Science.gov

Sample records for midland nuclear powerplant

  1. Nuclear powerplants for mobile applications.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. This paper examines the technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  2. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    Powerplant systems and procedures that ensure the day-to-day health and safety of people in and around the plant is referred to as operational safety. This safety is the result of careful planning, good engineering and design, strict licensing and regulation, and environmental monitoring. Procedures that assure operational safety at nuclear…

  3. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Design and Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    The most important concern in the design, construction and operation of nuclear powerplants is safety. Nuclear power is one of the major contributors to the nation's supply of electricity; therefore, it is important to assure its safe use. Each different type of powerplant has special design features and systems to protect health and safety. One…

  4. Nuclear Powerplant Safety: Source Terms. Nuclear Energy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Energy, Washington, DC. Nuclear Energy Office.

    There has been increased public interest in the potential effects of nuclear powerplant accidents since the Soviet reactor accident at Chernobyl. People have begun to look for more information about the amount of radioactivity that might be released into the environment as a result of such an accident. When this issue is discussed by people…

  5. Synthetic Organic Materials in Nuclear Powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bouquet, F. L.; Winslow, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    Report aids plant designers and qualification engineers in ensuring that organic materials in nuclear powerplants will perform satisfactorily in such safety-related equipment as insulation on motor windings, pump diaphragms, motor and pump lubricants, and pump seals and gaskets. Report provides information for service that may include both mild and harsh nuclear environments.

  6. Water consumption by nuclear powerplants and some hydrological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giusti, Ennio V.; Meyer, E.L.

    1977-01-01

    Published data show that estimated water consumption varies with the cooling system adopted, being least in once-through cooling (about 18 cubic feet per second per 1,000 megawatts electrical) and greatest in closed cooling with mechanical draft towers (about 30 cubic feet per second per 1,000 megawatts electrical). When freshwater is used at this magnitude, water-resources economy may be affected in a given region. The critical need for cooling water at all times by the nuclear powerplant industry, coupled with the knowledge that water withdrawal in the basin will generally increase with time and will be at a maximum during low-flow periods, indicates a need for reexamination of the design low flow currently adopted and the methods used to estimate it. The amount of power generated, the name of the cooling water source, and the cooling method adopted for all nuclear powerplants projected to be in operation by 1985 in the United States are tabulated and the estimated annual evaporation at each powerplant site is shown on a map of the conterminous United States. Another map is presented that shows all nuclear powerplants located on river sites as well as stream reaches in the United States where the 7-day, 10-year low flow is at least 300 cubic feet per second or where this amount of flow can be developed with storage. (Woodard-USGS)

  7. Emerging needs for mobile nuclear powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Incentives for broadening the present role of civilian nuclear power to include mobile nuclear power plants that are compact, lightweight, and safe are examined. Specifically discussed is the growing importance of: (1) a new international cargo transportation capability, and (2) the capability for development of resources in previously remote regions of the earth including the oceans and the Arctic. This report surveys present and potential systems (vehicles, remote stations, and machines) that would both provide these capabilities and require enough power to justify using mobile nuclear reactor power plants.

  8. Nuclear power-plant safety functions

    SciTech Connect

    Corcoran, W.R.; Finnicum, D.J.; Hubbard, F.R. III; Musick, C.R.; Walzer, P.F.

    1981-03-01

    The concept of safety functions is discussed. Ten critical safety functions and the multiple success paths available for accomplishing them are described. Use of the safety function concept in the development of emergency procedures, operator training, and control-room displays provides a systematic approach and a hierarchy of protection that an operator can use to mitigate the consequences of an event. The safety function concept can also be applied to the design and analysis of nuclear plant systems and to the evaluation of past expierience.

  9. Nuclear Plant Analyzer: an interactive TRAC/RELAP Power-Plant Simulation Program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, R.; Booker, C.; Giguere, P.; Liles, D.; Mahaffy, J.; Turner, M.; Wiley, R.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a computer-software interface for executing the TRAC or RELAP5 power-plant systems codes. The NPA is designed to use advanced supercomputers, long-distance data communications, and a remote workstation terminal with interactive computer graphics to analyze power-plant thermal-hydraulic behavior. The NPA interface simplifies the running of these codes through automated procedures and dialog interaction. User understanding of simulated-plant behavior is enhanced through graphics displays of calculational results. These results are displayed concurrently with the calculation. The user has the capability to override the plant's modeled control system with hardware adjustment commands. This gives the NPA the utility of a simulator, and at the same time, the accuracy of an advanced, best-estimate, power-plant systems code for plant operation and safety analysis.

  10. Los Alamos Nuclear Plant Analyzer: an interactive power-plant simulation program

    SciTech Connect

    Steinke, R.; Booker, C.; Giguere, P.; Liles, D.R.; Mahaffy, J.H.; Turner, M.R.

    1984-01-01

    The Nuclear Plant Analyzer (NPA) is a computer-software interface for executing the TRAC or RELAP5 power-plant systems codes. The NPA is designed to use advanced supercomputers, long-distance data communications, and a remote workstation terminal with interactive computer graphics to analyze power-plant thermal-hydraulic behavior. The NPA interface simplifies the running of these codes through automated procedures and dialog interaction. User understanding of simulated-plant behavior is enhanced through graphics displays of calculational results. These results are displayed concurrently with the calculation. The user has the capability to override the plant's modeled control system with hardware-adjustment commands. This gives the NPA the utility of a simulator, and at the same time, the accuracy of an advanced, best-estimate, power-plant systems code for plant operation and safety analysis.

  11. Technology for Bayton-cycle powerplants using solar and nuclear energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Brayton cycle gas turbines have the potential to use either solar heat or nuclear reactors for generating from tens of kilowatts to tens of megawatts of power in space, all this from a single technology for the power generating system. Their development for solar energy dynamic power generation for the space station could be the first step in an evolution of such powerplants for a very wide range of applications. At the low power level of only 10 kWe, a power generating system has already demonstrated overall efficiency of 0.29 and operated 38 000 hr. Tests of improved components show that these components would raise that efficiency to 0.32, a value twice that demonstrated by any alternate concept. Because of this high efficiency, solar Brayton cycle power generators offer the potential to increase power per unit of solar collector area to levels exceeding four times that from photovoltaic powerplants using present technology for silicon solar cells. The technologies for solar mirrors and heat receivers are reviewed and assessed. This Brayton technology for solar powerplants is equally suitable for use with the nuclear reactors. The available long time creep data on the tantalum alloy ASTAR-811C show that such Brayton cycles can evolve to cycle peak temperatures of 1500 K (2240 F). And this same technology can be extended to generate 10 to 100 MW in space by exploiting existing technology for terrestrial gas turbines in the fields of both aircraft propulsion and stationary power generation.

  12. Some issues in the seismic design of nuclear power-plant facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Hadjian, A.H.; Iwan, W.D.

    1980-09-01

    This paper summarizes the major issues discussed by an international panel of experts during the post-SMIRT (Structural Mechanics in Reactor Technology) Seminar on Extreme Load Design of Nuclear Power-Plant Facilities, which was held in Berlin, Aug. 20-21, 1979. The emphasis of the deliberations was on the state of the art of seismic-response calculations to predict the expected performance of structures and equipment during earthquakes. Four separate panels discussed issues on (1) soil-structure interaction and structural response, (2) modeling, materials, and boundary conditions, (3) damping in structures and equipment, and (4) fragility levels of equipment. The international character of the seminar was particularly helpful in the cross-pollination of ideas regarding the issues and the steps required to enhance the cause of safety of nuclear plants.

  13. Powerplant software

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, T.C.

    1995-07-01

    Powerplants need software to thrive and compete. Covered here are many programs and applications -- an overview of the functions, tasks, and problem-solving software is used for today. Software or, more accurately, software-driven systems are pervasive. Their presence is felt in every nook and cranny of the powerplant -- from design and construction through operation and maintenance, even dismantling and decommissioning -- embracing whole systems but also focusing on individual pieces of equipment. No one software supplier or two or three dominates -- powerplant software is the purview of scores if not hundreds of suppliers ranging from the largest corporations to individual consultants and application developers.

  14. Technology for Brayton-cycle space powerplants using solar and nuclear energy

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E.

    1986-02-01

    Brayton-cycle gas turbines have the potential to use either solar heat or nuclear reactors to generate from tens of kilowatts to tens of megawatts of power in space, all this from a single technology for the power-generating system. Their development for solar-energy dynamic power generation for the space station could be the first step in an evolution of such powerplants for a very wide range of applications. At the low power level of only 10 kWe, a power-generating system has already demonstrated overall efficiency of 0.29 and operated for 38,000 hr. Tests of improved components show that, if installed in the power-generating system, these components would raise that efficiency to 0.32; this efficiency is twice that so far demonstrated by any alternate concept, a characteristic especially important for solar power systems. Because of this high efficiency, solar-heat Brayton-cycle power generators offer the potential to increase power per unit of solar-collector area to levels exceeding four times that from photovoltaic powerplants based on present technology for silicon solar cells. For the heat source, paraboloidal mirrors have been assembled from sectors here on Earth. One mirror, 1.5-m diameter, had a standard error for its surface of only 1 arc-min and a specific mass of only 1.3 kg/m 2. A heavier mirror (nearly 5 kg/m{sup 2}), assembled from 12 sectors, had a standard surface error of 3 arc-min but was 6 m in diameter. Either of these mirrors is sufficiently accurate for use with the Brayton cycle, but the techniques for actually assembling large mirrors in space must yet be worked out. For use during the shadow period of a low Earth orbit (LEO), heat could be stored in LiF, a salt that melts at 1121 K (1558{degrees}F) and whose latent heat of fusion exceeds 1 MJ/kg. Because of the prior experience with its fabrication and of its tolerance of the thermal cycling in LEO, Nb-1Zr was selected to contain the LiF.

  15. Effects of backlash and dead band on temperature control of the primary loop of a conceptual nuclear Brayton space powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrick, E. J.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical study was made of the stability of a closed-loop liquid-lithium temperature control of the primary loop of a conceptual nuclear Brayton space powerplant. The operating point was varied from 20 to 120 percent of design. A describing-function technique was used to evaluate the effects of temperature dead band and control coupling backlash. From the system investigation, it was predicted that a limit cycle will not exist with a temperature dead band, but a limit cycle will not exist when backlash is present. The results compare favorably with a digital computer simulation.

  16. Midlands Teaching Factory, LTD.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlands Technical Coll., Columbia, SC.

    In 1987, Midlands Technical College (MTC), in Columbia, South Carolina, initiated a Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) project, the Midlands Teaching Factory, LTD, which integrated various college departments with the goal of manufacturing a high quality, saleable product. The faculty developed a teaching factory model which was designed to…

  17. Assessing inundation hazards to nuclear powerplant sites using geologically extended histories of riverine floods, tsunamis, and storm surges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    O'Connor, Jim; Atwater, Brian F.; Cohn, Timothy A.; Cronin, Thomas M.; Keith, Mackenzie K.; Smith, Christopher G.; Mason, Jr., Robert R.

    2014-01-01

    A screening of the 104 nuclear powerplants in the United States licensed by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (at 64 sites) indicates several sites for which paleoflood studies likely would provide additional flood-frequency information. Two sites—Duane Arnold, Iowa, on the Cedar River; and David-Besse, Ohio, on the Toussaint River—have geologic conditions suitable for creating and preserving stratigraphic records of flooding and few upstream dams that may complicate flood-frequency analysis. One site—Crystal River, Florida1, on the Withlacoochee River and only 4 kilometers from the coast—has high potential as a candidate for assessing riverine and marine inundation hazards. Several sites on the Mississippi River have high geologic potential, but upstream dams almost certainly now regulate peak flows. Nevertheless, studies on the Mississippi River to evaluate long-term flood frequency may provide results applicable to a wide spectrum of regional hazard issues. Several sites in the southeastern United States have high geologic potential, and studies at these sites also may be helpful in evaluating hazards from outburst floods from landslide dams (river blockages formed by mass movements), which may be a regional hazard. For all these sites, closer investigation and field reconnaissance would be needed to confirm suitable deposits and settings for a complete paleoflood analysis. Similar screenings may help identify high-potential sites for geologic investigations of tsunami and storm-surge hazards.

  18. Solar/Thermal Powerplant Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, J. M.; El Gabalawi, N.; Hill, G. M.; Slonski, M. L.

    1985-01-01

    Simulation program evaluates performances and energy costs of diverse solar/thermal powerplant configurations. Approach based on optimizing sizes of collector and storage subsystems to give minimum energy cost for specified plant rating and load factor. Methodology provides for consistent comparative evaluation of solar/thermal powerplants.

  19. Diversification: Midland/Odessa Health & Retirement Endeavor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skipper, P. K.

    In reaction to the economic risks associated with an over reliance on oil and gas exports, residents of the Midland/Odessa area of Texas began seeking diversification options for the local economy and, in 1986, formed the Midland/Odessa Health and Retirement Endeavor (MOHRE). This non-profit corporation was formed to examine the feasibility of…

  20. Powerplant productivity improvements and regulatory incentives

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, D; Brown, D

    1980-10-27

    The purpose of this study was to examine the benefits to be gained from increased powerplant productivity and to validate and demonstrate the use of incentives within the regulatory process to promote the improvement of powerplant productivity. The system-wide costs savings to be gained from given productivity improvement scenarios are estimated in both the short and long term. Numerous reports and studies exist which indicate that productivity improvements at the powerplant level are feasible and cost effective. The efforts of this study widen this focus and relate system-wide productivity improvements with system-wide cost savings. The initial thrust of the regulatory section of this study is to validate the existence of reasonable incentive procedures which would enable regulatory agencies to better motivate electric utilities to improve productivity on both the powerplant and system levels. The voluntary incentive format developed in this study was designed to facilitate the link between profit and efficiency which is typically not clear in most regulated market environments. It is concluded that at the present time, many electric utilities in this country could significantly increase the productivity of their base load units, and the adoption of an incentive program of the general type recommended in this study would add to rate of return regulation the needed financial incentives to enable utilities to make such improvements without losing long-run profit. In light of the upcoming oil import target levels and mandatory cutbacks of oil and gas as boiler fuels for electric utilities, the use of incentive programs to encourage more efficient utilization of coal and nuclear base load capacity will become far more inviting over the next two decades.

  1. Midland, South Dakota geothermal district heating

    SciTech Connect

    Lund, J.W.

    1997-12-01

    This article describes historical aspects and present usage of geothermal district heating systems in the town of Midland, South Dakota. The use of geothermal resources exists due to a joint venture between the school district and the city back in the early 1960`s. A total of approximately 30,000 square feet (2800 square meters) of floor space is heated using geothermal energy in Midland. This provides an estimated annual saving in propane cost of $15,000 to the community.

  2. Coal gasifier cogeneration powerplant project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shure, L. I.; Bloomfield, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    Industrial cogeneration and utility pr systems were analyzed and a conceptual design study was conducted to evaluate the economic feasibility of a coal gasifier power plant for NASA Lewis Research Center. Site location, plant size, and electric power demand were considered in criteria developed for screening and selecting candidates that could use a wide variety of coals, including that from Ohio. A fluidized bed gasifier concept was chosen as the baseline design and key components of the powerplant were technically assessed. No barriers to environmental acceptability are foreseen. If funded, the powerplant will not only meet the needs of the research center, but will reduce the commercial risk for utilities and industries by fully verifying and demonstrating the technology, thus accelerating commercialization.

  3. The Enterprise Campus at Midlands Technical College

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhames, Ronald L.; Ledbetter, J. Tom, Jr.

    2008-01-01

    The Commission established the Midlands Technical College (MTC) Enterprise Campus through special legislation. The Enterprise Campus provides for partnerships with private developers using private resources to create a unique business environment. Participants learn about the legislative process, the need for public/private partnerships, and what…

  4. 14 CFR 29.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 29.1337 Section 29.1337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 29.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 27.1337 Section 27.1337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 27.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments and...

  6. 14 CFR 27.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 27.1305 Section 27.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 27.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are the required...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 29.1305 Section 29.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment General § 29.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are required...

  8. 14 CFR 27.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 27.1337 Section 27.1337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL CATEGORY ROTORCRAFT Equipment Instruments: Installation § 27.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments and...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument... of fluids would not create a hazard. (3) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that... position. (f) Fuel pressure indicator. There must be means to measure fuel pressure, in each...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument... of fluids would not create a hazard. (3) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that... position. (f) Fuel pressure indicator. There must be means to measure fuel pressure, in each...

  11. 14 CFR 23.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 23.1305 Section 23.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 23.1305 Powerplant instruments. The...

  12. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1337 Section 25.1337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1305 Section 25.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are required...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 23.1305 Section 23.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 23.1305 Powerplant instruments. The...

  15. 14 CFR 25.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1305 Section 25.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are required...

  16. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... instruments. (a) Instruments and instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument... of fluids would not create a hazard. (3) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that... position. (f) Fuel pressure indicator. There must be means to measure fuel pressure, in each...

  17. 14 CFR 25.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1305 Section 25.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 25.1305 Powerplant instruments. The following are required...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 23.1305 Section 23.1305 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment General § 23.1305 Powerplant instruments. The...

  19. 14 CFR 25.1337 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant instruments. 25.1337 Section 25.1337 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Equipment Instruments: Installation § 25.1337 Powerplant instruments. (a) Instruments...

  20. 14 CFR 25.1521 - Powerplant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant limitations. 25.1521 Section 25.1521 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Operating Limitations § 25.1521 Powerplant limitations....

  1. 14 CFR 25.1521 - Powerplant limitations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant limitations. 25.1521 Section 25.1521 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Operating Limitations § 25.1521 Powerplant limitations....

  2. Aircraft Power-Plant Instruments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sontag, Harcourt; Brombacher, W G

    1934-01-01

    This report supersedes NACA-TR-129 which is now obsolete. Aircraft power-plant instruments include tachometers, engine thermometers, pressure gages, fuel-quantity gages, fuel flow meters and indicators, and manifold pressure gages. The report includes a description of the commonly used types and some others, the underlying principle utilized in the design, and some design data. The inherent errors of the instrument, the methods of making laboratory tests, descriptions of the test apparatus, and data in considerable detail in the performance of commonly used instruments are presented. Standard instruments and, in cases where it appears to be of interest, those used as secondary standards are described. A bibliography of important articles is included.

  3. Super Spool: An Experiment in Powerplant Design

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kesler, Ronald

    1974-01-01

    Discusses the use of rubberbands, an empty wooden thread spool, two wooden matches, a wax washer, and a small nail to conduct an experiment or demonstration in powerplant design. Detailed procedures and suggested activities are included. (CC)

  4. Genetic variation in the east Midlands.

    PubMed

    Mastana, S S; Sokol, R J

    1998-01-01

    According to history, the population of the British Isles derives its genepool from a succession of invaders and immigrants. The settlement pattern of these invaders gave rise to a patchwork of genepools, shown in previous genetic surveys. Specimens from 1117 blood donors of regionally subdivided East Midlands (Derbyshire, Nottinghamshire and Leicestershire) were analysed for 18 conventional genetic systems (blood groups, serum proteins and red cell enzymes), according to place of residence. Significant differences exist among the five geographically defined sub-populations, and it is argued that these are derived from the historical settlement of continental European populations in the region, especially the Danes and the Vikings. PMID:9483207

  5. Midland reactor pressure vessel flaw distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Foulds, J.R.; Kennedy, E.L.; Rosinski, S.T.

    1993-12-01

    The results of laboratory nondestructive examination (NDE), and destructive cross-sectioning of selected weldment sections of the Midland reactor pressure vessel were analyzed per a previously developed methodology in order to develop a flaw distribution. The flaw distributions developed from the NDE results obtained by two different ultrasonic test (UT) inspections (Electric Power Research Institute NDE Center and Pacific Northwest Laboratories) were not statistically significantly different. However, the distribution developed from the NDE Center`s (destructive) cross-sectioning-based data was found to be significantly different than those obtained through the UT inspections. A fracture mechanics-based comparison of the flaw distributions showed that the cross-sectioning-based data, conservatively interpreted (all defects considered as flaws), gave a significantly lower vessel failure probability when compared with the failure probability values obtained using the UT-based distributions. Given that the cross-sectioning data were reportedly biased toward larger, more significant-appearing (by UT) indications, it is concluded that the nondestructive examinations produced definitively conservative results. In addition to the Midland vessel inspection-related analyses, a set of twenty-seven numerical simulations, designed to provide a preliminary quantitative assessment of the accuracy of the flaw distribution method used here, were conducted. The calculations showed that, in more than half the cases, the analysis produced reasonably accurate predictions.

  6. 14 CFR 65.87 - Powerplant rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.87... certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating may approve and return to service a powerplant or propeller or... and return it to service. (b) A certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating can approve and...

  7. 14 CFR 65.87 - Powerplant rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.87... certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating may approve and return to service a powerplant or propeller or... and return it to service. (b) A certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating can approve and...

  8. 14 CFR 65.87 - Powerplant rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.87... certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating may approve and return to service a powerplant or propeller or... and return it to service. (b) A certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating can approve and...

  9. 14 CFR 65.87 - Powerplant rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.87... certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating may approve and return to service a powerplant or propeller or... and return it to service. (b) A certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating can approve and...

  10. 14 CFR 65.87 - Powerplant rating; additional privileges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED) AIRMEN CERTIFICATION: AIRMEN OTHER THAN FLIGHT CREWMEMBERS Mechanics § 65.87... certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating may approve and return to service a powerplant or propeller or... and return it to service. (b) A certificated mechanic with a powerplant rating can approve and...

  11. 14 CFR 23.939 - Powerplant operating characteristics.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant operating characteristics. 23.939 Section 23.939 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Powerplant General § 23.939 Powerplant...

  12. Midland's Economy: Past, Present and Future; The Midland/Odessa Economy: Foundation and Future; and Report on Labor Demand in the Permian Basin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, James L.; McCarty, Nolan M.

    As part of an effort to identify ways in which Midland College (Texas) and local businesses can respond to the economic needs of the community, these three papers by the Midland's Business and Economic Development Center offer various perspectives on the economic climate and labor market of the Permian Basis. The first report, "Midland's Economy:…

  13. Nuclear air cushion vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    The state-of-the-art of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant is identified. Using mission studies and cost estimates, some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles are described. The technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies are summarized.

  14. 14 CFR 25.1725 - Powerplants: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Electrical Wiring Interconnection Systems (EWIS) § 25.1725... of an EWIS component will not prevent the continued safe operation of the remaining powerplants or require immediate action by any crewmember for continued safe operation, in accordance with...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1305 - Powerplant instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... following are the required powerplant instruments: (a) A carburetor air temperature indicator, for each... temperature indicator, for each— (1) Air cooled engine; (2) Rotorcraft with cooling shutters; and (3... indicator for each engine. (i) An oil quantity indicator for each oil tank. (j) An oil temperature...

  16. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) Have torque limiting means on all accessory drives in order to prevent the torque limits established... approved as part of the powerplant driving the gearbox must— (1) Have torque limiting means to prevent the torque limits established for the affected drive from being exceeded; (2) Use the provisions on...

  17. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) Have torque limiting means on all accessory drives in order to prevent the torque limits established... approved as part of the powerplant driving the gearbox must— (1) Have torque limiting means to prevent the torque limits established for the affected drive from being exceeded; (2) Use the provisions on...

  18. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) Have torque limiting means on all accessory drives in order to prevent the torque limits established... approved as part of the powerplant driving the gearbox must— (1) Have torque limiting means to prevent the torque limits established for the affected drive from being exceeded; (2) Use the provisions on...

  19. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) Have torque limiting means on all accessory drives in order to prevent the torque limits established... approved as part of the powerplant driving the gearbox must— (1) Have torque limiting means to prevent the torque limits established for the affected drive from being exceeded; (2) Use the provisions on...

  20. 14 CFR 23.1163 - Powerplant accessories.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... continued operation of the engine must be provided. (e) Each accessory driven by a gearbox that is not approved as part of the powerplant driving the gearbox must— (1) Have torque limiting means to prevent the... gearbox for mounting; and (3) Be sealed to prevent contamination of the gearbox oil system and...

  1. Nuclear power plants for mobile applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Mobile nuclear powerplants for applications other than large ships and submarines will require compact, lightweight reactors with especially stringent impact-safety design. The technical and economic feasibility that the broadening role of civilian nuclear power, in general, (land-based nuclear electric generating plants and nuclear ships) can extend to lightweight, safe mobile nuclear powerplants are examined. The paper discusses technical experience, identifies potential sources of technology for advanced concepts, cites the results of economic studies of mobile nuclear powerplants, and surveys future technical capabilities needed by examining the current use and projected needs for vehicles, machines, and habitats that could effectively use mobile nuclear reactor powerplants.

  2. 10 CFR 503.6 - Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... shall be: (a) All powerplants with only steam driven turbines—78 days, (b) all powerplants with only combustion turbines—142 days, (c) all powerplants with combined cycles—both steam driven turbines...

  3. 10 CFR 503.6 - Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... shall be: (a) All powerplants with only steam driven turbines—78 days, (b) all powerplants with only combustion turbines—142 days, (c) all powerplants with combined cycles—both steam driven turbines...

  4. 10 CFR 503.6 - Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... shall be: (a) All powerplants with only steam driven turbines—78 days, (b) all powerplants with only combustion turbines—142 days, (c) all powerplants with combined cycles—both steam driven turbines...

  5. High School Science Technology Additions, Midland Public Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Design Cost Data, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Discusses design goals, space requirements, and need for mobile furniture and "imagination stations" at Michigan's Midland Public High School science technology addition. Describes the architectural design, costs, and specifications. Includes floor plans, general description, photos and a list of consultants, manufacturers, and suppliers used for…

  6. Coal-Based Fuel-Cell Powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferral, J. F.; Pappano, A. W.; Jennings, C. N.

    1986-01-01

    Report assesses advanced technologyy design alternatives for integrated coal-gasifier/fuel-cell powerplants. Various gasifier, cleanup, and fuelcell options evaluated. Evaluation includes adjustments to assumed performances and costs of proposed technologies where required. Analysis identifies uncertainties remaining in designs and most promising alternatives and research and development required to develop these technologies. Bulk of report summary and detailed analysis of six major conceptual designs and variations of each. All designs for plant that uses Illinois No. 6 coal and produces 675 MW of net power.

  7. 10 CFR 504.9 - Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... approved before OFP will issue a final prohibition order based on the certification. (b) Environmental... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. 504... Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. Under §§ 501.52, 504.5 and 504.6 of these...

  8. 10 CFR 504.9 - Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... approved before OFP will issue a final prohibition order based on the certification. (b) Environmental... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. 504... Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. Under §§ 501.52, 504.5 and 504.6 of these...

  9. 10 CFR 504.9 - Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... approved before OFP will issue a final prohibition order based on the certification. (b) Environmental... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. 504... Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. Under §§ 501.52, 504.5 and 504.6 of these...

  10. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 147 - Powerplant Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant Curriculum Subjects D Appendix D... (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS Pt. 147, App. D Appendix D to Part 147—Powerplant Curriculum Subjects This appendix lists the subjects required in at...

  11. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 147 - Powerplant Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant Curriculum Subjects D Appendix D... (CONTINUED) SCHOOLS AND OTHER CERTIFICATED AGENCIES AVIATION MAINTENANCE TECHNICIAN SCHOOLS Pt. 147, App. D Appendix D to Part 147—Powerplant Curriculum Subjects This appendix lists the subjects required in at...

  12. 14 CFR 23.1337 - Powerplant instruments installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument line must meet the requirements of... other safety devices at the source of pressure to prevent the escape of excessive fluid if the line...) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that utilizes flammable fluids must be...

  13. 14 CFR 23.1337 - Powerplant instruments installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument line must meet the requirements of... other safety devices at the source of pressure to prevent the escape of excessive fluid if the line...) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that utilizes flammable fluids must be...

  14. 14 CFR 23.1337 - Powerplant instruments installation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... instrument lines. (1) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument line must meet the requirements of... other safety devices at the source of pressure to prevent the escape of excessive fluid if the line...) Each powerplant and auxiliary power unit instrument that utilizes flammable fluids must be...

  15. 10 CFR 504.9 - Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants. 504.9 Section 504.9 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.9... use of natural gas or petroleum, or both, as a primary energy source in any certifying...

  16. Seasonal issues can chill powerplant profits

    SciTech Connect

    Swanekamp, R.

    1996-07-01

    Profitable operation requires minimizing the seasonal constraints imposed by weather. This article describes how forward-thinking operators review their plans for winterization and hot-weather operation--before the thermometer darts toward either extreme. new cooling towers (CTs) are no longer oversized, leaving little room for fouling that can shoot up in hot weather. Also, powerplants are no longer being designed with surplus heat exchangers and redundant pumps--features that can help a plant get through extreme temperatures. And at a growing list of plants, the CTs are eliminated altogether, in favor of air-cooled (AC) condensers--which can have their own trouble holding condenser vacuum when the outdoor thermometer skyrockets; and, like their CT cousins, can suffer serious failures if improperly operated in winter`s freeze. Although design margins are being stretched thin, seasoned operations and maintenance (O and M) teams can minimize the constraints imposed by mother nature.

  17. Nuclear air cushion vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J. L.

    1973-01-01

    This paper serves several functions. It identifies the 'state-of-the-art' of the still-conceptual nuclear air cushion vehicle, particularly the nuclear powerplant. Using mission studies and cost estimates, the report describes some of the advantages of nuclear power for large air cushion vehicles. The paper also summarizes the technology studies on mobile nuclear powerplants and conceptual ACV systems/missions studies that have been performed at NASA Lewis Research Center.

  18. 76 FR 34805 - Arkansas Midland Railroad Company, Inc., Trackage Rights Exemption; Caddo Valley Railroad Company

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-14

    ... Surface Transportation Board Arkansas Midland Railroad Company, Inc., Trackage Rights Exemption; Caddo Valley Railroad Company Pursuant to a written trackage rights agreement, Caddo Valley Railroad Company (CVR) has agreed to grant local trackage rights to Arkansas Midland Railroad Company, Inc. (AKMD)...

  19. Speculations on future opportunities to evolve Brayton powerplants aboard the space station

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E.

    1994-09-01

    The Space Station provides a unique, low-risk environment in which to evolve new capabilities. In this way, the Station will grow in capacity, in its range of capabilities, and in its economy of operation as a laboratory, as a center for materials processing, and as a center for space operations. Although both Rankine and Brayton cycles, two concepts for solar-dynamic power generation, now compete to power the Station, this paper confines its attention to the Brayton cycle using a mixture of He and Xe as its working fluid. Such a Brayton powerplant to supply the Station`s increasing demands for both electric power and heat has the potential to gradually evolve higher and higher performance by exploiting already-evolved materials (ASTAR-811C and molten-Li heat storage), its peak cycle temperature rising ultimately to 1500 K. Adapting the Station to exploit long tethers (200 to 300 km long) could yield large increases in payloads to LEO, to GEO, and to distant destinations in the solar system. Such tethering of the Space Station would not only require additional power for electric propulsion but also would so increase nuclear safety that nuclear powerplants might provide this power. From an 8000-kWt SP-100 reactor, thermoelectric power generation could produce 300 kWe, or adapted solar-Brayton cycle, 2400 to 2800 kWe.

  20. Speculations on future opportunities to evolve Brayton powerplants aboard the space station

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Robert E.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station provides a unique, low-risk environment in which to evolve new capabilities. In this way, the Space Station will grow in capacity, in its range of capabilities, and its economy of operation as a laboratory and as a center for space operations. Although both Rankine and Brayton cycles, two concepts for solar dynamic power generation, now compete to power the station, this paper confines its attention to the Brayton cycle using a mixture of He and Xe as its working fluid. Such a Brayton powerplant to supply the station's increasing demands for both electric power and heat has the potential to gradually evolve higher and higher performance by exploiting already-evolved materials (ASTAR-811C and molten-Li heat storage), its peak cycle temperature rising ultimately to 1500 K. Adapting the station to exploit long tethers (200 to 300 km long) could yield increases in payloads to LEO, to GEO, and to distant destinations in the solar system. Such tethering of the Space Station would not only require additional power for electric propulsion but also would so increase nuclear safety that nuclear powerplants might provide this power. From an 8000-kWt SP-100 reactor, thermoelectric power generation could produce 300 kWe, or adapted solar-Brayton cycle, 2400 to 2800 kWe.

  1. Stratigraphy of Midland basin in regional and global context

    SciTech Connect

    Robinson, R.M. ); Hayner, D. )

    1994-03-01

    A new correlation of 85 well logs provides the data for a continuous set of structure and isopach maps covering one square degree of longitude and latitude from 101 to 102 west and 32 to 33 north. A corresponding set of maps showing paleogeography and tectonics relates each of the above maps to its surroundings in the southwest quarter of North America. A further set of maps of the globe then relates the paleogeographic settings to global plate tectonics. The logs were chosen for an even distribution throughout the study areas and they illustrate the stratigraphic development of the Midland basin from the Early Ordovician up to the middle of the Leonardian stage, i.e., up to the union of Gondwana.

  2. 14 CFR 29.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 29.1141 Section 29.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... indicate to the flight crew when the valve— (i) Is in the fully open or fully closed position; or (ii)...

  3. 14 CFR 25.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 25.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... must be able to maintain any set position without constant attention by flight crewmembers and without...) For powerplant valve controls located in the flight deck there must be a means: (1) For the...

  4. 14 CFR 27.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 27.1141 Section 27.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... open and closed position; and (2) For power-assisted valves, a means to indicate to the flight...

  5. 14 CFR 27.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 27.1141 Section 27.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... open and closed position; and (2) For power-assisted valves, a means to indicate to the flight...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... Section 25.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... must be able to maintain any set position without constant attention by flight crewmembers and without...) For powerplant valve controls located in the flight deck there must be a means: (1) For the...

  7. 14 CFR 29.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 29.1141 Section 29.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... indicate to the flight crew when the valve— (i) Is in the fully open or fully closed position; or (ii)...

  8. 14 CFR 25.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... Section 25.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... must be able to maintain any set position without constant attention by flight crewmembers and without...) For powerplant valve controls located in the flight deck there must be a means: (1) For the...

  9. 14 CFR 27.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 27.1141 Section 27.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... open and closed position; and (2) For power-assisted valves, a means to indicate to the flight...

  10. 14 CFR 29.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 29.1141 Section 29.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... indicate to the flight crew when the valve— (i) Is in the fully open or fully closed position; or (ii)...

  11. 14 CFR 29.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 29.1141 Section 29.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... indicate to the flight crew when the valve— (i) Is in the fully open or fully closed position; or (ii)...

  12. 14 CFR 29.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 29.1141 Section 29.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... indicate to the flight crew when the valve— (i) Is in the fully open or fully closed position; or (ii)...

  13. 14 CFR 25.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Section 25.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... must be able to maintain any set position without constant attention by flight crewmembers and without...) For powerplant valve controls located in the flight deck there must be a means: (1) For the...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 25.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... must be able to maintain any set position without constant attention by flight crewmembers and without...) For powerplant valve controls located in the flight deck there must be a means: (1) For the...

  15. 14 CFR 27.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 27.1141 Section 27.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... open and closed position; and (2) For power-assisted valves, a means to indicate to the flight...

  16. 14 CFR 27.1141 - Powerplant controls: general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant controls: general. 27.1141 Section 27.1141 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION... open and closed position; and (2) For power-assisted valves, a means to indicate to the flight...

  17. Airframe and Powerplant Mechanics Certification Guide. Revised 1971.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Federal Aviation Administration (DOT), Washington, DC. Flight Standards Service.

    The guide was prepared to provide information to prospective airframe and powerplant mechanics and other persons interested in the certification of mechanics. The requirements for a mechanic certificate are concerned with age, language ability, experience, knowledge, and skill. The sections of the guide explain the procedure for either…

  18. Characterization Testing of the Teledyne Passive Breadboard Fuel Cell Powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Exploration Technology Development Program (ETDP) is tasked with the development of enabling and enhancing technologies for NASA's exploration missions. As part of that initiative, the return to the Moon requires a reliable, efficient, and lightweight fuel cell powerplant system to provide power to the Altair Lunar Lander and for lunar surface systems. Fuel cell powerplants are made up of two basic parts; the fuel cell itself and the supporting ancillary subsystem. This subsystem is designed to deliver reactants to the fuel cell and remove product water and waste heat from the fuel cell. Typically, fuel cell powerplant ancillary subsystems rely upon pumps and active water separation techniques to accomplish these tasks for closed hydrogen/oxygen systems. In a typical system, these components are the largest contributors to the overall parasitic power load of the fuel cell powerplant. A potential step towards the development of an efficient lightweight power system is to maximize the use of "passive" or low-power ancillary components as a replacement to these high-power load components

  19. 14 CFR 121.253 - Powerplant fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant fire protection. 121.253 Section 121.253 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements §...

  20. 14 CFR 121.253 - Powerplant fire protection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant fire protection. 121.253 Section 121.253 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION (CONTINUED... REQUIREMENTS: DOMESTIC, FLAG, AND SUPPLEMENTAL OPERATIONS Special Airworthiness Requirements §...

  1. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... adjusted for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  2. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  3. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  4. 18 CFR 287.101 - Determination of powerplant design capacity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 1978, a powerplant's design capacity shall be determined as follows: (a) Steam-electric generating unit. The design capacity of a steam-electric generating unit shall be maximum generator nameplate rating... adjusted for site elevation, and the maximum generator nameplate rating measured in kilowatts of the...

  5. Groundwater impact assessment report for the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, D.J.; Johnson, V.G.; Lindsey, K.A.

    1993-09-01

    As required by the Hanford Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (Tri-Party Agreement Milestone M-17-00A), this report assesses the impact of wastewater discharged to the 284-WB Powerplant Ponds on groundwater quality. The assessment reported herein expands upon the initial analysis conducted between 1989 and 1990 for the Liquid Effluent Study Final Project Plan.

  6. 10 CFR 504.9 - Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the costs of preparing any necessary Environmental Assessment (EA) or Environmental Impact Statement... information. In addition, OFP will have the authority to approve and modify any statement, analysis, and... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Environmental requirements for certifying powerplants....

  7. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 147 - Powerplant Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Powerplant Theory and Maintenance Teaching level..., and repair engine ice and rain control systems. (1) 27. Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot and repair heat exchangers, superchargers, and turbine engine airflow and temperature control systems. (3)...

  8. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 147 - Powerplant Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Powerplant Theory and Maintenance Teaching level..., and repair engine ice and rain control systems. (1) 27. Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot and repair heat exchangers, superchargers, and turbine engine airflow and temperature control systems. (3)...

  9. 14 CFR Appendix D to Part 147 - Powerplant Curriculum Subjects

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of proficiency at which that item must be taught. I. Powerplant Theory and Maintenance Teaching level..., and repair engine ice and rain control systems. (1) 27. Inspect, check, service, troubleshoot and repair heat exchangers, superchargers, and turbine engine airflow and temperature control systems. (3)...

  10. Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-03-01

    This annual report was prepared for Congress by the Department of Energy in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency, as required by section 806 of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 as amended (FUA), Public Law 95-620, enacted November 9, 1978. Actions taken under the provisions of the legislation, which was enacted to encourage the use of indigenous energy resources in electric powerplants and major fuel-burning installations in the electric utility, industrial, and federal governmental sectors are described. Implementation activities during calendar year 1981 under FUA and under section 2 of the Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act of 1974, Public Law 93-319, and the effectiveness of both laws in achieving their purposes are described. Summary information on natural gas consumption by electric utilities in 1977 and 1981 is included.

  11. Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act annual report

    SciTech Connect

    1981-03-01

    This annual report was prepared for the Congress by the Secretary of the Department of Energy (DOE) in conjunction with the Acting Administrator of the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) as required by Section 806 of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA), Public Law 95-620, enacted November 9, 1978. This annual report describes actions taken under the legislation, which was enacted to promote national energy self-sufficiency and encourage the use of the alternate energy resources in electric powerplants and major industrial fuel-burning installations (MFBI's) in the utility, industrial and Federal governmental sectors. Annual FUA implementation activities are discussed and legislative requirements are satisfied that the annual report discuss: actions taken under FUA and under Section 2 of the Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act of 1974 (ESECA) Public Law 93-319 during the preceding calendar year; and the effectiveness of the provisions of both laws in achieving their purposes.

  12. Exploration applications of geochemistry in the Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Dow, W.G.; Talukdar, S.C. ); Harmon, L. )

    1990-05-01

    Reservoirs, source rocks, and crude oils were studied at Pegasas field on the eastern flank of the Central Basin platform. The field is a faulted anticlinal structure and produces oil and gas from seven geologically complex reservoirs ranging from the Ordovician Ellenburger to the Permian San Andres formations. A better understanding of the petroleum systems present should lead to improved exploration and development opportunities. Good to excellent-quality, mature oil-prone source rocks occur at numerous horizons between the Permian Spraberry and Ordovician Ellenburger formations. Oil-rock correlations indicate three major petroleum systems: Ordovician sources for oil in Ordovician, Silurian and Devonian reservoirs; Mississippian to Pennsylvanian sources for Pennsylvanian reservoired oils; and Permian sources for oils in Permian reservoirs. The Ordovician to Devonian system experienced peak oil generation, extensive vertical oil migration, and in-reservoir oil maturation in Triassic time; the Mississippian-Pennsylvanian system reached peak oil generation with limited vertical oil migration in Jurassic time; and the Permian system is just reaching peak oil generation and has had little or no vertical oil migration. The total amount of oil available to charge the field is several times the oil in place, and all available traps were filled to capacity. This implies substantial accumulations remain undiscovered in subtle stratigraphic and combination traps in the Pegasus field area. The same is probably true throughout the Midland basin. Integrated studies with geological, geophysical, engineering, and geochemical input can provide valuable exploration information on local as well as regional scales. Pegasus field examples include fault-block isolation reservoir segregation and waterflood or gas cycling efficiency. Such studies may also contribute information leading to lateral and vertical field extension wells.

  13. 75 FR 71487 - Norfolk Southern Railway Company-Abandonment Exemption-in Crawford County, GA; Georgia Midland...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-23

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Norfolk Southern Railway Company--Abandonment Exemption--in Crawford County, GA; Georgia Midland Railroad, Inc.\\1\\--Discontinuance of Service Exemption--in Crawford County... discontinuing railroad-- not Georgia Midland Railroad Company, as indicated in the notice. Norfolk...

  14. Chemical composition and RT[sub NDT] determinations for Midland weld WF-70

    SciTech Connect

    Nanstad, R.K.; McCabe, D.E.; Swain, R.L.; Miller, M.K. )

    1992-12-01

    The Heavy-Section Steal Irradiation Program Tenth Irradiation Series has the objective to investigate the affects of radiation on the fracture toughness of the low-upper-shelf submerged-arc welds (B W designation WF-70) in the reactor pressure vessel of the canceled Midland Unit 1 nuclear plant. This report discusses determination of variations in chemical composition And reference temperature (RT[sub NDT]) throughout the welds. Specimens were machined from different sections and through thickness locations in both the beltline and nozzle course welds. The nil-ductility transition temperatures ranged from [minus]40 to [minus]60[degrees]C ([minus]40 and [minus]76[degrees]F) while the RT[sub NDT]S, controlled by the Charpy behavior, varied from [minus]20 to 37[degrees]C ([minus]4 to 99[degrees]F). The upper-shelf energies varied from 77 to 108 J (57 to 80 ft-lb). The combined data revealed a mean 41-J (30-ft-lb) temperature of [minus]8[degrees]C (17[degrees]F) with a mean upper-shelf energy of 88 J (65 ft-lb). The copper contents range from 0.21 to 0.34 wt % in the beltline weld and from 0.37 to 0.46 wt % in the nozzle course weld. Atom probe field ion microscope analyses indicated substantial depletion of copper in the matrix but no evidence of copper clustering. Statistical analyses of the Charpy and chemical composition results as well as interpretation of the ASME procedures for RT[sub NDT] determination are discussed.

  15. Overcoming Present-Day Powerplant Limitations Via Unconventional Engine Configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meitner, Peter L.

    2006-01-01

    The Army Research Laboratory s Vehicle Technology Directorate is sponsoring the prototype development of three unconventional engine concepts - two intermittent combustion (IC) engines and one turbine engine (via SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contracts). The IC concepts are the Nutating Engine and the Bonner Engine, and the turbine concept is the POWER Engine. Each of the three engines offers unique and greatly improved capabilities (which cannot be achieved by present-day powerplants), while offering significant reductions in size and weight. This paper presents brief descriptions of the physical characteristics of the three engines, and discusses their performance potentials, as well as their development status.

  16. 10 CFR 503.7 - State approval-general requirement for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false State approval-general requirement for new powerplants. 503.7 Section 503.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.7 State approval—general requirement for new powerplants. (a) Where...

  17. 10 CFR 503.7 - State approval-general requirement for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false State approval-general requirement for new powerplants. 503.7 Section 503.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.7 State approval—general requirement for new powerplants. (a) Where...

  18. 10 CFR 503.7 - State approval-general requirement for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false State approval-general requirement for new powerplants. 503.7 Section 503.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.7 State approval—general requirement for new powerplants. (a) Where...

  19. 10 CFR 503.7 - State approval-general requirement for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false State approval-general requirement for new powerplants. 503.7 Section 503.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.7 State approval—general requirement for new powerplants. (a) Where...

  20. 10 CFR 503.7 - State approval-general requirement for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false State approval-general requirement for new powerplants. 503.7 Section 503.7 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.7 State approval—general requirement for new powerplants. (a) Where...

  1. 10 CFR 501.51 - Prohibitions by order-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Prohibitions by order-electing powerplants. 501.51 Section 501.51 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS ADMINISTRATIVE PROCEDURES AND SANCTIONS Prohibition Rules and Orders § 501.51 Prohibitions by order—electing powerplants. (a) OFE may prohibit...

  2. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  3. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  4. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  5. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  6. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  7. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  8. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards § 23.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power...

  9. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Information Markings and Placards § 25.1549 Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. For each...

  10. 14 CFR 25.1731 - Powerplant and APU fire detector system: EWIS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Powerplant and APU fire detector system: EWIS. 25.1731 Section 25.1731 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Systems (EWIS) § 25.1731 Powerplant and APU fire detector system: EWIS. (a) EWIS that are part of...

  11. Dioxin in Midland: A Case Study of Press Coverage of Expert Disagreement.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palen, John

    Drawing from articles appearing in several national publications about the dioxin contamination found in Midland, Michigan, in l983, a case study examined how the publications handled the phenomenon of expert disagreement concerning the nature of dioxin. Specifically, it examined how the publications handled expert disagreement about (1) the way…

  12. The Fredegonde (V-57) Quadrangle, Venus: Characterization of the Venus Midlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivanov, M. A.; Head, James W.

    2008-01-01

    The Fredegonde quadrangle (V-57, 50-75degS, 60-120degE) in the southern hemisphere of Venus represents a typical region of midlands (0-2 km above MPR). Midlands are the most widespread topographic province on Venus (approx.80%) and display the richest variety of features. Geological mapping in the V-57 quadrangle provides the possibility of defining and characterizing units that make up a region of midlands and to establish the general sequence of events there and thus address questions about the modes of formation and chronology of midlands on Venus. The map area is in contact with the uplands in the central portion of Lada Terra to the west and the lowlands of Aino Planitia to the northeast. This position also provides a transitional zone between the other two major topographic provinces, similar to that of the Meskhent Tessera (V-3) area. Here we report on the results of our mapping in the V-57 quadrangle, describe the major features, units, and structural assemblages exposed there, and outline the main episodes of geologic history.

  13. 77 FR 26603 - Central Midland Railway Company and Progressive Rail Inc.-Intra-Corporate Family Transaction...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ... Family Transaction Exemption Central Midland Railway Company (CMR) and Progressive Rail Inc. (PGR), both... 1180.2(d)(6) for an intra-corporate family transaction and for reincorporation in a different State...-Corporate Family Transaction Exemption--Airlake Terminal Ry., FD 35168 (STB served Nov. 28, 2008). \\3\\...

  14. The Midlands Consortium Star Schools Project: Final Report, Final Evaluation Report, Final Evaluation Report Appendices.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Midlands Consortium.

    The reports presented in this document describe the results of the first 2 years of the Midlands Consortium Star Schools Project (MCSSP) (October 1, 1988-December 31, 1990). The first report summarizes the major accomplishments of the MCSSP, including: (1) the installation of communications satellites at schools in Alabama, Kansas, Mississippi,…

  15. Exploring Management Strategies to Reduce Cheating in Written Examinations: Case Study of Midlands State University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taderera, Ever; Nyikahadzoi, Loveness; Matamande, Wilson; Mandimika, Elinah

    2014-01-01

    This study was concerned about cheating in written examinations at Midlands State University (MSU). The study revealed that both male and female students cheat in written examination; business studies students cheat more than other faculties, and younger (lower class) students cheat more than (upper class) older students. Factors influencing…

  16. Influence of policy and climate change on air quality within the UK West Midlands plume

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, H. L.; Baker, J.

    2009-04-01

    The photochemical trajectory model (PTM), coupled with the Master Chemical Mechanism (MCM v3.1), was used to assess the contribution of locally emitted anthropogenic and biogenic emissions to ambient secondary pollutant levels recorded in Birmingham, UK during the summer Pollution in the Urban Midlands Atmosphere (PUMA) campaign (9 June - 12 July 1999). The contribution to ozone (and particulate matter) formation were found to be small, 0.0 to 3.2 ppb (0 to 11 %), with an overall average contribution of about 0.35 ppb or 1.0 % of the total ozone during the period. Subsequently, a stationary or slowly advecting boundary layer scenario was used to assess the timescales for which the local emissions within the West Midlands react and impact on secondary pollutant levels within or downwind of the region. Considering averaged biogenic and anthropogenic emissions across the region as representative of the West Midlands plume, the formation of ozone was found to be VOC-limited, and increased emissions of BVOCs were found to overall increase the reactivity of the plume. Future emissions scenarios were then modelled for 2010, 2015 and 2020 taking into account implementation of European legislation and possible climate change. This work reports on the predicted effects of these policy implementations and possible climate changes have on air quality within and downwind of the West Midlands connurbation.

  17. Living and Learning as an International Postgraduate Student at a Midlands University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Busher, Hugh; Lewis, Gareth; Comber, Chris

    2016-01-01

    This paper investigates the views of 20 full-time international postgraduate students, many of whom were Chinese, on living, learning and becoming successful students at one university in a multicultural city in the Midlands of England. The qualitative study built on findings from the International Students' Barometer (ISB) survey for the…

  18. Family Environment and School Achievement: A Cross-Cultural Comparison in a British Midlands Town.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferdman, Bernardo M.; And Others

    An investigation was made of possible ethnic differences in academically relevant environmental variables in order to help account for ethnic differences in achievement (in particular, West Indian underachievement) in a town in the British Midlands. Questionnaires were completed by the parents of 35 West Indian, 33 Indian, and 43 nonminority…

  19. Theorising "Sacred" Space in Educational Contexts: A Case Study of Three English Midlands Sixth Form Colleges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Stephen G.

    2009-01-01

    Sixth Form Colleges (along with the general Further Education sector) in England and Wales have of late begun to appoint new chaplains and to set aside space for quiet, prayer and reflection. This article explores this phenomenon as exhibited by three colleges in the English Midlands, utilising spatial theory and the sociology of "sacred" spaces…

  20. Master Plan for Educational Facilities: Midland Park, Bergen County, New Jersey.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt and Engelhardt, Inc., Purdy Station, NY.

    Midland Park, New Jersey, is a small borough with an estimated population in 1978 of 8,500 persons. The first part of the master plan for educational facilities in the area begins with an overview using maps to illustrate characteristics including its topography, relationship to key population centers and major transportation routes, boundaries,…

  1. Status of commercial fuel cell powerplant system development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warshay, Marvin

    The primary focus is on the development of commercial Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) powerplant systems because the PAFC, which has undergone extensive development, is currently the closest fuel cell system to commercialization. Shorter discussions are included on the high temperature fuel cell systems which are not as mature in their development, such as the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) and the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC). The alkaline and the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell systems, are also included, but their discussions are limited to their prospects for commercial development. Currently, although the alkaline fuel cell continues to be used for important space applications there are no commercial development programs of significant size in the USA and only small efforts outside. The market place for fuel cells and the status of fuel cell programs in the USA receive extensive treatment. The fuel cell efforts outside the USA, especially the large Japanese programs, are also discussed.

  2. Status of commercial fuel cell powerplant system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warshay, Marvin

    1987-01-01

    The primary focus is on the development of commercial Phosphoric Acid Fuel Cell (PAFC) powerplant systems because the PAFC, which has undergone extensive development, is currently the closest fuel cell system to commercialization. Shorter discussions are included on the high temperature fuel cell systems which are not as mature in their development, such as the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) and the Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC). The alkaline and the Solid Polymer Electrolyte (SPE) fuel cell systems, are also included, but their discussions are limited to their prospects for commercial development. Currently, although the alkaline fuel cell continues to be used for important space applications there are no commercial development programs of significant size in the USA and only small efforts outside. The market place for fuel cells and the status of fuel cell programs in the USA receive extensive treatment. The fuel cell efforts outside the USA, especially the large Japanese programs, are also discussed.

  3. Performance retention of the RB211 powerplant in service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astridge, B. L.; Pinder, J. T.

    1981-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms of deterioration is essential in order that features to counteract performance degradation can be built into the basic design of an engine and nacelle. Furthermore, the interpretation must be continued in service for effective feedback to provide modifications which may be necessary in maintaining a satisfactory performance retention program. The in service assessment must be accurate as to magnitude and causes and this requires consideration of: (1) the powerplant as a complete entity, i.e., the engine components and nacelle including the thrust reverser; (2) measurement of performance in flight rather than by sole reliance on the scaling of test cell data to flight conditions (although some correlation should be possible); and (3) the relationship of engine parts condition to overhaul performance and in flight deterioration level of that engine. These aspects are addressed by consideration of the RB211 engine in service in both the Lockheed L1011 Tristar and Boeing 747 aircraft.

  4. Deer Creek Dam, Hydroelectric Powerplant, 868 feet/291 degrees from intersection ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Deer Creek Dam, Hydroelectric Powerplant, 868 feet/291 degrees from intersection of dam complex access road with U.S. Highway 189, 1,340 feet/352 degrees from the dam spillway overpass, Charleston, Wasatch County, UT

  5. NORM in the East Midlands' oil and gas producing region of the UK.

    PubMed

    Garner, Joel; Cairns, James; Read, David

    2015-12-01

    Naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM) is a common feature in North Sea oil and gas production offshore but, to date, has been reported from only one production site onshore in the United Kingdom. The latter, Wytch Farm on the Dorset coast, revealed high activity concentrations of (210)Pb in metallic form but little evidence of radium accumulation. NORM has now been discovered at two further onshore sites in the East Midlands region of the UK. The material has been characterized in terms of its mineralogy, bulk composition and disequilibrium in the natural uranium and thorium series decay chains. In contrast to Wytch Farm, scale and sludge samples from the East Midlands were found to contain elevated levels of radium and radioactive progeny associated with crystalline strontiobarite. The highest (226)Ra and (228)Ra activity concentrations found in scale samples were 132 and 60 Bq/g, with mean values of 86 and 40 Bq/g respectively; somewhat higher than the mean for the North Sea and well above national exemption levels for landfill disposal. The two East Midlands sites exhibited similar levels of radioactivity. Scanning electron microscope imaging shows the presence of tabular, idiomorphic and acicular strontiobarite crystals with elemental mapping confirming that barium and strontium are co-located throughout the scale. Bulk compositional data show a corresponding correlation between barium-strontium concentrations and radium activity. Scales and sludge were dated using the (226)Ra/(210)Pb method giving mean ages of 2.2 and 3.7 years, respectively. The results demonstrate clearly that these NORM deposits, with significant radium activity, can form over a very short period of time. Although the production sites studied here are involved in conventional oil recovery, the findings have direct relevance should hydraulic fracturing for shale gas be pursued in the East Midlands oilfield. PMID:26276535

  6. Comparisons of four alternative powerplant types for future general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wickenheiser, T. J.; Knip, G.; Plencner, R. M.; Strack, W. C.

    1980-01-01

    Recently completed NASA sponsored conceptual studies were culminated in the identification of promising new technologies for future spark ignition, diesel, rotary, and turbine engines. The results of a NASA in-house preliminary assessment study that compares these four powerplants types in several general aviation applications are reported. The evaluation consisted of installing each powerplant type in rubberized aircraft which are sized to accomplish fixed missions. The primary evaluation criteria include projected aircraft cost, total ownership cost, and mission fuel.

  7. Risk-management recommendations for dioxin contamination at Midland, Michigan. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-12-01

    The report sets out risk management recommendations for contamination with 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (2378-TCDD) and other polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (CDDS) and polychlorinated dibenzofurans (CDFs) in and around Midland, Michigan. Included are: (1) a summary of the results of environmental studies undertaken by the U.S. EPA, the State of Michigan, and the Dow Chemical Company, including monitoring of air, soil, surface water, waste water, fish tissue, and garden vegetables for CDDs/CDFs; (2) a summary of possible health risks to Midland area residents resulting from exposures to CDDs/CDFs; (3) actions for minimizing emissions and discharges to the environment from Dow Chemical; (4) recommendations for residents of the Midland area on how to minimize exposures to CDDs/CDFs, and thus the possible health risks associated with these exposures; and (5) additional monitoring programs to delineate long-term trends in emissions and discharges of CDDs/CDFs, and to document changes in environmental contamination for the more significant human exposure routes. A summary of public comments on the Risk Assessment and on the Risk Management Recommendations is presented in an appendix.

  8. External flow radiators for reduced space powerplant temperatures. Technical information report

    SciTech Connect

    Elliott, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Nuclear space powerplants can operate at temperatures below 900 K and use stainless steel construction without a weight penalty if new radiator concepts can achieve radiator weights of 1-3 kg/m{sup 2}. Conventional tube-and-fin radiators weight about 10 kg/m{sup 2} because of heavy tube walls to prevent meteroid puncture. Radiator designs that do not require meteroid protection are possible; they operate with fluids of low vapor pressure that can be exposed directly to space in external-flow radiators. An example is the {open_quotes}rotating disk radiator{close_quotes} in which centrifugal force drives a liquid film radially outward across a thin rotating metal disk; meteroid punctures cause no loss of fluid other than from evaporation, which can be small. An even lighter concept is the liquid drop radiator in which heat is radiated directly from moving liquid drops. Such radiator concepts look practical, and they may be much easier to develop than the high-temperature, refractory-metal power systems necessitated by conventional radiators.

  9. Potential Role of Land Use and Land Cover Information in Powerplant Siting: Example of Three Mile Island

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wray, J. R.

    1982-01-01

    Selecting a site for a nuclear powerplant can be helped by digitizing land use and land cover data, population data, and other pertinent data sets, and then placing them in a geographic information system. Such a system begins with a set of standardized maps for location reference and then provides for retrieval and analysis of spatial data keyed to the maps. This makes possible thematic mapping by computer, or interactive visual display for decisionmaking. It also permits correlating land use area measurements with census and other data (such as fallout dosages), and the updating of all data sets. The system is thus a tool for dealing with resource management problems and for analyzing the interaction between people and their environment. An explanation of a computer-plotted map of land use and cover for Three Mile Island and vicinity is given.

  10. Implications of environmental externalities assessments for solar thermal powerplants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, A. D.; Baechler, M. C.

    1991-03-01

    Externalities are those impacts of one activity on other activities that are not priced in the marketplace. An externality is said to exist when two conditions hold: (1) the utility or operations of one economic agent, A, include nonmonetary variables whose values are chosen by another economic agent, B, without regard to the effects on A, and (2) B does not pay A compensation equal to the incremental costs inflicted on A. Electricity generation involves a wide range of potential and actual environmental impacts. Legislative, permitting, and regulatory requirements directly or indirectly control certain environmental impacts, implicitly causing them to become internalized in the cost of electricity generation. Electricity generation, however, often produces residual environmental impacts that meet the definition of an externality. Mechanisms have been developed by several states to include the costs associated with externalities in the cost-effectiveness analyses of new powerplants. This paper examines these costs for solar thermal plants and applies two states' scoring methodologies to estimate how including externalities would affect the levelized costs of power from a solar plant in the Pacific Northwest. It concludes that including externalities in the economics can reduce the difference between the levelized cost of a coal and solar plant by between 0.74 and 2.42 cents/kWh.

  11. 10Be depth profile dating in the Swiss Midlands: deposition ages versus erosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Zech, Roland; Haghipour, Negar; Terrizzano, Carla; Christl, Marcus; Gnägi, Christian; Veit, Heinz; Ivy-Ochs, Susan

    2015-04-01

    During the Pleistocene, glaciers advanced repeatedly from the Alps into the Swiss Midlands. The exact extents and timing are still under debate, even for the last glacial advances. Decalcification depths, for example, increase from west to east in the western Swiss Midlands and have been interpreted to indicate that the Rhone glacier may have been less extensive during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 20 ka than assumed so far [1]. In an attempt to provide more quantitative age control, we applied 10Be depth profile dating [2] on till at five locations in the western part of Switzerland. Two of them lie outside the assumed LGM extent of the Rhone glacier (Niederbuchsiten, St.Urban), two inside the extent of the LGM Rhone glacier (Steinhof, Deisswil) and one profile was taken from the Berne stade (LGM) of the Aare glacier [3]. All surface concentrations are relatively low and indicate massive erosion. Without constrains for age and erosion, depth profile dating yields ages between roughly 15 ka up to more than 1 Ma for the profiles in St. Urban, Niederbuchsiten and Deisswil whereas the profiles in Steinhof and Bern yields only last glacial ages. The wide range of possible exposure ages illustrates, that independent estimates for erosion would be needed to precisely determine the deposition ages of the investigated tills. However, at this point, we interpret the best model fits to our depth profile concentrations as tentative verification of the assumed LGM extent [3]. The spatial patterns of decalcification depths and soil development in the Swiss Midlands deserves further evaluation. [1] Bitterli et al. (2011) Geologischer Atlas der Schweiz, Blatt 1108, Swisstopo [2] Hidy et al. (2010) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 11, doi:10.1029/2010GC003084 . [3] Bini et al. (2009) Switzerland during the Last Glacial Maximum, Swisstopo

  12. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-03-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  13. Conceptual design study of a coal gasification combined-cycle powerplant for industrial cogeneration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, H. S.; Nelson, S. G.; Straight, H. F.; Subramaniam, T. K.; Winklepleck, R. G.

    1981-01-01

    A conceptual design study was conducted to assess technical feasibility, environmental characteristics, and economics of coal gasification. The feasibility of a coal gasification combined cycle cogeneration powerplant was examined in response to energy needs and to national policy aimed at decreasing dependence on oil and natural gas. The powerplant provides the steam heating and baseload electrical requirements while serving as a prototype for industrial cogeneration and a modular building block for utility applications. The following topics are discussed: (1) screening of candidate gasification, sulfur removal and power conversion components; (2) definition of a reference system; (3) quantification of plant emissions and waste streams; (4) estimates of capital and operating costs; and (5) a procurement and construction schedule. It is concluded that the proposed powerplant is technically feasible and environmentally superior.

  14. A reliability and mass perspective of SP-100 Stirling cycle lunar-base powerplant designs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomfield, Harvey S.

    1991-01-01

    The purpose was to obtain reliability and mass perspectives on selection of space power system conceptual designs based on SP-100 reactor and Stirling cycle power-generation subsystems. The approach taken was to: (1) develop a criterion for an acceptable overall reliability risk as a function of the expected range of emerging technology subsystem unit reliabilities; (2) conduct reliability and mass analyses for a diverse matrix of 800-kWe lunar-base design configurations employing single and multiple powerplants with both full and partial subsystem redundancy combinations; and (3) derive reliability and mass perspectives on selection of conceptual design configurations that meet an acceptable reliability criterion with the minimum system mass increase relative to reference powerplant design. The developed perspectives provided valuable insight into the considerations required to identify and characterize high-reliability and low-mass lunar-base powerplant conceptual design.

  15. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. (a) The following is a...

  16. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. (a) The following is a...

  17. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF... reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. (a) The following is a...

  18. 10 CFR 504.8 - Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.8 Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... use of petroleum or natural gas in such powerplant in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary... feasible for the unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and coal or another alternate fuel as...

  19. 10 CFR 504.8 - Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.8 Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... use of petroleum or natural gas in such powerplant in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary... feasible for the unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and coal or another alternate fuel as...

  20. 10 CFR 504.8 - Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.8 Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... use of petroleum or natural gas in such powerplant in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary... feasible for the unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and coal or another alternate fuel as...

  1. 10 CFR 504.8 - Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.8 Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... use of petroleum or natural gas in such powerplant in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary... feasible for the unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and coal or another alternate fuel as...

  2. 10 CFR 504.8 - Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-certifying powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.8 Prohibitions against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... use of petroleum or natural gas in such powerplant in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary... feasible for the unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and coal or another alternate fuel as...

  3. Exposure of thermoelectric power-plant workers to volatile organic compounds from fuel oil: genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in buccal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Garcia, P V; Linhares, D; Amaral, A F S; Rodrigues, A S

    2012-09-18

    Thermoelectric power-plant workers are constantly exposed to high levels of potentially genotoxic gaseous substances, such as volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from the combustion of fuel oil or the processing of naphtha. The aim of the present study was to estimate the association between such occupational exposure and the frequency of micronucleated cells and cells with other nuclear anomalies. Buccal epithelial cells were collected from a total of 44 power-plant workers (exposed group) and 47 administrative workers (non-exposed group), and examined for the frequency of micronucleated cells (MNC) and of cells with other nuclear anomalies (ONA: pyknosis, karyolysis, and karyorrhexis) by means of the micronucleus assay. The frequencies of MNC and ONA per 1000 cells in the exposed group (1.8‰ and 82.4‰, respectively) were significantly higher than in the non-exposed group (0.2‰ and 58.3‰, respectively). The exposed group had a twelve-fold increase in risk for formation of MNC compared with non-exposed individuals (RR=12.1; 95% CI, 5.0-29.2; P<0.001). The confounding factors analyzed (age, smoking status, alcohol consumption, and mouthwash use) did not show any significant association with the frequency of MNC or ONA. The findings of this study show that workers from power plants exposed to VOCs have a significantly elevated risk for DNA damage. Therefore, bio-monitoring of DNA damage is recommended for this group of workers. PMID:22640882

  4. 76 FR 28019 - Gregory R. Swecker, Beverly F. Swecker v. Midland Power Cooperative, State of Iowa; Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-13

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Gregory R. Swecker, Beverly F. Swecker v. Midland Power Cooperative, State... Public Utility Regulatory Policies Act of 1978 (PURPA),\\1\\ Gregory R. Swecker and Beverly F. Swecker... Court. \\1\\ 16 U.S.C. 824a-3(h)(2) (2006). Any person desiring to intervene or to protest this...

  5. 78 FR 15714 - Welch Motel, Inc., Welch Oil, Inc., Boondocks USA Truck Stop, Bob Welch v. Midland Power...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Welch Motel, Inc., Welch Oil, Inc., Boondocks USA Truck Stop, Bob Welch v. Midland Power Cooperative, Corn Belt Power Cooperative; Notice of Complaint Take notice that on March 4, 2013, pursuant to section...

  6. 10 CFR 503.11 - Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants. 503.11 Section 503.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.11 Alternative sites—general requirement...

  7. 10 CFR 503.11 - Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants. 503.11 Section 503.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.11 Alternative sites—general requirement...

  8. 10 CFR 503.11 - Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants. 503.11 Section 503.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.11 Alternative sites—general requirement...

  9. 10 CFR 503.11 - Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants. 503.11 Section 503.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.11 Alternative sites—general requirement...

  10. 10 CFR 503.11 - Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Alternative sites-general requirement for permanent exemptions for new powerplants. 503.11 Section 503.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.11 Alternative sites—general requirement...

  11. Evaluation of nonpotable ground water in the desert area of southeastern California for powerplant cooling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Steinemann, Anne C.

    1989-01-01

    Powerplant siting is dependent upon many factors; in southern California the prevailing physical constraint is water availability. Increasing land-use and other environmental concerns preclude further sites along the coast. A review of available hydrologic data was made of 142 ground-water basins in the southeast California desert area to ascertain if any could be feasible sources of nonpotable powerplant cooling water. Feasibility implies the capacity to sustain a typical 1,000-megawatt electrical-power generating plant for 30 years with an ample supply of ground water for cooling. Of the 142 basins reviewed, 5 met or exceeded established hydrologic criteria for supplying the water demands of a typical powerplant. These basins are: (1) middle Amargosa valley, (2) Soda Lake valley, (3) Caves Canyon valley, (4) Chuckwalla Valley, and (5) Calzona-Vidal Valley. Geohydrologic evaluations of these five basins assessed the occurrence and suitability of ground water and effects of long-term pumping. An additional six basins met or exceeded hydrologic criteria, with qualifications, for providing powerplant cooling water. The remaining 131 basins either did not meet the criteria, or available data were insufficient to determine if the basins would meet the criteria.

  12. 10 CFR 503.6 - Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations. 503.6 Section 503.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General... examine. (2) The cost of using an alternate fuel as a primary energy source will be deemed...

  13. 10 CFR 503.6 - Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Cost calculations for new powerplants and installations. 503.6 Section 503.6 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General... examine. (2) The cost of using an alternate fuel as a primary energy source will be deemed...

  14. 14 CFR 25.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 25.1549 Section 25.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: TRANSPORT CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and Information Markings and Placards §...

  15. 14 CFR 23.1549 - Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Powerplant and auxiliary power unit instruments. 23.1549 Section 23.1549 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: NORMAL, UTILITY, ACROBATIC, AND COMMUTER CATEGORY AIRPLANES Operating Limitations and...

  16. Empirical expressions for estimating length and weight of axial-flow components of VTOL powerplants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sagerser, D. A.; Lieblein, S.; Krebs, R. P.

    1971-01-01

    Simplified equations are presented for estimating the length and weight of major powerplant components of VTOL aircraft. The equations were developed from correlations of lift and cruise engine data. Components involved include fan, fan duct, compressor, combustor, turbine, structure, and accessories. Comparisons of actual and calculated total engine weights are included for several representative engines.

  17. Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Powerplants Developed and Tested for Exploration Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Pham, Nang T.

    2005-06-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has received major attention for terrestrial applications, such as the automotive and residential markets, for the past 20 years. This attention has significantly advanced the maturity of the technology, resulting in ever more compact, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive PEMFC designs. In comparison to the terrestrial operating environment, the space operating environment is much more demanding. Microgravity to high-gravity loads and the need to use pure oxygen (rather than air) as the fuel cell oxidizer place more stringent demands on PEMFC technology. NASA and its partners from industry are leveraging terrestrial PEMFC advancements by conducting parallel space technology development for future exploration missions. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Center, and NASA Kennedy Space Center recently completed the first phase of a PEMFC powerplant development effort for exploration missions. The industry partners for this phase of the development effort were ElectroChem, Inc., and Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc. Under contract to Glenn, both of these industry partners successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a breadboard PEMFC powerplant in the 1- to 5-kW power range. These powerplants were based on existing company-proprietary fuel cell stack designs, combined with off-the-shelf components, which formed the balance of the powerplant design. Subsequent to the contractor development efforts, both powerplants were independently tested at Johnson to verify operational and performance characteristics, and to determine suitability for further technology development in the second phase of the NASA-led effort. Following the independent NASA testing, Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., was selected to develop an engineering model PEMFC powerplant. This effort was initiated by the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program Office in 2001; it transitioned to the Next Generation Launch

  18. Proton-Exchange-Membrane Fuel Cell Powerplants Developed and Tested for Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoberecht, Mark A.; Pham, Nang T.

    2005-01-01

    Proton-exchange-membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) technology has received major attention for terrestrial applications, such as the automotive and residential markets, for the past 20 years. This attention has significantly advanced the maturity of the technology, resulting in ever more compact, efficient, reliable, and inexpensive PEMFC designs. In comparison to the terrestrial operating environment, the space operating environment is much more demanding. Microgravity to high-gravity loads and the need to use pure oxygen (rather than air) as the fuel cell oxidizer place more stringent demands on PEMFC technology. NASA and its partners from industry are leveraging terrestrial PEMFC advancements by conducting parallel space technology development for future exploration missions. A team from the NASA Glenn Research Center, NASA Johnson Space Center, and NASA Kennedy Space Center recently completed the first phase of a PEMFC powerplant development effort for exploration missions. The industry partners for this phase of the development effort were ElectroChem, Inc., and Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc. Under contract to Glenn, both of these industry partners successfully designed, fabricated, and tested a breadboard PEMFC powerplant in the 1- to 5-kW power range. These powerplants were based on existing company-proprietary fuel cell stack designs, combined with off-the-shelf components, which formed the balance of the powerplant design. Subsequent to the contractor development efforts, both powerplants were independently tested at Johnson to verify operational and performance characteristics, and to determine suitability for further technology development in the second phase of the NASA-led effort. Following the independent NASA testing, Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., was selected to develop an engineering model PEMFC powerplant. This effort was initiated by the 2nd Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program Office in 2001; it transitioned to the Next Generation Launch

  19. Characterization of bedded salt for storage caverns -- A case study from the Midland Basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Hovorka, Susan D.; Nava, Robin

    2000-06-13

    The geometry of Permian bedding salt in the Midland Basin is a product of interaction between depositional facies and postdepositional modification by salt dissolution. Mapping high-frequency cycle patterns in cross section and map view using wireline logs documents the salt geometry. Geologically based interpretation of depositional and dissolution processes provides a powerful tool for mapping and geometry of salt to assess the suitability of sites for development of solution-mined storage caverns. In addition, this process-based description of salt geometry complements existing data about the evolution of one of the best-known sedimentary basins in the world, and can serve as a genetic model to assist in interpreting other salts.

  20. Extremely eroded or incredibly young - 10Be depth profile dating of moraines in the Swiss Midlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wüthrich, Lorenz; Zech, Roland; Haghipour, Negar; Gnägi, Christian; Christl, Markus; Ivy-Ochs, Susan; Veit, Heinz

    2014-05-01

    During the Pleistocene, glaciers advanced repeatedly from the Alps into the Swiss Midlands. The exact extent and timing are still under debate, even for the last glacial advances. Decalcification depths, for example, increase from west to east in the western Swiss Midlands and have been interpreted to indicate that the Valais (Rhone) glacier may have been less extensive during the global Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) at 20 ka than assumed so far [1]. In an attempt to provide more quantitative age control, we applied 10Be depth profile dating [2] on moraines at two locations. Steinhof has previously been dated to the global LGM based on exposure ages from four boulders [3], and Niederbuchsiten presumably lies outside the last glacial ice extent [1]. The 10Be concentrations at both sites decrease consistently with depth, but are very similar. Assuming only a few decimeters of erosion since moraine deposition, we obtain apparent exposure ages of ~20 ka. Niederbuchsiten would thus be unexpectedly young, implying a much more extensive extent of the LGM glacier than assumed so far. Alternatively, if the till at Niederbuchsiten was deposited during or before the penultimate glaciation (>130 ka), the surprisingly low 10Be concentrations indicate several meters of erosion during the last glacial cycle and/or the Holocene, which seems to be at odds with the deep and intensive soil formation. References: [1] Bitterli et al. (2011) Geologischer Atlas der Schweiz, Blatt 1108. [2] Hidy et al. (2010) Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst. 11, doi:10.1029/2010GC003084. [3] Ivy- Ochs et al. (2004) Ecl. Geol. Helv. 97, 47-55.

  1. Participation Motivation In Martial Artists In The West Midlands Region Of England

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Gareth W.; Mackay, Ken S.; Peters, Derek M.

    2006-01-01

    The objectives were to identify the participation motivations and the perceived importance of certain participation factors in martial artists in the West Midlands, England, UK. A 28-item adapted version of the Participation Motivation Questionnaire with additional demographic questions was distributed to 30 martial arts clubs in the West Midlands region. Eight questions that assessed the perceived importance for participation of progression through grades, learning self defence skills, technical ability of instructors, cost of participating, development of confidence, underpinning philosophy and instructional style were included. Seventy-five questionnaires were returned from a total of 11 clubs from across representing practitioners in Tai Chi, Karate, Kung fu, Aikido, Jeet Kune Do, British Free Fighting, Taekwon-Do and Jujitsu. Results indicated that the rank order in terms of participation motives was: 1-Affiliation; 2-Friendship; 3-Fitness; 4-Reward/status; 5-Competition; 6-Situational and 7-Skill development. Participants who trained for more than 4 hours per week placed greater importance on the underpinning philosophy of the martial art. Findings suggest that whilst there is a gender discrepancy in participation level, once engaged, females were equally committed to weekly training. The 'style' of the instructor is of paramount importance for enhancing student motivation to participate. High volume practitioners would appear to be fully immersed in the holistic appreciation of the martial art through increased value placed on its underpinning philosophy. Key Points Whilst there is a gender discrepancy in participation level, once engaged, females were equally committed to weekly training. The four most important participation motivations evident were 'Affiliation', 'Fitness', 'Skill Development' and 'Friendship'. The three least influential motives were 'Rewards/status; 'Situational' and 'Competition'. “ There were no significant gender or experience

  2. Apparatus and method for suppressing sound in a gas turbine engine powerplant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wynosky, Thomas A. (Inventor); Mischke, Robert J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A method and apparatus for suppressing jet noise in a gas turbine engine powerplant 10 is disclosed. Various construction details are developed for providing sound suppression at sea level take-off operative conditions and not providing sound suppression at cruise operative conditions. In one embodiment, the powerplant 10 has a lobed mixer 152 between a primary flowpath 44 and a second flowpath 46, a diffusion region downstream of the lobed mixer region (first mixing region 76), and a deployable ejector/mixer 176 in the diffusion region which forms a second mixing region 78 having a diffusion flowpath 72 downstream of the ejector/mixer and sound absorbing structure 18 bounding the flowpath throughout the diffusion region. The method includes deploying the ejector/mixer 176 at take-off and stowing the ejector/mixer at cruise.

  3. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in COAL IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2004-09-30

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, has been re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for Coal IGCC powerplants. The new program has been re-titled as ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants'' to better match the new scope. This technical progress report summarizes the work accomplished in the reporting period April 1, 2004 to August 31, 2004 on the revised Re-Directed and De-Scoped program activity. The program Tasks are: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: This first materials task has been refocused to address Coal IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials use in gas turbines and remains in the program. This task will screen material performance and quantify the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in Coal IGCC applications. The materials of interest will include those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: This second task develops and demonstrates new sensor technologies to determine the in-service health of advanced technology Coal IGCC powerplants, and remains in the program with a reduced scope. Its focus is now on only two critical sensor need areas for advanced Coal IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor for detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation, and a Fuel Heating Value Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware.

  4. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect

    Simmons, Mary Ann; Johnson, Robert L.; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2004-01-01

    This report documents the third year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  5. Strobe Light Deterrent Efficacy Test and Fish Behavior Determination at Grand Coulee Dam Third Powerplant Forebay

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert L.; Simmons, Mary Ann; McKinstry, Craig A.; Simmons, Carver S.; Cook, Chris B.; Brown, Richard S.; Tano, Daniel K.; Thorsten, Susan L.; Faber, Derrek M.; Lecaire, Richard; Francis, Stephen

    2005-02-25

    This report documents the fourth year of a four-year study to assess the efficacy of a prototype strobe light system to elicit a negative phototactic response in kokanee salmon (Oncorhynchus nerka) and rainbow trout (O. mykiss) in the forebay to the third powerplant at Grand Coulee Dam. This work was conducted for the Bonneville Power Administration, U.S. Department of Energy, by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in conjunction with the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation (Colville Confederated Tribes).

  6. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Benchmark Tests in Three Spatial Orientations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the aging alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. This test effort marks the final phase of a 5-yr development program that began under the Second Generation Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV) Program, transitioned into the Next Generation Launch Technologies (NGLT) Program, and continued under Constellation Systems in the Exploration Technology Development Program. Initially, the engineering model (EM) powerplant was evaluated with respect to its performance as compared to acceptance tests carried out at the manufacturer. This was to determine the sensitivity of the powerplant performance to changes in test environment. In addition, a series of tests were performed with the powerplant in the original standard orientation. This report details the continuing EM benchmark test results in three spatial orientations as well as extended duration testing in the mission profile test. The results from these tests verify the applicability of PEM fuel cells for future NASA missions. The specifics of these different tests are described in the following sections.

  7. Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth A. Yackly

    2005-12-01

    The ''Enabling & Information Technology To Increase RAM for Advanced Powerplants'' program, by DOE request, was re-directed, de-scoped to two tasks, shortened to a 2-year period of performance, and refocused to develop, validate and accelerate the commercial use of enabling materials technologies and sensors for coal/IGCC powerplants. The new program was re-titled ''Enabling Technology for Monitoring & Predicting Gas Turbine Health & Performance in IGCC Powerplants''. This final report summarizes the work accomplished from March 1, 2003 to March 31, 2004 on the four original tasks, and the work accomplished from April 1, 2004 to July 30, 2005 on the two re-directed tasks. The program Tasks are summarized below: Task 1--IGCC Environmental Impact on high Temperature Materials: The first task was refocused to address IGCC environmental impacts on high temperature materials used in gas turbines. This task screened material performance and quantified the effects of high temperature erosion and corrosion of hot gas path materials in coal/IGCC applications. The materials of interest included those in current service as well as advanced, high-performance alloys and coatings. Task 2--Material In-Service Health Monitoring: The second task was reduced in scope to demonstrate new technologies to determine the inservice health of advanced technology coal/IGCC powerplants. The task focused on two critical sensing needs for advanced coal/IGCC gas turbines: (1) Fuel Quality Sensor to rapidly determine the fuel heating value for more precise control of the gas turbine, and detection of fuel impurities that could lead to rapid component degradation. (2) Infra-Red Pyrometer to continuously measure the temperature of gas turbine buckets, nozzles, and combustor hardware. Task 3--Advanced Methods for Combustion Monitoring and Control: The third task was originally to develop and validate advanced monitoring and control methods for coal/IGCC gas turbine combustion systems. This task was

  8. Sedimentology and genetic stratigraphy of Dean and Spraberry Formations (Permian), Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Handford, C.R.

    1981-09-01

    The Spraberry trend of west Texas, once known as the world's largest uneconomic oil field, will undoubtedly become an increasingly important objective for the development of enhanced oil recovery techniques in fine-grained, low-permeability, low-pressure reservoirs. As the trend expands, facies and stratigraphic data should be integrated into exploration strategies. The Spraberry and Dean Formations may be divided into three genetic sequences, each consisting of several hundred feet of interbedded shale and carbonate overlain by a roughly equal amount of sandstone and siltstone. These sequences record episodes of shelf-margin progradation, deep-water resedimentation of shelf-derived carbonate debris, followed by influxes of terrigenous clastics into the basin by way of feeder channels or submarine canyons, and suspension settling of fine-grained sediment from the water column. Four lithofacies comprise the terrigenous clastics of the Spraberry and Dean Fomations: (1) cross-laminated, massive, and parallel-laminated sandstone, (2) laminated siltstone, (3) bioturbated siltstone, and (4) black, organic-rich shale. Carbonate lithofacies occur mostly in the form of thin-bedded turbidites, slump, and debris-flow deposits. Terrigenous clastic rocks display facies sequences, isopach patterns, and sedimentary structures suggestive of deposition from turbidity currents, and long-lived saline density underflow and interflow currents. Clastic isopach patterns reflect an overall southward thinning of clastics in the Midland basin. Channelized flow and suspension settling were responsible for the formation of elongate fan-shaped accumulations of clastic sediments.

  9. Reproductive success of three passerine species exposed to dioxin-like compounds near Midland, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Fredricks, Timothy B; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Seston, Rita M; Coefield, Sarah J; Glaspie, Cassandra N; Tazelaar, Dustin L; Kay, Denise P; Newsted, John L; Giesy, John P

    2012-05-01

    Nests of three passerine birds, house wren (HOWR), tree swallow (TRES), and eastern bluebird (EABL) were monitored daily (2005-2007) at study areas (SAs) downstream of Midland, Michigan where soil and sediment concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) were significantly greater than the regional background concentrations and upstream reference areas (RAs). Similarly, TRES research conducted at sites contaminated with dioxin-like compounds indicated that concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and PCDFs, expressed as ΣPCDD/DFs and 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents observed in the diet and eggs of these three species would be predicted to cause significant effects on reproduction. However, site-specific reproductive parameters including hatching success and fledging success at downstream SAs were similar to or greater than those at upstream RAs. Specifically, hatching success was not significantly different among years, species, locations, or between early and late nesting attempts. Of all initiated clutches, 66% (n = 427), 73% (n = 245), and 64% (n = 122) successfully fledged at least one nestling for HOWR, TRES, and EABL, respectively. Overall reproductive performance was similar between SAs and RAs. The reason for these unexpected results is consistent with the fact that there are species-specific and congener-specific differences in sensitivities to the effects of aryl hydrocarbon receptor agonists. PMID:22392542

  10. Use of traditional veterinary medicine in Nhema communal area of the Midlands province, Zimbabwe.

    PubMed

    Maroyi, Alfred

    2012-01-01

    This study documents the use of ethno-veterinary medicine to treat livestock in Nhema communal area in the Midlands province of Zimbabwe. This study employed oral interviews and detailed discussions with 69 smallholder farmers and 3 traditional healers. The local people use 23 plant species belonging to 16 families as ethno-veterinary remedies. Two plant families were particularly frequent in usage: Fabaceae and Solanaceae, while the most utilized plant species were Aloe chabaudii (UV = 0.69), Aloe greatheadii (UV = 0.65), Adenium multiflorum (UV = 0.63), Vernonia amygdalina (UV = 0.61), Nicotiana tabacum (UV = 56), Solanum lycopersicum (UV = 55), Capsicum annum (UV = 53) and Pouzolzia hypoleuca (UV = 51). Fourteen animal conditions were identified in the surveyed area. The major and most common animal diseases were tick-borne diseases, eye problems, retained afterbirth, fleas, lice and diarrhoea. The majority of ethno-veterinary remedies (78%) were collected from the wild, with respondents mostly using herbs (11 species, 48%), followed by 6 trees (26%), 4 shrubs (17%), and 2 climbers (9%). The most frequently used plant parts were leaves (51%), followed by bark (16%), roots (13%) and fruits (10%). These remedies were mostly administered as decoctions or infusions of single plants. These plants were used not only as alternatives to conventional veterinary drugs but also because in certain diseases they were thought to be more efficacious. In view of many and widespread uses of wild plants as ethnoveterinary remedies, further research into their pharmacological activities may prove worthwhile. PMID:23983361

  11. Architectural analysis of a Triassic fluvial system: The Sherwood Sandstone of the East Midlands Shelf, UK

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wakefield, Oliver J. W.; Hough, Edward; Peatfield, Alex W.

    2015-08-01

    The Sherwood Sandstone Group of the northeast UK (East Midlands Shelf) has hitherto never been studied in detail to ascertain its palaeoenvironment of deposition, largely because it is poorly exposed. As such, this paper aims to provide the first modern sedimentological interpretation of the Sherwood Sandstone in the east of England based on a field outcrop at the disused quarry at Styrrup. This is in stark contrast to the western parts of England where the Sherwood Sandstone is well exposed and offshore in the North Sea Basin where it is represented by a substantial library of core material where it is also relatively well understood. The outcrop at Styrrup Quarry allows contrasts to be made with the style and expression of the Sherwood Sandstone between eastern and western England. Specifically, this highlights differences around the variation in fluvial discharge (between lowstand and highstand) and the absence of aeolian facies types. It is interpreted that these differences relate to discharge variations between ephemeral and perennial systems with a perennial model proposed for Styrrup Quarry. This model draws upon inferences of additional water input from more local areas, likely topographic uplands of the London-Brabant and Pennine Highs which supplement the primary source of the Variscan Mountains in France with additional water and sediment.

  12. Transverse Eskers in the Irish Midlands: Implications for Meltwater Pathways in Ice Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, Cathy

    2013-04-01

    Large eskers in the Irish Midlands, formed during the last Glacial Termination (MIS 2) are thought to have formed time-transgressively in subglacial conduits feeding to a subaqueous margin, where conduit orientation was controlled by the ice sheet surface gradient in this area, and parallels ice flow direction as indicated by drumlinoid features. However, three eskers systems (the Ballyduff Esker, Kilcormac Esker and Streamstown Esker) have sections with orientations at up to 90 degrees to the dominant ridge orientation, over distances of up to 5km. These shifts in orientation are associated with a change in esker morphology from one or two continuous ridges to anabranching and fragmented ridges and small kames. Exposures in the Ballyduff and Kilcormac Eskers indicate water flow was both parallel and perpendicular to ridge orientation during formation, and that deposition occurred en- or supra-glacially. Deposition of the Streamstown ridges occurred subglacially. In all cases the shift in ridge orientation indicates the diversion of meltwater drainage into transverse crevasse systems, reflecting a temporary phase of extensional ice flow.

  13. Establish and Operate a Geologic Core and Sample Repository in Midland, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Tyler, Noel

    2000-08-14

    Shell Oil Company donated its proprietary core and sample repository to the Bureau of Economic Geology, The University of Texas at Austin, in 1994. This collection of geologic materials is composed of 325,000 boxes of rocks and samples housed in a 32,700-ft{sup 2} warehouse in Midland, Texas. The material includes cores from more than 3,000 wells (75,000 boxes) and cuttings from more than 90,000 wells (260,000 boxes). In addition to the warehouse space, the repository consists of layout rooms, a processing room, and office space. The U.S. Department of Energy provided $375,000 under Grant Number DE-FG22-94BC14854 for organizing the collection, staffing the facility, and making the material available to the public for the first 5 years of operation. Shell Oil Company provided an endowment of $1.3 million to cover the cost of operating the facility after the fifth year of operation.

  14. Chlorine-36 in groundwater as a palaeoclimatic indicator: the East Midlands Triassic sandstone aquifer (UK)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, J. N.; Edmunds, W. M.; Smedley, P. L.; Fontes, J.-Ch.; Fifield, L. K.; Allan, G. L.

    1994-03-01

    The 36Cl contents of groundwaters from the East Midlands Triassic sandstone have been used to deduce rainfall, its chloride content and evapotranspiration during the Late Pleistocene. At this time, the regional precipitation and evapotranspiration would have been reduced relative to the modern and Holocene climate. It is estimated that the infiltration was reduced by about 40 mm · a -1. The method for evaluation of these palaeoclimatic parameters is dependent upon the major Cl - source being a marine aerosol fall-out. This is the general case, but groundwater east of the exploited zone of the aquifer contains chloride which is derived from saline formation water, with a marine Cl -Br/ - ratio, and in equilibrium with the in situ neutron flux. The fall-out of cosmogenic 36Cl at the geomagnetic latitude 56.2°N is evaluated as 30.6 atoms m -2s -1 and is significantly greater than that estimated from the theoretical fall-out curve of Bentley et al. [1]. The 'bomb peak' of 36Cl remains entirely within the unconfined zone of the aquifer. The assessment of groundwater residence time from the 36Cl chronometer is shown to be impossible for this aquifer.

  15. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan

    SciTech Connect

    Zellmer, S.D. ); Rastorfer, J.R. . Dept. of Biological Sciences ANL Van Dyke, G.D. . Dept. of Biology)

    1991-07-01

    Implementation of recent federal and state regulations promulgated to protect wetlands makes information on effects of gas pipeline rights-of-way (ROWs) in wetlands essential to the gas pipeline industry. This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth forested wetland sites mapped as Lenawee soils, one mature and one subjected to recent selective logging, were selected in Midland County, Michigan. Changes in the adjacent forest and successional development on the ROW are being documented. Cover-class estimates are being made for understory and ROW plant species using 1 {times}1-m quadrats. Counts are also being made for all woody species with stems < 2 cm in diameter at breast height (dbh) in the same plots used for cover-class estimates. Individual stem diameters and species counts are being recorded for all woody understory and overstory plants with stems {ge}2 cm dbh in 10 {times} 10-m plots. Although analyses of the data have not been completed, preliminary analyses indicate that some destruction of vegetation at the ROW forest edge may have been avoidable during pipeline construction. Rapid regrowth of many native wetland plant species on the ROW occurred because remnants of native vegetation and soil-bearing propagules of existing species survived on the ROW after pipeline construction and seeding operations. 91 refs., 11 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. 20 years of local ecological public health: the experience of Sandwell in the English West Midlands.

    PubMed

    Middleton, J; Saunders, P

    2015-10-01

    A long-term picture of the economy and living conditions of Sandwell, an area of England's industrial Midlands, is presented to explore how these underpin and influence its 'health economy'. Sandwell's experience illustrates how public health actors have to tackle industrial and other factors which shape human health. The paper explores how the ecological public health perspective has helped inform the modern public health task in an area such as Sandwell. Some lessons are offered, including: the need to understand the specific economic legacy of a local area (in Sandwell, principally one of polluting and then declining manufacturing industries); the continuing story of infection control; the complexity of tackling poor diet; and the importance of the built environment and town planning. Faced by such challenges, local public health action represents, in effect, an attempt to transcend unecological public health. This can be exciting, innovative and ultimately successful; but it also means being prepared to face daunting and politically charged obstacles and superior national or international forces over which local public health practitioners conventionally have little leverage. The paper argues that, in such unequal power circumstances, public health practitioners have to draw on the creativity within the local population and build a facilitative alliance of formal and informal pro-public health actors. Despite the confounding odds and ever-present stretched resources, the Sandwell experience gives grounds for optimism, being a story of constant creativity and effective local alliances. PMID:26390950

  17. Design of power-plant installations pressure-loss characteristics of duct components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, John R

    1944-01-01

    A correlation of what are believed to be the most reliable data available on duct components of aircraft power-plant installations is presented. The information is given in a convenient form and is offered as an aid in designing duct systems and, subject to certain qualifications, as a guide in estimating their performance. The design and performance data include those for straight ducts; simple bends of square, circular, and elliptical cross sections; compound bends; diverging and converging bends; vaned bends; diffusers; branch ducts; internal inlets; and an angular placement of heat exchangers. Examples are included to illustrate methods of applying these data in analyzing duct systems. (author)

  18. Comparison of Two U.S. Power-Plant Carbon Dioxide Emissions Datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ackerman, K. V.; Sundquist, E. T.

    2006-12-01

    U.S. electric generating facilities account for 8-9 percent of global fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. Because estimates of fossil-fuel consumption and CO2 emissions are recorded at each power-plant point source, U.S. power-plant CO2 emissions may be the most thoroughly monitored globally significant source of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions. We examined two datasets for the years 1998-2000: (1) the Department of Energy/Energy Information Administration (EIA) dataset of emissions calculated from fuel data contained in the EIA electricity database files, and (2) eGRID (Emissions and Generation Resource Integrated Database), a publicly available database generated by the Environmental Protection Agency. We compared the eGRID and EIA estimates of CO2 emissions for electricity generation at power plants within the conterminous U.S. at two levels: (1) estimates for individual power-plant emissions, which allowed analysis of differences due to plant listings, calculation methods, and measurement methods; and (2) estimated conterminous U.S. totals for power-plant emissions, which allowed analysis of the aggregated effects of these individual plant differences, and assessment of the aggregated differences in the context of previously published uncertainty estimates. Comparison of data for individual plants, after removing outliers, shows the average difference (absolute value) between eGRID and EIA estimates for individual plants to be approximately 12 percent, relative to the means of the paired estimates. Systematic differences are apparent in the eGRID and EIA reporting of emissions from combined heat and power plants. Additional differences between the eGRID and EIA datasets can be attributed to the fact that most of the emissions from the largest plants are derived from a Continuous Emissions Monitoring (CEM) system in eGRID and are calculated using fuel consumption data in the EIA dataset. This results in a conterminous U.S. total calculated by eGRID that is 3.4 to 5.8 percent

  19. Contrasting evolutionary patterns of Lower Permian shelf and basinal facies, Midland basin, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mazzullo, S.J.; Reid, A.M.

    1987-05-01

    The evolution of carbonate and siliciclastic shelf-to-basin depositional systems of the Lower Permian in the Midland basin was influenced by eustatic fluctuations, changing shelf-margin biota, and concurrent tectonism. The development of these systems from Wolfcampian to Leonardian time (28-m.y. duration) involved seven distinct phases that are recognized seismically as third and lesser order cycles. These phases are (1) highstand progradational shelf carbonate packages, separated by low-stand deltaic and basinal shales, deposited during relatively long-term eustatic cycles (early Wolfcampian); the component carbonate systems evolved from ramps to distally steepened ramps associated with nonframe-building algal reefs and grainstones, with little resedimented foreshelf detritus; (2) dominantly carbonate deposition during the middle and early late Wolfcampian, with construction of offlapping (but laterally juxtaposed) progradational shelves with steep platform margins deposited during a lengthy period of stillstand and/or slow submergence; dolomitized platform-margin facies are composed of marine-cemented, sponge-algal reefs and grainstones, with resedimented carbonate megabreccia to micrite channels and lobes in the contiguous shale basin; (3) shelf emergence and erosion during a major late middle(.) to late Wolfcampian lowstand contemporaneous with basinwide tectonism, with mass wastage into the basin of the terminal Wolfcampian platform-margin carbonate section; (4) regional transgression and black shale deposition followed by a repeat of Phase 2 type systems in the latest Wolfcampian to earliest Leonardian but under arid conditions; rapid vertical platform margin accretion by dolomitized, marine-cemented, sponge-algal-coral reefs and grainstones, and deposition of thick foreshelf megabreccia wedges, aprons, channels, and lobes;

  20. Teledyne Energy Systems, Inc., Proton Exchange Member (PEM) Fuel Cell Engineering Model Powerplant. Test Report: Initial Benchmark Tests in the Original Orientation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loyselle, Patricia; Prokopius, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the leading candidate to replace the alkaline fuel cell technology, currently used on the Shuttle, for future space missions. During a 5-yr development program, a PEM fuel cell powerplant was developed. This report details the initial performance evaluation test results of the powerplant.

  1. Access to medicines by child refugees in the East Midlands region of England: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Alkahtani, S; Cherrill, J; Millward, C; Grayson, K; Hilliam, R; Sammons, H; Choonara, I

    2014-01-01

    Objectives To explore access to primary healthcare and drug therapy by refugee children in the East Midlands region of England. Design Interviews with refugees with children and a control group of British parents with children. Setting East Midlands region of England. Participants 50 refugees with children and a control group of 50 parents with children. Main outcome measures Number of medicines used by children in the last month and the past 6 months. Health of parents and children. Registration with a general practitioner (GP). Results All families in both groups were registered with a GP. There was no difference in the number of children in the two groups experiencing illnesses .In the last month, 30 refugee children received 60 medicines and 31 control children 63 medicines. In the past 6 months, 48 refugee children received 108 medicines and 43 control children 96 medicines. There was no difference between the two groups of children in relation to the likelihood of receiving any medicines in either the last month (P=0.839) or the past 6 months (p=0.81). Children in the refugee group were more likely to receive prescribed medicines for the last month (p=0.008) and the past 6 months (p<0.001). They were also less likely to receive over the counter (OTC) medicines in the past 6 months (p=0.009). Conclusions The refugee children in this study in the East Midlands had access to primary healthcare, medicines and a family doctor. They were more likely to receive prescribed medicines and less likely to receive OTC medicines, especially paracetamol. PMID:25524546

  2. Information and issues related to the quantification of environmental externalities for new powerplants

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, A.D.; Callaway, J.M.; Glantz, C.S.; Baechler, M.C.; Foley, L.O.

    1990-10-01

    This report provides background information for the Bonneville Power Administration (Bonneville) in its efforts to quantify the environmental externalities associated with new electricity resources. A more detailed companion document has been provided to Bonneville for internal use. This report defines what is meant by externalities, particularly in the context of electricity resources. It outlines the economics issues associated with assigning an economic value, such as cents per kilowatt hour, to the residual environmental impacts of electricity powerplants. It examines two generic theoretical approaches for estimating such values and discusses their advantages and disadvantages. The report also addresses the need to include relevant stages in the fuel cycle in estimating the costs of externalities. The fuel-cycle concept is defined and its importance is discussed. The approaches used by several states to quantify externalities are described. A review of the valuation efforts of various states and utilities indicates that three states have actually developed methodologies for assigning economic values to externalities. Information that Bonneville may need to request from resource developers to quantify externalities is discussed, and an appendix presents suggested forms for obtaining the required information. Summary information also is presented on models for analyzing the dispersion of powerplant plumes for the purpose of estimating environmental externality costs. 34 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. What can nuclear energy do for society.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rom, F. E.

    1971-01-01

    Nuclear fuel is a compact and abundant source of energy. Its cost per unit of energy is less than that of fossil fuel. Disadvantages of nuclear fuel are connected with the high cost of capital equipment required for releasing nuclear energy and the heavy weight of the necessary shielding. In the case of commercial electric power production and marine propulsion the advantages have outweighed the disadvantages. It is pointed out that nuclear commercial submarines have certain advantages compared to surface ships. Nuclear powerplants might make air-cushion vehicles for transoceanic ranges feasible. The problems and advantages of a nuclear aircraft are discussed together with nuclear propulsion for interplanetary space voyages.

  4. Model simulation of meteorology and air quality during the summer PUMA intensive measurement campaign in the UK West Midlands conurbation.

    PubMed

    Baggott, Sarah; Cai, Xiaoming; McGregor, Glenn; Harrison, Roy M

    2006-05-01

    The Regional Atmospheric Modeling System (RAMS) and Urban Airshed Model (UAM IV) have been implemented for prediction of air pollutant concentrations within the West Midlands conurbation of the United Kingdom. The modelling results for wind speed, direction and temperature are in reasonable agreement with observations for two stations, one in a rural area and the other in an urban area. Predictions of surface temperature are generally good for both stations, but the results suggest that the quality of temperature prediction is sensitive to whether cloud cover is reproduced reliably by the model. Wind direction is captured very well by the model, while wind speed is generally overestimated. The air pollution climate of the UK West Midlands is very different to those for which the UAM model was primarily developed, and the methods used to overcome these limitations are described. The model shows a tendency towards under-prediction of primary pollutant (NOx and CO) concentrations, but with suitable attention to boundary conditions and vertical profiles gives fairly good predictions of ozone concentrations. Hourly updating of chemical concentration boundary conditions yields the best results, with input of vertical profiles desirable. The model seriously underpredicts NO2/NO ratios within the urban area and this appears to relate to inadequate production of peroxy radicals. Overall, the chemical reactivity predicted by the model appears to fall well below that occurring in the atmosphere. PMID:16266739

  5. Relationship of Ordovician and Silurian reservoir development to unconformities at Midland farms and Inez fields, Andrews County, Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Mear, C.E.; Becher, J.W.

    1986-03-01

    Hydrocarbons are being produced at Midland Farms and Inez fields from Ellenburger dolomites and Fusselman limestones. Reservoirs developed there during Ordovician and Silurian periods of minor folding and faulting, followed by regional uplift and subaerial exposure of the carbonates. Vuggy, cavernous, and solution-enlarged fracture porosity was developed in the Lower Ordovician Ellenburger dolomites prior to deposition of the overlying Middle Ordovician shales of the Simpson Group. Vuggy and cavernous porosity developed in the Lower Silurian Fusselman crinoid-ostracod-pellet packstones and grainstones before deposition of the overlying Silurian Wristen shales. Montoya siliceous limestones of Late Ordovician age were truncated during a period of pre-Silurian erosion, but porosity development is not indicated in Montoya rock cuttings. Only minor amounts of porosity developed in the Lower to Middle Devonian Thirty-one packstones and wackestones as a result of uplift and erosion in the Middle Devonian. Regional compression during the post-Mississippian enhanced doubly plunging anticlines now having up to 91 m (300 ft) of closure at the Ellenburger through Thirty-one formations at Midland Farms and Inez fields. Fractures may have developed in Paleozoic limestones during this period of folding, but reservoir enhancement appears to have resulted only in the Ellenburger dolomites. Representative porosity measurements of the Ellenburger and Fusselman pay zones cannot be made from wireline log calculations, due to the fractured, vuggy, and cavernous nature of the porosity.

  6. Passerine Exposure to Primarily PCDFs and PCDDs in the River Floodplains Near Midland, Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Zwiernik, Matthew J.; Seston, Rita M.; Coefield, Sarah J.; Plautz, Stephanie C.; Tazelaar, Dustin L.; Shotwell, Melissa S.; Bradley, Patrick W.; Kay, Denise P.; Giesy, John P.

    2009-01-01

    House wren (Troglodytes aedon), tree swallow (Tachycineta bicolor), and eastern bluebird (Sialia sialis) tissues collected in study areas (SAs) downstream of Midland, Michigan (USA) contained concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDFs) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs) greater than in upstream reference areas (RAs) in the region. The sum of concentrations of PCDD/DFs (ΣPCDD/DFs) in eggs of house wrens and eastern bluebirds from SAs were 4- to 22-fold greater compared to those from RAs, whereas concentrations in tree swallow eggs were similar among areas. Mean concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs and sum 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin equivalents (ΣTEQsWHO-Avian), based on 1998 WHO avian toxic equivalency factors, in house wren and eastern bluebird eggs ranged from 860 (430) to 1500 (910) ng/kg wet weight (ww) and 470 (150) to 1100 (510) ng/kg ww, respectively, at the most contaminated study areas along the Tittabawassee River, whereas mean concentrations in tree swallow eggs ranged from 280 (100) to 760 (280) ng/kg ww among all locations. Concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs in nestlings of all studied species at SAs were 3- to 50-fold greater compared to RAs. Mean house wren, tree swallow, and eastern bluebird nestling concentrations of ΣPCDD/DFs and ΣTEQsWHO-Avian ranged from 350 (140) to 610 (300) ng/kg ww, 360 (240) to 1100 (860) ng/kg ww, and 330 (100) to 1200 (690) ng/kg ww, respectively, at SAs along the Tittabawassee River. Concentrations of ΣTEQsWHO-Avian were positively correlated with ΣPCDD/DF concentrations in both eggs and nestlings of all species studied. Profiles of relative concentrations of individual congeners were dominated by furan congeners (69–84%), primarily 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran and 2,3,4,7,8-pentachlorodibenzofuran, for all species at SAs on the Tittabawassee and Saginaw rivers but were dominated by dioxin congeners at upstream RAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10

  7. 10 CFR 500.3 - Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electric regions-electric region groupings for reliability measurements under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978. 500.3 Section 500.3 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS DEFINITIONS § 500.3 Electric regions—electric region groupings for reliability measurements under...

  8. 10 CFR 503.8 - No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants. 503.8 Section 503.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.8 No alternate power...

  9. 10 CFR 503.8 - No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants. 503.8 Section 503.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.8 No alternate power...

  10. 10 CFR 503.8 - No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants. 503.8 Section 503.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.8 No alternate power...

  11. 10 CFR 503.8 - No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants. 503.8 Section 503.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.8 No alternate power...

  12. 10 CFR 503.8 - No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false No alternate power supply-general requirement for certain exemptions for new powerplants. 503.8 Section 503.8 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY (CONTINUED) ALTERNATE FUELS NEW FACILITIES General Requirements for Exemptions § 503.8 No alternate power...

  13. 78 FR 26337 - Notice of Filing of Self-Certification of Coal Capability Under the Powerplant and Industrial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-06

    ... of Filing of Self-Certification of Coal Capability Under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act... a coal capability self- certification to the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to Sec. 201(d) of... 501.60, 61. FUA and regulations thereunder require DOE to publish a notice of filing of...

  14. 77 FR 74473 - Notice of Filing of Self-Certification of Coal Capability Under the Powerplant and Industrial...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-14

    ... of Filing of Self-Certification of Coal Capability Under the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act... a coal capability self- certification to the Department of Energy (DOE) pursuant to Sec. 201(d) of... 501.60, 61. FUA and regulations thereunder require DOE to publish a notice of filing of...

  15. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an alternate... natural gas, or both, in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary to maintain reliability...

  16. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an alternate... natural gas, or both, in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary to maintain reliability...

  17. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an alternate... natural gas, or both, in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary to maintain reliability...

  18. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an alternate... natural gas, or both, in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary to maintain reliability...

  19. 10 CFR 504.7 - Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas in mixtures-electing powerplants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...) ALTERNATE FUELS EXISTING POWERPLANTS § 504.7 Prohibition against excessive use of petroleum or natural gas... technically and financially feasible for a unit to use a mixture of petroleum or natural gas and an alternate... natural gas, or both, in amounts exceeding the minimum amount necessary to maintain reliability...

  20. "How People Read and Write and They Don't Even Notice": Everyday Lives and Literacies on a Midlands Council Estate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Susan

    2014-01-01

    This article presents data from a British Academy-funded study of the everyday literacy practices of three families living on a predominantly white working-class council housing estate on the edge of a Midlands city. The study explored, as one participant succinctly put it, "how people read and write and they don't even notice".…

  1. A Qualitative Study of the Impact of the London 2012 Olympics on Families in the East Midlands of England: Lessons for Sports Development Policy and Practice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mackintosh, Chris; Darko, Natalie; Rutherford, Zoe; Wilkins, Hetty-May

    2015-01-01

    The dynamics and culture of families are central to individual and community sport and physical activity participation. This research project examined the lived experiences and day-to-day realities of the London 2012 Olympics from the perspectives of five families in the East Midlands region of England. The aims of the project were to assess the…

  2. Collaborating for Success: Collaborative Arrangements for 14-19 Provision in the West Midlands. Summary and Analysis of Research Findings from Six Case Studies. Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hardman, Jill

    2006-01-01

    These findings from six case study areas in the West Midlands examine how 14-19 collaborative arrangements have developed and changed in response to local circumstances, assess the impact of the developments and changes on the curriculum offer, learner choice and participation, and identify the main success factors for starting and sustaining…

  3. Evaluation of the Impact of the Webster-Stratton Parent-Child Videotape Series on Participants in a Midlands Town in 2001-2002

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manby, Martin

    2005-01-01

    Small groups of parents experiencing problems in managing the behaviour of young children took part in parenting programmes in a Midlands city in 2001-2002 based on the Webster Stratton Parent-Child Videotape Series. Programmes were evaluated using standardised measures and qualitative data. Most participants who completed the programme (N = 29)…

  4. Spatial variations in the incidence of breast cancer and potential risks associated with soil dioxin contamination in Midland, Saginaw, and Bay Counties, Michigan, USA

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Dajun; Oyana, Tonny J

    2008-01-01

    Background High levels of dioxins in soil and higher-than-average body burdens of dioxins in local residents have been found in the city of Midland and the Tittabawassee River floodplain in Michigan. The objective of this study is threefold: (1) to evaluate dioxin levels in soils; (2) to evaluate the spatial variations in breast cancer incidence in Midland, Saginaw, and Bay Counties in Michigan; (3) to evaluate whether breast cancer rates are spatially associated with the dioxin contamination areas. Methods We acquired 532 published soil dioxin data samples collected from 1995 to 2003 and data pertaining to female breast cancer cases (n = 4,604) at ZIP code level in Midland, Saginaw, and Bay Counties for years 1985 through 2002. Descriptive statistics and self-organizing map algorithm were used to evaluate dioxin levels in soils. Geographic information systems techniques, the Kulldorff's spatial and space-time scan statistics, and genetic algorithms were used to explore the variation in the incidence of breast cancer in space and space-time. Odds ratio and their corresponding 95% confidence intervals, with adjustment for age, were used to investigate a spatial association between breast cancer incidence and soil dioxin contamination. Results High levels of dioxin in soils were observed in the city of Midland and the Tittabawassee River 100-year floodplain. After adjusting for age, we observed high breast cancer incidence rates and detected the presence of spatial clusters in the city of Midland, the confluence area of the Tittabawassee, and Saginaw Rivers. After accounting for spatiotemporal variations, we observed a spatial cluster of breast cancer incidence in Midland between 1985 and 1993. The odds ratio further suggests a statistically significant (α = 0.05) increased breast cancer rate as women get older, and a higher disease burden in Midland and the surrounding areas in close proximity to the dioxin contaminated areas. Conclusion These findings suggest that

  5. Temporal distribution of rotavirus G-serotypes in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom, 1983-1994.

    PubMed

    Beards, G; Graham, C

    1995-12-01

    Samples of rotavirus from cases of acute gastroenteritis, occurring in the West Midlands region of the United Kingdom during the winter months of 1983 to 1994, were tested by enzyme-immunoassay for G-serotype (VP7). Statistically significant changes in the relative prevalence of serotypes occurred each year (p-values in chi-square tests were: p < 0.05 or p < 0.01). No consistent pattern was associated with these changes. G1, G2, G3, and G4 were the most common serotypes detected throughout the study period, accounting for 93.2%. Serotypes G5, G8, and G10 were detected in 0.4% samples, and serotypes other than G1 to G4 were detected in 6.8% samples. Thus, the rotavirus serotypes are less diverse here compared to other locations. These data are important for the development of an appropriate rotavirus vaccine. PMID:8838827

  6. Power generation from nuclear reactors in aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    English, R.E.

    1982-01-01

    Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere. A program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

  7. Power Generation from Nuclear Reactors in Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    English, Robert E.

    1982-01-01

    Power generation in nuclear powerplants in space is addressed. In particular, the states of technology of the principal competitive concepts for power generation are assessed. The possible impact of power conditioning on power generation is also discussed. For aircraft nuclear propulsion, the suitability of various technologies is cursorily assessed for flight in the Earth's atmosphere; a program path is suggested to ease the conditions of first use of aircraft nuclear propulsion.

  8. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Analysis of the electrical power generation/fuel cell powerplant subsystem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. L.; Bertsch, P. J.

    1986-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA approach features a top-down analysis of the hardware to determine failure modes, criticality, and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. This report documents the independent analysis results corresponding to the Orbiter Electrical Power Generation (EPG)/Fuel Cell Powerplant (FCP) hardware. The EPG/FCP hardware is required for performing functions of electrical power generation and product water distribution in the Orbiter. Specifically, the EPG/FCP hardware consists of the following divisions: (1) Power Section Assembly (PSA); (2) Reactant Control Subsystem (RCS); (3) Thermal Control Subsystem (TCS); and (4) Water Removal Subsystem (WRS). The IOA analysis process utilized available EPG/FCP hardware drawings and schematics for defining hardware assemblies, components, and hardware items. Each level of hardware was evaluated and analyzed for possible failure modes and effects. Criticality was assigned based upon the severity of the effect for each failure mode.

  9. Hospital admission rates for asthma and respiratory disease in the West Midlands: their relationship to air pollution levels.

    PubMed Central

    Walters, S.; Phupinyokul, M.; Ayres, J.

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND--A study was undertaken to determine the relationship between hospital admissions for asthma and all respiratory conditions in electoral wards in the West Midlands and ambient levels of smoke, sulphur dioxide, and nitrogen dioxide, and to establish whether the relationship is independent of social deprivation and ethnicity, and is different for young children and older individuals. METHODS--Data on hospital admissions for acute respiratory conditions were obtained by electoral ward from the West Midlands Regional Health Authority Information Department Körner inpatient data including asthma (ICD 493) and all acute respiratory disease (466, 480-486, 490-496) for the period April 1988 to March 1990. The population for each electoral ward, percentage of ward population that was from non-white ethnic groups, and Townsend deprivation score were all calculated from 1991 census information. Data on smoke and sulphur dioxide (SO2) levels were obtained for 24 wards in Birmingham, Coventry, Wolverhampton, Dudley, Stafford, and Burton-on-Trent, and on nitrogen dioxide (NO2) levels from 39 wards in the same local authority areas. All were background urban sites and most participated in the Warren Spring national quality control programme for SO2 and smoke monitoring. Indirect age-sex standardised hospitalisation rates (SHR) for all respiratory conditions and asthma were calculated using the 1991 rates for the West Midlands RHA as the standard. Multivariate regression models were used to assess the relationship between individual pollutants and the SHR. The Townsend score and percentage of the population from non-white ethnic groups were included in all models to adjust for ethnicity and socioeconomic deprivation. RESULTS--The SHR for asthma varied almost fourfold across the region, and all respiratory SHR showed more than three fold variation. Bivariate regression revealed both Townsend score and percentage of non-white individuals to be associated with SHR for

  10. Hydrogeology and Migration of Septic-Tank Effluent in the Surficial Aquifer System in the Northern Midlands Area, Palm Beach County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Wesley L.

    1992-01-01

    The northern Midlands area in Palm Beach County is an area of expected residential growth, but its flat topography, poor drainage, and near-surface marl layers retard rainfall infiltration and cause frequent flooding. Public water supplies and sewer services are not planned for the area, thus, residents must rely on domestic wells and septic tanks. The water table in the northern Midlands area is seldom more than 5 feet below land surface, and regional ground-water flows are east, southwest, and south from the north-central part of the area where ground-water levels are highest. Ground-water quality in the western part of the area and in the Loxahatchee Slough is greatly influenced by residual seawater emplaced during the Pleistocene Epoch. Chloride and dissolved-solids concentrations of ground water in the surficial aquifer system in these areas often exceed secondary drinking-water standards. Residual seawater has been more effectively flushed from the more permeable sediments elsewhere in the eastern and southwestern parts of the study area. Test at three septic-tank sites showed traces of effluent in ground water (38-92 feet from the septic tank outlets) and that near-surface marl layers greatly impede the downward migration of the effluent in the surficial aquifer system throughout the northern midlands.

  11. Measuring the effect of influenza A(H1N1)pdm09: the epidemiological experience in the West Midlands, England during the 'containment' phase.

    PubMed

    Inglis, N J; Bagnall, H; Janmohamed, K; Suleman, S; Awofisayo, A; De Souza, V; Smit, E; Pebody, R; Mohamed, H; Ibbotson, S; Smith, G E; House, T; Olowokure, B

    2014-02-01

    The West Midlands was the first English region to report sustained community transmission during the 'containment' phase of the influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic in England. To describe the epidemiological experience in the region, West Midlands and national datasets containing laboratory-confirmed A(H1N1)pdm09 virus cases in the region during the 'containment' phase were analysed. The region accounts for about 10·5% of England's population, but reported about 42% of all laboratory-confirmed cases. Altogether 3063 cases were reported, with an incidence rate of 56/100 000 population. School-associated cases accounted for 25% of cases. Those aged <20 years, South Asian ethnic groups, and residents of urban and socioeconomically deprived areas were disproportionately affected. Imported cases accounted for 1% of known exposures. Regional R 0 central estimates between 1·41 and 1·43 were obtained. The West Midlands experience suggests that interpretation of transmission rates may be affected by complex interactions within and between sub-populations in the region. PMID:23731730

  12. Impact of deprivation on breast cancer survival among women eligible for mammographic screening in the West Midlands (UK) and New South Wales (Australia): Women diagnosed 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Woods, Laura M; Rachet, Bernard; O'Connell, Dianne; Lawrence, Gill; Coleman, Michel P

    2016-05-15

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK display marked differences in survival between categories defined by socio-economic deprivation. Timeliness of diagnosis is one of the possible explanations for these patterns. Women whose cancer is screen-detected are more likely to be diagnosed at an earlier stage. We examined deprivation and screening-specific survival in order to evaluate the role of early diagnosis upon deprivation-specific survival differences in the West Midlands (UK) and New South Wales (Australia). We estimated net survival for women aged 50-65 years at diagnosis and whom had been continuously eligible for screening from the age of 50. Records for 5,628 women in West Midlands (98.5% of those eligible, mean age at diagnosis 53.7 years) and 6,396 women in New South Wales (99.9% of those eligible, mean age at diagnosis 53.8 years). In New South Wales, survival was similar amongst affluent and deprived women, regardless of whether their cancer was screen-detected or not. In the West Midlands, there were large and persistent differences in survival between affluent and deprived women. Deprivation differences were similar between the screen-detected and non-screen detected groups. These differences are unlikely to be solely explained by artefact, or by patient or tumour factors. Further investigations into the timeliness and appropriateness of the treatments received by women with breast cancer across the social spectrum in the UK are warranted. PMID:26756181

  13. Impact of deprivation on breast cancer survival among women eligible for mammographic screening in the West Midlands (UK) and New South Wales (Australia): Women diagnosed 1997–2006

    PubMed Central

    Rachet, Bernard; O'Connell, Dianne; Lawrence, Gill; Coleman, Michel P.

    2016-01-01

    Women diagnosed with breast cancer in the UK display marked differences in survival between categories defined by socio‐economic deprivation. Timeliness of diagnosis is one of the possible explanations for these patterns. Women whose cancer is screen‐detected are more likely to be diagnosed at an earlier stage. We examined deprivation and screening‐specific survival in order to evaluate the role of early diagnosis upon deprivation‐specific survival differences in the West Midlands (UK) and New South Wales (Australia). We estimated net survival for women aged 50–65 years at diagnosis and whom had been continuously eligible for screening from the age of 50. Records for 5,628 women in West Midlands (98.5% of those eligible, mean age at diagnosis 53.7 years) and 6,396 women in New South Wales (99.9% of those eligible, mean age at diagnosis 53.8 years). In New South Wales, survival was similar amongst affluent and deprived women, regardless of whether their cancer was screen‐detected or not. In the West Midlands, there were large and persistent differences in survival between affluent and deprived women. Deprivation differences were similar between the screen‐detected and non‐screen detected groups. These differences are unlikely to be solely explained by artefact, or by patient or tumour factors. Further investigations into the timeliness and appropriateness of the treatments received by women with breast cancer across the social spectrum in the UK are warranted. PMID:26756181

  14. Great horned owl (Bubo virginianus) dietary exposure to PCDD/DF in the Tittabawassee River floodplain in Midland, Michigan, USA.

    PubMed

    Coefield, Sarah J; Zwiernik, Matthew J; Fredricks, Timothy B; Seston, Rita M; Nadeau, Michael W; Tazelaar, Dustin L; Moore, Jeremy N; Kay, Denise P; Roark, Shaun A; Giesy, John P

    2010-10-01

    Soils and sediments in the floodplain of the Tittabawassee River downstream of Midland, Michigan, USA contain elevated concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD). As a long-lived, resident top predator, the great horned owl (Bubo virginianus; GHO) has the potential to be exposed to bioaccumulative compounds such as PCDD/DF. Site-specific components of the GHO diet were collected along 115 km of the Tittabawassee, Pine, Chippewa, and Saginaw Rivers during 2005 and 2006. The site-specific GHO biomass-based diet was dominated by cottontail rabbits (Sylvilagus floridanus) and muskrats (Ondatra zibethicus). Incidental soil ingestion and cottontail rabbits were the primary contributors of PCDD/DF to the GHO diet. The great horned owl daily dietary exposure estimates were greater in the study area (SA) (3.3 to 5.0 ng 2,3,7,8-TCDD equivalents (TEQ(WHO-avian))/kg body wt/d) than the reference area (RA) (0.07 ng TEQ(WHO-Avian)/kg body wt/d). Hazard quotients (HQs) based on central tendency estimates of the average daily dose and no-observable-adverse effect level (NOAEL) for the screech owl and uncertainty factors were <1.0 for both the RA and the SA. Hazard quotients based on upper end estimates of the average daily dose and NOAEL were <1.0 in the RA and up to 3.4 in the SA. PMID:20872700

  15. Perceptions of Psychological Coercion and Human Trafficking in the West Midlands of England: Beginning to Know the Unknown

    PubMed Central

    Dando, Coral J.; Walsh, David; Brierley, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Modern slavery is less overt than historical state-sanctioned slavery because psychological abuse is typically used to recruit and then control victims. The recent UK Draft Modern Slavery Bill, and current UK government anti-slavery strategy relies heavily on a shared understanding and public cooperation to tackle this crime. Yet, UK research investigating public understanding of modern slavery is elusive. We report community survey data from 682 residents of the Midlands of England, where modern slavery is known to occur, concerning their understanding of nonphysical coercion and human trafficking (one particular form of modern slavery). Analysis of quantitative data and themed categorization of qualitative data revealed a mismatch between theoretical frameworks and understanding of psychological coercion, and misconceptions concerning the nature of human trafficking. Many respondents did not understand psychological coercion, believed that human trafficking did not affect them, and confused trafficking with immigration. The public are one of the most influential interest groups, but only if well informed and motivated towards positive action. Our findings suggest the need for strategically targeted public knowledge exchange concerning this crime. PMID:27149330

  16. Perceptions of Psychological Coercion and Human Trafficking in the West Midlands of England: Beginning to Know the Unknown.

    PubMed

    Dando, Coral J; Walsh, David; Brierley, Robin

    2016-01-01

    Modern slavery is less overt than historical state-sanctioned slavery because psychological abuse is typically used to recruit and then control victims. The recent UK Draft Modern Slavery Bill, and current UK government anti-slavery strategy relies heavily on a shared understanding and public cooperation to tackle this crime. Yet, UK research investigating public understanding of modern slavery is elusive. We report community survey data from 682 residents of the Midlands of England, where modern slavery is known to occur, concerning their understanding of nonphysical coercion and human trafficking (one particular form of modern slavery). Analysis of quantitative data and themed categorization of qualitative data revealed a mismatch between theoretical frameworks and understanding of psychological coercion, and misconceptions concerning the nature of human trafficking. Many respondents did not understand psychological coercion, believed that human trafficking did not affect them, and confused trafficking with immigration. The public are one of the most influential interest groups, but only if well informed and motivated towards positive action. Our findings suggest the need for strategically targeted public knowledge exchange concerning this crime. PMID:27149330

  17. A new coccidian (Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae), from midland brown snake, Storeria dekayi wrightorum Trapido (Ophidia: Colubridae) from Arkansas, USA.

    PubMed

    McAllister, Chris T; Seville, R Scott; Connior, Matthew B

    2016-01-01

    A new species of coccidian (Protista: Apicomplexa: Eimeriidae) collected from the faeces of a midland brown snake Storeria dekayi wrightorum Trapido (Ophidia: Colubridae) in Arkansas, USA, is described. Oöcysts of Isospora holbrooki n. sp. are subspherical to ovoidal with a smooth, colourless, bi-layered wall, measure on average 27.1 × 24.0 µm, and have a length/width (L/W) ratio of 1.1; both micropyle and oöcyst residuum are absent, but a polar granule is present. Sporocysts are ovoidal, 14.8 × 10.0 µm on average (L/W 1.5); the Stieda body is nipple-like, the sub-Stieda body is ellipsoidal and the sporocyst residuum is composed of coarse granules in a cluster. Sporozoites have a spheroidal anterior refractile body, a subspheroidal posterior refractile body, and one centrally-located nucleus. This is the first description of an isosporan from the snake genus Storeria Baird & Girard as well as the largest oöcysts and sporocysts of any previous snake isosporan to date. PMID:26739289

  18. Ecological effects of pipeline construction through deciduous forested wetlands, Midland County, Michigan. Topical report, October 1990--August 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Rastorfer, J.R.; Van Dyke, G.D.; Zellmer, S.D.; Wilkey, P.L.

    1995-04-01

    This study is designed to record vegetational changes induced by the construction of a large-diameter gas pipeline through deciduous forested wetlands. Two second-growth wetland sites mapped Lenawee soils were selected in Midland County, Michigan: Site 1, a younger stand subjected to recent selective logging, and Site 2, a more mature stand. The collection of ecological data to analyze plant succession on the right-of-way (ROW) and the effects of the developing ROW plant communities on adjacent forest communities was initiated in 1989. Cover class estimates were made for understory and ROW plant species on the basis of 1 {times} 1{minus}m quadrats. Individual stem diameters and species counts were recorded for overstory plants in 10{minus}m quadrats. Although long-term studies have not been completed, firm baseline data were established for comparative analyses with future sampling. Current data indicate that vegetation became well-established on the ROW within one year and subsequently increased in coverage. About 65% of the species were wetland indicators, and the dominants included seeded and natural invading species; nevertheless, some elements of the original flora regenerated and persist. The plants of the ecotone understories of both sites changed from their original composition as a result of the installation of the gas pipeline. Although some forest species persist at both sites, the ecotone of Site I was influenced more by the seeded species, whereas the natural invaders were more important at Site 2.

  19. Impact on soot control measures on MCFC powerplants. Task report No. 4

    SciTech Connect

    Bloomfield, D.P.

    1980-12-12

    Physical Sciences Inc. has performed a preliminary evaluation of the effects of soot control measures on the molten carbonate fuel cell powerplant. Soot control measures are required because of the temperature and humidity restrictions imposed on the system by the low temperature gas cleanup system. The system configuration chosen is the General Electric System 1 configuration. This system uses a Texaco, oxygen blown gasifier and a low temperature (Selexol) gas cleanup system. The pressure of this portion of the system is about 600 psi which drops to 500 psi at the exit of the gas cleanup system. The gas which at this point has dew point of 100/sup 0/F is expanded to about 105 psi. At this point, steam is injected. The function of this steam is to suppress soot formation both in the anode inlet preheater and in the molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) anode. GE alludes that the function of the steam may also be to optimize the output of the steam turbines. Upon leaving the anode, the sensible heat in the anode exhaust is used to regeneratively preheat the anode inlet gas. Finally, the anode exhaust is fed to a catalytic combustor via a compressor. The combustor effluent is mixed with fresh cathode inlet air. This stream is then mixed with cathode exhaust recycle. The resulting mixture is fed to the MCFC cathode. The cathode exhaust is split into recycle and system exhaust streams. About 77% of the cathode exhaust is recycled. The system exhaust is expanded through a gas turbine, a regenerative heat exchanger and an economizer. Results of the study are reported. (WHK)

  20. Comparison of two U.S. power-plant carbon dioxide emissions data sets

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerman, K.V.; Sundquist, E.T.

    2008-01-01

    Estimates of fossil-fuel CO2 emissions are needed to address a variety of climate-change mitigation concerns over a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. We compared two data sets that report power-plant CO 2 emissions in the conterminous U.S. for 2004, the most recent year reported in both data sets. The data sets were obtained from the Department of Energy's Energy Information Administration (EIA) and the Environmental Protection Agency's eGRID database. Conterminous U.S. total emissions computed from the data sets differed by 3.5% for total plant emissions (electricity plus useful thermal output) and 2.3% for electricity generation only. These differences are well within previous estimates of uncertainty in annual U.S. fossil-fuel emissions. However, the corresponding average absolute differences between estimates of emissions from individual power plants were much larger, 16.9% and 25.3%, respectively. By statistical analysis, we identified several potential sources of differences between EIA and eGRID estimates for individual plants. Estimates that are based partly or entirely on monitoring of stack gases (reported by eGRID only) differed significantly from estimates based on fuel consumption (as reported by EIA). Differences in accounting methods appear to explain differences in estimates for emissions from electricity generation from combined heat and power plants, and for total and electricity generation emissions from plants that burn nonconventional fuels (e.g., biomass). Our analysis suggests the need for care in utilizing emissions data from individual power plants, and the need for transparency in documenting the accounting and monitoring methods used to estimate emissions.

  1. Effects of effluents from a coal-fired, electric-generating powerplant on local ground water near Hayden, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, S.R.; Mann, P.G.

    1981-01-01

    Data were collected at the Hayden, Colo., powerplant for about a year during 1978-79 to monitor the effects of effluent and raw-water storage ponds on the local ground water, Sage Creek, and the Yampa River. The concentration of boron in wells downgradient from the effluent ponds indicated that the ponds were leaking, increasing the average boron concentrations in the ground water to a level in excess of the standards for agricultural use of water. Water from seeps, probably the best indicators of downgradient water quality, had average concentrations of boron two times that of the Colorado Department of Health (1977) standard for agricultural use of water. Chemical analyses of water from wells and the discharge weir downgradient from the raw-water storage ponds indicated these ponds are leaking. The effect of this leakage is that the water in wells downgradient from these ponds has a lower specific conductance and a lower boron concentration than the water in wells downgradient from the effluent ponds. The concentration of trace elements in the water from the wells and the discharge weir generally declined during the study, probably because the ground water was recovering from the effects of a plume from the raw-water pond previously used for fly-ash disposal. The effluents from the Hayden powerplant lowered the specific conductance and the iron and manganese concentrations, increased the concentration of boron, and had little or no effect on the selenium concentration in Sage Creek. Sage Creek had no discernible effect on the Yampa River because the volume of water in the Yampa River was so much greater. The effluents from the powerplant also had no discernible effect on the Yampa River. (USGS)

  2. Questing Dermacentor reticulatus harbouring Babesia canis DNA associated with outbreaks of canine babesiosis in the Swiss Midlands.

    PubMed

    Schaarschmidt, Daniel; Gilli, Urs; Gottstein, Bruno; Marreros, Nelson; Kuhnert, Peter; Daeppen, Jérôme A; Rosenberg, Gertrud; Hirt, Didier; Frey, Caroline F

    2013-06-01

    In 2011 and 2012, outbreaks of clinical canine babesiosis were observed in 2 areas of the Swiss Midlands that had no history of this disease so far. In one area, cases of canine babesiosis occurred over 2 consecutive tick seasons. The outbreaks involved 29 dogs, 4 of which died. All dogs were infected with large Babesia sp. as diagnosed in Giemsa-stained blood smears and/or PCR. These were identified as B. canis (formerly known as B. canis canis) by subsequent partial sequencing of the 18S rRNA gene of Babesia sp. Interestingly, the sequence indicated either a genotype with heterogeneity in the ssrRNA gene copies or double infection with different B. canis isolates. None of the dogs had a recent travel history, but one had frequently travelled to Hungary and had suffered twice from clinical babesiosis 18 and 24 months prior to the outbreak in autumn 2011. Retrospective sequencing of a stored blood DNA sample of this dog revealed B. canis, with an identical sequence to the Babesia involved in the outbreaks. For the first time in Switzerland, the partial 18S rRNA gene of B. canis could be amplified from DNA isolated from 19 out of 23 adult Dermacentor reticulatus ticks flagged in the same area. The sequence was identical to that found in the dogs. Furthermore, one affected dog carried a female D. reticulatus tick harbouring B. canis DNA. Our findings illustrate that, under favourable biogeographic and climatic conditions, the life-cycle of B. canis can relatively rapidly establish itself in previously non-endemic areas. Canine babesiosis should therefore always be a differential diagnosis when dogs with typical clinical signs are presented, regardless of known endemic areas. PMID:23571114

  3. A detrital zircon provenance study of the Lower Carboniferous sequences in the East Fife section of the Midland Valley of Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murchie, Sean; Robinson, Ruth, ,, Dr; Lancaster, Penelope, ,, Dr

    2014-05-01

    Detrital zircons from the Lower Carboniferous clastic rocks of the Midland Valley of Scotland have been dated using U-Pb laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICPMS) to determine which source areas contributed sediment to the basin during its development, and to investigate whether provenance changed during deposition of these units. Specific provenance detection using U/Pb dating of zircons has never been attempted in these rocks, and there are uncertainties remaining about the regional paleogeographic setting for the Midland Valley. Four samples from the Dinantian Strathclyde Group have been analysed, and the units are locally known as the Fife Ness, Anstruther, Pittenweem, Sandy Craig, and Pathhead formations. The formations are composed of shallow marine, deltaic, fluvial and floodplain deposits and these predominantly siliciclastic sedimentary rocks are interbedded with thin fossiliferous carbonate bands. The samples are quartz arenitic, sub-arkosic and lithic arkosic medium-grained sandstones, predominantly from a fluvial origin. The British Geological Survey developed a lithostratigraphy which is the most used framework for the Strathclyde Group (Browne et al., 1997), but a different biostratigraphical framework based on palynology has been proposed by Owens et al. (2005). In addition to identifying provenance, the zircon age populations for each formation are compared to test which stratigraphic framework is correct. More broadly, the provenance data provides a way to improve the regional palaeogeographic setting for the Midland Valley. Zircon ages in the Strathclyde Group are dominated by Late Mesoproterozoic to Late Palaeoproterozoic (0.9 - 2.0 Ga) and Early Palaeozoic (350 - 450 Ma) ages which reflect Caledonide (Laurentian-Baltica margin including Scotland, Scandinavia, Greenland, Newfoundland), Grampian and internal Midland Valley source areas. Notable peaks occur at 400 Ma, 1.0 --1.1 Ga, 1.3 Ga, 1.6 - 1.7 Ga, and 2.7 Ga, and

  4. Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act. Annual report. [Annual report required by Section 108, Public Law 95-620

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-03-01

    This annual report has been prepared for Congress by the Department of Energy in conjunction with the Environmental Protection Agency, as required by section 806 of the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 (FUA) as amended, Public Law 95-620, enacted November 9, 1978. This annual report describes actions taken, under the provisions of the legislation, to encourage the use of indigenous energy resources in electric powerplants and major fuel-burning installations in the electric utility, industrial, and Federal governmental sectors. This report addresses implementation activities during calendar year 1982 under FUA and section 2 of the Energy Supply and Environmental Coordination Act of 1974, Public Law 93-319, and assesses the effectiveness of both laws in achieving their purposes. The report also includes summary information on natural gas consumption by electric utilities in 1977 and 1982, as required by section 711(c) of FUA, as amended by section 1021 of the Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act of 1981, Public Law 97-35. Copies of this report were submitted to the Committee on Energy and Natural Resources of the US Senate and to the Committee on Energy and Commerce of the US House of Representatives, as required by section 807 of FUA. A companion report, as required by section 403(c) of FUA, will be submitted to Congress covering implementation of FUA at fuel-burning facilities owned or operated by the Federal Government.

  5. Which landscape elements support streamflow during low flow conditions? Lessons from field observations in the Swiss midlands in dry summer 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floriancic, Marius; Margreth, Michael; Naef, Felix

    2016-04-01

    Low flows can be very heterogeneous even on small scale. It is not well known which areas contribute to low flow during extended dry periods nor can we expect which challenges will arise with changing climate conditions. Therefore we need to improve our understanding of physical properties relevant for water storage and drainage during dry periods. We present a spatially resolved discharge dataset from the Swiss midlands during the extended dry summer 2015. On very small scales we found major differences in discharge: neighboring nested subcatchments varied by up to a factor of 5. These variations correspond to certain landscape elements. Required storage volumes are quite small, making up only about 1% of annual precipitation, but some features are more likely to support higher streamflow during dry periods due to slow drainage. We found significant evidence for differences in storage and drainage behavior, existence of sections of streambed infiltration and point sources of outstanding contribution along the stream networks of the Swiss midlands and Alps. Major differences can be traced back to different lithology, slope angles and connectivity of storage features to the network. Even though heterogeneity is high on small scale, spatial scale of the research is limited by point source contribution, subsurface flow paths and streambed infiltration and exfiltration. These findings show the significant extent to which different geological formations with certain physical properties contribute to low flow discharge in midland environments. Understanding the effects of physical landscape properties is a first step to get an insight of water storage capacity and the relevant drainage timescale supporting streamflow during extended dry periods. This helps to find areas that are either sensitive or resistant to changes towards a dryer climate.

  6. Effects of emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant on precipitation, snowpack, and surface-water chemistry in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area, Colorado, 1995-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mast, M. Alisa; Campbell, Donald H.; Ingersoll, George P.

    2005-01-01

    Precipitation, snowpack, and surface-water samples collected during 1995-2003 were analyzed to evaluate the effects of emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant on water chemistry in the Mount Zirkel Wilderness Area. The Hayden powerplant, one of two large coal-fired powerplants in the Yampa Valley, was retrofitted with control systems during late 1998 and 1999 to reduce emissions of sulfur dioxide and nitrogen oxide--the primary precursors of haze and acidic precipitation. The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Colorado Department of Public Health and Environment, evaluated three water-chemistry data sets: wet-only precipitation chemistry from the National Atmospheric Deposition Program, snowpack chemistry from the Rocky Mountain snowpack network, and surface-water chemistry from a U.S. Geological Survey long-term lakes monitoring program. Concentrations and deposition rates of selected constituents were compared for the periods before and after emission reductions at the Hayden powerplant. Data collected during 1995-98 were used to represent the pre-control period, and data collected during 2000-2003 were used to represent the post-control period. Ten stations in the National Atmospheric Deposition Program were evaluated including two that were directly downwind from the Hayden powerplant (Dry Lake and Buffalo Pass) and eight that were upwind or more distant (more than 100 kilometers) from the powerplant. Precipitation amount at all 10 precipitation stations was lower in the post-control period than the pre-control period as a result of a regional drought that persisted during the post-control period. In contrast to precipitation amount, there was no consistent pattern of change in sulfate concentrations between periods, indicating that the drought did not have a concentrating effect on sulfate or that trends in regional sulfur dioxide emissions masked its influence. Sulfate concentrations increased at three stations between periods, remained the

  7. Development of USES Specific Aptitude Test Battery S-111R84 for Airframe-and-Powerplant Mechanic (Aircraft-Aerospace Mfg.; Air Trans.) 621.281-014.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oregon State Dept. of Human Resources, Salem.

    This report is designed to provide information required to evaluate the Specific Aptitude Test Battery (SATB) for Airframe-and-Powerplant Mechanic from three points of view: (1) technical adequacy of the research, (2) fairness to minorities, and (3) usefulness of the battery to Employment Service staff and employers in selecting individuals for…

  8. Investigation of the presence of ESBL-producing Escherichia coli in the North Wales and West Midlands areas of the UK in 2007 to 2008 using scanning surveillance.

    PubMed

    Snow, L C; Wearing, H; Stephenson, B; Teale, C J; Coldham, N G

    2011-12-17

    Between November 5, 2007 and November 4, 2008, faecal samples from cattle and sheep submitted for diagnostic purposes to the Aberystwyth and Shrewsbury Veterinary Laboratories Agency (VLA) (now AHVLA) regional laboratories (covering North Wales and the West Midlands) were screened for the presence of Escherichia coli that produces CTX-M extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) using the selective medium CHROMagar CTX. Samples from 113 farms were tested and eight ESBL-positive farms identified. Of these, six farms were identified via submissions of cattle faeces and two from sheep. Gene sequencing revealed both group 1 and group 9 CTX-M enzymes corresponding to CTX-M-14, CTX-M-14B (group 9) and CTX-M-15/28 (group 1). Analysis of these isolates by nanoarray revealed that some were carrying a range of virulence genes including ireA, iroN and prfB, which have been associated with extraintestinal pathogenic E coli, and were multidrug resistant. Geographical analysis with choropleth maps suggested that these CTX-M genes are relatively widespread in the North Wales and West Midlands study area. This work was carried out concurrently with the running of a VLA ESBL surveillance system, which has subsequently identified many more CTX-M positive farms in the UK. PMID:22021063

  9. Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA): Assessment of the electrical power generation/fuel cell powerplant subsystem FMEA/CIL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, K. L.; Bertsch, P. J.

    1987-01-01

    Results of the Independent Orbiter Assessment (IOA) of the Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FMEA) and Critical Items List (CIL) are presented. The IOA effort first completed an analysis of the Electrical Power Generation/Fuel Cell Powerplant (EPG/FCP) hardware, generating draft failure modes and potential critical items. To preserve independence, this analysis was accomplished without reliance upon the results contained within the NASA FMEA/CIL documentation. The IOA results were then compared to the proposed Post 51-L NASA FMEA/CIL baseline. A resolution of each discrepancy from the comparison was provided through additional analysis as required. This report documents the results of that comparison for the Orbiter EPG/FCP hardware.

  10. Compliance problems of small utility systems with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978: volume II - appendices

    SciTech Connect

    1981-01-01

    A study of the problems of compliance with the Powerplant and Industrial Fuel Use Act of 1978 experienced by electric utility systems which have a total generating capacity of less than 2000 MW is presented. This volume presents the following appendices: (A) case studies (Farmington, New Mexico; Lamar, Colorado; Dover, Delaware; Wolverine Electric Cooperative, Michigan; Central Telephone and Utilities, Kansas; Sierra Pacific Power Company, Nevada; Vero Beach, Florida; Lubbock, Texas; Western Farmers Cooperative, Oklahoma; and West Texas Utilities Company, Texas); (B) contacts and responses to study; (C) joint action legislation chart; (D) Texas Municipal Power Agency case study; (E) existing generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (F) future generating units jointly owned with small utilities; (G) Federal Register Notice of April 17, 1980, and letter of inquiry to utilities; (H) small utility responses; and (I) Section 744, PIFUA. (WHK)