysates of 232 × 106 rabbit leukocytes which had been incubated in cultures at 37 C for 24 hours produced disseminated intravascular coagulation and vasculitis involving the pulmonary arteries in normal rabbits. Intraaortic infusions of lysates of 230 × 106 similarly incubated leukocytes produced renal thrombosis and renal cortical necrosis in normal rabbits. These observations suggest that the procoagulant of granulocytic leukocytes could play a role in the generalized Shwartzman reaction and other syndromes of disseminated intravascular coagulation. ImagesFig 3Fig 4Fig 5Fig 6Fig 7Fig 1Fig 2 PMID:5086898

  11. Casting uniform ceramics with direct coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Graule, T.J.; Baader, F.H.; Gauckler, L.J.

    1995-06-01

    Today complex-shaped ceramic parts are mass fabricated by many different methods, two of which are slip casting and injection molding. The selection of the appropriate technique is governed by the geometric shape, the number of pieces to be manufactured, and the chemistry of the ceramic. Both slip casting and injection molding introduce imperfections in the green part, which lead to inhomogeneous microstructures in the sintered parts. A new fabrication method, direct coagulation casting (DCC), may be suitable for the mass production of complex ceramic parts with high strength and reliability. In DCC, an aqueous suspension is coagulated by a change in pH or an increase in ionic strength after casting, producing a rigid green body. The use of DCC can avoid most of the limitations of conventional shaping techniques, and it can be applied to a large variety of ceramic powders, sols, and polymers, alone or in combination.

  12. Development of the selective coagulation process

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-07-01

    The selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process is based on the recent finding that hydrophobic particles can be selectively coagulated without using traditional agglomerating agents or flocculants. The driving force for the coagulation is the attractive energy between hydrophobic surfaces, an interaction that has been overlooked in classical colloid chemistry. In most cases, selective separations can be achieved using simple pH control to disperse the mineral matter, followed by recovery of the coal coagula using techniques that take advantage of the size enlargement. In the present work, studies have been carried out to further investigate the fundamental mechanisms of the SHC process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur. Studies have included direct force measurements of the attractive interaction between model hydrophobic surfaces, in-situ measurements of the size distributions of coagula formed under a variety of operating conditions, and development of a population balance model to describe the coagulation process. An extended DLVO colloid stability model which includes a hydrophobic interaction energy term has also been developed to explain the findings obtained from the experimental studies. In addition to the fundamental studies, bench-scale process development test work has been performed to establish the best possible method of separating the coagula from dispersed mineral matter. Two types of separators, i.e., a sedimentation tank and a rotating drum screen, were examined in this study. The sedimentation tank proved to be the more efficient unit, achieving ash reductions as high as 60% in a single pass while recovering more than 90% of the combustible material. This device, which minimizes turbulence and coagula breakage, was used in subsequent test work to optimize design and operating parameters.

  13. Electrocoagulation versus chemical coagulation: coagulation/flocculation mechanisms and resulting floc characteristics.

    PubMed

    Harif, Tali; Khai, Moti; Adin, Avner

    2012-06-15

    Electrocoagulation (EC) and chemical coagulation (CC) are employed in water treatment for particle removal. Although both are used for similar purposes, they differ in their dosing method - in EC the coagulant is added by electrolytic oxidation of an appropriate anode material, while in CC dissolution of a chemical coagulant is used. These different methods in fact induce different chemical environments, which should impact coagulation/flocculation mechanisms and subsequent floc formation. Hence, the process implications when choosing which to apply should be significant. This study elucidates differences in coagulation/flocculation mechanisms in EC versus CC and their subsequent effect on floc growth kinetics and structural evolution. A buffered kaolin suspension served as a representative solution that underwent EC and CC by applying aluminum via additive dosing regime in batch mode. In EC an aluminum anode generated the active species while in CC, commercial alum was used. Aluminum equivalent doses were applied, at initial pH values of 5, 6.5 and 8, while samples were taken over pre-determined time intervals, and analyzed for pH, particle size distribution, ζ potential, and structural properties. EC generated fragile flocs, compared to CC, over a wider pH range, at a substantially higher growth rate, that were prone to restructuring and compaction. The results suggest that the flocculation mechanism governing EC in sweep floc conditions is of Diffusion Limited Cluster Aggregation (DCLA) nature, versus a Reaction Limited Cluster Aggregation (RLCA) type in CC. The implications of these differences are discussed. PMID:22525456

  14. A novel coagulation inhibitor from Schistosoma japonicum.

    PubMed

    Ranasinghe, Shiwanthi L; Fischer, Katja; Gobert, Geoffrey N; McManus, Donald P

    2015-12-01

    Little is known about the molecular mechanisms whereby the human blood fluke Schistosoma japonicum is able to survive in the host venous blood system. Protease inhibitors are likely released by the parasite enabling it to avoid attack by host proteolytic enzymes and coagulation factors. Interrogation of the S. japonicum genomic sequence identified a gene, SjKI-1, homologous to that encoding a single domain Kunitz protein (Sjp_0020270) which we expressed in recombinant form in Escherichia coli and purified. SjKI-1 is highly transcribed in adult worms and eggs but its expression was very low in cercariae and schistosomula. In situ immunolocalization with anti-SjKI-1 rabbit antibodies showed the protein was present in eggs trapped in the infected mouse intestinal wall. In functional assays, SjKI-1 inhibited trypsin in the picomolar range and chymotrypsin, neutrophil elastase, FXa and plasma kallikrein in the nanomolar range. Furthermore, SjKI-1, at a concentration of 7·5 µ m, prolonged 2-fold activated partial thromboplastin time of human blood coagulation. We also demonstrate that SjKI-1 has the ability to bind Ca(++). We present, therefore, characterization of the first Kunitz protein from S. japonicum which we show has an anti-coagulant properties. In addition, its inhibition of neutrophil elastase indicates SjKI-1 have an anti-inflammatory role. Having anti-thrombotic properties, SjKI-1 may point the way towards novel treatment for hemostatic disorders. PMID:26463744

  15. Arsenic removal from drinking water during coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Hering, J.G.; Chen, P.Y.; Wilkie, J.A.; Elimelech, M.

    1997-08-01

    The efficiency of arsenic removal from source waters and artificial freshwaters during coagulation with ferric chloride and alum was examined in bench-scale studies. Arsenic(V) removal by either ferric chloride or alum was relatively insensitive to variations in source water composition below pH 8. At pH 8 and 9, the efficiency of arsenic(V) removal by ferric chloride was decreased in the presence of natural organic matter. The pH range for arsenic(V) removal with alum was more restricted than with ferric chloride. For source waters spiked with 20 {micro}g/L arsenic(V), final dissolved arsenic(V) concentrations in the product water of less than 2 {micro}g/L were achieved with both coagulants at neutral pH. Removal of arsenic(III) from source waters by ferric chloride was both less efficient and more strongly influenced by source water composition than removal of arsenic(V). The presence of sulfate (at pH 4 and 5) and natural organic matter (at pH 4 through 9) adversely affected the efficiency of arsenic(III) removal by ferric chloride. Arsenic(III) could not be removed from source waters by coagulation with alum.

  16. Ultrarapid vacuum-microwave histoprocessing.

    PubMed

    Kok, L P; Boon, M E

    1995-05-01

    A novel histoprocessing method for paraffin sections is presented in which the combination of vacuum and microwave exposure is the key element. By exploiting the decrease in boiling temperature under vacuum, the liquid molecules in the tissues have been successfully extracted and exchanged at relatively low temperatures during each of the steps from dehydration, clearing, and impregnation. In this vacuum-microwave method, an extremely short time suffices for the preparation of optimal-quality paraffin blocks. No xylene (but isopropanol instead) was used as the intermediate solvent. Thirty biopsies (thickness 2-4 mm) can be processed in 40 min. In addition, this approach can be used to produce large sections of giant blocks (4 x 6 x 1 cm3) which can be easily cut on a routine microtome due to the optimal paraffin impregnation. These giant blocks do not shrink during this vacuum-microwave histoprocessing. PMID:7657560

  17. Microwave-assisted purge-and-trap extraction device coupled with gas chromatography and mass spectrometry for the determination of five predominant odors in sediment, fish tissues, and algal cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xuwei; Xie, Ping; Qi, Min; Liang, Gaodao; Chen, Jun; Ma, Zhimei; Jiang, Yan

    2012-01-01

    Off-flavors are among the most troublesome compounds in the environment worldwide. The lack of a viable theory for studying the sources, distribution, and effect of odors has necessitated the accurate measurement of odors from environmental compartments. A rapid and flexible microwave-assisted purge-and-trap extraction device for simultaneously determining five predominant odors, namely, dimethyltrisulfide, 2-methylisoborneol, geosmin, β-cyclocitral and β-ionone, from the primary sources and sinks is demonstrated. This instrument facilitates the extraction and concentration of odors from quite different matrices simultaneously. This device is a solvent-free automated system that does not require cleaning and is timesaving. The calibration curves of the five odor compounds showed good linearity in the range of 1-500 ng/L, with correlation coefficients above 0.999 (levels=7) and with residuals ranging from approximately 77% to 104%. The limits of detection (S/N=3) were below 0.15 ng/L in algae sample and 0.07 ng/g in sediment and fish tissue samples. The relative standard deviations were between 2.65% and 7.29% (n=6). Thus the proposed design is ready for rapid translation into a standard analytical tool and is useful for multiple applications in the analysis of off-flavors. PMID:22153815

  18. Coagulation of Dust Particles in Argon Plasma of RF Discharge

    SciTech Connect

    Mankelevich, Yu. A.; Olevanov, M. A.; Pal, A. F.; Rakhimova, T. V.; Ryabinkin, A. N.; Serov, A. O.; Filippov, A. V.

    2008-09-07

    The experiments on coagulation of poly-disperse particles with various size distributions injected into the argon plasma of the magnetron radio-frequency discharge are discussed. The experiments were carried out under the conditions similar to those using dusty plasma for technology applications. Within the created theory the threshold behavior of the coagulation process was explained for the first time, the estimation of the critical particle size for onset of a fast coagulation was made, and the analytical calculation of the coagulation rate of dust particles was performed. The proposed coagulation mechanism makes it possible to describe the typical features of coagulation processes observed in experiments and to explain the effects of attraction and coalescence of highly negatively charged microns size particles.

  19. Application of the precipitation-charge neutralization model of coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    Dentel, S.K.

    1988-07-01

    A quantitative model is considered that develops predictions of suspension stability on the basis of electrokinetic characteristics of colloid material prior to and following coagulation. The model is applied in this paper to coagulation with aluminum sulfate and other aluminum salts. The effect of increasing particle surface area on coagulation is first modeled for a system containing particulate silica, but of varying size and concentration. Experimental results show a correlation of turbidity removal to attainment of near neutral zeta potential in zone 2 coagulation, and the calibrated model successfully predicts this zone. The model is then used to describe the coagulation of waters containing humic substances by considering them as small colloids with a substantial contribution to surface area in the system. Finally, it is shown that the model can be employed to describe the performance of polyaluminum coagulants as well.

  20. A comprehensive model for the humoral coagulation network in humans.

    PubMed

    Wajima, T; Isbister, G K; Duffull, S B

    2009-09-01

    Coagulation is an important process in hemostasis and comprises a complicated interaction of multiple enzymes and proteins. We have developed a mechanistic quantitative model of the coagulation network. The model accurately describes the time courses of coagulation factors following in vivo activation as well as in vitro blood coagulation tests of prothrombin time (PT, often reported as international normalized ratio (INR)) and activated partial thromboplastin time (aPTT). The model predicts the concentration-time and time-effect profiles of warfarin, heparins, and vitamin K in humans. The model can be applied to predict the time courses of coagulation kinetics in clinical situations (e.g., hemophilia) and for biomarker identification during drug development. The model developed in this study is the first quantitative description of the comprehensive coagulation network. PMID:19516255

  1. [Progress in research of the blood coagulation system].

    PubMed

    Urano, H; Karasaki, Y; Shirahata, A

    1999-09-01

    Blood coagulation is an amplification system consisting of reactions between enzymes and zymogens. It has been illustrated as a cascade model. However, the exact mechanism by which haemostasis is achieved under physiological conditions remains to be clarified. The solving of structure-function relation of each coagulation factor, analysis of the enzymological characteristics of each reaction, analysis of the regulation mechanism of the reactions and identification of novel factors involved in coagulation reactions contribute to the understanding of this complex system. Based on these findings, some new conceptions of blood coagulation are proposed. In the model introduced in this review, the extrinsic pathway and the intrinsic pathway of the 'classical' cascade model of the blood coagulation system could not be separated, and the suppression of fibrinolysis by TAFI (thrombin activatable fibrinolysis inhibitor) during coagulation reactions is thought to be a critical process for effective haemostasis. PMID:10589463

  2. Large Volume Coagulation Utilizing Multiple Cavitation Clouds Generated by Array Transducer Driven by 32 Channel Drive Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Kotaro; Asai, Ayumu; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Yoshizawa, Shin; Umemura, Shin-ichiro

    2013-07-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment is a noninvasive treatment, in which focused ultrasound is generated outside the body and coagulates a diseased tissue. The advantage of this method is minimal physical and mental stress to the patient, and the disadvantage is the long treatment time caused by the smallness of the therapeutic volume by a single exposure. To improve the efficiency and shorten the treatment time, we are focusing attention on utilizing cavitation bubbles. The generated microbubbles can convert the acoustic energy into heat with a high efficiency. In this study, using the class D amplifiers, which we have developed, to drive the array transducer, we demonstrate a new method to coagulate a large volume by a single HIFU exposure through generating cavitation bubbles distributing in a large volume and vibrating all of them. As a result, the coagulated volume by the proposed method was 1.71 times as large as that of the conventional method.

  3. Comparison of coagulation behavior and floc structure characteristic of different polyferric-cationic polymer dual-coagulants in humic acid solution.

    PubMed

    Wei, Jincheng; Gao, Baoyu; Yue, Qinyan; Wang, Yan; Li, Weiwei; Zhu, Xiaobiao

    2009-02-01

    Three polyferric-cationic polymer dual-coagulants were comparatively evaluated in terms of coagulation behavior and floc structure characteristic in the coagulation of humic acid (HA) solution. The first dual-coagulant, PFC-PDADMAC, was prepared by premixing of polyferric chloride (PFC) and polydiallyldimethylammonium (PDADMAC) before dosing. The other two were achieved by dosing PFC and PDADMAC in different order. For the given neutral condition, all three dual-coagulants gave similar HA removal before reaching optimal dosage. The strongest charge neutralization and narrowest effective coagulation dosage range were obtained when PFC was dosed firstly. While the weakest charge neutralization and the broadest effective coagulation dosage were obtained when PDADMAC was used as the primary coagulant. The HA removal of all three dual-coagulants was slightly pH dependent for optimum coagulant doses. Fe(III) hydrolysis species distributions of the dual-coagulants in coagulation process were measured by ferron method. PFC-PDADMAC gave the highest content of active Fe(III) coagulating species which is responsible for the coagulation performance of ferric coagulant. The evolution of floc size and floc fractal dimension (Df) in coagulation process was measured under optimum dose and neutral condition by laser diffraction instrument and small-angle laser light scattering (SALLS), respectively. All three dual-coagulants gave similar final floc size but different floc growth rate and floc structure. Both the growth rate and Df were in the same order: PFC dosed firstly>PDADMAC dosed firstly>PFC-PDADMAC. PMID:19046756

  4. Ancrod revisited: viscoelastic analyses of the effects of Calloselasma rhodostoma venom on plasma coagulation and fibrinolysis.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G

    2016-08-01

    Fibrinogen depletion via catalysis by snake venom enzymes as a therapeutic strategy to prevent or treat thrombotic disorders was utilized for over four decades, with ancrod being the quintessential agent. However, ancrod eventually was found to not be of clinical utility in large scale stroke trial, resulting in the eventual discontinuation of the administration of the drug for any indication. It was hypothesized that ancrod, possessing thrombin-like activity, may have unappreciated robust coagulation kinetics. Using thrombelastographic methods, a comparison of equivalent tissue factor initiated thrombin generation and Calloselasma rhodostoma venom (rich in ancrod activity) on plasmatic coagulation kinetics was performed. The venom resulted in thrombi that formed nearly twice as fast compared to thrombin formed clots, and there was no difference in fibrinolytic kinetics initiated by tissue-type plasminogen activator. In plasma containing iron and carbon monoxide modified fibrinogen, which may be found in patients at risk of stroke, the coagulation kinetic differences observed with venom was still more vigorous than that seen with thrombin. These phenomena may provide insight into the clinical failure of ancrod, and may serve as an impetus to revisit the concept of fibrinogen depletion via fibrinogenolytic enzymes, not those with thrombin-like activity. PMID:26905070

  5. Local hemostasis, immunothrombosis, and systemic disseminated intravascular coagulation in trauma and traumatic shock.

    PubMed

    Gando, Satoshi; Otomo, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Knowing the pathophysiology of trauma-induced coagulopathy is important for the management of severely injured trauma patients. The aims of this review are to provide a summary of the recent advances in our understanding of thrombosis and hemostasis following trauma and to discuss the pathogenesis of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) at an early stage of trauma. Local hemostasis and thrombosis respectively act to induce physiological wound healing of injuries and innate immune responses to damaged-self following trauma. However, if overwhelmed by systemic inflammation caused by extensive tissue damage and tissue hypoperfusion, both of these processes foster systemic DIC associated with pathological fibrin(ogen)olysis. This is called DIC with the fibrinolytic phenotype, which is characterized by the activation of coagulation, consumption coagulopathy, insufficient control of coagulation, and increased fibrin(ogen)olysis. Irrespective of microvascular thrombosis, the condition shows systemic thrombin generation as well as its activation in the circulation and extensive damage to the microvasculature endothelium. DIC with the fibrinolytic phenotype gives rise to oozing-type non-surgical bleeding and greatly affects the prognosis of trauma patients. The coexistences of hypothermia, acidosis, and dilution aggravate DIC and lead to so-called trauma-induced coagulopathy. He that would know what shall be must consider what has been. The Analects of Confucius. PMID:25886801

  6. Coagulation activation in sickle cell trait: an exploratory study

    PubMed Central

    Amin, Chirag; Adam, Soheir; Mooberry, Micah J.; Kutlar, Abdullah; Kutlar, Ferdane; Esserman, Denise; Brittain, Julia E.; Ataga, Kenneth I.; Chang, Jen-Yea; Wolberg, Alisa S.; Key, Nigel S.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Recent epidemiologic data suggest that sickle cell trait (HbAS; AS) is a risk factor for venous thromboembolism. We conducted an exploratory study of healthy subjects with AS under baseline conditions to determine whether a chronic basal hyperactivation of coagulation exists, and if so, what mechanism(s) contribute to this state. Eighteen healthy AS individuals were compared to 22 African-American controls with a normal haemoglobin profile (HbAA; AA) and 17 patients with sickle cell disease (HbSS; SS). Plasma thrombin-antithrombin complexes and D-dimer levels were elevated in AS relative to AA patients (P = 0.0385 and P = 0.017, respectively), and as expected, were much higher in SS versus AA (P < 0.0001 for both). Thrombin generation in platelet poor plasma was indistinguishable between AA and AS subjects, whereas a paradoxical decrease in endogenous thrombin potential was observed in SS (P ≤ 0.0001). Whole blood tissue factor was elevated in SS compared to AA (P = 0.005), but did not differ between AA and AS. Plasma microparticle tissue factor activity was non-significantly elevated in AS (P = 0.051), but was clearly elevated in SS patients (P = 0.004) when compared to AA controls. Further studies in larger cohorts of subjects with sickle cell trait are needed to confirm the results of this preliminary investigation. PMID:26511074

  7. Improving the efficiency of clarifiers for coagulation treatment of water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinogradov, V. N.; Smirnov, B. A.; Zhadan, A. V.; Avan, V. K.

    2010-08-01

    Technological and design possibilities of improving clarifiers for coagulation treatment of water are considered. The results obtained from implementing these possibilities in real devices are presented.

  8. Medical Applications of Microwave Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhao; Lim, Eng Gee; Tang, Yujun

    2014-01-01

    Ultrawide band (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for the detection of early stage breast cancer, based on the large contrast in electrical parameters between malignant tumour tissue and the surrounding normal breast-tissue. In this paper, the detection and imaging of a malignant tumour are performed through a tomographic based microwave system and signal processing. Simulations of the proposed system are performed and postimage processing is presented. Signal processing involves the extraction of tumour information from background information and then image reconstruction through the confocal method delay-and-sum algorithms. Ultimately, the revision of time-delay and the superposition of more tumour signals are applied to improve accuracy. PMID:25379515

  9. Pathogenesis and management of peripartum coagulopathic calamities (disseminated intravascular coagulation and amniotic fluid embolism).

    PubMed

    Levi, Marcel

    2013-01-01

    Acute coagulopathic peripartum calamities are relatively rare but contribute importantly to maternal morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Abruptio placenta, amniotic fluid embolism, and retained fetal or placental material may lead to fulminant intravascular activation of coagulation which results in thromboembolic complications and consumption coagulopathy causing severe hemorrhage. The central underlying pathophysiological pathway in the coagulopathy associated with these syndromes is the occurrence of tissue factor, released from the placenta and amniotic fluid, in the circulation, in combination with low levels of physiological anticoagulant factors during pregnancy. The diagnosis of DIC may be made trough conventional composite scoring systems employing routine coagulation tests, whereas for the diagnosis of amniotic fluid embolism measurement of insulin like growth factor binding protein-1 seems promising. Therapy is aimed at removing the precipitating factor combined with supportive adjunctive treatment options. PMID:23452737

  10. Intron-exon organization of the human gene coding for the lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor: The factor Xa dependent inhibitor of the extrinsic pathway of coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    van der Logt, C.P.E.; Reitsma, P.H.; Bertina, R.M. )

    1991-02-12

    Blood coagulation can be initiated when factor VII(a) binds to its cofactor tissue factor. This factor VIIa/tissue factor complex proteolytically activates factors IX and X, which eventually leads to the formation of a fibrin clot. Plasma contains a lipoprotein-associated coagulation inhibitor (LACI) which inhibits factor Xa directly and, in a Xa-dependent manner, also inhibits the factor VIIa/tissue factor complex. Here the authors report the cloning of the human LACI gene and the elucidation of its intron-exon organization. The LACI gene, which spans about 70 kb, consists of nine exons separated by eight introns. As has been found for other Kunitz-type protease inhibitors, the domain structure of human LACI is reflected in the intron-exon organization of the gene. The 5{prime} terminus of the LACI mRNA has been determined by primer extension and S1 nuclease mapping. The putative promoter was examined and found to contain two consensus sequences for AP-1 binding and one for NF-1 binding, but no TATA consensus promoter element.

  11. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s’, RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s’, showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  12. Microwave ablation of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Guido; Tosoratti, Nevio; Montagna, Benedetta; Picchi, Chiara

    2015-11-01

    Although surgical resection is still the optimal treatment option for early-stage hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in patients with well compensated cirrhosis, thermal ablation techniques provide a valid non-surgical treatment alternative, thanks to their minimal invasiveness, excellent tolerability and safety profile, proven efficacy in local disease control, virtually unlimited repeatability and cost-effectiveness. Different energy sources are currently employed in clinics as physical agents for percutaneous or intra-surgical thermal ablation of HCC nodules. Among them, radiofrequency (RF) currents are the most used, while microwave ablations (MWA) are becoming increasingly popular. Starting from the 90s', RF ablation (RFA) rapidly became the standard of care in ablation, especially in the treatment of small HCC nodules; however, RFA exhibits substantial performance limitations in the treatment of large lesions and/or tumors located near major heat sinks. MWA, first introduced in the Far Eastern clinical practice in the 80s', showing promising results but also severe limitations in the controllability of the emitted field and in the high amount of power employed for the ablation of large tumors, resulting in a poor coagulative performance and a relatively high complication rate, nowadays shows better results both in terms of treatment controllability and of overall coagulative performance, thanks to the improvement of technology. In this review we provide an extensive and detailed overview of the key physical and technical aspects of MWA and of the currently available systems, and we want to discuss the most relevant published data on MWA treatments of HCC nodules in regard to clinical results and to the type and rate of complications, both in absolute terms and in comparison with RFA. PMID:26557950

  13. Study on coagulation property of metal-polysilicate coagulants in low turbidity water treatment.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hai-yan; Cui, Fu-yi; Zhao, Qing-liang; Ma, Chao

    2004-06-01

    In order to remove the low turbidity present in surface water, a novel metal-polysilicate coagulant was used to treat the raw water taken from Tanjiang River in Guangdong Province. This study on the effects of Al/Fe molar ratio on the performance of a complex compound formed by polysilicic acid, aluminium and ferric salt (PAFS) showed that PAFS with Al/Fe ratio of 10:3 seemed to have the best coagulation performance in removing turbidity and color. Experimental results showed that under the conditions of polymerization time of 15 d, sedimentation time of 12 min, and pH of 6-8, PAFS with Al/Fe molar ratio of 10:3 had the best coagulation efficiency and lowest residual Al concentration. The turbidity decreased from 23.8 NTU to 3.23 NTU and the residual Al concentration was only 0.165 mg/L in the product water. It could be speculated that colloidal impurities and particulate Al were removed by adsorption bridging and electrical neutralization of long chain inorganic polymer coagulants. PMID:15101109

  14. Research on orthogonal coagulated setting and coagulation-flotation test of tannery wastewater.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi; Fei, Qingzhi; Zhong, Weilei

    2009-01-01

    The treatment of the tannery wastewater was studied by orthogonal test of beaker coagulation. FeSO4 and alkaline sodium aluminum waste liquid contained NaOH-NaAlO2 were used as flocculants, with polyacrylamide (PAM) as coagulation. When the dosage of FeSO4 was 2.66 g/L (pH 5.5), the wastewater pH value of adding alkaline sodium aluminum waste liquid was 8, and the dosage of PAM was 1 mg/L, the optimum result was obtained. A test device of co-coagulation flotation reactor was designed on the basis of the conglutination of bubble, flocci and turbulent flotation theory. In the device, the gas-1iuid mixed pump substituted the air compressor and the pressure releaser. The combination of coagulation and air flotation were realized. The pump is a new kind of air saturation equipment. The air compressor and the pressure releaser were used commonly in traditional air flotation device. The results of treatment of the tannery wastewater showed a stable state, when the operating pressure was 5×10(5) Pa, circumfluence ratio was 225%. PMID:25084418

  15. Coagulation disorders and their cutaneous presentations: Pathophysiology.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yunyoung; Dabiri, Ganary; Damstetter, Elizabeth; Baiyee Ebot, Emily; Powers, Jennifer Gloeckner; Phillips, Tania

    2016-05-01

    Hypercoagulable states are inherited or acquired predispositions to venous or arterial thromboses that are best understood in the context of the coagulation cascade. Dermatologists can play a critical role in diagnosing and treating patients with hypercoagulable states because cutaneous symptoms may be a presenting manifestation, thereby reducing morbidity and mortality related to these conditions. This review focuses on the epidemiology and pathophysiology of hypercoagulable states, while the accompanying article iterates the basic clinical features, diagnostic testing, and management of patients who have these conditions. PMID:27085225

  16. Preparation and coagulation efficiency of polyaluminium ferric silicate chloride composite coagulant from wastewater of high-purity graphite production.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoxia; Li, Xili; Zhao, Jihong; Ren, Yigang; Yang, Yanqin

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present work was to produce a polyaluminium ferric silicate chloride (PAFSiC) coagulant from acidic and alkaline wastewater of purifying graphite by roasting, and subsequently to evaluate coagulation efficiency of the reagent by treating surface water from the Yellow River as well as municipal wastewater in comparison with the conventional coagulant polyaluminium chloride (PAC). The PAFSiC coagulant was prepared by co-polymerization. The effects of (Al+Fe)/Si molar ratio, OH/(Al+Fe) molar ratio (i.e., y value), coagulant dosage and pH value of test suspension on the coagulation behavior of FAFSiC and the stability of the PAFSiC were also examined. Results showed that PAFSiC performed more efficiently than PAC in removing turbidity, chemical oxygen demand (COD), and total phosphate (TP). The PAFSiC with a y value of 2.0 and (Al+Fe)/Si ratio of 5 (PAFSiC 2.0/5) showed excellent coagulation effect for both turbidity and COD, while PAFSiC 1.0/5 was the best for TP. The optimum coagulation pH range of PAFSiC 2.0/5 was 5.0-9.0, slightly wider than that of PAC (6.0-8.0). The process can be easily incorporated into high-purity graphite production plants, thereby reducing wastewater pollution and producing a valuable coagulant. PMID:22125904

  17. A new approach using coagulation rate constant for evaluation of turbidity removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Sameraiy, Mukheled

    2015-09-01

    Coagulation-flocculation-sedimentation processes for treating three levels of bentonite synthetic turbid water using date seeds (DS) and alum (A) coagulants were investigated in the previous research work. In the current research, the same experimental results were used to adopt a new approach on a basis of using coagulation rate constant as an investigating parameter to identify optimum doses of these coagulants. Moreover, the performance of these coagulants to meet (WHO) turbidity standard was assessed by introducing a new evaluating criterion in terms of critical coagulation rate constant (kc). Coagulation rate constants (k2) were mathematically calculated in second order form of coagulation process for each coagulant. The maximum (k2) values corresponded to doses, which were obviously to be considered as optimum doses. The proposed criterion to assess the performance of coagulation process of these coagulants was based on the mathematical representation of (WHO) turbidity guidelines in second order form of coagulation process stated that (k2) for each coagulant should be ≥ (kc) for each level of synthetic turbid water. For all tested turbid water, DS coagulant could not satisfy it. While, A coagulant could satisfy it. The results obtained in the present research are exactly in agreement with the previous published results in terms of finding optimum doses for each coagulant and assessing their performances. On the whole, it is recommended considering coagulation rate constant to be a new approach as an indicator for investigating optimum doses and critical coagulation rate constant to be a new evaluating criterion to assess coagulants' performance.

  18. Coagulant recovery and reuse for drinking water treatment.

    PubMed

    Keeley, James; Jarvis, Peter; Smith, Andrea D; Judd, Simon J

    2016-01-01

    Coagulant recovery and reuse from waterworks sludge has the potential to significantly reduce waste disposal and chemicals usage for water treatment. Drinking water regulations demand purification of recovered coagulant before they can be safely reused, due to the risk of disinfection by-product precursors being recovered from waterworks sludge alongside coagulant metals. While several full-scale separation technologies have proven effective for coagulant purification, none have matched virgin coagulant treatment performance. This study examines the individual and successive separation performance of several novel and existing ferric coagulant recovery purification technologies to attain virgin coagulant purity levels. The new suggested approach of alkali extraction of dissolved organic compounds (DOC) from waterworks sludge prior to acidic solubilisation of ferric coagulants provided the same 14:1 selectivity ratio (874 mg/L Fe vs. 61 mg/L DOC) to the more established size separation using ultrafiltration (1285 mg/L Fe vs. 91 mg/L DOC). Cation exchange Donnan membranes were also examined: while highly selective (2555 mg/L Fe vs. 29 mg/L DOC, 88:1 selectivity), the low pH of the recovered ferric solution impaired subsequent treatment performance. The application of powdered activated carbon (PAC) to ultrafiltration or alkali pre-treated sludge, dosed at 80 mg/mg DOC, reduced recovered ferric DOC contamination to <1 mg/L but in practice, this option would incur significant costs. The treatment performance of the purified recovered coagulants was compared to that of virgin reagent with reference to key water quality parameters. Several PAC-polished recovered coagulants provided the same or improved DOC and turbidity removal as virgin coagulant, as well as demonstrating the potential to reduce disinfection byproducts and regulated metals to levels comparable to that attained from virgin material. PMID:26521220

  19. Comparative study between atmospheric microwave and low-frequency plasmas: Production efficiency of reactive species and their effectiveness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, Im Hee; Kim, Myoung Soo; Kim, Ho Young; Shin, Hyun Kook; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Sim, Jae Yoon; Lee, Jae Koo

    2014-01-01

    The characteristics of low-frequency (LF) and microwave-powered plasmas were investigated. The optical emission of these two plasmas indicated that more chemicals were generated by microwave plasma than by LF plasma with the intensities being higher by factors of about 9, 3, 5, and 1.6 for OH (309 nm), O (777 nm), NO (247 nm), and Ca2+ (290 nm), respectively. Application experiments were also conducted. A steel plate became hydrophilic after 45 s of microwave plasma treatment. This is more than ten times faster than in the case of LF plasma treatment, an action related to the generation of reactive species (e.g., OH, O, and NO) as measured by optical emission spectroscopy (OES). Ca2+ generation was verified by blood coagulation experiment. Microwave-plasma-induced coagulation was twice faster than LF-plasma-induced coagulation. Simulation results that explain the chemical generation in microwave plasma were also included. High-energy electrons were considered a major factor for microwave plasma characteristics.

  20. Microwave hematoma detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.; Matthews, Dennis L.

    2001-01-01

    The Microwave Hematoma Detector is a non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots near the outer surface of the body. While being geared towards finding sub-dural and epi-dural hematomas, the device can be used to detect blood pooling anywhere near the surface of the body. Modified versions of the device can also detect pneumothorax, organ hemorrhage, atherosclerotic plaque in the carotid arteries, evaluate perfusion (blood flow) at or near the body surface, body tissue damage at or near the surface (especially for burn assessment) and be used in a number of NDE applications. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with a specialized antenna, signal processing/recognition algorithms and a disposable cap worn by the patient which will facilitate accurate mapping of the brain and proper function of the instrument. The invention may be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of sub-dural or epi-dural hematoma in human or animal patients, detection of hemorrhage within approximately 5 cm of the outer surface anywhere on a patient's body.

  1. Coagulation parameters in inflammatory bowel disease

    PubMed Central

    Dolapcioglu, Can; Soylu, Aliye; Kendir, Tulin; Ince, Ali Tuzun; Dolapcioglu, Hatice; Purisa, Sevim; Bolukbas, Cengiz; Sokmen, Haci Mehmet; Dalay, Remzi; Ovunc, Oya

    2014-01-01

    Thromboembolic events represent a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with inflammatory bowel disease and they may occur both at the gastrointestinal tract and at extraintestinal sites. This study aimed to examine the alterations in coagulation parameters involved at different steps of hemostasis in patients with Crohn’s disease and ulcerative colitis, in comparison with healthy individuals. Fifty-one patients with inflammatory bowel disease and 26 healthy controls were included in this study. Plasma levels of PT, APTT, AT III, plasminogen, fibrinogen, D-dimer, factor V, factor VIII, protein C, protein S, and APCR were measured and factor V Leiden mutation was examined in both patients and controls. Two patients with ulcerative colitis had a history of previous thromboembolic event. Inflammatory bowel disease was associated with significantly higher levels of fibrinogen, PT, factor V, factor VIII, plasminogen and thrombocyte. Protein S, fibrinogen, plasminogen and thrombocyte levels were associated with disease activity, depending on the type of the disease (Crohn’s disease or ulcerative colitis). The coagulation abnormalities detected in this study seems to be a secondary phenomena resulting from the disease process, which is more likely to be associated with a multitude of factors rather than a single abnormality. PMID:24995109

  2. Contact Activation of Blood Plasma Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Vogler, Erwin A.; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2009-01-01

    This opinion identifies inconsistencies in the generally-accepted surface biophysics involved in contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation, reviews recent experimental work aimed at resolving inconsistencies, and concludes that this standard paradigm requires substantial revision to accommodate new experimental observations. Foremost among these new findings is that surface-catalyzed conversion of the blood zymogen factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) to the enzyme FXIIa ( FXII→surfaceFXIIa, a.k.a. autoactivation) is not specific for anionic surfaces, as proposed by the standard paradigm. Furthermore, it is found that surface activation is moderated by the protein composition of the fluid phase in which FXII autoactivation occurs by what appears to be a protein adsorption-competition effect. Both of these findings argue against the standard view that contact activation of plasma coagulation is potentiated by assembly of activation-complex proteins (FXII, FXI, prekallikrein, and high-molecular-weight kininogen) directly onto activating surfaces (procoagulants) through specific protein/surface interactions. These new findings supplement the observation that adsorption behavior of FXII and FXIIa is not remarkably different from a wide variety of other blood proteins surveyed. Similarity in adsorption properties further undermines the idea that FXII and/or FXIIa are distinguished from other blood proteins by unusual adsorption properties resulting in chemically-specific interactions with activating anionic surfaces. PMID:19168215

  3. Cosmic dust synthesis by accretion and coagulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Praburam, G.; Goree, J.

    1995-01-01

    The morphology of grains grown by accretion and coagulation is revaled by a new laboratory method of synthesizing cosmic dust analogs. Submicron carbon particles, grown by accretion of carbon atoms from a gas, have a spherical shape with a cauliflower-like surface and an internal micro-structure of radial columns. This shape is probably common for grains grown by accretion at a temperature well below the melting point. Coagulated grains, consisting of spheres that collided to form irregular strings, were also synthesized. Another shape we produced had a bumpy non- spherical morphology, like an interplanetary particle collected in the terrestrial stratosphere. Besides these isolated grains, large spongy aggregates of nanometer-size particles were also found for various experimental conditions. Grains were synthesized using ions to sputter a solid target, producing an atomic vapor at a low temperature. The ions were provided by a plasma, which also provided electrostatic levitation of the grains during their growth. The temporal development of grain growth was studied by extinguishing the plasma after various intervals.

  4. Evaluation of natural coagulants for direct filtration.

    PubMed

    Mandloi, M; Chaudhari, S; Folkard, G K

    2004-04-01

    In the present study surjana (Moringa oleifera) seed, maize (Zea mays) and chitosan were used in direct filtration of Bilaoli lake water and evaluated for their efficiency in removing turbidity and microorganisms from water. The experiments with these natural coagulants gave filtered water turbidity less than or almost equal to 1NTU and thereby met the turbidity criteria for drinking water as per WHO guidelines. Bilaoli lake water had low ionic strength and low turbidity which represents one of the most difficult raw waters to treat, but natural coagulants in direct filtration achieved good filtrate quality. The head loss development across the filter bed with chitosan was more than that of alum, while with maize it was comparable to that of alum. With M. oleifera seeds the head loss was much less in comparison to alum. The average most probable number (MPN) reductions obtained with M. oleifera seeds, maize and chitosan were 97.35%, 95.4% and 87.1% respectively, whereas, with alum it was only 7.7%. PMID:15214453

  5. Perioperative coagulation management--fresh frozen plasma.

    PubMed

    Kor, Daryl J; Stubbs, James R; Gajic, Ognjen

    2010-03-01

    Clinical studies support the use of perioperative fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in patients who are actively bleeding with multiple coagulation factor deficiencies and for the prevention of dilutional coagulopathy in patients with major trauma and/or massive haemorrhage. In these settings, current FFP dosing recommendations may be inadequate. However, a substantial proportion of FFP is transfused in non-bleeding patients with mild elevations in coagulation screening tests. This practice is not supported by the literature, is unlikely to be of benefit and unnecessarily exposes patients to the risks of FFP. The role of FFP in reversing the effects of warfarin anticoagulation is dependent on the clinical context and availability of alternative agents. Although FFP is commonly transfused in patients with liver disease, this practice needs broad reconsideration. Adverse effects of FFP include febrile and allergic reactions, transfusion-associated circulatory overload and transfusion-related acute lung injury. The latter is the most serious complication, being less common with the preferential use of non-alloimmunised, male-donor predominant plasma. FP24 and thawed plasma are alternatives to FFP with similar indications for administration. Both provide an opportunity for increasing the safe plasma donor pool. Although prothrombin complex concentrates and factor VIIa may be used as alternatives to FFP in a variety of specific clinical contexts, additional study is needed. PMID:20402170

  6. Perspectives of transurethral robotic laser resection of the prostate: vaporization and coagulation effects with the Nd:YAG laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Gideon; Teo, Ming Y.; Kwoh, Chee K.; Ng, Wan S.; Cheng, Wai S.

    2000-05-01

    A longer operating time and steeper learning curve in mastering the techniques for transurethral laser resection of the prostate are the main problems faced by surgeons compared to standard transurethral resection of the prostate (TURP). However, these disadvantages can be solved with the introduction of a treatment modality designed and developed based on an integrated system of computer, robotics and laser technology. In vitro experiments were carried out to determine variables affecting the vaporization and coagulation lesions, in order to identify the parameters that could optimize this modality. Human cadaveric prostate and fresh chicken breast tissues were irradiated with different parameters using continuous wave Nd:YAG laser fiber in contact with the tissue. The effects of irrigant flowrate, fiber/tissue angle of inclination, number of passes, direction, speed and power of lase on the volume of tissue vaporized and coagulated, were assessed. A non-contact optical coordinate measuring machine was used to measure the depth and width of the vaporized and coagulated lesion. Results reveal that for each directional vaporization path (forward, clockwise and counter-clockwise), power and speed of lase are the most significant parameters influencing the volume of the vaporized and coagulated lesion. Optimized values of the power and speed of lase at 100 W and 1 - 3 mm/s respectively were obtained from the experiments when the tissues were irradiated in the forward, clockwise and counter-clockwise directions. It was concluded from our study to quantify tissue removal and damage, optimized values of irradiation power and speed could be obtained and implemented in the procedure of transurethral robotic laser resection of the prostate.

  7. Coagulation chemistries for silica removal from cooling tower water.

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May Devan; Altman, Susan Jeanne; Stewart, Tom

    2010-02-01

    The formation of silica scale is a problem for thermoelectric power generating facilities, and this study investigated the potential for removal of silica by means of chemical coagulation from source water before it is subjected to mineral concentration in cooling towers. In Phase I, a screening of many typical as well as novel coagulants was carried out using concentrated cooling tower water, with and without flocculation aids, at concentrations typical for water purification with limited results. In Phase II, it was decided that treatment of source or make up water was more appropriate, and that higher dosing with coagulants delivered promising results. In fact, the less exotic coagulants proved to be more efficacious for reasons not yet fully determined. Some analysis was made of the molecular nature of the precipitated floc, which may aid in process improvements. In Phase III, more detailed study of process conditions for aluminum chloride coagulation was undertaken. Lime-soda water softening and the precipitation of magnesium hydroxide were shown to be too limited in terms of effectiveness, speed, and energy consumption to be considered further for the present application. In Phase IV, sodium aluminate emerged as an effective coagulant for silica, and the most attractive of those tested to date because of its availability, ease of use, and low requirement for additional chemicals. Some process optimization was performed for coagulant concentration and operational pH. It is concluded that silica coagulation with simple aluminum-based agents is effective, simple, and compatible with other industrial processes.

  8. Analysis and optimization of coagulation and flocculation process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saritha, V.; Srinivas, N.; Srikanth Vuppala, N. V.

    2015-02-01

    Natural coagulants have been the focus of research of many investigators through the last decade owing to the problems caused by the chemical coagulants. Optimization of process parameters is vital for the effectiveness of coagulation process. In the present study optimization of parameters like pH, dose of coagulant and mixing speed were studied using natural coagulants sago and chitin in comparison with alum. Jar test apparatus was used to perform the coagulation. The results showed that the removal of turbidity was up to 99 % by both alum and chitin at lower doses of coagulant, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L, whereas sago has shown a reduction of 70-100 % at doses of 0.1 and 0.2 g/L. The optimum conditions observed for sago were 6 and 7 whereas chitin was stable at all pH ranges, lower coagulant doses, i.e., 0.1-0.3 g/L and mixing speed—rapid mixing at 100 rpm for 10 min and slow mixing 20 rpm for 20 min. Hence, it can be concluded that sago and chitin can be used for treating water even with large seasonal variation in turbidity.

  9. Assessment of Coagulation and Fibrinolysis in Pre-eclampsia

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S. M.; Burnett, D.; Picken, A. M.; Farrell, G. W.; Wolf, P.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described for distinguishing coagulation from fibrinolysis by three estimates of fibrinogen. This “fibrinogen series” together with plasma antithrombin and urinary urokinase have been compared in pregnant patients with venous thrombosis and pre-eclampsia. Evidence is presented for active coagulation during deterioration of the pre-eclampsia state and for enhanced fibrinolysis during improvement. PMID:4596483

  10. Characteristics of particle coagulation in an underground parking lot.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yu; Kato, Shinsuke; Zhao, Jianing

    2015-12-01

    Particles in vehicle exhaust plumes in underground parking lots have adverse health effects due to the enclosed environment in which they are released and the temperature difference between the tailpipe and ambient environment; at the same time, particle coagulation might be obvious near the tailpipe in an underground parking lot. In the present study, airflow and temperature fields were calculated using the Realizable k-ε model, and the Eulerian particle transport model was selected in the numerical simulation of particle concentration dispersion. Polydisperse thermal coagulation due to Brownian collisions was employed to calculate the particle coagulation. The results show that particle coagulation rate and half-time were significant within 1 m from the tailpipe. The variations in the particle coagulation rate and half-time were similar, but their directions were opposite. Air exhaust time was nearly four times longer than averaged half-time and 40 times longer than minimum half-time. The peak particle diameter increased approximately 1.43 times due to coagulation. A double particle concentration at the tailpipe caused the fourfold rise in the particle coagulation rate in the distance ranging less than 1 m from the tailpipe. An increase in exhaust velocity at the tailpipe could shorten the obvious range of particle coagulation along the centerline of the tailpipe from 1 to 0.8 m in the study. PMID:26490941

  11. Metals in airpollution particles decrease whole blood coagulation time

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mechanism underlying the pro-coagulative effect of air pollution particle exposure is not known. We tested the postulate that 1) the soluble fraction ofan air pollution particle can affect whole blood coagulation time and 2) metals included in the soluble fraction are respons...

  12. Microwave catheter design.

    PubMed

    Nevels, R D; Arndt, G D; Raffoul, G W; Carl, J R; Pacifico, A

    1998-07-01

    A microwave antenna system for transcatheter ablation of cardiac tissue is investigated. A numerical model based on the finite-difference time-domain method incorporating a Gaussian pulse excitation has been constructed and frequency domain electric and magnetic fields are obtained through Fourier transformation. Results are presented for a coaxial line fed monopole catheter which is modified by the successive inclusion of a Teflon sheath outer coating, a terminating disk at the tip of the antenna, a sleeve choke, and a high dielectric constant cylinder surrounding the monopole antenna. The effects of these design features are characterized in terms of specific absorption rate (SAR) and return loss (RL). Numerical calculations are confirmed by comparing with the RL measurement of a Teflon-coated monopole containing a disk and choke. PMID:9644897

  13. Optical and thermal simulations of noninvasive laser coagulation of the human vas deferens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Cilip, Christopher M.; Trammell, Susan R.; Cherukuri, Harish; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, there is a significant difference between the optical properties of canine and human skin. In this study, Monte Carlo simulations of light transport through tissue and heat transfer simulations are performed to determine the feasibility of noninvasive laser vasectomy in humans. A laser wavelength of 1064 nm was chosen for deep optical penetration in tissue. Monte Carlo simulations determined the spatial distribution of absorbed photons inside the tissue layers (epidermis, dermis, and vas). The results were convolved with a 3-mm-diameter laser beam, and then used as the spatial heat source for the heat transfer model. A laser pulse duration of 500 ms and pulse rate of 1 Hz, and cryogen spray cooling were incident on the tissue for 60 s. Average laser power (5-9 W), cryogen pulse duration (60-100 ms), cryogen cooling rate (0.5-1.0 Hz), and increase in optical transmission due to optical clearing (0-50 %), were studied. After application of an optical clearing agent to increase skin transmission by 50%, an average laser power of 6 W, cryogen pulse duration of 60 ms, and cryogen cooling rate of 1 Hz resulted in vas temperatures of ~ 60°C, sufficient for thermal coagulation, while 1 mm of the skin surface (epidermis and dermis) remained at a safe temperature of ~ 45 °C. Monte Carlo and heat transfer simulations indicate that it is possible to noninvasively thermally coagulate the human vas without adverse effects (e.g. scrotal skin burns), if an optical clearing agent is applied to the skin prior to the procedure.

  14. Performance and characterization of a new tannin-based coagulant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beltrán-Heredia, J.; Sánchez-Martín, J.; Gómez-Muñoz, C.

    2012-09-01

    Diethanolamine and formaldehyde were employed to cationize tannins from black wattle. This novel coagulant called CDF was functionally characterized in removing sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (anionic surfactant) and Palatine Fast Black WAN (azoic dye). Refined tannin-derived commercial coagulants exhibited similar efficiency, while CDF presented higher coagulant ability than alum, a usual coagulant agent. Low doses of CDF (ca. 100 mg L-1) were able to remove more than 70 % of surfactant and more than 85 % of dye (initial pollutant concentration of ca. 100 mg L-1) and it presented no temperature affection and worked at a relatively wide pH range. Surfactant and dye removal responded to the classical coagulant-and-adsorption models, such as Frumkin-Fowler-Guggenheim or Gu and Zhu in the case of surfactant, and Langmuir and Freundlich in the case of dye.

  15. Analysis of Coagulation Processes for the Groundwater Treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrektiene, Ramune; Rimeika, Mindaugas; Jurkiene, Anzelika

    2013-06-01

    Coagulation process is widely used for removal of natural organic matters (NOM) and for water color intensity reduction. The efficiency of coagulation process depends on many different factors. Aim of this research is to investigate coagulation process under different conditions. During the research coagulation process was held at different pH values (5.5; 6.0; 6.5), at different water alkalinity and at different water turbidity. It was found that removal of NOM and water color intensity reduction is most effective at pH values from 5.5 to 6.0. At these conditions water color intensity reduction is most efficient, but removal of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) is the lowest. During the research it was also found that different water alkalinity and turbidity do not make significant influence on efficiency of coagulation process.

  16. Enhanced arsenite removal through surface-catalyzed oxidative coagulation treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Yue; Bland, Garret D; Yan, Weile

    2016-05-01

    Arsenic being a naturally-occurring groundwater contaminant is subject to stringent water quality regulations. Coagulation and adsorption are widely used methods to treat arsenic-contaminated water, however, these treatments have been reported to be less efficient for the removal of arsenite (As(III)) than arsenate (As(V)). In this study, the feasibility of in situ oxidation of As(III) during coagulation was investigated in two systems: Fe(II) or H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation treatment using ferric chloride as the coagulant. This setup exploits the catalytic property of the fresh formed Fe(III) hydroxide colloids in coagulation suspension to mediate the production of reactive oxidants capable of As(III) oxidation. Fe(II)-assisted coagulation brought about small improvements in As(III) removal compared to treatment with Fe(III) coagulant alone, however, its arsenic removal efficiency is strongly dependent on pH (observed optimal pH = 7-9). Addition of H2O2 together with ferric chloride led to a significant enhancement in arsenic retention at pH 6-8, with final arsenic concentrations well below the U.S.EPA regulatory limit (10 μg/L). H2O2-assisted oxidative coagulation can attain reliable As(III) removal over a broad pH range of 4-9. Radical quenching experiments reveal the participation of superoxide radical in As(III) removal in the oxidative coagulation systems. Phosphate (at > 0.1 mM) strongly suppresses As(III) removal efficiency, whereas carbonate and humic acid pose a minor impact. Overall, the results suggest that a low dose addition of H2O2 along with ferric coagulant is a feasible method for the existing water treatment facilities to achieve improved As(III) removal efficiency. PMID:26897520

  17. Microwave Medical Treatment Apparatus and Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Ngo, Phong H. (Inventor); Carl, James R. (Inventor); George, W. Rflfoul (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Methods, simulations, and apparatus are provided that may be utilized for medical treatments which are especially suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). In a preferred embodiment, a plurality of separate microwave antennas are utilized to heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. By utilizing constructive and destructive interference of the microwave transmission, the energy can be deposited on the tissues to be necrosed while protecting other tissues such as the urethra. Saline injections to alter the conductivity of the tissues may also be used to further focus the energy deposits. A computer simulation is Provided that can be used to Predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of one or more catheters and the methods of applying microwave energy, a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  18. Comparison of 808, 980, and 1075nm lasers for noninvasive thermal coagulation of the canine vas deferens, ex vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Schweinsberger, Gino R.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2011-03-01

    Successful noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo, has been previously reported. However, the therapeutic window for treatment is relatively narrow. This study determines the dependence of vas thermal coagulation on laser wavelength for development of a noninvasive laser vasectomy procedure. Noninvasive laser coagulation of canine vas tissue, ex vivo, was performed using three commonly available near-infrared laser wavelengths: 808, 980, and 1075 nm. Each laser delivered an average power of 9.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, pulse rate of 1.0-Hz, and 3.2-mm diameter laser spot, synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface for a total treatment time of 60 s. Vas burst pressures were measured to determine strength of vas closure and compared to previously reported ejaculation pressures. Gross inspection of vas and scrotal skin was also performed immediately after the procedure as an indicator of thermal coagulation and skin burns. The 1075 nm laser produced the highest vas burst pressures (288 +/- 28 mmHg), significantly greater than previously reported ejaculation pressures (136 +/- 29 mmHg). The 808 nm wavelength produced insufficient vas burst pressures of 141 +/- 61 mmHg, and minor scrotal skin burns were observed in at least one case. The 980 nm wavelength was unable to produce thermal coagulation of the vas, with low burst pressures (89 +/- 58 mmHg) and severe scrotal skin burns. The 1075 nm wavelength was the only near-IR wavelength that consistently thermally coagulated the vas with a strong degree of closure and without any scrotal skin burns.

  19. Current Pathological and Laboratory Considerations in the Diagnosis of Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Toh, Cheng Hock; Alhamdi, Yasir; Abrams, Simon T

    2016-11-01

    Systemically sustained thrombin generation in vivo is the hallmark of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Typically, this is in response to a progressing disease state that is associated with significant cellular injury. The etiology could be infectious or noninfectious, with the main pathophysiological mechanisms involving cross-activation among coagulation, innate immunity, and inflammatory responses. This leads to consumption of both pro- and anticoagulant factors as well as endothelial dysfunction and disrupted homeostasis at the blood vessel wall interface. In addition to the release of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) and soluble thrombomodulin (sTM) following cellular activation and damage, respectively, there is the release of damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs) such as extracellular histones and cell-free DNA. Extracellular histones are increasingly recognized as significantly pathogenic in critical illnesses through direct cell toxicity, the promotion of thrombin generation, and the induction of neutrophil extracellular trap (NET) formation. Clinically, high circulating levels of histones and histone-DNA complexes are associated with multiorgan failure, DIC, and adverse patient outcomes. Their measurements as well as that of other DAMPs and molecular markers of thrombin generation are not yet applicable in the routine diagnostic laboratory. To provide a practical diagnostic tool for acute DIC, a composite scoring system using rapidly available coagulation tests is recommended by the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis. Its usefulness and limitations are discussed alongside the advances and unanswered questions in DIC pathogenesis. PMID:27578502

  20. Postoperative MRI in patients undergoing interstitial laser coagulation thermotherapy of benign prostatic hyperplasia

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller-Lisse, U.G.; Heuck, A.F.; Scheidler, H.J.; Reiser, M.F.

    1996-03-01

    We conducted MRI of the effects of laser-induced thermal therapy (LITT) in benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Eighteen patients (average age 64 years) were examined with MRI 24-48 h before and after LITT of BPH. Sagittal and axial T2-weighted FSE MR images were evaluated for signs of coagulation necrosis in the prostate gland and the presence of intra- and extraprostatic edema. Coagulation areas showed as a hypointense central core with a hyperintense rim. Intraprostatic edema led to a volume increase of 18-108% both in the central and in the total gland. Periprostatic edema was severe in preprostatic and prevesical tissue as well as lateral to the prostate, moderate in the presacral space, and mild perirectally and dorsal to the prostate. Follow-up examinations 2 weeks to 6 months after LITT in five patients showed decrease of coagulation necrosis volume, prostate size, and edema. MRI appears to be a reliable method to monitor LITT effects in patients with BPH. 22 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  1. Seawater Immersion Aggravates Burn Injury Causing Severe Blood Coagulation Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Hong; Mao, Qingxiang; Ma, Yongda; Wang, Li; Chen, Xian; Hu, Yi; Ge, Hengjiang

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the endothelial function in a canine model of burn injury combined with seawater immersion. The model of burn injury was established. The dogs were randomly divided into four groups including dogs with burn injury (B group), or burn injury combined with seawater immersion (BI group), or only immersion in seawater (I group), or control animals with no injury or immersion (C group). The circulating endothelial cell (CEC) count and coagulation-fibrinolysis parameters were measured. The CEC count in B group increased at 4 h, 7 h, and 10 h after injury and then reduced, whereas it continuously increased to a greater extent in BI group (P < 0.05). The von Willebrand factor (vWF) activity, plasminogen activator inhibitor (PAI-1), and the ratio of thromboxane B2 (TXB2) to 6-keto-prostaglandin F1α (6-K-PGF1α) in BI group had a marked increase after injury, and the tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) in the BI group decreased. Microscope observations revealed thrombus formation in lungs of the animals in BI group, but not in C, I, or B groups. Burn injury causes endothelial dysfunction, and seawater immersion lastingly aggravates this injury, leading to a higher risk of developing thrombosis. PMID:26885523

  2. Monitoring changes in tissue optical properties following interstitial photothermal therapy of ex vivo human prostate tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weersink, Robert A.; He, Jie; Veilleux, Israel; Trachtenberg, John; Wilson, Brian C.

    2013-03-01

    We are developing a method of monitoring treatment progression of interstitial photothermal therapy of focal prostate cancer using transrectal diffuse optical tomography (TRDOT) combined with transrectal 3D ultrasound (3D-TRUS). Measurements of prostate tissue optical properties were made on ex vivo human prostate samples prior to and post coagulation. Interstitial photothermal treatments were delivered to the ex vivo samples and monitored using an interstitial probe near the treatment fiber. After treatment, bulk optical properties were measured on native and coagulated zones of tissue. Changes in optical properties across the boundary between native and coagulated tissues were spatially mapped using a small diffuse reflectance probe. The optical property estimates and spatial information obtained using each method was compared.

  3. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  4. Quinine-Induced Disseminated Intravascular Coagulation.

    PubMed

    Abed, Firas; Baniya, Ramkaji; Bachuwa, Ghassan

    2016-01-01

    Every drug comes with some side effect. It is the benefit/risk ratio that determines the medical use of the drug. Quinine, a known antimalarial drug, has been used for nocturnal leg cramps since the 1930s; it is associated with severe life-threatening hematological and cardiovascular side effects. Disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC), albeit rare, is a known coagulopathy associated with Quinine. It is imperative to inquire about the Quinine intake in medication history in patients with coagulopathy, as most patients still consider it a harmless home remedy for nocturnal leg cramps. In this report, we present a case of coagulopathy in a middle-aged woman, who gave a history of taking Quinine for nocturnal leg cramps, as her home remedy. Early identification of the offending agent led to the diagnosis, prompt discontinuation of the medication, and complete recovery and prevented the future possibility of recurrence. PMID:27293443

  5. Application of enzyme immunoassays to coagulation testing.

    PubMed

    Amiral, J; Adalbert, B; Adam, M

    1984-09-01

    Enzyme immunoassays are very useful for the detection of low concentrations of coagulation proteins and pathological markers in plasma. Analytes in the ng/mL range are measurable with good reproducibility with intra- and interassay CVs of less than 5% to 10%. "Sandwich" methods have been developed for von Willebrand factor (plasma concentration about 8 micrograms/mL, Factor IX (5 micrograms/mL), protein C (4 micrograms/mL), and Factor X (10 micrograms/mL). However, this technique is only suitable for macromolecules; for low-molecular-mass peptides such as fibrinopeptide A a competitive method is used. Normal concentrations of fibrinopeptide A are below 3 ng/mL, with greater values suggesting in vivo generation of thrombin; thus this test is quite useful in detecting thrombosis. Reagents for both the sandwich and competitive methods are commercially available and cost effective, and have a longer shelf-life than those for radioimmunoassays. PMID:6380814

  6. Optimized alumina coagulants for water treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Nyman, May D.; Stewart, Thomas A.

    2012-02-21

    Substitution of a single Ga-atom or single Ge-atom (GaAl.sub.12 and GeAl.sub.12 respectively) into the center of an aluminum Keggin polycation (Al.sub.13) produces an optimal water-treatment product for neutralization and coagulation of anionic contaminants in water. GaAl.sub.12 consistently shows .about.1 order of magnitude increase in pathogen reduction, compared to Al.sub.13. At a concentration of 2 ppm, GaAl.sub.12 performs equivalently to 40 ppm alum, removing .about.90% of the dissolved organic material. The substituted GaAl.sub.12 product also offers extended shelf-life and consistent performance. We also synthesized a related polyaluminum chloride compound made of pre-hydrolyzed dissolved alumina clusters of [GaO.sub.4Al.sub.12(OH).sub.24(H.sub.2O).sub.12].sup.7+.

  7. Contact activation of blood-plasma coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golas, Avantika

    Surface engineering of biomaterials with improved hemocompatibility is an imperative, given the widespread global need for cardiovascular devices. Research summarized in this dissertation focuses on contact activation of FXII in buffer and blood plasma frequently referred to as autoactivation. The extant theory of contact activation imparts FXII autoactivation ability to negatively charged, hydrophilic surfaces. According to this theory, contact activation of plasma involves assembly of proteins comprising an "activation complex" on activating surfaces mediated by specific chemical interactions between complex proteins and the surface. This work has made key discoveries that significantly improve our core understanding of contact activation and unravel the existing paradigm of plasma coagulation. It is shown herein that contact activation of blood factor XII (FXII, Hageman factor) in neat-buffer solution exhibits a parabolic profile when scaled as a function of silanized-glass-particle activator surface energy (measured as advancing water adhesion tension t°a=g° Iv costheta in dyne/cm, where g°Iv is water interfacial tension in dyne/cm and theta is the advancing contact angle). Nearly equal activation is observed at the extremes of activator water-wetting properties --36 < t°a < 72 dyne/cm (O° ≤ theta < 120°), falling sharply through a broad minimum within the 20 < t°a < 40 dyne/cm (55° < theta < 75°). Furthermore, contact activation of FXII in buffer solution produces an ensemble of protein fragments exhibiting either procoagulant properties in plasma (proteolysis of blood factor XI or prekallikrein), amidolytic properties (cleavage of s-2302 chromogen), or the ability to suppress autoactivation through currently unknown biochemistry. The relative proportions of these fragments depend on activator surface chemistry/energy. We have also discovered that contact activation is moderated by adsorption of plasma proteins unrelated to coagulation through an

  8. Field-theory methods in coagulation theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lushnikov, A. A.

    2011-08-15

    Coagulating systems are systems of chaotically moving particles that collide and coalesce, producing daughter particles of mass equal to the sum of the masses involved in the respective collision event. The present article puts forth basic ideas underlying the application of methods of quantum-field theory to the theory of coagulating systems. Instead of the generally accepted treatment based on the use of a standard kinetic equation that describes the time evolution of concentrations of particles consisting of a preset number of identical objects (monomers in the following), one introduces the probability W(Q, t) to find the system in some state Q at an instant t for a specific rate of transitions between various states. Each state Q is characterized by a set of occupation numbers Q = (n{sub 1}, n{sub 2}, ..., n{sub g}, ...), where n{sub g} is the total number of particles containing precisely g monomers. Thereupon, one introduces the generating functional {Psi} for the probability W(Q, t). The time evolution of {Psi} is described by an equation that is similar to the Schroedinger equation for a one-dimensional Bose field. This equation is solved exactly for transition rates proportional to the product of the masses of colliding particles. It is shown that, within a finite time interval, which is independent of the total mass of the entire system, a giant particle of mass about the mass of the entire system may appear in this system. The particle in question is unobservable in the thermodynamic limit, and this explains the well-known paradox of mass-concentration nonconservation in classical kinetic theory. The theory described in the present article is successfully applied in studying the time evolution of random graphs.

  9. Coagulation factor XII protease domain crystal structure

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, M; Wilmann, P; Awford, J; Li, C; Hamad, BK; Fischer, PM; Dreveny, I; Dekker, LV; Emsley, J

    2015-01-01

    Background Coagulation factor XII is a serine protease that is important for kinin generation and blood coagulation, cleaving the substrates plasma kallikrein and FXI. Objective To investigate FXII zymogen activation and substrate recognition by determining the crystal structure of the FXII protease domain. Methods and results A series of recombinant FXII protease constructs were characterized by measurement of cleavage of chromogenic peptide and plasma kallikrein protein substrates. This revealed that the FXII protease construct spanning the light chain has unexpectedly weak proteolytic activity compared to β-FXIIa, which has an additional nine amino acid remnant of the heavy chain present. Consistent with these data, the crystal structure of the light chain protease reveals a zymogen conformation for active site residues Gly193 and Ser195, where the oxyanion hole is absent. The Asp194 side chain salt bridge to Arg73 constitutes an atypical conformation of the 70-loop. In one crystal form, the S1 pocket loops are partially flexible, which is typical of a zymogen. In a second crystal form of the deglycosylated light chain, the S1 pocket loops are ordered, and a short α-helix in the 180-loop of the structure results in an enlarged and distorted S1 pocket with a buried conformation of Asp189, which is critical for P1 Arg substrate recognition. The FXII structures define patches of negative charge surrounding the active site cleft that may be critical for interactions with inhibitors and substrates. Conclusions These data provide the first structural basis for understanding FXII substrate recognition and zymogen activation. PMID:25604127

  10. Field-theory methods in coagulation theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lushnikov, A. A.

    2011-08-01

    Coagulating systems are systems of chaotically moving particles that collide and coalesce, producing daughter particles of mass equal to the sum of the masses involved in the respective collision event. The present article puts forth basic ideas underlying the application of methods of quantum-field theory to the theory of coagulating systems. Instead of the generally accepted treatment based on the use of a standard kinetic equation that describes the time evolution of concentrations of particles consisting of a preset number of identical objects (monomers in the following), one introduces the probability W( Q, t) to find the system in some state Q at an instant t for a specific rate of transitions between various states. Each state Q is characterized by a set of occupation numbers Q = { n 1, n 2, ..., n g , ...}, where n g is the total number of particles containing precisely g monomers. Thereupon, one introduces the generating functional Ψ for the probability W( Q, t). The time evolution of Ψ is described by an equation that is similar to the Schrödinger equation for a one-dimensional Bose field. This equation is solved exactly for transition rates proportional to the product of the masses of colliding particles. It is shown that, within a finite time interval, which is independent of the total mass of the entire system, a giant particle of mass about the mass of the entire system may appear in this system. The particle in question is unobservable in the thermodynamic limit, and this explains the well-known paradox of mass-concentration nonconservation in classical kinetic theory. The theory described in the present article is successfully applied in studying the time evolution of random graphs.

  11. Effects of Rivaroxaban on Platelet Activation and Platelet–Coagulation Pathway Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Heitmeier, Stefan; Laux, Volker

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Activation of coagulation and platelets is closely linked, and arterial thrombosis involves coagulation activation as well as platelet activation and aggregation. In these studies, we investigated the possible synergistic effects of rivaroxaban in combination with antiplatelet agents on thrombin generation and platelet aggregation in vitro and on arterial thrombosis and hemostasis in rat models. Materials and Methods: Thrombin generation was measured by the Calibrated Automated Thrombogram method (0.5 pmol/L tissue factor) using human platelet-rich plasma (PRP) spiked with rivaroxaban (15, 30, or 60 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1.0 µg/mL), and acetylsalicylic acid (ASA; 100 µg/mL). Tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation was measured in PRP spiked with rivaroxaban (15 or 30 ng/mL), ticagrelor (1 or 3 µg/mL), or a combination of these. An arteriovenous (AV) shunt model in rats was used to determine the effects of rivaroxaban (0.01, 0.03, or 0.1 mg/kg), clopidogrel (1 mg/kg), ASA (3 mg/kg), and combinations on arterial thrombosis. Results: Rivaroxaban inhibited thrombin generation in a concentration-dependent manner and the effect was enhanced with ticagrelor and ticagrelor plus ASA. Rivaroxaban and ticagrelor also concentration-dependently inhibited tissue factor-induced platelet aggregation, and their combination increased the inhibition synergistically. In the AV shunt model, rivaroxaban dose-dependently reduced thrombus formation. Combining subefficacious or weakly efficacious doses of rivaroxaban with ASA or ASA plus clopidogrel increased the antithrombotic effect. Conclusion: These data indicate that the combination of rivaroxaban with single or dual antiplatelet agents works synergistically to reduce platelet activation, which may in turn lead to the delayed/reduced formation of coagulation complexes and vice versa, thereby enhancing antithrombotic potency. PMID:25848131

  12. Mean scatterer spacing estimation in normal and thermally coagulated ex vivo bovine liver.

    PubMed

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-04-01

    The liver has been hypothesized to have a unique arrangement of microvasculature that presents as an arrangement of quasiperiodic scatterers to an interrogating ultrasound pulse. The mean scatterer spacing (MSS) of these quasiperiodic scatterers has been proposed as a useful quantitative ultrasound biomarker for characterizing liver tissue. Thermal ablation is an increasingly popular method for treating hepatic tumors, and ultrasonic imaging approaches for delineating the extent of thermal ablation are in high demand. In this work, we examine the distribution of estimated MSS in thermally coagulated bovine liver and normal untreated bovine liver ex vivo. We estimate MSS by detecting local maxima in the spectral coherence function of radio frequency echoes from a clinical transducer, the Siemens VFX 9L4 transducer operating on an S2000 scanner. We find that normal untreated bovine liver was characterized by an MSS of approximately 1.3 mm. We examined regions of interest 12 mm wide laterally, and ranging from 12 mm to 18 mm axially, in 2 mm increments. Over these parameters, the mode of the MSS estimates was between 1.25 and 1.37 mm. On the other hand, estimation of MSS in thermally coagulated liver tissue yields a distribution of MSS estimates whose mode varied between 0.45 and 1.0 mm when examining regions of interest over the same sizes. We demonstrate that the estimated MSS in thermally coagulated liver favors small spacings because the randomly positioned scatterers in this tissue are better modeled as aperiodic scatterers. The submillimeter spacings result from the fact that this was the most probable spacing to be estimated if the discretely sampled spectral coherence function was a uniformly random two-dimensional function. PMID:24554290

  13. Mean Scatterer Spacing Estimation in Normal and Thermally Coagulated Ex Vivo Bovine Liver

    PubMed Central

    Rubert, Nicholas; Varghese, Tomy

    2014-01-01

    The liver has been hypothesized to have a unique arrangement of microvasculature that presents as an arrangement of quasiperiodic scatterers to an interrogating ultrasound pulse. The mean scatterer spacing (MSS) of these quasiperiodic scatterers has been proposed as a useful quantitative ultrasound biomarker for characterizing liver tissue. Thermal ablation is an increasingly popular method for treating hepatic tumors, and ultrasonic imaging approaches for delineating the extent of thermal ablation are in high demand. In this work, we examine the distribution of estimated MSS in thermally coagulated bovine liver and normal untreated bovine liver ex vivo. We estimate MSS by detecting local maxima in the spectral coherence function of radio frequency echoes from a clinical transducer, the Siemens VFX 9L4 transducer operating on an S2000 scanner. We find that normal untreated bovine liver was characterized by an MSS of approximately 1.3 mm. We examined regions of interest 12 mm wide laterally, and ranging from 12 mm to 18 mm axially, in 2 mm increments. Over these parameters, the mode of the MSS estimates was between 1.25 and 1.37 mm. On the other hand, estimation of MSS in thermally coagulated liver tissue yields a distribution of MSS estimates whose mode varied between 0.45 and 1.0 mm when examining regions of interest over the same sizes. We demonstrate that the estimated MSS in thermally coagulated liver favors small spacings because the randomly positioned scatterers in this tissue are better modeled as aperiodic scatterers. The submillimeter spacings result from the fact that this was the most probable spacing to be estimated if the discretely sampled spectral coherence function was a uniformly random two-dimensional function. PMID:24554290

  14. Microwave Processing of Crowns from Winter Cereals for Light Microscopy.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Microwave processing of tissue considerably shortens the time it takes to prepare samples for light and electron microscopy. However, plant tissues from different species and different regions of the plant respond differently making it impossible to use a single protocol for all plant tissue. The ...

  15. Chemical behavior of different species of phosphorus in coagulation.

    PubMed

    Park, Taejun; Ampunan, Vanvimol; Lee, Sanghyup; Chung, Eunhyea

    2016-02-01

    Phosphorus is one of the elements that have a significant impact on such environmental problems as eutrophication or algal bloom. Phosphorus compounds in water can be hydrolyzed to orthophosphate that is the only form of phosphorus that algae can assimilate. In this study, phosphorus removal in terms of orthophosphate and total phosphorus from wastewater was studied using alum or ferric ions as coagulants. It was observed that alum shows higher phosphorus removal efficiency than ferric ions in the same mole ratio concentrations. The proportion of orthophosphate among total phosphorus did not change significantly during coagulation process when the coagulant concentration is low. However, the proportion becomes gradually decreased as the coagulant concentration increases. Not only the electrolyte concentration difference in solution, but the characteristics of orthophosphate and polyphosphate such as reactivity and ionic size might also cause the differences in the removal rate. Orthophosphate that has greater reactivity than other phosphorus species would be involved in chemical reactions dominantly when large amounts of coagulants are applied. However, the effect of reactivity was diminished due to the large ionic size of polyphosphate and low concentration of electrolyte in low coagulant concentration during the coagulation process. PMID:26598995

  16. Systemic blood coagulation activation in acute coronary syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Undas, Anetta; Szułdrzyński, Konstanty; Brummel-Ziedins, Kathleen E.; Tracz, Wiesława; Zmudka, Krzysztof

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated systemic alterations to the blood coagulation system that occur during a coronary thrombotic event. Peripheral blood coagulation in patients with acute coronary thrombosis was compared with that in people with stable coronary artery disease (CAD). Blood coagulation and platelet activation at the microvascular injury site were assessed using immunochemistry in 28 non-anticoagulated patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI) versus 28 stable CAD patients matched for age, sex, risk factors, and medications. AMI was associated with increased maximum rates of thrombin-antithrombin complex generation (by 93.8%; P < .001), thrombin B-chain formation (by 57.1%; P < .001), prothrombin consumption (by 27.9%; P = .012), fibrinogen consumption (by 27.0%; P = .02), factor (f) Va light chain generation (by 44.2%; P = .003), and accelerated fVa inactivation (by 76.1%; P < .001), and with enhanced release of platelet-derived soluble CD40 ligand (by 44.4%; P < .001). FVa heavy chain availability was similar in both groups because of enhanced formation and activated protein C (APC)–mediated destruction. The velocity of coagulant reactions in AMI patients showed positive correlations with interleukin-6. Heparin treatment led to dampening of coagulant reactions with profiles similar to those for stable CAD. AMI-induced systemic activation of blood coagulation markedly modifies the pattern of coagulant reactions at the site of injury in peripheral vessels compared with that in stable CAD patients. PMID:18931343

  17. Percutaneous microwave ablation vs radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Poulou, Loukia S; Botsa, Evanthia; Thanou, Ioanna; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Thanos, Loukas

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular cancer ranks fifth among cancers and is related to chronic viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, steatohepatitis and liver autoimmunity. Surgical resection and orthotopic liver transplantation have curative potential, but fewer than 20% of patients are suitable candidates. Interventional treatments are offered to the vast majority of patients. Radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are among the therapeutic modalities, with similar indications which include the presence of up to three lesions, smaller than 3 cm in size, and the absence of extrahepatic disease. The therapeutic effect of both methods relies on thermal injury, but MWA uses an electromagnetic field as opposed to electrical current used in RFA. Unlike MWA, the effect of RFA is partially limited by the heat-sink effect and increased impedance of the ablated tissue. Compared with RFA, MWA attains a more predictable ablation zone, permits simultaneous treatment of multiple lesions, and achieves larger coagulation volumes in a shorter procedural time. Major complications of both methods are comparable and infrequent (approximately 2%-3%), and they include haemorrhage, infection/abscess, visceral organ injury, liver failure, and pneumothorax. RFA may incur the additional complication of skin burns. Nevertheless, there is no compelling evidence for differences in clinical outcomes, including local recurrence rates and survival. PMID:26052394

  18. Percutaneous microwave ablation vs radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Poulou, Loukia S; Botsa, Evanthia; Thanou, Ioanna; Ziakas, Panayiotis D; Thanos, Loukas

    2015-05-18

    Hepatocellular cancer ranks fifth among cancers and is related to chronic viral hepatitis, alcohol abuse, steatohepatitis and liver autoimmunity. Surgical resection and orthotopic liver transplantation have curative potential, but fewer than 20% of patients are suitable candidates. Interventional treatments are offered to the vast majority of patients. Radiofrequency (RFA) and microwave ablation (MWA) are among the therapeutic modalities, with similar indications which include the presence of up to three lesions, smaller than 3 cm in size, and the absence of extrahepatic disease. The therapeutic effect of both methods relies on thermal injury, but MWA uses an electromagnetic field as opposed to electrical current used in RFA. Unlike MWA, the effect of RFA is partially limited by the heat-sink effect and increased impedance of the ablated tissue. Compared with RFA, MWA attains a more predictable ablation zone, permits simultaneous treatment of multiple lesions, and achieves larger coagulation volumes in a shorter procedural time. Major complications of both methods are comparable and infrequent (approximately 2%-3%), and they include haemorrhage, infection/abscess, visceral organ injury, liver failure, and pneumothorax. RFA may incur the additional complication of skin burns. Nevertheless, there is no compelling evidence for differences in clinical outcomes, including local recurrence rates and survival. PMID:26052394

  19. Seawater pretreatment for reverse osmosis: chemistry, contaminants, and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Edzwald, James K; Haarhoff, Johannes

    2011-11-01

    The paper addresses the effects of salinity and temperature on the chemistry of important parameters affecting coagulation pretreatment including the ion product of water, acid-base chemistry, dissolved metal speciation, and precipitation reactions for aluminum and iron coagulants. The ion product of seawater is greater than for freshwaters and affects chemical hydrolysis and metal-hydroxide solubility reactions. Inorganic carbon is the main cause of seawater alkalinity and buffer intensity but borate B(OH)(4)(1-) also contributes. Buffer intensity is an important parameter in assessing coagulation pH adjustment. Mineral particles are relatively unstable in seawater from electrical double layer compression, and when present these particles are easily coagulated. Algal-particle stability is affected by steric effects and algal motility. Dissolved natural organic matter from algae and humic substances causes fouling of RO membranes and pretreatment removal is essential. Aluminum coagulants are not recommended, and not used, because they are too soluble in seawater. Ferric coagulants are preferred and used. The equilibrium solubility of Fe with amorphous ferric hydroxide in seawater is low over a wide range of pH and temperature conditions. Ferric chloride dosing guidelines are presented for various raw seawater quality characteristics. The effect of pH on coagulant dose and the role of buffer intensity are addressed. A dual coagulation strategy is recommended for treating seawater with moderate to high concentrations of algae or seawater with humic matter. This involves a low and constant dose with high charge-density cationic polymers using Fe as the main coagulant where it is varied in response to raw water quality changes. PMID:21907384

  20. Microwave Radiometer (MWR) Handbook

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, VR

    2006-08-01

    The Microwave Radiometer (MWR) provides time-series measurements of column-integrated amounts of water vapor and liquid water. The instrument itself is essentially a sensitive microwave receiver. That is, it is tuned to measure the microwave emissions of the vapor and liquid water molecules in the atmosphere at specific frequencies.

  1. Microwave Workshop for Windows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Colin

    1998-01-01

    "Microwave Workshop for Windows" consists of three programs that act as teaching aid and provide a circuit design utility within the field of microwave engineering. The first program is a computer representation of a graphical design tool; the second is an accurate visual and analytical representation of a microwave test bench; the third is a more…

  2. Changes in the human blood coagulating system during prolonged hypokinesia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filatova, L. M.; Anashkin, O. D.

    1978-01-01

    Changes in the coagulating system of the blood were studied in six subjects during prolonged hypokinesia. Thrombogenic properties of the blood rose in all cases on the 8th day. These changes are explained by stress reaction due to unusual conditions for a healthy person. Changes in the blood coagulating system in the group subjected to physical exercise and without it ran a practically parallel course. Apparently physical exercise is insufficient to prevent such changes that appear in the coagulating system of the blood during prolonged hypokinesia.

  3. Optical properties measurement of the laser-ablated tissues for the combined laser ablation with photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Norihiro; Ishii, Katsunori; Awazu, Kunio

    2012-03-01

    Laser ablation therapy combined with photodynamic therapy (PDT) is studied for treatment of advanced cancers. The clinical outcome of PDT may be improved by the accurate knowledge about the light distribution within tissue. Optical properties [absorption coefficient (μa), scattering coefficient (μs), anisotropy factor (g), refractive index, etc.] of tissues help us realizing a light propagation through the tissue. It is important to understand of the effect of laser coagulation formed by laser ablation to PDT. The aim of this study is to estimate of influence of coagulated region to PDT for effective PDT combined laser ablation therapy. We evaluated the optical property of mouse tumor tissue in native and coagulated state using a double integrating sphere system and an inverse Monte Carlo method in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. After laser ablation, the μa and reduced scattering coefficient spectra of coagulated tissues were increased in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The optical penetration depth of coagulated tissues is 1.2-2.9 times lower than the native state in the wavelength range from 350 to 1000 nm. The intensity of the light energy inside the coagulated tissue falls to about 60% of its original value at the end of coagulated layer. The evaluation of light energy distribution by the determination of the tissues optical properties could be useful for optimization of the treatment procedure in combined laser ablation with PDT.

  4. Carbon nanotubes and microwaves: interactions, responses, and applications.

    PubMed

    Vázquez, Ester; Prato, Maurizio

    2009-12-22

    The interaction of microwaves with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) is an interesting topic for a variety of potential applications. Microwaves have been used for the purification of CNTs and for their chemical functionalization, providing a technique for simple, green, and large-scale protocols. In addition, the selective destruction of metallic CNTs under microwave irradiation could potentially result in a batch of semiconducting-only nanotubes. As an innovative application, the combination of microwaves with well-aligned CNTs could produce a new illumination technology. Moreover, the microwave absorbing properties of CNTs and their different behavior from typical organic compounds may open the door to the preparation of a wide range of new materials useful in many fields. A few examples of practical applications include electromagnetic interference for protecting the environment from radiation and microwave hyperthermia for cancer treatment as well as other medical therapies requiring precise heating of biological tissues. PMID:20025299

  5. EPCR-dependent PAR2 activation by the blood coagulation initiation complex regulates LPS-triggered interferon responses in mice

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Hai Po H.; Kerschen, Edward J.; Hernandez, Irene; Basu, Sreemanti; Zogg, Mark; Botros, Fady; Jia, Shuang; Hessner, Martin J.; Griffin, John H.; Ruf, Wolfram

    2015-01-01

    Infection and inflammation are invariably associated with activation of the blood coagulation mechanism, secondary to the inflammation-induced expression of the coagulation initiator tissue factor (TF) on innate immune cells. By investigating the role of cell-surface receptors for coagulation factors in mouse endotoxemia, we found that the protein C receptor (ProcR; EPCR) was required for the normal in vivo and in vitro induction of lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-regulated gene expression. In cultured bone marrow–derived myeloid cells and in monocytic RAW264.7 cells, the LPS-induced expression of functionally active TF, assembly of the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa initiation complex of blood coagulation, and the EPCR-dependent activation of protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR2) by the ternary TF-VIIa-Xa complex were required for the normal LPS induction of messenger RNAs encoding the TLR3/4 signaling adaptor protein Pellino-1 and the transcription factor interferon regulatory factor 8. In response to in vivo challenge with LPS, mice lacking EPCR or PAR2 failed to fully initiate an interferon-regulated gene expression program that included the Irf8 target genes Lif, Iigp1, Gbp2, Gbp3, and Gbp6. The inflammation-induced expression of TF and crosstalk with EPCR, PAR2, and TLR4 therefore appear necessary for the normal evolution of interferon-regulated host responses. PMID:25733582

  6. Medical applications of microwaves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrba, Jan; Lapes, M.

    2004-04-01

    Medical applications of microwaves (i.e. a possibility to use microwave energy and/or microwave technique and technology for therapeutical purposes) are a quite new and a very rapidly developing field. Microwave thermotherapy is being used in medicine for the cancer treatment and treatment of some other diseases since early eighties. In this contribution we would like to offer general overview of present activities in the Czech Republic, i.e. clinical applications and results, technical aspects of thermo therapeutic equipment and last but not least, prospective diagnostics based on microwave principals ant technology and instrumentation.

  7. Microwave sintering of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, W.B.

    1989-01-01

    Successful adaptation of microwave heating to the densification of ceramic materials require a marriage of microwave and materials technologies. Using an interdisciplinary team of microwave and materials engineers, we have successfully demonstrated the ability to density ceramic materials over a wide range of temperatures. Microstructural evolution during microwave sintering has been found to be significantly different from that observed in conventional sintering. Our results and those of others indicate that microwave sintering has the potential to fabricate components to near net shape with mechanical properties equivalent to hot pressed or hot isostatically pressed material. 6 refs., 11 figs.

  8. Impacts of epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine on coagulation performance and membrane fouling in coagulation/ultrafiltration combined process with different Al-based coagulants.

    PubMed

    Bu, Fan; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Ruihua; Sun, Shenglei; Yue, Qinyan

    2016-09-01

    Two kinds of aluminum-based coagulants and epichlorohydrin-dimethylamine (DAM-ECH) were used in the treatment of humic acid-kaolin simulated water by coagulation-ultrafiltration (C-UF) hybrid process. Coagulation performance, floc characteristics, including floc size, compact degree, and strength were investigated in this study. Ultrafiltration experiments were conducted by a dead-end batch unit to implement the resistance analyses to explore the membrane fouling mechanisms. Results showed that DAM-ECH aid significantly increased the UV254 and DOC removal efficiencies and contributed to the formation of larger and stronger flocs with a looser structure. Aluminum chloride (Al) gave rise to better coagulation performance with DAM-ECH compared with poly aluminum chloride (PACl). The consequences of ultrafiltration experiments showed that DAM-ECH aid could reduce the membrane fouling mainly by decreasing the cake layer resistance. The flux reductions for PACl, Al/DAM-ECH (dosing both Al and DAM-ECH) and PACl/DAM-ECH (dosing both PACl and DAM-ECH) were 62%, 56% and 44%, respectively. Results of this study would be beneficial for the application of PACl/DAM-ECH and Al/DAM-ECH composite coagulants in water treatment processes. PMID:27295439

  9. Effects of microwave radiation on the eye: The occupational health perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Cutz, A. )

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this overview is to promote an interest in understanding and reducing the possible occupational health risks of microwave radiation on the eye. Microwaves act on living tissue through two types of mechanisms, thermal and nonthermal. Lens opacities can be induced in experimental animals at relatively high intensities (power densities greater than 100 mW/cm2). For lower intensities, lens changes may depend on the cumulative dose. At nonthermal intensities, microwaves can act as a trigger and set off changes in the living tissues (e.g. Ca++ efflux). Some cataract-causing agents (alloxan and galactose) act synergistically with microwaves. Microwaves also accelerate formation of cataracts due to diabetes. The corneal endothelium can be damaged by microwaves alone or in combination with some drugs. Microwave degeneration of retinal nerve endings and a small increase in retinal permeability were also found in animals. The effect of long-term low-intensity microwave exposure on the human lens remains poorly understood. Several reports have implicated occupational microwave exposure as a factor in increasing the rate of lens aging and retinal injury in microwave workers. In Canada, recommended microwave exposure limits are set at 25 mW/cm2 for microwave workers and at 1 mW/cm2 for the general public (both averaged over 1 minute). The Australian microwave exposure safety standard (1985) recommends pre- and post-employment eye examinations for workers.

  10. High brightness microwave lamp

    DOEpatents

    Kirkpatrick, Douglas A.; Dolan, James T.; MacLennan, Donald A.; Turner, Brian P.; Simpson, James E.

    2003-09-09

    An electrodeless microwave discharge lamp includes a source of microwave energy, a microwave cavity, a structure configured to transmit the microwave energy from the source to the microwave cavity, a bulb disposed within the microwave cavity, the bulb including a discharge forming fill which emits light when excited by the microwave energy, and a reflector disposed within the microwave cavity, wherein the reflector defines a reflective cavity which encompasses the bulb within its volume and has an inside surface area which is sufficiently less than an inside surface area of the microwave cavity. A portion of the reflector may define a light emitting aperture which extends from a position closely spaced to the bulb to a light transmissive end of the microwave cavity. Preferably, at least a portion of the reflector is spaced from a wall of the microwave cavity. The lamp may be substantially sealed from environmental contamination. The cavity may include a dielectric material is a sufficient amount to require a reduction in the size of the cavity to support the desired resonant mode.

  11. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2007-06-05

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stoke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  12. Microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector

    DOEpatents

    Haddad, Waleed S.; Trebes, James E.

    2002-01-01

    The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector includes a low power pulsed microwave transmitter with a broad-band antenna for producing a directional beam of microwaves, an index of refraction matching cap placed over the patients head, and an array of broad-band microwave receivers with collection antennae. The system of microwave transmitter and receivers are scanned around, and can also be positioned up and down the axis of the patients head. The microwave hemorrhagic stroke detector is a completely non-invasive device designed to detect and localize blood pooling and clots or to measure blood flow within the head or body. The device is based on low power pulsed microwave technology combined with specialized antennas and tomographic methods. The system can be used for rapid, non-invasive detection of blood pooling such as occurs with hemorrhagic stroke in human or animal patients as well as for the detection of hemorrhage within a patient's body.

  13. Bak-Sneppen Type Models and Coagulation-Fragmentation Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grinfeld, M.

    2008-09-01

    We suggest a construction that allows us to bring methods of denumerable Markov chain theory and coagulation-fragmentation processes to bear on the question of locating the threshold in Bak-Sneppen type models.

  14. Carbon dioxide pressure-induced coagulation of microalgae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Roland; Jessop, Philip G; Champagne, Pascale

    2015-12-28

    The move to a low-carbon economy has generated renewed interest in microalgae for the production of biofuels with the potential mutual benefit of wastewater treatment. However, harvesting has been identified as a limiting factor to the economic viability of this process. This paper explores the harvesting of microalgae using high-pressure gas without the addition of coagulants. Coagulation of microalgae under high-pressure gas was found to be an efficient method to separate algae from suspension. The critical coagulation pressures (CCPs) for H(2) and CO(2) were determined to be 6.1 and 6.2 MPa, respectively. The CO(2)-induced decrease in solution pH positively influenced coagulation rates, without appearing to affect the CCP. This approach could be beneficial for the economic removal of microalgae from solution for the production of both biofuels and biomedical compounds without the addition of non-environmentally friendly chemicals. PMID:26574522

  15. CARDIOVASCULAR AND BLOOD COAGULATION EFFECTS OF PULMONARY ZINC EXPOSURE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily, from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Mal...

  16. Electro-coagulation treatment of oily wastewater with sludge analysis.

    PubMed

    Ibrahim, Dhorgham Skban; Sakthipriya, N; Balasubramanian, N

    2012-01-01

    Experiments were carried out in a batch reactor to treat the oily effluent by electro-coagulation. The influence of operating parameters such as applied current, type of electrode and electrolysis time on electro-coagulation efficiency has been critically examined. The maximum percentage removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD) was 94% under optimum experimental conditions of pH 6.7, current density 6 mA/cm², electrolysis time 40 min, and using mild steel as anode. The remaining sludge in the reactor was analyzed by energy disperse analysis of X-rays (EDAX) and scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis. The analysis confirms that the oily pollutant was removed by electroflotation and adsorption of the oily particles of precipitate during the electro-coagulation process. Electro-coagulation can be used as an efficient treatment technique for oily wastewater. PMID:23109567

  17. Moringa coagulant as a stabilizer for amorphous solids: Part I.

    PubMed

    Bhende, Santosh; Jadhav, Namdeo

    2012-06-01

    Stabilization of amorphous state is a focal area for formulators to reap benefits related with solubility and consequently bioavailability of poorly soluble drugs. In the present work, an attempt has been made to explore the potential of moringa coagulant as an amorphous state stabilizer by investigating its role in stabilization of spray-dried (amorphous) ibuprofen, meloxicam and felodipine. Thermal studies like glass forming ability, glass transition temperature, hot stage microscopy and DSC were carried out for understanding thermodynamic stabilization of drugs. PXRD and dissolution studies were performed to support contribution of moringa coagulant. Studies showed that hydrogen bonding and electrostatic interactions between drug and moringa coagulant are responsible for amorphous state stabilization as explored by ATR-FTIR and molecular docking. Especially, H-bonding was found to be predominant mechanism for drug stabilization. Therein, arginine (basic amino acid in coagulant) exhibited various interactions and played important role in stabilization of aforesaid amorphous drugs. PMID:22359158

  18. Argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery.

    PubMed

    Adams, Melissa L; Steinberg, John S

    2011-01-01

    In this brief report, we introduce the principles, indications, advantages, disadvantages, and surgical techniques involved in the use of argon beam coagulation in foot and ankle surgery. PMID:21907597

  19. Complement-coagulation crosstalk on cellular and artificial surfaces.

    PubMed

    Wiegner, Rebecca; Chakraborty, Shinjini; Huber-Lang, Markus

    2016-10-01

    The humoral serine proteases of the complement system and the coagulation system play central roles during the events of an inflammatory response. While the complement system confers immunoprotective and -regulatory functions, the coagulation cascade is responsible to ensure hemostatic maintenance. Although these two systems individually unfold during inflammation, several studies have reported on the "crosstalk" between components of the complement and the coagulation system in the fluid phase. However, both cascades are usually initiated on or in close proximity to foreign or activated surfaces, and there is increasing evidence for interacting complement and coagulation proteins on various superficial areas on endothelium, circulating entities like platelets, leukocytes, microparticles and pathogens, and even on artificial surfaces. This review aims at summarizing these interactions to complete the picture. PMID:27371975

  20. Electromagnetic Initiation and Propagation of Bipolar Radiofrequency Tissue Reactions via Invasive Non-Insulated Microneedle Electrodes.

    PubMed

    Na, Jongju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Dannaker, Christopher; Lee, Sang Eun; Kang, Jin-Soo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy can be emitted into the skin, either non- or invasively, via a monopolar mode that utilizes an active electrode and a grounded electrode or via a bipolar mode that employs two active electrodes. In this experimental study of RF tissue reactions, bipolar RF energy was emitted in vivo to micropig skin at varying microneedle penetration depths, signal amplitudes, and conduction times. Immediately after RF treatment, skin samples exhibited RF-induced coagulation columns of thermal injury, separately generated around each microneedle in the dermis. In ex vivo bovine liver tissue, the thermal coagulation columns were found to be concentrated maximally around the pointed tips of each electrode. After a RF conduction time of 2 seconds, the individual areas of thermal coagulation began to converge with neighboring RF-induced coagulation columns; the convergence of coagulation columns was found to start from the tips of neighboring electrodes. PMID:26563971

  1. Electromagnetic Initiation and Propagation of Bipolar Radiofrequency Tissue Reactions via Invasive Non-Insulated Microneedle Electrodes

    PubMed Central

    Na, Jongju; Zheng, Zhenlong; Dannaker, Christopher; Lee, Sang Eun; Kang, Jin-Soo; Cho, Sung Bin

    2015-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) energy can be emitted into the skin, either non- or invasively, via a monopolar mode that utilizes an active electrode and a grounded electrode or via a bipolar mode that employs two active electrodes. In this experimental study of RF tissue reactions, bipolar RF energy was emitted in vivo to micropig skin at varying microneedle penetration depths, signal amplitudes, and conduction times. Immediately after RF treatment, skin samples exhibited RF-induced coagulation columns of thermal injury, separately generated around each microneedle in the dermis. In ex vivo bovine liver tissue, the thermal coagulation columns were found to be concentrated maximally around the pointed tips of each electrode. After a RF conduction time of 2 seconds, the individual areas of thermal coagulation began to converge with neighboring RF-induced coagulation columns; the convergence of coagulation columns was found to start from the tips of neighboring electrodes. PMID:26563971

  2. The Continuous Coagulation-FragmentationEquations with Diffusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurençot, Philippe; Mischler, Stéphane

    Existence of global weak solutions to the continuous coagulation-fragmentation equations with diffusion is investigated when the kinetic coefficients satisfy a detailed balance condition or the coagulation coefficient enjoys a monotonicity condition. Our approach relies on weak and strong compactness methods in L1 in the spirit of the DiPerna-Lions theory for the Boltzmann equation. Under the detailed balance condition the large-time behaviour is also studied.

  3. Disseminated intravascular coagulation and hepatocellular necrosis due to clove oil.

    PubMed

    Brown, S A; Biggerstaff, J; Savidge, G F

    1992-10-01

    We describe the case of a 2-year-old child who suffered from disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC) and hepatocellular necrosis, following ingestion of clove oil. The patient was treated with heparin and fresh frozen plasma, and, following specific haemostasis assays, with appropriate coagulation factor and inhibitor concentrates. The case demonstrates how this approach can be successfully used in the management of DIC with coexisting liver failure. PMID:1450336

  4. Gastric explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation and prevention strategies.

    PubMed

    Freiman, John Saul; Hampe, Toni

    2014-12-01

    We describe the occurrence of an iatrogenic explosion induced by argon plasma coagulation in a 70-year-old man undergoing gastroscopy. Combustible gases in the stomach may have been released by bacterial overgrowth as a result of partial gastric outlet obstruction (caused by a gastric tumor) and reduced acidity (from proton pump inhibitor therapy). We propose a stepwise process during upper endoscopy to prevent this devastating complication, comprising aspiration, preinsufflation with CO2, and then coagulation. PMID:25041867

  5. Removal of Arsenic from Drinking Water by Adsorption and Coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, M.; Sugita, H.; Hara, J.; Takahashi, S.

    2013-12-01

    Removal of arsenic from drinking water has been an important issue worldwide, which has attracted greater attentions in recent years especially for supplying safe drinking water in developing countries. Although many kinds of treatment approaches that are available or applicable both in principle and practice, such as adsorption, coagulation, membrane filtration, ion exchange, biological process, electrocoagulation and so on, the first 2 approaches (i.e., adsorption and coagulation) are most promising due to the low-cost, high-efficiency, simplicity of treating systems, and thus can be practically used in developing countries. In this study, a literature survey on water quality in Bangladesh was performed to understand the ranges of arsenic concentration and pH of groundwater in Bangladesh. A series of tests were then organized and performed to investigate the effects of arsenic concentration, arsenic forms, pH, chemical compositions of the materials used for adsorption and coagulation, particle size distribution and treatment time on quality of treated water. The experimental results obtained in the study illustrated that both adsorption and coagulation can be used to effectively reduce the concentrations of either arsenic (V) or arsenic (III) from the contaminated water. Coagulation of arsenic with a magnesium-based material developed in this study can be very effective to remove arsenic, especially arsenic (V), from contaminated water with a concentration of 10 ppm to an undetectable level of 0.002 ppm by ICP analyses. Compared to arsenic (III), arsenic (V) is easier to be removed. The materials used for adsorption and coagulation in this study can remove arsenic (V) up to 9 mg/g and 6 mg/g, and arsenic (III) up to 4 mg/g and 3 mg/g, respectively, depending on test conditions and compositions of the materials being used. The control of pH during treatment can be a challenging technical issue for developing both adsorbent and coagulant. Keywords: Water Treatment

  6. Removal of dispersant-stabilized carbon nanotubes by regular coagulants.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ni; Liu, Changli; Zhang, Jing; Lin, Daohui

    2012-01-01

    Coagulation followed by sedimentation, as a conventional technique in the water treatment plant, can be the first line of defense against exposures of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) to aquatic organisms and human beings, which has been rarely documented. This study investigated the removal of dispersant-stabilized CNT suspensions by poly aluminum chloride (PACl) and KAl(SO4)2 x 12H2O (alum), with a focus on the effects of dispersant type, coagulant type and dosage. PACl performed better than alum in the removal of tannic acid-, humic acid-, and sodium dodecyl benzenesulfonate-stabilized CNTs, but worse for polyethylene glycol octylphenyl ether (TX100)-stabilized CNTs. Neither coagulant could effectively precipitate cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide-stabilized CNTs. The removal by PACl first increased up to a plateau and then decreased with the continued increase of coagulant dosage. However, the removal rates leveled off but did not decrease after achieving their highest level with the continued addition of alum. The coagulation and flocculation of the CNT suspensions by PACl could be regulated mainly by the mechanism of adsorption charge neutralization, whereas the coagulation by alum mainly involved electrical double-layer compression. PMID:23513676

  7. Coagulation-flocculation in leachate treatment using modified micro sand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaldiri, Nur Hanani; Halim, Azhar Abdul

    2013-11-01

    Sanitary landfill leachate is considered as highly polluted wastewater, without any treatment, discharging into water system will cause underground water and surface water pollutions. This study was to investigate the treatability of the semi-aerobic landfill leachate via coagulation-flocculation using poly-aluminum chloride (PAC), cationic polymer, and modified micro sand. Leachate was collected from Pulau Burung Sanitary Landfill (PBSL) located in Penang, Malaysia. Coagulation-flocculation was performed by using jar test equipment and the effect of pH, dose of coagulant and dose of polymer toward removal of chemical oxygen demand (COD), color and suspended solid (SS) were examined. Micro sand was also used in this study to compare settling time of coagulation-flocculation process. The optimum pH, dose of coagulant (PAC) and dose of polymer (cationic) achieved were 7.0, 1000 mg/L and 8 mg/L, respectively. The dose of micro sand used for the settling time process was 300 mg/L. Results showed that 52.66% removal of COD, 97.16% removal of SS and 96.44% removal of color were achieved under optimum condition. The settling times for the settling down of the sludge or particles that formed during coagulation-flocculation process were 1 min with modified sand, 20 min with raw micro sand and 45 min without micro sand.

  8. Planetesimal formation by sweep-up coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Windmark, Fredrik; Birnstiel, Til; Ormel, Chris W.; Dullemond, Cornelis P.

    2013-07-01

    The formation of planetesimals is often accredited to collisional sticking of dust grains in the protoplanetary disk. The exact process is however unknown, as collisions between larger aggregates tend to lead to fragmentation or bouncing rather than sticking. These growth barriers tend to halt the dust growth already at millimeters or centimeters in size, which is far below the kilometer-sizes that are needed for gravity to aid in the accretion. To study how far dust coagulation can proceed, we have developed a new collision model based on the latest laboratory experiments, and have used it together with a dust-size evolution code capable of resolving all grain interactions in the protoplanetary disk. We find that for the general dust population, bouncing and fragmenting collisions prevent the growth above millimeter-sizes. However, a small number of lucky particles can grow larger than the rest by only interacting at low, sticky velocities. As they grow, they become increasingly resilient to fragmentation caused by the small grains. In this way, two populations are formed: One which remains small due to the collisional barriers, and one that continues to grow by sweeping up the smaller grains around them.

  9. Oxidation inhibits iron-induced blood coagulation.

    PubMed

    Pretorius, Etheresia; Bester, Janette; Vermeulen, Natasha; Lipinski, Boguslaw

    2013-01-01

    Blood coagulation under physiological conditions is activated by thrombin, which converts soluble plasma fibrinogen (FBG) into an insoluble clot. The structure of the enzymatically-generated clot is very characteristic being composed of thick fibrin fibers susceptible to the fibrinolytic degradation. However, in chronic degenerative diseases, such as atherosclerosis, diabetes mellitus, cancer, and neurological disorders, fibrin clots are very different forming dense matted deposits (DMD) that are not effectively removed and thus create a condition known as thrombosis. We have recently shown that trivalent iron (ferric ions) generates hydroxyl radicals, which subsequently convert FBG into abnormal fibrin clots in the form of DMDs. A characteristic feature of DMDs is their remarkable and permanent resistance to the enzymatic degradation. Therefore, in order to prevent thrombotic incidences in the degenerative diseases it is essential to inhibit the iron-induced generation of hydroxyl radicals. This can be achieved by the pretreatment with a direct free radical scavenger (e.g. salicylate), and as shown in this paper by the treatment with oxidizing agents such as hydrogen peroxide, methylene blue, and sodium selenite. Although the actual mechanism of this phenomenon is not yet known, it is possible that hydroxyl radicals are neutralized by their conversion to the molecular oxygen and water, thus inhibiting the formation of dense matted fibrin deposits in human blood. PMID:23170793

  10. Influence of blood coagulability after spinal surgeries

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Marcelo Hide; Rodrigues, Luiz Claudio Lacerda; Batalini, Luiz Gustavo da silva; Fonteles, Thales Arcanjo; Bortoletto, Adalberto

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To verify whether spinal surgery causes relevant changes in the blood clotting process and define which factors have the greatest influence on changes found. Method: This is a not randomized, cross-sectional study, Forty seven patients were evaluated between August 2011 and February 2013, whose clinical, surgical, laboratory and image daata were collected. The data obtained were crossed with the epidemiological data of each patient in a moment prior to and another after surgery searching which variables have been directly influenced. Result: Our analysis showed that the most important changes occurred in patients with BMI classified, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) as out of healthy range. Other smaller correlations were also found. Another important consideration was the tendency to observe hypercoagulability in smoker patients, a fact that is not influenced by spinal procedures. Conclusion: We concluded that spinal surgeries cause few relevant changes in the blood clotting process and that among the factors studied, BMI (when out of the healthy range, according to the WHO classification) showed closer relationship with changes in laboratory coagulation tests. Level of Evidence III, Cross-Sectional Study. PMID:25328429

  11. Disseminated intravascular coagulation following administration of sunitinib

    PubMed Central

    OLIVO, ANAËLLE; NOËL, NICOLAS; BESSE, BENJAMIN; TABURET, ANNE-MARIE; LAMBOTTE, OLIVIER

    2016-01-01

    Sunitinib is an increasingly used, orally administered targeted therapy, approved by the European Medicines Agency for the treatment of various types of cancer, including gastrointestinal stromal tumor unresectable or metastatic disease, following disease progression or intolerance to imatinib, and advanced or metastatic renal cell carcinoma, progressive well-differentiated pancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in patients with unresectable, locally advanced or metastatic disease. Sunitinib inhibits several tyrosine kinases, including the vascular endothelial growth factor receptor and the platelet-derived growth factor receptor. Tyrosine kinases inhibitor therapies are generally well-tolerated; nonetheless, they are not void of side effects. The majority of patients reported are grade 1 or 2, and include common and unspecific adverse events, including fatigue, gastrointestinal disorders, skin discoloration, altered taste, cough and dyspnea. Grade 3 or 4 adverse events, including bleeding and hemorrhage, are less frequent. The present study presented the first case of disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with the administration of sunitinib, shortly following the increase of sunitinib dosage. PMID:27330781

  12. Flow-Dependent Vascular Heat Transfer during Microwave Thermal Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Chiang, Jason; Hynes, Kieran; Brace, Christopher L.

    2012-01-01

    Microwave tumor ablation is an attractive option for thermal ablation because of its inherent benefits over radiofrequency ablation (RFA) in the treatment of solid tumors such as hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Microwave energy heats tissue to higher temperatures and at a faster rate than RFA, creating larger, more homogenous ablation zones. In this study, we investigate microwave heating near large vasculature using coupled fluid-flow and thermal analysis. Low-flow conditions are predicted to be more likely to cause cytotoxic heating and, therefore, vessel thrombosis and endothelial damage of downstream tissues. Such conditions may be more prevalent in patient with severe cirrhosis or compromised blood flow. High-flow conditions create the more familiar heat-sink effect that can protect perivascular tissues from the intended thermal damage. These results may help guide placement and use of microwave ablation technologies in future studies. PMID:23367194

  13. Preoperative detection of intrahepatic venovenous shunt treated by microwave precoagulation during right hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Delhorme, Jean-Baptiste; Méméo, Riccardo; Marescaux, Jacques; Pessaux, Patrick

    2015-11-01

    A 53-year-old woman underwent a 2-stage right hepatectomy for bilobar metastasis of an ileal neuroendocrine carcinoma. Preoperative three-dimensional computed tomography reconstruction helped to diagnose an intrahepatic venovenous shunts from the right and middle hepatic veins to the left hepatic vein, which could cause a intraoperative bleeding. Hemostasis was performed by means of precoagulation with microwave-assisted coagulation. PMID:26558160

  14. 1.06-μm Nd:YAG laser coagulation tonsillectomy: an animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhi; Pankratov, Michail M.; Volk, Mark S.; Perrault, Donald F., Jr.; Shapshay, Stanley M.

    1995-05-01

    Tonsillectomy is one of the most frequently performed surgeries which is not free from post- operative morbidity. We have developed a non contact photocoagulation technique using 1.06 micrometers Nd:YAG laser and tested its safety and efficacy in an animal model. Eight animals were divided into the laser coagulation group (6 animals) and the laser excision group (2 animals). Tonsils of the laser coagulation animals were irradiated with 8 - 10 W of laser power for 5 - 6 min in a slow painting-like motion over the surface of a tonsil until slight blanching of mucosa was noticed. Tonsils of the laser excision group were resected with 25 - 30 W of 1.06 micrometers Nd:YAG laser power through a contact fiber. The animals were examined endoscopically at 1.5 hrs and at 2, 5, 12, 30, and 42 days post treatment. Atrophic process was followed until total disappearance of tonsillar tissue was observed. The animals were sacrificed at various time intervals and the tonsillar specimens were collected for gross and histological examination. The thermal damage to mucosa and adjacent tissues was minimal which we attribute to a low laser power and cooling from preoperative injection of saline into subcapsular space. The potential advantages of this technique include intact mucosa with no intra- or post-operative bleeding, less pain, and avoidance of general anesthesia. These advantages may enable this surgery to become an in-the-office procedure.

  15. Curriculum in biomedical optics and laser-tissue interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacques, Steven L.

    2003-10-01

    A graduate student level curriculum has been developed for teaching the basic principles of how lasers and light interact with biological tissues and materials. The field of Photomedicine can be divided into two topic areas: (1) where tissue affects photons, used for diagnostic sensing, imaging, and spectroscopy of tissues and biomaterials, and (2) where photons affect tissue, used for surgical and therapeutic cutting, dissecting, machining, processing, coagulating, welding, and oxidizing tissues and biomaterials. The courses teach basic principles of tissue optical properties and light transport in tissues, and interaction of lasers and conventional light sources with tissues via photochemical, photothermal and photomechanical mechanisms.

  16. Floc characterization and membrane fouling of polyferric-polymer dual/composite coagulants in coagulation/ultrafiltration hybrid process.

    PubMed

    Rong, Hongyan; Gao, Baoyu; Li, Junchao; Zhang, Bei; Sun, Shenglei; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Li, Qian

    2013-12-15

    Papermaking sludge and spent pickling liquor were recycled to synthesize a macromolecular lignin-acrylamide polymer (LA) and polyferric chloride (PFC), respectively. The dual-coagulant PFC-LA (PFC and LA were dosed orderly), composite coagulant PFCLA (PFC and LA premixed before dosed) and PFC were used in coagulation/ultrafiltration hybrid process in surface water treatment. The objectives of this paper are to comparatively investigate final water quality after coagulation and coagulation/ultrafiltration process and floc properties, including floc size, strength, recoverability and floc structure, with or without LA addition. Additionally, the relationship between membrane fouling and floc characteristics was discussed. The results showed that best final water quality was obtained by PFC-LA, sequentially followed by PFCLA and PFC. Floc size, growth rate, strength and recoverability as well as fractal dimension were also in the order of PFC-LA>PFCLA>PFC. The maximum permeate fluxes before and after backwash operation were obtained by PFC-LA, which gave the largest and most compact flocs. Coagulation suspension after breakage resulted in much more serious membrane fouling for PFC, whereas permeate flux slightly decreased when LA was used in combination with PFC. PMID:24144372

  17. Coagulation of humic waters for diffused pollution control and the influence of coagulant type on DOC fractions removed.

    PubMed

    Heiderscheidt, Elisangela; Leiviskä, Tiina; Kløve, Bjørn

    2016-10-01

    This study examined the suitability of organic coagulants for treatment of typically humic peat extraction runoff water by comparing their performance with that of ferric sulphate (FS). The influence of coagulant type on dissolved organic carbon (DOC) fractions removed was analysed in detail using LC-OCD-OND (size exclusion liquid chromatography coupled with organic carbon and organic nitrogen detection) fractionation techniques. In general, lower coagulant dosage was needed under acidic (pH 4.5) than neutral (pH 6.5) conditions. Chitosan (Chit) and poly (diallyldimethyl) ammonium chloride (pDMAC) required significantly lower dosage (40-55%) than FS for acceptable purification, while a tannin-based coagulant (Tan2) required substantially higher dosage (55-75%) independent of water pH. FS demonstrated the best removal of DOC (<81%) and phosphorus (<93%) followed by pDMAC, while Chit and Tan2 achieved the highest removal of suspended solids (SS) (<58%), with flocs formed by Tan2 presenting the best settling properties. Higher molecular weight (MW) DOC fractions were more efficiently removed by all coagulants, with FS being the most efficient (biopolymers 69% and humic substances 91%), followed by Tan2. FS also displayed satisfactory removal of lower MW fractions (building blocks ∼46% and low MW neutrals 62%). Overall, FS was the best performing coagulant. Nevertheless, the organic polymers demonstrated satisfactory overall performance, achieving purification rates mostly inside the requirements set by Finnish environmental authorities. PMID:27401835

  18. Noninvasive laser coagulation of the canine vas deferens, in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cilip, Christopher M.; Ross, Ashley E.; Jarow, Jonathan P.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    Development of a noninvasive vasectomy technique may eliminate male fear of complications (incision, bleeding, infection, and scrotal pain) and result in a more popular procedure. This study builds upon previously reported ex vivo tissue studies by exploring acute and short-term chronic in vivo canine studies. Isolation of the canine vas was achieved using a conventional vas ring clamp method. No perforation of the scrotal skin was necessary to occlude the vas. Laser radiation with a wavelength of 1075 nm, average power of 11.2 W, 500-ms pulse duration, 0.5 Hz pulse rate, and 3-mm-diameter spot was synchronized with cryogen spray cooling of the scrotal skin surface in a total of 8 dogs (n = 16 vasa) for a treatment time of 60 s. Burst pressure measurements were conducted at Days 0 and 21 (n = 8 vasa each day) to quantify the strength of vas closure. The vas was successfully thermally occluded in 15/16 (94%) procedures with 14/15 (93%) vas recording burst pressures above ejaculation pressure. One vas was not present, and another vas recorded a bursting pressure below ejaculation pressure. The coagulated vas bursting pressure averaged 283 +/- 34 mm Hg at Day 0 and 260 +/- 77 mm Hg at Day 21, significantly higher than reported vas ejaculation pressures of 136 +/- 29 mm Hg. Minor scrotal skin burns were observed during the recovery period. Noninvasive thermal occlusion of the vas is feasible in an in vivo canine model. Elimination of minor skin burns and longer term chronic in vivo canine studies are needed to confirm azospermia after vas occlusion without recanalization.

  19. Influence of NaCl Concentrations on Coagulation, Temperature, and Electrical Conductivity Using a Perfusion Radiofrequency Ablation System: An Ex Vivo Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Aube, Christophe Schmidt, Diethard; Brieger, Jens; Schenk, Martin; Kroeber, Stefan; Vielle, Bruno; Claussen, Claus D.; Goldberg, S. Nahum; Pereira, Philippe L.

    2007-02-15

    Purpose. To determine, by means of an ex vivo study, the effect of different NaCl concentrations on the extent of coagulation obtained during radiofrequency (RF) ablation performed using a digitally controlled perfusion device. Method. Twenty-eight RF ablations were performed with 40 W for 10 min using continuous NaCl infusion in fresh excised bovine liver. For perfusion, NaCl concentrations ranging from 0 (demineralized water) to 25% were used. Temperature, the amount of energy, and the dimensions of thermal-induced white coagulation were assessed for each ablation. These parameters were compared using the nonparametric Mann-Whitney test. Correlations were calculated according to the Spearman test. Results. RF ablation performed with 0.9% to 25% concentrations of NaCl produced a mean volume of coagulation of 30.7 {+-} 3.8 cm{sup 3}, with a mean short-axis diameter of 3.6 {+-} 0.2 cm. The mean amount of energy was 21,895 {+-} 1,674 W and the mean temperature was 85.4 {+-} 12.8 deg. C. Volume of coagulation, short-axis diameter, and amount of energy did not differ significantly among NaCl concentrations (p > 0.5). A correlation was found between the NaCl concentration and the short-axis diameter of coagulation (r = 0.64) and between the NaCl concentration and the mean temperature (r = 0.67), but not between the NaCl concentration and volume of coagulation. Conclusion. In an ex vivo model, continuous perfusion with high NaCl concentrations does not significantly improve the volume of thermal-induced coagulation. This may be because the use of a low-power generator cannot sufficiently exploit the potential advantage of better tissue conductivity provided by NaCl perfusion.

  20. Microwave Lightcraft concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Looking like an alien space ship or a flying saucer the Microwave Lightcraft is an unconventional launch vehicle approach for delivering payload to orbit using power transmitted via microwaves. Microwaves re beamed from either a ground station or an orbiting solar power satellite to the lightcraft. The energy received breaks air molecules into a plasma and a magnetohydrodynamic fanjet provides the lifting force. Only a small amount of propellant is required for circulation, attitude control and deorbit.

  1. Effect of nano-scale curvature on the intrinsic blood coagulation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kushida, Takashi; Saha, Krishnendu; Subramani, Chandramouleeswaran; Nandwana, Vikas; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2014-11-01

    The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation `silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation.The intrinsic coagulation activity of silica nanoparticles strongly depends on their surface curvature. Nanoparticles with higher surface curvature do not denature blood coagulation factor XII on its surface, providing a coagulation `silent' surface, while nanoparticles with lower surface curvature show denaturation and concomitant coagulation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Physical properties and scanning electron micrographs (SEM) of silica NPs, intrinsic coagulation activity after 3 h. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr04128c

  2. A quantitative comparison between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation for boron removal from boron-containing solution.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, A Erdem; Boncukcuoğlu, Recep; Kocakerim, M Muhtar

    2007-10-22

    This paper provides a quantitative comparison of electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation approaches based on boron removal. Electrocoagulation process delivers the coagulant in situ as the sacrificial anode corrodes, due to a fixed current density, while the simultaneous evolution of hydrogen at the cathode allows for pollutant removal by flotation. By comparison, conventional chemical coagulation typically adds a salt of the coagulant, with settling providing the primary pollutant removal path. Chemical coagulation was carried out via jar tests using aluminum chloride. Comparison was done with the same amount of coagulant between electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation processes. Boron removal obtained was higher with electrocoagulation process. In addition, it was seen that chemical coagulation has any effect for boron removal from boron-containing solution. At optimum conditions (e.g. pH 8.0 and aluminum dose of 7.45 g/L), boron removal efficiencies for electrocoagulation and chemical coagulation were 94.0% and 24.0%, respectively. PMID:17524554

  3. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1997-04-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymeric materials. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIM Materials Program, allows the authors, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of various thermoset resins will be studied because it holds the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components or in-situ curing of adhesives, including metal-to-metal. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  4. Advanced microwave processing concepts

    SciTech Connect

    Lauf, R.J.; McMillan, A.D.; Paulauskas, F.L.

    1995-05-01

    The purpose of this work is to explore the feasibility of several advanced microwave processing concepts to develop new energy-efficient materials and processes. The project includes two tasks: (1) commercialization of the variable-frequency microwave furnace; and (2) microwave curing of polymer composites. The variable frequency microwave furnace, whose initial conception and design was funded by the AIC Materials Program, will allow us, for the first time, to conduct microwave processing studies over a wide frequency range. This novel design uses a high-power traveling wave tube (TWT) originally developed for electronic warfare. By using this microwave source, one can not only select individual microwave frequencies for particular experiments, but also achieve uniform power densities over a large area by the superposition of many different frequencies. Microwave curing of thermoset resins will be studied because it hold the potential of in-situ curing of continuous-fiber composites for strong, lightweight components. Microwave heating can shorten curing times, provided issues of scaleup, uniformity, and thermal management can be adequately addressed.

  5. Medical imaging with a microwave tomographic scanner.

    PubMed

    Jofre, L; Hawley, M S; Broquetas, A; de los Reyes, E; Ferrando, M; Elias-Fusté, A R

    1990-03-01

    A microwave tomographic scanner for biomedical applications is presented. The scanner consists of a 64 element circular array with a useful diameter of 20 cm. Electronically scanning the transmitting and receiving antennas allows multiview measurements with no mechanical movement. Imaging parameters are appropriate for medical use: a spatial resolution of 7 mm and a contrast resolution of 1% for a measurement time of 3 s. Measurements on tissue-simulating phantoms and volunteers, together with numerical simulations, are presented to assess the system for absolute imaging of tissue distribution and for differential imaging of physiological, pathological, and induced changes in tissues. PMID:2329003

  6. Effects of Erwinia-asparaginase on the coagulation system.

    PubMed

    Carlsson, H; Stockelberg, D; Tengborn, L; Braide, I; Carneskog, J; Kutti, J

    1995-11-01

    L-Asparaginase treatment during induction therapy in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL) is known to be frequently complicated by thromboembolic events. It was recently suggested that L-asparaginase derived from Erwinia chrysanthemi alters the coagulation system less severely than does Escherichia coli asparaginase. In a series of 11 adult patients with ALL, we investigated some parameters of the coagulation system during treatment with Erwinia asparaginase. The doses employed were rather high; all patients below the age of 60 years received 15,000 U/m2 daily over 14 days. In accordance with what is known from treatment with E. coli asparaginase, we observed significant lowering of antithrombin as well as of fibrinogen. However, as to fibrinogen indeed a significant decrease had occurred prior to the institution of Erwinia asparaginase treatment. The most striking observation in the present study was that the levels of prothrombin complex, reflecting the function of K-vitamin dependent coagulation factors II, VII and X, remained within normal ranges during treatment. This indicates that these coagulation factors were not affected by Erwinia asparaginase, an observation at variance with several reports where E. coli asparaginase was investigated. This latter observation was the only finding which could lend support to the view that Erwinia asparaginase affects the coagulation system less than E. coli asparaginase. Finally, one of our patients developed a sinus thrombosis, a severe thrombotic complication. PMID:7493674

  7. The effects of NOM and coagulation on copper corrosion

    SciTech Connect

    Rehring, J.P.; Edwards, M.

    1994-12-31

    Copper corrosion was examined in solutions containing natural organic matter (NOM) and in situations where NOM was removed by enhanced coagulation with alum or ferric chloride. Electrochemical methods were used to evaluate the long-term effects of each water quality on copper corrosion. In experiments exploring the role of NOM in copper corrosion, corrosion rates increased with NOM concentration at pH 6, whereas at pH 7.5 and 9 the NOM had less significant effects. Waters treated by enhanced alum coagulation had higher corrosion rates than untreated waters, but enhanced ferric chloride coagulation had the opposite effect. This difference was attributed to the relative effects of added sulfate via alum coagulation versus added chloride via ferric chloride coagulation. Compliance with the EPA Lead and Copper Rule and disinfection byproduct regulations may require that utilities address both regulations simultaneously. That is, water treatment processes, NOM concentration, and copper corrosion behavior are clearly interdependent and should be considered when contemplating changes to meet DBP regulations.

  8. A mini review of preoxidation to improve coagulation.

    PubMed

    Xie, Pengchao; Chen, Yiqun; Ma, Jun; Zhang, Xiang; Zou, Jing; Wang, Zongping

    2016-07-01

    Preoxidation has attracted people's attention due to its effectiveness in enhancing coagulation. The mechanisms, drawbacks and applications in the improvement of coagulation were summarized in this work. Preoxidation can destroy the organic coating on the surface of particles to change the zeta potential, which is the vital reason for improving coagulation. Co-existing metallic ions, such as calcium, iron and manganese, play important roles in the improvement of coagulation due to the formation of metal-humate complexes or the in situ formed coagulant. However, preoxidation could degrade organic matter from high molecular weight to low molecular weight and damage cell membrane of algae, causing intracellular algal organic matter to release outside and producing hydrophilic functional groups to some extent, which has the potential to deteriorate the water quality. Additionally, disinfection byproduct formation is also affected significantly through changing the characteristics of the organic and inorganic precursors. Based on the recent publications, some future developments of preoxidation process were suggested in this study. PMID:27153238

  9. Removal of perfluorooctanoate from surface water by polyaluminium chloride coagulation.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shubo; Zhou, Qin; Yu, Gang; Huang, Jun; Fan, Qing

    2011-02-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) has been detected in surface water all over the world, and little is known of its removal by coagulation in water treatment plants. In this study, polyaluminium chloride (PACl) was used to remove PFOA from surface water, and the effects of coagulant dose, solution pH, temperature, and initial turbidity on the removal of both PFOA and suspended solids (SS) from water were investigated. Since the SS had high sorption affinity for PFOA, most PFOA was adsorbed on the particles and removed via the SS removal in the coagulation process. PFOA concentrations in aqueous phase decreased with increasing initial turbidity and PACl dose, while they increased with increasing solution pH and temperature. Other perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) with different C-F chain lengths and functional groups were also compared with PFOA. It was proved that hydrophobic interaction played an important role in the adsorption of PFOA on the SS. The addition of powdered activated carbon (PAC) before the coagulation process significantly enhanced the removal efficiency of PFOA in water, and the residual PFOA concentrations in water were less than 1 μg/L after the addition of 1-16 mg/L PAC and subsequent coagulation when the initial PFOA concentrations were in the range of 0.5-3 mg/L. PMID:21163511

  10. Disseminated intravascular coagulation in cattle with abomasal displacement.

    PubMed

    Irmak, K; Turgut, K

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate haemostatic function in cattle with abomasal displacement (AD) and to reflect the occurrence of disseminated intravascular coagulation (DIC). Ten adult cattle with left displacement of abomasum (LDA) (group I), 10 adult cattle with right displacement of abomasum with volvulus (RDA) (group II) and 10 clinically healthy adult cattle (control group) were used as material. Numbers of platelets (PLT) and coagulation tests (activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), prothrombin time (PT), thrombin time (TT), serum fibrin/fibrinogen degradation products (FDPs), fibrinogen) were measured before the surgical treatment of cattle with LDA and RDA. APTT was prolonged only in group II compared with the control and group I (p<0.05). However, when the individual values of coagulation profiles of each cow were evaluated, two cattle in group I and three cattle in group II had at least three abnormal coagulation profiles, which reflect the occurrence of DIC. These cattle died after surgical treatment. The two cattle with LDA had abnormal APTT, FDPs and PLT values; three cattle with RDA had abnormal APTT, PT, TT, FDPs and PLT values. APTT (5 cases), FDPs (5 cases) and thrombocytopenia (5 cases) were the three most common abnormal tests on coagulation profile in the cattle with LDA and RDA. The results of the study indicate that cattle with AD had a spectrum of haemostatic dysfunction and that DIC was a significant risk factor for mortality. PMID:15727292

  11. Clay-catalyzed reactions of coagulant polymers during water chlorination

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, J.-F.; Liao, P.-M.; Lee, C.-K.; Chao, H.-P.; Peng, C.-L.; Chiou, C.T.

    2004-01-01

    The influence of suspended clay/solid particles on organic-coagulant reactions during water chlorination was investigated by analyses of total product formation potential (TPFP) and disinfection by-product (DBP) distribution as a function of exchanged clay cation, coagulant organic polymer, and reaction time. Montmorillonite clays appeared to act as a catalytic center where the reaction between adsorbed polymer and disinfectant (chlorine) was mediated closely by the exchanged clay cation. The transition-metal cations in clays catalyzed more effectively than other cations the reactions between a coagulant polymer and chlorine, forming a large number of volatile DBPs. The relative catalytic effects of clays/solids followed the order Ti-Mont > Fe-Mont > Cu-Mont > Mn-Mont > Ca-Mont > Na-Mont > quartz > talc. The effects of coagulant polymers on TPFP follow the order nonionic polymer > anionic polymer > cationic polymer. The catalytic role of the clay cation was further confirmed by the observed inhibition in DBP formation when strong chelating agents (o-phenanthroline and ethylenediamine) were added to the clay suspension. Moreover, in the presence of clays, total DBPs increased appreciably when either the reaction time or the amount of the added clay or coagulant polymer increased. For volatile DBPs, the formation of halogenated methanes was usually time-dependent, with chloroform and dichloromethane showing the greatest dependence. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Polymorphisms of the coagulation system and risk of cancer.

    PubMed

    Tinholt, Mari; Sandset, Per Morten; Iversen, Nina

    2016-04-01

    Hypercoagulability is a frequently finding in patients with cancer, and is associated with an increased risk of venous thrombosis (VT). Cancer-associated VT is associated with poor prognosis and represents the leading non-cancer cause of death among these patients. Conversely, patients experiencing VT are at increased risk of subsequent cancer, suggesting an epidemiological bidirectional link between cancer and hemostasis, and indicating a role of the hemostatic system in cancer development. How the coagulation system relates to cancer etiology at the genetic level is largely unexplored. Data on the association of polymorphisms in genes involved in coagulation with cancer development is important to clarify the role of the coagulation system in cancer pathogenesis. Effects of coagulation-related gene polymorphisms on cancer risk may possibly be translated into novel treatment- and prevention strategies of cancer-associated thrombosis and the cancer itself. This article reviews the current knowledge of the relation between polymorphisms in genes involved in coagulation and cancer risk in solid tumors. PMID:27067978

  13. Comparison of Moringa stenopetala seed extract as a clean coagulant with Alum and Moringa stenopetala-Alum hybrid coagulant to remove direct dye from Textile Wastewater.

    PubMed

    Dalvand, Arash; Gholibegloo, Elham; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Golchinpoor, Najmeh; Khazaei, Mohammad; Kamani, Hossein; Hosseini, Sara Sadat; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2016-08-01

    In this study, the efficiency of Moringa stenopetala seed extract was compared with alum and M. stenopetala-alum hybrid coagulant to remove Direct Red 23 azo dye from textile wastewater. The effects of parameters such as pH, coagulant dose, type of salt used for the extraction of coagulant and initial dye concentration on dye removal efficiency were investigated. Moreover, the existing functional groups on the structure of M. stenopetala coagulant (MSC) were determined by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and the morphology of sludge produced by MSC, alum, and hybrid coagulant was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. Ninhydrin test was also used to determine the quantity of primary amines in the MSC and Moringa oleifera coagulant (MOC). According to the results, with increasing the coagulant dose and decreasing the initial dye concentration, dye removal efficiency has increased. The maximum dye removal of 98.5, 98.2, and 98.3 % were obtained by using 240, 120, and 80 mg/L MSC, alum and hybrid coagulant at pH 7, respectively. The results also showed MSC was much more effective than MOC for dye removal. The volume of sludge produced by MSC was one fourth and half of those produced by alum and hybrid coagulant, respectively. Based on the results, hybrid coagulant was the most efficient coagulant for direct dye removal from colored wastewater. PMID:27164876

  14. In Vitro Tissue Differentiation using Dynamics of Tissue Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Wei-Chiang; Phillips, Paul J.

    2002-03-01

    Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties of various human tissue types were studied at macroscopic as well as microscopic level in vitro. This study was conducted to enable the development of a feedback system based on dynamics of tissue mechanical properties for intraoperative guidance for tumor treatment (e.g., RF ablation of liver tumor) and noninvasive tumor localization. Human liver tissues, including normal, cancerous, and cirrhotic tissues, were obtained from patients receiving liver transplant or tumor resection at Vanderbilt University Medical Center with the approval of the Vanderbilt Institutional Review Board. Tissue samples, once resected from the patients, were snap-frozen using liquid nitrogen and stored at -70 oC. Measurements of the mechanical properties of these tissue samples were conducted at the University of Tennessee at Knoxville. Dynamics of tissue mechanical properties were measured from both native and thermally coagulated tissue samples at macroscopic and microscopic level. Preliminary results suggest the dynamics of mechanical properties of normal liver tissues are very different from those of cancerous liver tissues. The correlation between the dynamics of mechanical properties at macroscopic level and those at microscopic level is currently under investigation.

  15. Coagulation-driven platelet activation reduces cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis in mice

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, N.; Kopec, A. K.; O’Brien, K. M.; Towery, K. L.; Cline-Fedewa, H.; Williams, K.J.; Copple, B. L.; Flick, M. J.; Luyendyk, J. P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background The coagulation cascade has been shown to participate in chronic liver injury and fibrosis, but the contribution of various thrombin targets, such as protease activated receptors (PARs) and fibrin(ogen), has not been fully described. Emerging evidence suggests that in some experimental settings of chronic liver injury, platelets can promote liver repair and inhibit liver fibrosis. However, the precise mechanisms linking coagulation and platelet function to hepatic tissue changes following injury remain poorly defined. Objectives To determine the role of PAR-4, a key thrombin receptor on mouse platelets, and fibrin(ogen) engagement of the platelet αIIbβ3 integrin in a model of cholestatic liver injury and fibrosis. Methods Biliary and hepatic injury was characterized following 4 week administration of the bile duct toxicant α-naphthylisothiocyanate (ANIT) (0.025%) in PAR-4-deficient mice (PAR-4−/− mice), mice expressing a mutant form of fibrin(ogen) incapable of binding integrin αIIbβ3 (FibγΔ5), and wild-type mice. Results Elevated plasma thrombin-antithrombin and serotonin levels, hepatic fibrin deposition and platelet accumulation in liver accompanied hepatocellular injury and fibrosis in ANIT-treated wild-type mice. PAR-4 deficiency reduced plasma serotonin levels, increased serum bile acid concentration, and exacerbated ANIT-induced hepatocellular injury and peribiliary fibrosis. Compared to PAR-4-deficient mice, ANIT-treated FibγΔ5 mice displayed more widespread hepatocellular necrosis accompanied by marked inflammation, robust fibroblast activation and extensive liver fibrosis. Conclusions Collectively, the results indicate that PAR-4 and fibrin-αIIbβ3 integrin engagement, pathways coupling coagulation to platelet activation, each exert hepatoprotective effects during chronic cholestasis. PMID:25353084

  16. Direct numerical simulation of turbulent aerosol coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reade, Walter Caswell

    There are numerous systems-including both industrial applications and natural occurring phenomena-in which the collision/coagulation rates of aerosols are of significant interest. Two examples are the production of fine powders (such as titanium dioxide) and the formation of rain drops in the atmosphere. During the last decade, it has become apparent that dense aerosol particles behave much differently in a turbulent fluid than has been previously assumed. Particles with a response time on the order of the small-scale fluid time scale tend to collect in regions of low vorticity. The result is a particle concentration field that can be highly non-uniform. Sundaram and Collins (1997) recently demonstrated the effect that turbulence can have on the particle collision rate of a monodisperse system. The collision rates of finite-inertia particles can be as much as two orders of magnitude greater than particles that precisely follow the fluid streamlines. Sundaram and Collins derived a general collision expression that explicitly accounted for the two phenomena that affect the collision rate-changes in the particle concentration field and changes in the particle relative velocities. The result of Sundaram and Collins has generated further interest in the turbulent-aerosol problem. This thesis shows that, in addition to changing the rate that an aerosol size distribution might form, turbulence has the potential of dramatically changing the shape of the distribution. This result is demonstrated using direct numerical simulation of a turbulent-aerosol system over a wide range of particle parameters, and a moderate range of turbulence levels. Results show that particles with a small (but finite) initial inertia have the greatest potential of forming broad size distributions. The shape of the resulting size distribution is also affected by the initial size of the particles. Observations are explained using the statistics identified by Sundaram and Collins (1997). A major

  17. Coagulation profile, gene expression and bioinformatics characterization of coagulation factor X of striped murrel Channa striatus.

    PubMed

    Arasu, Abirami; Kumaresan, Venkatesh; Sathyamoorthi, Akila; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Arockiaraj, Jesu

    2016-08-01

    A transcriptome wide analysis of the constructed cDNA library of snakehead murrel Channa striatus revealed a full length cDNA sequence of coagulation factor X. Sequence analysis of C. striatus coagulation factor X (CsFX) showed that the cDNA contained 1232 base pairs (bp) comprising 1209 bp open reading frame (ORF). The ORF region encodes 424 amino acids with a molecular mass of 59 kDa. The polypeptide contains γ-carboxyglutamic acid (GLA) rich domain and two epidermal growth factor (EGF) like domains including EGF-CA domain and serine proteases trypsin signature profile. CsFX exhibited the maximum similarity with fish species such as Stegastes partitus (78%), Poecilia formosa (76%) and Cynoglossus semilaevis (74%). Phylogenetically, CsFX is clustered together with the fish group belonging to Actinopterygii. Secondary structure of factor X includes alpha helix 28.54%, extended strand 20.75%, beta turn 7.78% and random coil 42.92%. A predicted 3D model of CsFX revealed a short α-helix and a Ca(2+) (Gla domain) binding site in the coil. Four disulfide bridges were found in serine protease trypsin profile. Obviously, the highest gene expression (P < 0.05) was noticed in blood. Further, the changes in expression of CsFX was observed after inducing with bacterial (Aeromonas hydrophila) and fungal (Aphanomyces invadans) infections and other synthetic immune stimulants. Variation in blood clotting time (CT), prothrombin time (PT) and activated prothromboplastin time (APTT) was analyzed and compared between healthy and bacterial infected fishes. During infection, PT and APTT showed a declined clotting time due to the raised level of thrombocytes. PMID:27235370

  18. Frequency analysis of optoacoustic signals in laser heated tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ladéroute, Annie; Patterson, Michelle P.; Kolios, Michael C.; Whelan, William M.

    2012-02-01

    Laser thermal therapy involves heating tissue using light to temperatures between 55 °C and 95 °C for several minutes resulting in coagulation and cell death. This treatment method has been under investigation for use as a minimally invasive method for treating solid tumors and cancer cells. Heating tissues results in highly variable outcomes and challenges; for example, ensuring complete coagulation of the target tissue while avoiding damage to surrounding healthy tissues. Overcoming such challenges requires precise and real-time monitoring. Optoacoustic imaging has been proposed as a real-time, noninvasive method for monitoring laser thermal. Ex-vivo porcine tenderloin samples were heated using a 1000 μm core optical fiber coupled to an 810 nm diode laser at a constant power of 7 W for 10 minutes. Lesions (6-7 mm diameter) were scanned using a prototype reverse-mode optoacoustic system consisting of a pulsed laser which operates at 1064 nm coupled to a bifurcated fibre bundle, and an 8 element annular array wideband ultrasound transducer with a central frequency ~5 MHz. Scanning was done across native and coagulated tissue with an energy of 6.5 mJ at a 1064 nm wavelength. Three lesions of similar size, shape and coagulation state were chosen for analysis. Thermal coagulation effects were analyzed using optoacoustic signal amplitude and spectral analysis of the optoacoustic RF data. Results show that the signal amplitude and the intercept and midband fit of the power spectrum exhibit interesting differences between native and coagulated tissue states.

  19. MICROWAVES IN ORGANIC SYNTHESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The effect of microwaves, a non-ionizing radiation, on organic reactions is described both in polar solvents and under solvent-free conditions. The special applications are highlighted in the context of solventless organic synthesis which involve microwave (MW) exposure of neat r...

  20. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  1. Microwave processing of ceramics

    SciTech Connect

    Katz, J.D.

    1993-04-01

    Recent work in the areas of microwave processing and joining of ceramics is briefly reviewed. Advantages and disadvantages of microwave processing as well as some of the current issues in the field are discussed. Current state and potential for future commercialization of this technology is also addressed.

  2. Television Microwave--1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peterson, Roger E.

    Since it became a reality just before World War II, terrestrial microwave has improved in systems and equipments, but with the improvements have come higher costs. Television microwave costs are so high because users are demanding more capability, land prices have increased, operating costs are higher, and there is frequency congestion along many…

  3. Anti-coagulant therapy with dabigatran for cystic fibrosis patients.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Manvi; Ren, Clement L

    2016-08-01

    Patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) are at increased risk of venous thromboembolism, especially in association with central venous catheter use. Coumarin drugs and low molecular weight heparin are frequently used for anti-coagulant therapy, but are more challenging to administer in CF patients. Dabigatran, an oral thrombin antagonist, is an alternative anti-coagulant medication, but its use in CF has not been reported. We describe our experience in successfully using dabigatran for long-term anti-coagulation therapy in two CF patients. Our experience suggests that dabigatran can serve as an option for anticoagulation therapy in CF. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:E29-E30. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27128852

  4. Mathematical Modeling of Intravascular Blood Coagulation under Wall Shear Stress

    PubMed Central

    Rukhlenko, Oleksii S.; Dudchenko, Olga A.; Zlobina, Ksenia E.; Guria, Georgy Th.

    2015-01-01

    Increased shear stress such as observed at local stenosis may cause drastic changes in the permeability of the vessel wall to procoagulants and thus initiate intravascular blood coagulation. In this paper we suggest a mathematical model to investigate how shear stress-induced permeability influences the thrombogenic potential of atherosclerotic plaques. Numerical analysis of the model reveals the existence of two hydrodynamic thresholds for activation of blood coagulation in the system and unveils typical scenarios of thrombus formation. The dependence of blood coagulation development on the intensity of blood flow, as well as on geometrical parameters of atherosclerotic plaque is described. Relevant parametric diagrams are drawn. The results suggest a previously unrecognized role of relatively small plaques (resulting in less than 50% of the lumen area reduction) in atherothrombosis and have important implications for the existing stenting guidelines. PMID:26222505

  5. Multifrequency acoustics as a probe of mesoscopic blood coagulation dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganesan, Adarsh; Rajendran, Gokulnath; Ercole, Ari; Seshia, Ashwin

    2016-08-01

    Coagulation is a complex enzymatic polymerisation cascade. Disordered coagulation is common in medicine and may be life-threatening yet clinical assays are typically bulky and/or provide an incomplete picture of clot mechanical evolution. We present the adaptation of an in-plane acoustic wave device: quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation at multiple harmonics to determine the time-evolution of mesoscale mechanical properties of clot formation in vitro. This approach is sensitive to changes in surface and bulk clot structure in various models of induced coagulopathy. Furthermore, we are able to show that clot formation at surfaces has different kinetics and mechanical strength to that in the bulk, which may have implications for the design of bioprosthetic materials. The "Multifrequency acoustics" approach thus enables unique capability to portray biological processes concerning blood coagulation.

  6. A hypothesis testing approach for microwave breast imaging in conjunction with CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Jie; Kelly, Patrick A.; Siqueira, Paul; Das, Mini

    2010-04-01

    The recent findings of high heterogeneity of human breast tissue and much lower than predicted dielectric contrast between tumors and their host tissue have raised questions about the potential utility of stand-alone microwave breast imaging techniques. Multimodal approaches that employ microwaves together with other imaging techniques seem more promising. This study investigates a CT-microwave combination in which microwave detection makes use of prior information obtained from volumetric CT scans and knowledge of tissue dielectric properties. In particular, a detailed patient-specific tissue distribution is first obtained from a 3D-CT scan of the breast under exam. It is assumed that from this scan a limited suspect region is identified. Then from recent research results on the dielectric properties of breast tissue, complex permittivity (dielectric constant and conductivity) maps of the breast can be constructed under the hypotheses of normal and cancerous tissue in the suspect region. These in turn can be used with electromagnetic (EM) simulation software to generate empirical distributions for the microwave system observations under each hypothesis. Microwave detection is then performed. Instead of trying to recover a complete dielectric image of the breast from the microwave scan, the question of interest in this approach is simply which hypothesis is more consistent with the observed electromagnetic response of the microwave system. A hypothesis testing method based on the likelihood ratio for the empirical distributions and Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) optimization is proposed. The results from a simple idealized test case show good potential and invite further study.

  7. Properties and coagulation performance of coagulant poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride in water and wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Gao, Bao-yu; Yue, Qin-yan; Wang, Bing-jian

    2006-01-01

    An efficient inorganic polymer coagulant, poly-aluminum-ferric-silicate-chloride (PAFSC), was developed using two approaches: (i) hydroxylation of the mixture of AlCl3, FeCl3 and fresh polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si molar ratios to obtain PAFSCc and (ii) hydroxylated poly-aluminum-iron-chloride (PAFC) combined with aged polysilicic acid in different Al/Fe/Si ratios to produce PAFSCm. The properties of PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum silicate chloride (PASC) and polyferric silicate chloride (PAFC) were characterized by various experimental methods. The effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on the hydrolysis-polymerization process of Al (III) and Fe (III) in PAFSC solutions was examined by pH titration, and the effect of Al/Fe/Si molar ratio on electrokinetic mobility of PAFSC was studied by Zeta potential measurement. The laboratory experiments were performed to evaluate the PAFSC in comparison with polyaluminum chloride (PAC) for the coagulation of synthetic water samples, actual surface water and wastewater. The results show that interactions exist among aluminum species, ferric species and polysilicic acid, and the Al/Fe/Si molar ratio affects the Zeta potential of the hydrolyzate and the coagulating performance. PAFSC achieved a better water treatment result than PAC. At the same basicity (B) value and Al/Fe/Si ratio, PAFSCc has better coagulation performance than PAFSCm. PAFSC is a new type and high efficiency composite inorganic polymer coagulant. PMID:16854802

  8. Characteristics of meso-particles formed in coagulation process causing irreversible membrane fouling in the coagulation-microfiltration water treatment.

    PubMed

    Ding, Q; Yamamura, H; Murata, N; Aoki, N; Yonekawa, H; Hafuka, A; Watanabe, Y

    2016-09-15

    In coagulation-membrane filtration water treatment processes, it is still difficult to determine the optimal coagulation condition to minimize irreversible membrane fouling. In microfiltration (MF), meso-particles (i.e., 20 nm-0.5 μm) are thought to play an important role in irreversible membrane fouling, especially their characteristics of particle number (PN) and zeta potential (ZP). In this study, a new nanoparticle tracker combined a high-output violet laser with a microscope was developed to identify the physicochemical characteristics of these microscopic and widely dispersed meso-particles. The effects of pH and coagulant dose on ZP and PN of micro-particles (i.e., >0.5 μm) and meso-particles were investigated, and then coagulation-MF tests were conducted. As the result, irreversible membrane fouling was best controlled for both types of membranes, while meso-particle ZP approached zero at around pH 5.5 for both types of natural water. Since PN was greatest under these conditions, ZP is more important in determining the extent of irreversible membrane fouling than PN. However, the acidic condition to neutralize meso-particles is not suitable for actual operation, as considering residual aluminum concentration, pipe corrosion, and chlorination efficiency. It is therefore necessary to investigate coagulants or other methods for the appropriate modification of meso-particle characteristics. PMID:27262117

  9. Variable frequency microwave heating apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Bible, Don W.; Lauf, Robert J.; Johnson, Arvid C.; Thigpen, Larry T.

    1999-01-01

    A variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) designed to allow modulation of the frequency of the microwaves introduced into a multi-mode microwave cavity (34) for testing or other selected applications. The variable frequency microwave heating apparatus (10) includes a microwave signal generator (12) and a high-power microwave amplifier (20) or a high-power microwave oscillator (14). A power supply (22) is provided for operation of the high-power microwave oscillator (14) or microwave amplifier (20). A directional coupler (24) is provided for detecting the direction and amplitude of signals incident upon and reflected from the microwave cavity (34). A first power meter (30) is provided for measuring the power delivered to the microwave furnace (32). A second power meter (26) detects the magnitude of reflected power. Reflected power is dissipated in the reflected power load (28).

  10. Microwave hydrology: A trilogy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stacey, J. M.; Johnston, E. J.; Girard, M. A.; Regusters, H. A.

    1985-01-01

    Microwave hydrology, as the term in construed in this trilogy, deals with the investigation of important hydrological features on the Earth's surface as they are remotely, and passively, sensed by orbiting microwave receivers. Microwave wavelengths penetrate clouds, foliage, ground cover, and soil, in varying degrees, and reveal the occurrence of standing liquid water on and beneath the surface. The manifestation of liquid water appearing on or near the surface is reported by a microwave receiver as a signal with a low flux level, or, equivalently, a cold temperature. Actually, the surface of the liquid water reflects the low flux level from the cosmic background into the input terminals of the receiver. This trilogy describes and shows by microwave flux images: the hydrological features that sustain Lake Baykal as an extraordinary freshwater resource; manifestations of subsurface water in Iran; and the major water features of the Congo Basin, a rain forest.

  11. Microwave ion source

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani; Thomae, Rainer W.

    2005-07-26

    A compact microwave ion source has a permanent magnet dipole field, a microwave launcher, and an extractor parallel to the source axis. The dipole field is in the form of a ring. The microwaves are launched from the middle of the dipole ring using a coaxial waveguide. Electrons are heated using ECR in the magnetic field. The ions are extracted from the side of the source from the middle of the dipole perpendicular to the source axis. The plasma density can be increased by boosting the microwave ion source by the addition of an RF antenna. Higher charge states can be achieved by increasing the microwave frequency. A xenon source with a magnetic pinch can be used to produce intense EUV radiation.

  12. Microwave radiation hazards around large microwave antenna.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klascius, A.

    1973-01-01

    The microwave radiation hazards associated with the use of large antennas become increasingly more dangerous to personnel as the transmitters go to ever higher powers. The near-field area is of the greatest concern. It has spill over from subreflector and reflections from nearby objects. Centimeter waves meeting in phase will reinforce each other and create hot spots of microwave energy. This has been measured in front of and around several 26-meter antennas. Hot spots have been found and are going to be the determining factor in delineating safe areas for personnel to work. Better techniques and instruments to measure these fields are needed for the evaluation of hazard areas.

  13. Sex Differences in Stroke: The Contribution of Coagulation

    PubMed Central

    Roy-O’Reilly, Meaghan; McCullough, Louise D.

    2014-01-01

    Stroke is now the leading cause of adult disability in the United States. Women are disproportionately affected by stroke. Women increasingly outnumber men in the elderly population, the period of highest risk for stroke. However, there is also a growing recognition that fundamental sex differences are present that contribute to differential ischemic sensitivity. In addition, gonadal hormone exposure can impact coagulation and fibrinolysis, key factors in the initiation of thrombosis. In this review we will discuss sex differences in stroke, with a focus on platelets, vascular reactivity and coagulation. PMID:24560819

  14. Sonoclot(®)-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Vance G; Henderson, Jon

    2016-07-01

    Thrombelastographic methods have been recently introduced to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in settings such as sickle cell disease, hemodialysis, mechanical circulatory support, and neuroinflammation. However, these inflammatory situations may have heme oxygenase-derived, coexistent carbon monoxide present, which also enhances coagulation as assessed by the same thrombelastographic variables that are affected by iron. This brief report presents a novel, Sonoclot-based method to detect iron enhanced coagulation that is independent of carbon monoxide influence. Future investigation will be required to assess the sensitivity of this new method to detect iron mediated hypercoagulability in clinical settings compared to results obtained with thrombelastographic techniques. PMID:26497986

  15. Two solvable systems of coagulation equations with limited aggregations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertoin, Jean

    2009-11-01

    We consider two simple models for the formation of polymers where at the initial time, each monomer has a certain number of potential links (called arms in the text) that are consumed when aggregations occur. Loosely speaking, this imposes restrictions on the number of aggregations. The dynamics of concentrations are governed by modifications of Smoluchowski's coagulation equations. Applying classical techniques based on generating functions, resolution of quasi-linear PDE's, and Lagrange inversion formula, we obtain explicit solutions to these non-linear systems of ODE's. We also discuss the asymptotic behavior of the solutions and point at some connexions with certain known solutions to Smoluchowski's coagulation equations with additive or multiplicative kernels.

  16. A review of research on nanoparticulate flow undergoing coagulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianzhong; Huo, Linlin

    2015-06-01

    Nanoparticulate flows occur in a wide range of natural phenomena and engineering applications and, hence, have attracted much attention. The purpose of the present paper is to provide a review of the research conducted over the last decade. The research covered relates to the Brownian coagulation of monodisperse and polydisperse particles, the Taylor-series expansion method of moment, and nanoparticle distributions due to coagulation in pipe and channel flow, jet flow, and the mixing layer and in the process of flame synthesis and deposition.

  17. Relationships between milk coagulation property traits analyzed with different methodologies.

    PubMed

    Pretto, D; Kaart, T; Vallas, M; Jõudu, I; Henno, M; Ancilotto, L; Cassandro, M; Pärna, E

    2011-09-01

    Milk coagulation properties (MCP) analysis is performed using a wide range of methodologies in different countries and laboratories, using different instruments, coagulant activity in the milk, and type of coagulant. This makes it difficult to compare results and data from different research. The aims of this study were to propose a method for the transformation of values of rennet coagulation time (RCT) and curd firmness (a(30)) and to predict the noncoagulation (NC) probability of milk samples analyzed using different methodologies. Individual milk samples were collected during the morning milking in October 2010 from each of 165 Holstein-Friesian dairy cows in 2 freestall barns in Italy, and sent to 3 laboratories for MCP analysis. For each laboratory, MCP analysis was performed using a different methodology: A, with a computerized renneting meter instrument using 0.051 international milk clotting units (IMCU)/mL of coagulant activity; B, with a Lattodinamografo (Foss-Italia, Padova, Italy) using 0.051 IMCU/mL of coagulant activity; and C, with an Optigraph (Ysebaert, Frépillon, France) using 0.120 IMCU/mL of coagulant activity. The relationships between MCP traits were analyzed with correlation and regression analyses for each pair of methodologies. For each MCP trait, 2 regression models were applied: model 1 was a single regression model, where the dependent and independent variables were the same MCP trait determined by 2 different methodologies; in model 2, both a(30) and RCT were included as independent variables. The NC probabilities for laboratories with the highest number of NC samples were predicted based on the RCT and a(30) values measured in the laboratories with lower number of NC samples using logistic regression and receiver operating characteristic analysis. The percentages of NC samples were 4.2, 11.5, and 0.6% for A, B, and C, respectively. The transformation of MCP traits was more precise with model 1 for RCT (R(2): 0.77-0.82) than for a(30

  18. Reincarnation of ancient links between coagulation and complement.

    PubMed

    Conway, E M

    2015-06-01

    Throughout evolution, organisms have developed means to contain wounds by simultaneously limiting bleeding and eliminating pathogens and damaged host cells via the recruitment of innate defense mechanisms. Disease emerges when there is unchecked activation of innate immune and/or coagulation responses. A key component of innate immunity is the complement system. Concurrent excess activation of coagulation and complement - two major blood-borne proteolytic pathways - is evident in numerous diseases, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, venous thromboembolic disease, thrombotic microangiopathies, arthritis, cancer, and infectious diseases. Delineating the cross-talk between these two cascades will uncover novel therapeutic insights. PMID:26149013

  19. Viability and antigenicity of anisakis simplex after conventional and microwave heating at fixed temperatures.

    PubMed

    Vidaček, Sanja; De Las Heras, Cristina; Solas, Maria Teresa; García, Maria Luisa; Mendizábal, Angel; Tejada, Margarita

    2011-12-01

    Inactivation of parasites in food by microwave treatment may vary due to differences in the characteristics of microwave ovens and food properties. Microwave treatment in standard domestic ovens results in hot and cold spots, and the microwaves do not penetrate all areas of the samples depending on the thickness, which makes it difficult to compare microwave with conventional heat treatments. The viability of Anisakis simplex (isolated larvae and infected fish muscle) heated in a microwave oven with precise temperature control was compared with that of larvae heated in a water bath to investigate any additional effect of the microwaves. At a given temperature, less time was required to kill the larvae by microwaves than by heated water. Microwave treatment killed A. simplex larvae faster than did conventional cooking when the microwaves fully penetrated the samples and resulted in fewer changes in the fish muscle. However, the heat-stable allergen Ani s 4 was detected by immunohistochemistry in the fish muscle after both heat treatments, even at 70°C, suggesting that Ani s 4 allergens were released from the larvae into the surrounding tissue and that the tissues retained their allergenicity even after the larvae were killed by both heat treatments. Thus, microwave cooking will not render fish safe for individuals already sensitized to A. simplex heat-resistant allergens. PMID:22186053

  20. The Coagulant Type Influence on Removal Efficiency of 5- and 6-Ring Pahs During Water Coagulation Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowacka, Anna; Włodarczyk-Makuła, Maria

    2014-12-01

    The article presents results on investigation of the removal efficiency of selected 5- and 6-ring polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (benzo[a]pyrene, benzo[b]fluoranthene, benzo[k]fluoranthene, benzo[j]fluoranthene, benzo[g,h,i]perylene, indeno[1,2,3-cd]pyrene, dibenzo[a,h]anthracene) from water during coagulation and sedimentation process. Two pre-hydrolyzed aluminum coagulants: PAX XL 19H and FLOKOR 105V were chosen for research. Process was carried out at optimum process parameters: rapid-mixing - 3 min at the rotational speed of 200 rpm, slow mixing - 10 min at 30 rpm, sedimentation - 60 min. The removal effectiveness was dependant on coagulant type and its composition. Better results in the removal of 5-and 6-ring PAHs were obtained after application of FLOKOR 105V (lower aluminum content) than after using PAX XL 19H.

  1. [Ultrasonic dissection and coagulation by attachment ("Harmonic Focus" in anatomic resection of the lung].

    PubMed

    Akopov, A L; Karlson, A

    2014-01-01

    The authors aimed to evaluate the efficacy of application of ultrasound dissection technology and coagulation by using "Harmonic Focus" (HF) instrument, while performing anatomical resection of the lung in open thoracic surgery. The method was carried out in serial 20 patients with lung cancer, whom the lung anatomical resection was performed. A long attachment (17 cm) with curved branches was applied. There were 11 lobectomies and 9 pneumoectomies. The application of HF allowed the dissection of pleural adhesions, pulmonary ligament, a separation of roots of the lung elements, lymphatic nodes of roots of the lung and mediastinum, in spite of being very close to vessels. A fatty tissue of the mediastinum was removed quickly and practically without blood. The HF considerably accelerated the process of vessel treatment, especially, while performing the lobectomy. At the same time, the attempts of application of HF instrument for separation of interlobal fissure resulted in not quite satisfactory aerostasis and hemostasis. The duration of the lobectomy was 127 +/- 35 minutes at the average and in the case of pneumoectomy, it consisted of 120 +/- 45 minutes. An intraoperative hemorrhage was 300 +/- 145 ml. A quantity of exudates was 440 +/- 280 ml by drainage on the first day. The pleural cavity drainage was used during 3 +/- 1 days. The HF instrument, which was applied for ultrasonic dissection and coagulation, was characterized by multifunctionality and simplicity of usage. It was recommended for a wide application in the thoracic surgery for performing the anatomical lung resections by thoracotomy method. PMID:25055517

  2. Cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD): focus on hypoxemia, secondary erythrocytosis, and coagulation alterations.

    PubMed

    Zabala, Luis M; Guzzetta, Nina A

    2015-10-01

    Children with cyanotic congenital heart disease (CCHD) have complex alterations in their whole blood composition and coagulation profile due to long-standing hypoxemia. Secondary erythrocytosis is an associated physiological response intended to increase circulating red blood cells and oxygen carrying capacity. However, this response is frequently offset by an increase in whole blood viscosity that paradoxically reduces blood flow and tissue perfusion. In addition, the accompanying reduction in plasma volume leads to significant deficiencies in multiple coagulation proteins including platelets, fibrinogen and other clotting factors. On the one hand, these patients may suffer from severe hyperviscosity and subclinical 'sludging' in the peripheral vasculature with an increased risk of thrombosis. On the other hand, they are at an increased risk for postoperative hemorrhage due to a complex derangement in their hemostatic profile. Anesthesiologists caring for children with CCHD and secondary erythrocytosis need to understand the pathophysiology of these alterations and be aware of available strategies that lessen the risk of bleeding and/or thrombosis. The aim of this review is to provide an updated analysis of the systemic effects of long-standing hypoxemia in children with primary congenital heart disease with a specific focus on secondary erythrocytosis and hemostasis. PMID:26184479

  3. Enhanced Microwave Hyperthermia of Cancer Cells with Fullerene.

    PubMed

    Sun, Mingrui; Kiourti, Asimina; Wang, Hai; Zhao, Shuting; Zhao, Gang; Lu, Xiongbin; Volakis, John L; He, Xiaoming

    2016-07-01

    Hyperthermia generated with various energy sources including microwave has been widely studied for cancer treatment. However, the potential damage due to nontargeted heating of normal tissue is a major hurdle to its widespread application. Fullerene is a potential agent for improving cancer therapy with microwave hyperthermia but is limited by its poor solubility in water for biomedical applications. Here we report a combination therapy for enhanced cancer cell destruction by combining microwave heating with C60-PCNPs consisting of fullerene (C60) encapsulated in Pluronic F127-chitosan nanoparticles (PCNPs) with high water solubility. A cell culture dish integrated with an antenna was fabricated to generate microwave (2.7 GHz) for heating PC-3 human prostate cancer cells either with or without the C60-PCNPs. The cell viability data show that the C60-PCNPs alone have minimal cytotoxicity. The combination of microwave heating and C60-PCNPs is significantly more effective than the microwave heating alone in killing the cancer cells (7.5 versus 42.2% cell survival). Moreover, the combination of microwave heating and C60-PCNPs is significantly more destructive to the cancer cells than the combination of simple water-bath heating (with a similar thermal history to microwave heating) and C60-PCNPs (7.5 versus 32.5% survival) because the C60 in the many nanoparticles taken up by the cells can absorb the microwave energy and convert it into heat to enhance heating inside the cells under microwave irradiation. These data suggest the great potential of targeted heating via fullerene for enhanced cancer treatment by microwave hyperthermia. PMID:27195904

  4. Microwave bonding of MEMS component

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Mai, John D. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor); Budraa, Nasser K. (Inventor); Pike, William T. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Bonding of MEMs materials is carried out using microwave. High microwave absorbing films are placed within a microwave cavity, and excited to cause selective heating in the skin of the material. This causes heating in one place more than another. Thereby minimizing the effects of the bonding microwave energy.

  5. Three-dimensional microwave imaging with incorporated prior structural information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golnabi, Amir H.; Meaney, Paul M.; Epstein, Neil R.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2012-03-01

    Microwave imaging for biomedical applications, especially for early detection of breast cancer and effective treatment monitoring, has attracted increasing interest in last several decades. This fact is due to the high contrast between the dielectric properties of the normal and malignant breast tissues at microwave frequencies. The available range of dielectric properties for different soft tissue can provide important functional information about tissue health. Nonetheless, one of the limiting weaknesses of microwave imaging is that unlike conventional modalities, such as X-ray CT or MRI, it inherently cannot provide high-resolution images. The conventional modalities can produce highly resolved anatomical information but often cannot provide the functional information required for diagnoses. Previously, we have developed a regularization strategy that can incorporate prior anatomical information from MR or other sources and use it in a way to refine the resolution of the microwave images, while also retaining the functional nature of the reconstructed property values. In the present work, we extend the use of prior structural information in microwave imaging from 2D to 3D. This extra dimension adds a significant layer of complexity to the entire image reconstruction procedure. In this paper, several challenges with respect to the 3D microwave imaging will be discussed and the results of a series of 3D simulation and phantom experiments with prior structural information will be studied.

  6. Method of Constructing a Microwave Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  7. Method of constructing a microwave antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Carl, James (Inventor); Ngo, Phong (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    A method, simulation, and apparatus are provided that are highly suitable for treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). A catheter is disclosed that includes a small diameter disk loaded monopole antenna surrounded by fusion material having a high heat of fusion and a melting point preferably at or near body temperature. Microwaves from the antenna heat prostatic tissue to promote necrosing of the prostatic tissue that relieves the pressure of the prostatic tissue against the urethra as the body reabsorbs the necrosed or dead tissue. The fusion material keeps the urethra cool by means of the heat of fusion of the fusion material. This prevents damage to the urethra while the prostatic tissue is necrosed. A computer simulation is provided that can be used to predict the resulting temperature profile produced in the prostatic tissue. By changing the various control features of the catheter and method of applying microwave energy a temperature profile can be predicted and produced that is similar to the temperature profile desired for the particular patient.

  8. Demonstration of the Coagulation and Diffusion of Homemade Slime Prepared under Acidic Conditions without Borate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Isokawa, Naho; Fueda, Kazuki; Miyagawa, Korin; Kanno, Kenichi

    2015-01-01

    Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) precipitates in many kinds of aqueous salt solutions. While sodium sulfate, a coagulant for PVA fiber, precipitates PVA to yield a white rigid gel, coagulation of PVA with aluminum sulfate, a coagulant for water treatment, yields a slime-like viscoelastic fluid. One type of homemade slime is prepared under basic…

  9. Microwave vision for robots

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewandowski, Leon; Struckman, Keith

    1994-01-01

    Microwave Vision (MV), a concept originally developed in 1985, could play a significant role in the solution to robotic vision problems. Originally our Microwave Vision concept was based on a pattern matching approach employing computer based stored replica correlation processing. Artificial Neural Network (ANN) processor technology offers an attractive alternative to the correlation processing approach, namely the ability to learn and to adapt to changing environments. This paper describes the Microwave Vision concept, some initial ANN-MV experiments, and the design of an ANN-MV system that has led to a second patent disclosure in the robotic vision field.

  10. Microwave Comb Generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sigman, E. H.

    1989-01-01

    Stable reference tones aid testing and calibration of microwave receivers. Signal generator puts out stable tones in frequency range of 2 to 10 GHz at all multiples of reference input frequency, at any frequency up to 1 MHz. Called "comb generator" because spectral plot resembles comb. DC reverse-bias current switched on and off at 1 MHz to generate sharp pulses in step-recovery diode. Microwave components mounted on back of special connector containing built-in attenuator. Used in testing microwave and spread-spectrum wide-band receivers.

  11. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, Cressie E.

    1985-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  12. Microwave coupler and method

    DOEpatents

    Holcombe, C.E.

    1984-11-29

    The present invention is directed to a microwave coupler for enhancing the heating or metallurgical treatment of materials within a cold-wall, rapidly heated cavity as provided by a microwave furnace. The coupling material of the present invention is an alpha-rhombohedral-boron-derivative-structure material such as boron carbide or boron silicide which can be appropriately positioned as a susceptor within the furnace to heat other material or be in powder particulate form so that composites and structures of boron carbide such as cutting tools, grinding wheels and the like can be rapidly and efficiently formed within microwave furnaces.

  13. Determination of colchicine and O-demethylated metabolites in decomposed skeletal tissues by microwave assisted extraction, microplate solid phase extraction and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (MAE-MPSPE-UHPLC).

    PubMed

    Watterson, J H; Imfeld, A B; Cornthwaite, H C

    2014-06-01

    Microwave assisted extraction (MAE) followed by microplate solid phase extraction (MPSPE) coupled with ultra high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) for the semi-quantitative determination of colchicine, 3-demethyl colchicine and 2-demethyl colchicine in postmortem rat bone is described. Rats (n=4) received 50mg/kg colchicine (i.p), and euthanized by CO2 asphyxiation. Remains decomposed to skeleton outdoors and vertebral bones were collected cleaned, and ground to a fine powder. Powdered bone underwent MAE using methanol in a closed microwave system, followed by MPSPE and analysis using UHPLC-PDA. MAE analyte stability was assessed and found to be stable for at least 60 min irradiation time. The majority (>95%) of each analyte was recovered after 15 min. The MPSPE-UHPLC method was linear between 10 and 2,000 ng/mL, with coefficients of variation <20% in triplicate analysis, with a limit of detection of 10 ng/mL for each of the three analytes. Following MAE for 30 min (80°C, 1200W), MPSPE-UHPLC analysis of vertebral bone of colchicine-exposed rats detected colchicine (1.8-4.1 μg/g), 3-demethyl colchicine (0.77-1.8 μg/g) and 2-demethyl colchicine (0.43-0.80 μg/g) in all samples assayed. PMID:24799069

  14. Treatment of melanoidin wastewater by anaerobic digestion and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Arimi, Milton M; Zhang, Yongjun; Götz, Gesine; Geißen, Sven-Uwe

    2015-01-01

    Melanoidins are dark-coloured recalcitrant pollutants found in many industrial wastewaters including coffee-manufacturing effluent, molasses distillery wastewater (MDWW) and other wastewater with molasses as the raw material. The wastewaters are mostly treated with anaerobic digestion after some dilution to minimize the inhibition effect. However, the dark colour and recalcitrant dissolved organic carbon (DOC) mainly caused by melanoidin are not effectively removed. The aim of this study was to investigate the removal of colour and remnant DOC by different coagulants from anaerobically digested MDWW. From the six coagulants tested, ferric chloride had the highest melanoidin (48%), colour (92.7%) and DOC (63.3%) removal at pH 5 and a dosage of 1.6 g/l. Both polymer and inorganic salt coagulants tested had optimal colour, melanoidin and DOC removal at acidic pH. The molecular size distribution of synthetic melanoidins by liquid chromatography-organic carbon detection indicated a preferential removal of high-molecular-weight melanoidins over low weight melanoidins by the coagulation. Further studies should focus on how to improve biodegradability of the treated effluent for it to be reused as dilution water for anaerobic digestion. PMID:25799161

  15. Nanofiltration based water reclamation from tannery effluent following coagulation pretreatment.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, J; Mondal, D; Chakraborty, S; Sikder, J; Curcio, S; Arafat, H A

    2015-11-01

    Coagulation-nanofiltration based integrated treatment scheme was employed in the present study to maximize the removal of toxic Cr(VI) species from tannery effluents. The coagulation pretreatment step using aluminium sulphate hexadecahydrate (alum) was optimized by response surface methodology (RSM). A nanofiltration unit was integrated with this coagulation pre-treatment unit and the resulting flux decline and permeate quality were investigated. Herein, the coagulation was conducted under response surface-optimized operating conditions. The hybrid process demonstrated high chromium(VI) removal efficiency over 98%. Besides, fouling of two of the tested nanofiltration membranes (NF1 and NF3) was relatively mitigated after feed pretreatment. Nanofiltration permeation fluxes as high as 80-100L/m(2)h were thereby obtained. The resulting permeate stream quality post nanofiltration (NF3) was found to be suitable for effective reuse in tanneries, keeping the Cr(VI) concentration (0.13mg/L), Biochemical Oxygen Demand (BOD) (65mg/L), Chemical Oxygen Demand (COD) (142mg/L), Total Dissolved Solids (TDS) (108mg/L), Total Solids (TS) (86mg/L) and conductivity levels (14mho/cm) in perspective. The process water reclaiming ability of nanofiltration was thereby substantiated and the effectiveness of the proposed hybrid system was thus affirmed. PMID:26188702

  16. Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion on polyaniline films.

    PubMed

    Humpolíček, Petr; Kuceková, Zdenka; Kašpárková, Věra; Pelková, Jana; Modic, Martina; Junkar, Ita; Trchová, Miroslava; Bober, Patrycja; Stejskal, Jaroslav; Lehocký, Marián

    2015-09-01

    Polyaniline is a promising conducting polymer with still increasing application potential in biomedicine. Its surface modification can be an efficient way how to introduce desired functional groups and to control its properties while keeping the bulk characteristics of the material unchanged. The purpose of the study was to synthetize thin films of pristine conducting polyaniline hydrochloride, non-conducting polyaniline base and polyaniline modified with poly(2-acrylamido-2-methyl-1-propanesulfonic acid) (PAMPSA) and investigate chosen parameters of their hemocompatibility. The modification was performed either by introduction of PAMPSA during the synthesis or by reprotonation of polyaniline base. The polyaniline hydrochloride and polyaniline base had no impact on blood coagulation and platelet adhesion. By contrast, the polyaniline reprotonated with PAMPSA completely hindered coagulation thanks to its interaction with coagulation factors Xa, Va and IIa. The significantly lower platelets adhesion was also found on this surface. Moreover, this film maintains its conductivity at pH of 6, which is an improvement in comparison with standard polyaniline hydrochloride losing most of its conductivity at pH of 4. Polyaniline film with PAMPSA introduced during synthesis had an impact on platelet adhesion but not on coagulation. The combined conductivity, anticoagulation activity, low platelet adhesion and improved conductivity at pH closer to physiological, open up new possibilities for application of polyaniline reprotonated by PAMPSA in blood-contacting devices, such as catheters or blood vessel grafts. PMID:26119372

  17. Fragmentation and Coagulation in Supramolecular (Co)polymerization Kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The self-assembly of molecular building blocks into one-dimensional supramolecular architectures has opened up new frontiers in materials science. Due to the noncovalent interactions between the monomeric units, these architectures are intrinsically dynamic, and understanding their kinetic driving forces is key to rationally programming their morphology and function. To understand the self-assembly dynamics of supramolecular polymerizations (SP), kinetic models based on aggregate growth by sequential monomer association and dissociation have been analyzed. However, fragmentation and coagulation events can also play a role, as evident from studies on peptide self-assembly and the fact that aggregations can be sensitive to mechanical agitations. Here, we analyze how fragmentation and coagulation events influence SP kinetics by theoretical analysis of self-assembling systems of increasing complexity. Our analysis starts with single-component systems in which aggregates are able to grow via an isodesmic or cooperative nucleation–elongation mechanism. Subsequently, equilibration dynamics in cooperative two-component supramolecular copolymerizations are investigated. In the final part, we reveal how aggregate growth in the presence of competing, kinetically controlled pathways is influenced by fragmentation and coagulation reactions and reveal how seed-induced growth can give rise to block copolymers. Our analysis shows how fragmentation and coagulation reactions are able to modulate SP kinetics in ways that are highly system dependent. PMID:27163054

  18. Removal and Transformation of Estrogens During the Coagulation Process

    EPA Science Inventory

    Estrogenic compounds have been shown to be present in surface waters, leading to concerns over the possible presence of endocrine disrupting compounds in finished drinking waters. Bench-scale studies (jar tests) simulating coagulation were conducted to evaluate the ability of tw...

  19. Removal of sulfide, sulfate and sulfite ions by electro coagulation.

    PubMed

    Murugananthan, M; Raju, G Bhaskar; Prabhakar, S

    2004-06-18

    The removal of various species of sulfur from beamhouse of tannery wastewater and also from synthetic samples was studied by electro-flotation technique. Consumable anodes of iron and aluminum and insoluble anode of titanium were tested as anodes. It was found that iron and aluminum anodes were effective for the removal of suspended solids, sulfide, sulfite and sulfate. Progress of simultaneous coagulation of suspended solids during electro-flotation was measured using particle size analysis. Coagulation was found to be essential for effective flotation of suspended solids. Metal ions generated in situ by electrolytic oxidation of anode were found to react with dissolved sulfide ions. Metal sulfides thus formed as colloidal suspension were coagulated and floated simultaneously by hydrogen bubbles generated from cathode. Simultaneous occurrence of precipitation, coagulation and flotation was observed during electro-flotation. X-ray diffraction studies were conducted to identify the nature of sulfide phase formed during electrolytic precipitation. The effect of pH, current density and initial concentration of pollutants was studied and the results are discussed. The removal of sulfite and sulfate ions is explained by zeta-potential measurements. PMID:15177743

  20. Application performance of a new coagulant in wastewater reuse.

    PubMed

    Fu, Ying; Wang, Jingzhi; Wang, Yanzheng; Lu, Ningning

    2016-01-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) absorption characteristics of poly-Al-Zn-Fe (PAZF), a polymerized coagulant containing three kinds of metallic elements prepared from a galvanized-aluminum slag, was analyzed by UV-visible spectrophotometry during its polymerization process. Pollutant removal by PAZF in treating various wastewaters was investigated, in comparison with that of polyaluminum chloride (PAC). The results showed that PAZF can be applied to different wastewaters and had excellent coagulation behavior due to its special internal composition. Various complicated substances having different absorption wavelengths and polymeric properties were produced during the PAZF polymerization process, and the structures of these complicated substances were adjusted continuously with the increasing of the polymerization time. PAZF posed better turbidity and organic matter (chemical oxygen demand, COD(Cr)) removal than PAC for different wastewaters, and the required dosage of PAZF was far lower than that of PAC when achieving the same coagulation performance. For pharmaceutical, sugar, dyeing, simulated pesticide and landscape wastewaters, PAZF gave higher removal of turbidity or COD(Cr) than PAC, by up to 79.5% (coagulant dose: 74 mg/L) or 16% (148 mg/L), 13.4% (111 mg/L) or 10% (185 mg/L), 26.5% (148 mg/L) or 8.1% (18.5 mg/L), 40% (18.5 mg/L) or 13.4% (111 mg/L), and 5% (70 mg/L) or 5% (70 mg/L), respectively. PMID:27148711

  1. Blood coagulation using High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Phuc V.; Oh, Junghwan; Kang, Hyun Wook

    2014-03-01

    High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) technology provides a feasible method of achieving thermal coagulation during surgical procedures. One of the potential clinical benefits of HIFU can induce immediate hemostasis without suturing. The objective of this study was to investigate the efficiency of a HIFU system for blood coagulation on severe vascular injury. ngHIFU treatment was implemented immediately after bleeding in artery. The ultrasound probe was made of piezoelectric material, generating a central frequency of 2.0 MHz as well as an ellipsoidal focal spot of 2 mm in lateral dimension and 10 mm in axial dimension. Acoustic coagulation was employed on a perfused chicken artery model in vitro. A surgical incision (1 to 2 mm long) was made with a scapel on the arterial wall, and heparinized autologous blood was made to leak out from the incision with a syringe pump. A total of 5 femoral artery incisions was treated with the HIFU beam. The intensity of 4500 W/cm2 at the focus was applied for all treatments. Complete hemostasis was achieved in all treatments, along with the treatment times of 25 to 50 seconds. The estimated intraoperative blood loss was from 2 to 5 mL. The proposed HIFU system may provide an effective method for immediate blood coagulation for arteries and veins in clinical applications.

  2. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Lin, D.; Suttner, G.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and -- due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly -- influence the evolution during early phases of star formation.

  3. Dust Coagulation in Infalling Protostellar Envelopes I. Compact Grains

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yorke, H.; Suttner, G.; Lin, D.

    1999-01-01

    Dust plays a key role in the optical, thermodynamic and gas dynamical behavior of collapsing molecular cores. Because of relative velocities of the individual dust grains, coagulation and shattering can modify the grain size distribution and due to corresponding changes in the medium's opacity significantly influence the evolution during early phase of star formation.

  4. Reduction of Turbidity of Water Using Locally Available Natural Coagulants

    PubMed Central

    Asrafuzzaman, Md.; Fakhruddin, A. N. M.; Hossain, Md. Alamgir

    2011-01-01

    Turbidity imparts a great problem in water treatment. Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab were used as locally available natural coagulants in this study to reduce turbidity of synthetic water. The tests were carried out, using artificial turbid water with conventional jar test apparatus. Optimum mixing intensity and duration were determined. After dosing water-soluble extracts of Moringa oleifera, Cicer arietinum, and Dolichos lablab reduced turbidity to 5.9, 3.9, and 11.1 nephelometric turbidity unit (NTU), respectively, from 100 NTU and 5, 3.3, and 9.5, NTU, respectively, after dosing and filtration. Natural coagulants worked better with high, turbid, water compare to medium, or low, turbid, water. Highest turbidity reduction efficiency (95.89%) was found with Cicer arietinum. About 89 to 96% total coliform reduction were also found with natural coagulant treatment of turbid water. Using locally available natural coagulants, suitable, easier, and environment friendly options for water treatment were observed. PMID:23724307

  5. Coagulation disorders in severely and critically injured patients.

    PubMed

    Avikainen, V

    1977-01-01

    Forty-five patients with multiple injuries treated at an intensive care unit were studied prospectively. The patients were divided into two groups: the severely injured (no mortality) and critically injured (56% mortality). Treatment was started within two hours from the accident in all cases. The following coagulation parameters were measured for eight days: euglobulin lysis time (ELT), thromboelastography (TEG), vecalcification time (RECA), partial thromboplastin time (PTT), factor V, factor VIII, Normotest, Thrombotest, thrombin time, fibrinogen and platelets. Severe coagulation disorders were observed in one-third of the patients 12-48 hours after trauma. The abnormalities were more pronounced in patients who had sustained very severe injuries and arrived in a state of shock. The ELT was shortened 0-6 hours after the accident and accelerated coagulation was indicated simultaneously by decreased PTT, RECA, and r-values as well as by elevated Thrombotest and factor VIII values. The factor V and fibrinogen levels were initially lowered. Low platelet values at 2-4 days, prolonged thrombin and r-times, secondary decrease of fibrinogen FV, FVIII, and low Thrombotest values suggested disseminated intravascular coagulation associated with complications, such as fat embolism and "shock lung" syndromes. General bleeding tendency with high mortality was observed in 16% of the patients. PMID:603216

  6. On the Fundamental Solution of a Linearized Homogeneous Coagulation Equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobedo, Miguel; Velázquez, J. J. L.

    2010-08-01

    We describe the fundamental solution of the equation that is obtained by linearization of the coagulation equation with kernel K( x, y) = ( xy)λ/2, around the steady state f( x) = x -(3+λ)/2 with {λ in (1, 2)} . Detailed estimates on its asymptotics are obtained. Some consequences are deduced for the flux properties of the particles distributions described by such models.

  7. Microwave thawing apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Fathi, Zakaryae; Lauf, Robert J.; McMillan, April D.

    2004-06-01

    An apparatus for thawing a frozen material includes: a microwave energy source; a microwave applicator which defines a cavity for applying microwave energy from the microwave source to a material to be thawed; and a shielded region which is shielded from the microwave source, the shielded region in fluid communication with the cavity so that thawed material may flow from the cavity into the shielded region.

  8. Removal of THM precursors by coagulation or ion exchange.

    PubMed

    Bolto, Brian; Dixon, David; Eldridge, Rob; King, Simon

    2002-12-01

    The removal of natural organic matter (NOM) from drinking water supplies can be achieved by different processes, among them coagulation and adsorption. Synthetic waters made from concentrates of humic substances from reservoir and river waters were tested in the laboratory for ease of removAl of NOM by coagulation with cationic organic polymers and with alum, and by adsorption on anion exchangers. For polymers such as high molecular weight polydiallyldimethylammonium chloride (polyDADMAC) and cationic polyacrylamides of high charge, performance was nearly as effective as alum, with colour removals 86-100% of those obtained for alum. Ion exchange using the best commercially available resins designed for this purpose, a gel polystyrene and a macroporous acrylic resin, was more effective than alum treatment for two of the natural waters studied, but inferior for a third. The resins were overall superior to cationic polymers. The NOM was separated into four fractions based on hydrophobic and hydrophilic properties. Alum was not as effective as ion exchange for the elimination of individual ionic NOM fractions. It was better than cationic polymers for removal of humic and fulvic acids, although polyDADMAC was as good for one water. For the removal of charged compounds alum then polyDADMAC were the best performers for that water. Unequivocal evidence was obtained that coagulants remove material that is not adsorbed by resins, and vice versa. A combination of coagulation with a cationic polymer and adsorption by an anion exchanger removed essentially all of the NOM. The preference of the coagulants was for the larger, more hydrophobic molecules, and of resins for smaller highly charged hydrophilic molecules. Each fraction had trihalomethane formation potentials in the range 11-24 microg/mg, except for one water that was more reactive. Hence, the actual amount of each fraction in the original water becomes a crucial factor. PMID:12448555

  9. Microwave sensing from orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kritikos, H. N.; Shiue, J.

    1979-01-01

    Microwave sensors, used in conjunction with the traditional sensors of visible and infrared light to extend present capabilities of global weather forecasts and local storm watches, are discussed. The great advantage of these sensors is that they can penetrate or 'see' through cloud formations to monitor temperature, humidity and wind fields below the clouds. Other uses are that they can penetrate the earth deeper than optical and IR systems; they can control their own angle of incidence; they can detect oil spills; and they can enhance the studies of the upper atmosphere through measurement of temperature, water vapor and other gaseous species. Two types of microwave sensors, active and passive, are examined. Special attention is given to the study of the microwave radiometer and the corresponding temperature resolution as detected by the antenna. It is determined that not only will the microwave remote sensors save lives by allowing close monitoring of developing storms, but also save approximately $172 million/year.

  10. Microwave Radiation Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lesh, J. R.

    1984-01-01

    Direct photon detector responds to microwave frequencies. Method based on trapped-ion frequency-generation standards proposed to detect radio-frequency (RF) radiation at 40.5 GHz. Technique used for directdetection (RF) communication, radar, and radio astronomy.

  11. Emitron: microwave diode

    DOEpatents

    Craig, G.D.; Pettibone, J.S.; Drobot, A.T.

    1982-05-06

    The invention comprises a new class of device, driven by electron or other charged particle flow, for producing coherent microwaves by utilizing the interaction of electromagnetic waves with electron flow in diodes not requiring an external magnetic field. Anode and cathode surfaces are electrically charged with respect to one another by electron flow, for example caused by a Marx bank voltage source or by other charged particle flow, for example by a high energy charged particle beam. This produces an electric field which stimulates an emitted electron beam to flow in the anode-cathode region. The emitted electrons are accelerated by the electric field and coherent microwaves are produced by the three dimensional spatial and temporal interaction of the accelerated electrons with geometrically allowed microwave modes which results in the bunching of the electrons and the pumping of at least one dominant microwave mode.

  12. Microwave fluid flow meter

    DOEpatents

    Billeter, Thomas R.; Philipp, Lee D.; Schemmel, Richard R.

    1976-01-01

    A microwave fluid flow meter is described utilizing two spaced microwave sensors positioned along a fluid flow path. Each sensor includes a microwave cavity having a frequency of resonance dependent upon the static pressure of the fluid at the sensor locations. The resonant response of each cavity with respect to a variation in pressure of the monitored fluid is represented by a corresponding electrical output which can be calibrated into a direct pressure reading. The pressure drop between sensor locations is then correlated as a measure of fluid velocity. In the preferred embodiment the individual sensor cavities are strategically positioned outside the path of fluid flow and are designed to resonate in two distinct frequency modes yielding a measure of temperature as well as pressure. The temperature response can then be used in correcting for pressure responses of the microwave cavity encountered due to temperature fluctuations.

  13. Microwave Oven Observations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sumrall, William J.; Richardson, Denise; Yan, Yuan

    1998-01-01

    Explains a series of laboratory activities which employ a microwave oven to help students understand word problems that relate to states of matter, collect data, and calculate and compare electrical costs to heat energy costs. (DDR)

  14. Computational modeling of laser-tissue interaction

    SciTech Connect

    London, R.A.; Amendt, P.; Bailey, D.S.; Eder, D.C.; Maitland, D.J.; Glinsky, M.E.; Strauss, M.; Zimmerman, G.B.

    1996-05-01

    Computational modeling can play an important role both in designing laser-tissue interaction experiments and in understanding the underlying mechanisms. This can lead to more rapid and less expensive development if new procedures and instruments, and a better understanding of their operation. We have recently directed computer programs and associated expertise developed over many years to model high intensity laser-matter interactions for fusion research towards laser-tissue interaction problem. A program called LATIS is being developed to specifically treat laser-tissue interaction phenomena, such as highly scattering light transport, thermal coagulation, and hydrodynamic motion.

  15. Enhanced Coagulation-Flocculation Performance of Iron-Based Coagulants: Effects of PO43- and SiO32- Modifiers

    PubMed Central

    Teng, Houkai; Wang, Yili; Zhang, Yuxin; Zhao, Chuanliang; Liao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    PO43- and SiO32- are often used as modifier to improve stability and aggregating ability of the iron-base coagulants, however, there are few reports about their detailed comparison between the coagulation performance and mechanisms. In this study, three coagulants—polyferric phosphoric sulfate (PFPS), polysilicon ferric sulfate (PFSS), and polyferric sulfate (PFS) were synthesized; their structure and morphology were characterized by Fourier transformed infrared (FT-IR) spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscope (SEM). Alkali titration and Ferron species analysis were employed to investigate the hydrolysis performance and species distribution. Jar test was conducted to measure their coagulation behaviors at different dosage, pH, and temperatures in which the flocs properties were measured. The results showed that a number of new compounds were formed due to the presence of PO43- and SiO32-. Moreover, PFPS and PFSS had similar level in Fea as well as Feb. Among them, PFPS produced more multi-core iron atoms polymer and content of Feb, and the formed flocs were larger and denser. It exhibited superior coagulation performance in terms of turbidity reduction, UV254 removal and residual ferric concentration. Jar test and floc breakage/regrowth experiments indicated other than charge neutrality, the dominated mechanism involved in PFSS was the adsorption between polysilicic acid and solution particle, while PFPS was sweeping, entrapment/adsorption resulting from larger polymer colloid of Fe-P chemistry bond. PMID:26339902

  16. Microwave emissions from snow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, A. T. C.

    1984-01-01

    The radiation emitted from dry and wet snowpack in the microwave region (1 to 100 GHz) is discussed and related to ground observations. Results from theoretical model calculations match the brightness temperatures obtained by truck mounted, airborne and spaceborne microwave sensor systems. Snow wetness and internal layer structure complicate the snow parameter retrieval algorithm. Further understanding of electromagnetic interaction with snowpack may eventually provide a technique to probe the internal snow properties

  17. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, C.A.

    1983-12-29

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  18. High power microwave generator

    DOEpatents

    Ekdahl, Carl A.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave generator efficiently converts the energy of an intense relativistic electron beam (REB) into a high-power microwave emission using the Smith-Purcell effect which is related to Cerenkov radiation. Feedback for efficient beam bunching and high gain is obtained by placing a cylindrical Smith-Purcell transmission grating on the axis of a toroidal resonator. High efficiency results from the use of a thin cold annular highly-magnetized REB that is closely coupled to the resonant structure.

  19. Coagulation sensors based on magnetostrictive delay lines for biomedical and chemical engineering applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliaritsi, E.; Zoumpoulakis, L.; Simitzis, J.; Vassiliou, P.; Hristoforou, E.

    2006-04-01

    Coagulation sensors based on the magnetostrictive delay line technique are presented in this paper. They are based on magnetostrictive ribbons and are used for measuring the coagulation, curing or solidification time of different liquids. Experimental results indicate that the presented sensing elements can determine the blood coagulation with remarkable repeatability, thus allowing their use as blood coagulation sensors. Additionally, results indicate that they can also measure curing time of resins, solidification of fluids and coagulation of chemical substances, therefore allowing their implementation in chemical engineering applications.

  20. Microwave sintering process model.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hu; Tinga, W R; Sundararaj, U; Eadie, R L

    2003-01-01

    In order to simulate and optimize the microwave sintering of a silicon nitride and tungsten carbide/cobalt toolbits process, a microwave sintering process model has been built. A cylindrical sintering furnace was used containing a heat insulating layer, a susceptor layer, and an alumina tube containing the green toolbit parts between parallel, electrically conductive, graphite plates. Dielectric and absorption properties of the silicon nitride green parts, the tungsten carbide/cobalt green parts, and an oxidizable susceptor material were measured using perturbation and waveguide transmission methods. Microwave absorption data were measured over a temperature range from 20 degrees C to 800 degrees C. These data were then used in the microwave process model which assumed plane wave propagation along the radial direction and included the microwave reflection at each interface between the materials and the microwave absorption in the bulk materials. Heat transfer between the components inside the cylindrical sintering furnace was also included in the model. The simulated heating process data for both silicon nitride and tungsten carbide/cobalt samples closely follow the experimental data. By varying the physical parameters of the sintering furnace model, such as the thickness of the susceptor layer, the thickness of the allumina tube wall, the sample load volume and the graphite plate mass, the model data predicts their effects which are helpful in optimizing those parameters in the industrial sintering process. PMID:15323110

  1. Microwave quantum illumination.

    PubMed

    Barzanjeh, Shabir; Guha, Saikat; Weedbrook, Christian; Vitali, David; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Pirandola, Stefano

    2015-02-27

    Quantum illumination is a quantum-optical sensing technique in which an entangled source is exploited to improve the detection of a low-reflectivity object that is immersed in a bright thermal background. Here, we describe and analyze a system for applying this technique at microwave frequencies, a more appropriate spectral region for target detection than the optical, due to the naturally occurring bright thermal background in the microwave regime. We use an electro-optomechanical converter to entangle microwave signal and optical idler fields, with the former being sent to probe the target region and the latter being retained at the source. The microwave radiation collected from the target region is then phase conjugated and upconverted into an optical field that is combined with the retained idler in a joint-detection quantum measurement. The error probability of this microwave quantum-illumination system, or quantum radar, is shown to be superior to that of any classical microwave radar of equal transmitted energy. PMID:25768743

  2. Behavioral effects of microwaves

    SciTech Connect

    Stern, S.

    1980-01-01

    Microwaves can produce sensations of warmth and sound in humans. In other species, they also can serve as cues, they may be avoided, and they can disrupt ongoing behavior. These actions appear to be due to heat produced by energy absorption. The rate of absorption depends on the microwave parameters and the electrical and geometric properties of the subject. We therefore, cannot predict the human response to microwaves based on data from other animals without appropriate scaling considerations. At low levels of exposure, microwaves can produce changes in behavior without large, or even measureable, changes in body temperature. Thermoregulatory behavior may respond to those low levels of heat, and thereby affect other behavior occurring concurrently. There are no data that demonstrate that behavioral effects of microwaves depend on any mechanism other than reactions to heat. Our interpretation of whether a reported behavioral effect indicates that microwaves may be hazardous depends on our having a complete description of the experiment and on our criteria of behavioral toxicity.

  3. Coagulation of human prostate volumes with MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy: Results in gel phantoms

    PubMed Central

    N’Djin, William Apoutou; Burtnyk, Mathieu; Kobelevskiy, Ilya; Hadjis, Stefan; Bronskill, Michael; Chopra, Rajiv

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The feasibility and safety of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy were demonstrated recently in a preliminary human study in which a small subvolume of prostate tissue was treated prior to radical prostatectomy. Translation of this technology to full clinical use, however, requires the capability to generate thermal coagulation in a volume up to that of the prostate gland itself. The aim of this study was to investigate the parameters required to treat a full 3D human prostate accurately with a multi-element transurethral applicator and multiplanar MR temperature control. Methods: The approach was a combination of simulations (to select appropriate parameters) followed by experimental confirmation in tissue-mimicking phantoms. A ten-channel, MRI-compatible transurethral ultrasound therapy system was evaluated using six human prostate models (average volume: 36 cm3) obtained from the preliminary human feasibility study. Real-time multiplanar MR thermometry at 3 T was used to control the spatial heating pattern in up to nine planes simultaneously. Treatment strategies incorporated both single (4.6 or 8.1 MHz) and dual (4.6 and 14.4 MHz) frequencies, as well as maximum acoustic surface powers of 10 or 20 W cm−2. Results: Treatments at 4.6 MHz were capable of coagulating a volume equivalent to 97% of the prostate. Increasing power from 10 to 20 W cm−2 reduced treatment times by approximately 50% with full treatments taking 26 ± 3 min at a coagulation rate of 1.8 ± 0.4 cm3 min−1. A dual-frequency 4.6/14.4 MHz treatment strategy was shown to be the most effective configuration for achieving full human prostate treatment while maintaining good treatment accuracy for small treatment radii. The dual-frequency approach reduced overtreatment close to the prostate base and apex, confirming the simulations. Conclusions: This study reinforces the capability of MRI-controlled transurethral ultrasound therapy to treat

  4. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerois

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, N. Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof. Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial layer and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount about 20 C, with the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radical sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed, directable or focussed heating preserves healthy sectors of the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed beam. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and may be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  5. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, N. Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof. Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial layer and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount, about 20 C. within the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radial sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed directable or focussed heating preserves healthy sectors of the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed beam. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and may be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  6. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, G. Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, N. Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial laser and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount, about 20 C., within the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radial sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed, directable of focussed heating preserves healthy sectors of the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed beam. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and man be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  7. Endothelium Preserving Microwave Treatment for Atherosclerosis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carl, James R. (Inventor); Arndt, Dickey (Inventor); Fink, Patrick W. (Inventor); Beer, Reginald (Inventor); Henry, Phillip D. (Inventor); Pacifico, Antonio (Inventor); Raffoul, George W. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Method and apparatus are provided to treat atherosclerosis wherein the artery is partially closed by dilating the artery while preserving the vital and sensitive endothelial layer thereof. Microwave energy having a frequency from 3 GHz to 300 GHz is propagated into the arterial wall to produce a desired temperature profile therein at tissue depths sufficient for thermally necrosing connective tissue and softening fatty and waxy plaque while limiting heating of surrounding tissues including the endothelial layer and/or other healthy tissue, organs, and blood. The heating period for raising the temperature a potentially desired amount, about 20 C. within the atherosclerotic lesion may be less than about one second. In one embodiment of the invention, a radically beveled waveguide antenna is used to deliver microwave energy at frequencies from 25 GHz or 30 GHz to about 300 GHz and is focused towards a particular radial sector of the artery. Because the atherosclerotic lesions are often asymmetrically disposed, directable or focussed heating preserves healthy sectors or the artery and applies energy to the asymmetrically positioned lesion faster than a non-directed bean. A computer simulation predicts isothermic temperature profiles for the given conditions and may be used in selecting power, pulse duration, beam width, and frequency of operation to maximize energy deposition and control heat rise within the atherosclerotic lesion without harming healthy tissues or the sensitive endothelium cells.

  8. Hearing of microwave pulses by humans and animals: effects, mechanism, and thresholds.

    PubMed

    Lin, James C; Wang, Zhangwei

    2007-06-01

    The hearing of microwave pulses is a unique exception to the airborne or bone-conducted sound energy normally encountered in human auditory perception. The hearing apparatus commonly responds to airborne or bone-conducted acoustic or sound pressure waves in the audible frequency range. But the hearing of microwave pulses involves electromagnetic waves whose frequency ranges from hundreds of MHz to tens of GHz. Since electromagnetic waves (e.g., light) are seen but not heard, the report of auditory perception of microwave pulses was at once astonishing and intriguing. Moreover, it stood in sharp contrast to the responses associated with continuous-wave microwave radiation. Experimental and theoretical studies have shown that the microwave auditory phenomenon does not arise from an interaction of microwave pulses directly with the auditory nerves or neurons along the auditory neurophysiological pathways of the central nervous system. Instead, the microwave pulse, upon absorption by soft tissues in the head, launches a thermoelastic wave of acoustic pressure that travels by bone conduction to the inner ear. There, it activates the cochlear receptors via the same process involved for normal hearing. Aside from tissue heating, microwave auditory effect is the most widely accepted biological effect of microwave radiation with a known mechanism of interaction: the thermoelastic theory. The phenomenon, mechanism, power requirement, pressure amplitude, and auditory thresholds of microwave hearing are discussed in this paper. A specific emphasis is placed on human exposures to wireless communication fields and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) coils. PMID:17495664

  9. Effect of two-stage coagulant addition on coagulation-ultrafiltration process for treatment of humic-rich water.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ting; Chen, Zhong-lin; Yu, Wen-zheng; Shen, Ji-min; Gregory, John

    2011-08-01

    A novel two-stage coagulant addition strategy applied in a coagulation-ultrafiltration (UF) process for treatment of humic-rich water at neutral pH was investigated in this study. When aluminum sulfate (alum) doses were set at a ratio of 3:1 added during rapid mix stage and half way through flocculation stage, the integrated process of two-stage alum addition achieved almost the same organic matter removal as that of conventional one-stage alum addition at the same overall dose. Whereas membrane fouling could be effectively mitigated by the two-stage addition exhibited by trans-membrane pressure (TMP) developments. The TMP developments were found to be primarily attributed to external fouling on membrane surface, which was closely associated with floc characteristics. The results of jar tests indicated that the average size of flocs formed in two-stage addition mode roughly reached one half larger than that in one-stage addition mode, which implied a beneficial effect on membrane fouling reduction. Moreover, the flocs with more irregular structure and lower effective density resulted from the two-stage alum addition, which caused higher porosity of cake layer formed by such flocs on membrane surface. Microscopic observations of membrane surface demonstrated that internal fouling in membrane pores could be also remarkably limited by two-stage alum addition. It is likely that the freshly formed hydroxide precipitates were distinct in surface characteristics from the aged precipitates due to formation of more active groups or adsorption of more labile aluminum species. Consequently, the flocs could further connect and aggregate to contribute to preferable properties for filtration performance of the coagulation-UF process. As a simple and efficient approach, two-stage coagulant addition strategy could have great practical significance in coagulation-membrane processes. PMID:21704354

  10. Obstetric hemorrhage and coagulation: an update. Thromboelastography, thromboelastometry, and conventional coagulation tests in the diagnosis and prediction of postpartum hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    de Lange, Natascha M; Lancé, Marcus D; de Groot, Reneé; Beckers, Erik A M; Henskens, Yvonne M; Scheepers, Hubertina C J

    2012-07-01

    Globally, postpartum hemorrhage (PPH) is the leading cause of maternal morbidity and mortality. In the current treatment of severe PPH, first-line therapy includes transfusion of packed cells and fresh-frozen plasma in addition to uterotonic medical management and surgical interventions. In persistent PPH, tranexamic acid, fibrinogen, and coagulation factors are often administered. Secondary coagulopathy due to PPH or its treatment is often underestimated and therefore remains untreated, potentially causing progression to even more severe PPH. In most cases, medical and transfusion therapy is not based on the actual coagulation state because conventional laboratory test results are usually not available for 45 to 60 minutes. Thromboelastography and rotational thromboelastometry are point-of-care coagulation tests. A good correlation has been shown between thromboelastometric and conventional coagulation tests, and the use of these in massive bleeding in nonobstetric patients is widely practiced and it has been proven to be cost-effective. As with conventional laboratory tests, there is an influence of fluid dilution on coagulation test results, which is more pronounced with colloid fluids. Fibrinogen seems to play a major role in the course of PPH and can be an early predictor of the severity of PPH. The FIBTEM values (in thromboelastometry, reagent specific for the fibrin polymerization process) decline even more rapidly than fibrinogen levels and can be useful for early guidance of interventions. Data on thromboelastography and thromboelastometry in pregnant women are limited, particularly during the peripartum period and in women with PPH, so more research in this field is needed. PMID:22926249

  11. Microwave ablation versus laser ablation in occluding lateral veins in goats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xu-hong; Wang, Xiao-ping; Su, Wen-juan; Yuan, Yuan

    2016-02-01

    Increasing number of endovenous techniques are available for the treatment of saphenous vein reflux and endovenous laser ablation (EVLA) is a frequently used method. A newly developed alternative, based on thermal therapy, is endovenous microwave ablation (EMA). This study evaluated the effect of the two procedures, in terms of coagulation and histological changes, in occluding lateral veins in goats. Twelve animals were randomized into two group, with 6 treated with EMA (EMA group), and the rest 6 with EVLA (EVLA group). Results of coagulation, including coagulation, fibrinolysis and platelet activation, were assessed at three or four different time points: before, immediately after, 24 h (and 48 h) after ablation. The diameter change, a measure of efficacy, was ultrasonographically measured before and 1 month after the ablation. Histological changes were grossly and microscopically evaluated immediately, 1 and 3 month(s) after the ablation. The length of the ablated vein and preoperative average diameter were comparable between the two groups. In both EMA and EVLA groups, several coagulation parameters, fibrinolysis and platelet activation parameters only underwent slight changes. Ultrasound imaging displayed that the diameter reduction of the veins treated by EMA was significantly larger than by EVLA, in consistent with the results of macroscopic examination. Microscopic examination revealed necrosis and thickening of the vein wall, and occlusion of the lumen within 3 months after ablation in both EMA and EVLA groups. It is concluded that EMA is a minimally invasive therapy, which appears to be safe and effective for treatment of lateral veins in goats. PMID:26838749

  12. New method for detection of blood coagulation using fiber-optic sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fediay, Sergey G.; Kuznetzov, Alexsey V.

    1991-07-01

    The detection of blood coagulation is very important in therapeutics and surgery. It is necessary to determine the overall time taken for blood clotting, production rate of thrombin, presence or absence of blood coagulation factors, etc. In this paper a new method for detection of blood coagulation is presented. This method is based on the fiber-optic sensor and allows for the study of different ways of blood clotting (such as blood coagulation and platelets aggregation) separately, thus enhancing the precision of determination. The method for determining the blood coagulation presented possesses high precision in monitoring the process of coagulation. An elaborate mathematical model of the process of blood coagulation has been developed to help the computer handle obtained data.

  13. Mechanisms during suspended solids and phosphate concentration variations in wastewater coagulation process.

    PubMed

    Manamperuma, Lelum Duminda; Ratnaweera, Harsha Chandima; Martsul, A

    2016-10-01

    Coagulation-flocculation process is one of the most commonly used treatment process in water and wastewater treatment. Particles (PA) and phosphates (P) removal are the main objectives in wastewater coagulation. There is a general agreement on the dominant mechanism of PA and P removal during coagulation. While it is agreed that the PA and P removal reactions are competitive and takes place simultaneously, there is no clear understanding on the ratio of distribution of coagulants among the PA and P removal. The ratio can be significantly influenced by the content of PA and P, in addition to other water and coagulant quality factors. This paper attempts to provide a qualitative ratio of coagulant distribution based on PA:P proportion in raw water and OH:Al ratio in coagulants. PMID:26857441

  14. Comparative assessment of water treatment using polymeric and inorganic coagulants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manda, Innocent K. M.; Chidya, Russel C. G.; Saka, John D. K.; Biswick, Timothy T.

    2016-06-01

    Portable water plays a vital role in improving human life, particularly in controlling the spread of diseases. However, problems associated with lack of potable water are still common especially in developing countries including Malawi. Until now little information exists on the effectiveness of available commercial coagulants used by national water boards in Malawi. Therefore, this study was undertaken in Southern Region Water Board (SRWB) to investigate the efficiency of polymeric coagulants (sufdfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s) in turbidity reduction comparative with inorganic coagulant (aluminium sulphate) at Zomba, Liwonde, Mangochi, Chikwawa and Mulanje Treatment plants. The jar test method was used to determine the effectiveness of the water coagulants. The results revealed that sudfloc 3850 was most effective in reducing turbidity at Mangochi (99.4 ± 0.06%) and Liwonde (97.2 ± 0.04%) using 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dose. The Zomba, Mulanje and Chikwawa plants gave 19.56 ± 0.03%, 29.23 ± 0.02% and 9.43 ± 0.02% total reductions respectively. Algaefloc 19s afforded the highest turbidity reduction at Liwonde and Mangochi plants (98.66 ± 0.06 and 97.48 ± 0.05% at a dose of 0.4 and 0.6 mg L-1 respectively), while Chikwawa provided the lowest (9.52 ± 0.01%). At the Zomba and Mulanje plants 20.5 ± 0.03% and 28.4 ± 0.04% reductions were obtained respectively. The inorganic flocculant, alum provided a 99.0 ± 0.05% and 98.6 ± 0.04% reduction at a dose of 4.0 mg L-1 and 6.0 mg L-1 at Zomba and Liwonde plants respectively. The lowest reductions in turbidity were achieved at Chikwawa (7.50 ± 0.01%), Mangochi (12.97 ± 0.02%) and Mulanje (25.00 ± 0.02). The best and optimum pH ranges for polymeric and inorganic coagulants were 7.20-7.80 and 7.35 to 7.57 respectively. The results further revealed that sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s achieved faster formation of heavy flocs than alum. At 0.4 mg L-1 flocculant dosage sudfloc 3850 and algaefloc 19s required ten times

  15. Magnetic Microspheres and Tissue Model Studies for Therapeutical Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramachandran, N.; Mazuruk, K.

    2003-01-01

    Hyperthermia is a well known cancer therapy and consists of heating a tumor region to the elevated temperatures in the range of 40-45 C for an extended period of time (2-8 hours). This leads to thermal inactivation of cell regulatory and growth processes with resulting widespread necrosis, carbonization and coagulation. Moreover, heat boosts the tumor response to other treatments such as radiation, chemotherapy or immunotherapy. Of particular importance is careful control of generated heat in the treated region and keeping it localized. Higher heating, to about 56 C can lead to tissue thermo-ablation. With accurate temperature control, hyperthermia has the advantage of having minimal side effects. Several heating techniques are utilized for this purpose, such as whole body hyperthermia, radio-frequency (RF) hyperthermia, ultrasound technique, inductive microwave antenna hyperthermia, inductive needles (thermoseeds), and magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH).MFH offers many advantages as targeting capability by applying magnets. However, this technology still suffers significant inefficiencies due to lack of thermal control. This paper will provide a review of the topic and outline the ongoing work in this area. The main emphasis is in devising ways to overcome the technical difficulty in hyperthermia breast therapy of achieving a uniform therapeutic temperature over the required region of the body and holding it steady for an extended period (2-3 hours). The basic shortcomings of the presently utilized heating methods stem from the non-uniform thermal properties of the tissue and the point heating characteristics of the techniques without any thermal control. Our approach is to develop a novel class of magnetic fluids, which have inherent thermoregulating properties. We have identified a few magnetic alloys which can serve as suitable nano to micron-size particle material. The objective is to synthesize, characterize and evaluate the efficacy of Thermo Regulating

  16. A phantom system for microwave treatment of intraocular tumors.

    PubMed

    Finger, P T; Selkin, R; Grabczyk, J; Fetter, R W

    1993-01-01

    A gel-block system was developed to illustrate heating patterns induced by ophthalmic microwave applicators. A heat-sensitive liquid crystal card was affixed as to bisect a Lucite box. The box was then filled with a clear tissue equivalent polyacrylamide gel. It was found that semicircular heating patterns were generated within the gel. These patterns were visualized by placing one of the dish-shaped ophthalmic microwave applicators on top of the polyacrylamide gel and the heat-sensitive liquid crystal card. An antenna was then placed in the gel and behind the card. Microwave energy was sent through the card and into the gel. This demonstrated the relatively homogeneous and roughly circular heating pattern produced at the applicator's surface. A combination of these profiles led to construction of a three-dimensional, dome-shaped model of heating, as provided by this microwave antenna design. PMID:8460282

  17. Thermal analysis of laser interstitial thermotherapy in ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue using exponential functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salas, Nelson, Jr.; Manns, Fabrice; Milne, Peter J.; Denham, David B.; Minhaj, Ahmed M.; Parel, Jean-Marie; Robinson, David S.

    2004-05-01

    A therapeutic procedure to treat small, surface breast tumours up to 10 mm in radius plus a 5 mm margin of healthy, surrounding tissue using laser interstitial thermotherapy (LITT) is currently being investigated. The purpose of this study is to analyse and model the thermal and coagulative response of ex vivo fibro-fatty tissue, a model for breast tissue, during experimental laser interstitial thermotherapy at 980 nm. Laser radiation at 980 nm was delivered interstitially through a diffusing tip optical fibre inserted into a fibro-fatty tissue model to produce controlled heating at powers ranging from 3.2 to 8.0 W. Tissue temperature was measured with thermocouples placed at 15 positions around the fibre. The induced coagulation zone was measured on gross anatomical sections. Thermal analysis indicates that a finite sum of exponential functions is an approximate solution to the heat conduction equation that more accurately predicts the time-temperature dependence in tissue prior to carbonization (T < 100 °C) during LITT than the traditional model using a single exponential function. Analysis of the ellipsoid coagulation volume induced in tissue indicates that the 980 nm wavelength does not penetrate deep enough in fibro-fatty tissue to produce a desired 30 mm diameter (14.1 × 103 mm3) coagulation volume without unwanted tissue liquefaction and carbonization.

  18. Design of a microwave calorimeter for the microwave tokamak experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Marinak, M. )

    1988-10-07

    The initial design of a microwave calorimeter for the Microwave Tokamak Experiment is presented. The design is optimized to measure the refraction and absorption of millimeter rf microwaves as they traverse the toroidal plasma of the Alcator C tokamak. Techniques utilized can be adapted for use in measuring high intensity pulsed output from a microwave device in an environment of ultra high vacuum, intense fields of ionizing and non-ionizing radiation and intense magnetic fields. 16 refs.

  19. Proteins, Platelets, and Blood Coagulation at Biomaterial Interfaces

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Li-Chong; Bauer, James; Siedlecki, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Blood coagulation and platelet adhesion remain major impediments to the use of biomaterials in implantable medical devices. There is still significant controversy and question in the field regarding the role that surfaces play in this process. This manuscript addresses this topic area and reports on state of the art in the field. Particular emphasis is placed on the subject of surface engineering and surface measurements that allow for control and observation of surface-mediated biological responses in blood and test solutions. Appropriate use of surface texturing and chemical patterning methodologies allow for reduction of both blood coagulation and platelet adhesion, and new methods of surface interrogation at high resolution allow for measurement of the relevant biological factors. PMID:25448722

  20. Thrombin-Responsive Gated Silica Mesoporous Nanoparticles As Coagulation Regulators.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Ravishankar; Ribes, Àngela; Mas, Núria; Aznar, Elena; Sancenón, Félix; Marcos, M Dolores; Murguía, Jose R; Venkataraman, Abbaraju; Martínez-Máñez, Ramón

    2016-02-01

    The possibility of achieving sophisticated actions in complex biological environments using gated nanoparticles is an exciting prospect with much potential. We herein describe new gated mesoporous silica nanoparticles (MSN) loaded with an anticoagulant drug and capped with a peptide containing a thrombin-specific cleavage site. When the coagulation cascade was triggered, active thrombin degraded the capping peptidic sequence and induced the release of anticoagulant drugs to delay the clotting process. The thrombin-dependent response was assessed and a significant increase in coagulation time in plasma from 2.6 min to 5 min was found. This work broadens the application of gated silica nanoparticles and demonstrates their ability to act as controllers in a complex scenario such as hemostasis. PMID:26794474

  1. Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for stochastic particle coagulation

    SciTech Connect

    DeVille, R.E.L.; Riemer, N.; West, M.

    2011-09-20

    Stochastic particle-resolved methods are a useful way to compute the time evolution of the multi-dimensional size distribution of atmospheric aerosol particles. An effective approach to improve the efficiency of such models is the use of weighted computational particles. Here we introduce particle weighting functions that are power laws in particle size to the recently-developed particle-resolved model PartMC-MOSAIC and present the mathematical formalism of these Weighted Flow Algorithms (WFA) for particle coagulation and growth. We apply this to an urban plume scenario that simulates a particle population undergoing emission of different particle types, dilution, coagulation and aerosol chemistry along a Lagrangian trajectory. We quantify the performance of the Weighted Flow Algorithm for number and mass-based quantities of relevance for atmospheric sciences applications.

  2. Coagulation of grains in static and collapsing protostellar clouds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.; Ruzmaikina, T. V.

    1993-01-01

    The wavelength dependence of extinction in the diffuse interstellar medium implies that it is produced by particles of dominant size of approximately 10(exp -5) cm. There is some indication that in the cores of dense molecular clouds, sub-micron grains can coagulate to form larger particles; this process is probably driven by turbulence. The most primitive meteorites (carbonaceous chondrites) are composed of particles with a bimodal size distribution with peaks near 1 micron (matrix) and 1 mm (chondrules). Models for chondrule formation that involve processing of presolar material by chemical reactions or through an accretion shock during infall assume that aggregates of the requisite mass could form before or during collapse. The effectiveness of coagulation during collapse has been disputed; it appears to depend on specific assumptions. The first results of detailed numerical modeling of spatial and temporal variations of particle sizes in presolar clouds, both static and collapsing, is reported in this article.

  3. Examining coagulation-complement crosstalk: complement activation and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Foley, Jonathan H

    2016-05-01

    The coagulation and complement systems are ancestrally related enzymatic cascades of the blood. Although their primary purposes have diverged over the past few hundred million years, they remain inextricably connected. Both complement and coagulation systems limit infection by pathogens through innate immune mechanisms. Recently, it has been shown that hyperactive complement (in particular, elevated C5a/C5b-9) is involved in the pathogenesis (including thrombosis) of diseases such as paroxysmal nocturnal hemoglobinuria, atypical haemolytic uremic syndrome, antiphospholipid syndrome and bacteremia. Although these diseases together account for many thrombosis cases, there are many more where complement activation is not considered a causative factor leading to thrombosis. To better understand what role complement may play in the pathogenesis of thrombosis a better understanding of the mechanisms that cause over-active complement in thrombotic disease is required. PMID:27207425

  4. Microwave applicator for hyperthermia treatment on in vivo melanoma model.

    PubMed

    Togni, Paolo; Vrba, Jan; Vannucci, Luca

    2010-03-01

    In this article, we evaluated a planar microwave applicator for in vivo superficial hyperthermia treatments on small tumors in the mouse mimicking treatments for human neoplasms. The design of the applicator, was challenged by the small dimensions of the tumors and unwanted diffusion of heating in the tumor-bearing animals. The required solution was to limit the penetration of microwaves in the depth of the tissue maintaining the full efficacy of hyperthermia. The study was firstly performed by computer simulations of SAR distribution inside a flat homogeneous phantom, considering various thicknesses of the integrated water bolus. Simulations, validated by the measurements, were also used to evaluate the impedance matching. Further tests were performed on homogeneous agar phantom to simulate the temperature distribution in the biological tissue and to preliminary assess the possible modality and schedule of microwave hyperthermia delivery. The in vivo experiments showed the evidence of direct microwave-induced heating and damage of the melanoma tissue in a range of penetration coherent both with computer simulations and phantom studies. The described approach appears perspective for designing limited-microwave-delivery applicators tailored for treatments of human superficial tumors and pre-tumoral lesions. PMID:20033789

  5. Theoretical investigations of the processes of laser interaction with ocular tissues for laser applications in ophthalmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pustovalov, V. K.; Jean, B.

    2006-08-01

    Theoretical investigations and the results of computer modeling of the optical, thermophysical, and thermochemical processes during laser interaction with ocular tissues are reviewed in this paper. Physical-mathematical models and results of numerical simulation of the processes are presented. The computer modeling was applied for investigations of laser heating and coagulation of ocular tissues for treatment of retina diseases and intraocular tumors, cyclophotocoagulation of the ciliary body for treatment of glaucoma, and laser thermal keratoplasty of the cornea. The influence of radiation parameters on the selectivity of laser coagulation of laminated ocular tissues is considered. The results obtained are of essential interest for laser applications in ophthalmology and can be used for investigation of heating and coagulation of tissues in different fields of laser medicine.

  6. Protein composition affects variation in coagulation properties of buffalo milk.

    PubMed

    Bonfatti, V; Gervaso, M; Rostellato, R; Coletta, A; Carnier, P

    2013-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects exerted by the content of casein and whey protein fractions on variation of pH, rennet-coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time (K20), and curd firmness of Mediterranean buffalo individual milk. Measures of milk protein composition and assessment of genotypes at CSN1S1 and CSN3 were obtained by reversed-phase HPLC analysis of 621 individual milk samples. Increased content of αS1-casein (CN) was associated with delayed coagulation onset and increased K20, whereas average pH, RCT, and K20 decreased when β-CN content increased. Milk with low κ-CN content exhibited low pH and RCT relative to milk with high content of κ-CN. Increased content of glycosylated κ-CN was associated with unfavorable effects on RCT. Effects of milk protein composition on curd firmness were less important than those on pH, RCT, and K20. Likely, this occurred as a consequence of the very short RCT of buffalo milk, which guaranteed a complete strengthening of the curd even in the restricted 31 min time of analysis of coagulation properties and for samples initially showing soft curds. Effects of CSN1S1-CSN3 genotypes on coagulation properties were not to be entirely ascribed to existing variation in milk protein composition associated with polymorphisms at CSN1S1 and CSN3 genes. Although the role of detailed milk protein composition in variation of cheese yield needs to be further investigated, findings of this study suggest that modification of the relative content of specific CN fractions can relevantly influence the behavior of buffalo milk during processing. PMID:23684020

  7. Interaction between Cryptosporidium oocysts and water treatment coagulants.

    PubMed

    Bustamante, H A; Shanker, S R; Pashley, R M; Karaman, M E

    2001-09-01

    The electrokinetic properties of gamma-irradiated Cryptosporidium oocysts in the presence of coagulants (ferric chloride and alum) and coagulant aids (DADMAC based cationic polyelectrolytes) have been studied. The zeta potential of the oocysts was unaffected by the addition of ferric chloride at all pH values (3-10) studied. Addition of alum resulted in reversal of the oocysts charge, which suggests that the initial stage in the coagulation process leading to floc formation proceeds via the adsorption of hydrolysed aluminium species. The cationic polyelectrolyte Magnafloc LT35 was adsorbed onto iron flocs at doses of 0.1 mg/L even against an electrostatic barrier. The cationic polyelectrolyte only adsorbed and caused charge reversal at the oocyst surface at around 0.4 mg/L, suggesting a lower affinity for this surface. These results indicate that the oocysts, unlike inorganic colloidal materials such as metal oxides, appear to possess a lower surface density of active or charged sites. The lower density of sites, combined with the rapid precipitation of iron salts, may be responsible for the lack of specific adsorption of either hydroxylated ferric species or primary iron hydroxide particles on the oocysts. Further, this suggests that a process of sweep flocculation, where oocysts are engulfed in flocs during coagulation and floc formation, is the more likely mechanism involved. By comparison, it is likely that the specific interaction of hydrolysed aluminium species with the oocysts surface would result in a stronger link at the oocyst-floc interface and that the flocculation process may initially proceed via charge neutralisation. PMID:11487115

  8. Blood viscosity during coagulation at different shear rates

    PubMed Central

    Ranucci, Marco; Laddomada, Tommaso; Ranucci, Matteo; Baryshnikova, Ekaterina

    2014-01-01

    Abstract During the coagulation process, blood changes from a liquid to a solid gel phase. These changes are reflected by changes in blood viscosity; however, blood viscosity at different shear rates (SR) has not been previously explored during the coagulation process. In this study, we investigated the viscosity changes of whole blood in 10 subjects with a normal coagulation profile, using a cone‐on‐plate viscosimeter. For each subject, three consecutive measurements were performed, at a SR of 20, 40, 80 sec−1. On the basis of the time‐dependent changes in blood viscosity, we identified the gel point (GP), the time‐to‐gel point (TGP), the maximum clot viscosity (MCV), and the clot lysis half‐time (CLH). The TGP significantly (P = 0.0023) shortened for increasing SR, and was significantly associated with the activated partial thromboplastin time at a SR of 20 sec−1 (P = 0.038) and 80 sec−1 (P = 0.019). The MCV was significantly lower at a SR of 80 sec−1 versus 40 sec−1 (P = 0.027) and the CLH significantly (P = 0.048) increased for increasing SR. These results demonstrate that measurement of blood viscosity during the coagulation process offers a number of potentially useful parameters. In particular, the association between the TGP and the activated partial thromboplastin time is an expression of the clotting time (intrinsic and common pathway), and its shortening for increasing SR may be interpreted the well‐known activating effects of SR on platelet activation and thrombin generation. Further studies focused on the TGP under conditions of hypo‐ or hypercoagulability are required to confirm its role in the clinical practice. PMID:24994896

  9. The influence of riboflavin photochemistry on plasma coagulation factors

    PubMed Central

    Larrea, Luis; Calabuig, María; Roldán, Vanesa; Rivera, José; Tsai, Han-Mou; Vicente, Vicente; Roig, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Studies with riboflavin in the 1960s showed that it could be effective at inactivating pathogens when exposed to light. The principal mode of action is through electron transfer reactions, most importantly in nucleic acids. This suggested that it could act as a photosensitizer useful in the inactivation of pathogens found in blood products. Objective To study the influence of photo-inactivation with riboflavin on the coagulation factors of plasma. Methods The photo-inactivation procedure of riboflavin plus light was applied. Fifty isogroup pools of two plasmas were made from 100 U of plasma that were derived from whole blood products that had previously been held overnight. Pools were split into two bags. One of them was photo-inactivated, and post inactivation samples were obtained. The second bag was not photo-inactivated and samples were taken. Total protein, fibrinogen, FII, FV, FVII, FVIII, FIX, FX, FXI, FXIII, antithrombin III, PC, PS, α-2 antiplasmin and vWF:Ag, the multimeric structure of vWF and ADAMTS-13 were analyzed. Results In plasma, the proteins most sensitive to photo-inactivation were fibrinogen, FXI, FVIII, FV, and FIX (33%, 32%, 30%, 18% and 18% loss, respectively). Coagulation inhibitors, PS, antithrombin III and PC showed little decrease (all 2%). Retention of vWF and ADAMTS-13 were 99% and 88%, respectively. Conclusions As with other pathogen reduction procedures for plasma products, treatment with riboflavin and UV light resulted in reduction in the activity levels of several pro-coagulant factors. Coagulation inhibitors are well preserved. PMID:19782644

  10. Commonly Used Dietary Supplements on Coagulation Function during Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chong-Zhi; Moss, Jonathan; Yuan, Chun-Su

    2015-01-01

    Background Patients who undergo surgery appear to use dietary supplements significantly more frequently than the general population. Because they contain pharmacologically active compounds, dietary supplements may affect coagulation and platelet function during the perioperative period through direct effects, pharmacodynamic interactions, and pharmacokinetic interactions. However, in this regard, limited studies have been conducted that address the pharmacological interactions of dietary supplements. To avoid possible bleeding risks during surgery, information of potential complications of dietary supplements during perioperative management is important for physicians. Methods Through a systematic database search of all available years, articles were identified in this review if they included dietary supplements and coagulation/platelet function, while special attention was paid to studies published after 1990. Results Safety concerns are reported in commercially available dietary supplements. Effects of the most commonly used natural products on blood coagulation and platelet function are systematically reviewed, including 11 herbal medicines (echinacea, ephedra, garlic, ginger, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, kava, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and valerian) and 4 other dietary supplements (coenzyme Q10, glucosamine and chondroitin sulfate, fish oil, and vitamins). Bleeding risks of garlic, ginkgo, ginseng, green tea, saw palmetto, St John’s wort, and fish oil are reported. Cardiovascular instability was observed with ephedra, ginseng, and kava. Pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic interactions between dietary supplements and drugs used in the perioperative period are discussed. Conclusions To prevent potential problems associated with the use of dietary supplements, physicians should be familiar with the perioperative effects of commonly used dietary supplements. Since the effects of dietary supplements on coagulation and platelet function are difficult to

  11. Routine coagulation testing: do we need a discard tube?

    PubMed

    Masih, Markas; Kakkar, Naveen

    2014-12-01

    When coagulation tests are performed, the recommended guideline is that a discard tube be used and the coagulation testing should be done only on the second tube. This guideline is however inconsistently enforced and most laboratories follow a single tube draw for routine coagulation testing. Few studies have however, challenged this guideline and have shown that comparable results can be obtained in both tubes when a two tube draw is used. This prospective study was done over a 3 months period in the hematology laboratory under the Clinical Hematology unit of a tertiary care teaching institution in North India. Fifty-six paired specimens were drawn from healthy volunteers following the prescribed "two tube draw" method. Prothrombin time (PT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT) were performed within 1 h of sample collection on a fully automated photo-optical coagulation instrument (Ceveron-Alpha). Paired results for PT and APTT were compared using Bland-Altman plots for method comparison. There was good correlation between the PT, INR and APTT of the first and second tubes with bias of 0.09, -0.05 and 0.3 respectively). Bland-Altman plots showed acceptable agreement between the two values with 95 % confidence interval ranging from -0.62 to 0.79 for PT, -0.05 to 0.06 for INR and -3.9 to 4.6 for APTT. Our study has shown no significant difference between PT and APTT values for the first and second tubes. Hence the use of a discard tube is not required. PMID:25435740

  12. Development of the selective coagulation process. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, R.H.; Luttrell, G.H.

    1992-07-01

    The selective hydrophobic coagulation (SHC) process is based on the recent finding that hydrophobic particles can be selectively coagulated without using traditional agglomerating agents or flocculants. The driving force for the coagulation is the attractive energy between hydrophobic surfaces, an interaction that has been overlooked in classical colloid chemistry. In most cases, selective separations can be achieved using simple pH control to disperse the mineral matter, followed by recovery of the coal coagula using techniques that take advantage of the size enlargement. In the present work, studies have been carried out to further investigate the fundamental mechanisms of the SHC process and the parameters that affect the process of separating coal from the ash-forming minerals and pyritic sulfur. Studies have included direct force measurements of the attractive interaction between model hydrophobic surfaces, in-situ measurements of the size distributions of coagula formed under a variety of operating conditions, and development of a population balance model to describe the coagulation process. An extended DLVO colloid stability model which includes a hydrophobic interaction energy term has also been developed to explain the findings obtained from the experimental studies. In addition to the fundamental studies, bench-scale process development test work has been performed to establish the best possible method of separating the coagula from dispersed mineral matter. Two types of separators, i.e., a sedimentation tank and a rotating drum screen, were examined in this study. The sedimentation tank proved to be the more efficient unit, achieving ash reductions as high as 60% in a single pass while recovering more than 90% of the combustible material. This device, which minimizes turbulence and coagula breakage, was used in subsequent test work to optimize design and operating parameters.

  13. Dust to planetesimals - Settling and coagulation in the solar nebula

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weidenschilling, S. J.

    1980-01-01

    The behavior of solid particles in a low-mass solar nebula during settling to the central plane and the formation of planetesimals is discussed. The gravitational instability in a dust layer and collisional accretion are examined as possible mechanisms of planetesimal formation. The shear between the gas and a dust layer is considered along with the differences in the planetesimal formation mechanisms between the inner and outer nebula. A numerical model for computing simultaneous coagulation and settling is described.

  14. Effect of microparticulated whey proteins on milk coagulation properties.

    PubMed

    Sturaro, A; Penasa, M; Cassandro, M; Varotto, A; De Marchi, M

    2014-11-01

    The enhancement of milk coagulation properties (MCP) and the reuse of whey produced by the dairy industry are of great interest to improve the efficiency of the cheese-making process. Native whey proteins (WP) can be aggregated and denatured to obtain colloidal microparticulated WP (MWP). The objective of this study was to assess the effect of MWP on MCP; namely, rennet coagulation time (RCT), curd-firming time, and curd firmness 30 min after rennet addition. Six concentrations of MWP (vol/vol; 1.5, 3.0, 4.5, 6.0, 7.5, and 9.0%) were added to 3 bulk milk samples (collected and analyzed during 3 d), and a sample without MWP was used as control. Within each day of analysis, 6 replicates of MCP for each treatment were obtained, changing the position of the treatment in the rack. For control samples, 2 replicates per day were performed. In addition to MCP, WP fractions were measured on each treatment during the 3 d of analysis. Milk coagulation properties were measured on 144 samples by using a Formagraph (Foss Electric, Hillerød, Denmark). Increasing the amount of MWP added to milk led to a longer RCT. In particular, significant differences were found between RCT of the control samples (13.5 min) and RCT of samples with 3.0% (14.6 min) or more MWP. A similar trend was observed for curd-firming time, which was shortest in the control samples and longest in samples with 9.0% MWP (21.4 min). No significant differences were detected for curd firmness at 30 min across concentrations of MWP. Adjustments in cheese processing should be made when recycling MWP, in particular during the coagulation process, by prolonging the time of rennet activity before cutting the curd. PMID:25151883

  15. Effect of Dust Coagulation Dynamics on the Geometry of Aggregates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, R.

    1996-01-01

    Master equation gives a more fundamental description of stochastic coagulation processes rather than popular Smoluchowski's equation. In order to examine the effect of the dynamics on the geometry of resulting aggregates, we study Master equation with a rigorous Monte Carlo algorithm. It is found that Cluster-Cluster aggregation model is a good approximation of orderly growth and the aggregates have fluffy structures with a fractal dimension approx. 2. A scaling analysis of Smoluchowski's equation also supports this conclusion.

  16. Human plasma kallikrein releases neutrophil elastase during blood coagulation.

    PubMed Central

    Wachtfogel, Y T; Kucich, U; James, H L; Scott, C F; Schapira, M; Zimmerman, M; Cohen, A B; Colman, R W

    1983-01-01

    Elastase is released from human neutrophils during the early events of blood coagulation. Human plasma kallikrein has been shown to stimulate neutrophil chemotaxis, aggregation, and oxygen consumption. Therefore, the ability of kallikrein to release neutrophil elastase was investigated. Neutrophils were isolated by dextran sedimentation, and elastase release was measured by both an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and an enzymatic assay using t-butoxy-carbonyl-Ala-Ala-Pro-Val-amino methyl coumarin as the substrate. Kallikrein, 0.1-1.0 U/ml, (0.045-0.45 microM), was incubated with neutrophils that were preincubated with cytochalasin B (5 micrograms/ml). The release of elastase was found to be proportional to the kallikrein concentration. Kallikrein released a maximum of 34% of the total elastase content, as measured by solubilizing the neutrophils in the nonionic detergent Triton X-100. A series of experiments was carried out to determine if kallikrein was a major enzyme involved in neutrophil elastase release during blood coagulation. When 10 million neutrophils were incubated in 1 ml of normal plasma in the presence of 30 mM CaCl2 for 90 min, 2.75 micrograms of elastase was released. In contrast, neutrophils incubated in prekallikrein-deficient or Factor XII-deficient plasma released less than half of the elastase, as compared with normal plasma. The addition of purified prekallikrein to prekallikrein-deficient plasma restored neutrophil elastase release to normal levels. Moreover, release of elastase was enhanced in plasma deficient in C1-inhibitor, the major plasma inhibitor of kallikrein. This release was not dependent upon further steps in the coagulation pathway, or on C5a, since levels of elastase, released in Factor XI- or C5-deficient plasma, were similar to that in normal plasma, and an antibody to C5 failed to inhibit elastase release. These data suggest that kallikrein may be a major enzyme responsible for the release of elastase during blood

  17. [The coagulation characteristics of human oxyhemoglobin in the presence of a mercury (II) ion in a neutral phosphate buffer].

    PubMed

    Bogdanova, L D; Myshkin, A E

    1990-01-01

    The kinetics of human oxyhemoglobin coagulation in neutral phosphate buffer in the presence of mercury acetate at 20 degrees has been studied using turbidimetric methods. The addition of small amounts of concentrated Hg2+ solution leads to rapid local protein coagulation with subsequent dissolution of the formed coagulate. Coagulation can be inhibited by addition of Tris that binds to mercury ions. The pattern of oxyhemoglobin coagulation is determined by molar Hg2+/protein ration rather than by total Hg2+ concentration. PMID:2362035

  18. MICROWAVE TECHNOLOGY CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS APPLICATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-accelerated chemical syntheses in various solvents as well as under solvent-free conditions have witnessed an explosive growth. The technique has found widespread application predominantly exploiting the inexpensive unmodified household microwave (MW) ovens although th...

  19. Refinement of microwave vegetation indices

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Previous investigations have established the basis for a new type of vegetation index based on passive microwave satellite observations. These microwave vegetation indices (MVIs) have been qualitatively evaluated by examining global spatial and seasonal temporal features. Limited quantitative studie...

  20. Dust grain coagulation modelling : From discrete to continuous

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paruta, P.; Hendrix, T.; Keppens, R.

    2016-07-01

    In molecular clouds, stars are formed from a mixture of gas, plasma and dust particles. The dynamics of this formation is still actively investigated and a study of dust coagulation can help to shed light on this process. Starting from a pre-existing discrete coagulation model, this work aims to mathematically explore its properties and its suitability for numerical validation. The crucial step is in our reinterpretation from its original discrete to a well-defined continuous form, which results in the well-known Smoluchowski coagulation equation. This opens up the possibility of exploiting previous results in order to prove the existence and uniqueness of a mass conserving solution for the evolution of dust grain size distribution. Ultimately, to allow for a more flexible numerical implementation, the problem is rewritten as a non-linear hyperbolic integro-differential equation and solved using a finite volume discretisation. It is demonstrated that there is an exact numerical agreement with the initial discrete model, with improved accuracy. This is of interest for further work on dynamically coupled gas with dust simulations.

  1. Silica Nanoparticles Effects on Blood Coagulation Proteins and Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Gryshchuk, Volodymyr; Galagan, Natalya

    2016-01-01

    Interaction of nanoparticles with the blood coagulation is important prior to their using as the drug carriers or therapeutic agents. The aim of present work was studying of the primary effects of silica nanoparticles (SiNPs) on haemostasis in vitro. We studied the effect of SiNPs on blood coagulation directly estimating the activation of prothrombin and factor X and to verify any possible effect of SiNPs on human platelets. It was shown that SiNPs shortened coagulation time in APTT and PT tests and increased the activation of factor X induced by RVV possibly due to the sorption of intrinsic pathway factors on their surface. SiNPs inhibited the aggregation of platelet rich plasma induced by ADP but in the same time partially activated platelets as it was shown using flow cytometry. The possibility of SiNPs usage in nanomedicine is strongly dependant on their final concentration in bloodstream and the size of the particles that are used. However SiNPs are extremely promising as the haemostatic agents for preventing the blood loss after damage. PMID:26881078

  2. Kinetic Modeling of Oxidative Coagulation for Arsenic Removal

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin-Wook; Kramer, Timothy A.

    2004-03-31

    A model of oxidative coagulation consisting of Fenton's reagent (Fe(II)/H2O2 at pH 7.0) was established. The optimum condition was found when the mole ratio of As(III):H2O2:Fe(II)=1:15:20. In this optimum condition, all of Fe(II) was converted to HFO (am-Fe(OH)3) and precipitated to be used as the oxidized arsenic(V) adsorbent and particle coagulant. Two sorption models consisting of a surface complexation model and a kinetic model were developed and coupled. Using the coupled sorption model, the kinetics of HFO surface charge/potential during As(V) sorption was calculated. Further, during arsenic sorption, the colloid stability kinetics resulting from the perikinetic coagulation mechanism was calculated by considering interparticle forces. Colloid surface potential was decreased from 60 mv to 12 mv in proportion to the amount of arsenic adsorbed onto HFO and this surface potential directly affected the colloid stability (collision efficiency).

  3. Slaughterhouse Wastewater Treatment by Combined Chemical Coagulation and Electrocoagulation Process

    PubMed Central

    Bazrafshan, Edris; Kord Mostafapour, Ferdos; Farzadkia, Mehdi; Ownagh, Kamal Aldin; Mahvi, Amir Hossein

    2012-01-01

    Slaughterhouse wastewater contains various and high amounts of organic matter (e.g., proteins, blood, fat and lard). In order to produce an effluent suitable for stream discharge, chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation techniques have been particularly explored at the laboratory pilot scale for organic compounds removal from slaughterhouse effluent. The purpose of this work was to investigate the feasibility of treating cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater by combined chemical coagulation and electrocoagulation process to achieve the required standards. The influence of the operating variables such as coagulant dose, electrical potential and reaction time on the removal efficiencies of major pollutants was determined. The rate of removal of pollutants linearly increased with increasing doses of PACl and applied voltage. COD and BOD5 removal of more than 99% was obtained by adding 100 mg/L PACl and applied voltage 40 V. The experiments demonstrated the effectiveness of chemical and electrochemical techniques for the treatment of slaughterhouse wastewaters. Consequently, combined processes are inferred to be superior to electrocoagulation alone for the removal of both organic and inorganic compounds from cattle-slaughterhouse wastewater. PMID:22768233

  4. Laboratory study of electro-coagulation-flotation for water treatment.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jia-Qian; Graham, Nigel; André, Cecile; Kelsall, Geoff H; Brandon, Nigel

    2002-09-01

    An electro-coagulation-flotation process has been developed for water treatment. This involved an electrolytic reactor with aluminium electrodes and a separation/flotation tank. The water to be treated passed through the reactor and was subjected to coagulation/flotation, by Al(III) ions dissolved from the electrodes, the resulting flocs floating after being captured by hydrogen gas bubbles generated at cathode surfaces. Apparent current efficiencies for Al dissolution as aqueous Al(III) species at pH 6.5 and 7.8 were greater than unity. This was due to additional reactions occurring in parallel with Al dissolution: oxygen reduction at anodes and cathodes, and hydrogen evolution at cathodes, resulting in net (i.e. oxidation + reduction) currents at both anodes and cathodes. The specific electrical energy consumption of the reactor for drinking water treatment was as low as 20 kWh (kg Al)(-1) for current densities of 10-20A m(-2). The water treatment performance of the electrocoagulation process was found to be superior to that of conventional coagulation with aluminium sulphate for treating a model-coloured water, with 20% more dissolved organic carbon (DOC) being removed for the same Al(III) dose. However, for a lowland surface water sample, the two processes achieved a similar performance for DOC and UV-absorbance removal. In addition, an up-flow electrocoagulator configuration performed better than a horizontal flow configuration, with both bipolar and monopolar electrodes. PMID:12405415

  5. COAGULATION PARAMETERS IN THE AMERICAN FLAMINGO (PHOENICOPTERUS RUBER).

    PubMed

    Gardhouse, Sara; Eshar, David; Beaufrère, Hugues

    2016-06-01

    American flamingos ( Phoenicopterus ruber ) are commonly kept in zoologic collections. When presented to veterinarians in states of health and illness, evaluation of selected coagulation parameters can aid in assessment of various coagulopathies, as well as other disease processes such as septicemia, vasculitis, and hepatic disease. Sixteen American flamingos (eight males, eight females) were presented for annual health evaluations. A blood sample was collected from the medial metatarsal vein, and prothrombin time (PT), activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), fibrinogen, and fibrin degradation products (FDPs) were evaluated using an automated hemostasis analyzer. Results were reported as median and range (minimum-maximum): PT = 72.7 (39 to >100 sec), APTT = 97.5 (6.1 to >200 sec), fibrinogen = 184 (138-364 mg/dl), and FDPs = <5 (<5 to >20 μg/ml). To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of coagulation parameters in American flamingos. Knowledge of coagulation parameters will allow for better clinical assessment and management of American flamingos. PMID:27468017

  6. Effect of second coagulant addition on coagulation efficiency, floc properties and residual Al for humic acid treatment by Al13 polymer and polyaluminum chloride (PACl).

    PubMed

    Xu, Weiying; Gao, Baoyu; Wang, Yan; Yue, Qinyan; Ren, Haijing

    2012-05-15

    Influence of second dose on coagulation efficiency, floc re-growth, fractal structure and residual Al of the effluent in humic acid (HA) coagulation with Al(13) polymer ([Al(13)O(4)(OH)(24)(H(2)O)(12)](7+)) and PACl were comparatively investigated in this study. Effects of breakage shear on the floc properties generated in the coagulation with and without additional dose were also investigated. The results indicated that additional dose during breakage could essentially improve the HA removal efficiency and floc re-growth in both Al(13) and PACl coagulations. Second doses of Al(13) at 0.5 and 1.0mg/L resulted in better turbidity and UV(254) removal as well as floc re-growth rather than higher additional dose of 1.5 and 2.0mg/L; while in PACl coagulation, more efficient HA removal and better floc re-growth were obtained at higher additional doses (1.0, 1.5 and 2.0mg/L). Small additional Al(13) could apparently increase the D(f) of re-formed flocs while the additional PACl displayed inconspicuous effect on floc D(f). The additional coagulant dose could alleviate the further decrease of re-grown floc size with increased breakage shear for both coagulants. The residual Al analysis implied that two-stage addition contributed to lower residual Al in effluent than one-time addition mode with the same total coagulant concentration. PMID:22410719

  7. Decolorization and COD reduction of dyeing wastewater from a cotton textile mill using thermolysis and coagulation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Pradeep; Prasad, B; Mishra, I M; Chand, Shri

    2008-05-01

    The decolorization and reduction of COD of dyeing wastewater from a cotton textile mill was conducted using catalytic thermal treatment (thermolysis) accompanied with/without coagulation. Thermolysis in presence of a homogeneous copper sulphate catalyst was found to be the most effective in comparison to other catalysts (FeCl(3), FeSO(4), CuO, ZnO and PAC) used. A maximum reduction of chemical oxygen demand (COD) and color of dyeing wastewater of 66.85% and 71.4%, respectively, was observed with a catalyst concentration of 5 kg/m(3) at pH 8. Commercial alum was found most effective coagulant among various coagulants (aluminum potassium sulphate, PAC, FeCl(3) and FeSO(4)) tested during coagulation operations, resulting in 58.57% COD and 74% color reduction at pH 4 and coagulant dose of 5 kg/m(3). Coagulation of the clear fluid (supernatant) obtained after treatment by thermolysis at the conditions previously used resulted in an overall reduction of 89.91% COD and 94.4% color at pH 4 and a coagulant dose of 2 kg/m(3). The application of thermolysis followed by coagulation, thus, is the most effective treatment method in removing nearly 90% COD and 95% color at a lower dose of coagulant (2 kg/m(3)). The sludge thus produced would contain lower inorganic mass coagulant and, therefore, less amount of inorganic sludge. PMID:17931773

  8. Determining the effectiveness of conventional and alternative coagulants through effective characterization schemes.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Shahnawaz; Yoon, Yeomin; Amy, Gary; Yoon, Jaekyung

    2004-12-01

    Polymeric forms of metal coagulants in water treatment have become increasingly used due to their wider availability and reduction in cost. These specialized coagulant forms and products are claimed by manufacturers to be superior to conventional coagulants in particulate and/or organic removal with inherent advantages of lower alkalinity consumption and lesser sludge production. However, due to their proprietary nature, little is known about their chemical composition. To determine and understand the effectiveness of these alternative coagulants, a comprehensive study was undertaken to characterize metal coagulants, and to comparatively evaluate them on a well-characterized source water. The objective of this study was to provide a scheme for utilities that could be employed as a screening process and a method of selecting an appropriate coagulant based on raw water characteristics and insight into the coagulatability of the source water. Characterizations of coagulants included: (i) active metal content, (ii) anion content, (iii) acidity, (iv) alkalinity consumption, (v) charge reversal by colloidal titration, and (vi) molecular weight determination. A total of five poly-aluminum chlorides (PACl), along with a conventional coagulant (aluminum sulfate or alum) were evaluated. Results show that through the characterization scheme, an effective coagulant (conventional versus alternative) and coagulant type (among various PACl) can be chosen before undertaking time-consuming bench or pilot-scale evaluation. PMID:15504470

  9. Microwave Ablation of Hepatic Malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Lubner, Meghan G.; Brace, Christopher L.; Ziemlewicz, Tim J.; Hinshaw, J. Louis; Lee, Fred T.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave ablation is an extremely promising heat-based thermal ablation modality that has particular applicability in treating hepatic malignancies. Microwaves can generate very high temperatures in very short time periods, potentially leading to improved treatment efficiency and larger ablation zones. As the available technology continues to improve, microwave ablation is emerging as a valuable alternative to radiofrequency ablation in the treatment of hepatic malignancies. This article reviews the current state of microwave ablation including technical and clinical considerations. PMID:24436518

  10. Uniform batch processing using microwaves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barmatz, Martin B. (Inventor); Jackson, Henry W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A microwave oven and microwave heating method generates microwaves within a cavity in a predetermined mode such that there is a known region of uniform microwave field. Samples placed in the region will then be heated in a relatively identical manner. Where perturbations induced by the samples are significant, samples are arranged in a symmetrical distribution so that the cumulative perturbation at each sample location is the same.

  11. Optomechanics with microwave light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehnert, Konrad

    2009-03-01

    Recently, superconducting circuits resonant at microwave frequencies have revolutionized the measurement of astrophysical detectors [1] and superconducting qubits [2]. In this talk, I will describe how we extend this technique to measuring and manipulating nanomechanical oscillators. By strongly coupling the motion of a nanomechanical oscillator to the resonance of the microwave circuit we create structures where the dominant dissipative force acting on the oscillator is the radiation pressure of microwave ``light'' [3]. These devices are ultrasensitive force detectors and they allow us to cool the oscillator towards its motional ground state. [4pt] [1] P. K. Day et al., Nature 425, 817 (2003).[0pt] [2] A. Wallraff et al., Nature 431, 162 (2004).[0pt] [3] J. D. Teufel, J. W. Harlow, C. A. Regal and K. W. Lehnert, Phys. Rev. Lett., 101, 197203 (2008).

  12. RFTF ECH microwave system

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; White, T.L.; Kimrey, H.D.

    1986-01-01

    A Radio-Frequency Test Facility (RFTF) has recently been constructed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for development and testing of Ion Cyclotron Heating (ICH) antennas under realistic fusion reactor plasma edge conditions. High-power ICH antennas must be immersed in the plasma for proper coupling of rf power and therefore are subject to particle bombardment and heat flux. In RFTF, plasma is generated and heated by electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) with 28-GHz microwave power from a gyrotron tube. The plasma is confined in a simple magnetic mirror formed by two superconducting coils surrounding a box-shaped vacuum vessel. Using 50 kW of microwave power, a plasma with density of 5 x 10/sup 11/ cm/sup 3/ and temperature of 8 eV is obtained, a fairly good fusion research edge plasma. This presentation covers the microwave generation and transmission system plus some of the electron cyclotron heated (ECH) results on RFTF.

  13. Microwave effects on isolated chick embryo hearts

    SciTech Connect

    Caddemi, A.; Tamburello, C.C.; Zanforlin, L.; Torregrossa, M.V.

    1986-01-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of microwaves on the electric activity of hearts as a means of elucidating interactive mechanisms of nonionizing radiation with cardiac tissue. Experiments were performed on isolated hearts of 9-12-day-old chick embryos placed in small petri dishes. Oxygenated isotonic Ringer's solution at 37 degrees C permitted heart survival. Samples were irradiated at 2.45 GHz with a power density of 3 mW/cm2. The heart signal was detected with a glass micropipet inserted into the sinoatrial node and examined by means of a Berg-Fourier analyzer. Pulsed microwaves caused the locking of the heartbeat to the modulation frequency, whereas continuous wave irradiation might have induced slight bradycardia. Pulsed fields induced stimulation or regularization of the heartbeat in arrhythmia, fibrillation, or arrest of the heart.

  14. Microwave-assisted Chemical Transformations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In recent years, there has been a considerable interest in developing sustainable chemistries utilizing green chemistry principles. Since the first published report in 1986 by Gedye and Giguere on microwave assisted synthesis in household microwave ovens, the use of microwaves as...

  15. Physics of the Microwave Oven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vollmer, Michael

    2004-01-01

    This is the first of two articles about the physics of microwave ovens. This article deals with the generation of microwaves in the oven and includes the operation of the magnetrons, waveguides and standing waves in resonant cavities. It then considers the absorption of microwaves by foods, discussing the dielectric relaxation of water,…

  16. Handbook of microwave testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laverghetta, T. S.

    A description of microwave test equipment is presented, taking into account signal generators, signal detection/indicating devices, auxiliary testing devices, and microwave systems. Low power, medium power, high power, and peak power measurements are considered along with noise measurements, spectrum analyzer measurements, active testing, antenna measurements, and automatic testing. Attention is given to phase noise, Q measurements, the Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) measurement, swept impedance, noise sources, noise meters, manual noise measurements, automatic noise figure measurements, gain, gain compression, intermodulation, the third order intercept, and questions of spectral purity.

  17. Microwave Frequency Polarizers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ha, Vien The; Mirel, Paul; Kogut, Alan J.

    2013-01-01

    This article describes the fabrication and analysis of microwave frequency polarizing grids. The grids are designed to measure polarization from the cosmic microwave background. It is effective in the range of 500 to 1500 micron wavelength. It is cryogenic compatible and highly robust to high load impacts. Each grid is fabricated using an array of different assembly processes which vary in the types of tension mechanisms to the shape and size of the grids. We provide a comprehensive study on the analysis of the grids' wire heights, diameters, and spacing.

  18. High power microwave generator

    SciTech Connect

    Minich, Roger W.

    1988-01-01

    A device (10) for producing high-powered and coherent microwaves is described. The device comprises an evacuated, cylindrical, and hollow real cathode (20) that is driven to inwardly field emit relativistic electrons. The electrons pass through an internally disposed cylindrical and substantially electron-transparent cylindrical anode (24), proceed toward a cylindrical electron collector electrode (26), and form a cylindrical virtual cathode (32). Microwaves are produced by spatial and temporal oscillations of the cylindrical virtual cathode (32), and by electrons that reflex back and forth between the cylindrical virtual cathode (32) and the cylindrical real cathode (20).

  19. EDITORIAL: Microwave Moisture Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatze, Udo; Kupfer, Klaus; Hübner, Christof

    2007-04-01

    Microwave moisture measurements refer to a methodology by which the water content of materials is non-invasively determined using electromagnetic fields of radio and microwave frequencies. Being the omnipresent liquid on our planet, water occurs as a component in most materials and often exercises a significant influence on their properties. Precise measurements of the water content are thus extremely useful in pure sciences, particularly in biochemistry and biophysics. They are likewise important in many agricultural, technical and industrial fields. Applications are broad and diverse, and include the quality assessment of foodstuffs, the determination of water content in paper, cardboard and textile production, the monitoring of moisture in sands, gravels, soils and constructions, as well as the measurement of water admixtures to coal and crude oil in reservoirs and in pipelines. Microwave moisture measurements and evaluations require insights in various disciplines, such as materials science, dielectrics, the physical chemistry of water, electrodynamics and microwave techniques. The cooperation of experts from the different fields of science is thus necessary for the efficient development of this complex discipline. In order to advance cooperation the Workshop on Electromagnetic Wave Interaction with Water and Moist Substances was held in 1993 in Atlanta. It initiated a series of international conferences, of which the last one was held in 2005 in Weimar. The meeting brought together 130 scientists and engineers from all over the world. This special issue presents a collection of some selected papers that were given at the event. The papers cover most topics of the conference, featuring dielectric properties of aqueous materials, electromagnetic wave interactions, measurement methods and sensors, and various applications. The special issue is dedicated to Dr Andrzej W Kraszewski, who died in July 2006 after a distinguished career of 48 years in the research of

  20. Influence of coagulation mechanisms on the residual aluminum--the roles of coagulant species and MW of organic matter.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Ruyuan; Xu, Hui; Xu, Weiying; Yang, Xiaofang; Wang, Dongsheng

    2015-06-15

    Aluminum (Al) based coagulants are widely used in coagulation process to enhance the removal of turbidity and dissolved substances in the drinking water treatment. However, it raised more concerns due to the increase of residual aluminum in treated water, which can cause even more issues. In this study, the effects of organic matter molecular weight and coagulants species on the concentration and aluminum distribution in residual aluminum were investigated. The residual aluminum concentration decreases as the organic matter (OM) molecular weight (MW) rises. Charge neutralization mechanism was found to be the most important factor that determines the residual aluminum concentration directly. Basically, higher Ala percentage leads to lower residual Al concentration at acidic conditions, and Alb/Alc plays an important role in controlling the residual Al concentration at neutral and alkaline condition. The flocs structures formed by charge neutralization mechanism will be more compact for the mid and high MW OM, and fractal dimension (Df) was important to reflect the dissolved residual aluminum rather than the flocs size. The total dissolved residual aluminum concentration of Al13 and Al30 was mainly contributed by the fractions with low and/or high MW, especially by the fraction with MW range of 0-1 kDa. PMID:25731148