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Sample records for midgut ph regulation

  1. Injury-induced BMP signaling negatively regulates Drosophila midgut homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zheng; Driver, Ian

    2013-01-01

    Although much is known about injury-induced signals that increase rates of Drosophila melanogaster midgut intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation, it is largely unknown how ISC activity returns to quiescence after injury. In this paper, we show that the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling pathway has dual functions during midgut homeostasis. Constitutive BMP signaling pathway activation in the middle midgut mediated regional specification by promoting copper cell differentiation. In the anterior and posterior midgut, injury-induced BMP signaling acted autonomously in ISCs to limit proliferation and stem cell number after injury. Loss of BMP signaling pathway members in the midgut epithelium or loss of the BMP signaling ligand decapentaplegic from visceral muscle resulted in phenotypes similar to those described for juvenile polyposis syndrome, a human intestinal tumor caused by mutations in BMP signaling pathway components. Our data establish a new link between injury and hyperplasia and may provide insight into how BMP signaling mutations drive formation of human intestinal cancers. PMID:23733344

  2. The physiology of the midgut of Lutzomyia longipalpis (Lutz and Neiva 1912): pH in different physiological conditions and mechanisms involved in its control.

    PubMed

    Santos, Vânia C; Araujo, Ricardo N; Machado, Luciane A D; Pereira, Marcos H; Gontijo, Nelder F

    2008-09-01

    Nutrient digestion and absorption after blood feeding are important events for Lutzomyia longipalpis, which uses these nutrients to produce eggs. In this context, the pH inside the digestive tract is an important physiological feature as it can markedly influence the digestive process as well as interfere with Leishmania development in infected phlebotomines. It was described previously that unfed females have an acidic midgut (pH 6). In this study, the pH inside the midgut of blood-fed females was measured. The abdominal midgut (AM) pH varied from 8.15+/-0.31 in the first 10 h post-blood meal to 7.7+/-0.17 after 24 h. While the AM was alkaline during blood digestion, the pH in the thoracic midgut (TM) remained acidic (5.5-6.0). In agreement with these findings, the enzyme alpha-glucosidase, which has an optimum pH of 5.8, is mainly encountered in the acidic TM. The capacity of unfed females to maintain the acidic intestinal pH was also evaluated. Our results showed the presence of an efficient mechanism that maintains the pH almost constant at about 6 in the midgut, but not in the crop. This mechanism is promptly interrupted in the AM by blood ingestion. RT-PCR results indicated the presence of carbonic anhydrase in the midgut cells, which apparently is required to maintain the pH at 6 in the midgut of unfed females. Investigations on the phenomenon of alkalization observed after blood ingestion indicated that two mechanisms are involved: in addition to the alkalization promoted by CO2 volatilization there is a minor contribution from a second mechanism not yet characterized. Some inferences concerning Leishmania development and pH in the digestive tube are presented. PMID:18723537

  3. A tetraspanin regulates septate junction formation in Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Izumi, Yasushi; Motoishi, Minako; Furuse, Kyoko; Furuse, Mikio

    2016-03-15

    Septate junctions (SJs) are membrane specializations that restrict the free diffusion of solutes through the paracellular pathway in invertebrate epithelia. In arthropods, two morphologically different types of septate junctions are observed; pleated (pSJs) and smooth (sSJs), which are present in ectodermally and endodermally derived epithelia, respectively. Recent identification of sSJ-specific proteins, Mesh and Ssk, in Drosophila indicates that the molecular compositions of sSJs and pSJs differ. A deficiency screen based on immunolocalization of Mesh identified a tetraspanin family protein, Tsp2A, as a newly discovered protein involved in sSJ formation in Drosophila Tsp2A specifically localizes at sSJs in the midgut and Malpighian tubules. Compromised Tsp2A expression caused by RNAi or the CRISPR/Cas9 system was associated with defects in the ultrastructure of sSJs, changed localization of other sSJ proteins, and impaired barrier function of the midgut. In most Tsp2A mutant cells, Mesh failed to localize to sSJs and was distributed through the cytoplasm. Tsp2A forms a complex with Mesh and Ssk and these proteins are mutually interdependent for their localization. These observations suggest that Tsp2A cooperates with Mesh and Ssk to organize sSJs. PMID:26848177

  4. Silencing of Anopheles stephensi Heme Peroxidase HPX15 Activates Diverse Immune Pathways to Regulate the Growth of Midgut Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Kajla, Mithilesh; Choudhury, Tania P.; Kakani, Parik; Gupta, Kuldeep; Dhawan, Rini; Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev

    2016-01-01

    Anopheles mosquito midgut harbors a diverse group of endogenous bacteria that grow extensively after the blood feeding and help in food digestion and nutrition in many ways. Although, the growth of endogenous bacteria is regulated by various factors, however, the robust antibacterial immune reactions are generally suppressed in this body compartment by a heme peroxidase HPX15 crosslinked mucins barrier. This barrier is formed on the luminal side of the midgut and blocks the direct interactions and recognition of bacteria or their elicitors by the immune reactive midgut epithelium. We hypothesized that in the absence of HPX15, an increased load of exogenous bacteria will enormously induce the mosquito midgut immunity and this situation in turn, can easily regulate mosquito-pathogen interactions. In this study, we found that the blood feeding induced AsHPX15 gene in Anopheles stephensi midgut and promoted the growth of endogenous as well as exogenous fed bacteria. In addition, the mosquito midgut also efficiently regulated the number of these bacteria through the induction of classical Toll and Imd immune pathways. In case of AsHPX15 silenced midguts, the growth of midgut bacteria was largely reduced through the induction of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) gene, a downstream effector molecule of the JAK/STAT pathway. Interestingly, no significant induction of the classical immune pathways was observed in these midguts. Importantly, the NOS is a well known negative regulator of Plasmodium development, thus, we proposed that the induction of diverged immune pathways in the absence of HPX15 mediated midgut barrier might be one of the strategies to manipulate the vectorial capacity of Anopheles mosquito.

  5. GATAe regulates intestinal stem cell maintenance and differentiation in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Takashi; Takeda, Koji; Kuchiki, Megumi; Akaishi, Marie; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Adachi-Yamada, Takashi

    2016-02-01

    Adult intestinal tissues, exposed to the external environment, play important roles including barrier and nutrient-absorption functions. These functions are ensured by adequately controlled rapid-cell metabolism. GATA transcription factors play essential roles in the development and maintenance of adult intestinal tissues both in vertebrates and invertebrates. We investigated the roles of GATAe, the Drosophila intestinal GATA factor, in adult midgut homeostasis with its first-generated knock-out mutant as well as cell type-specific RNAi and overexpression experiments. Our results indicate that GATAe is essential for proliferation and maintenance of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Also, GATAe is involved in the differentiation of enterocyte (EC) and enteroendocrine (ee) cells in both Notch (N)-dependent and -independent manner. The results also indicate that GATAe has pivotal roles in maintaining normal epithelial homeostasis of the Drosophila adult midgut through interaction of N signaling. Since recent reports showed that mammalian GATA-6 regulates normal and cancer stem cells in the adult intestinal tract, our data also provide information on the evolutionally conserved roles of GATA factors in stem-cell regulation. PMID:26719127

  6. Ecdysone-Induced Receptor Tyrosine Phosphatase PTP52F Regulates Drosophila Midgut Histolysis by Enhancement of Autophagy and Apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Santhanam, Abirami; Peng, Wen-Hsin; Yu, Ya-Ting; Sang, Tzu-Kang

    2014-01-01

    The rapid removal of larval midgut is a critical developmental process directed by molting hormone ecdysone during Drosophila metamorphosis. To date, it remains unclear how the stepwise events can link the onset of ecdysone signaling to the destruction of larval midgut. This study investigated whether ecdysone-induced expression of receptor protein tyrosine phosphatase PTP52F regulates this process. The mutation of the Ptp52F gene caused significant delay in larval midgut degradation. Transitional endoplasmic reticulum ATPase (TER94), a regulator of ubiquitin proteasome system, was identified as a substrate and downstream effector of PTP52F in the ecdysone signaling. The inducible expression of PTP52F at the puparium formation stage resulted in dephosphorylation of TER94 on its Y800 residue, ensuring the rapid degradation of ubiquitylated proteins. One of the proteins targeted by dephosphorylated TER94 was found to be Drosophila inhibitor of apoptosis 1 (DIAP1), which was rapidly proteolyzed in cells with significant expression of PTP52F. Importantly, the reduced level of DIAP1 in response to inducible PTP52F was essential not only for the onset of apoptosis but also for the initiation of autophagy. This study demonstrates a novel function of PTP52F in regulating ecdysone-directed metamorphosis via enhancement of autophagic and apoptotic cell death in doomed Drosophila midguts. PMID:24550005

  7. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus

    PubMed Central

    Crava, Cristina M.; Jakubowska, Agata K.; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity. PMID:25993013

  8. Dissimilar Regulation of Antimicrobial Proteins in the Midgut of Spodoptera exigua Larvae Challenged with Bacillus thuringiensis Toxins or Baculovirus.

    PubMed

    Crava, Cristina M; Jakubowska, Agata K; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador; Bel, Yolanda

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) and lysozymes are the main effectors of the insect immune system, and they are involved in both local and systemic responses. Among local responses, midgut immune reaction plays an important role in fighting pathogens that reach the insect body through the oral route, as do many microorganisms used in pest control. Under this point of view, understanding how insects defend themselves locally during the first phases of infections caused by food-borne pathogens is important to further improve microbial control strategies. In the present study, we analyzed the transcriptional response of AMPs and lysozymes in the midgut of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae), a polyphagous pest that is commonly controlled by products based on Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) or baculovirus. First, we comprehensively characterized the transcripts encoding AMPs and lysozymes expressed in S. exigua larval midgut, identifying 35 transcripts that represent the S. exigua arsenal against microbial infection. Secondly, we analyzed their expression in the midgut after ingestion of sub-lethal doses of two different pore-forming B. thuringiensis toxins, Cry1Ca and Vip3Aa, and the S. exigua nucleopolyhedrovirus (SeMNPV). We observed that both Bt toxins triggered a similar, wide and in some cases high transcriptional activation of genes encoding AMPs and lysozymes, which was not reflected in the activation of the classical systemic immune-marker phenoloxidase in hemolymph. Baculovirus ingestion resulted in the opposed reaction: Almost all transcripts coding for AMPs and lysozymes were down-regulated or not induced 96 hours post infection. Our results shed light on midgut response to different virulence factors or pathogens used nowadays as microbial control agents and point out the importance of the midgut immune response contribution to the larval immunity. PMID:25993013

  9. Dynamics and regulation of glycolysis-tricarboxylic acid metabolism in the midgut of Spodoptera litura during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Hu, D; Luo, W; Fan, L F; Liu, F L; Gu, J; Deng, H M; Zhang, C; Huang, L H; Feng, Q L

    2016-04-01

    Significant changes usually take place in the internal metabolism of insects during metamorphosis. The glycolysis-tricarboxylic acid (glycolysis-TCA) pathway is important for energy metabolism. To elucidate its dynamics, the mRNA levels of genes involved in this pathway were examined in the midgut of Spodoptera litura during metamorphosis, and the pyruvate content was quantified. The expression patterns of these genes in response to starvation were examined, and the interaction between protein phosphatase 1 (PP1) and phosphofructokinase (PFK) was studied. The results revealed that the expression or activities of most glycolytic enzymes was down-regulated in prepupae and then recovered in some degree in pupae, and all TCA-related genes were remarkably suppressed in both the prepupae and pupae. Pyruvate was enriched in the pupal midgut. Taken together, these results suggest that insects decrease both glycolysis and TCA in prepupae to save energy and then up-regulate glycolysis but down-regulate TCA in pupae to increase the supply of intermediates for construction of new organs. The expression of all these genes were down-regulated by starvation, indicating that non-feeding during metamorphosis may be a regulator of glycolysis-TCA pathway in the midgut. Importantly, interaction between PP1 and PFK was identified and is suggested to be involved in the regulation of glycolysis. PMID:26683413

  10. Human IGF1 regulates midgut oxidative stress and epithelial homeostasis to balance lifespan and Plasmodium falciparum resistance in Anopheles stephensi.

    PubMed

    Drexler, Anna L; Pietri, Jose E; Pakpour, Nazzy; Hauck, Eric; Wang, Bo; Glennon, Elizabeth K K; Georgis, Martha; Riehle, Michael A; Luckhart, Shirley

    2014-06-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) regulates cell death, repair, autophagy, and renewal in response to stress, damage, and pathogen challenge. Therefore, IIS is fundamental to lifespan and disease resistance. Previously, we showed that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) within a physiologically relevant range (0.013-0.13 µM) in human blood reduced development of the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum in the Indian malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi. Low IGF1 (0.013 µM) induced FOXO and p70S6K activation in the midgut and extended mosquito lifespan, whereas high IGF1 (0.13 µM) did not. In this study the physiological effects of low and high IGF1 were examined in detail to infer mechanisms for their dichotomous effects on mosquito resistance and lifespan. Following ingestion, low IGF1 induced phosphorylation of midgut c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), a critical regulator of epithelial homeostasis, but high IGF1 did not. Low and high IGF1 induced midgut mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and nitric oxide (NO) synthase gene expression, responses which were necessary and sufficient to mediate IGF1 inhibition of P. falciparum development. However, increased ROS and apoptosis-associated caspase-3 activity returned to baseline levels following low IGF1 treatment, but were sustained with high IGF1 treatment and accompanied by aberrant expression of biomarkers for mitophagy, stem cell division and proliferation. Low IGF1-induced ROS are likely moderated by JNK-induced epithelial cytoprotection as well as p70S6K-mediated growth and inhibition of apoptosis over the lifetime of A. stephensi to facilitate midgut homeostasis and enhanced survivorship. Hence, mitochondrial integrity and homeostasis in the midgut, a key signaling center for IIS, can be targeted to coordinately optimize mosquito fitness and anti-pathogen resistance for improved control strategies for malaria and other vector-borne diseases. PMID:24968248

  11. Human IGF1 Regulates Midgut Oxidative Stress and Epithelial Homeostasis to Balance Lifespan and Plasmodium falciparum resistance in Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Drexler, Anna L.; Pietri, Jose E.; Pakpour, Nazzy; Hauck, Eric; Wang, Bo; Glennon, Elizabeth K. K.; Georgis, Martha; Riehle, Michael A.; Luckhart, Shirley

    2014-01-01

    Insulin and insulin-like growth factor signaling (IIS) regulates cell death, repair, autophagy, and renewal in response to stress, damage, and pathogen challenge. Therefore, IIS is fundamental to lifespan and disease resistance. Previously, we showed that insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) within a physiologically relevant range (0.013–0.13 µM) in human blood reduced development of the human parasite Plasmodium falciparum in the Indian malaria mosquito Anopheles stephensi. Low IGF1 (0.013 µM) induced FOXO and p70S6K activation in the midgut and extended mosquito lifespan, whereas high IGF1 (0.13 µM) did not. In this study the physiological effects of low and high IGF1 were examined in detail to infer mechanisms for their dichotomous effects on mosquito resistance and lifespan. Following ingestion, low IGF1 induced phosphorylation of midgut c-Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK), a critical regulator of epithelial homeostasis, but high IGF1 did not. Low and high IGF1 induced midgut mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) synthesis and nitric oxide (NO) synthase gene expression, responses which were necessary and sufficient to mediate IGF1 inhibition of P. falciparum development. However, increased ROS and apoptosis-associated caspase-3 activity returned to baseline levels following low IGF1 treatment, but were sustained with high IGF1 treatment and accompanied by aberrant expression of biomarkers for mitophagy, stem cell division and proliferation. Low IGF1-induced ROS are likely moderated by JNK-induced epithelial cytoprotection as well as p70S6K-mediated growth and inhibition of apoptosis over the lifetime of A. stephensi to facilitate midgut homeostasis and enhanced survivorship. Hence, mitochondrial integrity and homeostasis in the midgut, a key signaling center for IIS, can be targeted to coordinately optimize mosquito fitness and anti-pathogen resistance for improved control strategies for malaria and other vector-borne diseases. PMID:24968248

  12. Cadmium Accumulation and Pathological Alterations in the Midgut Gland of Terrestrial Snail Helix pomatia L. from a Zinc Smelter Area: Role of Soil pH.

    PubMed

    Włostowski, Tadeusz; Kozłowski, Paweł; Łaszkiewicz-Tiszczenko, Barbara; Oleńska, Ewa

    2016-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether cadmium (Cd) accumulation and toxicity in the midgut gland of Helix pomatia snails living in a Cd-contaminated area were related to soil pH. Toxic responses in the midgut gland (i.e., increased vacuolization and lipid peroxidation) occurred in H. pomatia snails exhibiting the highest Cd levels in the gland (265-274 µg/g dry wt) and living on acidic soil (pH 5.3-5.5), while no toxicity was observed in snails accumulating less Cd (90 µg/g) and ranging on neutral soil (pH 7.0), despite the fact that total soil Cd was similar in the two cases. The accumulation of Cd in the gland was directly related to the water extractable Cd in soil, which in turn correlated inversely with soil pH, indicating that this factor had a significant effect on tissue Cd. It appeared further that the occurrence of Cd toxicity was associated with low levels of metallothionein in the gland of snails ranging on acidic soil. PMID:26868644

  13. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting. PMID:27609527

  14. Roles and regulation of autophagy and apoptosis in the remodelling of the lepidopteran midgut epithelium during metamorphosis.

    PubMed

    Romanelli, Davide; Casartelli, Morena; Cappellozza, Silvia; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-01-01

    We previously showed that autophagy and apoptosis occur in the removal of the lepidopteran larval midgut during metamorphosis. However, their roles in this context and the molecular pathways underlying their activation and regulation were only hypothesized. The results of the present study better clarify the timing of the activation of these two processes: autophagic and apoptotic genes are transcribed at the beginning of metamorphosis, but apoptosis intervenes after autophagy. To investigate the mechanisms that promote the activation of autophagy and apoptosis, we designed a set of experiments based on injections of 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E). Our data demonstrate that autophagy is induced at the end of the last larval stage by the 20E commitment peak, while the onset of apoptosis occurs concomitantly with the 20E metamorphic peak. By impairing autophagic flux, the midgut epithelium degenerated faster, and higher caspase activity was observed compared to controls, whereas inhibiting caspase activation caused a severe delay in epithelial degeneration. Our data demonstrate that autophagy plays a pro-survival function in the silkworm midgut during metamorphosis, while apoptosis is the major process that drives the demise of the epithelium. The evidence collected in this study seems to exclude the occurrence of autophagic cell death in this setting. PMID:27609527

  15. The Hippo pathway regulates intestinal stem cell proliferation during Drosophila adult midgut regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Shaw, Rachael L.; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Polesello, Cédric; Veelken, Cornelia; Edgar, Bruce A.; Tapon, Nicolas

    2010-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the adult Drosophila midgut proliferate to self-renew and to produce differentiating daughter cells that replace those lost as part of normal gut function. Intestinal stress induces the activation of Upd/Jak/Stat signalling, which promotes intestinal regeneration by inducing rapid stem cell proliferation. We have investigated the role of the Hippo (Hpo) pathway in the Drosophila intestine (midgut). Hpo pathway inactivation in either the ISCs or the differentiated enterocytes induces a phenotype similar to that observed under stress situations, including increased stem cell proliferation and expression of Jak/Stat pathway ligands. Hpo pathway targets are induced by stresses such as bacterial infection, suggesting that the Hpo pathway functions as a sensor of cellular stress in the differentiated cells of the midgut. In addition, Yki, the pro-growth transcription factor target of the Hpo pathway, is required in ISCs to drive the proliferative response to stress. Our results suggest that the Hpo pathway is a mediator of the regenerative response in the Drosophila midgut. PMID:21068063

  16. Characterization of Plasmodium developmental transcriptomes in Anopheles gambiae midgut reveals novel regulators of malaria transmission

    PubMed Central

    Akinosoglou, Karolina A; Bushell, Ellen S C; Ukegbu, Chiamaka Valerie; Schlegelmilch, Timm; Cho, Jee-Sun; Redmond, Seth; Sala, Katarzyna; Christophides, George K; Vlachou, Dina

    2015-01-01

    The passage through the mosquito is a major bottleneck for malaria parasite populations and a target of interventions aiming to block disease transmission. Here, we used DNA microarrays to profile the developmental transcriptomes of the rodent malaria parasite Plasmodium berghei in vivo, in the midgut of Anopheles gambiae mosquitoes, from parasite stages in the midgut blood bolus to sporulating oocysts on the basal gut wall. Data analysis identified several distinct transcriptional programmes encompassing genes putatively involved in developmental processes or in interactions with the mosquito. At least two of these programmes are associated with the ookinete development that is linked to mosquito midgut invasion and establishment of infection. Targeted disruption by homologous recombination of two of these genes resulted in mutant parasites exhibiting notable infection phenotypes. GAMER encodes a short polypeptide with granular localization in the gametocyte cytoplasm and shows a highly penetrant loss-of-function phenotype manifested as greatly reduced ookinete numbers, linked to impaired male gamete release. HADO encodes a putative magnesium phosphatase with distinctive cortical localization along the concave ookinete periphery. Disruption of HADO compromises ookinete development leading to significant reduction of oocyst numbers. Our data provide important insights into the molecular framework underpinning Plasmodium development in the mosquito and identifies two genes with important functions at initial stages of parasite development in the mosquito midgut. PMID:25225164

  17. Drosophila Myc integrates multiple signaling pathways to regulate intestinal stem cell proliferation during midgut regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Fangfang; Shi, Qing; Chen, Yongbin; Jiang, Alice; Ip, Y Tony; Jiang, Huaqi; Jiang, Jin

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells (ISCs) in the Drosophila adult midgut are essential for maintaining tissue homeostasis, and their proliferation and differentiation speed up in order to meet the demand for replenishing the lost cells in response to injury. Several signaling pathways including JAK-STAT, EGFR and Hippo (Hpo) pathways have been implicated in damage-induced ISC proliferation, but the mechanisms that integrate these pathways have remained elusive. Here, we demonstrate that the Drosophila homolog of the oncoprotein Myc (dMyc) functions downstream of these signaling pathways to mediate their effects on ISC proliferation. dMyc expression in precursor cells is stimulated in response to tissue damage, and dMyc is essential for accelerated ISC proliferation and midgut regeneration. We show that tissue damage caused by dextran sulfate sodium feeding stimulates dMyc expression via the Hpo pathway, whereas bleomycin feeding activates dMyc through the JAK-STAT and EGFR pathways. We provide evidence that dMyc expression is transcriptionally upregulated by multiple signaling pathways, which is required for optimal ISC proliferation in response to tissue damage. We have also obtained evidence that tissue damage can upregulate dMyc expression post-transcriptionally. Finally, we show that a basal level of dMyc expression is required for ISC maintenance, proliferation and lineage differentiation during normal tissue homeostasis. PMID:23896988

  18. Aedes aegypti midgut early trypsin is post-transcriptionally regulated by blood feeding.

    PubMed

    Noriega, F G; Pennington, J E; Barillas-Mury, C; Wang, X Y; Wells, M A

    1996-02-01

    Early trypsin is a female-specific protease present in the Aedes aegypti midgut during the first hours after ingestion of a blood meal. Early trypsin gene expression was studied by Northern blot analysis. The early trypsin mRNA, absent in larvae, pupae and newly emerged females, reaches detectable levels at 24 h post-emergence and attains a maximum level at an adult age of 4-7 days. After the first week there is a decrease in the steady-state level of the transcript, but it remains readily detectable for up to a month after emergence. Despite the high levels of early trypsin mRNA present in the midgut of the unfed female, translation of the early trypsin mRNA occurs only after a blood or a protein meal. Early trypsin mRNA levels rapidly decrease during the first 24 h after feeding, but the steady-state level of the transcript rises again at the end of the blood digestion cycle (60 h), as the mosquito prepares for a second blood meal. PMID:8630532

  19. Histone Acetylation Regulates Intracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    McBrian, Matthew A.; Behbahan, Iman Saramipoor; Ferrari, Roberto; Su, Trent; Huang, Ta-Wei; Li, Kunwu; Hong, Candice S.; Christofk, Heather R.; Vogelauer, Maria; Seligson, David B.; Kurdistani, Siavash K.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Differences in global levels of histone acetylation occur in normal and cancer cells, although the reason why cells regulate these levels has been unclear. Here we demonstrate a role for histone acetylation in regulating intracellular pH (pHi). As pHi decreases, histones are globally deacetylated by histone deacetylases (HDACs), and the released acetate anions are coexported with protons out of the cell by monocarboxylate transporters (MCTs), preventing further reductions in pHi. Conversely, global histone acetylation increases as pHi rises, such as when resting cells are induced to proliferate. Inhibition of HDACs or MCTs decreases acetate export and lowers pHi, particularly compromising pHi maintenance in acidic environments. Global deacetylation at low pH is reflected at a genomic level by decreased abundance and extensive redistribution of acetylation throughout the genome. Thus, acetylation of chromatin functions as a rheostat to regulate pHi with important implications for mechanism of action and therapeutic use of HDAC inhibitors. PMID:23201122

  20. THAP and ATF-2 Regulated Sterol Carrier Protein-2 Promoter Activities in the Larval Midgut of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Rong; Fu, Qiang; Hong, Huazhu; Schwaegler, Tyler; Lan, Que

    2012-01-01

    Expression of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) in Aedes aegypti shows a distinct temporal/spatial pattern throughout the life cycle. In order to identify the transcription factors responsible for the larval temporal/spatial regulation of AeSCP-2 transcription, AeSCP-2 promoter activities were studied in vivo via transient transfection of promoter/reporter gene assays. Regulatory sequences upstream −1.3 kb of the transcription start site of AeSCP-2 were found to be critical for the in vivo temporal/spatial promoter activity. Interestingly, the −1.6 kb promoter sequence efficiently drove the larval midgut-specific siRNA expression, indicating that the −1.6 kb upstream sequence is sufficient for temporal/spatial AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity. Four transcription factors were identified in the midgut nuclear extract from feeding larvae via labeled −1.6/−1.3 kb DNA probe pull-down and proteomic analysis. Co-transfection of the promoter/reporter gene with inducible siRNA expression of each transcription factor was performed to confirm the regulatory function of individual transcription factor on AeSCP-2 transcriptional activities in the larval midgut. The results indicate that two of the identified transcription factors, Thanatos-associated protein (THAP) and activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), antagonistically control AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity in the midgut of feeding larvae via the regulatory sequences between −1.6 to −1.3 kb 5′ upstream of the transcription start site. In vivo expression knockdown of THAP and ATF-2 resulted in significant changes in developmental progression, which may be partially due to their effects on AeSCP-2 expression. PMID:23056538

  1. THAP and ATF-2 regulated sterol carrier protein-2 promoter activities in the larval midgut of the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Peng, Rong; Fu, Qiang; Hong, Huazhu; Schwaegler, Tyler; Lan, Que

    2012-01-01

    Expression of sterol carrier protein-2 (SCP-2) in Aedes aegypti shows a distinct temporal/spatial pattern throughout the life cycle. In order to identify the transcription factors responsible for the larval temporal/spatial regulation of AeSCP-2 transcription, AeSCP-2 promoter activities were studied in vivo via transient transfection of promoter/reporter gene assays. Regulatory sequences upstream -1.3 kb of the transcription start site of AeSCP-2 were found to be critical for the in vivo temporal/spatial promoter activity. Interestingly, the -1.6 kb promoter sequence efficiently drove the larval midgut-specific siRNA expression, indicating that the -1.6 kb upstream sequence is sufficient for temporal/spatial AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity. Four transcription factors were identified in the midgut nuclear extract from feeding larvae via labeled -1.6/-1.3 kb DNA probe pull-down and proteomic analysis. Co-transfection of the promoter/reporter gene with inducible siRNA expression of each transcription factor was performed to confirm the regulatory function of individual transcription factor on AeSCP-2 transcriptional activities in the larval midgut. The results indicate that two of the identified transcription factors, Thanatos-associated protein (THAP) and activating transcription factor-2 (ATF-2), antagonistically control AeSCP-2 transcriptional activity in the midgut of feeding larvae via the regulatory sequences between -1.6 to -1.3 kb 5' upstream of the transcription start site. In vivo expression knockdown of THAP and ATF-2 resulted in significant changes in developmental progression, which may be partially due to their effects on AeSCP-2 expression. PMID:23056538

  2. Amino acids trigger down-regulation of superoxide via TORC pathway in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Gandara, Ana Caroline P; Oliveira, José Henrique M; Nunes, Rodrigo D; Goncalves, Renata L S; Dias, Felipe A; Hecht, Fabio; Fernandes, Denise C; Genta, Fernando A; Laurindo, Francisco R M; Oliveira, Marcus F; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2016-01-01

    Sensing incoming nutrients is an important and critical event for intestinal cells to sustain life of the whole organism. The TORC is a major protein complex involved in monitoring the nutritional status and is activated by elevated amino acid concentrations. An important feature of haematophagy is that huge amounts of blood are ingested in a single meal, which results in the release of large quantities of amino acids, together with the haemoglobin prosthetic group, haem, which decomposes hydroperoxides and propagates oxygen-derived free radicals. Our previous studies demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were diminished in the mitochondria and midgut of the Dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, immediately after a blood meal. We proposed that this mechanism serves to avoid oxidative damage that would otherwise be induced by haem following a blood meal. Studies also performed in mosquitoes have shown that blood or amino acids controls protein synthesis through TORC activation. It was already proposed, in different models, a link between ROS and TOR, however, little is known about TOR signalling in insect midgut nor about the involvement of ROS in this pathway. Here, we studied the effect of a blood meal on ROS production in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus We observed that blood meal amino acids decreased ROS levels in the R. prolixus midgut immediately after feeding, via lowering mitochondrial superoxide production and involving the amino acid-sensing TORC pathway. PMID:26945025

  3. Amino acids trigger down-regulation of superoxide via TORC pathway in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Gandara, Ana Caroline P.; Oliveira, José Henrique M.; Nunes, Rodrigo D.; Goncalves, Renata L.S.; Dias, Felipe A.; Hecht, Fabio; Fernandes, Denise C.; Genta, Fernando A.; Laurindo, Francisco R.M.; Oliveira, Marcus F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2016-01-01

    Sensing incoming nutrients is an important and critical event for intestinal cells to sustain life of the whole organism. The TORC is a major protein complex involved in monitoring the nutritional status and is activated by elevated amino acid concentrations. An important feature of haematophagy is that huge amounts of blood are ingested in a single meal, which results in the release of large quantities of amino acids, together with the haemoglobin prosthetic group, haem, which decomposes hydroperoxides and propagates oxygen-derived free radicals. Our previous studies demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were diminished in the mitochondria and midgut of the Dengue fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti, immediately after a blood meal. We proposed that this mechanism serves to avoid oxidative damage that would otherwise be induced by haem following a blood meal. Studies also performed in mosquitoes have shown that blood or amino acids controls protein synthesis through TORC activation. It was already proposed, in different models, a link between ROS and TOR, however, little is known about TOR signalling in insect midgut nor about the involvement of ROS in this pathway. Here, we studied the effect of a blood meal on ROS production in the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus. We observed that blood meal amino acids decreased ROS levels in the R. prolixus midgut immediately after feeding, via lowering mitochondrial superoxide production and involving the amino acid-sensing TORC pathway. PMID:26945025

  4. The Role of pH Regulation in Cancer Progression.

    PubMed

    McIntyre, Alan; Harris, Adrian L

    2016-01-01

    Frequently observed phenotypes of tumours include high metabolic activity, hypoxia and poor perfusion; these act to produce an acidic microenvironment. Cellular function depends on pH homoeostasis, and thus, tumours become dependent on pH regulatory mechanisms. Many of the proteins involved in pH regulation are highly expressed in tumours, and their expression is often of prognostic significance. The more acidic tumour microenvironment also has important implications with regard to chemotherapeutic and radiotherapeutic interventions. In addition, we review pH-sensing mechanisms, the role of pH regulation in tumour phenotype and the use of pH regulatory mechanisms as therapeutic targets. PMID:27557536

  5. pH regulation of urease levels in Streptococcus salivarius.

    PubMed

    Sissons, C H; Perinpanayagam, H E; Hancock, E M; Cutress, T W

    1990-05-01

    Potential mechanisms for regulation of urease levels in Streptococcus salivarius were examined, including: induction by urea, nitrogen or carbon source repression, and effects of pH and CO2 (because CO2 enrichment enhanced urease detection on urea agar plates). Regulation by either pH or CO2 was confirmed by comparison of the urease accumulation pattern during anaerobic growth under CO2 with that under N2. Under CO2, there was an initial buffering plateau at pH 6.2 and a rate of Streptococcus salivarius urease accumulation three-fold that under N2, with a pH 7.6 plateau. With both gas phases there was also an increase in the rate of urease appearance coincident with the decrease in medium pH following the pH plateau. The effects of pH, CO2, and HCO3- on urease levels and on growth were separately assessed by culture in media containing 0, 25, 100 mmol/L KHCO3 buffered at different pH levels. There was an inverse relationship between the logarithm of the urease level after 24-hour growth and the pH during growth-the urease specific activity was 100-fold higher at pH 5.5, compared with pH 7.0 and above. HCO3-/CO2 (100 mmol/L) had little effect on urease levels, but was essential for growth at pH 5.5. There was no significant urease induction by urea, or repression by ammonia or glucose. There was also evidence of pH regulation of urease levels in some staphylococci, Klebsiella pneumonia, and Corynebacterium renale, but not in Actinomyces naeslundii and several other species. We conclude that the external pH is a major factor regulating urease levels in S. salivarius and possibly some other species-a mechanism equivalent to urease repression by OH-. PMID:2110582

  6. Preferential intracellular pH regulation: hypotheses and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Baker, Daniel W; Crossley, Dane A; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-08-01

    The regulation of vertebrate acid-base balance during acute episodes of elevated internal PCO2  is typically characterized by extracellular pH (pHe) regulation. Changes in pHe are associated with qualitatively similar changes in intracellular tissue pH (pHi) as the two are typically coupled, referred to as 'coupled pH regulation'. However, not all vertebrates rely on coupled pH regulation; instead, some preferentially regulate pHi against severe and maintained reductions in pHe Preferential pHi regulation has been identified in several adult fish species and an aquatic amphibian, but never in adult amniotes. Recently, common snapping turtles were observed to preferentially regulate pHi during development; the pattern of acid-base regulation in these species shifts from preferential pHi regulation in embryos to coupled pH regulation in adults. In this Commentary, we discuss the hypothesis that preferential pHi regulation may be a general strategy employed by vertebrate embryos in order to maintain acid-base homeostasis during severe acute acid-base disturbances. In adult vertebrates, the retention or loss of preferential pHi regulation may depend on selection pressures associated with the environment inhabited and/or the severity of acid-base regulatory challenges to which they are exposed. We also consider the idea that the retention of preferential pHi regulation into adulthood may have been a key event in vertebrate evolution, with implications for the invasion of freshwater habitats, the evolution of air breathing and the transition of vertebrates from water to land. PMID:27489212

  7. Cytosolic pH: A conserved regulator of cell growth?

    PubMed Central

    Dechant, Reinhard; Peter, Matthias

    2014-01-01

    Although target of rapamycin (TOR) kinase and Ras are central regulators of cell growth in yeast and mammals, the molecular mechanisms underlying their regulation by nutrients are still poorly understood. Interestingly, recent studies identified cytosolic pH as a critical regulatory signal for both pathways, which might have widespread implications for tumor cell biology PMID:27308377

  8. [Regulation effects of tourmaline on seawater pH value].

    PubMed

    Xia, Meisheng; Zhang, Hongmei; Hu, Caihong; Xu, Zirong

    2005-10-01

    In this paper, chemical analysis, X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy were employed to examine the characteristics of tourmaline produced in east Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, and batch experiments were conducted to study its regulation effects on seawater pH value. The factors affecting the regulation, such as the dosage of tourmaline and the salinity and initial pH value of seawater, were also studied. The results showed that tourmaline could regulate the seawater pH value from its initial 3 and 10 to 7.1 and 8.9, respectively, and the regulation effect was greater in the seawater with lower salinity, e.g., after 120 minutes treatment, the initial pH value (5.0) of the seawater with a salinity of 5, 10, 15, 20 and 35 was increased by 3.24, 3.16, 3.06, 2.99 and 2.85 unit, respectively. Tourmaline had little effect on seawater conductivity. This study would provide an experimental base for the application of tourmaline in aquaculture. PMID:16422525

  9. pH sensing and regulation in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Damaghi, Mehdi; Wojtkowiak, Jonathan W.; Gillies, Robert J.

    2013-01-01

    Cells maintain intracellular pH (pHi) within a narrow range (7.1–7.2) by controlling membrane proton pumps and transporters whose activity is set by intra-cytoplasmic pH sensors. These sensors have the ability to recognize and induce cellular responses to maintain the pHi, often at the expense of acidifying the extracellular pH. In turn, extracellular acidification impacts cells via specific acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs) and proton-sensing G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). In this review, we will discuss some of the major players in proton sensing at the plasma membrane and their downstream consequences in cancer cells and how these pH-mediated changes affect processes such as migration and metastasis. The complex mechanisms by which they transduce acid pH signals to the cytoplasm and nucleus are not well understood. However, there is evidence that expression of proton-sensing GPCRs such as GPR4, TDAG8, and OGR1 can regulate aspects of tumorigenesis and invasion, including cofilin and talin regulated actin (de-)polymerization. Major mechanisms for maintenance of pHi homeostasis include monocarboxylate, bicarbonate, and proton transporters. Notably, there is little evidence suggesting a link between their activities and those of the extracellular H+-sensors, suggesting a mechanistic disconnect between intra- and extracellular pH. Understanding the mechanisms of pH sensing and regulation may lead to novel and informed therapeutic strategies that can target acidosis, a common physical hallmark of solid tumors. PMID:24381558

  10. pH regulation of an egg cortex tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Jiang, W P; Veno, P A; Wood, R W; Peaucellier, G; Kinsey, W H

    1991-07-01

    Fertilization of the echinoderm egg is known to result in the phosphorylation, on tyrosine, of a high-molecular-weight cortical protein (HMWCP) localized in the egg cortex. Studies using various parthenogenic agents indicate that this phosphorylation event occurs in response to the alkaline shift in cytoplasmic pHi which normally occurs 1 to 2 min after fertilization. In the present study, the purified egg cell surface complex was used as in vitro system to determine whether a small alkaline shift in pH, such as occurs upon fertilization, could stimulate the activity of the egg cortex-associated tyrosine kinase toward endogenous protein substrates. The results demonstrated that the cell surface complex is highly enriched in a tyrosine kinase activity which accounts for the majority of the protein kinase activity in this preparation. The activity of this tyrosine kinase toward the HMWCP and other cortical proteins was highly dependent on pH over the range pH 6.8 to 7.3. This indicates that the fertilization-associated change in cytoplasmic pH would be sufficient to trigger increased tyrosine phosphorylation of the high-molecular-weight cortical protein in vivo. The regulation of tyrosine phosphorylation by small changes in pH represents a novel control mechanism in which a tyrosine protein kinase may act as a pH-sensitive transducer. PMID:2060713

  11. A novel arrangement of midgut epithelium and hepatic cells implies a novel regulation of the insulin signaling pathway in long-lived millipedes.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Miller, Lou Ann; Bee, Charles M

    2016-01-01

    Nutrients absorbed by the epithelial cells of the millipede midgut are channeled to a contiguous population of hepatic cells where sugars are stored as glycogen. In insects and other arthropods, however, nutrients absorbed by midgut epithelia are first passed across the epithelial basal surface to the hemolymph before storage in fat body. The inter-digitation of cellular processes at the interface of hepatic and midgut epithelial cells offers a vast surface area for exchange of nutrients. At this interface, numerous small vesicles with the dimensions of exosomes (∼30nm) may represent the mediators of nutrient exchange. Longevity and the developmental arrest of diapause are associated with reduced insulin signaling. The long lifespans for which millipedes are known may be attributable to a novel pathway with reduced insulin signaling represented by the novel arrangement of hepatic storage cells and midgut epithelial absorbing cells. PMID:27373842

  12. Regulation of Vacuolar pH in Citrus limon

    SciTech Connect

    Lincoln Taiz

    2005-06-22

    The primary objective of this grant was to characterize the vacuolar V-ATPase of lemon fruits. Lemon fruit vacuoles have an internal pH of about 2.5. Since a typical plant vacuole has a luminal pH of around 5.5, the lemon fruit V-APTase must have special properties which allow it to acidify the lumen to such a low pH: (1) it might have a different structure; (2) it might have a different H{sup +}/ATP stoichiometry; and (3) it might be regulated differently. During the course of the investigations (which began in 1996) they characterized these aspects of the V-ATPases of both lemon fruits and lime fruits. They examined lime fruits because of the availability of both acidic limes with a low vacuolar pH and sweet limes, which have a much higher vacuolar pH. The existence of two types of lime fruits allowed a comparison of the V-ATPases of the two varieties. In this report they are including two publications from 1996 and 1997 as background for the later publications. A review article with Heven Sze on V-ATPase nomenclature was also generated during the funding period. In addition to the studies on citrus fruit vacuoles, they also initiated studies in two new areas: polar auxin transport and the regulation of stomatal opening by UV-B irradiation. These studies were intended to serve as a basis of future separate grants, but the proposals they submitted on these topics were not funded.

  13. Identification and profiling of Manduca sexta microRNAs and their possible roles in regulating specific transcripts in fat body, hemocytes, and midgut

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiufeng; Zheng, Yun; Cao, Xiaolong; Ren, Ren; Yu, Xiao-Qiang; Jiang, Haobo

    2014-01-01

    Significance of microRNA-mediated posttranscriptional regulation has been appreciated ever since its discovery. In the tobacco hornworm Manduca sexta, 164 conserved and 16 novel microRNAs have been identified experimentally (Zhang et al., 2012, 2014). To extend the list of microRNAs in this lepidopteran model species and further explore their possible regulatory roles, we constructed and sequenced small RNA libraries of M. sexta fat body, hemocytes and midgut, since transcriptomes of these tissues from the 5th instar larvae had been studied quite extensively. Each library represented a mixture of the same tissues from larvae that were naïve or induced by three different pathogens. From a total of 167 million reads obtained, we identified two new variants of conserved miR-281 and miR-305 and six novel microRNAs. Abundances of all microRNAs were normalized and compared to reveal their differential expression in these three tissues. Star strands of ten microRNAs were present at higher levels than the corresponding mature strands. From a list of tissue-specific transcripts, we predicted target sites in 3′-UTRs using preferentially expressed microRNA groups in each tissue and suggested possible regulatory roles of these microRNAs in energy metabolism, insecticide resistance, and some mitochondrial and immune gene expression. Examining manifold targets, microRNA regulations were suggested of multiple physiological processes. This study has enriched our knowledge of M. sexta microRNAs and how microRNAs potentially coordinate different physiological processes. PMID:25196249

  14. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti interacts with DENV2 E protein and regulates intracellular viral accumulation and release from midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Tham, Hong-Wai; Balasubramaniam, Vinod R M T; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Ahmad, Hamdan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2014-12-01

    Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screenings against DENV2 envelope (E) protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network. PMID:25521592

  15. CPB1 of Aedes aegypti Interacts with DENV2 E Protein and Regulates Intracellular Viral Accumulation and Release from Midgut Cells

    PubMed Central

    Tham, Hong-Wai; Balasubramaniam, Vinod R. M. T.; Tejo, Bimo Ario; Ahmad, Hamdan; Hassan, Sharifah Syed

    2014-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is a principal vector responsible for the transmission of dengue viruses (DENV). To date, vector control remains the key option for dengue disease management. To develop new vector control strategies, a more comprehensive understanding of the biological interactions between DENV and Ae. aegypti is required. In this study, a cDNA library derived from the midgut of female adult Ae. aegypti was used in yeast two-hybrid (Y2H) screenings against DENV2 envelope (E) protein. Among the many interacting proteins identified, carboxypeptidase B1 (CPB1) was selected, and its biological interaction with E protein in Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells was further validated. Our double immunofluorescent assay showed that CPB1-E interaction occurred in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) of the Ae. aegypti primary midgut cells. Overexpression of CPB1 in mosquito cells resulted in intracellular DENV2 genomic RNA or virus particle accumulation, with a lower amount of virus release. Therefore, we postulated that in Ae. aegypti midgut cells, CPB1 binds to the E protein deposited on the ER intraluminal membranes and inhibits DENV2 RNA encapsulation, thus inhibiting budding from the ER, and may interfere with immature virus transportation to the trans-Golgi network. PMID:25521592

  16. Ventilatory regulation of arterial H(+) (pH) during exercise.

    PubMed

    Wasserman, Karlman; Cox, Timothy A; Sietsema, Kathy E

    2014-01-01

    We hypothesized that exercise ventilation and arterial H(+) ([H(+)]a) are mutually interactive, [H(+)]a stimulating V(E) and V(E) regulating [H(+)]a increase. Fifty-five patients were studied, 10 normal and 45 with cardio-respiratory disorders. Each patient underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing with simultaneous serial arterial blood gas and pH measurements. Subsequently, they were classified into one of 7 clinical groups: (1) normal, (2) exercise-induced hypoxemia (PaO2<50mmHg), (3) exercise-induced myocardial ischemia, (4) heart failure, (5) COPD, (6) interstitial lung disease, and (7) pulmonary vasculopathy. The average resting pHa was 7.42 or 7.43 for each group. At anaerobic (lactic acidosis) threshold (AT), [H(+)]a increased due to PaCO2 increase (+2mmHg), primarily. At peak exercise, [H(+)]a increased further due to arterial HCO3(-) decrease. In summary, [H(+)]a appears to be closely regulated at rest to AT and further to peak exercise by CO2 elimination from the venous return. No evidence was observed for over-ventilation of CO2, causing the arterial blood to become more alkaline during exercise in the patient groups studied. PMID:24369924

  17. Extracellular pH regulates excitability of vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    PubMed

    Cichy, Annika; Ackels, Tobias; Tsitoura, Chryssanthi; Kahan, Anat; Gronloh, Nina; Söchtig, Melanie; Engelhardt, Corinna H; Ben-Shaul, Yoram; Müller, Frank; Spehr, Jennifer; Spehr, Marc

    2015-03-01

    The mouse vomeronasal organ (VNO) plays a critical role in semiochemical detection and social communication. Vomeronasal stimuli are typically secreted in various body fluids. Following direct contact with urine deposits or other secretions, a peristaltic vascular pump mediates fluid entry into the recipient's VNO. Therefore, while vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs) sample various stimulatory semiochemicals dissolved in the intraluminal mucus, they might also be affected by the general physicochemical properties of the "solvent." Here, we report cycle stage-correlated variations in urinary pH among female mice. Estrus-specific pH decline is observed exclusively in urine samples from sexually experienced females. Moreover, patch-clamp recordings in acute VNO slices reveal that mouse VSNs reliably detect extracellular acidosis. Acid-evoked responses share the biophysical and pharmacological hallmarks of the hyperpolarization-activated current Ih. Mechanistically, VSN acid sensitivity depends on a pH-induced shift in the voltage-dependence of Ih activation that causes the opening of HCN channels at rest, thereby increasing VSN excitability. Together, our results identify extracellular acidification as a potent activator of vomeronasal Ih and suggest HCN channel-dependent vomeronasal gain control of social chemosignaling. Our data thus reveal a potential mechanistic basis for stimulus pH detection in rodent chemosensory communication. PMID:25740530

  18. Regulatory peptides in fruit fly midgut.

    PubMed

    Veenstra, Jan A; Agricola, Hans-Jürgen; Sellami, Azza

    2008-12-01

    Regulatory peptides were immunolocalized in the midgut of the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. Endocrine cells were found to produce six different peptides: allatostatins A, B and C, neuropeptide F, diuretic hormone 31, and the tachykinins. Small neuropeptide-F (sNPF) was found in neurons in the hypocerebral ganglion innervating the anterior midgut, whereas pigment-dispersing factor was found in nerves on the most posterior part of the posterior midgut. Neuropeptide-F (NPF)-producing endocrine cells were located in the anterior and middle midgut and in the very first part of the posterior midgut. All NPF endocrine cells also produced tachykinins. Endocrine cells containing diuretic hormone 31 were found in the caudal half of the posterior midgut; these cells also produced tachykinins. Other endocrine cells produced exclusively tachykinins in the anterior and posterior extemities of the midgut. Allatostatin-immunoreactive endocrine cells were present throughout the midgut. Those in the caudal half of the posterior midgut produced allatostatins A, whereas those in the anterior, middle, and first half of the posterior midgut produced allatostatin C. In the middle of the posterior midgut, some endocrine cells produced both allatostatins A and C. Allatostatin-C-immunoreactive endocrine cells were particularly prominent in the first half of the posterior midgut. Allatostatin B/MIP-immunoreactive cells were not consistently found and, when present, were only weakly immunoreactive, forming a subgroup of the allatostatin-C-immunoreactive cells in the posterior midgut. Previous work on Drosophila and other insect species suggested that (FM)RFamide-immunoreactive endocrine cells in the insect midgut could produce NPF, sNPF, myosuppressin, and/or sulfakinins. Using a combination of specific antisera to these peptides and transgenic fly models, we showed that the endocrine cells in the adult Drosophila midgut produced exclusively NPF. Although the Drosophila insulin gene Ilp3

  19. Stage-specific binding of Leishmania donovani to the sand fly vector midgut is regulated by conformational changes in the abundant surface lipophosphoglycan.

    PubMed

    Sacks, D L; Pimenta, P F; McConville, M J; Schneider, P; Turco, S J

    1995-02-01

    The life cycle of Leishmania parasites within the sand fly vector includes the development of extracellular promastigotes from a noninfective, procyclic stage into an infective, metacyclic stage that is uniquely adapted for transmission by the fly and survival in the vertebrate host. These adaptations were explored in the context of the structure and function of the abundant surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG) on Leishmania donovani promastigotes. During metacyclogenesis, the salient structural feature of L. donovani LPG is conserved, involving expression of a phosphoglycan chain made up of unsubstituted disaccharide-phosphate repeats. Two important developmental modifications were also observed. First, the size of the molecule is substantially increased because of a twofold increase in the number of phosphorylated disaccharide repeat units expressed. Second, there is a concomitant decrease in the presentation of terminally exposed sugars. This later property was indicated by the reduced accessibility of terminal galactose residues to galactose oxidase and the loss of binding by the lectins, peanut agglutinin, and concanavalin A, to metacyclic LPG in vivo and in vitro. The loss of lectin binding was not due to downregulation of the capping oligosaccharides as the same beta-linked galactose or alpha-linked mannose-terminating oligosaccharides were present in both procyclic and metacyclic promastigotes. The capping sugars on procyclic LPG were found to mediate procyclic attachment to the sand fly midgut, whereas these same sugars on metacyclic LPG failed to mediate metacyclic binding. And whereas intact metacyclic LPG did not inhibit procyclic attachment, depolymerized LPG inhibited as well as procyclic LPG, demonstrating that the ligands are normally buried. The masking of the terminal sugars is attributed to folding and clustering of the extended phosphoglycan chains, which form densely distributed particulate structures visible on fracture-flip preparations of the

  20. Regulation of lung surfactant secretion by intracellular pH.

    PubMed

    Chander, A

    1989-12-01

    We investigated secretion of lung surfactant phosphatidylcholine (PC) using isolated perfused rat lung preparation after labeling the lung lipids in vitro with [methyl-3H]choline. The perfusion medium was Krebs-Ringer bicarbonate buffer (pH 7.4) containing 10 mM glucose and 3% fatty acid-poor bovine serum albumin. After ventilation of lungs with air containing 5% CO2 (control) for 1 h, 0.91% +/- 0.04 (mean +/- SE, n = 6) of total lung lipid radioactivity (greater than 95% in PC) was recovered in the cell-free lavage fluid. The secretion of PC was increased with terbutaline (50 microM), 8-bromoadenosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (8-BrcAMP, 100 microM), phorbol L2-myristate 13-acetate (30 ng/ml), and ATP (1 mM), in each case by approximately 150%. Secretion of PC was also increased by 160% if the lungs were ventilated with air containing 0% CO2. The low CO2-mediated PC secretion was time and concentration dependent. The dose-response curve for 0-10% CO2 was S-shaped. The low CO2-induced increase in PC secretion could be largely reversed with diffusible weak acids (25 mM, acetate or butyrate) in the perfusion medium. An increase (70%) in secretion was also induced with 10 mM NH4Cl, suggesting a role for intracellular alkalosis. These observations suggest that intracellular alkalosis stimulates lung surfactant secretion. Alkalosis-stimulated secretion of PC was additive with that with terbutaline (5 X 10(-7) to 5 X 10(-4) M) or 10(-4) M 8-BrcAMP, suggesting that alkalosis effect was not mediated through the beta-adrenergic pathway of surfactant secretion.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2514603

  1. A semipermeable enzymatic nanoreactor as an efficient modulator for reversible pH regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yanyan; Lin, Youhui; Ran, Xiang; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2014-09-01

    Here we propose a new concept for the fabrication of a semipermeable enzymatic nanoreactor as an efficient modulator to reversibly switch the pH of an aqueous environment. We used amino-functionalized, expanded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (EMSN) as a model nanocarrier to load enzymes. In order to protect enzymes from the interference of a complicated environment, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) were coated on the surface of the EMSN through layer by layer (LbL) assembly. These PEMs can serve as semipermeable membranes, allowing small molecules to diffuse in and out freely while trapping the enzymes in the nanoreactors. Compared with traditional electrochemical stimulation or optical control methods, our enzymatic regulation platform is easy to operate without complicated instruments. In addition, this system can cover a wide range of pH values and conveniently regulate pH values by simply controlling the concentrations of catalysts or reactants. Meanwhile, this strategy could be generalized to other enzymes or nanocarriers to achieve reversible pH regulation for different purposes. The switched pH values can be implemented for the modulation of the conformational changes of nucleic acids and activation of the charge conversion in drug delivery applications.Here we propose a new concept for the fabrication of a semipermeable enzymatic nanoreactor as an efficient modulator to reversibly switch the pH of an aqueous environment. We used amino-functionalized, expanded mesoporous silica nanoparticles (EMSN) as a model nanocarrier to load enzymes. In order to protect enzymes from the interference of a complicated environment, polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) were coated on the surface of the EMSN through layer by layer (LbL) assembly. These PEMs can serve as semipermeable membranes, allowing small molecules to diffuse in and out freely while trapping the enzymes in the nanoreactors. Compared with traditional electrochemical stimulation or optical control methods

  2. Intestinal malrotation and midgut volvulus.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Hidayatullah; Obaidy, Yalda; Maroof, Sahar

    2016-09-01

    A four-day-old boy presented with persistent bilious vomiting, bloody stained stool, and mild abdominal distension. Transabdominal ultrasound demonstrated a round soft-tissue mass-like structure in the right upper quadrant. With color Doppler ultrasound, the whirlpool sign was observed. Abdominal radiograph showed nonspecific findings. Upper gastrointestinal series revealed upper gastrointestinal tract obstruction at the level of distal duodenum. The diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus was established and the treated surgically. Intestinal malrotation is congenital abnormal positioning of the bowel loops within the peritoneal cavity resulting in abnormal shortening of mesenteric root that is predisposed to midgut volvulus. Neonates and infants with persistent bilious vomiting should undergo diagnostic workup and preferably ultrasound as the first step. With classic sonographic appearance of whirlpool sign, even further imaging investigations is often not needed, and the surgeon should be alerted to plan surgery. PMID:27594965

  3. The role of stem cells in midgut growth and regeneration.

    PubMed

    Hakim, R S; Baldwin, K M; Loeb, M

    2001-06-01

    The Manduca sexta (L.) [Lepidoptera: Sphingidae] and Heliothis virescens (F.) [Lepidoptera: Noctuidae] midguts consist of a pseudostratified epithelium surrounded by striated muscle and tracheae. This epithelium contains goblet, columnar, and basal stem cells. The stem cells are critically important in that they are capable of massive proliferation and differentiation. This growth results in a fourfold enlargement of the midgut at each larval molt. The stem cells are also responsible for limited cell replacement during repair. While the characteristics of the stem cell population vary over the course of an instar, stem cells collected early in an instar and those collected late can start in vitro cultures. Cultures of larval stem, goblet, and columnar cells survive in vitro for several mo through proliferation and differentiation of the stem cells. One of the two polypeptide differentiation factors which have been identified and characterized from the culture medium has now been shown to be present in midgut in vivo. Thus the ability to examine lepidopteran midgut stem cell growth in vitro and in vivo is proving to be effective in determining the basic features of stem cell action and regulation. PMID:11515964

  4. Effects of local pH on the formation and regulation of cristae morphologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Philbert, Martin A.; Sastry, Ann Marie; Lu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Cristae, folded subcompartments of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), have complex and dynamic morphologies. Since cristae are the major site of adenosine triphosphate synthesis, morphological changes of cristae have been studied in relation to functional states of mitochondria. In this sense, investigating the functional and structural significance of cristae may be critical for understanding progressive mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms of the formation and regulation of these cristae structures have not been fully elucidated. Among the hypotheses concerning the regulation of cristae morphologies, we exclusively investigate the effects of the local pH gradient on the cristae morphologies by using a numerical model. An area-difference induced curvature of the membrane is modeled as a function of local pH. This curvature is then applied to the finite element model of a closed lipid bilayer in order to find the energetically favorable membrane configuration. From this study, we substantiate the hypothesis that a tubular crista structure can be formed and regulated by the local pH gradient. Through the simulations with various initial conditions, we further demonstrate that the diameter of a crista is mainly determined by the local pH gradient, and the energetically favorable direction of crista growth is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of a mitochondrion. Finally, the simulation results at the mitochondrial scale suggest that the cristae membrane may have a lower local pH value and/or a higher cardiolipin composition than the other parts of the IMM.

  5. Effects of local pH on the formation and regulation of cristae morphologies.

    PubMed

    Song, Dong Hoon; Park, Jonghyun; Philbert, Martin A; Sastry, Ann Marie; Lu, Wei

    2014-08-01

    Cristae, folded subcompartments of the inner mitochondrial membrane (IMM), have complex and dynamic morphologies. Since cristae are the major site of adenosine triphosphate synthesis, morphological changes of cristae have been studied in relation to functional states of mitochondria. In this sense, investigating the functional and structural significance of cristae may be critical for understanding progressive mitochondrial dysfunction. However, the detailed mechanisms of the formation and regulation of these cristae structures have not been fully elucidated. Among the hypotheses concerning the regulation of cristae morphologies, we exclusively investigate the effects of the local pH gradient on the cristae morphologies by using a numerical model. An area-difference induced curvature of the membrane is modeled as a function of local pH. This curvature is then applied to the finite element model of a closed lipid bilayer in order to find the energetically favorable membrane configuration. From this study, we substantiate the hypothesis that a tubular crista structure can be formed and regulated by the local pH gradient. Through the simulations with various initial conditions, we further demonstrate that the diameter of a crista is mainly determined by the local pH gradient, and the energetically favorable direction of crista growth is perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of a mitochondrion. Finally, the simulation results at the mitochondrial scale suggest that the cristae membrane may have a lower local pH value and/or a higher cardiolipin composition than the other parts of the IMM. PMID:25215753

  6. Regulation of intracellular pH in cnidarians: response to acidosis in Anemonia viridis.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Julien; Venn, Alexander; Tambutté, Éric; Ganot, Philippe; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2014-02-01

    The regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) is a fundamental aspect of cell physiology that has received little attention in studies of the phylum Cnidaria, which includes ecologically important sea anemones and reef-building corals. Like all organisms, cnidarians must maintain pH homeostasis to counterbalance reductions in pHi, which can arise because of changes in either intrinsic or extrinsic parameters. Corals and sea anemones face natural daily changes in internal fluids, where the extracellular pH can range from 8.9 during the day to 7.4 at night. Furthermore, cnidarians are likely to experience future CO₂-driven declines in seawater pH, a process known as ocean acidification. Here, we carried out the first mechanistic investigation to determine how cnidarian pHi regulation responds to decreases in extracellular and intracellular pH. Using the anemone Anemonia viridis, we employed confocal live cell imaging and a pH-sensitive dye to track the dynamics of pHi after intracellular acidosis induced by acute exposure to decreases in seawater pH and NH₄Cl prepulses. The investigation was conducted on cells that contained intracellular symbiotic algae (Symbiodinium sp.) and on symbiont-free endoderm cells. Experiments using inhibitors and Na⁺-free seawater indicate a potential role of Na⁺/H⁺ plasma membrane exchangers (NHEs) in mediating pHi recovery following intracellular acidosis in both cell types. We also measured the buffering capacity of cells, and obtained values between 20.8 and 43.8 mM per pH unit, which are comparable to those in other invertebrates. Our findings provide the first steps towards a better understanding of acid-base regulation in these basal metazoans, for which information on cell physiology is extremely limited. PMID:24256552

  7. Molecular Components of the Neurospora crassa pH Signaling Pathway and Their Regulation by pH and the PAC-3 Transcription Factor.

    PubMed

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Bernardes, Natália Elisa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pH induces a stress response triggering a signaling pathway whose components have been identified and characterized in several fungi. Neurospora crassa shares all six components of the Aspergillus nidulans pH signaling pathway, and we investigate here their regulation during an alkaline pH stress response. We show that the N. crassa pal mutant strains, with the exception of Δpal-9, which is the A. nidulans palI homolog, exhibit low conidiation and are unable to grow at alkaline pH. Moreover, they accumulate the pigment melanin, most likely via regulation of the tyrosinase gene by the pH signaling components. The PAC-3 transcription factor binds to the tyrosinase promoter and negatively regulates its gene expression. PAC-3 also binds to all pal gene promoters, regulating their expression at normal growth pH and/or alkaline pH, which indicates a feedback regulation of PAC-3 in the pal gene expression. In addition, PAC-3 binds to the pac-3 promoter only at alkaline pH, most likely influencing the pac-3 expression at this pH suggesting that the activation of PAC-3 in N. crassa results from proteolytic processing and gene expression regulation by the pH signaling components. In N. crassa, PAC-3 is proteolytically processed in a single cleavage step predominately at alkaline pH; however, low levels of the processed protein can be observed at normal growth pH. We also demonstrate that PAC-3 preferentially localizes in the nucleus at alkaline pH stress and that the translocation may require the N. crassa importin-α since the PAC-3 nuclear localization signal (NLS) has a strong in vitro affinity with importin-α. The data presented here show that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa shares all the components with the A. nidulans and S. cerevisiae pathways; however, it exhibits some properties not previously described in either organism. PMID:27557053

  8. Molecular Components of the Neurospora crassa pH Signaling Pathway and Their Regulation by pH and the PAC-3 Transcription Factor

    PubMed Central

    Virgilio, Stela; Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Bernardes, Natália Elisa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; Takeda, Agnes Alessandra Sekijima; Fontes, Marcos Roberto de Mattos; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pH induces a stress response triggering a signaling pathway whose components have been identified and characterized in several fungi. Neurospora crassa shares all six components of the Aspergillus nidulans pH signaling pathway, and we investigate here their regulation during an alkaline pH stress response. We show that the N. crassa pal mutant strains, with the exception of Δpal-9, which is the A. nidulans palI homolog, exhibit low conidiation and are unable to grow at alkaline pH. Moreover, they accumulate the pigment melanin, most likely via regulation of the tyrosinase gene by the pH signaling components. The PAC-3 transcription factor binds to the tyrosinase promoter and negatively regulates its gene expression. PAC-3 also binds to all pal gene promoters, regulating their expression at normal growth pH and/or alkaline pH, which indicates a feedback regulation of PAC-3 in the pal gene expression. In addition, PAC-3 binds to the pac-3 promoter only at alkaline pH, most likely influencing the pac-3 expression at this pH suggesting that the activation of PAC-3 in N. crassa results from proteolytic processing and gene expression regulation by the pH signaling components. In N. crassa, PAC-3 is proteolytically processed in a single cleavage step predominately at alkaline pH; however, low levels of the processed protein can be observed at normal growth pH. We also demonstrate that PAC-3 preferentially localizes in the nucleus at alkaline pH stress and that the translocation may require the N. crassa importin-α since the PAC-3 nuclear localization signal (NLS) has a strong in vitro affinity with importin-α. The data presented here show that the pH signaling pathway in N. crassa shares all the components with the A. nidulans and S. cerevisiae pathways; however, it exhibits some properties not previously described in either organism. PMID:27557053

  9. Regulating Emotions and Aiming for a Ph.D.: Excerpts from "Anthropology Matters"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hovland, Ingie

    2012-01-01

    In this article I will present a range of experiences of graduate socialisation that have been discussed in past articles in the journal "Anthropology Matters". These are the experiences of social anthropology Ph.D. students in the United Kingdom. The overarching theme for the article is "regulating emotions", and the excerpts presented illustrate…

  10. Regulating Glucose and pH, and Monitoring Oxygen in a Bioreactor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Melody M.; Pellis, Neat R.; Jeevarajan, Antony S.; Taylor, Thomas D.; Xu, Yuanhang; Gao, Frank

    2006-01-01

    A system that automatically regulates the concentration of glucose or pH in a liquid culture medium that is circulated through a rotating-wall perfused bioreactor is described. Another system monitors the concentration of oxygen in the culture medium.

  11. Sequence of three cDNAs encoding an alkaline midgut trypsin from Manduca sexta.

    PubMed

    Peterson, A M; Barillas-Mury, C V; Wells, M A

    1994-05-01

    We have purified trypsin from the midgut of Manduca sexta and shown it has an alkaline pH optimum of 10.5. In order to clone the midgut trypsin, a DNA probe was generated using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with template isolated from a midgut cDNA library phage stock, a mixture of degenerate primers synthesized to code for the highly conserved region around the active site serine found in trypsins, and the T7 sequencing primer. Three different trypsin cDNAs were isolated each of which encodes a preproenzyme of 256 amino acids with a putative signal sequence of 17 amino acids, an activation peptide of seven amino acids and a mature trypsin of 232 amino acids. The encoded midgut trypsins contain the highly conserved residues, Asp, His, Ser, involved in catalysis in serine proteases, along with the residues which define the trypsin specificity pocket. Sequence comparisons show that all sequences are similar to other invertebrate and vertebrate serine proteases, but they differ in that two of the three encoded trypsins have an odd number of cysteines. Northern analysis localizes the trypsin mRNA to the middle third of the midgut. A large number of arginines (19, 20 and 21) are encoded by the three cDNAs which may stabilize the trypsin, by remaining protonated, in the alkaline midgut of M. sexta. PMID:8205142

  12. Oxygen and pH regulation of protein synthesis in mitochondria from Artemia franciscana embryos.

    PubMed Central

    Kwast, K E; Hand, S C

    1996-01-01

    To identify factors responsible for the down-regulation of mitochondrial biosynthetic processes during anoxia in encysted Artemia franciscana embryos, the effects of oxygen limitation and pH on protein synthesis were investigated in isolated mitochondria. At the optimal pH of 7.5, exposure of mitochondria to anoxia decreases the protein synthesis rate by 79%. Rates were suppressed by a further 10% at pH 6.8, the intracellular pH (pHi) measured under anoxia in vivo. Matrix pH, measured under identical conditions, was 8.43 +/- 0.01 at an extra-mitochondrial pH of 7.9 (mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3), 8.05 +/- 0.01 at pH 7.5, and 7.10 +/- 0.01 at pH 6.8. The matrix pH did not vary (P > or = 0.20) as a function of oxygen availability during the 1 h assays. Intramitochondrial purine nucleotides varied little as a function of pH. In contrast, after 1 h of protein synthesis under anoxia, ATP levels decreased by up to 40%, whereas AMP, ADP and GDP concentrations increased, and GTP and GMP concentrations remained relatively constant. The addition of 1 mM ATP at the onset of anoxia maintained the ATP/ADP ratio at the aerobic value, but did not stabilized the GTP/GDP ratio or rescue rates of protein synthesis. Thus, at present, we cannot eliminate the possibility that the decrease in the GTP/GDP ratio during anoxia may contribute to the suppression of protein synthesis. The effect of anoxia was reversible; the rate of protein synthesis upon reoxygenation after a 30 min bout of anoxia was comparable (P = 0.14) with the pre-anoxic rate (193 +/- 17 and 174 +/- 6 pmol of leucine per mg of protein respectively, mean +/- S.E.M., n = 3). The array of mitochondrial translation products did not differ qualitatively as a function of either oxygen availability or pH. Finally, similar pH profiles for protein synthesis were obtained with either [3H]leucine or [3H]histidine (known to use different transporters). Consequently, it is improbable that the pH-sensitivity of protein synthesis can be

  13. Human microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 is stable at extremes of pH.

    PubMed

    Naz, Farha; Singh, Parvesh; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Imtaiyaz Hassan, Md

    2016-06-01

    MAP/microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) is a member of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinases, directly associated with cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. Here, we have cloned, expressed, and purified two variants of MARK4 [the kinase domain (MARK4-F2), and kinase domain along with 59 N-terminal residues (MARK4-F1)] and compared their stability at varying pH range. Structural and functional changes were observed by incubating both forms of MARK4 in buffers of different pH. We measured the secondary structure of MARK4 using circular dichroism and tertiary structure by measuring intrinsic fluorescence and absorbance properties along with the size of proteins by dynamic light scattering. We observed that at extremes of pH (below pH 3.5 and above pH 9.0), MARK4 is quite stable. However, a remarkable aggregate formation was observed at intermediate pH (between pH 3.5 and 9.0). To further validate this result, we have modeled both forms of MARK4 and performed molecular dynamics simulation for 15 ns. The spectroscopic observations are in excellent agreement with the findings of molecular dynamics simulation. We also performed ATPase activity at varying pH and found a significant correlation of structure of MARK4 with its enzyme activity. It is interesting to note that both forms of MARK4 are showing a similar pattern of structure changes with reference to pH. PMID:26208600

  14. Factors regulating nitrification in aquatic sediments: Effects of organic carbon, nitrogen availability, and pH

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strauss, E.A.; Mitchell, N.L.; Lamberti, G.A.

    2002-01-01

    We investigated the response in nitrification to organic carbon (C) availability, the interactive effects of the C: nitrogen (N) ratio and organic N availability, and differing pH in sediments from several streams in the upper midwestern United States. In addition, we surveyed 36 streams to assess variability in sediment nitrification rates. Labile dissolved organic carbon (DOC) additions of 30 mg C??L-1 (as acetate) to stream sediments reduced nitrification rates (P < 0.003), but lower concentration additions or dilution of ambient DOC concentration had no effect on nitrification. C:N and organic N availability strongly interacted to affect nitrification (P < 0.0001), with N availability increasing nitrification most at lower C:N. Nitrification was also strongly influenced by pH (P < 0.002), with maximum rates occurring at pH 7.5. A multiple regression model developed from the stream survey consisted of five variables (stream temperature, pH, conductivity, DOC concentration, and total extractable NH4+) and explained 60% of the variation observed in nitrification. Our results suggest that nitrification is regulated by several variables, with NH4+ availability and pH being the most important. Organic C is likely important at regulating nitrification only under high environmental C:N conditions and if most available C is relatively labile.

  15. On enzymatic pH oscillations in CSTR with outlet regulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohmori, Takao; Yu, Weifang; Yamamoto, Takuji; Endo, Akira; Nakaiwa, Masaru; Amemiya, Takashi; Yamaguchi, Tomohiko

    2005-05-01

    The possibility of enzymatic pH oscillations is investigated for a CSTR with an outlet regulator. A linear stability analysis shows that no oscillation is possible in a CSTR without the regulator, using a proton-producing pH-dependent enzymatic reaction. However, self-sustained oscillations are found to occur in a CSTR, where the discharge of substrate is regulated at the outlet. The regions of oscillations in the parameter space are determined using a hydrolysis of N-α-benzoyl- L-arginine ethyl ester with papain. It is found that the region is quite large only when the substrate concentration in the outflow is kept at zero.

  16. Theoretical considerations on the role of membrane potential in the regulation of endosomal pH.

    PubMed Central

    Rybak, S L; Lanni, F; Murphy, R F

    1997-01-01

    Na+,K(+)-ATPase has been observed to partially inhibit acidification of early endosomes by increasing membrane potential, whereas chloride channels have been observed to enhance acidification in endosomes and lysosomes. However, little theoretical analysis of the ways in which different pumps and channels may interact has been carried out. We therefore developed quantitative models of endosomal pH regulation based on thermodynamic considerations. We conclude that 1) both size and shape of endosomes will influence steady-state endosomal pH whenever membrane potential due to the pH gradient limits proton pumping, 2) steady-state pH values similar to those observed in early endosomes of living cells can occur in endosomes containing just H(+)-ATPases and Na+,K(+)-ATPases when low endosomal buffering capacities are present, and 3) inclusion of active chloride channels results in predicted pH values well below those observed in vivo. The results support the separation of endocytic compartments into two classes, those (such as early endosomes) whose acidification is limited by attainment of a certain membrane potential, and those (such as lysosomes) whose acidification is limited by the attainment of a certain pH. The theoretical framework and conclusions described are potentially applicable to other membrane-enclosed compartments that are acidified, such as elements of the Golgi apparatus. PMID:9251786

  17. Intestinal stem cells in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, Huaqi; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2011-11-15

    Drosophila has long been an excellent model organism for studying stem cell biology. Notably, studies of Drosophila's germline stem cells have been instrumental in developing the stem cell niche concept. The recent discovery of somatic stem cells in adult Drosophila, particularly the intestinal stem cells (ISCs) of the midgut, has established Drosophila as an exciting model to study stem cell-mediated adult tissue homeostasis and regeneration. Here, we review the major signaling pathways that regulate the self-renewal, proliferation and differentiation of Drosophila ISCs, discussing how this regulation maintains midgut homeostasis and mediates regeneration of the intestinal epithelium after injury. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The homeostasis and regeneration of adult fly midguts are mediated by ISCs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Damaged enterocytes induce the proliferation of intestinal stem cells (ISC). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer EGFR and Jak/Stat signalings mediate compensatory ISC proliferation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Notch signaling regulates ISC self-renewal and differentiation.

  18. Regulation of dopamine D2 receptors by sodium and pH.

    PubMed

    Neve, K A

    1991-04-01

    The role of Na+ and H+ in the regulation of D2 receptor affinity for ligands was studied to determine the molecular mechanisms of this phenomenon. The potency of substituted benzamide derivatives and agonists at D2 receptors depended on the concentration of Na+ and H+, whereas the potency of other antagonists was relatively unaltered by changes in pH or Na+ concentration. The potency of agonists was generally decreased in the presence of NaCl or lowered pH. For example, in the absence of sodium the affinity of D2 receptors for dopamine was decreased 17-fold by lowering of the pH from 8.0 to pH 6.8. Addition of NaCl caused 2-4-fold decreases in affinity for most agonists. The affinity of the receptors for two substituted benzamide derivatives, on the other hand, was reduced 6-44-fold by elevated concentrations of H+ but was enhanced 7-24-fold in the presence of Na+. The regulation by H+ of the potency of dopamine was selective for D2 receptors, because binding of dopamine to neostriatal D1 receptors was unaffected by changes in pH. Decreasing of the pH from 8.0 or 7.3 to 6.8 facilitated the dissociation of the substituted benzamide ligand [125I]epidepride from D2 receptors but inhibited dissociation of [3H]spiperone. Furthermore, the presence of NaCl or lowered pH slowed inactivation of D2 receptors by N-ethylmaleimide. Together, these data suggest that the conformation of D2 receptors is regulated by both Na+ and H+. The affinity of D2 receptors for agonists and substituted benzamide antagonists varies according to the conformational state of the receptors, whereas other antagonists bind to both forms with approximately equal potency. Amiloride is a compound that interacts with many sodium-binding macromolecules. At equilibrium, amiloride inhibited the binding of [3H]spiperone and [125I]epidepride in a manner suggesting a more complex interaction than simple competitive inhibition. The rate of dissociation of both radioligands was enhanced by amiloride, as would be

  19. pH Regulates White-Opaque Switching and Sexual Mating in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuan; Cao, Chengjun; Jia, Wei; Tao, Li; Guan, Guobo; Huang, Guanghua

    2015-11-01

    As a successful commensal and pathogen of humans, Candida albicans encounters a wide range of environmental conditions. Among them, ambient pH, which changes frequently and affects many biological processes in this species, is an important factor, and the ability to adapt to pH changes is tightly linked with pathogenesis and morphogenesis. In this study, we report that pH has a profound effect on white-opaque switching and sexual mating in C. albicans. Acidic pH promotes white-to-opaque switching under certain culture conditions but represses sexual mating. The Rim101-mediated pH-sensing pathway is involved in the control of pH-regulated white-opaque switching and the mating response. Phr2 and Rim101 could play a major role in acidic pH-induced opaque cell formation. Despite the fact that the cyclic AMP (cAMP) signaling pathway does not play a major role in pH-regulated white-opaque switching and mating, white and opaque cells of the cyr1/cyr1 mutant, which is defective in the production of cAMP, showed distinct growth defects under acidic and alkaline conditions. We further discovered that acidic pH conditions repressed sexual mating due to the failure of activation of the Ste2-mediated α-pheromone response pathway in opaque A: cells. The effects of pH changes on phenotypic switching and sexual mating could involve a balance of host adaptation and sexual reproduction in C. albicans. PMID:26342021

  20. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity.

    PubMed

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  1. Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP) Regulates Melanosomal pH and Influences Tyrosinase Activity

    PubMed Central

    Bin, Bum-Ho; Bhin, Jinhyuk; Yang, Seung Ha; Shin, Misun; Nam, Yeon-Ju; Choi, Dong-Hwa; Shin, Dong Wook; Lee, Ai-Young; Hwang, Daehee; Cho, Eun-Gyung; Lee, Tae Ryong

    2015-01-01

    The SLC45A2 gene encodes a Membrane-Associated Transporter Protein (MATP). Mutations of this gene cause oculocutaneous albinism type 4 (OCA4). However, the molecular mechanism of its action in melanogenesis has not been elucidated. Here, we discuss the role of MATP in melanin production. The SLC45A2 gene is highly enriched in human melanocytes and melanoma cell lines, and its protein, MATP, is located in melanosomes. The knockdown of MATP using siRNAs reduced melanin content and tyrosinase activity without any morphological change in melanosomes or the expression of melanogenesis-related proteins. Interestingly, the knockdown of MATP significantly lowered the melanosomal pH, as verified through DAMP analysis, suggesting that MATP regulates melanosomal pH and therefore affects tyrosinase activity. Finally, we found that the reduction of tyrosinase activity associated with the knockdown of MATP was readily recovered by copper treatment in the in vitro L-DOPA oxidase activity assay of tyrosinase. Considering that copper is an important element for tyrosinase activity and that its binding to tyrosinase depends on melanosomal pH, MATP may play an important role in regulating tyrosinase activity via controlling melanosomal pH. PMID:26057890

  2. pH regulation of amphotericin B channels activity in the bilayer lipid membrane

    PubMed Central

    Shahmoradi, Tahereh; Sepehry, Hamid; Ashrafpour, Manuchehr

    2016-01-01

    Background: Amphotericin B (AmB) is a polyene antibiotic frequently applied in the treatment of systemic fungal infections in spite of its secondary effects. The pH plays a crucial role in modulating biophysical features of ion channels in the bilayer lipid membranes. Aim: In this study, the role of pH in the regulation of AmB channel was assessed by single channel recording of ion channel incorporated in the artificial membrane. Materials and Methods: Bilayer lipid membrane was formed by phosphatidylcholine in a 350 μm diameter aperture between two chambers, cis and trans contained 200/50 mMKCl solutions, respectively; then AmB was incorporated into the bilayer lipid membrane. Single channel recordings were used to indicate the effects of pH changes on AmB channels activity. The records were analyzed by Clamp fit 10 software. Results: A kinetic analysis of single channel currents indicated a cation ion channel with 500 pS conductance and voltage-dependence of the open probability of the AmB channel (Po). A reduction of cis pH to 6 decreased Po and conductance. This effect was also voltage-dependent, being greater at a more positive above −40. The pH changes in the range of 6-8 had no effect on the reversal potential and ion selectivity. Conclusion: Our data indicated that extracellular acidity can reduce AmB activity. PMID:27003977

  3. EVIDENCE OF DIFFERENTIAL PH REGULATION OF THE ARABIDOPSIS VACUOLAR CA2+/H+ ANTIPORTERS CAX1 AND CAX2

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Arabidopsis Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporters cation exchanger (CAX) 1 and 2 utilise an electrochemical gradient to transport Ca(2+) into the vacuole to help mediate Ca(2+) homeostasis. Previous whole plant studies indicate that activity of Ca(2+)/H(+) antiporters is regulated by pH. However, the pH regul...

  4. Regulation of gas exchange and haemolymph pH in the cockroach Nauphoeta cinerea.

    PubMed

    Matthews, Philip G D; White, Craig R

    2011-09-15

    Ventilatory control of internal CO(2) plays an important role in regulating extracellular acid-base balance in terrestrial animals. While this phenomenon is well understood among vertebrates, the role that respiration plays in the acid-base balance of insects is in need of much further study. To measure changes in insect haemolymph pH, we implanted micro pH optodes into the haemocoel of cockroaches (Nauphoeta cinerea). They were then exposed to normoxic, hypoxic, hyperoxic and hypercapnic atmospheres while their haemolymph pH, VCO(2) and abdominal ventilation frequency were measured simultaneously. Intratracheal O(2) levels were also measured in separate experiments. It was found that cockroaches breathing continuously control their ventilation to defend a haemolymph pH of 7.3, except under conditions where hypoxia (<10% O(2)) induces hyperventilation, or where ambient hypercapnia is in excess of haemolymph (>1% CO(2)). In contrast, intratracheal O(2) levels fluctuated widely, but on average remained above 15% in normoxic (21% O(2)) atmospheres. Decapitation caused the cockroaches to display discontinuous gas exchange cycles (DGCs). The alternating periods of ventilation and apnoea during DGCs caused haemolymph pH to fluctuate by 0.11 units. Exposure to hypoxia caused haemolymph pH to increase and initiated brief bouts of spiracular opening prior to the active ventilation phase. The spontaneous occurrence of DGCs in decapitated cockroaches indicates that central pattern generators in the thoracic and abdominal ganglia generate the periodic gas exchange pattern in the absence of control from the cephalic ganglion. This pattern continues to maintain gas exchange, but with less precision. PMID:21865519

  5. Evaluation the anaerobic hydrolysis acidification stage of kitchen waste by pH regulation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaya; Zang, Bing; Li, Guoxue; Liu, Yu

    2016-07-01

    This study analyzed the composition and characteristic of kitchen waste (KW) from closed cleaning station of Chaoyang District, Beijing. It was featured by high vegetables and peels contents. This study investigated effect of pH regulation and uncontrolled pH (CK) on the lab-scale anaerobic hydrolysis acidification stage of KW. The optimal adjusting mode by NaOH (including dosage and frequency) was evaluated according to indexes of pH, VFAs, NH4(+)-N, TS, VS, TS/VS, TS and VS removal rate. The treatment 4 as first two days adjusting per 16h and then one time per day at pH 7 was chosen as the optimal mode with high VFAs content(47.31g/L), TS and VS removal rate (42.95% and 54.01%, respectively), low adjusting frequency, fewer dosage and practical operability. Thus, adjusting mode of treatment 4 could be considered using in anaerobic hydrolysis acidification stage on engineering. PMID:27156363

  6. Role of metal oxide nanostructures in extracellular pH regulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lozhkomoev, Aleksandr S.

    2016-08-01

    A research area of great promise is the cancer treatment by regulating microenvironmental parameters of tumor cells using MgO and AlOOH. Magnesium hydroxide and aluminum oxyhydroxide (boehmite) are in the form of nanoplates and nanosheets. The morphology, structure, phases and electrokinetic properties of synthesized samples are analyzed using complex physical and chemical methods. We study how the pH of the culture medium—different when in contact with synthesized nanoplates—affects the viability of tumor cells. It is shown that MgO is more efficient in decreasing the tumor cell viability than AlOOH. In the case of magnesium hydroxide, the pH of the culture medium increases to 10.1; in the case of boehmite, to 7.7.

  7. Ambient pH Controls Glycogen Levels by Regulating Glycogen Synthase Gene Expression in Neurospora crassa. New Insights into the pH Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cupertino, Fernanda Barbosa; Freitas, Fernanda Zanolli; de Paula, Renato Magalhães; Bertolini, Maria Célia

    2012-01-01

    Glycogen is a polysaccharide widely distributed in microorganisms and animal cells and its metabolism is under intricate regulation. Its accumulation in a specific situation results from the balance between glycogen synthase and glycogen phosphorylase activities that control synthesis and degradation, respectively. These enzymes are highly regulated at transcriptional and post-translational levels. The existence of a DNA motif for the Aspergillus nidulans pH responsive transcription factor PacC in the promoter of the gene encoding glycogen synthase (gsn) in Neurospora crassa prompted us to investigate whether this transcription factor regulates glycogen accumulation. Transcription factors such as PacC in A. nidulans and Rim101p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae play a role in the signaling pathway that mediates adaptation to ambient pH by inducing the expression of alkaline genes and repressing acidic genes. We showed here that at pH 7.8 pacC was over-expressed and gsn was down-regulated in wild-type N. crassa coinciding with low glycogen accumulation. In the pacCKO strain the glycogen levels and gsn expression at alkaline pH were, respectively, similar to and higher than the wild-type strain at normal pH (5.8). These results characterize gsn as an acidic gene and suggest a regulatory role for PACC in gsn expression. The truncated recombinant protein, containing the DNA-binding domain specifically bound to a gsn DNA fragment containing the PacC motif. DNA-protein complexes were observed with extracts from cells grown at normal and alkaline pH and confirmed by ChIP-PCR analysis. The PACC present in these extracts showed equal molecular mass, indicating that the protein is already processed at normal pH, in contrast to A. nidulans. Together, these results show that the pH signaling pathway controls glycogen accumulation by regulating gsn expression and suggest the existence of a different mechanism for PACC activation in N. crassa. PMID:22952943

  8. TPC2 controls pigmentation by regulating melanosome pH and size.

    PubMed

    Ambrosio, Andrea L; Boyle, Judith A; Aradi, Al E; Christian, Keith A; Di Pietro, Santiago M

    2016-05-17

    Melanin is responsible for pigmentation of skin and hair and is synthesized in a specialized organelle, the melanosome, in melanocytes. A genome-wide association study revealed that the two pore segment channel 2 (TPCN2) gene is strongly linked to pigmentation variations. TPCN2 encodes the two-pore channel 2 (TPC2) protein, a cation channel. Nevertheless, how TPC2 regulates pigmentation remains unknown. Here, we show that TPC2 is expressed in melanocytes and localizes to the melanosome-limiting membrane and, to a lesser extent, to endolysosomal compartments by confocal fluorescence and immunogold electron microscopy. Immunomagnetic isolation of TPC2-containing organelles confirmed its coresidence with melanosomal markers. TPCN2 knockout by means of clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat/CRISPR-associated 9 gene editing elicited a dramatic increase in pigment content in MNT-1 melanocytic cells. This effect was rescued by transient expression of TPC2-GFP. Consistently, siRNA-mediated knockdown of TPC2 also caused a substantial increase in melanin content in both MNT-1 cells and primary human melanocytes. Using a newly developed genetically encoded pH sensor targeted to melanosomes, we determined that the melanosome lumen in TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells and primary melanocytes subjected to TPC2 knockdown is less acidic than in control cells. Fluorescence and electron microscopy analysis revealed that TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells have significantly larger melanosomes than control cells, but the number of organelles is unchanged. TPC2 likely regulates melanosomes pH and size by mediating Ca(2+) release from the organelle, which is decreased in TPC2-KO MNT-1 cells, as determined with the Ca(2+) sensor tyrosinase-GCaMP6. Thus, our data show that TPC2 regulates pigmentation through two fundamental determinants of melanosome function: pH and size. PMID:27140606

  9. Requirements for Ion and Solute Transport, and pH Regulation During Enamel Maturation

    PubMed Central

    LACRUZ, RODRIGO S.; SMITH, CHARLES E.; MOFFATT, PIERRE; CHANG, EUGENE H.; BROMAGE, TIMOTHY G.; BRINGAS, PABLO; NANCI, ANTONIO; BANIWAL, SANJEEV K.; ZABNER, JOSEPH; WELSH, MICHAEL J.; KURTZ, IRA; PAINE, MICHAEL L.

    2012-01-01

    Transcellular bicarbonate transport is suspected to be an important pathway used by ameloblasts to regulate extracellular pH and support crystal growth during enamel maturation. Proteins that play a role in amelogenesis include members of the ABC transporters (SLC gene family and CFTR). A number of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have also been identified. The defined functions of these genes are likely interlinked during enamel mineralization. The purpose of this study is to quantify relative mRNA levels of individual SLC, Cftr, and CAs in enamel cells obtained from secretory and maturation stages on rat incisors. We also present novel data on the enamel phenotypes for two animal models, amutant porcine(CFTR-ΔF508) and the NBCe1-null mouse.Our data show that two SLCs(AE2 and NBCe1),Cftr,and Car2, Car3,Car6,and Car12 are all significantly up-regulated at the onset of the maturation stage of amelogenesis when compared to the secretory stage. The remaining SLCs and CA gene transcripts showed negligible expression or no significant change in expression from secretory to maturation stages. The enamel of Cftr-ΔF508 adult pigs was hypomineralized and showed abnormal crystal growth. NBCe1-null mice enamel was structurally defective and had a marked decrease in mineral content relative to wild-type. These data demonstrate the importance of many non-matrix proteins to amelogenesis and that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating extracellular pH are modulated during enamel maturation in response to an increased need for pH buffering during hydroxyapatite crystal growth. PMID:21732355

  10. Requirements for ion and solute transport, and pH regulation during enamel maturation.

    PubMed

    Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Smith, Charles E; Moffatt, Pierre; Chang, Eugene H; Bromage, Timothy G; Bringas, Pablo; Nanci, Antonio; Baniwal, Sanjeev K; Zabner, Joseph; Welsh, Michael J; Kurtz, Ira; Paine, Michael L

    2012-04-01

    Transcellular bicarbonate transport is suspected to be an important pathway used by ameloblasts to regulate extracellular pH and support crystal growth during enamel maturation. Proteins that play a role in amelogenesis include members of the ABC transporters (SLC gene family and CFTR). A number of carbonic anhydrases (CAs) have also been identified. The defined functions of these genes are likely interlinked during enamel mineralization. The purpose of this study is to quantify relative mRNA levels of individual SLC, Cftr, and CAs in enamel cells obtained from secretory and maturation stages on rat incisors. We also present novel data on the enamel phenotypes for two animal models, a mutant porcine (CFTR-ΔF508) and the NBCe1-null mouse. Our data show that two SLCs (AE2 and NBCe1), Cftr, and Car2, Car3, Car6, and Car12 are all significantly up-regulated at the onset of the maturation stage of amelogenesis when compared to the secretory stage. The remaining SLCs and CA gene transcripts showed negligible expression or no significant change in expression from secretory to maturation stages. The enamel of CFTR-ΔF508 adult pigs was hypomineralized and showed abnormal crystal growth. NBCe1-null mice enamel was structurally defective and had a marked decrease in mineral content relative to wild-type. These data demonstrate the importance of many non-matrix proteins to amelogenesis and that the expression levels of multiple genes regulating extracellular pH are modulated during enamel maturation in response to an increased need for pH buffering during hydroxyapatite crystal growth. PMID:21732355

  11. Intracellular pH regulation in isolated hepatopancreas cells from the Roman snail (Helix pomatia).

    PubMed

    Manzl, Claudia; Krumschnabel, Gerhard; Schwarzbaum, Pablo J; Chabicovsky, Monika; Dallinger, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    The mechanisms of intracellular pH (pHi) regulation were studied in isolated hepatopancreas cells from the Roman snail, Helix pomatia. The relationship between intracellular and extracellular pH indicated that pHi is actively regulated in these cells. At least three pHi-regulatory ion transporters were found to be present in these cells and to be responsible for the maintenance of pHi: an amiloride-sensitive Na+/H+ exchanger, a 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'disulfonic acid (SITS)-sensitive, presumably Na(+)-dependent, Cl-/HCO3-exchanger, and a bafilomycin-sensitive H(+)-pump. Inhibition of one of these transporters alone did not affect steady state pHi, whereas incubation with amiloride and SITS in combination resulted in a significant intracellular acidification. Following the induction of intracellular acidosis by addition of the weak acid Na+propionate, the Na+/H+ exchanger was immediately activated leading to a rapid recovery of pHi towards the baseline level. Both the SITS-sensitive mechanism and the H(+)-pump responded more slowly, but were of similar importance for pHi recovery. Measurement of pHi recovery from acidification in the three discernible types of hepatopancreas cells with a video fluorescence image system revealed slightly differing response patterns, the physiological significance of which remains to be determined. PMID:14695690

  12. pH regulates genes for flagellar motility, catabolism, and oxidative stress in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Lisa M; Yohannes, Elizabeth; Bondurant, Sandra S; Radmacher, Michael; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2005-01-01

    consumption and proton export, while coinducing oxidative stress and heat shock regulons; (ii) high pH accelerates proton import, while repressing the energy-expensive flagellar and chemotaxis regulons; and (iii) pH differentially regulates a large number of periplasmic and envelope proteins. PMID:15601715

  13. Regulation of pH in rat brain synaptosomes. I. Role of sodium, bicarbonate, and potassium.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Armass, S; Martínez-Zaguilán, R; Martínez, G M; Gillies, R J

    1994-06-01

    1. We investigated the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) in rat brain isolated nerve terminals (synaptosomes), using fluorescence pH indicators and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy. 2. The resting pHi was not significantly affected by the presence or absence of HCO3-. Removal of external Na+, in the absence or presence of HCO3- caused a rapid acidification of pHi. The recovery from acid loads was primarily due to the activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger, confirming the relevance of this transport system in synaptosomes. 3. Our data revealed that in synaptosomes the activity of the Na+/H+ exchanger was not regulated by either protein kinase C or kinase A. In contrast, Ca2+ played an important role in the regulation of Na+/H+ exchanger. This was supported by the observation that 4Br-A23187 induced a Na(+)-dependent alkalinization of the resting pHi and greatly enhanced the initial rate and the degree of the recovery from acid loads. 4. In most eukaryotic cells, HCO3(-)-based transport mechanisms play an important role in pHi regulation. In synaptosomes, however, HCO3- transport is not significantly involved in pHi regulation, because the presence or absence of HCO3- does not affect resting pHi nor the rate of pHi recovery to acid loads. Further studies to address the role of Cl- and HCO3- in pHi regulation in synaptosomes are discussed in the companion paper. 5. Increasing the concentration of Ko+ also resulted in a rise of steady-state pHi by a processes that is Ca2+ and HCO3- independent. This alkalinization could be due to either K+/H+ exchanger activity, K(+)-induced depolarization, reduction of delta microH+, or a direct reduction of delta microK+. Calculated H+ driving forces suggest that the reduction in the inwardly directed H+ leak is sufficient to explain this K(+)-induced alkalinization because it changes the delta microH+ by virtue of setting the membrane potential difference (Em) to the K+ equilibrium potential (EK+). PMID:7931513

  14. The role of hemagglutinins in the midgut extracts of two lines of Aedes aegypti in their susceptibility to Dengue-2 virus.

    PubMed

    Barde, P V; Khan, M I; Gokhale, M D; Mishra, A C; Mourya, D T

    2004-01-01

    Hemagglutinin activity (HA) was studied in the midgut extracts from highly (h) and lowly susceptible strains of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to Dengue-2 virus (DEN-2). HA in the midgut extracts from these two isofemale strains of mosquitoes was high in as compared to (h) mosquitoes. HA was found to be higher with chicken red blood cells (RBCs) than with rabbit and human RBCs of O group. Larval midgut extracts showed higher activity than those from adult female mosquitoes. Exposure of midgut extracts to 100 degrees C for 10 mins destroyed the activity. The activity was observed between pH 6 and pH 10. HA in midgut extracts was also studied using twenty different carbohydrates; five of them showed an inhibition of HA. The inhibitory carbohydrates, when incorporated into DEN-2-infected bloodmeal, showed a reduction in the susceptibility of mosquitoes to the virus as compared to the control ones fed on the virus alone. Similarly, when these carbohydrates were incorporated in the DEN-2-infected inoculum, the inoculated mosquitoes showed a reduction in the susceptibility to the virus. HA in the virus-infected midgut extracts was higher than that in the uninfected controls. These results suggest that the presence of HA in the midgut may be one of the factors that affect the susceptibility of Ae. aegypti mosquitoes to DEN-2. PMID:15462286

  15. Jasmonate-inducible plant enzymes degrade essential amino acids in the herbivore midgut

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hui; Wilkerson, Curtis G.; Kuchar, Jason A.; Phinney, Brett S.; Howe, Gregg A.

    2005-01-01

    The plant hormone jasmonic acid (JA) activates host defense responses against a broad spectrum of herbivores. Although it is well established that JA controls the expression of a large set of target genes in response to tissue damage, very few gene products have been shown to play a direct role in reducing herbivore performance. To test the hypothesis that JA-inducible proteins (JIPs) thwart attack by disrupting digestive processes in the insect gut, we used a MS-based approach to identify host proteins that accumulate in the midgut of Manduca sexta larvae reared on tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) plants. We show that two JIPs, arginase and threonine deaminase (TD), act in the M. sexta midgut to catabolize the essential amino acids Arg and Thr, respectively. Transgenic plants that overexpress arginase were more resistant to M. sexta larvae, and this effect was correlated with reduced levels of midgut Arg. We present evidence indicating that the ability of TD to degrade Thr in the midgut is enhanced by herbivore-induced proteolytic removal of the enzyme's C-terminal regulatory domain, which confers negative feedback regulation by isoleucine in planta. Our results demonstrate that the JA signaling pathway strongly influences the midgut protein content of phytophagous insects and support the hypothesis that catabolism of amino acids in the insect digestive tract by host enzymes plays a role in plant protection against herbivores. PMID:16357201

  16. Midgut-specific immune molecules are produced by the blood-sucking insect Stomoxys calcitrans

    PubMed Central

    Lehane, Michael J.; Wu, Dan; Lehane, Stella M.

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced two defensins, Smd1 and Smd2, from anterior midgut tissue of the blood-sucking fly Stomoxys calcitrans. The DNA and N-terminal protein sequences suggest both are produced as prepropeptides. Smd1 differs from the classic defensin pattern in having an unusual six-amino acid-long N-terminal sequence. Both Smd1 and Smd2 have lower pI points and charge than insect defensins derived from fat body/hemocytes. Northern analysis shows both of these defensin molecules are tissue specific; both are produced by the anterior midgut tissue and, unlike the other insect defensins reported to date, neither appears to be expressed in fat body or hemocytes. Northern analysis also shows that mRNAs for both defensins are constitutively produced in the anterior midgut tissues and that these transcripts are up-regulated in response to sterile as well as a lipopolysaccharide-containing blood meal. However, anti-Gram-negative biological activity in the midgut is substantially enhanced by lipopolysaccharide. These findings suggest that the insect midgut has its own tissue-specific immune mechanisms and that this invertebrate epithelium is, like several vertebrate epithelia, protected by specific antibacterial peptides. PMID:9326639

  17. Midgut proteinases of Sitotroga cerealella (Oliver) (Lepidoptera:Gelechiidae): Characterization and relationship to resistance in cereals

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Lan.

    1989-01-01

    Midgut proteinases are vital to the insects which digest ingested food in the midgut. Insect midgut proteinases, therefore, have been considered as possible targets for the control of insect pests. Proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors are very attractive for their potential use in developing insect resistant plant varieties via genetic engineering. Sitotroga cerealella is one of the major storage pests of cereals, and no antibiotic resistance in wheat against this insect has been identified to date. A series of diagnostic inhibitors, thiol-reducing agents and a metal-ion chelator were used in the identification of proteinases in crude extracts from S. cerealella larval midguts with both protein and ester substrates. The partial inhibition of proteolytic activity in crude midgut extract toward ({sup 3}H)-methemoglobin by pepstatin A suggested the presence of another proteinase which was sensitive to pepstatin A. The optimum pH range for the proteolytic activity, however, indicated that the major midgut proteinases were not carboxyl proteinases. Two proteinases were successfully purified by a combination of fractionation with ammonium sulfate, gel permeation and anion exchange chromatography. Characterization of the enzymes with the purified enzyme preparations confirmed that the two major proteinases were serine endoproteinases with trypsin-like and chymotrypsin-like specificities respectively. Bioassays were conducted using the artificial seeds to test naturally occurring proteinaceous proteinase inhibitors of potential value. Soybean trypsin inhibitor and the Bowman-Birk proteinase inhibitor had adverse effects on the development of the insect. A predictive model was constructed to evaluate effects of seed resistance in conjunction with other control methods on S. cerealella population dynamics.

  18. Increased centrosome amplification in aged stem cells of the Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Joung-Sun; Pyo, Jung-Hoon; Na, Hyun-Jin; Jeon, Ho-Jun; Kim, Young-Shin; Arking, Robert; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2014-07-25

    Highlights: • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of aged Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs of oxidative stressed Drosophila midguts. • Increased centrosome amplification in ISCs by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be responsible for abnormal ISC polyploid cells. • Supernumerary centrosomes can be a useful marker for aging stem cells. - Abstract: Age-related changes in long-lived tissue-resident stem cells may be tightly linked to aging and age-related diseases such as cancer. Centrosomes play key roles in cell proliferation, differentiation and migration. Supernumerary centrosomes are known to be an early event in tumorigenesis and senescence. However, the age-related changes of centrosome duplication in tissue-resident stem cells in vivo remain unknown. Here, using anti-γ-tubulin and anti-PH3, we analyzed mitotic intestinal stem cells with supernumerary centrosomes in the adult Drosophila midgut, which may be a versatile model system for stem cell biology. The results showed increased centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells of aged and oxidatively stressed Drosophila midguts. Increased centrosome amplification was detected by overexpression of PVR, EGFR, and AKT in intestinal stem cells/enteroblasts, known to mimic age-related changes including hyperproliferation of intestinal stem cells and hyperplasia in the midgut. Our data show the first direct evidence for the age-related increase of centrosome amplification in intestinal stem cells and suggest that the Drosophila midgut is an excellent model for studying molecular mechanisms underlying centrosome amplification in aging adult stem cells in vivo.

  19. Mu d-directed lacZ fusions regulated by low pH in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Slonczewski, J L; Gonzalez, T N; Bartholomew, F M; Holt, N J

    1987-01-01

    Methods were devised to isolate strains of Escherichia coli containing Mu d (lacZ Kmr) operon fusions regulated by external pH and by internal pH. External acid-inducible fusions (exa) were detected by plating a Mu d fusion pool on Luria broth with 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside, buffered at pH 7.4, and then replica plating on the same medium buffered at pH 5.5. Two exa strains showed induction by external acidification, up to 800-fold and 90-fold. Induction of both fusions was maximal at pH 5.6 and minimal over pH 7.0 to 8.3. There was no induction by membrane-permeable weak acids which depress internal pH at constant external pH. Anaerobiosis increased the steady-state level of transcription of exa-1 5-fold and of exa-2 2.5-fold at low external pH. Internal acid-inducible fusions (ina) were detected by plating a Mu d fusion pool on MacConkey medium, pH 6.8, and then replica plating with 15 mM benzoate. Two ina strains showed 10-fold induction by 20 mM benzoate at external pH 7.0. Similar results were obtained with other weak acids; their relative potency (salicylate greater than benzoate greater than dimethoxazoledinedione) was consistent with their relative ability to depress internal pH. In the absence of a weak acid, external pH had almost no effect over the pH range 5.5 to 8.0. Anaerobiosis did not affect ina induction. To our knowledge, this is the first report of E. coli genes induced specifically by internal but not external acidification and the first report of gene fusions induced by external acidification but not by weak acids. PMID:2954947

  20. Carbon Cycling and pH regulation on the Scotian Shelf, NW Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Helmuth

    2015-04-01

    This presentation intends to describe the biogeochemical context for ocean acidification studies on the Scotian Shelf. The seasonality of the dominant processes, regulating surface ocean CO2 conditions, including pH, will be assessed as well as cross-shelf transports of CO2, acidity and nutrient, the latter ones exerting the "subsurface control" of CO2 air-sea fluxes and surface pH. Methods summary: The seasonal variability of inorganic carbon in the surface waters of the Scotian Shelf region of the Canadian northwestern Atlantic Ocean was assessed using hourly measurements of the partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2), and hydrographic variables obtained by an autonomous moored instrument (44.3°N and 63.3°W). These measurements were complemented by seasonal shipboard sampling of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), and pCO2, at the mooring site, and over the larger spatial scale. The Scotian Shelf is a 700 km long section of the continental shelf off Nova Scotia. Bounded by the Laurentian Channel to the northeast, and by the Northeast Channel and the Gulf of Maine to the southwest, it varies in width from 120 to 240 km covering roughly 120,000 km2 with an average depth of 90 m . Convective mixin in winter time and coastal upwelling and the associated favorable wind conditions on the Scotian Shelf have long been recognized. Strong winds of speeds greater than 10 m s-1, blowing to the northeast, and persisting for several days force relatively cold, saline, water toward the surface, displacing the warmer, fresher water offshore. Upwelling events have frequently been observed in the region in winter, and modeling studies have reproduced these observed events. Furthermore, these events may play a role in initiating and sustaining the spring phytoplankton bloom by displacing nutrient-depleted surface water and bring nutrient-rich waters up to the surface. Biological processes were found to be the dominant control on mixed-layer DIC, with the delivery of

  1. Nucleoporin 35 regulates cardiomyocyte pH homeostasis by controlling Na+-H+ exchanger-1 expression.

    PubMed

    Xu, Liang; Pan, Lei; Li, Jun; Huang, Bijun; Feng, Jing; Li, Changming; Wang, Shiyi; The, Erlinda; Liu, Yuan; Yuan, Tianyou; Zhen, Lixiao; Liang, Dandan; Liu, Yi; Li, Li; Cui, Yingyu; Jiang, Xiaoyan; Peng, Luying; Chen, Yi-Han

    2015-10-01

    The mammalian nuclear pore complex is comprised of ∼ 30 different nucleoporins (Nups). It governs the nuclear import of gene expression modulators and the export of mRNAs. In cardiomyocytes, Na(+)-H(+) exchanger-1 (NHE1) is an integral membrane protein that exclusively regulates intracellular pH (pHi) by exchanging one intracellular H(+) for one extracellular Na(+). However, the role of Nups in cardiac NHE1 expression remains unknown. We herein report that Nup35 regulates cardiomyocyte NHE1 expression by controlling the nucleo-cytoplasmic trafficking of nhe1 mRNA. The N-terminal domain of Nup35 determines nhe1 mRNA nuclear export by targeting the 5'-UTR (-412 to -213 nt) of nhe1 mRNA. Nup35 ablation weakens the resistance of cardiomyocytes to an acid challenge by depressing NHE1 expression. Moreover, we identify that Nup35 and NHE1 are simultaneously downregulated in ischemic cardiomyocytes both in vivo and in vitro. Enforced expression of Nup35 effectively counteracts the anoxia-induced intracellular acidification. We conclude that Nup35 selectively regulates cardiomyocyte pHi homeostasis by posttranscriptionally controlling NHE1 expression. This finding reveals a novel regulatory mechanism of cardiomyocyte pHi, and may provide insight into the therapeutic strategy for ischemic cardiac diseases. PMID:26260029

  2. Learning to Write a Research Article: Ph.D. Students' Transitions toward Disciplinary Writing Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castello, Montserrat; Inesta, Anna; Corcelles, Mariona

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study designed from a socially situated and activity theory perspective aimed at gaining a deeper understanding of how Ph.D. students regulate their academic writing activity. Writing regulation is a complex activity of a highly situated and social nature, involving cyclical thought-action-emotion dynamics and the…

  3. Streptococcus pyogenes Malate Degradation Pathway Links pH Regulation and Virulence

    PubMed Central

    Paluscio, Elyse

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Streptococcus pyogenes to infect different niches within its human host most likely relies on its ability to utilize alternative carbon sources. In examining this question, we discovered that all sequenced S. pyogenes strains possess the genes for the malic enzyme (ME) pathway, which allows malate to be used as a supplemental carbon source for growth. ME is comprised of four genes in two adjacent operons, with the regulatory two-component MaeKR required for expression of genes encoding a malate permease (maeP) and malic enzyme (maeE). Analysis of transcription indicated that expression of maeP and maeE is induced by both malate and low pH, and induction in response to both cues is dependent on the MaeK sensor kinase. Furthermore, both maePE and maeKR are repressed by glucose, which occurs via a CcpA-independent mechanism. Additionally, malate utilization requires the PTS transporter EI enzyme (PtsI), as a PtsI– mutant fails to express the ME genes and is unable to utilize malate. Virulence of selected ME mutants was assessed in a murine model of soft tissue infection. MaeP–, MaeK–, and MaeR– mutants were attenuated for virulence, whereas a MaeE– mutant showed enhanced virulence compared to that of the wild type. Taken together, these data show that ME contributes to S. pyogenes' carbon source repertory, that malate utilization is a highly regulated process, and that a single regulator controls ME expression in response to diverse signals. Furthermore, malate uptake and utilization contribute to the adaptive pH response, and ME can influence the outcome of infection. PMID:25583521

  4. Ionic permeability of K, Na, and Cl in crayfish nerve. Regulation by membrane fixed charges and pH.

    PubMed Central

    Strickholm, A; Clark, H R

    1977-01-01

    Teorell's fixed charge theory for membrane ion permeability was utilized to calculate specific ionic permeabilities from measurements of membrane potential, conductance, and specific ionic transference numbers. The results were compared with the passive ionic conductances calculated from the branched equivalent circuit membrane model of Hodgkin Huxley. Ionic permeabilities for potassium, sodium, and chloride of crayfish (Procambarus clarkii) medial giant axons were examined over an external pH range from 3.8 to 11.4. Action potentials were obtained over this pH range. Failures occurred below pH 3.8 during protonation of membrane phospholipid phosphate and carboxyl, and above pH 11.4 from calcium precipitation. In general, chloride permeability increases with membrane protonation, while cation permeability decreases. At pH 7.0, PK = 1.33 X 10(-5), PCl = 1.49 X 10(-6), PNa = 1.92 X 10(-8) cm/s. PK: PCl: PNa = 693:78:1. PCl is zero above pH 10.6 and is opened predominately by protonation of epsilon-amino, and partially by tyrosine and sulfhydryl groups from pH 10.6 to 9. PK is activated in part by ionization of phospholipid phosphate and carboxyl around pH 4, then further by imidazole from pH 5 to 7, and then predominately from pH 7 to 9 by most probably phosphatidic acid. PNa permeability parallels that of potassium from pH 5 to 9.4. Below pH 5 and above pH 9.4, PNa increases while PK decreases. Evidence was obtained that these ions possibly share common passive permeable channels. The data best support the theory of Teorell, that membrane fixed charges regulate permiability and that essentially every membrane ionizable group appears involved in various amounts in ionic permeability control. PMID:18219

  5. Embryonic common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) preferentially regulate intracellular tissue pH during acid-base challenges.

    PubMed

    Shartau, Ryan B; Crossley, Dane A; Kohl, Zachary F; Brauner, Colin J

    2016-07-01

    The nests of embryonic turtles naturally experience elevated CO2 (hypercarbia), which leads to increased blood PCO2  and a respiratory acidosis, resulting in reduced blood pH [extracellular pH (pHe)]. Some fishes preferentially regulate tissue pH [intracellular pH (pHi)] against changes in pHe; this has been proposed to be associated with exceptional CO2 tolerance and has never been identified in amniotes. As embryonic turtles may be CO2 tolerant based on nesting strategy, we hypothesized that they preferentially regulate pHi, conferring tolerance to severe acute acid-base challenges. This hypothesis was tested by investigating pH regulation in common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) reared in normoxia then exposed to hypercarbia (13 kPa PCO2 ) for 1 h at three developmental ages: 70% and 90% of incubation, and yearlings. Hypercarbia reduced pHe but not pHi, at all developmental ages. At 70% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.324 pH units while pHi of brain, white muscle and lung increased; heart, liver and kidney pHi remained unchanged. At 90% of incubation, pHe was depressed by 0.352 pH units but heart pHi increased with no change in pHi of other tissues. Yearlings exhibited a pHe reduction of 0.235 pH units but had no changes in pHi of any tissues. The results indicate common snapping turtles preferentially regulate pHi during development, but the degree of response is reduced throughout development. This is the first time preferential pHi regulation has been identified in an amniote. These findings may provide insight into the evolution of acid-base homeostasis during development of amniotes, and vertebrates in general. PMID:27091863

  6. SLC26A Gene Family Participate in pH Regulation during Enamel Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Kaifeng; Lei, Yuejuan; Wen, Xin; Lacruz, Rodrigo S.; Soleimani, Manoocher; Kurtz, Ira; Snead, Malcolm L.; White, Shane N.; Paine, Michael L.

    2015-01-01

    The bicarbonate transport activities of Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 are essential to physiological processes in multiple organs. Although mutations of Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 have not been linked to any human diseases, disruption of Slc26a1, Slc26a6 or Slc26a7 expression in animals causes severe dysregulation of acid-base balance and disorder of anion homeostasis. Amelogenesis, especially the enamel formation during maturation stage, requires complex pH regulation mechanisms based on ion transport. The disruption of stage-specific ion transporters frequently results in enamel pathosis in animals. Here we present evidence that Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 are highly expressed in rodent incisor ameloblasts during maturation-stage tooth development. In maturation-stage ameloblasts, Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 show a similar cellular distribution as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr) to the apical region of cytoplasmic membrane, and the distribution of Slc26a7 is also seen in the cytoplasmic/subapical region, presumably on the lysosomal membrane. We have also examined Slc26a1 and Slc26a7 null mice, and although no overt abnormal enamel phenotypes were observed in Slc26a1-/- or Slc26a7-/- animals, absence of Slc26a1 or Slc26a7 results in up-regulation of Cftr, Ca2, Slc4a4, Slc4a9 and Slc26a9, all of which are involved in pH homeostasis, indicating that this might be a compensatory mechanism used by ameloblasts cells in the absence of Slc26 genes. Together, our data show that Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 are novel participants in the extracellular transport of bicarbonate during enamel maturation, and that their functional roles may be achieved by forming interaction units with Cftr. PMID:26671068

  7. SLC26A Gene Family Participate in pH Regulation during Enamel Maturation.

    PubMed

    Yin, Kaifeng; Lei, Yuejuan; Wen, Xin; Lacruz, Rodrigo S; Soleimani, Manoocher; Kurtz, Ira; Snead, Malcolm L; White, Shane N; Paine, Michael L

    2015-01-01

    The bicarbonate transport activities of Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 are essential to physiological processes in multiple organs. Although mutations of Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 have not been linked to any human diseases, disruption of Slc26a1, Slc26a6 or Slc26a7 expression in animals causes severe dysregulation of acid-base balance and disorder of anion homeostasis. Amelogenesis, especially the enamel formation during maturation stage, requires complex pH regulation mechanisms based on ion transport. The disruption of stage-specific ion transporters frequently results in enamel pathosis in animals. Here we present evidence that Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 are highly expressed in rodent incisor ameloblasts during maturation-stage tooth development. In maturation-stage ameloblasts, Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 show a similar cellular distribution as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (Cftr) to the apical region of cytoplasmic membrane, and the distribution of Slc26a7 is also seen in the cytoplasmic/subapical region, presumably on the lysosomal membrane. We have also examined Slc26a1 and Slc26a7 null mice, and although no overt abnormal enamel phenotypes were observed in Slc26a1-/- or Slc26a7-/- animals, absence of Slc26a1 or Slc26a7 results in up-regulation of Cftr, Ca2, Slc4a4, Slc4a9 and Slc26a9, all of which are involved in pH homeostasis, indicating that this might be a compensatory mechanism used by ameloblasts cells in the absence of Slc26 genes. Together, our data show that Slc26a1, Slc26a6 and Slc26a7 are novel participants in the extracellular transport of bicarbonate during enamel maturation, and that their functional roles may be achieved by forming interaction units with Cftr. PMID:26671068

  8. Obstructive jaundice secondary to chronic midgut volvulus.

    PubMed Central

    Spitz, L; Orr, J D; Harries, J T

    1983-01-01

    A case of progressive extrahepatic biliary obstruction due to chronic midgut volvulus secondary to malrotation in a 5-month-old girl is presented. The obstruction to the bile duct was relieved after correction of the malrotation and division of the obstructing bands. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 PMID:6859923

  9. Regulation of intracellular pH in cancer cell lines under normoxia and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Hulikova, Alzbeta; Harris, Adrian L; Vaughan-Jones, Richard D; Swietach, Pawel

    2013-04-01

    Acid-extrusion by active transport is important in metabolically active cancer cells, where it removes excess intracellular acid and sets the intracellular resting pH. Hypoxia is a major trigger of adaptive responses in cancer, but its effect on acid-extrusion remains unclear. We studied pH-regulation under normoxia and hypoxia in eight cancer cell-lines (HCT116, RT112, MDA-MB-468, MCF10A, HT29, HT1080, MiaPaca2, HeLa) using the pH-sensitive fluorophore, cSNARF-1. Hypoxia responses were triggered by pre-incubation in low O(2) or with the 2-oxoglutarate-dependent dioxygenase inhibitor dimethyloxalylglycine (DMOG). By selective pharmacological inhibition or transport-substrate removal, acid-extrusion flux was dissected into components due to Na(+)/H(+) exchange (NHE) and Na(+)-dependent HCO(3)(-) transport. In half of the cell-lines (HCT116, RT112, MDA-MB-468, MCF10A), acid-extrusion on NHE was the dominant flux during an acid load, and in all of these, bar one (MDA-MB-468), NHE-flux was reduced following hypoxic incubation. Further studies in HCT116 cells showed that <4-h hypoxic incubation reduced NHE-flux reversibly with a time-constant of 1-2 h. This was not associated with a change in expression of NHE1, the principal NHE isoform. Following 48-h hypoxia, inhibition of NHE-flux persisted but became only slowly reversible and associated with reduced expression of the glycosylated form of NHE1. Acid-extrusion by Na(+)-dependent HCO(3)(-) transport was hypoxia-insensitive and comparable in all cell lines. This constitutive and stable element of pH-regulation was found to be important for setting and stabilizing resting pH at a mildly alkaline level (conducive for growth), irrespective of oxygenation status. In contrast, the more variable flux on NHE underlies cell-specific differences in their dynamic response to larger acid loads. PMID:22949268

  10. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi

    PubMed Central

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-01-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  11. Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors in the midgut of Phlebotomus papatasi.

    PubMed

    Sigle, Leah Theresa; Ramalho-Ortigão, Marcelo

    2013-09-01

    Sandflies (Diptera: Psychodidae) are important disease vectors of parasites of the genus Leishmania, as well as bacteria and viruses. Following studies of the midgut transcriptome of Phlebotomus papatasi, the principal vector of Leishmania major, two non-classical Kazal-type serine proteinase inhibitors were identified (PpKzl1 and PpKzl2). Analyses of expression profiles indicated that PpKzl1 and PpKzl2 transcripts are both regulated by blood-feeding in the midgut of P. papatasi and are also expressed in males, larva and pupa. We expressed a recombinant PpKzl2 in a mammalian expression system (CHO-S free style cells) that was applied to in vitro studies to assess serine proteinase inhibition. Recombinant PpKzl2 inhibited α-chymotrypsin to 9.4% residual activity and also inhibited α-thrombin and trypsin to 33.5% and 63.9% residual activity, suggesting that native PpKzl2 is an active serine proteinase inhibitor and likely involved in regulating digestive enzymes in the midgut. Early stages of Leishmania are susceptible to killing by digestive proteinases in the sandfly midgut. Thus, characterising serine proteinase inhibitors may provide new targets and strategies to prevent transmission of Leishmania. PMID:24037187

  12. Bacterial Infection and Immune Responses in Lutzomyia longipalpis Sand Fly Larvae Midgut.

    PubMed

    Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju-Lin; Hurwitz, Ivy; Durvasula, Ravi; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The midgut microbial community in insect vectors of disease is crucial for an effective immune response against infection with various human and animal pathogens. Depending on the aspects of their development, insects can acquire microbes present in soil, water, and plants. Sand flies are major vectors of leishmaniasis, and shown to harbor a wide variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Sand fly larval stages acquire microorganisms from the soil, and the abundance and distribution of these microorganisms may vary depending on the sand fly species or the breeding site. Here, we assess the distribution of two bacteria commonly found within the gut of sand flies, Pantoea agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis. We demonstrate that these bacteria are able to differentially infect the larval digestive tract, and regulate the immune response in sand fly larvae. Moreover, bacterial distribution, and likely the ability to colonize the gut, is driven, at least in part, by a gradient of pH present in the gut. PMID:26154607

  13. Bacterial Infection and Immune Responses in Lutzomyia longipalpis Sand Fly Larvae Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Heerman, Matthew; Weng, Ju-Lin; Hurwitz, Ivy; Durvasula, Ravi; Ramalho-Ortigao, Marcelo

    2015-01-01

    The midgut microbial community in insect vectors of disease is crucial for an effective immune response against infection with various human and animal pathogens. Depending on the aspects of their development, insects can acquire microbes present in soil, water, and plants. Sand flies are major vectors of leishmaniasis, and shown to harbor a wide variety of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Sand fly larval stages acquire microorganisms from the soil, and the abundance and distribution of these microorganisms may vary depending on the sand fly species or the breeding site. Here, we assess the distribution of two bacteria commonly found within the gut of sand flies, Pantoea agglomerans and Bacillus subtilis. We demonstrate that these bacteria are able to differentially infect the larval digestive tract, and regulate the immune response in sand fly larvae. Moreover, bacterial distribution, and likely the ability to colonize the gut, is driven, at least in part, by a gradient of pH present in the gut. PMID:26154607

  14. Tsetse EP Protein Protects the Fly Midgut from Trypanosome Establishment

    PubMed Central

    Haines, Lee R.; Lehane, Stella M.; Pearson, Terry W.; Lehane, Michael J.

    2010-01-01

    African trypanosomes undergo a complex developmental process in their tsetse fly vector before transmission back to a vertebrate host. Typically, 90% of fly infections fail, most during initial establishment of the parasite in the fly midgut. The specific mechanism(s) underpinning this failure are unknown. We have previously shown that a Glossina-specific, immunoresponsive molecule, tsetse EP protein, is up regulated by the fly in response to gram-negative microbial challenge. Here we show by knockdown using RNA interference that this tsetse EP protein acts as a powerful antagonist of establishment in the fly midgut for both Trypanosoma brucei brucei and T. congolense. We demonstrate that this phenomenon exists in two species of tsetse, Glossina morsitans morsitans and G. palpalis palpalis, suggesting tsetse EP protein may be a major determinant of vector competence in all Glossina species. Tsetse EP protein levels also decline in response to starvation of the fly, providing a possible explanation for increased susceptibility of starved flies to trypanosome infection. As starvation is a common field event, this fact may be of considerable importance in the epidemiology of African trypanosomiasis. PMID:20221444

  15. Revisiting the Role of Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator and Counterion Permeability in the pH Regulation of Endocytic Organelles

    PubMed Central

    Barriere, Herve; Bagdany, Miklos; Bossard, Florian; Okiyoneda, Tsukasa; Wojewodka, Gabriella; Gruenert, Dieter; Radzioch, Danuta

    2009-01-01

    Organellar acidification by the electrogenic vacuolar proton-ATPase is coupled to anion uptake and cation efflux to preserve electroneutrality. The defective organellar pH regulation, caused by impaired counterion conductance of the mutant cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), remains highly controversial in epithelia and macrophages. Restricting the pH-sensitive probe to CFTR-containing vesicles, the counterion and proton permeability, and the luminal pH of endosomes were measured in various cells, including genetically matched CF and non-CF human respiratory epithelia, as well as cftr+/+ and cftr−/− mouse alveolar macrophages. Passive proton and relative counterion permeabilities, determinants of endosomal, lysosomal, and phagosomal pH-regulation, were probed with FITC-conjugated transferrin, dextran, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, respectively. Although CFTR function could be documented in recycling endosomes and immature phagosomes, neither channel activation nor inhibition influenced the pH in any of these organelles. CFTR heterologous overexpression also failed to alter endocytic organellar pH. We propose that the relatively large CFTR-independent counterion and small passive proton permeability ensure efficient shunting of the proton-ATPase–generated membrane potential. These results have implications in the regulation of organelle acidification in general and demonstrate that perturbations of the endolysosomal organelles pH homeostasis cannot be linked to the etiology of the CF lung disease. PMID:19420138

  16. Ruminant Nutrition Symposium: Role of fermentation acid absorption in the regulation of ruminal pH.

    PubMed

    Aschenbach, J R; Penner, G B; Stumpff, F; Gäbel, G

    2011-04-01

    , SCFA absorption also accelerates urea transport into the rumen, which via ammonium recycling, may remove protons from rumen to the blood. Ammonium absorption into the blood is also stimulated by luminal SCFA. It is suggested that the interacting transport processes for SCFA, urea, and ammonia represent evolutionary adaptations of ruminants to actively coordinate energy fermentation, protein assimilation, and pH regulation in the rumen. PMID:20952531

  17. Effect of midgut proteolytic activity on susceptibility of lepidopteran larvae to Bacillus thuringiensis subsp. Kurstaki

    PubMed Central

    Talaei-Hassanloui, Reza; Bakhshaei, Raziyeh; Hosseininaveh, Vahid; Khorramnezhad, Ayda

    2014-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. All subspecies and strains of B. thuringiensis can produce a spore and a crystalline parasporal body. This crystal which contains proteinaceous protoxins is dissolved in the alkaline midgut, the resulting molecule is then cleaved and activated by proteolytic enzymes and acts as a toxin. An interesting aspect of this activation process is that variations in midgut pH and protease activity have been shown to account for the spectrum of some Bt proteins activity. Thus, an important factor that could be a determinant of toxin activity is the presence of proteases in the midgut microenvironment of susceptible insects. Reciprocally, any alteration in the midgut protease composition of the host can result in resistance to Bt. Here in this paper, we reviewed this processes in general and presented our assays to reveal whether resistance mechanism to Bt in Diamondback Moth (DbM) larvae could be due to the function of the midgut proteases? We estimated LC50 for both probable susceptible and resistant populations in laboratory and greenhouse tests. Then, the midgut protease activities of the B. thuringiensis induced-resistant and susceptible populations of the DbM were assayed on Hemoglubin and on N-alpha-benzoyl-DL-arginine-p-nitroanilide (BapNA) for total and tryptic activities, respectively. Six hours after feeding on Bt treated and untreated canola leaves, the midguts of instar larvae of both populations were isolated. Following related protocols, peptides released through the activity of proteinases on Hemoglubin and BApNA were recorded using microplate reader. Control (Blank) was also considered with adding TCA to reaction mix before adding enzymatic extract. Data analysis indicated that there are significant differences for tryptic activity on BApNA and also for total proteolytic activity on Hemoglubin between susceptible and

  18. Mechanisms of cytoplasmic pH regulation in alkaliphilic strains of Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Krulwich, T A; Ito, M; Gilmour, R; Guffanti, A A

    1997-11-01

    The central challenge for extremely alkaliphilic Bacillus species is the need to establish and sustain a cytoplasmic pH that is over two units lower than the highly alkaline medium. Its centrality is suggested by the strong correlation between the growth rate in the upper range of pH for growth, i.e., at values above pH 10.5, and the cytoplasmic pH. The diminishing growth rate at extremely high pH values correlates better with the rise in cytoplasmic pH than with other energetic parameters. There are also general adaptations of alkaliphiles that are crucial prerequisites for pH homeostasis as well as other cell functions, i.e., the reduced basic amino acid content of proteins or segments thereof that are exposed to the medium, and there are other challenges of alkaliphily that emerge from solution of the cytoplasmic pH problem, i.e., reduction of the chemiosmotic driving force. For cells growing on glucose, strong evidence exists for the importance of acidic cell wall components, teichuronic acid and teichuronopeptides, in alkaliphily. These wall macromolecules may provide a passive barrier to ion flux. For cells growing on fermentable carbon sources, this and other passive mechanisms may have a particularly substantial role, but for cells growing on both fermentable and nonfermentable substrates, an active Na+-dependent cycle is apparently required for alkaliphily and the alkaliphile's remarkable capacity for pH homeostasis. The active cycle involves primary establishment of an electrochemical gradient via proton extrusion, a secondary electrogenic Na+/H+ antiport to achieve net acidification of the cytoplasm relative to the outside pH, and mechanisms for Na+ re-entry. Recent work in several laboratories on the critical antiporters involved in this cycle has begun to clarify the number and characteristics of the porters that support active mechanisms of pH homeostasis. PMID:9680297

  19. The Importance of pH in Regulating the Function of the Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L1 Cysteine Protease

    PubMed Central

    Lowther, Jonathan; Robinson, Mark W.; Donnelly, Sheila M.; Xu, Weibo; Stack, Colin M.; Matthews, Jacqueline M.; Dalton, John P.

    2009-01-01

    The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica secretes cathepsin L cysteine proteases to invade its host, migrate through tissues and digest haemoglobin, its main source of amino acids. Here we investigated the importance of pH in regulating the activity and functions of the major cathepsin L protease FheCL1. The slightly acidic pH of the parasite gut facilitates the auto-catalytic activation of FheCL1 from its inactive proFheCL1 zymogen; this process was ∼40-fold faster at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.0. Active mature FheCL1 is very stable at acidic and neutral conditions (the enzyme retained ∼45% activity when incubated at 37°C and pH 4.5 for 10 days) and displayed a broad pH range for activity peptide substrates and the protein ovalbumin, peaking between pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. This pH profile likely reflects the need for FheCL1 to function both in the parasite gut and in the host tissues. FheCL1, however, could not cleave its natural substrate Hb in the pH range pH 5.5 and pH 7.0; digestion occurred only at pH≤4.5, which coincided with pH-induced dissociation of the Hb tetramer. Our studies indicate that the acidic pH of the parasite relaxes the Hb structure, making it susceptible to proteolysis by FheCL1. This process is enhanced by glutathione (GSH), the main reducing agent contained in red blood cells. Using mass spectrometry, we show that FheCL1 can degrade Hb to small peptides, predominantly of 4–14 residues, but cannot release free amino acids. Therefore, we suggest that Hb degradation is not completed in the gut lumen but that the resulting peptides are absorbed by the gut epithelial cells for further processing by intracellular di- and amino-peptidases to free amino acids that are distributed through the parasite tissue for protein anabolism. PMID:19172172

  20. Effect of glucagon on intracellular pH regulation in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets.

    PubMed Central

    Alvaro, D; Della Guardia, P; Bini, A; Gigliozzi, A; Furfaro, S; La Rosa, T; Piat, C; Capocaccia, L

    1995-01-01

    To elucidate mechanisms of glucagon-induced bicarbonate-rich choleresis, we investigated the effect of glucagon on ion transport processes involved in the regulation of intracellular pH (pHi) in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets. It was found that glucagon (200 nM), without influencing resting pHi, significantly stimulates the Cl-/HCO3- exchange activity. The effect of glucagon was associated with a sevenfold increase in cAMP levels in rat hepatocytes. The activity of the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger was also stimulated by DBcAMP + forskolin. The effect of glucagon on the Cl-/HCO3- exchange was individually blocked by two specific and selective inhibitors of protein kinase A, Rp-cAMPs (10 microM) and H-89 (30 microM), the latter having no influence on the glucagon-induced cAMP accumulation in isolated rat hepatocytes. The Cl- channel blocker, NPPB (10 microM), showed no effect on either the basal or the glucagon-stimulated Cl-/HCO3 exchange. In contrast, the protein kinase C agonist, PMA (10 microM), completely blocked the glucagon stimulation of the Cl-/HCO3- exchange; however, this effect was achieved through a significant inhibition of the glucagon-stimulated cAMP accumulation in rat hepatocytes. Colchicine pretreatment inhibited the basal as well as the glucagon-stimulated Cl-/HCO3- exchange activity. The Na+/H+ exchanger was unaffected by glucagon either at basal pHi or at acid pHi values. In contrast, glucagon, at basal pHi, stimulated the Na(+)-HCO3- symport. The main findings of this study indicate that glucagon, through the cAMP-dependent protein kinase A pathway, stimulates the activity of the Cl-/HCO3- exchanger in isolated rat hepatocyte couplets, a mechanism which could account for the in vivo induced bicarbonate-rich choleresis. Images PMID:7635959

  1. Regulation of arsenic mobility on basaltic glass surfaces by speciation and pH.

    PubMed

    Sigfusson, Bergur; Meharg, Andrew A; Gislason, Sigurdur R

    2008-12-01

    The importance of geothermal energy as a source for electricity generation and district heating has increased over recent decades. Arsenic can be a significant constituent of the geothermal fluids pumped to the surface during power generation. Dissolved As exists in different oxidation states, mainly as As(III) and As(V), and the charge of individual species varies with pH. Basaltic glass is one of the most important rock types in many high-temperature geothermal fields. Static batch and dynamic column experiments were combined to generate and validate sorption coefficients for As(III) and As(V) in contact with basaltic glass at pH 3-10. Validation was carried out by two empirical kinetic models and a surface complexation model (SCM). The SCM provided a better fit to the experimental column data than kinetic models at high pH values. However, in certain circumstances, an adequate estimation of As transport in the column could not be attained without incorporation of kinetic reactions. The varying mobility with pH was due to the combined effects of the variable charge of the basaltic glass with the pH point of zero charge at 6.8 and the individual As species as pH shifted, respectively. The mobility of As(III) decreased with increasing pH. The opposite was true for As(V), being nearly immobile at pH 3 to being highly mobile at pH 10. Incorporation of appropriate sorption constants, based on the measured pH and Eh of geothermal fluids, into regional groundwater-flow models should allow prediction of the As(III) and As(V) transport from geothermal systems to adjacent drinking water sources and ecosystems. PMID:19192803

  2. Hepatic urea synthesis and pH regulation. Role of CO2, HCO3-, pH and the activity of carbonic anhydrase.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, D; Gerok, W

    1985-10-15

    dependent regulation of urea synthesis is predominantly due to mitochondrial carbonic anhydrase-catalyzed HCO3- supply for carbamoyl phosphate synthesis, whereas there is no control of urea synthesis by pH at the level of the five enzymes of the urea cycle. Because HCO3- provision for carbamoyl phosphate synthetase increases with increasing portal CO2 concentrations even in the absence of carbonic anhydrase activity, susceptibility of ureogenesis to pH decreases with increasing portal CO2 concentrations. This may explain the different response of urea synthesis to chronic metabolic and chronic respiratory acidosis in vivo. PMID:3932068

  3. Midgut bacterial dynamics in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Terenius, Olle; Lindh, Jenny M; Eriksson-Gonzales, Karolina; Bussière, Luc; Laugen, Ane T; Bergquist, Helen; Titanji, Kehmia; Faye, Ingrid

    2012-06-01

    In vector mosquitoes, the presence of midgut bacteria may affect the ability to transmit pathogens. We have used a laboratory colony of Aedes aegypti as a model for bacterial interspecies competition and show that after a blood meal, the number of species (culturable on Luria-Bertani agar) that coexist in the midgut is low and that about 40% of the females do not harbor any cultivable bacteria. We isolated species belonging to the genera Bacillus, Elizabethkingia, Enterococcus, Klebsiella, Pantoea, Serratia, and Sphingomonas, and we also determined their growth rates, antibiotic resistance, and ex vivo inhibition of each other. To investigate the possible existence of coadaptation between midgut bacteria and their host, we fed Ae. aegypti cohorts with gut bacteria from human, a frog, and two mosquito species and followed the bacterial population growth over time. The dynamics of the different species suggests coadaptation between host and bacteria, and interestingly, we found that Pantoea stewartii isolated from Ae. aegypti survive better in Ae. aegypti as compared to P. stewartii isolated from the malaria mosquito Anopheles gambiae. PMID:22283178

  4. Stem cells of the beetle midgut epithelium.

    PubMed

    Nardi, James B; Bee, Charles Mark; Miller, Lou Ann

    2010-03-01

    At the completion of metamorphosis, adult insect cells have traditionally been assumed to halt cell divisions and terminally differentiate. While this model of differentiation holds for adult ectodermal epithelia that secrete cuticular specializations of exoskeletons, adult endodermal epithelia are populated by discrete three-dimensional aggregates of stem cells that continue to divide and differentiate after adult emergence. Aggregates of these presumptive adult stem cells are scattered throughout larval and pupal midgut monolayers. At the beginning of adult development (pupal-adult apolysis), the number of cells within each aggregate begins to increase rapidly. Dividing cells form three-dimensional, coherent populations that project as regenerative pouches of stem cells into the hemocoel surrounding the midgut. Stem cell pouches are regularly spaced throughout endodermal monolayers, having adopted a spacing pattern suggesting that each incipient pouch inhibits the formation of a similar pouch within a certain radius of itself-a process referred to as lateral inhibition. At completion of adult development (pupal-adult ecdysis), a distinct basal-luminal polarity has been established within each regenerative pouch. Dividing stem cells occupying the basal region are arranged in three-dimensional aggregates. As these are displaced toward the lumen, they transform into two-dimensional monolayers of differentiated epithelial cells whose apical surfaces are covered by microvilli. This organization of stem cell pouches in insect midguts closely parallels that of regenerative crypts in mammalian intestines. PMID:19909756

  5. Effect of low pH exposure on Na(+) regulation in two cichlid fish species of the Amazon.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rafael M; Ferreira, Marcio S; Wood, Chris M; Val, Adalberto L

    2013-11-01

    We evaluated the effects of acute exposure to low pH on Na(+) regulation in two Amazon cichlids collected from natural ion-poor "blackwaters", angelfish (Pterophyllum scalare) and discus (Symphysodon discus). Na(+) uptake kinetic parameters, unidirectional Na(+) fluxes, and net Cl(-) fluxes were determined at pH6.0 and 3.6. At pH6.0, both species presented low unidirectional Na(+) flux rates, with kinetics showing a relatively low affinity for Na(+) (angelfish Km=79, discus Km=268μmolL(-1)), with similar maximum transport capacities (Jmax~535nmolg(-1)h(-1)). Overall, there appeared to be high sensitivity to inhibition by low pH, yet low intrinsic branchial permeability limiting diffusive ion effluxes, resulting in relatively low net loss rates of Na(+), the same strategy as seen previously in other blackwater cichlids, and very different from the strategy of blackwater characids. At low pH, Na(+) uptake in angelfish was inhibited competitively (increased Km=166μmolL(-1)) and non-competitively (decreased Jmax=106nmolg(-1)h(-1)), whereas in discus, only a decrease in Jmax (112nmolg(-1)h(-1)) was statistically significant. An acute reduction in H(+)-ATPase activity, but not in Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase activity, in the gills of angelfish suggests a possible mechanism for this non-competitive inhibition at low pH. Discus fish were more tolerant to low pH than angelfish, as seen by lesser effects of exposure to pH3.6 on unidirectional Na(+) uptake and efflux rates and net Na(+) and Cl(-) loss rates. Overall, discus are better than angelfish in maintaining ionic balance under acidic, ion-poor conditions. PMID:23911980

  6. Role of the bicarbonate-responsive soluble adenylyl cyclase in pH sensing and metabolic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Jung-Chin; Oude-Elferink, Ronald P. J.

    2014-01-01

    The evolutionarily conserved soluble adenylyl cyclase (sAC, adcy10) was recently identified as a unique source of cAMP in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Its activity is regulated by bicarbonate and fine-tuned by calcium. As such, and in conjunction with carbonic anhydrase (CA), sAC constitutes an HCO−3/CO−2/pH sensor. In both alpha-intercalated cells of the collecting duct and the clear cells of the epididymis, sAC is expressed at significant level and involved in pH homeostasis via apical recruitment of vacuolar H+-ATPase (VHA) in a PKA-dependent manner. In addition to maintenance of pH homeostasis, sAC is also involved in metabolic regulation such as coupling of Krebs cycle to oxidative phosphorylation via bicarbonate/CO2 sensing. Additionally, sAC also regulates CFTR channel and plays an important role in regulation of barrier function and apoptosis. These observations suggest that sAC, via bicarbonate-sensing, plays an important role in maintaining homeostatic status of cells against fluctuations in their microenvironment. PMID:24575049

  7. Overcoming Hypoxia-Mediated Tumor Progression: Combinatorial Approaches Targeting pH Regulation, Angiogenesis and Immune Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Paul C.; Chafe, Shawn C.; Dedhar, Shoukat

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia is an important contributor to the heterogeneity of the microenvironment of solid tumors and is a significant environmental stressor that drives adaptations which are essential for the survival and metastatic capabilities of tumor cells. Critical adaptive mechanisms include altered metabolism, pH regulation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition, angiogenesis, migration/invasion, diminished response to immune cells and resistance to chemotherapy and radiation therapy. In particular, pH regulation by hypoxic tumor cells, through the modulation of cell surface molecules such as extracellular carbonic anhydrases (CAIX and CAXII) and monocarboxylate transporters (MCT-1 and MCT-4) functions to increase cancer cell survival and enhance cell invasion while also contributing to immune evasion. Indeed, CAIX is a vital regulator of hypoxia mediated tumor progression, and targeted inhibition of its function results in reduced tumor growth, metastasis, and cancer stem cell function. However, the integrated contributions of the repertoire of hypoxia-induced effectors of pH regulation for tumor survival and invasion remain to be fully explored and exploited as therapeutic avenues. For example, the clinical use of anti-angiogenic agents has identified a conundrum whereby this treatment increases hypoxia and cancer stem cell components of tumors, and accelerates metastasis. Furthermore, hypoxia results in the infiltration of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), regulatory T cells (Treg) and Tumor Associated Macrophages (TAMs), and also stimulates the expression of PD-L1 on tumor cells, which collectively suppress T-cell mediated tumor cell killing. Therefore, combinatorial targeting of angiogenesis, the immune system and pH regulation in the context of hypoxia may lead to more effective strategies for curbing tumor progression and therapeutic resistance, thereby increasing therapeutic efficacy and leading to more effective strategies for the treatment of patients with

  8. Constitutive activation of the midgut response to Bacillus thuringiensis in Bt-resistant Spodoptera exigua.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Navarro-Cerrillo, Gloria; Caccia, Silvia; de Maagd, Ruud A; Moar, William J; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. The main threat for the long term use of B. thuringiensis in pest control is the ability of insects to develop resistance. Thus, the identification of insect genes involved in conferring resistance is of paramount importance. A colony of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was selected for 15 years in the laboratory for resistance to Xentari™, a B. thuringiensis-based insecticide, reaching a final resistance level of greater than 1,000-fold. Around 600 midgut ESTs were analyzed by DNA-macroarray in order to find differences in midgut gene expression between susceptible and resistant insects. Among the differentially expressed genes, repat and arylphorin were identified and their increased expression was correlated with B. thuringiensis resistance. We also found overlap among genes that were constitutively over-expressed in resistant insects with genes that were up-regulated in susceptible insects after exposure to Xentari™, suggesting a permanent activation of the response to Xentari™ in resistant insects. Increased aminopeptidase activity in the lumen of resistant insects in the absence of exposure to Xentari™ corroborated the hypothesis of permanent activation of response genes. Increase in midgut proliferation has been proposed as a mechanism of response to pathogens in the adult from several insect species. Analysis of S. exigua larvae revealed that midgut proliferation was neither increased in resistant insects nor induced by exposure of susceptible larvae to Xentari™, suggesting that mechanisms other than midgut proliferation are involved in the response to B. thuringiensis by S. exigua larvae. PMID:20862260

  9. An epidemiologically successful Escherichia coli sequence type modulates Plasmodium falciparum infection in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Tchioffo, Majoline T; Abate, Luc; Boissière, Anne; Nsango, Sandrine E; Gimonneau, Geoffrey; Berry, Antoine; Oswald, Eric; Dubois, Damien; Morlais, Isabelle

    2016-09-01

    Malaria transmission relies on the successful development of Plasmodium parasites in the Anopheles mosquito vector. Within the mosquito midgut, malaria parasites encounter a resident bacterial flora and parasite-bacteria interactions modulate Plasmodium development. The mechanisms by which the bacteria interact with malaria parasites are still unknown. The intestinal microbiota could regulate immune signaling pathways or produce bacterial compounds that block Plasmodium development. In this study, we characterized Escherichia coli strains previously isolated from the Anopheles mosquito midgut and investigated the putative role of two E. coli clones, 444ST95 and 351ST73, on parasite development. Sporogonic development was significantly impacted by exposure to clone 444ST95 whereas prevalence and intensity of infection were not different in mosquitoes challenged with 351ST73 as compared to control mosquitoes. This result indicates midgut bacteria exhibit intra-specific variation in their ability to inhibit Plasmodium development. Expression patterns of immune genes differed between mosquitoes challenged with 444ST95 and 351ST73 and examination of the luminal midgut surface by transmission electron microscopy revealed distinct effects of bacterial exposure on midgut epithelial cells. The 444ST95 clone strongly affected mosquito survival and parasite development and this could be associated to the Hemolysin F or other toxins released by the bacteria. Further studies will be needed to decipher the virulence factors and to determine their contribution to the observed phenotype of the 444ST95E. coli strain that belongs to the epidemiological ST95 clonal group responsible for extra intestinal infections in human and other animals. PMID:27154329

  10. Constitutive Activation of the Midgut Response to Bacillus thuringiensis in Bt-Resistant Spodoptera exigua

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Martínez, Patricia; Navarro-Cerrillo, Gloria; Caccia, Silvia; de Maagd, Ruud A.; Moar, William J.; Ferré, Juan; Escriche, Baltasar; Herrero, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis is the most effective microbial control agent for controlling numerous species from different insect orders. The main threat for the long term use of B. thuringiensis in pest control is the ability of insects to develop resistance. Thus, the identification of insect genes involved in conferring resistance is of paramount importance. A colony of Spodoptera exigua (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae) was selected for 15 years in the laboratory for resistance to Xentari™, a B. thuringiensis-based insecticide, reaching a final resistance level of greater than 1,000-fold. Around 600 midgut ESTs were analyzed by DNA-macroarray in order to find differences in midgut gene expression between susceptible and resistant insects. Among the differentially expressed genes, repat and arylphorin were identified and their increased expression was correlated with B. thuringiensis resistance. We also found overlap among genes that were constitutively over-expressed in resistant insects with genes that were up-regulated in susceptible insects after exposure to Xentari™, suggesting a permanent activation of the response to Xentari™ in resistant insects. Increased aminopeptidase activity in the lumen of resistant insects in the absence of exposure to Xentari™ corroborated the hypothesis of permanent activation of response genes. Increase in midgut proliferation has been proposed as a mechanism of response to pathogens in the adult from several insect species. Analysis of S. exigua larvae revealed that midgut proliferation was neither increased in resistant insects nor induced by exposure of susceptible larvae to Xentari™, suggesting that mechanisms other than midgut proliferation are involved in the response to B. thuringiensis by S. exigua larvae. PMID:20862260

  11. Plasmodium falciparum evades mosquito immunity by disrupting JNK-mediated apoptosis of invaded midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Ramphul, Urvashi N; Garver, Lindsey S; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Canepa, Gaspar E; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-02-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, must survive and develop in the mosquito vector to be successfully transmitted to a new host. The Plasmodium falciparum Pfs47 gene is critical for malaria transmission. Parasites that express Pfs47 (NF54 WT) evade mosquito immunity and survive, whereas Pfs47 knockouts (KO) are efficiently eliminated by the complement-like system. Two alternative approaches were used to investigate the mechanism of action of Pfs47 on immune evasion. First, we examined whether Pfs47 affected signal transduction pathways mediating mosquito immune responses, and show that the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is a key mediator of Anopheles gambiae antiplasmodial responses to P. falciparum infection and that Pfs47 disrupts JNK signaling. Second, we used microarrays to compare the global transcriptional responses of A. gambiae midguts to infection with WT and KO parasites. The presence of Pfs47 results in broad and profound changes in gene expression in response to infection that are already evident 12 h postfeeding, but become most prominent at 26 h postfeeding, the time when ookinetes invade the mosquito midgut. Silencing of 15 differentially expressed candidate genes identified caspase-S2 as a key effector of Plasmodium elimination in parasites lacking Pfs47. We provide experimental evidence that JNK pathway regulates activation of caspases in Plasmodium-invaded midgut cells, and that caspase activation is required to trigger midgut epithelial nitration. Pfs47 alters the cell death pathway of invaded midgut cells by disrupting JNK signaling and prevents the activation of several caspases, resulting in an ineffective nitration response that makes the parasite undetectable by the mosquito complement-like system. PMID:25552553

  12. Molecular Genetic Analysis of Midgut Serine Proteases in Aedes aegypti Mosquitoes

    PubMed Central

    Isoe, Jun; Rascón, Alberto A.; Kunz, Susan; Miesfeld, Roger L.

    2009-01-01

    Digestion of blood meal proteins by midgut proteases provides anautogenous mosquitoes with the nutrients required to complete the gonotrophic cycle. Inhibition of protein digestion in the midgut of blood feeding mosquitoes could therefore provide a strategy for population control. Based on recent reports indicating that the mechanism and regulation of protein digestion in blood fed female Aedes aegypti mosquitoes is more complex than previously thought, we used a robust RNAi knockdown method to investigate the role of four highly expressed midgut serine proteases in blood meal metabolism. We show by Western blotting that the early phase trypsin protein (AaET) is maximally expressed at 3 h post blood meal (PBM), and that AaET is not required for the protein expression of three late phase serine proteases, AaLT (late trypsin), AaSPVI (5G1), and AaSPVII. Using the trypsin substrate analog BApNA to analyze in vitro enzyme activity in midgut extracts from single mosquitoes, we found that knockdown of AaSPVI expression caused a 77.6% decrease in late phase trypsin-like activity, whereas, knockdown of AaLT and AaSPVII expression had no significant effect on BApNA activity. In contrast, injection of AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII dsRNA inhibited degradation of endogenous serum albumin protein using an in vivo protease assay, as well as, significantly decreased egg production in both the first and second gonotrophic cycles (p<0.001). These results demonstrate that AaLT, AaSPVI, and AaSPVII all contribute to blood protein digestion and oocyte maturation, even though AaSPVI is the only abundant midgut late phase serine protease that appears to function as a classic trypsin enzyme. PMID:19883761

  13. Plasmodium falciparum evades mosquito immunity by disrupting JNK-mediated apoptosis of invaded midgut cells

    PubMed Central

    Ramphul, Urvashi N.; Garver, Lindsey S.; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Canepa, Gaspar E.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2015-01-01

    The malaria parasite, Plasmodium, must survive and develop in the mosquito vector to be successfully transmitted to a new host. The Plasmodium falciparum Pfs47 gene is critical for malaria transmission. Parasites that express Pfs47 (NF54 WT) evade mosquito immunity and survive, whereas Pfs47 knockouts (KO) are efficiently eliminated by the complement-like system. Two alternative approaches were used to investigate the mechanism of action of Pfs47 on immune evasion. First, we examined whether Pfs47 affected signal transduction pathways mediating mosquito immune responses, and show that the Jun-N-terminal kinase (JNK) pathway is a key mediator of Anopheles gambiae antiplasmodial responses to P. falciparum infection and that Pfs47 disrupts JNK signaling. Second, we used microarrays to compare the global transcriptional responses of A. gambiae midguts to infection with WT and KO parasites. The presence of Pfs47 results in broad and profound changes in gene expression in response to infection that are already evident 12 h postfeeding, but become most prominent at 26 h postfeeding, the time when ookinetes invade the mosquito midgut. Silencing of 15 differentially expressed candidate genes identified caspase-S2 as a key effector of Plasmodium elimination in parasites lacking Pfs47. We provide experimental evidence that JNK pathway regulates activation of caspases in Plasmodium-invaded midgut cells, and that caspase activation is required to trigger midgut epithelial nitration. Pfs47 alters the cell death pathway of invaded midgut cells by disrupting JNK signaling and prevents the activation of several caspases, resulting in an ineffective nitration response that makes the parasite undetectable by the mosquito complement-like system. PMID:25552553

  14. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases.

    PubMed

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M Gregor; Kaback, H Ronald; Fendler, Klaus

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6-7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  15. pH Regulation of Electrogenic Sugar/H+ Symport in MFS Sugar Permeases

    PubMed Central

    Bazzone, Andre; Madej, M. Gregor; Kaback, H. Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial sugar symporters in the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS) use the H+ (and in a few cases Na+) electrochemical gradients to achieve active transport of sugar into the cell. Because a number of structures of MFS sugar symporters have been solved recently, molecular insight into the transport mechanism is possible from detailed functional analysis. We present here a comparative electrophysiological study of the lactose permease (LacY), the fucose permease (FucP) and the xylose permease (XylE), which reveals common mechanistic principles and differences. In all three symporters energetically downhill electrogenic sugar/H+ symport is observed. Comparison of the pH dependence of symport at symmetrical pH exhibits broad bell-shaped pH profiles extending over 3 to 6 pH units and a decrease at extremely alkaline pH ≥ 9.4 and at acidic to neutral pH = 4.6–7.5. The pH dependence can be described by an acidic to neutral apparent pK (pKapp) and an alkaline pKapp. Experimental evidence suggests that the alkaline pKapp is due to H+ depletion at the protonation site, while the acidic pKapp is due to inhibition of deprotonation. Since previous studies suggest that a single carboxyl group in LacY (Glu325) may be the only side chain directly involved in H+ translocation and a carboxyl side chain with similar properties has been identified in FucP (Asp46) and XylE (Asp27), the present results imply that the pK of this residue is switched during H+/sugar symport in all three symporters. PMID:27227677

  16. Hindsight/RREB-1 functions in both the specification and differentiation of stem cells in the adult midgut of Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Baechler, Brittany L; McKnight, Cameron; Pruchnicki, Porsha C; Biro, Nicole A; Reed, Bruce H

    2015-01-01

    The adult Drosophila midgut is established during the larval/pupal transition from undifferentiated cells known as adult midgut precursors (AMPs). Four fundamental cell types are found in the adult midgut epithelium: undifferentiated intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their committed daughter cells, enteroblasts (EBs), plus enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine cells (EEs). Using the Drosophila posterior midgut as a model, we have studied the function of the transcription factor Hindsight (Hnt)/RREB-1 and its relationship to the Notch and Egfr signaling pathways. We show that hnt is required for EC differentiation in the context of ISC-to-EC differentiation, but not in the context of AMP-to-EC differentiation. In addition, we show that hnt is required for the establishment of viable or functional ISCs. Overall, our studies introduce hnt as a key factor in the regulation of both the developing and the mature adult midgut. We suggest that the nature of these contextual differences can be explained through the interaction of hnt with multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26658272

  17. Hindsight/RREB-1 functions in both the specification and differentiation of stem cells in the adult midgut of Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Baechler, Brittany L.; McKnight, Cameron; Pruchnicki, Porsha C.; Biro, Nicole A.; Reed, Bruce H.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The adult Drosophila midgut is established during the larval/pupal transition from undifferentiated cells known as adult midgut precursors (AMPs). Four fundamental cell types are found in the adult midgut epithelium: undifferentiated intestinal stem cells (ISCs) and their committed daughter cells, enteroblasts (EBs), plus enterocytes (ECs) and enteroendocrine cells (EEs). Using the Drosophila posterior midgut as a model, we have studied the function of the transcription factor Hindsight (Hnt)/RREB-1 and its relationship to the Notch and Egfr signaling pathways. We show that hnt is required for EC differentiation in the context of ISC-to-EC differentiation, but not in the context of AMP-to-EC differentiation. In addition, we show that hnt is required for the establishment of viable or functional ISCs. Overall, our studies introduce hnt as a key factor in the regulation of both the developing and the mature adult midgut. We suggest that the nature of these contextual differences can be explained through the interaction of hnt with multiple signaling pathways. PMID:26658272

  18. Altered intracellular pH regulation in cells with high levels of P-glycoprotein expression.

    PubMed

    Young, Gregory; Reuss, Luis; Altenberg, Guillermo A

    2011-01-01

    P-glycoprotein is an ATP-binding-cassette transporter that pumps many structurally unrelated drugs out of cells through an ATP-dependent mechanism. As a result, multidrug-resistant cells that overexpress P-glycoprotein have reduced intracellular steady-state levels of a variety of chemotherapeutic agents. In addition, increased cytosolic pH has been a frequent finding in multidrug-resistant cells that express P-glycoprotein, and it has been proposed that this consequence of P-glycoprotein expression may contribute to the lower intracellular levels of chemotherapeutic agents. In these studies, we measured intracellular pH and the rate of acid extrusion in response to an acid load in two cells with very different levels of P-glycoprotein expression: V79 parental cells and LZ-8 multidrug resistant cells. Compared to the wild-type V79 cells, LZ-8 cells have a lower intracellular pH and a slower recovery of intracellular pH after an acid load. The data also show that LZ-8 cells have reduced ability to extrude acid, probably due to a decrease in Na(+)/H(+) exchanger activity. The alterations in intracellular pH and acid extrusion in LZ-8 cells are reversed by 24-h exposure to the multidrug-resistance modulator verapamil. The lower intracellular pH in LZ-8 indicates that intracellular alkalinization is not necessary for multidrug resistance. The reversal by verapamil of the decreased acid-extrusion suggests that P-glycoprotein can affect other membrane transport mechanism. PMID:22003434

  19. CsrRS and environmental pH regulate group B streptococcus adherence to human epithelial cells and extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Park, Su Eun; Jiang, Shengmei; Wessels, Michael R

    2012-11-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common colonizer of the gastrointestinal and genital tracts and an important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and in adults with predisposing chronic conditions or advanced age. Attachment to epithelial surfaces at mucosal sites is a critical step in the successful colonization of a human host, and regulation of this process is likely to play an important role in both commensalism and dissemination to cause invasive disease. We found that inactivation of the CsrRS (or CovRS) two-component system increased GBS adherence to epithelial cells derived from human vaginal, cervical, and respiratory epithelium, as well as increasing adherence to extracellular matrix proteins and increasing biofilm formation on polystyrene. Neutral (as opposed to acidic) pH enhanced GBS binding to vaginal epithelial cells and to fibrinogen and fibronectin, effects that were partially dependent on CsrRS. The regulatory effects of CsrRS and environmental pH on bacterial adherence correlated with their effects on the expression of multiple surface adhesins, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We conclude that GBS adherence to epithelial and abiotic surfaces is regulated by the CsrRS two-component system and by environmental pH through their regulatory effects on the expression of bacterial surface adhesins. Dynamic regulation of GBS adherence enhances the organism's adaptability to survival in multiple niches in the human host. PMID:22949550

  20. CsrRS and Environmental pH Regulate Group B Streptococcus Adherence to Human Epithelial Cells and Extracellular Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Park, Su Eun; Jiang, Shengmei

    2012-01-01

    Streptococcus agalactiae (group B Streptococcus or GBS) is a common colonizer of the gastrointestinal and genital tracts and an important cause of invasive infections in newborn infants and in adults with predisposing chronic conditions or advanced age. Attachment to epithelial surfaces at mucosal sites is a critical step in the successful colonization of a human host, and regulation of this process is likely to play an important role in both commensalism and dissemination to cause invasive disease. We found that inactivation of the CsrRS (or CovRS) two-component system increased GBS adherence to epithelial cells derived from human vaginal, cervical, and respiratory epithelium, as well as increasing adherence to extracellular matrix proteins and increasing biofilm formation on polystyrene. Neutral (as opposed to acidic) pH enhanced GBS binding to vaginal epithelial cells and to fibrinogen and fibronectin, effects that were partially dependent on CsrRS. The regulatory effects of CsrRS and environmental pH on bacterial adherence correlated with their effects on the expression of multiple surface adhesins, as assessed by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR. We conclude that GBS adherence to epithelial and abiotic surfaces is regulated by the CsrRS two-component system and by environmental pH through their regulatory effects on the expression of bacterial surface adhesins. Dynamic regulation of GBS adherence enhances the organism's adaptability to survival in multiple niches in the human host. PMID:22949550

  1. Tissue-specific PhBPBT expression is differentially regulated in response to endogenous ethylene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Ethylene is a gaseous plant hormone involved in many physiological processes including senescence, fruit ripening, and defense. Here we show the effects of pollination and wound-induced ethylene signals on transcript accumulation of benzoyl CoA:benzyl alcohol/phenylethanol benzoyltransferase (PhBPBT...

  2. Dynamin GTPase Regulation is Altered by PH Domain Mutations Found in Centronuclear Myopathy Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Kenniston, J.; Lemmon, M

    2010-01-01

    The large GTPase dynamin has an important membrane scission function in receptor-mediated endocytosis and other cellular processes. Self-assembly on phosphoinositide-containing membranes stimulates dynamin GTPase activity, which is crucial for its function. Although the pleckstrin-homology (PH) domain is known to mediate phosphoinositide binding by dynamin, it remains unclear how this promotes activation. Here, we describe studies of dynamin PH domain mutations found in centronuclear myopathy (CNM) that increase dynamin's GTPase activity without altering phosphoinositide binding. CNM mutations in the PH domain C-terminal {alpha}-helix appear to cause conformational changes in dynamin that alter control of the GTP hydrolysis cycle. These mutations either 'sensitize' dynamin to lipid stimulation or elevate basal GTPase rates by promoting self-assembly and thus rendering dynamin no longer lipid responsive. We also describe a low-resolution structure of dimeric dynamin from small-angle X-ray scattering that reveals conformational changes induced by CNM mutations, and defines requirements for domain rearrangement upon dynamin self-assembly at membrane surfaces. Our data suggest that changes in the PH domain may couple lipid binding to dynamin GTPase activation at sites of vesicle invagination.

  3. Bursicon-α subunit modulates dLGR2 activity in the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut independently to Bursicon-β

    PubMed Central

    Scopelliti, Alessandro; Bauer, Christin; Cordero, Julia B.; Vidal, Marcos

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Bursicon is the main regulator of post molting and post eclosion processes during arthropod development. The active Bursicon hormone is a heterodimer of Burs-α and Burs-β. However, adult midguts express Burs-α to regulate the intestinal stem cell niche. Here, we examined the potential expression and function of its heterodimeric partner, Burs-β in the adult midgut. Unexpectedly, our evidence suggests that Burs-β is not significantly expressed in the adult midgut. burs-β mutants displayed the characteristic developmental defects but showed wild type-like adult midguts, thus uncoupling the developmental and adult phenotypes seen in burs-α mutants. Gain of function data and ex vivo experiments using a cAMP biosensor, demonstrated that Burs-α is sufficient to drive stem cell quiescence and to activate dLGR2 in the adult midgut. Our evidence suggests that the post developmental transactivation of dLGR2 in the adult midgut is mediated by Burs-α and that the β subunit of Bursicon is dispensable for these activities. PMID:27191973

  4. Bursicon-α subunit modulates dLGR2 activity in the adult Drosophila melanogaster midgut independently to Bursicon-β.

    PubMed

    Scopelliti, Alessandro; Bauer, Christin; Cordero, Julia B; Vidal, Marcos

    2016-06-17

    Bursicon is the main regulator of post molting and post eclosion processes during arthropod development. The active Bursicon hormone is a heterodimer of Burs-α and Burs-β. However, adult midguts express Burs-α to regulate the intestinal stem cell niche. Here, we examined the potential expression and function of its heterodimeric partner, Burs-β in the adult midgut. Unexpectedly, our evidence suggests that Burs-β is not significantly expressed in the adult midgut. burs-β mutants displayed the characteristic developmental defects but showed wild type-like adult midguts, thus uncoupling the developmental and adult phenotypes seen in burs-α mutants. Gain of function data and ex vivo experiments using a cAMP biosensor, demonstrated that Burs-α is sufficient to drive stem cell quiescence and to activate dLGR2 in the adult midgut. Our evidence suggests that the post developmental transactivation of dLGR2 in the adult midgut is mediated by Burs-α and that the β subunit of Bursicon is dispensable for these activities. PMID:27191973

  5. Non-rotated midgut in a dog.

    PubMed

    Kirk, E J; Nutman, A W; Murray, S L

    2009-02-01

    Macroscopic observations of the partly-dissected abdomen of the preserved cadaver of a Labrador bitch were recorded and photographs taken. Neither the duodenum nor the colon looped around the root of the great (jejuno-ileal) mesentery, but both were long enough to have done so. The abdominal organs appeared to be otherwise normal, as did the other parts of the body. The condition appeared to have resulted from non-rotation of the midgut during embryonic development and to have no adverse effect on the animal. PMID:18983624

  6. pH Dependence of the Stress Regulator DksA

    PubMed Central

    Furman, Ran; Danhart, Eric M.; NandyMazumdar, Monali; Yuan, Chunhua; Foster, Mark P.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    DksA controls transcription of genes associated with diverse stress responses, such as amino acid and carbon starvation, oxidative stress, and iron starvation. DksA binds within the secondary channel of RNA polymerase, extending its long coiled-coil domain towards the active site. The cellular expression of DksA remains constant due to a negative feedback autoregulation, raising the question of whether DksA activity is directly modulated during stress. Here, we show that Escherichia coli DksA is essential for survival in acidic conditions and that, while its cellular levels do not change significantly, DksA activity and binding to RNA polymerase are increased at lower pH, with a concomitant decrease in its stability. NMR data reveal pH-dependent structural changes centered at the interface of the N and C-terminal regions of DksA. Consistently, we show that a partial deletion of the N-terminal region and substitutions of a histidine 39 residue at the domain interface abolish pH sensitivity in vitro. Together, these data suggest that DksA responds to changes in pH by shifting between alternate conformations, in which competing interactions between the N- and C-terminal regions modify the protein activity. PMID:25799498

  7. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands

    PubMed Central

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1. PMID:26375462

  8. Role of Sodium Bicarbonate Cotransporters in Intracellular pH Regulation and Their Regulatory Mechanisms in Human Submandibular Glands.

    PubMed

    Namkoong, Eun; Shin, Yong-Hwan; Bae, Jun-Seok; Choi, Seulki; Kim, Minkyoung; Kim, Nahyun; Hwang, Sung-Min; Park, Kyungpyo

    2015-01-01

    Sodium bicarbonate cotransporters (NBCs) are involved in the pH regulation of salivary glands. However, the roles and regulatory mechanisms among different NBC isotypes have not been rigorously evaluated. We investigated the roles of two different types of NBCs, electroneutral (NBCn1) and electrogenic NBC (NBCe1), with respect to pH regulation and regulatory mechanisms using human submandibular glands (hSMGs) and HSG cells. Intracellular pH (pHi) was measured and the pHi recovery rate from cell acidification induced by an NH4Cl pulse was recorded. Subcellular localization and protein phosphorylation were determined using immunohistochemistry and co-immunoprecipitation techniques. We determined that NBCn1 is expressed on the basolateral side of acinar cells and the apical side of duct cells, while NBCe1 is exclusively expressed on the apical membrane of duct cells. The pHi recovery rate in hSMG acinar cells, which only express NBCn1, was not affected by pre-incubation with 5 μM PP2, an Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor. However, in HSG cells, which express both NBCe1 and NBCn1, the pHi recovery rate was inhibited by PP2. The apparent difference in regulatory mechanisms for NBCn1 and NBCe1 was evaluated by artificial overexpression of NBCn1 or NBCe1 in HSG cells, which revealed that the pHi recovery rate was only inhibited by PP2 in cells overexpressing NBCe1. Furthermore, only NBCe1 was significantly phosphorylated and translocated by NH4Cl, which was inhibited by PP2. Our results suggest that both NBCn1 and NBCe1 play a role in pHi regulation in hSMG acinar cells, and also that Src kinase does not regulate the activity of NBCn1. PMID:26375462

  9. Carbon and nitrogen dynamics across a bedrock-regulated subarctic pH gradient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomczyk, N.; Heim, E. W.; Sadowsky, J.; Remiszewski, K.; Varner, R. K.; Bryce, J. G.; Frey, S. D.

    2014-12-01

    Bedrock geochemistry has been shown to influence landscape evolution due to nutrient limitation on primary production. There may also be less direct interactions between bedrock-derived chemicals and ecosystem function. Effects of calcium (Ca) and pH on soil carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) cycling have been shown in acid impacted forests o f North America. Understanding intrinsic factors that affect C and nutrient dynamics in subarctic ecosystems has implications for how these ecosystems will respond to a changing climate. How the soil microbial community allocates enzymes to acquire resources from the environment can indicate whether a system is nutrient or energy limited. This study examined whether bedrock geochemistry exerts pressure on nutrient cycles in the overlying soils. In thin, weakly developed soils, bedrock is the primary mineral material and is a source of vital nutrients. Nitrogen (N) and C are not derived from bedrock, but their cycling is still affected by reactions with geologically-derived chemicals. Our study sites near Abisko, Sweden (~68°N) were selected adjacent to five distinct bedrock outcrops (quartzite, slate, carbonate, and two different metasedimenty units). All sites were at a similar elevation (~700 m a.s.l.) and had similar vegetation (subarctic heath). Nutrient concentrations in bedrock and soils were measured in addition to soil microbial biomass and extracellular enzyme activity. We found a statistically significant correlation between soil Ca concentrations and soil pH (r = 0.88, p < 0.01). There were also significant relationships between soil pH and the ratio of C-acquiring to N-acquiring enzyme activity (r = -0.89, p < 0.01), soil pH and soil C-to-N ratio (r = -0.76, p < 0.01), and the ratio of C-acquiring to N-acquiring enzyme activity and soil C-to-N ratio (r = 0.78, p < 0.01). These results suggest that soil Ca concentrations influence C and N cycling dynamics in these soils through their effect on soil pH.

  10. pH regulation in anoxic rice coleoptiles at pH 3.5: biochemical pHstats and net H+ influx in the absence and presence of NOFormula.

    PubMed

    Greenway, Hank; Kulichikhin, Konstantin Y; Cawthray, Gregory R; Colmer, Timothy D

    2012-03-01

    During anoxia, cytoplasmic pH regulation is crucial. Mechanisms of pH regulation were studied in the coleoptile of rice exposed to anoxia and pH 3.5, resulting in H(+) influx. Germinating rice seedlings survived a combination of anoxia and exposure to pH 3.5 for at least 4 d, although development was retarded and net K(+) efflux was continuous. Further experiments used excised coleoptile tips (7-10 mm) in anoxia at pH 6.5 or 3.5, either without or with 0.2 mM NO(3)(-), which distinguished two processes involved in pH regulation. Net H(+) influx (μmol g(-1) fresh weight h(-1)) for coleoptiles with NO(3)(-) was ∼1.55 over the first 24 h, being about twice that in the absence of NO(3)(-), but then decreased to 0.5-0.9 as net NO(3)(-) uptake declined from ∼1.3 to 0.5, indicating reduced uptake via H(+)-NO(3)(-) symports. NO(3)(-) reduction presumably functioned as a biochemical pHstat. A second biochemical pHstat consisted of malate and succinate, and their concentrations decreased substantially with time after exposure to pH 3.5. In anoxic coleoptiles, K(+) balancing the organic anions was effluxed to the medium as organic anions declined, and this efflux rate was independent of NO(3)(-) supply. Thus, biochemical pHstats and reduced net H(+) influx across the plasma membrane are important features contributing to pH regulation in anoxia-tolerant rice coleoptiles at pH 3.5. PMID:22174442

  11. Intracellular pH regulation in isolated rat bile duct epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Strazzabosco, M; Mennone, A; Boyer, J L

    1991-01-01

    To evaluate ion transport mechanisms in bile duct epithelium (BDE), BDE cells were isolated from bile duct-ligated rats. After short-term culture pHi was measured with a single cell microfluorimetric set-up using the fluorescent pHi indicator BCECF, and calibrated with nigericin in high K+ concentration buffer. Major contaminants were identified using vital markers. In HCO3(-)-free media, baseline pHi (7.03 +/- 0.12) decreased by 0.45 +/- 0.18 pH units after Na+ removal and by 0.12 +/- .04 after amiloride administration (1 mM). After acid loading (20 mM NH4Cl) pHi recovery was inhibited by both Na+ removal and amiloride (JH+ = 0.74 +/- 1.1, and JH+ = 2.28 +/- 0.8, respectively, vs. 5.47 +/- 1.97 and 5.97 +/- 1.76 mM/min, in controls, respectively). In HCO3- containing media baseline pHi was higher (7.16 +/- 0.1, n = 36, P less than 0.05) and was decreased by Na+ substitution but not by amiloride. Na+ removal inhibited pHi recovery after an intracellular acid load (0.27 +/- 0.26, vs. 7.7 +/- 4.1 mM/min, in controls), whereas amiloride reduced JH+ only by 27%. pH recovery was inhibited by DIDS (0.5-1 mM), but not by Cl- depletion. Finally, acute Cl- removal increased pHi by 0.18 pH units in the absence but not presence of DIDS. These data indicate that BDE cells possess mechanisms for Na+/H+ exchange, Na+:HCO3- symport and Cl-/HCO3 exchange. Therefore BDE may be capable of transepithelial H+/HCO3- transport. Images PMID:2022723

  12. pH regulates ammonia-oxidizing bacteria and archaea in paddy soils in Southern China.

    PubMed

    Li, Hu; Weng, Bo-Sen; Huang, Fu-Yi; Su, Jian-Qiang; Yang, Xiao-Ru

    2015-07-01

    Ammonia-oxidizing archaea (AOA) and bacteria (AOB) play important roles in nitrogen cycling. However, the effects of environmental factors on the activity, abundance, and diversity of AOA and AOB and the relative contributions of these two groups to nitrification in paddy soils are not well explained. In this study, potential nitrification activity (PNA), abundance, and diversity of amoA genes from 12 paddy soils in Southern China were determined by potential nitrification assay, quantitative PCR, and cloning. The results showed that PNA was highly variable between paddy soils, ranging from 4.05 ± 0.21 to 9.81 ± 1.09 mg NOx-N kg(-1) dry soil day(-1), and no significant correlation with soil parameters was found. The abundance of AOA was predominant over AOB, indicating that AOA may be the major members in aerobic ammonia oxidation in these paddy soils. Community compositions of AOA and AOB were highly variable among samples, but the variations were best explained by pH. AOA sequences were affiliated to the Nitrosopumilus cluster and Nitrososphaera cluster, and AOB were classified into the lineages of Nitrosospira and Nitrosomonas, with Nitrosospira being predominant over Nitrosomonas, accounting for 83.6 % of the AOB community. Moreover, the majority of Nitrosomonas was determined in neutral soils. Canonical correspondence analysis (CCA) analysis further demonstrated that AOA and AOB community structures were significantly affected by pH, soil total organic carbon, total nitrogen, and C/N ratio, suggesting that these factors exert strong effects on the distribution of AOB and AOA in paddy soils in Southern China. In conclusion, our results imply that soil pH was a key explanatory variable for both AOA and AOB community structure and nitrification activity. PMID:25744648

  13. The zebrafish merovingian mutant reveals a role for pH regulation in hair cell toxicity and function.

    PubMed

    Stawicki, Tamara M; Owens, Kelly N; Linbo, Tor; Reinhart, Katherine E; Rubel, Edwin W; Raible, David W

    2014-07-01

    Control of the extracellular environment of inner ear hair cells by ionic transporters is crucial for hair cell function. In addition to inner ear hair cells, aquatic vertebrates have hair cells on the surface of their body in the lateral line system. The ionic environment of these cells also appears to be regulated, although the mechanisms of this regulation are less understood than those of the mammalian inner ear. We identified the merovingian mutant through genetic screening in zebrafish for genes involved in drug-induced hair cell death. Mutants show complete resistance to neomycin-induced hair cell death and partial resistance to cisplatin-induced hair cell death. This resistance is probably due to impaired drug uptake as a result of reduced mechanotransduction ability, suggesting that the mutants have defects in hair cell function independent of drug treatment. Through genetic mapping we found that merovingian mutants contain a mutation in the transcription factor gcm2. This gene is important for the production of ionocytes, which are cells crucial for whole body pH regulation in fish. We found that merovingian mutants showed an acidified extracellular environment in the vicinity of both inner ear and lateral line hair cells. We believe that this acidified extracellular environment is responsible for the defects seen in hair cells of merovingian mutants, and that these mutants would serve as a valuable model for further study of the role of pH in hair cell function. PMID:24973752

  14. Co-regulation of root hair tip growth by ROP GTPases and nitrogen source modulated pH fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Daria; Monshausen, Gabriele; Gilroy, Simon; Yalovsky, Shaul

    2011-03-01

    Growth of plant cells involves tight regulation of the cytoskeleton and vesicle trafficking by processes including the action of the ROP small G proteins together with pH-modulated cell wall modifications. Yet, little is known on how these systems are coordinated. In a paper recently published in Plant Cell and Environment we show that ROPs/RACs function synergistically with NH4NO3-modulated pH fluctuations to regulate root hair growth. Root hairs expand exclusively at their apical end in a strictly polarized manner by a process known as tip growth. The highly polarized secretion at the apex is maintained by a complex network of factors including the spatial organization of the actin cytoskeleton, tip-focused ion gradients and by small G proteins. Expression of constitutively active ROP mutants disrupts polar growth, inducing the formation of swollen root hairs. Root hairs are also known to elongate in an oscillating manner, which is correlated with oscillatory H(+) fluxes at the tip. Our analysis shows that root hair elongation in wild type plants and swelling in transgenic plants expressing a constitutively active ROP11 (rop11(CA)) is sensitive to the presence of NH4(+) at concentrations higher than 1 mM and on NO3(-). The NH4(+) and NO3(-) ions did not affect the localization of ROP in the membrane but modulated pH fluctuations at the root hair tip. Actin organization and reactive oxygen species distribution were abnormal in rop11CA root hairs but were similar to wild type root hairs when seedlings were grown on medium lacking NH4(+) and / or NO3(-). These observations suggest that the nitrogen source-modulated pH fluctuations may function synergistically with ROP regulated signaling during root hair tip growth. Interestingly, under certain growth conditions, expression of rop11 (CA) suppressed ammonium toxicity, similar to auxin resistant mutants. In this Addendum article we discuss these findings and their implications. PMID:21673509

  15. Escherichia coli Response to Uranyl Exposure at Low pH and Associated Protein Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Khemiri, Arbia; Carrière, Marie; Bremond, Nicolas; Ben Mlouka, Mohamed Amine; Coquet, Laurent; Llorens, Isabelle; Chapon, Virginie; Jouenne, Thierry; Cosette, Pascal; Berthomieu, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Better understanding of uranyl toxicity in bacteria is necessary to optimize strains for bioremediation purposes or for using bacteria as biodetectors for bioavailable uranyl. In this study, after different steps of optimization, Escherichia colicells were exposed to uranyl at low pH to minimize uranyl precipitation and to increase its bioavailability. Bacteria were adapted to mid acidic pH before exposure to 50 or 80 µM uranyl acetate for two hours at pH≈3. To evaluate the impact of uranium, growth in these conditions were compared and the same rates of cells survival were observed in control and uranyl exposed cultures. Additionally, this impact was analyzedby two-dimensional differential gel electrophoresis proteomics to discover protein actors specifically present or accumulated in contact with uranium.Exposure to uranium resulted in differential accumulation of proteins associated with oxidative stress and in the accumulation of the NADH/quinone oxidoreductase WrbA. This FMN dependent protein performs obligate two-electron reduction of quinones, and may be involved in cells response to oxidative stress. Interestingly, this WrbA protein presents similarities with the chromate reductase from E. coli, which was shown to reduce uranyl in vitro. PMID:24587082

  16. Intracellular pH regulation in resting and contracting segments of rat mesenteric resistance vessels.

    PubMed Central

    Aalkjaer, C; Cragoe, E J

    1988-01-01

    1. The pH-sensitive dye 2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5 (and -6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF) was used to measure intracellular pH (pHi) in segments of rat resistance vessels (internal diameter about 200 microns) with the vessels mounted in a myograph for simultaneous measurements of isometric contraction. 2. BCECF loaded slowly into the vessels over 1 h and did not affect the maximal contractility of the vessels. There was a loss of dye with time which, however, was very slow when the segments were only excited for 2 s/min, suggesting that the loss was mainly due to dye bleaching with only a very slow leak. 3. The ratio of the emissions (at 540 nm) with excitation at 495 and 450 nm was calibrated in terms of pH using the K+-H+ ionophore nigericin. This calibration gave a pHi value of 7.15 +/- 0.02 (n = 20), suggesting that hydrogen ions are not in electrochemical equilibrium in these vascular smooth muscles which have a membrane potential of about -60 mV. 4. Addition of 10 mM-NH4Cl caused a transient alkalinization and wash-out of 10 mM-NH4Cl a transient acidification. Increasing CO2 with maintained bicarbonate caused a rapid acidification followed by an incomplete recovery. Removal of CO2 and bicarbonate (HEPES-buffered solution) with constant extracellular pH caused a transient alkalinization but steady-state pHi was not significantly altered. 5. In bicarbonate-free buffer the Na+-H+ exchange blocker 5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl) amiloride (EIPA) and sodium-free conditions caused a slow acidification. In bicarbonate buffer (PSS) EIPA had no detectable effect after 10 min but the anion exchange blocker diisothio-cyanatostilbenedisulphonic acid (DIDS) caused a small acidification over that time course. 6. The rate of recovery after an acid load was about 50% lower in HEPES buffer compared to PSS and it was inhibited by EIPA. In PSS amiloride and EIPA each had a small inhibitory effect on the pH recovery after an acid load. DIDS also inhibited the recovery from an acid load

  17. Improved volatile fatty acids anaerobic production from waste activated sludge by pH regulation: Alkaline or neutral pH?

    PubMed

    Ma, Huijun; Chen, Xingchun; Liu, He; Liu, Hongbo; Fu, Bo

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the anaerobic fermentation was carried out for volatile fatty acids (VFAs) production at different pH (between 7.0 and 10.0) conditions with untreated sludge and heat-alkaline pretreated waste activated sludge. In the fermentation with untreated sludge, the extent of hydrolysis of organic matters and extent of acidification at alkaline pH are 54.37% and 30.37%, respectively, resulting in the highest VFAs yield at 235.46mg COD/gVS of three pH conditions. In the fermentation with heat-alkaline pretreated sludge, the acidification rate and VFAs yield at neutral pH are 30.98% and 240.14mg COD/gVS, respectively, which are higher than that at other pH conditions. With the glucose or bovine serum albumin as substrate for VFAs production, the neutral pH showed a higher VFAs concentration than the alkaline pH condition. The results of terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis indicated that the alkaline pH caused low microbial richness. Based on the results in this study, we demonstrated that the alkaline pH is favor of hydrolysis of organic matter in sludge while neutral pH improved the acidogenesis for the VFAs production from sludge. Our finding is obvious different to the previous research and helpful for the understanding of how heat-alkaline pretreatment and alkaline fermentation influence the VFAs production, and beneficial to the development of VFAs production process. PMID:26652215

  18. pH Regulation of ammonia secretion by Colletotrichum gloeosporioides and its effect on appressorium formation and pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Miyara, Itay; Shafran, Hadas; Davidzon, Maayan; Sherman, Amir; Prusky, Dov

    2010-03-01

    Host-tissue alkalinization via ammonia accumulation is key to Colletotrichum spp. colonization. Using macroarrays carrying C. gloeosporioides cDNAs, we monitored gene expression during the alkalinization process. A set of genes involved in synthesis and catabolism of ammonia accumulation were identified. Expression of NAD(+)-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH2, encoding ammonia synthesis) and the ammonia exporter AMET were induced at pH 4.0 to 4.5. Conversely, ammonia uptake and transcript activation of the ammonia and glutamate importers (MEP and GLT, respectively) and glutamine synthase (GS1) were higher at pH 6.0 to 7.0. Accumulated ammonia in the wild-type mycelium decreased during ambient alkalinization, concurrent with increased GS1 expression. Deltapac1 mutants of C. gloeosporioides, which are sensitive to alkaline pH changes, showed upregulation of the acid-expressed GDH2 and downregulation of the alkaline-expressed GS1, resulting in 60% higher ammonia accumulation inside the mycelium. Deltagdh2 strains of C. gloeosporioides, impaired in ammonia production, showed 85% inhibition in appressorium formation followed by reduced colonization on avocado fruit (Persea americana cv. Fuerte) pericarp, while exogenic ammonia addition restored appressoria formation. Thus the modulation of genes involved in ammonia metabolism and catabolism by C. gloeosporioides is ambient pH-dependent. Aside from its contribution to necrotrophic stages, ammonia accumulation by germinating spores regulates appressorium formation and determines the initiation of biotrophic stages of avocado-fruit colonization by Colletotrichum spp. PMID:20121452

  19. Proton/l-Glutamate Symport and the Regulation of Intracellular pH in Isolated Mesophyll Cells 1

    PubMed Central

    Snedden, Wayne A.; Chung, Induk; Pauls, Randy H.; Bown, Alan W.

    1992-01-01

    Addition of l-[U-14C]glutamate to a suspension of mechanically isolated asparagus (Asparagus sprengeri Regel) mesophyll cells results in (a) alkalinization of the medium, (b) uptake of l-[U-14C]glutamate, and (c) efflux of [14C]4-aminobutyrate, a product of glutamate decarboxylation. All three phenomena were eliminated by treatment with 1 millimolar aminooxyacetate. In vitro glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) assays showed that (a) 2 millimolar aminooxyacetate eliminated enzyme activity, (b) activity was pyridoxal phosphate-dependent, and (c) activity exhibited a sharp pH optimum at 6.0 that decreased to 20% of optimal activity at pH 5.0 and 7.0. Addition of 1.5 millimolar sodium butyrate or sodium acetate to cell suspensions caused immediate alkalinization of the medium followed by a resumption of acidification of the medium at a rate approximately double the initial rate. The data indicate that (a) continued H+/l-glutamate contransport is dependent upon GAD activity, (b) the pH-dependent properties of GAD are consistent with a role in a metabolic pH-stat, and (c) the regulation of intracellular pH during H+/l-Glu symport may involve both H+ consumption during 4-aminobutyrate production and ATP-driven H+ efflux. PMID:16668938

  20. Kinetic transport model for cellular regulation of pH and solute concentration in the renal proximal tubule.

    PubMed Central

    Verkman, A S; Alpern, R J

    1987-01-01

    An open circuit kinetic model was developed to calculate the time course of proximal tubule cell pH, solute concentrations, and volume in response to induced perturbations in luminal or peritubular fluid composition. Solute fluxes were calculated from electrokinetic equations containing terms for known carrier saturabilities, allosteric dependences, and ion coupling ratios. Apical and basolateral membrane potentials were determined iteratively from the requirements of cell electroneutrality and equal opposing transcellular and paracellular currents. The model converged to membrane potentials accurate to 0.05% in one to four iterations. Model variables included cell concentrations of Na, K, HCO3, glucose, pH (uniform CO2), volume, and apical and basolateral membrane potentials. The basic model contained passive apical membrane transport of Na/H, Na/glucose, H and K, basolateral transport of Na/3HCO3, K, H, and glucose, and paracellular transport of Na, K, Cl, and HCO3; apical H and basolateral 3Na/2K-ATPases were present. Apical Na/H and basolateral K transport were regulated allosterically by pH. Apical Na/H transport, basolateral Na/3HCO3 transport, and the 3Na/2K-ATPase were saturable. Model parameters were chosen from data in the rat proximal tubule. Model predictions for the magnitude and time course of cell pH, Na, and membrane potential in response to rapid changes in apical and peritubular Na and HCO3 were in excellent agreement with experiment. In addition, the model requires that there exist an apical H-ATPase, basolateral Na/3HCO3 transport saturable with HCO3, and electroneutral basolateral K transport. PMID:3580482

  1. Regulating proton-coupled electron transfer for efficient water splitting by manganese oxides at neutral pH

    PubMed Central

    Yamaguchi, Akira; Inuzuka, Riko; Takashima, Toshihiro; Hayashi, Toru; Hashimoto, Kazuhito; Nakamura, Ryuhei

    2014-01-01

    Manganese oxides have been extensively investigated as model systems for the oxygen-evolving complex of photosystem II. However, most bioinspired catalysts are inefficient at neutral pH and functional similarity to the oxygen-evolving complex has been rarely achieved with manganese. Here we report the regulation of proton-coupled electron transfer involved in water oxidation by manganese oxides. Pyridine and its derivatives, which have pKa values intermediate to the water ligand bound to manganese(II) and manganese(III), are used as proton-coupled electron transfer induction reagents. The induction of concerted proton-coupled electron transfer is demonstrated by the detection of deuterium kinetic isotope effects and compliance of the reactions with the libido rule. Although proton-coupled electron transfer regulation is essential for the facial redox change of manganese in photosystem II, most manganese oxides impair these regulatory mechanisms. Thus, the present findings may provide a new design rationale for functional analogues of the oxygen-evolving complex for efficient water splitting at neutral pH. PMID:24977746

  2. Requirement of matrix metalloproteinase-1 for intestinal homeostasis in the adult Drosophila midgut

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Shin-Hae; Park, Joung-Sun; Kim, Young-Shin; Chung, Hae-Young; Yoo, Mi-Ae

    2012-03-10

    Stem cells are tightly regulated by both intrinsic and extrinsic signals as well as the extracellular matrix (ECM) for tissue homeostasis and regenerative capacity. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), proteolytic enzymes, modulate the turnover of numerous substrates, including cytokine precursors, growth factors, and ECM molecules. However, the roles of MMPs in the regulation of adult stem cells are poorly understood. In the present study, we utilize the Drosophila midgut, which is an excellent model system for studying stem cell biology, to show that Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of intestinal stem cells (ISCs). The results showed that Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut and that its expression increases with age and with exposure to oxidative stress. Mmp1 knockdown or Timp-overexpressing flies and flies heterozygous for a viable, hypomorphic Mmp1 allele increased ISC proliferation in the gut, as shown by staining with an anti-phospho-histone H3 antibody and BrdU incorporation assays. Reduced Mmp1 levels induced intestinal hyperplasia, and the Mmp1depletion-induced ISC proliferation was rescued by the suppression of the EGFR signaling pathway, suggesting that Mmp1 regulates ISC proliferation through the EGFR signaling pathway. Furthermore, adult gut-specific knockdown and whole-animal heterozygotes of Mmp1 increased additively sensitivity to paraquat-induced oxidative stress and shortened lifespan. Our data suggest that Drosophila Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation for maintenance of gut homeostasis. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is expressed in the adult midgut. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 is involved in the regulation of ISC proliferation activity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1-related ISC proliferation is associated with EGFR signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Mmp1 in the gut is required for the intestinal homeostasis and longevity.

  3. Midgut tissue of male pine engraver , Ips pini, synthesizes monoterpenoid pheromone component ipsdienol de novo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Gregory M.; Tittiger, Claus; Andrews, Gracie L.; Mastick, Grant S.; Kuenzli, Marilyn; Luo, Xin; Seybold, Steven J.; Blomquist, Gary J.

    2002-02-01

    For over three decades the site and pathways of bark beetle aggregation pheromone production have remained elusive. Studies on pheromone production in Ips spp. bark beetles have recently shown de novo biosynthesis of pheromone components via the mevalonate pathway. The gene encoding a key regulated enzyme in this pathway, 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase ( HMG-R), showed high transcript levels in the anterior midgut of male pine engravers, Ips pini (Say) (Coleoptera:Scolytidae). HMG-R expression in the midgut was sex, juvenile hormone, and feeding dependent, providing strong evidence that this is the site of acyclic monoterpenoid (ipsdienol) pheromone production in male beetles. Additionally, isolated midgut tissue from fed or juvenile hormone III (JH III)-treated males converted radiolabeled acetate to ipsdienol, as assayed by radio-HPLC. These data support the de novo production of this frass-associated aggregation pheromone component by the mevalonate pathway. The induction of a metazoan HMG-R in this process does not support the postulated role of microorganisms in ipsdienol production.

  4. Transporters involved in regulation of intracellular pH in primary cultured rat brain endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Caroline J; Nicola, Pieris A; Wang, Shanshan; Barrand, Margery A; Hladky, Stephen B

    2006-01-01

    Fluid secretion across the blood–brain barrier, critical for maintaining the correct fluid balance in the brain, entails net secretion of HCO3−, which is brought about by the combined activities of ion transporters situated in brain microvessels. These same transporters will concomitantly influence intracellular pH (pHi). To analyse the transporters that may be involved in the maintenance of pHi and hence secretion of HCO3−, we have loaded primary cultured endothelial cells derived from rat brain microvessels with the pH indicator BCECF and suspended them in standard NaCl solutions buffered with Hepes or Hepes plus 5% CO2/HCO3−. pHi in the standard solutions showed a slow acidification over at least 30 min, the rate being less in the presence of HCO3− than in its absence. However, after accounting for the difference in buffering, the net rates of acid loading with and without HCO3− were similar. In the nominal absence of HCO3− the rate of acid loading was increased equally by removal of external Na+ or by inhibition of Na+/H+ exchange by ethylisopropylamiloride (EIPA). By contrast, in the presence of HCO3− the increase in the rate of acid loading when Na+ was removed was much larger and the rate was then also significantly greater than the rate observed in the absence of both Na+ and HCO3−. Removal of Cl− in the presence of HCO3− produced an alkalinization followed by a resumption of the slow acid gain. Removal of Na+ following removal of Cl− increased the rate of acid gain. In the presence of HCO3− and initial presence of Na+ and Cl−, DIDS inhibited the changes in pHi produced by removal of either Na+ or Cl−. These are the expected results if these cells possess an AE-like Cl−/HCO3− exchanger, a ‘channel-like’ permeability allowing slow influx of acid (or efflux of HCO3−), a NBC-like Cl−-independent Na+−HCO3− cotransporter, and a NHE-like Na+/H+ exchanger. The in vitro rates of HCO3− loading via the Na+−HCO3

  5. Identification and Partial Characterization of Midgut Proteases in the Lesser Mulberry Pyralid, Glyphodes pyloalis

    PubMed Central

    Mahdavi, Atiyeh; Ghadamyari, Mohammad; Sajedi, Reza H.; Sharifi, Mahbobeh; Kouchaki, Behrooz

    2013-01-01

    Proteolytic activities in digestive system extracts from the larval midgut of the lesser mulberry pyralid, Glyphodes pyloalis Walker (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae), were analyzed using different specific peptide substrates and proteinase inhibitors. High proteolytic activities were found at pH 10.0 and a temperature of 50° C using azocasein as substrate. The trypsin was active in the pH range of 9.5– 12.0, with its maximum activity at pH 11.5. Ethylene diamine tetraacetic acid had the most inhibitory effect, and 44% inhibition was detected in the presence of this inhibitor. Phenyl methane sulfonyl floride and N-tosyl-L-phe chloromethyl ketone also showed considerable inhibition of larval azocaseinolytic activity, with 40.2 and 35.1% inhibition respectively. These data suggest that the midgut of larvae contains mainly metalloproteases and serine proteases, mainly chymotrypsin. The effect of several metal ions on the activity of proteases showed that NaCl, CaCl2, CoCl2 (5 and 10 mM), and MnCl2 (5mM) reduced the protease activity. The kinetic parameters of trypsin-like proteases using N-benzoyl-L-arg-p-nitroanilide as substrate indicated that the Km and Vmax values of trypsin in the alimentary canal were 50.5 ± 2.0 µM and 116.06 ± 1.96 nmol min-1 mg-1 protein, respectively. Inhibition assays showed only small amounts of cysteine proteases were present in the G. pyloalis digestive system. The midgut digestive protease system of G. pyloalis is as diverse as that of any of the other polyphagous lepidopteran insect species, and the midgut of larvae contains mainly metalloproteases. Moreover, serine proteases and chymotrypsin also play main roles in protein digestion. Characterization of the proteolytic properties of the digestive enzymes of G. pyloalis offers an opportunity for developing appropriate and effective pest management strategies via metalloproteases and chymotrypsin inhibitors. PMID:24228902

  6. PIP Water Transport and Its pH Dependence Are Regulated by Tetramer Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Jozefkowicz, Cintia; Sigaut, Lorena; Scochera, Florencia; Soto, Gabriela; Ayub, Nicolás; Pietrasanta, Lía Isabel; Amodeo, Gabriela; González Flecha, F Luis; Alleva, Karina

    2016-03-29

    Many plasma membrane channels form oligomeric assemblies, and heterooligomerization has been described as a distinctive feature of some protein families. In the particular case of plant plasma membrane aquaporins (PIPs), PIP1 and PIP2 monomers interact to form heterotetramers. However, the biological properties of the different heterotetrameric configurations formed by PIP1 and PIP2 subunits have not been addressed yet. Upon coexpression of tandem PIP2-PIP1 dimers in Xenopus oocytes, we can address, for the first time to our knowledge, the functional properties of single heterotetrameric species having 2:2 stoichiometry. We have also coexpressed PIP2-PIP1 dimers with PIP1 and PIP2 monomers to experimentally investigate the localization and biological activity of each tetrameric assembly. Our results show that PIP2-PIP1 heterotetramers can assemble with 3:1, 1:3, or 2:2 stoichiometry, depending on PIP1 and PIP2 relative expression in the cell. All PIP2-PIP1 heterotetrameric species localize at the plasma membrane and present the same water transport capacity. Furthermore, the contribution of any heterotetrameric assembly to the total water transport through the plasma membrane doubles the contribution of PIP2 homotetramers. Our results also indicate that plasma membrane water transport can be modulated by the coexistence of different tetrameric species and by intracellular pH. Moreover, all the tetrameric species present similar cooperativity behavior for proton sensing. These findings throw light on the functional properties of PIP tetramers, showing that they have flexible stoichiometry dependent on the quantity of PIP1 and PIP2 molecules available. This represents, to our knowledge, a novel regulatory mechanism to adjust water transport across the plasma membrane. PMID:27028641

  7. A pH Switch Regulates the Inverse Relationship between Membranolytic and Chaperone-like Activities of HSP-1/2, a Major Protein of Horse Seminal Plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumar, C Sudheer; Swamy, Musti J

    2016-07-01

    HSP-1/2, a major protein of horse seminal plasma binds to choline phospholipids present on the sperm plasma membrane and perturbs its structure by intercalating into the hydrophobic core, which results in an efflux of choline phospholipids and cholesterol, an important event in sperm capacitation. HSP-1/2 also exhibits chaperone-like activity (CLA) in vitro and protects target proteins against various kinds of stress. In the present study we show that HSP-1/2 exhibits destabilizing activity toward model supported and cell membranes. The membranolytic activity of HSP-1/2 is found to be pH dependent, with lytic activity being high at mildly acidic pH (6.0-6.5) and low at mildly basic pH (8.0-8.5). Interestingly, the CLA is also found to be pH dependent, with high activity at mildly basic pH and low activity at mildly acidic pH. Taken together the present studies demonstrate that the membranolytic and chaperone-like activities of HSP-1/2 have an inverse relationship and are regulated via a pH switch, which is reversible. The higher CLA observed at mildly basic pH could be correlated to an increase in surface hydrophobicity of the protein. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study reporting regulation of two different activities of a chaperone protein by a pH switch. PMID:27292547

  8. The development of malaria parasites in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Bennink, Sandra; Kiesow, Meike J; Pradel, Gabriele

    2016-07-01

    The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are crucial for establishing an infection in the insect vector and to thus ensure further spread of the pathogen. Parasite development in the midgut starts with the activation of the intraerythrocytic gametocytes immediately after take-up and ends with traversal of the midgut epithelium by the invasive ookinetes less than 24 h later. During this time period, the plasmodia undergo two processes of stage conversion, from gametocytes to gametes and from zygotes to ookinetes, both accompanied by dramatic morphological changes. Further, gamete formation requires parasite egress from the enveloping erythrocytes, rendering them vulnerable to the aggressive factors of the insect gut, like components of the human blood meal. The mosquito midgut stages of malaria parasites are unprecedented objects to study a variety of cell biological aspects, including signal perception, cell conversion, parasite/host co-adaptation and immune evasion. This review highlights recent insights into the molecules involved in gametocyte activation and gamete formation as well as in zygote-to-ookinete conversion and ookinete midgut exit; it further discusses factors that can harm the extracellular midgut stages as well as the measures of the parasites to protect themselves from any damage. PMID:27111866

  9. LeftyA sensitive cytosolic pH regulation and glycolytic flux in Ishikawa human endometrial cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Salker, Madhuri S.; Zhou, Yuetao; Singh, Yogesh; Brosens, Jan; Lang, Florian

    2015-05-08

    Objective: LeftyA, a powerful regulator of stemness, embryonic differentiation, and reprogramming of cancer cells, counteracts cell proliferation and tumor growth. Key properties of tumor cells include enhanced glycolytic flux, which is highly sensitive to cytosolic pH and thus requires export of H{sup +} and lactate. H{sup +} extrusion is in part accomplished by Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchangers, such as NHE1. An effect of LeftyA on transport processes has, however, never been reported. The present study thus explored whether LeftyA modifies regulation of cytosolic pH (pHi) in Ishikawa cells, a well differentiated endometrial carcinoma cell model. Methods: NHE1 transcript levels were determined by qRT-PCR, NHE1 protein abundance quantified by Western blotting, pH{sub i} estimated utilizing (2',7'-bis-(2-carboxyethyl)-5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein [BCECF] fluorescence, Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger activity from Na{sup +} dependent realkalinization after an ammonium pulse, and lactate concentration in the supernatant utilizing an enzymatic assay and subsequent colorimetry. Results: A 2 h treatment with LeftyA (8 ng/ml) significantly decreased NHE1 transcript levels (by 99.6%), NHE1 protein abundance (by 71%), Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger activity (by 55%), pHi (from 7.22 ± 0.02 to 7.05 ± 0.02), and lactate release (by 41%). Conclusions: LeftyA markedly down-regulates NHE1 expression, Na{sup +}/H{sup +} exchanger activity, pHi, and lactate release in Ishikawa cells. Those effects presumably contribute to cellular reprogramming and growth inhibition. - Highlights: • LeftyA, an inhibitor of tumor growth, reduces Na{sup +}/H{sup +}-exchanger activity by 55%. • LeftyA decreases NHE1 transcripts by 99.6% and NHE1 protein by 71%. • LeftyA decreases cytosolic pH from 7.22 ± 0.02 to 7.05 ± 0.02. • Cytosolic acidification by Lefty A decreases glycolysis by 41%. • Cytosolic acidification by Lefty A compromises energy production of tumor cells.

  10. βν Integrin Inhibits Chronic and High Level Activation of JNK to Repress Senescence Phenotypes in Drosophila Adult Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Okumura, Takashi; Takeda, Koji; Taniguchi, Kiichiro; Adachi-Yamada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Proper control of adult stem cells including their proliferation and differentiation is crucial in maintaining homeostasis of well-organized tissues/organs throughout an organism's life. The Drosophila adult midgut has intestinal stem cells (ISCs), which have been exploited as a simple model system to investigate mechanisms controlling adult tissue homeostasis. Here, we found that a viable mutant of βν integrin (βint-ν), encoding one of two Drosophila integrin β subunits, showed a short midgut and abnormal multilayered epithelia accompanied by an increase in ISC proliferation and misdifferentiation defects. The increase in ISC proliferation and misdifferentiation was due to frequent ISC duplication expanding a pool of ISCs, which was caused by depression of the Notch signalling, and up-regulation of unpaired (upd), a gene encoding an extracellular ligand in the JAK/STAT signalling pathway. In addition, we observed that abnormally high accumulation of filamentous actin (F-actin) was caused in the βint-ν mutant enterocytes. Furthermore, the defects were rescued by suppressing c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signalling, which was up-regulated in a manner correlated with the defect levels in the above-mentioned βint-ν mutant phenotype. These symptoms observed in young βint-ν mutant midgut were very similar to those in the aged midgut in wild type. Our results suggested that βint-ν has a novel function for the Drosophila adult midgut homeostasis under normal conditions and provided a new insight into possible age-related diseases caused by latent abnormality of an integrin function. PMID:24586740

  11. Lipid production from hemicellulose with Lipomyces starkeyi in a pH regulated fed-batch cultivation.

    PubMed

    Brandenburg, Jule; Blomqvist, Johanna; Pickova, Jana; Bonturi, Nemailla; Sandgren, Mats; Passoth, Volkmar

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated lipid production from the hemicellulosic fraction of birch wood by the oleaginous yeast Lipomyces starkeyi. Birch wood chips were thermochemically pretreated by hot water extraction, and the liquid phase, containing 45.1 g/l xylose as the major sugar, 13.1 g/l acetic acid and 4.7 g/l furfural, was used for cultivations of L. starkeyi CBS1807. The hydrolysate strongly inhibited yeast growth; the strain could only grow in medium containing 30% hydrolysate at pH 6. At pH 5, growth stopped already upon the addition of about 10% hydrolysate. In fed-batch cultures fed with hydrolysate or a model xylose-acetic acid mixture, co-consumption of xylose and acetic acid was observed, which resulted in a pH increase. This phenomenon was utilized to establish a pH-stat fed-batch cultivation in which, after an initial feeding, hydrolysate or model mixture was connected to the pH-regulation system of the bioreactor. Under these conditions we obtained growth and lipid production in cultures grown on either xylose or glucose during the batch phase. In cultivations fed with model mixture, a maximum lipid content of 60.5% of the cell dry weight (CDW) was obtained; however, not all xylose was consumed. When feeding hydrolysate, growth was promoted and carbon sources were completely consumed, resulting in higher CDW with maximum lipid content of 51.3%. In both cultures the lipid concentration was 8 g/l and a lipid yield of 0.1 g/g carbon source was obtained. Lipid composition was similar in all cultivations, with C18:1 and C16:0 being the most abundant fatty acids. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26945827

  12. Metabolic regulation of neutrophil spreading, membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes) formation and intracellular pH upon adhesion to fibronectin

    SciTech Connect

    Galkina, Svetlana I. . E-mail: galkina@genebee.msu.su; Sud'ina, Galina F.; Klein, Thomas

    2006-08-01

    Circulating leukocytes have a round cell shape and roll along vessel walls. However, metabolic disorders can lead them to adhere to the endothelium and spread (flatten). We studied the metabolic regulation of adhesion, spreading and intracellular pH (pHi) of neutrophils (polymorphonuclear leukocytes) upon adhesion to fibronectin-coated substrata. Resting neutrophils adhered and spread on fibronectin. An increase in pHi accompanied neutrophil spreading. Inhibition of oxidative phosphorylation or inhibition of P- and F-type ATPases affected neither neutrophil spreading nor pHi. Inhibition of glucose metabolism or V-ATPase impaired neutrophil spreading, blocked the increase in the pHi and induced extrusion of membrane tubulovesicular extensions (cytonemes), anchoring cells to substrata. Omission of extracellular Na{sup +} and inhibition of chloride channels caused a similar effect. We propose that these tubulovesicular extensions represent protrusions of exocytotic trafficking, supplying the plasma membrane of neutrophils with ion exchange mechanisms and additional membrane for spreading. Glucose metabolism and V-type ATPase could affect fusion of exocytotic trafficking with the plasma membrane, thus controlling neutrophil adhesive state and pHi. Cl{sup -} efflux through chloride channels and Na{sup +} influx seem to be involved in the regulation of the V-ATPase by carrying out charge compensation for the proton-pumping activity and through V-ATPase in regulation of neutrophil spreading and pHi.

  13. Regulation of the starfish sperm acrosome reaction by cGMP, pH, cAMP and Ca2+.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Midori; Kawase, Osamu; Islam, M Sadiqul; Naruse, Masahiro; Watanabe, Shin-Nosuke; Ishikawa, Riho; Hoshi, Motonori

    2008-01-01

    In the starfish, Asterias amurensis, three components in the jelly coat of eggs, namely acrosome reaction-inducing substance (ARIS), Co-ARIS and asterosap, act in concert on homologous spermatozoa to induce the acrosome reaction (AR). Molecular recognition between the sperm surface molecules and the egg jelly molecules must underlie signal transduction events triggering the AR. Asterosap is a sperm-activating molecule, which stimulates rapid synthesis of intracellular cGMP, pH and Ca2+. This transient elevation of Ca2+ level is caused by a K+-dependent Na+/Ca2+ exchanger, and the increase of intracellular pH is sufficient for ARIS to induce the AR. The concerted action of ARIS and asterosap could induce elevate intracellular cAMP levels in starfish sperm and the sustained increase in [Ca2+], which is essential for the AR. The signaling pathway induced by these factors seems to be synergistically regulated to trigger the AR in starfish sperm. PMID:18649265

  14. Regulation of the glutamine transporter SN1 by extracellular pH and intracellular sodium ions

    PubMed Central

    Bröer, Angelika; Albers, Alexandra; Setiawan, Iwan; Edwards, Robert H; Chaudhry, Farrukh A; Lang, Florian; Wagner, Carsten A; Bröer, Stefan

    2002-01-01

    The glutamine transporter SN1 has recently been identified as one of the major glutamine transporters in hepatocytes and brain astrocytes. It appears to be the molecular correlate of system N amino acid transport. Two different transport mechanisms have been proposed for this transporter. These are an electroneutral mechanism, in which glutamine uptake is coupled to an exchange of 1Na+ and 1H+, or an electrogenic mechanism coupled to the exchange of 2Na+ against 1H+. This study was performed to solve these discrepancies and to investigate the reversibility of the transporter. When SN1 was expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes, glutamine uptake was accompanied by a cotransport of 2–3 Na+ ions as determined by 22Na+ fluxes. However, at the same time a rapid release of intracellular Na+ was observed indicating an active exchange of Na+ ions. The driving force of the proton electrochemical gradient was equivalent to that of the sodium electrochemical gradient. Acidification of the extracellular medium caused the transporter to run in reverse and to release glutamine. Determination of accumulation ratios at different driving forces were in agreement with an electroneutral 1Na+-glutamine cotransport-1H+ antiport. Inward currents that were observed during glutamine uptake were much smaller than expected for a stoichiometric cotransport of charges. A slippage mode in the transporter mechanism and pH-regulated endogenous oocyte cation channels are likely to contribute to the observed currents. PMID:11850497

  15. Insertion of Proteolipid Protein into Oligodendrocyte Mitochondria Regulates Extracellular pH and ATP

    PubMed Central

    Appikatla, Sunita; Bessert, Denise; Lee, Icksoo; Hüttemann, Maik; Mullins, Chadwick; Somayajulu-Nitu, Mallika; Yao, Fayi; Skoff, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Proteolipid protein (PLP) and DM20, the most abundant myelin proteins, are coded by the human PLP1 and non-human Plp1 proteolipid protein gene. Mutations in the PLP1 gene cause Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disease (PMD) with duplications of the native PLP1 gene accounting for 70% of PLP1 mutations. Humans with PLP1 duplications and mice with extra Plp1 copies have extensive neuronal degeneration. The mechanism that causes neuronal degeneration is unknown. We show that native PLP traffics to mitochondria when the gene is duplicated in mice and in humans. This report is the first demonstration of a specific cellular defect in brains of PMD patients; it validates rodent models as ideal models to study PMD. Insertion of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial proteins requires specific import pathways; we show that specific cysteine motifs, part of the Mia40/Erv1 mitochondrial import pathway, are present in PLP and are required for its insertion into mitochondria. Insertion of native PLP into mitochondria of transfected cells acidifies media, partially due to increased lactate; it also increases ATP in the media. The same abnormalities are found in the extracellular space of mouse brains with extra copies of Plp1. These physiological abnormalities are preventable by mutations in PLP cysteine motifs, a hallmark of the Mia40/Erv1 pathway. Increased extracellular ATP and acidosis lead to neuronal degeneration. Our findings may be the mechanism by which microglia are activated and pro-inflammatory molecules are up-regulated in Plp1 transgenic mice (Tatar et al., 2010). Manipulation of this metabolic pathway may restore normal metabolism and provide therapy for PMD patients. PMID:24382809

  16. Sharply Tuned pH Response of Genetic Competence Regulation in Streptococcus mutans: a Microfluidic Study of the Environmental Sensitivity of comX

    PubMed Central

    Son, Minjun; Ghoreishi, Delaram; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans is a transient state that is regulated in response to multiple environmental inputs. These include extracellular pH and the concentrations of two secreted peptides, designated CSP (competence-stimulating peptide) and XIP (comX-inducing peptide). The role of environmental cues in regulating competence can be difficult to disentangle from the effects of the organism's physiological state and its chemical modification of its environment. We used microfluidics to control the extracellular environment and study the activation of the key competence gene comX. We find that the comX promoter (PcomX) responds to XIP or CSP only when the extracellular pH lies within a narrow window, about 1 pH unit wide, near pH 7. Within this pH range, CSP elicits a strong PcomX response from a subpopulation of cells, whereas outside this range the proportion of cells expressing comX declines sharply. Likewise, PcomX is most sensitive to XIP only within a narrow pH window. While previous work suggested that comX may become refractory to CSP or XIP stimulus as cells exit early exponential phase, our microfluidic data show that extracellular pH dominates in determining sensitivity to XIP and CSP. The data are most consistent with an effect of pH on the ComR/ComS system, which has direct control over transcription of comX in S. mutans. PMID:26070670

  17. Sharply Tuned pH Response of Genetic Competence Regulation in Streptococcus mutans: a Microfluidic Study of the Environmental Sensitivity of comX.

    PubMed

    Son, Minjun; Ghoreishi, Delaram; Ahn, Sang-Joon; Burne, Robert A; Hagen, Stephen J

    2015-08-15

    Genetic competence in Streptococcus mutans is a transient state that is regulated in response to multiple environmental inputs. These include extracellular pH and the concentrations of two secreted peptides, designated CSP (competence-stimulating peptide) and XIP (comX-inducing peptide). The role of environmental cues in regulating competence can be difficult to disentangle from the effects of the organism's physiological state and its chemical modification of its environment. We used microfluidics to control the extracellular environment and study the activation of the key competence gene comX. We find that the comX promoter (PcomX) responds to XIP or CSP only when the extracellular pH lies within a narrow window, about 1 pH unit wide, near pH 7. Within this pH range, CSP elicits a strong PcomX response from a subpopulation of cells, whereas outside this range the proportion of cells expressing comX declines sharply. Likewise, PcomX is most sensitive to XIP only within a narrow pH window. While previous work suggested that comX may become refractory to CSP or XIP stimulus as cells exit early exponential phase, our microfluidic data show that extracellular pH dominates in determining sensitivity to XIP and CSP. The data are most consistent with an effect of pH on the ComR/ComS system, which has direct control over transcription of comX in S. mutans. PMID:26070670

  18. A novel tissue in an established model system: the Drosophila pupal midgut.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Ortiz, Paola A; Hartenstein, Volker

    2011-06-01

    The Drosophila larval and adult midguts are derived from two populations of endodermal progenitors that separate from each other in the early embryo. As larval midgut cells differentiate into an epithelial layer, adult midgut progenitors (AMPs) remain as small clusters of proliferating, undifferentiated cells attached to the basal surface of the larval gut epithelium. During the first few hours of metamorphosis, AMPs merge into a continuous epithelial tube that overgrows the larval layer and differentiates into the adult midgut; at the same time, the larval midgut degenerates. As shown in this paper, there is a second, transient pupal midgut that develops from the AMPs at the beginning of metamorphosis and that intercalates between the adult and larval midgut epithelia. Cells of the transient pupal midgut form a multilayered tube that exhibits signs of differentiation, in the form of septate junctions and rudimentary apical microvilli. Some cells of the pupal midgut develop as endocrine cells. The pupal midgut remains closely attached to the degenerating larval midgut cells. Along with these cells, pupal midgut cells are sequestered into the lumen where they form the compact "yellow body." The formation of a pupal midgut has been reported from several other species and may represent a general feature of intestinal metamorphosis in insects. PMID:21556856

  19. A novel tissue in an established model system: the Drosophila pupal midgut

    PubMed Central

    Takashima, Shigeo; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Ortiz, Paola A.; Hartenstein, Volker

    2014-01-01

    The Drosophila larval and adult midgut are derived from two populations of endodermal progenitors that separate from each other in the early embryo. As larval midgut cells differentiate into an epithelial layer, adult midgut progenitors (AMPs) remain as small clusters of proliferating, undifferentiated cells attached to the basal surface of the larval gut epithelium. During the first few hours of metamorphosis, AMPs merge into a continuous epithelial tube that overgrows the larval layer and differentiates into the adult midgut; at the same time, the larval midgut degenerates. As shown in this paper, there is a second, transient pupal midgut that develops from the AMPs at the beginning of metamorphosis, and that intercalates between the adult and larval midgut epithelia. Cells of the transient pupal midgut form a multilayered tube that exhibits signs of differentiation, in the form of septate junctions and rudimentary apical microvilli. Some cells of the pupal midgut develop as endocrine cells. The pupal midgut remains closely attached to the degenerating larval midgut cells. Along with these cells, pupal midgut cells are sequestered into the lumen where they form the compact “yellow body”. The formation of a pupal midgut has been reported from several other species, and may represent a general feature of intestinal metamorphosis in insects. PMID:21556856

  20. A subset of enteroendocrine cells is activated by amino acids in the Drosophila midgut.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong-Ho; Chen, Ji; Jang, Sooin; Ahn, Tae Jung; Kang, KyeongJin; Choi, Min Sung; Kwon, Jae Young

    2016-02-01

    The intestine is involved in digestion and absorption, as well as the regulation of metabolism upon sensation of the internal intestinal environment. Enteroendocrine cells are thought to mediate these internal intestinal chemosensory functions. Using the CaLexA (calcium-dependent nuclear import of LexA) method, we examined the enteroendocrine cell populations that are activated when flies are subjected to various dietary conditions such as starvation, sugar, high fat, protein, or pathogen exposure. We find that a specific subpopulation of enteroendocrine cells in the posterior midgut which express Dh31 and tachykinin are activated by the presence of proteins and amino acids. PMID:26801353

  1. Circadian Regulation of the PhCCD1 Carotenoid Cleavage Dioxygenase Controls Emission of β-Ionone, a Fragrance Volatile of Petunia Flowers1

    PubMed Central

    Simkin, Andrew J.; Underwood, Beverly A.; Auldridge, Michele; Loucas, Holly M.; Shibuya, Kenichi; Schmelz, Eric; Clark, David G.; Klee, Harry J.

    2004-01-01

    Carotenoids are thought to be the precursors of terpenoid volatile compounds that contribute to flavor and aroma. One such volatile, β-ionone, is important to fragrance in many flowers, including petunia (Petunia hybrida). However, little is known about the factors regulating its synthesis in vivo. The petunia genome contains a gene encoding a 9,10(9′,10′) carotenoid cleavage dioxygenase, PhCCD1. The PhCCD1 is 94% identical to LeCCD1A, an enzyme responsible for formation of β-ionone in tomato (Lycopersicon esculentum; Simkin AJ, Schwartz SH, Auldridge M, Taylor MG, Klee HJ [2004] Plant J [in press]). Reduction of PhCCD1 transcript levels in transgenic plants led to a 58% to 76% decrease in β-ionone synthesis in the corollas of selected petunia lines, indicating a significant role for this enzyme in volatile synthesis. Quantitative reverse transcription-PCR analysis revealed that PhCCD1 is highly expressed in corollas and leaves, where it constitutes approximately 0.04% and 0.02% of total RNA, respectively. PhCCD1 is light-inducible and exhibits a circadian rhythm in both leaves and flowers. β-Ionone emission by flowers occurred principally during daylight hours, paralleling PhCCD1 expression in corollas. The results indicate that PhCCD1 activity and β-ionone emission are likely regulated at the level of transcript. PMID:15516502

  2. cis- and trans-Acting Localization Determinants of pH Response Regulator Rim13 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Subramanian, Shoba; Woolford, Carol A.; Desai, Jigar V.; Lanni, Frederick

    2012-01-01

    The Rim101/PacC pathway governs adaptation to alkaline pH in many fungi. Output of the pathway is mediated by transcription factors of the Rim101/PacC family, which are activated by proteolytic cleavage. The proteolytic complex includes scaffold protein Rim20 and endosome-associated subunits of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT). We provide here evidence that Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rim13, the protease that is implicated in Rim101 cleavage, is associated with the Rim20-ESCRT complex, and we investigate its regulation. Rim13-GFP is dispersed in cells grown in acidic medium but forms punctate foci when cells encounter alkaline conditions. A vps4Δ mutant, which accumulates elevated levels of endosomal ESCRT, also accumulates elevated levels of Rim13-GFP foci, independently of external pH. In the vps4Δ background, mutation of ESCRT subunit Snf7 or of Rim20 blocks the formation of Rim13 foci, and we found that Rim13 and Rim20 are colocalized. The Rim13 ortholog PalB of Aspergillus nidulans has been shown to undergo ESCRT and membrane association through an N-terminal MIT domain, but Rim13 orthologs in the Saccharomyces clade lack homology to this N-terminal region. Instead, there is a clade-limited C-terminal region, and we show that point mutations in this region prevent punctate localization and impair Rim13 function. We suggest that RIM13 arose from its ancestral gene through two genome rearrangements. The ancestor lost the coding region for its MIT domain through a 5′ rearrangement and acquired the coding region for the Saccharomyces-specific functional equivalent through a 3′ rearrangement. PMID:22865500

  3. Tigutcystatin, a cysteine protease inhibitor from Triatoma infestans midgut expressed in response to Trypanosoma cruzi

    SciTech Connect

    Buarque, Diego S.; Spindola, Leticia M.N.; Martins, Rafael M.; Braz, Gloria R.C.; Tanaka, Aparecida S.

    2011-09-23

    Highlights: {yields} Tigutcystatin inhibits Trypanosoma cruzi cysteine proteases with high specificity. {yields} Tigutcystatin expression is up-regulated in response to T. cruzi infection. {yields} It is the first cysteine proteases inhibitor characterized from a triatomine insect. -- Abstract: The insect Triatoma infestans is a vector of Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. A cDNA library was constructed from T. infestans anterior midgut, and 244 clones were sequenced. Among the EST sequences, an open reading frame (ORF) with homology to a cystatin type 2 precursor was identified. Then, a 288-bp cDNA fragment encoding mature cystatin (lacking signal peptide) named Tigutcystatin was cloned fused to a N-terminal His tag in pET-14b vector, and the protein expressed in Escherichia coli strain Rosetta gami. Tigutcystatin purified and cleaved by thrombin to remove His tag presented molecular mass of 11 kDa and 10,137 Da by SDS-PAGE and MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, respectively. Purified Tigutcystatin was shown to be a tight inhibitor towards cruzain, a T. cruzi cathepsin L-like enzyme (K{sub i} = 3.29 nM) and human cathepsin L (K{sub i} = 3.78 nM). Tissue specific expression analysis showed that Tigutcystatin was mostly expressed in anterior midgut, although amplification in small intestine was also detected by semi quantitative RT-PCR. qReal time PCR confirmed that Tigutcystatin mRNA is significantly up-regulated in anterior midgut when T. infestans is infected with T. cruzi. Together, these results indicate that Tigutcystatin may be involved in modulation of T. cruzi in intestinal tract by inhibiting parasite cysteine proteases, which represent the virulence factors of this protozoan.

  4. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Jing; Chang, Xiaoxiao; Kasuga, Takao; Bui, Mai; Reid, Michael S; Jiang, Cai-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during flower senescence. Transcription of PhFBH4 is induced by plant hormones and abiotic stress treatments. Silencing of PhFBH4 using virus-induced gene silencing or an antisense approach extended flower longevity, while transgenic petunia flowers with an overexpression construct showed a reduction in flower lifespan. Abundance of transcripts of senescence-related genes (SAG12, SAG29) was significantly changed in petunia PhFBH4 transgenic flowers. Furthermore, silencing or overexpression of PhFBH4 reduced or increased, respectively, transcript abundances of important ethylene biosynthesis-related genes, ACS1 and ACO1, thereby influencing ethylene production. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay showed that the PhFBH4 protein physically interacted with the G-box cis-element in the promoter of ACS1, suggesting that ACS1 was a direct target of the PhFBH4 protein. In addition, ectopic expression of this gene altered plant development including plant height, internode length, and size of leaves and flowers, accompanied by alteration of transcript abundance of the gibberellin biosynthesis-related gene GA2OX3. Our results indicate that PhFBH4 plays an important role in regulating plant growth and development through modulating the ethylene biosynthesis pathway. PMID:26715989

  5. Intracellular pH (pHin) and cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]cyt) regulation via ATPases: studies in cell populations, single cells, and subcellular compartments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojas, Jose D.; Sanka, Shankar C.; Gyorke, Sandor; Wesson, Donald E.; Minta, Akwasi; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul

    1999-07-01

    Changes in pHin and (Ca2+)cyt are important in the signal transduction mechanisms leading to many physiological responses including cell growth, motility, secretion/exocytosis, etc. The concentrations of these ions are regulated via primary and secondary ion transporting mechanisms. In diabetes, specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory mechanism might be altered. To study these ions, we employ fluorescence spectroscopy, and cell imagin spectroscopy/confocal microscopy. pH and Ca2+ indicators are loaded in the cytosol with acetoxymethyl ester forms of dyes, and in endosomal/lysosomal (E/L) compartments by overnight incubation of cells with dextran- conjugated ion fluorescent probes. We focus on specific pH and Ca2+ regulatory systems: plasmalemmal vacuolar- type H+-ATPases (pm V-ATPases) and sarcoplasmic/endoplasmic reticulum Ca2+-ATPases (SERCA). As experimental models, we employ vascular smooth muscle (VSM) and microvascular endothelial cells. We have chosen these cells because they are important in blood flow regulation and in angiogenesis. These processes are altered in diabetes. In many cell types, ion transport processes are dependent on metabolism of glucose for maximal activity. Our main findings are: (a) glycolysis coupling the activity of SERCA is required for cytosolic Ca2+ homeostasis in both VSM and microvascular endothelial cells; (b) E/L compartments are important for pH and Ca2+ regulation via H+-ATPases and SERCA, respectively; and (c) pm-V- ATPases are important for pHin regulation in microvascular endothelial cells.

  6. A basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor, PhFBH4, regulates flower senescence by modulating ethylene biosynthesis pathway in petunia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors (TFs) play important roles in regulating multiple biological processes in plants. However, there are few reports about the function of bHLHs in flower senescence. In this study, a bHLH TF, PhFBH4, was found to be dramatically upregulated during...

  7. Sequence variation and differential splicing of the midgut cadherin gene in Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin; Kain, Wendy; Wang, Ping

    2013-08-01

    The insect midgut cadherin serves as an important receptor for the Cry toxins from Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt). Variation of the cadherin in insect populations provides a genetic potential for development of cadherin-based Bt resistance in insect populations. Sequence analysis of the cadherin from the cabbage looper, Trichoplusia ni, together with cadherins from 18 other lepidopterans showed a similar phylogenetic relationship of the cadherins to the phylogeny of Lepidoptera. The midgut cadherin in three laboratory populations of T. ni exhibited high variability, although the resistance to Bt toxin Cry1Ac in the T. ni strain is not genetically associated with cadherin gene mutations. A total of 142 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were identified in the cadherin cDNAs from the T. ni strains, including 20 missense mutations. In addition, insertion and deletion polymorphisms (indels) were also identified in the cadherin alleles in T. ni. More interestingly, the results from this study reveal that differential splicing of mRNA also occurs in the cadherin gene expression. Therefore, variation of the midgut cadherin in insects may not only be caused by cadherin gene mutations, but could also result from alternative splicing of its mRNA regulated by factors acting in trans. Analysis of cadherin gene alleles in F2, F3 and F4 progenies from the cross between the Cry1Ac resistant and the susceptible strain after consecutive selections with Cry1Ac for three generations showed that selection with Cry1Ac did not result in an increase of frequencies of the cadherin alleles originated from the resistant strain. PMID:23743444

  8. Activation of AMP-activated protein kinase regulates hippocampal neuronal pH by recruiting Na(+)/H(+) exchanger NHE5 to the cell surface.

    PubMed

    Jinadasa, Tushare; Szabó, Elöd Z; Numat, Masayuki; Orlowski, John

    2014-07-25

    Strict regulation of intra- and extracellular pH is an important determinant of nervous system function as many voltage-, ligand-, and H(+)-gated cationic channels are exquisitely sensitive to transient fluctuations in pH elicited by neural activity and pathophysiologic events such as hypoxia-ischemia and seizures. Multiple Na(+)/H(+) exchangers (NHEs) are implicated in maintenance of neural pH homeostasis. However, aside from the ubiquitous NHE1 isoform, their relative contributions are poorly understood. NHE5 is of particular interest as it is preferentially expressed in brain relative to other tissues. In hippocampal neurons, NHE5 regulates steady-state cytoplasmic pH, but intriguingly the bulk of the transporter is stored in intracellular vesicles. Here, we show that NHE5 is a direct target for phosphorylation by the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a key sensor and regulator of cellular energy homeostasis in response to metabolic stresses. In NHE5-transfected non-neuronal cells, activation of AMPK by the AMP mimetic AICAR or by antimycin A, which blocks aerobic respiration and causes acidification, increased cell surface accumulation and activity of NHE5, and elevated intracellular pH. These effects were effectively blocked by the AMPK antagonist compound C, the NHE inhibitor HOE694, and mutation of a predicted AMPK recognition motif in the NHE5 C terminus. This regulatory pathway was also functional in primary hippocampal neurons, where AMPK activation of NHE5 protected the cells from sustained antimycin A-induced acidification. These data reveal a unique role for AMPK and NHE5 in regulating the pH homeostasis of hippocampal neurons during metabolic stress. PMID:24936055

  9. Left-Sided Appendicitis in an Elderly Patient with Midgut Malrotation.

    PubMed

    Chuang, Pei Wen; Huang, Bo-Ming; Liu, Chung Hsien; Chen, Chien-Chin; Tsai, Ming-Jen

    2015-12-01

    Appendicitis is a common surgical abdominal disease with various presentations. Its diagnosis may be obscured by asymptomatic congenital anatomical anomalies like midgut malrotation. Midgut malrotation is a rare fetal anomaly resulting from incomplete or failure of midgut rotation and fixation. It is mostly presented with bowel obstruction or volvulus in early life. Presentation in adult is rare. Here, we report an elderly patient presented with left lower abdominal pain and urinary tract infection. Abdominal computed tomography revealed left-sided appendicitis with non-rotational-type midgut malrotation. Clinicians should bear in mind the possibility of underlying midgut malrotation, as appendicitis could be the first presentation of this rare congenital condition. PMID:27011586

  10. Internal pH regulation facilitates in situ long-term acclimation of massive corals to end-of-century carbon dioxide conditions.

    PubMed

    Wall, M; Fietzke, J; Schmidt, G M; Fink, A; Hofmann, L C; de Beer, D; Fabricius, K E

    2016-01-01

    The resilience of tropical corals to ocean acidification depends on their ability to regulate the pH within their calcifying fluid (pHcf). Recent work suggests pHcf homeostasis under short-term exposure to pCO2 conditions predicted for 2100, but it is still unclear if pHcf homeostasis can be maintained throughout a corals lifetime. At CO2 seeps in Papua New Guinea, massive Porites corals have grown along a natural seawater pH gradient for decades. This natural gradient, ranging from pH 8.1-7.4, provides an ideal platform to determine corals' pHcf (using boron isotopes). Porites maintained a similar pHcf (~8.24) at both a control (pH 8.1) and seep-influenced site (pH 7.9). Internal pHcf was slightly reduced (8.12) at seawater pH 7.6, and decreased to 7.94 at a site with a seawater pH of 7.4. A growth response model based on pHcf mirrors the observed distribution patterns of this species in the field. We suggest Porites has the capacity to acclimate after long-time exposure to end-of-century reduced seawater pH conditions and that strong control over pHcf represents a key mechanism to persist in future oceans. Only beyond end-of-century pCO2 conditions do they face their current physiological limit of pH homeostasis and pHcf begins to decrease. PMID:27477963

  11. Internal pH regulation facilitates in situ long-term acclimation of massive corals to end-of-century carbon dioxide conditions

    PubMed Central

    Wall, M.; Fietzke, J.; Schmidt, G. M.; Fink, A; Hofmann, L. C.; de Beer, D.; Fabricius, K. E.

    2016-01-01

    The resilience of tropical corals to ocean acidification depends on their ability to regulate the pH within their calcifying fluid (pHcf). Recent work suggests pHcf homeostasis under short-term exposure to pCO2 conditions predicted for 2100, but it is still unclear if pHcf homeostasis can be maintained throughout a corals lifetime. At CO2 seeps in Papua New Guinea, massive Porites corals have grown along a natural seawater pH gradient for decades. This natural gradient, ranging from pH 8.1–7.4, provides an ideal platform to determine corals’ pHcf (using boron isotopes). Porites maintained a similar pHcf (~8.24) at both a control (pH 8.1) and seep-influenced site (pH 7.9). Internal pHcf was slightly reduced (8.12) at seawater pH 7.6, and decreased to 7.94 at a site with a seawater pH of 7.4. A growth response model based on pHcf mirrors the observed distribution patterns of this species in the field. We suggest Porites has the capacity to acclimate after long-time exposure to end-of-century reduced seawater pH conditions and that strong control over pHcf represents a key mechanism to persist in future oceans. Only beyond end-of-century pCO2 conditions do they face their current physiological limit of pH homeostasis and pHcf begins to decrease. PMID:27477963

  12. Midgut microbiota and host immunocompetence underlie Bacillus thuringiensis killing mechanism.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Di Lelio, Ilaria; La Storia, Antonietta; Marinelli, Adriana; Varricchio, Paola; Franzetti, Eleonora; Banyuls, Núria; Tettamanti, Gianluca; Casartelli, Morena; Giordana, Barbara; Ferré, Juan; Gigliotti, Silvia; Ercolini, Danilo; Pennacchio, Francesco

    2016-08-23

    Bacillus thuringiensis is a widely used bacterial entomopathogen producing insecticidal toxins, some of which are expressed in insect-resistant transgenic crops. Surprisingly, the killing mechanism of B. thuringiensis remains controversial. In particular, the importance of the septicemia induced by the host midgut microbiota is still debated as a result of the lack of experimental evidence obtained without drastic manipulation of the midgut and its content. Here this key issue is addressed by RNAi-mediated silencing of an immune gene in a lepidopteran host Spodoptera littoralis, leaving the midgut microbiota unaltered. The resulting cellular immunosuppression was characterized by a reduced nodulation response, which was associated with a significant enhancement of host larvae mortality triggered by B. thuringiensis and a Cry toxin. This was determined by an uncontrolled proliferation of midgut bacteria, after entering the body cavity through toxin-induced epithelial lesions. Consequently, the hemolymphatic microbiota dramatically changed upon treatment with Cry1Ca toxin, showing a remarkable predominance of Serratia and Clostridium species, which switched from asymptomatic gut symbionts to hemocoelic pathogens. These experimental results demonstrate the important contribution of host enteric flora in B. thuringiensis-killing activity and provide a sound foundation for developing new insect control strategies aimed at enhancing the impact of biocontrol agents by reducing the immunocompetence of the host. PMID:27506800

  13. STIMULATION OF MIDGUT STEM CELL PROLIFERATION BY MANDUCA SEXTA ARYLPHORIN

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Extracts of the green-colored perivisceral fat body of newly ecdysed Manduca sexta pupae stimulate mitosis in midgut stem cells of Heliothis virescens cultured in vitro. Using a combination of cation- and anion-exchange chromatography, we have isolated a protein from these fat body extracts that acc...

  14. More Frequent than Desired: Midgut Stem Cell Somatic Mutations.

    PubMed

    Li, Qi; Ip, Y Tony

    2015-12-01

    The accumulation of somatic mutations in adult stem cells contributes to the decline of tissue functions and cancer initiation. In this issue of Cell Stem Cell, Siudeja et al. (2015) investigate the rate and mechanism of naturally occurring mutations in Drosophila midgut intestinal stem cells during aging and find high-frequency mutations arising from multiple mechanisms. PMID:26637937

  15. Adult midgut malrotation presented with acute bowel obstruction and ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zengin, Akile; Uçar, Bercis İmge; Düzgün, Şükrü Aydın; Bayhan, Zülfü; Zeren, Sezgin; Yaylak, Faik; Şanal, Bekir; Bayhan, Nilüfer Araz

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation refers to the partial or complete failure of rotation of midgut around the superior mesenteric vessels in embryonic life. Arrested midgut rotation results due to narrow-based mesentery and increases the risk of twisting midgut and subsequent obstruction and necrosis. Presentation of case 40 years old female patient admitted to emergency service with acute abdomen and computerized tomography scan showed dilated large and small intestine segments with air-fluid levels and twisted mesentery around superior mesenteric artery and vein indicating “whirpool sign”. Discussion Malrotation in adults is a rare cause of midgut volvulus as though it should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Even though clinical symptoms are obscure, adult patients usually present with vomiting and recurrent abdominal pain due to chronic partial obstruction. Contrast enhanced radiograph has been shown to be the most accurate method. Typical radiological signs are corkscrew sign, which is caused by the dilatation of various duodenal segments at different levels and the relocation of duodenojejunal junction due to jejunum folding. As malrotation commonly causes intestinal obstruction, patients deserve an elective laparotomy. Conclusion Malrotation should be considered in differential diagnosis in patients presented with acute abdomen and intestinal ischemia. Surgical intervention should be prompt to limit morbidity and mortality. PMID:27015011

  16. pH changes in frog rods upon manipulation of putative pH-regulating transport mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Kalamkarov, G; Pogozheva, I; Shevchenko, T; Koskelainen, A; Hemila, S; Donner, K

    1996-10-01

    Rod intracellular pH (pHi) in the intact frog retina was measured fluorometrically with the dye 2',7'-bis(2-carboxyethyl)-5(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein under treatments chosen to affect putative pH-regulating transport mechanisms in the plasma membrane. The purpose was to relate possible pHi changes to previously reported effects on photoresponses. In nominally bicarbonate-free Ringer, application of amiloride (1 mM) or substitution of 95 mM external Na+ by K+ or choline triggered monotonic but reversible acidifications, consistent with inhibition of Na+/H+ exchange. Bicarbonate-dependent mechanisms were characterized as follows: (1) Replacing half of a 12 mM phosphate buffer by bicarbonate caused a sustained rise of pHi. (2) Subsequent application of the anion transport inhibitor 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2',2'-disulphonic acid (DIDS, 0.2 mM) set off a slow acidification. (3) Substitution of external Cl- by gluconate (95 mM) caused a rapid pHi rise both in normal Na+ and low-Na+ perfusion. (4) This effect was inhibited by DIDS. The results support a consistent explanation of parallel electrophysiological experiments on the assumption that intracellular acidifications reduce and alkalinizations (in a certain range) augment photoresponses. It is concluded that both Na+/H+ exchange and bicarbonate transport control rod pHi, modulating the light-sensitive current. Part of the bicarbonate transport is by Na(+)-independent HCO3-/Cl- exchange, but a further Na(+)-coupled bicarbonate import mechanism is implicated. PMID:8917766

  17. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors.

    PubMed

    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis

  18. Carbonic anhydrase IX, a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the pH regulating machinery in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Sedlakova, Olga; Svastova, Eliska; Takacova, Martina; Kopacek, Juraj; Pastorek, Jaromir; Pastorekova, Silvia

    2013-01-01

    Acidic tissue microenvironment contributes to tumor progression via multiple effects including the activation of angiogenic factors and proteases, reduced cell-cell adhesion, increased migration and invasion, etc. In addition, intratumoral acidosis can influence the uptake of anticancer drugs and modulate the response of tumors to conventional therapy. Acidification of the tumor microenvironment often develops due to hypoxia-triggered oncogenic metabolism, which leads to the extensive production of lactate, protons, and carbon dioxide. In order to avoid intracellular accumulation of the acidic metabolic products, which is incompatible with the survival and proliferation, tumor cells activate molecular machinery that regulates pH by driving transmembrane inside-out and outside-in ion fluxes. Carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) is a hypoxia-induced catalytic component of the bicarbonate import arm of this machinery. Through its catalytic activity, CA IX directly participates in many acidosis-induced features of tumor phenotype as demonstrated by manipulating its expression and/or by in vitro mutagenesis. CA IX can function as a survival factor protecting tumor cells from hypoxia and acidosis, as a pro-migratory factor facilitating cell movement and invasion, as a signaling molecule transducing extracellular signals to intracellular pathways (including major signaling and metabolic cascades) and converting intracellular signals to extracellular effects on adhesion, proteolysis, and other processes. These functional implications of CA IX in cancer are supported by numerous clinical studies demonstrating the association of CA IX with various clinical correlates and markers of aggressive tumor behavior. Although our understanding of the many faces of CA IX is still incomplete, existing knowledge supports the view that CA IX is a biologically and clinically relevant molecule, exploitable in anticancer strategies aimed at targeting adaptive responses to hypoxia and/or acidosis

  19. Midgut Microbial Community of Culex quinquefasciatus Mosquito Populations from India

    PubMed Central

    Chandel, Kshitij; Mendki, Murlidhar J.; Parikh, Rasesh Y.; Kulkarni, Girish; Tikar, Sachin N.; Sukumaran, Devanathan; Prakash, Shri; Parashar, Brahma D.; Shouche, Yogesh S.; Veer, Vijay

    2013-01-01

    The mosquito Culex quinquefasciatus is a ubiquitous species that serves as a major vector for west nile virus and lymphatic filariasis. Ingestion of bloodmeal by females triggers a series of physiological processes in the midgut and also exposes them to infection by these pathogens. The bacteria normally harbored in the midgut are known to influence physiology and can also alter the response to various pathogens. The midgut bacteria in female Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes collected over a large geographical area from India was studied. Examination of 16S ribosomal DNA amplicons from culturable microflora revealed the presence of 83 bacterial species belonging to 31 bacterial genera. All of these species belong to three phyla i.e. Proteobacteria, Firmicutes and Actinobacteria. Phylum Proteobacteria was the most dominant phylum (37 species), followed by Firmicutes (33 species) and Actinobacteria (13 species). Phylum Proteobacteria, was dominated by members of γ-proteobacteria class. The genus Staphylococcus was the largest genus represented by 11 species whereas Enterobacter was the most prevalent genus and recovered from all the field stations except Leh. Highest bacterial prevalence was observed from Bhuj (22 species) followed by Nagrota (18 species), Masimpur (18 species) and Hathigarh (16 species). Whereas, least species were observed from Leh (8 species). It has been observed that individual mosquito harbor extremely diverse gut bacteria and have very small overlap bacterial taxa in their gut. This variation in midgut microbiota may be one of the factors responsible for variation in disease transmission rates or vector competence within mosquito population. The present data strongly encourage further investigations to verify the potential role of the detected bacteria in mosquito for the transmission of lymphatic filariasis and west nile virus. To the best of our knowledge this is the first study on midgut microbiota of wild Cx. quinquefasciatus from over a

  20. Modeling pH Regulation During Coral Calcification: Implications for Predicting Coral Calcification Responses to Ocean Acidification and for Interpreting Geochemical Proxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, W.

    2014-12-01

    Coral, like many other carbonate-secreting organisms, exerts strong control over its calcification process, resulting in an internal calcifying environment that departs from the ambient seawater. Most notably, pH of the coral calcifying fluid has been shown to be significantly elevated relative to seawater. Such pH regulation not only determines coral calcification responses to environmental changes (e.g. ocean acidification and rising temperature), but also affects the elemental and isotopic compositions of coral skeleton and complicates the interpretation of various geochemical proxies. Based on existing models of coral calcification and geochemical constraints on its pH regulation, I simulated the chemistry, especially pH, of the coral calcifying fluid, and evaluated the calcification responses to changing seawater chemistry among different coral species. Predictions from these simulations compare favorably with results from laboratory manipulation experiments, and suggest different coral species can exhibit different responses to ocean acidification depending on their respective capabilities to regulate the calcifying environment. The implication of these model results for interpreting geochemical proxies will also be discussed at the meeting.

  1. Na/sup +/ requirement for growth, photosynthesis, and pH regulation of the alkalotolerant cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, A.G.; Turpin, D.H.; Canvin, D.T.

    1984-07-01

    It was found that Na/sup +/ is required for all the alkalotolerance of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus leopoliensis. Cell division did not occur at any pH in the absence of Na/sup +/, but cells inoculated into Na/sup +/-free growth medium at pH 6.8 did continue metabolic activity, and over a period of 48 h, the cells became twice their normal size. Many of these cells remained viable for at least 59 h and formed colonies on Na/sup +/-containing medium. Cells grown in the presence of Na/sup +/ and inoculated into Na/sup +/-free growth medium at pH 9.6 rapidly lost viability. An Na/sup +/ concentration of ca. 0.5 milliequivalents x liter/sup -1/ was required for sustained growth above pH 9.0. The Na/sup +/ requirement could be only partially met by Li/sup +/ and not at all by K/sup +/ or Rb/sup +/. Cells incubated in darkness in growth medium at pH 6.8 had an intracellular pH near neutrality in the presence or absence of Na/sup +/. When the external pH was shifted to 9.6, only cells in the presence of Na/sup +/ were able to maintain an intracellular pH near 7.0. The membrane potential, however, remained high (-120mV) in the absence or presence of Na/sup +/ unless collapsed by the addition of gramicidin. Thus, the inability to maintain a neutral intracellular pH at pH 9.6 in the absence of Na/sup +/ was not due to a generalized disruption of membrane integrity. Even cells containing Na/sup +/ still required added Na/sup +/ to restore photosynthetic rates to normal after the cells had been washed in Na/sup +/-free buffer at pH 9.6. This requirement was only partially met by Li/sup +/ and was not met at all by K/sup +/, Rb/sup +/, Cs/sup +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, or Ca/sup 2 +/. The restoration of photosynthesis by added Na/sup +/ occurred within 30 s and suggests a role for extracellular Na/sup +/. Part of our results can be explained in terms of the operation of an Na/sup +//H/sup +/ antiporter activity in the plasma membrane, but some results would seem to require other

  2. The tyrosyl-tRNA synthetase like gene located in the tyramine biosynthesis cluster of Enterococcus durans is transcriptionally regulated by tyrosine concentration and extracellular pH

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The tyramine producer Enterococcus durans IPLA655 contains all the necessary genes for tyramine biosynthesis, grouped in the TDC cluster. This cluster includes tyrS, an aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase like gene. Results This work shows that tyrS was maximally transcribed in absence of tyrosine at acidic pH, showing a greater than 10-fold induction in mRNA levels over levels occurring in presence of tyrosine. Mapping of the tyrS transcriptional start site revealed an unusually long untranslated leader region of 322 bp, which displays the typical features of the T box transcriptional attenuation mechanism. The tyrosine concentration regulation of tyrS was found to be mediated by a transcription antitermination system, whereas the specific induction at acidic pH was regulated at transcription initiation level. Conclusions The expression of the tyrS gene present in the TDC cluster of E. durans is transcriptionally regulated by tyrosine concentration and extracelular pH. The regulation is mediated by both an antitermination system and the promoter itself. PMID:22333391

  3. The adverse effects of phoxim exposure in the midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Gu, ZhiYa; Zhou, YiJun; Xie, Yi; Li, FanChi; Ma, Lie; Sun, ShanShan; Wu, Yu; Wang, BinBin; Wang, JuMei; Hong, Fashui; Shen, WeiDe; Li, Bing

    2014-02-01

    The silkworm is an important economic insect. Poisoning of silkworms by organophosphate pesticides causes tremendous loss to the sericulture. In this study, Solexa sequencing technology was performed to profile the gene expression changes in the midgut of silkworms in response to 24h of phoxim exposure and the impact on detoxification, apoptosis and immune defense were addressed. The results showed that 254 genes displayed at least 2.0-fold changes in expression levels, with 148 genes up-regulated and 106 genes down-regulated. Cytochrome P450 played an important role in detoxification. Histopathology examination and transmission electron microscope revealed swollen mitochondria and disappearance of the cristae of mitochondria, which are the important features in insect apoptotic cells. Cytochrome C release from mitochondria into the cytoplasm was confirmed. In addition, the Toll and immune deficiency (IMD) signal pathways were all inhibited using qRT-PCR. Our results could help better understand the impact of phoxim exposure on silkworm. PMID:23899924

  4. Low pH, Aluminum, and Phosphorus Coordinately Regulate Malate Exudation through GmALMT1 to Improve Soybean Adaptation to Acid Soils1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Cuiyue; Piñeros, Miguel A.; Tian, Jiang; Yao, Zhufang; Sun, Lili; Liu, Jiping; Shaff, Jon; Coluccio, Alison; Kochian, Leon V.; Liao, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Low pH, aluminum (Al) toxicity, and low phosphorus (P) often coexist and are heterogeneously distributed in acid soils. To date, the underlying mechanisms of crop adaptation to these multiple factors on acid soils remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that P addition to acid soils could stimulate Al tolerance, especially for the P-efficient genotype HN89. Subsequent hydroponic studies demonstrated that solution pH, Al, and P levels coordinately altered soybean (Glycine max) root growth and malate exudation. Interestingly, HN89 released more malate under conditions mimicking acid soils (low pH, +P, and +Al), suggesting that root malate exudation might be critical for soybean adaptation to both Al toxicity and P deficiency on acid soils. GmALMT1, a soybean malate transporter gene, was cloned from the Al-treated root tips of HN89. Like root malate exudation, GmALMT1 expression was also pH dependent, being suppressed by low pH but enhanced by Al plus P addition in roots of HN89. Quantitative real-time PCR, transient expression of a GmALMT1-yellow fluorescent protein chimera in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and electrophysiological analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GmALMT1 demonstrated that GmALMT1 encodes a root cell plasma membrane transporter that mediates malate efflux in an extracellular pH-dependent and Al-independent manner. Overexpression of GmALMT1 in transgenic Arabidopsis, as well as overexpression and knockdown of GmALMT1 in transgenic soybean hairy roots, indicated that GmALMT1-mediated root malate efflux does underlie soybean Al tolerance. Taken together, our results suggest that malate exudation is an important component of soybean adaptation to acid soils and is coordinately regulated by three factors, pH, Al, and P, through the regulation of GmALMT1 expression and GmALMT1 function. PMID:23341359

  5. The Pal pathway required for ambient pH adaptation regulates growth, conidiation, and osmotolerance of Beauveria bassiana in a pH-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jing; Ying, Sheng-Hua; Feng, Ming-Guang

    2016-05-01

    The Pal/Rim pathway essential for fungal adaptation to ambient pH has been unexplored in Beauveria bassiana, a classic fungal entomopathogen. Here, we show the characterized Pal pathway comprising transcription factor PacC and upstream six Pal partners (PalA/B/C/F/H/I) in B. bassiana. Their coding genes were all transcribed most abundantly in standard wild-type culture under the alkaline condition of pH 9. Deletion of pacC or each pal gene resulted in a significant delay of culture acidification in a minimal broth (initial pH = 7.3). This delay concurred with altered accumulation levels of intra/extracellular organic acids and drastically depressed expression of some enzyme genes required for the syntheses of oxalic and lactic acids. Our deletion mutants except ΔpalI showed growth defects and maximal sensitivity to NaCl, KCl, LiCl, or sorbitol at pH 9, an alkaline condition leading to fragmented vacuoles in their hyphal cells exposed to osmotic stress. In these mutants, conidiation was significantly facilitated at pH 3 more than at pH 7 but suppressed slightly at pH 9. Mild virulence defects also occurred in the absence of pacC or any pal gene. These changes were restored by targeted gene complementation. Taken together, PacC and Pal partners regulate the growth, conidiation, and osmotolerance of B. bassiana in a pH-dependent manner, highlighting their vitality for the fungal pH response. PMID:26754817

  6. The Ca2+-Regulation of the Mitochondrial External NADPH Dehydrogenase in Plants Is Controlled by Cytosolic pH

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Meng-Shu; Jensen, Anna M.; Boquist, Ann-Sofie; Liu, Yun-Jun; Rasmusson, Allan G.

    2015-01-01

    NADPH is a key reductant carrier that maintains internal redox and antioxidant status, and that links biosynthetic, catabolic and signalling pathways. Plants have a mitochondrial external NADPH oxidation pathway, which depends on Ca2+ and pH in vitro, but concentrations of Ca2+ needed are not known. We have determined the K0.5(Ca2+) of the external NADPH dehydrogenase from Solanum tuberosum mitochondria and membranes of E. coli expressing Arabidopsis thaliana NDB1 over the physiological pH range using O2 and decylubiquinone as electron acceptors. The K0.5(Ca2+) of NADPH oxidation was generally higher than for NADH oxidation, and unlike the latter, it depended on pH. At pH 7.5, K0.5(Ca2+) for NADPH oxidation was high (≈100 μM), yet 20-fold lower K0.5(Ca2+) values were determined at pH 6.8. Lower K0.5(Ca2+) values were observed with decylubiquinone than with O2 as terminal electron acceptor. NADPH oxidation responded to changes in Ca2+ concentrations more rapidly than NADH oxidation did. Thus, cytosolic acidification is an important activator of external NADPH oxidation, by decreasing the Ca2+-requirements for NDB1. The results are discussed in relation to the present knowledge on how whole cell NADPH redox homeostasis is affected in plants modified for the NDB1 gene. PMID:26413894

  7. The Ca2+-Regulation of the Mitochondrial External NADPH Dehydrogenase in Plants Is Controlled by Cytosolic pH.

    PubMed

    Hao, Meng-Shu; Jensen, Anna M; Boquist, Ann-Sofie; Liu, Yun-Jun; Rasmusson, Allan G

    2015-01-01

    NADPH is a key reductant carrier that maintains internal redox and antioxidant status, and that links biosynthetic, catabolic and signalling pathways. Plants have a mitochondrial external NADPH oxidation pathway, which depends on Ca2+ and pH in vitro, but concentrations of Ca2+ needed are not known. We have determined the K0.5(Ca2+) of the external NADPH dehydrogenase from Solanum tuberosum mitochondria and membranes of E. coli expressing Arabidopsis thaliana NDB1 over the physiological pH range using O2 and decylubiquinone as electron acceptors. The K0.5(Ca2+) of NADPH oxidation was generally higher than for NADH oxidation, and unlike the latter, it depended on pH. At pH 7.5, K0.5(Ca2+) for NADPH oxidation was high (≈100 μM), yet 20-fold lower K0.5(Ca2+) values were determined at pH 6.8. Lower K0.5(Ca2+) values were observed with decylubiquinone than with O2 as terminal electron acceptor. NADPH oxidation responded to changes in Ca2+ concentrations more rapidly than NADH oxidation did. Thus, cytosolic acidification is an important activator of external NADPH oxidation, by decreasing the Ca2+-requirements for NDB1. The results are discussed in relation to the present knowledge on how whole cell NADPH redox homeostasis is affected in plants modified for the NDB1 gene. PMID:26413894

  8. Expression of a sugar clade gustatory receptor, BmGr6, in the oral sensory organs, midgut, and central nervous system of larvae of the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Mang, Dingze; Shu, Min; Endo, Haruka; Yoshizawa, Yasutaka; Nagata, Shinji; Kikuta, Shingo; Sato, Ryoichi

    2016-03-01

    Insects taste nonvolatile chemicals through gustatory receptors (Grs) and make choices for feeding, mating, and oviposition. To date, genome projects have identified 69 Gr genes in the silkworm, Bombyx mori; however, the expression sites of these Grs remain to be explored. In this study, we used reverse transcription (RT)-PCR to investigate expression of the B. mori Gr-6 (BmGr6) gene, a member of the putative sugar clade gene family in various tissues. BmGr6 is expressed in the midgut, central nervous system (CNS), and oral sensory organs. Moreover, immunohistochemistry using an anti-BmGr6 antiserum demonstrated that BmGr6 is expressed in cells by oral sensory organs, midgut and nervous system. Furthermore, double-immunohistochemistry indicated that BmGr6 is expressed in midgut enteroendocrine cells, also in CNS neurosecretory cells. In particular, a portion of BmGr6-expressing cells, in both midgut and CNS, secretes FMRFamide-related peptides (FaRPs). These results suggest that BmGr6 functions not only as a taste receptor, but also as a chemical sensor such as for the regulation of gut movement, physiological conditions, and feeding behavior of larvae. PMID:26721200

  9. Carbon, nitrogen and pH regulate the production and activity of a polygalacturonase isozyme produced by Penicillium expansum

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The influence of carbon, nitrogen and pH on polygalacturonase activity produced by Penicillium expansum were investigated. P. expansum mycelial growth was greatest on lyophilized fruit tissue and the highest PG activity occurred in apple pectin medium. Nitrogen source influenced PG activity and was ...

  10. pH up-regulation as a potential mechanism for the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to sustain growth in aragonite undersaturated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, M.; Ragazzola, F.; Foster, L. C.; Form, A.; Schmidt, D. N.

    2015-12-01

    Cold-water corals are important habitat formers in deep-water ecosystems and at high latitudes. Ocean acidification and the resulting change in aragonite saturation are expected to affect these habitats and impact coral growth. Counter to expectations, the deep water coral Lophelia pertusa has been found to be able to sustain growth even in undersaturated conditions. However, it is important to know whether such undersaturation modifies the skeleton and thus its ecosystem functioning. Here we used Synchrotron X-Ray Tomography and Raman spectroscopy to examine changes in skeleton morphology and fibre orientation. We combined the morphological assessment with boron isotope analysis to determine if changes in growth are related to changes in control of calcification pH. We compared the isotopic composition and structure formed in their natural environment to material grown in culture at lower pH conditions. Skeletal morphology is highly variable but shows no distinctive differences between natural and low pH conditions. Raman investigations found no difference in macromorphological skeletal arrangement of early mineralization zones and secondary thickening between the treatments. The δ11B analyses show that L. pertusa up-regulates the internal calcifying fluid pH (pHcf) during calcification compared to ambient seawater pH and maintains a similar elevated pHcf at increased pCO2 conditions. We suggest that as long as the energy is available to sustain the up-regulation, i.e. individuals are well fed, there is no detrimental effect to the skeletal morphology.

  11. Modulation of phagosomal pH by Candida albicans promotes hyphal morphogenesis and requires Stp2p, a regulator of amino acid transport.

    PubMed

    Vylkova, Slavena; Lorenz, Michael C

    2014-03-01

    Candida albicans, the most important fungal pathogen of humans, has a unique interaction with macrophages in which phagocytosis induces a switch from the yeast to hyphal form, allowing it to escape by rupturing the immune cell. While a variety of factors induce this switch in vitro, including neutral pH, it is not clear what triggers morphogenesis within the macrophage where the acidic environment should inhibit this transition. In vitro, C. albicans grown in similar conditions in which amino acids are the primary carbon source generate large quantities of ammonia to raise the extracellular pH and induce the hyphal switch. We show here that C. albicans cells neutralize the macrophage phagosome and that neutral pH is a key inducer of germination in phagocytosed cells by using a mutant lacking STP2, a transcription factor that regulates the expression of multiple amino acid permeases, that is completely deficient in alkalinization in vitro. Phagocytosed stp2Δ mutant cells showed significant reduction in hypha formation and escaped from macrophages less readily compared to wild type cells; as a result stp2Δ mutant cells were killed at a higher rate and caused less damage to RAW264.7 macrophages. Stp2p-regulated import leads to alkalinization of the phagosome, since the majority of the wild type cells fail to co-localize with acidophilic dyes, whereas the stp2Δ mutant cells were located in acidic phagosomes. Furthermore, stp2Δ mutant cells were able to form hyphae and escape from neutral phagosomes, indicating that the survival defect in these cells was pH dependent. Finally, these defects are reflected in an attenuation of virulence in a mouse model of disseminated candidiasis. Altogether our results suggest that C. albicans utilizes amino acids to promote neutralization of the phagosomal pH, hyphal morphogenesis, and escape from macrophages. PMID:24626429

  12. Autophagy precedes apoptosis during the remodeling of silkworm larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Huang, Zhi-Jun; Shi, Yan-Xia; Xie, Kun; Deng, Xiao-Juan; Li, Jian-Ping; Li, Qing-Rong; Yang, Wan-Ying; Zeng, Wen-Nian; Casartelli, Morena; Deng, Hui-Min; Cappellozza, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; Xia, Qingyou; Feng, Qili; Cao, Yang; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2012-03-01

    Although several features of apoptosis and autophagy have been reported in the larval organs of Lepidoptera during metamorphosis, solid experimental evidence for autophagy is still lacking. Moreover, the role of the two processes and the nature of their relationship are still cryptic. In this study, we perform a cellular, biochemical and molecular analysis of the degeneration process that occurs in the larval midgut of Bombyx mori during larval-adult transformation, with the aim to analyze autophagy and apoptosis in cells that die under physiological conditions. We demonstrate that larval midgut degradation is due to the concerted action of the two mechanisms, which occur at different times and have different functions. Autophagy is activated from the wandering stage and reaches a high level of activity during the spinning and prepupal stages, as demonstrated by specific autophagic markers. Our data show that the process of autophagy can recycle molecules from the degenerating cells and supply nutrients to the animal during the non-feeding period. Apoptosis intervenes later. In fact, although genes encoding caspases are transcribed at the end of the larval period, the activity of these proteases is not appreciable until the second day of spinning and apoptotic features are observable from prepupal phase. The abundance of apoptotic features during the pupal phase, when the majority of the cells die, indicates that apoptosis is actually responsible for cell death and for the disappearance of larval midgut cells. PMID:22127643

  13. Debra-mediated Ci degradation controls tissue homeostasis in Drosophila adult midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-02-11

    Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  14. Debra-Mediated Ci Degradation Controls Tissue Homeostasis in Drosophila Adult Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhouhua; Guo, Yueqin; Han, Lili; Zhang, Yan; Shi, Lai; Huang, Xudong; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Summary Adult tissue homeostasis is maintained by resident stem cells and their progeny. However, the underlying mechanisms that control tissue homeostasis are not fully understood. Here, we demonstrate that Debra-mediated Ci degradation is important for intestinal stem cell (ISC) proliferation in Drosophila adult midgut. Debra inhibition leads to increased ISC activity and tissue homeostasis loss, phenocopying defects observed in aging flies. These defects can be suppressed by depleting Ci, suggesting that increased Hedgehog (Hh) signaling contributes to ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis loss. Consistently, Hh signaling activation causes the same defects, whereas depletion of Hh signaling suppresses these defects. Furthermore, the Hh ligand from multiple sources is involved in ISC proliferation and tissue homeostasis. Finally, we show that the JNK pathway acts downstream of Hh signaling to regulate ISC proliferation. Together, our results provide insights into the mechanisms of stem cell proliferation and tissue homeostasis control. PMID:24527387

  15. Intracellular pH regulation in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) hepatocytes: the activity of sodium/proton exchange is oxygen-dependent.

    PubMed

    Tuominen, A; Rissanen, E; Bogdanova, A; Nikinmaa, M

    2003-06-01

    We studied pH regulation in freshly isolated rainbow trout hepatocytes using microspectrofluorometry with the fluorescent dye BCECF. In accordance with earlier data on rainbow trout hepatocytes, ion substitution (N-methyl D-glucamine for sodium and gluconate for chloride) and transport inhibitor [10 microM M methyl isobutyl amiloride (MIA) to inhibit sodium/proton exchange and 100 microM DIDS to inhibit bicarbonate transport] studies in either Hepes-buffered or bicarbonate/carbon dioxide-buffered media (extracellular pH 7.6) indicated a role for sodium/proton exchange, sodium-dependent bicarbonate transport, and sodium-independent anion exchange in the regulation of hepatocyte pH. In Hepes-buffered medium, the activity of the sodium/proton exchanger (i.e. proton extrusion inhibited by MIA) was greater at 1% than at 21% oxygen. The oxygen dependency of the sodium/proton exchange is not caused by hydroxyl radicals, which appear to mediate the oxygen sensitivity of potassium-chloride cotransport in erythrocytes. PMID:12820008

  16. Role of H(+)-pyrophosphatase activity in the regulation of intracellular pH in a scuticociliate parasite of turbot: Physiological effects.

    PubMed

    Mallo, Natalia; Lamas, Jesús; de Felipe, Ana-Paula; Sueiro, Rosa-Ana; Fontenla, Francisco; Leiro, José-Manuel

    2016-10-01

    The scuticociliatosis is a very serious disease that affects the cultured turbot, and whose causal agent is the anphizoic and marine euryhaline ciliate Philasterides dicentrarchi. Several protozoans possess acidic organelles that contain high concentrations of pyrophosphate (PPi), Ca(2+) and other elements with essential roles in vesicular trafficking, pH homeostasis and osmoregulation. P. dicentrarchi possesses a pyrophosphatase (H(+)-PPase) that pumps H(+) through the membranes of vacuolar and alveolar sacs. These compartments share common features with the acidocalcisomes described in other parasitic protozoa (e.g. acid content and Ca(2+) storage). We evaluated the effects of Ca(2+) and ATP on H (+)-PPase activity in this ciliate and analyzed their role in maintaining intracellular pH homeostasis and osmoregulation, by the addition of PPi and inorganic molecules that affect osmolarity. Addition of PPi led to acidification of the intracellular compartments, while the addition of ATP, CaCl2 and bisphosphonates analogous of PPi and Ca(2+) metabolism regulators led to alkalinization and a decrease in H(+)-PPase expression in trophozoites. Addition of NaCl led to proton release, intracellular Ca(2+) accumulation and downregulation of H(+)-PPase expression. We conclude that the regulation of the acidification of intracellular compartments may be essential for maintaining the intracellular pH homeostasis necessary for survival of ciliates and their adaptation to salt stress, which they will presumably face during the endoparasitic phase, in which the salinity levels are lower than in their natural environment. PMID:27480055

  17. A Hypothetical Model of Crossing Bombyx mori Nucleopolyhedrovirus through Its Host Midgut Physical Barrier

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yang; Wang, Xue-Yang; Hu, Hao; Killiny, Nabil; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a primary pathogen of silkworm (B. mori) that causes severe economic losses each year. However, the molecular mechanisms of silkworm-BmNPV interactions, especially the silkworm proteins that can interact with the virus, are still largely unknown. In this study, the total and membrane proteins of silkworm midguts were displayed using one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. A virus overlay assay was used to detect B. mori proteins that specifically bind to BmNPV particles. Twelve proteins were located and identified using mass spectrometry, and the different expression of the corresponding genes in BmNPV susceptible and resistant silkworm strains also indicated their involvement in BmNPV infection. The 12 proteins are grouped based on their potential roles in viral infection, for example, endocytosis, intracellular transportation, and host responses. Based on these results, we hypothesize the following: I) vacuolar ATP synthase catalytic subunit A and subunit B may be implicated in the process of the membrane fusion of virus and the release of the nucleocapsid into cytoplasm; II) actin, enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase are cytoskeleton associated proteins and may play an important role in BmNPV intracellular transportation; III) mitochondrial prohibitin complex protein 2, ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein, calreticulin, regucalcin-like isoform X1 and 60 kDa heat shock protein are involved in cell apoptosis regulation during BmNPV infection in larvae midguts; IV) ribosomal P0 may be associated with BmNPV infection by regulating gene expression of BmNPV; V) arginine kinase has a role in the antiviral activities against BmNPV. Our work should prove informative by providing multiple protein targets and a novel direction to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between silkworms and BmNPV. PMID:25502928

  18. A hypothetical model of crossing Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus through its host midgut physical barrier.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yang; Wang, Xue-Yang; Hu, Hao; Killiny, Nabil; Xu, Jia-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Bombyx mori nucleopolyhedrovirus (BmNPV) is a primary pathogen of silkworm (B. mori) that causes severe economic losses each year. However, the molecular mechanisms of silkworm-BmNPV interactions, especially the silkworm proteins that can interact with the virus, are still largely unknown. In this study, the total and membrane proteins of silkworm midguts were displayed using one- and two-dimensional electrophoresis. A virus overlay assay was used to detect B. mori proteins that specifically bind to BmNPV particles. Twelve proteins were located and identified using mass spectrometry, and the different expression of the corresponding genes in BmNPV susceptible and resistant silkworm strains also indicated their involvement in BmNPV infection. The 12 proteins are grouped based on their potential roles in viral infection, for example, endocytosis, intracellular transportation, and host responses. Based on these results, we hypothesize the following: I) vacuolar ATP synthase catalytic subunit A and subunit B may be implicated in the process of the membrane fusion of virus and the release of the nucleocapsid into cytoplasm; II) actin, enolase and phosphoglycerate kinase are cytoskeleton associated proteins and may play an important role in BmNPV intracellular transportation; III) mitochondrial prohibitin complex protein 2, ganglioside-induced differentiation-associated protein, calreticulin, regucalcin-like isoform X1 and 60 kDa heat shock protein are involved in cell apoptosis regulation during BmNPV infection in larvae midguts; IV) ribosomal P0 may be associated with BmNPV infection by regulating gene expression of BmNPV; V) arginine kinase has a role in the antiviral activities against BmNPV. Our work should prove informative by providing multiple protein targets and a novel direction to investigate the molecular mechanisms of the interactions between silkworms and BmNPV. PMID:25502928

  19. The 5'-UTR intron of the midgut-specific BmAPN4 gene affects the level and location of expression in transgenic silkworms.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Huang, Chunlin; Sun, Qiang; Guo, Huizhen; Cheng, Tingcai; Peng, Zhengwen; Dang, Yinghui; Liu, Weiqiang; Xu, Guowen; Xia, Qingyou

    2015-08-01

    Introns are important for regulating gene expression. BmAPN4, which has a 5'-UTR upstream intron (5 UI), is specifically expressed in the entire silkworm midgut. In our previous study, the promoter region upstream of the 5 UI of BmAPN4 was cloned and identified as the P3 promoter (P3P) with activity only in the anterior midgut. In this study, the sequence consisting of the P3P and the 5 UI was cloned and named as P3P+5 UI. A transgenic vector was constructed in which EGFP was controlled by P3P+5 UI. Transgenic P3+5 UI silkworms were generated by embryo microinjection. RT-PCR showed P3P+5 UI activity throughout the larval stage. Intense green fluorescence was seen only in the entire midgut of P3+5 UI silkworms and expression was confirmed by RT-PCR. qPCR revealed that expression of EGFP in the anterior midgut of P3+5 UI silkworms was 64% higher than in P3 silkworms, indicating the 5 UI sustained intron-mediated enhancement of gene expression. These results suggested that the BmAPN4 5 UI affected the level and site of expression. The 5 UI was cloned and added behind P2P, another specific promoter with activity only in the anterior midgut of silkworm, to construct the P2P+5 UI and transgenic P2+5 UI silkworms. Expression patterns were the same for P2P+5 UI and P2P, suggesting that the 5UI of BmAPN4 did not affect P2P. This study found that the BmAPN4 5 UI affected the amount and location of gene expression. Its influence appeared to be dependent on a specific promoter. PMID:25982022

  20. Dual regulation of the native ClC-K2 chloride channel in the distal nephron by voltage and pH.

    PubMed

    Pinelli, Laurent; Nissant, Antoine; Edwards, Aurélie; Lourdel, Stéphane; Teulon, Jacques; Paulais, Marc

    2016-09-01

    ClC-K2, a member of the ClC family of Cl(-) channels and transporters, forms the major basolateral Cl(-) conductance in distal nephron epithelial cells and therefore plays a central role in renal Cl(-) absorption. However, its regulation remains largely unknown because of the fact that recombinant ClC-K2 has not yet been studied at the single-channel level. In the present study, we investigate the effects of voltage, pH, Cl(-), and Ca(2+) on native ClC-K2 in the basolateral membrane of intercalated cells from the mouse connecting tubule. The ∼10-pS channel shows a steep voltage dependence such that channel activity increases with membrane depolarization. Intracellular pH (pHi) and extracellular pH (pHo) differentially modulate the voltage dependence curve: alkaline pHi flattens the curve by causing an increase in activity at negative voltages, whereas alkaline pHo shifts the curve toward negative voltages. In addition, pHi, pHo, and extracellular Ca(2+) strongly increase activity, mainly because of an increase in the number of active channels with a comparatively minor effect on channel open probability. Furthermore, voltage alters both the number of active channels and their open probability, whereas intracellular Cl(-) has little influence. We propose that changes in the number of active channels correspond to them entering or leaving an inactivated state, whereas modulation of open probability corresponds to common gating by these channels. We suggest that pH, through the combined effects of pHi and pHo on ClC-K2, might be a key regulator of NaCl absorption and Cl(-)/HCO3 (-) exchange in type B intercalated cells. PMID:27574292

  1. Aspen defense chemicals influence midgut bacterial community composition of gypsy moth.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Rubert-Nason, Kennedy F; Lindroth, Richard L; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2015-01-01

    Microbial symbionts are becoming increasingly recognized as mediators of many aspects of plant - herbivore interactions. However, the influence of plant chemical defenses on gut associates of insect herbivores is less well understood. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.), and differing trembling aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) genotypes that vary in chemical defenses, to assess the influence of foliar chemistry on bacterial communities of larval midguts. We evaluated the bacterial community composition of foliage, and of midguts of larvae feeding on those leaves, using next-generation high-throughput sequencing. Plant defense chemicals did not influence the composition of foliar communities. In contrast, both phenolic glycosides and condensed tannins affected the bacterial consortia of gypsy moth midguts. The two most abundant operational taxonomic units were classified as Ralstonia and Acinetobacter. The relative abundance of Ralstonia was higher in midguts than in foliage when phenolic glycoside concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when phenolic glycosides were high. In contrast, the relative abundance of Ralstonia was lower in midguts than in foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but higher in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter showed a different relationship with host chemistry, being relatively more abundant in midguts than with foliage when condensed tannin concentrations were low, but lower in midguts when condensed tannins were high. Acinetobacter tended to have a greater relative abundance in midguts of insects feeding on genotypes with high phenolic glycoside concentrations. These results show that plant defense chemicals influence herbivore midgut communities, which may in turn influence host utilization. PMID:25475786

  2. Carbon regulation of environmental pH by secreted small molecules that modulate pathogenicity in phytopathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Bi, Fangcheng; Barad, Shiri; Ment, Dana; Luria, Neta; Dubey, Amit; Casado, Virginia; Glam, Nofar; Mínguez, Jose Diaz; Espeso, Eduardo A; Fluhr, Robert; Prusky, Dov

    2016-10-01

    Fruit pathogens can contribute to the acidification or alkalinization of the host environment. This capability has been used to divide fungal pathogens into acidifying and/or alkalinizing classes. Here, we show that diverse classes of fungal pathogens-Colletotrichum gloeosporioides, Penicillium expansum, Aspergillus nidulans and Fusarium oxysporum-secrete small pH-affecting molecules. These molecules modify the environmental pH, which dictates acidic or alkaline colonizing strategies, and induce the expression of PACC-dependent genes. We show that, in many organisms, acidification is induced under carbon excess, i.e. 175 mm sucrose (the most abundant sugar in fruits). In contrast, alkalinization occurs under conditions of carbon deprivation, i.e. less than 15 mm sucrose. The carbon source is metabolized by glucose oxidase (gox2) to gluconic acid, contributing to medium acidification, whereas catalysed deamination of non-preferred carbon sources, such as the amino acid glutamate, by glutamate dehydrogenase 2 (gdh2), results in the secretion of ammonia. Functional analyses of Δgdh2 mutants showed reduced alkalinization and pathogenicity during growth under carbon deprivation, but not in high-carbon medium or on fruit rich in sugar, whereas analysis of Δgox2 mutants showed reduced acidification and pathogencity under conditions of excess carbon. The induction pattern of gdh2 was negatively correlated with the expression of the zinc finger global carbon catabolite repressor creA. The present results indicate that differential pH modulation by fruit fungal pathogens is a host-dependent mechanism, affected by host sugar content, that modulates environmental pH to enhance fruit colonization. PMID:26666972

  3. Regulation of the gtfBC and ftf genes of Streptococcus mutans in biofilms in response to pH and carbohydrate.

    PubMed

    Li, Y; Burne, R A

    2001-10-01

    Streptococcus mutans produces a number of extracellular sucrose-metabolizing enzymes that contribute to the ability of the organism to cause dental caries, including three glucosyltransferases, the products of the gtfB, gtfC and gtfD genes, and a fructosyltransferase, encoded by the ftf gene. To better understand the regulation of the expression of these genes under environmental conditions that more closely mimic those in dental plaque, two strains of S. mutans harbouring fusions of the gtfBC (SMS102) and ftf (SMS101) promoters to a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene were examined in biofilms formed in vitro. The strains were grown in a Rototorque biofilm reactor in a tryptone-yeast extract-sucrose medium. CAT specific activity in biofilm cells was measured at quasi-steady state or following additions of 25 mM sucrose or glucose, with or without pH control. After approximately 10 generations of biofilm growth, the ftf and gtfBC genes of S. mutans were found to be expressed at levels different from those reported for planktonic cells growing under otherwise similar conditions. The expression of these genes was induced by the addition of sucrose to the quasi-steady-state cultures. Expression of the gtfBC genes was influenced by environmental pH, since CAT specific activities in quasi-steady-state biofilms of strain SMS102 grown without pH control were twice those produced by cells grown with pH control. Moreover, addition of glucose to quasi-steady-state biofilms resulted in increased expression of the gtfBC-cat fusion, although the magnitude of the induction was less than that seen with sucrose. The effect of pH on ftf expression was negligible. A modest and transient induction of ftf was observed in biofilms pulsed with excess glucose and the kinetics and level of induction of ftf by excess carbohydrate were dependent on the pH of the biofilms. This study demonstrates that the type and amount of carbohydrate and the environmental pH have a major

  4. The Rim101p/PacC pathway and alkaline pH regulate pattern formation in yeast colonies.

    PubMed

    Piccirillo, Sarah; White, Melissa G; Murphy, Jeffrey C; Law, Douglas J; Honigberg, Saul M

    2010-03-01

    Multicellular organisms utilize cell-to-cell signals to build patterns of cell types within embryos, but the ability of fungi to form organized communities has been largely unexplored. Here we report that colonies of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae formed sharply divided layers of sporulating and nonsporulating cells. Sporulation initiated in the colony's interior, and this region expanded upward as the colony matured. Two key activators of sporulation, IME1 and IME2, were initially transcribed in overlapping regions of the colony, and this overlap corresponded to the initial sporulation region. The development of colony sporulation patterns depended on cell-to-cell signals, as demonstrated by chimeric colonies, which contain a mixture of two strains. One such signal is alkaline pH, mediated through the Rim101p/PacC pathway. Meiotic-arrest mutants that increased alkali production stimulated expression of an early meiotic gene in neighboring cells, whereas a mutant that decreased alkali production (cit1Delta) decreased this expression. Addition of alkali to colonies accelerated the expansion of the interior region of sporulation, whereas inactivation of the Rim101p pathway inhibited this expansion. Thus, the Rim101 pathway mediates colony patterning by responding to cell-to-cell pH signals. Cell-to-cell signals coupled with nutrient gradients may allow efficient spore formation and spore dispersal in natural environments. PMID:20038633

  5. Target-based screen against a periplasmic serine protease that regulates intrabacterial pH homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nan; Darby, Crystal M; Small, Jennifer; Bachovchin, Daniel A; Jiang, Xiuju; Burns-Huang, Kristin E; Botella, Helene; Ehrt, Sabine; Boger, Dale L; Anderson, Erin D; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Speers, Anna E; Fernandez-Vega, Virneliz; Hodder, Peter S; Eberhart, Christina; Rosen, Hugh; Spicer, Timothy P; Nathan, Carl F

    2015-02-20

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) maintains its intrabacterial pH (pHIB) near neutrality in the acidic environment of phagosomes within activated macrophages. A previously reported genetic screen revealed that Mtb loses this ability when the mycobacterial acid resistance protease (marP) gene is disrupted. In the present study, a high throughput screen (HTS) of compounds against the protease domain of MarP identified benzoxazinones as inhibitors of MarP. A potent benzoxazinone, BO43 (6-chloro-2-(2'-methylphenyl)-4H-1,3-benzoxazin-4-one), acylated MarP and lowered Mtb's pHIB and survival during incubation at pH 4.5. BO43 had similar effects on MarP-deficient Mtb, suggesting the existence of additional target(s). Reaction of an alkynyl-benzoxazinone, BO43T, with Mycobacterium bovis variant bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) followed by click chemistry with azido-biotin identified both the MarP homologue and the high temperature requirement A1 (HtrA1) homologue, an essential protein. Thus, the chemical probe identified through a target-based screen not only reacted with its intended target in the intact cells but also implicated an additional enzyme that had eluded a genetic screen biased against essential genes. PMID:25457457

  6. Target-Based Screen Against a Periplasmic Serine Protease That Regulates Intrabacterial pH Homeostasis in Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) maintains its intrabacterial pH (pHIB) near neutrality in the acidic environment of phagosomes within activated macrophages. A previously reported genetic screen revealed that Mtb loses this ability when the mycobacterial acid resistance protease (marP) gene is disrupted. In the present study, a high throughput screen (HTS) of compounds against the protease domain of MarP identified benzoxazinones as inhibitors of MarP. A potent benzoxazinone, BO43 (6-chloro-2-(2′-methylphenyl)-4H-1,3-benzoxazin-4-one), acylated MarP and lowered Mtb’s pHIB and survival during incubation at pH 4.5. BO43 had similar effects on MarP-deficient Mtb, suggesting the existence of additional target(s). Reaction of an alkynyl-benzoxazinone, BO43T, with Mycobacterium bovis variant bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG) followed by click chemistry with azido-biotin identified both the MarP homologue and the high temperature requirement A1 (HtrA1) homologue, an essential protein. Thus, the chemical probe identified through a target-based screen not only reacted with its intended target in the intact cells but also implicated an additional enzyme that had eluded a genetic screen biased against essential genes. PMID:25457457

  7. Control of Cl− Efflux in Chara corallina by Cytosolic pH, Free Ca2+, and Phosphorylation Indicates a Role of Plasma Membrane Anion Channels in Cytosolic pH Regulation1

    PubMed Central

    Johannes, Eva; Crofts, Alan; Sanders, Dale

    1998-01-01

    Enhanced Cl− efflux during acidosis in plants is thought to play a role in cytosolic pH (pHc) homeostasis by short-circuiting the current produced by the electrogenic H+ pump, thereby facilitating enhanced H+ efflux from the cytosol. Using an intracellular perfusion technique, which enables experimental control of medium composition at the cytosolic surface of the plasma membrane of charophyte algae (Chara corallina), we show that lowered pHc activates Cl− efflux via two mechanisms. The first is a direct effect of pHc on Cl− efflux; the second mechanism comprises a pHc-induced increase in affinity for cytosolic free Ca2+ ([Ca2+]c), which also activates Cl− efflux. Cl− efflux was controlled by phosphorylation/dephosphorylation events, which override the responses to both pHc and [Ca2+]c. Whereas phosphorylation (perfusion with the catalytic subunit of protein kinase A in the presence of ATP) resulted in a complete inhibition of Cl− efflux, dephosphorylation (perfusion with alkaline phosphatase) arrested Cl− efflux at 60% of the maximal level in a manner that was both pHc and [Ca2+]c independent. These findings imply that plasma membrane anion channels play a central role in pHc regulation in plants, in addition to their established roles in turgor/volume regulation and signal transduction. PMID:9733536

  8. Loading of lipophorin particles with phospholipids at the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus.

    PubMed

    Atella, G C; Gondim, C; Masuda, H

    1995-01-01

    32P-Labelled midguts (32P-midguts) of Rhodnius prolixus females were incubated in the presence of nonradioactive purified lipophorin and the release of radioactivity to the medium was analysed. The radioactivity found in the medium was associated with lipophorin phospholipids. When the 32P-midguts were incubated in the absence of lipophorin, no 32P-phospholipids were found in the medium. Comparative analysis by thin-layer chromatography of 32P-phospholipids derived from metabolically labelled 32P-midgut or lipophorin particles after incubation with 32P-midgut showed some differences, revealing a possible selectivity in the process of phospholipids transfer. The transfer of phospholipids to lipophorin was linear with time up to 45 min, was saturable with respect to the concentration of lipophorin, and was half-maximal at about 5 mg/ml. The binding of 32P-lipophorin to the midgut at 0 degrees C reached the equilibrium at about 1 h of incubation. The binding of 32P-lipophorin was inhibited by an excess of nonradioactive lipophorin, which suggests a specific receptor for lipophorin. The capacity of midguts and fat bodies to transfer phospholipids to lipophorin varied during the days following the meal. When lipophorin enzymatically depleted of phospholipids by treatment with phospholipase A2 was incubated with 32P-midguts, the same amount of phospholipids was transferred, indicating a net gain of phospholipids by the particle. PMID:11488302

  9. Transcriptional Signatures in Response to Wheat Germ Agglutinin and Starvation in Drosophila melanogaster Larval Midgut

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    One function of plant lectins such as wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) is to serve as defenses against herbivorous insects. The midgut is one critical site affected by dietary lectins. We observed marked cellular, structural, and gene expression changes in the midguts of Drosophila melanogaster third-i...

  10. Effect of Insect Larval Midgut Proteases on the Activity of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry Toxins▿

    PubMed Central

    Fortier, Mélanie; Vachon, Vincent; Frutos, Roger; Schwartz, Jean-Louis; Laprade, Raynald

    2007-01-01

    To test the possibility that proteolytic cleavage by midgut juice enzymes could enhance or inhibit the activity of Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal toxins, once activated, the effects of different toxins on the membrane potential of the epithelial cells of isolated Manduca sexta midguts in the presence and absence of midgut juice were measured. While midgut juice had little effect on the activity of Cry1Aa, Cry1Ac, Cry1Ca, Cry1Ea, and R233A, a mutant of Cry1Aa from which one of the four salt bridges linking domains I and II of the toxin was eliminated, it greatly increased the activity of Cry1Ab. In addition, when tested in the presence of a cocktail of protease inhibitors or when boiled, midgut juice retained almost completely its capacity to enhance Cry1Ab activity, suggesting that proteases were not responsible for the stimulation. On the other hand, in the absence of midgut juice, the cocktail of protease inhibitors also enhanced the activity of Cry1Ab, suggesting that proteolytic cleavage by membrane proteases could render the toxin less effective. The lower toxicity of R233A, despite a similar in vitro pore-forming ability, compared with Cry1Aa, cannot be accounted for by an increased susceptibility to midgut proteases. Although these assays were performed under conditions approaching those found in the larval midgut, the depolarizing activities of the toxins correlated only partially with their toxicities. PMID:17693568

  11. Studies of pH regulation by Btn1p, the yeast homolog of human Cln3p.

    PubMed

    Pearce, D A; Nosel, S A; Sherman, F

    1999-04-01

    Although the gene responsible for Batten disease, CLN3, was positionally cloned in 1995, the function of Cln3p and the molecular basis of the disease still remain elusive. We previously reported that the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a homolog to Cln3p, designated Btn1p, and that the human Cln3p complemented the pH-dependent resistance to D-(-)-threo-2-amino-1-[p-nitrophenyl]-1, 3-propanediol in btn1-Delta yeast mutants. We have determined that yeast lacking Btn1p have an elevated ability to acidify media during growth that correlates with an elevated plasma membrane ATPase activity. Btn1p may be involved in maintaining pH homeostasis of yeast cells. PMID:10191121

  12. Host plant-specific remodeling of midgut physiology in the generalist insect herbivore Trichoplusia ni.

    PubMed

    Herde, Marco; Howe, Gregg A

    2014-07-01

    Species diversity in terrestrial ecosystems is influenced by plant defense compounds that alter the behavior, physiology, and host preference of insect herbivores. Although it is established that insects evolved the ability to detoxify specific allelochemicals, the mechanisms by which polyphagous insects cope with toxic compounds in diverse host plants are not well understood. Here, we used defended and non-defended plant genotypes to study how variation in chemical defense affects midgut responses of the lepidopteran herbivore Trichoplusia ni, which is a pest of a wide variety of native and cultivated plants. The genome-wide midgut transcriptional response of T. ni larvae to glucosinolate-based defenses in the crucifer Arabidopsis thaliana was characterized by strong induction of genes encoding Phase I and II detoxification enzymes. In contrast, the response of T. ni to proteinase inhibitors and other jasmonate-regulated defenses in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum) was dominated by changes in the expression of digestive enzymes and, strikingly, concomitant repression of transcripts encoding detoxification enzymes. Unbiased proteomic analyses of T. ni feces demonstrated that tomato defenses remodel the complement of T.ni digestive enzymes, which was associated with increased amounts of serine proteases and decreased lipase protein abundance upon encountering tomato defense chemistry. These collective results indicate that T. ni adjusts its gut physiology to the presence of host plant-specific chemical defenses, and further suggest that plants may exploit this digestive flexibility as a defensive strategy to suppress the production of enzymes that detoxify allelochemicals. PMID:24727019

  13. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells.

    PubMed

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H F; Almeida, Igor C; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  14. ATP Binding Cassette Transporter Mediates Both Heme and Pesticide Detoxification in Tick Midgut Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lara, Flavio Alves; Pohl, Paula C.; Gandara, Ana Caroline; Ferreira, Jessica da Silva; Nascimento-Silva, Maria Clara; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Almeida, Igor C.; Vaz, Itabajara da Silva; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2015-01-01

    In ticks, the digestion of blood occurs intracellularly and proteolytic digestion of hemoglobin takes place in a dedicated type of lysosome, the digest vesicle, followed by transfer of the heme moiety of hemoglobin to a specialized organelle that accumulates large heme aggregates, called hemosomes. In the present work, we studied the uptake of fluorescent metalloporphyrins, used as heme analogs, and amitraz, one of the most regularly used acaricides to control cattle tick infestations, by Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut cells. Both compounds were taken up by midgut cells in vitro and accumulated inside the hemosomes. Transport of both molecules was sensitive to cyclosporine A (CsA), a well-known inhibitor of ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporters. Rhodamine 123, a fluorescent probe that is also a recognized ABC substrate, was similarly directed to the hemosome in a CsA-sensitive manner. Using an antibody against conserved domain of PgP-1-type ABC transporter, we were able to immunolocalize PgP-1 in the digest vesicle membranes. Comparison between two R. microplus strains that were resistant and susceptible to amitraz revealed that the resistant strain detoxified both amitraz and Sn-Pp IX more efficiently than the susceptible strain, a process that was also sensitive to CsA. A transcript containing an ABC transporter signature exhibited 2.5-fold increased expression in the amitraz-resistant strain when compared with the susceptible strain. RNAi-induced down-regulation of this ABC transporter led to the accumulation of metalloporphyrin in the digestive vacuole, interrupting heme traffic to the hemosome. This evidence further confirms that this transcript codes for a heme transporter. This is the first report of heme transport in a blood-feeding organism. While the primary physiological function of the hemosome is to detoxify heme and attenuate its toxicity, we suggest that the use of this acaricide detoxification pathway by ticks may represent a new

  15. Regulation of nitrogen uptake and assimilation: Effects of nitrogen source, root-zone pH, and aerial CO2 concentration on growth and productivity of soybeans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raper, C. D.; Tolley-Henry, L.

    1989-01-01

    An important feature of controlled-environment crop production systems such as those to be used for life support of crews during space exploration is the efficient utilization of nitrogen supplies. Making decisions about the best sources of these supplies requires research into the relationship between nitrogen source and the physiological processes which regulate vegetative and reproductive plant growth. Work done in four areas within this research objective is reported: (1) experiments on the effects of root-zone pH on preferential utilization of NO3(-) versus NH4(+) nitrogen; (2) investigation of processes at the whole-plant level that regulate nitrogen uptake; (3) studies of the effects of atmospheric CO2 and NO3(-) supply on the growth of soybeans; and (4) examination of the role of NO3(-) uptake in enhancement of root respiration.

  16. The Pochonia chlamydosporia Serine Protease Gene vcp1 Is Subject to Regulation by Carbon, Nitrogen and pH: Implications for Nematode Biocontrol

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Elaine; Kerry, Brian R.; Manzanilla-López, Rosa H.; Mutua, Gerald; Devonshire, Jean; Kimenju, John; Hirsch, Penny R.

    2012-01-01

    The alkaline serine protease VCP1 of the fungus Pochonia chlamydosporia belongs to a family of subtilisin-like enzymes that are involved in infection of nematode and insect hosts. It is involved early in the infection process, removing the outer proteinaceous vitelline membrane of nematode eggs. Little is known about the regulation of this gene, even though an understanding of how nutrients and other factors affect its expression is critical for ensuring its efficacy as a biocontrol agent. This paper provides new information on the regulation of vcp1 expression. Sequence analysis of the upstream regulatory region of this gene in 30 isolates revealed that it was highly conserved and contained sequence motifs characteristic of genes that are subject to carbon, nitrogen and pH-regulation. Expression studies, monitoring enzyme activity and mRNA, confirmed that these factors affect VCP1 production. As expected, glucose reduced VCP1 expression and for a few hours so did ammonium chloride. Surprisingly, however, by 24 h VCP1 levels were increased in the presence of ammonium chloride for most isolates. Ambient pH also regulated VCP1 expression, with most isolates producing more VCP1 under alkaline conditions. There were some differences in the response of one isolate with a distinctive upstream sequence including a variant regulatory-motif profile. Cryo-scanning electron microscopy studies indicated that the presence of nematode eggs stimulates VCP1 production by P. chlamydosporia, but only where the two are in close contact. Overall, the results indicate that readily-metabolisable carbon sources and unfavourable pH in the rhizosphere/egg-mass environment may compromise nematode parasitism by P. chlamydosporia. However, contrary to previous indications using other nematophagous and entomopathogenic fungi, ammonium nitrate (e.g. from fertilizers) may enhance biocontrol potential in some circumstances. PMID:22558192

  17. Mechanism of regulation of the formate-hydrogenlyase pathway by oxygen, nitrate, and pH: definition of the formate regulon.

    PubMed

    Rossmann, R; Sawers, G; Böck, A

    1991-11-01

    The products of a minimum of 15 genes are required for the synthesis of an active formate-hydrogenlyase (FHL) system in Escherichia coli. All are co-ordinately regulated in response to variations in the oxygen and nitrate concentration and the pH of the culture medium. Formate is obligately required for transcriptional activation of these genes. Analysis of the transcription of one of these genes, hycB linked to the lacZ reporter gene, revealed that oxygen and nitrate repression of transcription could be relieved completely, or partially in the case of nitrate, either by the addition of formate to the medium or by increasing the copy number of the gene encoding the transcriptional activator (fhlA) of this regulon. These studies uncovered a further level of regulation in which the transcription of hycB was reduced in cells grown on glucose. This effect was most clearly seen in aerobically grown cells when formate was added externally. Addition of cAMP overcame this glucose repression, which could be shown to be mediated by the cAMP receptor protein. These results would be consistent with the transport of formate being regulated by catabolite repression. Moreover, the repression of transcription through high pH also could be partially overcome by addition of increasing concentrations of formate to the medium, again being consistent with regulation at the level of formate import and export. Taken together, all these observations indicate that it is the intracellular level of formate that determines the transcription of the genes of the formate regulon by FhlA. This represents a novel positive feedback mechanism in which the activator of a regulon induces its own synthesis in response to increases in the concentration of the catabolic substrate, and this in turn is governed by the relative affinities of FhlA and the three formate dehydrogenase isoenzymes for formate. PMID:1779767

  18. Vacuolar CAX1 and CAX3 Influence Auxin Transport in Guard Cells via Regulation of Apoplastic pH1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Daeshik; Villiers, Florent; Kroniewicz, Laetitia; Lee, Sangmee; Seo, You Jin; Hirschi, Kendal D.; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Kwak, June M.

    2012-01-01

    CATION EXCHANGERs CAX1 and CAX3 are vacuolar ion transporters involved in ion homeostasis in plants. Widely expressed in the plant, they mediate calcium transport from the cytosol to the vacuole lumen using the proton gradient across the tonoplast. Here, we report an unexpected role of CAX1 and CAX3 in regulating apoplastic pH and describe how they contribute to auxin transport using the guard cell’s response as readout of hormone signaling and cross talk. We show that indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) inhibition of abscisic acid (ABA)-induced stomatal closure is impaired in cax1, cax3, and cax1/cax3. These mutants exhibited constitutive hypopolarization of the plasma membrane, and time-course analyses of membrane potential revealed that IAA-induced hyperpolarization of the plasma membrane is also altered in these mutants. Both ethylene and 1-naphthalene acetic acid inhibited ABA-triggered stomatal closure in cax1, cax3, and cax1/cax3, suggesting that auxin signaling cascades were functional and that a defect in IAA transport caused the phenotype of the cax mutants. Consistent with this finding, chemical inhibition of AUX1 in wild-type plants phenocopied the cax mutants. We also found that cax1/cax3 mutants have a higher apoplastic pH than the wild type, further supporting the hypothesis that there is a defect in IAA import in the cax mutants. Accordingly, we were able to fully restore IAA inhibition of ABA-induced stomatal closure in cax1, cax3, and cax1/cax3 when stomatal movement assays were carried out at a lower extracellular pH. Our results suggest a network linking the vacuolar cation exchangers to apoplastic pH maintenance that plays a crucial role in cellular processes. PMID:22932758

  19. Enhancement of butanol production in Clostridium acetobutylicum SE25 through accelerating phase shift by different phases pH regulation from cassava flour.

    PubMed

    Li, Han-guang; Zhang, Qing-hua; Yu, Xiao-bin; Wei, Luo; Wang, Qiang

    2016-02-01

    A prominent delay with 12h was encountered in the phase shift from acidogenesis to solventogenesis in butanol production when the substrate-glucose was replaced by cassava flour. To solve this problem, different phase of pH regulation strategies were performed to shorten this delay time. With this effort, the phase shift occurred smoothly and the fermentation time was shortened. Under the optimal conditions, 16.24g/L butanol and 72h fermentation time were achieved, which were 25.3% higher and 14.3% shorter than those in the case of without pH regulation. Additionally, the effect of CaCO3 on "acid crash" and butanol production was also investigated. It was found that organic acids reassimilation would be of benefit to enhance butanol production. These results indicated that the simple but effective approach for acceleration of phase shift is a promising technique for shortening the fermentation time and improvement of butanol production. PMID:26642220

  20. Multifunctional hybrid nanogel for integration of optical glucose sensing and self-regulated insulin release at physiological pH.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weitai; Mitra, Nivedita; Yan, Elsa C Y; Zhou, Shuiqin

    2010-08-24

    Optical detection of glucose, high drug loading capacity, and self-regulated drug delivery are simultaneously possible using a multifunctional hybrid nanogel particle under a rational design in a colloid chemistry method. Such hybrid nanogels are made of Ag nanoparticle (NP) cores covered by a copolymer gel shell of poly(4-vinylphenylboronic acid-co-2-(dimethylamino)ethyl acrylate) [p(VPBA-DMAEA)]. The introduction of the glucose sensitive p(VPBA-DMAEA) gel shell onto Ag NPs makes the polymer-bound Ag NPs responsive to glucose. While the small sized Ag cores (10 +/- 3 nm) provide fluorescence as an optical code, the responsive polymer gel shell can adapt to a surrounding medium of different glucose concentrations over a clinically relevant range (0-30 mM), convert the disruptions in homeostasis of glucose level into optical signals, and regulate release of preloaded insulin. This shows a new proof-of-concept for diabetes treatment that exploits the properties from each building block of a multifunctional nano-object. The highly versatile multifunctional hybrid nanogels could potentially be used for simultaneous optical diagnosis, self-regulated therapy, and monitoring of the response to treatment. PMID:20731458

  1. Revisiting rubisco as a protein substrate for insect midgut proteases.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Usha; Bhardwaj, Amit; Kumar, Rakesh; Leelavathi, Sadhu; Reddy, Vanga Siva; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2014-01-01

    Gene fragments encoding the large subunit (LS) of Rubisco (RBCL) were cloned from various species of host plants of phytophagous Lepidoptera and expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant RBCLs were compared among each other along with casein and native Rubisco as proteinaceous substrates for measuring total midgut protease activities of fourth instar larvae of Helicoverpa armigera feeding on casein, Pieris brassicae feeding on cauliflower, and Antheraea assamensis feeding on Litsea monopetala and Persea bombycina. Cognate rRBCL (from the pertinent host plant species) substrates performed similar to noncognate rRBCL reflecting the conserved nature of encoding genes and the versatile use of these recombinant proteins. Casein and recombinant RBCL generally outperformed native Rubisco as substrates, except where inclusion of a reducing agent in the enzyme assay likely unfolded the plant proteins. Levels of total midgut protease activities detected in A. assamensis larvae feeding on two primary host species were similar, suggesting that the suite(s) of digestive enzymes in these insects could hydrolyze a plant protein efficiently. Protease activities detected in the presence of protease inhibitors and the reducing agent dithiothreitol (DTT) suggested that recombinant RBCL was a suitable protein substrate for studying insect proteases using in vitro enzyme assays and substrate zymography. PMID:24338735

  2. Borrelia burgdorferi Proteins Whose Expression Is Similarly Affected by Culture Temperature and pH

    PubMed Central

    Ramamoorthy, Ramesh; Scholl-Meeker, Dorothy

    2001-01-01

    Previously, we had demonstrated the upregulation in the expression of several proteins, including the lipoproteins OspC and P35, of Borrelia burgdorferi in the stationary growth phase. Since the expression of OspC is also known to be affected by culture temperature and pH, we examined the effects of both variables on the expression of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins. Our study revealed that the expression of each of the remaining stationary-phase-upregulated proteins, P35 included, was also influenced by culture temperature; these proteins were selectively expressed at 34°C but not at 24°C. Significantly, the expression of a majority of these proteins was also affected by culture pH, since they were abundantly expressed at pH 7.0 (resembling the tick midgut pH of 6.8 during feeding) but only sparsely at pH 8.0 (a condition closer to that of the unfed tick midgut pH of 7.4). We propose that this group of B. burgdorferi proteins, which in culture is selectively expressed under conditions of 34°C and pH 7.0, may be induced in the tick midgut during the feeding event. Furthermore, the differential and coordinate expression of these proteins under different environmental conditions suggests that the encoding genes may be coregulated. PMID:11254645

  3. Regulation of intracellular pH in cardiac muscle during cell shrinkage and swelling in anisosmolar solutions.

    PubMed

    Whalley, D W; Hemsworth, P D; Rasmussen, H H

    1994-02-01

    The effect on intracellular pH (pHi) of exposure to solutions of progressively increasing osmolarity from 418 to 620 mosM and to hyposmolar solutions (240 mosM) was examined in guinea pig ventricular muscle using ion-selective microelectrodes. Exposure of tissue to 418 mosM Tyrode solution (100 mM sucrose added) produced an intracellular alkalosis of approximately 0.1 U, whereas exposure to 620 mosM solution (300 mM sucrose added) caused an intracellular acidosis of approximately 0.1 U. The maximal rate of recovery of pHi from acidosis induced by an NH4Cl prepulse increased progressively as extracellular osmolarity was raised from 310 to 620 mosM. This suggests that the acidosis observed at steady state in 620 mosM solution is not due to inhibition of the Na(+)-H+ exchanger. In the presence of 10 microM ryanodine, exposure to 620 mosM solution produced a sustained intracellular alkalosis. We suggest that the decrease in pHi during exposure to 620 mosM solution is due, at least in part, to the acidifying influence of Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum. This decrease in pHi is expected to contribute to the negative inotrop reported in studies of cardiac contractility in markedly hyperosmolar solutions. There was no change in pHi when tissue was exposed to hyposmolar solution. However, the maximal rate of recovery of pHi from acidosis was slower in hyposmolar than in isosmolar solution, despite a concomitant decrease in the intracellular buffer capacity. This suggests that osmotic cell swelling results in inhibition of the sarcolemmal Na(+)-H+ exchanger. PMID:8141367

  4. Lack of Connection Between Midgut Cell Autophagy Gene Expression and BmCPV Infection in the Midgut of Bombyx mori

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiaobing; Wu, Suli; Wu, Yongpeng; Liu, Yang; Qian, Yonghua; Jiao, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is associated with multiple biological processes and has protective and defensive functions with respect to immunity, inflammation, and resistance to microbial infection. In this experiment, we wished to investigate whether autophagy is a factor in the midgut cell response of Bombyx mori to infection by the B. mori cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV). Our results indicated that the expression of three autophagy-related genes (BmAtg8, BmAtg5, and BmAtg7) in the midgut did not change greatly after BmCPV infection in B. mori. Basal ATG8/ATG8PE protein expression was detected in different B. mori tissues by using western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry showed that the ATG8/ATG8PE proteins were located mainly in the cytoplasm. ATG8/ATG8PE protein levels decreased at 12 and 16 h after BmCPV infection. Our results indicate that autophagy responded slightly to BmCPV infection, but could not prevent the invasion and replication of the virus. PMID:26163666

  5. Resilience of cold-water scleractinian corals to ocean acidification: Boron isotopic systematics of pH and saturation state up-regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCulloch, Malcolm; Trotter, Julie; Montagna, Paolo; Falter, Jim; Dunbar, Robert; Freiwald, André; Försterra, Günter; López Correa, Matthias; Maier, Cornelia; Rüggeberg, Andres; Taviani, Marco

    2012-06-01

    The boron isotope systematics has been determined for azooxanthellate scleractinian corals from a wide range of both deep-sea and shallow-water environments. The aragonitic coral species, Caryophyllia smithii, Desmophyllum dianthus, Enallopsammia rostrata, Lophelia pertusa, and Madrepora oculata, are all found to have relatively high δ11B compositions ranging from 23.2‰ to 28.7‰. These values lie substantially above the pH-dependent inorganic seawater borate equilibrium curve, indicative of strong up-regulation of pH of the internal calcifying fluid (pHcf), being elevated by ˜0.6-0.8 units (ΔpH) relative to ambient seawater. In contrast, the deep-sea calcitic coral Corallium sp. has a significantly lower δ11B composition of 15.5‰, with a corresponding lower ΔpH value of ˜0.3 units, reflecting the importance of mineralogical control on biological pH up-regulation. The solitary coral D. dianthus was sampled over a wide range of seawater pHT and shows an approximate linear correlation with ΔpHDesmo = 6.43 - 0.71pHT (r2 = 0.79). An improved correlation is however found with the closely related parameter of seawater aragonite saturation state, where ΔpHDesmo = 1.09 - 0.14Ωarag (r2 = 0.95), indicating the important control that carbonate saturation state has on calcification. The ability to up-regulate internal pHcf, and consequently Ωcf, of the calcifying fluid is therefore a process present in both azooxanthellate and zooxanthellate aragonitic corals, and is attributed to the action of Ca2+-ATPase in modulating the proton gradient between seawater and the site of calcification. These findings also show that the boron isotopic compositions (δ11Bcarb) of aragonitic corals are highly systematic and consistent with direct uptake of the borate species within the biologically controlled extracellular calcifying medium. We also show that the relatively strong up-regulation of pH and consequent elevation of the internal carbonate saturation state (Ωcf ˜8

  6. Acquisition and structuring of midgut bacterial communities in gypsy moth (Lepidoptera: Erebidae) larvae.

    PubMed

    Mason, Charles J; Raffa, Kenneth F

    2014-06-01

    Insects are associated with a diversity of bacteria that colonize their midguts. The extent to which these communities reflect maternal transmission, environmental acquisition, and subsequent structuring by the extreme conditions within the insect gut are poorly understood in many species. We used gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar L.) as a model to investigate interactions between egg mass and environmental sources of bacteria on larval midgut communities. Egg masses were collected from several wild and laboratory populations, and the effects of diet, initial egg mass community, and internal host environment were evaluated using 454 16S-rRNA gene pyrosequencing. Wild populations were highly diverse, while laboratory-maintained egg masses were associated with few operational taxonomic units. As larvae developed, their midgut bacterial communities became more similar to each other and the consumed diet despite initial differences in egg mass-associated bacteria. Subsequent experiments revealed that while midgut membership was more similar to bacteria associated with diet than with egg mass-associated bacteria, we were unable to detect distinct, persistent differences attributable to specific host plants. The differences between foliar communities and midgut communities of larvae that ingested them were owing to relative changes in populations of several bacteria phylotypes. We conclude that gypsy moth has a relatively characteristic midgut bacterial community that is reflective of, but ultimately distinct from, its foliar diet. This work demonstrates that environmental acquisition of diverse microbes can lead to similar midgut bacterial assemblages, underscoring the importance of host physiological environment in structuring bacterial communities. PMID:24780292

  7. Nucleolar localization of SmMAK16 protein from Schistosoma mansoni is regulated by three distinct signals that function independent of pH or phosphorylation status.

    PubMed

    Hoellerich, Elisa; Dunagan, Christie; Maring, Daniel; Wong, Yun-Lan C; Shouldice, Daniel; Stripe, Jennifer; Kline, Tayah; Albert, Thomas J; Milhon, Jon L

    2014-01-01

    SmMAK16 from the trematode Schistosoma mansoni is a protein that is known to localize in the nucleolus. Recent findings show that SmMAK16 is involved in 60S ribosomal subunit synthesis. Although the SmMAK16 protein contains putative nuclear localization signals (NLS), little is known about their precise function, redundancy or regulation. The goal of the current study was to identify and characterize the presence and functional regulation of the localization signals in SmMAK16. The SmMAK16 coding sequence and specific fragments were individually cloned in-frame into the pEGFP-C2 expression vector to encode Green Fluorescent Protein (GFP) fusion proteins. Constructs were individually transfected into COS-7 cells and fluorescent microscopy used to determine the cellular location and thus the presence of signals regulating nuclear and nucleolar localization. SmMAK16 was found to contain two NLSs and one nucleolar localization signal (NoLS). One of the signals contains a sequence identical to an established nucleolar detention signal that reportedly functions only under acidic cellular conditions. The localization of the SmMAK16-GFP constructs was analyzed under acidic conditions; however, altering pH did not influence the localization of SmMAK16. It has been previously reported that casein kinase 2 (CK2) can phosphorylate SmMAK16 at serines adjacent to one of the NLSs. One of these CK2 sites and the adjacent NLS are conserved with that of the SV40 Large T Antigen (LTA) and phosphorylation of this site in the SV40 LTA regulates the kinetics of the NLS. To discover if kinetic regulation also occurs in SmMAK16, mutant and wild type SmMAK16-GFP proteins were purified and injected into individual COS-7 cells. No difference in the rate of transport was found between wt and mutant SmMAK16 proteins. Therefore, SmMAK16 localizes to the nucleolus using three separate signals, two NLSs and one NoLS, however, these signals appear to function independently of pH and

  8. Adjustments of molecular key components of branchial ion and pH regulation in Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in response to ocean acidification and warming.

    PubMed

    Michael, Katharina; Kreiss, Cornelia M; Hu, Marian Y; Koschnick, Nils; Bickmeyer, Ulf; Dupont, Sam; Pörtner, Hans-O; Lucassen, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Marine teleost fish sustain compensation of extracellular pH after exposure to hypercapnia by means of efficient ion and acid-base regulation. Elevated rates of ion and acid-base regulation under hypercapnia may be stimulated further by elevated temperature. Here, we characterized the regulation of transepithelial ion transporters (NKCC1, NBC1, SLC26A6, NHE1 and 2) and ATPases (Na(+)/K(+) ATPase and V-type H(+) ATPase) in gills of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) after 4 weeks of exposure to ambient and future PCO2 levels (550 μatm, 1200 μatm, 2200 μatm) at optimum (10 °C) and summer maximum temperature (18 °C), respectively. Gene expression of most branchial ion transporters revealed temperature- and dose-dependent responses to elevated PCO2. Transcriptional regulation resulted in stable protein expression at 10 °C, whereas expression of most transport proteins increased at medium PCO2 and 18 °C. mRNA and protein expression of distinct ion transport proteins were closely co-regulated, substantiating cellular functional relationships. Na(+)/K(+) ATPase capacities were PCO2 independent, but increased with acclimation temperature, whereas H(+) ATPase capacities were thermally compensated but decreased at medium PCO2 and 10 °C. When functional capacities of branchial ATPases were compared with mitochondrial F1Fo ATP-synthase strong correlations of F1Fo ATP-synthase and ATPase capacities generally indicate close coordination of branchial aerobic ATP demand and supply. Our data indicate physiological plasticity in the gills of cod to adjust to a warming, acidifying ocean within limits. In light of the interacting and non-linear, dose-dependent effects of both climate factors the role of these mechanisms in shaping resilience under climate change remains to be explored. PMID:26688541

  9. Localisation of laminin within Plasmodium berghei oocysts and the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi

    PubMed Central

    Nacer, Adéla; Walker, Karen; Hurd, Hilary

    2008-01-01

    Background Oocysts of the malaria parasite form and develop in close proximity to the mosquito midgut basal lamina and it has been proposed that components of this structure play a crucial role in the development and maturation of oocysts that produce infective sporozoites. It is further suggested that oocysts incorporate basal lamina proteins into their capsule and that this provides them with a means to evade recognition by the mosquito's immune system. The site of production of basal lamina proteins in insects is controversial and it is still unclear whether haemocytes or midgut epithelial cells are the main source of components of the mosquito midgut basal lamina. Of the multiple molecules that compose the basal lamina, laminin is known to interact with a number of Plasmodium proteins. In this study, the localisation of mosquito laminin within the capsule and cytoplasm of Plasmodium berghei oocysts and in the midgut epithelial cells of Anopheles stephensi was investigated. Results An ultrastructural examination of midgut sections from infected and uninfected An. stephensi was performed. Post-embedded immunogold labelling demonstrated the presence of laminin within the mosquito basal lamina. Laminin was also detected on the outer surface of the oocyst capsule, incorporated within the capsule and associated with sporozoites forming within the oocysts. Laminin was also found within cells of the midgut epithelium, providing support for the hypothesis that these cells contribute towards the formation of the midgut basal lamina. Conclusion We suggest that ookinetes may become coated in laminin as they pass through the midgut epithelium. Thereafter, laminin secreted by midgut epithelial cells and/or haemocytes, binds to the outer surface of the oocyst capsule and that some passes through and is incorporated into the developing oocysts. The localisation of laminin on sporozoites was unexpected and the importance of this observation is less clear. PMID:18808667

  10. Antioxidant defenses in caterpillars: role of the ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, R V; Bumgarner, S L; Roosen, E F; Martin, M M

    2001-04-01

    This study demonstrates that an ascorbate-recycling system in the midgut lumen can act as an effective antioxidant defense in caterpillars that feed on prooxidant-rich foods. In tannin-sensitive larvae of the forest tent caterpillar, Malacosoma disstria (Lasiocampidae), ingested tannic acid is oxidized in the midgut lumen, generating significant quantities of peroxides, including hydrogen peroxide, which readily diffuses across cell membranes and is a powerful cytotoxin. By contrast, in the tannin-tolerant larvae of the white-marked tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma (Lymantriidae), tannic acid oxidation and the generation of peroxides are suppressed. The superior defense of O. leucostigma against oxidative stress imposed by the oxidation of ingested polyphenols can be explained by the presence of higher concentrations of ascorbate and glutathione in the midgut lumen. In O. leucostigma at least 50% of the ingested ascorbate present in the anterior midgut is still present in the posterior midgut, whereas in M. disstria, only 10% of the ascorbate is present in the posterior half of the midgut. We propose that the maintenance of higher levels of ascorbate in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma than in M. disstria is explained by the secretion of glutathione into the midgut lumen by O. leucostigma, thereby forming a complete ascorbate-recycling system. The concentration of glutathione in the midgut lumen of O. leucostigma is 3.5-fold higher than in M. disstria and more than double the concentration in the diet. Our results emphasize the importance of a defensive strategy in herbivorous insects based on the maintenance of conditions in the gut lumen that reduce or eliminate the potential prooxidant behavior of ingested phenols. PMID:11166299

  11. Intracellular pH and its relationship to regulation of ion transport in normal and cystic fibrosis human nasal epithelia.

    PubMed Central

    Willumsen, N J; Boucher, R C

    1992-01-01

    1. Intracellular pH (pHi) of cultured human airway epithelial cells from normal and cystic fibrosis (CF) subjects were measured with double-barrelled pH-sensitive liquid exchanger microelectrodes. The cells, which were grown to confluence on a permeable collagen matrix support, were mounted in a modified miniature Ussing chamber. All studies were conducted under open circuit conditions. Values are given as means +/- S.E.M. and n refers to the number of preparations. 2. Normal preparations (n = 15) were characterized by a transepithelial potential difference (Vt) of -18 +/- 2 mV, an apical membrane potential (Va) of -19 +/- 2 mV, a basolateral membrane potential (Vb) of -37 +/- 2 mV, a transepithelial resistance (Rt) of 253 +/- 15 omega cm2, a fractional apical membrane resistance (fRa) of 0.40 +/- 0.04 and an equivalent short circuit current (Ieq) of -73 +/- 7 microA cm-2. 3. CF preparations (n = 13) were characterized by a Vt of -46 +/- 7 mV, a Va of 3 +/- 5 mV, a Vb of -43 +/- 3 mV, Rt of 373 +/- 47 omega cm2, fRa of 0.44 +/- 0.04 and an Ieq of -130 +/- 16 microA cm-2. All parameters except Vb and fRa were significantly different (P < 0.025) from those of normal preparations. 4. Despite large differences in electrochemical driving force for proton flow across the apical cell membranes between normal and CF preparations (-4 +/- 3 mV and 20 +/- 7 mV, respectively), pHi was similar (7.15 +/- 0.02 and 7.11 +/- 0.05, respectively). The driving force across the basolateral membrane was similar in normal and CF preparations (22 +/- 3 and 26 +/- 3 mV, respectively). 5. Intracellular alkalinization achieved by removal of CO2 from the luminal Ringer solution or by luminal ammonium prepulse led to stimulation of Ieq in both normal (from -58 to -70 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.05) and CF (from -144 to -163 microA cm-2, n = 4; P < 0.005) preparations. The increase in Ieq was associated with a reduction of Rt, increase in fRa, and hyperpolarization of Vb. All changes in

  12. Regulation of SpeB in Streptococcus pyogenes by pH and NaCl: a Model for In Vivo Gene Expression†

    PubMed Central

    Loughman, Jennifer A.; Caparon, Michael

    2006-01-01

    For a pathogen such as Streptococcus pyogenes, ecological success is determined by its ability to sense the environment and mount an appropriate adaptive transcriptional response. Thus, determining conditions for analyses of gene expression in vitro that are representative of the in vivo environment is critical for understanding the contributions of transcriptional response pathways to pathogenesis. In this study, we determined that the gene encoding the SpeB cysteine protease is up-regulated over the course of infection in a murine soft-tissue model. Conditions were identified, including growth phase, acidic pH, and an NaCl concentration of <0.1 M, that were required for expression of speB in vitro. Analysis of global expression profiles in response to these conditions in vitro identified a set of coregulated genes whose expression patterns showed a significant correlation with that of speB when examined during infection of murine soft tissues. This analysis revealed that a culture medium that promotes high levels of SpeB expression in vitro produced an expression profile that showed significant correlation to the profile observed in vivo. Taken together, these studies establish culture conditions that mimic in vivo expression patterns; that growth phase, pH, and NaCl may mimic relevant cues sensed by S. pyogenes during infection; and that identification of other environmental cues that alter expression of speB in vitro may provide insight into the signals that direct global patterns of gene expression in vivo. PMID:16385029

  13. Characterization of a Digestive α-Amylase in the Midgut of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae).

    PubMed

    Sharifloo, Ali; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal J; Jahroumi, Khalil Talebi

    2016-01-01

    The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression, and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM) and anterior midgut (AM). A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35°C. Also, the enzyme had V max values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and K m values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity, and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate, and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones. PMID:27014094

  14. Characterization of a Digestive α-Amylase in the Midgut of Pieris brassicae L. (Lepidoptera: Pieridae)

    PubMed Central

    Sharifloo, Ali; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal J.; Jahroumi, Khalil Talebi

    2016-01-01

    The current study deals with a digestive α-amylase in the larvae of Pieris brassicae L. through purification, enzymatic characterization, gene expression, and in vivo effect of a specific inhibitor, Acarbose. Although α-amylase activity was the highest in the whole gut homogenate of larvae but compartmentalization of amylolytic activity showed an equal activity in posterior midgut (PM) and anterior midgut (AM). A three step purification using ammonium sulfate, Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-Cellulose Fast flow revealed an enzyme with a specific activity of 5.18 U/mg, recovery of 13.20, purification fold of 19.25 and molecular weight of 88 kDa. The purified α-amylase had the highest activity at optimal pH and temperature of 8 and 35°C. Also, the enzyme had Vmax values of 4.64 and 3.02 U/mg protein and Km values of 1.37 and 1.74% using starch and glycogen as substrates, respectively. Different concentrations of acarbose, ethylenediamine tetraacetic acid, and ethylene glycol-bis (β-aminoethylether) N, N, N′, N′-tetraacetic acid significantly decreased activity of the purified α-amylase. The 4th instar larvae of P. brassicae were fed on the treated leaves of Raphanus sativus L. with 0.22 mM of Acarbose to find in vivo effects on nutritional indices, α-amylase activity, and gene expression. The significant differences were only found in conversion efficiency of digested food, relative growth rate, and metabolic cost of control and fed larvae on Acarbose. Also, amylolytic activity significantly decreased in the treated larvae by both biochemical and native-PAGE experiments. Results of RT-PCR revealed a gene with 621 bp length responsible for α-amylase expression that had 75% identity with Papilio xuthus and P. polytes. Finally, qRT-PCR revealed higher expression of α-amylase in control larvae compared to acarbose-fed ones. PMID:27014094

  15. Assembling of Holotrichia parallela (dark black chafer) midgut tissue transcriptome and identification of midgut proteins that bind to Cry8Ea toxin from Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Changlong; Tan, Shuqian; Yin, Jiao; Soberón, Mario; Bravo, Alejandra; Liu, Chunqing; Geng, Lili; Song, Fuping; Li, Kebin; Zhang, Jie

    2015-09-01

    Holotrichia parallela is one of the most severe crop pests in China, affecting peanut, soybean, and sweet potato crops. Previous work showed that Cry8Ea toxin is highly effective against this insect. In order to identify Cry8Ea-binding proteins in the midgut cells of H. parallela larvae, we assembled a midgut tissue transcriptome by high-throughput sequencing and used this assembled transcriptome to identify Cry8Ea-binding proteins by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). First, we obtained de novo sequences of cDNAs from midgut tissue of H. parallela larvae and used available cDNA data in the GenBank. In a parallel assay, we obtained 11 Cry8Ea-binding proteins by pull-down assays performed with midgut brush border membrane vesicles. Peptide sequences from these proteins were matched to the H. parallela newly assembled midgut transcriptome, and 10 proteins were identified. Some of the proteins were shown to be intracellular proteins forming part of the cell cytoskeleton and/or vesicle transport such as actin, myosin, clathrin, dynein, and tubulin among others. In addition, an apolipophorin, which is a protein involved in lipid metabolism, and a novel membrane-bound alanyl aminopeptidase were identified. Our results suggest that Cry8Ea-binding proteins could be different from those characterized for Cry1A toxins in lepidopteran insects. PMID:26135984

  16. Adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper (APPL1) regulates the protein level of EGFR by modulating its trafficking

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Jae-Rin; Hahn, Hwa-Sun; Kim, Young-Hoon; Nguyen, Hong-Hoa; Yang, Jun-Mo; Kang, Jong-Sun; Hahn, Myong-Joon

    2011-11-11

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer APPL1 regulates the protein level of EGFR in response to EGF stimulation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Depletion of APPL1 accelerates the movement of EGF/EGFR from the cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of APPL1 enhances the activity of Rab5. -- Abstract: The EGFR-mediated signaling pathway regulates multiple biological processes such as cell proliferation, survival and differentiation. Previously APPL1 (adaptor protein containing PH domain, PTB domain and leucine zipper 1) has been reported to function as a downstream effector of EGF-initiated signaling. Here we demonstrate that APPL1 regulates EGFR protein levels in response to EGF stimulation. Overexpression of APPL1 enhances EGFR stabilization while APPL1 depletion by siRNA reduces EGFR protein levels. APPL1 depletion accelerates EGFR internalization and movement of EGF/EGFR from cell surface to the perinuclear region in response to EGF treatment. Conversely, overexpression of APPL1 decelerates EGFR internalization and translocation of EGF/EGFR to the perinuclear region. Furthermore, APPL1 depletion enhances the activity of Rab5 which is involved in internalization and trafficking of EGFR and inhibition of Rab5 in APPL1-depleted cells restored EGFR levels. Consistently, APPL1 depletion reduced activation of Akt, the downstream signaling effector of EGFR and this is restored by inhibition of Rab5. These findings suggest that APPL1 is required for EGFR signaling by regulation of EGFR stabilities through inhibition of Rab5.

  17. Cruzipain Promotes Trypanosoma cruzi Adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Uehara, Lívia Almeida; Moreira, Otacílio C.; Oliveira, Ana Carolina; Azambuja, Patrícia; Lima, Ana Paula Cabral Araujo; Britto, Constança; dos Santos, André Luis Souza; Branquinha, Marta Helena; d'Avila-Levy, Claudia Masini

    2012-01-01

    Background Trypanosoma cruzi is the etiological agent of Chagas' disease. Cysteine peptidases are relevant to several aspects of the T. cruzi life cycle and are implicated in parasite-mammalian host relationships. However, little is known about the factors that contribute to the parasite-insect host interaction. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we have investigated whether cruzipain could be involved in the interaction of T. cruzi with the invertebrate host. We analyzed the effect of treatment of T. cruzi epimastigotes with anti-cruzipain antibodies or with a panel of cysteine peptidase inhibitors (cystatin, antipain, E-64, leupeptin, iodocetamide or CA-074-OMe) on parasite adhesion to Rhodnius prolixus posterior midgut ex vivo. All treatments, with the exception of CA074-OMe, significantly decreased parasite adhesion to R. prolixus midgut. Cystatin presented a dose-dependent reduction on the adhesion. Comparison of the adhesion rate among several T. cruzi isolates revealed that the G isolate, which naturally possesses low levels of active cruzipain, adhered to a lesser extent in comparison to Dm28c, Y and CL Brener isolates. Transgenic epimastigotes overexpressing an endogenous cruzipain inhibitor (pCHAG), chagasin, and that have reduced levels of active cruzipain adhered to the insect gut 73% less than the wild-type parasites. The adhesion of pCHAG parasites was partially restored by the addition of exogenous cruzipain. In vivo colonization experiments revealed low levels of pCHAG parasites in comparison to wild-type. Parasites isolated after passage in the insect presented a drastic enhancement in the expression of surface cruzipain. Conclusions/Significance These data highlight, for the first time, that cruzipain contributes to the interaction of T. cruzi with the insect host. PMID:23272264

  18. Organoaxial partial rotation of duodenum with midgut malrotation in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Amarakoon, Luckshika Udeshani; Rathnamali, Baj Gamage Anushka; Jayasundara, Jasin Arachchige Saman Bingumal; de Silva, Ajith

    2014-01-01

    Midgut malrotation includes a range of developmental abnormalities that occur during fetal intestinal rotation. Manifestations of intestinal malrotation are generally seen in the paediatric population and are uncommon in adults. Symptomatic patients may present with either acute abdominal pain due to midgut volvulus, or chronic abdominal pain due to proximal midgut partial obstruction in the presence of congenital bands. A limited number of paediatric cases of duodenal occlusion due to duodenal malrotation has been previously reported in the medical literature. We herein report the case of a 57-year-old woman who presented with duodenal obstruction due to organoaxial partial rotation of the distal duodenum associated with midgut malrotation. This is probably the first of such a case diagnosed in adulthood reported in the medical literature. Our patient underwent Roux-en-Y duodenojejunostomy and had symptomatic relief following the successful surgery. PMID:25630324

  19. The Effects of Midgut Serine Proteases on Dengue Virus Type 2 Infectivity of Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Brackney, Doug E.; Foy, Brian D.; Olson, Ken E.

    2009-01-01

    Dengue viruses (DENV) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide and are transmitted by the mosquito Aedes aegypti. Mosquitoes become infected after ingesting a viremic bloodmeal, and molecular mechanisms involved in bloodmeal digestion may affect the ability of DENV to infect the midgut. We used RNA interference (RNAi) to silence expression of four midgut serine proteases and assessed the effect of each RNAi phenotype on DENV-2 infectivity of Aedes aegypti. Silencing resulted in significant reductions in protease mRNA levels and correlated with a reduction in activity except in the case of late trypsin. RNA silencing of chymotrypsin, early and late trypsin had no effect on DENV-2 infectivity. However, silencing of 5G1 or the addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor to the infectious bloodmeals significantly increased midgut infection rates. These results suggest that some midgut serine proteases may actually limit DENV-2 infectivity of Ae. aegypti. PMID:18689635

  20. Proteomic profiling of Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus midgut responses to infection with Babesia bovis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Differences in protein expression in midgut tissue of uninfected and Babesia bovis-infected southern cattle ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus, were investigated in an effort to establish a proteome database containing proteins involved in successful pathogen transmission. The electrophoreti...

  1. [Morphofunctional changes in the midgut of ticks of the genus Ixodes (Acarina: Ixodidae) during life cycle].

    PubMed

    Grigor'eva, L A

    2009-01-01

    Morphofunctional investigations of five Ixodes species (Ixodes pacificus, I. pavlovsky, I. persulcatus, I. ricinus and I. scapularis) were carried out. It was established, that the change of midgut epithelium lags at the each next developmental stage, and it is not synchronized with general processes of metamorphosis and organogenesis during molts. The midgut epithelium of a previous phase of the life cycle persists and functions during the feeding stage at the next phase. PMID:19957908

  2. Disruption of Plasmodium falciparum development by antibodies against a conserved mosquito midgut antigen

    PubMed Central

    Dinglasan, Rhoel R.; Kalume, Dario E.; Kanzok, Stefan M.; Ghosh, Anil K.; Muratova, Olga; Pandey, Akhilesh; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2007-01-01

    Malaria parasites must undergo development within mosquitoes to be transmitted to a new host. Antivector transmission-blocking vaccines inhibit parasite development by preventing ookinete interaction with mosquito midgut ligands. Therefore, the discovery of novel midgut antigen targets is paramount. Jacalin (a lectin) inhibits ookinete attachment by masking glycan ligands on midgut epithelial surface glycoproteins. However, the identities of these midgut glycoproteins have remained unknown. Here we report on the molecular characterization of an Anopheles gambiae aminopeptidase N (AgAPN1) as the predominant jacalin target on the mosquito midgut luminal surface and provide evidence for its role in ookinete invasion. α-AgAPN1 IgG strongly inhibited both Plasmodium berghei and Plasmodium falciparum development in different mosquito species, implying that AgAPN1 has a conserved role in ookinete invasion of the midgut. Molecules targeting single midgut antigens seldom achieve complete abrogation of parasite development. However, the combined blocking activity of α-AgAPN1 IgG and an unrelated inhibitory peptide, SM1, against P. berghei was incomplete. We also found that SM1 can block only P. berghei, whereas α-AgAPN1 IgG can block both parasite species significantly. Therefore, we hypothesize that ookinetes can evade inhibition by two potent transmission-blocking molecules, presumably through the use of other ligands, and that this process further partitions murine from human parasite midgut invasion models. These results advance our understanding of malaria parasite–mosquito host interactions and guide in the design of transmission-blocking vaccines. PMID:17673553

  3. Two-Stage pH Control Strategy Based on the pH Preference of Acetoin Reductase Regulates Acetoin and 2,3-Butanediol Distribution in Bacillus subtilis

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian; Li, Huazhong

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin reductase/2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (AR/BDH), which catalyzes the interconversion between acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, plays an important role in distribution of the products pools. This work characterized the Bacillus subtilis AR/BDH for the first time. The enzyme showed very different pH preferences of pH 6.5 for reduction and pH 8.5 for oxidation. Based on these above results, a two-stage pH control strategy was optimized for acetoin production, in which the pH was controlled at 6.5 for quickly converting glucose to acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, and then 8.0 for reversely transforming 2,3-butanediol to acetoin. By over-expression of AR/BDH in the wild-type B. subtilis JNA 3-10 and applying fed-batch fermentation based on the two-stage pH control strategy, acetoin yield of B. subtilis was improved to a new record of 73.6 g/l, with the productivity of 0.77 g/(l·h). The molar yield of acetoin was improved from 57.5% to 83.5% and the ratio of acetoin/2,3-butanediol was switched from 2.7∶1 to 18.0∶1. PMID:24608678

  4. Two-stage pH control strategy based on the pH preference of acetoin reductase regulates acetoin and 2,3-butanediol distribution in Bacillus subtilis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xian; Bao, Teng; Rao, Zhiming; Yang, Taowei; Xu, Zhenghong; Yang, Shangtian; Li, Huazhong

    2014-01-01

    Acetoin reductase/2,3-butanediol dehydrogenase (AR/BDH), which catalyzes the interconversion between acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, plays an important role in distribution of the products pools. This work characterized the Bacillus subtilis AR/BDH for the first time. The enzyme showed very different pH preferences of pH 6.5 for reduction and pH 8.5 for oxidation. Based on these above results, a two-stage pH control strategy was optimized for acetoin production, in which the pH was controlled at 6.5 for quickly converting glucose to acetoin and 2,3-butanediol, and then 8.0 for reversely transforming 2,3-butanediol to acetoin. By over-expression of AR/BDH in the wild-type B. subtilis JNA 3-10 and applying fed-batch fermentation based on the two-stage pH control strategy, acetoin yield of B. subtilis was improved to a new record of 73.6 g/l, with the productivity of 0.77 g/(l · h). The molar yield of acetoin was improved from 57.5% to 83.5% and the ratio of acetoin/2,3-butanediol was switched from 2.7:1 to 18.0:1. PMID:24608678

  5. The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods: a critical target organ in environmental toxicology.

    PubMed Central

    Beaty, Barry J; Mackie, Ryan S; Mattingly, Kimberly S; Carlson, Jonathan O; Rayms-Keller, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of aquatic arthropods is emerging as an important and toxicologically relevant organ system for monitoring environmental pollution. The peritrophic matrix of aquatic arthropods, which is secreted by the midgut epithelium cells, is perturbed by copper or cadmium. Molecular biological studies have identified and characterized two midgut genes induced by heavy metals in the midgut epithelium. Many other metal-responsive genes (MRGs) await characterization. One of the MRGs codes for an intestinal mucin, which is critical for protecting the midgut from toxins and pathogens. Another codes for a tubulin gene, which is critical for structure and function of the midgut epithelial cells. Perturbation of expression of either gene could condition aquatic arthropod survivorship. Induction of these MRGs is a more sensitive and rapid indicator of heavy-metal pollution than biological assays. Characterization of genes induced by pollutants could provide mechanistic understanding of fundamental cellular responses to pollutants and insight into determinants of aquatic arthropod population genetic structure and survivorship in nature. PMID:12634118

  6. Identification of a midgut-specific promoter in the silkworm Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Liang; Cheng, Tingcai; Dang, Yinghui; Peng, Zhengwen; Zhao, Ping; Liu, Shiping; Jin, Shengkai; Lin, Ping; Sun, Qiang; Xia, Qingyou

    2013-04-19

    The midgut is an important organ for digestion and absorption of nutrients and immune defense in the silkworm Bombyx mori. In an attempt to create a tool for midgut research, we cloned the 1080 bp P2 promoter sequence (P2P) of a highly expressed midgut-specific gene in the silkworm. The transgenic line (P2) was generated via embryo microinjection, in which the expression of EGFP was driven by P2P. There was strong green fluorescence only in the midgut of P2. RT-PCR and Western blot showed that P2P was a midgut-specific promoter with activity throughout the larval stage. A transgenic truncation experiment suggested that regions -305 to -214 and +107 to +181 were very important for P2P activity. The results of this study revealed that we have identified a midgut-specific promoter with a high level of activity in the silkworm that will aid future research and application of silkworm genes. PMID:23524268

  7. Ultrastructural midgut events in Culicidae larvae fed with Bacillus sphaericus 2297 spore/crystal complex.

    PubMed

    Charles, J F

    1987-01-01

    Ingestion of Bacillus sphaericus 2297 spore/crystal complex by Culicidae larvae Anopheles stephensi, Culex pipiens subsp. pipiens and Aedes aegypti was rapidly followed by a dissolution of the protein crystalline inclusions inside the anterior stomach of the three species. During the first day of intoxication, B. sphaericus spores germinated within the midgut lumen, and were in a vegetative stage between 36-48 h after ingestion when the larvae began to die. Ultrastructural observations focused on larval midgut showed alterations which differed according to the mosquito species, being localized mainly in the gastric caeca and posterior stomach. With the bacterial concentration used, neither general cell swelling nor complete breakdown of the midgut epithelium was recorded before larval death. In A. stephensi larval midgut epithelium large low-electron-density areas appeared, rough endoplasmic reticula formed numerous concentrical structures and mitochondria swelled. Large vacuoles (of unknown origin) appeared early on in the C. pipiens midgut cells, and rough endoplasmic reticula broke into small vesicles. Midgut epithelial cells of A. aegypti showed mitochondria swelling except in the anterior stomach, and a vacuolisation of smooth reticula: these aspects remained unchanged until the larvae died. PMID:3663390

  8. Midgut of the non-hematophagous mosquito Toxorhynchites theobaldi (Diptera, Culicidae)

    PubMed Central

    Godoy, Raquel S. M.; Fernandes, Kenner M.; Martins, Gustavo F.

    2015-01-01

    In most mosquito species, the females require a blood-feeding for complete egg development. However, in Toxorhynchites mosquitoes, the eggs develop without blood-feeding, and both females and males exclusively feed on sugary diets. The midgut is a well-understood organ in blood-feeding mosquitoes, but little is known about it in non-blood-feeding ones. In the present study, the detailed morphology of the midgut of Toxorhynchites theobaldi were investigated using histochemical and ultrastructural methods. The midgut of female and male T. theobaldi adults consists of a long, slender anterior midgut (AMG), and a short, dilated posterior midgut (PMG). The AMG is subdivided into AMG1 (short, with folds) and AMG2 (long, without folds). Nerve branches and enteroendocrine cells are present in AMG and PMG, respectively. Compared with the PMG of blood-feeding female mosquitoes, the PMG of T. theobaldi is smaller; however, in both mosquitoes, PMG seems be the main region of food digestion and absorption, and protein secretion. The epithelial folds present in the AMG of T. theobaldi have not been reported in other mosquitoes; however, the midgut muscle organization and endocrine control of the digestion process are conserved in both T. theobaldi and blood-feeding mosquitoes. PMID:26514271

  9. Plasmodium gallinaceum preferentially invades vesicular ATPase-expressing cells in Aedes aegypti midgut

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, Mohammed; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.

    1998-01-01

    Penetration of the mosquito midgut epithelium is obligatory for the further development of Plasmodium parasites. Therefore, blocking the parasite from invading the midgut wall disrupts the transmission of malaria. Despite such a pivotal role in malaria transmission, the cellular and molecular interactions that occur during the invasion are not understood. Here, we demonstrate that the ookinetes of Plasmodium gallinaceum, which is related closely to the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum, selectively invade a cell type in the Aedes aegypti midgut. These cells, unlike the majority of the cells in the midgut, do not stain with a basophilic dye (toluidine blue) and are less osmiophilic. In addition, they contain minimal endoplasmic reticulum, lack secretory granules, and have few microvilli. Instead, these cells are highly vacuolated and express large amounts of vesicular ATPase. The enzyme is associated with the apical plasma membrane, cytoplasmic vesicles, and tubular extensions of the basal membrane of the invaded cells. The high cost of insecticide use in endemic areas and the emergence of drug resistant malaria parasites call for alternative approaches such as modifying the mosquito to block the transmission of malaria. One of the targets for such modification is the parasite receptor on midgut cells. A step toward the identification of this receptor is the realization that malaria parasites invade a special cell type in the mosquito midgut. PMID:9520375

  10. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus.

    PubMed

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R; Murdock, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant-insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  11. Plant Defense Inhibitors Affect the Structures of Midgut Cells in Drosophila melanogaster and Callosobruchus maculatus

    PubMed Central

    Li-Byarlay, Hongmei; Pittendrigh, Barry R.; Murdock, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Plants produce proteins such as protease inhibitors and lectins as defenses against herbivorous insects and pathogens. However, no systematic studies have explored the structural responses in the midguts of insects when challenged with plant defensive proteins and lectins across different species. In this study, we fed two kinds of protease inhibitors and lectins to the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster and alpha-amylase inhibitors and lectins to the cowpea bruchid Callosobruchus maculatus. We assessed the changes in midgut cell structures by comparing them with such structures in insects receiving normal diets or subjected to food deprivation. Using light and transmission electron microscopy in both species, we observed structural changes in the midgut peritrophic matrix as well as shortened microvilli on the surfaces of midgut epithelial cells in D. melanogaster. Dietary inhibitors and lectins caused similar lesions in the epithelial cells but not much change in the peritrophic matrix in both species. We also noted structural damages in the Drosophila midgut after six hours of starvation and changes were still present after 12 hours. Our study provided the first evidence of key structural changes of midguts using a comparative approach between a dipteran and a coleopteran. Our particular observation and discussion on plant–insect interaction and dietary stress are relevant for future mode of action studies of plant defensive protein in insect physiology. PMID:27594789

  12. Implications of Time Bomb model of ookinete invasion of midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Han, Yeon Soo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2002-10-01

    In this review, we describe the experimental observations that led us to propose the Time Bomb model of ookinete midgut invasion and discuss potential implications of this model when considering malaria transmission-blocking strategies aimed at arresting parasite development within midgut cells. A detailed analysis of the molecular interactions between Anopheles stephensi midgut epithelial cells and Plasmodium berghei parasites, as they migrate through midgut cells, revealed that ookinetes induce nitric oxide synthase (NOS) expression, remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton and characteristic morphological changes in the invaded epithelial cells. Parasites inflict extensive damage that ultimately leads to genome fragmentation and cell death. During their migration through the cytoplasm, ookinetes release a subtilisin-like protease (PbSub2) and the surface protein (Pbs21). The model proposes that ookinetes must escape rapidly from the invaded cells, as the responses mediating cell death could be potentially lethal to the parasites. In other words, the physical and/or chemical damage triggered by the parasite can be thought of as a 'lethal bomb'. Once this cascade of events is initiated, the parasite must leave the cellular compartment within a limited time to escape unharmed from the 'bomb' it has activated. The midgut epithelium has the ability to heal rapidly by 'budding off' the damaged cells to the midgut lumen without losing its integrity. PMID:12225921

  13. Effect of mosquito midgut trypsin activity on dengue-2 virus infection and dissemination in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Richardson, Jason; Bennett, Kristine; Black, William; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-05-01

    The effect of mosquito midgut trypsins in dengue serotype 2 flavivirus (DENV-2) infectivity to Aedes aegypti was studied. Addition of soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) in a DENV-2 infectious blood meal resulted in a 91-97% decrease in midgut DENV-2 RNA copies (qRT-PCR analysis). STI treatment also resulted in slower DENV-2 replication in the midgut, less DENV-2 E protein expression, and decreased dissemination to the thorax and the head. A second uninfected blood meal, 7 days after the STI-treated infectious meal, significantly increased DENV-2 replication in the midgut and recovered oogenesis, suggesting that the lower viral infection caused by STI was in part due to a nutritional effect. Mosquitoes fed DENV-2 digested in vitro with bovine trypsin (before STI addition) exhibited a transient increase in midgut DENV-2 4 days postinfection. Blood digestion and possibly DENV-2 proteolytic processing, mediated by midgut trypsins, influence the rate of DENV-2 infection, replication, and dissemination in Ae. aegypti. PMID:15891140

  14. Expression of human papilloma virus type 16 E5 protein in amelanotic melanoma cells regulates endo-cellular pH and restores tyrosinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Di Domenico, Fabio; Foppoli, Cesira; Blarzino, Carla; Perluigi, Marzia; Paolini, Francesca; Morici, Salvatrice; Coccia, Raffaella; Cini, Chiara; De Marco, Federico

    2009-01-01

    Background Melanin synthesis, the elective trait of melanocytes, is regulated by tyrosinase activity. In tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas this rate limiting enzyme is inactive because of acidic endo-melanosomal pH. The E5 oncogene of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 is a small transmembrane protein with a weak transforming activity and a role during the early steps of viral infections. E5 has been shown to interact with 16 kDa subunit C of the trans-membrane Vacuolar ATPase proton pump ultimately resulting in its functional suppressions. However, the cellular effects of such an interaction are still under debate. With this work we intended to explore whether the HPV16 E5 oncoprotein does indeed interact with the vacuolar ATPase proton pump once expressed in intact human cells and whether this interaction has functional consequences on cell metabolism and phenotype. Methods The expression of the HPV16-E5 oncoproteins was induced in two Tyrosinase-positive amelanotic melanomas (the cell lines FRM and M14) by a retroviral expression construct. Modulation of the intracellular pH was measured with Acridine orange and fluorescence microscopy. Expression of tyrosinase and its activity was followed by RT-PCR, Western Blot and enzyme assay. The anchorage-independence growth and the metabolic activity of E5 expressing cells were also monitored. Results We provide evidence that in the E5 expressing cells interaction between E5 and V-ATPase determines an increase of endo-cellular pH. The cellular alkalinisation in turn leads to the post-translational activation of tyrosinase, melanin synthesis and phenotype modulation. These effects are associated with an increased activation of tyrosine analogue anti-blastic drugs. Conclusion Once expressed within intact human cells the HPV16-E5 oncoprotein does actually interact with the vacuolar V-ATPase proton pump and this interaction induces a number of functional effects. In amelanotic melanomas these effects can modulate the

  15. Therapeutic potential of analogues of amiloride: inhibition of the regulation of intracellular pH as a possible mechanism of tumour selective therapy.

    PubMed Central

    Maidorn, R. P.; Cragoe, E. J.; Tannock, I. F.

    1993-01-01

    The extracellular pH (pHe) in solid tumours is frequently lower than the pHe in normal tissues. Cells within an acidic environment depend on mechanisms which regulate intracellular pH (pHi) for their survival, including the Na+/H+ antiport which exports protons in exchange for Na+ ions. Amiloride and its analogues DMA (5-(N,N-dimethyl)amiloride), MIBA (5-(N-methyl-N-isobutyl)amiloride) and EIPA (5-(N-ethyl-N-isopropyl)amiloride) are known to inhibit the Na+/H+ antiport and therefore decrease the cells ability to regulate pHi. All three analogues were found to be potent inhibitors of the antiport in human MGH-U1 and murine EMT-6 cells, with DMA being approximately 20, MIBA 100 and EIPA 200-fold as potent as amiloride; EIPA also gave more complete suppression of the Na+/H+ antiport. These agents were not toxic to cells when used alone; however, in combination with nigericin, an agent which acidifies cells, all three analogues were toxic to cells at pHe < 7.0, and markedly enhanced the toxicity of nigericin alone. Cell killing was greatest for nigericin used with EIPA or MIBA. None of the agents were toxic to cells at pHe 7.0 or above. When used against variant cells lacking the Na+/H+ antiport (PS-120 cells) EIPA did not enhance the cytotoxicity of nigericin alone, suggesting that the observed effect was due to inhibition of Na+/H+ exchange, rather than due to non-specific effects. The combination of EIPA and nigericin gave similar cell killing in previously dissociated and intact MGH-U1 spheroids, suggesting that the agents have good penetration of solid tissue. Preliminary experiments using EMT-6 tumours in mice suggested that EIPA and nigericin were able to enhance the toxicity of radiation in vivo, presumably through selective effects against the hypoxic (and probably acidic) subpopulation of cells that is resistant to radiation. PMID:8381657

  16. Implication of the Mosquito Midgut Microbiota in the Defense against Malaria Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuemei; Manfredini, Fabio; Dimopoulos, George

    2009-01-01

    Malaria-transmitting mosquitoes are continuously exposed to microbes, including their midgut microbiota. This naturally acquired microbial flora can modulate the mosquito's vectorial capacity by inhibiting the development of Plasmodium and other human pathogens through an unknown mechanism. We have undertaken a comprehensive functional genomic approach to elucidate the molecular interplay between the bacterial co-infection and the development of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum in its natural vector Anopheles gambiae. Global transcription profiling of septic and aseptic mosquitoes identified a significant subset of immune genes that were mostly up-regulated by the mosquito's microbial flora, including several anti-Plasmodium factors. Microbe-free aseptic mosquitoes displayed an increased susceptibility to Plasmodium infection while co-feeding mosquitoes with bacteria and P. falciparum gametocytes resulted in lower than normal infection levels. Infection analyses suggest the bacteria-mediated anti-Plasmodium effect is mediated by the mosquitoes' antimicrobial immune responses, plausibly through activation of basal immunity. We show that the microbiota can modulate the anti-Plasmodium effects of some immune genes. In sum, the microbiota plays an essential role in modulating the mosquito's capacity to sustain Plasmodium infection. PMID:19424427

  17. Relative contribution of ruminal buffering systems to pH regulation in feedlot cattle fed either low- or high-forage diets.

    PubMed

    Chibisa, G E; Beauchemin, K A; Penner, G B

    2016-07-01

    The relative contribution of ruminal short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) absorption and salivary buffering to pH regulation could potentially change under different dietary conditions. Therefore, the objective of this study was to investigate the effects of altering the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable carbohydrate (CHO) on absorptive function and salivation in beef cattle. Eight heifers (mean BW±SD=410±14 kg) were randomly allocated to two treatments in a crossover design with 37-day periods. Dietary treatments were barley silage at 30% low forage (LF) or 70% high forage (HF) of dietary dry matter (DM), with the remainder of the diet consisting of barley grain (65% or 25% on a DM basis) and a constant level (5%) of supplement. The LF and HF diets contained 45.3% and 30.9% starch, and 4.1% and 14.0% physically effective fiber (DM basis), respectively. Ruminal pH was continuously measured from day 17 to day 23, whereas ruminal fluid was collected on day 23 to determine SCFA concentration. Ruminal liquid passage rate was determined on day 23 using Cr-ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. Eating or resting salivation was measured by collecting masticate (days 28 and 29) or saliva samples (days 30 and 31) at the cardia, respectively. On days 30 and 31, the temporarily isolated and washed reticulo-rumen technique was used to measure total, and Cl--competitive (an indirect measure of protein-mediated transport) absorption of acetate, propionate and butyrate. As a result of the higher dietary starch content and DM intake, the ruminal supply of rapidly fermentable CHO, total ruminal SCFA concentration (118 v. 95 mM; P<0.001) and osmolality (330 v. 306 mOsm/kg; P=0.018) were greater in cattle fed LF compared with HF. In addition, feeding LF resulted in a longer duration (2.50 v. 0.09 h/day; P=0.02) and a larger area (0.44 v. 0.01 (pH×h)/day; P=0.050) that pH was below 5.5. There was no diet effect on total and Cl--competitive absorption (mmol/h and %/h) of acetate, propionate

  18. Sex-specific and blood meal-induced proteins of Anopheles gambiae midguts: analysis by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Prévot, GI; Laurent-Winter, C; Rodhain, F; Bourgouin, C

    2003-01-01

    Background Anopheles gambiae is the main vector of Plasmodium falciparum in Africa. The mosquito midgut constitutes a barrier that the parasite must cross if it is to develop and be transmitted. Despite the central role of the mosquito midgut in the host/parasite interaction, little is known about its protein composition. Characterisation of An. gambiae midgut proteins may identify the proteins that render An. gambiae receptive to the malaria parasite. Methods We carried out two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of An. gambiae midgut proteins and compared protein profiles for midguts from males, sugar-fed females and females fed on human blood. Results Very few differences were detected between male and female mosquitoes for the approximately 375 silver-stained proteins. Male midguts contained ten proteins not detected in sugar-fed or blood-fed females, which are therefore probably involved in male-specific functions; conversely, female midguts contained twenty-three proteins absent from male midguts. Eight of these proteins were specific to sugar-fed females, and another ten, to blood-fed females. Conclusion Mass spectrometry analysis of the proteins found only in blood-fed female midguts, together with data from the recent sequencing of the An. gambiae genome, should make it possible to determine the role of these proteins in blood digestion or parasite receptivity. PMID:12605724

  19. Overexpression of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator in NIH 3T3 cells lowers membrane potential and intracellular pH and confers a multidrug resistance phenotype.

    PubMed Central

    Wei, L Y; Stutts, M J; Hoffman, M M; Roepe, P D

    1995-01-01

    Because of the similarities between the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and multidrug resistance (MDR) proteins, recent observations of decreased plasma membrane electrical potential (delta psi) in cells overexpressing either MDR protein or the CFTR, and the effects of delta psi on passive diffusion of chemotherapeutic drugs, we have analyzed chemotherapeutic drug resistance for NIH 3T3 cells overexpressing different levels of functional CFTR. Three separate clones not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs exhibit resistance to doxorubicin, vincristine, and colchicine that is similar to MDR transfectants not previously exposed to chemotherapeutic drugs. Two other clones expressing lower levels of CFTR are less resistant. As shown previously these clones exhibit decreased plasma membrane delta psi similar to MDR transfectants, but four of five exhibit mildly acidified intracellular pH in contrast to MDR transfectants, which are in general alkaline. Thus the MDR protein and CFTR-mediated MDR phenotypes are distinctly different. Selection of two separate CFTR clones on either doxorubicin or vincristine substantially increases the observed MDR and leads to increased CFTR (but not measurable MDR or MRP) mRNA expression. CFTR overexpressors also exhibit a decreased rate of 3H -vinblastine uptake. These data reveal a new and previously unrecognized consequence of CFTR expression, and are consistent with the hypothesis that membrane depolarization is an important determinant of tumor cell MDR. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 6 PMID:8519988

  20. Regulation of the Na+/K+-ATPase Ena1 Expression by Calcineurin/Crz1 under High pH Stress: A Quantitative Study

    PubMed Central

    Petrezsélyová, Silvia; López-Malo, María; Canadell, David; Roque, Alicia; Serra-Cardona, Albert; Marqués, M. Carmen; Vilaprinyó, Ester; Alves, Rui; Yenush, Lynne

    2016-01-01

    Regulated expression of the Ena1 Na+-ATPase is a crucial event for adaptation to high salt and/or alkaline pH stress in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. ENA1 expression is under the control of diverse signaling pathways, including that mediated by the calcium-regulatable protein phosphatase calcineurin and its downstream transcription factor Crz1. We present here a quantitative study of the expression of Ena1 in response to alkalinization of the environment and we analyze the contribution of Crz1 to this response. Experimental data and mathematical models substantiate the existence of two stress-responsive Crz1-binding sites in the ENA1 promoter and estimate that the contribution of Crz1 to the early response of the ENA1 promoter is about 60%. The models suggest the existence of a second input with similar kinetics, which would be likely mediated by high pH-induced activation of the Snf1 kinase. PMID:27362362

  1. Characterization of a midgut-specific chitin synthase gene (LmCHS2) responsible for biosynthesis of chitin of peritrophic matrix in Locusta migratoria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Huanhuan; Li, Sheng; Zhu, Kun Yan; Ma, Enbo; Zhang, Jianzhen

    2012-12-01

    Chitin, an essential component of peritrophic matrix (PM), is produced by a series of biochemical reactions. Chitin synthase plays a crucial role in chitin polymerization in chitin biosynthetic pathway. In this study, we identified and characterized a full-length cDNA of chitin synthase 2 gene (LmCHS2) from Locusta migratoria. The cDNA contains an open reading frame of 4569 nucleotides that encode 1523 amino acid residues, and 76- and 373-nucleotides for 5'- and 3'-noncoding regions, respectively. Analysis of LmCHS2 transcript in different tissues of the locust by using real-time quantitative PCR indicated that LmCHS2 was exclusively expressed in midgut and gastric caeca (a part of the midgut). The highest expression was found in the anterior midgut with a decline of the transcript level from the anterior to posterior regions. During growth and development of locusts, there was only a slight expression in eggs, but the expression gradually increased from nymphs to adults. In situ hybridization further revealed that LmCHS2 transcript mainly presented in the apical regions of brush border forming columnar cells of gastric caeca. LmCHS2 dsRNA was injected to fifth-instar nymphs to further explore biological functions of LmCHS2. Significantly down-regulated transcript of LmCHS2 resulted in a cessation of feeding and a high mortality of the insect. However, no visible abnormal morphological change of locusts was observed until insects molted to adults. After dissection, we found that the average length of midguts from the LmCHS2 dsRNA-injected locusts was shorter than that of the control insects that were injected with dsGFP. Furthermore, microsection of midguts showed that the PM of the LmCHS2 dsRNA-injected nymphs was amorphous and thin as compared with the controls. Our results demonstrate that LmCHS2 is responsible for the biosynthesis of chitin associated with PM and plays an essential role in locust growth and development. PMID:23006725

  2. Midgut expression of immune-related genes in Glossina palpalis gambiensis challenged with Trypanosoma brucei gambiense

    PubMed Central

    Hamidou Soumana, Illiassou; Tchicaya, Bernadette; Chuchana, Paul; Geiger, Anne

    2014-01-01

    Tsetse flies from the subspecies Glossina morsitans morsitans and Glossina palpalis gambiensis, respectively, transmit Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense and Trypanosoma brucei gambiense. The former causes the acute form of sleeping sickness, and the latter provokes the chronic form. Although several articles have reported G. m. morsitans gene expression following trypanosome infection, no comparable investigation has been performed for G. p. gambiensis. This report presents results on the differential expression of immune-related genes in G. p. gambiensis challenged with T. b. gambiense. The aim was to characterize transcriptomic events occurring in the tsetse gut during the parasite establishment step, which is the crucial first step in the parasite development cycle within its vector. The selected genes were chosen from those previously shown to be highly expressed in G. m. morsitans, to allow further comparison of gene expression in both Glossina species. Using quantitative PCR, genes were amplified from the dissected midguts of trypanosome-stimulated, infected, non-infected, and self-cleared flies at three sampling timepoints (3, 10, and 20 days) after a bloodmeal. At the 3-day sampling point, transferrin transcripts were significantly up-regulated in trypanosome-challenged flies versus flies fed on non-infected mice. In self-cleared flies, serpin-2 and thioredoxin peroxidase-3 transcripts were significantly up-regulated 10 days after trypanosome challenge, whereas nitric oxide synthase and chitin-binding protein transcripts were up-regulated after 20 days. Although the expression levels of the other genes were highly variable, the expression of immune-related genes in G. p. gambiensis appears to be a time-dependent process. The possible biological significance of these findings is discussed, and the results are compared with previous reports for G. m. morsitans. PMID:25426112

  3. MdSOS2L1 forms a complex with MdMYB1 to control vacuolar pH by transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in apples.

    PubMed

    Sun, Cui-Hui; Zhang, Quan-Yan; Sun, Mei-Hong; Hu, Da-Gang

    2016-03-01

    Vacuolar pH is important and involves in many different physiological processes in plants. A recent paper published in Plant Physiology reveals that MdMYB1 regulates vacuolar pH by directly transcriptionally regulating proton pump genes and malate transporters genes, such as V-ATPase subunit gene MdVHA-B1. Here, we found that MdSOS2L1 in vitro did not directly interact with MdMYB1, however, in vivo formed a complex with MdMYB1 in the nucleus to regulate MdVHA-B1-mediated vacuolar acidification. This finding shed light on the role of MdSOS2L1 in transcriptionally regulating MdVHA-B1 in addition to its post-modified function in apples. PMID:26910596

  4. The regenerative cells during the metamorphosis in the midgut of bees.

    PubMed

    Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Neves, Clóvis Andrade; Campos, Lúcio Antonio Oliveira; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2006-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of bees is formed by the digestive cells, responsible for enzyme secretion and nutrient absorption and for small regenerative cells that are placed in nests scattered among the digestive cells. During metamorphosis, the larval midgut epithelium degenerates and a new adult midgut epithelium is built during larval differentiation of regenerative cells. The present work focuses on the midgut epithelial modifications during the post-embryonic development of the stingless bee Melipona quadrifasciata anthidioides worker and the occurrence of regenerative cell proliferation during midgut metamorphosis in order to test the hypothesis that adult midgut epithelium of worker bees results from regenerative cell proliferation during the pupal stage. Regenerative cell proliferation was detected during larval lifespan. Larval aging is followed by an increase in the number and the size of the nests of regenerative cells. Larval epithelium degeneration begins 2 days after the start of defecation process and in this period the nests of regenerative cells are in contact by means of cytoplasmic extension which have many septate desmosomes and gap junctions. The BrdU immunoreactive regenerative cells were found in the prepupae 12 h after BrdU injection, suggesting that regenerative cell population increase during this larval period. Regenerative cell proliferation results in the increase of the regenerative cell population and not in the formation of new digestive cells because the proliferation of regenerative cells would not be enough to reestablish the nests of regenerative cells and at the same time form new adult digestive cells. In this sense the hypothesis that digestive adult cells originate from regenerative cell proliferation during midgut metamorphosis in M. quadrifasciata anthidioides was rejected. PMID:16168658

  5. Effects of a potato cysteine proteinase inhibitor on midgut proteolytic enzyme activity and growth of the southern corn rootworm, Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae).

    PubMed

    Fabrick, J; Behnke, C; Czapla, T; Bala, K; Rao, A G; Kramer, K J; Reeck, G R

    2002-04-01

    The major proteinase activity in extracts of larval midguts from the southern corn rootworm (SCR), Diabrotica undecimpunctata howardi, was identified as a cysteine proteinase that prefers substrates containing an arginine residue in the P1 position. Gelatin-zymogram analysis of the midgut proteinases indicated that the artificial diet-fed SCR, corn root-fed SCR, and root-fed western corn rootworms (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera) possess a single major proteinase with an apparent molecular mass of 25kDa and several minor proteinases. Similar proteinase activity pH profiles were exhibited by root-fed and diet-fed rootworms with the optimal activity being slightly acidic. Rootworm larvae reared on corn roots exhibited significantly less caseinolytic activity than those reared on the artificial diet. Midgut proteolytic activity from SCR was most sensitive to inhibition by inhibitors of cysteine proteinases. Furthermore, rootworm proteinase activity was particularly sensitive to inhibition by a commercial protein preparation from potato tubers (PIN-II). One of the proteins, potato cysteine proteinase inhibitor-10', PCPI-10', obtained from PIN-II by ion-exchange chromatography, was the major source of inhibitory activity against rootworm proteinase activity. PCPI-10' and E-64 were of comparable potency as inhibitors of southern corn rootworm proteinase activity (IC(50) =31 and 35nM, respectively) and substantially more effective than chicken egg white cystatin (IC(50) =121nM). Incorporation of PCPI-10' into the diet of SCR larvae in feeding trials resulted in a significant increase in mortality and growth inhibition. We suggest that expression of inhibitors such as PCPI-10' by transgenic corn plants in the field is a potentially attractive method of host plant resistance to these Diabrotica species. PMID:11886775

  6. BmVDAC upregulation in the midgut of Rhipicephalus microplus, during infection with Babesia bigemina.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Hernández, Elba; Mosqueda, Juan; León-Ávila, Gloria; Castañeda-Ortiz, Elizabeth J; Álvarez-Sánchez, María Elizbeth; Camacho, Alejandro D; Ramos, Alberto; Camacho-Nuez, Minerva

    2015-09-15

    The molecular mechanisms involved during the infection of Rhipicephalus microplus midgut cells by Babesia bigemina are of great relevance and currently unknown. In a previous study, we found a voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC)-like protein (BmVDAC) that may participate during parasite invasion of midgut cells. In this work, we investigated BmVDAC expression at both mRNA and protein levels and examined BmVDAC localization in midgut cells of ticks infected with B. bigemina at different times post-repletion. Based on the RT-PCR results, Bmvdac expression levels were significantly higher in infected ticks compared to uninfected ones, reaching their highest values at 24h post-repletion (p<0.0001). Similar results were obtained at the protein level (p<0.0001). Interestingly, BmVDAC immunolocalization showed that there was an important differential expression and redistribution of BmVDAC protein between the midgut cells of infected and uninfected ticks, which was more evident 24h post-repletion of infected ticks. This is the first report of BmVDAC upregulation and immunolocalization in R. microplus midgut cells during B. bigemina infection. Further studies regarding the function of BmVDAC during the infection may provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms between B. bigemina and its tick vector and could result in its use as an anti-tick and transmission-blocking vaccine candidate. PMID:26141408

  7. DNA duplication is essential for the repair of gastrointestinal perforation in the insect midgut

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wuren; Zhang, Jie; Yang, Bing; Beerntsen, Brenda T.; Song, Hongsheng; Ling, Erjun

    2016-01-01

    Invertebrate animals have the capacity of repairing wounds in the skin and gut via different mechanisms. Gastrointestinal perforation, a hole in the human gastrointestinal system, is a serious condition, and surgery is necessary to repair the perforation to prevent an abdominal abscess or sepsis. Here we report the repair of gastrointestinal perforation made by a needle-puncture wound in the silkworm larval midgut. Following insect gut perforation, only a weak immune response was observed because the growth of Escherichia coli alone was partially inhibited by plasma collected at 6 h after needle puncture of the larval midgut. However, circulating hemocytes did aggregate over the needle-puncture wound to form a scab. While, cell division and apoptosis were not observed at the wound site, the needle puncture significantly enhanced DNA duplication in cells surrounding the wound, which was essential to repair the midgut perforation. Due to the repair capacity and limited immune response caused by needle puncture to the midgut, this approach was successfully used for the injection of small compounds (ethanol in this study) into the insect midgut. Consequently, this needle-puncture wounding of the insect gut can be developed for screening compounds for use as gut chemotherapeutics in the future. PMID:26754166

  8. Conserved Mechanisms of Tumorigenesis in the Drosophila Adult Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Martorell, Òscar; Merlos-Suárez, Anna; Campbell, Kyra; Barriga, Francisco M.; Christov, Christo P.; Miguel-Aliaga, Irene; Batlle, Eduard; Casanova, Jordi; Casali, Andreu

    2014-01-01

    Whereas the series of genetic events leading to colorectal cancer (CRC) have been well established, the precise functions that these alterations play in tumor progression and how they disrupt intestinal homeostasis remain poorly characterized. Activation of the Wnt/Wg signaling pathway by a mutation in the gene APC is the most common trigger for CRC, inducing benign lesions that progress to carcinomas due to the accumulation of other genetic alterations. Among those, Ras mutations drive tumour progression in CRC, as well as in most epithelial cancers. As mammalian and Drosophila's intestines share many similarities, we decided to explore the alterations induced in the Drosophila midgut by the combined activation of the Wnt signaling pathway with gain of function of Ras signaling in the intestinal stem cells. Here we show that compound Apc-Ras clones, but not clones bearing the individual mutations, expand as aggressive intestinal tumor-like outgrowths. These lesions reproduce many of the human CRC hallmarks such as increased proliferation, blockade of cell differentiation and cell polarity and disrupted organ architecture. This process is followed by expression of tumoral markers present in human lesions. Finally, a metabolic behavioral assay shows that these flies suffer a progressive deterioration in intestinal homeostasis, providing a simple readout that could be used in screens for tumor modifiers or therapeutic compounds. Taken together, our results illustrate the conservation of the mechanisms of CRC tumorigenesis in Drosophila, providing an excellent model system to unravel the events that, upon mutation in Apc and Ras, lead to CRC initiation and progression. PMID:24516653

  9. EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling mediates adult midgut epithelial homeostasis and regeneration in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Huaqi; Grenley, Marc O.; Bravo, Maria-Jose; Blumhagen, Rachel Z.; Edgar, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Many tissues in higher animals undergo dynamic homeostatic growth, wherein damaged or aged cells are replaced by the progeny of resident stem cells. To maintain homeostasis, stem cells must respond to tissue needs. Here we show that in response to damage or stress in the intestinal (midgut) epithelium of adult Drosophila, multiple EGFR ligands and rhomboids (intramembrane proteases that activate some EGFR ligands) are induced, leading to the activation of EGFR signaling in intestinal stem cells (ISCs). Activation of EGFR signaling promotes ISC division and midgut epithelium regeneration, thus maintaining tissue homeostasis. ISCs defective in EGFR signaling cannot grow or divide, are poorly maintained, and cannot support midgut epithelium regeneration following enteric infection by the bacterium, Pseudomonas entomophila. Furthermore, ISC proliferation induced by Jak/Stat signaling is dependent upon EGFR signaling. Thus the EGFR/Ras/MAPK signaling pathway plays central, essential roles in ISC maintenance and the feedback system that mediates intestinal homeostasis. PMID:21167805

  10. Interaction of salivary and midgut proteins of Helicoverpa armigera with soybean trypsin inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Chandrashekar, Krishnappa

    2012-03-01

    Feeding of Helicoverpa armigera larvae on semi-synthetic diet containing Soybean trypsin inhibitor (STI) resulted in disappearance of STI sensitive protease in salivary and midgut protease extract. This might be due to in situ inhibition by dietary STI. STI was largely degraded within 1 h of incubation with total salivary protease (1:1). Degradation was relatively low in midgut proteases. STI interacting proteins were isolated from saliva and midgut extracts of larvae fed on STI supplemented diet using affinity column. Most of the isolated proteins showed caseinolytic activity in zymogram. Denovo sequencing data of seven different peptides selected from trypsin digested total protein showed similarity to chymotrypsinogen, serine protease, aminopeptidase N, peroxidase, hypothetical protein and muscle specific protein. PMID:22415700

  11. An unexpected cause of small bowel obstruction in an adult patient: midgut volvulus.

    PubMed

    Söker, Gökhan; Yılmaz, Cengiz; Karateke, Faruk; Gülek, Bozkurt

    2014-01-01

    The most important complication of intestinal malrotation is midgut volvulus because it may lead to intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. A 29-year-old male patient was admitted to the emergency department with abdominal pain. Ultrasonography (US), colour Doppler ultrasonography (CDUS), CT and barium studies were carried out. On US and CDUS, twisting of intestinal segments around the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) and superior mesenteric vein (SMV) and alteration of the SMA-SMV relationship were detected. CT demonstrated that the small intestine was making a rotation around the SMA and SMV, which amounted to more than 360°. The upper gastrointestinal barium series revealed a corkscrew appearance of the duodenum and proximal jejunum, which is a pathognomonic finding of midgut volvulus. Prior knowledge of characteristic imaging findings of midgut volvulus is essential in order to reach proper diagnosis and establish proper treatment before the development of intestinal ischaemia and necrosis. PMID:24811563

  12. Carbonic Anhydrase Activity Monitored In Vivo by Hyperpolarized 13C-Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Demonstrates Its Importance for pH Regulation in Tumors.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Ferdia A; Sladen, Helen; Kettunen, Mikko I; Serrao, Eva M; Rodrigues, Tiago B; Wright, Alan; Gill, Andrew B; McGuire, Sarah; Booth, Thomas C; Boren, Joan; McIntyre, Alan; Miller, Jodi L; Lee, Shen-Han; Honess, Davina; Day, Sam E; Hu, De-En; Howat, William J; Harris, Adrian L; Brindle, Kevin M

    2015-10-01

    Carbonic anhydrase buffers tissue pH by catalyzing the rapid interconversion of carbon dioxide (CO2) and bicarbonate (HCO3 (-)). We assessed the functional activity of CAIX in two colorectal tumor models, expressing different levels of the enzyme, by measuring the rate of exchange of hyperpolarized (13)C label between bicarbonate (H(13)CO3(-)) and carbon dioxide ((13)CO2), following injection of hyperpolarized H(13)CO3(-), using (13)C-magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((13)C-MRS) magnetization transfer measurements. (31)P-MRS measurements of the chemical shift of the pH probe, 3-aminopropylphosphonate, and (13)C-MRS measurements of the H(13)CO3(-)/(13)CO2 peak intensity ratio showed that CAIX overexpression lowered extracellular pH in these tumors. However, the (13)C measurements overestimated pH due to incomplete equilibration of the hyperpolarized (13)C label between the H(13)CO3(-) and (13)CO2 pools. Paradoxically, tumors overexpressing CAIX showed lower enzyme activity using magnetization transfer measurements, which can be explained by the more acidic extracellular pH in these tumors and the decreased activity of the enzyme at low pH. This explanation was confirmed by administration of bicarbonate in the drinking water, which elevated tumor extracellular pH and restored enzyme activity to control levels. These results suggest that CAIX expression is increased in hypoxia to compensate for the decrease in its activity produced by a low extracellular pH and supports the hypothesis that a major function of CAIX is to lower the extracellular pH. PMID:26249175

  13. Functional characterization of leucine transport induced in Xenopus laevis oocytes injected with mRNA isolated from midguts of lepidopteran larvae (Philosamia cynthia).

    PubMed

    Sacchi, V F; Perego, C; Magagnin, S

    1995-04-01

    The injection of poly(A)+ mRNA prepared from Philosamia cynthia midgut caused time- and dose-dependent increases of leucine transport in Xenopus laevis oocytes, with an increase in leucine uptake 1.5-3 times that of oocytes injected with water. When the NaCl concentration was reduced from 100 to 5 mmol l-1, the difference between mRNA- and water-injected oocytes was greater and a fourfold increase of L-leucine uptake was measured. D-Leucine (10 mmol l-1) completely inhibited the induced uptake of 0.1 mmol l-1 L-leucine. The newly expressed component of L-leucine uptake increased at alkaline pH and was abolished by incubation for 15 min with 15 mmol l-1 phenylglyoxal. The mean Km values, calculated using Na+ activation curves of leucine uptake, were 23.3 +/- 6.1 mmol l-1 in water-injected oocytes and 0.4 +/- 0.2 mmol l-1 for the newly expressed component of leucine uptake in mRNA-injected oocytes. On the basis of these results, we conclude that the increase of L-leucine uptake in mRNA-injected oocytes was due to the expression of a new transport system, which differs from the endogenous ones and shares many features with that found previously in Philosamia cynthia midgut. PMID:7730757

  14. Fluazuron-induced morphophysiological changes in the cuticle formation and midgut of Rhipicephalus sanguineus Latreille, 1806 (Acari: Ixodidae) nymphs.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Patrícia Rosa; Calligaris, Izabela Braggião; Roma, Gislaine Cristina; Bechara, Gervásio Henrique; Camargo-Mathias, Maria Izabel

    2013-01-01

    The present study demonstrated the effects of the arthropod growth regulator, fluazuron (Acatak®), in the formation of the integument and digestive processes of Rhipicephalus sanguineus nymphs fed on rabbits treated with different doses of this chemical acaricide. For this, three different doses of fluazuron (20, 40, or 80 mg/kg) were applied "pour on" to the hosts (groups II, III, and IV), as well as distilled water to the control group. On the first day after treatment (24 h), the hosts were artificially infested with R. sanguineus nymphs. After full engorgement (7 days), the nymphs were removed, placed on labeled Petri dishes, and kept in biochemical oxygen demand incubator for 7 days. The engorged nymphs were then taken for morphological, histochemical, and histological analyses. The results showed the occurrence of cytological, morphohistological, and histochemical alterations in the integument and midgut of nymphs from all the different treated groups. These alterations occurred at cuticular level in the subdivisions of the cuticle, related to the size of the digestive cells, amount of accumulated blood elements, and digestive residues, as well as the presence of vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells. Thus, this study demonstrated that fluazuron acts on the integument and midgut cells of R. sanguineus nymphs fed on treated rabbits and pointed out the possibility of the use of this chemical-which is more specific, less toxic, and less harmful to the environment and nontarget organisms-in the control of R. sanguineus, at least in the nymphal stage of its biological cycle. PMID:22992894

  15. Ultrastructural analysis of midgut cells from Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae resistant to Bacillus sphaericus.

    PubMed

    de Melo, Janaina Viana; Vasconcelos, Romero Henrique Teixeira; Furtado, André Freire; Peixoto, Christina Alves; Silva-Filha, Maria Helena Neves Lobo

    2008-12-01

    The larvicidal action of the entomopathogen Bacillus sphaericus towards Culex quinquefasciatus is due to the binary (Bin) toxin present in crystals, which are produced during bacterial sporulation. The Bin toxin needs to recognize and bind specifically to a single class of receptors, named Cqm1, which are 60-kDa alpha-glucosidases attached to the apical membrane of midgut cells by a glycosylphosphatidylinositol anchor. C. quinquefasciatus resistance to B. sphaericus has been often associated with the absence of the alpha-glucosidase Cqm1 in larvae midgut microvilli. In this work, we aimed to investigate, at the ultrastructural level, the midgut cells from C. quinquefasciatus larvae whose resistance relies on the lack of the Cqm1 receptor. The morphological analysis showed that midgut columnar cells from the resistant larvae are characterized by a pronounced production of lipid inclusions, throughout the 4th instar. At the end of this stage, resistant larvae had an increased size and number of these inclusions in the midgut cells, while only a small number were observed in the cells from susceptible larvae. The morphological differences in the midgut cells of resistant larvae found in this work suggested that the lack of the Cqm1 receptor, which also has a physiological role as being an alpha-glucosidase, can be related to changes in the cell metabolism. The ultrastructural effects of Bin toxin on midgut epithelial cells from susceptible and resistant larvae were also investigated. The cytopathological alterations observed in susceptible larvae treated with a lethal concentration of toxin included breakdown of the endoplasmic reticulum, mitochondrial swelling, microvillar disruption and vacuolization. Some effects were observed in cells from resistant larvae, although those alterations did not lead to larval death, indicating that the receptor Cqm1 is essential to mediate the larvicidal action of the toxin. This is the first ultrastructural study to show differences

  16. A Peroxidase/Dual Oxidase System Modulates Midgut Epithelial Immunity in Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2012-01-01

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are crosslinked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that the Immunomodulatory Peroxidase (IMPer), an enzyme secreted by the mosquito Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase (Duox) form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors and protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites to develop within the midgut lumen without inducing nitric oxide synthase expression. Disruption of this barrier results in strong and effective pathogen-specific immune responses. PMID:20223948

  17. A peroxidase/dual oxidase system modulates midgut epithelial immunity in Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Molina-Cruz, Alvaro; Gupta, Lalita; Rodrigues, Janneth; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2010-03-26

    Extracellular matrices in diverse biological systems are cross-linked by dityrosine covalent bonds catalyzed by the peroxidase/oxidase system. We show that a peroxidase, secreted by the Anopheles gambiae midgut, and dual oxidase form a dityrosine network that decreases gut permeability to immune elicitors. This network protects the microbiota by preventing activation of epithelial immunity. It also provides a suitable environment for malaria parasites to develop within the midgut lumen without inducing nitric oxide synthase expression. Disruption of this barrier results in strong and effective pathogen-specific immune responses. PMID:20223948

  18. The Tandem PH Domain-Containing Protein 2 (TAPP2) Regulates Chemokine-Induced Cytoskeletal Reorganization and Malignant B Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongzhao; Hou, Sen; Wu, Xun; Nandagopal, Saravanan; Lin, Francis; Kung, Sam; Marshall, Aaron James

    2013-01-01

    The intracellular signaling processes controlling malignant B cell migration and tissue localization remain largely undefined. Tandem PH domain-containing proteins TAPP1 and TAPP2 are adaptor proteins that specifically bind to phosphatidylinositol-3,4-bisphosphate, or PI(3,4)P2, a product of phosphoinositide 3-kinases (PI3K). While PI3K enzymes have a number of functions in cell biology, including cell migration, the functions of PI(3,4)P2 and its binding proteins are not well understood. Previously we found that TAPP2 is highly expressed in primary leukemic B cells that have strong migratory capacity. Here we find that SDF-1-dependent migration of human malignant B cells requires both PI3K signaling and TAPP2. Migration in a transwell assay is significantly impaired by pan-PI3K and isoform-selective PI3K inhibitors, or by TAPP2 shRNA knockdown (KD). Strikingly, TAPP2 KD in combination with PI3K inhibitor treatment nearly abolished the migration response, suggesting that TAPP2 may contribute some functions independent of the PI3K pathway. In microfluidic chamber cell tracking assays, TAPP2 KD cells show reduction in percentage of migrating cells, migration velocity and directionality. TAPP2 KD led to alterations in chemokine-induced rearrangement of the actin cytoskeleton and failure to form polarized morphology. TAPP2 co-localized with the stable F-actin-binding protein utrophin, with both molecules reciprocally localizing against F-actin accumulated at the leading edge upon SDF-1 stimulation. In TAPP2 KD cells, Rac was over-activated and localized to multiple membrane protrusions, suggesting that TAPP2 may act in concert with utrophin and stable F-actin to spatially restrict Rac activation and reduce formation of multiple membrane protrusions. TAPP2 function in cell migration is also apparent in the more complex context of B cell migration into stromal cell layers – a process that is only partially dependent on PI3K and SDF-1. In summary, this study identified

  19. A red tide alga grown under ocean acidification up-regulates its tolerance to lower pH by increasing its photophysiological functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, S.-W.; Beardall, J.; Gao, K.-S.

    2014-05-01

    Phaeocystis globosa, a red tide alga, often forms blooms in or adjacent to coastal waters and experiences changes of pH and seawater carbonate chemistry caused by either diel/periodic fluctuation in biological activity, human activity or, in the longer term, ocean acidification due to atmospheric CO2 rise. We examined the photosynthetic physiology of this species while growing it under different pH levels induced by CO2 enrichment and investigated its acclimation to carbonate chemistry changes under different light levels. Short-term exposure to reduced pHnbs (7.70) decreased the alga's photosynthesis and light use efficiency. However, acclimation to the reduced pH level for 1-19 generations led to recovered photosynthetic activity, being equivalent to that of cells grown under pH 8.07 (control), though such acclimation required a different time span (number of generations) under different light regimes. The low-pH grown cells increased their contents of chlorophyll and carotenoids with prolonged acclimation to the acidification, with increased photosynthetic quantum yield and decreased non-photochemical quenching. The specific growth rate of the low-pH grown cells also increased to emulate that grown under the ambient pH level. This study clearly shows that Phaeocystis globosa is able to acclimate to seawater acidification by increasing its energy capture and decreasing its non-photochemcial energy loss.

  20. Distribution of tetracycline resistance genes in anaerobic treatment of waste sludge: The role of pH in regulating tetracycline resistant bacteria and horizontal gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Huang, Haining; Chen, Yinguang; Zheng, Xiong; Su, Yinglong; Wan, Rui; Yang, Shouye

    2016-10-01

    Although pH value has been widely regarded as an important factor that affects resource recovery of waste sludge, the potential influence of diverse pHs on the distribution of tetracycline resistance genes (TRGs) during sludge anaerobic treatment is largely unknown. Here we reported that in the range of pH 4-10, 0.58-1.18 log unit increase of target TRGs was observed at pH 4, compared with that at pH 7, while 0.70-1.31 log unit further removal were obtained at pH 10. Mechanism study revealed that varied pHs not only altered the community structures of tetracycline resistant bacteria (TRB), but also changed their relative abundances, benefitting the propagation (acidic pHs) or attenuation (alkaline pHs) of TRB. Further investigation indicated that the amount and gene-possessing abilities of key genetic vectors for horizontal TRGs transfer were greatly promoted at acidic pHs but restricted under alkaline conditions. PMID:27485281

  1. Analysis of differentially expressed genes between fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals in midgut of silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qian, Heying; Li, Gang; He, Qingling; Zhang, Huaguang; Xu, Anying

    2016-08-15

    Fluoride tolerance is an economically important trait of silkworm. Near-isogenic lines (NILs) of the dominant endurance to fluoride (Def) gene in Bombyx mori has been constructed before. Here, we analyzed the gene expression profiles of midgut of fluoride-sensitive and fluoride-endurable individuals of Def NILs by using high-throughput Illumina sequencing technology and bioinformatics tools, and identified differentially expressed genes between these individuals. A total of 3,612,399 and 3,567,631 clean tags for the libraries of fluoride-endurable and fluoride-sensitive individuals were obtained, which corresponded to 32,933 and 43,976 distinct clean tags, respectively. Analysis of differentially expressed genes indicates that 241 genes are differentially expressed between the two libraries. Among the 241 genes, 30 are up-regulated and 211 are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. Pathway enrichment analysis demonstrates that genes related to ribosomes, pancreatic secretion, steroid biosynthesis, glutathione metabolism, steroid biosynthesis, and glycerolipid metabolism are down-regulated in fluoride-endurable individuals. qRT-PCR was conducted to confirm the results of the DGE. The present study analyzed differential expression of related genes and tried to find out whether the crucial genes were related to fluoride detoxification which might elucidate fluoride effect and provide a new way in the fluorosis research. PMID:27106117

  2. S-nitrosothiols regulate cell-surface pH buffering by airway epithelial cells during the human immune response to rhinovirus.

    PubMed

    Carraro, Silvia; Doherty, Joseph; Zaman, Khalequz; Gainov, Iain; Turner, Ronald; Vaughan, John; Hunt, John F; Márquez, Javier; Gaston, Benjamin

    2006-05-01

    Human rhinovirus infection is a common trigger for asthma exacerbations. Asthma exacerbations and rhinovirus infections are both associated with markedly decreased pH and ammonium levels in exhaled breath condensates. This observation is thought to be related, in part, to decreased activity of airway epithelial glutaminase. We studied whether direct rhinovirus infection and/or the host immune response to the infection decreased airway epithelial cell surface pH in vitro. Interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor-alpha, but not direct rhinovirus infection, decreased pH, an effect partly associated with decreased ammonium concentrations. This effect was 1) prevented by nitric oxide synthase inhibition; 2) independent of cyclic GMP; 3) associated with an increase in endogenous airway epithelial cell S-nitrosothiol concentration; 4) mimicked by the exogenous S-nitrosothiol, S-nitroso-N-acetyl cysteine; and 5) independent of glutaminase expression and activity. We then confirmed that decreased epithelial pH inhibits human rhinovirus replication in airway epithelial cells. These data suggest that a nitric oxide synthase-dependent host response to viral infection mediated by S-nitrosothiols, rather than direct infection itself, plays a role in decreased airway surface pH during human rhinovirus infection. This host immune response may serve to protect the lower airways from direct infection in the normal host. In patients with asthma, however, this fall in pH could be associated with the increased mucus production, augmented inflammatory cell degranulation, bronchoconstriction, and cough characteristic of an asthma exacerbation. PMID:16603595

  3. Transcriptomic profile of Drosophila melanogaster larval midgut and responses to oxidative stress

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Oligoarray analysis was used to determine the number and nature of genes expressed in third-instar Drosophila melanogaster larval midguts. The majority of transcripts were associated with protein synthesis and metabolism. Serine proteases were the main proteolytic enzymes detected. Some 40% of th...

  4. Midgut serine proteases and alternative host plant utilization in Pieris brassicae L.

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Rakesh; Bhardwaj, Usha; Kumar, Pawan; Mazumdar-Leighton, Sudeshna

    2015-01-01

    Pieris brassicae L. is a serious pest of cultivated crucifers in several parts of the world. Larvae of P. brassicae also feed prolifically on garden nasturtium (Tropaeolum majus L., of the family Tropaeolaceae). Proteolytic digestion was studied in larvae feeding on multiple hosts. Fourth instars were collected from cauliflower fields before transfer onto detached, aerial tissues of selected host plants in the lab. Variable levels of midgut proteases were detected in larvae fed on different hosts using protein substrates (casein and recombinant RBCL cloned from cauliflower) and diagnostic, synthetic substrates. Qualitative changes in midgut trypsin activities and quantitative changes in midgut chymotrypsin activities were implicated in physiological adaptation of larvae transferred to T. majus. Midgut proteolytic activities were inhibited to different extents by serine protease inhibitors, including putative trypsin inhibitors isolated from herbivore-attacked and herbivore-free leaves of cauliflower (CfTI) and T. majus (TpTI). Transfer of larvae to T. majus significantly influenced feeding parameters but not necessarily when transferred to different tissues of the same host. Results obtained are relevant for devising sustainable pest management strategies, including transgenic approaches using genes encoding plant protease inhibitors. PMID:25873901

  5. Transcriptome of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptomic profiles of the lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by the biopesticide Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which...

  6. Perimicrovillar membrane assembly: the fate of phospholipids synthesised by the midgut of Rhodnius prolixus

    PubMed Central

    Bittencourt-Cunha, Paula Rêgo; Silva-Cardoso, Livia; de Oliveira, Giselle Almeida; da Silva, José Roberto; da Silveira, Alan Barbosa; Kluck, George Eduardo Gabriel; Souza-Lima, Michele; Gondim, Katia Calp; Dansa-Petretsky, Marilvia; Silva, Carlos Peres; Masuda, Hatisaburo; da Silva, Mario Alberto Cardoso; Atella, Georgia Correa

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we describe the fate of fatty acids that are incorporated from the lumen by the posterior midgut epithelium of Rhodnius prolixus and the biosynthesis of lipids. We also demonstrate that neutral lipids (NL) are transferred to the haemolymphatic lipophorin (Lp) and that phospholipids remain in the tissue in which they are organised into perimicrovillar membranes (PMMs). 3H-palmitic acid added at the luminal side of isolated midguts of R. prolixus females was readily absorbed and was used to synthesise phospholipids (80%) and NL (20%). The highest incorporation of 3H-palmitic acid was on the first day after a blood meal. The amounts of diacylglycerol (DG) and triacylglycerol synthesised by the tissue decreased in the presence of Lp in the incubation medium. The metabolic fates of 3H-lipids synthesised by the posterior midgut were followed and it was observed that DG was the major lipid released to Lp particles. However, the majority of phospholipids were not transferred to Lp, but remained in the tissue. The phospholipids that were synthesised and accumulated in the posterior midgut were found to be associated with Rhodnius luminal contents as structural components of PMMs. PMID:23827998

  7. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P.; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K.; Wilson, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  8. Seasonality and Locality Affect the Diversity of Anopheles gambiae and Anopheles coluzzii Midgut Microbiota from Ghana.

    PubMed

    Akorli, Jewelna; Gendrin, Mathilde; Pels, Nana Adjoa P; Yeboah-Manu, Dorothy; Christophides, George K; Wilson, Michael D

    2016-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria can have important implications in the development and competence of disease vectors. In Anopheles mosquitoes, the composition of the midgut microbiota is largely influenced by the larval breeding site, but the exact factors shaping this composition are currently unknown. Here, we examined whether the proximity to urban areas and seasons have an impact on the midgut microbial community of the two major malaria vectors in Africa, An. coluzzii and An. gambiae. Larvae and pupae were collected from selected habitats in two districts of Ghana during the dry and rainy season periods. The midgut microbiota of adults that emerged from these collections was determined by 454-pyrosequencing of the 16S ribosomal DNA. We show that in both mosquito species, Shewanellaceae constituted on average of 54% and 73% of the midgut microbiota from each site in the dry and rainy season, respectively. Enterobacteriaceae was found in comparatively low abundance below 1% in 22/30 samples in the dry season, and in 25/38 samples in the rainy season. Our data indicate that seasonality and locality significantly affect both the diversity of microbiota and the relative abundance of bacterial families with a positive impact of dry season and peri-urban settings. PMID:27322614

  9. Intravital imaging of Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin binding sites in the midgut of silkworm.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Wang, Jing; Han, Heyou; Huang, Liang; Shao, Feng; Li, Xuepu

    2014-02-15

    Identification of the resistance mechanism of insects against Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1A toxin is becoming an increasingly challenging task. This fact highlights the need for establishing new methods to further explore the molecular interactions of Cry1A toxin with insects and the receptor-binding region of Cry1A toxins for their wider application as biopesticides and a gene source for gene-modified crops. In this contribution, a quantum dot-based near-infrared fluorescence imaging method has been applied for direct dynamic tracking of the specific binding of Cry1A toxins, CrylAa and CrylAc, to the midgut tissue of silkworm. The in vitro fluorescence imaging displayed the higher binding specificity of CrylAa-QD probes compared to CrylAc-QD to the brush border membrane vesicles of midgut from silkworm. The in vivo imaging demonstrated that more CrylAa-QDs binding to silkworm midgut could be effectively and distinctly monitored in living silkworms. Furthermore, frozen section analysis clearly indicated the broader receptor-binding region of Cry1Aa compared to that of Cry1Ac in the midgut part. These observations suggest that the insecticidal activity of Cry toxins may depend on the receptor-binding sites, and this scatheless and visual near-infrared fluorescence imaging could provide a new avenue to study the resistance mechanism to maintain the insecticidal activity of B. thuringiensis toxins. PMID:24252542

  10. EFFECTS OF INSECT HORMONE ACTIONS, 20E AND JH, ON MIDGUT STEM CELLS OF LEPIDOPTERA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Addition of the two principal insect hormones, 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) and juvenile hormone (JH3) to the medium containing midgut stem cells cultured in vitro, induced stimulation of stem cell proliferation in a concentration-dependent manner. Stem cells were obtained from larvae of an economically...

  11. Midgut gene expression in Asian citrus psyllid (Hemiptera: Psyllidae) Diaphorina citri

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector of the bacterium associated with a devastating citrus disease known as huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP ...

  12. EFFECT OF A FAT BODY EXTRACT ON LARVAL MIDGUT CELLS AND GROWTH OF LEPIDOPTERA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    An extract of fat body (FBX) prepared from green fat body tissue from newly ecdysed pupae of Manduca sexta must be added to cultures with a very low (1 pg/ l) titer of insect molting hormone (20-hydroxyecdysone, 20E) in order to induce midgut stem cells to multiply in vitro. However, FBX fed or...

  13. Unusual presentation of left sided acute appendicitis in elderly male with asymptomatic midgut malrotation

    PubMed Central

    Singla, Animesh A.; Rajaratnam, Joshua; Singla, Apresh A.; Wiltshire, Stephanie; Kwik, Charlotte; Smigelski, Michelle; Morgan, Mathew J.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Acute appendicitis in the setting of midgut malrotation is uncommon. Midgut malrotation commonly presents within the first month of life. A minority remain asymptomatic and may present with concomitant abdominal pathology making diagnosis difficult. Presentation of case This paper reports a rare case of a 73-year-old male diagnosed with acute appendicitis and asymptomatic MM .The patient underwent a laparoscopic appendectomy, but had an unplanned return to theatre for washout of post-operative intra-abdominal haematoma. Discussion Midgut malrotation is commonly described by the stringer classification and type 1a is the most common in adults. There have only been a handful of documented cases of acute appendicitis with midgut malrotation occurring in the adult population. Previous delay in diagnosis has led to a delay in definitive management. Both laparoscopic and open surgery has been used in the past. Conclusion Acute appendicitis with malrotation should be considered in elderly patients presenting with atypical signs and symptoms. Imaging offers significant advantage for timely and definitive management. PMID:26520036

  14. Recurrent intestinal volvulus in midgut malrotation causing acute bowel obstruction: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Sheikh, Fayed; Balarajah, Vickna; Ayantunde, Abraham Abiodun

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal malrotation occurs when there is a disruption in the normal embryological development of the bowel. The majority of patients present with clinical features in childhood, though rarely a first presentation can take place in adulthood. Recurrent bowel obstruction in patients with previous abdominal operation for midgut malrotation is mostly due to adhesions but very few reported cases have been due to recurrent volvulus. We present the case of a 22-year-old gentleman who had laparotomy in childhood for small bowel volvulus and then presented with acute bowel obstruction. Preoperative computerised tomography scan showed small bowel obstruction and features in keeping with midgut malrotation. Emergency laparotomy findings confirmed midgut malrotation with absent appendix, abnormal location of caecum, ascending colon and small bowel. In addition, there were small bowel volvulus and a segment of terminal ileal stricture. Limited right hemicolectomy was performed with excellent postoperative recovery. This case is presented to illustrate a rare occurrence and raise an awareness of the possibility of dreadful recurrent volvulus even several years following an initial Ladd’s procedure for midgut malrotation. Therefore, one will need to exercise a high index of suspicion and this becomes very crucial in order to ensure prompt surgical intervention and thereby preventing an attendant bowel ischaemia with its associated high fatality. PMID:23556060

  15. A case report of hepatic and renal dysfunction complicating midgut malrotation in an adult

    PubMed Central

    Samaraee, Ahmad Al; Kilgour, Alixe H M; Goulbourne, Ian A; Robson, Rita; Hayat, Mumtaz

    2009-01-01

    A 39-year-old man had an unusual presentation of jaundice and acute renal dysfunction complicating midgut malrotation. Diagnosis by computed tomography scan enabled prompt surgery and functional correction of the malrotation, with a full return to normal life. PMID:21686902

  16. Midgut transcriptome profiling of Anoplophora glabripennis, a lignocellulose degrading Cerambycid beetle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Wood-feeding insects often work in collaboration with microbial symbionts to degrade lignin biopolymers and release glucose and other fermentable sugars from recalcitrant plant cell wall carbohydrates, including cellulose and hemicellulose. Here, we present the midgut transcriptome of la...

  17. Barber Pole Sign in CT Angiography, Adult Presentation of Midgut Malrotation: A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Garcelan-Trigo, Juan Arsenio; Tello-Moreno, Manuel; Rabaza-Espigares, Manuel Jesus; Talavera-Martinez, Ildefonso

    2015-07-01

    Adult midgut volvulus is a challenging diagnosis because of its low incidence and nonspecific symptoms. Diagnostic delay and long-term complaints are frequent in this clinical scenario. We reported a patient referred to our diagnostic imaging unit with intermittent abdominal pain, bloating and episodic vomiting for several years. He underwent barium gastrointestinal transit and abdominal ultrasound, which revealed severe gastric dilatation, food retention and slow transit until a depressed duodenojejunal flexure, with malrotation of the midgut and jejunal loops being located in the right upper quadrant. Computed tomography angiography was performed, showing rotation of the small intestine around the mesentery root, suggestive of midgut malrotation. In addition, an abnormal twisted disposition of superior mesenteric artery with corkscrew appearance was seen, shaping the pole-barber sign which was evident in volume rendering three-dimensional reconstructions. The patient underwent scheduled surgical treatment without any complication and had good outcome after hospital discharge and follow-up. Computed tomography plays an important role in evaluation of adult midgut volvulus. In addition, angiographic reconstructions can help us to assess the anatomic disposition of mesenteric vascular supply. Both of these assessments are useful in preoperative management. PMID:26557278

  18. Gene expression in midgut tissues of Diaphorina citri: Application to biology and vector control

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We produced a gene expression dataset from the midgut tissues of the Asian citrus psyllid (AsCP), Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae). The AsCP is the primary vector associated with the spread of a devastating citrus trees disease, huanglongbing (HLB). The occurrence and spread of the AsCP and H...

  19. Midgut epithelium in molting silkworm: A fine balance among cell growth, differentiation, and survival.

    PubMed

    Franzetti, Eleonora; Casartelli, Morena; D'Antona, Paola; Montali, Aurora; Romanelli, Davide; Cappellozza, Silvia; Caccia, Silvia; Grimaldi, Annalisa; de Eguileor, Magda; Tettamanti, Gianluca

    2016-07-01

    The midgut of insects has attracted great attention as a system for studying intestinal stem cells (ISCs) as well as cell death-related processes, such as apoptosis and autophagy. Among insects, Lepidoptera represent a good model to analyze these cells and processes. In particular, larva-larva molting is an interesting developmental phase since the larva must deal with nutrient starvation and its organs are subjected to rearrangements due to proliferation and differentiation events. Several studies have analyzed ISCs in vitro and characterized key factors involved in their division and differentiation during molt. However, in vivo studies performed during larva-larva transition on these cells, and on the whole midgut epithelium, are fragmentary. In the present study, we analyzed the larval midgut epithelium of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, during larva-larva molting, focusing our attention on ISCs. Moreover, we investigated the metabolic changes that occur in the epithelium and evaluated the intervention of autophagy. Our data on ISCs proliferation and differentiation, autophagy activation, and metabolic and functional activities of the midgut cells shed light on the complexity of this organ during the molting phase. PMID:27349418

  20. Localization of two post-proline cleaving peptidases in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two soluble post-proline cleaving peptidase activities, PPCP1 and PPCP2, were demonstrated in the midgut of Tenebrio molitor larvae with the substrate benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanyl-L-proline p-nitroanilide. Both activities were serine peptidases. PPCP1 was active in acidic buffers, with maximum activit...

  1. Does autophagy in the midgut epithelium of centipedes depend on the day/night cycle?

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K; Kszuk-Jendrysik, M

    2015-01-01

    The midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata, is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. In L. forficatus, the autophagy occurred only in the cytoplasm of the digestive cells as a sporadic process, while in S. cingulata, it occurred intensively in the digestive, secretory and regenerative cells of the midgut epithelium. In both of the species that were analyzed, this process proceeded in a continuous manner and did not depend on the day/night cycle. Ultrastructural analysis showed that the autophagosomes and autolysosomes were located mainly in the apical and perinuclear cytoplasm of the digestive cells in L. forficatus. However, in S. cingulata, the entire cytoplasm was filled with autophagosomes and autolysosomes. Initially the membranes of phagophores surround organelles during autophagosome formation. Autolysosomes result from the fusion of autophagosomes and lysosomes. Residual bodies which are the last stage of autophagy were released into the midgut lumen due to necrosis. Autophagy in the midgut epithelia that were analyzed was confirmed using acid phosphatase and mono-dansyl-cadaverine stainings. PMID:25464151

  2. Apoptosis and necrosis during the circadian cycle in the centipede midgut.

    PubMed

    Rost-Roszkowska, M M; Chajec, Ł; Vilimova, J; Tajovský, K

    2016-07-01

    Three types of cells have been distinguished in the midgut epithelium of two centipedes, Lithobius forficatus and Scolopendra cingulata: digestive, secretory, and regenerative cells. According to the results of our previous studies, we decided to analyze the relationship between apoptosis and necrosis in their midgut epithelium and circadian rhythms. Ultrastructural analysis showed that these processes proceed in a continuous manner that is independent of the circadian rhythm in L. forficatus, while in S. cingulata necrosis is activated at midnight. Additionally, the description of apoptosis and necrosis showed no differences between males and females of both species analyzed. At the beginning of apoptosis, the cell cytoplasm becomes electron-dense, apparently in response to shrinkage of the cell. Organelles such as the mitochondria, cisterns of endoplasmic reticulum transform and degenerate. Nuclei gradually assume lobular shapes before the apoptotic cell is discharged into the midgut lumen. During necrosis, however, the cytoplasm of the cell becomes electron-lucent, and the number of organelles decreases. While the digestive cells of about 10 % of L. forficatus contain rickettsia-like pathogens, the corresponding cells in S. cingulata are free of rickettsia. As a result, we can state that apoptosis in L. forficatus is presumably responsible for protecting the organism against infections, while in S. cingulata apoptosis is not associated with the elimination of pathogens. Necrosis is attributed to mechanical damage, and the activation of this process coincides with proliferation of the midgut regenerative cells at midnight in S. cingulata. PMID:26277351

  3. African Swine Fever Virus Replication in the Midgut Epithelium Is Required for Infection of Ornithodoros Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Kleiboeker, S. B.; Scoles, G. A.; Burrage, T. G.; Sur, J.-H.

    1999-01-01

    Although the Malawi Lil20/1 (MAL) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) was isolated from Ornithodoros sp. ticks, our attempts to experimentally infect ticks by feeding them this strain failed. Ten different collections of Ornithodorus porcinus porcinus ticks and one collection of O. porcinus domesticus ticks were orally exposed to a high titer of MAL. At 3 weeks postinoculation (p.i.), <25% of the ticks contained detectable virus, with viral titers of <4 log10 50% hemadsorbing doses/ml. Viral titers declined to undetectability in >90% of the ticks by 5 weeks p.i. To further study the growth defect, O. porcinus porcinus ticks were orally exposed to MAL and assayed at regular intervals p.i. Whole-tick viral titers dramatically declined (>1,000-fold) between 2 and 6 days p.i., and by 18 days p.i., viral titers were below the detection limit. In contrast, viral titers of ticks orally exposed to a tick-competent ASFV isolate, Pretoriuskop/96/4/1 (Pr4), increased 10-fold by 10 days p.i. and 50-fold by 14 days p.i. Early viral gene expression, but not extensive late gene expression or viral DNA synthesis, was detected in the midguts of ticks orally exposed to MAL. Ultrastructural analysis demonstrated that progeny virus was rarely present in ticks orally exposed to MAL and, when present, was associated with extensive cytopathology of phagocytic midgut epithelial cells. To determine if viral replication was restricted only in the midgut epithelium, parenteral inoculations into the hemocoel were performed. With inoculation by this route, a persistent infection was established although a delay in generalization of MAL was detected and viral titers in most tissues were typically 10- to 1,000-fold lower than those of ticks injected with Pr4. MAL was detected in both the salivary secretion and coxal fluid following feeding but less frequently and at a lower titer compared to Pr4. Transovarial transmission of MAL was not detected after two gonotrophic cycles

  4. A trypsin-like proteinase in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae Zeller (Lepidoptera: Pyralidae): purification, characterization, and host plant inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Ranjbar, Mina; Zibaee, Arash; Sendi, Jalal Jalali

    2014-01-01

    A trypsin-like proteinase was purified and characterized in the midgut of Ectomyelois ceratoniae. A purification process that used Sepharyl G-100 and DEAE-cellulose fast flow chromatographies revealed a proteinase with specific activity of 66.7 μmol/min/mg protein, recovery of 27.04 and purification fold of 23.35. Molecular weight of the purified protein was found to be 35.8 kDa. Optimal pH and temperature were obtained 9 and 20°C for the purified trypsin proteinase, respectively. The purified enzyme was significantly inhibited by PMSF, TLCK, and SBTI as specific inhibitors of trypsins in which TLCK showed the highest inhibitory effect. Trypsin proteinase inhibitors were extracted from four varieties of pomegranate including Brait, Torsh-Sabz, May-Khosh, and Shirin by ion exchange chromatography. It was found that fractions 17-20 of Brait; fractions 18 and 21-26 of Torsh-Sabz; fractions 1-7, 11-17, and 19-21 of May-Khosh and fraction 8 for Shirin showed presence of trypsin inhibitor in these host. Comparison of their inhibitory effects on the purified trypsin proteinase of E. ceratoniae demonstrated that fractions from May-khosh variety had the highest effect on the enzyme among other extracted fractions. Characterization of serine proteinases of insects mainly trypsins is one of the promising methods to decrease population and damages via extracting their inhibitors and providing resistant varieties. PMID:24338707

  5. Low pH, aluminum and phosphorus coordinately regulate malate exudation through GmALMT1 to improve soybean adaptation to acid soils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Low pH, aluminum (Al) toxicity and low phosphorus (P) often coexist in acid soils where crops need to cope with these multiple limiting factors. In this study we found that P addition to acid soils alleviates Al toxicity and enhanced soybean adaptation to acid soils, especially for the P-efficient g...

  6. pH Regulation by NHX-Type Antiporters Is Required for Receptor-Mediated Protein Trafficking to the Vacuole in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Reguera, Maria; Bassil, Elias; Tajima, Hiromi; Wimmer, Monika; Chanoca, Alexandra; Otegui, Marisa S.; Paris, Nadine; Blumwald, Eduardo

    2015-01-01

    Protein trafficking requires proper ion and pH homeostasis of the endomembrane system. The NHX-type Na+/H+ antiporters NHX5 and NHX6 localize to the Golgi, trans-Golgi network, and prevacuolar compartments and are required for growth and trafficking to the vacuole. In the nhx5 nhx6 T-DNA insertional knockouts, the precursors of the 2S albumin and 12S globulin storage proteins accumulated and were missorted to the apoplast. Immunoelectron microscopy revealed the presence of vesicle clusters containing storage protein precursors and vacuolar sorting receptors (VSRs). Isolation and identification of complexes of VSRs with unprocessed 12S globulin by 2D blue-native PAGE/SDS-PAGE indicated that the nhx5 nhx6 knockouts showed compromised receptor-cargo association. In vivo interaction studies using bimolecular fluorescence complementation between VSR2;1, aleurain, and 12S globulin suggested that nhx5 nhx6 knockouts showed a significant reduction of VSR binding to both cargoes. In vivo pH measurements indicated that the lumens of VSR compartments containing aleurain, as well as the trans-Golgi network and prevacuolar compartments, were significantly more acidic in nhx5 nhx6 knockouts. This work demonstrates the importance of NHX5 and NHX6 in maintaining endomembrane luminal pH and supports the notion that proper vacuolar trafficking and proteolytic processing of storage proteins require endomembrane pH homeostasis. PMID:25829439

  7. Fluid absorption in the isolated midgut of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti)

    PubMed Central

    Onken, Horst; Moffett, David F.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The transepithelial voltage (Vte) and the volume of isolated posterior midguts of adult female yellow fever mosquitoes (Aedes aegypti) were monitored. In all experiments, the initial Vte after filling the midgut was lumen negative, but subsequently became lumen positive at a rate of approximately 1 mV min−1. Simultaneously, the midgut volume decreased, indicating spontaneous fluid absorption. When the midguts were filled and bathed with mosquito saline, the average rate of fluid absorption was 36.5±3.0 nl min−1 (N=4, ±s.e.m.). In the presence of theophylline (10 mmol l−1), Vte reached significantly higher lumen-positive values, but the rate of fluid absorption was not affected (N=6). In the presence of NaCN (5 mmol l−1), Vte remained close to 0 mV (N=4) and fluid absorption was reduced (14.4±1.3 nl min−1, N=3, ±s.e.m.). When midguts were filled with buffered NaCl (154 mmol l−1 plus 1 mmol l−1 HEPES) and bathed in mosquito saline with theophylline, fluid absorption was augmented (50.0±5.8 nl min−1, N=12, ±s.e.m.). Concanamycin A (10 µmol l−1), ouabain (1 mmol l−1), and acetazolamide (1 mmol l−1) affected Vte in different ways, but all reduced fluid absorption by 60–70% of the value before addition of the drugs. PMID:25944920

  8. Composition of the Spruce Budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) Midgut Microbiota as Affected by Rearing Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Landry, Mathieu; Comeau, André M.; Derome, Nicolas; Cusson, Michel; Levesque, Roger C.

    2015-01-01

    The eastern spruce budworm (Choristoneura fumiferana) is one of the most destructive forest insect pests in Canada. Little is known about its intestinal microbiota, which could play a role in digestion, immune protection, communication and/or development. The present study was designed to provide a first characterization of the effects of rearing conditions on the taxonomic diversity and structure of the C. fumiferana midgut microbiota, using a culture-independent approach. Three diets and insect sources were examined: larvae from a laboratory colony reared on a synthetic diet and field-collected larvae reared on balsam fir or black spruce foliage. Bacterial DNA from the larval midguts was extracted to amplify and sequence the V6-V8 region of the 16S rRNA gene, using the Roche 454 GS-FLX technology. Our results showed a dominance of Proteobacteria, mainly Pseudomonas spp., in the spruce budworm midgut, irrespective of treatment group. Taxonomic diversity of the midgut microbiota was greater for larvae reared on synthetic diet than for those collected and reared on host plants, a difference that is likely accounted for by several factors. A greater proportion of bacteria from the phylum Bacteroidetes in insects fed artificial diet constituted the main difference between this group and those reared on foliage; within the phylum Proteobacteria, the presence of the genus Bradyrhizobium was also unique to insects reared on artificial diet. Strikingly, a Bray-Curtis analysis showed important differences in microbial diversity among the treatment groups, pointing to the importance of diet and environment in defining the spruce budworm midgut microbiota. PMID:26636571

  9. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments. PMID:27153200

  10. Transcriptome analysis in the midgut of the earthworm (Eisenia andrei) using expressed sequence tags.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myung Sik; Cho, Sung Jin; Tak, Eun Sik; Lee, Jong Ae; Cho, Hyun Ju; Park, Bum Joon; Shin, Chuog; Kim, Dae Kyong; Park, Soon Cheol

    2005-03-25

    In order to gain insight into the expression profiles of the earthworm midgut, we analyzed 1106 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) derived from the earthworm midgut cDNA library. Among the 1106 ESTs analyzed, 557 (50.4%) ESTs showed significant similarity to known genes and represented 229 unique genes of which 166 ESTs were singletons and 63 ESTs manifest as two or more ESTs. While 552 ESTs (49.9%) were sequenced only once, 230 ESTs (20.8%) appeared two to five times and 324 ESTs (29.3%) were sequenced more than five times. Considering this redundancy of expression, it is likely that the gene expression profile of the earthworm midgut would be polarized. The expression of globin-related proteins, including ferritin and linker chain, and fibrinolytic enzymes appeared to account for 10.1% and 4.7% of the total ESTs analyzed in this study, respectively. This suggests that the prime functions of the midgut in the earthworm would be associated with protein hydrolysis as well as globin formation. Among the recognized protein-coding genes, the gene category involved in protein synthesis appeared to be the largest one accounting for 15.6% of the expression in the midgut, followed by gene categories associated with energy (11.2%), homeostasis (10.8%), metabolism (3.6%), cytoskeleton (2.5%), and protein fate (1.4%). With regard to functional aspects, the most abundantly expressed genes were associated with respiratory pigment (10.1%), cellular respiration (8.6%), and fibrin hydrolysis (4.7%). In addition, we were able to identify novel ESTs in the earthworm, which were related to the innate immune system, including destabilase, a possible antagonist of transglutaminase. PMID:15708003

  11. Midgut and salivary gland transcriptomes of the arbovirus vector Culicoides sonorensis (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae).

    PubMed

    Campbell, C L; Vandyke, K A; Letchworth, G J; Drolet, B S; Hanekamp, T; Wilson, W C

    2005-04-01

    Numerous Culicoides spp. are important vectors of livestock or human disease pathogens. Transcriptome information from midguts and salivary glands of adult female Culicoides sonorensis provides new insight into vector biology. Of 1719 expressed sequence tags (ESTs) from adult serum-fed female midguts harvested within 5 h of feeding, twenty-eight clusters of serine proteases were derived. Four clusters encode putative iron binding proteins (FER1, FERL, PXDL1, PXDL2), and two clusters encode metalloendopeptidases (MDP6C, MDP6D) that probably function in bloodmeal catabolism. In addition, a diverse variety of housekeeping cDNAs were identified. Selected midgut protease transcripts were analysed by quantitative real-time PCR (q-PCR): TRY1_115 and MDP6C mRNAs were induced in adult female midguts upon feeding, whereas TRY1_156 and CHYM1 were abundant in midguts both before and immediately after feeding. Of 708 salivary gland ESTs analysed, clusters representing two new classes of protein families were identified: a new class of D7 proteins and a new class of Kunitz-type protease inhibitors. Additional cDNAs representing putative immunomodulatory proteins were also identified: 5' nucleotidases, antigen 5-related proteins, a hyaluronidase, a platelet-activating factor acetylhydrolase, mucins and several immune response cDNAs. Analysis by q-PCR showed that all D7 and Kunitz domain transcripts tested were highly enriched in female heads compared with other tissues and were generally absent from males. The mRNAs of two additional protease inhibitors, TFPI1 and TFPI2, were detected in salivary glands of paraffin-embedded females by in situ hybridization. PMID:15796745

  12. Midgut Transcriptome of the Cockroach Periplaneta americana and Its Microbiota: Digestion, Detoxification and Oxidative Stress Response.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianhua; Zhang, Yixi; Li, Jingjing; Liu, Meiling; Liu, Zewen

    2016-01-01

    The cockroach, Periplaneta americana, is an obnoxious and notorious pest of the world, with a strong ability to adapt to a variety of complex environments. However, the molecular mechanism of this adaptability is mostly unknown. In this study, the genes and microbiota composition associated with the adaptation mechanism were studied by analyzing the transcriptome and 16S rDNA pyrosequencing of the P. americana midgut, respectively. Midgut transcriptome analysis identified 82,905 unigenes, among which 64 genes putatively involved in digestion (11 genes), detoxification (37 genes) and oxidative stress response (16 genes) were found. Evaluation of gene expression following treatment with cycloxaprid further revealed that the selected genes (CYP6J1, CYP4C1, CYP6K1, Delta GST, alpha-amylase, beta-glucosidase and aminopeptidase) were upregulated at least 2.0-fold at the transcriptional level, and four genes were upregulated more than 10.0-fold. An interesting finding was that three digestive enzymes positively responded to cycloxaprid application. Tissue expression profiles further showed that most of the selected genes were midgut-biased, with the exception of CYP6K1. The midgut microbiota composition was obtained via 16S rDNA pyrosequencing and was found to be mainly dominated by organisms from the Firmicutes phylum, among which Clostridiales, Lactobacillales and Burkholderiales were the main orders which might assist the host in the food digestion or detoxification of noxious compounds. The preponderant species, Clostridium cellulovorans, was previously reported to degrade lignocellulose efficiently in insects. The abundance of genes involved in digestion, detoxification and response to oxidative stress, and the diversity of microbiota in the midgut might provide P. americana high capacity to adapt to complex environments. PMID:27153200

  13. Histidine residues in the Na+-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) are central regulators of SVCT2 function, modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na+ cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Ormazabal, Valeska; Zuñiga, Felipe A; Escobar, Elizabeth; Aylwin, Carlos; Salas-Burgos, Alexis; Godoy, Alejandro; Reyes, Alejandro M; Vera, Juan Carlos; Rivas, Coralia I

    2010-11-19

    Na(+)-coupled ascorbic acid transporter-2 (SVCT2) activity is impaired at acid pH, but little is known about the molecular determinants that define the transporter pH sensitivity. SVCT2 contains six histidine residues in its primary sequence, three of which are exofacial in the transporter secondary structure model. We used site-directed mutagenesis and treatment with diethylpyrocarbonate to identify histidine residues responsible for SVCT2 pH sensitivity. We conclude that five histidine residues, His(109), His(203), His(206), His(269), and His(413), are central regulators of SVCT2 function, participating to different degrees in modulating pH sensitivity, transporter kinetics, Na(+) cooperativity, conformational stability, and subcellular localization. Our results are compatible with a model in which (i) a single exofacial histidine residue, His(413), localized in the exofacial loop IV that connects transmembrane helices VII-VIII defines the pH sensitivity of SVCT2 through a mechanism involving a marked attenuation of the activation by Na(+) and loss of Na(+) cooperativity, which leads to a decreased V(max) without altering the transport K(m); (ii) exofacial histidine residues His(203), His(206), and His(413) may be involved in maintaining a functional interaction between exofacial loops II and IV and influence the general folding of the transporter; (iii) histidines 203, 206, 269, and 413 affect the transporter kinetics by modulating the apparent transport K(m); and (iv) histidine 109, localized at the center of transmembrane helix I, might be fundamental for the interaction of SVCT2 with the transported substrate ascorbic acid. Thus, histidine residues are central regulators of SVCT2 function. PMID:20843809

  14. Developmental Expression of Ecdysone-Related Genes Associated With Metamorphic Changes During Midgut Remodeling of Silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera:Bombycidae).

    PubMed

    Goncu, Ebru; Uranlı, Ramazan; Selek, Gozde; Parlak, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is known as the systemic regulators of insect cells; however, how to impact the fate and function of mature and stem cells is unclear. For the first time, we report ecdysone regulatory cascades in both mature midgut cell and stem cell fractions related to developmental events by using histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and gene expression analysis methods. Ecdysone receptor-B1 (EcR-B1) and ultraspiracle 1 (USP-1) mRNAs were detected mainly in mature cells during programmed cell death (PCD). Lowered E75A and probably BR-C Z4 in mature cells appear to provide a signal to the initiation of PCD. E74B, E75B and BR-C Z2 seem to be early response genes which are involved in preparatory phase of cell death. It is likely that βFTZ-F1, E74A and BR-C Z1 are probably associated with execution of death. EcR-A and USP2 mRNAs were found in stem cells during remodeling processes but EcR-B1, USP1 and E74B genes imply an important role during initial phase of metamorphic events in stem cells. BHR3 mRNAs were determined abundantly in stem cells suggesting its primary role in differentiation. All of these results showed the determination the cell fate in Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) midgut depends on type of ecdysone receptor isoforms and ecdysone-related transcription factors. PMID:27620558

  15. Developmental Expression of Ecdysone-Related Genes Associated With Metamorphic Changes During Midgut Remodeling of Silkworm Bombyx mori (Lepidoptera:Bombycidae)

    PubMed Central

    Goncu, Ebru; Uranlı, Ramazan; Selek, Gozde; Parlak, Osman

    2016-01-01

    Steroid hormone 20-hydroxyecdysone is known as the systemic regulators of insect cells; however, how to impact the fate and function of mature and stem cells is unclear. For the first time, we report ecdysone regulatory cascades in both mature midgut cell and stem cell fractions related to developmental events by using histological, immunohistochemical, biochemical and gene expression analysis methods. Ecdysone receptor-B1 (EcR-B1) and ultraspiracle 1 (USP-1) mRNAs were detected mainly in mature cells during programmed cell death (PCD). Lowered E75A and probably BR-C Z4 in mature cells appear to provide a signal to the initiation of PCD. E74B, E75B and BR-C Z2 seem to be early response genes which are involved in preparatory phase of cell death. It is likely that βFTZ-F1, E74A and BR-C Z1 are probably associated with execution of death. EcR-A and USP2 mRNAs were found in stem cells during remodeling processes but EcR-B1, USP1 and E74B genes imply an important role during initial phase of metamorphic events in stem cells. BHR3 mRNAs were determined abundantly in stem cells suggesting its primary role in differentiation. All of these results showed the determination the cell fate in Bombyx mori (Linnaeus) midgut depends on type of ecdysone receptor isoforms and ecdysone-related transcription factors. PMID:27620558

  16. Fatty acid binding protein 10 in the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides): characterization and regulation under pH and temperature stress.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zeng-hua; Liu, Yu-feng; Wang, Wei-Na; Xin, Yu; Xie, Fu-xing; Wang, An-Li

    2012-04-01

    We have isolated and characterized a fatty acid binding protein from the liver of the orange-spotted grouper (Epinephelus coioides). Amino acid sequence similarity of the Ec-FABP (E. coioides-FABP) was highest to FABP10s isolated from the livers of catfish, chicken, salamander and iguana. The open-reading frame of the Ec-FABP codes for a protein of 14.0 kDa with a calculated isoelectric point of 8.5. We first expressed a FABP10 protein from orange-spotted grouper (E. coioides) in Pichia pastoris, and then characterized the antioxidative potential of our recombinant Ec-FABP by DCF fluorescence assay. RT-PCR assays showed that endogenous Ec-FABP mRNA is most strongly expressed in liver with the most abundance and intestine. Change in the groupers' blood cells respiratory burst activity was examined during and after exposure to the pH and temperature stress using flow cytometry. Further analysis of Ec-FABP gene expression in liver tissue by quantitative real-time PCR demonstrated that Ec-FABP transcript levels increased when the fish were exposed to both pH and temperature stress, but the time when its mRNA expression level peaked differed under these stresses. Western blot analyses confirmed that the Ec-FABP protein was strongly expressed in the liver after exposure to the pH and temperature stress. These results suggest that Ec-FABP expression is stimulated by pH and temperature stress and that it may play important roles in general adaptive and antioxidant responses. PMID:22182678

  17. The midgut of Aedes albopictus females expresses active trypsin-like serine peptidases

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Aedes albopictus is widely distributed across tropical and sub-tropical regions and is associated with the transmission of several arboviruses. Although this species is increasingly relevant to public health due its ability to successfully colonize both urban and rural habitats, favoring the dispersion of viral infections, little is known about its biochemical traits, with all assumptions made based on studies of A. aegypti. In previous studies we characterized the peptidase profile of pre-imaginal stages of A. albopictus and we reported the first proteomic analysis of the midgut from sugar-fed females of this insect species. Methods In the present work, we further analyzed the peptidase expression in the midgut of sugar-fed females using 1DE-substrate gel zymography, two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE), mass spectrometry (MS), and protein identification based on similarity. Results The combination of zymography, in solution assays using fluorescent substrates and 2DE-MS/MS allowed us to identify the active serine peptidase “fingerprint” in the midgut of A. albopictus females. Zymographic analysis revealed a proteolytic profile composed of at least 13 bands ranging from ~25 to 250 kDa, which were identified as trypsin-like serine peptidases by using specific inhibitors of this class of enzymes. Concomitant use of the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC and trypsin-like serine protease inhibitors corroborated the zymographic findings. Our proteomic approach allowed the identification of two different trypsin-like serine peptidases and one chymotrypsin in protein spots of the alkaline region in 2DE map of the A. albopictus female midgut. Identification of these protein coding genes was achieved by similarity to the A. aegypti genome sequences using Mascot and OMSSA search engines. Conclusion These results allowed us to detect, identify and characterize the expression of active trypsin-like serine peptidases in the midgut of sugar-fed A. albopictus

  18. Gene expression and localization analysis of Bombyx mori bidensovirus and its putative receptor in B. mori midgut.

    PubMed

    Ito, Katsuhiko; Shimura, Sachiko; Katsuma, Susumu; Tsuda, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Jun; Tabunoki, Hiroko; Yokoyama, Takeshi; Shimada, Toru; Kadono-Okuda, Keiko

    2016-05-01

    Bombyx mori bidensovirus (BmBDV), which causes fatal flacherie disease in the silkworm, replicates only in midgut columnar cells. The viral resistance expressed by some silkworm strains, which is characterized as non-susceptibility irrespective of the viral dose, is determined by a single gene, nsd-2. We previously identified nsd-2 by positional cloning and found that this gene encodes a putative amino acid transporter that might function as a receptor for BmBDV. In this study, we investigated the relationship between the part of the midgut expressing nsd-2 (resistance gene), +(nsd-2) (susceptibility gene) and BmBDV propagation. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis using total RNA isolated from the anterior, middle, and posterior parts of the midgut showed that nsd-2 and +(nsd-2) were strongly expressed in the posterior part of the midgut. The expression levels of both genes were very low in the anterior and middle parts. The qRT-PCR analysis showed that the expression levels of BmBDV-derived transcripts were correlated with the levels of +(nsd-2) expression. However, BmBDV-derived transcripts were clearly detected in all parts of the midgut. These results suggest that the infectivity of BmBDV depends mainly on the expression level of +(nsd-2) in the midgut and that viral infection is supported even by very faint expression of +(nsd-2). By contrast, the expression levels of +(nsd-2) were exceedingly low or undetectable in the middle part of the midgut, indicating that BmBDV infection might occur via another mechanism, independent of +(nsd-2), in the middle part of the midgut. PMID:26953258

  19. Transcriptome Analysis of Bombyx mori Larval Midgut during Persistent and Pathogenic Cytoplasmic Polyhedrosis Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kolliopoulou, Anna; Van Nieuwerburgh, Filip; Stravopodis, Dimitrios J.; Deforce, Dieter; Swevers, Luc; Smagghe, Guy

    2015-01-01

    Many insects can be persistently infected with viruses but do not show any obvious adverse effects with respect to physiology, development or reproduction. Here, Bombyx mori strain Daizo, persistently infected with cytoplasmic polyhedrosis virus (BmCPV), was used to study the host’s transcriptional response after pathogenic infection with the same virus in midgut tissue of larvae persistently and pathogenically infected as 2nd and 4th instars. Next generation sequencing revealed that from 13,769 expressed genes, 167 were upregulated and 141 downregulated in both larval instars following pathogenic infection. Several genes that could possibly be involved in B. mori immune response against BmCPV or that may be induced by the virus in order to increase infectivity were identified, whereas classification of differentially expressed transcripts (confirmed by qRT-PCR) resulted in gene categories related to physical barriers, immune responses, proteolytic / metabolic enzymes, heat-shock proteins, hormonal signaling and uncharacterized proteins. Comparison of our data with the available literature (pathogenic infection of persistently vs. non-persistently infected larvae) unveiled various similarities of response in both cases, which suggests that pre-existing persistent infection does not affect in a major way the transcriptome response against pathogenic infection. To investigate the possible host’s RNAi response against BmCPV challenge, the differential expression of RNAi-related genes and the accumulation of viral small RNAs (vsRNAs) were studied. During pathogenic infection, siRNA-like traces like the 2-fold up-regulation of the core RNAi genes Ago-2 and Dcr-2 as well as a peak of 20 nt small RNAs were observed. Interestingly, vsRNAs of the same size were detected at lower rates in persistently infected larvae. Collectively, our data provide an initial assessment of the relative significance of persistent infection of silkworm larvae on the host response following

  20. Enzyme-regulated the changes of pH values for assembling a colorimetric and multistage interconnection logic network with multiple readouts.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yanyan; Ran, Xiang; Lin, Youhui; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-04-22

    Based on enzymatic reactions-triggered changes of pH values and biocomputing, a novel and multistage interconnection biological network with multiple easy-detectable signal outputs has been developed. Compared with traditional chemical computing, the enzyme-based biological system could overcome the interference between reactions or the incompatibility of individual computing gates and offer a unique opportunity to assemble multicomponent/multifunctional logic circuitries. Our system included four enzyme inputs: β-galactosidase (β-gal), glucose oxidase (GOx), esterase (Est) and urease (Ur). With the assistance of two signal transducers (gold nanoparticles and acid-base indicators) or pH meter, the outputs of the biological network could be conveniently read by the naked eyes. In contrast to current methods, the approach present here could realize cost-effective, label-free and colorimetric logic operations without complicated instrument. By designing a series of Boolean logic operations, we could logically make judgment of the compositions of the samples on the basis of visual output signals. Our work offered a promising paradigm for future biological computing technology and might be highly useful in future intelligent diagnostics, prodrug activation, smart drug delivery, process control, and electronic applications. PMID:25819791

  1. Structure regulation of silica nanotubes and their adsorption behaviors for heavy metal ions: pH effect, kinetics, isotherms and mechanism.

    PubMed

    Wang, Pan; Du, Mingliang; Zhu, Han; Bao, Shiyong; Yang, Tingting; Zou, Meiling

    2015-04-01

    Silica nanotubes (SNTs) with controlled nanotubular structure were synthesized via an electrospinning and calcination process. In this regard, SNTs were found to be ideal adsorbents for Pb(II) removal with a higher adsorption capacity, and surface modification of the SNTs by sym-diphenylcarbazide (SD-SNTs) markedly enhanced the adsorption ability due to the chelating interaction between imino groups and Pb(II). The pH effect, kinetics, isotherms and adsorption mechanism of SNTs and SD-SNTs on Pb(II) adsorption were investigated and discussed detailedly. The adsorption capacity for Pb(II) removal was found to be significantly improved with the decrease of pH value. The Langmuir adsorption model agreed well with the experimental data. As for kinetic study, the adsorption onto SNTs and SD-SNTs could be fitted to pseudo-first-order and pseudo-second-order model, respectively. In addition, the as-prepared SNTs and SD-SNTs also exhibit high adsorption ability for Cd(II) and Co(II). The experimental results demonstrate that the SNTs and SD-SNTs are potential adsorbents and can be used effectively for the treatment of heavy-metal-ions-containing wastewater. PMID:25615696

  2. Fine-structural changes in the midgut of old Drosophila melanogaster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anton-Erxleben, F.; Miquel, J.; Philpott, D. E.

    1983-01-01

    Senescent fine-structural changes in the midgut of Drosophila melanogaster are investigated. A large number of midgut mitochondria in old flies exhibit nodular cristae and a tubular system located perpendicular to the normal cristae orientation. Anterior intestinal cells show a senescent accumulation of age pigment, either with a surrounding two-unit membrane or without any membrane. The predominant localization of enlarged mitochondria and pigment in the luminal gut region may be related to the polarized metabolism of the intestinal cells. Findings concur with previous observations of dense-body accumulations and support the theory that mitochondria are involved in the aging of fixed post-mitotic cells. Demonstrated by statistical analyses is that mitochondrial size increase is related to mitochondrial variation increase.

  3. Proteomic analysis of the mosquito Aedes aegypti midgut brush border membrane vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Popova-Butler, Alexandra; Dean, Donald H.

    2009-01-01

    We analyzed brush border membrane vesicle proteins from isolated midguts of the mosquito Aedes aegypti, by two proteomic methods: two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (isoelectric focusing and SDS-PAGE) and a shotgun two-dimensional liquid chromatographic (LS/LS) approach based on multidimensional protein identification technology (MudPIT). We were interested in the most abundant proteins of the apical brush border midgut membrane. About 400 spots were detected on 2D gels and 39 spots were cored and identified by mass spectrometry. 86 proteins were identified by MudPIT. Three proteins, arginine kinase, putative allergen and actin are shown to be the most predominant proteins in the sample. The total number of 36 proteins detected by both methods represents the most abundant proteins in the BBMV. PMID:19133270

  4. Using bacteria to express and display anti-Plasmodium molecules in the mosquito midgut.

    PubMed

    Riehle, Michael A; Moreira, Cristina K; Lampe, David; Lauzon, Carol; Jacobs-Lorena, Marcelo

    2007-05-01

    Bacteria capable of colonizing mosquito midguts are attractive vehicles for delivering anti-malaria molecules. We genetically engineered Escherichia coli to display two anti-Plasmodium effector molecules, SM1 and phospholipase-A(2), on their outer membrane. Both molecules significantly inhibited Plasmodium berghei development when engineered bacteria were fed to mosquitoes 24h prior to an infective bloodmeal (SM1=41%, PLA2=23%). Furthermore, prevalence and numbers of engineered bacteria increased dramatically following a bloodmeal. However, E. coli survived poorly in mosquitoes. Therefore, Enterobacter agglomerans was isolated from mosquitoes and selected for midgut survival by multiple passages through mosquitoes. After four passages, E. agglomerans survivorship increased from 2 days to 2 weeks. Since E. agglomerans is non-pathogenic and widespread, it is an excellent candidate for paratransgenic control strategies. PMID:17224154

  5. Atypical midgut malrotation presenting as chronic bowel obstruction in the eighth decade

    PubMed Central

    Horwood, James; Akbar, Fayaz; Maw, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    An elderly patient was referred urgently to our rapid access suspected colorectal cancer clinic with symptoms suspicious for malignancy. Despite exhaustive investigations, no cause for his symptomatology could be identified. However, his condition deteriorated and we elected to undertake exploratory surgery, at which time a congenital midgut malrotation, causing chronic small bowel obstruction, was identified. The malrotation was surgical corrected and the patient has made a full recovery. PMID:21686714

  6. Effects of phoxim on nutrient metabolism and insulin signaling pathway in silkworm midgut.

    PubMed

    Li, Fanchi; Hu, Jingsheng; Tian, Jianghai; Xu, Kaizun; Ni, Min; Wang, Binbin; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing

    2016-03-01

    Silkworm (Bombyx mori) is an important economic insect. Each year, poisoning caused by phoxim pesticide leads to huge economic losses in sericulture in China. Silkworm midgut is the major organ for food digestion and nutrient absorption. In this study, we found that the activity and expression of nutrition metabolism-related enzymes were dysregulated in midgut by phoxim exposure. DGE analysis revealed that 40 nutrition metabolism-related genes were differentially expressed. qRT-PCR results indicated that the expression levels of insulin/insulin growth factor signaling (IIS) pathway genes Akt, PI3K, PI3K60, PI3K110, IRS and PDK were reduced, whereas PTEN's expression was significantly increased in the midgut at 24 h after phoxim treatment. However, the transcription levels of Akt, PI3K60, PI3K110, IRS, InR and PDK were elevated and reached the peaks at 48 h, which were 1.48-, 1.35-, 1.21-, 2.24-, 2.89-, and 1.44-fold of those of the control, respectively. At 72 h, the transcription of these genes was reduced. Akt phosphorylation level was increasing along with the growth of silkworms in the control group. However, phoxim treatment led to increased Akt phosphorylation that surged at 24 h but gradually decreased at 48 h and 72 h. The results indicated that phoxim dysregulated the expression of IIS pathway genes and induced abnormal nutrient metabolism in silkworm midgut, which may be the reason of the slow growth of silkworms. PMID:26741554

  7. Cytotoxic effects of neem oil in the midgut of the predator Ceraeochrysa claveri.

    PubMed

    Scudeler, Elton Luiz; Garcia, Ana Silvia Gimenes; Padovani, Carlos Roberto; Pinheiro, Patricia Fernanda Felipe; dos Santos, Daniela Carvalho

    2016-01-01

    Studies of morphological and ultrastructural alterations in target organs have been useful for evaluating the sublethal effects of biopesticides regarded as safe for non-target organisms in ecotoxicological analyses. One of the most widely used biopesticides is neem oil, and its safety and compatibility with natural enemies have been further clarified through bioassays performed to analyze the effects of indirect exposure by the intake of poisoned prey. Thus, this study examined the cellular response of midgut epithelial cells of the adult lacewing, Ceraeochrysa claveri, to neem oil exposure via intake of neem oil-contaminated prey during the larval stage. C. claveri larvae were fed Diatraea saccharalis eggs treated with neem oil at concentrations of 0.5%, 1% and 2% throughout the larval stage. The adult females obtained from these treatments were used at two ages (newly emerged and at the start of oviposition) in morphological and ultrastructural analyses. Neem oil was found to cause pronounced cytotoxic effects in the adult midgut, such as cell dilation, emission of cytoplasmic protrusions, cell lysis, loss of integrity of the cell cortex, dilation of cisternae of the rough endoplasmic reticulum, swollen mitochondria, vesiculated appearance of the Golgi complex and dilated invaginations of the basal labyrinth. Epithelial cells responded to those injuries with various cytoprotective and detoxification mechanisms, including increases in cell proliferation, the number of calcium-containing cytoplasmic granules, and HSP 70 expression, autophagic processes and the development of smooth endoplasmic reticulum, but these mechanisms were insufficient for recovery from all of the cellular damage to the midgut. This study demonstrates that neem oil exposure impairs the midgut by causing sublethal effects that may affect the physiological functions of this organ, indicating the importance of studies of different life stages of this species and similar species to evaluate the

  8. Changes in the midgut diverticula in the harvestmen Amilenus aurantiacus (Phalangiidae, Opiliones) during winter diapause.

    PubMed

    Lipovšek, Saška; Novak, Tone; Janžekovič, Franc; Leitinger, Gerd

    2015-03-01

    The harvestmen Amilenus aurantiacus overwinter in diapause in hypogean habitats. The midgut diverticula have been studied microscopically (light microscopy, TEM) and biochemically (energy-storing compounds: lipids and glycogen) to analyze changes during this programmed starvation period. Throughout the investigated period, the epithelium of the midgut diverticula is composed of secretory cells, digestive cells and adipocytes. Additionally, after the middle of overwintering, the excretory cells appear, and two assemblages of secretory cells are present: the SC1 secretory cells are characterized by electron-dense cytoplasm with numerous protein granules, and the SC2 cells by an electron-lucent cytoplasm with fewer protein granules. The autophagic activity is observed from the middle of overwintering, indicating its vital role in providing nutrients during this non-feeding period. Lipids and glycogen are present in the midgut diverticula cells, except in the excretory cells. Measurements of the lipid droplet diameters and the lipid quantities yielded quite comparable information on their consumption. Lipids are gradually spent in both sexes, more rapidly in females, owing to ripening of the ovaries. Glycogen rates decrease towards the middle, and increase just before the end of overwintering, indicating that individuals are preparing for the epigean active ecophase. PMID:25546311

  9. Dynamics of Midgut Microflora and Dengue Virus Impact on Life History Traits in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Casey L.; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:25193134

  10. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M.; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E.; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A.; Oneal, Meghan A.; Kernodle, Bliss M.; Steimel, Joseph P.; Crane, Virginia C.; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L.; Howard, Richard J.; Presnail, James K.; Lu, Albert L.; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by “blebbing” of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  11. Early responses of silkworm midgut to microsporidium infection--A Digital Gene Expression analysis.

    PubMed

    Yue, Ya-Jie; Tang, Xu-Dong; Xu, Li; Yan, Wei; Li, Qian-Long; Xiao, Sheng-Yan; Fu, Xu-Liang; Wang, Wei; Li, Nan; Shen, Zhong-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Host-pathogen interactions are complex processes, which have been studied extensively in recent years. In insects, the midgut is a vital organ of digestion and nutrient absorption, and also serves as the first physiological and immune barrier against invading pathogenic microorganisms. Our focus is on Nosema bombycis, which is a pathogen of silkworm pebrine and causes great economic losses to the silk industry. A complete understanding of the host response to infection by N. bombycis and the interaction between them is necessary to prevent this disease. Silkworm midgut infected with N. bombycis is a good model to investigate the early host responses to microsporidia infection and the interaction between the silkworm and the microsporidium. Using Digital Gene Expression analysis, we investigated the midgut transcriptome profile of P50 silkworm larvae orally inoculated with N. bombycis. At 6, 12, 18, 24, 48, 72, and 96 h post-infection (hpi), 247, 95, 168, 450, 89, 80, and 773 DEGs were identified, respectively. KEGG pathway analysis showed the influence of N. bombycis infection on many biological processes including folate biosynthesis, spliceosome, nicotinate and nicotinamide metabolism, protein export, protein processing in endoplasmic reticulum, lysosome, biosynthesis of amino acids, ribosome, and RNA degradation. In addition, a number of differentially expressed genes involved in the immune response were identified. Overall, the results of this study provide an understanding of the strategy used by silkworm as a defense against the invasion by N. bombycis. Similar interactions between hosts and pathogens infection may exist in other species. PMID:25315610

  12. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae.

    PubMed

    da Silva Costa, Marilza; de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola; Santana, Antônio Euzébio Goulart; Serrão, José Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  13. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season

    PubMed Central

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  14. Midgut of the diplopod Urostreptus atrobrunneus: structure, function, and redefinition of hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    Moreira-de-Sousa, C; Iamonte, M; Fontanetti, C S

    2016-07-11

    Diplopods are considered important macroarthropods the soil as part of its maintenance and balance. These animals usually do not occur in high densities, but population explosions caused by environmental disturbances, climate changes, and use of pesticides that eliminate possible competitors, have been reported. The millipede Urostreptus atrobrunneus Pierozzi and Fontanetti, 2006 have become a nuisance to humans in infestation sites in urban centers of the state of Sao Paulo, Brazil. As a contribution to the understanding of this potential pest, this study describes the histology, histochemistry, and ultrastructure of the U. atrobrunneus midgut, and presents the redefinition of hepatic cells somewhat controversial in the literature. The region of the midgut is characterized by the absence of a cuticular intima, and composed of a pseudostratified epithelium on a thick basal membrane, followed by a muscle layer, a layer of hepatic cells, lined by an external membrane. The morphology observed in U. atrobrunneus is similar to that reported for other species of diplopods. The hepatic cells have been previously described as randomly without forming a layer, however, the present results clearly demonstrate that these cells form a continuous layer over the whole midgut. PMID:27409229

  15. Effects of gamma irradiation on the midgut ultrastructure of Glossina palpalis subspecies

    SciTech Connect

    Stiles, J.K.; Molyneux, D.H.; Wallbanks, K.R.; Van der Vloedt, A.M.

    1989-05-01

    In the sterile insect technique, insects are sterilized prior to release in areas where they are pests. The sterile males compete for and with fertile wild individuals for mates, thus reducing the population's reproductive rate. Tsetse fly (Glossina spp.) populations have been eradicated after release of laboratory-bred flies sterilized by gamma irradiation. However, no studies exist on radiation-induced damage to the midgut morphology and function of the radiation-sterilized insects. After G. palpalis palpalis and G. p. gambiensis were subjected to 130 Gy gamma radiation, their midgut damage and recovery were monitored by electron microscopy. The first sign of damage was atrophy and loss of the microvillous border from epithelial cells. The rate of cell degeneration increased, with young as well as old cells being affected and cellular debris filling the ectoperitrophic space. Muscle cells were destroyed, patches of basal lamina were left bare, intracellular virus- and rickettsia-like organisms became more frequent, and many replacement cells became unusually large. Partial recovery occurred from the 10th day postirradiation. Such changes in midgut ultrastructure and the corresponding inhibition of functions may increase the susceptibility of the fly to trypanosome infection.

  16. Dynamics of midgut microflora and dengue virus impact on life history traits in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Hill, Casey L; Sharma, Avinash; Shouche, Yogesh; Severson, David W

    2014-12-01

    Significant morbidity and potential mortality following dengue virus infection is a re-emerging global health problem. Due to the limited effectiveness of current disease control methods, mosquito biologists have been searching for new methods of controlling dengue transmission. While much effort has concentrated on determining genetic aspects to vector competence, paratransgenetic approaches could also uncover novel vector control strategies. The interactions of mosquito midgut microflora and pathogens may play significant roles in vector biology. However, little work has been done to see how the microbiome influences the host's fitness and ultimately vector competence. Here we investigated the effects of the midgut microbial environment and dengue infection on several fitness characteristics among three strains of the primary dengue virus vector mosquito Aedes aegypti. This included comparisons of dengue infection rates of females with and without their normal midgut flora. According to our findings, few effects on fitness characteristics were evident following microbial clearance or with dengue virus infection. Adult survivorship significantly varied due to strain and in one strain varied due to antibiotic treatment. Fecundity varied in one strain due to microbial clearance by antibiotics but no variation was observed in fertility due to either treatment. We show here that fitness characteristics of Ae. aegypti vary largely between strains, including varying response to microflora presence or absence, but did not vary in response to dengue virus infection. PMID:25193134

  17. Phylogenetically Diverse Burkholderia Associated with Midgut Crypts of Spurge Bugs, Dicranocephalus spp. (Heteroptera: Stenocephalidae).

    PubMed

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Matsuura, Yu; Dettner, Konrad; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2016-06-25

    Diverse phytophagous heteropteran insects, commonly known as stinkbugs, are associated with specific gut symbiotic bacteria, which have been found in midgut cryptic spaces. Recent studies have revealed that members of the stinkbug families Coreidae and Alydidae of the superfamily Coreoidea are consistently associated with a specific group of the betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia, called the "stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)" group, and horizontally acquire specific symbionts from the environment every generation. However, the symbiotic system of another coreoid family, Stenocephalidae remains undetermined. We herein investigated four species of the stenocephalid genus Dicranocephalus. Examinations via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical arrangement and ultrastructures of midgut crypts and gut symbionts. Cloning and molecular phylogenetic analyses of bacterial genes showed that the midgut crypts of all species are colonized by Burkholderia strains, which were further assigned to different subgroups of the genus Burkholderia. In addition to the SBE-group Burkholderia, a number of stenocephalid symbionts belonged to a novel clade containing B. sordidicola and B. udeis, suggesting a specific symbiont clade for the Stenocephalidae. The symbiotic systems of stenocephalid bugs may provide a unique opportunity to study the ongoing evolution of symbiont associations in the stinkbug-Burkholderia interaction. PMID:27265344

  18. Multiple Modes of Action of the Squamocin in the Midgut Cells of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Sérgio Oliveira; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Zanuncio, José Cola

    2016-01-01

    Annonaceous acetogenins are botanical compounds with good potential for use as insecticides. In the vector, Aedes aegypti (L.) (Diptera: Culicidae), squamocin (acetogenin) has been reported to be a larvicide and cytotoxic, but the modes of action of this molecule are still poorly understood. This study evaluated the changes in the cell morphology, and in the expression of genes, for autophagy (Atg1 and Atg8), for membrane ion transporter V-ATPase, and for water channel aquaporin-4 (Aqp4) in the midgut of A. aegypti larvae exposed to squamocin from Annona mucosa Jacq. (Annonaceae). Squamocin showed cytotoxic action with changes in the midgut epithelium and digestive cells of A. aegypti larvae, increase in the expression for autophagy gene Atg1 and Atg8, decrease in the expression of V-ATPase, decrease in the expression of Aqp4 gene in LC20 and inhibition of Apq4 genes in the midgut of this vector in LC50. These multiple modes of action for squamocin are described for the first time in insects, and they are important because different sites of action of squamocin from A. mucosa may reduce the possibility of resistance of A. aegypti to this molecule. PMID:27532504

  19. Densovirus Crosses the Insect Midgut by Transcytosis and Disturbs the Epithelial Barrier Function

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Gosselin Grenet, A. S.; Castelli, I.; Cermenati, G.; Ravallec, M.; Fiandra, L.; Debaisieux, S.; Multeau, C.; Lautredou, N.; Dupressoir, T.; Li, Y.

    2013-01-01

    Densoviruses are parvoviruses that can be lethal for insects of different orders at larval stages. Although the horizontal transmission mechanisms are poorly known, densoviral pathogenesis usually starts with the ingestion of contaminated food by the host. Depending on the virus, this leads to replication restricted to the midgut or excluding it. In both cases the success of infection depends on the virus capacity to enter the intestinal epithelium. Using the Junonia coenia densovirus (JcDNV) as the prototype virus and the lepidopteran host Spodoptera frugiperda as an interaction model, we focused on the early mechanisms of infection during which JcDNV crosses the intestinal epithelium to reach and replicate in underlying target tissues. We studied the kinetics of interaction of JcDNV with the midgut epithelium and the transport mechanisms involved. Using several approaches, in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro, at molecular and cellular levels, we show that JcDNV is specifically internalized by endocytosis in absorptive cells and then crosses the epithelium by transcytosis. As a consequence, viral entry disturbs the midgut function. Finally, we showed that four mutations on the capsid of JcDNV affect specific recognition by the epithelial cells but not their binding. PMID:24027326

  20. Shifts in the Midgut/Pyloric Microbiota Composition within a Honey Bee Apiary throughout a Season.

    PubMed

    Ludvigsen, Jane; Rangberg, Anbjørg; Avershina, Ekaterina; Sekelja, Monika; Kreibich, Claus; Amdam, Gro; Rudi, Knut

    2015-01-01

    Honey bees (Apis mellifera) are prominent crop pollinators and are, thus, important for effective food production. The honey bee gut microbiota is mainly host specific, with only a few species being shared with other insects. It currently remains unclear how environmental/dietary conditions affect the microbiota within a honey bee population over time. Therefore, the aim of the present study was to characterize the composition of the midgut/pyloric microbiota of a honey bee apiary throughout a season. The rationale for investigating the midgut/pyloric microbiota is its dynamic nature. Monthly sampling of a demographic homogenous population of bees was performed between May and October, with concordant recording of the honey bee diet. Mixed Sanger-and Illumina 16S rRNA gene sequencing in combination with a quantitative PCR analysis were used to determine the bacterial composition. A marked increase in α-diversity was detected between May and June. Furthermore, we found that four distinct phylotypes belonging to the Proteobacteria dominated the microbiota, and these displayed major shifts throughout the season. Gilliamella apicola dominated the composition early on, and Snodgrassella alvi began to dominate when the other bacteria declined to an absolute low in October. In vitro co-culturing revealed that G. apicola suppressed S. alvi. No shift was detected in the composition of the microbiota under stable environment/dietary conditions between November and February. Therefore, environmental/dietary changes may trigger the shifts observed in the honey bee midgut/pyloric microbiota throughout a season. PMID:26330094

  1. Discovery of midgut genes for the RNA interference control of corn rootworm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Xu; Richtman, Nina M; Zhao, Jian-Zhou; Duncan, Keith E; Niu, Xiping; Procyk, Lisa A; Oneal, Meghan A; Kernodle, Bliss M; Steimel, Joseph P; Crane, Virginia C; Sandahl, Gary; Ritland, Julie L; Howard, Richard J; Presnail, James K; Lu, Albert L; Wu, Gusui

    2016-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a promising new technology for corn rootworm control. This paper presents the discovery of new gene targets - dvssj1 and dvssj2, in western corn rootworm (WCR). Dvssj1 and dvssj2 are orthologs of the Drosophila genes snakeskin (ssk) and mesh, respectively. These genes encode membrane proteins associated with smooth septate junctions (SSJ) which are required for intestinal barrier function. Based on bioinformatics analysis, dvssj1 appears to be an arthropod-specific gene. Diet based insect feeding assays using double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) targeting dvssj1 and dvssj2 demonstrate targeted mRNA suppression, larval growth inhibition, and mortality. In RNAi treated WCR, injury to the midgut was manifested by "blebbing" of the midgut epithelium into the gut lumen. Ultrastructural examination of midgut epithelial cells revealed apoptosis and regenerative activities. Transgenic plants expressing dsRNA targeting dvssj1 show insecticidal activity and significant plant protection from WCR damage. The data indicate that dvssj1 and dvssj2 are effective gene targets for the control of WCR using RNAi technology, by apparent suppression of production of their respective smooth septate junction membrane proteins located within the intestinal lining, leading to growth inhibition and mortality. PMID:27464714

  2. Effects of gamma irradiation on the midgut ultrastructure of Glossina palpalis subspecies.

    PubMed

    Stiles, J K; Molyneux, D H; Wallbanks, K R; Van der Vloedt, A M

    1989-05-01

    In the sterile insect technique, insects are sterilized prior to release in areas where they are pests. The sterile males compete for and with fertile wild individuals for mates, thus reducing the population's reproductive rate. Tsetse fly (Glossina spp.) populations have been eradicated after release of laboratory-bred flies sterilized by gamma irradiation. However, no studies exist on radiation-induced damage to the midgut morphology and function of the radiation-sterilized insects. After G. palpalis palpalis and G. p. gambiensis were subjected to 130 Gy gamma radiation, their midgut damage and recovery were monitored by electron microscopy. The first sign of damage was atrophy and loss of the microvillous border from epithelial cells. The rate of cell degeneration increased, with young as well as old cells being affected and cellular debris filling the ectoperitrophic space. Muscle cells were destroyed, patches of basal lamina were left bare, intracellular virus- and rickettsia-like organisms became more frequent, and many replacement cells became unusually large. Partial recovery occurred from the 10th day postirradiation. Such changes in midgut ultrastructure and the corresponding inhibition of functions may increase the susceptibility of the fly to trypanosome infection. PMID:2727263

  3. Incidental midgut malrotation detected during second laparotomy: Case report and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Vural, Veli; Türkoğlu, Mehmet Akif; Karatas, Gulnur

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Intestinal malrotation is defined as intestinal nonrotation or incomplete rotation around superior mesenteric artery (SMA), involving anomalies of intestinal fixation as well. The patients may be recognized incidentally during other surgical procedures or at autopsy. Here in, we present a case of midgut malrotation which was diagnosed incidentally during hepaticojejunostomy procedure for benign biliary stricture. Presentation of case A 46 years old male patient was referred to our clinic with failed surgery for biliary stricture due to extensive adhesions. Prior to our surgery, intestinal malrotation was not reported and noticed by the diagnostic tools. When the patient underwent relaparotomy, midgut malrotation was observed. Discussion Distruption in the normal embryological development of bowel is the cause of intestinal malrotation. Various anatomic configurations and anomalies resulting from rotation anomalies of midgut. Adult patients are usually asymptomatic and the anomaly is discovered only at autopsy or incidentally at surgery. The role of additional surgery especially in patients with asymptomatic disease related to malrotation is debated. Conclusion Performing loop hepaticojejunostomy with Braun enteroenterostomy is feasible and acceptable option rather than Roux-N-Y hepaticojejunostomy in case of intestinal malrotation. PMID:25533325

  4. Phylogenetically Diverse Burkholderia Associated with Midgut Crypts of Spurge Bugs, Dicranocephalus spp. (Heteroptera: Stenocephalidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kuechler, Stefan Martin; Matsuura, Yu; Dettner, Konrad; Kikuchi, Yoshitomo

    2016-01-01

    Diverse phytophagous heteropteran insects, commonly known as stinkbugs, are associated with specific gut symbiotic bacteria, which have been found in midgut cryptic spaces. Recent studies have revealed that members of the stinkbug families Coreidae and Alydidae of the superfamily Coreoidea are consistently associated with a specific group of the betaproteobacterial genus Burkholderia, called the “stinkbug-associated beneficial and environmental (SBE)” group, and horizontally acquire specific symbionts from the environment every generation. However, the symbiotic system of another coreoid family, Stenocephalidae remains undetermined. We herein investigated four species of the stenocephalid genus Dicranocephalus. Examinations via fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) revealed the typical arrangement and ultrastructures of midgut crypts and gut symbionts. Cloning and molecular phylogenetic analyses of bacterial genes showed that the midgut crypts of all species are colonized by Burkholderia strains, which were further assigned to different subgroups of the genus Burkholderia. In addition to the SBE-group Burkholderia, a number of stenocephalid symbionts belonged to a novel clade containing B. sordidicola and B. udeis, suggesting a specific symbiont clade for the Stenocephalidae. The symbiotic systems of stenocephalid bugs may provide a unique opportunity to study the ongoing evolution of symbiont associations in the stinkbug-Burkholderia interaction. PMID:27265344

  5. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner.

    PubMed

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  6. Cantharidin Impedes Activity of Glutathione S-Transferase in the Midgut of Helicoverpa armigera Hübner

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Rashid Ahmed; Liu, Ji Yuan; Rashid, Maryam; Wang, Dun; Zhang, Ya Lin

    2013-01-01

    Previous investigations have implicated glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) as one of the major reasons for insecticide resistance. Therefore, effectiveness of new candidate compounds depends on their ability to inhibit GSTs to prevent metabolic detoxification by insects. Cantharidin, a terpenoid compound of insect origin, has been developed as a bio-pesticide in China, and proves highly toxic to a wide range of insects, especially lepidopteran. In the present study, we test cantharidin as a model compound for its toxicity, effects on the mRNA transcription of a model Helicoverpa armigera glutathione S-transferase gene (HaGST) and also for its putative inhibitory effect on the catalytic activity of GSTs, both in vivo and in vitro in Helicoverpa armigera, employing molecular and biochemical methods. Bioassay results showed that cantharidin was highly toxic to H. armigera. Real-time qPCR showed down-regulation of the HaGST at the mRNA transcript ranging from 2.5 to 12.5 folds while biochemical assays showed in vivo inhibition of GSTs in midgut and in vitro inhibition of rHaGST. Binding of cantharidin to HaGST was rationalized by homology and molecular docking simulations using a model GST (1PN9) as a template structure. Molecular docking simulations also confirmed accurate docking of the cantharidin molecule to the active site of HaGST impeding its catalytic activity. PMID:23528854

  7. Enteroendocrine cells are generated from stem cells through a distinct progenitor in the adult Drosophila posterior midgut

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiankun; Hou, Steven X.

    2015-01-01

    Functional mature cells are continually replenished by stem cells to maintain tissue homoeostasis. In the adult Drosophila posterior midgut, both terminally differentiated enterocyte (EC) and enteroendocrine (EE) cells are generated from an intestinal stem cell (ISC). However, it is not clear how the two differentiated cells are generated from the ISC. In this study, we found that only ECs are generated through the Su(H)GBE+ immature progenitor enteroblasts (EBs), whereas EEs are generated from ISCs through a distinct progenitor pre-EE by a novel lineage-tracing system. EEs can be generated from ISCs in three ways: an ISC becoming an EE, an ISC becoming a new ISC and an EE through asymmetric division, or an ISC becoming two EEs through symmetric division. We further identified that the transcriptional factor Prospero (Pros) regulates ISC commitment to EEs. Our data provide direct evidence that different differentiated cells are generated by different modes of stem cell lineage specification within the same tissues. PMID:25670791

  8. Extracellular and Luminal pH Regulation by Vacuolar H+-ATPase Isoform Expression and Targeting to the Plasma Membrane and Endosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gina A.; Howell, Gareth J.; Phillips, Clair; Muench, Stephen P.; Ponnambalam, Sreenivasan; Harrison, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Plasma membrane vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) activity of tumor cells is a major factor in control of cytoplasmic and extracellular pH and metastatic potential, but the isoforms involved and the factors governing plasma membrane recruitment remain uncertain. Here, we examined expression, distribution, and activity of V-ATPase isoforms in invasive prostate adenocarcinoma (PC-3) cells. Isoforms 1 and 3 were the most highly expressed forms of membrane subunit a, with a1 and a3 the dominant plasma membrane isoforms. Correlation between plasma membrane V-ATPase activity and invasiveness was limited, but RNAi knockdown of either a isoform did slow cell proliferation and inhibit invasion in vitro. Isoform a1 was recruited to the cell surface from the early endosome-recycling complex pathway, its knockdown arresting transferrin receptor recycling. Isoform a3 was associated with the late endosomal/lysosomal compartment. Both a isoforms associated with accessory protein Ac45, knockdown of which stalled transit of a1 and transferrin-transferrin receptor, decreased proton efflux, and reduced cell growth and invasiveness; this latter effect was at least partly due to decreased delivery of the membrane-bound matrix metalloproteinase MMP-14 to the plasma membrane. These data indicate that in prostatic carcinoma cells, a1 and a3 isoform populations predominate in different compartments where they maintain different luminal pH. Ac45 plays a central role in navigating the V-ATPase to the plasma membrane, and hence it is an important factor in expression of the invasive phenotype. PMID:26912656

  9. Changes in the Daphnia magna midgut upon ingestion of copper oxide nanoparticles: a transmission electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Heinlaan, Margit; Kahru, Anne; Kasemets, Kaja; Arbeille, Brigitte; Prensier, Gérard; Dubourguier, Henri-Charles

    2011-01-01

    This work is a follow-up of our previous paper (Heinlaan et al., 2008. Chemosphere 71, 1308-1316) where we showed about 50-fold higher acute toxicity of CuO nanoparticles (NPs) compared to bulk CuO to water flea Daphnia magna. In the current work transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to determine potential time-dependent changes in D. magna midgut epithelium ultrastructure upon exposure to CuO NPs compared to bulk CuO at their 48 h EC(50) levels: 4.0 and 175 mg CuO/L, respectively. Special attention was on potential internalization of CuO NPs by midgut epithelial cells. Ingestion of both CuO formulations by daphnids was evident already after 10 min of exposure. In the midgut lumen CuO NPs were dispersed whereas bulk CuO was clumped. By the 48th hour of exposure to CuO NPs (but not to equitoxic concentrations of bulk CuO) the following ultrastructural changes in midgut epithelium of daphnids were observed: protrusion of epithelial cells into the midgut lumen, presence of CuO NPs in circular structures analogous to membrane vesicles from holocrine secretion in the midgut lumen. Implicit internalization of CuO NPs via D. magna midgut epithelial cells was not evident however CuO NPs were no longer contained within the peritrophic membrane but located between the midgut epithelium microvilli. Interestingly, upon exposure to CuO NPs bacterial colonization of the midgut occurred. Ultrastructural changes in the midgut of D. magna upon exposure to CuO NPs but not to bulk CuO refer to its nanosize-related adverse effects. Time-dependent solubilisation of CuO NPs and bulk CuO in the test medium was quantified by recombinant Cu-sensor bacteria: by the 48th hour of exposure to bulk CuO, the concentration of solubilised copper ions was 0.05 ± 0.01 mg Cu/L that was comparable to the acute EC(50) value of Cu-ions to D. magna (48 h CuSO(4) EC(50) = 0.07 ± 0.01 mg Cu/L). However, in case of CuO NPs, the solubilised Cu-ions 0.01 ± 0.001 mg Cu/L, explained only part of

  10. The invasion of the midgut of the mosquito Culex (Culex) quinquefasciatus Say, 1823 by the helminth Litomosoides chagasfilhoi Moraes Neto, Lanfredi and De Souza, 1997.

    PubMed

    Santos, J N; Lanfredi, R M; Pimenta, P F P

    2006-09-01

    The Litomosoides chagasfilhoi helminth was studied as a model for microfilaria invasion of the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquito, vector of Wuchereria bancrofti helminth, causative agent of the human filariasis. Histology and transmission and scanning electron microscopy were utilized to show the topography of mosquito midgut invasion by the helminth. An analysis of midguts dissected at different time points after a blood meal demonstrated that the microfilariae interacted and crossed the peritrophic matrix and the midgut epithelium of C. quinquefasciatus. The microfilariae invaded preferentially the mosquito abdominal midgut and the invasion process occurred between 2 and 3h after the blood feeding. In some cases, microfilariae caused an opening in the midgut that separated the epithelial cells, while in others cases, the worms caused the detachment of cells from the epithelium. Ultimately, L. chagasfilhoi crossing activity appeared to damage the midgut. It was also observed that the microfilariae lost their sheaths during their passage through the fibrous material of the peritrophic matrix, before they reached the midgut epithelium. Since the exsheathment process is necessary for the continuity of larvae development, it seems that the passage through the peritrophic matrix is an important step for the parasite's life cycle. This experimental model revealed details of the interaction process of helminthes within the vector midgut, contributing to the knowledge of factors involved in the vector competence of C. quinquefasciatus as a vector of filariasis. PMID:16780868

  11. The fine structure of the midgut epithelium in a centipede, Scolopendra cingulata (Chilopoda, Scolopendridae), with the special emphasis on epithelial regeneration.

    PubMed

    Chajec, Lukasz; Sonakowska, Lidia; Rost-Roszkowska, Magdalena M

    2014-01-01

    Scolopendra cingulata has a tube-shaped digestive system that is divided into three distinct regions: fore-, mid- and hindgut. The midgut is lined with a pseudostratified columnar epithelium which is composed of digestive, secretory and regenerative cells. Hemocytes also appear between the digestive cells of the midgut epithelium. The ultrastructure of three types of epithelial cells and hemocytes of the midgut has been described with the special emphasis on the role of regenerative cells in the protection of midgut epithelium. The process of midgut epithelium regeneration proceeds due to the ability of regenerative cells to proliferate and differentiate according to a circadian rhythm. The regenerative cells serve as unipotent stem cells that divide in an asymmetric manner. Additionally, two types of hemocytes have been distinguished among midgut epithelial cells. They enter the midgut epithelium from the body cavity. Because of the fact that numerous microorganisms occur in the cytoplasm of midgut epithelial cells, we discuss the role of hemocytes in elimination of pathogens from the midgut epithelium. The studies were conducted with the use of transmission electron microscope and immunofluorescent methods. PMID:23831526

  12. Fat absorption is not complete by midgut but is dependent on load of fat.

    PubMed

    Lin, H C; Zhao, X T; Wang, L

    1996-07-01

    Since the intubation study of B. Borgstrom, A. Dahlqvist, and G. Lundh (J. Clin. Invest. 36: 1521-1536, 1957) in humans, the completion of fat absorption within the proximal small intestine has been widely accepted. Based on this report, it has been assumed that the distal small intestine is exposed to fat only in the setting of pathology. This concept may be flawed, since completeness of fat absorption was calculated from the recovery of a water-soluble marker but the aqueous phase is now known to move independently from fat. To reexamine the question of whether fat absorption is complete by midgut, we measured the recovery of a fat-specific marker, 99mTc-thiocyanate, in a canine model equipped with duodenal and midgut fistulas. The fistulous output allowed for the measurement of the amount of fat entering the small intestine and the amount of fat entering the distal one-half of the small intestine. Emulsion meals containing 15 or 60 g of corn oil were tested. The importance of fat exposure of the distal one-half of the small intestine was further confirmed by comparing the fistulous fat recovery under two different patterns of exposure [allowing (ALL) or denying (150 cm) access to the distal small intestine]. We found that fat recovery depended on 1) the dose of fat (15 vs. 60 g; P < 0.0005), 2) the pattern of exposure (150 cm vs. ALL; P < 0.01), and 3) the fistulous position (duodenal vs. midgut; P < 0.005). Specifically, under a 150-cm exposure pattern, whereas 8.8 +/- 1.8 g (means +/- SE) of fat emptied into the duodenum after the 15-g fat meal, 32.6 +/- 3.2 g emptied after the 60-g fat meal. Correspondingly, although 3.5 +/- 1.5 g of fat were recoverable from the midgut fistulous output after the 15-g meal, a much larger amount, 17.1 +/- 5.6 g of fat, was recoverable and therefore not absorbed by the proximal one-half of the small intestine after the 60-g meal. The amount of fat recovery at each fistula was reduced when chyme was allowed access to the whole

  13. The Tribolium chitin synthase genes TcCHS1 and TcCHS2 are specialized for synthesis of epidermal cuticle and midgut peritrophic matrix.

    PubMed

    Arakane, Y; Muthukrishnan, S; Kramer, K J; Specht, C A; Tomoyasu, Y; Lorenzen, M D; Kanost, M; Beeman, R W

    2005-10-01

    Functional analysis of the two chitin synthase genes, TcCHS1 and TcCHS2, in the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum, revealed unique and complementary roles for each gene. TcCHS1-specific RNA interference (RNAi) disrupted all three types of moult (larval-larval, larval-pupal and pupal-adult) and greatly reduced whole-body chitin content. Exon-specific RNAi showed that splice variant 8a of TcCHS1 was required for both the larval-pupal and pupal-adult moults, whereas splice variant 8b was required only for the latter. TcCHS2-specific RNAi had no effect on metamorphosis or on total body chitin content. However, RNAi-mediated down-regulation of TcCHS2, but not TcCHS1, led to cessation of feeding, a dramatic shrinkage in larval size and reduced chitin content in the midgut. PMID:16164601

  14. Comparative analysis of midgut bacterial communities of Aedes aegypti mosquito strains varying in vector competence to dengue virus.

    PubMed

    Charan, Shakti S; Pawar, Kiran D; Severson, David W; Patole, Milind S; Shouche, Yogesh S

    2013-07-01

    Differences in midgut bacterial communities of Aedes aegypti, the primary mosquito vector of dengue viruses (DENV), might influence the susceptibility of these mosquitoes to infection by DENV. As a first step toward addressing this hypothesis, comparative analysis of bacterial communities from midguts of mosquito strains with differential genetic susceptibility to DENV was performed. 16S rRNA gene libraries and real-time PCR approaches were used to characterize midgut bacterial community composition and abundance in three Aedes aegypti strains: MOYO, MOYO-R, and MOYO-S. Although Pseudomonas spp.-related clones were predominant across all libraries, some interesting and potentially significant differences were found in midgut bacterial communities among the three strains. Pedobacter sp.- and Janthinobacterium sp.-related phylotypes were identified only in the MOYO-R strain libraries, while Bacillus sp. was detected only in the MOYO-S strain. Rahnella sp. was found in MOYO-R and MOYO strains libraries but was absent in MOYO-S libraries. Both 16S rRNA gene library and real-time PCR approaches confirmed the presence of Pedobacter sp. only in the MOYO-R strain. Further, real-time PCR-based quantification of 16S rRNA gene copies showed bacterial abundance in midguts of the MOYO-R strain mosquitoes to be at least 10-100-folds higher than in the MOYO-S and MOYO strain mosquitoes. Our study identified some putative bacteria with characteristic physiological properties that could affect the infectivity of dengue virus. This analysis represents the first report of comparisons of midgut bacterial communities with respect to refractoriness and susceptibility of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes to DENV and will guide future efforts to address the potential interactive role of midgut bacteria of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes in determining vectorial capacity for DENV. PMID:23636307

  15. Blood Meal-Derived Heme Decreases ROS Levels in the Midgut of Aedes aegypti and Allows Proliferation of Intestinal Microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Jose Henrique M.; Gonçalves, Renata L. S.; Lara, Flavio A.; Dias, Felipe A.; Gandara, Ana Caroline P.; Menna-Barreto, Rubem F. S.; Edwards, Meredith C.; Laurindo, Francisco R. M.; Silva-Neto, Mário A. C.; Sorgine, Marcos H. F.; Oliveira, Pedro L.

    2011-01-01

    The presence of bacteria in the midgut of mosquitoes antagonizes infectious agents, such as Dengue and Plasmodium, acting as a negative factor in the vectorial competence of the mosquito. Therefore, knowledge of the molecular mechanisms involved in the control of midgut microbiota could help in the development of new tools to reduce transmission. We hypothesized that toxic reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by epithelial cells control bacterial growth in the midgut of Aedes aegypti, the vector of Yellow fever and Dengue viruses. We show that ROS are continuously present in the midgut of sugar-fed (SF) mosquitoes and a blood-meal immediately decreased ROS through a mechanism involving heme-mediated activation of PKC. This event occurred in parallel with an expansion of gut bacteria. Treatment of sugar-fed mosquitoes with increased concentrations of heme led to a dose dependent decrease in ROS levels and a consequent increase in midgut endogenous bacteria. In addition, gene silencing of dual oxidase (Duox) reduced ROS levels and also increased gut flora. Using a model of bacterial oral infection in the gut, we show that the absence of ROS resulted in decreased mosquito resistance to infection, increased midgut epithelial damage, transcriptional modulation of immune-related genes and mortality. As heme is a pro-oxidant molecule released in large amounts upon hemoglobin degradation, oxidative killing of bacteria in the gut would represent a burden to the insect, thereby creating an extra oxidative challenge to the mosquito. We propose that a controlled decrease in ROS levels in the midgut of Aedes aegypti is an adaptation to compensate for the ingestion of heme. PMID:21445237

  16. Digestive enzyme compartmentalization and recycling and sites of absorption and secretion along the midgut of Dermestes maculatus (Coleoptera) larvae.

    PubMed

    Caldeira, Waldir; Dias, Alcides B; Terra, Walter R; Ribeiro, Alberto F

    2007-01-01

    Bostrichiformia is the less known major series of Coleoptera regarding digestive physiology. The midgut of Dermestes maculatus has a cylindrical ventriculus with anterior caeca. There is no cell differentiation along the ventriculus, except for the predominance of cells undergoing apocrine secretion in the anterior region. Apocrine secretion affects a larger extension and a greater number of cells in caeca than in ventriculus. Ventricular cells putatively secrete digestive enzymes, whereas caecal cells are supposed to secrete peritrophic gel (PG) glycoproteins. Feeding larvae with dyes showed that caeca are water-absorbing, whereas the posterior ventriculus is water-secreting. Midgut dissection revealed a PG and a peritrophic membrane (PM) covering the contents in anterior and posterior ventriculus, respectively. This was confirmed by in situ chitin detection with FITC-WGA conjugates. Ion-exchange chromatography of midgut homogenates, associated with enzymatic assays with natural and synthetic substrates and specific inhibitors, showed that trypsin and chymotrypsin are the major proteinases, cysteine proteinase is absent, and aspartic proteinase probably is negligible. Amylase and trypsin occur in contents and decrease along the ventriculus; the contrary is true for cell-membrane-bound aminopeptidase. Maltase is cell-membrane-bound and predominates in anterior and middle midgut. Digestive enzyme activities in hindgut are negligible. This, together with dye data, indicates that enzymes are recovered from inside PM by a posterior-anterior flux of fluid outside PM before being excreted. The combined results suggest that protein digestion starts in anterior midgut and ends in the surface of posterior midgut cells. All glycogen digestion takes place in anterior midgut. PMID:17167750

  17. Nanoparticulate TiO2 protection of midgut damage in the silkworm (Bombyx mori) following phoxim exposure.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ling; Su, Mingyu; Zhao, Xiaoyang; Hong, Jie; Yu, Xiaohong; Xu, Bingqing; Sheng, Lei; Liu, Dong; Shen, Weide; Li, Bing; Hong, Fashui

    2015-04-01

    Bombyx mori (B. mori) is often subjected to phoxim poisoning in China due to phoxim exposure, which leads to a decrease in silk production. Nanoparticulate (NP) titanium dioxide (nano-TiO2) has been shown to attenuate damages in B. mori caused by phoxim exposure. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms of midgut injury due to organophosphorus insecticide exposure and its repair by nano-TiO2 pretreatment. In this study, phoxim exposure for 36 h led to significant decreases in body weight and survival and increased oxidative stress and midgut injury. Pretreatment with nano-TiO2 attenuated the phoxim-induced midgut injury, increased body weight and survival, and decreased oxidative stress in the midgut of B. mori. Digital gene-expression data showed that exposure to phoxim results in significant changes in the expression of 254 genes in the phoxim-exposed midgut and 303 genes in phoxim + nano-TiO2-exposed midgut. Specifically, phoxim exposure led to upregulation of Tpx, α-amylase, trypsin, and glycoside hydrolase genes involved in digestion and absorption. Phoxim exposure also led to the downregulation of Cyp450 and Cyp4C1 genes involved in an antioxidant capacity. In contrast, a combination of both phoxim and nano-TiO2 treatment significantly decreased the change in α-amylase, trypsin, and glycoside hydrolases (GHs), which are involved in digestion and absorption. These results indicated that Tpx, α-amylase, trypsin, GHs, Cyp450, and Cyp4C1 may be potential biomarkers of midgut toxicity caused by phoxim exposure and the attenuation of these toxic impacts by nano-TiO2. PMID:25552327

  18. Functional photoacoustic microscopy of pH

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatni, M. Rameez; Yao, Junjie; Danielli, Amos; Favazza, Christopher P.; Maslov, Konstantin I.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2012-02-01

    pH is a tightly regulated indicator of metabolic activity. In mammalian systems, imbalance of pH regulation may result from or result in serious illness. Even though the regulation system of pH is very robust, tissue pH can be altered in many diseases such as cancer, osteoporosis and diabetes mellitus. Traditional high-resolution optical imaging techniques, such as confocal microscopy, routinely image pH in cells and tissues using pH sensitive fluorescent dyes, which change their fluorescence properties with the surrounding pH. Since strong optical scattering in biological tissue blurs images at greater depths, high-resolution pH imaging is limited to penetration depths of 1mm. Here, we report photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) of commercially available pH-sensitive fluorescent dye in tissue phantoms. Using both opticalresolution photoacoustic microscopy (OR-PAM), and acoustic resolution photoacoustic microscopy (AR-PAM), we explored the possibility of recovering the pH values in tissue phantoms. In this paper, we demonstrate that PAM was capable of recovering pH values up to a depth of 2 mm, greater than possible with other forms of optical microscopy.

  19. Surface Charge-Mediated Effects of Mg2+ on K+ Flux across the Chloroplast Envelope Are Associated with Regulation of Stromal pH and Photosynthesis 1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Weihua; Peters, Jeanne; Berkowitz, Gerald A.

    1991-01-01

    Studies of Spinacia oleracea L. were undertaken to characterize further how Mg2+ external to the isolated intact chloroplast interacts with stromal K+, pH, and photosynthetic capacity. Data presented in this report were consistent with the previously developed hypothesis that millimolar levels of external, unchelated Mg2+ result in lower stromal K+, which somehow is linked to stromal acidification. Stromal acidification directly results in photosynthetic inhibition. These effects were attributed to Mg2+ interaction (binding) to negative surface charges on the chloroplast envelope. Chloroplast envelope-bound Mg2+ was found to decrease the envelope membrane potential (inside negative) of the illuminated chloroplast by 10 millivolts. It was concluded that Mg2+ effects on photosynthesis were likely not mediated by this effect on membrane potential. Further experiments indicated that envelope-bound Mg2+ caused lower stromal K+ by restricting the rate of K+ influx; Mg2+ did not affect K+ efflux from the stroma. Mg2+ restriction of K+ influx appeared consistent with the typical effects imposed on monovalent cation channels by polyvalent cations that bind to negatively charged sites on a membrane surface near the outer pore of the channel. It was hypothesized that this interaction of Mg2+ with the chloroplast envelope likely mediated external Mg2+ effects on chloroplast metabolism. PMID:16668438

  20. ALL2, a Homologue of ALL1, Has a Distinct Role in Regulating pH Homeostasis in the Pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Neena; Bouklas, Tejas; Gupta, Anjali; Varshney, Avanish K.; Orner, Erika P.

    2015-01-01

    Cryptococcus neoformans is a facultative intracellular fungal pathogen that has a polysaccharide capsule and causes life-threatening meningoencephalitis. Its capsule, as well as its ability to survive in the acidic environment of the phagolysosome, contributes to the pathogen's resilience in the host environment. Previously, we reported that downregulation of allergen 1 (ALL1) results in the secretion of a shorter, more viscous exopolysaccharide with less branching and structural complexity, as well as altered iron homeostasis. Now, we report on a homologous coregulated gene, allergen 2 (ALL2). ALL2's function was characterized by generating null mutants in C. neoformans. In contrast to ALL1, loss of ALL2 attenuated virulence in the pulmonary infection model. The all2Δ mutant shed a less viscous exopolysaccharide and exhibited higher sensitivity to hydrogen peroxide than the wild type, and as a result, the all2Δ mutant was more resistant to macrophage-mediated killing. Transcriptome analysis further supported the distinct function of these two genes. Unlike ALL1's involvement in iron homeostasis, we now present data on ALL2's unique function in maintaining intracellular pH in low-pH conditions. Thus, our data highlight that C. neoformans, a human-pathogenic basidiomycete, has evolved a unique set of virulence-associated genes that contributes to its resilience in the human niche. PMID:26597983

  1. Histopathological effects and immunolocalization of periplocoside NW from Periploca sepium Bunge on the midgut epithelium of Mythimna separata Walker larvae.

    PubMed

    Feng, Mingxing; Shi, Baojun; Zhao, Yanchao; Hu, Zhaonong; Wu, Wenjun

    2014-10-01

    Periplocoside NW (PSNW) with pregnane glycoside skeleton is a novel insecticidal compound isolated from the root bark of Periploca sepium Bunge. This compound has a potent stomach poisoning activity against several insect pests. In this study, we observed the intoxication symptoms, investigated the histopathological effects and carried out immuno-electron microscopic localization of PSNW on the midgut epithelium of oriental armyworm Mythimna separata Walker larvae for better understanding its action mechanism against insects. Ultrastructural observations showed that cell damages caused by PSNW in the midgut of M. separata larvae are related to the degeneration of brush border microvilli. The dissolution of cytoskeletal structures in the interior and on the surface of microvilli was responsible for the decrease in size and eventual disappearance of microvilli when bubbles of cytoplasmic substances protrude into the midgut lumen of M. separata, thus resulting in cell death. The immuno-electron microscopic localization research showed that gold particle appeared on the microvilli layer of the midgut of M. separate larvae firstly. The density of gold particle gradually added with the time, and finally microvilli layer was destructed severely. Meantime, the gold particles were also presented to the intracellular organelle membrane and the organelles also were destructed. Therefore, we proposed that this membrane system on insect midgut epithelium cells is the initial acting site of PSNW against insects. PMID:25307468

  2. The Drosophila Hand gene is required for remodeling of the developing adult heart and midgut during metamorphosis

    PubMed Central

    Lo, Patrick C.H.; Zaffran, Stéphane; Sénatore, Sébastien; Frasch, Manfred

    2007-01-01

    The Hand proteins of the bHLH family of transcriptional factors play critical roles in vertebrate cardiogenesis. In Drosophila, the single orthologous Hand gene is expressed in the developing embryonic dorsal vessel (heart), lymph glands, circular visceral musculature, and a subset of CNS cells. We demonstrate that the absence of Hand activity causes semilethality during the early larval instars. The dorsal vessel and midgut musculature are unaffected in null mutant embryos, but in a large fraction the lymph glands are missing. However, homozygous adult flies lacking Hand possess morphologically abnormal dorsal vessels characterized by a disorganized myofibrillar structure, reduced systolic and diastolic diameter, abnormal heartbeat contractions, and suffer from premature lethality. In addition, their midguts are highly deformed; in the most severe cases, there is midgut blockage and a massive excess of ectopic peritrophic membrane tubules exiting a rupture in an anterior midgut bulge. Nevertheless, the visceral musculature appears to be relatively normal. Based on these phenotypes, we conclude that the expression of the Drosophila Hand gene in the dorsal vessel and circular visceral muscles is mainly required during pupal stages, when Hand participates in the proper hormone-dependent remodeling of the larval aorta into the adult heart and in the normal morphogenesis of the adult midgut endoderm during metamorphosis. PMID:17904115

  3. Dual Oxidase 2 (Duox2) Regulates Pannexin 1-mediated ATP Release in Primary Human Airway Epithelial Cells via Changes in Intracellular pH and Not H2O2 Production.

    PubMed

    Krick, Stefanie; Wang, Junjie; St-Pierre, Melissa; Gonzalez, Carlos; Dahl, Gerhard; Salathe, Matthias

    2016-03-18

    Human airway epithelial cells express pannexin 1 (Panx1) channels to release ATP, which regulates mucociliary clearance. Airway inflammation causes mucociliary dysfunction. Exposure of primary human airway epithelial cell cultures to IFN-γ for 48 h did not alter Panx1 protein expression but significantly decreased ATP release in response to hypotonic stress. The IFN-γ-induced functional down-regulation of Panx1 was due to the up-regulation of dual oxidase 2 (Duox2). Duox2 suppression by siRNA led to an increase in ATP release in control cells and restoration of ATP release in cells treated with IFN-γ. Both effects were reduced by the pannexin inhibitor probenecid. Duox2 up-regulation stoichiometrically increases H2O2 and proton production. H2O2 inhibited Panx1 function temporarily by formation of disulfide bonds at the thiol group of its terminal cysteine. Long-term exposure to H2O2, however, had no inhibitory effect. To assess the role of cellular acidification upon IFN-γ treatment, fully differentiated airway epithelial cells were exposed to ammonium chloride to alkalinize the cytosol. This led to a 2-fold increase in ATP release in cells treated with IFN-γ that was also inhibited by probenecid. Duox2 knockdown also partially corrected IFN-γ-mediated acidification. The direct correlation between intracellular pH and Panx1 open probability was shown in oocytes. Therefore, airway epithelial cells release less ATP in response to hypotonic stress in an inflammatory environment (IFN-γ exposure). Decreased Panx1 function is a response to cell acidification mediated by IFN-γ-induced up-regulation of Duox2, representing a novel mechanism for mucociliary dysfunction in inflammatory airway diseases. PMID:26823467

  4. Cytotoxic effects of thiamethoxam in the midgut and malpighian tubules of Africanized Apis mellifera (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Catae, Aline Fernanda; Roat, Thaisa Cristina; De Oliveira, Regiane Alves; Nocelli, Roberta Cornélio Ferreira; Malaspina, Osmar

    2014-04-01

    Due to its expansion, agriculture has become increasingly dependent on the use of pesticides. However, the indiscriminate use of insecticides has had additional effects on the environment. These products have a broad spectrum of action, and therefore the insecticide affects not only the pests but also non-target insects such as bees, which are important pollinators of agricultural crops and natural environments. Among the most used pesticides, the neonicotinoids are particularly harmful. One of the neonicotinoids of specific concern is thiamethoxam, which is used on a wide variety of crops and is toxic to bees. Thus, this study aimed to analyze the effects of this insecticide in the midgut and Malpighian tubule cells of Africanized Apis mellifera. Newly emerged workers were exposed until 8 days to a diet containing a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam equal to 1/10 of LC₅₀ (0.0428 ng a.i./l L of diet). The bees were dissected and the organs were processed for transmission electron microscopy. The results showed that thiamethoxam is cytotoxic to midgut and Malpighian tubules. In the midgut, the damage was more evident in bees exposed to the insecticide on the first day. On the eighth day, the cells were ultrastructurally intact suggesting a recovery of this organ. The Malpighian tubules showed pronounced alterations on the eighth day of exposure of bees to the insecticide. This study demonstrates that the continuous exposure to a sublethal dose of thiamethoxam can impair organs that are used during the metabolism of the insecticide. PMID:24470251

  5. Schinus terebinthifolius Leaf Extract Causes Midgut Damage, Interfering with Survival and Development of Aedes aegypti Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Procópio, Thamara Figueiredo; Fernandes, Kenner Morais; Pontual, Emmanuel Viana; Ximenes, Rafael Matos; de Oliveira, Aline Rafaella Cardoso; Souza, Carolina de Santana; Melo, Ana Maria Mendonça de Albuquerque; Navarro, Daniela Maria do Amaral Ferraz; Paiva, Patrícia Maria Guedes; Martins, Gustavo Ferreira; Napoleão, Thiago Henrique

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a leaf extract from Schinus terebinthifolius was evaluated for effects on survival, development, and midgut of A. aegypti fourth instar larvae (L4), as well as for toxic effect on Artemia salina. Leaf extract was obtained using 0.15 M NaCl and evaluated for phytochemical composition and lectin activity. Early L4 larvae were incubated with the extract (0.3–1.35%, w/v) for 8 days, in presence or absence of food. Polymeric proanthocyanidins, hydrolysable tannins, heterosid and aglycone flavonoids, cinnamic acid derivatives, traces of steroids, and lectin activity were detected in the extract, which killed the larvae at an LC50 of 0.62% (unfed larvae) and 1.03% (fed larvae). Further, the larvae incubated with the extract reacted by eliminating the gut content. No larvae reached the pupal stage in treatments at concentrations between 0.5% and 1.35%, while in the control (fed larvae), 61.7% of individuals emerged as adults. The extract (1.0%) promoted intense disorganization of larval midgut epithelium, including deformation and hypertrophy of cells, disruption of microvilli, and vacuolization of cytoplasms, affecting digestive, enteroendocrine, regenerative, and proliferating cells. In addition, cells with fragmented DNA were observed. Separation of extract components by solid phase extraction revealed that cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids are involved in larvicidal effect of the extract, being the first most efficient in a short time after larvae treatment. The lectin present in the extract was isolated, but did not show deleterious effects on larvae. The extract and cinnamic acid derivatives were toxic to A. salina nauplii, while the flavonoids showed low toxicity. S. terebinthifolius leaf extract caused damage to the midgut of A. aegypti larvae, interfering with survival and development. The larvicidal effect of the extract can be attributed to cinnamic acid derivatives and flavonoids. The data obtained using A. salina indicates that caution

  6. Tissue-Specific Transcriptome Profiling of Plutella Xylostella Third Instar Larval Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Wen; Lei, Yanyuan; Fu, Wei; Yang, Zhongxia; Zhu, Xun; Guo, Zhaojiang; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xu, Baoyun; Zhou, Xuguo; Zhang, Youjun

    2012-01-01

    The larval midgut of diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella, is a dynamic tissue that interfaces with a diverse array of physiological and toxicological processes, including nutrient digestion and allocation, xenobiotic detoxification, innate and adaptive immune response, and pathogen defense. Despite its enormous agricultural importance, the genomic resources for P. xylostella are surprisingly scarce. In this study, a Bt resistant P. xylostella strain was subjected to the in-depth transcriptome analysis to identify genes and gene networks putatively involved in various physiological and toxicological processes in the P. xylostella larval midgut. Using Illumina deep sequencing, we obtained roughly 40 million reads containing approximately 3.6 gigabases of sequence data. De novo assembly generated 63,312 ESTs with an average read length of 416bp, and approximately half of the P. xylostella sequences (45.4%, 28,768) showed similarity to the non-redundant database in GenBank with a cut-off E-value below 10-5. Among them, 11,092 unigenes were assigned to one or multiple GO terms and 16,732 unigenes were assigned to 226 specific pathways. In-depth analysis indentified genes putatively involved in insecticide resistance, nutrient digestion, and innate immune defense. Besides conventional detoxification enzymes and insecticide targets, novel genes, including 28 chymotrypsins and 53 ABC transporters, have been uncovered in the P. xylostella larval midgut transcriptome; which are potentially linked to the Bt toxicity and resistance. Furthermore, an unexpectedly high number of ESTs, including 46 serpins and 7 lysozymes, were predicted to be involved in the immune defense. As the first tissue-specific transcriptome analysis of P. xylostella, this study sheds light on the molecular understanding of insecticide resistance, especially Bt resistance in an agriculturally important insect pest, and lays the foundation for future functional genomics research. In addition, current

  7. Origin and dynamic lineage characteristics of the developing Drosophila midgut stem cells.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Shigeo; Aghajanian, Patrick; Younossi-Hartenstein, Amelia; Hartenstein, Volker

    2016-08-15

    Proliferating intestinal stem cells (ISCs) generate all cell types of the Drosophila midgut, including enterocytes, endocrine cells, and gland cells (e.g., copper cells), throughout the lifetime of the animal. Among the signaling mechanisms controlling the balance between ISC self-renewal and the production of different cell types, Notch (N) plays a pivotal role. In this paper we investigated the emergence of ISCs during metamorphosis and the role of N in this process. Precursors of the Drosophila adult intestinal stem cells (pISCs) can be first detected within the pupal midgut during the first hours after onset of metamorphosis as motile mesenchymal cells. pISCs perform 2-3 rounds of parasynchronous divisions. The first mitosis yields only an increase in pISC number. During the following rounds of mitosis, dividing pISCs give rise to more pISCs, as well as the endocrine cells that populate the midgut of the eclosing fly. Enterocytes do not appear among the pISC progeny until around the time of eclosion. The "proendocrine" gene prospero (pros), expressed from mid-pupal stages onward in pISCs, is responsible to advance the endocrine fate in these cells; following removal of pros, pISCs continue to proliferate, but endocrine cells do not form. Conversely, the onset of N activity that occurs around the stage when pros comes on restricts pros expression among pISCs. Loss of N abrogates proliferation and switches on an endocrine fate among all pISCs. Our results suggest that a switch depending on the activity of N and pros acts at the level of the pISC to decide between continued proliferation and endocrine differentiation. PMID:27321560

  8. Inducible peroxidases mediate nitration of anopheles midgut cells undergoing apoptosis in response to Plasmodium invasion.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Gupta, Lalita; Han, Yeon Soo; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2004-12-17

    Plasmodium berghei invasion of Anopheles stephensi midgut cells causes severe damage, induces expression of nitric-oxide synthase, and leads to apoptosis. The present study indicates that invasion results in tyrosine nitration, catalyzed as a two-step reaction in which nitric-oxide synthase induction is followed by increased peroxidase activity. Ookinete invasion induced localized expression of peroxidase enzymes, which catalyzed protein nitration in vitro in the presence of nitrite and H(2)O(2). Histochemical stainings revealed that when a parasite migrates laterally and invades more than one cell, the pattern of induced peroxidase activity is similar to that observed for tyrosine nitration. In Anopheles gambiae, ookinete invasion elicited similar responses; it induced expression of 5 of the 16 peroxidase genes predicted by the genome sequence and decreased mRNA levels of one of them. One of these inducible peroxidases has a C-terminal oxidase domain homologous to the catalytic moiety of phagocyte NADPH oxidase and could provide high local levels of superoxide anion (O(2)), that when dismutated would generate the local increase in H(2)O(2) required for nitration. Chemically induced apoptosis of midgut cells also activated expression of four ookinete-induced peroxidase genes, suggesting their involvement in general apoptotic responses. The two-step nitration reaction provides a mechanism to precisely localize and circumscribe the toxic products generated by defense reactions involving nitration. The present study furthers our understanding of the biochemistry of midgut defense reactions to parasite invasion and how these may influence the efficiency of malaria transmission by anopheline mosquitoes. PMID:15456781

  9. Restriction of Francisella novicida Genetic Diversity during Infection of the Vector Midgut

    PubMed Central

    Reif, Kathryn E.; Palmer, Guy H.; Crowder, David W.; Ueti, Massaro W.; Noh, Susan M.

    2014-01-01

    The genetic diversity of pathogens, and interactions between genotypes, can strongly influence pathogen phenotypes such as transmissibility and virulence. For vector-borne pathogens, both mammalian hosts and arthropod vectors may limit pathogen genotypic diversity (number of unique genotypes circulating in an area) by preventing infection or transmission of particular genotypes. Mammalian hosts often act as “ecological filters” for pathogen diversity, where novel variants are frequently eliminated because of stochastic events or fitness costs. However, whether vectors can serve a similar role in limiting pathogen diversity is less clear. Here we show using Francisella novicida and a natural tick vector of Francisella spp. (Dermacentor andersoni), that the tick vector acted as a stronger ecological filter for pathogen diversity compared to the mammalian host. When both mice and ticks were exposed to mixtures of F. novicida genotypes, significantly fewer genotypes co-colonized ticks compared to mice. In both ticks and mice, increased genotypic diversity negatively affected the recovery of available genotypes. Competition among genotypes contributed to the reduction of diversity during infection of the tick midgut, as genotypes not recovered from tick midguts during mixed genotype infections were recovered from tick midguts during individual genotype infection. Mediated by stochastic and selective forces, pathogen genotype diversity was markedly reduced in the tick. We incorporated our experimental results into a model to demonstrate how vector population dynamics, especially vector-to-host ratio, strongly affected pathogen genotypic diversity in a population over time. Understanding pathogen genotypic population dynamics will aid in identification of the variables that most strongly affect pathogen transmission and disease ecology. PMID:25392914

  10. Dietary influences over proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression in the locust midgut.

    PubMed

    Zudaire, E; Simpson, S J; Illa, I; Montuenga, L M

    2004-06-01

    We have studied the influence of variations in dietary protein (P) and digestible carbohydrate (C), the quantity of food eaten, and insect age during the fifth instar on the expression of the proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) in the epithelial cells of the midgut (with special reference to the midgut caeca) in the African migratory locust, Locusta migratoria. Densitometric analysis of PCNA-immunostained cells was used as an indirect measure of the levels of expression of PCNA, and a PCNA cellular index (PCNA-I) was obtained. Measurements of the DNA content of the cells have also been carried out by means of microdensitometry of Feulgen-stained, thick sections of midgut. A comparison between the PCNA nuclear level and the DNA content was performed. The PCNA levels were significantly different among the cells of the five regions studied: caeca, anterior ventricle, medial ventricle, posterior ventricle and ampullae of the Malpighian tubules. We have studied in more detail the region with highest PCNA-I, i.e. the caeca. The quality and the quantity of food eaten under ad libitum conditions were highly correlated with both the PCNA and DNA levels in the caeca cells. Locusts fed a diet with a close to optimal P:C content (P 21%, C 21%) showed the highest PCNA and DNA content. In locusts fed a food that also contained a 1:1 ratio of P to C but was diluted three-fold by addition of indigestible cellulose (P 7%, C 7%), a compensatory increase in consumption was critical to maintaining PCNA levels. Our measurements also showed that the nuclear DNA content of the mature and differentiated epithelial cells was several-fold higher than the levels in the undifferentiated stem cells of the regenerative nests. These results, combined with the low number of mitotic figures found in the regenerative nests of the caeca and the marked variation in PCNA levels among groups, suggest that some type of DNA endoreduplication process may be taking place. Our data also indicate that

  11. The surgery of malrotation and midgut volvulus: a nine year experience in neonates.

    PubMed Central

    Welch, G. H.; Azmy, A. F.; Ziervogel, M. A.

    1983-01-01

    Thirty four neonates presented with acute duodenal obstruction due to malrotation during a 9 year period between 1973 and the end of 1981. Of these, 20 patients (58.8%) presented in the first week of life, and 24 (70.5%) had an associated midgut volvulus. This frequent association is stressed as bowel necrosis occurs very rapidly. Massive gangrene of small bowel was present in 5 patients, extensive resection was necessary in 3 patients, of whom 2 died postoperatively (5.8%). Five patients required reoperation and 10 had additional G.I. malformations (29.4%). Images Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:6870133

  12. Imidacloprid impairs the post-embryonic development of the midgut in the yellow fever mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti).

    PubMed

    Fernandes, K M; Gonzaga, W G; Pascini, T V; Miranda, F R; Tomé, H V V; Serrão, J E; Martins, G F

    2015-09-01

    The mosquito Stegomyia aegypti (=Aedes aegypti) (Diptera: Culicidae) is a vector for the dengue and yellow fever viruses. As blood digestion occurs in the midgut, this organ constitutes the route of entry of many pathogens. The effects of the insecticide imidacloprid on the survival of St. aegypti were investigated and the sub-lethal effects of the insecticide on midgut development were determined. Third instar larvae were exposed to different concentrations of imidacloprid (0.15, 1.5, 3.0, 6.0 and 15.0 p.p.m.) and survival was monitored every 24 h for 10 days. Midguts from imidacloprid-treated insects at different stages of development were dissected and processed for analyses by transmission electron microscopy, immunofluorescence microscopy and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assays. Imidacloprid concentrations of 3.0 and 15.0 p.p.m. were found to affect midgut development similarly. Digestive cells of the fourth instar larvae (L4) midgut exposed to imidacloprid had more multilamellar bodies, abundantly found in the cell apex, and more electron-lucent vacuoles in the basal region compared with those from untreated insects. Moreover, imidacloprid interfered with the differentiation of regenerative cells, dramatically reducing the number of digestive and endocrine cells and leading to malformation of the midgut epithelium in adults. The data demonstrate that imidacloprid can reduce the survival of mosquitoes and thus indicate its potentially high efficacy in the control of St. aegypti populations. PMID:25968596

  13. DNA Sequencing Reveals the Midgut Microbiota of Diamondback Moth, Plutella xylostella (L.) and a Possible Relationship with Insecticide Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Xiaofeng; Zheng, Dandan; Zhong, Huanzi; Qin, Bingcai; Gurr, Geoff M.; Vasseur, Liette; Lin, Hailan; Bai, Jianlin; He, Weiyi; You, Minsheng

    2013-01-01

    Background Insect midgut microbiota is important in host nutrition, development and immune response. Recent studies indicate possible links between insect gut microbiota and resistance to biological and chemical toxins. Studies of this phenomenon and symbionts in general have been hampered by difficulties in culture-based approach. In the present study, DNA sequencing was used to examine the midgut microbiota of diamondback moth (DBM), Plutella xylostella (L.), a destructive pest that attacks cruciferous crops worldwide. Its ability to develop resistance to many types of synthetic insecticide and even Bacillus thuringiensis toxins makes it an important species to study. Methodology/Principal Findings Bacteria of the DBM larval midgut in a susceptible and two insecticide (chlorpyrifos and fipronil) resistant lines were examined by Illumina sequencing sampled from an insect generation that was not exposed to insecticide. This revealed that more than 97% of the bacteria were from three orders: Enterobacteriales, Vibrionales and Lactobacillales. Both insecticide-resistant lines had more Lactobacillales and the much scarcer taxa Pseudomonadales and Xanthomonadales with fewer Enterobacteriales compared with the susceptible strain. Consistent with this, a second study observed an increase in the proportion of Lactobacillales in the midgut of DBM individuals from a generation treated with insecticides. Conclusions/Significance This is the first report of high-throughput DNA sequencing of the entire microbiota of DBM. It reveals differences related to inter- and intra-generational exposure to insecticides. Differences in the midgut microbiota among susceptible and insecticide-resistant lines are independent of insecticide exposure in the sampled generations. While this is consistent with the hypothesis that Lactobacillales or other scarcer taxa play a role in conferring DBM insecticide resistance, further studies are necessary to rule out other possibilities. Findings

  14. Robustness of the bacterial community in the cabbage white butterfly larval midgut.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Courtney J; Schloss, Patrick; Ramos, Yolied; Raffa, Kenneth; Handelsman, Jo

    2010-02-01

    Microbial communities typically vary in composition and structure over space and time. Little is known about the inherent characteristics of communities that govern various drivers of these changes, such as random variation, changes in response to perturbation, or susceptibility to invasion. In this study, we use 16S ribosomal RNA gene sequences to describe variation among bacterial communities in the midguts of cabbage white butterfly (Pieris rapae) larvae and examine the influence of community structure on susceptibility to invasion. We compared communities in larvae experiencing the same conditions at different times (temporal variation) or fed different diets (perturbation). The most highly represented phylum was Proteobacteria, which was present in all midgut communities. The observed species richness ranged from six to 15, and the most abundant members affiliated with the genera Methylobacteria, Asaia, Acinetobacter, Enterobacter, and Pantoea. Individual larvae subjected to the same conditions at the same time harbored communities that were highly similar in structure and membership, whereas the communities observed within larval populations changed with diet and over time. In addition, structural changes due to perturbation coincided with enhanced susceptibility to invasion by Enterobacter sp. NAB3R and Pantoea stewartii CWB600, suggesting that resistance to invasion is in part governed by community structure. These findings along with the observed conservation of membership at the phylum level, variation in structure and membership at lower taxonomic levels, and its relative simplicity make the cabbage white butterfly larval community an attractive model for studying community dynamics and robustness. PMID:19924467

  15. Differential protein expression in the midgut of Culex quinquefasciatus mosquitoes induced by the insecticide temephos.

    PubMed

    Games, P D; Alves, S N; Katz, B B; Tomich, J M; Serrão, J E

    2016-09-01

    Mosquitoes are vectors for pathogens of malaria, lymphatic filariasis, dengue, chikungunya, yellow fever and Japanese encephalitis. Culex quinquefasciatus Say, 1823 (Diptera: Culicidae) is a known vector of lymphatic filariasis. Its control in Brazil has been managed using the organophosphate temephos. Studies examining the proteins of Cx. quinquefasciatus that are differentially expressed in response to temephos further understanding of the modes of action of the insecticide and may potentially identify resistance factors in the mosquito. In the present study, a comparative proteomic analysis, using 2-dimensional electrophoresis coupled with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) time of flight (TOF)/TOF mass spectrometry, and bioinformatics analyses were performed to identify midgut proteins in Cx. quinquefasciatus larvae that were differentially expressed in response to exposure to temephos relative to those in untreated controls. A total of 91 protein spots were differentially expressed; 40 were upregulated and 51 were downregulated by temephos. A total of 22 proteins, predominantly upregulated, were identified as known to play a role in the immune response, whereas the downregulated proteins were involved in energy and protein catabolism. This is the first proteome study of the midgut of Cx. quinquefasciatus and it provides insights into the molecular mechanisms of insecticide-induced responses in the mosquito. PMID:27072633

  16. Cadmium-binding proteins in midgut gland of freshwater crayfish Procambarus clarkii

    SciTech Connect

    Del Ramo, J.; Pastor, A.; Torreblanca, A.; Medina, J.; Diza-Mayans, J.

    1989-02-01

    Metallothioneins, metal binding proteins, were originally isolated and characterized by Margoshes and Vallee. These proteins have a high affinity for various heavy metals, particularly cadmium and mercury and have extensively been studied in mammals. Metal binding proteins have been observed in a variety of marine invertebrates; however, there is very little information available on metal binding proteins in freshwater invertebrates, and particularly in freshwater crustaceans. Cadmium is an ubiquitous non essential element which possesses high toxicity to aquatic organisms. Cadmium binding proteins observed in invertebrates have similar characteristics to mammalian metallothioneins. In 1978, the American red crayfish appeared in Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields (Valencia, Spain). Albufera Lake and the surrounding rice fields waters are subjected to very heavy loads of sewage and toxic industrial residues (including heavy metals) from the many urban and wastewaters in this area. In previous reports the authors studied the toxicity and accumulation of cadmium on Procambarus clarkii of Albufera Lake. This crayfish shows a high resistance to cadmium and a great accumulation rate of this metal in several tissues, including midgut gland. Since Procambarus clarkii shows a high resistance to cadmium, the presence of cadmium binding proteins (Cd-BP) in midgut gland of these crayfish would be expected. This report describes results on the characterization of Cd-BPs obtained from cadmium exposed crayfish Procambarus clarkii, demonstrating their presence in this freshwater crayfish.

  17. Bacteria in midguts of field-collected Anopheles albimanus block Plasmodium vivax sporogonic development.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Ceron, Lilia; Santillan, Frida; Rodriguez, Mario H; Mendez, Domingo; Hernandez-Avila, Juan E

    2003-05-01

    Bacterial infections were investigated in midguts of insectary and field-collected Anopheles albimanus Weidemann from southern Mexico. Serratia marcescens, Enterobacter cloacae and Enterobacter amnigenus 2, Enterobacter sp., and Serratia sp. were isolated in field samples obtained in 1998, but only Enterobacter sp. was recovered in field samples of 1997 and no bacteria were isolated from insectary specimens. These bacteria were offered along with Plasmodium vivax infected blood to aseptic insectary An. albimanus, and the number of infected mosquitoes as well as the oocyst densities assessed after 7d. Plasmodium vivax infections in mosquitoes co-infected with En. amnigenus 2, En. cloacae, and S. marcensces were 53, 17, and 210 times, respectively, lower than in control mosquitoes, and the mean oocyst density in mosquitoes co-infected with En. cloacae was 2.5 times lower than in controls. Mortality was 13 times higher in S. marcensces-infected mosquitoes compared with controls. The overall midgut bacterial infection in mosquito field populations may influence P. vivax transmission, and could contribute to explain the annual variations in malaria incidence observed in the area. PMID:12943119

  18. Internalization of Sambucus nigra agglutinins I and II in insect midgut CF-203 cells.

    PubMed

    Shahidi-Noghabi, Shahnaz; Van Damme, Els J M; De Vos, Winnok H; Smagghe, Guy

    2011-04-01

    In this project, the uptake mechanisms and localization of two lectins from Sambucus nigra, further referred to as S. nigra agglutinin (SNA)-I and SNA-II, into insect midgut CF-203 cells were studied. SNA-I is a chimeric lectin belonging to the class of ribosome-inactivating proteins, whereas SNA-II is a hololectin devoid of enzymatic activity. Internalization of the fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled lectin was investigated using confocal microscopy. Both lectins were internalized into the cytoplasm of CF-203 cells at similar rates. Preexposure of the insect midgut cells to specific inhibitors of clathrin- and caveolae-mediated endocytosis resulted in an inhibition of lectin uptake in CF-203 cells and caspase-induced cytotoxicity caused by SNA-I and SNA-II, confirming the involvement of both endocytosis pathways. Further studies demonstrated that the uptake mechanism(s) for both lectins required phosphoinositide 3-kinases, but did not depend on the actin cytoskeleton. Since the hololectin SNA-II apparently uses a similar endocytosis pathway as the chimerolectin SNA-I, it can be concluded that the endocytosis process mainly relies on the carbohydrate-binding activity of the lectins under investigation. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:21254203

  19. Inducible P450s of the CYP9 family from larval Manduca sexta midgut.

    PubMed

    Stevens, J L; Snyder, M J; Koener, J F; Feyereisen, R

    2000-07-01

    Several related cytochrome P450 cDNAs belonging to the CYP9 family have been cloned from the midgut of larval tobacco hornworms, Manduca sexta. The first P450, CYP9A2, was obtained by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. Northern blot analysis of expression in the midgut using the CYP9A2 probe revealed a significant induction by a variety of chemicals. Diets supplemented with the wild tomato compound 2-undecanone caused a dose-dependent induction which peaked after 48 h. Induction was also observed after addition to the diet of indole-3-carbinol, phenobarbital, 2-tridecanone and xanthotoxin. Neither alpha-pinene, clofibrate nor nicotine were effective inducers. The CYP9A2 probe hybridized to two mRNA species, one of 2. 0 kb and another of 4.2 kb, suggesting cross-hybridization to other P450 mRNAs. Additional P450 clones of the CYP9 family were then obtained and sequenced. Northern hybridization revealed that the 4.2 kb band also hybridized to CYP9A4 whereas the 2.0 kb hybridized to CYP9A5. Despite being 91% identical, CYP9A4 and CYP9A5 were induced differentially by clofibrate and xanthotoxin. Multiple P450 genes from various families are therefore induced in Lepidoptera in response to plant allelochemicals or xenobiotics. PMID:10844248

  20. Malaria parasite colonisation of the mosquito midgut--placing the Plasmodium ookinete centre stage.

    PubMed

    Angrisano, Fiona; Tan, Yan-Hong; Sturm, Angelika; McFadden, Geoffrey I; Baum, Jake

    2012-05-15

    Vector-borne diseases constitute an enormous burden on public health across the world. However, despite the importance of interactions between infectious pathogens and their respective vector for disease transmission, the biology of the pathogen in the insect is often less well understood than the forms that cause human infections. Even with the global impact of Plasmodium parasites, the causative agents of malarial disease, no vaccine exists to prevent infection and resistance to all frontline drugs is emerging. Malaria parasite migration through the mosquito host constitutes a major population bottleneck of the lifecycle and therefore represents a powerful, although as yet relatively untapped, target for therapeutic intervention. The understanding of parasite-mosquito interactions has increased in recent years with developments in genome-wide approaches, genomics and proteomics. Each development has shed significant light on the biology of the malaria parasite during the mosquito phase of the lifecycle. Less well understood, however, is the process of midgut colonisation and oocyst formation, the precursor to parasite re-infection from the next mosquito bite. Here, we review the current understanding of cellular and molecular events underlying midgut colonisation centred on the role of the motile ookinete. Further insight into the major interactions between the parasite and the mosquito will help support the broader goal to identify targets for transmission-blocking therapies against malarial disease. PMID:22406332

  1. Exosome secretion by the parasitic protozoan Leishmania within the sand fly midgut

    PubMed Central

    Atayde, Vanessa Diniz; Suau, Hamide Aslan; Townsend, Shannon; Hassani, Kasra; Kamhawi, Shaden; Olivier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Despite several studies describing the secretion of exosomes by Leishmania in vitro, observation of their formation and release in vivo has remained a major challenge. Herein, we show that Leishmania constitutively secretes exosomes within the lumen of the sand fly midgut through a mechanism homologous to the mammalian pathway. Through egestion experiments, we demonstrate that Leishmania exosomes are part of the sand fly inoculum and are co-egested with the parasite during the insect’s bite possibly influencing the host infectious process. Indeed, co-inoculation of mice footpads with L. major plus midgut-isolated or in vitro-isolated L. major exosomes resulted in a significant increase in footpad swelling. Notably, co-injections produced exacerbated lesions through overinduction of inflammatory cytokines, in particular IL-17a. Our data indicate that Leishmania exosomes are an integral part of the parasite’s infectious life cycle and propose to add these vesicles to the repertoire of virulence factors associated to vector-transmitted infections. PMID:26565909

  2. The Anopheles-midgut APN1 structure reveals a new malaria transmission-blocking vaccine epitope.

    PubMed

    Atkinson, Sarah C; Armistead, Jennifer S; Mathias, Derrick K; Sandeu, Maurice M; Tao, Dingyin; Borhani-Dizaji, Nahid; Tarimo, Brian B; Morlais, Isabelle; Dinglasan, Rhoel R; Borg, Natalie A

    2015-07-01

    Mosquito-based malaria transmission-blocking vaccines (mTBVs) target midgut-surface antigens of the Plasmodium parasite's obligate vector, the Anopheles mosquito. The alanyl aminopeptidase N (AnAPN1) is the leading mTBV immunogen; however, AnAPN1's role in Plasmodium infection of the mosquito and how anti-AnAPN1 antibodies functionally block parasite transmission have remained elusive. Here we present the 2.65-Å crystal structure of AnAPN1 and the immunoreactivity and transmission-blocking profiles of three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to AnAPN1, including mAb 4H5B7, which effectively blocks transmission of natural strains of Plasmodium falciparum. Using the AnAPN1 structure, we map the conformation-dependent 4H5B7 neoepitope to a previously uncharacterized region on domain 1 and further demonstrate that nonhuman-primate neoepitope-specific IgG also blocks parasite transmission. We discuss the prospect of a new biological function of AnAPN1 as a receptor for Plasmodium in the mosquito midgut and the implications for redesigning the AnAPN1 mTBV. PMID:26075520

  3. Midgut and fat body bacteriocytes in neotropical cerambycid beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae).

    PubMed

    Calderon, Olga; Berkov, Amy

    2012-02-01

    Xylophagous insects derive nutrients from intractable substrates by producing or ingesting cellulolytic enzymes, or by maintaining associations with symbiotic microbes. Wood-boring cerambycid beetle larvae sometimes house maternally-transmitted endosymbiotic yeasts that are presumed to provide their hosts with nutritional benefits. These are thought to be absent from species in the large subfamily Lamiinae; nevertheless yeasts have been repeatedly isolated from the guts of neotropical lamiines. The objective of this study was to conduct transmission electron microscopy (TEM) studies of cerambycid larval midgut tissues to determine if gut yeasts were intracellular, or simply present in the gut lumen. Nine cerambycid larvae were harvested from two trees in the Brazil nut family (Lecythidaceae) in the rain forest of SE Peru; seven were identified using mtDNA sequence data and processed for TEM. Yeasts cultured from larval frass or exuvia, and identified with rDNA sequence data, were identical or similar to yeasts previously isolated from beetles. In TEM analyses yeast cells were found only in the gut lumens, sometimes associated with fragments of thick-walled xylem cells. Apparent bacteriocytes were found in either midgut or fat body tissue of three larval specimens, including two lamiines. This is the first report of a potential fat body symbiosis in a cerambycid beetle. Future studies of cerambycid symbiosis should distinguish the identities and potential roles of free-living organisms in the gut lumen from those of organisms harbored within gut epithelial or fat body tissue. PMID:22525065

  4. Malaria parasites form filamentous cell-to-cell connections during reproduction in the mosquito midgut

    PubMed Central

    Rupp, Ingrid; Sologub, Ludmilla; Williamson, Kim C; Scheuermayer, Matthias; Reininger, Luc; Doerig, Christian; Eksi, Saliha; Kombila, Davy U; Frank, Matthias; Pradel, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Physical contact is important for the interaction between animal cells, but it can represent a major challenge for protists like malaria parasites. Recently, novel filamentous cell-cell contacts have been identified in different types of eukaryotic cells and termed nanotubes due to their morphological appearance. Nanotubes represent small dynamic membranous extensions that consist of F-actin and are considered an ancient feature evolved by eukaryotic cells to establish contact for communication. We here describe similar tubular structures in the malaria pathogen Plasmodium falciparum, which emerge from the surfaces of the forming gametes upon gametocyte activation in the mosquito midgut. The filaments can exhibit a length of > 100 μm and contain the F-actin isoform actin 2. They actively form within a few minutes after gametocyte activation and persist until the zygote transforms into the ookinete. The filaments originate from the parasite plasma membrane, are close ended and express adhesion proteins on their surfaces that are typically found in gametes, like Pfs230, Pfs48/45 or Pfs25, but not the zygote surface protein Pfs28. We show that these tubular structures represent long-distance cell-to-cell connections between sexual stage parasites and demonstrate that they meet the characteristics of nanotubes. We propose that malaria parasites utilize these adhesive “nanotubes” in order to facilitate intercellular contact between gametes during reproduction in the mosquito midgut. PMID:21173797

  5. Transcriptome of the lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) larval midgut and its response to infection by bacillus thuringiensis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Transcriptomic profiles of the serious lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a biopesticide commonly used for its control in nature. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of ...

  6. HISTOPATHOLOGICAL AND ULTRASTRUCTURAL CHANGES IN THE ANTENNAL GLAND, MIDGUT, HEPATOPANCREAS, AND GILL OF GRASS SHRIMP FOLLOWING EXPOSURE TO HEXAVALENT CHROMIUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Grass shrimp, Palaemonetes pugio, were exposed for 1 month to subacute concentrations of hexavalent chromium (0.5, 1.0, 2.0, 4.0 ppm) after which the gills, midgut, hepatopancreas, and antennal glands were examined for histopathological and ultrastructural changes. Pathological c...

  7. The receptor of Bacillus sphaericus binary toxin in Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) midgut: molecular cloning and expression.

    PubMed

    Darboux, I; Nielsen-LeRoux, C; Charles, J F; Pauron, D

    2001-09-01

    Culex pipiens larval midgut is the primary target of the binary toxin (Bin) present in parasporal inclusions of Bacillus sphaericus. Cpm1, a 60-kDa protein purified from brush border membranes, has been proposed as the receptor of the Bin toxin in the midgut epithelial cells of mosquitoes. We have cloned and characterized the corresponding cDNA from midgut of Culex pipiens larvae. The open reading frame predicted a 580 amino-acid protein with a putative signal peptide at the N-terminus and a putative GPI-anchoring signal at the C-terminus. The amino acid sequence of the cloned Cpm1 exhibited 39-43% identities with insect maltases (alpha-glucosidases and alpha-amylases). Recombinant Cpm1 expressed in E. coli specifically bound to the Bin toxin and had a significant alpha-glucosidase activity but no alpha-amylase activity. These results support the view that Cpm1 is an alpha-glucosidase expressed in Culex midgut where it constitutes the receptor for the Bin toxin. To date, this is the first component involved in the mosquitocidal activity of the Bacillus sphaericus Bin toxin to be characterized. Its identification provides a key step to elucidate the mode of action of the Bin toxin and the mechanisms of resistance developed against it by some mosquito strains. PMID:11483434

  8. Comparative analysis of carbohydrate residues in the midgut of phlebotomines (Diptera: Psychodidae) from colony and field populations from Amazon, Brazil.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Davi Marcos Souza; da Silva, Bruno José Martins; de Sena, Chubert Bernardo Castro; Lima, José Aprígio Nunes; Vasconcelos Dos Santos, Thiago; Silveira, Fernando Tobias; Silva, Edilene Oliveira

    2016-09-01

    Leishmaniasis are worldwide diseases that occur in 98 countries including Brazil, transmitted by the bite of female phlebotomines during blood feeding. In Brazil it is known that some species of sand flies as Lutzomyia longipalpis sensun latum (vector of Leishmania infantum chagasi), Lutzomyia flaviscutellata (vector of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis) and Lutzomyia antunesi [suspected vector of Leishmania (Viannia) lindenbergi] are incriminated of transmitting the parasite Leishmania for the vertebrate host. The phlebotomine-parasite is mediated by the attachment of the promastigote lipophosphoglycan (LPG) to the midgut epithelium. However, another mechanism that is LPG-independent and mediated by N-acetyl-galactosamine (GalNAc) seems to occur in some species of phlebotomines that are classified as permissive. The aim of this study was to characterize the carbohydrate residues that, probably, play a role in parasite attachment to the midgut of phlebotomine from colony and field populations from the Brazilian Amazonian region. We observed the presence of GalNAc, mannose, galactose and GlcNAc in all phlebotomine species. A binding assay between L. (L.) amazonensis and L. i.chagasi to the midguts of different species of phlebotomines was performed. The attachment of both Leishmania and vector species suggests the presence of GalNAc on the midgut surfaces. Thus, these results suggested that GalNAc is a possible binding sites of Leishmania in sand flies from the Brazilian Amazonian region. PMID:27264642

  9. Major Pesticide Receptors, Detoxification Enzymes, and Transcriptional Profile in Midgut of the Tobacco Budworm, Heliothis virescens (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Insecticide resistance mechanisms, including those for Cry proteins (Bt) in the tobacco budworm, Heliothis virescens, are not well understood. Sequencing of midgut transcriptomes may facilitate the discovery of the genes responsible for resistance development which could then be targeted by new bio-...

  10. The effects of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of Apis mellifera ligustica (Hymenoptera: Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Geng, Li-Li; Li, Yun-He; Wang, Qiang; Diao, Qing-Yun; Zhou, Ting; Dai, Ping-Li

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee has been regarded as a key species in the environmental risk assessment of biotech crops. Here, the potential adverse effects of Cry1Ie toxin on the midgut bacteria of the worker bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed with different concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin syrups (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL), pure sugar syrup, and 48 ppb of imidacloprid syrups, then sampled after 15 and 30 d. We characterized the dominant midgut bacteria and compared the composition and structure of the midgut bacterial community in all samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V3–V4 regions of 16S rDNA. No significant differences in the diversity of the midgut bacteria were observed between the five treatments. This work was the first to show the effects of Cry1Ie toxin on honey bees, and our study provided a theoretical basis for the biosafety assessment of transgenic Cry1Ie maize. PMID:27090812

  11. Amount and metal composition of midgut gland metallothionein in shore crabs (Carcinus maenas) after exposure to cadmium in the food.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Knud Ladegaard; Bach, Louise Thornhøj; Bjerregaard, Poul

    2014-05-01

    Accumulation of cadmium in aquatic invertebrates may compromise human food safety and anthropogenic additions of cadmium to coastal areas cause concern. Induction of crustacean metallothionein has been suggested as a useful biomarker for contamination of the aquatic environment with cadmium. We investigated how exposure to low concentrations of cadmium in the food affects the subcellular binding of cadmium with the shore crab Carcinus maenas as model organism. Approximately 80% of the assimilated cadmium was bound in the soluble fraction of the midgut gland and of this, 82% was found in the metallothionein fraction. Metallothionein synthesis was only induced at the highest exposure level. However, the number of cadmium atoms bound per molecule of metallothionein increased linearly with exposure, from approximately 0.18 in the control group to 1.4 in a group administered food containing 5.1 μg Cd g(-1). We noted a marked interaction between the presence of copper and zinc in the midgut gland and the binding of cadmium. The usefulness of crustacean midgut gland metallothionein as a biomarker for cadmium exposure at modest levels was questioned since exposures at levels producing significant increases in the tissue contents of the metal did not result in elevated concentrations of metallothionein in the midgut gland. PMID:24685622

  12. The effects of Bt Cry1Ie toxin on bacterial diversity in the midgut of Apis mellifera ligustica (Hymenoptera: Apidae).

    PubMed

    Jia, Hui-Ru; Geng, Li-Li; Li, Yun-He; Wang, Qiang; Diao, Qing-Yun; Zhou, Ting; Dai, Ping-Li

    2016-01-01

    The honey bee has been regarded as a key species in the environmental risk assessment of biotech crops. Here, the potential adverse effects of Cry1Ie toxin on the midgut bacteria of the worker bees (Apis mellifera ligustica) were investigated under laboratory conditions. Newly emerged bees were fed with different concentrations of Cry1Ie toxin syrups (20 ng/mL, 200 ng/mL, and 20 μg/mL), pure sugar syrup, and 48 ppb of imidacloprid syrups, then sampled after 15 and 30 d. We characterized the dominant midgut bacteria and compared the composition and structure of the midgut bacterial community in all samples using the Illumina MiSeq platform targeting the V3-V4 regions of 16S rDNA. No significant differences in the diversity of the midgut bacteria were observed between the five treatments. This work was the first to show the effects of Cry1Ie toxin on honey bees, and our study provided a theoretical basis for the biosafety assessment of transgenic Cry1Ie maize. PMID:27090812

  13. Metabolism of cydiastatin 4 and analogues by enzymes associated with the midgut and haemolymph of Manduca sexta larvae

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The degradation of synthetic cydiastatin 4 (ARPYSFGL-amide) and cydiastatin 4 analogues cydiastatin 4a (PPPPPARPYSFGL-amide) and cydiastatin 4b (PPPPPARPYSF[Acpc]L-amide) by enzymes associated with the midgut and/or haemolymph of the tobacco hawkmoth moth, Manduca sexta were investigated using rever...

  14. Live imaging of baculovirus infection of midgut epithelium cells: a functional assay of per os infectivity factors.

    PubMed

    Mu, Jingfang; van Lent, Jan W M; Smagghe, Guy; Wang, Yun; Chen, Xinwen; Vlak, Just M; van Oers, Monique M

    2014-11-01

    The occlusion-derived viruses (ODVs) of baculoviruses are responsible for oral infection of insect hosts, whereas budded viruses (BVs) are responsible for systemic infection within the host. The ODV membrane proteins play crucial roles in mediating virus entry into midgut epithelium cells to initiate infection and are important factors in host-range determination. For Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV), seven conserved ODV membrane proteins have been shown to be essential for oral infectivity and are called per os infectivity factors (PIFs). Information on the function of the individual PIF proteins in virus entry is limited, partly due to the lack of a good in vitro system for monitoring ODV entry. Here, we constructed a baculovirus with EGFP fused to the nucleocapsid to monitor virus entry into primary midgut epithelium cells ex vivo using confocal fluorescence microscopy. The EGFP-labelled virus showed similar BV virulence and ODV infectivity as WT virus. The ability to bind and enter host cells was then visualized for WT AcMNPV and viruses with mutations in P74 (PIF0), PIF1 or PIF2, showing that P74 is required for ODV binding, whilst PIF1 and PIF2 play important roles in the entry of ODV after binding to midgut cells. This is the first live imaging of ODV entry into midgut cells and complements the genetic and biochemical evidence for the role of PIFs in the oral infection process. PMID:25006078

  15. Transepithelial flux of an allotostatin and analogs across the anterior midgut of Manduca sexta larvae in vitro

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The transepithelial transport of cydiastatin 4 and analogues across flat sheet preparations of the anterior midgut of larvae of the tobacco hawkmoth moth, Manduca sexta, was investigated using a combination of reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), enzyme linked immunosorbe...

  16. Midgut epithelial responses of different mosquito–Plasmodium combinations: The actin cone zipper repair mechanism in Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Han, Yeon Soo; Pimenta, Paulo F. P.; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-01-01

    In vivo responses of midgut epithelial cells to ookinete invasion of three different vector–parasite combinations, Aedes aegypti–Plasmodium gallinaceum, Anopheles stephensi–Plasmodium berghei, and A. stephensi–P. gallinaceum, were directly compared by using enzymatic markers and immunofluorescence stainings. Our studies indicate that, in A. aegypti and A. stephensi ookinetes traverse the midgut via an intracellular route and inflict irreversible damage to the invaded cells. These two mosquito species differ, however, in their mechanisms of epithelial repair. A. stephensi detaches damaged cells by an actin-mediated budding-off mechanism when invaded by either P. berghei or P. gallinaceum. In A. aegypti, the midgut epithelium is repaired by a unique actin cone zipper mechanism that involves the formation of a cone-shaped actin aggregate at the base of the cell that closes sequentially, expelling the cellular contents into the midgut lumen as it brings together healthy neighboring cells. Invasion of A. stephensi by P. berghei induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and peroxidase activities, which mediate tyrosine nitration. These enzymes and nitrotyrosine, however, were not induced in the other two vector–parasite combinations examined. These studies indicate that the epithelial responses of different mosquito–parasite combinations are not universal. The implications of these observations to validate animal experimental systems that reflect the biology of natural vectors of human malarias are discussed. PMID:15753303

  17. Midgut epithelial responses of different mosquito-Plasmodium combinations: the actin cone zipper repair mechanism in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Lalita; Kumar, Sanjeev; Han, Yeon Soo; Pimenta, Paulo F P; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-03-15

    In vivo responses of midgut epithelial cells to ookinete invasion of three different vector-parasite combinations, Aedes aegypti-Plasmodium gallinaceum, Anopheles stephensi-Plasmodium berghei, and A. stephensi-P. gallinaceum, were directly compared by using enzymatic markers and immunofluorescence stainings. Our studies indicate that, in A. aegypti and A. stephensi ookinetes traverse the midgut via an intracellular route and inflict irreversible damage to the invaded cells. These two mosquito species differ, however, in their mechanisms of epithelial repair. A. stephensi detaches damaged cells by an actin-mediated budding-off mechanism when invaded by either P. berghei or P. gallinaceum. In A. aegypti, the midgut epithelium is repaired by a unique actin cone zipper mechanism that involves the formation of a cone-shaped actin aggregate at the base of the cell that closes sequentially, expelling the cellular contents into the midgut lumen as it brings together healthy neighboring cells. Invasion of A. stephensi by P. berghei induced expression of nitric oxide synthase and peroxidase activities, which mediate tyrosine nitration. These enzymes and nitrotyrosine, however, were not induced in the other two vector-parasite combinations examined. These studies indicate that the epithelial responses of different mosquito-parasite combinations are not universal. The implications of these observations to validate animal experimental systems that reflect the biology of natural vectors of human malarias are discussed. PMID:15753303

  18. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies.

    PubMed

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A; Beverley, Stephen M; Turco, Salvatore J; Sacks, David

    2010-07-01

    Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO(4)] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2(-) or lpg5A(-)/5B(-)) or LPG alone (lpg1(-)) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36-72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2(-) and lpg5A(-)/5B(-) mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2(-) in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2(-) promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  19. Mining an Ostrinia nubilalis Midgut Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) Library for Candidate Genes and Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    European corn borer, Ostrinia nubilalis, larvae feed upon many plant hosts and are a major target for genetically-engineered corn expressing Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) toxins. DNA sequencing of a non-normalized O. nubilalis larval midgut cDNA library (ARS-CICGRU ONmgEST) identified 535 unique sequ...

  20. Identification of a new tachykinin from the midgut of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria, by ESI-Qq-oa-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Veelaert, D; Baggerman, G; Derua, R; Waelkens, E; Meeusen, T; Vande Water, G; De Loof, A; Schoofs, L

    1999-12-01

    This paper reports the purification of a tachykinin isoform from the midgut of the desert locust, Schistocerca gregaria. One hundred locust midguts were extracted in an acidified methanolic solvent, after which three HPLC column systems were used to obtain a pure peptide. A tachykinin immunoassay was used to monitor all collected fractions. After each purification step the purity of the sample was monitored by MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry. The pure peptide was sequenced by ESI-Qq-oa-TOF mass spectrometry. Edman degradation-based automated microsequencing and chemical synthesis confirmed the sequences. The midgut peptide, GNTKKAVPGFYGTRamide (Scg-midgut-TK), belongs to the tachykinin family with identified members in all vertebrate phyla and some invertebrate phyla: arthropods, annelids and molluscs. Scg-midgut-TK is the first tachykinin purified from midguts of the desert locust Schistocerca gregaria. In comparison to locust brain tachykinins, the midgut tachykinin is N-terminally extended. Similar to neuropeptide gamma, an N-terminally extended mammalian tachykinin, first isolated from rabbit intestine, the present identified locust intestinal tachykinin contains a putative dibasic cleavage site. PMID:10581195

  1. Limited effect of reactive oxygen species on the composition of susceptible essential amino acids in the midguts of Lymantria dispar caterpillars.

    PubMed

    Barbehenn, Raymond V; Niewiadomski, Julie; Kochmanski, Joseph; Constabel, C Peter

    2012-11-01

    The essential amino acids (EAAs) arginine, histidine, lysine, and methionine, as well as cysteine (semiessential), are believed to be susceptible to reactions with reactive oxygen species (ROS) in biological systems. The decreased availability of these EAAs could harm insect nutrition, since several of them can also be limiting for protein synthesis. However, no in vivo studies have quantified the effect of ROS in the midguts of insect herbivores on EAA composition. This study examined the association between elevated levels of ROS in the midgut fluid of Lymantria dispar caterpillars and the compositions of EAAs (protein-bound + protein-free) in their midgut fluid and frass. Contrary to expectation, the compositions of EAAs were not significantly decreased by ROS in midgut fluid ex vivo when incubated with phenolic compounds. Two in vivo comparisons of low- and high-ROS-producing leaves also showed similar results: there were no significant decreases in the compositions of EAAs in the midgut fluids and/or frass of larvae with elevated levels of ROS in their midguts. In addition, waste nitrogen excretion was not significantly increased from larvae on high-ROS treatments, as would be expected if ROS produced unbalanced EAA compositions. These results suggest that L. dispar larvae are able to tolerate elevated levels of ROS in their midguts without nutritionally significant changes in the compositions of susceptible EAAs in their food. PMID:22961657

  2. Exploring the mialome of ticks: an annotated catalogue of midgut transcripts from the hard tick, Dermacentor variabilis (Acari: Ixodidae)

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Jennifer M; Sonenshine, Daniel E; Valenzuela, Jesus G

    2008-01-01

    Background Ticks are obligate blood feeders. The midgut is the first major region of the body where blood and microbes ingested with the blood meal come in contact with the tick's internal tissues. Little is known about protein expression in the digestive tract of ticks. In this study, for analysis of global gene expression during tick attachment and feeding, we generated and sequenced 1,679 random transcripts (ESTs) from cDNA libraries from the midguts of female ticks at varying stages of feeding. Results Sequence analysis of the 1,679 ESTs resulted in the identification of 835 distinct transcripts, from these, a total of 82 transcripts were identified as proteins putatively directly involved in blood meal digestion, including enzymes involved in oxidative stress reduction/antimicrobial activity/detoxification, peptidase inhibitors, protein digestion (cysteine-, aspartic-, serine-, and metallo-peptidases), cell, protein and lipid binding including mucins and iron/heme metabolism and transport. A lectin-like protein with a high match to lectins in other tick species, allergen-like proteins and surface antigens important in pathogen recognition and/or antimicrobial activity were also found. Furthermore, midguts collected from the 6-day-fed ticks expressed twice as many transcripts involved in bloodmeal processing as midguts from unfed/2-day-fed ticks. Conclusion This tissue-specific transcriptome analysis provides an opportunity to examine the global expression of transcripts in the tick midgut and to compare the gut response to host attachment versus blood feeding and digestion. In contrast to those in salivary glands of other Ixodid ticks, most proteins in the D. variabilis midgut cDNA library were intracellular. Of the total ESTs associated with a function, an unusually large number of transcripts were associated with peptidases, cell, lipid and protein binding, and oxidative stress or detoxification. Presumably, this is consistent with their role in

  3. Affinity purification and characterization of a biodegradable plastic-degrading enzyme from a yeast isolated from the larval midgut of a stag beetle, Aegus laevicollis.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Ken; Sakamoto, Hironori; Shinozaki, Yukiko; Tabata, Jun; Watanabe, Takashi; Mochizuki, Atsushi; Koitabashi, Motoo; Fujii, Takeshi; Tsushima, Seiya; Kitamoto, Hiroko K

    2013-09-01

    Two yeast strains, which have the ability to degrade biodegradable plastic films, were isolated from the larval midgut of a stag beetle, Aegus laevicollis. Both of them are most closely related to Cryptococcus magnus and could degrade biodegradable plastic (BP) films made of poly(butylene succinate) (PBS) and poly(butylene succinate-co-adipate) (PBSA) effectively. A BP-degrading enzyme was purified from the culture broth of one of the isolated strains employing a newly developed affinity purification method based on the binding action of the enzyme to the substrate (emulsified PBSA) and its subsequent degradative action toward the substrate. Partial amino acid sequences of this enzyme suggested that it belongs to the cutinase family, and thus, the enzyme was named CmCut1. It has a molecular mass of 21 kDa and a degradative activity for emulsified PBSA which was significantly enhanced by the simultaneous presence of Ca(2+) or Mg(2+) at a concentration of about 2.5 mM. Its optimal pH was 7.5, and the optimal temperature was 40 °C. It showed a broad substrate specificity for p-nitrophenyl (pNP)-fatty acid esters ranging from pNP-acetate (C2) to pNP-stearate (C18) and films of PBSA, PBS, poly(ε-caprolactone), and poly(lactic acid). PMID:23224497

  4. Lectin-carbohydrate recognition mechanism of Plasmodium berghei in the midgut of malaria vector Anopheles stephensi using quantum dot as a new approach.

    PubMed

    Basseri, Hamid R; Javazm, Mahdi Salari; Farivar, Leila; Abai, Mohammad R

    2016-04-01

    Potential targets of Plasmodium ookinetes at the mosquito midgut walls were investigated in relation to interfering malarial transmission. In this study, the essential application of Quantum Dots (QDs) was used to examine the interaction between Plasmodium berghei ookinetes and the Anopheles stephensi midgut, based on lectin-carbohydrate recognition. Two significant lectins were utilized to determine this interaction. Two QDs, cadmium telluride (CdTe)/CdS and cadmium selenide (CdSe)/CdS, were employed in staining Plasmodium ookinete to study its interaction in the midgut of the mosquito vector in vivo. Concurrently, two lectins, wheat germ agglutinin (WGA) and concanavalin A (Con A), were inadvertently exploited to mask lectin binding sites between ookinetes and mosquito midgut cells. The numbers of ookinetes in both lumen and epithelial cells were eventually counted, following adequate preparation of wax sections extracted from whole midgut, and subsequent examination using a differential interference contrast a fluorescence microscopic technique. Interestingly, we detected that neither of the QDs mutated ookinete invasion into the midgut cells of the investigated mosquitoes. QD staining of ookinetes remained permanent despite the effective embedding procedure. The massive binding potency of ookinetes to midgut cells of the cross-examined mosquitoes undoubtedly revealed that Con A did not interrupt ookinete penetration into the midgut wall. In contrast, WGA inhibited ookinete invasion into the midgut cells. The results proved that QD nanoparticles are biocompatible, non-toxic to P. berghei and stable to photobleaching. The QDs staining, which was successfully implemented for ookinete labelling, is a simple and effective tool which plays a crucial role in bioimaging including the study of parasite-vector interactions. PMID:26772447

  5. Bacterial Communities and Midgut Microbiota Associated with Mosquito Populations from Waste Tires in East-Central Illinois.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chang-Hyun; Lampman, Richard L; Muturi, Ephantus J

    2015-01-01

    Mosquito-microbe interactions tend to influence larval nutrition, immunity, and development, as well as fitness and vectorial capacity of adults. Understanding the role of different bacterial species not only improves our knowledge of the physiological and ecological consequences of these interactions, but also provides the basis for developing novel strategies for controlling mosquito-borne diseases. We used culture-dependent and culture-independent techniques to characterize the bacterial composition and abundance in water and midgut samples of larval and adult females of Aedes japonicus (Theobald), Aedes triseriatus (Say), and Culex restuans (Theobald) collected from waste tires at two wooded study sites in Urbana, IL. The phylum-specific real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay revealed a higher proportion of Actinobacteria and a lower proportion of gamma-Proteobacteria and Bacteroidetes in water samples and larval midguts compared to adult female midguts. Only 15 of the 57 bacterial species isolated in this study occurred in both study sites. The number of bacterial species was highest in water samples (28 species from Trelease Woods; 25 species from South Farms), intermediate in larval midguts (13 species from Ae. japonicus; 12 species from Ae. triseriatus; 8 species from Cx. restuans), and lowest in adult female midguts (2 species from Ae. japonicus; 3 species from Ae. triseriatus). These findings suggest that the composition and richness of bacterial communities varies both between habitats and among mosquito species and that the reduction in bacteria diversity during metamorphosis is more evident among bacteria detected using the culture-dependent method. PMID:26336281

  6. Changes in Drosophila melanogaster midgut proteins in response to dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Li, H-M; Margam, V; Muir, W M; Murdock, L L; Pittendrigh, B R

    2007-10-01

    The midgut proteome of Drosophila melanogaster was compared in larvae fed dietary Bowman-Birk inhibitor (BBI) vs. larvae fed a control diet. By using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, nine differentially expressed proteins were observed, which were associated with enzymes or transport functions such as sterol carrier protein X (SCPX), ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, endopeptidase, receptor signalling protein kinase, ATP-dependent RNA helicase and alpha-tocopherol transport. Quantitative real-time PCR verified differential expression of transcripts coding for six of the proteins observed from the proteomic analysis. BBI evidently affects expression of proteins associated with protein degradation, transport and fatty acid catabolism. We then tested the hypothesis that SCPX was critical for the Drosophila third instars' response to BBI treatment. Inhibition of SCPX caused the third instars to become more susceptible to dietary BBI. PMID:17725801

  7. Volvulus of the ascending colon: an unusual complication of non-rotation of the midgut.

    PubMed

    Berger, R B; Hillemeier, A C; Stahl, R S; Markowitz, R I

    1982-01-01

    A case of non-rotation of the bowel is presented wherein volvulus of the colon occurred causing acute obstruction. Spontaneous reduction following a barium enema as well as the patient's history leads us to suspect that volvulus had occurred in the past and was responsible for the intermittent nature of the patient's symptoms. This type of volvulus is distinctly different from midgut volvulus and is a rare complication of the anomaly of intestinal rotation and fixation known as non-rotation of the bowel. Efforts should be made to study patients with malrotation anomalies at a time when they are acutely symptomatic so that intermittent volvulus such as shown here is not overlooked. PMID:7162881

  8. Bacillus amyloliquefaciens AG1 biosurfactant: Putative receptor diversity and histopathological effects on Tuta absoluta midgut.

    PubMed

    Ben Khedher, Saoussen; Boukedi, Hanen; Kilani-Feki, Olfa; Chaib, Ikbel; Laarif, Asma; Abdelkefi-Mesrati, Lobna; Tounsi, Slim

    2015-11-01

    The use of biosurfactant in pest management has received much attention for the control of plant pathogens, but few studies reported their insecticidal activity. The present study describes the insecticidal activity of biosurfactant extracted from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain AG1. This strain produces a lipopeptide biosurfactant exhibiting an LC50 of about 180ng/cm(2) against Tuta absoluta larvae. Accordingly, the histopathologic effect of this biosurfactant on T. absoluta larvae showed serious damages of the midgut tissues including rupture and disintegration of epithelial layer and cellular vacuolization. By PCR, we showed that this biosurfactant could be formed by several lipopeptides and polyketides including iturin, fengycin, surfactin, bacyllomicin, bacillaene, macrolactin and difficidin. Binding experiment revealed that it recognized five putative receptors located in the BBMV of T. absoluta with sizes of 68, 63, 44, 30 and 19kDa. Therefore, biosurfactant AG1 hold potential for use as an environmentally friendly agent to control the tomato leaf miner. PMID:26299754

  9. Trilogy of foregut, midgut and hindgut atresias presenting in reverse order

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Ramnik V; Jackson, Paul; De Coppi, Paolo; Pierro, Agostino

    2014-01-01

    We present a case of triple gut atresias (foregut, midgut and hindgut) with multiple congenital anomalies presenting as imperforate anus. Abdominal radiography showed the double bubble sign. Upper gastrointestinal study through a nasogastric tube confirmed duodenal obstruction. Exploratory laparotomy, duodeno-duodenostomy for duodenal atresia and a left descending colostomy for anorectal malformation were performed. During extubation, the nasogastric tube came out and could not be reinserted by the anaesthetic team under laryngoscopic guidance. A chest radiograph showed the tube curled in the upper pouch. Bronchoscopy and oesophagoscopy confirmed oesophageal atresia (OA) with a distal tracheoesophageal fistula (TOF). The patient underwent right-sided extrapleural thoracotomy and division of the fistula with primary repair of OA uneventfully. Triple gut atresias presenting in reverse order with multiple anomalies is rare and passage of a nasogastric tube into the stomach in the presence of OA+TOF is exceptional. Alimentary tract obstruction should be corrected in proximal to distal direction. PMID:24835810

  10. Tissue-specific Proteogenomic Analysis of Plutella xylostella Larval Midgut Using a Multialgorithm Pipeline.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Xun; Xie, Shangbo; Armengaud, Jean; Xie, Wen; Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xia, Jixing; He, Rongjun; Zhang, Youjun

    2016-06-01

    The diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), is the major cosmopolitan pest of brassica and other cruciferous crops. Its larval midgut is a dynamic tissue that interfaces with a wide variety of toxicological and physiological processes. The draft sequence of the P. xylostella genome was recently released, but its annotation remains challenging because of the low sequence coverage of this branch of life and the poor description of exon/intron splicing rules for these insects. Peptide sequencing by computational assignment of tandem mass spectra to genome sequence information provides an experimental independent approach for confirming or refuting protein predictions, a concept that has been termed proteogenomics. In this study, we carried out an in-depth proteogenomic analysis to complement genome annotation of P. xylostella larval midgut based on shotgun HPLC-ESI-MS/MS data by means of a multialgorithm pipeline. A total of 876,341 tandem mass spectra were searched against the predicted P. xylostella protein sequences and a whole-genome six-frame translation database. Based on a data set comprising 2694 novel genome search specific peptides, we discovered 439 novel protein-coding genes and corrected 128 existing gene models. To get the most accurate data to seed further insect genome annotation, more than half of the novel protein-coding genes, i.e. 235 over 439, were further validated after RT-PCR amplification and sequencing of the corresponding transcripts. Furthermore, we validated 53 novel alternative splicings. Finally, a total of 6764 proteins were identified, resulting in one of the most comprehensive proteogenomic study of a nonmodel animal. As the first tissue-specific proteogenomics analysis of P. xylostella, this study provides the fundamental basis for high-throughput proteomics and functional genomics approaches aimed at deciphering the molecular mechanisms of resistance and controlling this pest. PMID:26902207

  11. Impact of cysteine proteinase inhibition in midgut fluid and oral secretion on fecundity and pollen consumption of western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera virgifera).

    PubMed

    Kim, Jae Hak; Mullin, Christopher A

    2003-03-01

    Cysteine proteinases predominate in the midgut fluid (MF) and oral secretion (OS) of adult western corn rootworm (WCR) based on their mild acidic pH optima (pH 6.0), enhanced activities after treatment with thiol reducing agents, and inhibition by selective cysteine proteinase inhibitors (PIs). Four cysteine PIs including E-64, calpeptin, calpain inhibitor II, and leupeptin (also a serine PI) strongly inhibited azocaseinolytic activity in a dose-dependent manner in both the MF and OS. The most significant effect on adult female WCR of cysteine PI consumption with corn pollen was the reduction in fecundity, but female survival was not apparently affected. Mean fresh weights for all PI-fed females were also lower than control groups. All PI-fed groups [E-64, calpain inhibitor I (Cal I) and leupeptin] had a significantly lower daily egg production than respective corn pollen-fed controls. E-64 was more potent than leupeptin and Cal I on inhibiting fecundity, which correlates with their relative anti-proteinase potency in vitro. E-64, Cal I, and leupeptin at 1.5-2 nmol/beetle/day reduced fecundity down to 25-45% of control values. Reduced egg production by PI-fed beetles results from a combination of the direct inhibition of protein digestion and a post-ingestive negative feedback mechanism, which reduces food intake. The supplement of ten essential amino acids into the E-64-treated pollen enhanced up to 3.7-fold the number of eggs laid compared to the E-64-fed group without these amino acids, suggesting that egg production is dependent on the supply of essential amino acids from corn pollen proteolysis. PMID:12587142

  12. Effects of some botanical extracts on the midgut, integument and fat body of the cotton leaf worm, Spodoptera littoralis (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae).

    PubMed

    Khatter, Najat A

    2010-08-01

    Botanical extracts (8%) of four plants (Artemisia monosperma, Zygophyllum cocccineum, Lupinus termis and Brassica tournifortii) fed to the 4th larval instars of Spodoptera littoralis induced histopathological changes in the structure of the midgut, integument and fat body of the 5th instars. Zygophyllum cocci-neum and Lupinus termis induced severe damages in the midgut. The integument of treated larvae showed degeneration in the cuticle and epidermal cells which were also detached from each other. Water extracts of A. monosperma, Z. coccinieum and L. termis were the most promising in inducing shrinkage in the fat body cells and detachment of midgut muscle layers. Also, the degeneration of the midgut membrane and epithelial layer occurs in different degrees with the tested plants. This study supports the use of botanical extracts in pest control programs of lepidopterous insects. PMID:21246948

  13. A Lectin from Dioclea violacea Interacts with Midgut Surface of Lutzomyia migonei, Unlike Its Homologues, Cratylia floribunda Lectin and Canavalia gladiata Lectin

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro Tínel, Juliana Montezuma Barbosa; Benevides, Melina Fechine Costa; Frutuoso, Mércia Sindeaux; Rocha, Camila Farias; Arruda, Francisco Vassiliepe Sousa; Vasconcelos, Mayron Alves; Pereira-Junior, Francisco Nascimento; Cajazeiras, João Batista; do Nascimento, Kyria Santiago; Martins, Jorge Luiz; Teixeira, Edson Holanda; Cavada, Benildo Sousa; dos Santos, Ricardo Pires; Lima Pompeu, Margarida Maria

    2014-01-01

    Leishmaniasis is a vector-borne disease transmitted by phlebotomine sand fly. Susceptibility and refractoriness to Leishmania depend on the outcome of multiple interactions that take place within the sand fly gut. Promastigote attachment to sand fly midgut epithelium is essential to avoid being excreted together with the digested blood meal. Promastigote and gut sand fly surface glycans are important ligands in this attachment. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the interaction of three lectins isolated from leguminous seeds (Diocleinae subtribe), D-glucose and D-mannose-binding, with glycans on Lutzomyia migonei midgut. To study this interaction the lectins were labeled with FITC and a fluorescence assay was performed. The results showed that only Dioclea violacea lectin (DVL) was able to interact with midgut glycans, unlike Cratylia floribunda lectin (CFL) and Canavalia gladiata lectin (CGL). Furthermore, when DVL was blocked with D-mannose the interaction was inhibited. Differences of spatial arrangement of residues and volume of carbohydrate recognition domain (CRD) may be the cause of the fine specificity of DVL for glycans in the surface on Lu. migonei midgut. The findings in this study showed the presence of glycans in the midgut with glucose/mannose residues in its composition and these residues may be important in interaction between Lu. migonei midgut and Leishmania. PMID:25431778

  14. The vectorial competence of Phlebotomus sergenti is specific for Leishmania tropica and is controlled by species-specific, lipophosphoglycan-mediated midgut attachment.

    PubMed

    Kamhawi, S; Modi, G B; Pimenta, P F; Rowton, E; Sacks, D L

    2000-07-01

    The vectorial competence of Phlebotomus sergenti for 3 Old World species of Leishmania, L. tropica, L. major and L. donovani, was investigated in vivo and by in vitro midgut binding assays using living promastigotes and purified lipophosphoglycan (LPG). P. sergenti consistently showed a high specificity for L. tropica strains, which were able to develop mature, potentially transmissible infections. The loss of infection with L. major and L. donovani correlated with the excretion of the digested bloodmeal. These strains were able to produce sustained infections in the midguts of their appropriate vectors, P. papatasi and P. argentipes, respectively. In in vitro binding assays, a significantly higher number of L. tropica procyclic promastigotes attached to the midgut lining of P. sergenti, compared to those of L. major and L. donovani (P < 0.05). The prediction that the species specificity of midgut attachment is controlled by polymorphic structures on the parasite LPG was supported by the finding that P. sergenti midguts were intensely stained following incubation with purified phosphoglycan (PG) from L. tropica compared with PGs from L. major or L. donovani. The results provide further evidence that LPG structural polymorphisms are driven by the species diversity of molecules present on the sandfly midgut that function as parasite attachment sites. PMID:11085222

  15. A new oxygen-regulated operon in Escherichia coli comprises the genes for a putative third cytochrome oxidase and for pH 2.5 acid phosphatase (appA)

    PubMed

    Dassa, J; Fsihi, H; Marck, C; Dion, M; Kieffer-Bontemps, M; Boquet, P L

    1991-10-01

    The Escherichia coli acid phosphatase gene appA is expressed in response to oxygen deprivation and is positively controlled by the product of appR (katF) which encodes a putative new sigma transcription-initiation factor. However, transcription of appA from its nearest promoter (P1) did not account for total pH 2.5 acid phosphatase expression and was not subject to regulation. The cloned region upstream of appA was extended and analyzed by insertions of transposon TnphoA and by fusions with lacZ. It contains two new genes, appC and appB, which both encode extracytoplasmic proteins. appC and appB are expressed from a promoter (P2) lying just upstream of appC. Both genes are regulated by oxygen, as is appA, and by appR gene product exactly as previously shown for appA. Analysis of the nucleotide sequence and of the origins of transcription have confirmed that the P2-appC-appB- (ORFX)-P1-appA region is organized on the chromosome as an operon transcribed clockwise from P2 and that P1 is a minor promoter for appA alone. Genes appC and appB encode proteins of Mr 58,133 and 42,377, respectively, which have the characteristics of integral membrane proteins. The deduced amino acid sequences of appC and appB show 60% and 57% homology, respectively, with subunits I and II of the E. coli cytochrome d oxidase (encoded by genes cydA and cydB). The notion that the AppC and AppB proteins constitute a new cytochrome oxidase or a new oxygen-detoxifying system is supported by the observation of enhanced sensitivity to oxygen of mutants lacking all three genes, cyo (cytochrome o oxidase), cyd (cytochrome d oxidase) and appB, compared to that of cyo cyd double mutants. PMID:1658595

  16. Glutathione S-transferase in the midgut tissue of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) caterpillars exposed to dietary cadmium.

    PubMed

    Vlahović, Milena; Ilijin, Larisa; Mrdaković, Marija; Todorović, Dajana; Matić, Dragana; Lazarević, Jelica; Mataruga, Vesna Perić

    2016-06-01

    Activity of glutathione S-transferase (GST) in midgut of gypsy moth caterpillars exposed to 10 and 30μg Cd/g dry food was examined. Based on the enzyme reaction through conjugation with glutathione, overall activity remained unaltered after acute and chronic treatment. No-observed-effect-concentration (10μg Cd/g dry food) significantly increased activity only after 3-day recovery following cadmium administration. Almost all comparisons of the indices of phenotypic plasticity revealed statistically significant differences. Despite the facts that GST has important role in xenobiotic biotransformation, our results indicate that this enzyme in insect midgut does not represent the key factor in cadmium detoxification. PMID:27084993

  17. Association of Cry1Ac Toxin Resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) with Increased Alkaline Phosphatase Levels in the Midgut Lumen

    PubMed Central

    Caccia, Silvia; Moar, William J.; Chandrashekhar, Jayadevi; Oppert, Cris; Anilkumar, Konasale J.; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis

    2012-01-01

    Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin was characterized in a population of Helicoverpa zea larvae previously shown not to have an alteration in toxin binding as the primary resistance mechanism to this toxin. Cry1Ac-selected larvae (AR1) were resistant to protoxins and toxins of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and the corresponding modified proteins lacking helix α-1 (Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod). When comparing brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from susceptible (LC) and AR1 larval midguts, there were only negligible differences in overall Cry1Ac toxin binding, though AR1 had 18% reversible binding, in contrast to LC, in which all binding was irreversible. However, no differences were detected in Cry1Ac-induced pore formation activity in BBMVs from both strains. Enzymatic activities of two putative Cry1Ac receptors (aminopeptidase N [APN] and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]) were significantly reduced (2-fold and 3-fold, respectively) in BBMVs from AR1 compared to LC larvae. These reductions corresponded to reduced protein levels in midgut luminal contents only in the case of ALP, with an almost 10-fold increase in specific ALP activity in midgut fluids from AR1 compared to LC larvae. Partially purified H. zea ALP bound Cry1Ac toxin in ligand blots and competed with Cry1Ac toxin for BBMV binding. Based on these results, we suggest the existence of at least one mechanism of resistance to Cry1A toxins in H. zea involving binding of Cry1Ac toxin to an ALP receptor in the larval midgut lumen of resistant larvae. PMID:22685140

  18. Association of Cry1Ac toxin resistance in Helicoverpa zea (Boddie) with increased alkaline phosphatase levels in the midgut lumen.

    PubMed

    Caccia, Silvia; Moar, William J; Chandrashekhar, Jayadevi; Oppert, Cris; Anilkumar, Konasale J; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Ferré, Juan

    2012-08-01

    Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin was characterized in a population of Helicoverpa zea larvae previously shown not to have an alteration in toxin binding as the primary resistance mechanism to this toxin. Cry1Ac-selected larvae (AR1) were resistant to protoxins and toxins of Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, and the corresponding modified proteins lacking helix α-1 (Cry1AbMod and Cry1AcMod). When comparing brush border membrane vesicles (BBMVs) prepared from susceptible (LC) and AR1 larval midguts, there were only negligible differences in overall Cry1Ac toxin binding, though AR1 had 18% reversible binding, in contrast to LC, in which all binding was irreversible. However, no differences were detected in Cry1Ac-induced pore formation activity in BBMVs from both strains. Enzymatic activities of two putative Cry1Ac receptors (aminopeptidase N [APN] and alkaline phosphatase [ALP]) were significantly reduced (2-fold and 3-fold, respectively) in BBMVs from AR1 compared to LC larvae. These reductions corresponded to reduced protein levels in midgut luminal contents only in the case of ALP, with an almost 10-fold increase in specific ALP activity in midgut fluids from AR1 compared to LC larvae. Partially purified H. zea ALP bound Cry1Ac toxin in ligand blots and competed with Cry1Ac toxin for BBMV binding. Based on these results, we suggest the existence of at least one mechanism of resistance to Cry1A toxins in H. zea involving binding of Cry1Ac toxin to an ALP receptor in the larval midgut lumen of resistant larvae. PMID:22685140

  19. CT Angiographic Demonstration of a Mesenteric Vessel "Whirlpool" in Intestinal Malrotation and Midgut Volvulus: a Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Coskun, Unsal

    2008-01-01

    Although the color Doppler ultrasonography diagnosis of intestinal malrotation with midgut volvulus, based on the typical "whirlpool" appearance of the mesenteric vascular structures is well-defined in the peer-reviewed literature, the combination of both the angiographic illustration of these findings and the contemporary state-of-the-art imaging techniques is lacking. We report the digital subtraction angiography and multidetector computed tomography angiography findings of a 37-year-old male with intestinal malrotation. PMID:18838858

  20. A new antimicrobial protein from the anterior midgut of Triatoma infestans mediates Trypanosoma cruzi establishment by controlling the microbiota.

    PubMed

    Buarque, Diego S; Gomes, Cícera M; Araújo, Ricardo N; Pereira, Marcos H; Ferreira, Roberta C; Guarneri, Alessandra A; Tanaka, Aparecida S

    2016-04-01

    The Reduviid Triatoma infestans is a vector for the protozoan Trypanosoma cruzi, the etiological agent of Chagas disease. The parasite must address the defense molecules and microbiota that colonize the anterior midgut of T. infestans. To obtain insight into T. cruzi - microbiota interactions in triatomine insects, we characterized a new antimicrobial product from the anterior midgut of T. infestans (TiAP) that may be involved in these relationships. The TiAP DNA fragment was cloned and expressed in a bacterial system, and the effect of the protein on bacteria and T. cruzi was evaluated by RNAi, qPCR and antimicrobial experiments. The number of T. cruzi in T. infestans anterior midguts was significantly lower in TiAP knockdown insects than in unsilenced groups. We also verified that the amount of bacteria in silenced T. infestans is approximately 600-fold higher than in unsilenced insects by qPCR. The 327-bp cDNA fragment that encodes mature TiAP was cloned into the pET-14b vector and expressed fused to a His-tag in Escherichia coli C43. The recombinant protein (rTiAP) was purified using an Ni-NTA column, followed by a HiTrap SP column. According to a trypanocidal assay, rTiAP did not interfere with the viability of T. cruzi trypomastigotes. Moreover, in antimicrobial experiments using E. coli and Micrococcus luteus, the protein was only bacteriostatic for Gram-negative bacteria. The data indicate that infection by T. cruzi increases the expression of TiAP to modulate the microbiota. The inhibition of microbiota growth by TiAP is important for parasite establishment in the T. infestans anterior midgut. PMID:26905205

  1. Alteration of carbohydrates metabolism and midgut glucose absorption in Gromphadorhina portentosa after subchronic exposure to imidacloprid and fenitrothion.

    PubMed

    Sawczyn, Tomasz; Dolezych, Bogdan; Klosok, Marcin; Augustyniak, Maria; Stygar, Dominika; Buldak, Rafal J; Kukla, Michal; Michalczyk, Katarzyna; Karcz-Socha, Iwona; Zwirska-Korczala, Krystyna

    2012-01-01

    This study was undertaken to test the hypothesis that following exposure to insecticides, changes take place in the metabolism of carbohydrates and absorption in the midgut of insects. The Madagascar hissing cockroach (Gromphadorhina portentosa) was chosen for the experiment as a model organism, due to it being easy to breed and its relatively large alimentary tract, which was important when preparing the microperfusion midgut bioassay. In each group of cockroaches treated with imidacloprid and fenitrothion, absorption of glucose, expressed as the area under the curve (AUC), was elevated compared to the control group. Glucose in the hemolymph of the examined insects was present in a vestigial amount, often below the threshold of determination, so the determinable carbohydrate indices were: hemolymph trehalose concentration and fat body glycogen content. The level of trehalose found in the hemolymph of insects when exposed to fenitrothion, and irrespective of the level of concentration mixed into food, were significantly lower when comparing to the control samples. Imidacloprid acted analogically with one exception at the concentration of 10 mg·kg(-1) dry food where trehalose concentration did not differ from the control values. Coupling with fat body glycogen concentration was less visible and appeared only at the concentrations of 5 and 10 mg imidacloprid·kg(-1) dry food. As described in this study changes in the sugar distribution and midgut glucose absorption indicate that insects cover the increased energy needs induced by insecticides; also at the gastrointestinal tract level. The result indicates that the midgut glucose absorption parameters could be considered as a non-specific biomarker of insecticide toxicity. PMID:22702824

  2. Proteophosphoglycan confers resistance of Leishmania major to midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding in vector sand flies

    PubMed Central

    Secundino, Nagila; Kimblin, Nicola; Peters, Nathan C.; Lawyer, Phillip; Capul, Althea A.; Beverley, Stephen M.; Turco, Salvatore J.; Sacks, David

    2010-01-01

    Summary Leishmania synthesize abundant phosphoglycan-containing molecules made up of [Gal-Man-PO4] repeating units, including the surface lipophosphoglycan (LPG), and the surface and secreted proteophosphoglycan (PPG). The vector competence of Phlebotomus duboscqi and Lutzomyia longipalpis sand flies was tested using L. major knockout mutants deficient in either total phosphoglycans (lpg2− or lpg5A−/5B−) or LPG alone (lpg1−) along with their respective gene add-back controls. Our results confirm that LPG, the major cell surface molecule of Leishmania promastigotes known to mediate attachment to the vector midgut, is necessary to prevent the loss of infection during excretion of the blood meal remnants from a natural vector, P. duboscqi, but not an unnatural vector, L. longipalpis. Midgut digestive enzymes induced by blood feeding pose another potential barrier to parasite survival. Our results show that 36–72 h after the infective feed, all parasites developed well except the lpg2− and lpg5A−/5B− mutants, which showed significantly reduced survival and growth. Protease inhibitors promoted the early survival and growth of lpg2− in the blood meal. PPG was shown to be the key molecule conferring resistance to midgut digestive enzymes, as it prevented killing of lpg2− promastigotes exposed to midgut lysates prepared from blood-fed flies. The protection was not associated with inhibition of enzyme activities, but with cell surface acquisition of the PPG, which appears to function similar to mammalian mucins to protect the surface of developing promastigotes against proteolytic damage. PMID:20088949

  3. Effects of plant flavonoids on Manduca sexta (tobacco hornworm) fifth larval instar midgut and fat body mitochondrial transhydrogenase.

    PubMed

    Vandock, Kurt P; Mitchell, Martin J; Fioravanti, Carmen F

    2012-06-01

    The reversible, membrane-associated transhydrogenase that catalyzes hydride-ion transfer between NADP(H) and NAD(H) was evaluated and compared to the corresponding NADH oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase activities in midgut and fat body mitochondria from fifth larval instar Manduca sexta. The developmentally significant NADPH-forming transhydrogenation occurs as a nonenergy- or energy-linked activity with energy for the latter derived from either electron transport-dependent NADH or succinate utilization, or ATP hydrolysis by Mg++-dependent ATPase. In general, the plant flavonoids examined (chyrsin, juglone, morine, quercetin, and myricetin) affected all reactions in a dose-dependent fashion. Differences in the responses to the flavonoids were apparent, with the most notable being inhibition of midgut, but stimulation of fat body transhydrogenase by morin, and myricetin as also noted for NADH oxidase and succinate dehydrogenase. Although quercetin inhibited or stimulated transhydrogenase activity depending on the origin of mitochondria, it was without effect on either midgut or fat body NADH oxidase or succinate dehydrogenase. Observed sonication-dependent increases in flavonoid inhibition may well reflect an alteration in membrane configuration, resulting in increased exposure of the enzyme systems to the flavonoids. The effects of flavonoids on the transhydrogenation, NADH oxidase, and succinate dehydrogenase reactions suggest that compounds of this nature may prove valuable in the control of insect populations by affecting these mitochondrial enzyme components. PMID:22522595

  4. Larval midgut modifications associated with Bti resistance in the yellow fever mosquito using proteomic and transcriptomic approaches

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Bacillus thuringiensis var. israelensis (Bti) is a natural larval mosquito pathogen producing pore-forming toxins targeting the midgut of Diptera larvae. It is used worldwide for mosquito control. Resistance mechanisms of an Aedes aegypti laboratory strain selected for 30 generations with field-collected leaf litter containing Bti toxins were investigated in larval midguts at two levels: 1. gene transcription using DNA microarray and RT-qPCR and 2. differential expression of brush border membrane proteins using DIGE (Differential In Gel Electrophoresis). Results Several Bti Cry toxin receptors including alkaline phosphatases and N-aminopeptidases and toxin-binding V-ATPases exhibited altered expression levels in the resistant strain. The under-expression of putative Bti-receptors is consistent with Bt-resistance mechanisms previously described in Lepidoptera. Four soluble metalloproteinases were found under-transcribed together with a drastic decrease of metalloproteinases activity in the resistant strain, suggesting a role in resistance by decreasing the amount of activated Cry toxins in the larval midgut. Conclusions By combining transcriptomic and proteomic approaches, we detected expression changes at nearly each step of the ingestion-to-infection process, providing a short list of genes and proteins potentially involved in Bti-resistance whose implication needs to be validated. Collectively, these results open the way to further functional analyses to better characterize Bti-resistance mechanisms in mosquitoes. PMID:22703117

  5. A rare presentation of midgut malrotation as an acute intestinal obstruction in an adult: Two case reports and literature review

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shailendra; Das, Anupam; Chawla, A.S.; Arya, S.V.; Chaggar, Jasneet

    2012-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Midgut malrotation is a congenital anomaly presenting mainly in the childhood. Its presentation as an acute intestinal obstruction is extremely rare in adults usually recognized intra-operatively, therefore a high index of suspicion is always required when dealing with any case of acute intestinal obstruction. PRESENTATION OF CASE We report two cases of young adults who presented with symptoms of acute intestinal obstruction and were diagnosed intra-operatively as cecal volvulus and paraduodenal hernia, respectively, caused by midgut malrotation. Post-operative CT scan confirmed these findings. DISCUSSION Malrotation of the intestinal tract is a product of an aberrant embryology. The presentation of intestinal malrotation in adults is rare (0.2–0.5%). Contrast enhanced CT can show the abnormal anatomic location of a right sided small bowel, a left-sided colon and an abnormal relationship of the superior mesenteric vein (SMV) situated to the left of the superior mesenteric artery (SMA) instead of to the right. CONCLUSION Anomalies like midgut malrotation can present as an operative surprise and awareness regarding these anomalies can help surgeons deal with these conditions. PMID:23123419

  6. Anopheles gambiae collagen IV genes: cloning, phylogeny and midgut expression associated with blood feeding and Plasmodium infection.

    PubMed

    Gare, D C; Piertney, S B; Billingsley, P F

    2003-07-01

    A prerequisite for understanding the role that mosquito midgut extracellular matrix molecules play in malaria parasite development is proper isolation and characterisation of the genes coding for components of the basal lamina. Here we have identified genes coding for alpha1 and alpha2 chains of collagen IV from the major malaria vector, Anopheles gambiae. Conserved sequences in the terminal NC1 domain were used to obtain partial gene sequences of this functional region, and full sequence was isolated from a pupal cDNA library. In a DNA-derived phylogeny, the alpha1 and alpha2 chains cluster with dipteran orthologs, and the alpha2 is ancestral. The expression of collagen alpha1(IV) peaked during the pupal stage of mosquito development, and was expressed continuously in the adult female following a blood meal with a further rise detected in older mosquitoes. Collagen alpha1(IV) is also upregulated when the early oocyst of Plasmodium yoelii was developing within the mosquito midgut and may contribute to a larger wound healing response. A model describing the expression of basal lamina proteins during oocyst development is presented, and we hypothesise that the development of new basal lamina between the oocyst and midgut epithelium is akin to a wound healing process. PMID:12814648

  7. Tissue- and time-dependent transcription in Ixodes ricinus salivary glands and midguts when blood feeding on the vertebrate host

    PubMed Central

    Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schwarz, Alexandra; Erhart, Jan; Ribeiro, José M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus is a tick that transmits the pathogens of Lyme and several arboviral diseases. Pathogens invade the tick midgut, disseminate through the hemolymph, and are transmitted to the vertebrate host via the salivary glands; subverting these processes could be used to interrupt pathogen transfer. Here, we use massive de novo sequencing to characterize the transcriptional dynamics of the salivary and midgut tissues of nymphal and adult I. ricinus at various time points after attachment on the vertebrate host. Members of a number of gene families show stage- and time-specific expression. We hypothesize that gene expression switching may be under epigenetic control and, in support of this, identify 34 candidate proteins that modify histones. I. ricinus-secreted proteins are encoded by genes that have a non-synonymous to synonymous mutation rate even greater than immune-related genes. Midgut transcriptome (mialome) analysis reveals several enzymes associated with protein, carbohydrate, and lipid digestion, transporters and channels that might be associated with nutrient uptake, and immune-related transcripts including antimicrobial peptides. This publicly available dataset supports the identification of protein and gene targets for biochemical and physiological studies that exploit the transmission lifecycle of this disease vector for preventative and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25765539

  8. Overexpression and altered nucleocytoplasmic distribution of Anopheles ovalbumin-like SRPN10 serpins in Plasmodium-infected midgut cells.

    PubMed

    Danielli, Alberto; Barillas-Mury, Carolina; Kumar, Sanjeev; Kafatos, Fotis C; Loukeris, Thanasis G

    2005-02-01

    The design of effective, vector-based malaria transmission blocking strategies relies on a thorough understanding of the molecular and cellular interactions that occur during the parasite sporogonic cycle in the mosquito. During Plasmodium berghei invasion, transcription from the SRPN10 locus, encoding four serine protease inhibitors of the ovalbumin family, is strongly induced in the mosquito midgut. Herein we demonstrate that intense induction as well as redistribution of SRPN10 occurs specifically in the parasite-invaded midgut epithelial cells. Quantitative analysis establishes that in response to epithelial invasion, SRPN10 translocates from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and this is followed by strong SRPN10 overexpression. The invaded cells exhibit signs of apoptosis, suggesting a link between this type of intracellular serpin and epithelial damage. The SRPN10 gene products constitute a novel, robust and cell-autonomous marker of midgut invasion by ookinetes. The SRPN10 dynamics at the subcellular level confirm and further elaborate the 'time bomb' model of P. berghei invasion in both Anopheles stephensi and Anopheles gambiae. In contrast, this syndrome of responses is not elicited by mutant P. berghei ookinetes lacking the major ookinete surface proteins, P28 and P25. Molecular markers with defined expression patterns, in combination with mutant parasite strains, will facilitate dissection of the molecular mechanisms underlying vector competence and development of effective transmission blocking strategies. PMID:15659062

  9. Expression profiling and comparative analyses of seven midgut serine proteases from the yellow fever mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    PubMed Central

    Brackney, Doug E.; Isoe, Jun; Black, W.C.; Zamora, Jorge; Foy, Brian D.; Miesfeld, Roger L.; Olson, Ken E.

    2010-01-01

    Aedes aegypti utilizes blood for energy production, egg maturation and replenishment of maternal reserves. The principle midgut enzymes responsible for bloodmeal digestion are endoproteolytic serine-type proteases within the S1.A subfamily. While there are hundreds of serine protease-like genes in the A. aegypti genome, only five are known to be expressed in the midgut. We describe the cloning, sequencing and expression profiling of seven additional serine proteases and provide a genomic and phylogenetic assessment of these findings. Of the seven genes, four are constitutively expressed and three are transcriptionally induced upon blood feeding. The amount of transcriptional induction is strongly correlated among these genes. Alignments reveal that, in general, the conserved catalytic triad, active site and accessory catalytic residues are maintained in these genes and phylogenetic analysis shows that these genes fall within three distinct clades; trypsins, chymotrypsins and serine collagenases. Interestingly, a previously described trypsin consistently arose with other serine collagenases in phylogenetic analyses. These results suggest that multiple gene duplications have arisen within the S1.A subfamily of midgut serine proteases and/or that A. aegypti has evolved an array of proteases with a broad range of substrate specificities for rapid, efficient digestion of bloodmeals. PMID:20100490

  10. Tissue- and time-dependent transcription in Ixodes ricinus salivary glands and midguts when blood feeding on the vertebrate host.

    PubMed

    Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Schwarz, Alexandra; Erhart, Jan; Ribeiro, José M C

    2015-01-01

    Ixodes ricinus is a tick that transmits the pathogens of Lyme and several arboviral diseases. Pathogens invade the tick midgut, disseminate through the hemolymph, and are transmitted to the vertebrate host via the salivary glands; subverting these processes could be used to interrupt pathogen transfer. Here, we use massive de novo sequencing to characterize the transcriptional dynamics of the salivary and midgut tissues of nymphal and adult I. ricinus at various time points after attachment on the vertebrate host. Members of a number of gene families show stage- and time-specific expression. We hypothesize that gene expression switching may be under epigenetic control and, in support of this, identify 34 candidate proteins that modify histones. I. ricinus-secreted proteins are encoded by genes that have a non-synonymous to synonymous mutation rate even greater than immune-related genes. Midgut transcriptome (mialome) analysis reveals several enzymes associated with protein, carbohydrate, and lipid digestion, transporters and channels that might be associated with nutrient uptake, and immune-related transcripts including antimicrobial peptides. This publicly available dataset supports the identification of protein and gene targets for biochemical and physiological studies that exploit the transmission lifecycle of this disease vector for preventative and therapeutic purposes. PMID:25765539

  11. A Slot Blot Immunoassay for Quantitative Detection of Plasmodium falciparum Circumsporozoite Protein in Mosquito Midgut Oocyst

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sanjai; Zheng, Hong; Deng, Bingbing; Mahajan, Babita; Grabias, Bryan; Kozakai, Yukiko; Morin, Merribeth J.; Locke, Emily; Birkett, Ashley; Miura, Kazutoyo; Long, Carole

    2014-01-01

    There is still a need for sensitive and reproducible immunoassays for quantitative detection of malarial antigens in preclinical and clinical phases of vaccine development and in epidemiology and surveillance studies, particularly in the vector host. Here we report the results of sensitivity and reproducibility studies for a research-grade, quantitative enhanced chemiluminescent-based slot blot assay (ECL-SB) for detection of both recombinant Plasmodium falciparum circumsporozoite protein (rPfCSP) and native PfCSP from Oocysts (Pf Oocyst) developing in the midguts of Anopheles stephensi mosquitoes. The ECL-SB detects as little as 1.25 pg of rPfCSP (linear range of quantitation 2.5–20 pg; R2 = 0.9505). We also find the earliest detectable expression of native PfCSP in Pf Oocyst by ECL-SB occurs on day 7 post feeding with infected blood meal. The ECL-SB was able to detect approximately as few as 0.5 day 8 Pf Oocysts (linear quantitation range 1–4, R2 = 0.9795) and determined that one Pf Oocyst expressed approximately 2.0 pg (0.5–3 pg) of native PfCSP, suggesting a similar range of detection for recombinant and native forms of Pf CSP. The ECL-SB is highly reproducible; the Coefficient of Variation (CV) for inter-assay variability for rPf CSP and native PfCSP were 1.74% and 1.32%, respectively. The CVs for intra-assay variability performed on three days for rPf CSP were 2.41%, 0.82% and 2% and for native Pf CSP 1.52%, 0.57%, and 1.86%, respectively. In addition, the ECL-SB was comparable to microscopy in determining the P. falciparum prevalence in mosquito populations that distinctly contained either high and low midgut Pf Oocyst burden. In whole mosquito samples, estimations of positivity for P. falciparum in the high and low burden groups were 83.3% and 23.3% by ECL-SB and 85.7% and 27.6% by microscopy. Based on its performance characteristics, ECL-SB could be valuable in vaccine development and to measure the parasite prevalence in mosquitoes and

  12. Plant Habitat (PH)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onate, Bryan

    2016-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will soon have a platform for conducting fundamental research of Large Plants. Plant Habitat (PH) is designed to be a fully controllable environment for high-quality plant physiological research. PH will control light quality, level, and timing, temperature, CO2, relative humidity, and irrigation, while scrubbing ethylene. Additional capabilities include leaf temperature and root zone moisture and oxygen sensing. The light cap will have red (630 nm), blue (450 nm), green (525 nm), far red (730 nm) and broad spectrum white LEDs. There will be several internal cameras (visible and IR) to monitor and record plant growth and operations.

  13. Proton Transport and pH Control in Fungi.

    PubMed

    Kane, Patricia M

    2016-01-01

    Despite diverse and changing extracellular environments, fungi maintain a relatively constant cytosolic pH and numerous organelles of distinct lumenal pH. Key players in fungal pH control are V-ATPases and the P-type proton pump Pma1. These two proton pumps act in concert with a large array of other transporters and are highly regulated. The activities of Pma1 and the V-ATPase are coordinated under some conditions, suggesting that pH in the cytosol and organelles is not controlled independently. Genomic studies, particularly in the highly tractable S. cerevisiae, are beginning to provide a systems-level view of pH control, including transcriptional responses to acid or alkaline ambient pH and definition of the full set of regulators required to maintain pH homeostasis. Genetically encoded pH sensors have provided new insights into localized mechanisms of pH control, as well as highlighting the dynamic nature of pH responses to the extracellular environment. Recent studies indicate that cellular pH plays a genuine signaling role that connects nutrient availability and growth rate through a number of mechanisms. Many of the pH control mechanisms found in S. cerevisiae are shared with other fungi, with adaptations for their individual physiological contexts. Fungi deploy certain proton transport and pH control mechanisms not shared with other eukaryotes; these regulators of cellular pH are potential antifungal targets. This review describes current and emerging knowledge proton transport and pH control mechanisms in S. cerevisiae and briefly discusses how these mechanisms vary among fungi. PMID:26721270

  14. pH optrode

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Langry, Kevin C.

    1993-01-01

    A process is provided for forming a long-lasting, stable, pH-sensitive dye-acrylamide copolymer useful as a pH-sensitive material for use in an optrode or other device sensitive to pH. An optrode may be made by mechanically attaching the copolymer to a sensing device such as an optical fiber.

  15. pH Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lunelli, Bruno; Scagnolari, Francesco

    2009-01-01

    The exposition of the pervasive concept of pH, of its foundations and implementation as a meaningful quantitative measurement, in nonspecialist university texts is often not easy to follow because too many of its theoretical and operative underpinnings are neglected. To help the inquiring student we provide a concise introduction to the depth just…

  16. Ph.D. shortage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The late 1990s will see a shortage of Ph.D. graduates, according to the Association of American Universities, Washington, D.C. AAU's new comprehensive study, “The Ph.D. Shortage: The Federal Role,” reports that competition for new Ph.D.s is already intense and can only intensify because demand is greater than supply in both academic and nonacademic markets.Doctoral education plays an increasingly important role in U.S. research and development programs. Students have a pivotal part in doing research and enriching it with new ideas. The AAU report says that graduate students are “major determinants of the creativity and productivity of U.S. academic research, the source of more than 50% of the nation's basic research.’ The market for doctoral education extends beyond the university. In 1985, about 43% of all Ph.D.s employed in this country were working outside higher education; the demand for doctorate recipients in nonacademic sectors continues to grow.

  17. Visualization of protein digestion in the midgut of the acarid mite Lepidoglyphus destructor.

    PubMed

    Erban, Tomas; Hubert, Jan

    2011-10-01

    The ingestion of chromogenic or fluorescent substrates for protease detection enables the visualization of digestive processes in mites in vivo due to their transparent bodies. The substrates for protease detection were offered to Lepidoglyphus destructor, and the resulting signals were observed in specimens under a compound microscope. The protease activity was successfully localized using chromogenic substrates (azoalbumin, AAPpNA, SAAPFpNA, elastin-orcein, SA(3) pNA, ZRRpNA, ArgpNA, and MAAPMpNA) and fluorescent substrates (casein-fluorescein, albumin-fluorescein, AAPAMC, BAAMC, ZRRAMC, ArgAMC, and AGPPPAMC). No activity was detected using the keratin azure and BApNA substrates. In the mesodeum, trypsin-like activity generated by hydrolysis of the BApNA substrate was not observed, but the BAAMC substrate allowed the visualization of trypsin-like activity in food boli in the posterior mesodeum. The results indicate that cathepsins B, D, and G and cathepsin H or aminopeptidase-like activities are present in the midgut of L. destructor. Among these activities, cathepsin D-like activity was identified for the first time in the gut of L. destructor. All proteases mentioned are produced in the mesodeal lumen and form the food bolus together with ingested food, afterward passing through the gut to be defecated. The method used enables the visualization of protease activities in the gut of transparent animals. PMID:21818771

  18. Screening and Molecular Cloning of a Protective Antigen from the Midgut of Haemaphysalis longicornis

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yonghong; Zhang, Jincheng; Yang, Shujie; Wang, Hui; Zeng, Hua; Zhang, Tiantian

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination is considered a promising alternative for controlling tick infestations. Haemaphysalis longicornis midgut proteins separated by SDS-PAGE and transferred to polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane were screened for protective value against bites. The western blot demonstrated the immunogenicity of 92 kDa protein (P92). The analysis of the P92 amino acid sequence by LC-MS/MS indicated that it was a H. longicornis paramyosin (Hl-Pmy). The full lenghth cDNA of Hl-Pmy was obtained by rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE) which consisted of 2,783 bp with a 161 bp 3' untranslated region. Sequence alignment of tick paramyosin (Pmy) showed that Hl-Pmy shared a high level of conservation among ticks. Comparison with the protective epitope sequence of other invertebrate Pmy, it was calculated that the protective epitope of Hl-Pmy was a peptide (LEEAEGSSETVVEMNKKRDTE) named LEE, which was close to the N-terminal of Hl-Pmy protein. The secondary structure analysis suggested that LEE had non-helical segments within an α-helical structure. These results provide the basis for developing a vaccine against biting H. longicornis ticks. PMID:23864744

  19. Transcriptome of the Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis.

    PubMed

    Sparks, Michael E; Blackburn, Michael B; Kuhar, Daniel; Gundersen-Rindal, Dawn E

    2013-01-01

    Transcriptomic profiles of the serious lepidopteran insect pest Lymantria dispar (gypsy moth) were characterized in the larval midgut in response to infection by Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki, a biopesticide commonly used for its control. RNA-Seq approaches were used to define a set of 49,613 assembled transcript sequences, of which 838, 1,248 and 3,305 were respectively partitioned into high-, mid- and low-quality tiers on the basis of homology information. Digital gene expression profiles suggested genes differentially expressed at 24 hours post infection, and qRT-PCR analyses were performed for verification. The differentially expressed genes primarily associated with digestive function, including α-amylase, lipase and carboxypeptidase; immune response, including C-type lectin 4; developmental genes such as arylphorin; as well as a variety of binding proteins: cellular retinoic acid binding protein (lipid-binding), insulin-related peptide binding protein (protein-binding) and ovary C/EBPg transcription factor (nucleic acid-binding). This is the first study conducted to specifically investigate gypsy moth response to a bacterial infection challenge using large-scale sequencing technologies, and the results highlight important genes that could be involved in biopesticide resistance development or could serve as targets for biologically-based control mechanisms of this insect pest. PMID:23658687

  20. Volvulus of the ascending colon in a non-rotated midgut: Plain film and MDCT findings

    PubMed Central

    Camera, Luigi; Calabrese, Milena; Mainenti, Pier Paolo; Masone, Stefania; Vecchio, Walter Del; Persico, Giovanni; Salvatore, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Colonic volvulus is a relatively uncommon cause of large bowel obstruction usually involving mobile, intra-peritoneal, colonic segments. Congenital or acquired anatomic variation may be associated with an increased risk of colonic volvulus which can occasionally involve retro-peritoneal segments. We report a case of 54-year-old female who presented to our Institution to perform a plain abdominal film series for acute onset of cramping abdominal pain. Both the upright and supine films showed signs of acute colonic obstruction which was thought to be due to an internal hernia of the transverse colon into the lesser sac. The patient was therefore submitted to a multi-detector contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT). CT findings were initially thought to be consistent with the presumed diagnosis of internal hernia but further evaluation and coronal reformatting clearly depicted the presence of a colonic volvulus possibly resulting from a retro-gastric colon. At surgery, a volvulus of the ascending colon was found and a right hemi-colectomy had to be performed. However, a non rotated midgut with a right-sided duodeno-jejunal flexure and a left sided colon was also found at laparotomy and overlooked in the pre-operative CT. Retrospective evaluation of CT images was therefore performed and a number of CT signs of intestinal malrotation could be identified. PMID:23150768

  1. A Bemisia tabaci midgut protein interacts with begomoviruses and plays a role in virus transmission.

    PubMed

    Rana, Vipin Singh; Popli, Sonam; Saurav, Gunjan Kumar; Raina, Harpreet Singh; Chaubey, Rahul; Ramamurthy, V V; Rajagopal, R

    2016-05-01

    Begomoviruses are a major group of plant viruses, transmitted exclusively by Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) in a persistent circulative non-propagative manner. The information regarding molecular and cellular basis underlying Begomovirus - whitefly interaction is very scarce. Evidences have suggested that the insect gut possesses some crucial protein receptors that allow specific entry of virus into the insect haemolymph. We have performed yeast two hybrid gut cDNA expression library screening against coat protein of Tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCV) and Cotton leaf curl Rajasthan virus (CLCuV) as bait. Midgut protein (MGP) was the common protein found interacting with both ToLCV and CLCuV. MGP was localized in whole mount B. tabaci as well as in dissected guts through confocal microscopy. Pull down and dot blot assays confirmed in vitro interaction between ToLCV/CLCuV coat protein and MGP. Immunolocalization analysis also showed colocalization of ToLCV/CLCuV particles and MGP within insect's gut. Finally, anti-MGP antibody fed B. tabaci, exhibited 70% reduction in ToLCV transmission, suggesting a supportive role for MGP in virus transmission. PMID:26488331

  2. Ookinete-induced midgut peroxidases detonate the time bomb in anopheline mosquitoes.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sanjeev; Barillas-Mury, Carolina

    2005-07-01

    Previous analysis of the temporal-spatial relationship between ookinete migration and the cellular localization of genes mediating midgut immune defense responses suggested that, in order to survive, parasites must complete invasion before toxic chemicals ("a bomb") are generated by the invaded cell. Recent studies indicate that ookinete invasion induces tyrosine nitration as a two-step reaction, in which NOS induction is followed by a localized increase in peroxidase activity. Peroxidases utilize nitrite and hydrogen peroxide as substrates, and detonate the time bomb by generating reactive nitrogen intermediates, such as nitrogen dioxide, which mediate nitration. There is evidence that peroxidases also mediate antimicrobial responses to bacteria, fungi and parasites in a broad range of biological systems including humans and plants. Defense reactions that generate toxic chemicals are also potentially harmful to the host mounting the response and often results in apoptosis. The two-step nitration pathway is probably an ancient response, as it has also been described in vertebrate leukocytes and probably evolved as a mechanism to circumscribe the toxic products generated during defense responses involving protein nitration. PMID:15894189

  3. Rhynchophorus ferrugineus midgut cell line to evaluate insecticidal potency of different plant essential oils.

    PubMed

    Rizwan-ul-Haq, Muhammad; Aljabr, Ahmed Mohammed

    2015-03-01

    Cell cultures can be a potent and strong tool to evaluate the insecticidal efficiency of natural products. Plant essential oils have long been used as the fragrance or curative products around the world which means that they are safer to be used in close proximity of humans and mammals. In this study, a midgut cell line, developed from Rhynchophorus ferrugineus (RPW-1), was used for screening essential oils from nine different plants. Assays revealed that higher cell mortality was observed at 500 ppm which reached to 86, 65, 60, 59, 56, 54, 54, 53, and 53%, whereas lowest cell mortality at 1 ppm remained at 41, 23, 20, 17, 16, 15, 14, 13, and 10%, for Azadirachta indica, Piper nigrum, Mentha spicata, Cammiphora myrrha, Elettaria cardamomum, Zingiber officinale, Curcuma longa, Schinus molle, and Rosmarinus officinalis, respectively. 3-(4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell proliferation assay revealed the percentage of cell growth inhibition was highest at 500 ppm and remained at 48, 45, 42, 37, 34, 29, 24, 22, and 18% against A. indica, P. nigrum, M. spicata, C. myrrha, E. cardamomum, Z. officinale, C. longa, S. molle, and R. officinalis, respectively. Lowest LC50 value (7.98 ppm) was found for A. indica, whereas the highest LC50 (483.11 ppm) was against R. officinalis. Thus, in this study, essential oils of A. indica exhibited the highest levels of toxicity, whereas those from R. officinalis exhibited the lowest levels of toxicity toward RPW-1 cells. PMID:25381034

  4. Antibody-mediated inhibition of Aedes aegypti midgut trypsins blocks sporogonic development of Plasmodium gallinaceum.

    PubMed Central

    Shahabuddin, M; Lemos, F J; Kaslow, D C; Jacobs-Lorena, M

    1996-01-01

    The peritrophic matrix (PM) that forms around a blood meal is a potential barrier of Plasmodium development in mosquitoes. Previously, we have shown that to traverse the PM, Plasmodium ookinetes secrete a prochitinase and that an inhibitor of chitinase blocks further parasite development. Here we report that it is the mosquito trypsin that activates the Plasmodium prochitinase. Trypsin was identified as the chitinase-activating enzyme by two criteria: (i) trypsin activity and activating activity comigrated on one-dimensional gels, and (ii) activating activity and penetration of the PM by Plasmodium parasites were both hindered by trypsin-specific inhibitors. Subsequently, we examined the effect of antitrypsin antibodies on the parasite life cycle. Antibodies prepared against a recombinant blackfly trypsin effectively and specifically inhibited mosquito trypsin activity. Moreover, when incorporated into an infective blood meal, the antitrypsin antibodies blocked infectivity of Aedes aegypti mosquitoes by Plasmodium gallinaceum. This block of infectivity could be reversed by exogenously provided chitinase, strongly suggesting that the antibodies act by inhibiting prochitinase activation and not on the parasite itself. This work led to the identification of a mosquito antigen, i.e., midgut trypsin, as a novel target for blocking malaria transmission. PMID:8641775

  5. Identification of Bombyx mori midgut receptor for Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal CryIA(a) toxin.

    PubMed

    Nagamatsu, Y; Toda, S; Yamaguchi, F; Ogo, M; Kogure, M; Nakamura, M; Shibata, Y; Katsumoto, T

    1998-04-01

    As part of a study of the mechanism by which Bacillus thuringiensis insecticidal crystal protein acts, a Bombyx mori receptor to the CryIA(a) toxin specific for lepidopterans was examined. Histological examination showed that the toxin acted on the brush-border membrane of the midgut columnar cells and broke its infolding structure, causing cell lysis. The membrane vesicles were purified, and a 175-kDa protein binding the toxin was found that accounted for some 0.015% of membrane proteins. The protein, designated BtR175, was a glycoprotein that reacted with concanavalin A. Anti-BtR antibodies inhibited the binding of toxin to membrane vesicles in vitro and decreased the effect of the toxin to silkworms in vivo. BtR175, although found in the gut, was not found in fat bodies, integument, or silk glands. These results indicated that BtR175 was the receptor protein for the insecticidal toxin. Proteins (137 and 107 kDa) binding the CryIA(a) toxin also were found in the gut membranes of Tenebrio moritor larvae, a coleopteran not sensitive to the toxin. The specificity of the toxin could not be explained only in term of the existence of its binding protein. PMID:9614702

  6. Comparative microarray analyses of adult female midgut tissues from feeding Rhipicephalus species.

    PubMed

    van Zyl, Willem A; Stutzer, Christian; Olivier, Nicholas A; Maritz-Olivier, Christine

    2015-02-01

    The cattle tick, Rhipicephalus microplus, has a debilitating effect on the livestock industry worldwide, owing to its being a vector of the causative agents of bovine babesiosis and anaplasmosis. In South Africa, co-infestation with R. microplus and R. decoloratus, a common vector species on local livestock, occurs widely in the northern and eastern parts of the country. An alternative to chemical control methods is sought in the form of a tick vaccine to control these tick species. However, sequence information and transcriptional data for R. decoloratus is currently lacking. Therefore, this study aimed at identifying genes that are shared between midgut tissues of feeding adult female R. microplus and R. decoloratus ticks. In this regard, a custom oligonucleotide microarray comprising of 13,477 R. microplus sequences was used for transcriptional profiling and 2476 genes were found to be shared between these Rhipicephalus species. In addition, 136 transcripts were found to be more abundantly expressed in R. decoloratus and 1084 in R. microplus. Chi-square analysis revealed that genes involved in lipid transport and metabolism are significantly overrepresented in R. microplus and R. decoloratus. This study is the first transcriptional profiling of R. decoloratus and is an additional resource that can be evaluated further in future studies for possible tick control. PMID:25448423

  7. In vitro lipid transfer between lipoproteins and midgut-diverticula in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus.

    PubMed

    Laino, Aldana; Cunningham, Mónica L; Heras, Horacio; Garcia, Fernando

    2011-12-01

    It has been already reported that most hemolymphatic lipids in the spider Polybetes pythagoricus are transported by HDL1 and VHDL lipoproteins. We studied in vitro the lipid transfer among midgut-diverticula (M-diverticula), and either hemolymph or purified lipoproteins as well as between hemolymphatic lipoproteins. M-diverticula and hemolymph were labeled by in vivo (14)C-palmitic acid injection. In vitro incubations were performed between M-diverticula and either hemolymph or isolated lipoproteins. Hemolymph lipid uptake was associated to HDL1 (67%) and VHDL (32%). Release from hemolymph towards M-diverticula showed the opposite trend, VHDL 75% and HDL1 45%. Isolated lipoproteins showed a similar behavior to that observed with whole hemolymph. Lipid transfer between lipoproteins showed that HDL1 transfer more (14)C-lipids to VHDL than vice versa. Only 38% FFA and 18% TAG were transferred from M-diverticula to lipoproteins, while on the contrary 75% and 73% of these lipids, respectively, were taken up from hemolymph. A similar trend was observed regarding lipoprotein phospholipids. This study supports the hypothesis that HDL1 and hemocyanin-containing VHDL are involved in the uptake and release of FFA, phospholipids and triacylglycerols in the spider P. pythagoricus. The data support a directional flow of lipids from HDL1 and VHDL suggesting a mode of lipid transport between lipoproteins and M-diverticula. PMID:21889600

  8. Interactive Effects of Growth Regulators, Carbon Sources, pH on Plant Regeneration and Assessment of Genetic Fidelity Using Single Primer Amplification Reaction (SPARS) Techniques in Withania somnifera L.

    PubMed

    Fatima, Nigar; Ahmad, Naseem; Ahmad, Iqbal; Anis, Mohammad

    2015-09-01

    An improved and methodical in vitro shoot morphogenic approach through axillary bud multiplication was established in a drug yielding plant, Withania somnifera L. Effects of plant growth regulators [6-benzyladenine (BA), kinetin (Kin), 2-isopentenyladenine (2iP), and thidiazuron (TDZ)] either singly or in combination with α-napthalene acetic acid (NAA), indole-3-butyric acid (IBA), and indole-3-acetic acid (IAA) in Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium were tested. The highest regeneration frequency (90 %) with optimum number of shoots (32 ± 0.00)/explant were obtained on MS medium fortified with 2.5 μM 6-benzyladenine (BA) and 0.5 μM NAA and 30 g/l sucrose at pH 5.8. Among the tried TDZ concentrations, 0.5 μM resulted in maximum number of shoots (20.4 ± 0.40)/explant after 4 weeks of exposure. The proliferating shoot cultures established by repeated subculturing of the mother explants on the hormone-free medium produced the highest shoot number (29.4 ± 0.40) with shoot length (6.80 ± 0.12 cm)/explant at fourth subculture passage, which a decline in shoot proliferation was recorded. Different concentrations of NAA were tested for ex vitro rooting of microshoots. The maximum percentage of rooting 100 % with maximum roots (18.3 ± 0.1) was achieved in soilrite when basal portion of the microshoots were treated with 200 μM (NAA) for 15 min per shoot. The plantlets went through hardening phase in a growth chamber, prior to ex vitro transfer. The PCR-based single primer amplification reaction (SPAR) methods which include random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) and direct amplification of minisatellite DNA (DAMD) markers has been used for assessment of genetic stability of micropropagated plantlets. No variation was observed in DNA fingerprinting patterns among the micropropagated and the donor plants illustrating their genetic uniformity. PMID:26152820

  9. A novel Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporter plays an important role in the growth of Acetobacter tropicalis SKU1100 at high temperatures via regulation of cation and pH homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Soemphol, Wichai; Tatsuno, Maki; Okada, Takahiro; Matsutani, Minenosuke; Kataoka, Naoya; Yakushi, Toshiharu; Matsushita, Kazunobu

    2015-10-10

    A gene encoding a putative Na(+)/H(+) antiporter was previously proposed to be involved in the thermotolerance mechanism of Acetobacter tropicalis SKU 1100. The results of this study show that disruption of this antiporter gene impaired growth at high temperatures with an external pH>6.5. The growth impairment at high temperatures was much more severe in the absence of Na(+) (with only the presence of K(+)); under these conditions, cells failed to grow even at 30°C and neutral to alkaline pH values, suggesting that this protein is also important for K(+) tolerance. Functional analysis with inside-out membrane vesicles from wild type and mutant strains indicated that the antiporter, At-NhaK2 operates as an alkali cation/proton antiporter for ions such as Na(+), K(+), Li(+), and Rb(+) at acidic to neutral pH values (6.5-7.5). The membrane vesicles were also shown to contain a distinct pH-dependent Na(+)(specific)/H(+) antiporter(s) that might function at alkaline pH values. In addition, phylogenetic analysis showed that At-NhaK2 is a novel type of Na(+)/H(+) antiporter belonging to a phylogenetically distinct new clade. These data demonstrate that At-NhaK2 functions as a Na(+)(K(+))/H(+) antiporter and is essential for K(+) and pH homeostasis during the growth of A. tropicalis SKU1100, especially at higher temperatures. PMID:26100236

  10. Role of the PhoP-PhoQ System in the Virulence of Erwinia chrysanthemi Strain 3937: Involvement in Sensitivity to Plant Antimicrobial Peptides, Survival at Acid pH, and Regulation of Pectolytic Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Llama-Palacios, Arancha; López-Solanilla, Emilia; Rodríguez-Palenzuela, Pablo

    2005-01-01

    Erwinia chrysanthemi is a phytopathogenic bacterium that causes soft-rot diseases in a broad number of crops. The PhoP-PhoQ system is a key factor in pathogenicity of several bacteria and is involved in the bacterial resistance to different factors, including acid stress. Since E. chrysanthemi is confronted by acid pH during pathogenesis, we have studied the role of this system in the virulence of this bacterium. In this work, we have isolated and characterized the phoP and phoQ mutants of E. chrysanthemi strain 3937. It was found that: (i) they were not altered in their growth at acid pH; (ii) the phoQ mutant showed diminished ability to survive at acid pH; (iii) susceptibility to the antimicrobial peptide thionin was increased; (iv) the virulence of the phoQ mutant was diminished at low and high magnesium concentrations, whereas the virulence of the phoP was diminished only at low magnesium concentrations; (v) in planta Pel activity of both mutant strains was drastically reduced; and (vi) both mutants lagged behind the wild type in their capacity to change the apoplastic pH. These results suggest that the PhoP-PhoQ system plays a role in the virulence of this bacterium in plant tissues, although it does not contribute to bacterial growth at acid pH. PMID:15743964

  11. Comparative analysis of midgut bacterial communities in three aedine mosquito species from dengue-endemic and non-endemic areas of Rajasthan, India.

    PubMed

    Charan, S S; Pawar, K D; Gavhale, S D; Tikhe, C V; Charan, N S; Angel, B; Joshi, V; Patole, M S; Shouche, Y S

    2016-09-01

    Dengue viruses are transmitted to humans through the bites of infected female aedine mosquitoes. Differences in the composition and structure of bacterial communities in the midguts of mosquitoes may affect the vector's ability to transmit the disease. To investigate and analyse the role of midgut bacterial communities in viral transmission, midgut bacteria from three species, namely Stegomyia aegypti (= Aedes aegypti), Fredwardsius vittatus (= Aedes vittatus) and Stegomyia albopicta (= Aedes albopictus) (all: Diptera: Culicidae), from dengue-endemic and non-endemic areas of Rajasthan, India were compared. Construction and analyses of six 16S rRNA gene libraries indicated that Serratia spp.-related phylotypes dominated all clone libraries of the three mosquito species from areas in which dengue is not endemic. In dengue-endemic areas, phylotypes related to Aeromonas, Enhydrobacter spp. and uncultivated bacterium dominated the clone libraries of S. aegypti, F. vittatus and S. albopicta, respectively. Diversity indices analysis and real-time TaqMan polymerase chain reaction assays showed bacterial diversity and abundance in the midguts of S. aegypti to be higher than in the other two species. Significant differences observed among midgut bacterial communities of the three mosquito species from areas in which dengue is and is not endemic, respectively, may be related to the vectorial capacity of mosquitoes to carry dengue viruses and, hence, to the prevalence of disease in some areas. PMID:27094337

  12. MAPK signaling pathway alters expression of midgut ALP and ABCC genes and causes resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac toxin in diamondback moth.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhaojiang; Kang, Shi; Chen, Defeng; Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Xun; Baxter, Simon W; Zhou, Xuguo; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-04-01

    Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1). Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP) outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC) genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella. PMID:25875245

  13. MAPK Signaling Pathway Alters Expression of Midgut ALP and ABCC Genes and Causes Resistance to Bacillus thuringiensis Cry1Ac Toxin in Diamondback Moth

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qingjun; Wang, Shaoli; Xie, Wen; Zhu, Xun; Baxter, Simon W.; Zhou, Xuguo; Jurat-Fuentes, Juan Luis; Zhang, Youjun

    2015-01-01

    Insecticidal crystal toxins derived from the soil bacterium Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) are widely used as biopesticide sprays or expressed in transgenic crops to control insect pests. However, large-scale use of Bt has led to field-evolved resistance in several lepidopteran pests. Resistance to Bt Cry1Ac toxin in the diamondback moth, Plutella xylostella (L.), was previously mapped to a multigenic resistance locus (BtR-1). Here, we assembled the 3.15 Mb BtR-1 locus and found high-level resistance to Cry1Ac and Bt biopesticide in four independent P. xylostella strains were all associated with differential expression of a midgut membrane-bound alkaline phosphatase (ALP) outside this locus and a suite of ATP-binding cassette transporter subfamily C (ABCC) genes inside this locus. The interplay between these resistance genes is controlled by a previously uncharacterized trans-regulatory mechanism via the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathway. Molecular, biochemical, and functional analyses have established ALP as a functional Cry1Ac receptor. Phenotypic association experiments revealed that the recessive Cry1Ac resistance was tightly linked to down-regulation of ALP, ABCC2 and ABCC3, whereas it was not linked to up-regulation of ABCC1. Silencing of ABCC2 and ABCC3 in susceptible larvae reduced their susceptibility to Cry1Ac but did not affect the expression of ALP, whereas suppression of MAP4K4, a constitutively transcriptionally-activated MAPK upstream gene within the BtR-1 locus, led to a transient recovery of gene expression thereby restoring the susceptibility in resistant larvae. These results highlight a crucial role for ALP and ABCC genes in field-evolved resistance to Cry1Ac and reveal a novel trans-regulatory signaling mechanism responsible for modulating the expression of these pivotal genes in P. xylostella. PMID:25875245

  14. 17-4 PH and 15-5 PH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Howard T.

    1995-01-01

    17-4 PH and 15-5 PH are extremely useful and versatile precipitation-hardening stainless steels. Armco 17-4 PH is well suited for the magnetic particle inspection requirements of Aerospace Material Specification. Armco 15-5 PH and 17-4 PH are produced in billet, plate, bar, and wire. Also, 15-5 PH is able to meet the stringent mechanical properties required in the aerospace and nuclear industries. Both products are easy to heat treat and machine, making them very useful in many applications.

  15. Bm86 midgut protein sequence variation in South Texas cattle fever ticks

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Cattle fever ticks, Rhipicephalus (Boophilus) microplus and R. (B.) annulatus, vector bovine and equine babesiosis, and have significantly expanded beyond the permanent quarantine zone established in South Texas. Currently, there are no vaccines approved for use within the United States for controlling these vectors. Vaccines developed in Australia and Cuba based on the midgut antigen Bm86 have variable efficacy against cattle fever ticks. A possible explanation for this variation in vaccine efficacy is amino acid sequence divergence between the recombinant Bm86 vaccine component and native Bm86 expressed in ticks from different geographical regions of the world. Results There was 91.8% amino acid sequence identity in Bm86 among R. microplus and R. annulatus sequenced from South Texas infestations. When South Texas isolates were compared to the Australian Yeerongpilly and Cuban Camcord vaccine strains, there was 89.8% and 90.0% identity, respectively. Most of the sequence divergence was focused in one region of the protein, amino acids 206-298. Hydrophilicity profiles revealed that two short regions of Bm86 (amino acids 206-210 and 560-570) appear to be more hydrophilic in South Texas isolates compared to vaccine strains. Only one amino acid difference was found between South Texas and vaccine strains within two previously described B-cell epitopes. A total of 4 amino acid differences were observed within three peptides previously shown to induce protective immune responses in cattle. Conclusions Sequence differences between South Texas isolates and Yeerongpilly and Camcord strains are spread throughout the entire Bm86 sequence, suggesting that geographic variation does exist. Differences within previously described B-cell epitopes between South Texas isolates and vaccine strains are minimal; however, short regions of hydrophilic amino acids found unique to South Texas isolates suggest that additional unique surface exposed peptides could be targeted

  16. AACE/ACE DISEASE STATE CLINICAL REVIEW: DIAGNOSIS AND MANAGEMENT OF MIDGUT CARCINOIDS

    PubMed Central

    Katznelson, Laurence; Vinik, Aaron I.; Wong, Richard; Randolph, Gregory

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neuroendocrine tumors (NETs) are a collection of complex tumors that arise from the diffuse endocrine system, primarily from the digestive tract. Carcinoid tumors most commonly originate from the small intestine. These tumors are either referred to as small intestinal neuroendocrine tumors or midgut carcinoids (MGCs). The purpose of this review article is to survey the diagnostic and therapeutic pathways for patients with MGC and provide an overview of the complex multidisciplinary care involved in improving their quality of life, treatment outcomes, and survival. Methods The current literature regarding the diagnosis and management of MGCs was reviewed. Results Dry flushing and secretory diarrhea are the hallmarks of the clinical syndrome of MGC. Managing MGC requires attention to the overall symptom complex, including the physical effects of the tumor and biomarker levels. The somatostatin analogs (SAs) octreotide and lanreotide are highly efficacious for symptomatic improvement. MGCs require resection to encompass the primary tumor and mesenteric lymph node metastases and should include cholecystectomy if the patient is likely to receive SA therapy. Debulking of liver metastasis by resection in combination with ablative therapies and other liver-directed modalities may help palliate symptoms and hormonal overproduction in carefully selected patients. Quality of life is an important measure of patients’ perception of the burden of their disease and impact of treatment modalities and may be a useful guide in deciding changes in therapy to alter apparent health status. Conclusion MGC is a challenging malignancy that requires the input of a multidisciplinary team to develop the best treatment plan. Consultation with expert centers that specialize in NETs may also be indicated for complex cases. With expert care, patients can be cured or live with the disease and enjoy good quality of life. PMID:25962092

  17. Maize toxin degrades peritrophic matrix proteins and stimulates compensatory transcriptome responses in fall armyworm midgut.

    PubMed

    Fescemyer, Howard W; Sandoya, Germán V; Gill, Torrence A; Ozkan, Seval; Marden, James H; Luthe, Dawn S

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the molecular mechanisms underlying insect compensatory responses to plant defenses could lead to improved plant resistance to herbivores. The Mp708 inbred line of maize produces the maize insect resistant 1-cysteine protease (Mir1-CP) toxin. Reduced feeding and growth of fall armyworm larvae fed on Mp708 was previously linked to impairment of nutrient utilization and degradation of the midgut (MG) peritrophic matrix (PM) by Mir1-CP. Here we examine the biochemical and transcriptional responses of fall armyworm larvae to Mir1-CP. Insect Intestinal Mucin (IIM) was severely depleted from pure PMs treated in vitro with recombinant Mir1-CP. Larvae fed on Mp708 midwhorls excrete frass largely depleted of IIM. Cracks, fissures and increased porosity previously observed in the PM of larvae fed on Mp708 midwhorls could ensue when Mir1-CP degrades the IIM that cross-links chitin fibrils in the PM. Both targeted and global transcriptome analyses were performed to determine how complete dissolution of the structure and function of the PM is prevented, enabling larvae to continue growing in the presence of Mir1-CP. The MGs from fall armyworm fed on Mp708 upregulate expression of genes encoding proteins involved in PM production as an apparent compensation to replace the disrupted PM structure and restore appropriate counter-current MG gradients. Also, several families of digestive enzymes (endopeptidases, aminopeptidases, lipases, amylase) were more highly expressed in MGs from larvae fed on Mp708 than MGs from larvae fed on diets lacking Mir1-CP (artificial diet, midwhorls from Tx601 or B73 maize). Impaired growth of larvae fed on Mp708 probably results from metabolic costs associated with higher production of PM constituents and digestive enzymes in a compensatory attempt to maintain MG function. PMID:23306018

  18. Do pH changes in the leaf apoplast contribute to rapid inhibition of leaf elongation rate by water stress? Comparison of stress responses induced by polyethylene glycol and down-regulation of root hydraulic conductivity.

    PubMed

    Ehlert, Christina; Plassard, Claude; Cookson, Sarah Jane; Tardieu, François; Simonneau, Thierry

    2011-08-01

    We have dissected the influences of apoplastic pH and cell turgor on short-term responses of leaf growth to plant water status, by using a combination of a double-barrelled pH-selective microelectrodes and a cell pressure probe. These techniques were used, together with continuous measurements of leaf elongation rate (LER), in the (hidden) elongating zone of the leaves of intact maize plants while exposing roots to various treatments. Polyethylene glycol (PEG) reduced water availability to roots, while acid load and anoxia decreased root hydraulic conductivity. During the first 30 min, acid load and anoxia induced moderate reductions in leaf growth and turgor, with no effect on leaf apoplastic pH. PEG stopped leaf growth, while turgor was only partially reduced. Rapid alkalinization of the apoplast, from pH 4.9 ± 0.3 to pH 5.8 ± 0.2 within 30 min, may have participated to this rapid growth reduction. After 60 min, leaf growth inhibition correlated well with turgor reduction across all treatments, supporting a growth limitation by hydraulics. We conclude that apoplastic alkalinization may transiently impair the control of leaf growth by cell turgor upon abrupt water stress, whereas direct hydraulic control of growth predominates under moderate conditions and after a 30-60 min delay following imposition of water stress. PMID:21477119

  19. CHARACTERIZATION OF TRYPSIN-LIKE AND CHYMOTRYPSIN-LIKE SERINE PROTEASES FROM MIDGUT OF Mythimna separata Walker.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoqun; Fan, Dong; Zhao, Kuijun

    2016-07-01

    Two cDNA sequences encoding a trypsin-like and a chymotrypsin-like serine protease (MsT and MsCT, GenBank accession Nos. KP730443 and KP730444, respectively) were cloned from midgut of oriental armyworm, Mythimna separata Walker. Multiple alignments revealed that the deduced amino acid sequences of MsT and MsCT contained a serine protease catalytic motif GDSGGPL and catalytic triads (His, Asp, and Ser). Analyses of tissue and developmental expression of MsT and MsCT showed that they were mainly expressed in midguts and could be detected in first to sixth instar larvae, prepupal and pupal stages. Expressions of both MsT and MsCT were downregulated after 24 h of starvation and upregulated by subsequent insect refeeding. MsT expression in response to 20-hydroxyecdysone (20E) was dose dependent and upregulated after 24 h. However, MsCT expression in response to 20E was downregulated compared with controls. MsCT, but not MsT, transcripts were upregulated after 24 h of Cry1Ac protoxin exposure. These results suggested that MsT was most likely involved in food protein digestion and molting in M. separata whereas MsCT was most likely involved in food protein digestion and Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) protoxin activation. RNA interference indicated that MsT and MsCT expression levels decreased 76.7 and 86.2% after treated with MsT and MsCT dsRNA, respectively. This study showed that M. separata expressed midgut proteases in line with known lepidopteran counterparts and contributed valuable sequence resource information regarding insect proteases. PMID:26988941

  20. Adult midgut expressed sequence tags from the tsetse fly Glossina morsitans morsitans and expression analysis of putative immune response genes

    PubMed Central

    Lehane, M J; Aksoy, S; Gibson, W; Kerhornou, A; Berriman, M; Hamilton, J; Soares, M B; Bonaldo, M F; Lehane, S; Hall, N

    2003-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies transmit African trypanosomiasis leading to half a million cases annually. Trypanosomiasis in animals (nagana) remains a massive brake on African agricultural development. While trypanosome biology is widely studied, knowledge of tsetse flies is very limited, particularly at the molecular level. This is a serious impediment to investigations of tsetse-trypanosome interactions. We have undertaken an expressed sequence tag (EST) project on the adult tsetse midgut, the major organ system for establishment and early development of trypanosomes. Results A total of 21,427 ESTs were produced from the midgut of adult Glossina morsitans morsitans and grouped into 8,876 clusters or singletons potentially representing unique genes. Putative functions were ascribed to 4,035 of these by homology. Of these, a remarkable 3,884 had their most significant matches in the Drosophila protein database. We selected 68 genes with putative immune-related functions, macroarrayed them and determined their expression profiles following bacterial or trypanosome challenge. In both infections many genes are downregulated, suggesting a malaise response in the midgut. Trypanosome and bacterial challenge result in upregulation of different genes, suggesting that different recognition pathways are involved in the two responses. The most notable block of genes upregulated in response to trypanosome challenge are a series of Toll and Imd genes and a series of genes involved in oxidative stress responses. Conclusions The project increases the number of known Glossina genes by two orders of magnitude. Identification of putative immunity genes and their preliminary characterization provides a resource for the experimental dissection of tsetse-trypanosome interactions. PMID:14519198