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Sample records for middle hepatic vein

  1. Usability of Cryopreserved Aortic Allografts for Middle Hepatic Vein Reconstruction During Living-Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seok-Hwan; Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Kim, Ki-Hun; Park, Gil-Chun; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2016-05-01

    Iliac vein allografts are suitable for middle hepatic vein (MHV) reconstruction during living-donor liver transplantation (LDLT), but their supply is often limited. Polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts are easily available but have drawbacks of accidental gastric penetration and non-degradable foreign body. To replace the use of PTFE grafts, we started using cryopreserved aorta allografts (CAAs). This study presents the technical details and patency outcomes of using CAAs in MHV reconstruction. We reviewed the surgical techniques of CAA interposition and analyzed the patency rates in 74 patients who underwent LDLT during the 6-year study period. The two control groups received either cryopreserved iliac veins (n = 122) or PTFE grafts (n = 84). The surgical techniques for MHV reconstruction used to implant the CAA and PTFE grafts are very similar because the techniques developed for PTFE grafts were also applied to CAAs. We inserted an arterial patch at the liver cut surface because the CAA wall is too thick to perform direct anastomosis. Two patients (2.7 %) underwent MHV stenting during the first month. The 1-year patency rate was 69.7 % in the CAA group vs. 39.2 % in iliac vein group vs. 57.2 % in PTFE group (p = 0.000). The overall graft and patient survival rates did not differ depending on the MHV interposition vessel materials (p > 0.1). CAAs combined with small-artery patches demonstrated high patency rates that surpass other vessel grafts, and thus, we suggest that CAA can be reliably used for MHV reconstruction when CAA is available. PMID:26666546

  2. Hemodynamic changes of the middle hepatic vein in patients with pulmonary hypertension using echocardiography.

    PubMed

    Sun, Dan Dan; Hou, Chuan Ju; Yuan, Li Jun; Duan, Yun You; Hou, Ying; Zhou, Fang Ping

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze the changes of the middle hepatic vein (MHV) spectra in patients with pulmonary hypertension (PH) caused by congenital heart disease (CHD) and determine the proper parameters of MHV to predict PH. Eighty patients with CHD were included, whose pulmonary artery pressure was measured via right heart catheterization, and the MHV spectra were detected via echocardiography. The peak value of velocity (V) and velocity time integral (VTI) of the waves, including S wave, D wave and A wave, were measured at the end of inspiration. The values of the MHV parameters that were predictive of PH were evaluated and their cut-off points were determined. Compared with the control group, V of S wave (S), VTI of S wave (SVTI), V of D wave (D), VTI of D wave (DVTI) decreased and V of A wave (A), VTI of A wave (AVTI), A/S, AVTI/SVTI, A/(S+D), AVTI/ (SVTI+DVTI) increased in the PH group. These differences were statistically significant (P<0.05). A correlation analysis determined that the ratios of A/S, A/(S+D), AVTI/(SVTI+DVTI) were positively correlated with pulmonary artery mean pressure (r=0.529,0.575,0.438,P<0.001). An ROC curve analysis determined that the diagnostic effect of A/(S+D) was superior to the other two parameters. On the ROC curve, when the ratio of A/(S+D) was 0.30, the sensitivity was 85.37% and specificity was 75.00% for predicting PH. The spectral parameters of MHV, including the ratios of A/S, A/(S+D) and AVTI/(SVTI+DVTI), increased with increasing pulmonary pressure in CHD patients. When the ratio of A/(S+D) was 0.30 in MHV spectra, it had sufficient sensitivity and specificity for diagnosing PH, and this method could be used as a new non-invasive complementary echocardiographic parameter for predicting PH. PMID:25821961

  3. Corrosion cast study of the canine hepatic veins.

    PubMed

    Uršič, M; Vrecl, M; Fazarinc, G

    2014-11-01

    This study presents a detailed description of the distribution, diameters and drainage patterns of hepatic veins on the basis of the corrosion cast analysis in 18 dogs. We classified the hepatic veins in three main groups: the right hepatic veins of the caudate process and right lateral liver lobe, the middle hepatic veins of the right medial and quadrate lobes and the left hepatic veins of both left liver lobes and the papillary process. The corrosion cast study showed that the number of the veins in the Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria and most anatomical textbooks is underestimated. The number of various-sized hepatic veins of the right liver division ranged from 3 to 5 and included 1 to 4 veins from the caudate process and 2 to 4 veins from the right lateral liver lobe. Generally, in all corrosion casts, one middle-sized vein from the right part of the right medial lobe, which emptied separately in the caudal vena cava, was established. The other vein was a large-sized vein from the remainder of the central division, which frequently joined the common left hepatic vein from the left liver lobes. The common left hepatic vein was the largest of all the aforementioned hepatic veins. PMID:25448906

  4. A novel technique for hepatic vein reconstruction during hepatectomy.

    PubMed

    Surjan, Rodrigo C; Basseres, Tiago; Pajecki, Denis; Puzzo, Daniel B; Makdissi, Fabio F; Machado, Marcel A C; Battilana, Alexandre Gustavo Bellorio

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for malignant liver tumours. Nevertheless, surgical approach to tumours located close to the confluence of the hepatic veins is a challenging issue. Trisectionectomies are considered the first curative option for treatment of these tumours. However, those procedures are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates primarily due to post-operative liver failure. Thus, maximal preservation of functional liver parenchyma should always be attempted. We describe the isolated resection of Segment 8 for the treatment of a tumour involving the right hepatic vein and in contact with the middle hepatic vein and retrohepatic vena cava with immediate reconstruction of the right hepatic vein with a vascular graft. This is the first time this type of reconstruction was performed, and it allowed to preserve all but one of the hepatic segments with normal venous outflow. This innovative technique is a fast and safe method to reconstruct hepatic veins. PMID:27076622

  5. A novel technique for hepatic vein reconstruction during hepatectomy

    PubMed Central

    Surjan, Rodrigo C.; Basseres, Tiago; Pajecki, Denis; Puzzo, Daniel B.; Makdissi, Fabio F.; Machado, Marcel A.C.; Battilana, Alexandre Gustavo Bellorio

    2016-01-01

    Surgical resection is the treatment of choice for malignant liver tumours. Nevertheless, surgical approach to tumours located close to the confluence of the hepatic veins is a challenging issue. Trisectionectomies are considered the first curative option for treatment of these tumours. However, those procedures are associated with high morbidity and mortality rates primarily due to post-operative liver failure. Thus, maximal preservation of functional liver parenchyma should always be attempted. We describe the isolated resection of Segment 8 for the treatment of a tumour involving the right hepatic vein and in contact with the middle hepatic vein and retrohepatic vena cava with immediate reconstruction of the right hepatic vein with a vascular graft. This is the first time this type of reconstruction was performed, and it allowed to preserve all but one of the hepatic segments with normal venous outflow. This innovative technique is a fast and safe method to reconstruct hepatic veins. PMID:27076622

  6. Hepatic myospherulosis complicating portal vein embolisation

    PubMed Central

    Lui, P C W; Luk, I S C; Lee, C K L; Lui, Y H; Leung, C Y; Choi, C H

    2004-01-01

    Aims: Myospherulosis is a rare condition characterised by sac-like structures containing spheroid bodies in cysts or cystic spaces in the tissue. This condition has not previously been reported in the liver. The association with previous portal vein embolisation using a mixture of butyl 2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodised oil and the proposed mechanism of pathogenesis are discussed. Methods: Samples from 8 patients treated by hepatectomy after portal vein embolisation using a mixture of butyl 2-cyanoacrylate and ethiodised oil were retrieved from the archives of the United Christian Hospital, Hong Kong. The histological specimens were reviewed. A panel of histochemical and immunohistochemical stains was used. Results: All cases showed hepatic myospherulosis within the veins. The veins were denuded of endothelium, which was replaced by granulation tissue and fibrous tissue with a lymphoplasmacytic infiltrate. Foreign body-type giant cells (six cases) and eosinophilic infiltrates (seven cases) were noted in most cases. Both parent bodies and endobodies were stained red by Papanicolaou and Masson’s trichrome and stained blue by solochrome cyanine. The endobodies showed immunoreactivity towards glycophorin A. They were negative for Alcian blue, periodic acid Schiff, Grocott, and Ziehl-Neelsen stains. Conclusions: The endobodies of myospherulosis may be misdiagnosed as fungi or algae by the unwary. The clinical history, intravascular location, lack of staining with periodic acid Schiff and Grocott stains, and positive glycophorin A staining are generally sufficient for a confident diagnosis of myospherulosis. PMID:14747440

  7. Intraoperative assessment of hepatic venous congestion with direct clamping of the hepatic vein trunk for living donor liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Hwang, S; Lee, S G; Kim, K H; Park, K M; Lee, Y J; Ahn, C S; Moon, D B; Ha, T Y; Cho, S H; Oh, K B

    2004-06-01

    We devised a hepatic vein clamping method to assess the amount of hepatic venous congestion (HVC) before liver transection. From February 2003 to May 2003, this method was applied to 5 of 58 living donor livers especially to assess donor safety. The left portal vein and proper hepatic artery as well as the middle hepatic vein (MHV)-left hepatic vein (LHV) trunk were clamped simultaneously to assess the HVC in the remnant right lobe before performing extended left lobectomy. As three donors demonstrated the extent of the HVC equivalent to about 40% of the right lobe volume (RLV), their operations proceeded according to the preoperative plan. The territory of HVC after liver transection was the same as that observed with direct clamping of the hepatic vein. However, one donor showed massive HVC more than 50% of RLV and the operative plan was adjusted to harvest only the left lobe without the MHV trunk for donor safety. To assess the HVC in the remnant left lobe, the isolated LHV trunk was occluded after clamping the donor's proper hepatic artery. The whole left lobe except for a small area at the anterior portion of the medial segment became discolored on LHV clamping: the opposite demarcation appeared on MHV clamping. The amount of HVC was so small that we harvested the right lobe with the MHV trunk. All donors and recipients recovered uneventfully. We believe that this direct clamping method makes the assessment of HVC feasible before parenchymal transection of a donor liver. PMID:15251358

  8. Anatomy of the portal branches and the hepatic veins in the caudate lobe of the liver.

    PubMed

    Ortale, J R; Borges Keiralla, L C

    2004-10-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the caudate portal branches and their relationships with the hepatic caudate veins and propose a new nomenclature for the caudate branches based on their territory of distribution. We realized the fine dissection of the veins of the caudate lobe in 40 human livers fixed and preserved in formalin. In 15/40 (37.5%) cases there was a single branch to the caudate lobe. In 25/40 (62.5%) cases there was more than one branch, with a posterior caudate branch in 20/40 (50%) cases, an anterior caudate branch in 15/40 (37.5%) cases, a left caudate branch in 14/40 (35%) cases, and a right caudate branch in 8/40 (20%) cases. The most frequent combination detected (11/40, 27.5% of cases) was that of the posterior and anterior branches. The venous drainage of the caudate lobe and its papillary process was provided by the superior caudate hepatic vein in 23/40 (57.5%) cases, by the middle caudate vein in 35/40 (87.5%) cases (which was the only vein in 12/35 cases), and by the inferior caudate vein in 16/40 (40%) cases. In 11/40 (12.5%) cases there were accessory caudate veins, which emptied into the left and intermediate hepatic veins. The portal branches and the hepatic veins related to the caudate process were studied. In conclusion, the new nomenclature analyzes more precisely the distribution of the caudate portal branches. PMID:15300411

  9. Posttransplant Complex Inferior Venacava Balloon Dilatation After Hepatic Vein Stenting

    SciTech Connect

    Kohli, Vikas; Wadhawan, Manav; Gupta, Subhash; Roy, Vipul

    2010-02-15

    Orthotopic and living related liver transplantation is an established mode of treatment of end-stage liver disease. One of the major causes of postoperative complications is vascular anastomotic stenosis. One such set of such complications relates to hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC), or portal vein stenosis, with a reported incidence of 1-3%. The incidence of vascular complications is reported to be higher in living donor versus cadaveric liver transplants. We encountered a patient with hepatic venous outflow tract obstruction, where the hepatic vein had been previously stented, but the patient continued to have symptoms due to additional IVC obstruction. The patient required double-balloon dilatation of the IVC simultaneously from the internal jugular vein and IVC.

  10. A method for quickly and exactly extracting hepatic vein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Qing; Yuan, Rong; Wang, Luyao; Wang, Yanchun; Li, Zhen; Hu, Daoyu; Xie, Qingguo

    2013-02-01

    It is of vital importance that providing detailed and accurate information about hepatic vein (HV) for liver surgery planning, such as pre-operative planning of living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). Due to the different blood flow rate of intra-hepatic vascular systems and the restrictions of CT scan, it is common that HV and hepatic portal vein (HPV) are both filled with contrast medium during the scan and in high intensity in the hepatic venous phase images. As a result, the HV segmentation result obtained from the hepatic venous phase images is always contaminated by HPV which makes accurate HV modeling difficult. In this paper, we proposed a method for quick and accurate HV extraction. Based on the topological structure of intra-hepatic vessels, we analyzed the anatomical features of HV and HPV. According to the analysis, three conditions were presented to identify the nodes that connect HV with HPV in the topological structure, and thus to distinguish HV from HPV. The method costs less than one minute to extract HV and provides a correct and detailed HV model even with variations in vessels. Evaluated by two experienced radiologists, the accuracy of the HV model obtained from our method is over 97%. In the following work, we will extend our work to a comprehensive clinical evaluation and apply this method to actual LDLT surgical planning.

  11. Reconstruction of a rare variant of the left hepatic vein in a left lateral segment liver graft from a living donor: Technical notes

    PubMed Central

    Veerankutty, Fadl H.; Ali, T.U. Shabeer; Manoj, Krishnan Sarojam; Venugopal, B.

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of hepatic veins in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is often technically challenging and a good venous outflow is essential for survival of the graft and patient. We describe a quadrangular patch venoplasty technique used for the reconstruction of a rare variant of the left hepatic vein (LHV) in a pediatric LDLT with left lateral segment (LLS) graft. Segment II vein in the graft was draining directly into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and segment III vein was draining into the middle hepatic vein (MHV) after receiving a tributary from segment IV so that there were two widely separated ostia at the cut surface. This is one of the rarest variations of the LHV and is so called type 3 variant; it is usually reconstructed using interposition tubular conduits necessitating two separate anastomoses at the IVC. PMID:26862296

  12. Reconstruction of a rare variant of the left hepatic vein in a left lateral segment liver graft from a living donor: Technical notes.

    PubMed

    Veerankutty, Fadl H; Ali, T U Shabeer; Manoj, Krishnan Sarojam; Venugopal, B

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of hepatic veins in living donor liver transplantation (LDLT) is often technically challenging and a good venous outflow is essential for survival of the graft and patient. We describe a quadrangular patch venoplasty technique used for the reconstruction of a rare variant of the left hepatic vein (LHV) in a pediatric LDLT with left lateral segment (LLS) graft. Segment II vein in the graft was draining directly into the inferior vena cava (IVC) and segment III vein was draining into the middle hepatic vein (MHV) after receiving a tributary from segment IV so that there were two widely separated ostia at the cut surface. This is one of the rarest variations of the LHV and is so called type 3 variant; it is usually reconstructed using interposition tubular conduits necessitating two separate anastomoses at the IVC. PMID:26862296

  13. Hepatic Artery Doppler Indices in Children with Extra Hepatic Portal Vein Obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Randhir, Jesudoss; Chandrasekaran, Satyabhama; Sathiyasekaran, Malathi; Venkataraman, Jayanthi

    2013-01-01

    Doppler measurement provides information on the hemodynamics in the hepatic artery and the portal venous system. Aim To study the hepatic artery hemodynamics in children with extra hepatic portal vein obstruction. Materials and methods Hepatic artery indices were studied using Doppler indices in 15 children (<12 years) with extra hepatic portal hypertension (EHPVO) and obliterated esophageal varices. The hepatic artery resistive index, the arterial acceleration time and the acceleration index were used to determine the flow pattern within the hepatic artery. Controls were 15 healthy age-sex matched children, belonging to the same socioeconomic strata in absence of liver disease. Results The mean age of the children was 8.43 ± 3.2 years and male female ratio was 4:1. All the children had obliterated esophageal varices. The hepatic artery resistive index in the children with EHPVO was normal and similar to controls. The hepatic arterial early systolic acceleration index was significantly higher in cases compared to controls (436 ± 290 vs 214 ± 100; P value <0.004). The hepatic arterial acceleration time though low in the cases (86 ± 35 cm/s) was not statistically different from the controls (128 ± 14 cm/s). Conclusion There was a significant increase in hepatic arterial early systolic acceleration in children with chronic EHPVO. The latter may be responsible for an increase in hepatic arterial in flow velocity in a slow flow system despite a normal resistive index. PMID:25755483

  14. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization

    PubMed Central

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500 mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  15. Hepatic artery injury during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastasis treated by portal vein arterialization.

    PubMed

    Hokuto, Daisuke; Nomi, Takeo; Yamato, Ichiro; Yasuda, Satoshi; Obara, Shinsaku; Yamada, Takatsugu; Kanehiro, Hiromichi; Nakajima, Yoshiyuki

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein arterialization (PVA) has been applied as a salvage procedure in hepatopancreatobiliary surgeries, including transplantation and liver resection, with revascularization for malignancies. Here we describe the use PVA as a salvage procedure following accidental injury of the hepatic artery to the remnant liver occurred during left hepatic trisectionectomy for colorectal liver metastases (CRLM). A 60-year-old man with cancer of the sigmoid colon and initially unresectable CRLM received 11 cycles of hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with 5-fluorouracil (1500mg/week), after which CRLM was downstaged to resectable. One month after laparoscopic sigmoidectomy, a left trisectionectomy and wedge resection of segment 6 were performed. The posterior branch of the right hepatic artery, the only feeding artery to the remnant liver, was injured and totally dissected. Because microsurgical reconstruction of the artery was impossible, PVA was used; PVA is the sole known procedure available when hepatic artery reconstruction is impossible. The patient then suffered portal hypertension, and closure of arterio-portal anastomosis using an interventional technique with angiography was eventually performed on postoperative day 73. Therefore, it is considered that because PVA is associated with severe postoperative portal hypertension, closure of the arterio-portal shunt should be performed as soon as possible on diagnosing portal hypertension. PMID:26197094

  16. [Myeloproliferative diseases as causative agents of portal and hepatic veins thrombosis].

    PubMed

    Culafić, Dj; Miljić, P; Perisić, M; Djuranović, S; Popović, D; Krstić, M; Jovanović, I; Pavlović, A; Mijalković, N; Sokić-Milutinović, A; Pesko, P

    2007-01-01

    Thrombosis of portal and hepatic veins is one of the most severe complications and most important causes of death of patients with chronic myeloproliferative diseases. Based on results of the past studies, myeloproliferative diseases were the causes of hepatic veins thrombosis in 30% and portal vein thrombosis in 20% of patients. The study presented 4 patients with myeloproliferative diseases complicated by thrombosis of splanchnic veins, aiming at the illustration of issue complexity in diagnostics and therapy. Two patients with portal vein thrombosis and recurring hemorrhage from esophageal varicosity were described. The first case was planned for shunting, while another case sustained bleeding on what account his anticoagulant therapy was discontinued, but it caused mesenterial thrombosis resulting in lethal outcome. Another two patients had hepatic veins thrombosis. Due to frequent, life-threatening bleeding from the esophageal and gastric varices, a patient with chronic Budd-Chiari syndrome and lineal vein thrombosis underwent mesocaval shunting. An immediate postoperative period was manifested by multiple thrombosis and hemorrhages that ended in his death. A patient with the acute Budd-Chiari syndrome was administered myelosuppressants and anticoagulants on time so reperfusion was restored. In myeloproliferative diseases, thrombosis of portal and hepatic veins gives rise to excessive portal hypertension with profuse hemorrhage from the esophageal and gastric varicosity which is difficult to manage because of complex coagulation disorders. PMID:17633867

  17. Environmental Factors Responsible for Variability of Hepatic Vein Flow: A Doppler Assessment in Healthy Twins.

    PubMed

    Tarnoki, Adam D; Tarnoki, David L; Littvay, Levente; Garami, Zsolt; Molnar, Andrea Agnes; Berczi, Viktor; Karlinger, Kinga; Baffy, Gyorgy

    2016-02-29

    Doppler interrogation studies of the liver blood flow indicate altered hepatic vein waveforms in association with impaired hepatocellular function. However, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for variations of these parameters in the absence of disease. We aimed to investigate the contribution of heritable and environmental factors to the physiological variability of hepatic vein flow in a twin cohort. Two hundred twenty-eight healthy adult Hungarian twins (69 monozygotic, 45 same-sex dizygotic pairs) underwent Doppler sonography of the hepatic vein. Age- and sex-adjusted heritability of the highest velocity (amplitude of S wave) of hepatic vein flow was negligible. Shared environment contributed to 33% (95% CI, 16%-51%), and unshared environment was responsible for the largest portion (67%; 95% CI, 49%-84%) of the variance. Duration of sports activities was significantly (P < 0.05) related to the magnitude of hepatic vein flow, while other risk factors and lifestyle characteristics had no significant influence. The data suggest that genetic factors have little impact on the parameters of hepatic venous blood flow. The variability observed in healthy twins by the Doppler interrogation can be explained by the effect of unshared environmental components primarily related to regular physical activity. These findings underscore the importance of unique environments in physiological variations of hepatic venous blood flow. PMID:26875560

  18. Computed tomography arterial portography for assessment of portal vein injury after blunt hepatic trauma

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Chen-Ju; Wong, Yon-Cheong; Tsang, Yuk-Ming; Wang, Li-Jen; Chen, Huan-Wu; Ku, Yi-Kang; Wu, Cheng-Hsien; Chen, Huan-Wen; Kang, Shih-Ching

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE Intrahepatic portal vein injuries secondary to blunt abdominal trauma are difficult to diagnose and can result in insidious bleeding. We aimed to compare computed tomography arterial portography (CTAP), reperfusion CTAP (rCTAP), and conventional computed tomography (CT) for diagnosing portal vein injuries after blunt hepatic trauma. METHODS Patients with blunt hepatic trauma, who were eligible for nonoperative management, underwent CTAP, rCTAP, and CT. The number and size of perfusion defects observed using the three methods were compared. RESULTS A total of 13 patients (seven males/six females) with a mean age of 34.5±14.1 years were included in the study. A total of 36 hepatic segments had perfusion defects on rCTAP and CT, while there were 47 hepatic segments with perfusion defects on CTAP. The size of perfusion defects on CT (239 cm3; interquartile range [IQR]: 129.5, 309.5) and rCTAP (238 cm3; IQR: 129.5, 310.5) were significantly smaller compared with CTAP (291 cm3; IQR: 136, 371) (both, P = 0.002). CONCLUSION Perfusion defects measured by CTAP were significantly greater than those determined by either rCTAP or CT in cases of blunt hepatic trauma. This finding suggests that CTAP is superior to rCTAP and CT in evaluating portal vein injuries after blunt liver trauma. PMID:26268303

  19. Comparison of harmonic scalpel versus conventional knot tying for transection of short hepatic veins at liver transplantation: prospective randomized study.

    PubMed

    Olmez, A; Karabulut, K; Aydin, C; Kayaalp, C; Yilmaz, S

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare harmonic scalpel for short hepatic vein transection with conventional ligation during recipient hepatectomy with caval preservation. Sixteen patients undergoing elective living donor liver transplantation were randomized into 2 groups. We recorded number, diameter, and location of each short hepatic vein, procedure time, central venous pressure, and degree of liver failure (Child-Pugh and Model for End stage Liver Disease scores). As an end point, we observed the intraoperative and postoperative bleeding rates of the transected veins. We transected 144 veins of mean diameter of 2.6 ± 1.8 mm (range, 1-12 mm). Mean number of short hepatic veins in each person was 9 (range, 5-16). Harmonic scalpel was safe for veins with a diameter ≤ 2 mm; these veins were more prone to bleeding with conventional ligation. Bleeding rate was higher after ligation of veins in the upper half than the lower half of the cava (37% vs 21%; P = .04). Both total and per vessel procedure time did not differ between the groups. No postoperative bleeding complications occurred. Transection of veins with a diameter ≤ 2 mm by harmonic scalpel was as safe as conventional ligation. Harmonic scalpel transection of small hepatic veins (≤ 2 mm) can be even safer than conventional control by knot tying, particularly in narrow areas. PMID:22841252

  20. Current role of portal vein embolization/hepatic artery chemoembolization.

    PubMed

    Kokudo, Norihiro; Makuuchi, Masatoshi

    2004-04-01

    This article has reviewed indications, methods, and results of PVE and TACE for hepatobiliary tumors. PVE is applied mainly to increase the safety of major hepatic resection in patients with hilar cholangiocarcinoma, HCC, or metastatic liver tumors. Hepatic arterial embolization causes selective ischemia of the liver tumor and enhances the cytotoxicity of the chemotherapeutic agent administered concomitantly. A survival benefit of TACE in patients with unresectable or recurrent HCC has been demonstrated. The significance of preoperative TACE is still controversial. TACE is routinely performed before PVE in HCC patients. PMID:15062666

  1. The study on sectional anatomy and imaging of accessory hepatic veins.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yan; Li, Zhenping; Liu, Shuwei; Fan, Lingzhong; Dong, Lei; Liu, Lanfen; Liang, Bangling

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the distribution and clinical value of accessory hepatic veins (AHVs), we investigated the number and caliber of the AHVs and the angles between the shafts of AHVs and inferior caval vein. We analyzed the anatomical dissections, serial transverse and coronal sections (0.1-0.2 mm) of a frozen liver, and the ultrasonographical and enhanced CT images of healthy patients. We found that: (1) Most of the angles between the AHVs and inferior caval veins on the thin sections (78%) and liver dissections (72%) were acute (P < 0.01), while the AHVs with right angles had significantly larger average calibers (P < 0.05). However, on the contrary, most of the angles between the AHVs and inferior caval veins were right angles as observed in ultrasonography (89%) and spiral CT images (83%) (P < 0.01). The angle parameters appear to be more selective when displaying the AHVs on ultrasonography and spiral CT images. (2) The presentation rates of the AHVs in ultrasonic and spiral CT images were much lower than those of the anatomical dissections (P < 0.01). (3) There were no apparent differences in displaying right inferior hepatic veins between ultrasonography and spiral CT (P > 0.05). However, the presentation rate of small AHVs was much lower in spiral CT images (P < 0.05). (4) The ultrasonographical and spiral CT scans provide effective reference for the diagnosis of Budd-child syndrome, hepatectomy, especially liver hanging maneuver. PMID:19455274

  2. Liver Stiffness: A Significant Relationship with the Waveform Pattern in the Hepatic Vein.

    PubMed

    Sekimoto, Tadashi; Maruyama, Hitoshi; Kiyono, Soichiro; Kondo, Takayuki; Shimada, Taro; Takahashi, Masanori; Yokosuka, Osamu; Yamaguchi, Tadashi

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to assess the relationship between liver stiffness and hepatic vein waveform patterns in 42 patients with chronic hepatitis and 55 with cirrhosis. Liver stiffness measurement (LSM) values (FibroScan, Echosens, Paris, France) were significantly lower in the triphasic pattern group (11.3 ± 8.4 kPa) than in the monophasic pattern (32.5 ± 23.5 kPa, p = 0.001) and biphasic pattern (25.6 ± 18.1 kPa, p = 0.001) groups, indicating no significant relationship with portal pressure. The ability to diagnose cirrhosis represented by the highest area under the receiver operating characteristic curve was 0.921 (83.6% sensitivity, 90.5% specificity, best cutoff value: 16.9 kPa) by LSM and 1.000 (best cutoff value: 19.4 kPa) by LSM combined with the monophasic pattern. This study revealed a close linkage between liver stiffness and hepatic vein waveform findings, resulting in a better understanding of hepatic vein hemodynamics and wider application of its analysis. PMID:25858000

  3. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-06-01

    The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  4. Hepatic resection or transarterial chemoembolization for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Ninggang; Wei, Xiaodong; Zhang, Dongzhi; Chai, Wenxiao; Che, Ming; Wang, Jiangye; Du, Binbin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The role of hepatic resection in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with accompanying portal vein tumor thrombus (PVTT) remains controversial. This study aimed to evaluate the surgical outcomes of hepatic resection compared with those of transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) in HCC patients. A retrospective study was conducted using the medical records of 230 HCC patients with portal vein invasion who underwent hepatic resection (96 patients) or TACE (134 patients). The baseline characteristics, tumor characteristics, clinicopathological parameters, and overall survival rates were compared between the 2 groups. The baseline and tumor characteristics were comparable between the hepatic resection and TACE groups. The overall complication rate was 35.4% in the hepatic resection group, which was significantly lower than that in the TACE group (73.0%, P <0.001). However, the serious complication rate (grade ≥3) in the hepatic resection group was 13.5%, which was significantly higher than that in the TACE group (P = 0.003). The cumulative overall survival rates at 1, 3, and 5 years in the hepatic resection group were 86.5%, 60.4%, and 33.3%, respectively. These rates were much higher than those in the TACE group (1-year: 77.6%; 3-year: 47.8%; and 5-year: 20.9%; P = 0.021). The long-term survival was notably better in the patients with types I and II PVTT than in the patients with types III and IV PVTT (P <0.05). The univariate and multivariate analyses indicated that types III and IV PVTT and TACE may have contributed to the poor overall survival following surgery. In HCC patients with PVTT and compensated liver function, hepatic resection is a safe and effective surgical protocol, particularly for patients with type I or II PVTT. PMID:27367992

  5. Blocking of the Hepatic Vein Outflow by Neointima Covering a Wallstent Across a Membranous Stenosis of the Inferior Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, Usha; Garg, Pramod K.; Agarwal, Rajeev; Gupta, S. Dutta; Prasad, G. A.; Kaul, Upendra; Tandon, Rakesh K.

    1999-11-15

    A 31-year-old man presented with idiopathic membranous obstruction of the suprahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) and was treated by balloon dilation and placement of a Wallstent. The patient improved markedly. However, he developed obstruction of the hepatic vein outflow secondary to neointima formation over the stent that covered the hepatic vein ostia. The patient died of liver failure and septicemia. We believe that this is the first report of such a serious complication.

  6. Portal vein thrombosis, mortality and hepatic decompensation in patients with cirrhosis: A meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G; Shah, Puja M; Cornella, Scott L; Rudnick, Sean R; Ghabril, Marwan S; Stukenborg, George J; Northup, Patrick G

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the clinical impact of portal vein thrombosis in terms of both mortality and hepatic decompensations (variceal hemorrhage, ascites, portosystemic encephalopathy) in adult patients with cirrhosis. METHODS: We identified original articles reported through February 2015 in MEDLINE, Scopus, Science Citation Index, AMED, the Cochrane Library, and relevant examples available in the grey literature. Two independent reviewers screened all citations for inclusion criteria and extracted summary data. Random effects odds ratios were calculated to obtain aggregate estimates of effect size across included studies, with 95%CI. RESULTS: A total of 226 citations were identified and reviewed, and 3 studies with 2436 participants were included in the meta-analysis of summary effect. Patients with portal vein thrombosis had an increased risk of mortality (OR = 1.62, 95%CI: 1.11-2.36, P = 0.01). Portal vein thrombosis was associated with an increased risk of ascites (OR = 2.52, 95%CI: 1.63-3.89, P < 0.001). There was insufficient data available to determine the pooled effect on other markers of decompensation including gastroesophageal variceal bleeding or hepatic encephalopathy. CONCLUSION: Portal vein thrombosis appears to increase mortality and ascites, however, the relatively small number of included studies limits more generalizable conclusions. More trials with a direct comparison group are needed. PMID:26644821

  7. Imaging and radiological interventions in extra-hepatic portal vein obstruction

    PubMed Central

    Pargewar, Sudheer S; Desai, Saloni N; Rajesh, S; Singh, Vaibhav P; Arora, Ankur; Mukund, Amar

    2016-01-01

    Extrahepatic portal vein obstruction (EHPVO) is a primary vascular condition characterized by chronic long standing blockage and cavernous transformation of portal vein with or without additional involvement of intrahepatic branches, splenic or superior mesenteric vein. Patients generally present in childhood with multiple episodes of variceal bleed and EHPVO is the predominant cause of paediatric portal hypertension (PHT) in developing countries. It is a pre-hepatic type of PHT in which liver functions and morphology are preserved till late. Characteristic imaging findings include multiple parabiliary venous collaterals which form to bypass the obstructed portal vein with resultant changes in biliary tree termed portal biliopathy or portal cavernoma cholangiopathy. Ultrasound with Doppler, computed tomography, magnetic resonance cholangiography and magnetic resonance portovenography are non-invasive techniques which can provide a comprehensive analysis of degree and extent of EHPVO, collaterals and bile duct abnormalities. These can also be used to assess in surgical planning as well screening for shunt patency in post-operative patients. The multitude of changes and complications seen in EHPVO can be addressed by various radiological interventional procedures. The myriad of symptoms arising secondary to vascular, biliary, visceral and neurocognitive changes in EHPVO can be managed by various radiological interventions like transjugular intra-hepatic portosystemic shunt, percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage, partial splenic embolization, balloon occluded retrograde obliteration of portosystemic shunt (PSS) and revision of PSS. PMID:27358683

  8. Heterotopic auxiliary rat liver transplantation with flow-regulated portal vein arterialization in acute hepatic failure.

    PubMed

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.(1-3) The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.(4) In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.(5-6) We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor's portal vein was carried out via the recipient's right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient's aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. (7) In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft's weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  9. Heterotopic Auxiliary Rat Liver Transplantation With Flow-regulated Portal Vein Arterialization in Acute Hepatic Failure

    PubMed Central

    Schleimer, Karina; Kalder, Johannes; Grommes, Jochen; Jalaie, Houman; Tawadros, Samir; Greiner, Andreas; Jacobs, Michael; Kokozidou, Maria

    2014-01-01

    In acute hepatic failure auxiliary liver transplantation is an interesting alternative approach. The aim is to provide a temporary support until the failing native liver has regenerated.1-3 The APOLT-method, the orthotopic implantation of auxiliary segments- averts most of the technical problems. However this method necessitates extensive resections of both the native liver and the graft.4 In 1998, Erhard developed the heterotopic auxiliary liver transplantation (HALT) utilizing portal vein arterialization (PVA) (Figure 1). This technique showed promising initial clinical results.5-6 We developed a HALT-technique with flow-regulated PVA in the rat to examine the influence of flow-regulated PVA on graft morphology and function (Figure 2). A liver graft reduced to 30 % of its original size, was heterotopically implanted in the right renal region of the recipient after explantation of the right kidney.  The infra-hepatic caval vein of the graft was anastomosed with the infrahepatic caval vein of the recipient. The arterialization of the donor’s portal vein was carried out via the recipient’s right renal artery with the stent technique. The blood-flow regulation of the arterialized portal vein was achieved with the use of a stent with an internal diameter of 0.3 mm. The celiac trunk of the graft was end-to-side anastomosed with the recipient’s aorta and the bile duct was implanted into the duodenum. A subtotal resection of the native liver was performed to induce acute hepatic failure. 7 In this manner 112 transplantations were performed. The perioperative survival rate was 90% and the 6-week survival rate was 80%. Six weeks after operation, the native liver regenerated, showing an increase in weight from 2.3±0.8 g to 9.8±1 g. At this time, the graft’s weight decreased from 3.3±0.8 g to 2.3±0.8 g. We were able to obtain promising long-term results in terms of graft morphology and function. HALT with flow-regulated PVA reliably bridges acute hepatic failure

  10. [Hydatid cyst in the hepatic hilum causing a cavernous transformation in the portal vein].

    PubMed

    Gil-Egea, M J; Alameda, F; Girvent, M; Riera, R; Sitges-Serra, A

    1998-05-01

    Portal cavernomatosis consists in the substitution of the portal vein by many fine, twisting venules leading to the liver. This phenomenon is produced as a consequence of anterior thrombosis of the portal vein and is associated with chronic pancreatitis, cancer of the pancreas, intraabdominal sepsis and cholelithiasis. The symptomatology may be nul or present as obstructive jaundice or portal hypertension. Diagnosis is made by Doppler echography. The treatment is portal shunt when symptomatology is produced. In patients with cholelithiasis requiring surgery, the shunt is advised prior to biliary surgery since perioperative hemorrhage, if present, may be incoercible as in the case herein described. We present a 84-year-old woman with portal cavernomatosis the etiology of which was a hydatidic cyst located in the hepatic bifurcation and treated with mebendazol 10 years previously. This etiology has not been previously reported. PMID:9644876

  11. Treatment of surgical brain injury by immune tolerance induced by intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of brain antigens

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Weijian; Liu, Yong; Liu, Baolong; Tan, Huajun; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) defines complications induced by intracranial surgery, such as cerebral edema and other secondary injuries. In our study, intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of allogeneic myelin basic protein (MBP) or autogeneic brain cell suspensions were administered to a standard SBI model. Serum pro-inflammatory IL-2, anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations and the CD4+T/CD8+T ratio were measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after surgery to verify the establishment of immune tolerance. Furthermore, we confirmed neuroprotective effects by evaluating neurological scores at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after SBI. Anti-Fas ligand (FasL) immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays of brain sections were tested at 21 d after surgery. Intrathymic injections of MBP or autogeneic brain cell suspensions functioned by both suppressing secondary inflammatory reactions and improving prognoses, whereas hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions exerted a better effect than MBP. Intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injections of MBP had equal effects on reducing secondary inflammation and improving prognoses. Otherwise, hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions had better outcomes than intrathymic injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions. Moreover, the benefit of injecting antigens into the thymus was outweighed by hepatic portal vein injections. PMID:27554621

  12. Treatment of surgical brain injury by immune tolerance induced by intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of brain antigens.

    PubMed

    Yang, Weijian; Liu, Yong; Liu, Baolong; Tan, Huajun; Lu, Hao; Wang, Hong; Yan, Hua

    2016-01-01

    Surgical brain injury (SBI) defines complications induced by intracranial surgery, such as cerebral edema and other secondary injuries. In our study, intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injection of allogeneic myelin basic protein (MBP) or autogeneic brain cell suspensions were administered to a standard SBI model. Serum pro-inflammatory IL-2, anti-inflammatory IL-4 concentrations and the CD4(+)T/CD8(+)T ratio were measured at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after surgery to verify the establishment of immune tolerance. Furthermore, we confirmed neuroprotective effects by evaluating neurological scores at 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 d after SBI. Anti-Fas ligand (FasL) immunohistochemistry and TUNEL assays of brain sections were tested at 21 d after surgery. Intrathymic injections of MBP or autogeneic brain cell suspensions functioned by both suppressing secondary inflammatory reactions and improving prognoses, whereas hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions exerted a better effect than MBP. Intrathymic and hepatic portal vein injections of MBP had equal effects on reducing secondary inflammation and improving prognoses. Otherwise, hepatic portal vein injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions had better outcomes than intrathymic injections of autogeneic brain cell suspensions. Moreover, the benefit of injecting antigens into the thymus was outweighed by hepatic portal vein injections. PMID:27554621

  13. Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide: differential effects on hepatic artery vs. portal vein endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ding, Ke-Hong; Zhong, Qing; Xu, Jianrui; Isales, Carlos M

    2004-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) has been reported to have opposing effects on splanchnic blood flow. GIP infusion in dogs results in an increase in portal vein circulation but a drop in hepatic artery blood flow. In an effort to evaluate whether these different responses were related to intrinsic differences in GIP effects, we isolated canine hepatic artery (HAEC) and portal vein endothelial cells (PVEC). We report that there are differences in GIP activation of the signal transduction pathways in these two cell types. GIP stimulates secretion of endothelin-1 (ET-1), a potent vasoconstrictor, from HAEC (EC50 0.28 nM) but not from PVEC. This effect could be abolished by preventing a rise in intracellular calcium, demonstrating the calcium dependence of GIP-induced ET-1 secretion from HAEC. The GIP effect was specific, as a GIP receptor antagonist blocked it. In contrast, GIP stimulated nitric oxide production from PVEC (EC50 0.09 nM) but not from HAEC. Taken together, our data demonstrate distinct differences in GIP effects on HAEC from those on PVEC. We conclude that differences in GIP stimulation of ET-1 vs. nitric oxide production in different vascular beds may account for some of the observed differences in its physiological effects. PMID:14709420

  14. Hepatic angiomyolipoma: differential diagnosis from other liver tumors in a special reference to vascular imaging - importance of early drainage vein.

    PubMed

    Yoshioka, Masato; Watanabe, Go; Uchinami, Hiroshi; Kudoh, Kazuhiro; Hiroshima, Yuko; Yoshioka, Toshiaki; Nanjo, Hiroshi; Funaoka, Masato; Yamamoto, Yuzo

    2015-12-01

    A 51-year-old female had been diagnosed with a hemangioma in the hepatic segment 6 (S6). After a 6-year follow-up, enlargement of the tumor was detected. The tumor was clearly enhanced in the arterial phase, and the enhancement remained in the portal phase on computed tomography (CT). Although the primary differential diagnosis on CT was hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), we worried about the possibility of other vessel system tumors because the tumor remained to be enhanced at the portal phase for HCC and all tumor markers of HCC were negative. We performed angiography to determine the tumor nature and to seek other tumors. Angiography showed tumor stain at the hepatic S6 with an early obvious drainage vein from the tumor flowing through the right hepatic vein into the inferior vena cava. In addition to tumor stain and the drainage vein, there were many small poolings of contrast medium in the whole liver, which were suspected as dilatation of the hepatic peripheral artery. We suspected the tumor as a benign tumor such as hepatocellular adenoma or focal nodular hyperplasia, but the possibility of HCC could not be ruled out. Hepatic posterior sectionectomy was done to completely remove the drainage vein with the tumor. Intraoperative histological examination revealed the tumor as not malignant and not HCC. Later, immunohistochemical analysis uncovered that the tumor had high expression of HMB-45 and, therefore, the final diagnosis was angiomyolipoma. We think that detecting an early drainage vein from the tumor would be a key point for diagnosing hepatic angiomyolipoma. PMID:26943379

  15. Hepatitis B epidemiology in Asia, the Middle East and Africa.

    PubMed

    André, F

    2000-02-18

    Asia and Africa have previously been classified as areas of high endemicity for hepatitis B virus (HBV), but in some countries highly effective vaccination programmes have shifted this pattern towards intermediate or low endemicity. Thus, China is now the only country in Asia where HBV endemicity is high. Countries with intermediate endemicity include India, Korea, the Philippines, Taiwan and Thailand, and those with low endemicity include Japan, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Singapore, Sri Lanka and Malaysia. Most countries in Africa have high HBV endemicity, with the exceptions of Tunisia and Morocco, which have intermediate endemicity. Zambia has borderline intermediate/high endemicity. In the Middle East, Bahrain, Iran, Israel and Kuwait are areas of low endemicity, Cyprus, Iraq and the United Arab Emirates have intermediate endemicity, and Egypt, Jordan, Oman, Palestine, Yemen and Saudi Arabia have high endemicity. All of these Middle East countries reach a large proportion of their population with hepatitis B vaccination, which is reducing the infection rate, particularly in Saudi Arabia. The vaccination programme in Taiwan has also greatly reduced the HBV infection rate. Future vaccination programmes must take into account the mode of transmission of HBV, the healthcare infrastructure to deliver vaccination, and the socioeconomic and political factors in each individual country, to determine the most cost-effective way of infection control. PMID:10683538

  16. Constriction rate variation produced by partial ligation of the portal vein at pre-hepatic portal hypertension induced in rats

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUES, Daren Athiê Boy; da SILVA, Aline Riquena; SERIGIOLLE, Leonardo Carvalho; FIDALGO, Ramiro de Sousa; FAVERO, Sergio San Gregorio; LEME, Pedro Luiz Squilacci

    2014-01-01

    Background Partial portal vein ligation causes an increase in portal pressure that remains stable even after the appearance of collateral circulation, with functional adaptation to prolonged decrease in portal blood flow. Aim To assess whether different constriction rates produced by partial ligation of the vein interfere with the results of this experimental model in rats. Methods Three groups of five rats each were used; in group 1 (sham-operated), dissection and measurement of portal vein diameters were performed. Portal hypertension was induced by partial portal vein ligation, reducing its size to 0.9 mm in the remaining 10 animals, regardless of the initial diameter of the veins. Five animals with portal hypertension (group 2) underwent reoperation after 15 days and the rats in group 3 after 30 days. The calculation of the constriction rate was performed using a specific mathematical formula (1 - π r 2 / π R2) x 100% and the statistical analysis with the Student t test. Results The initial diameter of the animal's portal vein was 2.06 mm, with an average constriction rate of the 55.88%; although the diameter of the veins and the constriction rate in group 2 were lower than in group 3 (2.06 mm - 55,25% and 2.08 mm - 56.51%, respectively), portal hypertension was induced in all rats and no significant macroscopic differences were found between the animals that were reoperated after 15 days and after 30 days respectively, being the shorter period considered enough for the evaluation. Comparing the initial diameter of the vein and the rate of constriction performed in groups 2 and 3, no statistic significance was found (p>0.05). Conclusion Pre-hepatic portal hypertension in rat can be induced by the reduction of the portal vein diameter to 0.9 mm, regardless the initial diameter of the vein and the vessel constriction rate. PMID:25626939

  17. Anomalous connection of the left hepatic vein to coronary sinus in a child with PAPVD. Surgical significance and diagnostic difficulties

    PubMed Central

    Mądry, Wojciech; Zacharska-Kokot, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Left hepatic vein (LHV) that drains blood into a coronary sinus (CS) is an extremely rare congenital anomaly of systemic vein drainage with only single reports published. In most of these cases the unusual venous connection was found incidentally during diagnostics or surgery. The case of a two-year-old boy in whom the anomaly was discovered during open heart surgery for partial anomalous pulmonary venous drainage (PAPVD) is presented. Difficulties in obtaining proper diagnosis preoperatively are confronted with postoperative echo findings. Embryology and evolution of sinus venosus are discussed to explain the persistent connection between hepatic venous circulation and a coronary sinus. The authors attempt to recapitulate the possible surgical consequences of LHV-CS continuity. PMID:27212980

  18. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Associated With an Increased Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chun-Cheng; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The association between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke has been previously investigated. However, the association between the HCV infection and the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been extensively discussed. Using the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000), we selected 3686 patients with newly diagnosed HCV infection. We randomly selected 14,744 people with no HCV or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection as comparison group and frequency matched them with patients with HCV infection according to their age, sex, and index year. The incidence density rates and hazard ratios (HRs) of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were calculated until the end of 2011. The mean follow-up duration of 5.14 years for the HCV cohort and 5.61 years for the non-HCV cohort, the overall incidence density rates of DVT were 7.92 and 3.51 per 10,000 person-years in the non-HCV group, and the HCV groups, respectively (crude HR = 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21–4.21). After adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities, the risk of DVT remained significantly higher in the HCV group than in the non-HCV group (adjusted HR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.03–3.73). The overall incidence density rates of PE in the HCV and non-HCV groups were not significantly different (crude HR = 2.20; 95% CI = 0.94–5.14). HCV infection is associated with the risk of DVT in a long-term follow-up period. PMID:26402820

  19. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations.

    PubMed

    Orcutt, Sonia T; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other's techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient's anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  20. Portal Vein Embolization as an Oncosurgical Strategy Prior to Major Hepatic Resection: Anatomic, Surgical, and Technical Considerations

    PubMed Central

    Orcutt, Sonia T.; Kobayashi, Katsuhiro; Sultenfuss, Mark; Hailey, Brian S.; Sparks, Anthony; Satpathy, Bighnesh; Anaya, Daniel A.

    2016-01-01

    Preoperative portal vein embolization (PVE) is used to extend the indications for major hepatic resection, and it has become the standard of care for selected patients with hepatic malignancies treated at major hepatobiliary centers. To date, various techniques with different embolic materials have been used with similar results in the degree of liver hypertrophy. Regardless of the specific strategy used, both surgeons and interventional radiologists must be familiar with each other’s techniques to be able to create the optimal plan for each individual patient. Knowledge of the segmental anatomy of the liver is paramount to fully understand the liver segments that need to be embolized and resected. Understanding the portal vein anatomy and the branching variations, along with the techniques used to transect the portal vein during hepatic resection, is important because these variables can affect the PVE procedure and the eventual surgical resection. Comprehension of the advantages and disadvantages of approaches to the portal venous system and the various embolic materials used for PVE is essential to best tailor the procedures for each patient and to avoid complications. Before PVE, meticulous assessment of the portal vein branching anatomy is performed with cross-sectional imaging, and embolization strategies are developed based on the patient’s anatomy. The PVE procedure consists of several technical steps, and knowledge of these technical tips, potential complications, and how to avoid the complications in each step is of great importance for safe and successful PVE and ultimately successful hepatectomy. Because PVE is used as an adjunct to planned hepatic resection, priority must always be placed on safety, without compromising the integrity of the future liver remnant, and close collaboration between interventional radiologists and hepatobiliary surgeons is essential to achieve successful outcomes. PMID:27014696

  1. Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is an independent risk factor for graft loss due to hepatic artery thrombosis in liver transplant recipients

    PubMed Central

    Stine, Jonathan G.; Pelletier, Shawn J.; Schmitt, Timothy M.; Porte, Robert J.; Northup, Patrick G.

    2015-01-01

    Background Hepatic artery thrombosis is an uncommon but catastrophic complication following liver transplantation. We hypothesize that recipients with portal vein thrombosis are at increased risk. Methods Data on all liver transplants in the U.S. during the MELD era through September 2014 were obtained from UNOS. Status one, multivisceral, living donor, re-transplants, pediatric recipients and donation after cardiac death were excluded. Logistic regression models were constructed for hepatic artery thrombosis with resultant graft loss within 90 days of transplantation. Results 63,182 recipients underwent transplantation; 662 (1.1%) recipients had early hepatic artery thrombosis; of those, 91 (13.8%) had pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis, versus 7.5% with portal vein thrombosis but no hepatic artery thrombosis (p < 0.0001). Portal vein thrombosis was associated with an increased independent risk of hepatic artery thrombosis (OR 2.17, 95% CI 1.71–2.76, p < 0.001) as was donor risk index (OR 2.02, 95% CI 1.65–2.48, p < 0.001). Heparin use at cross clamp, INR, and male donors were all significantly associated with lower risk. Discussion Pre-transplant portal vein thrombosis is associated with post-transplant hepatic artery thrombosis independent of other factors. Recipients with portal vein thrombosis might benefit from aggressive coagulation management and careful donor selection. More research is needed to determine causal mechanism. PMID:27017168

  2. Transarterial chemoembolization combined with sorafenib for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma with hepatic vein tumor thrombus

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yong-Fa; Wei, Wei; Wang, Jia-Hong; Xu, Li; Jian, Pei-En; Xiao, Cheng-Zuo; Zhong, Xiao-Ping; Shi, Ming; Guo, Rong-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Objective To compare the treatment outcomes of sorafenib plus transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) vs TACE alone in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and hepatic vein tumor thrombus (HVTT). Methods Twenty patients who were initially diagnosed with HCC and HVTT and received TACE combined with sorafenib during February 2009 to October 2013 were included in the study. To minimize selection bias, these patients were compared with 60 case-matched controls selected from a pool of 81 patients (in a 1:3 ratio) who received TACE alone during the same period. The primary end point was overall survival (OS). The secondary end points were time to progression, disease control rate, and adverse events. Results After a median follow-up period of 12.5 months (range, 1.03–44.23 months), the OS of the combined group was found to be significantly higher compared with the monotherapy group (14.9 vs 6.1 months, P=0.010). The time to progression was found to be significantly longer in the combined group (4.9 vs 2.4 months, P=0.016). Univariate and multivariate analyses revealed that the treatment allocation was an independent predictor of OS. Conclusion Sorafenib plus TACE was well tolerated and was more effective in treating patients with advanced HCC and HVTT. Future trials with prospective larger samples are required to validate these results. PMID:27471398

  3. Treatment of the Budd-Chiari syndrome in polycythemia vera by repeated percutaneous transluminal angioplasty of a hepatic vein stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, M.; Miyoshi, S.; Imai, Y.; Tarui, S.; Seki, K.; Minami, Y.; Kawata, S.; Nakamura, H.

    1982-01-01

    This report is of a 63-year-old man with polycythemia vera who developed the Budd-Chiari syndrome due to right hepatic vein stenosis. Diagnosis was made by laparoscopy and liver biopsy, and confirmed by hepatic venography. The patient was treated by percutaneous transluminal angioplasty, and recovered completely from ascites, leg oedema and venous stasis. No pulmonary embolism was observed. One month after angioplasty, a second laparoscopy and liver biopsy showed a marked improvement in hepatic congestion and haemorrhagic necrosis, thereby confirming the effectiveness of this technique in treating the Budd-Chiari syndrome. Further treatments with percutaneous transluminal angioplasty were required with a good clinical outcome. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 4 PMID:6215641

  4. Percutaneous Transhepatic Venous Angioplasty and Stenting in a 9-Month-Old Patient with Hepatic Vein Obstruction After Partial Liver Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Rasekhi, A. R.; Nabavizadeh, S. A.; Malek-Hosseini, S. A.; Varedi, P.; Naderifar, M.; Soltani, S.

    2008-09-15

    Hepatic venous outflow obstruction is a rare but serious complication after liver transplantation. We report ultrasound-guided percutaneous transhepatic stent placement in a 9-month-old infant with a left lateral split liver transplantation with near-complete hepatic vein obstruction.

  5. How Far Can We Go with Laparoscopic Liver Resection for Hepatocellular Carcinoma? Laparoscopic Sectionectomy of the Liver Combined with the Resection of the Major Hepatic Vein Main Trunk

    PubMed Central

    Morise, Zenichi; Kawabe, Norihiko; Tomishige, Hirokazu; Nagata, Hidetoshi; Kawase, Jin; Arakawa, Satoshi; Isetani, Masashi

    2015-01-01

    Although the reports of laparoscopic major liver resection are increasing, hepatocellular carcinomas (HCCs) close to the liver hilum and/or major hepatic veins are still considered contraindications. There is virtually no report of laparoscopic liver resection (LLR) for HCC which involves the main trunk of major hepatic veins. We present our method for the procedure. We experienced 6 cases: 3 right anterior, 2 left medial, and 1 right posterior extended sectionectomies with major hepatic vein resection; tumor sizes are within 40–75 (median: 60) mm. The operating time, intraoperative blood loss, and postoperative hospital stay are within 341–603 (median: 434) min, 100–750 (300) ml, and 8–44 (18) days. There was no mortality and 1 patient developed postoperative pleural effusion. For these procedures, we propose that the steps listed below are useful, taking advantages of the laparoscopy-specific view. (1) The Glissonian pedicle of the section is encircled and clamped. (2) Liver transection on the ischemic line is performed in the caudal to cranial direction. (3) During transection, the clamped Glissonian pedicle and the peripheral part of hepatic vein are divided. (4) The root of hepatic vein is divided in the good view from caudal and dorsal direction. PMID:26448949

  6. Hepatic Veins and Inferior Vena Cava Thrombosis in a Child Treated by Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Santos, Aline Cristine Barbosa; Tannuri, Uenis; Cerri, Giovanni Guido

    2010-06-15

    We report the case of a 9-year-old boy with portal hypertension, due to Budd-Chiari syndrome, and retrohepatic inferior vena cava thrombosis, submitted to a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) by connecting the suprahepatic segment of the inferior vena cava directly to the portal vein. After 3 months, the withdrawal of anticoagulants promoted the thrombosis of the TIPS. At TIPS revision, thrombosis of the TIPS and the main portal vein and clots at the splenic and the superior mesenteric veins were found. Successful angiography treatment was performed by thrombolysis and balloon angioplasty of a severe stenosis at the distal edge of the stent.

  7. Postoperative portal vein thrombosis and gastric hemorrhage associated with late-onset hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery after pancreaticoduodenectomy.

    PubMed

    Watanobe, Ikuo; Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2016-02-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious postoperative complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We reported a case of late-onset postoperative PVT with hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery (CHA) in a 73-year-old man who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) for duodenum papilla cancer, followed by reconstruction using the modified Child's technique. The pancreaticojejunostomy was achieved by end-to-side, 2-layer invagination anastomosis without pancreatic duct stenting. Drain removal and hospital discharge were scheduled on postoperative day (POD) 18, but blood-stained fluid in the drain and sudden hematemesis were noted. Emergency surgery was performed because PVT and imaging findings were suggestive of necrosis of the lifted jejunum. Although no jejunal necrosis was identified during surgery, bleeding from the side of the CHA was detected and the bleeding point was suture-closed to achieve hemostasis. We suspected late-onset postoperative arterial hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, which caused portal vein compression and PVT formation. We chose a conservative treatment strategy for PVT, taking into account the operation time, intraoperative vital signs and blood flow in the portal vein. Despite the complicated postoperative course, he was discharged home in a fully ambulatory state on POD 167. PMID:26925150

  8. Postoperative portal vein thrombosis and gastric hemorrhage associated with late-onset hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery after pancreaticoduodenectomy

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Yuzuru; Akimoto, Eigo; Sekine, Yuuki; Haruyama, Yurie; Amemiya, Kota; Miyano, Shozo; Kosaka, Taijiro; Machida, Michio; Kitabatake, Toshiaki; Kojima, Kuniaki

    2016-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is a rare but serious postoperative complication of pancreaticoduodenectomy (PD). We reported a case of late-onset postoperative PVT with hemorrhage from the common hepatic artery (CHA) in a 73-year-old man who underwent pylorus-preserving pancreaticoduodenectomy (PPPD) for duodenum papilla cancer, followed by reconstruction using the modified Child's technique. The pancreaticojejunostomy was achieved by end-to-side, 2-layer invagination anastomosis without pancreatic duct stenting. Drain removal and hospital discharge were scheduled on postoperative day (POD) 18, but blood-stained fluid in the drain and sudden hematemesis were noted. Emergency surgery was performed because PVT and imaging findings were suggestive of necrosis of the lifted jejunum. Although no jejunal necrosis was identified during surgery, bleeding from the side of the CHA was detected and the bleeding point was suture-closed to achieve hemostasis. We suspected late-onset postoperative arterial hemorrhage and subsequent hematoma formation, which caused portal vein compression and PVT formation. We chose a conservative treatment strategy for PVT, taking into account the operation time, intraoperative vital signs and blood flow in the portal vein. Despite the complicated postoperative course, he was discharged home in a fully ambulatory state on POD 167. PMID:26925150

  9. Portal hypertension associated with primary hypoplasia of the hepatic portal vein in dogs.

    PubMed

    Van den Ingh, T S; Rothuizen, J; Meyer, H P

    1995-10-21

    Portal hypertension caused by primary hypoplasia of the portal vein was diagnosed in 42 dogs. The portal hypertension was manifested by the presence of multiple portosystemic collateral vessels. The main clinical signs were retarded growth or weight loss, apathy, intermittent diarrhoea and vomiting, anorexia, abdominal distension and polydipsia. Major findings at physical examination were ascites in 23 dogs and neurological signs in 16 dogs. The dogs had increased activities of liver enzymes in plasma and increased fasting levels of total bile acids and ammonia; in many of the dogs the packed red cell volume, total serum protein and albumin were low. Gross inspection of the portal vein revealed a patent but underdeveloped extrahepatic vein in 13 of the dogs. Microscopic examination of the liver revealed hypoplasia of the intrahepatic portal veins in all the dogs, and this was associated with minor arteriolar proliferation and absence of fibrosis in 12 of them, with moderate to marked arteriolar proliferation often combined with ductular proliferation in 13, and with marked portal fibrosis (formerly described as hepatoportal fibrosis) with a varying number of arteriolar and bile ductular structures in 17 of the dogs. The disease affected mainly young dogs, and was most likely to have been of congenital origin. PMID:8560700

  10. New Hepatitis E Virus Genotype in Camels, the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Susanna K.P.; Teng, Jade L.L.; Tsang, Alan K. L.; Joseph, Marina; Wong, Emily Y.M.; Tang, Ying; Sivakumar, Saritha; Xie, Jun; Bai, Ru; Wernery, Renate; Wernery, Ulrich; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2014-01-01

    In a molecular epidemiology study of hepatitis E virus (HEV) in dromedaries in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, HEV was detected in fecal samples from 3 camels. Complete genome sequencing of 2 strains showed >20% overall nucleotide difference to known HEVs. Comparative genomic and phylogenetic analyses revealed a previously unrecognized HEV genotype. PMID:24856611

  11. Occlusion of a hepatic artery to portal vein fistula with Bucrylate

    SciTech Connect

    Kerlan, R.K. Jr.; Hoddick, W.K.; Pogany, A.C.; Bank, W.O.; Sollenberger, R.D.

    1983-08-01

    A 49-year-old woman with cirrhosis and portal hypertension was evaluated for a portal-systemic shunt procedure following recurrent variceal hemorrhage. The preoperative visceral angiogram demonstrated a hepatic arterial to portal venous fistula, presumably a complication of a previous liver biopsy. The fistula was successfully closed using isobutyl-2-cyanoacrylate (Bucrylate) delivered through a flow-directed, calibrated-leak balloon microcatheter.

  12. Survival outcomes of hepatic resection compared with transarterial chemoembolization or sorafenib for hepatocellular carcinoma with portal vein tumor thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jung Min; Jang, Byoung Kuk; Lee, Yoo Jin; Choi, Wang Yong; Choi, Sei Myong; Chung, Woo Jin; Hwang, Jae Seok; Kang, Koo Jeong; Kim, Young Hwan; Chauhan, Anil Kumar; Park, Soo Young; Tak, Won Young; Kweon, Young Oh; Kim, Byung Seok; Lee, Chang Hyeong

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims: Treating hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT) remains controversial. We compared the outcomes of hepatic resection (HR), transarterial chemoembolization (TACE), and sorafenib therapy as treatments for HCC with PVTT. Methods: Patients diagnosed as HCC with PVTT between January 2000 and December 2011 who received treatment with sorafenib, HR, or TACE were included. Patients with main PVTT, superior mesenteric vein tumor thrombosis, or Child-Turcotte-Pugh (CTP) class C were excluded. The records of 172 patients were analyzed retrospectively. HR, TACE, and sorafenib treatment were performed is 40, 80, and 52 patients respectively. PVTT was classified as either involving the segmental branch (type I) or extending to involve the right or left portal vein (type II). Results: The median survival time was significantly longer in the HR group (19.9 months) than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (6.6 and 6.2 months, respectively; both p<0.001), and did not differ significantly between the latter two groups (p=0.698). Among patients with CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC, the median survival time was longer in the HR group than in the TACE and sorafenib groups (p=0.006). In univariate analyses, the initial treatment method, tumor size, PVTT type, involved lobe, CTP class, and presence of cirrhosis or ascites were correlated with overall survival. The significant prognostic factors for overall survival in Cox proportional-hazards regression analysis were initial treatment method (HR vs. TACE: hazard ratio=1.750, p=0.036; HR vs. sorafenib: hazard ratio=2.262, p=0.006), involved lobe (hazard ratio=1.705, p=0.008), PVTT type (hazard ratio=1.617, p=0.013), and CTP class (hazard ratio=1.712, p=0.012). Conclusions: Compared with TACE or sorafenib, HR may prolong the survival of patients with HCC in cases of CTP class A, type I PVTT or unilobar-involved HCC. PMID:27044767

  13. Hepatitis C Virus Infection Associated With an Increased Risk of Deep Vein Thrombosis: A Population-Based Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chun-Cheng; Chang, Chiz-Tzung; Lin, Cheng-Li; Lin, I-Ching; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-09-01

    The association between the hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and the risk of myocardial infarction (MI) and stroke has been previously investigated. However, the association between the HCV infection and the risk of venous thromboembolism (VTE) has not been extensively discussed. Using the Longitudinal Health Insurance Database 2000 (LHID2000), we selected 3686 patients with newly diagnosed HCV infection. We randomly selected 14,744 people with no HCV or hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection as comparison group and frequency matched them with patients with HCV infection according to their age, sex, and index year. The incidence density rates and hazard ratios (HRs) of deep vein thrombosis (DVT) and pulmonary embolism (PE) were calculated until the end of 2011. The mean follow-up duration of 5.14 years for the HCV cohort and 5.61 years for the non-HCV cohort, the overall incidence density rates of DVT were 7.92 and 3.51 per 10,000 person-years in the non-HCV group, and the HCV groups, respectively (crude HR = 2.25; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.21-4.21). After adjusted for age, sex, and comorbidities, the risk of DVT remained significantly higher in the HCV group than in the non-HCV group (adjusted HR = 1.96; 95% CI = 1.03-3.73). The overall incidence density rates of PE in the HCV and non-HCV groups were not significantly different (crude HR = 2.20; 95% CI = 0.94-5.14). HCV infection is associated with the risk of DVT in a long-term follow-up period. PMID:26402820

  14. Hepatic Artery and Portal Vein Doppler Indexes in Non-alcoholic Fatty Liver Disease Before and After Treatment to Prevent Unnecessary Health Care Costs

    PubMed Central

    Tarzamni, Mohammad Kazem; Khoshbaten, Manouchehr; Sadrarhami, Shohreh; Daneshpajouhnejad, Parnaz; Jalili, Javad; Gholamian, Masoud; Shahmoradi, Zahra

    2014-01-01

    Background: We tested whether hepatic haemodynamics assessed by Doppler ultrasonography can be a predictor of response to therapy in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) to prevent further unnecessary diagnostic tests and interventions. Methods: Forty eight consecutive patients affected by NAFLD, who refered to some clinics in Tabriz, Iran between 2009 and 2011 were included in the study. Response to therapy was assessed by decrease in liver enzyme levels. Three liver Doppler parameters (hepatic artery resistance index [RI], hepatic artery pulsatility index [PI] and portal vein waveform [PVW]) were analysed in all subjects who showed a decrease in liver function tests results. Wilcoxon and paired student's t-test were used for analysis. Results: Forty eight subjects with NAFLD were included in the study during 21 months, out of which 22 (39.1% male - mean age: 37.6 ± 8.3) responded to the treatment and formed the basis of this study. Mean hepatic artery RI increased significantly from 0.60 ± 0.07 to 0.83 ± 0.27before and after treatment, however, there was no significant differences between hepatic artery PI or PVW. Conclusions: Increase in hepatic artery RI assessed by Doppler ultrasound may provide information on improvement of NAFLD in patients during the course of therapy. PMID:24829735

  15. Asymmetrical intersection between the middle cerebral artery and rhinal vein suggests asymmetrical gustatory cortex location in rodent hemispheres.

    PubMed

    Kida, Ikuhiro; Enmi, Jun-Ichiro; Iida, Hidehiro; Yoshioka, Yoshichika

    2015-03-01

    The rodent gustatory cortex is located in the anterior part of the insular cortex, which is near the dorsal part of the rhinal vein (RHV) and the intersection of the anterior and posterior regions of the middle cerebral artery (MCA). Thus, the intersection between the RHV and MCA is used as a landmark for the rodent gustatory cortex. In our previous study, we employed functional magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to demonstrate that tastants evoked bilateral responses in the rodent insular cortices, but that these representations were asymmetrical between the hemispheres. In the present study, to clarify the observed asymmetrical responses, we performed magnetic resonance angiography in a 7.0-Tesla MRI scanner to determine the anatomical position of the rodent gustatory cortex, which was identified using the intersection of the MCA and RHV. We successfully observed the intersection while administering carbogen as an inhaled gas and found that the intersection in the left hemisphere is more anterior compared to that in the right hemisphere. Taken together with the previous functional MRI results, this result indicates that the gustatory representation in relation to the intersection may be identically conserved in the insular cortex of both hemispheres; therefore, the rodent gustatory cortex may be asymmetrically located between the left and right hemispheres. The result also suggests that this landmark location needs to be verified when investigating gustatory representations and responses. PMID:25578950

  16. Strategic approach to concurrent aberrant left gastric vein and aberrant left hepatic artery in laparoscopic distal gastrectomy for early gastric cancer: A case report.

    PubMed

    Kuwada, Kazuya; Kuroda, Shinji; Kikuchi, Satoru; Hori, Naoto; Kubota, Tetsushi; Nishizaki, Masahiko; Kagawa, Shunsuke; Fujiwara, Toshiyoshi

    2015-11-01

    An aberrant left gastric vein (ALGV) directly entering the lateral segment of the liver is a rare variation in the portal vein system, whereas an aberrant left hepatic artery (ALHA) arising from the left gastric artery is observed relatively frequently. Here we report a case in which both ALGV and ALHA were encountered before laparoscopic distal gastrectomy with curative lymphadenectomy for gastric cancer. We accurately diagnosed these vessel anomalies preoperatively on abdominal contrast-enhanced CT. During surgery, we divided the ALGV at the point of entry to the liver and preserved the ALHA by dividing the branches toward the stomach, in consideration of curability and safety. The postoperative course was uneventful overall, although temporary mild liver dysfunction was observed. This case highlights the importance of preoperative evaluation and preparation in a rare case of concurrent ALGV and ALHA. PMID:26708584

  17. A path to eradication of hepatitis C in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Graham, Camilla S; Swan, Tracy

    2015-07-01

    We are entering a new era in the treatment of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection and almost all patient groups in high-income countries have the potential to be cured with all-oral, highly potent combinations of direct-acting antiviral drugs. Soon the main barrier to curing hepatitis C, even in wealthy countries, will be the high price of these all-oral regimens. The gulf between the advances in HCV drug development and access to treatment for individual patients will be even greater in low- and middle-income countries (LMIC) where 80% of the global burden of HCV infection and mortality exists. Ensuring that people in LMIC have access to regimens against HCV will require a similar level of advocacy and public-private partnerships as has transformed the control of other global diseases such as HIV. Numerous challenges will need to be overcome. These include improving low-cost diagnostic tests, especially in sub-Saharan Africa where the false-positive rate is unacceptably high, reducing iatrogenic spread of HCV, addressing transmission among people who inject drugs (PWID), and ensuring affordable access to antiviral treatment for all people living with HCV infection in LMIC. This article forms part of a symposium in Antiviral Research on "Hepatitis C: next steps toward global eradication." PMID:25615583

  18. Hepatic venography in noncirrhotic idiopathic portal hypertension: comparison with cirrhosis of the liver

    SciTech Connect

    Futagawa, S.; Fukazawa, M.; Musha, H.

    1981-11-01

    Free and wedged hepatic venography were carried out in 37 patients with idiopathic portal hypertension (IPH) and the findings compared with those in 88 patients with cirrhosis of the liver. Characteristic changes in IPH included frequent vein-to-vein anastomoses, narrower angles between large veins and their tributaries, smooth and wavy middle-sized to large branches (giving a general ''weeping willow'' appearance), homogeneous sinusoidal filling, and minimal to absent filling of the portal venous system on wedged retrograde portography. In cirrhosis, by contrast, changes included rare vein-to-vein anastomoses, wide angles between veins and tributaries, irregular stenoses of large veins and branches at various levels, spotty sinusoidal filling, and frequent retrograde flow in the portal venous system. Hepatic venography is helpful in differentiating IPH from cirrhosis.

  19. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Hepatitis KidsHealth > For Kids > Hepatitis Print A A A ... an important digestive liquid called bile . What Is Hepatitis? Hepatitis is an inflammation (say: in-fluh-MAY- ...

  20. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted veins that you can see just under the skin. They usually occur in ... of the body. Hemorrhoids are a type of varicose vein. Your veins have one-way valves that help ...

  1. Potential market size and impact of hepatitis C treatment in low- and middle-income countries.

    PubMed

    Woode, M E; Abu-Zaineh, M; Perriëns, J; Renaud, F; Wiktor, S; Moatti, J-P

    2016-07-01

    The introduction of direct-acting antiviral agents (DAAs) has made hepatitis C infection curable in the vast majority of cases and the elimination of the infection possible. Although initially too costly for large-scale use, recent reductions in DAA prices in some low- and middle-income countries (LaMICs) has improved the prospect of many people having access to these drugs/medications in the future. This article assesses the pricing and financing conditions under which the uptake of DAAs can increase to the point where the elimination of the disease in LaMICs is feasible. A Markov simulation model is used to study the dynamics of the infection with the introduction of treatment over a 10-year period. The impact on HCV-related mortality and HCV incidence is assessed under different financing scenarios assuming that the cost of the drugs is completely paid for out-of-pocket or reduced through either subsidy or drug price decreases. It is also assessed under different diagnostic and service delivery capacity scenarios separately for low-income (LIC), lower-middle-income (LMIC) and upper-middle-income countries (UMIC). Monte Carlo simulations are used for sensitivity analyses. At a price of US$ 1680 per 12-week treatment duration (based on negotiated Egyptian prices for an all oral two-DAA regimen), most of the people infected in LICs and LMICs would have limited access to treatment without subsidy or significant drug price decreases. However, people in UMICs would be able to access it even in the absence of a subsidy. For HCV treatment to have a significant impact on mortality and incidence, a significant scaling-up of diagnostic and service delivery capacity for HCV infection is needed. PMID:26924428

  2. Portal Vein Embolization with Radiolabeled Polyvinyl Alcohol Particles in a Swine Model: Hepatic Distribution and Implications for Pancreatic Islet Cell Transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, Richard J.; Mercer, John R.; Al-Saif, Faisal; Molinari, Michele; Ashforth, Robert A.; Rajotte, Ray V.; Conner-Spady, Barbara; Shapiro, A. M. James

    2009-05-15

    The distribution of radiolabeled polyvinyl alcohol microspheres (PVAMs) when infused into the portal vein of domestic swine was investigated, with the purpose of assessing implications for pancreatic islet cell transplantation. PVAMs measuring 100-300 {mu}m (Contour SE) and labeled with {sup 99m}Tc were infused into the main portal vein of 12 swine, with intermittent portal venous pressure measurements. The infusion catheter was introduced antegradely via direct or indirect cannulation of the portal vein. The liver was subsequently divided into anatomical segments. Radioactivity (decay corrected) was measured for {sup 99m}Tc microsphere synthesis, dose preparation, gross organ activities, tissue samples, and blood. Particulate labeling, catheter positioning, and infusion were successful in all cases. The number of particles used was (185,000 {+-} 24,000) with a volume of 1 ml. Mean portal pressure at 5 min was significantly higher than baseline, but without a significant difference at 15 min. Extrahepatic tissue and serum radioactivity was negligible. A significant difference in number of radioactive particles per gram was detected between segments 6/7 and segments 5/8. Intrasegmental activity was analyzed, and for segments 2/3 a significant difference in the percentage dose per gram across samples was demonstrated (P = 0.001). Effective and stable radiolabeling of PVAMs with {sup 99m}Tc-sulfur colloid was demonstrated. Portal venous infusion of 100- to 300-{mu}m particles showed entrapment in the sinusoidal hepatic system with transient portal pressure elevation. Preferential embolization into the right lateral and posterior segments occurs, suggesting that flow dynamics/catheter tip position plays a role in particle distribution.

  3. Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are Varicose Veins? Español Varicose (VAR-i-kos) veins are swollen, ... can form in other parts of the body. Varicose veins are a common condition. They usually cause few ...

  4. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... has been associated with drinking contaminated water. Hepatitis Viruses Type Transmission Prognosis A Fecal-oral (stool to ... risk for severe disease. Others A variety of viruses can affect the liver Signs and Symptoms Hepatitis ...

  5. Thermal Ablation by High-Intensity-Focused Ultrasound Using a Toroid Transducer Increases the Coagulated Volume and Allows Coagulation Near Portal and Hepatic veins in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Melodelima, D.; N'Djin, W. A.; Parmentier, H.; Chapelon, J. Y.; Rivoire, M.

    2009-04-14

    A new geometry of HIFU transducer is described to enlarge the coagulated volume. The geometry of the transducer was not spherical. The surface of the transducer was built based on a toroid geometry. The transducer was generated by the revolution of a circle about an axis lying in its plane. Eight emitters operating at a frequency of 3 MHz were diced out of a single toroid piezocomposite element. Each of the eight emitters was divided into 32 transducers. The focal zone is conical and located at 70 mm from the transducer. A 7.5 MHz ultrasound imaging probe is placed in the centre of the device for guiding the treatment. Our long-term objective is to develop a device that can be used during surgery. In vivo trials have been performed on 13 pigs to demonstrate this new principle and to evaluate the vascular tolerance of the treatment. This new geometry combined with consecutive activation of the eight emitters around the toroid allows achieving a mean thermal ablation of 7.0{+-}2.5 cm3 in 40 seconds. All lesions were visible with high contrast on sonograms. The correlation between the size of lesions observed on sonograms and during gross examination was 92%. This allows the user to easily enlarge the coagulated volume by juxtaposing single lesions. The pigs tolerate the treatment well over the experimental period even when coagulation was produced through portal and/or hepatic veins.

  6. Successful Outflow Reconstruction to Salvage Traumatic Hepatic Vein-Caval Avulsion of a Normothermic Machine Ex-Situ Perfused Liver Graft

    PubMed Central

    Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G.; Hadjittofi, Christopher; Dharmapala, Arinda Dinesh; Orti-Rodriguez, Rafael Jose; Ferro, Alessandra; Nasralla, David; Konstantinidou, Sofia K.; Malagó, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Donor organ shortage continues to limit the availability of liver transplantation, a successful and established therapy of end-stage liver diseases. Strategies to mitigate graft shortage include the utilization of marginal livers and recently ex-situ normothermic machine perfusion devices. A 59-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to primary sclerosing cholangitis was offered an ex-situ machine perfused graft with unnoticed severe injury of the suprahepatic vasculature due to road traffic accident. Following a complex avulsion, repair and reconstruction of all donor hepatic veins as well as the suprahepatic inferior vena cava, the patient underwent a face-to-face piggy-back orthotopic liver transplantation and was discharged on the 11th postoperative day after an uncomplicated recovery. This report illustrates the operative technique to utilize an otherwise unusable organ, in the current environment of donor shortage and declining graft quality. Normothermic machine perfusion can definitely play a role in increasing the graft pool, without compromising the quality of livers who had vascular or other damage before being ex-situ perfused. Furthermore, it emphasizes the importance of promptly and thoroughly communicating organ injuries, as well as considering all reconstructive options within the level of expertise at the recipient center. PMID:27082550

  7. Initial Imaging Analysis of Budd-Chiari Syndrome in Henan Province of China: Most Cases Have Combined Inferior Vena Cava and Hepatic Veins Involvement

    PubMed Central

    Han, Xinwei; Wu, Gang; Zhang, Wenguang; Ding, Pengxu; Bi, Yonghua

    2014-01-01

    Aim To evaluate the type of venous involvement in Chinese Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) patients and the relative diagnostic accuracy of the different imaging modalities. Methods Using digital subtraction angiography (DSA) as a reference standard, color Doppler ultrasound (CDUS), computed tomography angiography (CTA), and magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) were performed on 338 patients with BCS. We analyzed the course of the main and any accessory hepatic veins (HVs) and the inferior vena cava (IVC) to assess the etiology of obstructed segments and diagnostic accuracy of CDUS, CTA and MRA. Results Among the 338 cases, there were 8 cases (2.4%) of isolated IVC membranous obstruction, 45 cases (13.3%) of isolated HV occlusion, and 285 cases (84.3%) with both IVC membranous obstruction and HV occlusion. Comparing with DSA, CDUS, CTA had a diagnostic accuracy of 89.3% and 80.2% in detecting BCS, and 83.4% of cases correctly correlated by MRA. Conclusion In Henan Province, most patients with BCS have complex lesions combining IVC and HV involvement. The combination of CDUS and CTA or MRI is useful for diagnosis of BCS and guiding therapy. PMID:24416352

  8. Postcorrective surgery improvement of nocturnal hypoxemia in a case of partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection and aberrant hepatic vein drainage

    PubMed Central

    Agrawal, Abhinav; Palkar, Atul V; Sahni, Sonu; Vatsia, Sheel K; Shah, Rakesh D; Talwar, Arunabh

    2016-01-01

    Partial anomalous pulmonary venous connection (PAPVC) is a rare congenital anomaly that leads to an anatomical left-to-right shunt. Termination of the intrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC) with its azygos continuation associated with the hepatic venous connection to the left atrium (LA) is also a rare congenital anomaly that results in an anatomical right-to-left shunt. A 65-year-old male presented with severe dyspnea on exertion and pedal edema. He was further diagnosed at our clinic and was found to have both the aforementioned congenital abnormalities, creating a bidirectional shunt. On further investigation, he was found to have nocturnal hypoxemia on overnight oximetry. The patient was successfully treated via surgical corrections of the congenital anomalies leading to symptomatic improvement as well as the resolution of nocturnal hypoxemia. PMID:27185995

  9. Longitudinal stent fracture and migration of a stent fragment complicating treatment of hepatic vein stenosis after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Goelitz, Brian W; Darcy, Michael

    2007-09-01

    We report a case of inferior vena cava (IVC) stent placement complicated by longitudinal stent fracture and migration of a stent fragment to the right pulmonary artery 2 years after initial placement. During attempted stenting of a hepatic venous anastomotic stenosis following orthotopic liver transplantation, a Palmaz P308 stent (Cordis International, Miami, FL) migrated and was redeployed into the IVC. Two years later, the patient had recurrent ascites and liver failure. Chest radiograph showed the Palmaz P308 stent had fractured longitudinally with a fragment in the right interlobular pulmonary artery. Half of the stent remained in the IVC. Mild stenosis was noted in the IVC where the stent was deployed. Overdilation of stents may be associated with stent fracture and should be performed with caution. PMID:21326480

  10. Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... be serious. Some can lead to scarring, called cirrhosis, or to liver cancer. Sometimes hepatitis goes away by itself. If it does not, it can be treated with drugs. Sometimes hepatitis lasts a lifetime. Vaccines can help prevent some viral forms.

  11. Focus on Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other veins often mistaken for varicose veins are spider veins and reticular veins, which are the visible ... greenish-blue veins that appear in our legs. Spider veins or teleangiectesias are tiny veins that you ...

  12. Arrival time parametric imaging of the hemodynamic balance changes between the hepatic artery and the portal vein during deep inspiration, using Sonazoid-enhanced ultrasonography: A case of Budd-Chiari syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wakui, Noritaka; Takayama, Ryuji; Matsukiyo, Yasushi; Kamiyama, Naohisa; Kobayashi, Kojiro; Mukozu, Takanori; Nakano, Shigeru; Ikehara, Takashi; Nagai, Hidenari; Igarashi, Yoshinori; Sumino, Yasukiyo

    2013-07-01

    This case report concerns a 40-year-old male who had previously been treated for an esophageal varix rupture, at the age of 30 years. The medical examination at that time revealed occlusion of the inferior vena cava in the proximity of the liver, leading to the diagnosis of the patient with Budd-Chiari syndrome. The progress of the patient was therefore monitored in an outpatient clinic. The patient had no history of drinking or smoking, but had suffered an epileptic seizure in 2004. The patient's family history revealed nothing of note. In February 2012, color Doppler ultrasonography (US) revealed a change in the blood flow in the right portal vein branch, from hepatopetal to hepatofugal, during deep inspiration. Arrival time parametric imaging (At-PI), using Sonazoid-enhanced US, was subsequently performed to examine the deep respiration-induced changes observed in the hepatic parenchymal perfusion. US images captured during deep inspiration demonstrated hepatic parenchymal perfusion predominantly in red, indicating that the major blood supply was the hepatic artery. During deep expiration, the portal venous blood flow remained hepatopetal, and hepatic parenchymal perfusion was displayed predominantly in yellow, indicating that the portal vein was the major source of the blood flow. The original diagnostic imaging results were reproduced one month subsequently by an identical procedure. At-PI enabled an investigation into the changes that were induced in the hepatic parenchymal perfusion by a compensatory mechanism involving the hepatic artery. These changes occurred in response to a reduction in the portal venous blood flow, as is observed in the arterialization of hepatic blood flow that is correlated with the progression of chronic hepatitis C. It has been established that the peribiliary capillary plexus is important in the regulation of hepatic arterial blood flow. However, this case demonstrated that the peribiliary capillary plexus also regulates acute

  13. Hepatic Arterial Infusion Chemotherapy for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Thrombosis: Impact of Early Response to 4 Weeks of Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chen-Chun; Hung, Chien-Fu; Chen, Wei-Ting; Lin, Shi-Ming

    2015-01-01

    Aim The aim of the study was to investigate the impact of early response (ER) to hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) on outcomes of patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) complicated with major portal vein tumor thrombosis (PVTT). Methods Thirty-nine patients receiving HAIC with low-dose cisplatin, 5-fluorouracil (5FU), and leucovorin were enrolled. One course of HAIC consisted of 5 days of treatment and 2 days rest per week for 4 consecutive weeks. ER was categorized as complete response, partial response, or minor response and was determined by World Health Organization criteria with dynamic computed tomography findings performed within 1 week after the first course of HAIC. Results Thirteen (33%) patients achieved an ER. Twelve (92.3%) of these 13 ER patients achieved a higher overall response than all but one (3.8%) of the 26 non-early responders (NERs) (p<0.001). ER was the exclusive independent favorable factor for survival (p=0.003). Downstaging of tumors was noted in 76.9% of ERs, and these patients could proceed to locoregional therapies. ER patients subsequently had a higher 1-year survival (76.9% vs. 3.8%, p<0.001) and 6-month progression-free survival (PFS) (84.6% vs. 15.4%, p<0.001) than those for NERs. Only 8% of patients experienced grade 3 or higher toxicity during the first 4-week course of HAIC. Conclusions HAIC can yield a satisfactory ER for advanced HCC with PVTT. Moreover, achievement of ER after HAIC in advanced HCC with PVTT is strongly associated with better overall survival and PFS. PMID:26734578

  14. What Causes Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Causes Varicose Veins? Weak or damaged valves in the veins can ... space. These are varicose veins. Normal Vein and Varicose Vein Figure A shows a normal vein with a ...

  15. Balloon Occlusion Portography to Diagnose New-Onset Left Hepatic Vein Thrombosis and Widening of an Existing Wallstent TIPS by Palmaz Stents for Recurrent Portal Hypertension and Variceal Bleeding

    SciTech Connect

    Cope, Constantin; Baum, Richard A.; Haskal, Ziv J.

    1996-09-15

    A 31-year-old man with Child's class A micronodular cirrhosis, left lobe hypertrophy, and a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) which had been placed 6 months earlier, was admitted for recurrent esophageal bleeding and a portosystemic gradient of 42 mmHg. Balloon occlusion portography documented unsuspected ostial thrombosis of the previously patent left hepatic vein. This was considered the cause of the pressure rise. As it was not possible to insert a second TIPS in parallel, the shunt, stented originally with 10-mm Wallstents, was overdilated to 12 mm, and two 12-mm Palmaz stents were placed coaxially, reducing the portosystemic pressure gradient to 13 mmHg.

  16. Noncommunicable diseases in HIV infection in low- and middle-income countries: gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutritional aspects.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Paul; Saloojee, Haroon; Chen, Jennifer Y; Chung, Raymond T

    2014-09-01

    The purpose of this review was to outline the interaction between HIV and noncommunicable diseases affecting the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, and nutritional disorders in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and to identify research priorities. Noncommunicable GI tract disorders are only moderately influenced by HIV, and peptic ulceration is actually less common. However, the impact of HIV on GI cancers needs further investigation. HIV interacts strongly with environmental enteropathy, exacerbating malabsorption of nutrients and drugs. HIV has 2 major effects on noncommunicable liver disease: drug-induced liver injury and nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (particularly in persons of African genetic descent). The effect of HIV on nutrition was one of the first markers of the epidemic in the 1980s, and HIV continues to have major nutritional consequences. Childhood malnutrition and HIV frequently coexist in some regions, for example, southern Africa, resulting in powerful negative interactions with poorer responses to standard nutritional rehabilitation. HIV and nutritional care need to be better integrated, but many questions on how best to do this remain unanswered. Across the spectrum of GI, hepatic, and nutritional disorders in HIV infection, there is increasing evidence that the microbiome may play an important role in disease pathogenesis, but work in this area, especially in low- and middle-income countries, is in its infancy. PMID:25117963

  17. Vein Problems Related to Varicose Veins

    MedlinePlus

    ... your doctor if you think you have them. Spider Veins Spider veins are a smaller version of varicose veins and a less serious type of telangiectasias. Spider veins involve the capillaries, the smallest blood vessels ...

  18. Prevalence and knowledge of hepatitis C in a middle-aged population, Dunedin, New Zealand

    PubMed Central

    Vermunt, Jane; Fraser, Margaret; Herbison, Peter; Wiles, Anna; Schlup, Martin; Schultz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine the prevalence of infection with hepatitis C virus (HCV) in those most at risk of advanced liver disease and to identify gaps in knowledge of HCV. METHODS: Questionnaires were mailed to randomly selected residents aged 40-59 to assess the extent of their general knowledge about HCV. The questionnaire assessed demographics, the extent of general knowledge about viral hepatitis, potential risks for infection and the prevalence of risk factors associated with increased progression of liver fibrosis. Anonymised residual laboratory blood samples from 40-59 years old people from Dunedin taken in hospital or in the community, were tested for HCV antibodies and alanine transaminase (ALT), aspartate transaminase (AST), gamma-glutamyl transpeptidase (GGT). Linear regression was performed to examine whether the demographics sex, age, socio-economic status, qualification level and occupation sector (categorical variables) were predictors of level of general knowledge about hepatitis. For the demographics that were found to be significant predictors of score outcome, multiple regression analysis was used to determine independent effects. χ2 tests were used to compare our selected sample and our responder population demographics, to the demographics of the entire 40-59 years old population in Dunedin using the 2006 NZ census data. Exact confidence intervals for the proportion positive for HCV and HBV were calculated using the binomial distribution. RESULTS: The response rate to the mailed questionnaire was 431/1400 (30.8%). On average 59.4% questions were answered correctly. Predictors for higher scores, indicating greater knowledge about symptoms and transmission included sex (female, P < 0.01), higher level of qualification (P < 0.000) and occupation sector (P < 0.000). Sharing intravenous drug utensils was a known risk factor for disease transmission (94.4%), but the sharing of common household items such as a toothbrush was not. 93% of the population were

  19. Hepatoportography via the Umbilical Vein

    PubMed Central

    White, J. J.; Skinner, G. B.; MacLean, L. D.

    1966-01-01

    The umbilical vein in adults is patent but collapsed. There is a membranous valve at its entrance into the left portal vein. Cannulation of the portal vein via the umbilical vein permits direct access to the portal system for portography and hepatography. This procedure was performed under local or general anesthesia in 30 patients and was successful in 22. It is useful in the investigation of patients with portal hypertension, and suspected intrahepatic tumours or abscesses. It gives excellent contrast visualization of the liver and definition of lesions as small as 1.0 cm. This technique is superior to both hepatic scanning and splenoportography. ImagesFig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11 PMID:5924949

  20. Non-communicable disease in HIV infection in low- and middle-income countries: gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutritional aspects

    PubMed Central

    Kelly, Paul; Saloojee, Haroon; Chen, Jennifer Y; Chung, Raymond T

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of this review is to outline the interaction between HIV and non-communicable diseases (NCDs) affecting the gastrointestinal (GI) tract, liver, and nutritional disorders in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs), and to identify research priorities. Non-communicable GI tract disorders are only moderately influenced by HIV, and peptic ulceration is actually less common. However, the impact of HIV on GI cancers needs further investigation. HIV interacts strongly with environmental enteropathy, exacerbating malabsorption of nutrients and drugs. HIV has two major effects on non-communicable liver disease: drug-induced liver injury and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) (particularly in persons of African genetic descent). The effect of HIV on nutrition was one of the first markers of the epidemic in the 1980s, and HIV continues to have major nutritional consequences. Childhood malnutrition and HIV frequently co-exist in some regions, e.g., southern Africa, resulting in powerful negative interactions with poorer responses to standard nutritional rehabilitation. HIV and nutritional care need to be better integrated, but many questions on how best to do this remain unanswered. Across the spectrum of gastrointestinal, hepatic, and nutritional disorders in HIV infection, there is increasing evidence that the microbiome may play an important role in disease pathogenesis, but work in this area, especially in LMICs, is in its infancy. PMID:25117963

  1. Hand vein recognition based on orientation of LBP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bu, Wei; Wu, Xiangqian; Gao, Enying

    2012-06-01

    Vein recognition is becoming an effective method for personal recognition. Vein patterns lie under the skin surface of human body, and hence provide higher reliability than other biometric traits and hard to be damaged or faked. This paper proposes a novel vein feature representation method call orientation of local binary pattern (OLBP) which is an extension of local binary pattern (LBP). OLBP can represent the orientation information of the vein pixel which is an important characteristic of vein patterns. Moreover, the OLBP can also indicate on which side of the vein centerline the pixel locates. The OLBP feature maps are encoded by 4-bit binary values and an orientation distance is developed for efficient feature matching. Based on OLBP feature representation, we construct a hand vein recognition system employing multiple hand vein patterns include palm vein, dorsal vein, and three finger veins (index, middle, and ring finger). The experimental results on a large database demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  2. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose vein ...

  3. Varicose vein stripping

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/002952.htm Varicose vein stripping To use the sharing features on this ... enable JavaScript. Vein stripping is surgery to remove varicose veins in the legs. Description Varicose veins are swollen, ...

  4. Varicose vein - noninvasive treatment

    MedlinePlus

    Sclerotherapy; Laser therapy - varicose veins; Radiofrequency vein ablation; Endovenous thermal ablation; Ambulatory phlebectomy; Transilluminated power phlebotomy; Endovenous laser ablation; Varicose ...

  5. [Combination Chemotherapy Using Sorafenib and Hepatic Arterial Infusion with a Fine-Powder Formulation of Cisplatin for Advanced Hepatocellular Carcinoma with Portal Vein Tumor Thrombosis--A Case Report].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Tadashi; Kanazawa, Akishige; Shimizu, Sadatoshi; Murata, Akihiro; Sakae, Masayuki; Kurihara, Shigeaki; Tashima, Tetsuzo; Deguchi, Sota; Nakai, Takashi; Kawasaki, Yasuko; Kioka, Kiyohide

    2015-11-01

    Sorafenib has been a standard therapy for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with portal vein thrombosis. Hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy (HAIC) is still preferably performed in Japan because of its relatively good tumor-shrinking effect. We report a case of advanced multiple HCC with portal thrombus that responded to combination chemotherapy with sorafenib and repeat hepatic arterial infusion with a fine-powder formulation of cisplatin (IA-call®). A 57-year-old man presented for the treatment of HCC with alcoholic cirrhosis. Multiple HCC were found to be rapidly progressing with portal thrombosis. HAIC with IA-call® was performed, but the tumors progressed. TAE was performed 3 times thereafter and the main tumor shrunk to some extent. A month after the last TAE, the HCC was found to progress again, and oral sorafenib was administered. A reservoir and catheter were placed and HAIC with low-dose 5-fluorouracil and cisplatin was performed for 3 cycles following 1 HAIC cycle with epirubicin and mitomycin C, which was not effective. For 10 months after initial therapy, HAIC using IA-call® has been performed once for 6 weeks. After performing HAIC with IA-call® 5 times, the serum levels of HCC tumor markers AFP and PIVKA-Ⅱdecreased, and the tumors continued to shrink and were not stained on enhanced CT scan. The patient has been alive for 23 months after the initial therapy and has maintained stable disease. PMID:26805203

  6. Relative Importance of Hepatitis B and C Viruses in Hepatocellular Carcinoma in EMRO Countries and the Middle East: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Alavian, Seyed Moayed; Haghbin, Hossein

    2016-01-01

    Context Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is the second most common cancer-related death worldwide. Although many factors including dietary aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and alcoholic and non-alcoholic fatty liver diseases can lead to HCC, globally most HCC cases are due to hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV). Considering the importance of these viral factors in most HCC cases and relative lack of literature from eastern Mediterranean region office of world health organization (EMRO) countries and the Middle East, we decided to perform this systematic review to find distribution of viral etiology of HCC in these regions. Evidence Acquisition In this systemic review, we included all studies from 1 January 1989 to 1 September 2015 with at least 20 samples that measured HBV surface antigen (HBsAg) and antibodies to HCV (anti-HCV). The authors searched MEDLINE, Embase, Popline, Web of Science and WHO indexed databases. We searched the following MeSH terms; hepatocellular carcinoma, hepatitis B virus and hepatitis C virus or hepacvirus. Only studies using second- and third-generation HCV assays were included. Only articles studying HCC patients from EMRO countries and the Middle East were analyzed. Duplicate results that reported the same cases more than once were found and omitted. Studies in English and Farsi were reviewed. If the study was eligible, we recorded the following data; the first author, publication year and journal, study population and number and percentage of patients with different serologic statuses. Results We found 44 studies from 12 countries in EMRO and the Middle East. HCC cases from Iran, Lebanon, Turkey and Yemen were mainly due to HBV, while those of North African nations (Egypt, Tunisia, Morocco, Algeria and Somalia) in addition to Saudi Arabia and Pakistan were mostly HCV related. Sudan showed a high seronegativity and HBV infection in its HCC cases. Unfortunately, some countries from EMRO and the Middle East did not have eligible studies

  7. Status of HIV and hepatitis C virus infections among prisoners in the Middle East and North Africa: review and synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Heijnen, Marieke; Mumtaz, Ghina R; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The status of HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) infections among incarcerated populations in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) and the links between prisons and the HIV epidemic are poorly understood. This review synthesized available HIV and HCV data in prisons in MENA and highlighted opportunities for action. Methods The review was based on data generated through the systematic searches of the MENA HIV/AIDS Epidemiology Synthesis Project (2003 to December 15, 2015) and the MENA HCV Epidemiology Synthesis Project (2011 to December 15, 2015). Sources of data included peer-reviewed publications and country-level reports and databases. Results and discussion We estimated a population of 496,000 prisoners in MENA, with drug-related offences being a major cause for incarceration. Twenty countries had data on HIV among incarcerated populations with a median prevalence of 0.6% in Afghanistan, 6.1% in Djibouti, 0.01% in Egypt, 2.5% in Iran, 0% in Iraq, 0.1% in Jordan, 0.05% in Kuwait, 0.7% in Lebanon, 18.0% in Libya, 0.7% in Morocco, 0.3% in Oman, 1.1% in Pakistan, 0% in Palestine, 1.2% in Saudi Arabia, 0% in Somalia, 5.3% in Sudan and South Sudan, 0.04% in Syria, 0.05% in Tunisia, and 3.5% in Yemen. Seven countries had data on HCV, with a median prevalence of 1.7% in Afghanistan, 23.6% in Egypt, 28.1% in Lebanon, 15.6% in Pakistan, and 37.8% in Iran. Syria and Libya had only one HCV prevalence measure each at 1.5% and 23.7%, respectively. There was strong evidence for injecting drug use and the use of non-sterile injecting-equipment in prisons. Incarceration and injecting drugs, use of non-sterile injecting-equipment, and tattooing in prisons were found to be independent risk factors for HIV or HCV infections. High levels of sexual risk behaviour, tattooing and use of non-sterile razors among prisoners were documented. Conclusions Prisons play an important role in HIV and HCV dynamics in MENA and have facilitated the emergence of large HIV epidemics in

  8. Relationship between deep medullary veins in susceptibility-weighted imaging and ipsilateral cerebrovascular reactivity of middle cerebral artery in patients with ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    HAN, XIANJUN; OUYANG, LINHUI; ZHANG, CHUNNING; MA, HAILING; QIN, JINGCUI

    2016-01-01

    Deep cerebral veins have been recently associated with the severity of hemodynamic impairment in moyamoya disease. The aim of the current study was to determine the correlation of deep medullary veins (DMVs) in susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) with ipsilateral cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) of and anterior cecebrocervical artery stenosis in patients with ischemic stroke. Patients with unilateral TIA or infarction who underwent 3.0 T magnetic resonance imaging SWI, digital subtraction angiography and transcranial Doppler with CO2 stimulation within the first 7 days of hospitalization were retrospectively selected. CVR and stenosis of anterior cerebrocervical arteries were compared between different DMVs stages in symptomatic hemispheres (SHs) and asymptomatic hemispheres (AHs). A total of 61 patients were subsequently included in the present study. A univariate analysis was conducted and results for age (PAHs=0.004, PSHs=0.006), hypertension (PAHs=0.008, PSHs=0.020), current smoking (PAHs=0.006, PSHs=0.021), CVR (PAHs=0.000, PSHs=0.000), and artery stenosis (PAHs=0.000, PSHs=0.000) were obtained. The results suggested statistically significant differences between DMVs grades in SHs and AHs. A subsequent multivariate analysis revealed that CVR (ORAHs=0.925, 95% CIAHs: 0.873–0.981; ORSHs=0.945, 95% CISHs: 0.896–0.996), and artery stenosis (ORAH=3.147, 95% CIAH: 1.010–9.806; ORSHs=2.882, 95% CISHs: 1.017–8.166) were independent risk factors of DMVs. In conclusion, 3.0 T SWI was useful in detecting the DMVs around the lateral ventricle in patients with atherosclerotic ischemic stroke. CVR and stenosis of anterior cerebrocervical arteries were independent risk factors for ipsilateral DMVs in SHs and AHs. PMID:27284303

  9. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a serious problem ...

  10. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Deep Vein Thrombosis Overview What is deep vein thrombosis? Deep vein thrombosis (also called DVT) is a blood clot in a vein deep inside your body. These clots usually occur in your leg veins. While DVT is a fairly common condition, it is ...

  11. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    Deep vein thrombosis, or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Most deep vein clots occur in the lower leg or ... vein swells, the condition is called thrombophlebitis. A deep vein thrombosis can break loose and cause a ...

  12. Percutaneous Transumbilical Portal Vein Embolization in a Patient with a Ruptured Hepatocellular Carcinoma Supplied by the Portal Vein

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Soo Chin; Kim, Hyo-Cheol Chung, Jin Wook; Jae, Hwan Jun; Park, Jae Hyung

    2011-02-15

    We describe a case of a ruptured hepatocellular carcinoma supplied by the portal vein that was successfully treated with portal vein embolization via a percutaneous transumbilical approach. A contrast material-enhanced computed tomographic (CT) scan showed the presence of a large hypervascular tumor on portal venous phase as well as right hepatic vein thrombosis and hemoperitoneum that prevented portal vein embolization by the use of the percutaneous and transjugular transhepatic approach. The use of percutaneous transumbilical portal vein embolization can be an alternative option in this situation.

  13. Portal vein aneurysm demonstrated by blood pool SPECT.

    PubMed

    Fukui, H; Kashiwagi, T; Kimura, K; Goto, M; Takei, Y; Kasahara, A; Kawano, S; Fusamoto, H; Kozuka, T; Kamada, T

    1992-11-01

    Portal vein aneurysms are rare and are occasionally suggested by ultrasound and usually confirmed by invasive angiography. Such a case was diagnosed by scintigraphic studies, most importantly blood pool SPECT, which clearly separates it from hepatic cysts. PMID:1424375

  14. Hepatitis B Virus Middle Protein Enhances IL-6 Production via p38 MAPK/NF-κB Pathways in an ER Stress-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang-Xia; Ren, Yan-Li; Fu, Hai-Jing; Zou, Ling; Yang, Ying; Chen, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    During hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection, three viral envelope proteins of HBV are overexpressed in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). The large S protein (LHBs) and truncated middle S protein (MHBst) have been documented to play roles in regulating host gene expression and contribute to hepatic disease development. As a predominant protein at the ultrastructural level in biopsy samples taken from viremic patients, the role of the middle S protein (MHBs) remains to be understood despite its high immunogenicity. When we transfected hepatocytes with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged MHBs expressing plasmid, the results showed that expression of MHBs cause an upregulation of IL-6 at the message RNA and protein levels through activating the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38 MAPK) and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathways. The use of specific inhibitors of the signaling pathways can diminish this upregulation. The use of BAPTA-AM attenuated the stimulation caused by MHBs. We further found that MHBs accumulated in the endoplasmic reticulum and increased the amount of glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78/BiP). Our results provide a possibility that MHBs could be involved in liver disease progression. PMID:27434097

  15. Robotic suture of a large caval injury caused by endo-GIA stapler malfunction during laparoscopic wedge resection of liver segments VII and VIII en-bloc with the right hepatic vein.

    PubMed

    Boggi, Ugo; Moretto, Carlo; Vistoli, Fabio; D'Imporzano, Simone; Mosca, Franco

    2009-01-01

    Primary endo-GIA stapler malfunction occurred during robotic wedge resection of liver segments VII and VIII en-bloc with the right hepatic vein, in an obese woman diagnosed with single liver metastasis from a previous carcinoid tumour. Haemorrhage was soon controlled by clamping the vena cava below the injury using two wristed forceps angled at 90 degrees . With the two instruments locked in the holding position the ensuing operative strategy was discussed between surgeon and anaesthesia teams. Using the third robotic arm the caval injury was repaired laparoscopically with interrupted polypropylene sutures. The patient was transfused with two units of packed red blood cells, recovered uneventfully, and was discharged on post-operative day five. We conclude that even the most advanced technologies can fail and that surgeons should be fully aware of the consequences of these malfunctions and be prepared for repair. From this point of view, the da Vinci surgical system seems to have some advantages over classical laparoscopic methods including the ability to lock the wristed instruments in the holding position, the use of three arms by the same operating surgeon, and the extreme facilitation of intracorporeal suturing and knot-tying in deep and narrow spaces, extremely difficult if not impossible with conventional laparoscopic instruments. PMID:19707931

  16. Successful Outflow Reconstruction to Salvage Traumatic Hepatic Vein-Caval Avulsion of a Normothermic Machine Ex-Situ Perfused Liver Graft: Case Report and Management of Organ Pool Challenges.

    PubMed

    Athanasopoulos, Panagiotis G; Hadjittofi, Christopher; Dharmapala, Arinda Dinesh; Orti-Rodriguez, Rafael Jose; Ferro, Alessandra; Nasralla, David; Konstantinidou, Sofia K; Malagó, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Donor organ shortage continues to limit the availability of liver transplantation, a successful and established therapy of end-stage liver diseases. Strategies to mitigate graft shortage include the utilization of marginal livers and recently ex-situ normothermic machine perfusion devices.A 59-year-old woman with cirrhosis due to primary sclerosing cholangitis was offered an ex-situ machine perfused graft with unnoticed severe injury of the suprahepatic vasculature due to road traffic accident.Following a complex avulsion, repair and reconstruction of all donor hepatic veins as well as the suprahepatic inferior vena cava, the patient underwent a face-to-face piggy-back orthotopic liver transplantation and was discharged on the 11th postoperative day after an uncomplicated recovery.This report illustrates the operative technique to utilize an otherwise unusable organ, in the current environment of donor shortage and declining graft quality. Normothermic machine perfusion can definitely play a role in increasing the graft pool, without compromising the quality of livers who had vascular or other damage before being ex-situ perfused. Furthermore, it emphasizes the importance of promptly and thoroughly communicating organ injuries, as well as considering all reconstructive options within the level of expertise at the recipient center. PMID:27082550

  17. Regenerative and fibrotic pathways in canine hepatic portosystemic shunt and portal vein hypoplasia, new models for clinical hepatocyte growth factor treatment

    PubMed Central

    Spee, Bart; Penning, Louis C; van den Ingh, Ted SGAM; Arends, Brigitte; IJzer, Jooske; van Sluijs, Frederik J; Rothuizen, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Background We analyzed two spontaneous dog diseases characterized by subnormal portal perfusion and reduced liver growth: (i) congenital portosystemic shunts (CPSS) without fibrosis and (ii) primary portal vein hypoplasia (PPVH), a disease associated with fibrosis. These pathologies, that lack inflammation or cholestasis, may represent simplified models to study liver growth and fibrosis. To investigate the possible use of those models for hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) treatment, we studied the functionality of HGF signaling in CPSS and PPVH dogs and compared this to aged-matched healthy controls. Results We used quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (Q-PCR) to analyze the mRNA expression of HGF, transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1), and relevant mediators in liver biopsies from cases with CPSS or PPVH, in comparison with healthy control dogs. CPSS and PPVH were associated with a decrease in mRNA expression of HGF and of MET proto-oncogene (c-MET). Western blot analysis confirmed the Q-PCR results and showed that intracellular signaling components (protein kinase B/Akt, ERK1/2, and STAT3) were functional. The TGF-β1 mRNA levels were unchanged in CPSS whereas there was a 2-fold increase in PPVH indicating an active TGF-β1 pathway, consistent with the observation of fibrosis seen in PPVH. Western blots on TGF-β1 and phosphorylated Smad2 confirmed an activated pro-fibrotic pathway in PPVH. Furthermore, Q-PCR showed an increase in the amount of collagen I present in PPVH compared to CPSS and control, which was confirmed by Western blot analysis. Conclusion The pathophysiological differences between CPSS and PPVH can adequately be explained by the Q-PCR measurements and Western blots. Although c-MET levels were reduced, downstream signaling seemed to be functional and provides a rational for HGF-supplementation in controlled studies with CPSS and PPVH. Furthermore both diseases may serve as simplified models for comparison with more complex chronic

  18. Potential for human immunodeficiency virus parenteral transmission in the Middle East and North Africa: An analysis using hepatitis C virus as a proxy biomarker

    PubMed Central

    Mohamoud, Yousra A; Miller, F DeWolfe; Abu-Raddad, Laith J

    2014-01-01

    The Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region has endured several major events of infection parenteral transmission. Recent work has established the utility of using hepatitis C virus (HCV) as a proxy biomarker for assessing the epidemic potential for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) parenteral transmission. In this review, we use data on the prevalence of HCV infection antibody (seroprevalence) among general population and high risk population groups to assess the potential for HIV parenteral transmission in MENA. Relatively low prevalence of HCV infection in the general population groups was reported in most MENA countries indicating that parenteral HIV transmission at endemic levels does not appear to be a cause for concern. Nonetheless, there could be opportunities for localized HIV outbreaks and transmission of other blood-borne infections in some settings such as healthcare facilities. Though there have been steady improvements in safety measures related to parenteral modes of transmission in the region, these improvements have not been uniform across all countries. More precautions, including infection control training programs, surveillance systems for nosocomial infections and wider coverage and evaluation of hepatitis B virus immunization programs need to be implemented to avoid the unnecessary spread of HIV, HCV, and other blood-borne pathogens along the parenteral modes of transmission. PMID:25278675

  19. Anterior Hepatic Transection for Caudate Lobectomy

    PubMed Central

    Chaib, Eleazar; Ribeiro, Marcelo A F; de Souza, Yngrid Ellyn Dias Maciel; D’Albuquerque, Luiz Augusto C

    2009-01-01

    Resection of the caudate lobe (segment I- dorsal sector, segment IX- right paracaval region, or both) is often technically difficult due to the lobe’s location deep in the hepatic parenchyma and because it is adjacent to the major hepatic vessels (e.g., the left and middle hepatic veins). A literature search was conducted using Ovid MEDLINE for the terms “caudate lobectomy” and “anterior hepatic transection” (AHT) covering 1992 to 2007. AHT was used in 110 caudate lobectomies that are discussed in this review. Isolated caudate lobectomy was performed on 28 (25.4%) patients, with 11 case (11%) associated with hepatectomy, while 1 (0.9%) was associated with anterior segmentectomy. Complete caudate lobectomy was performed on 82 (74.5%) patients. Hepatocellular carcinoma was observed in 106 (96.3%) patients, while 1 (0.9%) had hemangioma and 3 (2.7%) had metastatic caudate tumors. AHT was used in 108 (98.1%) caudate resections, while AHT associated with a right-sided approach was performed in 2 (1.8%) cases. AHT is recommended for tumors located in the paracaval portion of the caudate lobe (segment IX). AHT is usually a safe and potentially curative surgical option. PMID:19936187

  20. Human immunodeficiency virus and viral hepatitis among high-risk groups: Understanding the knowledge gap in the Middle East and North Africa Region

    PubMed Central

    Melhem, Nada M; Rahhal, Nour; Charide, Rana; Kreidieh, Khalil; El-Khatib, Rolla

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To identify gaps in the existing knowledge on single, dual and triple infections of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA) region among men who have sex with men (MSMs), female sex workers (FSWs), injecting drug users (IDUs) and prisoners. METHODS: We performed an extensive literature search on articles published on the topic in the 25 countries of the MENA region. PubMed database was used as the main search engine. Case reports, case series, qualitative studies, editorials, commentaries, authors’ replies and animal studies were excluded. Original articles and reviews dealing with the prevalence of HIV, HBV and HCV and their co-infection were included. Data on population type, sample size, age and markers of infections were extracted from the relevant studies. RESULTS: HIV, HBV and HCV are blood-borne viruses with similar modes of transmission. The categories of people at high risk of acquiring HIV-1, HBV and HCV commonly include: MSMs, FSW and IDUs. It is well established that HIV-positive individuals co-infected with HBV or HCV suffer from liver pathology associated with morbidity and mortality. Moreover, HIV-infected individuals do not respond well to treatment for HBV or HCV and hence are at increased risk of hepatic toxicity. Consequently, co-infection of HIV-positive individuals with HBV and/or HCV is a global health problem of significant magnitude. Our review reveals the paucity of epidemiological data for key populations in many countries of the region. Limited number of studies exists in the MENA region on the status of HIV, HBV and HCV and their co-infections among prisoners, MSMs and FSWs. Evidence support the continued increase of the HIV epidemic among MSMs. In addition to the lack of studies on MSMs and FSWs in the MENA region, our review highlights the lack of data on the practices, characteristics, or the status of HIV infection and viral hepatitis

  1. Effective hepatic artery chemoembolization for advanced hepatocellular carcinoma with multiple tumor thrombi and pulmonary metastases: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Huang, De-Jia; Li, Yan-Hao; Luo, Yao-Chang; Huang, Jun-Zhen; He, Hai-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) with tumor thrombi invading the portal vein and extending into the right atrium (RA) through the hepatic vein is regarded as a terminal-stage condition. Intracardiac tumor thrombus and treatment via liver resection has been reported in the current literature, but results from this therapeutic approach remain unsatisfactory. The present study describes a rare case of HCC with metastatic portal vein, middle hepatic vein, inferior vena cava (IVC) and RA tumor thrombi, and pulmonary metastases. A 29-year-old woman was admitted to The First Affiliated Hospital of Guangxi Traditional Chinese Medical University (Nanning, China) subsequent to experiencing right upper quadrant abdominal pain. Following diagnosis, based on computed tomography analysis and laboratory data, the patient underwent an initial transcatheter arterial chemoembolization (TACE) treatment using fluorouracil (5-FU), pirarubicin, mitomycin C, Lipiodol and sodium alginate microball (KMG). At 1 month post-treatment, serum α-fetoprotein levels remained at >1,000 ng/ml. Subsequently, the patient underwent a second TACE treatment. At 1 month after the second treatment, the abdominal pain had been alleviated and the serum α-fetoprotein levels were reduced to <20 ng/ml. Imaging analysis indicated a marked reduction in tumor burden in the liver and the hepatic vein and IVC tumor thrombi. Furthermore, the portal vein and RA tumor thrombi, and the pulmonary metastases had disappeared. At 40 months after the second TACE therapy, the patient remains alive without any signs of recurrence. The present case demonstrates that the administration of TACE, using 5-FU, pirarubicin, mitomycin C, Lipiodol and KMG, functions as an effective treatment in cases of unresectable advanced HCC presenting with pulmonary metastases and extensive tumor thrombi in the IVC, the RA and one branch of the portal vein. PMID:27602147

  2. Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Patient Education FAQs Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis Patient Education Pamphlets - Spanish Preventing Deep Vein Thrombosis FAQ174, August 2011 PDF ... Your Practice Patient Safety & Quality Payment Reform (MACRA) Education & Events Annual ... Pamphlets Teen Health About ACOG About Us Leadership & ...

  3. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Mallet, Thierry; Soltys, Remigiusz; Loarte, Pablo

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is the blockage or narrowing of the portal vein by a thrombus. It is relatively rare and has been linked with the presence of an underlying liver disease or prothrombotic disorders. We present a case of a young male who presented with vague abdominal symptoms for approximately one week. Imaging revealed the presence of multiple nonocclusive thrombi involving the right portal vein, the splenic vein, and the left renal vein, as well as complete occlusion of the left portal vein and the superior mesenteric vein. We discuss pathogenesis, clinical presentation, and management of both acute and chronic thrombosis. The presence of PVT should be considered as a clue for prothrombotic disorders, liver disease, and other local and general factors that must be carefully investigated. It is hoped that this case report will help increase awareness of the complexity associated with portal vein thrombosis among the medical community. PMID:25802795

  4. Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Is Deep Vein Thrombosis? Español Deep vein thrombosis (throm-BO-sis), or DVT, is a blood clot that forms in a vein deep in the body. Blood clots occur when blood ...

  5. Varicose veins and venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    Varicose veins are swollen, twisted, and enlarged veins that you can see under the skin. They are often ... from the blood that collects there, which causes varicose veins. Smaller varicose veins that you can see on ...

  6. Ex Vivo Liver Resection Followed by Autotransplantation to a Patient With Advanced Alveolar Echinococcosis With a Replacement of the Retrohepatic Inferior Vena Cava Using Autogenous Vein Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Jianyong, Lei; Jingcheng, Hao; Wentao, Wang; Lunan, Yan; Jichun, Zhao; Bing, Huang; Ding, Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Alveolar echinococcosis (AE) of the liver is a rare disease. In advanced cases of this parasitic disease, the inferior vena cava (IVC) can be invaded; in these cases, the optimal treatment is liver transplantation and replacement of the IVC. Considering the donor shortage and the drawbacks of immunosuppressive therapy, ex vivo liver resection followed by autotransplantation may be the first choice for these patients. We report the first case of advanced AE successfully treated by an ex vivo liver resection, followed by autotransplantation with a replacement of the retrohepatic IVC using autogenous vein grafting. This graft included the following regions: the bilateral great saphenous vein, part of the retrohepatic inferior vena and the middle hepatic vein with no invasion, the inferior mesenteric vein, and part of the side wall of the infrahepatic vena cava. This patient had an uneventful postoperative recovery; currently, she has been enjoying a normal life and is 12 months postoperative with no immunosuppressive therapy or AE recurrence. In conclusion, ex vivo liver resection followed by autotransplantation with a replacement of the retrohepatic IVC using autogenous vein grafting might be a useful surgical practice for advanced AE. PMID:25700312

  7. Branch retinal vein occlusion.

    PubMed

    Hamid, Sadaf; Mirza, Sajid Ali; Shokh, Ishrat

    2008-01-01

    Retinal vein occlusions (RVO) are the second commonest sight threatening vascular disorder. Branch retinal vein occlusion (BRVO) and central retinal vein occlusion (CRVO) are the two basic types of vein occlusion. Branch retinal vein occlusion is three times more common than central retinal vein occlusion and- second only to diabetic retinopathy as the most common retinal vascular cause of visual loss. The origin of branch retinal vein occlusion undoubtedly includes both systemic factors such as hypertension and local anatomic factors such as arteriovenous crossings. Branch retinal vein occlusion causes a painless decrease in vision, resulting in misty or distorted vision. Current treatment options don't address the underlying aetiology of branch retinal vein occlusion. Instead they focus on treating sequelae of the occluded venous branch, such as macular oedema, vitreous haemorrhage and traction retinal detachment from neovascularization. Evidences suggest that the pathogenesis of various types of retinal vein occlusion, like many other ocular vascular occlusive disorders, is a multifactorial process and there is no single magic bullet that causes retinal vein occlusion. A comprehensive management of patients with retinal vascular occlusions is necessary to correct associated diseases or predisposing abnormalities that could lead to local recurrences or systemic event. Along with a review of the literature, a practical approach for the management of retinal vascular occlusions is required, which requires collaboration between the ophthalmologist and other physicians: general practitioner, cardiologist, internist etc. as appropriate according to each case. PMID:19385476

  8. Varicose Veins and Other Vein Disorders

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Glossary Basic Facts & Information Causes & Symptoms Diagnosis & Tests Care & Treatment Lifestyle & Management Other Resources Caregiving How To's Related Topics Peripheral Artery Disease Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Varicose Veins and Other ...

  9. Pharmacokinetics of Mitomycin C Following Hepatic Arterial Chemoembolization With Gelfoam

    PubMed Central

    de Wu, Zai; Andersson, Roland; Bengmark, Stig

    1992-01-01

    Twelve mongrel dogs were randomly allocated into two groups using matched paired-design. Catheters were inserted into the hepatic artery, hepatic vein and the femoral vein, respectively. In the first group, gelfoam supplemented with mitomycin C (MMC) was injected into the hepatic artery, whereas the second group received a hepatic arterial injection of MMC solution alone. Simultaneous blood sampling from the hepatic and femoral veins at regular intervals was performed. MMC concentrations in plasma was determined using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and the pharmacokinetics of MMC were determined. MMC concentrations in hepatic and femoral veins did not differ and no significant difference in pharmacokinetics was found when comparing MMC administration into the hepatic artery with or without gelfoam supplementation. Thus, our results revealed that gelfoam could not delay the clearance of MMC from the liver. PMID:1510890

  10. Screening of hepatocyte proteins binding with the middle surface protein of the hepatitis B virus by the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhiqun; Linghu, Enqiang; Cheng, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The effect of the middle hepatitis B virus surface protein (MHBs) remains to be elucidated. To investigate the biological function of the MHBs protein, the present study performed yeast two-hybrid screening to search for proteins that interact with the MHBs protein in hepatocytes. The bait plasmid expressing the MHBs protein was constructed by cloning the gene of the MHBs protein into pGBKT7, then the recombinant plasmid DNA was transformed into AH109 yeast (a type). The transformed yeast AH109 was mated with yeast Y187 (α type) containing the liver cDNA library plasmid in 2X yeast peptone dextrose adenine (YPDA) medium. The mated diploid yeast was plated on quadruple dropout medium (SD/-Trp-Leu-His-Ade) containing X-α-gal for selection and screening. Following extracting and sequencing of the plasmids from positive (blue) colonies, the sequence analysis was conducted and analyzed by bioinformatics methods. Two colonies were selected and sequenced. Among them, one was the human DNA sequence from the clone RP11-490D19 on chromosome 9 and the other was homo sapiens 12 BAC RP11-180M15 (Roswell Park Cancer Institute Human BAC Library). The yeast two-hybrid system is an effective method for identifying hepatocyte proteins that interact with MHBs. The MHBs protein binds with different proteins suggesting that it has multiple functions in vivo. PMID:24676405

  11. Internal Jugular Vein Entrapment in a Multiple Sclerosis Patient

    PubMed Central

    Simka, Marian; Majewski, Eugeniusz; Fortuna, Marek; Zaniewski, Maciej

    2012-01-01

    We describe a multiple sclerosis patient presenting with compression of the internal jugular vein caused by aberrant omohyoid muscle. Previously this patient underwent balloon angioplasty of the same internal jugular vein. Ten months after this endovascular procedure, Doppler sonography revealed totally collapsed middle part of the treated vein with no outflow detected. Still, the vein widened and the flow was restored when the patient's mouth opened. Thus, the abnormality was likely to be caused by muscular compression. Surgical exploration confirmed that an atypical omohyoid muscle was squeezing the vein. Consequently, pathological muscle was transected. Sonographic control three weeks after surgical procedure revealed a decompressed vein with fully restored venous outflow. Although such a muscular compression can be successfully managed surgically, future research has to establish its clinical relevance. PMID:23097738

  12. Using hepatitis C prevalence to estimate HIV epidemic potential among people who inject drugs in the Middle East and North Africa

    PubMed Central

    Mumtaz, Ghina R.; Weiss, Helen A.; Vickerman, Peter; Larke, Natasha; Abu-Raddad, Laith J.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The objective of this study is to understand the association between HIV and hepatitis C virus (HCV) among people who inject drugs (PWIDs) in the Middle East and North Africa (MENA), and to estimate HIV epidemic potential among PWIDs using HCV prevalence. Design/methods: Using data from a systematic review of HIV and HCV among PWID in MENA, we conducted two analyses, stratified by HIV epidemic state: a meta-analysis of the risk ratio of HCV to HIV prevalence (RRHCV/HIV) using DerSimonian-Laird random-effects models, and multivariable linear regression predicting log HIV prevalence. The HCV-HIV association from both analyses was used to estimate HIV prevalence at endemic equilibrium. We compared predicted with current HIV prevalence to classify HIV epidemic potential at country-level as low, medium or high, using predefined criteria. Results: The review identified 88 HCV prevalence measures among PWID in MENA, of which 54 had a paired HIV prevalence measure. The pooled RRHCV/HIV were 16, 4 and 3 in low-level, emerging and established HIV epidemics, respectively. There was a significant linear relationship between HCV and HIV at endemic equilibrium (P = 0.002). The predicted endemic HIV prevalence ranged between 8% (Tunisia) and 22% (Pakistan). Of the nine countries with data, five have high and three medium HIV epidemic potential. Only one country, Pakistan, appears to have reached saturation. Conclusion: HCV prevalence could be a predictor of future endemic HIV prevalence. In MENA, we predict that there will be further HIV epidemic growth among PWID. The proposed methodology can identify PWID populations that should be prioritized for HIV prevention interventions. PMID:26372281

  13. Varicose veins and venous insufficiency

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001109.htm Varicose veins and venous insufficiency To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Varicose veins are swollen, twisted, and enlarged veins that you ...

  14. The Cystic Vein: The Significance of a Forgotten Anatomic Landmark

    PubMed Central

    1997-01-01

    The cystic vein, a portion of biliary anatomy whose insignificance in open gallbladder surgery led to its being relegated to mythology, has been rediscovered by the magnified view of laparoscopic surgery. Its presence is an important anatomic feature that helps distinguish between cystic duct and common hepatic duct, thus diminishing the risk of inadvertent bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:9876684

  15. The cystic vein: the significance of a forgotten anatomic landmark.

    PubMed

    Fine, A

    1997-01-01

    The cystic vein, a portion of biliary anatomy whose insignificance in open gallbladder surgery led to its being relegated to mythology, has been rediscovered by the magnified view of laparoscopic surgery. Its presence is an important anatomic feature that helps distinguish between cystic duct and common hepatic duct, thus diminishing the risk of inadvertent bile duct injury during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. PMID:9876684

  16. SUBCLAVIAN VEIN THROMBOSIS FOLLOWING FRACTURE OF THE CLAVICLE: CASE REPORT

    PubMed Central

    Terra, Bernardo Barcellos; Cocco, Luiz Fernando; Ejnisman, Benno; Fernandes, Hélio Jorge Alvachian; dos Reis, Fernando Baldy

    2015-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis in the upper limbs is uncommon in the orthopedic literature. We report on a case of subclavian vein thrombosis that occurred during conservative treatment of a fracture in the middle third of the clavicle. This is difficult to diagnose and requires a high degree of suspicion. Treating it may prevent fatal thromboembolism. In some rare cases, it has been described in association with fractures of the clavicle. PMID:27027014

  17. Popliteal vein aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Falkowski, A; Poncyljusz, W; Zawierucha, D; Kuczmik, W

    2006-06-01

    The incidence of a popliteal vein aneurysm is extremely low. Two cases of this rare venous anomaly are described. The epidemiology, morphology, and diagnostic methods are discussed and the potentially dangerous complications and treatment methods are presented. PMID:16796307

  18. Retinal vein occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... Berrocal MH, Rodriguez FJ, et al. Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group (PACORES). Comparison of two doses ... retinal vein occlusion: results from the Pan-American Collaborative Retina Study Group at 6 months of follow- ...

  19. Deep vein thrombosis - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    You were treated for deep venous thrombosis (DVT). This is a condition in which a blood clot forms in a vein that is not on ... especially if it gets worse upon taking a deep breath in You cough up blood

  20. Anatomy of hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts evaluated by 3D micro-CT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Kline, Timothy L; Knudsen, Bruce E; Anderson, Jill L; Vercnocke, Andrew J; Jorgensen, Steven M; Ritman, Erik L

    2014-01-01

    The liver differs from other organs in that two vascular systems deliver its blood – the hepatic artery and the portal vein. However, how the two systems interact is not fully understood. We therefore studied the microvascular geometry of rat liver hepatic artery and portal vein injected with the contrast polymer Microfil®. Intact isolated rat livers were imaged by micro-CT and anatomic evidence for hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts occurring between hepatic artery and portal vein branches was found. Simulations were performed to rule out the possibility of the observed shunts being artifacts resulting from image blurring. In addition, in the case of specimens where only the portal vein was injected, only the portal vein was opacified, whereas in hepatic artery injections, both the hepatic artery and portal vein were opacified. We conclude that mixing of the hepatic artery and portal vein blood can occur proximal to the sinusoidal level, and that the hepatic arteriolo-portal venular shunts may function as a one-way valve-like mechanism, allowing flow only from the hepatic artery to the portal vein (and not the other way around). PMID:24684343

  1. Distribution of saphenous vein valves and its pratical importance

    PubMed Central

    Portugal, Isabella Batista Martins; Ribeiro, Igor de Lima; de Sousa-Rodrigues, Célio Fernando; Monte-Bispo, Rodrigo Freitas; da Rocha, Amauri Clemente

    2014-01-01

    Objective Among the veins used as a graft in myocardial revascularizations and ends, great saphenous vein is the most used. Knowing the presence and location of valves has great importance when evaluating the surgical anatomy of the great saphenous vein. Despite major surgical application and many works involving great saphenous vein, the number of valves present in it from the saphenous hiatus to the medial epicondyle of the femur is still described inaccurately. The objective of this study is to quantify the valves of the great saphenous vein from the saphenous hiatus to the medial epicondyle of the femur to determine the best portion of the great saphenous vein to perform revascularization surgeries. Methods This is a crosssectional observational study in which it was analyzed great saphenous vein extracted from 30 cadavers. It was measured the length of the veins; (diameter) at its proximal, middle and distal, quantifying the number of valves in each one and the total number of valves at the great saphenous vein. Results The frequency of valves in the great saphenous vein taken from the medial epicondyle of the femur to the saphenous hiatus was 4.82, ranging between 2 and 9. Moreover, there is a significant difference in the number of valves in the proximal and distal relative to the average. Conclusion the median and distal portions of the saphenous vein in the thigh, are the best options for the realization of bridges due to the fact that these portions have fewer valves which therefore would tend to decrease the risk of complications connected with the valves in these grafts. PMID:25714210

  2. Pelvic Vein Embolisation in the Management of Varicose Veins

    SciTech Connect

    Ratnam, Lakshmi A.; Marsh, Petra; Holdstock, Judy M.; Harrison, Charmaine S.; Hussain, Fuad F.; Whiteley, Mark S.; Lopez, Anthony

    2008-11-15

    Pelvic vein incompetence is common in patients with atypical varicose veins, contributing to their recurrence after surgery. Therefore, refluxing pelvic veins should be identified and treated. We present our experience with pelvic vein embolisation in patients presenting with varicose veins. Patients presenting with varicose veins with a duplex-proven contribution from perivulval veins undergo transvaginal duplex sonography (TVUS) to identify refluxing pelvic veins. Those with positive scans undergo embolisation before surgical treatment of their lower limb varicose veins. A total of 218 women (mean age of 46.3 years) were treated. Parity was documented in the first 60 patients, of whom 47 (78.3%) were multiparous, 11 (18.3%) had had one previous pregnancy, and 2 (3.3%) were nulliparous. The left ovarian vein was embolised in 78%, the right internal iliac in 64.7%, the left internal iliac in 56.4%, and the right ovarian vein in 42.2% of patients. At follow-up TVUS, mild reflux only was seen in 16, marked persistent reflux in 6, and new reflux in 3 patients. These 9 women underwent successful repeat embolisation. Two patients experienced pulmonary embolisation of the coils, of whom 1 was asymptomatic and 1 was successfully retrieved; 1 patient had a misplaced coil protruding into the common femoral vein; and 1 patient had perineal thrombophlebitis. The results of our study showed that pelvic venous embolisation by way of a transjugular approach is a safe and effective technique in the treatment of pelvic vein reflux.

  3. Acquired Jugular Vein Aneurysm

    PubMed Central

    Hopsu, Erkki; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Vento, Seija I.; Pitkäranta, Anne

    2009-01-01

    Venous malformations of the jugular veins are rare findings. Aneurysms and phlebectasias are the lesions most often reported. We report on an adult patient with an abruptly appearing large tumorous mass on the left side of the neck identified as a jugular vein aneurysm. Upon clinical examination with ultrasound, a lateral neck cyst was primarily suspected. Surgery revealed a saccular aneurysm in intimate connection with the internal jugular vein. Histology showed an organized hematoma inside the aneurysmal sac, which had a focally thinned muscular layer. The terminology and the treatment guidelines of venous dilatation lesions are discussed. For phlebectasias, conservative treatment is usually recommended, whereas for saccular aneurysms, surgical resection is the treatment of choice. While an exact classification based on etiology and pathophysiology is not possible, a more uniform taxonomy would clarify the guidelines for different therapeutic modalities for venous dilatation lesions. PMID:20107571

  4. Ovarian vein thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Jenayah, Amel Achour; Saoudi, Sarra; Boudaya, Fethia; Bouriel, Ines; Sfar, Ezzeddine; Chelli, Dalenda

    2015-01-01

    Ovarian vein thrombosis (OVT) is a rare cause of abdominal pain that may mimic a surgical abdomen. It is most often diagnosed during the postpartum period. In this report, we present four cases of postoperative ovarian vein thrombosis. The complications of OVT can be significant, and the diagnosis relies on a careful examination of the radiographic findings. It can occur with lower quadrant abdominal pain, especially in the setting of recent pregnancy, abdominal surgery, pelvic inflammatory disease, or malignancy. Diagnosis can be made with confidence using ultrasound, computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging. Treatment of ovarian vein thrombosis is particularly important in the post-partum patients, with anticoagulation therapy being the current recommendation. PMID:26526119

  5. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » For Veterans and the Public Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... the Public Veterans and Public Home How is Hepatitis C Treated? Find the facts about the newest ...

  6. Hepatic tumor angiography: a subject review

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, V.P.

    1983-09-01

    The dual blood supply of the normal hepatic parenchyma and the single arterial supply of hepatic neoplasms are important factors in the interpretation of celiac and hepatic arteriograms. Depending on whether the hepatic artery, portal vein, or both are opacified, three types of hepatogram can occur: arterial, portal, or mixed. On the celiac arteriogram, the densely opacified hepatic parenchyma makes the less well opacified tumor appear relatively hypovascular; and conversely, on the hepatic arteriogram the nonopacified portal flow has a ''wash-out'' effect on the normal parenchyma so that the neoplasm remains hypervascular. Thus most hepatic neoplasms are hypervascular on the hepatic arteriogram, and conversion of a hypervascular tumor to a hypovascular one is indicative of its response to treatment.

  7. Varicose vein surgery.

    PubMed

    Kendler, Micheal; Fellmer, Peter T; Wetzig, Tino

    2012-03-01

    Venous diseases are common in the general population. After a comprehensive diagnostic evaluation, an individual therapeutic approach should be selected on the basis of the findings, with the aim of treating the diseased vein segments and improving quality of life. Numerous therapeutic options are available for the treatment of varicose veins. In addition to conservative methods such as compression therapy, exercise or drugs, surgical procedures such as traditional surgery, thermal ablation techniques or sclerotherapy can be performed. Recent developments include the use of endoluminal water vapor or mechano-chemical endovenous ablation. PMID:22222053

  8. Viral Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... with hepatitis? How does a pregnant woman pass hepatitis B virus to her baby? If I have hepatitis B, what does my baby need so that she ... Can I breastfeed my baby if I have hepatitis B? More information on viral hepatitis What is hepatitis? ...

  9. Portal vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Yogesh K; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-03-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  10. Portal Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Yogesh K.; Bodh, Vijay

    2015-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis is an important cause of portal hypertension. PVT occurs in association with cirrhosis or as a result of malignant invasion by hepatocellular carcinoma or even in the absence of associated liver disease. With the current research into its genesis, majority now have an underlying prothrombotic state detectable. Endothelial activation and stagnant portal blood flow also contribute to formation of the thrombus. Acute non-cirrhotic PVT, chronic PVT (EHPVO), and portal vein thrombosis in cirrhosis are the three main variants of portal vein thrombosis with varying etiological factors and variability in presentation and management. Procoagulant state should be actively investigated. Anticoagulation is the mainstay of therapy for acute non-cirrhotic PVT, with supporting evidence for its use in cirrhotic population as well. Chronic PVT (EHPVO) on the other hand requires the management of portal hypertension as such and with role for anticoagulation in the setting of underlying prothrombotic state, however data is awaited in those with no underlying prothrombotic states. TIPS and liver transplant may be feasible even in the setting of PVT however proper selection of candidates and type of surgery is warranted. Thrombolysis and thrombectomy have some role. TARE is a new modality for management of HCC with portal vein invasion. PMID:25941431

  11. Elastomechanical properties of bovine veins.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, Jenn Stroud

    2010-02-01

    Veins have historically been discussed in qualitative, relative terms: "more compliant" than arteries, subject to "lower pressures". The structural and compositional differences between arteries and veins are directly related to the different functions of these vessels. Veins are often used as grafts to reroute flow from atherosclerotic arteries, and venous elasticity plays a role in the development of conditions such as varicose veins and valvular insufficiency. It is therefore of clinical interest to determine the elastomechanical properties of veins. In the current study, both tensile and vibration testing are used to obtain elastic moduli of bovine veins. Representative stress-strain data are shown, and the mechanical and failure properties reported. Nonlinear and viscoelastic behavior is observed, though most properties show little strain rate dependence. These data suggest parameters for constitutive modeling of veins and may inform the design and testing of prosthetic venous valves as well as vein grafts. PMID:20129420

  12. Living with Deep Vein Thrombosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page from the NHLBI on Twitter. Living With Deep Vein Thrombosis NHLBI Resources Pulmonary Embolism (Health Topics) Non-NHLBI Resources Deep Vein Thrombosis (MedlinePlus) Pulmonary Embolism (MedlinePlus) Clinical Trials ...

  13. Anatomical evaluation of hepatic vascular system in healthy beagles using X-ray contrast computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Oishi, Yasuhisa; Tani, Kenji; Nakazawa, Hiroshi; Itamoto, Kazuhito; Haraguchi, Tomoya; Taura, Yasuho

    2015-08-01

    Liver contrast X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been used for evaluation of hepatic vessels for liver transplantation, liver lobectomy, interventional radiology and diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma in humans. However, there remains scant available anatomical information on normal hepatic vessels in the veterinary field. In this study, visualization of hepatic vessels was evaluated in 32 normal beagle dogs by X-ray contrast CT using triple phase images. The following hepatic vessels were clearly visualized: arterial, portal and hepatic veins. With regards to the running patterns of the portal vein and hepatic vein, there were no significant differences between the dogs. However, the hepatic artery exhibited some differences in each dog. In particular, the hepatic artery of the quadrate lobe and the right lateral lobe had many running patterns. The results of the present study could be useful for veterinary diagnosis, surgery and interventional radiology. PMID:25843113

  14. Hepatic yersiniosis in a cougar (Felis concolor).

    PubMed

    Owston, Michael A; Wu, Ching Ching; Ramos-Vara, José A

    2006-09-01

    A cougar (Felis concolor) was diagnosed with hepatic yersiniosis by bacterial culture and histopathology. The animal had a 2-week history of anorexia and jaundice before its death. Grossly, the liver exhibited caseo-necrotic foci. Histopathologically, there was necrotizing and suppurative hepatitis, with large numbers of intralesional gram-negative coccobacilli. Additional hepatic lesions included central vein thrombosis, lymphoplasmacytic portal hepatitis, and capsulitis. Yersinia pseudotuberculosis coccobacilli were isolated in pure culture from the hepatic lesions. Because the hepatic lesions in this animal resemble those of other zoonotic diseases, such as plague and tularemia, veterinarians and laboratory personnel who handle samples should take adequate safety precautions. This report is the first to describe the pathology associated with hepatic yersiniosis in a cougar. PMID:17037628

  15. Spontaneous Iliac Vein Rupture

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Dae Hwan; Park, Hyung Sub; Lee, Taeseung

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous iliac vein rupture (SIVR) is a rare entity, which usually occurs without a precipitating factor, but can be a life-threatening emergency often requiring an emergency operation. This is a case report of SIVR in a 62-year-old female who presented to the emergency room with left leg swelling. Workup with contrast-enhanced computed tomography revealed a left leg deep vein thrombosis with May-Thurner syndrome and a hematoma in the pelvic cavity without definite evidence of arterial bleeding. She was managed conservatively without surgical intervention, and also underwent inferior vena cava filter insertion and subsequent anticoagulation therapy for pulmonary thromboembolism. This case shows that SIVR can be successfully managed with close monitoring and conservative management, and anticoagulation may be safely applied despite the patient presenting with venous bleeding. PMID:26217647

  16. COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHIC AND ULTRASONOGRAPHIC CHARACTERISTICS OF CAVERNOUS TRANSFORMATION OF THE OBSTRUCTED PORTAL VEIN IN SMALL ANIMALS.

    PubMed

    Specchi, Swan; Pey, Pascaline; Ledda, Gianluca; Lustgarten, Meghann; Thrall, Donald; Bertolini, Giovanna

    2015-01-01

    In humans, the process of development of collateral vessels with hepatopetal flow around the portal vein in order to bypass an obstruction is called "cavernous transformation of the portal vein." The purpose of this retrospective, cross-sectional, multicentric study was to describe presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in small animals with portal vein obstruction using ultrasound and multidetector-row computed tomography (MDCT). Databases from three different institutions were searched for patients with an imaging diagnosis of cavernous transformation of the portal vein secondary to portal vein obstruction of any cause. Images were retrieved and reanalyzed. With MDCT-angiography, two main portoportal collateral pathways were identified: short tortuous portoportal veins around/inside the thrombus and long portoportal collaterals bypassing the site of portal obstruction. Three subtypes of the long collaterals, often coexisting, were identified. Branches of the hepatic artery where involved in collateral circulation in nine cases. Concomitant acquired portosystemic shunts were identified in six patients. With ultrasound, cavernous transformation of the portal vein was suspected in three dogs and one cat based on visualization of multiple and tortuous vascular structures corresponding to periportal collaterals. In conclusion, the current study provided descriptive MDCT and ultrasonographic characteristics of presumed cavernous transformation of the portal vein in a sample of small animals. Cavernous transformation of the portal vein could occur as a single condition or could be concurrent with acquired portosystemic shunts. PMID:25877678

  17. An anomalous portal vein crossing the lesser sac and ending at the upper part of ductus venosus

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hee Chul; Murakami, Gen; Rodríguez-Vázquez, José Francisco; Cho, Baik Hwan

    2015-01-01

    In serial sagittal sections of a fetus on week 9 (crown-rump length, 36 mm), we incidentally found absence of the usual portal vein through the hepatoduodenal ligament. Instead, an anomalous portal vein originated behind the pancreatic body, crossed the lesser sac and merged with the upper part of the ductus venosus. During the course across the lesser sac, the vein provided a deep notch of the liver caudate lobe (Spiegel's lobe). The hepatoduodenal ligament contained the hepatic artery, the common bile duct and, at the right posterior margin of the ligament, and a branch of the anomalous portal vein which communicated with the usual right branch of the portal vein at the hepatic hilum. The umbilical portion of the portal vein took a usual morphology and received the umbilical vein and gave off the ductus venosus. Although it seemed not to be described yet, the present anomalous portal vein was likely to be a persistent left vitelline vein. The hepatoduodenal ligament was unlikely to include the left vitelline vein in contrast to the usual concept. PMID:26417483

  18. Fasting and postabsorptive hepatic glucose and insulin metabolism in hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Raboudi, N; Arem, R; Jones, R H; Chap, Z; Pena, J; Chou, J; Field, J B

    1989-01-01

    The effect of thyroid hormone excess on hepatic glucose balances and fractional hepatic extraction of insulin and glucagon was examined in six conscious dogs with catheters in the portal vein, hepatic vein, and femoral artery and Doppler flow probes on the portal vein and hepatic artery. An oral glucose tolerance test was performed before and after the animals were made hyperthyroid by intramuscular thyroxine administration (100 micrograms.kg-1.day-1) for 10 days. In the basal state and after oral glucose, insulin and glucagon levels in the three vessels and the basal fractional hepatic extraction of insulin and glucagon were not significantly modified by thyroid hormone. These results suggest that in short-term thyrotoxicosis insulin secretion is not impaired, and the rise in fasting plasma glucose and increased hepatic glucose production could reflect hepatic insulin resistance, increased availability of precursors for gluconeogenesis, or increased glycogenolysis. Hyperthyroidism significantly increased basal flows in the portal vein (14.7 +/- 0.6 vs. 12.9 +/- 0.5 ml.kg-1.min-1), the hepatic artery (4.8 +/- 0.3 vs. 3.9 +/- 0.2 ml.kg-1.min-1) and vein (19.6 +/- 0.7 vs. 16.9 +/- 0.4 ml.kg-1.min-1), the fasting plasma glucose concentration (104 +/- 3 vs. 92 +/- 2 mg/dl), and basal hepatic glucose output (2.1 +/- 0.2 vs. 1.5 +/- 0.2 mg.kg-1.min-1). It did not alter the nonhepatic splanchnic uptake of glucose, the percent of orally administered glucose that appeared in the portal vein (47 +/- 2 vs. 45 +/- 11%), the percent of hepatic uptake of glucose (59 +/- 11 vs. 74 +/- 22%), or the shape of the glucose tolerance test. PMID:2643338

  19. Endovascular Treatment of Acute Portal Vein Thrombosis After Liver Transplantation in a Child

    SciTech Connect

    Carnevale, Francisco Cesar Borges, Marcus Vinicius; Moreira, Airton Mota; Cerri, Giovanni Guido; Maksoud, Joao Gilberto

    2006-06-15

    Although operative techniques in hepatic transplantation have reduced the time and mortality on waiting lists, the rate of vascular complications associated with these techniques has increased. Stenosis or thrombosis of the portal vein is an infrequent complication, and if present, surgical treatment is considered the traditional management. This article describes a case of acute portal vein thrombosis after liver transplantation from a living donor to a child managed by percutaneous techniques.

  20. Percutaneous Stent Placement as Treatment of Renal Vein Obstruction Due to Inferior Vena Caval Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Stecker, Michael S. Casciani, Thomas; Kwo, Paul Y.

    2006-02-15

    A patient who had undergone his third orthotopic liver transplantation nearly 9 years prior to presentation developed worsening hepatic and renal function, as well as severe bilateral lower extremity edema. Magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated vena caval thrombosis from the suprahepatic venous anastomosis to the infrarenal inferior vena cava, obstructing the renal veins. This was treated by percutaneous placement of metallic stents from the renal veins to the right atrium. At 16 months clinical follow-up, the patient continues to do well.

  1. NET PORTAL AND HEPATIC FLUX OF NUTRIENTS IN GROWING WETHERS FED HIGH CONCENTRATE DIETS WITH OSCILLATING PROTEIN CONCENTRATIONS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We hypothesized that oscillating dietary CP would improve N retention by increasing urea-N recycling to the rumen, compared to static dietary CP regimens. Chronic indwelling catheters were surgically implanted in a abdominal artery, mesenteric vein, hepatic vein, and portal vein of 18 growing Dorse...

  2. Can we increase hepatic oxygen availability? The role of intentional hypercarbia.

    PubMed

    Atallah, M M; Demian, A D; el-Diasty, T A; Ma Saied, M

    2000-06-01

    Our hypothesis is that hypercarbia produces sympathetic stimulant effect and local vasodilatation. We studied the effect of intentional hypercarbia (IHC) on hepatic venous oxygen saturation. The hepatic vein (HV) was cannulated in 15 patients through either the right internal jugular vein or the femoral vein to measure HV oxygen saturation and calculate oxygen content. The inferior vena cava (IVC) was cannulated in 6 patients above and below drainage of the hepatic veins for oxygen saturation and content difference along the IVC. IHC was achieved in awake patients by breathing oxygen enriched air at a flow rate of 2L/min for 10 min, and during anesthesia by increasing anesthetic dead space and reducing tidal volume. IHC increased HV blood oxygen saturation, decreased the arterio-hepatic vein oxygen content difference and decreased oxygen saturation difference and oxygen content difference along IVC. PMID:11126503

  3. [Coronary veins and coronary sinus tributary veins in Africans].

    PubMed

    Yangni-Angate, H; Kokoua, A; Kouassi, R; Kassanyou, S; Gnagne, Y; Guessan, G N; Cowppli-Bony, P; Memel, J B

    1995-01-01

    This anatomical study carried out on 40 African adults hearts studied branches of the coronary sinus. By using of injection of the coronary arteries and corrosion of the myocardium, the study identified certain peculiarities of the small coronary vein and the posterior descending interventricular vein in Africans. PMID:8519704

  4. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... or past infection, or immunity to hepatitis A Hepatitis B tests: Hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg), you have ...

  5. Hepatitis C and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis C Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis C What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis B . Hepatitis C and HIV About 25% of people living ...

  6. Hepatitis B and HIV

    MedlinePlus

    ... Problems : Hepatitis B Subscribe Translate Text Size Print Hepatitis B What is Hepatitis? Hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. This condition ... our related pages, Hepatitis A and Hepatitis C . Hepatitis B and HIV About 10% of people living ...

  7. Hepatitis Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by viruses. They include hepatitis A, hepatitis B, and hepatitis C. To diagnose hepatitis, your health care provider will ask you about your medical history and symptoms, do a physical exam, and order blood tests. There are blood tests for each type of ...

  8. Non-contrast-enhanced MR portography and hepatic venography with time-spatial labeling inversion pulses: comparison at 1.5 Tesla and 3 Tesla

    PubMed Central

    Isoda, Hiroyoshi; Furuta, Akihiro; Togashi, Kaori

    2015-01-01

    Background A 3 Tesla (3 T) magnetic resonance (MR) scanner is a promising tool for upper abdominal MR angiography. However, there is no report focused on the image quality of non-contrast-enhanced MR portography and hepatic venography at 3 T. Purpose To compare and evaluate images of non-contrast-enhanced MR portography and hepatic venography with time-spatial labeling inversion pulses (Time-SLIP) at 1.5 Tesla (1.5 T) and 3 T. Material and Methods Twenty-five healthy volunteers were examined using respiratory-triggered three-dimensional balanced steady-state free-precession (bSSFP) with Time-SLIP. For portography, we used one tagging pulse (selective inversion recovery) and one non-selective inversion recovery pulse; for venography, two tagging pulses were used. The relative signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) were quantified, and the quality of visualization was evaluated. Results The CNRs of the main portal vein, right portal vein, and left portal vein at 3 T were better than at 1.5 T. The image quality scores for the portal branches of segment 4, 5, and 8 were significantly higher at 3 T than at 1.5 T. The CNR of the right hepatic vein (RHV) at 3 T was significantly lower than at 1.5 T. The image quality scores of RHV and the middle hepatic vein were higher at 1.5 T than at 3 T. For RHV visualization, the difference was statistically significant. Conclusion Non-contrast-enhanced MR portography with Time-SLIP at 3 T significantly improved visualization of the peripheral branch in healthy volunteers compared with1.5 T. Non-contrast-enhanced MR hepatic venography at 1.5 T was better than at 3 T. PMID:26019890

  9. Infrared imaging of varicose veins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noordmans, Herke Jan; de Zeeuw, Raymond; Verdaasdonk, Ruud M.; Wittens, Cees H. A.

    2004-06-01

    It has been established that varicose veins are better visualized with infrared photography. As near-infrared films are nowadays hard to get and to develop in the digital world, we investigated the use of digital photography of varicose veins. Topics that are discussed are illumination setup, photography and digital image enhancement and analysis.

  10. The economics of vein disease.

    PubMed

    Sales, Clifford M; Podnos, Joan; Levison, Jonathan

    2007-09-01

    The management of cosmetic vein problems requires a very different approach than that for the majority of most other vascular disorders that occur in a vascular surgery practice. This article focuses on the business aspects of a cosmetic vein practice, with particular attention to the uniqueness of these issues. Managing patient expectations is critical to the success of a cosmetic vein practice. Maneuvering within the insurance can be difficult and frustrating for both the patient and the practice. Practices should use cost accounting principles to evaluate the success of their vein work. Vein surgery--especially if performed within the office--can undergo an accurate break-even analysis to determine its profitability. PMID:17911565

  11. The Management of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fan; Zhang, Shiyi; Sun, Yan; Ren, Shiyan; Liu, Peng

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to review the current management modalities for varicose veins. There are a variety of management modalities for varicose veins. The outcomes of the treatment of varicose veins are different. The papers on the management of varicose veins were reviewed and the postoperative complications and efficacy were compared. Foam sclerotherapy and radiofrequency ablation were associated with less pain and faster recovery than endovenous laser ablation and surgical stripping. Patients undergoing endovenous laser ablation and radiofrequency ablation are most likely to have a faster recovery time and earlier return to work in comparison with those undergoing conventional high ligation and stripping. A randomized controlled study in multiple centers is warranted to verify which approach is better than others for the treatment of varicose veins. PMID:25594661

  12. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Creation in Budd-Chiari Syndrome: Percutaneous Ultrasound-Guided Direct Simultaneous Puncture of the Portal Vein and Vena Cava

    SciTech Connect

    Boyvat, Fatih Aytekin, Cueneyt; Harman, Ali; Ozin, Yasemin

    2006-10-15

    Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS) is an uncommon disorder that can be life-threatening, depending on the degree of hepatic venous outflow obstruction. Transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) provides decompression of the congested liver but the hepatic vein obstruction makes the procedure more difficult. We describe a modified method that involved a single percutaneous puncture of the portal vein and inferior vena cava simultaneously for TIPS creation in a patient with BCS.

  13. Sagittal vein thrombosis caused by central vein catheter.

    PubMed

    Sabzi, Feridoun; Karim, Hosein; Heydar Pour, Behzad; Faraji, Reza

    2015-01-01

    Cerebral venous thrombosis, including thrombosis of cerebral veins and major dural sinuses, is an uncommon disorder in the general population. However, it has a higher frequency among patients younger than 40 years of age, patients with thrombophilia, pregnant patients or those receiving hormonal contraceptive therapy or has foreign body such as catheter in their veins or arterial system. In this case report, we described clinical and radiological findings in a patient with protein C-S deficiency and malposition of central vein catheter. PMID:25796028

  14. Reduction of intimal hyperplasia and enhanced reactivity of experimental vein bypass grafts with verapamil treatment.

    PubMed Central

    el-Sanadiki, M N; Cross, K S; Murray, J J; Schuman, R W; Mikat, E; McCann, R L; Hagen, P O

    1990-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that calcium antagonists exert an antiatherogenic effect in animals fed cholesterol. Vein graft intimal hyperplasia is believed to be an early event in atherosclerotic lesion formation, which is a significant cause of graft failure. Altered vasoreactivity has also been postulated in the etiology of vein graft failure. Therefore this study examined the effect of verapamil treatment on the development of intimal hyperplasia and the vasoreactivity of experimental vein bypass grafts. The right external jugular vein was grafted into the right carotid artery of 30 male New Zealand white rabbits fed normal rabbit chow. The left external jugular vein was used as the control vein. Fifteen animals received verapamil (1.25 mg/day for 28 days) via the femoral vein by means of an osmotic pump. In 15 control animals the pump contained saline. Plasma verapamil concentration was 50.9 +/- 13.2 ng/mL (x +/- SEM), a dose that showed no effect on either blood pressure, total serum cholesterol, or in vitro platelet aggregation to ADP. Fourteen of fifteen grafts were patent in each group, for a patency rate of 93%. Histologic examination using computer morphometry showed significant reduction of intimal hyperplasia at the proximal, middle, and distal graft segments (p less than 0.05). In addition in vitro isometric tension studies of the vein grafts and control veins showed that verapamil causes enhanced reactivity of both vein grafts and control veins in response to norepinephrine and histamine (p less than 0.05). Reactivity of vein grafts to serotonin was unaltered. While none of the normal veins in the control group responded to serotonin, normal veins treated with verapamil contracted readily in response to serotonin. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was absent in both control and verapamil-treated vein grafts, while normal veins from both groups responded to the same extent to acetylcholine. Because we could not demonstrate any difference

  15. New perspectives on hepatitis E.

    PubMed

    Hyams, Kenneth C

    2002-08-01

    The infectious agent causing epidemic non-A, non-B hepatitis was identified in 1983 from a human challenge experiment. The novel hepatitis E virus (HEV) subsequently was cloned in 1990 and the genome sequenced. HEV transmission is highly endemic in Asia, the Middle East, and Africa. Fecal contamination of drinking water is the most common mode of spread. Although usually asymptomatic, HEV infection can cause fulminant hepatitis. Recent studies indicate that hepatitis E may be a zoonotic disease, with pigs and possibly rats serving as reservoirs for human infection. A recombinant HEV vaccine is currently in phase III clinical trials. The characterization of the major types of viral hepatitis during the last 20 years illustrates how modern genetic technology has revolutionized research in infectious diseases. Within less than two decades of the discovery of HEV, its epidemiology has been described, serologic tests have been developed, and a candidate vaccine has been evaluated in clinical trials. PMID:12149176

  16. Significant cohort of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease with portal vein thrombosis in transplant waiting list

    PubMed Central

    Basaranoglu, Metin; Najjar, Sonia M; Demirbag, Ali Ebag; Senturk, Hakan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To characterize non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) presentation with esophageal varices. METHODS: We carried out a retrospective cohort study on 258 patients with esophageal varices at a single tertiary referral center. These patients underwent diagnosis of several liver diseases, including: NAFLD-associated cirrhosis, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, Wilson disease, autoimune liver diseases, and others. RESULTS: Of the 258 patients, 39% of patients exhibited esophageal varices due to NAFLD-associated cirrhosis. Of the 38 (14.7%) patients developed hepatocellular carcinoma during follow-up, 52% were due to hepatitis B, 26% due to hepatitis C and 13.2% due to NAFLD. Of the 258 patients, 50.0% with NAFLD, 33.3% with hepatitis B, 26.3% with hepatitis C, and 58.3% with other diseases were alive at the end of the 5-year period with a significant difference according to the Kaplan-Meier log Rank test (P = 0.040). Portal vein thrombosis was detected in 47.5% of patients with NAFLD, in 29% of patients with hepatitis B, in 17% of patients with hepatitis C, and in 62% of patients with other related diseases (P < 0.0001). CONCLUSION: Our study showed a proportionally greater elevation in liver transplant candidacy in patients with NAFLD and portal vein thrombosis. Older patients were more prone to developing cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma and a high mortality rate. However, younger patients exhibited more portal vein thrombosis and gastric varices. PMID:26981175

  17. Vein matching using artificial neural network in vein authentication systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noori Hoshyar, Azadeh; Sulaiman, Riza

    2011-10-01

    Personal identification technology as security systems is developing rapidly. Traditional authentication modes like key; password; card are not safe enough because they could be stolen or easily forgotten. Biometric as developed technology has been applied to a wide range of systems. According to different researchers, vein biometric is a good candidate among other biometric traits such as fingerprint, hand geometry, voice, DNA and etc for authentication systems. Vein authentication systems can be designed by different methodologies. All the methodologies consist of matching stage which is too important for final verification of the system. Neural Network is an effective methodology for matching and recognizing individuals in authentication systems. Therefore, this paper explains and implements the Neural Network methodology for finger vein authentication system. Neural Network is trained in Matlab to match the vein features of authentication system. The Network simulation shows the quality of matching as 95% which is a good performance for authentication system matching.

  18. Hepatitis B and Hepatitis C in Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... infected with the hepatitis B virus, can I breastfeed? • If I am infected with the hepatitis B ... infected with the hepatitis C virus, can I breastfeed? • Glossary What are hepatitis B and hepatitis C ...

  19. Thrombosis Associated with Viral Hepatitis

    PubMed Central

    Galli, Luca; Gerdes, Victor E.A.; Guasti, Luigina; Squizzato, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    Viral hepatitis may promote the development of venous thromboembolism (VTE) and, more specifically, portal vein thrombosis (PVT). In this narrative review, we summarize the clinical data and discuss the possible pathogenetic roles of cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), and hepatitis A, B, and C viruses (HAV, HBV, HCV) in the occurrence of VTE. CMV is the first qualified candidate to enter the list of VTE minor risk factors, and in the rare case of fulminant infection, both EBV and CMV, like any severe infection or inflammatory disease, increase risk for thrombosis. In chronic hepatitis B and C, it remains controversial whether antiphospholipid antibodies are important for thrombotic complications or merely an epiphenomenon. Retinal vein occlusion described in chronic hepatitis C is usually attributed to the treatment with interferon. Eltrombopag, used for HCV-related thrombocytopenia, has been associated with increased thrombotic risk. The imbalance between procoagulant and anticoagulant factors associated with chronic liver disease may have clinical implications. This may help to explain why these patients are not protected from clinical events such as VTE, PVT, and the progression of liver fibrosis. PMID:26357629

  20. Transsinusoidal Portal Vein Embolization with Ethylene Vinyl Alcohol Copolymer (Onyx): A Feasibility Study in Pigs

    SciTech Connect

    Smits, Maarten L. J.; Vanlangenhove, Peter Sturm, Emiel J. C.; Bosch, Maurice A. A. J. van den; Hav, Monirath Praet, Marleen; Vente, Maarten A. D.; Snaps, Frederic R.; Defreyne, Luc

    2012-10-15

    Purpose: Portal vein embolization is performed to increase the future liver remnant before liver surgery in patients with liver malignancies. This study assesses the feasibility of a transsinusoidal approach for portal vein embolization (PVE) with the ethylene vinyl alcohol copolymer, Onyx. Methods: Indirect portography through contrast injection in the cranial mesenteric artery was performed in eight healthy pigs. Onyx was slowly injected through a microcatheter from a wedged position in the hepatic vein and advanced through the liver lobules into the portal system. The progression of Onyx was followed under fluoroscopy, and the extent of embolization was monitored by indirect portography. The pigs were euthanized immediately (n = 2), at 7 days (n = 4), or at 21 days postprocedure (n = 2). All pigs underwent necropsy and the ex vivo livers were grossly and histopathologically analyzed. Results: Transsinusoidal PVE was successfully performed in five of eight pigs (63%). In 14 of 21 injections (67%), a segmental portal vein could be filled completely. A mean of 1.6 liver lobes per pig was embolized (range 1-2 lobes). There were no periprocedural adverse events. Focal capsular scarring was visible on the surface of two resected livers, yet the capsules remained intact. Histopathological examination showed no signs of recanalization or abscess formation. Mild inflammatory reaction to Onyx was observed in the perivascular parenchyma. Conclusions: The porcine portal vein can be embolized through injection of Onyx from a wedged position in the hepatic vein. Possible complications of transsinusoidal PVE and the effect on contralateral hypertrophy need further study.

  1. AIR VENT OF VEIN GRAFT IN EXTRACRANIAL-INTRACRANIAL BYPASS SURGERY

    PubMed Central

    OYAMA, HIROFUMI; KITO, AKIRA; MAKI, HIDEKI; HATTORI, KENICHI; NODA, TOMOYUKI; WADA, KENTARO

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT Revascularization with a vein graft is a mandatory method for treatment of dissecting or pseudoaneurysms of the internal carotid artery. We report the necessity for an air vent from the vein graft and explain its use in our two cases. In Case 1, we searched for a great saphenous vein around its junction with a femoral vein during the harvest of vein graft. An accessory branch of that great saphenous vein was also found around the junctional region with a femoral vein, and was temporarily ligated. At first, anastomosis was completed on both the distal and proximal sides. After the proximal side of a vein graft was opened and the ligation of the branch was loosened, an air vent could be made through the branch of the vein graft. Multiple air bubbles and a large quantity of white microemboli were discharged through this branch. The postoperative course was uneventful. In Case 2, the air vent was omitted to shorten ischemia. During the opening of the vein graft, the migrated air was observed to move to the middle cerebral artery. A computed tomography scan demonstrated that brain infarction and dysarthria occurred postoperatively. The air vent of the vein graft is essential in extracranial-intracranial bypass surgery, because the air bubbles or microthrombi are easily trapped around the valve and cause cerebral infarction. An air vent can be easily made if the branch of a vein graft exists in the outflow pathway, because intraluminal air or thrombus can be washed out through the branch at the final stage of surgery. PMID:23092106

  2. Hepatitis virus panel

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis A antibody test; Hepatitis B antibody test; Hepatitis C antibody test; Hepatitis D antibody test ... There are different tests for hepatitis A and B. A positive test is ... may mean: You currently have a hepatitis infection. This may ...

  3. Hepatitis C: Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... Public Home » Hepatitis C » Hepatitis C Treatment Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... Enter ZIP code here Enter ZIP code here Hepatitis C Treatment for Veterans and the Public Treatment ...

  4. Hepatitis C and Incarceration

    MedlinePlus

    HEPATITIS C & INCARCERATION What is hepatitis? “Hepatitis” means inflammation or swelling of the liver. The liver is an important ... viral hepatitis: Hepatitis A, Hepatitis B, and Hepatitis C. They are all different from each other and ...

  5. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    ... is Hepatic Encephalopathy? Hepatic Encephalopathy, sometimes referred to as portosystemic encephalopathy or PSE, is a condition that ... medical care is an important factor in staying as healthy as possible. The American Liver Foundation is ...

  6. Hepatitis D

    MedlinePlus

    ... if the hepatitis B virus is also present. Transmission Hepatitis D can be found in the blood, ... other body fluids of people who are infected. Transmission happens when infected body fluid enters another person’s ...

  7. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    Lupoid hepatitis; Chronic acute liver disease ... This form of hepatitis is an autoimmune disease . The body's immune system cannot tell the difference between healthy body tissue and harmful, outside ...

  8. Hepatic ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatic ischemia is a condition in which the liver does not get enough blood or oxygen, causing injury to ... pressure from any condition can lead to hepatic ischemia. Such conditions may include: Abnormal heart rhythms Dehydration ...

  9. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... washed in untreated water Putting into your mouth a finger or object that came into contact with ...

  10. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/000279.htm Hepatitis B To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Hepatitis B is irritation and swelling (inflammation) of the ...

  11. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2014 Select a Language: Fact Sheet 507 Hepatitis C WHAT IS HEPATITIS C? HOW IS IT DIAGNOSED? ... treatment may be less likely to work. Hep C treatment is less effective for coinfected people. Cure ...

  12. How Are Varicose Veins Treated?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Intramural Research Research Resources Research Meeting Summaries Technology Transfer Clinical Trials What Are Clinical Trials? Children & Clinical ... shun) therapy uses lasers or radiowaves to create heat to close off a varicose vein. Your doctor ...

  13. Hepatic haemangiomata: diagnosis and management.

    PubMed Central

    Larcher, V F; Howard, E R; Mowat, A P

    1981-01-01

    Five cases of hepatic haemangioma are described, and a sixth (previously reported) is reviewed. Clinical features, investigation, and management are described to show the great variability of the complications and prognosis. Five children presented in the first 10 weeks of life with hepatomegaly; 4 developed congestive cardiac failure; 3 had cutaneous haemangiomata. One child presented at age 4 years with hepatomegaly and anaemia, and on investigation had features of chronic disseminated intravascular coagulation. Focal decrease or patchiness in hepatic uptake of technetium-99m colloid, and abnormal intrahepatic circulation was shown in all cases. In 3 children liver biopsy was performed to exclude malignant disease. In one patient there was spontaneous regression of the tumour by age 3 years. In 3 cases hepatic artery ligation was necessary to control congestive cardiac failure which had persisted despite treatment with digoxin, diuretics, and oral corticosteroids, a procedure which was without complications after up to 8 years. One infant with intractable portal hypertension, hepatic vein obstruction, and severe cholestasis died with persisting alimentary haemorrhage and intra-abdominal sepsis. One child aged 4 years showed no immediate response to hepatic artery ligation but the size of her tumour got smaller and the clinical features diminished after irradiation. These tumours cause considerable morbidity and have a high reported mortality. If congestive cardiac failure is not rapidly controlled, hepatic artery ligation should be performed. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 PMID:7469456

  14. Resolution of Large Azygos Vein Aneurysm Following Stent-Graft Shunt Placement in a Patient with Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome Type IV

    SciTech Connect

    D'Souza, Estelle S.; Williams, David M.; Deeb, G.M.; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-10-15

    Ehlers-Danlos syndrome (EDS) type IV is a rare connective tissue disorder associated with thin-walled, friable arteries and veins predisposing patients to aneurysm formation, dissection, fistula formation, and vessel rupture. Azygos vein aneurysm is an extremely rare condition which has not been reported in association with EDS in the literature. We present a patient with EDS type IV and interrupted inferior vena cava (IVC) with azygos continuation who developed an azygos vein aneurysm. In order to decrease flow through the azygos vein and reduce the risk of aneurysm rupture, a stent-graft shunt was created from the right hepatic vein to the azygos vein via a transhepatic, retroperitoneal route. At 6 month follow-up the shunt was open and the azygos vein aneurysm had resolved.

  15. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... is an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis A, is caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). The disease spreads through contact with ... suggest medicines to help relieve your symptoms. The hepatitis A vaccine can prevent HAV. Good hygiene can also ...

  16. Hepatitis A

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Español Hepatitis A Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is hepatitis A? Hepatitis * A is a virus , or infection, ...

  17. Autoimmune Hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Organizations ​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Autoimmune Hepatitis Page Content On this page: What is autoimmune ... Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is autoimmune hepatitis? Autoimmune hepatitis is a chronic—or long lasting— ...

  18. Hepatitis C

    MedlinePlus

    ... an inflammation of the liver. One type, hepatitis C, is caused by the hepatitis C virus (HCV). It usually spreads through contact with ... childbirth. Most people who are infected with hepatitis C don't have any symptoms for years. If ...

  19. Deltoid Branch of Thoracoacromial Vein

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ta-Wei; Wu, Ching-Feng; Fu, Jui-Ying; Ko, Po-Jen; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Hsieh, Hong-Chang; Wu, Ching-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Abstract An entry vessel is crucial for intravenous port implantation. A safe alternative entry vessel that can be easily explored is crucial for patients without feasible cephalic vein or for those who need port reimplantation because of disease relapse. In this study, we tried to analyze the safety and feasibility of catheter implantation via the deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein. From March 2012 to November 2013, 802 consecutive oncology patients who had received intravenous port implantation via the superior vena cava were enrolled in this study. The functional results and complications of different entry vessels were compared. The majority of patients (93.6%) could be identified as thoracoacromial vessel. The deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein is located on the medial aspect of the deltopectoral groove beneath the pectoralis major muscle (85.8%) and in the deep part of the deltopectoral groove (14.2%). Due to the various calibers employed and tortuous routes followed, we utilized 3 different methods for catheter implantation, including vessel cutdown (47.4%), wire assisted (17.9%), and modified puncture method (34.6%). The functional results and complication rate were similar to other entry vessels. The deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein is located in the neighborhood of the cephalic vein. The functional results of intravenous port implantation via the deltoid branch of the thoracoacromial vein are similar to other entry vessels. It is a safe alternative entry vessel for intravenous port implantation. PMID:25929903

  20. Deep vein thrombosis and tuberculosis: a causative link?

    PubMed Central

    Kechaou, Ines; Cherif, Eya; Ben Hassine, Lamia; Khalfallah, Narjess

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary tuberculosis is very devastating in developing countries and its thrombogenic potential is a disturbing new entity. We report an 18-year-old woman who presented with a first episode of deep vein thrombosis. Pulmonary, hepatic and splenic tuberculosis was diagnosed while looking for secondary causes. The patient was treated with rifampicin, isoniazid, pyrazinamide and ethambutol along with low-molecular-weight heparin and antivitamin K. Tuberculosis has several mechanisms that induce a hypercoagulable state and can lead to thromboembolic complications. PMID:24859543

  1. A model for the extended studies of hepatic hemodynamics and metabolism in swine.

    PubMed

    Drougas, J G; Barnard, S E; Wright, J K; Sika, M; Lopez, R R; Stokes, K A; Williams, P E; Pinson, C W

    1996-12-01

    To our knowledge postoperative hepatic hemodynamics and hepatic metabolism have not been fully studied on a long-term basis. Our goal was to develop a large animal model that would permit the measurement of hepatic blood flow (BF), perihepatic pressures (P), and hepatic metabolism in a long-term setting. Catheters were inserted into the jugular vein, carotid artery, pulmonary artery, hepatic vein, and portal vein (PV) of 27 commercially bred pigs; ultrasonic transit time flowmeter probes were placed around the hepatic artery and PV. Daily postoperative measurements of jugular vein P, carotid artery P, pulmonary artery P, hepatic vein P, and PVP, as well as hepatic artery BF and PVBF, were recorded for 20 days. Hepatic carbohydrate metabolism was assessed by arteriovenous difference techniques. Jugular vein P, pulmonary artery P, hepatic vein P, PVP, and heart rate reached steady-state values during the first week, with a mean +/- SEM of 1.0 +/- 0.3 mm Hg for jugular vein P, 21.4 +/- 2.1 mm Hg for pulmonary artery P, 4.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg for HVP, 7.8 +/- 0.5 mm Hg for PVP, and 116 +/- 4 beats per minute for heart rate. Mean carotid artery P increased from 65 +/- 3 mm Hg during surgery to 94 +/- 2 mm Hg on postoperative day 1 (P < 0.001) and to a mean 101 +/- 2 mm Hg thereafter. Total hepatic BF reached a steady-state value of 1,132 +/- 187 ml/min by postoperative day 7 (P = 0.19). Over week 1 hepatic artery BF measured as a percentage of total hepatic BF decreased from 35.0 +/- 3.0% to 15.5 +/- 2.7%, and PVBF increased from 65.0 +/- 3.0% to 84.5 +/- 2.7% (P < 0.005); both variables were steady thereafter. In the hemodynamic steady state the net hepatic balances of glucose, lactate, glycerol, and alanine in 5 pigs were 9.9 +/- 4.0, -4.2 +/- 0.4, -2.3 +/- 1.1, and -0.68 +/- 0.22 micromol/kg per min respectively. The net gut (portal-drained viscera) balances of glucose, lactate, alanine, and glycerol were -2.0 +/- 2.5, 1.1 +/- 0.5, 0.73 +/- 0.18, and -0.69 +/- 0

  2. Acute Effects of Liver Vein Occlusion by Stent-Graft Placed in Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt Channel: An Experimental Study

    SciTech Connect

    Keussen, Inger Bergqvist, Lennart; Rissler, Pehr; Cwikiel, Wojciech

    2006-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of hepatic vein occlusion by stent-graft used in transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS). The experiments were performed in six healthy pigs under general anesthesia. Following percutaneous transhepatic implantation of a port-a-cath in the right hepatic vein, TIPS was created with a stent-graft (Viatorr; W L Gore, Flagstaff, AZ, USA). The outflow from the hepatic vein, blocked by the stent-graft was documented by injection of contrast medium and repeated injections of {sup 99}Tc{sup m}-labeled human serum albumin through the port-a-cath. After 2 weeks, the outflow was re-evaluated, the pigs were sacrificed, and histopathologic examination of the liver was performed. Occlusion of the hepatic vein by a stent-graft had a short and temporary effect on the outflow. Histopathological examination from the affected liver segment showed no divergent pattern. Stent-grafts used in TIPS block the outflow from the liver vein, but do not have a prolonged circulatory effect and do not affect the liver parenchyma.

  3. A rare case of anastomosis between the external and internal jugular veins

    PubMed Central

    Karapantzos, Ilias; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Kioumis, Ioannis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Sachpekidis, Nikolaos; Organtzis, John; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Pitsiou, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Fouka, Evagelia; Demetriou, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Jugular veins bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart. There are two sets of external and internal veins. The external jugular vein receives the greater part of the blood from the cranium and the deep parts of the face. It commences from the substance of the parotid gland and runs down the neck at the posterior border of sternocleidomastoideus and ends in the subclavian vein in front of the scalenus anterior. The external jugular vein is covered by the platysma and its upper half runs parallel with the great auricular nerve. There is also another minor jugular vein, the anterior, draining the submaxillary region. In our patient, we recognized a shunt between the external and internal jugular veins. It appeared in the middle of the veins, between the pair of valves, which are placed ~2.5 cm above the termination of the vessel. The anastomosis was fully functional, and there was no problem in the blood pressure of the patient. Moreover, the shunt was not associated with any systemic disease. PMID:27051321

  4. A rare case of anastomosis between the external and internal jugular veins.

    PubMed

    Karapantzos, Ilias; Zarogoulidis, Paul; Charalampidis, Charalampos; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Kioumis, Ioannis; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Mpakas, Andrew; Sachpekidis, Nikolaos; Organtzis, John; Porpodis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Pitsiou, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kosmidis, Christoforos; Fouka, Evagelia; Demetriou, Theodoros

    2016-01-01

    Jugular veins bring deoxygenated blood from the head back to the heart. There are two sets of external and internal veins. The external jugular vein receives the greater part of the blood from the cranium and the deep parts of the face. It commences from the substance of the parotid gland and runs down the neck at the posterior border of sternocleidomastoideus and ends in the subclavian vein in front of the scalenus anterior. The external jugular vein is covered by the platysma and its upper half runs parallel with the great auricular nerve. There is also another minor jugular vein, the anterior, draining the submaxillary region. In our patient, we recognized a shunt between the external and internal jugular veins. It appeared in the middle of the veins, between the pair of valves, which are placed ~2.5 cm above the termination of the vessel. The anastomosis was fully functional, and there was no problem in the blood pressure of the patient. Moreover, the shunt was not associated with any systemic disease. PMID:27051321

  5. Hepatitis Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  6. Hepatitis Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ogholikhan, Sina; Schwarz, Kathleen B.

    2016-01-01

    Viral hepatitis is a serious health problem all over the world. However, the reduction of the morbidity and mortality due to vaccinations against hepatitis A and hepatitis B has been a major component in the overall reduction in vaccine preventable diseases. We will discuss the epidemiology, vaccine development, and post-vaccination effects of the hepatitis A and B virus. In addition, we discuss attempts to provide hepatitis D vaccine for the 350 million individuals infected with hepatitis B globally. Given the lack of a hepatitis C vaccine, the many challenges facing the production of a hepatitis C vaccine will be shown, along with current and former vaccination trials. As there is no current FDA-approved hepatitis E vaccine, we will present vaccination data that is available in the rest of the world. Finally, we will discuss the existing challenges and questions facing future endeavors for each of the hepatitis viruses, with efforts continuing to focus on dramatically reducing the morbidity and mortality associated with these serious infections of the liver. PMID:26978406

  7. Portal Vein Thrombosis in Cirrhosis

    PubMed Central

    Raja, Kaiser; Jacob, Mathew; Asthana, Sonal

    2013-01-01

    Portal vein thrombosis (PVT) is being increasingly recognized in patients with advanced cirrhosis and in those undergoing liver transplantation. Reduced flow in the portal vein is probably responsible for clotting in the spleno-porto-mesenteric venous system. There is also increasing evidence that hypercoagulability occurs in advanced liver disease and contributes to the risk of PVT. Ultrasound based studies have reported a prevalence of PVT in 10–25% of cirrhotic patients without hepatocellular carcinoma. Partial thrombosis of the portal vein is more common and may not have pathophysiological consequences. However, there is high risk of progression of partial PVT to complete PVT that may cause exacerbation of portal hypertension and progression of liver insufficiency. It is thus, essential to accurately diagnose and stage PVT in patients waiting for transplantation and consider anticoagulation therapy. Therapy with low molecular weight heparin and vitamin K antagonists has been shown to achieve complete and partial recanalization in 33–45% and 15–35% of cases respectively. There are however, no guidelines to help determine the dose and therapeutic efficacy of anticoagulation in patients with cirrhosis. Anticoagulation therapy related bleeding is the most feared complication but it appears that the risk of variceal bleeding is more likely to be dependent on portal pressure rather than solely related to coagulation status. TIPS has also been reported to restore patency of the portal vein. Patients with complete PVT currently do not form an absolute contraindication for liver transplantation. Thrombectomy or thromboendovenectomy is possible in more than 75% of patients followed by anatomical end-to-end portal anastomosis. When patency of the portal vein and/or superior mesenteric vein is not achieved, only non-anatomical techniques (reno-portal anastomosis or cavo-portal hemitransposition) can be performed. These techniques, which do not fully reverse portal

  8. Management of superficial vein thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Cosmi, B

    2015-07-01

    Superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) is less well studied than deep vein thrombosis (DVT), because it has been considered to be a minor, self-limiting disease that is easily diagnosed on clinical grounds and that requires only symptomatic relief. The most frequently involved sites of the superficial vein system are the lower limbs, especially the saphenous veins, mostly in relation to varicosities. Lower-limb SVT shares the same risk factors as DVT; it can propagate into the deep veins, and have a complicated course with pulmonary embolism. Clinical diagnosis may not be accurate, and ultrasonography is currently indicated for both confirmation and evaluation of SVT extension. Treatment aims are symptom relief and prevention of venous thromboembolism (VTE) in relation to the thrombotic burden. SVT of the long saphenous vein within 3 cm of the saphenofemoral junction (SFJ) is considered to be equivalent to a DVT, and thus deserving of therapeutic anticoagulation. Less severe forms of lower-limb SVT not involving the SFJ have been included in randomized clinical trials of surgery, compression hosiery, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, unfractionated heparin, and low molecular weight heparins, with inconclusive results. The largest randomized clinical trial available, on 3004 patients with lower-limb SVT not involving the SFJ, showed that fondaparinux 2.5 mg once daily for 6 weeks is more effective than placebo in reducing the risk of the composite of death from any cause and symptomatic VTE (0.9% versus 5.9%). Further studies are needed to define the optimal management strategies for SVT of the lower limbs and other sites, such as the upper limbs. PMID:25903684

  9. Hepatitis B Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    ... as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis B?Hepatitis B is a serious infection that affects the liver. It is caused by the hepatitis B virus. ...

  10. Hepatitis A Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Twinrix® (as a combination product containing Hepatitis A Vaccine, Hepatitis B Vaccine) ... What is hepatitis A?Hepatitis A is a serious liver disease caused by the hepatitis A virus (HAV). HAV is found in ...

  11. Hepatitis C: Clinical Trials

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Public Home » Hepatitis C » Treatment Decisions Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... can I find out about participating in a hepatitis C clinical trial? Many trials are being conducted ...

  12. Hepatitis B immunization in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, M H; Goldstein, M A

    1995-10-01

    This article reviews the epidemiology of hepatitis B in the United States, previous vaccination strategy, and reasons for its failure and issues leading to the recommendation to vaccinate all adolescents. A review of specific hepatitis B virus risk behaviors of adolescents and barriers to vaccinating adolescents is covered. Strategies that favor successful completion of the immunization series are also examined. Hepatitis B infection is an important public health concern for adolescents. The previous vaccine strategy to immunize only individuals though to be at high risk was unsuccessful, especially because providers of care could not identify these individuals. Furthermore, many individuals thought not to be at high risk for infection were exposed through contacts which could not be identified. Challenges to immunization of adolescents include logistical issues, patient education, cost of the vaccine, and patient compliance. Several of these issues can be addressed by a school-based hepatitis B immunization program. The body of evidence and national policy is rapidly changing to support the recommendation that all adolescents receive the hepatitis B immunization series. The series would be most effective if administered during the middle-school years. A universal adolescent hepatitis B vaccination program would result in the most immediate health benefits and acceleration toward the eradication of hepatitis B in the United States. PMID:8580124

  13. Autoimmune hepatitis

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. These include: Graves disease Inflammatory bowel disease Rheumatoid arthritis Scleroderma Sjogren syndrome Systemic lupus erythematosus Thyroiditis Type 1 diabetes Ulcerative colitis Autoimmune hepatitis may occur in family ...

  14. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... A Hepatitis B HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Influenza (Flu) Measles Meningococcal Disease Mumps Pertussis (Whooping Cough) Pneumococcal Disease Rubella (German Measles) Shingles (Herpes Zoster) Tetanus (Lockjaw) Professional Resources Adult ...

  15. Asymptomatic anomalous pulmonary veins in a Siberian Husky.

    PubMed

    Abraham, L A; Slocombe, R F

    2003-07-01

    A 2-year-old, neutered male Siberian Husky presented with depression, weight loss and an inability to prehend food and water. Cerebrospinal fluid was collected under general anaesthesia prior to euthanasia. The elevated white cell count comprised mostly mononuclear cells. Histological changes within the brain were variable and multifocal. Non-suppurative meningitis secondary to lymphoma was diagnosed. At necropsy, abnormal venous drainage of the right cranial and middle lung lobes was found. A dilated major pulmonary vein from these lobes passed across the lateral aspect of the right caudal lung lobe prior to entering the heart, and subpleural veins from the affected lobes were enlarged and tortuous. These vascular abnormalities were considered incidental. There were no apparent congenital abnormalities of the heart and the animal's clinical signs were related to lymphoma of the brain. PMID:15084052

  16. Percutaneous Mesocaval Shunt Creation in a Patient with Chronic Portal and Superior Mesenteric Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Bercu, Zachary L. Sheth, Sachin B.; Noor, Amir; Lookstein, Robert A. Fischman, Aaron M. Nowakowski, F. Scott Kim, Edward Patel, Rahul S.

    2015-10-15

    The creation of a transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) is a critical procedure for the treatment of recurrent variceal bleeding and refractory ascites in the setting of portal hypertension. Chronic portal vein thrombosis remains a relative contraindication to conventional TIPS and options are limited in this scenario. Presented is a novel technique for management of refractory ascites in a patient with hepatitis C cirrhosis and chronic portal and superior mesenteric vein thrombosis secondary to schistosomiasis and lupus anticoagulant utilizing fluoroscopically guided percutaneous mesocaval shunt creation.

  17. Hepatocellular carcinoma with extension to the diaphragm, falciform ligament, rectus abdominis and paraumbilical vein

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, R; Abdullah, BJJ; Rajasingam, V

    2008-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma is the most common primary tumour of the liver. The most common extrahepatic metastatic sites are the lung, lymph nodes, bones and adrenal glands. All forms of HCC demonstrate a tendency for vascular invasion, producing extensive intrahepatic metastases and, occasionally, portal vein or inferior vena cava extension with spread into the right atrium in extreme cases. Tumour spread of abdominal diseases via hepatic ligaments has also been previously reported. We report a rare case of hepatocellular carcinoma with extension into the falciform ligament, overlying rectus sheath and adjacent diaphragm with concomitant infiltration into the recanalised paraumbilical vein. PMID:21611019

  18. Preoperative portal vein embolization for hepatocellular carcinoma: Consensus and controversy

    PubMed Central

    Aoki, Taku; Kubota, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    Thirty years have passed since the first report of portal vein embolization (PVE), and this procedure is widely adopted as a preoperative treatment procedure for patients with a small future liver remnant (FLR). PVE has been shown to be useful in patients with hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) and chronic liver disease. However, special caution is needed when PVE is applied prior to subsequent major hepatic resection in cases with cirrhotic livers, and volumetric analysis of the liver segments in addition to evaluation of the liver functional reserve before PVE is mandatory in such cases. Advances in the embolic material and selection of the treatment approach, and combined use of PVE and transcatheter arterial embolization/chemoembolization have yielded improved outcomes after PVE and major hepatic resections. A novel procedure termed the associating liver partition and portal vein ligation for staged hepatectomy has been gaining attention because of the rapid hypertrophy of the FLR observed in patients undergoing this procedure, however, application of this technique in HCC patients requires special caution, as it has been shown to be associated with a high morbidity and mortality even in cases with essentially healthy livers. PMID:27028706

  19. Diagnosis of deep vein thrombosis.

    PubMed Central

    Douketis, J. D.; Ginsberg, J. S.

    1996-01-01

    Deep vein thrombosis (DVT), a common disease, can be difficult to diagnose because its clinical features are nonspecific. Venography is the standard test, but other less expensive, easily performed, noninvasive tests are available. At present, duplex ultrasonography is the noninvasive test of choice. PMID:8616289

  20. Blackberry Yellow Vein Disease Complex

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new virus disease has emerged in the Midsouth and Southeastern United States and was named blackberry yellow vein disease (BYVD). Originally, it was thought the disease was caused by Tobacco ringspot virus (TRSV) as the virus was found in many diseased plants and symptoms were very similar to thos...

  1. The Treatment of Varicose Veins

    PubMed Central

    Subramonia, S; Lees, TA

    2007-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Over the past few years, there has been a move to less invasive endoluminal methods in the treatment of lower limb varicose veins combined with a renewed interest in sclerotherapy, with the recent addition of foam sclerotherapy. The development of these new techniques has led many to question some of the more conventional teaching on the treatment of varicose veins. This review examines these new treatments for lower limb varicose veins and the current evidence for their use. MATERIALS AND METHODS An extensive search of available electronic and paper-based databases was performed to identify studies relevant to the treatment of varicose veins with particular emphasis on those published within the last 10 years. These were analysed by both reviewers independently. RESULTS There is no single method of treatment appropriate for all cases. Conventional surgery is safe and effective and is still widely practised. Whilst the new treatments may be popular with both surgeons and patients, it is important that they are carefully evaluated not only for their clinical benefits and complications when compared to existing treatments but also for their cost prior to their wider acceptance into clinical practice. PMID:17346396

  2. Varicose veins - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Below are some questions you may want to ask your health care provider to help you take ... What to ask your doctor about varicose veins; Venous insufficiency - what to ask your doctor; Vein stripping - what to ask your ...

  3. Clinical implications of concomitant variations of the testicular, suprarenal and renal veins: a case report.

    PubMed

    Malcic-Gürbüz, Jasna; Akalin, Aytül; Gümüşcü, Burak; Cavdar, Safiye

    2002-01-01

    Multiple venous anomalies have been observed during dissection of the posterior abdominal wall in a 65-year-old, white male cadaver. The left testicular and suprarenal veins united inferior to the superior mesenteric artery, coursed anterior to the abdominal aorta and drained into the inferior vena cava (IVC). Further the left renal vein coursed retroaortically and divided into three branches. The superior branch coursed on the vertebral column and drained into the azygos vein while middle and inferior branches drained into the IVC. The right renal vein was double and both drained into the IVC separately. Due to implications for numerous therapeutical and diagnostic procedures in the retroperitoneal region knowledge of these variations could be useful for clinicians in its recognition and protection. PMID:11876480

  4. A case of dural arteriovenous fistula draining to the diploic vein presenting with intracerebral hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Yako, Rie; Masuo, Osamu; Kubo, Kenji; Nishimura, Yasuhiko; Nakao, Naoyuki

    2016-03-01

    The authors report an unusual case of a dural arteriovenous fistula (dAVF) draining only to the diploic vein and causing intracerebral hemorrhage. A 62-year-old woman presented with disturbance of consciousness and left hemiparesis. Brain CT scanning on admission showed a right frontal subcortical hemorrhage. Digital subtraction angiography revealed an arteriovenous shunt located in the region around the pterion, which connected the frontal branch of the right middle meningeal artery with the anterior temporal diploic vein and drained into cortical veins in a retrograde manner through the falcine vein. The dAVF was successfully obliterated by percutaneous transarterial embolization with N-butyl-2-cyanoacrylate. The mechanism of retrograde cortical venous reflux causing intracerebral hemorrhage is discussed. PMID:26295918

  5. Surgical management of hepatic arterioportal fistula in a neonate.

    PubMed

    Ramachandran, Priya; Shanmugam, N P; Vij, M; Rela, M

    2014-05-01

    Congenital arterioportal fistulae in the liver are rare malformations which can lead to portal hypertension. We report a hepatic arterioportal fistula in a neonate who presented with intestinal hypoperfusion. Computerised tomography angiography showed a fistulous communication between the left hepatic artery and portal vein with hypoperfusion of small and large bowel. A formal left hepatectomy was done followed by clinical improvement and reduction in portal venous pressures. The case and the literature pertaining to it are discussed. PMID:24448912

  6. phenoVein-A Tool for Leaf Vein Segmentation and Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bühler, Jonas; Rishmawi, Louai; Pflugfelder, Daniel; Huber, Gregor; Scharr, Hanno; Hülskamp, Martin; Koornneef, Maarten; Schurr, Ulrich; Jahnke, Siegfried

    2015-12-01

    Precise measurements of leaf vein traits are an important aspect of plant phenotyping for ecological and genetic research. Here, we present a powerful and user-friendly image analysis tool named phenoVein. It is dedicated to automated segmenting and analyzing of leaf veins in images acquired with different imaging modalities (microscope, macrophotography, etc.), including options for comfortable manual correction. Advanced image filtering emphasizes veins from the background and compensates for local brightness inhomogeneities. The most important traits being calculated are total vein length, vein density, piecewise vein lengths and widths, areole area, and skeleton graph statistics, like the number of branching or ending points. For the determination of vein widths, a model-based vein edge estimation approach has been implemented. Validation was performed for the measurement of vein length, vein width, and vein density of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), proving the reliability of phenoVein. We demonstrate the power of phenoVein on a set of previously described vein structure mutants of Arabidopsis (hemivenata, ondulata3, and asymmetric leaves2-101) compared with wild-type accessions Columbia-0 and Landsberg erecta-0. phenoVein is freely available as open-source software. PMID:26468519

  7. Surgical Access to Jejunal Veins for Local Thrombolysis and Stent Placement in Portal Vein Thrombosis

    SciTech Connect

    Schellhammer, Frank; Esch, Jan Schulte am; Hammerschlag, Sascha; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Fuerst, Guenter

    2008-07-15

    Portal vein thrombosis is an infrequent entity, which may cause high morbidity and mortality. We report a case of portal vein thrombosis due to benign stenosis following partial pancreatoduodenectomy with segmental replacement of the portal vein by a Gore-tex graft. Using a surgical access to jenunal veins, local thrombolysis, mechanical fragmentation of thrombus, and stent placement were successfully performed.

  8. Prediction of long saphenous vein graft adaptation.

    PubMed

    Davies, A H; Magee, T R; Hayward, J K; Baird, R N; Horrocks, M

    1994-07-01

    The ability of vein to dilate may allow smaller veins to be used for bypass if this change could be predicted. Sixty patients undergoing femorodistal popliteal or infrapopliteal bypass have had their long saphenous vein studied. Diameter measurements of the long saphenous vein have been performed using an ATL Duplex scanner at the groin, mid-thigh and knee. Measurements were performed preoperatively both at rest and with a venous occlusion cuff to dilate the vein and subsequently at 7 days and 3, 6, 9, 12 months after implantation. The mean diameter of the vein at the mid thigh was 4.2 mm non dilated, 5.1 mm with occlusion, 5.4 mm 7 days postoperatively and 5.5 mm at 12 months (p < 0.01 ANOVA). The mean diameter of the vein at the knee was 3.8 mm non-dilated, 4.8 mm with occlusion, 4.8 mm at 7 days and 5.0 mm at 12 months after operation (p < 0.01 ANOVA). If the minimum resting internal diameter of vein regarded as being suitable for bypass was 3 mm, this technique would have increased the vein utilisation rate by 22%. These results show that by using a technique of venous occlusion at the time of preoperative vein mapping the adaptive response of the vein can be predicted and this can result in an increased rate of vein utilisation. PMID:8088400

  9. The Relationships between Metabolic Disorders (Hypertension, Dyslipidemia, and Impaired Glucose Tolerance) and Computed Tomography-Based Indices of Hepatic Steatosis or Visceral Fat Accumulation in Middle-Aged Japanese Men

    PubMed Central

    Yokokawa, Hirohide; Naito, Toshio; Sasabe, Noriko; Okumura, Mitsue; Iijima, Kimiko; Shibuya, Katsuhiko; Hisaoka, Teruhiko; Fukuda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Background Most studies on the relationships between metabolic disorders (hypertension, dyslipidemia, and impaired glucose tolerance) and hepatic steatosis (HS) or visceral fat accumulation (VFA) have been cross-sectional, and thus, these relationships remain unclear. We conducted a retrospective cohort study to clarify the relationships between components of metabolic disorders and HS/VFA. Methods The participants were 615 middle-aged men who were free from serious liver disorders, diabetes, and HS/VFA and underwent multiple general health check-ups at our institution between 2009 and 2013. The data from the initial and final check-ups were used. HS and VFA were assessed by computed tomography. HS was defined as a liver to spleen attenuation ratio of ≤1.0. VFA was defined as a visceral fat cross-sectional area of ≥100 cm2 at the level of the navel. Metabolic disorders were defined using Japan’s metabolic syndrome diagnostic criteria. The participants were divided into four groups based on the presence (+) or absence (-) of HS/VFA. The onset rates of each metabolic disorder were compared among the four groups. Results Among the participants, 521, 55, 24, and 15 were classified as HS(-)/VFA(-), HS(-)/VFA(+), HS(+)/VFA(-), and HS(+)/VFA(+), respectively, at the end of the study. Impaired glucose tolerance was more common among the participants that exhibited HS or VFA (p = 0.05). On the other hand, dyslipidemia was more common among the participants that displayed VFA (p = 0.01). Conclusions It is likely that VFA is associated with impaired glucose tolerance and dyslipidemia, while HS might be associated with impaired glucose tolerance. Unfortunately, our study failed to detect associations between HS/VFA and metabolic disorders due to the low number of subjects that exhibited fat accumulation. Although our observational study had major limitations, we consider that it obtained some interesting results. HS and VFA might affect different metabolic disorders

  10. Using autologous peritoneal graft for portal vein injury due to blunt thoracoabdominal trauma

    PubMed Central

    Sabuncuoglu, M Z; Dandin, O; Teomete, U; Cakir, T; Kayaalp, C

    2015-01-01

    Background Autologous vein or prosthetic materials are used as patch or tube graft for portal or caval vein reconstruction after trauma or tumor resection. Preparation of autologous veins requires extra incisions and is time consuming that is crucial especially in trauma patients. This condition adversely affects postoperative morbidity and mortality, particularly in trauma cases. Prosthetic materials may not be available in some centers, and their use is associated with an increased risk of infection. Description of case A 28-year-old hemodynamically unstable man presented to the emergency room with complete transection of main portal vein, right hepatic artery and common bile duct with tissue defect on hepatoduodenal ligament due to blunt thoracoabdominal trauma. Reconstructing of the portal vein was performed using an autologous peritoneal tube graft. Conclusion Autologous peritoneal graft is a very good option in the treatment of major vascular injuries which can not be repaired with primary suturing. It is also easy to prepare and use, safe, without a need of additional incision, as an alternative to autologous veins and prosthetic materials especially under emergency conditions. Hippokratia 2015; 19 (3): 260-262. PMID:27418787

  11. In-vivo xenograft murine human uveal melanoma model develops hepatic micrometastases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Hua; Fang, Guofu; Huang, Xinping; Yu, Jie; Hsieh, Chia-Ling; Grossniklaus, Hans E.

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of the study is to develop a mouse ocular melanoma model with human uveal melanoma cells that forms hepatic micrometastases. Human uveal melanoma Mel290 cells were transfected with a lentiviral-enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) expression vector. Proliferation assays were performed by comparing Mel290-EGFP and Mel290 cells. After stable expression of EGFP and proliferation was ascertained, 1 × 106 Mel290-EGFP cells were introduced into NU/NU mice by posterior compartment (PC) inoculation or tail vein injection. Control groups were inoculated or injected with Mel290 cells. Ocular and hepatic frozen sections were examined by fluorescence microscopy, and the number of hepatic micrometastases was determined. EGFP expression was observed at 24 h after transfection. At 72 h after transfection, more than 70% of Mel290 cells expressed EGFP. At 45 days (six passages), 90% of Mel290 cells stably expressed EGFP. Histologic examination showed that Mel290-EGFP cells formed hepatic micrometastases after either PC inoculation or tail vein injection. A significant difference in the number of hepatic micrometastases between PC inoculation and tail vein injection (P<0.01) was observed. Mel290-EGFP cells stably expressed green fluorescent protein in vitro at 45 days (six passages). These cells formed hepatic micrometastases in NU/NU mice after PC inoculation or tail vein injection, with significantly more micrometastases developing in the PC inoculation model than after tail vein injection. PMID:18337645

  12. Abnormal patterns of the renal veins

    PubMed Central

    Azari, Hassan; Abedinzadeh, Mehdi

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the renal vascular anatomy may greatly contribute to the success of surgical, invasive and radiological procedures of the retroperitoneal region. Here, morphometric and histological studies of a human cadaveric specimen presented a complex, anomalous pattern of renal veins. The left renal vein had an oblique retro-aortic course and received two lumbar veins. It bifurcated near its drainage point into the inferior vena cava. The right renal vein received the right testicular vein. In addition, the left kidney was located at a low position. The spleen was enlarged. The present case is unique and provides information that may help surgeons or angiologists to apply safer interventions. PMID:22536553

  13. Mechanical buckling of veins under internal pressure.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Ricky; Fierro, Cesar A; Shireman, Paula K; Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-04-01

    Venous tortuosity is associated with multiple disease states and is often thought to be a consequence of venous hypertension and chronic venous disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of vein tortuosity are unclear. We hypothesized that increased pressure causes vein buckling that leads to a tortuous appearance. The specific aim of this study was to determine the critical buckling pressure of veins. We determined the buckling pressure of porcine jugular veins and measured the mechanical properties of these veins. Our results showed that the veins buckle when the transmural pressure exceeds a critical pressure that is strongly related to the axial stretch ratio in the veins. The critical pressures of the eight veins tested were 14.2 +/- 5.4 and 26.4 +/- 9.0 mmHg at axial stretch ratio 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. In conclusion, veins buckle into a tortuous shape at high lumen pressures or reduced axial stretch ratios. Our results are useful in understanding the development of venous tortuosity associated with varicose veins, venous valvular insufficiency, diabetic retinopathy, and vein grafts. PMID:20094913

  14. Mechanical Buckling of Veins under Internal Pressure

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Ricky; Fierro, Cesar A.; Shireman, Paula K.; Han, Hai-Chao

    2010-01-01

    Venous tortuosity is associated with multiple disease states and is often thought to be a consequence of venous hypertension and chronic venous disease. However, the underlying mechanisms of vein tortuosity are unclear. We hypothesized that increased pressure causes vein buckling that leads to a tortuous appearance. The specific aim of this study was to determine the critical buckling pressure of veins. We determined the buckling pressure of porcine jugular veins and measured the mechanical properties of these veins. Our results showed that veins buckle when the transmural pressure exceeds a critical pressure that is strongly related to the axial stretch ratio in the veins. The critical pressures of the eight veins tested were 14.2 ± 5.4 mmHg and 26.4 ± 9.0 mmHg at axial stretch ratio 1.5 and 1.7, respectively. In conclusion, veins buckle into a tortuous shape at high lumen pressures or reduced axial stretch ratios. Our results are useful in understanding the development of venous tortuosity associated with varicose veins, venous valvular insufficiency, diabetic retinopathy and vein grafts. PMID:20094913

  15. Leiomyosarcoma of the renal vein.

    PubMed

    Imao, Tetsuya; Amano, Toshiyasu; Takemae, Katsurou

    2011-02-01

    A 43-year-old woman was referred to our clinic for evaluation of a left retroperitoneal mass. She presented to our internal medicine department complaining of back pain. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a left retroperitoneal mass 55 mm in size in the hilum of the left kidney. Enhanced CT scan and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) disclosed a poorly staining mass. Metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy demonstrated no accumulation in the mass; moreover, endocrinologic examination was normal. Laparoscopic resection of the left retroperitoneal tumor was attempted; however, strong adhesion between the tumor and the left renal vein was encountered. Thus, left nephrectomy after open conversion was performed. Histological findings indicated leiomyosarcoma originating from the left renal vein. The postoperative course has been uneventful; neither recurrence nor metastasis is evident 2 years postsurgery. PMID:20694494

  16. [ENDOVENOUS LASER TREATMENT FOR VARICOSE VEINS].

    PubMed

    Tezuka, Masahiro; Kanaoka, Yuji; Ohki, Takao

    2015-05-01

    Varicose veins are a common condition attecting approximately 10 million patients in Japan. The main cause of varicose veins is reflux of the saphenous vein, and conventional treatment for several decades was stripping the affected saphenous vein and phlebectomy. Endovenous laser treatment (EVLT) is a less-invasive treatment method in which the saphenous vein is ablated with a laser under local anesthesia. EVLT has been approved by the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare since 2011, and we have performed EVLT on 5,160 legs with saphenous insufficiency with no severe complications including deep vein thrombosis except for one case of arteriovenous fistula. EVLT appears to be a safe, effective treatment option for varicose veins with saphenous insufficiency. PMID:26281654

  17. Hepatic Encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Bleibel, Wissam; Al-Osaimi, Abdullah M. S.

    2012-01-01

    Chronic liver disease and cirrhosis affect hundreds of millions of patients all over the world. The majority of patients with cirrhosis will eventually develop complications related to portal hypertension. One of these recurrent and difficult to treat complications is hepatic encephalopathy. Studies have indicated that overt hepatic encephalopathy affects 30 to 45% of patients with cirrhosis and a higher percentage may be affected by minimal degree of encephalopathy. All of these factors add to the impact of hepatic encephalopathy on the healthcare system and presents a major challenge to the gastroenterologist, hospitalist and primary care physician. PMID:23006457

  18. Transjugular Intrahepatic Portosystemic Shunt in a Patient with Cavernomatous Portal Vein Occlusion

    SciTech Connect

    Kawamata, Hiroshi; Kumazaki, Tatsuo; Kanazawa, Hidenori; Takahashi, Shuji; Tajima, Hiroyuki; Hayashi, Hiromitsu

    2000-03-15

    A 23-year-old woman with liver cirrhosis secondary to primary sclerosing cholangitis was referred to us for the treatment of recurrent bleeding from esophageal varices that had been refractory to endoscopic sclerotherapy. Her portal vein was occluded, associated with cavernous transformation. A transjugular intrahepatic portosystemic shunt (TIPS) was performed after a preprocedural three-dimensional computed tomographic angiography evaluation to determine feasibility. The portal vein system was recanalized and portal blood flow increased markedly after TIPS. Esophageal varices disappeared 3 weeks after TIPS. Re-bleeding and hepatic encephalopathy were absent for 3 years after the procedure. We conclude that with adequate preprocedural evaluation, TIPS can be performed safely even in patients with portal vein occlusion associated with cavernous transformation.

  19. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommendation statement. Ann Intern Med . 2014;161(1):58-66. PMID 24863637 ... Development Conference Statement: Management of hepatitis B. Ann Intern Med . 2009;150:104-10. PMID: 19124811 www. ...

  20. Hepatitis B

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Change Plan Wallet card for patients to record their alcohol use over a 4-week period as a way to monitor and reduce their drinking behavior. Glossary Definitions of terms commonly used with viral hepatitis and ...

  1. Resolution of preoperative portal vein thrombosis after administration of antithrombin III in living donor liver transplantation: case report.

    PubMed

    Imai, H; Egawa, H; Kajiwara, M; Nakajima, A; Ogura, Y; Hatano, E; Ueda, M; Kawaguchi, Y; Kaido, T; Takada, Y; Uemoto, S

    2009-11-01

    A 59-year-old man with hepatitis C virus-associated liver cirrhosis was transferred to our hospital to undergo living donor liver transplantation. Coagulation was impaired (prothrombin time [International Normalized Ratio], 3.27), and antithrombin III (AT-III) activity was 23% (normal, 87%-115%). Contrast-enhanced computed tomography scans revealed portal vein thrombosis (PVT) from the junction between the splenic and superior mesenteric vein to the porta hepatica; the portal vein was completely obstructed (PVT). To prevent further development of PVT, 1500 U of AT-III was administered for 3 days, elevating the AT-III activity to 50%. A contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan obtained 9 days after AT-III administration showed resolution of PVT. Living donor liver transplantation was safely performed without portal vein grafting. Thus, a low AT-III concentration may have an important role in the pathogenesis of PVT in patients with cirrhosis. PMID:19917415

  2. Vein harvesting and techniques for infrainguinal bypass.

    PubMed

    Albäck, Anders; Saarinen, Eva; Venermo, Maarit

    2016-04-01

    In order to achieve good long term results after bypass surgery, alongside with good inflow and outflow arteries, the bypass graft material also has an important role. The best patency and limb salvage rates are achieved with autologous vein. If great saphenous vein is not available, acceptable long-term results can be achieved with arm veins and lesser saphenous vein. The quality and size of the vein are important. A small-caliber vein, increased wall thickness, postphlebitic changes and varicosities are associated with a risk of early failure. Preoperative vein mapping with ultrasound reduces readmissions and postoperative surgical site infections. During the mapping, the vein to be used and its main tributaries are marked with a permanent marker pen. To reduce wound complication rates we recommend bridged incisions in vein harvesting. Endoscopic vein harvesting seems to have no benefit compared to open techniques in lower limb bypasses, and has been associated with higher risk of primary patency loss at one year. With deep tunneling of the graft the problems caused by wound infection can be avoided. PMID:26837257

  3. Hepatitis C - children

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus (HCV). Other common hepatitis virus infections include hepatitis A and hepatitis B . ... Elisofon SA, Jonas MMF. Viral hepatitis in children. In: Boyer TD, Manns MP, Sanyal AJ, eds. Zakim & Boyer's Hepatology: A Textbook of Liver Disease. 6th ed. ...

  4. Hepatitis B Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... worldwide 2 Billion People have been infected with Hepatitis B Worldwide The Hepatitis B Foundation is working ... of people living with hepatitis B. Learn About Hepatitis B in 10 Other Languages . Resource Video See ...

  5. Delta agent (Hepatitis D)

    MedlinePlus

    Hepatitis D virus ... Hepatitis D virus (HDV) is found only in people who carry the hepatitis B virus. HDV may make liver ... B virus but who never had symptoms. Hepatitis D infects about 15 million people worldwide. It occurs ...

  6. Hepatitis C FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis C FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  7. Hepatitis B FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis B FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  8. Hepatitis A Test

    MedlinePlus

    ... be limited. Home Visit Global Sites Search Help? Hepatitis A Testing Share this page: Was this page ... HAV-Ab total; Anti-HAV Formal name: Viral Hepatitis A Antibody Related tests: Hepatitis B Testing ; Hepatitis ...

  9. Hepatitis A FAQs

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Viral Hepatitis Contact Us Quick Links to Hepatitis ... A | B | C | D | E Viral Hepatitis Home ... Outbreaks State and Local Partners & Grantees Resource Center Hepatitis A FAQs for the Public Recommend on Facebook ...

  10. Feature Hepatitis: Hepatitis Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Feature Hepatitis Hepatitis: Symptoms, Diagnosis, Treatment & Prevention Past Issues / Spring 2009 Table of ... Stomach ache Nausea Diarrhea No appetite Fever Headaches Diagnosis To check for hepatitis viruses, your doctor will ...

  11. Shifts in leaf vein density through accelerated vein formation in C4 Flaveria (Asteraceae)

    PubMed Central

    McKown, Athena D.; Dengler, Nancy G.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Aims Leaf venation in many C4 species is characterized by high vein density, essential in facilitating rapid intercellular diffusion of C4 photosynthetic metabolites between different tissues (mesophyll, bundle sheath). Greater vein density has been hypothesized to be an early step in C4 photosynthesis evolution. Development of C4 vein patterning is thought to occur from either accelerated or prolonged procambium formation, relative to ground tissue development. Methods Cleared and sectioned tissues of phylogenetically basal C3 Flaveria robusta and more derived C4 Flaveria bidentis were compared for vein pattern in mature leaves and vein pattern formation in developing leaves. Key Results In mature leaves, major vein density did not differ between C3 and C4 Flaveria species, whereas minor veins were denser in C4 species than in C3 species. The developmental study showed that both major and minor vein patterning in leaves of C3 and C4 species were initiated at comparable stages (based on leaf length). An additional vein order in the C4 species was observed during initiation of the higher order minor veins compared with the C3 species. In the two species, expansion of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells occurred after vein pattern was complete and xylem differentiation was continuous in minor veins. In addition, mesophyll cells ceased dividing sooner and enlarged less in C4 species than in C3 species. Conclusions Leaf vein pattern characteristic to C4 Flaveria was achieved primarily through accelerated and earlier offset of higher order vein formation, rather than other modifications in the timing of vein pattern formation, as compared with C3 species. Earlier cessation of mesophyll cell division and reduced expansion also contributed to greater vein density in the C4 species. The relatively late expansion of bundle sheath and mesophyll cells shows that vein patterning precedes ground tissue development in C4 species. PMID:19759038

  12. Gold Veins near Great Falls, Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reed, John Calvin, Jr.; Reed, John C.

    1969-01-01

    Small deposits of native gold are present along an anastomosing system of quartz veins and shear zones just east of Great Falls, Montgomery County, Md. The deposits were discovered in 1861 and were worked sporadically until 1951, yielding more than 5,000 ounces of gold. The vein system and the principal veins within it strike a few degrees west of north, at an appreciable angle to foliation and fold axial planes in enclosing rocks of the Wissahickon Formation of late Precambrian (?) age. The veins cut granitic rocks of Devonian or pre-Devonian age and may be as young as Triassic. Further development of the deposits is unlikely under present economic conditions because of their generally low gold content and because much of the vein system lies on park property, but study of the Great Falls vein system may be useful in the search for similar deposits elsewhere in the Appalachian Piedmont.

  13. Preduodenal portal vein: its surgical significance.

    PubMed

    Makey, D A; Bowen, J C

    1978-11-01

    Preduodenal portal vein is a rare anatomical variant which may be one of many anomalies in the neonate with duodenal "atresia." Preduodenal portal vein also may be an occasional finding in an adult undergoing biliary, gastric, or pancreatic surgery. Awareness and recognition of the anomaly are essential for the avoidance of injury during such operations. We report here a symptomless patient whose preduodenal portal vein was discovered at cholecystectomy. PMID:715684

  14. Laser leg vein treatment: a brief overview.

    PubMed

    Ross, Victor; Domankevitz, Yacov

    2003-12-01

    Laser treatment of leg veins has been associated with a number of disadvantages, but the introduction of new devices has increased the role of lasers in the treatment of leg veins. This paper reviews the role of laser devices applied from the surface in the treatment of reticular and spider veins. Success is determined by the proper selection of wavelength, fluence, pulse duration, spot size, and number and frequency of treatments. PMID:14741827

  15. Hepatitis C: Sex and Sexuality

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Hepatitis » Sex and Sexuality: Entire Lesson Viral Hepatitis Menu Menu Viral Hepatitis Viral Hepatitis Home For ... hepatitis C virus through sex. Can you pass hepatitis C to a sex partner? Yes, but it ...

  16. Hepatic venous outflow obstruction: Three similar syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Bayraktar, Ulas Darda; Seren, Soley; Bayraktar, Yusuf

    2007-01-01

    Our goal is to provide a detailed review of veno-occlusive disease (VOD), Budd-Chiari syndrome (BCS), and congestive hepatopathy (CH), all of which results in hepatic venous outflow obstruction. This is the first article in which all three syndromes have been reviewed, enabling the reader to compare the characteristics of these disorders. The histological findings in VOD, BCS, and CH are almost identical: sinusoidal congestion and cell necrosis mostly in perivenular areas of hepatic acini which eventually leads to bridging fibrosis between adjacent central veins. Tender hepatomegaly with jaundice and ascites is common to all three conditions. However, the clinical presentation depends mostly on the extent and rapidity of the outflow obstruction. Although the etiology and treatment are completely different in VOD, BCS, and CH; the similarities in clinical manifestations and liver histology may suggest a common mechanism of hepatic injury and adaptation in response to increased sinusoidal pressure. PMID:17461490

  17. Hepatitis C

    PubMed Central

    Mehta, Bharti; Kumar Dharma, Vijay; Chawla, Sumit; Jindal, Harashish; Bhatt, Bhumika

    2014-01-01

    Hepatitis C Virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of chronic hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma. Following acute infection, 20% of people eliminate the virus over weeks or months and are often asymptomatic. The remaining 80% of people will develop chronic disease, of which approximately 20% will eventually develop liver cirrhosis and 1–5% will develop liver cancer. About 150 million people are chronically infected with HCV, and more than 350 000 people die every year from hepatitis C related liver diseases. The economic cost of hepatitis C is significant both to the individual and to the society. In the United States the average lifetime cost of the disease was estimated at $33 407 USD with the cost of a liver transplant approximately $200 000 USD. PEG-IFN and ribavirin treatment is also expensive and, at an average cost of approximately GB £7000 in the UK for a treatment course, is unaffordable in developing countries. Hepatitis C, not only brings down the quality of the life of individuals but also affect progress of the nation by adding financial burden. If we prevent the disease from occurring or find a perfect cure of the disease, in form of a prophylactic or therapeutic vaccine, it will be a boon to not only to the individual but to the nation as a whole. PMID:24165512

  18. The adrenal and renal veins of man and their connections with azygos and lumbar veins.

    PubMed

    Monkhouse, W S; Khalique, A

    1986-06-01

    There exist many variations in the manner of formation, dimensions and place of termination of the central adrenal veins. In addition, some superficial adrenal veins may be substantial in size and may themselves drain directly into the renal veins and/or into other vessels which communicate with azygos and lumbar veins. This provides a route for venous adrenal blood to the heart via the azygos system and the superior vena cava rather than via the inferior vena cava. Variations in the formation and disposition of the renal veins are also described and the patterns of communication between somatic veins (including veins of the azygos and lumbar systems) and the left renal vein are illustrated and discussed in relation to the findings of others. PMID:3693053

  19. Morphological description of great cardiac vein in pigs compared to human hearts

    PubMed Central

    Alejandro Gómez, Fabian; Ballesteros, Luis Ernesto; Stella Cortés, Luz

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In spite of its importance as an experimental model, the information on the great cardiac vein in pigs is sparse. Objective To determine the morphologic characteristics of the great cardiac vein and its tributaries in pigs. Methods 120 hearts extracted from pigs destined to the slaughterhouse with stunning method were studied. This descriptive cross-over study evaluated continuous variables with T test and discrete variables with Pearson χ square test. A level of significance P<0.05 was used. The great cardiac vein and its tributaries were perfused with polyester resin (85% Palatal and 15% Styrene) and then subjected to potassium hydroxide infusion to release the subepicardial fat. Calibers were measured, and trajectories and relations with adjacent arterial structures were evaluated. Results The origin of the great cardiac vein was observed at the heart apex in 91 (76%) hearts. The arterio-venous trigone was present in 117 (97.5%) specimens, corresponding to the open expression in its lower segment and to the closed expression in the upper segment in the majority of the cases (65%). The caliber of the great cardiac vein at the upper segment of the paraconal interventricular sulcus was 3.73±0.79 mm. An anastomosis between the great cardiac vein and the middle cardiac vein was found in 59 (49%) specimens. Conclusion The morphological and biometric characteristics of the great cardiac vein and its tributaries had not been reported in prior studies, and due to their similitude with those of the human heart, allows us to propose the pig model for procedural and hemodynamic applications. PMID:25859869

  20. Remodelling of the Superior Caval Vein After Angioplasty in an Infant with Superior Caval Vein Syndrome

    SciTech Connect

    Mert, Murat Saltik, Levent; Gunay, Ilhan

    2004-08-15

    An 8-month old girl was presented with superior caval vein syndrome early after cardiac surgery. Angiography showed severe stenosis of the superior caval vein with 50 mmHg pressure gradient. Following balloon angioplasty, the pressure gradient was reduced to 7 mmHg with some residual stenosis of the superior caval vein. When the patient was reevaluated 5 months after the procedure, angiography revealed a normal diameter of the superior caval vein without a pressure gradient.

  1. Hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mínguez, Beatriz

    2008-02-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy is a severe complication of cirrhosis that is related to the effects of ammonia. Analysis of interorgan ammonia trafficking has identified an important role of skeletal muscle in ammonia removal and has highlighted the importance of the nutritional status. Ammonia causes neurotransmitter abnormalities and induces injury to astrocytes that is partially mediated by oxidative stress. These disturbances lead to astrocyte swelling and brain edema, which appear to be involved in the pathogenesis of neurological manifestations. Inflammatory mediators worsen brain disturbances. New methods for assessing hepatic encephalopathy include clinical scales, neuropsychological tests, imaging of portal-systemic circulation, and magnetic resonance of the brain. Reappraisal of current therapy indicates the need for performing placebo-controlled trials and the lack of evidence for administering diets with restricted protein content. Liver transplant should be considered in selected patients with hepatic encephalopathy. Future prospects include new drugs that decrease plasma ammonia, measures to reduce brain edema, and liver-support devices. PMID:18293278

  2. [Hepatic encephalopathy].

    PubMed

    Córdoba, Juan; Mur, Rafael Esteban

    2014-07-01

    Hepatic encephalopathy (EH) is a severe complication of hepatic cirrhosis that is characterized by multiple neuropsychiatric manifestations. EH is usually triggered by a precipitating factor and occurs in patients with severely impaired hepatic function. Minimal EH is characterized by minor cognitive impairments that are difficult to specify but represent a risk for the patients. The primary pathophysiological mechanism of EH is considered to be an increase in blood ammonia with an impairment in the patency of the blood-brainbarrier and its metabolism to glutamine in astrocytes. The diagnosis is clinical and neuroimaging techniques can be complementary. The diagnosis of minimal EH requires specific neurocognitive tests. The clinical evaluation should be directed towards identifying the trigger. Nonabsorbable disaccharides and rifaximin constitute the treatment of choice, along with prophylaxis for new episodes. PMID:25087716

  3. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Varicose Veins?

    MedlinePlus

    ... from the NHLBI on Twitter. What Are the Signs and Symptoms of Varicose Veins? The signs and symptoms of varicose veins include: Large veins ... skin in the area around the varicose vein. Signs of telangiectasias are clusters of red veins that ...

  4. Hydrodynamic Tail Vein Injection as a Simple Tool for Yielding Extended Transgene Expression in Solid Tumors.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Takuma; Ukawa, Masami; Kanazawa, Yuki; Ando, Hidenori; Shimizu, Taro; Ishida, Tatsuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Hydrodynamic tail vein injection was considered an in vivo transfection method that yields a higher level of gene expression mainly in the liver. This method has been applied to cancer gene therapy targeting both hepatic and non-hepatic cancers. However, intratumor transgene expression in non-hepatic tumors has not been well studied. In this study, we showed an extended transgene expression of β-galactosidase (LacZ), a nonsecretory protein, in a subcutaneously implanted murine solid tumor following the hydrodynamic injection of plasmid DNA (LacZ pDNA). Our result may indicate that the hydrodynamic injection method is a powerful tool that can be used to gain transgene expression not only in the liver but also in solid tumors. PMID:27582335

  5. Hepatocellular Carcinoma With Tumor Thrombus Occupying the Right Atrium and Portal Vein: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Luo, Xin; Zhang, Binhao; Dong, Shuilin; Zhang, Bixiang; Chen, Xiaoping

    2015-08-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients with tumor thrombus extended through the major hepatic veins and inferior vena cava into the right atrium (RA) are rare, and most cases are considered as the advanced stage with a poor prognosis.We report a case of HCC with a tumor thrombus extending into the RA and a tumor thrombus in the portal vein. A literature search for case reports was performed on PubMed.Compared with the published literature, our case is one of the youngest patients, but with the most advanced HCC that invades both the hepatic inflow and outflow vasculature. For this patient, we resected the tumor thrombus in the RA with the use of cardiopulmonary bypass, and then removed the tumor thrombus in the portal vein and ligated the left branch of portal vein. Because of insufficient remnant liver volume, microwave ablation and transcatheter arterial chemoembolization were performed to control the growth of HCC. The patient survived 6 months after surgery.This case suggests that for patients with extension of HCC into the RA and portal vein, surgery is a useful therapeutic modality, even in case that liver tumor cannot be resected. PMID:26313767

  6. Idiopathic Bilateral External Jugular Vein Thrombosis

    PubMed Central

    Hindi, Zakaria; Fadel, Ehab

    2015-01-01

    Patient: Male, 21 Final Diagnosis: Idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis Symptoms: Face engorgement • neck swelling Medication: — Clinical Procedure: None Specialty: Hematology Objective: Unknown ethiology Background: Vein thrombosis is mainly determined by 3 factors, which constitute a triad called Virchow’s triad: hypercoagulability, stasis, and endothelial injury. Venous thrombosis commonly occurs in the lower extremities since most of the blood resides there and flows against gravity. The veins of the lower extremities are dependent on intact valves and fully functional leg muscles. However, in case of valvular incompetency or muscular weakness, thrombosis and blood stasis will occur as a result. In contrast, the veins of the neck, specially the jugulars, have distensible walls which allow flexibility during respiration. In addition, the blood directly flows downward towards the heart. Nevertheless, many case reports mentioned the thrombosis of internal jugular veins and external jugular veins with identified risk factors. Jugular vein thrombosis has previously been associated in the literature with a variety of medical conditions, including malignancy. Case Report: This report is of a case of idiopathic bilateral external jugular vein thrombosis in a 21 year-old male construction worker of Southeast Asian origin with no previous medical history who presented with bilateral facial puffiness of gradual onset over 1 month. Doppler ultrasound and computed tomography were used in the diagnosis. Further work-up showed no evidence of infection or neoplasia. The patient was eventually discharged on warfarin. The patient was assessed after 6 months and his symptoms had resolved completely. Conclusions: Bilateral idiopathic external jugular veins thrombosis is extremely rare and can be an indicator of early malignancy or hidden infection. While previous reports in the literature have associated jugular vein thrombosis with malignancy, the present

  7. Doppler ultrasonography measurement of hepatic hemodynamics during Valsalva maneuver: healthy volunteer study

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of our study was to assess the hemodynamic change of liver during the Valsalva maneuver using Doppler ultrasonography. Methods: Thirty healthy men volunteers were enrolled (mean age, 25.5±3.64 years). The diameter, minimal and maximal velocities, and volume flow of intrahepatic inferior vena cava (IVC), middle hepatic vein (MHV), and right main portal vein (RMPV) was measured during both rest and Valsalva maneuver. These changes were compared using paired t-test. Results: The mean diameters (cm) of the intrahepatic IVC at rest and Valsalva maneuver were 1.94±0.40 versus 0.56±0.66 (P<0.001). The mean diameter (cm), minimal velocity (cm/sec), maximal velocity (cm/sec), and volume flow (mL/min) of MHV at rest and Valsalva maneuver were 0.60±0.15 versus 0.38±0.20 (P<0.001), -7.98±5.47 versus 25.74±13.13 (P<0.001), 21.34±6.89 versus 35.12±19.95 (P=0.002), and 106.94±97.65 versus 153.90±151.80 (P=0.014), respectively. Those of RMPV at rest and Valsalva maneuver were 0.78±0.21 versus 0.76±0.20 (P=0.485), 20.21±8.22 versus 18.73±7.43 (P=0.351), 26.79±8.85 versus 24.93±9.91 (P=0.275), and 391.52±265.63 versus 378.43±239.36 (P=0.315), respectively. Conclusion: The blood flow velocity and volume flow of MHV increased significantly during Valsalva maneuver. These findings suggest that hepatic vein might play an important role to maintain venous return to the heart during the maneuver. PMID:25327526

  8. Fontan conversion with hepatic vein exclusion: a means for hepatic preservation in single ventricle heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kogon, Brian; McConnell, Michael; Book, Wendy

    2016-03-01

    Patients with single ventricle heart disease often undergo staged surgical palliation, ultimately resulting in Fontan anatomy and physiology. Long-term consequences include cirrhosis of the liver, protein-losing enteropathy, and premature death. Elevated central venous pressure and venous congestion transmitted to the abdominal viscera have been implicated in the aetiology of many of these complications. We present a novel operation directed at protecting the liver and intestines by excluding the splanchnic venous return from the Fontan pathway. Instead of exposure to elevated Fontan pressures, the liver and intestines will be exposed to lower common atrial pressures. We hope that this modification will minimise the abdominal complications of Fontan anatomy and physiology. PMID:26139025

  9. Epidemiology of Blackberry yellow vein associated virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Blackberry yellow vein disease is one of the most important diseases of blackberry in the United States. Several viruses are found associated with the symptomology but Blackberry yellow vein associated virus (BYVaV) appears to be the most prevalent of all, leading to the need for a better understand...

  10. [Aneurysm of the femoral and popliteal vein].

    PubMed

    Hansen, L G; Boris, P

    1986-04-01

    Aneurysms of the popliteal and femoral veins are rare and may be seen as casual findings with no clinical manifestations whatsoever. On the other hand they may be potential source of recurrent pulmonary embolism. A case is reported, where an aneurysm of the femoral vein was found in a clinically symptomless woman aged 48. PMID:3715020