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Sample records for migrating cortical interneurons

  1. Ephrin-A5 acts as a repulsive cue for migrating cortical interneurons.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, Geraldine; Garcez, Patricia; Rudolph, Judith; Niehage, Ronny; Weth, Franco; Lent, Roberto; Bolz, Jürgen

    2008-07-01

    Cortical interneurons are born in the germinative zones of the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium, and migrate tangentially in spatially and temporally well-defined corridors into the neocortex. Because ephrin-A5 is expressed in the ventricular zone (VZ) of the ganglionic eminences at these developmental stages, we examined the possible effects of this molecule on interneuron migration. Double-immunocytochemistry of dissociated neurons from the medial ganglionic eminences (MGE) revealed that calbindin-positive cells express the EphA4-receptor. In situ, EphA4 is strongly expressed in the subventricular zone of the ganglionic eminences. Using different in vitro assays, we found that ephrin-A5 acts as a repellent cue for MGE neurons. We then examined interneuron migration in slice overlay experiments, where MGE-derived explants from enhanced green fluorescent protein-expressing transgenic mice were homotopically grafted into host slices from wild-type littermate embryos. In these in vitro preparations, interneurons recapitulated in vivo cell migration in several respects. However, interneurons in brain slices also migrated in the VZ of the ganglionic eminences, a region that is strictly avoided in vivo. In situ hybridizations revealed that ephrin-A5 became downregulated in the VZ in vitro. When recombinant ephrin-A5-Fc was added to the slices, it preferentially bound to the VZ, and migrating MGE neurons avoided the VZ as in vivo. The restoration of the normal migration pathway in slices required ephrin-A5 clustering and signalling of Src family kinases. Together, these experiments suggest that ephrin-A5 acts as an inhibitory flank that contributes to define the pathway of migrating interneurons. PMID:18662335

  2. Molecules and mechanisms involved in the generation and migration of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Miranda, Luis R; Parnavelas, John G; Chiara, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    The GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-containing interneurons of the neocortex are largely derived from the ganglionic eminences in the subpallium. Numerous studies have previously defined the migratory paths travelled by these neurons from their origins to their destinations in the cortex. We review here results of studies that have identified many of the genes expressed in the subpallium that are involved in the specification of the subtypes of cortical interneurons, and the numerous transcription factors, motogenic factors and guidance molecules that are involved in their migration. PMID:20360946

  3. Identification of Arx targets unveils new candidates for controlling cortical interneuron migration and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Friocourt, Gaëlle; Parnavelas, John G

    2011-01-01

    Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor ARX have been found to be responsible for a wide spectrum of disorders extending from phenotypes with severe neuronal migration defects, such as lissencephaly, to mild forms of intellectual disabilities without apparent brain abnormalities, but with associated features of dystonia and epilepsy. Arx expression is mainly restricted to populations of GABA-containing neurons. Studies of the effects of ARX loss of function, either in humans or mutant mice, revealed varying defects, suggesting multiple roles of this gene in brain patterning, neuronal proliferation and migration, cell maturation and differentiation, as well as axonal outgrowth and connectivity. However, to date, little is known about how Arx functions as a transcription factor or which genes it binds and regulates. Recently, we combined chromatin immunoprecipitation and mRNA expression with microarray analysis and identified approximately 1000 gene promoters bound by Arx in transfected neuroblastoma N2a cells and mouse embryonic brain. To narrow the analysis of Arx targets to those most likely to control cortical interneuron migration and/or differentiation, we compare here our data to previously published studies searching for genes enriched or down-regulated in cortical interneurons between E13.5 and E15.5. We thus identified 14 Arx-target genes enriched (Cxcr7, Meis1, Ppap2a, Slc 12a5, Ets2, Phlda1, Egr1, Igf1, Lmo3, Sema6, Lgi1, Alk, Tgfb3, and Napb) and 5 genes specifically down-regulated (Hmgn3, Lmo1, Ebf3, Rasgef1b, and Slit2) in cortical migrating neurons. In this review, we present these genes and discuss how their possible regulation by Arx may lead to the dysfunction of GABAergic neurons, resulting in mental retardation and epilepsy. PMID:22355284

  4. Cortical interneurons migrating on a pure substrate of N-cadherin exhibit fast synchronous centrosomal and nuclear movements and reduced ciliogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Luccardini, Camilla; Leclech, Claire; Viou, Lucie; Rio, Jean-Paul; Métin, Christine

    2015-01-01

    The embryonic development of the cortex involves a phase of long distance migration of interneurons born in the basal telencephalon. Interneurons first migrate tangentially and then reorient their trajectories radially to enter the developing cortex. We have shown that migrating interneurons can assemble a primary cilium, which maintains the centrosome to the plasma membrane and processes signals to control interneuron trajectory (Baudoin et al., 2012). In the developing cortex, N-cadherin is expressed by migrating interneurons and by cells in their migratory pathway. N-cadherin promotes the motility and maintains the polarity of tangentially migrating interneurons (Luccardini et al., 2013). Because N-cadherin is an important factor that regulates the migration of medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) cells in vivo, we further characterized the motility and polarity of MGE cells on a substrate that only comprises this protein. MGE cells migrating on a N-cadherin substrate were seven times faster than on a laminin substrate and two times faster than on a substrate of cortical cells. A primary cilium was much less frequently observed on MGE cells migrating on N-cadherin than on laminin. Nevertheless, the mature centriole (MC) frequently docked to the plasma membrane in MGE cells migrating on N-cadherin, suggesting that plasma membrane docking is a basic feature of the centrosome in migrating MGE cells. On the N-cadherin substrate, centrosomal and nuclear movements were remarkably synchronous and the centrosome remained near the nucleus. Interestingly, MGE cells with cadherin invalidation presented centrosomal movements no longer coordinated with nuclear movements. In summary, MGE cells migrating on a pure substrate of N-cadherin show fast, coordinated nuclear and centrosomal movements, and rarely present a primary cilium. PMID:26283922

  5. Cortical Interneurons Require Jnk1 to Enter and Navigate the Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Abigail K.; Meechan, Daniel W.; Adney, Danielle R.

    2014-01-01

    Proper assembly of cortical circuitry relies on the correct migration of cortical interneurons from their place of birth in the ganglionic eminences to their place of terminal differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Although molecular mechanisms mediating cortical interneuron migration have been well studied, intracellular signals directing their migration are largely unknown. Here we illustrate a novel and essential role for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling in guiding the pioneering population of cortical interneurons into the mouse cerebral cortex. Migrating cortical interneurons express Jnk proteins at the entrance to the cortical rudiment and have enriched expression of Jnk1 relative to noninterneuronal cortical cells. Pharmacological blockade of JNK signaling in ex vivo slice cultures resulted in dose-dependent and highly specific disruption of interneuron migration into the nascent cortex. Time-lapse imaging revealed that JNK-inhibited cortical interneurons advanced slowly and assumed aberrant migratory trajectories while traversing the cortical entry zone. In vivo analyses of JNK-deficient embryos supported our ex vivo pharmacological data. Deficits in interneuron migration were observed in Jnk1 but not Jnk2 single nulls, and those migratory deficits were further exacerbated when homozygous loss of Jnk1 was combined with heterozygous reduction of Jnk2. Finally, genetic ablation of Jnk1 and Jnk2 from cortical interneurons significantly perturbed migration in vivo, but not in vitro, suggesting JNK activity functions to direct their guidance rather than enhance their motility. These data suggest JNK signaling, predominantly mediated by interneuron expressed Jnk1, is required for guiding migration of cortical interneurons into and within the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:24899703

  6. Revisiting enigmatic cortical calretinin-expressing interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Cauli, Bruno; Zhou, Xiaojuan; Tricoire, Ludovic; Toussay, Xavier; Staiger, Jochen F.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical calretinin (CR)-expressing interneurons represent a heterogeneous subpopulation of about 10–30% of GABAergic interneurons, which altogether total ca. 12–20% of all cortical neurons. In the rodent neocortex, CR cells display different somatodendritic morphologies ranging from bipolar to multipolar but the bipolar cells and their variations dominate. They are also diverse at the molecular level as they were shown to express numerous neuropeptides in different combinations including vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP), cholecystokinin (CCK), neurokinin B (NKB) corticotrophin releasing factor (CRF), enkephalin (Enk) but also neuropeptide Y (NPY) and somatostatin (SOM) to a lesser extent. CR-expressing interneurons exhibit different firing behaviors such as adapting, bursting or irregular. They mainly originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) but a subpopulation also derives from the dorsal part of the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE). Cortical GABAergic CR-expressing interneurons can be divided in two main populations: VIP-bipolar interneurons deriving from the CGE and SOM-Martinotti-like interneurons originating in the dorsal MGE. Although bipolar cells account for the majority of CR-expressing interneurons, the roles they play in cortical neuronal circuits and in the more general metabolic physiology of the brain remained elusive and enigmatic. The aim of this review is, firstly, to provide a comprehensive view of the morphological, molecular and electrophysiological features defining this cell type. We will, secondly, also summarize what is known about their place in the cortical circuit, their modulation by subcortical afferents and the functional roles they might play in neuronal processing and energy metabolism. PMID:25009470

  7. Differential gene expression in migratory streams of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Antypa, Mary; Faux, Clare; Eichele, Gregor; Parnavelas, John G; Andrews, William D

    2011-01-01

    Cortical interneurons originate in the ganglionic eminences of the subpallium and migrate into the cortex in well-defined tangential streams. At the start of corticogenesis, two streams of migrating neurons are evident: a superficial one at the level of the preplate (PPL), and a deeper one at the level of the intermediate zone (IZ). Currently, little is known about the signalling mechanisms that regulate interneuron migration, and almost nothing is known about the molecules that may be involved in their choice of migratory stream. Here, we performed a microarray analysis, comparing the changes in gene expression between cells migrating in the PPL and those migrating in the IZ at embryonic day 13.5. This analysis identified genes, many of them novel, that were upregulated in one of the two streams. Moreover, polymerase chain reaction, in situ hybridization experiments and immunohistochemistry showed the expression of these genes in interneurons migrating within the PPL or IZ, suggesting that they play a role in their migration and choice of stream. PMID:22103416

  8. Inhibitory interneurons in visual cortical plasticity.

    PubMed

    van Versendaal, Daniëlle; Levelt, Christiaan N

    2016-10-01

    For proper maturation of the neocortex and acquisition of specific functions and skills, exposure to sensory stimuli is vital during critical periods of development when synaptic connectivity is highly malleable. To preserve reliable cortical processing, it is essential that these critical periods end after which learning becomes more conditional and active interaction with the environment becomes more important. How these age-dependent forms of plasticity are regulated has been studied extensively in the primary visual cortex. This has revealed that inhibitory innervation plays a crucial role and that a temporary decrease in inhibition is essential for plasticity to take place. Here, we discuss how different interneuron subsets regulate plasticity during different stages of cortical maturation. We propose a theory in which different interneuron subsets select the sources of neuronal input that undergo plasticity. PMID:27193323

  9. Selective Depletion of Molecularly Defined Cortical Interneurons in Human Holoprosencephaly with Severe Striatal Hypoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Fertuzinhos, Sofia; Krsnik, Željka; Kawasawa, Yuka Imamura; Rašin, Mladen-Roko; Kwan, Kenneth Y.; Chen, Jie-Guang; Judaš, Miloš; Hayashi, Masaharu; Šestan, Nenad

    2009-01-01

    Cortical excitatory glutamatergic projection neurons and inhibitory GABAergic interneurons follow substantially different developmental programs. In rodents, projection neurons originate from progenitors within the dorsal forebrain, whereas interneurons arise from progenitors in the ventral forebrain. In contrast, it has been proposed that in humans, the majority of cortical interneurons arise from progenitors within the dorsal forebrain, suggesting that their origin and migration is complex and evolutionarily divergent. However, whether molecularly defined human cortical interneuron subtypes originate from distinct progenitors, including those in the ventral forebrain, remains unknown. Furthermore, abnormalities in cortical interneurons have been linked to human disorders, yet no distinct cell population selective loss has been reported. Here we show that cortical interneurons expressing nitric oxide synthase 1, neuropeptide Y, and somatostatin, are either absent or substantially reduced in fetal and infant cases of human holoprosencephaly (HPE) with severe ventral forebrain hypoplasia. Notably, another interneuron subtype normally abundant from the early fetal period, marked by calretinin expression, and different subtypes of projection neuron were present in the cortex of control and HPE brains. These findings have important implications for the understanding of neuronal pathogenesis underlying the clinical manifestations associated with HPE and the developmental origins of human cortical interneuron diversity. PMID:19234067

  10. Cortical-layer-specific effects of PACAP and tPA on interneuron migration during post-natal development of the cerebellum.

    PubMed

    Raoult, Emilie; Bénard, Magalie; Komuro, Hitoshi; Lebon, Alexis; Vivien, Denis; Fournier, Alain; Vaudry, Hubert; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2014-07-01

    During early post-natal development of the cerebellum, granule neurons (GN) execute a centripetal migration toward the internal granular layer, whereas basket and stellate cells (B/SC) migrate centrifugally to reach their final position in the molecular layer (ML). We have previously shown that pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP) stimulates in vitro the expression and release of the serine protease tissue-type plasminogen activator (tPA) from GN, but the coordinated role of PACAP and tPA during interneuron migration has not yet been investigated. Here, we show that endogenous PACAP is responsible for the transient arrest phase of GN at the level of the Purkinje cell layer (PCL) but has no effect on B/SC. tPA is devoid of direct effect on GN motility in vitro, although it is widely distributed along interneuron migratory routes in the ML, PCL, and internal granular layer. Interestingly, plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 reduces the migration speed of GN in the ML and PCL, and that of B/SC in the ML. Taken together, these results reveal for the first time that tPA facilitates the migration of both GN and fast B/SC at the level of their intersection in the ML through degradation of the extracellular matrix. Crucial role of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) in interneuron migration. Interneuron migration is a critical step for normal establishment of neuronal network. This study indicates that, in the post-natal cerebellum, tPA facilitates the opposite migration of immature excitatory granule neurons (GN) and immature inhibitory basket/stellate cells (B/SC) along the same migratory route. These data show that tPA exerts a pivotal role in neurodevelopment. PMID:24646324

  11. Crosstalk between intracellular and extracellular signals regulating interneuron production, migration and integration into the cortex

    PubMed Central

    Peyre, Elise; Silva, Carla G.; Nguyen, Laurent

    2015-01-01

    During embryogenesis, cortical interneurons are generated by ventral progenitors located in the ganglionic eminences of the telencephalon. They travel along multiple tangential paths to populate the cortical wall. As they reach this structure they undergo intracortical dispersion to settle in their final destination. At the cellular level, migrating interneurons are highly polarized cells that extend and retract processes using dynamic remodeling of microtubule and actin cytoskeleton. Different levels of molecular regulation contribute to interneuron migration. These include: (1) Extrinsic guidance cues distributed along migratory streams that are sensed and integrated by migrating interneurons; (2) Intrinsic genetic programs driven by specific transcription factors that grant specification and set the timing of migration for different subtypes of interneurons; (3) Adhesion molecules and cytoskeletal elements/regulators that transduce molecular signalings into coherent movement. These levels of molecular regulation must be properly integrated by interneurons to allow their migration in the cortex. The aim of this review is to summarize our current knowledge of the interplay between microenvironmental signals and cell autonomous programs that drive cortical interneuron porduction, tangential migration, and intergration in the developing cerebral cortex. PMID:25926769

  12. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Bissonette, Gregory B; Bae, Mihyun H; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E; Powell, Elizabeth M

    2014-02-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  13. Prefrontal cognitive deficits in mice with altered cerebral cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Bissonette, Gregory B.; Bae, Mihyun H.; Suresh, Tejas; Jaffe, David E.; Powell, Elizabeth M.

    2013-01-01

    Alterations of inhibitory GABAergic neurons are implicated in multiple psychiatric and neurological disorders, including schizophrenia, autism and epilepsy. In particular, interneuron deficits in prefrontal areas, along with presumed decreased inhibition, have been reported in several human patients. The majority of forebrain GABAergic interneurons arise from a single subcortical source before migrating to their final regional destination. Factors that govern the interneuron populations have been identified, demonstrating that a single gene mutation may globally affect forebrain structures or a single area. In particular, mice lacking the urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (Plaur) gene have decreased GABAergic interneurons in frontal and parietal, but not caudal, cortical regions. Plaur assists in the activation of hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF), and several of the interneuron deficits are correlated with decreased levels of HGF/SF. In some cortical regions, the interneuron deficit can be remediated by endogenous overexpression of HGF/SF. In this study, we demonstrate decreased parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the medial frontal cortex, but not in the hippocampus or basal lateral amygdala in the Plaur null mouse. The Plaur null mouse demonstrates impaired medial frontal cortical function in extinction of cued fear conditioning and the inability to form attentional sets. Endogenous HGF/SF overexpression increased the number of PV-expressing cells in medial frontal cortical areas to levels greater than found in wildtype mice, but did not remediate the behavioral deficits. These data suggest that proper medial frontal cortical function is dependent upon optimum levels of inhibition and that a deficit or excess of interneuron numbers impairs normal cognition. PMID:24211452

  14. Cortical Interneuron Subtypes Vary in Their Axonal Action Potential Properties

    PubMed Central

    Casale, Amanda E.; Foust, Amanda J.; Bal, Thierry

    2015-01-01

    The role of interneurons in cortical microcircuits is strongly influenced by their passive and active electrical properties. Although different types of interneurons exhibit unique electrophysiological properties recorded at the soma, it is not yet clear whether these differences are also manifested in other neuronal compartments. To address this question, we have used voltage-sensitive dye to image the propagation of action potentials into the fine collaterals of axons and dendrites in two of the largest cortical interneuron subtypes in the mouse: fast-spiking interneurons, which are typically basket or chandelier neurons; and somatostatin containing interneurons, which are typically regular spiking Martinotti cells. We found that fast-spiking and somatostatin-expressing interneurons differed in their electrophysiological characteristics along their entire dendrosomatoaxonal extent. The action potentials generated in the somata and axons, including axon collaterals, of somatostatin-expressing interneurons are significantly broader than those generated in the same compartments of fast-spiking inhibitory interneurons. In addition, action potentials back-propagated into the dendrites of somatostatin-expressing interneurons much more readily than fast-spiking interneurons. Pharmacological investigations suggested that axonal action potential repolarization in both cell types depends critically upon Kv1 channels, whereas the axonal and somatic action potentials of somatostatin-expressing interneurons also depend on BK Ca2+-activated K+ channels. These results indicate that the two broad classes of interneurons studied here have expressly different subcellular physiological properties, allowing them to perform unique computational roles in cortical circuit operations. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Neurons in the cerebral cortex are of two major types: excitatory and inhibitory. The proper balance of excitation and inhibition in the brain is critical for its operation. Neurons

  15. The organization of two novel cortical interneuronal circuits

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xiaolong; Wang, Guangfu; Lee, Alice J.; Stornetta, Ruth L.; Zhu, J. Julius

    2013-01-01

    Deciphering interneuronal circuitry is central to understanding brain functions yet remains as a challenging task in neurobiology. Using simultaneous quadruple-octuple in vitro and dual in vivo whole-cell recordings, we found two previously unknown interneuronal circuits that link cortical layer 1–3 (L1-3) interneurons and L5 pyramidal neurons in the rat neocortex. L1 single-bouquet cells (SBCs) preferentially form unidirectional inhibitory connections on L2/3 interneurons that inhibit the entire dendritic-somato-axonal axis of ~1% of L5 pyramidal neurons located within the same column. In contrast, L1 elongated neurogliaform cells (ENGCs) frequently form mutual inhibitory and electric connections with L2/3 interneurons, and these L1-3 interneurons inhibit the distal apical dendrite of >60% of L5 pyramidal neurons across multiple columns. Functionally, SBC→L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits disinhibit and ENGC↔L2/3 interneuron→L5 pyramidal neuronal circuits inhibit the initiation of dendritic complex spikes in L5 pyramidal neurons. As dendritic complex spikes can serve coincidence detection, these cortical interneuronal circuits may be essential for salience selection. PMID:23313910

  16. Neuronal activity is required for the development of specific cortical interneuron subtypes.

    PubMed

    De Marco García, Natalia V; Karayannis, Theofanis; Fishell, Gord

    2011-04-21

    Electrical activity has been shown to regulate development in a variety of species and in various structures, including the retina, spinal cord and cortex. Within the mammalian cortex specifically, the development of dendrites and commissural axons in pyramidal cells is activity-dependent. However, little is known about the developmental role of activity in the other major cortical population of neurons, the GABA-producing interneurons. These neurons are morphologically and functionally heterogeneous and efforts over the past decade have focused on determining the mechanisms that contribute to this diversity. It was recently discovered that 30% of all cortical interneurons arise from a relatively novel source within the ventral telencephalon, the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE). Owing to their late birth date, these interneurons populate the cortex only after the majority of other interneurons and pyramidal cells are already in place and have started to functionally integrate. Here we demonstrate in mice that for CGE-derived reelin (Re)-positive and calretinin (Cr)-positive (but not vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive) interneurons, activity is essential before postnatal day 3 for correct migration, and that after postnatal day 3, glutamate-mediated activity controls the development of their axons and dendrites. Furthermore, we show that the engulfment and cell motility 1 gene (Elmo1), a target of the transcription factor distal-less homeobox 1 (Dlx1), is selectively expressed in Re(+) and Cr(+) interneurons and is both necessary and sufficient for activity-dependent interneuron migration. Our findings reveal a selective requirement for activity in shaping the cortical integration of specific neuronal subtypes. PMID:21460837

  17. The Stochastic Search Dynamics of Interneuron Migration

    PubMed Central

    Britto, Joanne M.; Johnston, Leigh A.; Tan, Seong-Seng

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Migration is a dynamic process in which a cell searches the environment and translates acquired information into somal advancement. In particular, interneuron migration during development is accomplished by two distinct processes: the extension of neurites tipped with growth cones; and nucleus translocation, termed nucleokinesis. The primary purpose of our study is to investigate neurite branching and nucleokinesis using high-resolution time-lapse confocal microscopy and computational modeling. We demonstrate that nucleokinesis is accurately modeled by a spring-dashpot system and that neurite branching is independent of the nucleokinesis event, and displays the dynamics of a stochastic birth-death process. This is in contrast to traditional biological descriptions, which suggest a closer relationship between the two migratory mechanisms. Our models are validated on independent data sets acquired using two different imaging protocols, and are shown to be robust to alterations in guidance cues and cellular migratory mechanisms, through treatment with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, neurotrophin-4, and blebbistatin. We postulate that the stochastic branch dynamics exhibited by interneurons undergoing guidance-directed migration permit efficient exploration of the environment. PMID:19651028

  18. Diversity of Cortical Interneurons in Primates: The Role of the Dorsal Proliferative Niche

    PubMed Central

    Radonjić, Nevena V.; Ayoub, Albert E.; Memi, Fani; Yu, Xiaojing; Maroof, Asif; Jakovcevski, Igor; Anderson, Stewart A.; Rakic, Pasko; Zecevic, Nada

    2015-01-01

    Summary Evolutionary elaboration of tissues starts with changes in the genome and location of the stem cells. For example, GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian neocortex are generated in the ventral telencephalon and migrate tangentially to the neocortex, in contrast to the projection neurons originating in the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) of the dorsal telencephalon. In human and nonhuman primates, evidence suggests that an additional subset of neocortical GABAergic interneurons is generated in the cortical VZ and a proliferative niche, the outer SVZ. The origin, magnitude, and significance of this species-specific difference are not known. We use a battery of assays applicable to the human, monkey, and mouse organotypic cultures and supravital tissue to identify neuronal progenitors in the cortical VZ/SVZ niche that produce a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Our findings suggest that these progenitors constitute an evolutionary novelty contributing to the elaboration of higher cognitive functions in primates. PMID:25497090

  19. Diversity of cortical interneurons in primates: the role of the dorsal proliferative niche.

    PubMed

    Radonjić, Nevena V; Ayoub, Albert E; Memi, Fani; Yu, Xiaojing; Maroof, Asif; Jakovcevski, Igor; Anderson, Stewart A; Rakic, Pasko; Zecevic, Nada

    2014-12-24

    Evolutionary elaboration of tissues starts with changes in the genome and location of the stem cells. For example, GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian neocortex are generated in the ventral telencephalon and migrate tangentially to the neocortex, in contrast to the projection neurons originating in the ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) of the dorsal telencephalon. In human and nonhuman primates, evidence suggests that an additional subset of neocortical GABAergic interneurons is generated in the cortical VZ and a proliferative niche, the outer SVZ. The origin, magnitude, and significance of this species-specific difference are not known. We use a battery of assays applicable to the human, monkey, and mouse organotypic cultures and supravital tissue to identify neuronal progenitors in the cortical VZ/SVZ niche that produce a subset of GABAergic interneurons. Our findings suggest that these progenitors constitute an evolutionary novelty contributing to the elaboration of higher cognitive functions in primates. PMID:25497090

  20. Subtype-selective electroporation of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    De Marco Garcia, Natalia V.; Fishell, Gord

    2014-01-01

    The study of central nervous system (CNS) maturation relies on genetic targeting of neuronal populations. However, the task of restricting the expression of genes of interest to specific neuronal subtypes has proven remarkably challenging due to the relative scarcity of specific promoter elements. GABAergic interneurons constitute a neuronal population with extensive genetic and morphological diversity. Indeed, more than 11 different subtypes of GABAergic interneurons have been characterized in the mouse cortex1. Here we present an adapted protocol for selective targeting of GABAergic populations. We achieved subtype-selective targeting of GABAergic interneurons by using the enhancer element of the homeobox transcription factors Dlx5 and Dlx6, homologues of the Drosophila distal-less (Dll) gene2,3, to drive the expression of specific genes through in utero electroporation. PMID:25177832

  1. Apical versus Basal Neurogenesis Directs Cortical Interneuron Subclass Fate.

    PubMed

    Petros, Timothy J; Bultje, Ronald S; Ross, M Elizabeth; Fishell, Gord; Anderson, Stewart A

    2015-11-10

    Fate determination in the mammalian telencephalon, with its diversity of neuronal subtypes and relevance to neuropsychiatric disease, remains a critical area of study in neuroscience. Most studies investigating this topic focus on the diversity of neural progenitors within spatial and temporal domains along the lateral ventricles. Often overlooked is whether the location of neurogenesis within a fate-restricted domain is associated with, or instructive for, distinct neuronal fates. Here, we use in vivo fate mapping and the manipulation of neurogenic location to demonstrate that apical versus basal neurogenesis influences the fate determination of major subgroups of cortical interneurons derived from the subcortical telencephalon. Somatostatin-expressing interneurons arise mainly from apical divisions along the ventricular surface, whereas parvalbumin-expressing interneurons originate predominantly from basal divisions in the subventricular zone. As manipulations that shift neurogenic location alter interneuron subclass fate, these results add an additional dimension to the spatial-temporal determinants of neuronal fate determination. PMID:26526999

  2. Prox1 Regulates the Subtype-Specific Development of Caudal Ganglionic Eminence-Derived GABAergic Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Young, Allison; Petros, Timothy; Karayannis, Theofanis; McKenzie Chang, Melissa; Lavado, Alfonso; Iwano, Tomohiko; Nakajima, Miho; Taniguchi, Hiroki; Huang, Z. Josh; Heintz, Nathaniel; Oliver, Guillermo; Matsuzaki, Fumio; Machold, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Neurogliaform (RELN+) and bipolar (VIP+) GABAergic interneurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex provide critical inhibition locally within the superficial layers. While these subtypes are known to originate from the embryonic caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), the specific genetic programs that direct their positioning, maturation, and integration into the cortical network have not been elucidated. Here, we report that in mice expression of the transcription factor Prox1 is selectively maintained in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and that loss of Prox1 impairs the integration of these cells into superficial layers. Moreover, Prox1 differentially regulates the postnatal maturation of each specific subtype originating from the CGE (RELN, Calb2/VIP, and VIP). Interestingly, Prox1 promotes the maturation of CGE-derived interneuron subtypes through intrinsic differentiation programs that operate in tandem with extrinsically driven neuronal activity-dependent pathways. Thus Prox1 represents the first identified transcription factor specifically required for the embryonic and postnatal acquisition of CGE-derived cortical interneuron properties. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Despite the recognition that 30% of GABAergic cortical interneurons originate from the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE), to date, a specific transcriptional program that selectively regulates the development of these populations has not yet been identified. Moreover, while CGE-derived interneurons display unique patterns of tangential and radial migration and preferentially populate the superficial layers of the cortex, identification of a molecular program that controls these events is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that the homeodomain transcription factor Prox1 is expressed in postmitotic CGE-derived cortical interneuron precursors and is maintained into adulthood. We found that Prox1 function is differentially required during both embryonic and postnatal stages of development to

  3. Caudal Ganglionic Eminence Precursor Transplants Disperse and Integrate as Lineage-Specific Interneurons but Do Not Induce Cortical Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Larimer, Phillip; Spatazza, Julien; Espinosa, Juan Sebastian; Tang, Yunshuo; Kaneko, Megumi; Hasenstaub, Andrea R; Stryker, Michael P; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2016-08-01

    The maturation of inhibitory GABAergic cortical circuits regulates experience-dependent plasticity. We recently showed that the heterochronic transplantation of parvalbumin (PV) or somatostatin (SST) interneurons from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) reactivates ocular dominance plasticity (ODP) in the postnatal mouse visual cortex. Might other types of interneurons similarly induce cortical plasticity? Here, we establish that caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived interneurons, when transplanted into the visual cortex of neonatal mice, migrate extensively in the host brain and acquire laminar distribution, marker expression, electrophysiological properties, and visual response properties like those of host CGE interneurons. Although transplants from the anatomical CGE do induce ODP, we found that this plasticity reactivation is mediated by a small fraction of MGE-derived cells contained in the transplant. These findings demonstrate that transplanted CGE cells can successfully engraft into the postnatal mouse brain and confirm the unique role of MGE lineage neurons in the induction of ODP. PMID:27425623

  4. Duration of culture and sonic hedgehog signaling differentially specify PV versus SST cortical interneuron fates from embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Tyson, Jennifer A.; Goldberg, Ethan M.; Maroof, Asif M.; Xu, Qing; Petros, Timothy J.; Anderson, Stewart A.

    2015-01-01

    Medial ganglionic eminence (MGE)-derived GABAergic cortical interneurons (cINs) consist of multiple subtypes that are involved in many cortical functions. They also have a remarkable capacity to migrate, survive and integrate into cortical circuitry after transplantation into postnatal cortex. These features have engendered considerable interest in generating distinct subgroups of interneurons from pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) for the study of interneuron fate and function, and for the development of cell-based therapies. Although advances have been made, the capacity to generate highly enriched pools of subgroup fate-committed interneuron progenitors from PSCs has remained elusive. Previous studies have suggested that the two main MGE-derived interneuron subgroups – those expressing somatostatin (SST) and those expressing parvalbumin (PV) – are specified in the MGE from Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors at higher or lower levels of sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, respectively. To further explore the role of Shh and other factors in cIN fate determination, we generated a reporter line such that Nkx2.1-expressing progenitors express mCherry and postmitotic Lhx6-expressing MGE-derived interneurons express GFP. Manipulations of Shh exposure and time in culture influenced the subgroup fates of ESC-derived interneurons. Exposure to higher Shh levels, and collecting GFP-expressing precursors at 12 days in culture, resulted in the strongest enrichment for SST interneurons over those expressing PV, whereas the strongest enrichment for PV interneurons was produced by lower Shh and by collecting mCherry-expressing cells after 17 days in culture. These findings confirm that fate determination of cIN subgroups is crucially influenced by Shh signaling, and provide a system for the further study of interneuron fate and function. PMID:25804737

  5. Early Somatostatin Interneuron Connectivity Mediates the Maturation of Deep Layer Cortical Circuits.

    PubMed

    Tuncdemir, Sebnem N; Wamsley, Brie; Stam, Floor J; Osakada, Fumitaka; Goulding, Martyn; Callaway, Edward M; Rudy, Bernardo; Fishell, Gord

    2016-02-01

    The precise connectivity of somatostatin and parvalbumin cortical interneurons is generated during development. An understanding of how these interneuron classes incorporate into cortical circuitry is incomplete but essential to elucidate the roles they play during maturation. Here, we report that somatostatin interneurons in infragranular layers receive dense but transient innervation from thalamocortical afferents during the first postnatal week. During this period, parvalbumin interneurons and pyramidal neurons within the same layers receive weaker thalamocortical inputs, yet are strongly innervated by somatostatin interneurons. Further, upon disruption of the early (but not late) somatostatin interneuron network, the synaptic maturation of thalamocortical inputs onto parvalbumin interneurons is perturbed. These results suggest that infragranular somatostatin interneurons exhibit a transient early synaptic connectivity that is essential for the establishment of thalamic feedforward inhibition mediated by parvalbumin interneurons. PMID:26844832

  6. GABA Regulates the Multidirectional Tangential Migration of GABAergic Interneurons in Living Neonatal Mice

    PubMed Central

    Inada, Hiroyuki; Watanabe, Miho; Uchida, Taku; Ishibashi, Hitoshi; Wake, Hiroaki; Nemoto, Tomomi; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Fukuda, Atsuo; Nabekura, Junichi

    2011-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons originate from ganglionic eminences and tangentially migrate into the cortical plate at early developmental stages. To elucidate the characteristics of this migration of GABAergic interneurons in living animals, we established an experimental design specialized for in vivo time-lapse imaging of the neocortex of neonate mice with two-photon laser-scanning microscopy. In vesicular GABA/glycine transporter (VGAT)-Venus transgenic mice from birth (P0) through P3, we observed multidirectional tangential migration of genetically-defined GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical marginal zone. The properties of this migration, such as the motility rate (distance/hr), the direction moved, and the proportion of migrating neurons to stationary neurons, did not change through P0 to P3, although the density of GABAergic neurons at the marginal zone decreased with age. Thus, the characteristics of the tangential motility of individual GABAergic neurons remained constant in development. Pharmacological block of GABAA receptors and of the Na+-K+-Cl− cotransporters, and chelating intracellular Ca2+, all significantly reduced the motility rate in vivo. The motility rate and GABA content within the cortex of neonatal VGAT-Venus transgenic mice were significantly greater than those of GAD67-GFP knock-in mice, suggesting that extracellular GABA concentration could facilitate the multidirectional tangential migration. Indeed, diazepam applied to GAD67-GFP mice increased the motility rate substantially. In an in vitro neocortical slice preparation, we confirmed that GABA induced a NKCC sensitive depolarization of GABAergic interneurons in VGAT-Venus mice at P0-P3. Thus, activation of GABAAR by ambient GABA depolarizes GABAergic interneurons, leading to an acceleration of their multidirectional motility in vivo. PMID:22180776

  7. Dendritic and Axonal Wiring Optimization of Cortical GABAergic Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Anton-Sanchez, Laura; Bielza, Concha; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2016-10-01

    The way in which a neuronal tree expands plays an important role in its functional and computational characteristics. We aimed to study the existence of an optimal neuronal design for different types of cortical GABAergic neurons. To do this, we hypothesized that both the axonal and dendritic trees of individual neurons optimize brain connectivity in terms of wiring length. We took the branching points of real three-dimensional neuronal reconstructions of the axonal and dendritic trees of different types of cortical interneurons and searched for the minimal wiring arborization structure that respects the branching points. We compared the minimal wiring arborization with real axonal and dendritic trees. We tested this optimization problem using a new approach based on graph theory and evolutionary computation techniques. We concluded that neuronal wiring is near-optimal in most of the tested neurons, although the wiring length of dendritic trees is generally nearer to the optimum. Therefore, wiring economy is related to the way in which neuronal arborizations grow irrespective of the marked differences in the morphology of the examined interneurons. PMID:27345531

  8. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA

    PubMed Central

    Luhmann, Heiko J.; Fukuda, A.; Kilb, W.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca2+ transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  9. Control of cortical neuronal migration by glutamate and GABA.

    PubMed

    Luhmann, Heiko J; Fukuda, A; Kilb, W

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration in the cortex is controlled by the paracrine action of the classical neurotransmitters glutamate and GABA. Glutamate controls radial migration of pyramidal neurons by acting primarily on NMDA receptors and regulates tangential migration of inhibitory interneurons by activating non-NMDA and NMDA receptors. GABA, acting on ionotropic GABAA-rho and GABAA receptors, has a dichotomic action on radially migrating neurons by acting as a GO signal in lower layers and as a STOP signal in upper cortical plate (CP), respectively. Metabotropic GABAB receptors promote radial migration into the CP and tangential migration of interneurons. Besides GABA, the endogenous GABAergic agonist taurine is a relevant agonist controlling radial migration. To a smaller extent glycine receptor activation can also influence radial and tangential migration. Activation of glutamate and GABA receptors causes increases in intracellular Ca(2+) transients, which promote neuronal migration by acting on the cytoskeleton. Pharmacological or genetic manipulation of glutamate or GABA receptors during early corticogenesis induce heterotopic cell clusters in upper layers and loss of cortical lamination, i.e., neuronal migration disorders which can be associated with neurological or neuropsychiatric diseases. The pivotal role of NMDA and ionotropic GABA receptors in cortical neuronal migration is of major clinical relevance, since a number of drugs acting on these receptors (e.g., anti-epileptics, anesthetics, alcohol) may disturb the normal migration pattern when present during early corticogenesis. PMID:25688185

  10. Cortical interneurons from human pluripotent stem cells: prospects for neurological and psychiatric disease

    PubMed Central

    Arber, Charles; Li, Meng

    2012-01-01

    Cortical interneurons represent 20% of the cells in the cortex. These cells are local inhibitory neurons whose function is to modulate the firing activities of the excitatory projection neurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is believed to lead to runaway excitation underlying (or implicated in) seizure-based diseases, such as epilepsy, autism, and schizophrenia. The complex development of this cell type and the intricacies involved in defining the relative subtypes are being increasingly well defined. This has led to exciting experimental cell therapy in model organisms, whereby fetal-derived interneuron precursors can reverse seizure severity and reduce mortality in adult epileptic rodents. These proof-of-principle studies raise hope for potential interneuron-based transplantation therapies for treating epilepsy. On the other hand, cortical neurons generated from patient iPSCs serve as a valuable tool to explore genetic influences of interneuron development and function. This is a fundamental step in enhancing our understanding of the molecular basis of neuropsychiatric illnesses and the development of targeted treatments. Protocols are currently being developed for inducing cortical interneuron subtypes from mouse and human pluripotent stem cells. This review sets out to summarize the progress made in cortical interneuron development, fetal tissue transplantation and the recent advance in stem cell differentiation toward interneurons. PMID:23493959

  11. Mechanisms of Firing Patterns in Fast-Spiking Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Golomb, David; Donner, Karnit; Shacham, Liron; Shlosberg, Dan; Amitai, Yael; Hansel, David

    2007-01-01

    Cortical fast-spiking (FS) interneurons display highly variable electrophysiological properties. Their spike responses to step currents occur almost immediately following the step onset or after a substantial delay, during which subthreshold oscillations are frequently observed. Their firing patterns include high-frequency tonic firing and rhythmic or irregular bursting (stuttering). What is the origin of this variability? In the present paper, we hypothesize that it emerges naturally if one assumes a continuous distribution of properties in a small set of active channels. To test this hypothesis, we construct a minimal, single-compartment conductance-based model of FS cells that includes transient Na+, delayed-rectifier K+, and slowly inactivating d-type K+ conductances. The model is analyzed using nonlinear dynamical system theory. For small Na+ window current, the neuron exhibits high-frequency tonic firing. At current threshold, the spike response is almost instantaneous for small d-current conductance, gd, and it is delayed for larger gd. As gd further increases, the neuron stutters. Noise substantially reduces the delay duration and induces subthreshold oscillations. In contrast, when the Na+ window current is large, the neuron always fires tonically. Near threshold, the firing rates are low, and the delay to firing is only weakly sensitive to noise; subthreshold oscillations are not observed. We propose that the variability in the response of cortical FS neurons is a consequence of heterogeneities in their gd and in the strength of their Na+ window current. We predict the existence of two types of firing patterns in FS neurons, differing in the sensitivity of the delay duration to noise, in the minimal firing rate of the tonic discharge, and in the existence of subthreshold oscillations. We report experimental results from intracellular recordings supporting this prediction. PMID:17696606

  12. Real-time Recordings of Migrating Cortical Neurons from GFP and Cre Recombinase Expressing Mice.

    PubMed

    Tielens, Sylvia; Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain that requires elaborate cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often leads to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuron migration is thus fundamental to understanding the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. In this unit, protocols allowing detailed analysis of patterns of migration of both interneurons and projection neurons under different experimental conditions (i.e., loss or gain of function) are presented. PMID:26729032

  13. Two functional inhibitory circuits are comprised of a heterogeneous population of fast spiking cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Peijun; Huntsman, Molly M.

    2014-01-01

    Cortical fast spiking (FS) interneurons possess autaptic, synaptic, and electrical synapses that serve to mediate a fast, coordinated response to their postsynaptic targets. While FS interneurons are known to participate in numerous and diverse actions, functional subgroupings within this multi-functional interneuron class remain to be identified. In the present study, we examined parvalbumin positive FS interneurons in layer 4 of the primary somatosensory (barrel) cortex - a brain region well-known for specialized inhibitory function. Here we show that FS interneurons fall into two broad categories identified by the onset of the first action potential in a depolarizing train as: “Delayed Firing FS interneurons (FSD) and Early Onset Firing FS interneurons (FSE). Subtle variations in action potential firing reveal 6 subtypes within these two categories: delayed non-accommodating (FSD-NAC), delayed stuttering (FSD-STUT), early onset stuttering (FSE-STUT), early onset-late spiking (FSE-LS), early onset early-spiking (FSE-ES), and early onset accommodating (FSE-AC). Using biophysical criteria previously employed to distinguish neuronal cell types, the FSD and FSE categories exhibit several shared biophysical and synaptic properties that coincide with the notion of specificity of inhibitory function within the cortical FS interneuron class. PMID:24480365

  14. Focal Cortical Lesions Induce Bidirectional Changes in the Excitability of Fast Spiking and Non Fast Spiking Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Mittmann, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    A physiological brain function requires neuronal networks to operate within a well-defined range of activity. Indeed, alterations in neuronal excitability have been associated with several pathological conditions, ranging from epilepsy to neuropsychiatric disorders. Changes in inhibitory transmission are known to play a key role in the development of hyperexcitability. However it is largely unknown whether specific interneuronal subpopulations contribute differentially to such pathological condition. In the present study we investigated functional alterations of inhibitory interneurons embedded in a hyperexcitable cortical circuit at the border of chronically induced focal lesions in mouse visual cortex. Interestingly, we found opposite alterations in the excitability of non fast-spiking (Non Fs) and fast-spiking (Fs) interneurons in acute cortical slices from injured animals. Non Fs interneurons displayed a depolarized membrane potential and a higher frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs). In contrast, Fs interneurons showed a reduced sEPSCs amplitude. The observed downscaling of excitatory synapses targeting Fs interneurons may prevent the recruitment of this specific population of interneurons to the hyperexcitable network. This mechanism is likely to seriously affect neuronal network function and to exacerbate hyperexcitability but it may be important to protect this particular vulnerable population of GABAegic neurons from excitotoxicity. PMID:25347396

  15. Extended Production of Cortical Interneurons into the Third Trimester of Human Gestation.

    PubMed

    Arshad, Arslan; Vose, Linnea R; Vinukonda, Govindaiah; Hu, Furong; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Csiszar, Anna; Brumberg, Joshua C; Ballabh, Praveen

    2016-05-01

    In humans, the developmental origins of interneurons in the third trimester of pregnancy and the timing of completion of interneuron neurogenesis have remained unknown. Here, we show that the total and cycling Nkx2.1(+)and Dlx2(+)interneuron progenitors as well as Sox2(+)precursor cells were higher in density in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) compared with the lateral ganglionic eminence and cortical ventricular/subventricular zone (VZ/SVZ) of 16-35 gw subjects. The proliferation of these progenitors reduced as a function of gestational age, almost terminating by 35 gw. Proliferating Dlx2(+)cells were higher in density in the caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) compared with the MGE, and persisted beyond 35 gw. Consistent with these findings, Sox2, Nkx2.1, Dlx2, and Mash1 protein levels were higher in the ganglionic eminences relative to the cortical VZ/SVZ. The density of gamma-aminobutyric acid-positive (GABA(+)) interneurons was higher in the cortical VZ/SVZ relative to MGE, but Nkx2.1 or Dlx2-expressing GABA(+)cells were more dense in the MGE compared with the cortical VZ/SVZ. The data suggest that the MGE and CGE are the primary source of cortical interneurons. Moreover, their generation continues nearly to the end of pregnancy, which may predispose premature infants to neurobehavioral disorders. PMID:25882040

  16. Distinct Roles of SOM and VIP Interneurons during Cortical Up States

    PubMed Central

    Neske, Garrett T.; Connors, Barry W.

    2016-01-01

    During cortical network activity, recurrent synaptic excitation among pyramidal neurons is approximately balanced by synaptic inhibition, which is provided by a vast diversity of inhibitory interneurons. The relative contributions of different interneuron subtypes to inhibitory tone during cortical network activity is not well-understood. We previously showed that many of the major interneuron subtypes in mouse barrel cortex are highly active during Up states (Neske et al., 2015); while fast-spiking (FS), parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells were the most active interneuron subtype, many non-fast-spiking (NFS), PV-negative interneurons were as active or more active than neighboring pyramidal cells. This suggests that the NFS cells could play a role in maintaining or modulating Up states. Here, using optogenetic techniques, we further dissected the functional roles during Up states of two major NFS, PV-negative interneuron subtypes: somatostatin (SOM)-positive cells and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP)-positive cells. We found that while pyramidal cell excitability during Up states significantly increased when SOM cells were optogenetically silenced, VIP cells did not influence pyramidal cell excitability either upon optogenetic silencing or activation. VIP cells failed to contribute to Up states despite their ability to inhibit SOM cells strongly. We suggest that the contribution of VIP cells to the excitability of pyramidal cells may vary with cortical state. PMID:27507936

  17. Bayesian network classifiers for categorizing cortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Mihaljević, Bojan; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; DeFelipe, Javier; Larrañaga, Pedro

    2015-04-01

    An accepted classification of GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex is a major goal in neuroscience. A recently proposed taxonomy based on patterns of axonal arborization promises to be a pragmatic method for achieving this goal. It involves characterizing interneurons according to five axonal arborization features, called F1-F5, and classifying them into a set of predefined types, most of which are established in the literature. Unfortunately, there is little consensus among expert neuroscientists regarding the morphological definitions of some of the proposed types. While supervised classifiers were able to categorize the interneurons in accordance with experts' assignments, their accuracy was limited because they were trained with disputed labels. Thus, here we automatically classify interneuron subsets with different label reliability thresholds (i.e., such that every cell's label is backed by at least a certain (threshold) number of experts). We quantify the cells with parameters of axonal and dendritic morphologies and, in order to predict the type, also with axonal features F1-F4 provided by the experts. Using Bayesian network classifiers, we accurately characterize and classify the interneurons and identify useful predictor variables. In particular, we discriminate among reliable examples of common basket, horse-tail, large basket, and Martinotti cells with up to 89.52% accuracy, and single out the number of branches at 180 μm from the soma, the convex hull 2D area, and the axonal features F1-F4 as especially useful predictors for distinguishing among these types. These results open up new possibilities for an objective and pragmatic classification of interneurons. PMID:25420745

  18. Distinct calcium signals in developing cortical interneurons persist despite disorganization of cortex by Tbr1 KO.

    PubMed

    Easton, C R; Dickey, C W; Moen, S P; Neuzil, K E; Barger, Z; Anderson, T M; Moody, W J; Hevner, R F

    2016-07-01

    Cortical development involves the structuring of network features by genetically programmed molecular signaling pathways. Additionally, spontaneous ion channel activity refines neuronal connections. We examine Ca(2+) fluctuations in the first postnatal week of normal mouse neocortex and that expressing knockout of the transcription factor T-brain-1 (Tbr1): a signaling molecule in cortical patterning and differentiation of excitatory neurons. In cortex, glutamatergic neurons express Tbr1 just before the onset of population electrical activity that is accompanied by intracellular Ca(2+) increases. It is known that glutamatergic cells are disordered with Tbr1 KO such that normal laying of the cortex, with newer born cells residing in superficial layers, does not occur. However, the fate of cortical interneurons is not well studied, nor is the ability of Tbr1 deficient cortex to express normal physiological activity. Using fluorescent proteins targeted to interneurons, we find that cortical interneurons are also disordered in the Tbr1 knockout. Using Ca(2+) imaging we find that population activity in mutant cortex occurs at normal frequencies with similar sensitivity to GABAA receptor blockade as in nonmutant cortex. Finally, using multichannel fluorescence imaging of Ca(2+) indicator dye and interneurons labeled with red fluorescent protein, we identify an additional Ca(2+) signal in interneurons distinct from population activity and with different pharmacological sensitivities. Our results show the population activity described here is a robust property of the developing network that continues in the absence of an important signaling molecule, Tbr1, and that cortical interneurons generate distinct forms of activity that may serve different developmental functions. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 705-720, 2016. PMID:26473411

  19. Properties of precise firing synchrony between synaptically coupled cortical interneurons depend on their mode of coupling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Hang

    2015-01-01

    Precise spike synchrony has been widely reported in the central nervous system, but its functional role in encoding, processing, and transmitting information is yet unresolved. Of particular interest is firing synchrony between inhibitory cortical interneurons, thought to drive various cortical rhythms such as gamma oscillations, the hallmark of cognitive states. Precise synchrony can arise between two interneurons connected electrically, through gap junctions, chemically, through fast inhibitory synapses, or dually, through both types of connections, but the properties of synchrony generated by these different modes of connectivity have never been compared in the same data set. In the present study we recorded in vitro from 152 homotypic pairs of two major subtypes of mouse neocortical interneurons: parvalbumin-containing, fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and somatostatin-containing (SOM) interneurons. We tested firing synchrony when the two neurons were driven to fire by long, depolarizing current steps and used a novel synchrony index to quantify the strength of synchrony, its temporal precision, and its dependence on firing rate. We found that SOM-SOM synchrony, driven solely by electrical coupling, was less precise than FS-FS synchrony, driven by inhibitory or dual coupling. Unlike SOM-SOM synchrony, FS-FS synchrony was strongly firing rate dependent and was not evident at the prototypical 40-Hz gamma frequency. Computer simulations reproduced these differences in synchrony without assuming any differences in intrinsic properties, suggesting that the mode of coupling is more important than the interneuron subtype. Our results provide novel insights into the mechanisms and properties of interneuron synchrony and point out important caveats in current models of cortical oscillations. PMID:25972585

  20. Highly energized inhibitory interneurons are a central element for information processing in cortical networks

    PubMed Central

    Kann, Oliver; Papageorgiou, Ismini E; Draguhn, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Gamma oscillations (∼30 to 100 Hz) provide a fundamental mechanism of information processing during sensory perception, motor behavior, and memory formation by coordination of neuronal activity in networks of the hippocampus and neocortex. We review the cellular mechanisms of gamma oscillations about the underlying neuroenergetics, i.e., high oxygen consumption rate and exquisite sensitivity to metabolic stress during hypoxia or poisoning of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation. Gamma oscillations emerge from the precise synaptic interactions of excitatory pyramidal cells and inhibitory GABAergic interneurons. In particular, specialized interneurons such as parvalbumin-positive basket cells generate action potentials at high frequency (‘fast-spiking') and synchronize the activity of numerous pyramidal cells by rhythmic inhibition (‘clockwork'). As prerequisites, fast-spiking interneurons have unique electrophysiological properties and particularly high energy utilization, which is reflected in the ultrastructure by enrichment with mitochondria and cytochrome c oxidase, most likely needed for extensive membrane ion transport and γ-aminobutyric acid metabolism. This supports the hypothesis that highly energized fast-spiking interneurons are a central element for cortical information processing and may be critical for cognitive decline when energy supply becomes limited (‘interneuron energy hypothesis'). As a clinical perspective, we discuss the functional consequences of metabolic and oxidative stress in fast-spiking interneurons in aging, ischemia, Alzheimer's disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24896567

  1. NPAS1 Represses the Generation of Specific Subtypes of Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Stanco, Amelia; Pla, Ramón; Vogt, Daniel; Chen, Yiran; Mandal, Shyamali; Walker, Jamie; Hunt, Robert F.; Lindtner, Susan; Erdman, Carolyn A.; Pieper, Andrew A.; Hamilton, Steven P.; Xu, Duan; Baraban, Scott C.; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Little is known about genetic mechanisms that regulate the ratio of cortical excitatory and inhibitory neurons. We show that NPAS1 and NPAS3 transcription factors (TF) are expressed in progenitor domains of the mouse basal ganglia (subpallium, MGE and CGE). NPAS1−/− mutants had increased proliferation, ERK signaling and expression of Arx in the MGE and CGE. NPAS1−/− mutants also had increased neocortical inhibition (sIPSC and mIPSC), and generated an excess of somatostatin+ (SST) (MGE-derived) and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide+ (VIP) (CGE-derived) neocortical interneurons, but had a normal density of parvalbumin+ (PV) (MGE-derived) interneurons. In contrast, NPAS3−/− mutants showed decreased proliferation and ERK signaling in progenitors of the ganglionic eminences and had fewer SST+ and VIP+ interneurons. NPAS1 repressed activity of an Arx enhancer, and Arx over-expression resulted in increased proliferation of CGE progenitors. These results provide novel insights into genetic regulation of cortical interneuron numbers and cortical inhibitory tone. PMID:25467980

  2. Characterization of a subpopulation of developing cortical interneurons from human iPSCs within serum-free embryoid bodies

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Samson; Sun, Bruce; Prè, Deborah; Sproul, Andrew A.; Hong, Seong Im; Woodard, Chris; Zimmer, Matthew; Chinchalongporn, Vorapin; Arancio, Ottavio; Noggle, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Production and isolation of forebrain interneuron progenitors are essential for understanding cortical development and developing cell-based therapies for developmental and neurodegenerative disorders. We demonstrate production of a population of putative calretinin-positive bipolar interneurons that express markers consistent with caudal ganglionic eminence identities. Using serum-free embryoid bodies (SFEBs) generated from human inducible pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), we demonstrate that these interneuron progenitors exhibit morphological, immunocytochemical, and electrophysiological hallmarks of developing cortical interneurons. Finally, we develop a fluorescence-activated cell-sorting strategy to isolate interneuron progenitors from SFEBs to allow development of a purified population of these cells. Identification of this critical neuronal cell type within iPSC-derived SFEBs is an important and novel step in describing cortical development in this iPSC preparation. PMID:25394470

  3. New insights into the classification and nomenclature of cortical GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    DeFelipe, Javier; López-Cruz, Pedro L.; Benavides-Piccione, Ruth; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Anderson, Stewart; Burkhalter, Andreas; Cauli, Bruno; Fairén, Alfonso; Feldmeyer, Dirk; Fishell, Gord; Fitzpatrick, David; Freund, Tamás F.; González-Burgos, Guillermo; Hestrin, Shaul; Hill, Sean; Hof, Patrick R.; Huang, Josh; Jones, Edward G.; Kawaguchi, Yasuo; Kisvárday, Zoltán; Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Lewis, David A.; Marín, Oscar; Markram, Henry; McBain, Chris J.; Meyer, Hanno S.; Monyer, Hannah; Nelson, Sacha B.; Rockland, Kathleen; Rossier, Jean; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Rudy, Bernardo; Scanziani, Massimo; Shepherd, Gordon M.; Sherwood, Chet C.; Staiger, Jochen F.; Tamás, Gábor; Thomson, Alex; Wang, Yun; Yuste, Rafael; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2013-01-01

    A systematic classification and accepted nomenclature of neuron types is much needed but is currently lacking. This article describes a possible taxonomical solution for classifying GABAergic interneurons of the cerebral cortex based on a novel, web-based interactive system that allows experts to classify neurons with pre-determined criteria. Using Bayesian analysis and clustering algorithms on the resulting data, we investigated the suitability of several anatomical terms and neuron names for cortical GABAergic interneurons. Moreover, we show that supervised classification models could automatically categorize interneurons in agreement with experts’ assignments. These results demonstrate a practical and objective approach to the naming, characterization and classification of neurons based on community consensus. PMID:23385869

  4. Complementary control of sensory adaptation by two types of cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Natan, Ryan G; Briguglio, John J; Mwilambwe-Tshilobo, Laetitia; Jones, Sara I; Aizenberg, Mark; Goldberg, Ethan M; Geffen, Maria Neimark

    2015-01-01

    Reliably detecting unexpected sounds is important for environmental awareness and survival. By selectively reducing responses to frequently, but not rarely, occurring sounds, auditory cortical neurons are thought to enhance the brain's ability to detect unexpected events through stimulus-specific adaptation (SSA). The majority of neurons in the primary auditory cortex exhibit SSA, yet little is known about the underlying cortical circuits. We found that two types of cortical interneurons differentially amplify SSA in putative excitatory neurons. Parvalbumin-positive interneurons (PVs) amplify SSA by providing non-specific inhibition: optogenetic suppression of PVs led to an equal increase in responses to frequent and rare tones. In contrast, somatostatin-positive interneurons (SOMs) selectively reduce excitatory responses to frequent tones: suppression of SOMs led to an increase in responses to frequent, but not to rare tones. A mutually coupled excitatory-inhibitory network model accounts for distinct mechanisms by which cortical inhibitory neurons enhance the brain's sensitivity to unexpected sounds. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09868.001 PMID:26460542

  5. Physiological Properties of Supragranular Cortical Inhibitory Interneurons Expressing Retrograde Persistent Firing

    PubMed Central

    Imbrosci, Barbara; Neitz, Angela; Mittmann, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Neurons are polarized functional units. The somatodendritic compartment receives and integrates synaptic inputs while the axon relays relevant synaptic information in form of action potentials (APs) across long distance. Despite this well accepted notion, recent research has shown that, under certain circumstances, the axon can also generate APs independent of synaptic inputs at axonal sites distal from the soma. These ectopic APs travel both toward synaptic terminals and antidromically toward the soma. This unusual form of neuronal communication seems to preferentially occur in cortical inhibitory interneurons following a period of intense neuronal activity and might have profound implications for neuronal information processing. Here we show that trains of ectopically generated APs can be induced in a large portion of neocortical layer 2/3 GABAergic interneurons following a somatic depolarization inducing hundreds of APs. Sparsely occurring ectopic spikes were also observed in a large portion of layer 1 interneurons even in absence of prior somatic depolarization. Remarkably, we found that interneurons which produce ectopic APs display specific membrane and morphological properties significantly different from the remaining GABAergic cells and may therefore represent a functionally unique interneuronal subpopulation. PMID:25763283

  6. Altered Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 Function Affects the Development of Cortical Parvalbumin Interneurons by an Indirect Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Borkowska, Malgorzata; Millar, J Kirsty; Price, David J

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene has been linked to schizophrenia and related major mental illness. Mouse Disc1 has been implicated in brain development, mainly in the proliferation, differentiation, lamination, neurite outgrowth and synapse formation and maintenance of cortical excitatory neurons. Here, the effects of two loss-of-function point mutations in the mouse Disc1 sequence (Q31L and L100P) on cortical inhibitory interneurons were investigated. None of the mutations affected the overall number of interneurons. However, the 100P, but not the 31L, mutation resulted in a significant decrease in the numbers of interneurons expressing parvalbumin mRNA and protein across the sensory cortex. To investigate role of Disc1 in regulation of parvalbumin expression, mouse wild-type Disc-1 or the 100P mutant form were electroporated in utero into cortical excitatory neurons. Overexpression of wild-type Disc1 in these cells caused increased densities of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the electroporated area and in areas connected with it, whereas expression of Disc1-100P did not. We conclude that the 100P mutation prevents expression of parvalbumin by a normally sized cohort of interneurons and that altering Disc1 function in cortical excitatory neurons indirectly affects parvalbumin expression by cortical interneurons, perhaps as a result of altered functional input from the excitatory neurons. PMID:27244370

  7. Altered Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 Function Affects the Development of Cortical Parvalbumin Interneurons by an Indirect Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Millar, J. Kirsty; Price, David J.

    2016-01-01

    Disrupted-in-Schizophrenia-1 (DISC1) gene has been linked to schizophrenia and related major mental illness. Mouse Disc1 has been implicated in brain development, mainly in the proliferation, differentiation, lamination, neurite outgrowth and synapse formation and maintenance of cortical excitatory neurons. Here, the effects of two loss-of-function point mutations in the mouse Disc1 sequence (Q31L and L100P) on cortical inhibitory interneurons were investigated. None of the mutations affected the overall number of interneurons. However, the 100P, but not the 31L, mutation resulted in a significant decrease in the numbers of interneurons expressing parvalbumin mRNA and protein across the sensory cortex. To investigate role of Disc1 in regulation of parvalbumin expression, mouse wild-type Disc-1 or the 100P mutant form were electroporated in utero into cortical excitatory neurons. Overexpression of wild-type Disc1 in these cells caused increased densities of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in the electroporated area and in areas connected with it, whereas expression of Disc1-100P did not. We conclude that the 100P mutation prevents expression of parvalbumin by a normally sized cohort of interneurons and that altering Disc1 function in cortical excitatory neurons indirectly affects parvalbumin expression by cortical interneurons, perhaps as a result of altered functional input from the excitatory neurons. PMID:27244370

  8. Distinct cis-Regulatory Elements from the Dlx1/Dlx2 Locus Mark Different Progenitor Cell Populations in the Ganglionic Eminences and Different Subtypes of Adult Cortical Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ghanem, Noël; Yu, Man; Long, Jason; Hatch, Gary; Rubenstein, John L. R.; Ekker, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Distinct subtypes of cortical GABAergic interneurons provide inhibitory signals that are indispensable for neural network function. The Dlx homeobox genes have a central role in regulating their development and function. We have characterized the activity of three cis-regulatory sequences involved in forebrain expression of vertebrate Dlx genes: upstream regulatory element 2 (URE2), I12b, and I56i. The three regulatory elements display regional and temporal differences in their activities within the lateral ganglionic eminence (LGE), medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), and caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE) and label distinct populations of tangentially migrating neurons at embryonic day 12.5 (E12.5) and E13.5. We provide evidence that the dorsomedial and ventral MGE are distinct sources of tangentially migrating neurons during midgestation. In the adult cortex, URE2 and I12b/I56i are differentially expressed in parvalbumin-, calretinin-, neuropeptide Y-, and neuronal nitric oxide synthase-positive interneurons; I12b and I56i were specifically active in somatostatin-, vasoactive intestinal peptide-, and calbindin-positive interneurons. These data suggest that interneuron subtypes use distinct combinations of Dlx1/Dlx2 enhancers from the time they are specified through adulthood. PMID:17494687

  9. Irregular Firing of Isolated Cortical Interneurons in Vitro Driven by Intrinsic Stochastic Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Englitz, Bernhard; Stiefel, Klaus M.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2009-01-01

    Pharmacologically isolated GABAergic irregular spiking and stuttering interneurons in the mouse visual cortex display highly irregular spike times, with high coefficients of variation ≈0.9–3, in response to a depolarizing, constant current input. This is in marked contrast to cortical pyramidal cells, which spike quite regularly in response to the same current injection. We applied time-series analysis methods to show that the irregular behavior of the interneurons was not a consequence of low-dimensional, deterministic processes. These methods were also applied to the Hindmarsh and Rose neuronal model to confirm that the methods are adequate for the types of data under investigation. This result has important consequences for the origin of fluctuations observed in the cortex in vivo. PMID:18045000

  10. Paradoxical proepileptic response to NMDA receptor blockade linked to cortical interneuron defect in stargazer mice.

    PubMed

    Maheshwari, Atul; Nahm, Walter K; Noebels, Jeffrey L

    2013-01-01

    Paradoxical seizure exacerbation by anti-epileptic medication is a well-known clinical phenomenon in epilepsy, but the cellular mechanisms remain unclear. One possibility is enhanced network disinhibition by unintended suppression of inhibitory interneurons. We investigated this hypothesis in the stargazer mouse model of absence epilepsy, which bears a mutation in stargazin, an AMPA receptor trafficking protein. If AMPA signaling onto inhibitory GABAergic neurons is impaired, their activation by glutamate depends critically upon NMDA receptors. Indeed, we find that stargazer seizures are exacerbated by NMDA receptor blockade with CPP (3-[(R)-2-carboxypiperazin-4-yl]-prop-2-enyl-1-phosphonic acid) and MK-801, whereas other genetic absence epilepsy models are sensitive to these antagonists. To determine how an AMPA receptor trafficking defect could lead to paradoxical network activation, we analyzed stargazin and AMPA receptor localization and found that stargazin is detected exclusively in parvalbumin-positive (PV (+)) fast-spiking interneurons in somatosensory cortex, where it is co-expressed with the AMPA receptor subunit GluA4. PV (+) cortical interneurons in stargazer show a near twofold decrease in the dendrite:soma GluA4 expression ratio compared to wild-type (WT) littermates. We explored the functional consequence of this trafficking defect on network excitability in neocortical slices. Both NMDA receptor antagonists suppressed 0 Mg (2) (+)-induced network discharges in WT but augmented bursting in stargazer cortex. Interneurons mediate this paradoxical response, since the difference between genotypes was masked by GABA receptor blockade. Our findings provide a cellular locus for AMPA receptor-dependent signaling defects in stargazer cortex and define an interneuron-dependent mechanism for paradoxical seizure exacerbation in absence epilepsy. PMID:24065886

  11. Roles of Rac1 and Rac3 GTPases during the development of cortical and hippocampal GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    de Curtis, Ivan

    2014-01-01

    Rac GTPases are regulators of the cytoskeleton that play an important role in several aspects of neuronal and brain development. Two distinct Rac GTPases are expressed in the developing nervous system, the widely expressed Rac1 and the neural-specific Rac3 proteins. Recent experimental evidence supports a central role of these two Rac proteins in the development of inhibitory GABAergic interneurons, important modulatory elements of the brain circuitry. The combined inactivation of the genes for the two Rac proteins has profound effects on distinct aspects of interneuron development, and has highlighted a synergistic contribution of the two proteins to the postmitotic maturation of specific populations of cortical and hippocampal interneurons. Rac function is modulated by different types of regulators, and can influence the activity of specific effectors. Some of these proteins have been associated to the development and maturation of interneurons. Cortical interneuron dysfunction is implicated in several neurological and psychiatric diseases characterized by cognitive impairment. Therefore the description of the cellular processes regulated by the Rac GTPases, and the identification of the molecular networks underlying these processes during interneuron development is relevant to the understanding of the role of GABAergic interneurons in cognitive functions. PMID:25309333

  12. Hearing loss differentially affects thalamic drive to two cortical interneuron subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Kotak, Vibhakar C.; Sharma, Neeti; Sanes, Dan H.

    2013-01-01

    Sensory deprivation, such as developmental hearing loss, leads to an adjustment of synaptic and membrane properties throughout the central nervous system. These changes are thought to compensate for diminished sound-evoked activity. This model predicts that compensatory changes should be synergistic with one another along each functional pathway. To test this idea, we examined the excitatory thalamic drive to two types of cortical inhibitory interneurons that display differential effects in response to developmental hearing loss. The inhibitory synapses made by fast-spiking (FS) cells are weakened by hearing loss, whereas those made by low threshold-spiking (LTS) cells remain strong but display greater short-term depression (Takesian et al. 2010). Whole-cell recordings were made from FS or LTS interneurons in a thalamocortical brain slice, and medial geniculate (MG)-evoked postsynaptic potentials were analyzed. Following hearing loss, MG-evoked net excitatory potentials were smaller than normal at FS cells but larger than normal at LTS cells. Furthermore, MG-evoked excitatory potentials displayed less short-term depression at FS cells and greater short-term depression at LTS cells. Thus deprivation-induced adjustments of excitatory synapses onto inhibitory interneurons are cell-type specific and parallel the changes made by the inhibitory afferents. PMID:23719211

  13. Interneuron epigenomes during the critical period of cortical plasticity: Implications for schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Morishita, Hirofumi; Kundakovic, Marija; Bicks, Lucy; Mitchell, Amanda; Akbarian, Schahram

    2015-10-01

    Schizophrenia, a major psychiatric disorder defined by delusions and hallucinations, among other symptoms, often with onset in early adulthood, is potentially associated with molecular and cellular alterations in parvalbumin-expressing fast spiking interneurons and other constituents of the cortical inhibitory GABAergic circuitry. The underlying mechanisms, including the role of disease-associated risk factors operating in adolescence such as drug abuse and social stressors, remain incompletely understood. Here, we summarize emerging findings from animal models, highlighting the ability of parvalbuminergic interneurons (PVI) to induce, during the juvenile period, long-term plastic changes in prefrontal and visual cortex, thereby altering perception, cognition and behavior in the adult. Of note, molecular alterations in PVI from subjects with schizophrenia, including downregulated expression of a subset of GABAergic genes, have also been found in juvenile stress models of the disorder. Some of the transcriptional alterations observed in schizophrenia postmortem brain could be linked to changes in the epigenetic architecture of GABAergic gene promoters, including dysregulated DNA methylation, histone modification patterns and disruption of promoter-enhancer interactions at site of chromosomal loop formations. Therefore, we predict that, in the not-to-distant future, PVI- and other cell-type specific epigenomic mappings in the animal model and human brain will provide novel insights into the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and related psychotic diseases, including the role of cortical GABAergic circuitry in shaping long-term plasticity and cognitive function of the cerebral cortex. PMID:25849095

  14. Analysis of non-radial interneuron migration dynamics and its disruption in Lis1+/- mice.

    PubMed

    Nasrallah, Ilya M; McManus, Matthew F; Pancoast, Maclean M; Wynshaw-Boris, Anthony; Golden, Jeffrey A

    2006-06-20

    Cell migration is an integral process in neural development. Analyses of radial cell migration (RCM) have revealed three modes of migration and specific defects in migration in various mouse mutants. In contrast, the dynamics of non-radial cell migration (NRCM) are incompletely understood. To investigate the dynamics of NRCM, we utilized a slice culture assay coupled with time-lapse videomicroscopy. This analysis revealed that non-radially migrating cells have a complex pattern of extending and retracting one or multiple processes while the nucleus advances concurrently or independently. These data indicate that the process of interneuron migration is unique to that seen for any mode of RCM. Non-radially migrating neurons moved for an average of 0.85 microm/min and paused for approximately 14% of the time observed. Given the novel morphology of NRCM, we hypothesized that specific aspects of migration would be defective with mutations in known cell migration genes, as described for RCM. This was tested by examining the dynamics of migration in the Lis1 mutant mouse; a well-defined cell migration mutant with known defects in NRCM. In contrast to wild-type cells, the rate of nuclear movement was significantly reduced in Lis1+/- interneurons, whereas the rate of active leading edge movement was similar. Morphologically, the leading process was significantly longer and the number of branches reduced in Lis1+/- mice. Together, these data indicate that the NRCM defect in Lis1+/- mice affects specific cellular processes. These data provide insight into NRCM and practical methods for future studies on the role(s) of specific genes in interneuron migration. PMID:16628622

  15. Tangential migration of glutamatergic neurons and cortical patterning during development: Lessons from Cajal-Retzius cells.

    PubMed

    Barber, Melissa; Pierani, Alessandra

    2016-08-01

    Tangential migration is a mode of cell movement, which in the developing cerebral cortex, is defined by displacement parallel to the ventricular surface and orthogonal to the radial glial fibers. This mode of long-range migration is a strategy by which distinct neuronal classes generated from spatially and molecularly distinct origins can integrate to form appropriate neural circuits within the cortical plate. While it was previously believed that only GABAergic cortical interneurons migrate tangentially from their origins in the subpallial ganglionic eminences to integrate in the cortical plate, it is now known that transient populations of glutamatergic neurons also adopt this mode of migration. These include Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), subplate neurons (SPs), and cortical plate transient neurons (CPTs), which have crucial roles in orchestrating the radial and tangential development of the embryonic cerebral cortex in a noncell-autonomous manner. While CRs have been extensively studied, it is only in the last decade that the molecular mechanisms governing their tangential migration have begun to be elucidated. To date, the mechanisms of SPs and CPTs tangential migration remain unknown. We therefore review the known signaling pathways, which regulate parameters of CRs migration including their motility, contact-redistribution and adhesion to the pial surface, and discuss this in the context of how CR migration may regulate their signaling activity in a spatial and temporal manner. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 847-881, 2016. PMID:26581033

  16. Functional effects of distinct innervation styles of pyramidal cells by fast spiking cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Kubota, Yoshiyuki; Kondo, Satoru; Nomura, Masaki; Hatada, Sayuri; Yamaguchi, Noboru; Mohamed, Alsayed A; Karube, Fuyuki; Lübke, Joachim; Kawaguchi, Yasuo

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory interneurons target precise membrane regions on pyramidal cells, but differences in their functional effects on somata, dendrites and spines remain unclear. We analyzed inhibitory synaptic events induced by cortical, fast-spiking (FS) basket cells which innervate dendritic shafts and spines as well as pyramidal cell somata. Serial electron micrograph (EMg) reconstructions showed that somatic synapses were larger than dendritic contacts. Simulations with precise anatomical and physiological data reveal functional differences between different innervation styles. FS cell soma-targeting synapses initiate a strong, global inhibition, those on shafts inhibit more restricted dendritic zones, while synapses on spines may mediate a strictly local veto. Thus, FS cell synapses of different sizes and sites provide functionally diverse forms of pyramidal cell inhibition. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07919.001 PMID:26142457

  17. Oxytocin modulates female sociosexual behavior through a specific class of prefrontal cortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Miho; Görlich, Andreas; Heintz, Nathaniel

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human imaging studies have revealed that intranasal administration of the “prosocial” hormone oxytocin (OT) activates the frontal cortex, and that this action of OT correlates with enhanced brain function in autism. Here we report the discovery of a population of somatostatin (Sst) positive, regular spiking interneurons that express the oxytocin receptor (OxtrINs). Silencing of OxtrINs in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) of female mice resulted in loss of social interest in male mice specifically during the sexually receptive phase of the estrous cycle. This sociosexual deficit was also present in mice in which the Oxtr gene was conditionally deleted from the mPFC, and in control mice infused with an Oxtr antagonist. Our data demonstrate a gender, cell type and state specific role for OT/Oxtr signaling in the mPFC, and identify a latent cortical circuit element that may modulate other complex social behaviors in response to OT. PMID:25303526

  18. Spatiotemporal alterations of cortical network activity by selective loss of NOS-expressing interneurons.

    PubMed

    Shlosberg, Dan; Buskila, Yossi; Abu-Ghanem, Yasmin; Amitai, Yael

    2012-01-01

    Deciphering the role of GABAergic neurons in large neuronal networks such as the neocortex forms a particularly complex task as they comprise a highly diverse population. The neuronal isoform of the enzyme nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) is expressed in the neocortex by specific subsets of GABAergic neurons. These neurons can be identified in live brain slices by the nitric oxide (NO) fluorescent indicator diaminofluorescein-2 diacetate (DAF-2DA). However, this indicator was found to be highly toxic to the stained neurons. We used this feature to induce acute phototoxic damage to NO-producing neurons in cortical slices, and measured subsequent alterations in parameters of cellular and network activity. Neocortical slices were briefly incubated in DAF-2DA and then illuminated through the 4× objective. Histochemistry for NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d), a marker for nNOS activity, revealed elimination of staining in the illuminated areas following treatment. Whole cell recordings from several neuronal types before, during, and after illumination confirmed the selective damage to non-fast-spiking (FS) interneurons. Treated slices displayed mild disinhibition. The reversal potential of compound synaptic events on pyramidal neurons became more positive, and their decay time constant was elongated, substantiating the removal of an inhibitory conductance. The horizontal decay of local field potentials (LFPs) was significantly reduced at distances of 300-400 μm from the stimulation, but not when inhibition was non-selectively weakened with the GABA(A) blocker picrotoxin. Finally, whereas the depression of LFPs along short trains of 40 Hz stimuli was linearly reduced with distance or initial amplitude in control slices, this ordered relationship was disrupted in DAF-treated slices. These results reveal that NO-producing interneurons in the neocortex convey lateral inhibition to neighboring columns, and shape the spatiotemporal dynamics of the network's activity. PMID:22347168

  19. A negative feedback loop controls NMDA receptor function in cortical interneurons via neuregulin 2/ErbB4 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Vullhorst, Detlef; Mitchell, Robert M.; Keating, Carolyn; Roychowdhury, Swagata; Karavanova, Irina; Tao-Cheng, Jung-Hwa; Buonanno, Andres

    2015-01-01

    The neuregulin receptor ErbB4 is an important modulator of GABAergic interneurons and neural network synchronization. However, little is known about the endogenous ligands that engage ErbB4, the neural processes that activate them or their direct downstream targets. Here we demonstrate, in cultured neurons and in acute slices, that the NMDA receptor is both effector and target of neuregulin 2 (NRG2)/ErbB4 signalling in cortical interneurons. Interneurons co-express ErbB4 and NRG2, and pro-NRG2 accumulates on cell bodies atop subsurface cisternae. NMDA receptor activation rapidly triggers shedding of the signalling-competent NRG2 extracellular domain. In turn, NRG2 promotes ErbB4 association with GluN2B-containing NMDA receptors, followed by rapid internalization of surface receptors and potent downregulation of NMDA but not AMPA receptor currents. These effects occur selectively in ErbB4-positive interneurons and not in ErbB4-negative pyramidal neurons. Our findings reveal an intimate reciprocal relationship between ErbB4 and NMDA receptors with possible implications for the modulation of cortical microcircuits associated with cognitive deficits in psychiatric disorders. PMID:26027736

  20. Postmitotic Nkx2-1 controls the migration of telencephalic interneurons by direct repression of guidance receptors

    PubMed Central

    Nóbrega-Pereira, Sandrina; Kessaris, Nicoletta; Du, Tonggong; Kimura, Shioko; Anderson, Stewart A.; Marín, Oscar

    2008-01-01

    Summary The homeodomain transcription factor Nkx2-1 plays key roles in the developing telencephalon, where it regulates the identity of progenitor cells in the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE) and mediates the specification of several classes of GABAergic and cholinergic neurons. Here we have investigated the postmitotic function of Nkx2-1 in the migration of interneurons originating in the MGE. Experimental manipulations and mouse genetics show that downregulation of Nkx2-1 expression in postmitotic cells is necessary for the migration of interneurons to the cortex, whereas maintenance of Nkx2-1 expression is required for interneuron migration to the striatum. Nkx2-1 exerts this role in the migration of MGE-derived interneurons by directly regulating the expression of a guidance receptor, Neuropilin-2, which enables interneurons to invade the developing striatum. Our results demonstrate a novel role for the cell-fate determinant Nkx2-1 in regulating neuronal migration by direct transcriptional regulation of guidance receptors in postmitotic cells. PMID:18786357

  1. Temporal lobe cortical pathology and inhibitory GABA interneuron cell loss are associated with seizures in multiple sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Richard; Magliozzi, Roberta; Campbell, Graham; Mahad, Don; Reynolds, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Background: Seizures are recognised in multiple sclerosis (MS), but their true incidence and the mechanism by which they are associated with MS is unclear. Objective: The objective of this paper is to determine the lifetime frequency of seizures in the United Kingdom MS Tissue Bank (UKMSTB) population and any pathological features associated with seizures. Methods: We evaluated 255 individuals from the UKMSTB. A subset underwent analysis of cortical thickness, grey matter lesion (GML) (type and number) and cortical neuronal numbers (total and GABAergic). Results: A total of 37/255 patients had seizures (14.5% lifetime incidence); in 47% they were associated with concurrent infection. In those with seizures, death and wheelchair use occurred earlier and in 59% seizures developed after 15 years of disease. Seizures were associated with Type 1 GMLs and reduced cortical thickness in the middle temporal gyrus. Localised selective GABAergic interneuron loss in layers IV and VI was related to GMLs but was not explained by the presence of inflammation or by mitochondrial dysfunction within Type I GMLs. Conclusion: We confirm that seizure frequency rises in MS. Type I GMLs in the temporal lobe underlie a loss of inhibitory interneurons in cortical layers IV and VI and these changes could together with concurrent infection enhance susceptibility to seizures. PMID:25921040

  2. GSK-3 signaling in developing cortical neurons is essential for radial migration and dendritic orientation

    PubMed Central

    Morgan-Smith, Meghan; Wu, Yaohong; Zhu, Xiaoqin; Pringle, Julia; Snider, William D

    2014-01-01

    GSK-3 is an essential mediator of several signaling pathways that regulate cortical development. We therefore created conditional mouse mutants lacking both GSK-3α and GSK-3β in newly born cortical excitatory neurons. Gsk3-deleted neurons expressing upper layer markers exhibited striking migration failure in all areas of the cortex. Radial migration in hippocampus was similarly affected. In contrast, tangential migration was not grossly impaired after Gsk3 deletion in interneuron precursors. Gsk3-deleted neurons extended axons and developed dendritic arbors. However, the apical dendrite was frequently branched while basal dendrites exhibited abnormal orientation. GSK-3 regulation of migration in neurons was independent of Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Importantly, phosphorylation of the migration mediator, DCX, at ser327, and phosphorylation of the semaphorin signaling mediator, CRMP-2, at Thr514 were markedly decreased. Our data demonstrate that GSK-3 signaling is essential for radial migration and dendritic orientation and suggest that GSK-3 mediates these effects by phosphorylating key microtubule regulatory proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.02663.001 PMID:25073924

  3. Production and organization of neocortical interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Sultan, Khadeejah T.; Brown, Keith N.; Shi, Song-Hai

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons are a vital component of the neocortex responsible for shaping its output through a variety of inhibitions. Consisting of many flavors, interneuron subtypes are predominantly defined by their morphological, physiological, and neurochemical properties that help to determine their functional role within the neocortex. During development, these cells are born in the subpallium where they then tangentially migrate over long distances before being radially positioned to their final location in the cortical laminae. As development progresses into adolescence, these cells mature and form chemical and electrical connections with both glutamatergic excitatory neurons and other interneurons ultimately establishing the cortical network. The production, migration, and organization of these cells are determined by vast array of extrinsic and intrinsic factors that work in concert in order to assemble a proper functioning cortical inhibitory network. Failure of these cells to undergo these processes results in abnormal positioning and cortical function. In humans, this can bring about several neurological disorders including schizophrenia, epilepsy, and autism spectrum disorders. In this article, we will review previous literature that has revealed the framework for interneuron neurogenesis and migratory behavior as well as discuss recent findings that aim to elucidate the spatial and functional organization of interneurons within the neocortex. PMID:24312011

  4. Unaltered Network Activity and Interneuronal Firing During Spontaneous Cortical Dynamics In Vivo in a Mouse Model of Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy

    PubMed Central

    De Stasi, Angela Michela; Farisello, Pasqualina; Marcon, Iacopo; Cavallari, Stefano; Forli, Angelo; Vecchia, Dania; Losi, Gabriele; Mantegazza, Massimo; Panzeri, Stefano; Carmignoto, Giorgio; Bacci, Alberto; Fellin, Tommaso

    2016-01-01

    Severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI) is associated with loss of function of the SCN1A gene encoding the NaV1.1 sodium channel isoform. Previous studies in Scn1a−/+ mice during the pre-epileptic period reported selective reduction in interneuron excitability and proposed this as the main pathological mechanism underlying SMEI. Yet, the functional consequences of this interneuronal dysfunction at the circuit level in vivo are unknown. Here, we investigated whether Scn1a−/+ mice showed alterations in cortical network function. We found that various forms of spontaneous network activity were similar in Scn1a−/+ during the pre-epileptic period compared with wild-type (WT) in vivo. Importantly, in brain slices from Scn1a−/+ mice, the excitability of parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SST) interneurons was reduced, epileptiform activity propagated more rapidly, and complex synaptic changes were observed. However, in vivo, optogenetic reduction of firing in PV or SST cells in WT mice modified ongoing network activities, and juxtasomal recordings from identified PV and SST interneurons showed unaffected interneuronal firing during spontaneous cortical dynamics in Scn1a−/+ compared with WT. These results demonstrate that interneuronal hypoexcitability is not observed in Scn1a−/+ mice during spontaneous activities in vivo and suggest that additional mechanisms may contribute to homeostatic rearrangements and the pathogenesis of SMEI. PMID:26819275

  5. Functional adaptation of cortical interneurons to attenuated activity is subtype-specific.

    PubMed

    Karayannis, Theofanis; De Marco García, Natalia V; Fishell, Gordon J

    2012-01-01

    Functional neuronal homeostasis has been studied in a variety of model systems and contexts. Many studies have shown that there are a number of changes that can be activated within individual cells or networks in order to compensate for perturbations or changes in levels of activity. Dissociating the cell autonomous from the network-mediated events has been complicated due to the difficulty of sparsely targeting specific populations of neurons in vivo. Here, we make use of a recent in vivo approach we developed that allows for the sparse labeling and manipulation of activity within superficial caudal ganglionic eminence (CGE)-derived GABAergic interneurons. Expression of the inward rectifying potassium channel Kir2.1 cell-autonomously reduced neuronal activity and lead to specific developmental changes in their intrinsic electrophysiological properties and the synaptic input they received. In contrast to previous studies on homeostatic scaling of pyramidal cells, we did not detect any of the typically observed compensatory mechanisms in these interneurons. Rather, we instead saw a specific alteration of the kinetics of excitatory synaptic events within the reelin-expressing subpopulation of interneurons. These results provide the first in vivo observations for the capacity of interneurons to cell-autonomously regulate their excitability. PMID:23015781

  6. Prospective separation and transcriptome analyses of cortical projection neurons and interneurons based on lineage tracing by Tbr2 (Eomes)-GFP/Dcx-mRFP reporters.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiancheng; Wu, Xiwei; Zhang, Heying; Qiu, Runxiang; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Lu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex, projection neurons and interneurons work coordinately to establish neural networks for normal cortical functions. While the specific mechanisms that control productions of projection neurons and interneurons are beginning to be revealed, a global characterization of the molecular differences between these two neuron types is crucial for a more comprehensive understanding of their developmental specifications and functions. In this study, using lineage tracing power of combining Tbr2(Eomes)-GFP and Dcx-mRFP reporter mice, we prospectively separated intermediate progenitor cell (IPC)-derived neurons (IPNs) from non-IPC-derived neurons (non-IPNs) of the embryonic cerebral cortex. Molecular characterizations revealed that IPNs and non-IPNs were enriched with projection neurons and interneurons, respectively. Expression profiling documented cell-specific genes including differentially expressed transcriptional regulators that might be involved in cellular specifications, for instance, our data found that SOX1 and SOX2, which were known for important functions in neural stem/progenitor cells, continued to be expressed by interneurons but not by projection neurons. Transcriptome analyses of cortical neurons isolated at different stages of neurogenesis revealed distinct temporal patterns of expression of genes involved in early-born or late-born neuron specification. These data present a resource useful for further investigation of the molecular regulations and functions of projection neurons and interneurons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 587-599, 2016. PMID:26248544

  7. Choline acetyltransferase immunoreactive cortical interneurons do not occur in all rodents: a study of the phylogenetic occurrence of this neural characteristic.

    PubMed

    Bhagwandin, Adhil; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2006-12-01

    The present study was designed to provide results aimed at testing whether the interneurons with choline acetyltransferase immunoreactivity (ChAT), probably representing GABA interneurons, found in the cerebral cortex of the rat represent a common feature of the order Rodentia. Initially we verified the presence of ChAT immunoreactive bipolar cell bodies, axons and terminal-like fibres in pigmented (Long-Evans) and non-pigmented (Sprague-Dawley) strains of Rattus norvegicus, confirming that the ChAT polyclonal antibodies (AB144P and AB143, Chemicon; VChAT, Sigma) with the immunohistochemical techniques used provided the same staining as previously described for this species. We then examined pigmented (AKR3) and non-pigmented (C3H) strains of Mus musculus, wild caught striped mice (Rhabdomys pumilio), bushveld gerbil (Tatera brantsii), greater canerat (Thryonomys swinderianus) and common molerat (Cryptomys hottentotus). The AB144P antibody revealed cortical interneurons in both strains of M. musculus and in R. pumilio, but not in the other species. In all species/strains cortical ChAT immunoreactive axons and terminal-like fibres were localized with the AB144P antibody. In the non-Rattus species/strains there was no evidence for localization of ChAT immunoreactivity in any cortical cell bodies using the AB143 and vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VChAT) antibodies despite extensive localization in axons and terminal-like fibres. It is concluded that bipolar cortical GABA interneurons in certain rodent species may develop ChAT immunoreactivity but not VChAT immunoreactivity making the cholinergic relevance of ChAT in the GABA interneurons uncertain and may exclude these neurons from being part of the traditionally defined cholinergic system. PMID:17049807

  8. Cortical oscillatory dynamics and benzodiazepine-site modulation of tonic inhibition in fast spiking interneurons.

    PubMed

    Prokic, Emma J; Weston, Cathryn; Yamawaki, Naoki; Hall, Stephen D; Jones, Roland S G; Stanford, Ian M; Ladds, Graham; Woodhall, Gavin L

    2015-08-01

    Tonic conductance mediated by extrasynaptic GABAA receptors has been implicated in the modulation of network oscillatory activity. Using an in vitro brain slice to produce oscillatory activity and a kinetic model of GABAA receptor dynamics, we show that changes in tonic inhibitory input to fast spiking interneurons underlie benzodiazepine-site mediated modulation of neuronal network synchrony in rat primary motor cortex. We found that low concentrations (10 nM) of the benzodiazepine site agonist, zolpidem, reduced the power of pharmacologically-induced beta-frequency (15-30 Hz) oscillatory activity. By contrast, higher doses augmented beta power. Application of the antagonist, flumazenil, also increased beta power suggesting endogenous modulation of the benzodiazepine binding site. Voltage-clamp experiments revealed that pharmacologically-induced rhythmic inhibitory postsynaptic currents were reduced by 10 nM zolpidem, suggesting an action on inhibitory interneurons. Further voltage-clamp studies of fast spiking cells showed that 10 nM zolpidem augmented a tonic inhibitory GABAA receptor mediated current in fast spiking cells whilst higher concentrations of zolpidem reduced the tonic current. A kinetic model of zolpidem-sensitive GABAA receptors suggested that incubation with 10 nM zolpidem resulted in a high proportion of GABAA receptors locked in a kinetically slow desensitized state whilst 30 nM zolpidem favoured rapid transition into and out of desensitized states. This was confirmed experimentally using a challenge with saturating concentrations of GABA. Selective modulation of an interneuron-specific tonic current may underlie the reversal of cognitive and motor deficits afforded by low-dose zolpidem in neuropathological states. PMID:25797493

  9. Cultured networks of excitatory projection neurons and inhibitory interneurons for studying human cortical neurotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin-Chong; Fan, Jing; Wang, Xueqing; Eacker, Stephen M; Kam, Tae-In; Chen, Li; Yin, Xiling; Zhu, Juehua; Chi, Zhikai; Jiang, Haisong; Chen, Rong; Dawson, Ted M; Dawson, Valina L

    2016-04-01

    Translating neuroprotective treatments from discovery in cell and animal models to the clinic has proven challenging. To reduce the gap between basic studies of neurotoxicity and neuroprotection and clinically relevant therapies, we developed a human cortical neuron culture system from human embryonic stem cells or human inducible pluripotent stem cells that generated both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks resembling the composition of the human cortex. This methodology used timed administration of retinoic acid to FOXG1(+)neural precursor cells leading to differentiation of neuronal populations representative of the six cortical layers with both excitatory and inhibitory neuronal networks that were functional and homeostatically stable. In human cortical neuronal cultures, excitotoxicity or ischemia due to oxygen and glucose deprivation led to cell death that was dependent onN-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors, nitric oxide (NO), and poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) (a cell death pathway called parthanatos that is distinct from apoptosis, necroptosis, and other forms of cell death). Neuronal cell death was attenuated by PARP inhibitors that are currently in clinical trials for cancer treatment. This culture system provides a new platform for the study of human cortical neurotoxicity and suggests that PARP inhibitors may be useful for ameliorating excitotoxic and ischemic cell death in human neurons. PMID:27053772

  10. AhR signaling activation disrupts migration and dendritic growth of olfactory interneurons in the developing mouse.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Eiki; Ding, Yunjie; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to a low level of dioxin, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has been shown to induce abnormalities in learning and memory, emotion, and sociality in laboratory animals later in adulthood. However, how aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling activation disrupts the higher brain function remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the possible effects of excessive activation of AhR signaling on neurodevelopmental processes, such as cellular migration and neurite growth, in mice. To this end, we transfected a constitutively active-AhR plasmid into stem cells in the lateral ventricle by in vivo electroporation on postnatal day 1. Transfection was found to induce tangential migration delay and morphological abnormalities in neuronal precursors in the rostral migratory stream at 6 days post-electroporation (dpe) as well as disrupt radial migration in the olfactory bulb and apical and basal dendritic growth of the olfactory interneurons in the granule cell layer at 13 and 20 dpe. These results suggest that the retarded development of interneurons by the excessive AhR signaling may at least in part explain the dioxin-induced abnormal behavioral alterations previously reported in laboratory animals. PMID:27197834

  11. AhR signaling activation disrupts migration and dendritic growth of olfactory interneurons in the developing mouse

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Eiki; Ding, Yunjie; Tohyama, Chiharu

    2016-01-01

    Perinatal exposure to a low level of dioxin, a ubiquitous environmental pollutant, has been shown to induce abnormalities in learning and memory, emotion, and sociality in laboratory animals later in adulthood. However, how aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) signaling activation disrupts the higher brain function remains unclear. Therefore, we studied the possible effects of excessive activation of AhR signaling on neurodevelopmental processes, such as cellular migration and neurite growth, in mice. To this end, we transfected a constitutively active-AhR plasmid into stem cells in the lateral ventricle by in vivo electroporation on postnatal day 1. Transfection was found to induce tangential migration delay and morphological abnormalities in neuronal precursors in the rostral migratory stream at 6 days post-electroporation (dpe) as well as disrupt radial migration in the olfactory bulb and apical and basal dendritic growth of the olfactory interneurons in the granule cell layer at 13 and 20 dpe. These results suggest that the retarded development of interneurons by the excessive AhR signaling may at least in part explain the dioxin-induced abnormal behavioral alterations previously reported in laboratory animals. PMID:27197834

  12. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Tang, Clara S-M; Bekkers, John M

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting over-excitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing (BF), is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform (NG) cells and fast-spiking (FS) cells, are unique in exhibiting BF in acute slices (~85 and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively). BF can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in NG cells). In slices, BF could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K(+), blockade of GABAA receptors). Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing NG cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of NG and FS cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:24659955

  13. Persistent barrage firing in cortical interneurons can be induced in vivo and may be important for the suppression of epileptiform activity

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Norimitsu; Tang, Clara S.-M.; Bekkers, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Neural circuits are typically maintained in a state of dynamic equilibrium by balanced synaptic excitation and inhibition. However, brain regions that are particularly susceptible to epilepsy may have evolved additional specialized mechanisms for inhibiting over-excitation. Here we identify one such possible mechanism in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus of mice. Recently it was reported that some types of GABAergic interneurons can slowly integrate excitatory inputs until eventually they fire persistently in the absence of the original stimulus. This property, called persistent firing or retroaxonal barrage firing (BF), is of unknown physiological importance. We show that two common types of interneurons in cortical regions, neurogliaform (NG) cells and fast-spiking (FS) cells, are unique in exhibiting BF in acute slices (~85 and ~23% success rate for induction, respectively). BF can also be induced in vivo, although the success rate for induction is lower (~60% in NG cells). In slices, BF could reliably be triggered by trains of excitatory synaptic input, as well as by exposure to proconvulsant bath solutions (elevated extracellular K+, blockade of GABAA receptors). Using pair recordings in slices, we confirmed that barrage-firing NG cells can produce synaptic inhibition of nearby pyramidal neurons, and that this inhibition outlasts the original excitation. The ubiquity of NG and FS cells, together with their ability to fire persistently following excessive excitation, suggests that these interneurons may function as cortical sentinels, imposing an activity-dependent brake on undesirable neuronal hyperexcitability. PMID:24659955

  14. Interleukin-1 beta guides the migration of cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-1beta (IL-1β) is expressed at high levels in the developing brain and declines to low constitutive levels in the adult. However, the pathophysiological function of IL-1β during brain development remains elusive. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-1β in neuronal migration. Methods The Boyden transwell assay was used to examine the effects of IL-1β on the migration of dissociated primary cortical neurons. To determine the role of IL-1β in neuron leading process pathfinding, we employed a growth cone turning assay. In utero electroporation combined with RNAi technology was used to examine the neuronal migration in vivo during brain development in Sprague–Dawley rats. Results IL-1β at concentrations ranging from 0.1 to 10 ng/mL in the lower chamber of a transwell induced a significant increase in the number of migrating neurons in a dose-dependent manner. When IL-1β was simultaneously put in both the upper and lower chambers to eliminate the gradient, no significant differences in cell migration were observed. IL-1 receptor antagonist IL-1RA dose-dependently blocked the attractive effect of IL-1β on neuronal migration. Microscopic gradients of IL-1β were created near the growth cones of isolated neurons by repetitive pulsatile application of picoliters of a IL-1β-containing solution with a micropipette. We found that growth cones exhibited a clear bias toward the source of IL-1β at the end of a one hour period in the IL-1β gradient. No significant difference was observed in the rate of neurite extension between IL-1β and controls. We electroporated specific siRNA constructs against IL-1R1 mRNA into cortical progenitors at embryonic day 16 and examined the position and distribution of transfected cells in the somatosensory cortex at postnatal day 5. We found that neurons transfected with IL-1R1-siRNA displayed a severe retardation in radial migration, with about 83% of total cells unable to arrive

  15. Interneurons from Embryonic Development to Cell-Based Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Southwell, Derek G.; Nicholas, Cory R.; Basbaum, Allan I.; Stryker, Michael P.; Kriegstein, Arnold R.; Rubenstein, John L.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Many neurologic and psychiatric disorders are marked by imbalances between neural excitation and inhibition. In the cerebral cortex, inhibition is mediated largely by GABAergic (γ-aminobutyric acid–secreting) interneurons, a cell type that originates in the embryonic ventral telencephalon and populates the cortex through long-distance tangential migration. Remarkably, when transplanted from embryos or in vitro culture preparations, immature interneurons disperse and integrate into host brain circuits, both in the cerebral cortex and in other regions of the central nervous system. These features make interneuron transplantation a powerful tool for the study of neurodevelopmental processes such as cell specification, cell death, and cortical plasticity. Moreover, interneuron transplantation provides a novel strategy for modifying neural circuits in rodent models of epilepsy, Parkinson’s disease, mood disorders, and chronic pain. PMID:24723614

  16. Specificity of prenatal cocaine exposure effects on cortical interneurons is independent from dopamine D1 receptor co-localization.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Barbara L; Stanwood, Gregg D; Levitt, Pat

    2010-07-01

    Gestational cocaine exposure in a rabbit model leads to a persistent increase in parvalbumin immunoreactive cells and processes, reduces dopamine D1 receptor coupling to Gsalpha by means of improper trafficking of the receptor, changes pyramidal neuron morphology, and disrupts cognitive function. Here, experiments investigated whether changes in parvalbumin neurons were specific, or extended to other subpopulations of interneurons. Additionally, we examined dopamine D1 receptor expression patterns and its overlap with specific interneuron populations in the rabbit prefrontal cortex as a possible correlate for alterations in interneuron development following prenatal cocaine exposure. Analysis of calbindin and calretinin interneuron subtypes revealed that they did not exhibit any differences in cell number or process development. Thus, specific consequences of prenatal cocaine in the rabbit appear to be limited to parvalbumin-positive interneurons. Dopamine D1 receptor expression did not correlate with the selective effects of cocaine exposure, however, as both parvalbumin and calbindin cell types expressed the receptor. The findings suggest that additional, unique properties of parvalbumin neurons contribute to their developmental sensitivity to in utero cocaine exposure. PMID:20080176

  17. An interneuron progenitor maintains neurogenic potential in vivo and differentiates into GABAergic interneurons after transplantation in the postnatal rat brain.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Hong, Peiwei; Gao, Hui; Chen, Yuntian; Yang, Qi; Jiang, Mei; Li, Hedong

    2016-01-01

    Dysfunction of cortical GABAergic interneurons are involved in numerous neurological disorders including epilepsy, schizophrenia and autism; and replenishment of these cells by transplantation strategy has proven to be a feasible and effective method to help revert the symptoms in several animal models. To develop methodology of generating transplantable GABAergic interneurons for therapy, we previously reported the isolation of a v-myc-induced GABAergic interneuron progenitor clone GE6 from embryonic ganglionic eminence (GE). These cells can proliferate and form functional inhibitory synapses in culture. Here, we tested their differentiation behavior in vivo by transplanting them into the postnatal rat forebrain. We found that GE6 cells migrate extensively in the neonatal forebrain and differentiate into both neurons and glia, but preferentially into neurons when compared with a sister progenitor clone CTX8. The neurogenic potential of GE6 cells is also maintained after transplantation into a non-permissive environment such as adult cortex or when treated with inflammatory cytokine in culture. The GE6-derived neurons were able to mature in vivo as GABAergic interneurons expressing GABAergic, not glutamatergic, presynaptic puncta. Finally, we propose that v-myc-induced human interneuron progenitor clones could be an alternative cell source of transplantable GABAergic interneurons for treating related neurological diseases in future clinic. PMID:26750620

  18. Synaptic Conductance Estimates of the Connection Between Local Inhibitor Interneurons and Pyramidal Neurons in Layer 2/3 of a Cortical Column.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Jochen H O; Meyer, H S; Schmitt, Arno C; Straehle, Jakob; Weitbrecht, Trinh; Sakmann, Bert; Helmstaedter, Moritz

    2015-11-01

    Stimulation of a principal whisker yields sparse action potential (AP) spiking in layer 2/3 (L2/3) pyramidal neurons in a cortical column of rat barrel cortex. The low AP rates in pyramidal neurons could be explained by activation of interneurons in L2/3 providing inhibition onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons. L2/3 interneurons classified as local inhibitors based on their axonal projection in the same column were reported to receive strong excitatory input from spiny neurons in L4, which are also the main source of the excitatory input to L2/3 pyramidal neurons. Here, we investigated the remaining synaptic connection in this intracolumnar microcircuit. We found strong and reliable inhibitory synaptic transmission between intracolumnar L2/3 local-inhibitor-to-L2/3 pyramidal neuron pairs [inhibitory postsynaptic potential (IPSP) amplitude -0.88 ± 0.67 mV]. On average, 6.2 ± 2 synaptic contacts were made by L2/3 local inhibitors onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons at 107 ± 64 µm path distance from the pyramidal neuron soma, thus overlapping with the distribution of synaptic contacts from L4 spiny neurons onto L2/3 pyramidal neurons (67 ± 34 µm). Finally, using compartmental simulations, we determined the synaptic conductance per synaptic contact to be 0.77 ± 0.4 nS. We conclude that the synaptic circuit from L4 to L2/3 can provide efficient shunting inhibition that is temporally and spatially aligned with the excitatory input from L4 to L2/3. PMID:25761638

  19. Rab, Arf, and Arl-Regulated Membrane Traffic in Cortical Neuron Migration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-07-01

    The migration of projection neurons from its birthplace in the subventricular zone to their final destination in the cortical plate is a complex process that requires a series of highly coordinated cellular events. Amongst the key factors involved in the processes are modulators of cytoskeletal dynamics, as well as cellular membrane traffic. Members of the small GTPases family responsible for the latter process, the Rabs and Arfs, have been recently implicated in cortical neuron migration. Rab5 and Rab11, which are key modulators of endocytosis and endocytic recycling respectively, ensure proper surface expression and distribution of N-cadherin, a key adhesion protein that tethers migrating neurons to the radial glia fiber tracts during pia-directed migration. Rab7, which is associated with lysosomal biogenesis and function, is important for the final step of terminal translocation when N-cadherin is downregulated by lysosomal degradation. Arf6 activity, which is known to be important in neuronal processes outgrowth, may negatively impact the multipolar-bipolar transition of cortical neurons undergoing radial migration, but the downstream effector of Arf6 in this regard is not yet known. In addition to the above, members of the Arl family which have been recently shown to be important in radial glia scaffold formation, would also be important for cortical neuron migration. In this short review, we discuss recent advances in our understanding of the importance of membrane traffic regulated by the Rab, Arf, and Arl family members in cortical neuron migration. PMID:26587959

  20. Three-Dimensional Balance of Cortical Tension and Axial Contractility Enables Fast Amoeboid Migration

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-González, Begoña; Meili, Ruedi; Bastounis, Effie; Firtel, Richard A.; Lasheras, Juan C.; del Álamo, Juan C.

    2015-01-01

    Fast amoeboid migration requires cells to apply mechanical forces on their surroundings via transient adhesions. However, the role these forces play in controlling cell migration speed remains largely unknown. We used three-dimensional force microscopy to measure the three-dimensional forces exerted by chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells, and examined wild-type cells as well as mutants with defects in contractility, internal F-actin crosslinking, and cortical integrity. We showed that cells pull on their substrate adhesions using two distinct, yet interconnected mechanisms: axial actomyosin contractility and cortical tension. We found that the migration speed increases when axial contractility overcomes cortical tension to produce the cell shape changes needed for locomotion. We demonstrated that the three-dimensional pulling forces generated by both mechanisms are internally balanced by an increase in cytoplasmic pressure that allows cells to push on their substrate without adhering to it, and which may be relevant for amoeboid migration in complex three-dimensional environments. PMID:25692587

  1. Genotype-phenotype correlation in neuronal migration disorders and cortical dysplasias

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Mitsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal migration disorders are human (or animal) diseases that result from a disruption in the normal movement of neurons from their original birth site to their final destination during early development. As a consequence, the neurons remain somewhere along their migratory route, their location depending on the pathological mechanism and its severity. The neurons form characteristic abnormalities, which are morphologically classified into several types, such as lissencephaly, heterotopia, and cobblestone dysplasia. Polymicrogyria is classified as a group of malformations that appear secondary to post-migration development; however, recent findings of the underlying molecular mechanisms reveal overlapping processes in the neuronal migration and post-migration development stages. Mutations of many genes are involved in neuronal migration disorders, such as LIS1 and DCX in classical lissencephaly spectrum, TUBA1A in microlissencephaly with agenesis of the corpus callosum, and RELN and VLDLR in lissencephaly with cerebellar hypoplasia. ARX is of particular interest from basic and clinical perspectives because it is critically involved in tangential migration of GABAergic interneurons in the forebrain and its mutations cause a variety of phenotypes ranging from hydranencephaly or lissencephaly to early-onset epileptic encephalopathies, including Ohtahara syndrome and infantile spasms or intellectual disability with no brain malformations. The recent advances in gene and genome analysis technologies will enable the genetic basis of neuronal migration disorders to be unraveled, which, in turn, will facilitate genotype-phenotype correlations to be determined. PMID:26052266

  2. The SH2 domain is crucial for function of Fyn in neuronal migration and cortical lamination

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xi; Hu, Xinde; Song, Lingzhen; An, Lei; Duan, Minghui; Chen, Shulin; Zhao, Shanting

    2015-01-01

    Neurons in the developing brain form the cortical plate (CP) in an inside-out manner, in which the late-born neurons are located more superficially than the early-born neurons. Fyn, a member of the Src family kinases, plays an important role in neuronal migration by binding to many substrates. However, the role of the Src-homology 2 (SH2) domain in function of Fyn in neuronal migration remains poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that the SH2 domain is essential for the action of Fyn in neuronal migration and cortical lamination. A point mutation in the Fyn SH2 domain (FynR176A) impaired neuronal migration and their final location in the cerebral cortex, by inducing neuronal aggregation and branching. Thus, we provide the first evidence of the Fyn SH2 domain contributing to neuronal migration and neuronal morphogenesis. [BMB Reports 2015; 48(2): 97-102] PMID:24912779

  3. Bidirectional radial Ca2+ activity regulates neurogenesis and migration during early cortical column formation

    PubMed Central

    Rash, Brian G.; Ackman, James B.; Rakic, Pasko

    2016-01-01

    Cortical columns are basic cellular and functional units of the cerebral cortex that are malformed in many brain disorders, but how they initially develop is not well understood. Using an optogenetic sensor in the mouse embryonic forebrain, we demonstrate that Ca2+ fluxes propagate bidirectionally within the elongated fibers of radial glial cells (RGCs), providing a novel communication mechanism linking the proliferative and postmitotic zones before the onset of synaptogenesis. Our results indicate that Ca2+ activity along RGC fibers provides feedback information along the radial migratory pathway, influencing neurogenesis and migration during early column development. Furthermore, we find that this columnar Ca2+ propagation is induced by Notch and fibroblast growth factor activities classically implicated in cortical expansion and patterning. Thus, cortical morphogens and growth factors may influence cortical column assembly in part by regulating long-distance Ca2+ communication along the radial axis of cortical development. PMID:26933693

  4. Early phenotype expression of cortical neurons: Evidence that a subclass of migrating neurons have callosal axons

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, M.L.; Rakic, P.; Goldman-Rakic, P.S. )

    1991-02-15

    The use of ({sup 3}H)thymidine labeling in combination with various axonal transport tracers has revealed that a subset of migrating neurons in the fetal monkey cerebrum issue axons to the opposite cerebral hemisphere while still migrating to their final positions in the cortical plate. Other cortical neurons with the same birthdate (i.e., that underwent their last round of DNA synthesis on the same day) are not retrogradely labeled by tracer injections of the opposite hemisphere. These findings suggest that the cardinal distinction between projection and local circuit neurons may be specified in postmitotic neurons before they acquire their final positions in the cortex.

  5. Molecular and Electrophysiological Characterization of GABAergic Interneurons Expressing the Transcription Factor COUP-TFII in the Adult Human Temporal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Varga, Csaba; Tamas, Gabor; Barzo, Pal; Olah, Szabolcs; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Transcription factors contribute to the differentiation of cortical neurons, orchestrate specific interneuronal circuits, and define synaptic relationships. We have investigated neurons expressing chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor II (COUP-TFII), which plays a role in the migration of GABAergic neurons. Whole-cell, patch-clamp recording in vitro combined with colocalization of molecular cell markers in the adult cortex differentiates distinct interneurons. The majority of strongly COUP-TFII-expressing neurons were in layers I–III. Most calretinin (CR) and/or cholecystokinin- (CCK) and/or reelin-positive interneurons were also COUP-TFII-positive. CR-, CCK-, or reelin-positive neurons formed 80%, 20%, or 17% of COUP-TFII-positive interneurons, respectively. About half of COUP-TFII-/CCK-positive interneurons were CR-positive, a quarter of them reelin-positive, but none expressed both. Interneurons positive for COUP-TFII fired irregular, accommodating and adapting trains of action potentials (APs) and innervated mostly small dendritic shafts and rarely spines or somata. Paired recording showed that a calretinin-/COUP-TFII-positive interneuron elicited inhibitory postsynaptic potentials (IPSPs) in a reciprocally connected pyramidal cell. Calbindin, somatostatin, or parvalbumin-immunoreactive interneurons and most pyramidal cells express no immunohistochemically detectable COUP-TFII. In layers V and VI, some pyramidal cells expressed a low level of COUP-TFII in the nucleus. In conclusion, COUP-TFII is expressed in a diverse subset of GABAergic interneurons predominantly innervating small dendritic shafts originating from both interneurons and pyramidal cells. PMID:25787832

  6. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  7. Molecular Pathways Underlying Projection Neuron Production and Migration during Cerebral Cortical Development.

    PubMed

    Ohtaka-Maruyama, Chiaki; Okado, Haruo

    2015-01-01

    Glutamatergic neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex originate from radial glia (RG) progenitors in the ventricular zone (VZ). During corticogenesis, neuroblasts migrate toward the pial surface using two different migration modes. One is multipolar (MP) migration with random directional movement, and the other is locomotion, which is a unidirectional movement guided by the RG fiber. After reaching their final destination, the neurons finalize their migration by terminal translocation, which is followed by maturation via dendrite extension to initiate synaptogenesis and thereby complete neural circuit formation. This switching of migration modes during cortical development is unique in mammals, which suggests that the RG-guided locomotion mode may contribute to the evolution of the mammalian neocortical 6-layer structure. Many factors have been reported to be involved in the regulation of this radial neuronal migration process. In general, the radial migration can be largely divided into four steps; (1) maintenance and departure from the VZ of neural progenitor cells, (2) MP migration and transition to bipolar cells, (3) RG-guided locomotion, and (4) terminal translocation and dendrite maturation. Among these, many different gene mutations or knockdown effects have resulted in failure of the MP to bipolar transition (step 2), suggesting that it is a critical step, particularly in radial migration. Moreover, this transition occurs at the subplate layer. In this review, we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying each of these steps. Finally, we discuss the evolutionary aspects of neuronal migration in corticogenesis. PMID:26733777

  8. Genetics and Function of Neocortical GABAergic Interneurons in Neurodevelopmental Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Rossignol, E.

    2011-01-01

    A dysfunction of cortical and limbic GABAergic circuits has been postulated to contribute to multiple neurodevelopmental disorders in humans, including schizophrenia, autism, and epilepsy. In the current paper, I summarize the characteristics that underlie the great diversity of cortical GABAergic interneurons and explore how the multiple roles of these cells in developing and mature circuits might contribute to the aforementioned disorders. Furthermore, I review the tightly controlled genetic cascades that determine the fate of cortical interneurons and summarize how the dysfunction of genes important for the generation, specification, maturation, and function of cortical interneurons might contribute to these disorders. PMID:21876820

  9. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Large, Adam M.; Kunz, Nicholas A.; Mielo, Samantha L.; Oswald, Anne-Marie M.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  10. Inhibition by Somatostatin Interneurons in Olfactory Cortex.

    PubMed

    Large, Adam M; Kunz, Nicholas A; Mielo, Samantha L; Oswald, Anne-Marie M

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory circuitry plays an integral role in cortical network activity. The development of transgenic mouse lines targeting unique interneuron classes has significantly advanced our understanding of the functional roles of specific inhibitory circuits in neocortical sensory processing. In contrast, considerably less is known about the circuitry and function of interneuron classes in piriform cortex, a paleocortex responsible for olfactory processing. In this study, we sought to utilize transgenic technology to investigate inhibition mediated by somatostatin (SST) interneurons onto pyramidal cells (PCs), parvalbumin (PV) interneurons, and other interneuron classes. As a first step, we characterized the anatomical distributions and intrinsic properties of SST and PV interneurons in four transgenic lines (SST-cre, GIN, PV-cre, and G42) that are commonly interbred to investigate inhibitory connectivity. Surprisingly, the distributions SST and PV cell subtypes targeted in the GIN and G42 lines were sparse in piriform cortex compared to neocortex. Moreover, two-thirds of interneurons recorded in the SST-cre line had electrophysiological properties similar to fast spiking (FS) interneurons rather than regular (RS) or low threshold spiking (LTS) phenotypes. Nonetheless, like neocortex, we find that SST-cells broadly inhibit a number of unidentified interneuron classes including putatively identified PV cells and surprisingly, other SST cells. We also confirm that SST-cells inhibit pyramidal cell dendrites and thus, influence dendritic integration of afferent and recurrent inputs to the piriform cortex. Altogether, our findings suggest that SST interneurons play an important role in regulating both excitation and the global inhibitory network during olfactory processing. PMID:27582691

  11. In Utero Electroporation: Assay System for Migration of Cerebral Cortical Neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tabata, Hidenori; Nakajima, Kazunori

    During the development of the cerebral cortex, the majority of cortical neurons are generated in the ventricular zone (VZ) facing the lateral ventricle and then migrate toward the pial surface to form the highly organized 6-layered cerebral cortex. Detailed profiles of these processes and their molecular mechanisms had been largely unknown because of the absence of an efficient assay system. The in vivo electroporation system was initially devised for use within chick embryos (Funahashi et al., 1999; Itasaki et al., 1999; Momose et al., 1999; Muramatsu et al., 1997), and we and other groups have used that system as a basis for developing an in utero electroporation system, which allows plasmid DNA to be introduced into cortical progenitor cells in developing mouse embryos in the uterus (Fukuchi-Shimogori and Grove, 2001; Saito and Nakatsuji, 2001; Tabata and Nakajima, 2001; Takahashi et al., 2002). In utero electroporation of other sites in the brain, including the hippocampus (Navarro-Quiroga et al., 2007), cerebral basal ganglia (Borrell et al., 2005; Nakahira et al., 2006), cortical hem (Takiguchi-Hayashi et al., 2004), and dorsal thalamus (Bonnin et al., 2007), has recently been reported. Introducing green fluorescent protein (GFP) enables the entire processes of migration and layer formation to be visualized (Ajioka and Nakajima, 2005; Sasaki et al., 2008; Tabata and Nakajima, 2002, 2003), and the role of any gene involved in these processes can be easily assessed by overexpressing the proteins or their mutants (Ohshima et al., 2007), or by knocking down the genes by the RNA interference technique (Bai et al., 2003). Furthermore, the Tet-On/Off system and/or other plasmid- vector-based technologies will expand the potential of the analyses. In this section we review the principles and methods of gene transfer into the cortical wall of mouse embryos by means of the in utero electroporation system.

  12. Depletion of kinesin-12, a myosin-IIB-interacting protein, promotes migration of cortical astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Hu, Zunlu; Chen, Haijiao; Hua, Juan; Wu, Ronghua; Dong, Zhangji; Qiang, Liang; Liu, Yan; Baas, Peter W; Liu, Mei

    2016-06-15

    Kinesin-12 (also named Kif15) participates in important events during neuronal development, such as cell division of neuronal precursors, migration of young neurons and establishment of axons and dendritic arbors, by regulating microtubule organization. Little is known about the molecular mechanisms behind the functions of kinesin-12, and even less is known about its roles in other cell types of the nervous system. Here, we show that kinesin-12 depletion from cultured rat cortical astrocytes decreases cell proliferation but increases migration. Co-immunoprecipitation, GST pulldown and small interfering RNA (siRNA) experiments indicated that kinesin-12 directly interacts with myosin-IIB through their tail domains. Immunofluorescence analyses indicated that kinesin-12 and myosin-IIB colocalize in the lamellar region of astrocytes, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer analyses revealed an interaction between the two. The phosphorylation at Thr1142 of kinesin-12 was vital for their interaction. Loss of their interaction through expression of a phosphorylation mutant of kinesin-12 promoted astrocyte migration. We suggest that kinesin-12 and myosin-IIB can form a hetero-oligomer that generates force to integrate microtubules and actin filaments in certain regions of cells, and in the case of astrocytes, that this interaction can modulate their migration. PMID:27170353

  13. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons.

    PubMed

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2013-04-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  14. EGF transactivation of Trk receptors regulates the migration of newborn cortical neurons

    PubMed Central

    Puehringer, Dirk; Orel, Nadiya; Lüningschrör, Patrick; Subramanian, Narayan; Herrmann, Thomas; Chao, Moses V; Sendtner, Michael

    2014-01-01

    The development of neuronal networks in the neocortex depends on control mechanisms for mitosis and migration that allow newborn neurons to find their accurate position. Multiple mitogens, neurotrophic factors, guidance molecules and their corresponding receptors are involved in this process, but the mechanisms by which these signals are integrated are only poorly understood. We found that TrkB and TrkC, the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3), are activated by epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) signaling rather than by BDNF or NT-3 in embryonic mouse cortical precursor cells. This transactivation event regulated migration of early neuronal cells to their final position in the developing cortex. Transactivation by EGF led to membrane translocation of TrkB, promoting its signaling responsiveness. Our results provide genetic evidence that TrkB and TrkC activation in early cortical neurons do not depend on BDNF and NT-3, but instead on transactivation by EGFR signaling. PMID:23416450

  15. Proneural transcription factors regulate different steps of cortical neuron migration through Rnd-mediated inhibition of RhoA signaling.

    PubMed

    Pacary, Emilie; Heng, Julian; Azzarelli, Roberta; Riou, Philippe; Castro, Diogo; Lebel-Potter, Mélanie; Parras, Carlos; Bell, Donald M; Ridley, Anne J; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2011-03-24

    Little is known of the intracellular machinery that controls the motility of newborn neurons. We have previously shown that the proneural protein Neurog2 promotes the migration of nascent cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the atypical Rho GTPase Rnd2. Here, we show that another proneural factor, Ascl1, promotes neuronal migration in the cortex through direct regulation of a second Rnd family member, Rnd3. Both Rnd2 and Rnd3 promote neuronal migration by inhibiting RhoA signaling, but they control distinct steps of the migratory process, multipolar to bipolar transition in the intermediate zone and locomotion in the cortical plate, respectively. Interestingly, these divergent functions directly result from the distinct subcellular distributions of the two Rnd proteins. Because Rnd proteins also regulate progenitor divisions and neurite outgrowth, we propose that proneural factors, through spatiotemporal regulation of Rnd proteins, integrate the process of neuronal migration with other events in the neurogenic program. PMID:21435554

  16. DOCK7 interacts with TACC3 to regulate interkinetic nuclear migration and cortical neurogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yu-Ting; Wang, Chia-Lin; Van Aelst, Linda

    2012-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the developing neocortex relies on the ability of radial glial progenitor cells (RGCs) to switch from proliferative to differentiative neuron-generating divisions, but the molecular mechanisms that control this switch in a correct temporal manner are not well understood. Here, we show that DOCK7, a member of the DOCK180 family of proteins, plays an important role in the regulation of RGC proliferation versus differentiation. Silencing of DOCK7 in RGCs of developing mouse embryos impedes neuronal differentiation and maintains cells as cycling progenitors. In contrast, DOCK7 overexpression promotes RGC differentiation to basal progenitors and neurons. We further present evidence that DOCK7 influences neurogenesis by controlling apically directed interkinetic nuclear migration (INM) of RGCs. Importantly, DOCK7 exerts its effects by antagonizing the microtubule growth-promoting function of the centrosome-associated protein TACC3. Thus, DOCK7 interaction with TACC3 controls INM and the genesis of neurons from RGCs during cortical development. PMID:22842144

  17. Bcl11a (Ctip1) Controls Migration of Cortical Projection Neurons through Regulation of Sema3c.

    PubMed

    Wiegreffe, Christoph; Simon, Ruth; Peschkes, Katharina; Kling, Carolin; Strehle, Michael; Cheng, Jin; Srivatsa, Swathi; Liu, Pentao; Jenkins, Nancy A; Copeland, Neal G; Tarabykin, Victor; Britsch, Stefan

    2015-07-15

    During neocortical development, neurons undergo polarization, oriented migration, and layer-type-specific differentiation. The transcriptional programs underlying these processes are not completely understood. Here, we show that the transcription factor Bcl11a regulates polarity and migration of upper layer neurons. Bcl11a-deficient late-born neurons fail to correctly switch from multipolar to bipolar morphology, resulting in impaired radial migration. We show that the expression of Sema3c is increased in migrating Bcl11a-deficient neurons and that Bcl11a is a direct negative regulator of Sema3c transcription. In vivo gain-of-function and rescue experiments demonstrate that Sema3c is a major downstream effector of Bcl11a required for the cell polarity switch and for the migration of upper layer neurons. Our data uncover a novel Bcl11a/Sema3c-dependent regulatory pathway used by migrating cortical neurons. PMID:26182416

  18. Foxp1 Regulates Cortical Radial Migration and Neuronal Morphogenesis in Developing Cerebral Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xue; Xiao, Jian; Fröhlich, Henning; Tu, Xiaomeng; Li, Lianlian; Xu, Yue; Cao, Huateng; Qu, Jia; Rappold, Gudrun A.; Chen, Jie-Guang

    2015-01-01

    FOXP1 is a member of FOXP subfamily transcription factors. Mutations in FOXP1 gene have been found in various development-related cognitive disorders. However, little is known about the etiology of these symptoms, and specifically the function of FOXP1 in neuronal development. Here, we report that suppression of Foxp1 expression in mouse cerebral cortex led to a neuronal migration defect, which was rescued by overexpression of Foxp1. Mice with Foxp1 knockdown exhibited ectopic neurons in deep layers of the cortex postnatally. The neuronal differentiation of Foxp1-downregulated cells was normal. However, morphological analysis showed that the neurons with Foxp1 deficiency had an inhibited axonal growth in vitro and a weakened transition from multipolar to bipolar in vivo. Moreover, we found that the expression of Foxp1 modulated the dendritic maturation of neurons at a late postnatal date. Our results demonstrate critical roles of Foxp1 in the radial migration and morphogenesis of cortical neurons during development. This study may shed light on the complex relationship between neuronal development and the related cognitive disorders. PMID:26010426

  19. Migration Speed of Cajal-Retzius Cells Modulated by Vesicular Trafficking Controls the Size of Higher-Order Cortical Areas.

    PubMed

    Barber, Melissa; Arai, Yoko; Morishita, Yoshihiro; Vigier, Lisa; Causeret, Frédéric; Borello, Ugo; Ledonne, Fanny; Coppola, Eva; Contremoulins, Vincent; Pfrieger, Frank W; Tissir, Fadel; Govindan, Subashika; Jabaudon, Denis; Proux-Gillardeaux, Véronique; Galli, Thierry; Pierani, Alessandra

    2015-10-01

    In the neocortex, higher-order areas are essential to integrate sensory-motor information and have expanded in size during evolution. How higher-order areas are specified, however, remains largely unknown. Here, we show that the migration and distribution of early-born neurons, the Cajal-Retzius cells (CRs), controls the size of higher-order areas in the mouse somatosensory, auditory, and visual cortex. Using live imaging, genetics, and in silico modeling, we show that subtype-specific differences in the onset, speed, and directionality of CR migration determine their differential invasion of the developing cortical surface. CR migration speed is cell autonomously modulated by vesicle-associated membrane protein 3 (VAMP3), a classically non-neuronal mediator of endosomal recycling. Increasing CR migration speed alters their distribution in the developing cerebral cortex and leads to an expansion of postnatal higher-order areas and congruent rewiring of thalamo-cortical input. Our findings thus identify novel roles for neuronal migration and VAMP3-dependent vesicular trafficking in cortical wiring. PMID:26387718

  20. An antagonistic interaction between PlexinB2 and Rnd3 controls RhoA activity and cortical neuron migration

    PubMed Central

    Azzarelli, Roberta; Pacary, Emilie; Garg, Ritu; Garcez, Patricia; van den Berg, Debbie; Riou, Philippe; Ridley, Anne J.; Friedel, Roland H.; Parsons, Maddy; Guillemot, François

    2014-01-01

    A transcriptional programme initiated by the proneural factors Neurog2 and Ascl1 controls successive steps of neurogenesis in the embryonic cerebral cortex. Previous work has shown that proneural factors also confer a migratory behaviour to cortical neurons by inducing the expression of the small GTP-binding proteins such as Rnd2 and Rnd3. However, the directionality of radial migration suggests that migrating neurons also respond to extracellular signal-regulated pathways. Here we show that the Plexin B2 receptor interacts physically and functionally with Rnd3 and stimulates RhoA activity in migrating cortical neurons. Plexin B2 competes with p190RhoGAP for binding to Rnd3, thus blocking the Rnd3-mediated inhibition of RhoA and also recruits RhoGEFs to directly stimulate RhoA activity. Thus, an interaction between the cell-extrinsic Plexin signalling pathway and the cell-intrinsic Ascl1-Rnd3 pathway determines the level of RhoA activity appropriate for cortical neuron migration. PMID:24572910

  1. A dynamic zone defines interneuron remodeling in the adult neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wei-Chung Allen; Chen, Jerry L.; Huang, Hayden; Leslie, Jennifer H.; Amitai, Yael; So, Peter T.; Nedivi, Elly

    2008-01-01

    The contribution of structural remodeling to long-term adult brain plasticity is unclear. Here, we investigate features of GABAergic interneuron dendrite dynamics and extract clues regarding its potential role in cortical function and circuit plasticity. We show that remodeling interneurons are contained within a “dynamic zone” corresponding to a superficial strip of layers 2/3, and remodeling dendrites respect the lower border of this zone. Remodeling occurs primarily at the periphery of dendritic fields with addition and retraction of new branch tips. We further show that dendrite remodeling is not intrinsic to a specific interneuron class. These data suggest that interneuron remodeling is not a feature predetermined by genetic lineage, but rather, it is imposed by cortical laminar circuitry. Our findings are consistent with dynamic GABAergic modulation of feedforward and recurrent connections in response to top-down feedback and suggest a structural component to functional plasticity of supragranular neocortical laminae. PMID:19066223

  2. Novel functions of core cell cycle regulators in neuronal migration.

    PubMed

    Godin, Juliette D; Nguyen, Laurent

    2014-01-01

    The cerebral cortex is one of the most intricate regions of the brain, which required elaborated cell migration patterns for its development. Experimental observations show that projection neurons migrate radially within the cortical wall, whereas interneurons migrate along multiple tangential paths to reach the developing cortex. Tight regulation of the cell migration processes ensures proper positioning and functional integration of neurons to specific cerebral cortical circuits. Disruption of neuronal migration often lead to cortical dysfunction and/or malformation associated with neurological disorders. Unveiling the molecular control of neuronal migration is thus fundamental to understand the physiological or pathological development of the cerebral cortex. Generation of functional cortical neurons is a complex and stratified process that relies on decision of neural progenitors to leave the cell cycle and generate neurons that migrate and differentiate to reach their final position in the cortical wall. Although accumulating work shed some light on the molecular control of neuronal migration, we currently do not have a comprehensive understanding of how cell cycle exit and migration/differentiation are coordinated at the molecular level. The current chapter tends to lift the veil on this issue by discussing how core cell cycle regulators, and in particular p27(Kip1) acts as a multifunctional protein to control critical steps of neuronal migration through activities that go far beyond cell cycle regulation. PMID:24243100

  3. Retinoic acid influences neuronal migration from the ganglionic eminence to the cerebral cortex

    PubMed Central

    Crandall, James E.; Goodman, Timothy; McCarthy, Deirdre M.; Duester, Gregg; Bhide, Pradeep G.; Dräger, Ursula C.; McCaffery, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The ganglionic eminence contributes cells to several forebrain structures including the cerebral cortex, for which it provides GABAergic interneurons. Migration of neuronal precursors from the retinoic-acid rich embryonic ganglionic eminence to the cerebral cortex is known to be regulated by several factors, but retinoic acid has not been previously implicated. We found retinoic acid to potently inhibit cell migration in slice preparations of embryonic mouse forebrains, which was reversed by an antagonist of the dopamine-D2 receptor, whose gene is transcriptionally regulated by retinoic acid. Histonedeacetylase inhibitors, which amplify nuclear receptor-mediated transcription, potentiated the inhibitory effect of retinoic acid. Surprisingly, when retinoic acid signalling was completely blocked with a pan-retinoic acid receptor antagonist, this also decreased cell migration into the cortex, implying that a minimal level of endogenous retinoic acid is necessary for tangential migration. Given these opposing effects of retinoic acid in vitro, the in vivo contribution of retinoic acid to migration was tested by counting GABAergic interneurons in cortices of adult mice with experimental reductions in retinoic acid signalling: a range of perturbations resulted in significant reductions in the numerical density of some GABAergic interneuron subpopulations. These observations suggest functions of retinoic acid in interneuron diversity and organization of cortical excitatory–inhibitory balance. PMID:21895658

  4. Hyperactive somatostatin interneurons contribute to excitotoxicity in neurodegenerative disorders.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen; Zhang, Lifeng; Liang, Bo; Schroeder, David; Zhang, Zhong-Wei; Cox, Gregory A; Li, Yun; Lin, Da-Ting

    2016-04-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are overlapping neurodegenerative disorders whose pathogenesis remains largely unknown. Using TDP-43(A315T) mice, an ALS and FTD model with marked cortical pathology, we found that hyperactive somatostatin interneurons disinhibited layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5-PNs) and contributed to their excitotoxicity. Focal ablation of somatostatin interneurons efficiently restored normal excitability of L5-PNs and alleviated neurodegeneration, suggesting a new therapeutic target for ALS and FTD. PMID:26900927

  5. Molecular control of two novel migratory paths for CGE-derived interneurons in the developing mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Touzot, Audrey; Ruiz-Reig, Nuria; Vitalis, Tania; Studer, Michèle

    2016-05-15

    GABAergic interneurons are highly heterogeneous and originate in the subpallium mainly from the medial (MGE) and caudal (CGE) ganglionic eminences according to a precise temporal sequence. MGE-derived cells disperse dorsally and migrate towards all regions of the cortex, but little is known about how CGE-derived cells reach their targets during development. Here, we unravel the existence of two novel CGE caudo-rostral migratory streams, one located laterally (LMS) and the other one more medially (MMS), that, together with the well-known caudal migratory stream (CMS), contribute to populate the neocortex, hippocampus and amygdala. These paths appear in a precise temporal sequence and express a distinct combination of transcription factors, such as SP8, PROX1, COUP-TFI and COUP-TFII. By inactivating COUP-TFI in developing interneurons, the lateral and medial streams are perturbed and expression of SP8 and COUP-TFII affected. As a consequence, adult mutant neocortices have laminar-specific alterations of distinct cortical interneuron subtypes. Overall, we propose that the existence of spatially and temporally regulated migratory paths in the subpallium contributes to the laminar distribution and specification of distinct interneuron subpopulations in the adult brain. PMID:27034423

  6. Inhibition of Inhibition in Visual Cortex: The Logic of Connections Between Molecularly Distinct Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Pfeffer, Carsten K.; Xue, Mingshan; He, Miao; Huang, Z. Josh; Scanziani, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Cortical inhibitory neurons contact each other to form a network of inhibitory synaptic connections. Our knowledge of the connectivity pattern underlying this inhibitory network is, however, still incomplete. Here we discover a simple and complementary interaction scheme between three large molecularly distinct interneuron populations in mouse visual cortex: Parvalbumin expressing interneurons strongly inhibit one another but, surprisingly, provide little inhibition to other populations. In contrast, somatostatin expressing interneurons avoid inhibiting one another, yet strongly inhibit all other populations. Finally, vasoactive intestinal peptide expressing interneurons preferentially inhibit somatostatin interneurons. This scheme occurs in supra- and infra-granular layers, suggesting that inhibitory networks operate similarly at the input and output of visual cortex. Thus, as the specificity of connections between excitatory neurons forms the basis for the cortical canonical circuit, the scheme described here outlines a standard connectivity pattern among cortical inhibitory neurons. PMID:23817549

  7. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Harwell, Corey C.; Fuentealba, Luis C.; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R.L.; Gertz, Caitlyn C.; Mazzola, Emanuele; Turrero Garcia, Miguel; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L.; Kriegstein, Arnold

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  8. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey C; Fuentealba, Luis C; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R L; Gertz, Caitlyn C; Mazzola, Emanuele; Garcia, Miguel Turrero; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  9. Drosophila sosie functions with βH-Spectrin and actin organizers in cell migration, epithelial morphogenesis and cortical stability

    PubMed Central

    Urwyler, Olivier; Cortinas-Elizondo, Fabiola; Suter, Beat

    2012-01-01

    Summary Morphogenesis in multicellular organisms requires the careful coordination of cytoskeletal elements, dynamic regulation of cell adhesion and extensive cell migration. sosie (sie) is a novel gene required in various morphogenesis processes in Drosophila oogenesis. Lack of sie interferes with normal egg chamber packaging, maintenance of epithelial integrity and control of follicle cell migration, indicating that sie is involved in controlling epithelial integrity and cell migration. For these functions sie is required both in the germ line and in the soma. Consistent with this, Sosie localizes to plasma membranes in the germ line and in the somatic follicle cells and is predicted to present an EGF-like domain on the extracellular side. Two positively charged residues, C-terminal to the predicted transmembrane domain (on the cytoplasmic side), are required for normal plasma membrane localization of Sosie. Because sie also contributes to normal cortical localization of βH-Spectrin, it appears that cortical βH-Spectrin mediates some of the functions of sosie. sie also interacts with the genes coding for the actin organizers Filamin and Profilin and, in the absence of sie function, F-actin is less well organized and nurse cells frequently fuse. PMID:23213377

  10. Focal cortical dysplasias in autism spectrum disorders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Previous reports indicate the presence of histological abnormalities in the brains of individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) suggestive of a dysplastic process. In this study we identified areas of abnormal cortical thinning within the cerebral cortex of ASD individuals and examined the same for neuronal morphometric abnormalities by using computerized image analysis. Results The study analyzed celloidin-embedded and Nissl-stained serial full coronal brain sections of 7 autistic (ADI-R diagnosed) and 7 age/sex-matched neurotypicals. Sections were scanned and manually segmented before implementing an algorithm using Laplace’s equation to measure cortical width. Identified areas were then subjected to analysis for neuronal morphometry. Results of our study indicate the presence within our ASD population of circumscribed foci of diminished cortical width that varied among affected individuals both in terms of location and overall size with the frontal lobes being particularly involved. Spatial statistic indicated a reduction in size of neurons within affected areas. Granulometry confirmed the presence of smaller pyramidal cells and suggested a concomitant reduction in the total number of interneurons. Conclusions The neuropathology is consistent with a diagnosis of focal cortical dysplasia (FCD). Results from the medical literature (e.g., heterotopias) and our own study suggest that the genesis of this cortical malformation seemingly resides in the heterochronic divisions of periventricular germinal cells. The end result is that during corticogenesis radially migrating neuroblasts (future pyramidal cells) are desynchronized in their development from those that follow a tangential route (interneurons). The possible presence of a pathological mechanism in common among different conditions expressing an autism-like phenotype argue in favor of considering ASD a “sequence” rather than a syndrome. Focal cortical dysplasias in ASD may serve to

  11. GABAergic Interneurons in the Neocortex: From Cellular Properties to Circuits.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Robin; Lee, Soohyun; Rudy, Bernardo

    2016-07-20

    Cortical networks are composed of glutamatergic excitatory projection neurons and local GABAergic inhibitory interneurons that gate signal flow and sculpt network dynamics. Although they represent a minority of the total neocortical neuronal population, GABAergic interneurons are highly heterogeneous, forming functional classes based on their morphological, electrophysiological, and molecular features, as well as connectivity and in vivo patterns of activity. Here we review our current understanding of neocortical interneuron diversity and the properties that distinguish cell types. We then discuss how the involvement of multiple cell types, each with a specific set of cellular properties, plays a crucial role in diversifying and increasing the computational power of a relatively small number of simple circuit motifs forming cortical networks. We illustrate how recent advances in the field have shed light onto the mechanisms by which GABAergic inhibition contributes to network operations. PMID:27477017

  12. Silencing TRPM7 in Mouse Cortical Astrocytes Impairs Cell Proliferation and Migration via ERK and JNK Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Zhao; Leng, Tiandong; Feng, Xuechao; Sun, Huawei; Inoue, Koichi; Zhu, Li; Xiong, Zhi-Gang

    2015-01-01

    Transient receptor potential melastatin 7 (TRPM7), a non-selective cation channel, is highly expressed expressed in the brain and plays a critical role in ischemic neuronal death. Astrocyte, the most abundant cell type in central nervous system (CNS), exerts many essential functions in the physiological and pathological conditions. Here we investigated the expression and functions of the TRPM7 channel in mouse cortical astrocytes. Using reverse transcription (RT)-PCR, immunostaining, western blot and patch clamp recording, we showed that functional TRPM7 channel is expressed in cultured mouse cortical astrocytes. Knocking down TRPM7 with specific siRNA impairs the proliferation and migration of astrocytes by 40.2% ± 3.9% and 40.1% ± 11.5%, respectively. Consistently, inhibition of TRPM7 with 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) also decreases astrocyte proliferation and migration by 46.1% ± 2.5% and 64.2% ± 2.4%. MAPKs and Akt signaling pathways have been shown to be implicated in TRPM7-mediated responses including cell proliferation and migration. Our data show that suppression of TRPM7 in astrocytes reduces the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERK) and c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), but not p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and Akt. In addition, TRPM7, as a cation channel, has been involved in the Ca2+ and Mg2+ homeostasis in several types of cells. In our study, we found that silencing TRPM7 decreases the intracellular basal Mg2+ concentration without affecting Ca2+ concentration in astrocytes. However, an addition of Mg2+ to the growth medium could not rescue the impaired proliferation of astrocytes. Together, our data suggest that TRPM7 channel may play a critical role in the proliferation and migration of astrocytes via the ERK and JNK pathways. PMID:25799367

  13. Mutual Control of Cholinergic and Low-Threshold Spike Interneurons in the Striatum

    PubMed Central

    Elghaba, Rasha; Vautrelle, Nicolas; Bracci, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    The striatum is the largest nucleus of the basal ganglia and is crucially involved in action selection and reward processing. Cortical and thalamic inputs to the striatum are processed by local networks in which several classes of interneurons play an important, but still poorly understood role. Here we investigated the interactions between cholinergic and low-threshold spike (LTS) interneurons. LTS interneurons were hyperpolarized by co-application of muscarinic and nicotinic receptor antagonists (atropine and mecamylamine, respectively). Mecamylamine alone also caused hyperpolarizations, while atropine alone caused depolarizations and increased firing. LTS interneurons were also under control of tonic GABA, as application of the GABAA receptor antagonist picrotoxin caused depolarizations and increased firing. Frequency of spontaneous GABAergic events in LTS interneurons was increased by co-application of atropine and mecamylamine or by atropine alone, but reduced by mecamylamine alone. In the presence of picrotoxin and tetrodotoxin (TTX), atropine and mecamylamine depolarized the LTS interneurons. We concluded that part of the excitatory effects of tonic acetylcholine (ACh) on LTS interneurons were due to cholinergic modulation of tonic GABA. We then studied the influence of LTS interneurons on cholinergic interneurons. Application of antagonists of somatostatin or neuropeptide Y (NPY) receptors or of an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (L-NAME) did not cause detectable effects in cholinergic interneurons. However, prolonged synchronized depolarizations of LTS interneurons (elicited with optogenetics tools) caused slow-onset depolarizations in cholinergic interneurons, which were often accompanied by strong action potential firing and were fully abolished by L-NAME. Thus, a mutual excitatory influence exists between LTS and cholinergic interneurons in the striatum, providing an opportunity for sustained activation of the two cell types. This activation may

  14. Postnatal development of GABAergic interneurons in the neocortical subplate of mice.

    PubMed

    Qu, G-J; Ma, J; Yu, Y-C; Fu, Y

    2016-05-13

    The subplate (SP) plays important roles in developmental and functional events in the neocortex, such as thalamocortical and corticofugal projection, cortical oscillation generation and corticocortical connectivity. Although accumulated evidence indicates that SP interneurons are crucial for SP function, the molecular composition of SP interneurons as well as their developmental profile and distribution remain largely unclear. In this study, we systematically investigated dynamic development of SP thickness and chemical marker expression in SP interneurons in distinct cortical regions during the first postnatal month. We found that, although the relative area of the SP in the cerebral cortex significantly declined with postnatal development, the absolute thickness did not change markedly. We also found that somatostatin (SOM), the ionotropic serotonin receptor 3A (5HT3AR), and parvalbumin (PV) reliably identify three distinct non-overlapping subpopulations of SP interneurons. The SOM group, which represents ∼30% of total SP interneurons, expresses neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and calbindin (CB) and colocalizes entirely with neuropeptide Y (NPY). The 5HT3AR group, which accounts for ∼60% of the total interneuronal population, expresses calretinin (CR) and GABA-A receptor subunit delta (GABAARδ). The PV group accounts for ∼10% of total SP interneurons and coexpressed GABAARδ. Moreover, distinct interneuron subtypes show characteristic temporal and spatial distribution in the SP. nNOS(+) interneurons in the SP increase from the anterior motor cortex to posterior visual cortex, while CR(+) and CB(+) interneurons the opposite. Interestedly, the majority of GABAARδ(+) neurons in SP are non-GABAergic neurons in contrast to other cortical layers. These findings clarify and extend our understanding of SP interneurons in the developing cerebral cortex and will underpin further study of SP function. PMID:26892297

  15. Target-Specific Effects of Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons on Neocortical Visual Processing

    PubMed Central

    Cottam, James C. H.

    2013-01-01

    A diverse array of interneuron types regulates activity in the mammalian neocortex. Two of the most abundant are the fast-spiking, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) interneurons, which target the axosomatic region of pyramidal cells, and the somatostatin-positive (SOM+) interneurons, which target the dendrites. Recent work has focused on the influence of PV+ and SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells. However, the connections among PV+ and SOM+ interneurons are poorly understood and could play an important role in cortical circuitry, since their interactions may alter the net influence on pyramidal cell output. We used an optogenetic approach to investigate the effect of SOM+ interneurons on pyramidal cells and PV+ interneurons during visual stimulation in mouse primary visual cortex. We find that SOM+ interneuron activation suppresses PV+ cell spiking at least twice as potently as pyramidal cell spiking during visual stimulation. This differential effect of SOM+ cell stimulation is detectable even when only two to three SOM+ cells are activated. Importantly, the remaining responses to oriented gratings in PV+ cells are more orientation tuned and temporally modulated, suggesting that SOM+ activity unmasks this tuning by suppressing untuned input. Our results highlight the importance of SOM+ inhibition of PV+ interneurons during sensory processing. This prominent competitive inhibition between interneuron types leads to a reconfiguration of inhibition along the somatodendritic axis of pyramidal cells, and enhances the orientation selectivity of PV+ cells. PMID:24336721

  16. Comparative aspects of cerebral cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Zoltán; Métin, Christine; Stoykova, Anastassia; Tarabykin, Victor; Price, David J.; Francis, Fiona; Meyer, Gundela; Dehay, Colette; Kennedy, Henry

    2006-01-01

    This review intends to provide examples how comparative and genetic analyses both contribute to our understanding of the rules for cortical development and evolution. Genetic studies helped to understand evolutionary rules of telencephalic organization in vertebrates. The control of the establishment of conserved telencephalic subdivisions and the formation of boundaries between these subdivisions has been examined and revealed the very specific alterations at the striatocortical junction. Comparative studies and genetic analyses both demonstrated the differential origin and migratory pattern of the two basic neuron types of the cerebral cortex. GABAergic interneurons are mostly generated in the subpallium and a common mechanisms govern their migration to the dorsal cortex in both mammals and sauropsids. The pyramidal neurons are generated within the cortical germinal zone and migrate radially. The earliest generated cell layers comprising preplate cells. Reelin positive Cajal-Retzius cells are a general feature of all vertebrates studied so far, however, there is a considerable amplification of the reelin signaling, which might have contributed to the establishment of the basic mammalian pattern of cortical development. Based on numerous recent observations we shall present an argument that specialization of the mitotic compartments might constitute a major drive behind the evolution of the mammalian cortex. Comparative developmental studies revealed distinct features in the early compartments of the developing macaque brain drawing our attention to the limitations of some of the current model systems for understanding human developmental abnormalities of the cortex. Comparative and genetic aspects of cortical development both reveal the workings of evolution. PMID:16519657

  17. Balanced cortical stiffness is important for efficient migration of Dictyostelium cells in confined environments.

    PubMed

    Roth, Heike; Samereier, Matthias; Trommler, Gudrun; Noegel, Angelika A; Schleicher, Michael; Müller-Taubenberger, Annette

    2015-11-27

    Dictyostelium discoideum cells resemble in many aspects human leukocytes and serve as a model to study actin cytoskeleton dynamics and cell migration of highly motile cells. Dictyostelium cells deficient in the actin-binding protein filamin (ddFLN) showed a surprisingly subtle change in phenotype with no or only minor effects in single cell motility. These findings were in contrast to the strong actin-crosslinking activities measured for filamin in vitro. In the present study, we set out to revisit the role of ddFLN in cell migration. For this purpose, we examined migration of wild-type, ddFLN-null and ddFLN-overexpressing cells under different conditions. In addition to cyclic-AMP chemotaxis assays using micropipettes, we explored cell migration under more confined conditions: an under-agarose 2D assay and a 3D assay employing a collagen matrix that was adapted from assays for leukocytes. Using 3D migration conditions, cells deficient in ddFLN displayed only a minor impairment of motility, similar to the results obtained for migration in 2D. However, cells overexpressing ddFLN showed a remarkable decrease in the speed of migration in particular in 3D environments. We suggest that these results are in line with an increased stiffening of the cortex due to the crosslinking activity of overexpressed ddFLN. Our conclusion is that the absolute level of ddFLN is critical for efficient migration. Furthermore, our results show that under conditions of increased mechanical stress, Dictyostelium cells, like leukocytes, switch to a bleb-based mode of movement. PMID:26482849

  18. The early fetal development of human neocortical GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Al-Jaberi, Nahidh; Lindsay, Susan; Sarma, Subrot; Bayatti, Nadhim; Clowry, Gavin J

    2015-03-01

    GABAergic interneurons are crucial to controlling the excitability and responsiveness of cortical circuitry. Their developmental origin may differ between rodents and human. We have demonstrated the expression of 12 GABAergic interneuron-associated genes in samples from human neocortex by quantitative rtPCR from 8 to 12 postconceptional weeks (PCW) and shown a significant anterior to posterior expression gradient, confirmed by in situ hybridization or immunohistochemistry for GAD1 and 2, DLX1, 2, and 5, ASCL1, OLIG2, and CALB2. Following cortical plate (CP) formation from 8 to 9 PCW, a proportion of cells were strongly stained for all these markers in the CP and presubplate. ASCL1 and DLX2 maintained high expression in the proliferative zones and showed extensive immunofluorescent double-labeling with the cell division marker Ki-67. CALB2-positive cells increased steadily in the SVZ/VZ from 10 PCW but were not double-labeled with Ki-67. Expression of GABAergic genes was generally higher in the dorsal pallium than in the ganglionic eminences, with lower expression in the intervening ventral pallium. It is widely accepted that the cortical proliferative zones may generate CALB2-positive interneurons from mid-gestation; we now show that the anterior neocortical proliferative layers especially may be a rich source of interneurons in the early neocortex. PMID:24047602

  19. Interneurons in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Saiz-Sanchez, Daniel; Flores-Cuadrado, Alicia; Ubeda-Bañon, Isabel; de la Rosa-Prieto, Carlos; Martinez-Marcos, Alino

    2016-02-01

    The principal olfactory structures display Alzheimer's disease (AD) related pathology at early stages of the disease. Consequently, olfactory deficits are among the earliest symptoms. Reliable olfactory tests for accurate clinical diagnosis are rarely made. In addition, neuropathological analysis postmortem of olfactory structures is often not made. Therefore, the relationship between the clinical features and the underlying pathology is poorly defined. Traditionally, research into Alzheimer's disease has focused on the degeneration of cortical temporal projection neurons and cholinergic neurons. Recent evidence has demonstrated the neurodegeneration of interneuron populations in AD. This review provides an updated overview of the pathological involvement of interneuron populations in the human olfactory system in Alzheimer's disease. PMID:26616239

  20. GABAergic interneurons form transient layer-specific circuits in early postnatal neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Anastasiades, Paul G.; Marques-Smith, Andre; Lyngholm, Daniel; Lickiss, Tom; Raffiq, Sayda; Kätzel, Dennis; Miesenböck, Gero; Butt, Simon J. B.

    2016-01-01

    GABAergic interneurons play key roles in cortical circuits, yet little is known about their early connectivity. Here we use glutamate uncaging and a novel optogenetic strategy to track changes in the afferent and efferent synaptic connections of developing neocortical interneuron subtypes. We find that Nkx2-1-derived interneurons possess functional synaptic connections before emerging pyramidal cell networks. Subsequent interneuron circuit maturation is both subtype and layer dependent. Glutamatergic input onto fast spiking (FS), but not somatostatin-positive, non-FS interneurons increases over development. Interneurons of both subtype located in layers (L) 4 and 5b engage in transient circuits that disappear after the somatosensory critical period. These include a pathway mediated by L5b somatostatin-positive interneurons that specifically targets L4 during the first postnatal week. The innervation patterns of immature cortical interneuron circuits are thus neither static nor progressively strengthened but follow a layer-specific choreography of transient connections that differ from those of the adult brain. PMID:26843463

  1. Cellullar insights into cerebral cortical development: focusing on the locomotion mode of neuronal migration

    PubMed Central

    Kawauchi, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The mammalian brain consists of numerous compartments that are closely connected with each other via neural networks, comprising the basis of higher order brain functions. The highly specialized structure originates from simple pseudostratified neuroepithelium-derived neural progenitors located near the ventricle. A long journey by neurons from the ventricular side is essential for the formation of a sophisticated brain structure, including a mammalian-specific six-layered cerebral cortex. Neuronal migration consists of several contiguous steps, but the locomotion mode comprises a large part of the migration. The locomoting neurons exhibit unique features; a radial glial fiber-dependent migration requiring the endocytic recycling of N-cadherin and a neuron-specific migration mode with dilation/swelling formation that requires the actin and microtubule organization possibly regulated by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 (Cdk5), Dcx, p27kip1, Rac1, and POSH. Here I will introduce the roles of various cellular events, such as cytoskeletal organization, cell adhesion, and membrane trafficking, in the regulation of the neuronal migration, with particular focus on the locomotion mode. PMID:26500496

  2. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  3. The Current Status of Somatostatin-Interneurons in Inhibitory Control of Brain Function and Plasticity.

    PubMed

    Scheyltjens, Isabelle; Arckens, Lutgarde

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian neocortex contains many distinct inhibitory neuronal populations to balance excitatory neurotransmission. A correct excitation/inhibition equilibrium is crucial for normal brain development, functioning, and controlling lifelong cortical plasticity. Knowledge about how the inhibitory network contributes to brain plasticity however remains incomplete. Somatostatin- (SST-) interneurons constitute a large neocortical subpopulation of interneurons, next to parvalbumin- (PV-) and vasoactive intestinal peptide- (VIP-) interneurons. Unlike the extensively studied PV-interneurons, acknowledged as key components in guiding ocular dominance plasticity, the contribution of SST-interneurons is less understood. Nevertheless, SST-interneurons are ideally situated within cortical networks to integrate unimodal or cross-modal sensory information processing and therefore likely to be important mediators of experience-dependent plasticity. The lack of knowledge on SST-interneurons partially relates to the wide variety of distinct subpopulations present in the sensory neocortex. This review informs on those SST-subpopulations hitherto described based on anatomical, molecular, or electrophysiological characteristics and whose functional roles can be attributed based on specific cortical wiring patterns. A possible role for these subpopulations in experience-dependent plasticity will be discussed, emphasizing on learning-induced plasticity and on unimodal and cross-modal plasticity upon sensory loss. This knowledge will ultimately contribute to guide brain plasticity into well-defined directions to restore sensory function and promote lifelong learning. PMID:27403348

  4. Neurogenesis and widespread forebrain migration of distinct GABAergic neurons from the postnatal subventricular zone

    PubMed Central

    Inta, Dragos; Alfonso, Julieta; von Engelhardt, Jakob; Kreuzberg, Maria M.; Meyer, Axel H.; van Hooft, Johannes A.; Monyer, Hannah

    2008-01-01

    Most forebrain GABAergic interneurons in rodents are born during embryonic development in the ganglionic eminences (GE) and migrate tangentially into the cortical plate. A subset, however, continues to be generated postnatally in the subventricular zone (SVZ). These interneurons populate the olfactory bulb (OB) reached via migration in the rostral migratory stream (RMS). Employing transgenic mice expressing EGFP in 5-HT3-positive neurons, we identified additional migratory pathways in the early postnatal brain. Time-lapse imaging experiments revealed massive migration of EGFP-positive cells from the SVZ into numerous forebrain regions, including cortex, striatum, and nucleus accumbens. The neuronal fate of the migratory EGFP-labeled cells was indicated by their doublecortin (DCX) expression. Birthdating experiments, by using 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) and retrovirus-based experiments, provided evidence that migrating neuroblasts were born in the SVZ postnatally and developed a distinct GABAergic phenotype. Our results demonstrate that the SVZ is a reservoir of GABAergic interneurons not only for the OB, but also for other cortical and subcortical areas. PMID:19095802

  5. An AKT3-FOXG1-Reelin Network Underlies Defective Migration in Human Focal Malformations of Cortical Development

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Seung Tae; Copeland, Brett; Yun, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Schaffer, Ashleigh E.; Kim, Sangwoo; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Song, Saera; Mathern, Gary W.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2016-01-01

    Focal malformations of cortical development (FMCD) account for the majority of drug-resistant pediatric epilepsy. Postzygotic somatic mutations activating the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway are found in a wide range of brain diseases, including FMCD. It remains unclear how a mutation in a small fraction of cells can disrupt the architecture of the entire hemisphere. We show that, within human FMCD brain, cells showing activation of this pathway were enriched for the mutation. Introducing the FMCD mutation into mouse brain resulted in electrographic seizures and impaired hemispheric architecture. Mutation-expressing neural progenitors showed reelin misexpression, which led to a non-cell autonomous migration defect in neighboring cells, due at least in part to FOXG1-mediated de-repression of reelin transcription. Treatments aimed at blocking downstream AKT signaling or inactivating reelin restored migration. These findings suggest a central AKT-FOXG1-Reelin signaling pathway in FMCD, and support pathway inhibitors as potential treatments or therapies for some forms of focal epilepsy. PMID:26523971

  6. An AKT3-FOXG1-reelin network underlies defective migration in human focal malformations of cortical development.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung Tae; Copeland, Brett; Yun, Eun-Jin; Kwon, Seok-Kyu; Guemez-Gamboa, Alicia; Schaffer, Ashleigh E; Kim, Sangwoo; Kang, Hoon-Chul; Song, Saera; Mathern, Gary W; Gleeson, Joseph G

    2015-12-01

    Focal malformations of cortical development (FMCDs) account for the majority of drug-resistant pediatric epilepsy. Postzygotic somatic mutations activating the phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate-3-kinase (PI3K)-protein kinase B (AKT)-mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway are found in a wide range of brain diseases, including FMCDs. It remains unclear how a mutation in a small fraction of cells disrupts the architecture of the entire hemisphere. Within human FMCD-affected brain, we found that cells showing activation of the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway were enriched for the AKT3(E17K) mutation. Introducing the FMCD-causing mutation into mouse brain resulted in electrographic seizures and impaired hemispheric architecture. Mutation-expressing neural progenitors showed misexpression of reelin, which led to a non-cell autonomous migration defect in neighboring cells, due at least in part to derepression of reelin transcription in a manner dependent on the forkhead box (FOX) transcription factor FOXG1. Treatments aimed at either blocking downstream AKT signaling or inactivating reelin restored migration. These findings suggest a central AKT-FOXG1-reelin signaling pathway in FMCD and support pathway inhibitors as potential treatments or therapies for some forms of focal epilepsy. PMID:26523971

  7. Serotonin Attenuates Feedback Excitation onto O-LM Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Böhm, Claudia; Pangalos, Maria; Schmitz, Dietmar; Winterer, Jochen

    2015-01-01

    The serotonergic system is a subcortical neuromodulatory center that controls cortical information processing in a state-dependent manner. In the hippocampus, serotonin (5-HT) is released by ascending serotonergic fibers from the midbrain raphe nuclei, thereby mediating numerous modulatory functions on various neuronal subtypes. Here, we focus on the neuromodulatory effects of 5-HT on GABAergic inhibitory oriens lacunosum-moleculare (O-LM) cells in the hippocampal area CA1 of the rat. These interneurons are thought to receive primarily local excitatory input and are, via their axonal projections to stratum lacunosum-moleculare, ideally suited to control entorhinal cortex input. We show that 5-HT reduces excitatory glutamatergic transmission onto O-LM interneurons. By means of paired recordings from synaptically connected CA1 pyramidal cells and O-LM interneurons we reveal that this synapse is modulated by 5-HT. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the reduction of glutamatergic transmission by serotonin is likely to be mediated via a decrease of calcium influx into presynaptic terminals of CA1 pyramidal cells. This modulation of excitatory synaptic transmission onto O-LM interneurons by 5-HT might be a mechanism to vary the activation of O-LM interneurons during ongoing network activity and serve as a brain state-dependent switch gating the efficiency of entorhinal cortex input to CA1 pyramidal neurons. PMID:26021702

  8. FMRP regulates multipolar to bipolar transition affecting neuronal migration and cortical circuitry.

    PubMed

    La Fata, Giorgio; Gärtner, Annette; Domínguez-Iturza, Nuria; Dresselaers, Tom; Dawitz, Julia; Poorthuis, Rogier B; Averna, Michele; Himmelreich, Uwe; Meredith, Rhiannon M; Achsel, Tilmann; Dotti, Carlos G; Bagni, Claudia

    2014-12-01

    Deficiencies in fragile X mental retardation protein (FMRP) are the most common cause of inherited intellectual disability, fragile X syndrome (FXS), with symptoms manifesting during infancy and early childhood. Using a mouse model for FXS, we found that Fmrp regulates the positioning of neurons in the cortical plate during embryonic development, affecting their multipolar-to-bipolar transition (MBT). We identified N-cadherin, which is crucial for MBT, as an Fmrp-regulated target in embryonic brain. Furthermore, spontaneous network activity and high-resolution brain imaging revealed defects in the establishment of neuronal networks at very early developmental stages, further confirmed by an unbalanced excitatory and inhibitory network. Finally, reintroduction of Fmrp or N-cadherin in the embryo normalized early postnatal neuron activity. Our findings highlight the critical role of Fmrp in the developing cerebral cortex and might explain some of the clinical features observed in patients with FXS, such as alterations in synaptic communication and neuronal network connectivity. PMID:25402856

  9. Cell-type Specific Development of NMDA Receptors in the Interneurons of Rat Prefrontal Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Xing; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2009-01-01

    In the prefrontal cortex, N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) receptors are critical not only for normal prefrontal functions but also for the pathological processes of schizophrenia. Little is known, however, about the developmental properties of NMDA receptors in the functionally diverse subpopulations of interneurons. We investigated the developmental changes of NMDA receptors in rat prefrontal interneurons using patch clamp recording in cortical slices. We found that fast-spiking (FS) interneurons exhibited properties of α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid (AMPA) and NMDA currents distinct from those in regular spiking (RS) and low-threshold spiking (LTS) interneurons, particularly during the adolescent period. In juvenile animals, most (73%) of the FS cells demonstrated both AMPA and NMDA currents. The NMDA currents, however, gradually became undetectable during cortical development, with most (74%) of the FS cells exhibiting no NMDA current in adults. In contrast, AMPA and NMDA currents in RS and LTS interneurons were relatively stable, without significant changes from juveniles to adults. Moreover, even in FS cells with NMDA currents, the NMDA/AMPA ratio dramatically decreased during the adolescent period but returned to juvenile level in adults, compared to the relatively stable ratios in RS and LTS interneurons. These data suggest that FS interneurons in the PFC undergo dramatic changes in glutamatergic receptors during the adolescent period. These properties may make FS cells particularly sensitive and vulnerable to epigenetic stimulation, thus contributing to the onset of many psychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia. PMID:19242405

  10. Postnatal subventricular zone progenitors give rise not only to granular and periglomerular interneurons but also to interneurons in the external plexiform layer of the rat olfactory bulb.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhengang

    2008-01-10

    Interneurons in the granule cell layer (GCL) and glomerular layer (GL) of the olfactory bulb (OB) are generated from progenitors in the subventricular zone (SVZ) of the lateral ventricle. However, little is known about the origin of interneurons in the external plexiform layer (EPL) of the OB. On the basis of the concept of corticogenesis, I hypothesized that interneurons in the EPL of the rodent OB also originate in the SVZ. In the present study, replication-incompetent retroviruses encoding a marker gene, human placental alkaline phosphatase (AP), were injected into the lateral ventricles of postnatal day 4 Wistar rats to label dividing cells in the SVZ. Two days after injection, some of the AP-labeled cells had migrated into the OB. Five weeks after injection, AP/NeuN double-labeled cells were found not only in the GCL and GL but also in the EPL of the OB. In the EPL, most AP-labeled cells were calcium-binding protein parvalbumin (PV)-immunoreactive (+) interneurons. A subset of these cells was made up of calcium-binding protein calretinin (CR)(+) interneurons. According to their structural features, AP-labeled cells in the EPL were Van Gehuchten cells, multipolar cells, and superficial short-axon cells. Thus, postnatal SVZ progenitors give rise not only to granular and periglomerular interneurons but also to interneurons in the EPL of the OB. Furthermore, these results suggest that SVZ progenitors give rise to virtually all subpopulations of interneurons in the OB. PMID:18022946

  11. Extensive respiratory chain defects in inhibitory interneurones in patients with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Lax, Nichola Z.; Grady, John; Laude, Alex; Chan, Felix; Hepplewhite, Philippa D.; Gorman, Grainne; Whittaker, Roger G.; Ng, Yi; Cunningham, Mark O.

    2015-01-01

    Aims Mitochondrial disorders are among the most frequently inherited cause of neurological disease and arise due to mutations in mitochondrial or nuclear DNA. Currently, we do not understand the specific involvement of certain brain regions or selective neuronal vulnerability in mitochondrial disease. Recent studies suggest γ‐aminobutyric acid (GABA)‐ergic interneurones are particularly susceptible to respiratory chain dysfunction. In this neuropathological study, we assess the impact of mitochondrial DNA defects on inhibitory interneurones in patients with mitochondrial disease. Methods Histochemical, immunohistochemical and immunofluorescent assays were performed on post‐mortem brain tissue from 10 patients and 10 age‐matched control individuals. We applied a quantitative immunofluorescent method to interrogate complex I and IV protein expression in mitochondria within GABAergic interneurone populations in the frontal, temporal and occipital cortices. We also evaluated the density of inhibitory interneurones in serial sections to determine if cell loss was occurring. Results We observed significant, global reductions in complex I expression within GABAergic interneurones in frontal, temporal and occipital cortices in the majority of patients. While complex IV expression is more variable, there is reduced expression in patients harbouring m.8344A>G point mutations and POLG mutations. In addition to the severe respiratory chain deficiencies observed in remaining interneurones, quantification of GABAergic cell density showed a dramatic reduction in cell density suggesting interneurone loss. Conclusions We propose that the combined loss of interneurones and severe respiratory deficiency in remaining interneurones contributes to impaired neuronal network oscillations and could underlie development of neurological deficits, such as cognitive impairment and epilepsy, in mitochondrial disease. PMID:25786813

  12. Preparation of the cortical reaction: maturation-dependent migration of SNARE proteins, clathrin, and complexin to the porcine oocyte's surface blocks membrane traffic until fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Pei-Shiue; van Haeften, Theo; Gadella, Bart M

    2011-02-01

    The cortical reaction is a calcium-dependent exocytotic process in which the content of secretory granules is released into the perivitellin space immediately after fertilization, which serves to prevent polyspermic fertilization. In this study, we investigated the involvement and the organization of SNARE (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor) proteins in the docking and fusion of the cortical granule membrane with the oolemma in porcine oocytes. During meiotic maturation, secretory vesicles that were labeled with a granule-specific binding lectin, peanut agglutinin (PNA), migrated toward the oocyte's surface. This surface-orientated redistribution behavior was also observed for the oocyte-specific SNARE proteins SNAP23 and VAMP1 that colocalized with the PNA-labeled structures in the cortex area just under the oolemma and with the exclusive localization area of complexin (a trans-SNARE complex-stabilizing protein). The coming together of these proteins serves to prevent the spontaneous secretion of the docked cortical granules and to prepare the oocyte's surface for the cortical reaction, which should probably be immediately compensated for by a clathrin-mediated endocytosis. In vitro fertilization resulted in the secretion of the cortical granule content and the concomitant release of complexin and clathrin into the oocyte's cytosol, and this is considered to stimulate the observed endocytosis of SNARE-containing membrane vesicles. PMID:20944080

  13. Many Specialists for Suppressing Cortical Excitation

    PubMed Central

    Burkhalter, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Cortical computations are critically dependent on GABA-releasing neurons for dynamically balancing excitation with inhibition that is proportional to the overall level of activity. Although it is widely accepted that there are multiple types of interneurons, defining their identities based on qualitative descriptions of morphological, molecular and physiological features has failed to produce a universally accepted ‘parts list’, which is needed to understand the roles that interneurons play in cortical processing. A list of features has been published by the Petilla Interneurons Nomenclature Group, which represents an important step toward an unbiased classification of interneurons. To this end some essential features have recently been studied quantitatively and their association was examined using multidimensional cluster analyses. These studies revealed at least 3 distinct electrophysiological, 6 morphological and 15 molecular phenotypes. This is a conservative estimate of the number of interneuron types, which almost certainly will be revised as more quantitative studies will be performed and similarities will be defined objectively. It is clear that interneurons are organized with physiological attributes representing the most general, molecular characteristics the most detailed and morphological features occupying the middle ground. By themselves, none of these features are sufficient to define classes of interneurons. The challenge will be to determine which features belong together and how cell type-specific feature combinations are genetically specified. PMID:19225588

  14. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation

    PubMed Central

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M.; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  15. Classification of neocortical interneurons using affinity propagation.

    PubMed

    Santana, Roberto; McGarry, Laura M; Bielza, Concha; Larrañaga, Pedro; Yuste, Rafael

    2013-01-01

    In spite of over a century of research on cortical circuits, it is still unknown how many classes of cortical neurons exist. In fact, neuronal classification is a difficult problem because it is unclear how to designate a neuronal cell class and what are the best characteristics to define them. Recently, unsupervised classifications using cluster analysis based on morphological, physiological, or molecular characteristics, have provided quantitative and unbiased identification of distinct neuronal subtypes, when applied to selected datasets. However, better and more robust classification methods are needed for increasingly complex and larger datasets. Here, we explored the use of affinity propagation, a recently developed unsupervised classification algorithm imported from machine learning, which gives a representative example or exemplar for each cluster. As a case study, we applied affinity propagation to a test dataset of 337 interneurons belonging to four subtypes, previously identified based on morphological and physiological characteristics. We found that affinity propagation correctly classified most of the neurons in a blind, non-supervised manner. Affinity propagation outperformed Ward's method, a current standard clustering approach, in classifying the neurons into 4 subtypes. Affinity propagation could therefore be used in future studies to validly classify neurons, as a first step to help reverse engineer neural circuits. PMID:24348339

  16. Diminished dosage of 22q11 genes disrupts neurogenesis and cortical development in a mouse model of 22q11 deletion/DiGeorge syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Meechan, Daniel W.; Tucker, Eric S.; Maynard, Thomas M.; LaMantia, Anthony-Samuel

    2009-01-01

    The 22q11 deletion (or DiGeorge) syndrome (22q11DS), the result of a 1.5- to 3-megabase hemizygous deletion on human chromosome 22, results in dramatically increased susceptibility for “diseases of cortical connectivity” thought to arise during development, including schizophrenia and autism. We show that diminished dosage of the genes deleted in the 1.5-megabase 22q11 minimal critical deleted region in a mouse model of 22q11DS specifically compromises neurogenesis and subsequent differentiation in the cerebral cortex. Proliferation of basal, but not apical, progenitors is disrupted, and subsequently, the frequency of layer 2/3, but not layer 5/6, projection neurons is altered. This change is paralleled by aberrant distribution of parvalbumin-labeled interneurons in upper and lower cortical layers. Deletion of Tbx1 or Prodh (22q11 genes independently associated with 22q11DS phenotypes) does not similarly disrupt basal progenitors. However, expression analysis implicates additional 22q11 genes that are selectively expressed in cortical precursors. Thus, diminished 22q11 gene dosage disrupts cortical neurogenesis and interneuron migration. Such developmental disruption may alter cortical circuitry and establish vulnerability for developmental disorders, including schizophrenia and autism. PMID:19805316

  17. Exogenous Sonic hedgehog modulates the pool of GABAergic interneurons during cerebellar development.

    PubMed

    De Luca, A; Parmigiani, E; Tosatto, G; Martire, S; Hoshino, M; Buffo, A; Leto, K; Rossi, F

    2015-04-01

    All cerebellar GABAergic interneurons were derived from a common pool of precursor cells residing in the embryonic ventricular zone (VZ) and migrating in the prospective white matter (PWM) after birth, where both intrinsic and extrinsic factors contribute to regulate their amplification. Among the environmental factors, we focused on Sonic hedgehog (Shh), a morphogen well known to regulate neural progenitor cell proliferation. We asked if and how exogenous Shh treatment affects the lineage of cerebellar GABAergic interneurons. To address these issues, exogenous Shh was administered to embryonic and postnatal organotypic slices. We found that Shh is able to expand the pool of interneuron progenitors residing in the embryonic epithelium and in the postnatal PWM. In particular, Shh signalling pathway was highly mitogenic at early developmental stages of interneuron production, whereas its effect decreased after the first postnatal week. Gene expression analysis of sorted cells and in situ hybridization further showed that immature interneurons express both the Shh receptor patched and the Shh target gene Gli1. Thus, within the interneuron lineage, Shh might exert regulatory functions also in postmitotic cells. On the whole, our data enlighten the role of Shh during cerebellar maturation and further broaden our knowledge on the amplification mechanisms of the interneuron progenitor pool. PMID:25245619

  18. Interneurons Differentially Contribute to Spontaneous Network Activity in the Developing Hippocampus Dependent on Their Embryonic Lineage

    PubMed Central

    Wester, Jason C.

    2016-01-01

    Spontaneously generated network activity is a hallmark of developing neural circuits, and plays an important role in the formation of synaptic connections. In the rodent hippocampus, this activity is observed in vitro as giant depolarizing potentials (GDPs) during the first postnatal week. Interneurons importantly contribute to GDPs, due to the depolarizing actions of GABA early in development. While they are highly diverse, cortical interneurons can be segregated into two distinct groups based on their embryonic lineage from either the medial or caudal ganglionic eminences (MGE and CGE). There is evidence suggesting CGE-derived interneurons are important for GDP generation; however, their contribution relative to those from the MGE has never been directly tested. Here, we optogenetically inhibited either MGE- or CGE-derived interneurons in a region-specific manner in mouse neonatal hippocampus in vitro. In CA1, where interneurons are the primary source of recurrent excitation, we found that those from the MGE strongly and preferentially contributed to GDP generation. Furthermore, in dual whole-cell patch recordings in neonatal CA1, MGE interneurons formed synaptic connections to and from neighboring pyramidal cells at a much higher rate than those from the CGE. These MGE interneurons were commonly perisomatic targeting, in contrast to those from the CGE, which were dendrite targeting. Finally, inhibiting MGE interneurons in CA1 suppressed GDPs in CA3 and vice versa; conversely, they could also trigger GDPs in CA1 that propagated to CA3 and vice versa. Our data demonstrate a key role for MGE-derived interneurons in both generating and coordinating GDPs across the hippocampus. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT During nervous system development, immature circuits internally generate rhythmic patterns of electrical activity that promote the establishment of synaptic connections. Immature interneurons are excitatory rather than inhibitory and actively contribute to the generation

  19. Motor command for precision grip in the macaque monkey can be mediated by spinal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Alstermark, B; Pettersson, L G; Nishimura, Y; Yoshino-Saito, K; Tsuboi, F; Takahashi, M; Isa, T

    2011-07-01

    In motor control, the general view is still that spinal interneurons mainly contribute to reflexes and automatic movements. The question raised here is whether spinal interneurons can mediate the cortical command for independent finger movements, like a precision grip between the thumb and index finger in the macaque monkey, or if this function depends exclusively on a direct corticomotoneuronal pathway. This study is a followup of a previous report (Sasaki et al. J Neurophysiol 92: 3142-3147, 2004) in which we trained macaque monkeys to pick a small piece of sweet potato from a cylinder by a precision grip between the index finger and thumb. We have now isolated one spinal interneuronal system, the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons with projection to hand and arm motoneurons. In the previous study, the lateral corticospinal tract (CST) was interrupted in C4/C5 (input intact to the C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons), and in this study, the CST was interrupted in C2 (input abolished). The precision grip could be performed within the first 15 days after a CST lesion in C4/C5 but not in C2. We conclude that C3-C4 propriospinal interneurons also can carry the command for precision grip. PMID:21511706

  20. Interneurons and oligodendrocyte progenitors form a structured synaptic network in the developing neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Orduz, David; Maldonado, Paloma P; Balia, Maddalena; Vélez-Fort, Mateo; de Sars, Vincent; Yanagawa, Yuchio; Emiliani, Valentina; Angulo, Maria Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    NG2 cells, oligodendrocyte progenitors, receive a major synaptic input from interneurons in the developing neocortex. It is presumed that these precursors integrate cortical networks where they act as sensors of neuronal activity. We show that NG2 cells of the developing somatosensory cortex form a transient and structured synaptic network with interneurons that follows its own rules of connectivity. Fast-spiking interneurons, highly connected to NG2 cells, target proximal subcellular domains containing GABAA receptors with γ2 subunits. Conversely, non-fast-spiking interneurons, poorly connected with these progenitors, target distal sites lacking this subunit. In the network, interneuron-NG2 cell connectivity maps exhibit a local spatial arrangement reflecting innervation only by the nearest interneurons. This microcircuit architecture shows a connectivity peak at PN10, coinciding with a switch to massive oligodendrocyte differentiation. Hence, GABAergic innervation of NG2 cells is temporally and spatially regulated from the subcellular to the network level in coordination with the onset of oligodendrogenesis. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06953.001 PMID:25902404

  1. Loss of dopamine D2 receptors increases parvalbumin-positive interneurons in the anterior cingulate cortex.

    PubMed

    Graham, Devon L; Durai, Heather H; Garden, Jamie D; Cohen, Evan L; Echevarria, Franklin D; Stanwood, Gregg D

    2015-02-18

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25393953

  2. Loss of Dopamine D2 Receptors Increases Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons in the Anterior Cingulate Cortex

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Disruption to dopamine homeostasis during brain development has been implicated in a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including depression and schizophrenia. Inappropriate expression or activity of GABAergic interneurons are common features of many of these disorders. We discovered a persistent upregulation of GAD67+ and parvalbumin+ neurons within the anterior cingulate cortex of dopamine D2 receptor knockout mice, while other GABAergic interneuron markers were unaffected. Interneuron distribution and number were not altered in the striatum or in the dopamine-poor somatosensory cortex. The changes were already present by postnatal day 14, indicating a developmental etiology. D2eGFP BAC transgenic mice demonstrated the presence of D2 receptor expression within a subset of parvalbumin-expressing cortical interneurons, suggesting the possibility of a direct cellular mechanism through which D2 receptor stimulation regulates interneuron differentiation or survival. D2 receptor knockout mice also exhibited decreased depressive-like behavior compared with wild-type controls in the tail suspension test. These data indicate that dopamine signaling modulates interneuron number and emotional behavior and that developmental D2 receptor loss or blockade could reveal a potential mechanism for the prodromal basis of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:25393953

  3. Preferential inactivation of Scn1a in parvalbumin interneurons increases seizure susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Dutton, Stacey B.; Makinson, Christopher D.; Papale, Ligia A.; Shankar, Anupama; Balakrishnan, Bindu; Nakazawa, Kazu; Escayg, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (VGSCs) are essential for the generation and propagation of action potentials in electrically excitable cells. Dominant mutations in SCN1A, which encodes the Nav1.1 VGSC α-subunit, underlie several forms of epilepsy, including Dravet syndrome (DS) and genetic epilepsy with febrile seizures plus (GEFS+). Electrophysiological analyses of DS and GEFS+ mouse models have led to the hypothesis that SCN1A mutations reduce the excitability of inhibitory cortical and hippocampal interneurons. To more directly examine the relative contribution of inhibitory interneurons and excitatory pyramidal cells to SCN1A-derived epilepsy, we first compared the expression of Nav1.1 in inhibitory parvalbumin (PV) interneurons and excitatory neurons from P22 mice using fluorescent immunohistochemistry. In the hippocampus and neocortex, 69% of Nav1.1 immunoreactive neurons were also positive for PV. In contrast, 13% and 5% of Nav1.1 positive cells in the hippocampus and neocortex, respectively, were found to co-localize with excitatory cells identified by CaMK2α immunoreactivity. Next, we reduced the expression of Scn1a in either a subset of interneurons (mainly PV interneurons) or excitatory cells by crossing mice heterozygous for a floxed Scn1a allele to either the Ppp1r2-Cre or EMX1-Cre transgenic lines, respectively. The inactivation of one Scn1a allele in interneurons of the neocortex and hippocampus was sufficient to reduce thresholds to flurothyl- and hyperthermia-induced seizures, whereas thresholds were unaltered following inactivation in excitatory cells. Reduced interneuron Scn1a expression also resulted in the generation of spontaneous seizures. These findings provide direct evidence for an important role of PV interneurons in the pathogenesis of Scn1a-derived epilepsies. PMID:22926190

  4. Parvalbumin neurons and gamma rhythms enhance cortical circuit performance

    PubMed Central

    Sohal, Vikaas S.; Zhang, Feng; Yizhar, Ofer; Deisseroth, Karl

    2014-01-01

    Synchronized oscillations and inhibitory interneurons have important and interconnected roles within cortical microcircuits. In particular, interneurons defined by the fast-spiking phenotype and expression of the calcium-binding protein parvalbumin1,2 have been suggested to be involved in gamma (30–80 Hz) oscillations3–7, which are hypothesized to enhance information processing8,9. However, because parvalbumin interneurons cannot be selectively controlled, definitive tests of their functional significance in gamma oscillations, and quantitative assessment of the impact of parvalbumin interneurons and gamma oscillations on cortical circuits, have been lacking despite potentially enormous significance (for example, abnormalities in parvalbumin interneurons may underlie altered gamma-frequency synchronization and cognition in schizophrenia10 and autism11). Here we use a panel of optogenetic technologies12–14 in mice to selectively modulate multiple distinct circuit elements in neocortex, alone or in combination. We find that inhibiting parvalbumin interneurons suppresses gamma oscillations in vivo, whereas driving these interneurons (even by means of non-rhythmic principal cell activity) is sufficient to generate emergent gamma-frequency rhythmicity. Moreover, gamma-frequency modulation of excitatory input in turn was found to enhance signal transmission in neocortex by reducing circuit noise and amplifying circuit signals, including inputs to parvalbumin interneurons. As demonstrated here, optogenetics opens the door to a new kind of informational analysis of brain function, permitting quantitative delineation of the functional significance of individual elements in the emergent operation and function of intact neural circuitry. PMID:19396159

  5. Modeling Inhibitory Interneurons in Efficient Sensory Coding Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengchen; Rozell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    There is still much unknown regarding the computational role of inhibitory cells in the sensory cortex. While modeling studies could potentially shed light on the critical role played by inhibition in cortical computation, there is a gap between the simplicity of many models of sensory coding and the biological complexity of the inhibitory subpopulation. In particular, many models do not respect that inhibition must be implemented in a separate subpopulation, with those inhibitory interneurons having a diversity of tuning properties and characteristic E/I cell ratios. In this study we demonstrate a computational framework for implementing inhibition in dynamical systems models that better respects these biophysical observations about inhibitory interneurons. The main approach leverages recent work related to decomposing matrices into low-rank and sparse components via convex optimization, and explicitly exploits the fact that models and input statistics often have low-dimensional structure that can be exploited for efficient implementations. While this approach is applicable to a wide range of sensory coding models (including a family of models based on Bayesian inference in a linear generative model), for concreteness we demonstrate the approach on a network implementing sparse coding. We show that the resulting implementation stays faithful to the original coding goals while using inhibitory interneurons that are much more biophysically plausible. PMID:26172289

  6. Modeling Inhibitory Interneurons in Efficient Sensory Coding Models.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Mengchen; Rozell, Christopher J

    2015-07-01

    There is still much unknown regarding the computational role of inhibitory cells in the sensory cortex. While modeling studies could potentially shed light on the critical role played by inhibition in cortical computation, there is a gap between the simplicity of many models of sensory coding and the biological complexity of the inhibitory subpopulation. In particular, many models do not respect that inhibition must be implemented in a separate subpopulation, with those inhibitory interneurons having a diversity of tuning properties and characteristic E/I cell ratios. In this study we demonstrate a computational framework for implementing inhibition in dynamical systems models that better respects these biophysical observations about inhibitory interneurons. The main approach leverages recent work related to decomposing matrices into low-rank and sparse components via convex optimization, and explicitly exploits the fact that models and input statistics often have low-dimensional structure that can be exploited for efficient implementations. While this approach is applicable to a wide range of sensory coding models (including a family of models based on Bayesian inference in a linear generative model), for concreteness we demonstrate the approach on a network implementing sparse coding. We show that the resulting implementation stays faithful to the original coding goals while using inhibitory interneurons that are much more biophysically plausible. PMID:26172289

  7. Control of response reliability by parvalbumin-expressing interneurons in visual cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yingjie; Qiao, Wenhui; Liu, Kefei; Zhong, Huiyuan; Yao, Haishan

    2015-01-01

    The responses of visual cortical neurons to natural stimuli are both reliable and sparse. These properties require inhibition, yet the contribution of specific types of inhibitory neurons is not well understood. Here we demonstrate that optogenetic suppression of parvalbumin (PV)- but not somatostatin (SOM)-expressing interneurons reduces response reliability in the primary visual cortex of anaesthetized and awake mice. PV suppression leads to increases in the low firing rates and decreases in the high firing rates of cortical neurons, resulting in an overall reduction of the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). In contrast, SOM suppression generally increases the overall firing rate for most neurons, without affecting the SNR. Further analysis reveals that PV, but not SOM, suppression impairs neural discrimination of natural stimuli. Together, these results reveal a critical role for PV interneurons in the formation of reliable visual cortical representations of natural stimuli. PMID:25869033

  8. Resonant Interneurons Can Increase Robustness of Gamma Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Tikidji-Hamburyan, Ruben A.; Martínez, Joan José; White, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Gamma oscillations are believed to play a critical role in in information processing, encoding, and retrieval. Inhibitory interneuronal network gamma (ING) oscillations may arise from a coupled oscillator mechanism in which individual neurons oscillate or from a population oscillator in which individual neurons fire sparsely and stochastically. All ING mechanisms, including the one proposed herein, rely on alternating waves of inhibition and windows of opportunity for spiking. The coupled oscillator model implemented with Wang–Buzsáki model neurons is not sufficiently robust to heterogeneity in excitatory drive, and therefore intrinsic frequency, to account for in vitro models of ING. Similarly, in a tightly synchronized regime, the stochastic population oscillator model is often characterized by sparse firing, whereas interneurons both in vivo and in vitro do not fire sparsely during gamma, but rather on average every other cycle. We substituted so-called resonator neural models, which exhibit class 2 excitability and postinhibitory rebound (PIR), for the integrators that are typically used. This results in much greater robustness to heterogeneity that actually increases as the average participation in spikes per cycle approximates physiological levels. Moreover, dynamic clamp experiments that show autapse-induced firing in entorhinal cortical interneurons support the idea that PIR can serve as a network gamma mechanism. Furthermore, parvalbumin-positive (PV+) cells were much more likely to display both PIR and autapse-induced firing than GAD2+ cells, supporting the view that PV+ fast-firing basket cells are more likely to exhibit class 2 excitability than other types of inhibitory interneurons. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Gamma oscillations are believed to play a critical role in information processing, encoding, and retrieval. Networks of inhibitory interneurons are thought to be essential for these oscillations. We show that one class of interneurons with an

  9. [Migration].

    PubMed

    Maccotta, W; Perotti, A; Thebaut, F; Cristofanelli, L; Pittau, F; Sergi, N; Pittau, L; Morelli, A; Morsella, M; Grinover, A P

    1990-01-01

    This is a collection of 11 individual articles on aspects of current migration problems affecting developed countries. The geographical focus is on immigration in Europe, with particular reference to Italy, although one paper is concerned with Quebec. The topical focus is on the social problems associated with immigration. The articles are in Italian, with one exception, which is in French. PMID:12343393

  10. PGC-1α Provides a Transcriptional Framework for Synchronous Neurotransmitter Release from Parvalbumin-Positive Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Elizabeth K.; Dougherty, Sarah E.; McMeekin, Laura J.; Reid, Courtney S.; Dobrunz, Lynn E.; West, Andrew B.; Hablitz, John J.

    2014-01-01

    Accumulating evidence strongly implicates the transcriptional coactivator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in the pathophysiology of multiple neurological disorders, but the downstream gene targets of PGC-1α in the brain have remained enigmatic. Previous data demonstrate that PGC-1α is primarily concentrated in inhibitory neurons and that PGC-1α is required for the expression of the interneuron-specific Ca2+-binding protein parvalbumin (PV) throughout the cortex. To identify other possible transcriptional targets of PGC-1α in neural tissue, we conducted a microarray on neuroblastoma cells overexpressing PGC-1α, mined results for genes with physiological relevance to interneurons, and measured cortical gene and protein expression of these genes in mice with underexpression and overexpression of PGC-1α. We observed bidirectional regulation of novel PGC-1α-dependent transcripts spanning synaptic [synaptotagmin 2 (Syt2) and complexin 1 (Cplx1)], structural [neurofilament heavy chain (Nefh)], and metabolic [neutral cholesterol ester hydrolase 1 (Nceh1), adenylate kinase 1 (Ak1), inositol polyphosphate 5-phosphatase J (Inpp5j), ATP synthase mitochondrial F1 complex O subunit (Atp5o), phytanol-CoA-2hydroxylase (Phyh), and ATP synthase mitrochondrial F1 complex α subunit 1 (Atp5a1)] functions. The neuron-specific genes Syt2, Cplx1, and Nefh were developmentally upregulated in an expression pattern consistent with that of PGC-1α and were expressed in cortical interneurons. Conditional deletion of PGC-1α in PV-positive neurons significantly decreased cortical transcript expression of these genes, promoted asynchronous GABA release, and impaired long-term memory. Collectively, these data demonstrate that PGC-1α is required for normal PV-positive interneuron function and that loss of PGC-1α in this interneuron subpopulation could contribute to cortical dysfunction in disease states. PMID:25339750

  11. Striatal cholinergic interneuron regulation and circuit effects

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Sean Austin O.; Kang, Un Jung; McGehee, Daniel S.

    2014-01-01

    The striatum plays a central role in motor control and motor learning. Appropriate responses to environmental stimuli, including pursuit of reward or avoidance of aversive experience all require functional striatal circuits. These pathways integrate synaptic inputs from limbic and cortical regions including sensory, motor and motivational information to ultimately connect intention to action. Although many neurotransmitters participate in striatal circuitry, one critically important player is acetylcholine (ACh). Relative to other brain areas, the striatum contains exceptionally high levels of ACh, the enzymes that catalyze its synthesis and breakdown, as well as both nicotinic and muscarinic receptor types that mediate its postsynaptic effects. The principal source of striatal ACh is the cholinergic interneuron (ChI), which comprises only about 1–2% of all striatal cells yet sends dense arbors of projections throughout the striatum. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the factors affecting the excitability of these neurons through acute effects and long term changes in their synaptic inputs. In addition, we discuss the physiological effects of ACh in the striatum, and how changes in ACh levels may contribute to disease states during striatal dysfunction. PMID:25374536

  12. RNA interference of Marlin-1/Jakmip1 results in abnormal morphogenesis and migration of cortical pyramidal neurons.

    PubMed

    Vidal, René L; Fuentes, Patricio; Valenzuela, José Ignacio; Alvarado-Diaz, Carlos P; Ramírez, Omar A; Kukuljan, Manuel; Couve, Andrés

    2012-08-01

    The formation of the nervous systems requires processes that coordinate proliferation, differentiation and migration of neuronal cells, which extend axons, generate dendritic branching and establish synaptic connections during development. The structural organization and dynamic remodeling of the cytoskeleton and its association to the secretory pathway are critical determinants of cell morphogenesis and migration. Marlin-1 (Jakmip1) is a microtubule-associated protein predominantly expressed in neurons and lymphoid cells. Marlin-1 participates in polarized secretion in lymphocytes, but its functional association with the neuronal cytoskeleton and its contribution to brain development have not been explored. Combining in vitro and in vivo approaches we show that Marlin-1 contributes to the establishment of neuronal morphology. Marlin-1 associates to the cytoskeleton in neurites, is required for the maintenance of an intact Golgi apparatus and its depletion produces the down-regulation of kinesin-1, a plus-end directed molecular motor with a central function in morphogenesis and migration. RNA interference of Marlin-1 in vivo results in abnormal migration of newborn pyramidal neurons during the formation of the cortex. Our results support the involvement of Marlin-1 in the acquisition of the complex architecture and migration of pyramidal neurons, two fundamental processes for the laminar layering of the cortex. PMID:22828129

  13. Oscillation-Driven Spike-Timing Dependent Plasticity Allows Multiple Overlapping Pattern Recognition in Inhibitory Interneuron Networks.

    PubMed

    Garrido, Jesús A; Luque, Niceto R; Tolu, Silvia; D'Angelo, Egidio

    2016-08-01

    The majority of operations carried out by the brain require learning complex signal patterns for future recognition, retrieval and reuse. Although learning is thought to depend on multiple forms of long-term synaptic plasticity, the way this latter contributes to pattern recognition is still poorly understood. Here, we have used a simple model of afferent excitatory neurons and interneurons with lateral inhibition, reproducing a network topology found in many brain areas from the cerebellum to cortical columns. When endowed with spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP) at the excitatory input synapses and at the inhibitory interneuron-interneuron synapses, the interneurons rapidly learned complex input patterns. Interestingly, induction of plasticity required that the network be entrained into theta-frequency band oscillations, setting the internal phase-reference required to drive STDP. Inhibitory plasticity effectively distributed multiple patterns among available interneurons, thus allowing the simultaneous detection of multiple overlapping patterns. The addition of plasticity in intrinsic excitability made the system more robust allowing self-adjustment and rescaling in response to a broad range of input patterns. The combination of plasticity in lateral inhibitory connections and homeostatic mechanisms in the inhibitory interneurons optimized mutual information (MI) transfer. The storage of multiple complex patterns in plastic interneuron networks could be critical for the generation of sparse representations of information in excitatory neuron populations falling under their control. PMID:27079422

  14. Cortex contacts both output neurons and nitrergic interneurons in the superior colliculus: Direct and Indirect routes for multisensory integration

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes-Santamaria, Veronica; Alvarado, Juan Carlos; Stein, Barry E.; McHaffie, John G.

    2010-01-01

    The ability of cat superior colliculus (SC) neurons to integrate information from different senses is thought to depend on direct projections from regions along the anterior ectosylvian sulcus (AES). However, electrical stimulation of AES also activates SC output neurons polysynaptically. In the present study we found that nitric oxide containing (nitrergic) interneurons are a target of AES projections, forming a component of this cortico-SC circuitry. The dendritic and axonal processes of these cortico-recipient nitrergic interneurons apposed the soma and dendrites of presumptive SC output neurons. Often, an individual cortical fiber targeted both an output neuron and a neighboring nitrergic interneuron that, in turn, contacted the output neuron. Many (46%) nitrergic neurons also colocalized with γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA), suggesting that a substantial subset have the potential for inhibiting output neurons. These observations suggest that nitrergic interneurons are positioned to convey cortical influences onto SC output neurons disynaptically via nitrergic mechanisms as well as conventional neurotransmitter systems utilizing GABA and other, possibly excitatory, neurotransmitters. In addition, because NO also acts as a retrograde messenger, cortically-mediated NO release from the post-synaptic elements of nitrergic interneurons could influence presynaptic cortico-SC terminals that directly contact output neurons. PMID:18003596

  15. Ex Vivo Imaging of Postnatal Cerebellar Granule Cell Migration Using Confocal Macroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  16. Ex vivo imaging of postnatal cerebellar granule cell migration using confocal macroscopy.

    PubMed

    Bénard, Magalie; Lebon, Alexis; Komuro, Hitoshi; Vaudry, David; Galas, Ludovic

    2015-01-01

    During postnatal development, immature granule cells (excitatory interneurons) exhibit tangential migration in the external granular layer, and then radial migration in the molecular layer and the Purkinje cell layer to reach the internal granular layer of the cerebellar cortex. Default in migratory processes induces either cell death or misplacement of the neurons, leading to deficits in diverse cerebellar functions. Centripetal granule cell migration involves several mechanisms, such as chemotaxis and extracellular matrix degradation, to guide the cells towards their final position, but the factors that regulate cell migration in each cortical layer are only partially known. In our method, acute cerebellar slices are prepared from P10 rats, granule cells are labeled with a fluorescent cytoplasmic marker and tissues are cultured on membrane inserts from 4 to 10 hr before starting real-time monitoring of cell migration by confocal macroscopy at 37 °C in the presence of CO2. During their migration in the different cortical layers of the cerebellum, granule cells can be exposed to neuropeptide agonists or antagonists, protease inhibitors, blockers of intracellular effectors or even toxic substances such as alcohol or methylmercury to investigate their possible role in the regulation of neuronal migration. PMID:25992599

  17. Impaired synaptic plasticity in the prefrontal cortex of mice with developmentally decreased number of interneurons.

    PubMed

    Konstantoudaki, X; Chalkiadaki, K; Tivodar, S; Karagogeos, D; Sidiropoulou, K

    2016-05-13

    Interneurons are inhibitory neurons, which protect neural tissue from excessive excitation. They are interconnected with glutamatergic pyramidal neurons in the cerebral cortex and regulate their function. Particularly in the prefrontal cortex (PFC), interneurons have been strongly implicated in regulating pathological states which display deficits in the PFC. The aim of this study is to investigate the adaptations in the adult glutamatergic system, when defects in interneuron development do not allow adequate numbers of interneurons to reach the cerebral cortex. To this end, we used a mouse model that displays ∼50% fewer cortical interneurons due to the Rac1 protein loss from Nkx2.1/Cre expressing cells (Rac1 conditional knockout (cKO) mice), to examine how the developmental loss of interneurons may affect basal synaptic transmission, synaptic plasticity and neuronal morphology in the adult PFC. Despite the decrease in the number of interneurons, basal synaptic transmission, as examined by recording field excitatory postsynaptic potentials (fEPSPs) from layer II networks, is not altered in the PFC of Rac1 cKO mice. However, there is decreased paired-pulse ratio (PPR) and decreased long-term potentiation (LTP), in response to tetanic stimulation, in the layer II PFC synapses of Rac1 cKO mice. Furthermore, expression of N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) subunits is decreased and dendritic morphology is altered, changes that could underlie the decrease in LTP in the Rac1 cKO mice. Finally, we find that treating Rac1 cKO mice with diazepam in early postnatal life can reverse changes in dendritic morphology observed in non-treated Rac1 cKO mice. Therefore, our data show that disruption in GABAergic inhibition alters glutamatergic function in the adult PFC, an effect that could be reversed by enhancement of GABAergic function during an early postnatal period. PMID:26926965

  18. Proper Level of Cytosolic Disabled-1, Which Is Regulated by Dual Nuclear Translocation Pathways, Is Important for Cortical Neuronal Migration.

    PubMed

    Honda, Takao; Nakajima, Kazunori

    2016-07-01

    Disabled-1 (Dab1) is an essential intracellular protein in the Reelin pathway. It has a nuclear localization signal (NLS; hereafter referred to as "NLS1") and 2 nuclear export signals, and shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. In this study, we found that Dab1 has an additional unidentified NLS, and that the Dab1 NLS1 mutant could translocate to the nucleus in an unconventional ATP/temperature-dependent and cytoplasmic factor/RanGTP gradient-independent manner. Additional mutations in the NLS1 mutant revealed that K(67) and K(69) are important for the nuclear transport. Furthermore, an excess of the intracellular domain of the Reelin receptors inhibited the nuclear translocation of Dab1. An in utero electroporation study showed that a large amount of Dab1 in the cytoplasm in migrating neurons inhibited the migration, and that forced transport of Dab1 into the nucleus attenuated this inhibitory effect. In addition, rescue experiments using yotari, an autosomal recessive mutant of dab1, revealed that cells expressing Dab1 NLS1 mutant tend to distribute at more superficial positions than those expressing wild-type Dab1. Taken together, these findings suggest that Dab1 has at least 2 NLSs, and that the regulation of the subcellular localization of Dab1 is important for the proper migration of excitatory neurons. PMID:26209842

  19. Reduction in focal ictal activity following transplantation of MGE interneurons requires expression of the GABAA receptor α4 subunit

    PubMed Central

    Jaiswal, Manoj K.; Keros, Sotirios; Zhao, Mingrui; Inan, Melis; Schwartz, Theodore H.; Anderson, Stewart A.; Homanics, Gregg E.; Goldstein, Peter A.

    2015-01-01

    Despite numerous advances, treatment-resistant seizures remain an important problem. Loss of neuronal inhibition is present in a variety of epilepsy models and is suggested as a mechanism for increased excitability, leading to the proposal that grafting inhibitory interneurons into seizure foci might relieve refractory seizures. Indeed, transplanted medial ganglionic eminence interneuron progenitors (MGE-IPs) mature into GABAergic interneurons that increase GABA release onto cortical pyramidal neurons, and this inhibition is associated with reduced seizure activity. An obvious conclusion is that inhibitory coupling between the new interneurons and pyramidal cells underlies this effect. We hypothesized that the primary mechanism for the seizure-limiting effects following MGE-IP transplantation is the tonic conductance that results from activation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAA-Rs) expressed on cortical pyramidal cells. Using in vitro and in vivo recording techniques, we demonstrate that GABAA-R α4 subunit deletion abolishes tonic currents (Itonic) in cortical pyramidal cells and leads to a failure of MGE-IP transplantation to attenuate cortical seizure propagation. These observations should influence how the field proceeds with respect to the further development of therapeutic neuronal transplants (and possibly pharmacological treatments). PMID:25914623

  20. Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Control Motor Behavior and Basal Ganglia Function in Experimental Parkinsonism.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Nicolas; Liberge, Martine; Jaouen, Florence; Ztaou, Samira; Hanini, Marwa; Camon, Jeremy; Deisseroth, Karl; Amalric, Marianne; Kerkerian-Le Goff, Lydia; Beurrier, Corinne

    2015-10-27

    Despite evidence showing that anticholinergic drugs are of clinical relevance in Parkinson's disease (PD), the causal role of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) in PD pathophysiology remains elusive. Here, we show that optogenetic inhibition of CINs alleviates motor deficits in PD mouse models, providing direct demonstration for their implication in parkinsonian motor dysfunctions. As neural correlates, CIN inhibition in parkinsonian mice differentially impacts the excitability of striatal D1 and D2 medium spiny neurons, normalizes pathological bursting activity in the main basal ganglia output structure, and increases the functional weight of the direct striatonigral pathway in cortical information processing. By contrast, CIN inhibition in non-lesioned mice does not affect locomotor activity, equally modulates medium spiny neuron excitability, and does not modify spontaneous or cortically driven activity in the basal ganglia output, suggesting that the role of these interneurons in motor function is highly dependent on dopamine tone. PMID:26489458

  1. DSCAM and DSCAML1 regulate the radial migration and callosal projection in developing cerebral cortex.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Huang, Ying; Chen, Jia-Yin; Ding, Yu-Qiang; Song, Ning-Ning

    2015-01-12

    Down syndrome cell adhesion molecule (Dscam) is essential for self-avoidance and tiling of dendritic development in sensory neurons in Drosophila. Recent studies also show that DSCAM together with its closely related protein DSCAML1 functions in dendritic self-avoidance of a certain types of interneuron in mammalian retina. However, the functions of these DSCAMs in developing mammalian cerebral cortex are not well understood. Here we reduced the expression of DSCAM or DSCAML1 in mouse cortical neurons by RNA interference both in vitro and in vivo. We found that knockdown of DSCAM or DSCAML1 increases the complexity of proximal dendritic branching, and impedes the axon growth in cultured neurons. In vivo knockdown experiments showed that both DSCAM and DSCAML1 contribute to normal radial migration and callosal projection during the postnatal development. Our results indicate an important role of DSCAM and DSCAML1 in the development of cortical neural network. PMID:25451118

  2. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5

    PubMed Central

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  3. Inhibitory Circuits in Cortical Layer 5.

    PubMed

    Naka, Alexander; Adesnik, Hillel

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons play a fundamental role in cortical computation and behavior. Recent technological advances, such as two photon imaging, targeted in vivo recording, and molecular profiling, have improved our understanding of the function and diversity of cortical interneurons, but for technical reasons most work has been directed towards inhibitory neurons in the superficial cortical layers. Here we review current knowledge specifically on layer 5 (L5) inhibitory microcircuits, which play a critical role in controlling cortical output. We focus on recent work from the well-studied rodent barrel cortex, but also draw on evidence from studies in primary visual cortex and other cortical areas. The diversity of both deep inhibitory neurons and their pyramidal cell targets make this a challenging but essential area of study in cortical computation and sensory processing. PMID:27199675

  4. Lost highway(s): barriers to postnatal cortical neurogenesis and implications for brain repair

    PubMed Central

    Akhtar, Aslam Abbasi; Breunig, Joshua J.

    2015-01-01

    The genesis of the cerebral cortex is a highly complex and tightly-orchestrated process of cell division, migration, maturation, and integration. Developmental missteps often have catastrophic consequences on cortical function. Further, the cerebral cortex, in which neurogenesis takes place almost exclusively prenatally, has a very poor capacity for replacement of neurons lost to injury or disease. A multitude of factors underlie this deficit, including the depletion of radial glia, the gliogenic switch which mitigates continued neurogenesis, diminished neuronal migratory streams, and inflammatory processes associated with disease. Despite this, there are glimmers of hope that new approaches may allow for more significant cortical repair. Herein, we review corticogenesis from the context of regeneration and detail the strategies to promote neurogenesis, including interneuron transplants and glial reprogramming. Such strategies circumvent the “lost highways” which are critical for cortical development but are absent in the adult. These new approaches may provide for the possibility of meaningful clinical regeneration of elements of cortical circuitry lost to trauma and disease. PMID:26136658

  5. Prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons shape neuronal activity to drive fear expression.

    PubMed

    Courtin, Julien; Chaudun, Fabrice; Rozeske, Robert R; Karalis, Nikolaos; Gonzalez-Campo, Cecilia; Wurtz, Hélène; Abdi, Azzedine; Baufreton, Jerome; Bienvenu, Thomas C M; Herry, Cyril

    2014-01-01

    Synchronization of spiking activity in neuronal networks is a fundamental process that enables the precise transmission of information to drive behavioural responses. In cortical areas, synchronization of principal-neuron spiking activity is an effective mechanism for information coding that is regulated by GABA (γ-aminobutyric acid)-ergic interneurons through the generation of neuronal oscillations. Although neuronal synchrony has been demonstrated to be crucial for sensory, motor and cognitive processing, it has not been investigated at the level of defined circuits involved in the control of emotional behaviour. Converging evidence indicates that fear behaviour is regulated by the dorsomedial prefrontal cortex (dmPFC). This control over fear behaviour relies on the activation of specific prefrontal projections to the basolateral complex of the amygdala (BLA), a structure that encodes associative fear memories. However, it remains to be established how the precise temporal control of fear behaviour is achieved at the level of prefrontal circuits. Here we use single-unit recordings and optogenetic manipulations in behaving mice to show that fear expression is causally related to the phasic inhibition of prefrontal parvalbumin interneurons (PVINs). Inhibition of PVIN activity disinhibits prefrontal projection neurons and synchronizes their firing by resetting local theta oscillations, leading to fear expression. Our results identify two complementary neuronal mechanisms mediated by PVINs that precisely coordinate and enhance the neuronal activity of prefrontal projection neurons to drive fear expression. PMID:24256726

  6. Fine-tuned SRF activity controls asymmetrical neuronal outgrowth: implications for cortical migration, neural tissue lamination and circuit assembly.

    PubMed

    Scandaglia, Marilyn; Benito, Eva; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Fiorenza, Anna; Del Blanco, Beatriz; Coca, Yaiza; Herrera, Eloísa; Barco, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The stimulus-regulated transcription factor Serum Response Factor (SRF) plays an important role in diverse neurodevelopmental processes related to structural plasticity and motile functions, although its precise mechanism of action has not yet been established. To further define the role of SRF in neural development and distinguish between cell-autonomous and non cell-autonomous effects, we bidirectionally manipulated SRF activity through gene transduction assays that allow the visualization of individual neurons and their comparison with neighboring control cells. In vitro assays showed that SRF promotes survival and filopodia formation and is required for normal asymmetric neurite outgrowth, indicating that its activation favors dendrite enlargement versus branching. In turn, in vivo experiments demonstrated that SRF-dependent regulation of neuronal morphology has important consequences in the developing cortex and retina, affecting neuronal migration, dendritic and axonal arborization and cell positioning in these laminated tissues. Overall, our results show that the controlled and timely activation of SRF is essential for the coordinated growth of neuronal processes, suggesting that this event regulates the switch between neuronal growth and branching during developmental processes. PMID:26638868

  7. Fine-tuned SRF activity controls asymmetrical neuronal outgrowth: implications for cortical migration, neural tissue lamination and circuit assembly

    PubMed Central

    Scandaglia, Marilyn; Benito, Eva; Morenilla-Palao, Cruz; Fiorenza, Anna; del Blanco, Beatriz; Coca, Yaiza; Herrera, Eloísa; Barco, Angel

    2015-01-01

    The stimulus-regulated transcription factor Serum Response Factor (SRF) plays an important role in diverse neurodevelopmental processes related to structural plasticity and motile functions, although its precise mechanism of action has not yet been established. To further define the role of SRF in neural development and distinguish between cell-autonomous and non cell-autonomous effects, we bidirectionally manipulated SRF activity through gene transduction assays that allow the visualization of individual neurons and their comparison with neighboring control cells. In vitro assays showed that SRF promotes survival and filopodia formation and is required for normal asymmetric neurite outgrowth, indicating that its activation favors dendrite enlargement versus branching. In turn, in vivo experiments demonstrated that SRF-dependent regulation of neuronal morphology has important consequences in the developing cortex and retina, affecting neuronal migration, dendritic and axonal arborization and cell positioning in these laminated tissues. Overall, our results show that the controlled and timely activation of SRF is essential for the coordinated growth of neuronal processes, suggesting that this event regulates the switch between neuronal growth and branching during developmental processes. PMID:26638868

  8. Spillover-mediated feedforward-inhibition functionally segregates interneuron activity

    PubMed Central

    Coddington, Luke T.; Rudolph, Stephanie; Lune, Patrick Vande; Overstreet-Wadiche, Linda; Wadiche, Jacques I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Neurotransmitter spillover represents a form of neural transmission not restricted to morphologically defined synaptic connections. Communication between climbing fibers (CFs) and molecular layer interneurons (MLIs) in the cerebellum is mediated exclusively by glutamate spillover. Here, we show how CF stimulation functionally segregates MLIs based on their location relative to glutamate release. Excitation of MLIs that reside within the domain of spillover diffusion coordinates inhibition of MLIs outside the diffusion limit. CF excitation of MLIs is dependent on extrasynaptic NMDA receptors that enhance the spatial and temporal spread of CF signaling. Activity mediated by functionally segregated MLIs converges onto neighboring Purkinje cells (PCs) to generate a long-lasting biphasic change in inhibition. These data demonstrate how glutamate release from single CFs modulates excitability of neighboring PCs, thus expanding the influence of CFs on cerebellar cortical activity in a manner not predicted by anatomical connectivity. PMID:23707614

  9. Neural circuits: Interacting interneurons regulate fear learning.

    PubMed

    Ozawa, Takaaki; Johansen, Joshua P

    2014-08-01

    A recent study has found that, during associative fear learning, different sensory stimuli activate subsets of inhibitory interneurons in distinct ways to dynamically regulate glutamatergic neural activity and behavioral memory formation. PMID:25093560

  10. The compartmental restriction of cerebellar interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Consalez, G. Giacomo; Hawkes, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The Purkinje cells (PC's) of the cerebellar cortex are subdivided into multiple different molecular phenotypes that form an elaborate array of parasagittal stripes. This array serves as a scaffold around which afferent topography is organized. The ways in which cerebellar interneurons may be restricted by this scaffolding are less well-understood. This review begins with a brief survey of cerebellar topography. Next, it reviews the development of stripes in the cerebellum with a particular emphasis on the embryological origins of cerebellar interneurons. These data serve as a foundation to discuss the hypothesis that cerebellar compartment boundaries also restrict cerebellar interneurons, both excitatory [granule cells, unipolar brush cells (UBCs)] and inhibitory (e.g., Golgi cells, basket cells). Finally, it is proposed that the same PC scaffold that restricts afferent terminal fields to stripes may also act to organize cerebellar interneurons. PMID:23346049

  11. Synaptic kainate currents reset interneuron firing phase

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ellen J; Harris, Alexander Z; Pettit, Diana L

    2007-01-01

    Hippocampal interneuron activity has been linked to epileptogenesis, seizures and the oscillatory synaptic activity detected in behaving rats. Interneurons fire at specific times in the rhythmic cycles that comprise these oscillations; however, the mechanisms controlling these firing patterns remain unclear. We have examined the role of synaptic input in modulating the firing of spontaneously active rat hippocampal interneurons. We find that synaptic glutamate receptor currents of 20–30 pA increase instantaneous firing frequency and reset the phase of spontaneously firing CA1 stratum oriens interneurons. Kainate receptor (KAR)-mediated currents are particularly effective at producing this phase reset, while AMPA receptor currents are relatively ineffective. The efficacy of KAR-mediated currents is probably due to their 3-fold longer decay. Given the small amplitude of the currents needed for this phase reset, coincident activation of only a few KAR-containing synapses could synchronize firing in groups of interneurons. These data suggest that KARs are potent modulators of circuit behaviour and their activation alters hippocampal interneuron output. PMID:17068102

  12. Distinct and synergistic feedforward inhibition of pyramidal cells by basket and bistratified interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Michele; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    Feedforward inhibition (FFI) enables pyramidal cells in area CA1 of the hippocampus (CA1PCs) to remain easily excitable while faithfully representing a broad range of excitatory inputs without quickly saturating. Despite the cortical ubiquity of FFI, its specific function is not completely understood. FFI in CA1PCs is mediated by two physiologically and morphologically distinct GABAergic interneurons: fast-spiking, perisomatic-targeting basket cells and regular-spiking, dendritic-targeting bistratified cells. These two FFI pathways might create layer-specific computational sub-domains within the same CA1PC, but teasing apart their specific contributions remains experimentally challenging. We implemented a biophysically realistic model of CA1PCs using 40 digitally reconstructed morphologies and constraining synaptic numbers, locations, amplitude, and kinetics with available experimental data. First, we validated the model by reproducing the known combined basket and bistratified FFI of CA1PCs at the population level. We then analyzed how the two interneuron types independently affected the CA1PC spike probability and timing as a function of inhibitory strength. Separate FFI by basket and bistratified respectively modulated CA1PC threshold and gain. Concomitant FFI by both interneuron types synergistically extended the dynamic range of CA1PCs by buffering their spiking response to excitatory stimulation. These results suggest testable hypotheses on the precise effects of GABAergic diversity on cortical computation. PMID:26594151

  13. Are Striatal Tyrosine Hydroxylase Interneurons Dopaminergic?

    PubMed Central

    Xenias, Harry S.; Ibáñez-Sandoval, Osvaldo; Koós, Tibor

    2015-01-01

    Striatal GABAergic interneurons that express the gene for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) have been identified previously by several methods. Although generally assumed to be dopaminergic, possibly serving as a compensatory source of dopamine (DA) in Parkinson's disease, this assumption has never been tested directly. In TH–Cre mice whose nigrostriatal pathway had been eliminated unilaterally with 6-hydroxydopamine, we injected a Cre-dependent virus coding for channelrhodopsin-2 and enhanced yellow fluorescent protein unilaterally into the unlesioned midbrain or bilaterally into the striatum. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry in striatal slices revealed that both optical and electrical stimulation readily elicited DA release in control striata but not from contralateral striata when nigrostriatal neurons were transduced. In contrast, neither optical nor electrical stimulation could elicit striatal DA release in either the control or lesioned striata when the virus was injected directly into the striatum transducing only striatal TH interneurons. This demonstrates that striatal TH interneurons do not release DA. Fluorescence immunocytochemistry in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)–TH mice revealed colocalization of DA, l-amino acid decarboxylase, the DA transporter, and vesicular monoamine transporter-2 with EGFP in midbrain dopaminergic neurons but not in any of the striatal EGFP–TH interneurons. Optogenetic activation of striatal EGFP–TH interneurons produced strong GABAergic inhibition in all spiny neurons tested. These results indicate that striatal TH interneurons are not dopaminergic but rather are a type of GABAergic interneuron that expresses TH but none of the other enzymes or transporters necessary to operate as dopaminergic neurons and exert widespread GABAergic inhibition onto direct and indirect spiny neurons. PMID:25904808

  14. Molecular layer interneurons of the cerebellum: developmental and morphological aspects.

    PubMed

    Sotelo, Constantino

    2015-10-01

    During the past 25 years, our knowledge on the development of basket and stellate cells (molecular layer interneurons [MLIs]) has completely changed, not only regarding their origin from the ventricular zone, corresponding to the primitive cerebellar neuroepithelium, instead of the external granular layer, but above all by providing an almost complete account of the genetic regulations (transcription factors and other genes) involved in their differentiation and synaptogenesis. Moreover, it has been shown that MLIs' precursors (dividing neuroblasts) and not young postmitotic neurons, as in other germinal neuroepithelia, leave the germinative zone and migrate all along a complex and lengthy path throughout the presumptive cerebellar white matter, which provides suitable niches exerting epigenetic influences on their ultimate neuronal identities. Recent studies carried out on the anatomical-functional properties of adult MLIs emphasize the importance of these interneurons in regulating PC inhibition, and point out the crucial role played by electrical synaptic transmission between MLIs as well as ephaptic interactions between them and Purkinje cells at the pinceaux level, in the regulation of this inhibition. PMID:25599913

  15. Trajectory of the main GABAergic interneuron populations from early development to old age in the rat primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Ouellet, Lydia; de Villers-Sidani, Etienne

    2014-01-01

    In both humans and rodents, decline in cognitive function is a hallmark of the aging process; the basis for this decrease has yet to be fully characterized. However, using aged rodent models, deficits in auditory processing have been associated with significant decreases in inhibitory signaling attributed to a loss of GABAergic interneurons. Not only are these interneurons crucial for pattern detection and other large-scale population dynamics, but they have also been linked to mechanisms mediating plasticity and learning, making them a prime candidate for study and modeling of modifications to cortical communication pathways in neurodegenerative diseases. Using the rat primary auditory cortex (A1) as a model, we probed the known markers of GABAergic interneurons with immunohistological methods, using antibodies against gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), parvalbumin (PV), somatostatin (SOM), calretinin (CR), vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT), neuropeptide Y (NPY), and cholecystokinin (CCK) to document the changes observed in interneuron populations across the rat's lifespan. This analysis provided strong evidence that several but not all GABAergic neurons were affected by the aging process, showing most dramatic changes in expression of parvalbumin (PV) and somatostatin (SOM) expression. With this evidence, we show how understanding these trajectories of cell counts may be factored into a simple model to quantify changes in inhibitory signaling across the course of life, which may be applied as a framework for creating more advanced simulations of interneuronal implication in normal cerebral processing, normal aging, or pathological processes. PMID:24917792

  16. Somatostatin Interneurons Control a Key Component of Mismatch Negativity in Mouse Visual Cortex.

    PubMed

    Hamm, Jordan P; Yuste, Rafael

    2016-07-19

    Patients with schizophrenia have deficient sensory processing, undermining how they perceive and relate to a changing environment. This impairment can be captured by the reduced mismatch negativity (MMN) index, an electroencephalographic biomarker of psychosis. The biological factors contributing to MMN are unclear, though mouse research, in which genetic and optical methods could be applied, has given some insight. Using fast two-photon calcium imaging and multielectrode recordings in awake mice, we find that visual cortical circuits display adapted (decreased) responses to repeated stimuli and amplified responses to a deviant stimulus, the key component of human MMN. Moreover, pharmacogenetic silencing of somatostatin-containing interneurons specifically eliminated this amplification, along with its associated theta/alpha-band response, leaving stimulus-specific adaption and related gamma-band modulations intact. Our results validate a mouse model of MMN and suggest that abnormalities in somatostatin-containing interneurons cause sensory deficits underlying MMN and schizophrenia. PMID:27396334

  17. Adolescent testosterone influences BDNF and TrkB mRNA and neurotrophin-interneuron marker relationships in mammalian frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Allen, Katherine; Fung, Samantha; Rothmond, Debora; Noble, Pam L; Handelsman, David J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-11-01

    Late adolescence in males is a period of increased susceptibility for the onset of schizophrenia, coinciding with increased circulating testosterone. The cognitive deficits prevalent in schizophrenia may be related to unhealthy cortical interneurons, which are trophically dependent on brain derived neurotrophic factor. We investigated, under conditions of depleted (monkey and rat) and replaced (rat) testosterone over adolescence, changes in gene expression of cortical BDNF and TrkB transcripts and interneuron markers and the relationships between these mRNAs and circulating testosterone. Testosterone removal by gonadectomy reduced gene expression of some BDNF transcripts in monkey and rat frontal cortices and the BDNF mRNA reduction was prevented by testosterone replacement. In rat, testosterone replacement increased the potential for classical TrkB signalling by increasing the full length to truncated TrkB mRNA ratio, whereas in the monkey cortex, circulating testosterone was negatively correlated with the TrkB full length/truncated mRNA ratio. We did not identify changes in interneuron gene expression in monkey frontal cortex in response to gonadectomy, and in rat, we showed that only somatostatin mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy but not restored by testosterone replacement. We identified complex and possibly species-specific, relationships between BDNF/TrkB gene expression and interneuron marker gene expression that appear to be dependent on the presence of testosterone at adolescence in rat and monkey frontal cortices. Taken together, our findings suggest there are dynamic relationships between BDNF/TrkB and interneuron markers that are dependent on the presence of testosterone but that this may not be a straightforward increase in testosterone leading to changes in BDNF/TrkB that contributes to interneuron health. PMID:26088421

  18. Interneuron Progenitor Transplantation to Treat CNS Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Chohan, Muhammad O.; Moore, Holly

    2016-01-01

    Due to the inadequacy of endogenous repair mechanisms diseases of the nervous system remain a major challenge to scientists and clinicians. Stem cell based therapy is an exciting and viable strategy that has been shown to ameliorate or even reverse symptoms of CNS dysfunction in preclinical animal models. Of particular importance has been the use of GABAergic interneuron progenitors as a therapeutic strategy. Born in the neurogenic niches of the ventral telencephalon, interneuron progenitors retain their unique capacity to disperse, integrate and induce plasticity in adult host circuitries following transplantation. Here we discuss the potential of interneuron based transplantation strategies as it relates to CNS disease therapeutics. We also discuss mechanisms underlying their therapeutic efficacy and some of the challenges that face the field. PMID:27582692

  19. Malformations of cortical development

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Trudy; Atefy, Ramin; Sheen, Volney

    2012-01-01

    Background Malformations of cortical development (MCD) are increasingly recognized as an important cause of epilepsy and developmental delay. MCD encompass a wide spectrum of disorders with various underlying genetic etiologies and clinical manifestations. High resolution imaging has dramatically improved our recognition of MCD. Review Summary This review will provide a brief overview of the stages of normal cortical development, including neuronal proliferation, neuroblast migration, and neuronal organization. Disruptions at various stages lead to characteristic MCD. Disorders of neurogenesis give rise to microcephaly (small brain) or macrocephaly (large brain). Disorders of early neuroblast migration give rise to periventricular heterotopia (neurons located along the ventricles), whereas abnormalities later in migration lead to lissencephaly (smooth brain) or subcortical band heterotopia (smooth brain with a band of heterotopic neurons under the cortex). Abnormal neuronal migration arrest give rise to over-migration of neurons in cobblestone lissencephaly. Lastly, disorders of neuronal organization cause polymicrogyria (abnormally small gyri and sulci). This review will also discuss the known genetic mutations and potential mechanisms that contribute to these syndromes. Conclusion Identification of various gene mutations has not only given us greater insight into some of the pathophysiologic basis of MCD, but also an understanding of the processes involved in normal cortical development. PMID:18469675

  20. Firing regulation of fast-spiking interneurons by autaptic inhibition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Daqing; Chen, Mingming; Perc, Matjaž; Wu, Shengdun; Xia, Chuan; Zhang, Yangsong; Xu, Peng; Xia, Yang; Yao, Dezhong

    2016-05-01

    Fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in the brain are self-innervated by powerful inhibitory GABAergic autaptic connections. By computational modelling, we investigate how autaptic inhibition regulates the firing response of such interneurons. Our results indicate that autaptic inhibition both boosts the current threshold for action potential generation and modulates the input-output gain of FS interneurons. The autaptic transmission delay is identified as a key parameter that controls the firing patterns and determines multistability regions of FS interneurons. Furthermore, we observe that neuronal noise influences the firing regulation of FS interneurons by autaptic inhibition and extends their dynamic range for encoding inputs. Importantly, autaptic inhibition modulates noise-induced irregular firing of FS interneurons, such that coherent firing appears at an optimal autaptic inhibition level. Our results reveal the functional roles of autaptic inhibition in taming the firing dynamics of FS interneurons.

  1. A specific role for NR2A-containing NMDA receptors in the maintenance of parvalbumin and GAD67 immunoreactivity in cultured interneurons.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Jefferson W; Davis, Christopher N; Tabarean, Iustin; Conti, Bruno; Bartfai, Tamas; Behrens, M Margarita

    2006-02-01

    Several lines of evidence suggest that a hypoglutamatergic condition may induce a phenotypic loss of cortical parvalbumin (PV)-positive GABAergic interneurons, such as that observed in brain tissue of schizophrenic subjects. However, it is not known whether the loss of PV interneurons is a consequence of the hypoglutamatergic condition or a secondary aspect of the disease. We characterized the signaling and subunit expression of NMDA receptors in cultured cortical PV interneurons and determined whether a hypoglutamatergic condition, created by direct application of sublethal concentrations of ketamine or subunit-selective NMDA receptor antagonists, can affect the expression of the GABAergic markers as observed in vivo. Real-time PCR performed on mRNA isolated from single neurons showed that PV interneurons present a fivefold higher NR2A/NR2B ratio than pyramidal neurons. Brief, nontoxic, exposure to NMDA led to an increase in ERK1/2 (extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2) and cAMP response element-binding protein phosphorylation in PV interneurons, and this increase was blocked by the NR2A-selective antagonist NVP-AAM077. Application of the nonselective NMDA receptor antagonist ketamine, at sublethal concentrations, induced a time and dose-dependent decrease in parvalbumin and GAD67 immunoreactivity specifically in PV interneurons. These effects were reversible and were also observed with the NR2A-selective antagonist, whereas the NR2B-selective antagonist Ro-25-6981 only partially reduced GAD67 immunoreactivity. Coexposure to the calcium channel opener BayK, or the group I metabotropic glutamate receptor agonist DHPG [(RS)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine] attenuated the decrease in GAD67 and parvalbumin induced by the NMDA receptor antagonists. These results suggest that the activity of NR2A-containing NMDA receptors play a pivotal role in the maintenance of the GABAergic function of PV interneurons. PMID:16452684

  2. Cryptic organisation within an apparently irregular rostrocaudal distribution of interneurons in the embryonic zebrafish spinal cord

    SciTech Connect

    Wells, Simon; Conran, John G.; Tamme, Richard; Gaudin, Arnaud; Webb, Jonathan; Lardelli, Michael

    2010-11-15

    The molecules and mechanisms involved in patterning the dorsoventral axis of the developing vertebrate spinal cord have been investigated extensively and many are well known. Conversely, knowledge of mechanisms patterning cellular distributions along the rostrocaudal axis is relatively more restricted. Much is known about the rostrocaudal distribution of motoneurons and spinal cord cells derived from neural crest but there is little known about the rostrocaudal patterning of most of the other spinal cord neurons. Here we report data from our analyses of the distribution of dorsal longitudinal ascending (DoLA) interneurons in the developing zebrafish spinal cord. We show that, although apparently distributed irregularly, these cells have cryptic organisation. We present a novel cell-labelling technique that reveals that DoLA interneurons migrate rostrally along the dorsal longitudinal fasciculus of the spinal cord during development. This cell-labelling strategy may be useful for in vivo analysis of factors controlling neuron migration in the central nervous system. Additionally, we show that DoLA interneurons persist in the developing spinal cord for longer than previously reported. These findings illustrate the need to investigate factors and mechanisms that determine 'irregular' patterns of cell distribution, particularly in the central nervous system but also in other tissues of developing embryos.

  3. Development of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors and their correlation with NMDA receptors in fast-spiking interneurons of rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Huai-Xing; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2010-01-01

    Abnormal influx of Ca2+ is thought to contribute to the neuronal injury associated with a number of brain disorders, and Ca2+-permeable AMPA receptors (CP-AMPARs) play a critical role in the pathological process. Despite the apparent vulnerability of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons in neurological disorders, little is known about the CP-AMPARs expressed by functionally identified FS interneurons in the developing prefrontal cortex (PFC). We investigated the development of inwardly rectifying AMPA receptor-mediated currents and their correlation with NMDA receptor-mediated currents in FS interneurons in the rat PFC. We found that 78% of the FS interneurons expressed a low rectification index, presumably Ca2+-permeable AMPARs, with only 22% exhibiting AMPARs with a high rectification index, probably Ca2+ impermeable (CI). FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs exhibited properties distinct from those expressing CI-AMPARs, although both displayed similar morphologies, passive membrane properties and AMPA currents at resting membrane potentials. The AMPA receptors also exhibited dramatic changes during cortical development with significantly more FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs and a clearly decreased rectification index during adolescence. In addition, FS interneurons with CP-AMPARs exhibited few or no NMDA currents, distinct frequency-dependent synaptic facilitation, and protracted maturation in short-term plasticity. These data suggest that CP-AMPARs in FS interneurons may play a critical role in neuronal integration and that their characteristic properties may make these cells particularly vulnerable to disruptive influences in the PFC, thus contributing to the onset of many psychiatric disorders. PMID:20547673

  4. Otx2-PNN Interaction to Regulate Cortical Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Bernard, Clémence; Prochiantz, Alain

    2016-01-01

    The ability of the environment to shape cortical function is at its highest during critical periods of postnatal development. In the visual cortex, critical period onset is triggered by the maturation of parvalbumin inhibitory interneurons, which gradually become surrounded by a specialized glycosaminoglycan-rich extracellular matrix: the perineuronal nets. Among the identified factors regulating cortical plasticity in the visual cortex, extracortical homeoprotein Otx2 is transferred specifically into parvalbumin interneurons and this transfer regulates both the onset and the closure of the critical period of plasticity for binocular vision. Here, we review the interaction between the complex sugars of the perineuronal nets and homeoprotein Otx2 and how this interaction regulates cortical plasticity during critical period and in adulthood. PMID:26881132

  5. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J.; Kis, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Diverse types of GABAergic interneurons coordinate the firing of cortical principal cells required for memory

  6. Multifunctional and specialized spinal interneurons for turtle limb movements.

    PubMed

    Berkowitz, Ari

    2010-06-01

    The turtle spinal cord can help reveal how vertebrate central nervous system (CNS) circuits select and generate an appropriate limb movement in each circumstance. Both multifunctional and specialized spinal interneurons contribute to the motor patterns for the three forms of scratching, forward swimming, and flexion reflex. Multifunctional interneurons, activated during all of these motor patterns, can have axon terminal arborizations in the ventral horn, where they likely contribute to limb motor output. Specialized interneurons can be specialized for a behavior, as opposed to a phase or motor synergy. Interneurons specialized for scratching can be hyperpolarized throughout swimming. Interneurons specialized for flexion reflex can be hyperpolarized throughout scratching and swimming. Some structure-function correlations have been revealed: flexion reflex-selective interneurons had somata exclusively in the dorsal horn, in contrast to scratch-activated interneurons. Transverse interneurons, defined by quantitative morphological criteria, had higher peak firing rates, narrower action potentials, briefer afterhyperpolarizations, and larger membrane potential oscillations than scratch-activated interneurons with different dendritic morphologies. Future investigations will focus on how multifunctional and specialized spinal interneurons interact to generate each motor output. PMID:20536926

  7. Synaptic Targets of Medial Septal Projections in the Hippocampus and Extrahippocampal Cortices of the Mouse.

    PubMed

    Unal, Gunes; Joshi, Abhilasha; Viney, Tim J; Kis, Viktor; Somogyi, Peter

    2015-12-01

    Temporal coordination of neuronal assemblies among cortical areas is essential for behavioral performance. GABAergic projections from the medial septum and diagonal band complex exclusively innervate GABAergic interneurons in the rat hippocampus, contributing to the coordination of neuronal activity, including the generation of theta oscillations. Much less is known about the synaptic target neurons outside the hippocampus. To reveal the contribution of synaptic circuits involving the medial septum of mice, we have identified postsynaptic cortical neurons in wild-type and parvalbumin-Cre knock-in mice. Anterograde axonal tracing from the septum revealed extensive innervation of the hippocampus as well as the subiculum, presubiculum, parasubiculum, the medial and lateral entorhinal cortices, and the retrosplenial cortex. In all examined cortical regions, many septal GABAergic boutons were in close apposition to somata or dendrites immunopositive for interneuron cell-type molecular markers, such as parvalbumin, calbindin, calretinin, N-terminal EF-hand calcium-binding protein 1, cholecystokinin, reelin, or a combination of these molecules. Electron microscopic observations revealed septal boutons forming axosomatic or axodendritic type II synapses. In the CA1 region of hippocampus, septal GABAergic projections exclusively targeted interneurons. In the retrosplenial cortex, 93% of identified postsynaptic targets belonged to interneurons and the rest to pyramidal cells. These results suggest that the GABAergic innervation from the medial septum and diagonal band complex contributes to temporal coordination of neuronal activity via several types of cortical GABAergic interneurons in both hippocampal and extrahippocampal cortices. Oscillatory septal neuronal firing at delta, theta, and gamma frequencies may phase interneuron activity. PMID:26631464

  8. Cortactin involvement in the keratinocyte growth factor and fibroblast growth factor 10 promotion of migration and cortical actin assembly in human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Ceccarelli, Simona; Cardinali, Giorgia; Aspite, Nicaela; Picardo, Mauro; Marchese, Cinzia; Torrisi, Maria Rosaria; Mancini, Patrizia . E-mail: patrizia.mancini@uniroma1.it

    2007-05-15

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF/FGF7) and fibroblast growth factor 10 (FGF10/KGF2) regulate keratinocyte proliferation and differentiation by binding to the tyrosine kinase KGF receptor (KGFR). KGF induces keratinocyte motility and cytoskeletal rearrangement, whereas a direct role of FGF10 on keratinocyte migration is not clearly established. Here we analyzed the motogenic activity of FGF10 and KGF on human keratinocytes. Migration assays and immunofluorescence of actin cytoskeleton revealed that FGF10 is less efficient than KGF in promoting migration and exerts a delayed effect in inducing lamellipodia and ruffles formation. Both growth factors promoted phosphorylation and subsequent membrane translocation of cortactin, an F-actin binding protein involved in cell migration; however, FGF10-induced cortactin phosphorylation was reduced, more transient and delayed with respect to that promoted by KGF. Cortactin phosphorylation induced by both growth factors was Src-dependent, while its membrane translocation and cell migration were blocked by either Src and PI3K inhibitors, suggesting that both pathways are involved in KGF- and FGF10-dependent motility. Furthermore, siRNA-mediated downregulation of cortactin inhibited KGF- and FGF10-induced migration. These results indicate that cortactin is involved in keratinocyte migration promoted by both KGF and FGF10.

  9. In Vivo Study of Dynamics and Stability of Dendritic Spines on Olfactory Bulb Interneurons in Xenopus laevis Tadpoles

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yu-Bin; Hu, Chun-Rui; Zhang, Li; Yin, Wu; Hu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic spines undergo continuous remodeling during development of the nervous system. Their stability is essential for maintaining a functional neuronal circuit. Spine dynamics and stability of cortical excitatory pyramidal neurons have been explored extensively in mammalian animal models. However, little is known about spiny interneurons in non-mammalian vertebrate models. In the present study, neuronal morphology was visualized by single-cell electroporation. Spiny neurons were surveyed in the Xenopus tadpole brain and observed to be widely distributed in the olfactory bulb and telencephalon. DsRed- or PSD95-GFP-expressing spiny interneurons in the olfactory bulb were selected for in vivo time-lapse imaging. Dendritic protrusions were classified as filopodia, thin, stubby, or mushroom spines based on morphology. Dendritic spines on the interneurons were highly dynamic, especially the filopodia and thin spines. The stubby and mushroom spines were relatively more stable, although their stability significantly decreased with longer observation intervals. The 4 spine types exhibited diverse preferences during morphological transitions from one spine type to others. Sensory deprivation induced by severing the olfactory nerve to block the input of mitral/tufted cells had no significant effects on interneuron spine stability. Hence, a new model was established in Xenopus laevis tadpoles to explore dendritic spine dynamics in vivo. PMID:26485435

  10. Cortical feedback control of olfactory bulb circuits.

    PubMed

    Boyd, Alison M; Sturgill, James F; Poo, Cindy; Isaacson, Jeffry S

    2012-12-20

    Olfactory cortex pyramidal cells integrate sensory input from olfactory bulb mitral and tufted (M/T) cells and project axons back to the bulb. However, the impact of cortical feedback projections on olfactory bulb circuits is unclear. Here, we selectively express channelrhodopsin-2 in olfactory cortex pyramidal cells and show that cortical feedback projections excite diverse populations of bulb interneurons. Activation of cortical fibers directly excites GABAergic granule cells, which in turn inhibit M/T cells. However, we show that cortical inputs preferentially target short axon cells that drive feedforward inhibition of granule cells. In vivo, activation of olfactory cortex that only weakly affects spontaneous M/T cell firing strongly gates odor-evoked M/T cell responses: cortical activity suppresses odor-evoked excitation and enhances odor-evoked inhibition. Together, these results indicate that although cortical projections have diverse actions on olfactory bulb microcircuits, the net effect of cortical feedback on M/T cells is an amplification of odor-evoked inhibition. PMID:23259951

  11. Response features of parvalbumin-expressing interneurons suggest precise roles for subtypes of inhibition in visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Runyan, Caroline A.; Schummers, James; Wart, Audra Van; Kuhlman, Sandra J.; Wilson, Nathan R.; Huang, Z. Josh; Sur, Mriganka

    2010-01-01

    Summary Inhibitory interneurons in the cerebral cortex include a vast array of subtypes, varying in their molecular signatures, electrophysiological properties, and connectivity patterns. This diversity suggests that individual inhibitory classes have unique roles in cortical circuits; however, their characterization to date has been limited to broad classifications including many subtypes. We used the Cre/LoxP system, specifically labeling parvalbumin(PV)-expressing interneurons in visual cortex of PV-Cre mice with red fluorescent protein (RFP), followed by targeted loose-patch recordings and two-photon imaging of calcium responses in vivo to characterize the visual receptive field properties of these cells. Despite their relative molecular and morphological homogeneity, we find that PV+ neurons have a diversity of feature-specific visual responses that include sharp orientation and direction-selectivity, small receptive fields, and bandpass spatial frequency tuning. These results suggest that subsets of parvalbumin interneurons are components of specific cortical networks, and that perisomatic inhibition contributes to the generation of precise response properties. PMID:20826315

  12. Fewer GABAergic interneurons, heightened anxiety and decreased high-frequency electroencephalogram components in Bronx waltzer mice, a model of hereditary deafness.

    PubMed

    Matsuda, Yoshiki; Inoue, Yuki; Izumi, Hitomi; Kaga, Makiko; Inagaki, Masumi; Goto, Yu-ichi

    2011-02-10

    The homozygous Bronx waltzer mutation (bv/bv) results in the degeneration of most but not all of the primary auditory receptors, the inner hair cells and their afferent neurons, and leads to perceptive deafness. However, the influence of the mutation on the central nervous system (CNS) remains largely unclear. In this study, we have conducted behavioral, morphological and electrophysiological investigations to clarify the CNS dysfunction in bv/bv mice. These mutant mice exhibited heightened levels of anxiety with normal levels of motor activity. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed a significant reduction in parvalbumin-containing GABAergic interneurons in the anterior cingulate, somatosensory and auditory cortices of bv/bv mice. The current results suggest that interneuron development may be disrupted in the bv/bv cerebrum. Moreover, the high-frequency electroencephalogram components of the cortical activity, including the frequency range containing high gamma, were markedly decreased in bv/bv mice compared with controls, probably indicating a disturbance in cortical inhibitory function. Together, these results suggest that the cortical development of interneurons and their electrophysiological profiles are altered in bv/bv mice. We propose that these novel phenotypes identified in bv/bv mice provide new perspectives on the basic neuronal mechanisms of developmental disorders. PMID:21146505

  13. Immunocytochemical heterogeneity of somatostatin-expressing GABAergic interneurons in layers II and III of the mouse cingulate cortex: A combined immunofluorescence/design-based stereologic study.

    PubMed

    Riedemann, Therese; Schmitz, Christoph; Sutor, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Many neurological diseases including major depression and schizophrenia manifest as dysfunction of the GABAergic system within the cingulate cortex. However, relatively little is known about the properties of GABAergic interneurons in the cingulate cortex. Therefore, we investigated the neurochemical properties of GABAergic interneurons in the cingulate cortex of FVB-Tg(GadGFP)45704Swn/J mice expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in a subset of GABAergic interneurons (GFP-expressing inhibitory interneurons [GINs]) by means of immunocytochemical and design-based stereologic techniques. We found that GINs represent around 12% of all GABAergic interneurons in the cingulate cortex. In contrast to other neocortical areas, GINs were only found in cortical layers II and III. More than 98% of GINs coexpressed the neuropeptide somatostatin (SOM), but only 50% of all SOM + neurons were GINs. By analyzing the expression of calretinin (CR), calbindin (CB), parvalbumin, and various neuropeptides, we identified several distinct GIN subgroups. In particular, we observed coexpression of SOM with CR and CB. In addition, we found neuropeptide Y expression almost exclusively in those GINs that coexpressed SOM and CR. Thus, with respect to the expression of calcium-binding proteins and neuropeptides, GINs are surprisingly heterogeneous in the mouse cingulate cortex, and the minority of GINs express only one marker protein or peptide. Furthermore, our observation of overlap between the SOM + and CR + interneuron population was in contrast to earlier findings of non-overlapping SOM + and CR + interneuron populations in the human cortex. This might indicate that findings in mouse models of neuropsychiatric diseases may not be directly transferred to human patients. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:2281-2299, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26669716

  14. Immunoreactivity for the GABAA receptor alpha1 subunit, somatostatin and Connexin36 distinguishes axoaxonic, basket, and bistratified interneurons of the rat hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Baude, Agnès; Bleasdale, Catherine; Dalezios, Yannis; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2007-09-01

    Parvalbumin (PV)-expressing interneurons synchronize cortical neurons through gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) synapses. Three types of PV-containing interneurons populate stratum pyramidale of the hippocampal CA1 area: basket cells targeting somata and proximal dendrites, axoaxonic cells innervating axon initial segments, and bistratified cells targeting the dendrites of pyramidal cells. We tested whether this axonal specialization is accompanied by a differential expression of molecules involved in neuronal signaling. Immunofluorescence evaluation of interneurons labeled by neurobiotin in vivo shows that axoaxonic cells express significantly less GABA(A) receptor alpha1 subunit in the plasma membrane than basket and bistratified cells. Electron microscopic immunogold labeling reveals that this subunit contributes heavily to extrasynaptic receptors providing a substrate for tonic inhibition. Results from additional immunofluorescence experiments were consistent with the finding that only bistratified cells express the neuropeptide somatostatin. From the molecular profiles, we estimate that basket, bistratified, and axoaxonic cells represent about 60%, 25%, and 15%, respectively, of PV-containing cells in CA1 stratum pyramidale. In addition, all 3 interneuron classes form connexin36-immunopositive dendrodendritic gap junctions. The differential expression of signaling molecules and the relative frequency of cells reflect the specialized temporal contribution of the 3 types of PV-positive interneurons to GABA release in the network. PMID:17122364

  15. Polysialic Acid Acute Depletion Induces Structural Plasticity in Interneurons and Impairs the Excitation/Inhibition Balance in Medial Prefrontal Cortex Organotypic Cultures

    PubMed Central

    Castillo-Gómez, Esther; Pérez-Rando, Marta; Vidueira, Sandra; Nacher, Juan

    2016-01-01

    The structure and function of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is affected in several neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia and major depression. Recent studies suggest that imbalances between excitatory and inhibitory activity (E/I) may be responsible for this cortical dysfunction and therefore, may underlie the core symptoms of these diseases. This E/I imbalance seems to be correlated with alterations in the plasticity of interneurons but there is still scarce information on the mechanisms that may link these phenomena. The polysialylated form of the neural cell adhesion molecule (PSA-NCAM) is a good candidate, because it modulates the neuronal plasticity of interneurons and its expression is altered in schizophrenia and major depression. To address this question, we have developed an in vitro model using mPFC organotypic cultures of transgenic mice displaying fluorescent spiny interneurons. After enzymatic depletion of PSA, the spine density of interneurons, the number of synaptic puncta surrounding pyramidal neuron somata and the E/I ratio were strongly affected. These results point to the polysialylation of NCAM as an important factor in the maintenance of E/I balance and the structural plasticity of interneurons. This may be particularly relevant for better understanding the etiology of schizophrenia and major depression. PMID:27445697

  16. Dlx-Dependent and -Independent Regulation of Olfactory Bulb Interneuron Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jason E.; Garel, Sonia; Alvarez-Dolado, Manuel; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Osumi, Noriko; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Rubenstein, John L. R.

    2016-01-01

    Olfactory bulb interneuron development is a complex multistep process that involves cell specification in the ventral telencephalon, tangential migration into the olfactory bulb, and local neuronal maturation. Although several transcription factors have been implicated in this process, how or when they act remains to be elucidated. Here we explore the mechanisms that result in olfactory bulb interneuron defects in Dlx1&2−/− (distal-less homeobox 1 and 2) and Mash1−/− (mammalian achaete-schute homolog 1) mutants. We provide evidence that Dlx1&2 and Mash1 regulate parallel molecular pathways that are required for the generation of these cells, thereby providing new insights into the mechanisms underlying olfactory bulb development. The analysis also defined distinct anatomical zones related to olfactory bulb development. Finally we show that Dlx1&2 are required for promoting tangential migration to the olfactory bulb, potentially via regulating the expression of ErbB4 (v-erb-a erythroblastic leukemia viral oncogene homolog 4), Robo2 (roundabout homolog 2), Slit1 (slit homolog 1), and PK2 (prokineticin 2), which have all been shown to play essential roles in this migration. PMID:17376983

  17. THE DISTINCT TEMPORAL ORIGINS OF OLFACTORY BULB INTERNEURON SUBTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Batista-Brito, Renata; Close, Jennie; Machold, Robert; Ekker, Mark; Fishell, Gord

    2008-01-01

    Olfactory bulb (OB) interneurons are a heterogeneous population produced beginning in embryogenesis and continuing through adulthood. Understanding how this diversity arises will provide insight into how olfactory bulb microcircuitry is established as well as adult neurogenesis. Specific spatial domains have been shown to contribute specific interneuron subtypes. However, the temporal profile by which OB interneuron subtypes are produced is unknown. Using inducible genetic fate mapping of Dlx1/2 precursors, we analyzed the production of seven OB interneuron subtypes and find that the generation of each subpopulation has a unique temporal signature. Within the glomerular layer, while the production of TH-positive interneurons is maximal during early embryogenesis, it decreases thereafter. By contrast, the generation of CB interneurons is maximal during late embryogenesis and declines postnatally, while CR cell production is low during embryogenesis and increases postnatally. PV interneurons within the external plexiform layer are produced only perinatally, while the generation of 5T4-positive granule cells in the mitral cell layer does not change significantly over time. CR-positive granule cells are not produced at early embryonic timepoints, but constitute a large percentage of the granule cells born after birth. Blanes cells by contrast are produced in greatest number during embryogenesis. Taken together we provide the first comprehensive analysis of the temporal generation of olfactory bulb interneuron subtypes and demonstrate that the timing by which these populations are produced is tightly orchestrated. PMID:18400896

  18. Alterations in cortical network oscillations and parvalbumin neurons in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Cho, Raymond Y; Lewis, David A

    2015-06-15

    Cognitive deficits are a core clinical feature of schizophrenia but respond poorly to available medications. Thus, understanding the neural basis of these deficits is crucial for the development of new therapeutic interventions. The types of cognitive processes affected in schizophrenia are thought to depend on the precisely timed transmission of information in cortical regions via synchronous oscillations at gamma band frequency. Here, we review 1) data from clinical studies suggesting that induction of frontal cortex gamma oscillations during tasks that engage cognitive or complex perceptual functions is attenuated in schizophrenia; 2) findings from basic neuroscience studies highlighting the features of parvalbumin-positive interneurons that are critical for gamma oscillation production; and 3) results from recent postmortem human brain studies providing additional molecular bases for parvalbumin-positive interneuron alterations in prefrontal cortical circuitry in schizophrenia. PMID:25863358

  19. Alterations in Cortical Network Oscillations and Parvalbumin Neurons in Schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Burgos, Guillermo; Cho, Raymond Y; Lewis, David A

    2015-01-01

    Cognitive deficits are a core clinical feature of schizophrenia but respond poorly to available medications. Thus, understanding the neural basis of these deficits is crucial for the development of new therapeutic interventions. The types of cognitive processes affected in schizophrenia are thought to depend on the precisely timed transmission of information in cortical regions via synchronous oscillations at gamma band frequency. Here, we review 1) data from clinical studies suggesting that induction of frontal cortex gamma oscillations during tasks that engage cognitive or complex perceptual functions is attenuated in schizophrenia, 2) findings from basic neuroscience studies highlighting the features of parvalbumin-positive (PV) interneurons that are critical for gamma oscillation production and 3) results from recent postmortem human brain studies providing additional molecular bases for PV interneuron alterations in prefrontal cortical circuitry in schizophrenia. PMID:25863358

  20. Bisphenol A delays the perinatal chloride shift in cortical neurons by epigenetic effects on the Kcc2 promoter

    PubMed Central

    Yeo, Michele; Berglund, Ken; Hanna, Michael; Guo, Junjie U.; Kittur, Jaya; Torres, Maria D.; Abramowitz, Joel; Busciglio, Jorge; Gao, Yuan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Liedtke, Wolfgang B.

    2013-01-01

    Bisphenol A (BPA) is a ubiquitous compound that is emerging as a possible toxicant during embryonic development. BPA has been shown to epigenetically affect the developing nervous system, but the molecular mechanisms are not clear. Here we demonstrate that BPA exposure in culture led to delay in the perinatal chloride shift caused by significant decrease in potassium chloride cotransporter 2 (Kcc2) mRNA expression in developing rat, mouse, and human cortical neurons. Neuronal chloride increased correspondingly. Treatment with epigenetic compounds decitabine and trichostatin A rescued the BPA effects as did knockdown of histone deacetylase 1 and combined knockdown histone deacetylase 1 and 2. Furthermore, BPA evoked increase in tangential interneuron migration and increased chloride in migrating neurons. Interestingly, BPA exerted its effect in a sexually dimorphic manner, with a more accentuated effect in females than males. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, we found a significant increase in binding of methyl-CpG binding protein 2 to the “cytosine-phosphate-guanine shores” of the Kcc2 promoter, and decrease in binding of acetylated histone H3K9 surrounding the transcriptional start site. Methyl-CpG binding protein 2-expressing neurons were more abundant resulting from BPA exposure. The sexually dimorphic effect of BPA on Kcc2 expression was also demonstrated in cortical neurons cultured from the offspring of BPA-fed mouse dams. In these neurons and in cortical slices, decitabine was found to rescue the effect of BPA on Kcc2 expression. Overall, our results indicate that BPA can disrupt Kcc2 gene expression through epigenetic mechanisms. Beyond increase in basic understanding, our findings have relevance for identifying unique neurodevelopmental toxicity mechanisms of BPA, which could possibly play a role in pathogenesis of human neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:23440186

  1. Functional properties and short-term dynamics of unidirectional and reciprocal synaptic connections between layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and fast-spiking interneurons in juvenile rat prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Zaitsev, A.V.; Lewis, D.A.

    2013-01-01

    The interactions between inhibitory fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and excitatory pyramidal neurons contribute to the fundamental properties of cortical networks. An important role for FS interneurons in mediating rapid inhibition in local sensory and motor cortex microcircuits and processing thalamic inputs to the cortex has been shown in multiple reports; however, studies in the prefrontal cortex, a key neocortical region supporting working memory, are less numerous. In the present work, connections between layer 2/3 pyramidal cells and FS interneurons were studied with paired whole-cell recordings in acute neocortical slices of the medial prefrontal cortex from juvenile rats. The connection rate between FS interneurons and pyramidal neurons was about 40% in each direction with 16% of pairs connected reciprocally. Excitatory and inhibitory connections had a high efficacy and a low neurotransmission failure rate. Sustained presynaptic activity decreased the amplitude of responses and increased the failure rate more in excitatory connections than in inhibitory connections. In the reciprocal connections between the FS and pyramidal neurons, inhibitory and excitatory neurotransmission was more efficient and had a lower failure rate than in the unidirectional connections; the differences increased during the train stimulation. These results suggest the presence of distinct preferential subnetworks between FS interneurons and pyramidal cells in the rat prefrontal cortex that might be specific for this cortical area. PMID:23834038

  2. Do Cortical Circuits Need Protecting from Themselves?

    PubMed

    Trevelyan, Andrew J

    2016-08-01

    All hippocampal and neocortical networks can be driven to seize quite easily. This can be done using drugs, by altering the ionic constituency of the bathing medium [cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)], or by electrical stimulation (both experimentally and clinically, as in electroconvulsive therapy). It is worth asking why this is so, because this will both tell us more about potentially devastating neurological disorders and extend our understanding of cortical function and architecture. Here I review work examining the features of cortical networks that bias activity towards and away from hyperexcitability. I suggest that several cellular- and circuit-level features of rapidly responsive interneuron networks tip the balance away from seizure in the healthy brain. PMID:27378547

  3. The mediodorsal thalamus drives feedforward inhibition in the anterior cingulate cortex via parvalbumin interneurons.

    PubMed

    Delevich, Kristen; Tucciarone, Jason; Huang, Z Josh; Li, Bo

    2015-04-01

    Although the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC) is classically defined by its reciprocal connections with the mediodorsal thalamic nucleus (MD), the nature of information transfer between MD and mPFC is poorly understood. In sensory thalamocortical pathways, thalamic recruitment of feedforward inhibition mediated by fast-spiking, putative parvalbumin-expressing (PV) interneurons is a key feature that enables cortical neurons to represent sensory stimuli with high temporal fidelity. Whether a similar circuit mechanism is in place for the projection from the MD (a higher-order thalamic nucleus that does not receive direct input from the periphery) to the mPFC is unknown. Here we show in mice that inputs from the MD drive disynaptic feedforward inhibition in the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex (dACC) subregion of the mPFC. In particular, we demonstrate that axons arising from MD neurons directly synapse onto and excite PV interneurons that in turn mediate feedforward inhibition of pyramidal neurons in layer 3 of the dACC. This feedforward inhibition in the dACC limits the time window during which pyramidal neurons integrate excitatory synaptic inputs and fire action potentials, but in a manner that allows for greater flexibility than in sensory cortex. These findings provide a foundation for understanding the role of MD-PFC circuit function in cognition. PMID:25855185

  4. Striatal cholinergic interneurons drive GABA release from dopamine terminals

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Alexandra B.; Hammack, Nora; Yang, Cindy F.; Shah, Nirao M.; Seal, Rebecca P.; Kreitzer, Anatol C.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibitory synaptic currents in dorsal striatal projection neurons, providing one potential substrate for control of striatal output, but the mechanism for these GABAergic currents is not fully understood. Using optogenetics and whole-cell recordings in brain slices, we find that a large component of these inhibitory responses derive from action-potential-independent disynaptic neurotransmission mediated by nicotinic receptors. Cholinergically-driven IPSCs were not affected by ablation of striatal fast-spiking interneurons, but were greatly reduced after acute treatment with vesicular monoamine transport inhibitors or selective destruction of dopamine terminals with 6-hydroxydopamine, indicating that GABA release originated from dopamine terminals. These results delineate a mechanism in which striatal cholinergic interneurons can co-opt dopamine terminals to drive GABA release and rapidly inhibit striatal output neurons. PMID:24613418

  5. Tasks for inhibitory interneurons in intact brain circuits

    PubMed Central

    Roux, Lisa; Buzsáki, György

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic inhibition, brought about by a rich variety of interneuron types that target different domains of principal cells and other interneurons, counters excitation, modulates the gain, timing, tuning, bursting properties of principal cell firing, and exerts selective filtering of synaptic excitation. At the network level, it allows for coordinating transient interactions among the principal cells to form cooperative assemblies for efficient transmission of information and routing of excitatory activity across networks, typically in the form of brain oscillations. Targeted expression of neuronal activity modulators, such as optogenetics, allow physiological identification and perturbation of specific interneuron subtypes. Combined with large-scale recordings or imaging techniques, these approaches facilitate our understanding of the multiple roles of inhibitory interneurons in shaping circuit functions. PMID:25239808

  6. Interneuronal DISC1 regulates NRG1-ErbB4 signalling and excitatory–inhibitory synapse formation in the mature cortex

    PubMed Central

    Seshadri, Saurav; Faust, Travis; Ishizuka, Koko; Delevich, Kristen; Chung, Youjin; Kim, Sun-Hong; Cowles, Martis; Niwa, Minae; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Lai, Cary; Anton, E. S.; Li, Bo; Sawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 influence several processes of neurodevelopment, but the mechanisms regulating this signalling in the mature brain are not well known. DISC1 is a multifunctional scaffold protein that mediates many cellular processes. Here we present a functional relationship between DISC1 and NRG1-ErbB4 signalling in mature cortical interneurons. By cell type-specific gene modulation in vitro and in vivo including in a mutant DISC1 mouse model, we demonstrate that DISC1 inhibits NRG1-induced ErbB4 activation and signalling. This effect is likely mediated by competitive inhibition of binding of ErbB4 to PSD95. Finally, we show that interneuronal DISC1 affects NRG1-ErbB4-mediated phenotypes in the fast spiking interneuron-pyramidal neuron circuit. Post-mortem brain analyses and some genetic studies have reported interneuronal deficits and involvement of the DISC1, NRG1 and ErbB4 genes in schizophrenia, respectively. Our results suggest a mechanism by which cross-talk between DISC1 and NRG1-ErbB4 signalling may contribute to these deficits. PMID:26656849

  7. Interneuronal DISC1 regulates NRG1-ErbB4 signalling and excitatory-inhibitory synapse formation in the mature cortex.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Saurav; Faust, Travis; Ishizuka, Koko; Delevich, Kristen; Chung, Youjin; Kim, Sun-Hong; Cowles, Martis; Niwa, Minae; Jaaro-Peled, Hanna; Tomoda, Toshifumi; Lai, Cary; Anton, E S; Li, Bo; Sawa, Akira

    2015-01-01

    Neuregulin-1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 influence several processes of neurodevelopment, but the mechanisms regulating this signalling in the mature brain are not well known. DISC1 is a multifunctional scaffold protein that mediates many cellular processes. Here we present a functional relationship between DISC1 and NRG1-ErbB4 signalling in mature cortical interneurons. By cell type-specific gene modulation in vitro and in vivo including in a mutant DISC1 mouse model, we demonstrate that DISC1 inhibits NRG1-induced ErbB4 activation and signalling. This effect is likely mediated by competitive inhibition of binding of ErbB4 to PSD95. Finally, we show that interneuronal DISC1 affects NRG1-ErbB4-mediated phenotypes in the fast spiking interneuron-pyramidal neuron circuit. Post-mortem brain analyses and some genetic studies have reported interneuronal deficits and involvement of the DISC1, NRG1 and ErbB4 genes in schizophrenia, respectively. Our results suggest a mechanism by which cross-talk between DISC1 and NRG1-ErbB4 signalling may contribute to these deficits. PMID:26656849

  8. The interneuron energy hypothesis: Implications for brain disease.

    PubMed

    Kann, Oliver

    2016-06-01

    Fast-spiking, inhibitory interneurons - prototype is the parvalbumin-positive (PV+) basket cell - generate action potentials at high frequency and synchronize the activity of numerous excitatory principal neurons, such as pyramidal cells, during fast network oscillations by rhythmic inhibition. For this purpose, fast-spiking, PV+ interneurons have unique electrophysiological characteristics regarding action potential kinetics and ion conductances, which are associated with high energy expenditure. This is reflected in the neural ultrastructure by enrichment with mitochondria and cytochrome c oxidase, indicating the dependence on oxidative phosphorylation for adenosine-5'-triphosphate (ATP) generation. The high energy expenditure is most likely required for membrane ion transport in dendrites and the extensive axon arbor as well as for presynaptic release of neurotransmitter, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). Fast-spiking, PV+ interneurons are central for the emergence of gamma oscillations (30-100Hz) that provide a fundamental mechanism of complex information processing during sensory perception, motor behavior and memory formation in networks of the hippocampus and the neocortex. Conversely, shortage in glucose and oxygen supply (metabolic stress) and/or excessive formation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (oxidative stress) may render these interneurons to be a vulnerable target. Dysfunction in fast-spiking, PV+ interneurons might set a low threshold for impairment of fast network oscillations and thus higher brain functions. This pathophysiological mechanism might be highly relevant for cerebral aging as well as various acute and chronic brain diseases, such as stroke, vascular cognitive impairment, epilepsy, Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. PMID:26284893

  9. Behavior-dependent specialization of identified hippocampal interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Lapray, Damien; Lasztoczi, Balint; Lagler, Michael; Viney, Tim James; Katona, Linda; Valenti, Ornella; Hartwich, Katja; Borhegyi, Zsolt; Somogyi, Peter; Klausberger, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    A large variety of GABAergic interneurons control information processing in hippocampal circuits governing the formation of neuronal representations. Whether distinct hippocampal interneuron types contribute differentially to information-processing during behavior is not known. We employed a novel technique for recording and labeling interneurons and pyramidal cells in drug-free, freely-moving rats. Recorded parvalbumin-expressing basket interneurons innervate somata and proximal pyramidal cell dendrites, whereas nitric-oxide-synthase- and neuropeptide-Y-expressing ivy cells provide synaptic and extrasynaptic dendritic modulation. Basket and ivy cells showed distinct spike timing dynamics, firing at different rates and times during theta and ripple oscillations. Basket but not ivy cells changed their firing rates during movement, sleep and quiet wakefulness, suggesting that basket cells coordinate cell assemblies in a behavioral state-contingent manner, whereas persistently-firing ivy cells might control network excitability and homeostasis. Different interneuron types provide GABA to specific subcellular domains at defined times and rates, thus differentially controlling network activity during behavior. PMID:22864613

  10. Electrical coupling regulates layer 1 interneuron microcircuit formation in the neocortex.

    PubMed

    Yao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Min; He, Xiang-Nan; He, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Lu, Wenlian; Qiu, Zi-Long; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of electrical and chemical synapses among interneurons is essential for interneuron function in the neocortex. However, it remains largely unclear whether electrical coupling between interneurons influences chemical synapse formation and microcircuit assembly during development. Here, we show that electrical and GABAergic chemical connections robustly develop between interneurons in neocortical layer 1 over a similar time course. Electrical coupling promotes action potential generation and synchronous firing between layer 1 interneurons. Furthermore, electrically coupled interneurons exhibit strong GABA-A receptor-mediated synchronous synaptic activity. Disruption of electrical coupling leads to a loss of bidirectional, but not unidirectional, GABAergic connections. Moreover, a reduction in electrical coupling induces an increase in excitatory synaptic inputs to layer 1 interneurons. Together, these findings strongly suggest that electrical coupling between neocortical interneurons plays a critical role in regulating chemical synapse development and precise formation of circuits. PMID:27510304

  11. Optogenetic mapping of cerebellar inhibitory circuitry reveals spatially biased coordination of interneurons via electrical synapses.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsook; Lee, Soojung; Tsuda, Sachiko; Zhang, Xuying; Asrican, Brent; Gloss, Bernd; Feng, Guoping; Augustine, George J

    2014-06-12

    We used high-speed optogenetic mapping technology to examine the spatial organization of local inhibitory circuits formed by cerebellar interneurons. Transgenic mice expressing channelrhodopsin-2 exclusively in molecular layer interneurons allowed us to focally photostimulate these neurons, while measuring resulting responses in postsynaptic Purkinje cells. This approach revealed that interneurons converge upon Purkinje cells over a broad area and that at least seven interneurons form functional synapses with a single Purkinje cell. The number of converging interneurons was reduced by treatment with gap junction blockers, revealing that electrical synapses between interneurons contribute substantially to the spatial convergence. Remarkably, gap junction blockers affected convergence in sagittal slices, but not in coronal slices, indicating a sagittal bias in electrical coupling between interneurons. We conclude that electrical synapse networks spatially coordinate interneurons in the cerebellum and may also serve this function in other brain regions. PMID:24857665

  12. Electrical coupling regulates layer 1 interneuron microcircuit formation in the neocortex

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Xing-Hua; Wang, Min; He, Xiang-Nan; He, Fei; Zhang, Shu-Qing; Lu, Wenlian; Qiu, Zi-Long; Yu, Yong-Chun

    2016-01-01

    The coexistence of electrical and chemical synapses among interneurons is essential for interneuron function in the neocortex. However, it remains largely unclear whether electrical coupling between interneurons influences chemical synapse formation and microcircuit assembly during development. Here, we show that electrical and GABAergic chemical connections robustly develop between interneurons in neocortical layer 1 over a similar time course. Electrical coupling promotes action potential generation and synchronous firing between layer 1 interneurons. Furthermore, electrically coupled interneurons exhibit strong GABA-A receptor-mediated synchronous synaptic activity. Disruption of electrical coupling leads to a loss of bidirectional, but not unidirectional, GABAergic connections. Moreover, a reduction in electrical coupling induces an increase in excitatory synaptic inputs to layer 1 interneurons. Together, these findings strongly suggest that electrical coupling between neocortical interneurons plays a critical role in regulating chemical synapse development and precise formation of circuits. PMID:27510304

  13. Striatal cholinergic interneurons: birthdates predict compartmental localization.

    PubMed

    van Vulpen, E H; van der Kooy, D

    1998-07-01

    The striatal patch and matrix compartment neurons are born at different times during rat development. The majority of the early born neurons preferentially end up in the patch compartment, while the majority of the later born neurons end up in the matrix compartment. Although the cholinergic interneurons are all born early in neurogenesis (between embryonic day E12 and E17), and we would therefore expect them to be located mainly in the patches, they are relatively homogeneously distributed in the adult, with a preference for the matrix area just outside the patches (the intermediate zone). To ask if birthdate can predict the compartmental localization of cholinergic neurons in the striatum, we marked new postmitotic neurons in the embryo with a maternal injection of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) on E13, E15 or E17 and labeled the patch compartment with an injection of the retrograde tracer True Blue into the substantia nigra on postnatal day (P) 1. The pups were sacrificed at P40 and the tissue was processed for BrdU, choline acetyltransferase, and True Blue triple labeling. Cholinergic neurons that became postmitotic at E13, had a higher chance of ending up in the patch compartment compared to either the intermediate zone or the rest of the matrix compartment. On the other hand cholinergic neurons that became postmitotic at E17 had a higher chance of ending up in the matrix compartment (including the intermediate zone). We conclude that birthdate can predict compartmental localization, with the cholinergic neurons in the intermediate zone following the same pattern as the cholinergic neurons in the rest of the matrix compartment. Cholinergic neurons show the same relative birthdate/compartment relationship as do other striatal neurons, although the absolute birthdates of cholinergic neurons are shifted earlier in neurogenesis. PMID:9706390

  14. Changes of cortical excitability in patients with upper limb amputation.

    PubMed

    Schwenkreis, P; Witscher, K; Janssen, F; Dertwinkel, R; Zenz, M; Malin, J P; Tegenthoff, M

    2000-10-27

    In our study we wanted to assess motor excitability in patients with upper limb amputation by means of transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). In 12 patients, TMS was applied using a paired pulse paradigm in order to test cortico-cortical excitability. Additional parameters of motor excitability like motor threshold and cortical silent period were also measured. Recordings from the amputated side were compared to the contralateral side and to healthy controls. We found a significant reduction of intracortical inhibition in forearm amputees and an enhancement of intracortical facilitation in upper arm amputees on the affected side. We conclude that after upper limb amputation, changes in the activity of intracortical interneuronal circuits appear in the affected hemisphere. These changes may depend on the level of amputation, and be the base of cortical reorganization. PMID:11027854

  15. The complex contribution of NOS interneurons in the physiology of cerebrovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Duchemin, Sonia; Boily, Michaël; Sadekova, Nataliya; Girouard, Hélène

    2012-01-01

    Following the discovery of the vasorelaxant properties of nitric oxide (NO) by Furchgott and Ignarro, the finding by Bredt and coll. of a constitutively expressed NO synthase in neurons (nNOS) led to the presumption that neuronal NO may control cerebrovascular functions. Consequently, numerous studies have sought to determine whether neuraly-derived NO is involved in the regulation of cerebral blood flow (CBF). Anatomically, axons, dendrites, or somata of NO neurons have been found to contact the basement membrane of blood vessels or perivascular astrocytes in all segments of the cortical microcirculation. Functionally, various experimental approaches support a role of neuronal NO in the maintenance of resting CBF as well as in the vascular response to neuronal activity. Since decades, it has been assumed that neuronal NO simply diffuses to the local blood vessels and produce vasodilation through a cGMP-PKG dependent mechanism. However, NO is not the sole mediator of vasodilation in the cerebral microcirculation and is known to interact with a myriad of signaling pathways also involved in vascular control. In addition, cerebrovascular regulation is the result of a complex orchestration between all components of the neurovascular unit (i.e., neuronal, glial, and vascular cells) also known to produce NO. In this review article, the role of NO interneuron in the regulation of cortical microcirculation will be discussed in the context of the neurovascular unit. PMID:22907993

  16. Transplantation of GABAergic Interneurons into the Neonatal Primary Visual Cortex Reduces Absence Seizures in Stargazer Mice.

    PubMed

    Hammad, Mohamed; Schmidt, Stephen L; Zhang, Xuying; Bray, Ryan; Frohlich, Flavio; Ghashghaei, H Troy

    2015-09-01

    Epilepsies are debilitating neurological disorders characterized by repeated episodes of pathological seizure activity. Absence epilepsy (AE) is a poorly understood type of seizure with an estimated 30% of affected patients failing to respond to antiepileptic drugs. Thus, novel therapies are needed for the treatment of AE. A promising cell-based therapeutic strategy is centered on transplantation of embryonic neural stem cells from the medial ganglionic eminence (MGE), which give rise to gamma-aminobutyric acidergic (GABAergic) interneurons during embyronic development. Here, we used the Stargazer (Stg) mouse model of AE to map affected loci using c-Fos immunohistochemistry, which revealed intense seizure-induce activity in visual and somatosensory cortices. We report that transplantation of MGE cells into the primary visual cortex (V1) of Stg mice significantly reduces AE episodes and lowers mortality. Electrophysiological analysis in acute cortical slices of visual cortex demonstrated that Stg V1 neurons exhibit more pronounced increases in activity in response to a potassium-mediated excitability challenge than wildtypes (WT). The defective network activity in V1 was significantly altered following WT MGE transplantation, associating it with behavioral rescue of seizures in Stgs. Taken together, these findings present MGE grafting in the V1 as a possible clinical approach in the treatment of AE. PMID:24812085

  17. Pyramidal Cell-Interneuron Interactions Underlie Hippocampal Ripple Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Eran; Roux, Lisa; Eichler, Ronny; Senzai, Yuta; Royer, Sebastien; Buzsáki, György

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY High-frequency ripple oscillations, observed most prominently in the hippocampal CA1 pyramidal layer, are associated with memory consolidation. The cellular and network mechanisms underlying the generation, frequency control, and spatial coherence of the rhythm are poorly understood. Using multisite optogenetic manipulations in freely behaving rodents, we found that depolarization of a small group of nearby pyramidal cells was sufficient to induce high-frequency oscillations, whereas closed-loop silencing of pyramidal cells or activation of parvalbumin-(PV) or somatostatin-immunoreactive interneurons aborted spontaneously occurring ripples. Focal pharmacological blockade of GABAA receptors abolished ripples. Localized PV inter-neuron activation paced ensemble spiking, and simultaneous induction of high-frequency oscillations at multiple locations resulted in a temporally coherent pattern mediated by phase-locked inter-neuron spiking. These results constrain competing models of ripple generation and indicate that temporally precise local interactions between excitatory and inhibitory neurons support ripple generation in the intact hippocampus. PMID:25033186

  18. Neuregulin 1 promotes excitatory synapse development specifically in GABAergic interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Ting, Annie K.; Chen, Yongjun; Wen, Lei; Yin, Dong-Min; Shen, Chengyong; Tao, Yanmei; Liu, Xihui; Xiong, Wen-Cheng; Mei, Lin

    2011-01-01

    Neuregulin 1 (NRG1) and its receptor ErbB4 are both susceptibility genes of schizophrenia. However, little is known about the underlying mechanisms of their malfunction. Although ErbB4 is enriched in GABAergic interneurons, the role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse formation in these neurons remains poorly understood. We showed that NRG1 increased both the number and size of PSD-95 puncta and the frequency and amplitude of miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents (mEPSCs) in GABAergic interneurons, indicating that NRG1 stimulates the formation of new synapses and strengthens existing synapses. In contrast, NRG1 treatment had no effect on either the number or size of excitatory synapses in glutamatergic neurons, suggesting its synaptogenic effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. Ecto-ErbB4 treatment diminished both the number and size of excitatory synapses, suggesting that endogenous NRG1 may be critical for basal synapse formation. NRG1 could stimulate the stability of PSD-95 in the manner that requires tyrosine kinase activity of ErbB4. Finally, deletion of ErbB4 in parvalbumin-positive interneurons led to reduced frequency and amplitude of mEPSCs, providing in vivo evidence that ErbB4 is important in excitatory synaptogenesis in interneurons. Taken together, our findings suggested a novel synaptogenic role of NRG1 in excitatory synapse development, possibly via stabilizing PSD-95, and this effect is specific to GABAergic interneurons. In light of the association of the genes of both NRG1 and ErbB4 with schizophrenia and dysfunction of GABAergic system in this disorder, these results provide insight into its potential pathological mechanism. PMID:21209185

  19. Interneuronal mechanism for Tinbergen's hierarchical model of behavioral choice.

    PubMed

    Pirger, Zsolt; Crossley, Michael; László, Zita; Naskar, Souvik; Kemenes, György; O'Shea, Michael; Benjamin, Paul R; Kemenes, Ildikó

    2014-09-01

    Recent studies of behavioral choice support the notion that the decision to carry out one behavior rather than another depends on the reconfiguration of shared interneuronal networks [1]. We investigated another decision-making strategy, derived from the classical ethological literature [2, 3], which proposes that behavioral choice depends on competition between autonomous networks. According to this model, behavioral choice depends on inhibitory interactions between incompatible hierarchically organized behaviors. We provide evidence for this by investigating the interneuronal mechanisms mediating behavioral choice between two autonomous circuits that underlie whole-body withdrawal [4, 5] and feeding [6] in the pond snail Lymnaea. Whole-body withdrawal is a defensive reflex that is initiated by tactile contact with predators. As predicted by the hierarchical model, tactile stimuli that evoke whole-body withdrawal responses also inhibit ongoing feeding in the presence of feeding stimuli. By recording neurons from the feeding and withdrawal networks, we found no direct synaptic connections between the interneuronal and motoneuronal elements that generate the two behaviors. Instead, we discovered that behavioral choice depends on the interaction between two unique types of interneurons with asymmetrical synaptic connectivity that allows withdrawal to override feeding. One type of interneuron, the Pleuro-Buccal (PlB), is an extrinsic modulatory neuron of the feeding network that completely inhibits feeding when excited by touch-induced monosynaptic input from the second type of interneuron, Pedal-Dorsal12 (PeD12). PeD12 plays a critical role in behavioral choice by providing a synaptic pathway joining the two behavioral networks that underlies the competitive dominance of whole-body withdrawal over feeding. PMID:25155505

  20. Novel AAV-Based Rat Model of Forebrain Synucleinopathy Shows Extensive Pathologies and Progressive Loss of Cholinergic Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Aldrin-Kirk, Patrick; Davidsson, Marcus; Holmqvist, Staffan; Li, Jia-Yi; Björklund, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Synucleinopathies, characterized by intracellular aggregation of α-synuclein protein, share a number of features in pathology and disease progression. However, the vulnerable cell population differs significantly between the disorders, despite being caused by the same protein. While the vulnerability of dopamine cells in the substantia nigra to α-synuclein over-expression, and its link to Parkinson's disease, is well studied, animal models recapitulating the cortical degeneration in dementia with Lewy-bodies (DLB) are much less mature. The aim of this study was to develop a first rat model of widespread progressive synucleinopathy throughout the forebrain using adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector mediated gene delivery. Through bilateral injection of an AAV6 vector expressing human wild-type α-synuclein into the forebrain of neonatal rats, we were able to achieve widespread, robust α-synuclein expression with preferential expression in the frontal cortex. These animals displayed a progressive emergence of hyper-locomotion and dysregulated response to the dopaminergic agonist apomorphine. The animals receiving the α-synuclein vector displayed significant α-synuclein pathology including intra-cellular inclusion bodies, axonal pathology and elevated levels of phosphorylated α-synuclein, accompanied by significant loss of cortical neurons and a progressive reduction in both cortical and striatal ChAT positive interneurons. Furthermore, we found evidence of α-synuclein sequestered by IBA-1 positive microglia, which was coupled with a distinct change in morphology. In areas of most prominent pathology, the total α-synuclein levels were increased to, on average, two-fold, which is similar to the levels observed in patients with SNCA gene triplication, associated with cortical Lewy body pathology. This study provides a novel rat model of progressive cortical synucleinopathy, showing for the first time that cholinergic interneurons are vulnerable to

  1. Radial and tangential migration of telencephalic somatostatin neurons originated from the mouse diagonal area.

    PubMed

    Puelles, Luis; Morales-Delgado, N; Merchán, P; Castro-Robles, B; Martínez-de-la-Torre, M; Díaz, C; Ferran, J L

    2016-07-01

    The telencephalic subpallium is the source of various GABAergic interneuron cohorts that invade the pallium via tangential migration. Based on genoarchitectonic studies, the subpallium has been subdivided into four major domains: striatum, pallidum, diagonal area and preoptic area (Puelles et al. 2013; Allen Developing Mouse Brain Atlas), and a larger set of molecularly distinct progenitor areas (Flames et al. 2007). Fate mapping, genetic lineage-tracing studies, and other approaches have suggested that each subpallial subdivision produces specific sorts of inhibitory interneurons, distinguished by differential peptidic content, which are distributed tangentially to pallial and subpallial target territories (e.g., olfactory bulb, isocortex, hippocampus, pallial and subpallial amygdala, striatum, pallidum, septum). In this report, we map descriptively the early differentiation and apparent migratory dispersion of mouse subpallial somatostatin-expressing (Sst) cells from E10.5 onward, comparing their topography with the expression patterns of the genes Dlx5, Gbx2, Lhx7-8, Nkx2.1, Nkx5.1 (Hmx3), and Shh, which variously label parts of the subpallium. Whereas some experimental results suggest that Sst cells are pallidal, our data reveal that many, if not most, telencephalic Sst cells derive from de diagonal area (Dg). Sst-positive cells initially only present at the embryonic Dg selectively populate radially the medial part of the bed nucleus striae terminalis (from paraseptal to amygdaloid regions) and part of the central amygdala; they also invade tangentially the striatum, while eschewing the globus pallidum and the preoptic area, and integrate within most cortical and nuclear pallial areas between E10.5 and E16.5. PMID:26189100

  2. Distinct behavioural and network correlates of two interneuron types in prefrontal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Kvitsiani, D.; Ranade, S.; Hangya, B.; Taniguchi, H.; Huang, JZ.; Kepecs, A.

    2013-01-01

    Neurons in prefrontal cortex exhibit diverse behavioural correlates1–4, an observation that has been attributed to cell-type diversity. To link identified neuron types with network and behavioural functions, we recorded from the two largest genetically-defined inhibitory interneuron classes, the perisomatically-targeting parvalbumin (Pv) and the dendritically-targeting somatostatin (Som) neurons5–8 in anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) of mice performing a reward foraging task. Here we show that Pv and a subtype of Som neurons form functionally homogeneous populations showing a double dissociation between both their inhibitory impact and behavioural correlates. Out of a number of events pertaining to behaviour, a subtype of Som neurons selectively responded at reward approach, while Pv neurons responded at reward leaving encoding preceding stay duration. These behavioural correlates of Pv and Som neurons defined a behavioural epoch and a decision variable important for foraging (whether to stay or to leave), a crucial function attributed to ACC9–11. Furthermore, Pv neurons could fire in millisecond synchrony exerting fast and powerful inhibition on principal cell firing, while the inhibitory impact of Som neurons on firing output was weak and more variable, consistent with the idea that they respectively control the outputs of and inputs to principal neurons12–16. These results suggest a connection between the circuit-level function of different interneuron-types in regulating the flow of information, and the behavioural functions served by the cortical circuits. Moreover these observations bolster the hope that functional response diversity during behaviour can in part be explained by cell-type diversity. PMID:23708967

  3. A Turing Reaction-Diffusion Model for Human Cortical Folding Patterns and Cortical Pattern Malformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurdal, Monica K.; Striegel, Deborah A.

    2011-11-01

    Modeling and understanding cortical folding pattern formation is important for quantifying cortical development. We present a biomathematical model for cortical folding pattern formation in the human brain and apply this model to study diseases involving cortical pattern malformations associated with neural migration disorders. Polymicrogyria is a cortical malformation disease resulting in an excessive number of small gyri. Our mathematical model uses a Turing reaction-diffusion system to model cortical folding. The lateral ventricle (LV) and ventricular zone (VZ) of the brain are critical components in the formation of cortical patterning. In early cortical development the shape of the LV can be modeled with a prolate spheroid and the VZ with a prolate spheroid surface. We use our model to study how global cortex characteristics, such as size and shape of the LV, affect cortical pattern formation. We demonstrate increasing domain scale can increase the number of gyri and sulci formed. Changes in LV shape can account for sulcus directionality. By incorporating LV size and shape, our model is able to elucidate which parameters can lead to excessive cortical folding.

  4. Oxytocin Enhances Social Recognition by Modulating Cortical Control of Early Olfactory Processing.

    PubMed

    Oettl, Lars-Lennart; Ravi, Namasivayam; Schneider, Miriam; Scheller, Max F; Schneider, Peggy; Mitre, Mariela; da Silva Gouveia, Miriam; Froemke, Robert C; Chao, Moses V; Young, W Scott; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Grinevich, Valery; Shusterman, Roman; Kelsch, Wolfgang

    2016-05-01

    Oxytocin promotes social interactions and recognition of conspecifics that rely on olfaction in most species. The circuit mechanisms through which oxytocin modifies olfactory processing are incompletely understood. Here, we observed that optogenetically induced oxytocin release enhanced olfactory exploration and same-sex recognition of adult rats. Consistent with oxytocin's function in the anterior olfactory cortex, particularly in social cue processing, region-selective receptor deletion impaired social recognition but left odor discrimination and recognition intact outside a social context. Oxytocin transiently increased the drive of the anterior olfactory cortex projecting to olfactory bulb interneurons. Cortical top-down recruitment of interneurons dynamically enhanced the inhibitory input to olfactory bulb projection neurons and increased the signal-to-noise of their output. In summary, oxytocin generates states for optimized information extraction in an early cortical top-down network that is required for social interactions with potential implications for sensory processing deficits in autism spectrum disorders. PMID:27112498

  5. Mechanism underlying unaltered cortical inhibitory synaptic transmission in contrast with enhanced excitatory transmission in CaV2.1 knockin migraine mice.

    PubMed

    Vecchia, Dania; Tottene, Angelita; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Pietrobon, Daniela

    2014-09-01

    Familial hemiplegic migraine type 1 (FHM1), a monogenic subtype of migraine with aura, is caused by gain-of-function mutations in CaV2.1 (P/Q-type) calcium channels. In FHM1 knockin mice, excitatory neurotransmission at cortical pyramidal cell synapses is enhanced, but inhibitory neurotransmission at connected pairs of fast-spiking (FS) interneurons and pyramidal cells is unaltered, despite being initiated by CaV2.1 channels. The mechanism underlying the unaltered GABA release at cortical FS interneuron synapses remains unknown. Here, we show that the FHM1 R192Q mutation does not affect inhibitory transmission at autapses of cortical FS and other types of multipolar interneurons in microculture from R192Q knockin mice, and investigate the underlying mechanism. Lowering the extracellular [Ca(2+)] did not reveal gain-of-function of evoked transmission neither in control nor after prolongation of the action potential (AP) with tetraethylammonium, indicating unaltered AP-evoked presynaptic calcium influx at inhibitory autapses in FHM1 KI mice. Neither saturation of the presynaptic calcium sensor nor short duration of the AP can explain the unaltered inhibitory transmission in the mutant mice. Recordings of the P/Q-type calcium current in multipolar interneurons in microculture revealed that the current density and the gating properties of the CaV2.1 channels expressed in these interneurons are barely affected by the FHM1 mutation, in contrast with the enhanced current density and left-shifted activation gating of mutant CaV2.1 channels in cortical pyramidal cells. Our findings suggest that expression of specific CaV2.1 channels differentially sensitive to modulation by FHM1 mutations in inhibitory and excitatory cortical neurons underlies the gain-of-function of excitatory but unaltered inhibitory synaptic transmission and the likely consequent dysregulation of the cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance in FHM1. PMID:24907493

  6. Environmental enrichment as a therapeutic avenue for anxiety in aged Wistar rats: Effect on cat odor exposition and GABAergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sampedro-Piquero, P; Castilla-Ortega, E; Zancada-Menendez, C; Santín, L J; Begega, A

    2016-08-25

    The use of more ethological animal models to study the neurobiology of anxiety has increased in recent years. We assessed the effect of an environmental enrichment (EE) protocol (24h/day over a period of two months) on anxiety-related behaviors when aged Wistar rats (21months old) were confronted with cat odor stimuli. Owing to the relationship between GABAergic interneurons and the anxiety-related neuronal network, we examined changes in the expression of Parvalbumin (PV) and 67kDa form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD-67) immunoreactive cells in different brain regions involved in stress response. Behavioral results revealed that enriched rats traveled further and made more grooming behaviors during the habituation session. In the cat odor session, they traveled longer distances and they showed more active interaction with the odor stimuli and less time in freezing behavior. Zone analysis revealed that the enriched group spent more time in the intermediate zone according to the proximity of the predator odor. Regarding the neurobiological data, the EE increased the expression of PV-positive cells in some medial prefrontal regions (cingulate (Cg) and prelimbic (PL) cortices), whereas the GAD-67 expression in the basolateral amygdala was reduced in the enriched group. Our results suggest that EE is able to reduce anxiety-like behaviors in aged animals even when ethologically relevant stimuli are used. Moreover, GABAergic interneurons could be involved in mediating this resilient behavior. PMID:27235742

  7. Metaplastic Regulation of CA1 Schaffer Collateral Pathway Plasticity by Hebbian MGluR1a-Mediated Plasticity at Excitatory Synapses onto Somatostatin-Expressing Interneurons(1,2,3).

    PubMed

    Vasuta, Cristina; Artinian, Julien; Laplante, Isabel; Hébert-Seropian, Sarah; Elayoubi, Karim; Lacaille, Jean-Claude

    2015-01-01

    Cortical GABAergic interneurons represent a highly diverse neuronal type that regulates neural network activity. In particular, interneurons in the hippocampal CA1 oriens/alveus (O/A-INs) area provide feedback dendritic inhibition to local pyramidal cells and express somatostatin (SOM). Under relevant afferent stimulation patterns, they undergo long-term potentiation (LTP) of their excitatory synaptic inputs through multiple induction and expression mechanisms. However, the cell-type specificity of these different forms of LTP and their specific contribution to the dynamic regulation of the CA1 network remain unclear. Here we recorded from SOM-expressing interneurons (SOM-INs) in the O/A region from SOM-Cre-Ai3 transgenic mice in whole-cell patch-clamp. Results indicate that, like in anatomically identified O/A-INs, theta-burst stimulation (TBS) induced a Hebbian form of LTP dependent on metabotropic glutamate receptor type 1a (mGluR1a) in SOM-INs, but not in parvalbumin-expressing interneurons, another mainly nonoverlapping interneuron subtype in CA1. In addition, we demonstrated using field recordings from transgenic mice expressing archaerhodopsin 3 selectively in SOM-INs, that a prior conditioning TBS in O/A, to induce mGluR1a-dependent LTP in SOM-INs, upregulated LTP in the Schaffer collateral pathway of pyramidal cells. This effect was prevented by light-induced hyperpolarization of SOM-INs during TBS, or by application of the mGluR1a antagonist LY367385, indicating a necessity for mGluR1a and SOM-INs activation. These results uncover that SOM-INs perform an activity-dependent metaplastic control on hippocampal CA1 microcircuits in a cell-specific fashion. Our findings provide new insights on the contribution of interneuron synaptic plasticity in the regulation of the hippocampal network activity and mnemonic processes. PMID:26464997

  8. Genetic animal models of malformations of cortical development and epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Wong, Michael; Roper, Steven N

    2016-02-15

    Malformations of cortical development constitute a variety of pathological brain abnormalities that commonly cause severe, medically-refractory epilepsy, including focal lesions, such as focal cortical dysplasia, heterotopias, and tubers of tuberous sclerosis complex, and diffuse malformations, such as lissencephaly. Although some cortical malformations result from environmental insults during cortical development in utero, genetic factors are increasingly recognized as primary pathogenic factors across the entire spectrum of malformations. Genes implicated in causing different cortical malformations are involved in a variety of physiological functions, but many are focused on regulation of cell proliferation, differentiation, and neuronal migration. Advances in molecular genetic methods have allowed the engineering of increasingly sophisticated animal models of cortical malformations and associated epilepsy. These animal models have identified some common mechanistic themes shared by a number of different cortical malformations, but also revealed the diversity and complexity of cellular and molecular mechanisms that lead to the development of the pathological lesions and resulting epileptogenesis. PMID:25911067

  9. Dlx transcription factors promote migration through repression of axon and dendrite growth

    PubMed Central

    Cobos, Inma; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L.R.

    2016-01-01

    In the mouse telencephalon, Dlx homeobox transcription factors are essential for the tangential migration of subpallial-derived GABAergic interneurons to neocortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dlx1&2 have a central role in restraining neurite growth of subpallial-derived immature interneurons at a stage when they migrate tangentially to cortex. In Dlx1−/−;Dlx2−/− mutants, neurite length is increased and cells fail to migrate. In Dlx1−/−;Dlx2+/− mutants, while the tangential migration of immature interneurons appears normal, they develop dendritic and axonal processes with increased length and decreased branching, and have deficits in the their neocortical laminar positions. Thus, Dlx1&2 are required for coordinating programs of neurite maturation and migration. In this regard, we provide genetic evidence that in immature interneurons Dlx1&2 repression of the p21-activated kinase PAK3, a downstream effector of the Rho-family of GTPases, is critical in restraining neurite growth and promoting tangential migration. PMID:17582329

  10. Dlx transcription factors promote migration through repression of axon and dendrite growth.

    PubMed

    Cobos, Inma; Borello, Ugo; Rubenstein, John L R

    2007-06-21

    In the mouse telencephalon, Dlx homeobox transcription factors are essential for the tangential migration of subpallial-derived GABAergic interneurons to neocortex. However, the mechanisms underlying this process are poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate that Dlx1/2 has a central role in restraining neurite growth of subpallial-derived immature interneurons at a stage when they migrate tangentially to cortex. In Dlx1-/-;Dlx2-/- mutants, neurite length is increased and cells fail to migrate. In Dlx1-/-;Dlx2+/- mutants, while the tangential migration of immature interneurons appears normal, they develop dendritic and axonal processes with increased length and decreased branching, and have deficits in their neocortical laminar positions. Thus, Dlx1/2 is required for coordinating programs of neurite maturation and migration. In this regard, we provide genetic evidence that in immature interneurons Dlx1/2 repression of the p21-activated serine/threonine kinase PAK3, a downstream effector of the Rho family of GTPases, is critical in restraining neurite growth and promoting tangential migration. PMID:17582329

  11. Respiratory interneurones in the thoracic spinal cord of the cat.

    PubMed Central

    Kirkwood, P A; Munson, J B; Sears, T A; Westgaard, R H

    1988-01-01

    1. The discharges of spontaneously firing neurones, whose activity was modulated in phase with the central respiratory cycle, were recorded in the thoracic ventral horn (T3-T9) of anaesthetized, paralysed cats. 2. Out of 310 neurones, forty-six were positively identified as motoneurones by antidromic activation or spike-triggered averaging, fifty-four were positively identified as interneurones by antidromic activation from other spinal cord segments and ninety were indirectly identified as interneurones by virtue of their positions or firing rates as compared to the motoneurones. 3. Units were classified as inspiratory (64%), expiratory (25%) or post-inspiratory (7%) according to the times of their maximum firing rates. The remaining 4% consisted of units whose discharges were either strongly locked to the respiratory pump cycle or did not fit into the other categories. All but one of the motoneurones were classified as inspiratory or expiratory. 4. Inspiratory and expiratory units were further classified as early, late or tonic according to the starting times of their discharges in the respiratory cycle. The interneurones (both positively and indirectly identified) included more of the early and tonic categories and more fast-firing units than did the motoneurones in both the inspiratory and expiratory groups. 5. The locations of the motoneurones corresponded to the known positions of the intercostal and interchondral motor nuclei, including clear segregation of inspiratory and expiratory populations. The locations of neither the interneurones nor the unidentified units were segregated according to their firing patterns. These neurones were concentrated in the medial half of the ventral horn and were found generally more dorsally than the positions of the motoneurones, though their positions overlapped considerably with this group. 6. The axons of the positively identified interneurones were identified from one to five segments caudally and mostly contralaterally

  12. [Interneuronal functional connections in the canine sensomotor cortex].

    PubMed

    Dolbakian, E E; Tarakanova, T A

    1993-01-01

    Multiple unit activity (MUA) of the sensomotor cortex was recorded from chronically implanted semimicroelectrodes in dogs. The spike trains of 6-8 neural units were selected from MUA. The character and temporal parameters of interneuronal functional connections were examined by the method of computerized cross-interval analysis. For this purpose the autocorrelation and cross-interval histograms were constructed. One of the main results was complete absence of symmetrical central peaks (shared input). The functional interrelations of selected neurons were characterized by unilateral and bilateral nonsymmetrical excitatory connections with short (1-10 ms), middle (10-80 ms) and late (80-2000 vs) delays. The peculiarities of these interneuronal connections are discussed. PMID:8485189

  13. Muscle synergy patterns as physiological markers of motor cortical damage

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, Vincent C. K.; Turolla, Andrea; Agostini, Michela; Silvoni, Stefano; Bennis, Caoimhe; Kasi, Patrick; Paganoni, Sabrina; Bonato, Paolo; Bizzi, Emilio

    2012-01-01

    The experimental findings herein reported are aimed at gaining a perspective on the complex neural events that follow lesions of the motor cortical areas. Cortical damage, whether by trauma or stroke, interferes with the flow of descending signals to the modular interneuronal structures of the spinal cord. These spinal modules subserve normal motor behaviors by activating groups of muscles as individual units (muscle synergies). Damage to the motor cortical areas disrupts the orchestration of the modules, resulting in abnormal movements. To gain insights into this complex process, we recorded myoelectric signals from multiple upper-limb muscles in subjects with cortical lesions. We used a factorization algorithm to identify the muscle synergies. Our factorization analysis revealed, in a quantitative way, three distinct patterns of muscle coordination—including preservation, merging, and fractionation of muscle synergies—that reflect the multiple neural responses that occur after cortical damage. These patterns varied as a function of both the severity of functional impairment and the temporal distance from stroke onset. We think these muscle-synergy patterns can be used as physiological markers of the status of any patient with stroke or trauma, thereby guiding the development of different rehabilitation approaches, as well as future physiological experiments for a further understanding of postinjury mechanisms of motor control and recovery. PMID:22908288

  14. Mechanisms of retroaxonal barrage firing in hippocampal interneurons.

    PubMed

    Sheffield, Mark E J; Edgerton, Gabrielle B; Heuermann, Robert J; Deemyad, Tara; Mensh, Brett D; Spruston, Nelson

    2013-10-01

    We recently described a new form of neural integration and firing in a subset of interneurons, in which evoking hundreds of action potentials over tens of seconds to minutes produces a sudden barrage of action potentials lasting about a minute beyond the inciting stimulation. During this persistent firing, action potentials are generated in the distal axon and propagate retrogradely to the soma. To distinguish this from other forms of persistent firing, we refer to it here as 'retroaxonal barrage firing', or 'barrage firing' for short. Its induction is blocked by chemical inhibitors of gap junctions and curiously, stimulation of one interneuron in some cases triggers barrage firing in a nearby, unstimulated interneuron. Beyond these clues, the mechanisms of barrage firing are unknown. Here we report new results related to these mechanisms. Induction of barrage firing was blocked by lowering extracellular calcium, as long as normal action potential threshold was maintained, and it was inhibited by blocking L-type voltage-gated calcium channels. Despite its calcium dependence, barrage firing was not prevented by inhibiting chemical synaptic transmission. Furthermore, loading the stimulated/recorded interneuron with BAPTA did not block barrage firing, suggesting that the required calcium entry occurs in other cells. Finally, barrage firing was normal in mice with deletion of the primary gene for neuronal gap junctions (connexin36), suggesting that non-neuronal gap junctions may be involved. Together, these findings suggest that barrage firing is probably triggered by a multicellular mechanism involving calcium signalling and gap junctions, but operating independently of chemical synaptic transmission. PMID:23878372

  15. Estimating functional connectivity in an electrically coupled interneuron network

    PubMed Central

    Alcami, Pepe; Marty, Alain

    2013-01-01

    Even though it has been known for some time that in many mammalian brain areas interneurons are electrically coupled, a quantitative description of the network electrical connectivity and its impact on cellular passive properties is still lacking. Approaches used so far to solve this problem are limited because they do not readily distinguish junctions among direct neighbors from indirect junctions involving intermediary, multiply connected cells. In the cerebellar cortex, anatomical and functional evidence indicates electrical coupling between molecular layer interneurons (basket and stellate cells). An analysis of the capacitive currents obtained under voltage clamp in molecular layer interneurons of juvenile rats or mice reveals an exponential component with a time constant of ∼20 ms, which represents capacitive loading of neighboring cells through gap junctions. These results, taken together with dual cell recording of electrical synapses, have led us to estimate the number of direct neighbors to be ∼4 for rat basket cells and ∼1 for rat stellate cells. The weighted number of neighbors (number of neighbors, both direct and indirect, weighted with the percentage of voltage deflection at steady state) was 1.69 in basket cells and 0.23 in stellate cells. The last numbers indicate the spread of potential changes in the network and serve to estimate the contribution of gap junctions to cellular input conductance. In conclusion the present work offers effective tools to analyze the connectivity of electrically connected interneuron networks, and it indicates that in juvenile rodents, electrical communication is stronger among basket cells than among stellate cells. PMID:24248377

  16. The role of cannabinoid 1 receptor expressing interneurons in behavior

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Jacquelyn A.; Horváth, Szatmár; Garbett, Krassimira; Schmidt, Martin J.; Everheart, Monika; Gellért, Levente; Ebert, Philip; Mirnics, Károly

    2013-01-01

    Schizophrenia is a devastating neurodevelopmental disorder that affects approximately 1% of the population. Reduced expression of the 67-kD a protein isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD67), is a hallmark of the disease, and is encoded by the GAD1 gene. In schizophrenia, GAD67 downregulation occurs in multiple interneuronal subpopulations, including the cannabinoid receptor type 1 positive (CNR1+) cells, but the functional consequences of these disturbances are not well understood. To investigate the role of the CNR1-positive GABA-ergic interneurons in behavioral and molecular processes, we employed a novel, miRNA-mediated transgenic mouse approach. We silenced the Gad1 transcript using a miRNA engineered to specifically target Gad1 mRNA under the control of Cnr1 bacterial artificial chromosome. Behavioral characterization of our transgenic mice showed elevated and persistent conditioned fear associated with an auditory cue and a significantly altered response to an amphetamine challenge. These deficits could not be attributed to sensory deficits or changes in baseline learning and memory. Furthermore, HPLC analyses revealed that Cnr1/Gad1 mice have enhanced serotonin levels, but not dopamine levels in response to amphetamine. Our findings demonstrate that dysfunction of a small subset of interneurons can have a profound effect on behavior and that the GABA-ergic, monoamine, and cannabinoid systems are functionally interconnected. The results also suggest that understanding the function of various interneuronal subclasses might be essential to develop knowledge-based treatment strategies for various mental disorders including schizophrenia and substance abuse. PMID:24239560

  17. A mechanism for ultra-slow oscillations in the cortical default network.

    PubMed

    Steyn-Ross, Moira L; Steyn-Ross, D A; Sleigh, J W; Wilson, M T

    2011-02-01

    When the brain is in its noncognitive "idling" state, functional MRI measurements reveal the activation of default cortical networks whose activity is suppressed during cognitive processing. This default or background mode is characterized by ultra-slow BOLD oscillations (∼0.05 Hz), signaling extremely slow cycling in cortical metabolic demand across distinct cortical regions. Here we describe a model of the cortex which predicts that slow cycling of cortical activity can arise naturally as a result of nonlinear interactions between temporal (Hopf) and spatial (Turing) instabilities. The Hopf instability is triggered by delays in the inhibitory postsynaptic response, while the Turing instability is precipitated by increases in the strength of the gap-junction coupling between interneurons. We comment on possible implications for slow dendritic computation and information processing. PMID:20821063

  18. Potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated transmission in striatal cholinergic interneurons.

    PubMed

    Oswald, Manfred J; Schulz, Jan M; Kelsch, Wolfgang; Oorschot, Dorothy E; Reynolds, John N J

    2015-01-01

    Pauses in the tonic firing of striatal cholinergic interneurons (CINs) emerge during reward-related learning in response to conditioning of a neutral cue. We have previously reported that augmenting the postsynaptic response to cortical afferents in CINs is coupled to the emergence of a cell-intrinsic afterhyperpolarization (AHP) underlying pauses in tonic activity. Here we investigated in a bihemispheric rat-brain slice preparation the mechanisms of synaptic plasticity of excitatory afferents to CINs and the association with changes in the AHP. We found that high frequency stimulation (HFS) of commissural corticostriatal afferents from the contralateral hemisphere induced a robust long-term depression (LTD) of postsynaptic potentials (PSP) in CINs. Depression of the PSP of smaller magnitude and duration was observed in response to HFS of the ipsilateral white matter or cerebral cortex. In Mg(2+)-free solution HFS induced NMDA receptor-dependent potentiation of the PSP, evident in both the maximal slope and amplitude of the PSP. The increase in maximal slope corroborates previous findings, and was blocked by antagonism of either D1-like dopamine receptors with SCH23390 or D2-like dopamine receptors with sulpiride during HFS in Mg(2+)-free solution. Potentiation of the slower PSP amplitude component was due to augmentation of the NMDA receptor-mediated potential as this was completely reversed on subsequent application of the NMDA receptor antagonist AP5. HFS similarly potentiated NMDA receptor currents isolated by blockade of AMPA/kainate receptors with CNQX. The plasticity-induced increase in the slow PSP component was directly associated with an increase in the subsequent AHP. Thus plasticity of cortical afferent synapses is ideally suited to influence the cue-induced firing dynamics of CINs, particularly through potentiation of NMDA receptor-mediated synaptic transmission. PMID:25914618

  19. Human pyramidal to interneuron synapses are mediated by multi-vesicular release and multiple docked vesicles

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, Gábor; Rózsa, Márton; Baka, Judith; Holderith, Noémi; Barzó, Pál; Nusser, Zoltan; Tamás, Gábor

    2016-01-01

    Classic theories link cognitive abilities to synaptic properties and human-specific biophysical features of synapses might contribute to the unparalleled performance of the human cerebral cortex. Paired recordings and multiple probability fluctuation analysis revealed similar quantal sizes, but 4-times more functional release sites in human pyramidal cell to fast-spiking interneuron connections compared to rats. These connections were mediated on average by three synaptic contacts in both species. Each presynaptic active zone (AZ) contains 6.2 release sites in human, but only 1.6 in rats. Electron microscopy (EM) and EM tomography showed that an AZ harbors 4 docked vesicles in human, but only a single one in rats. Consequently, a Katz’s functional release site occupies ~0.012 μm2 in the human presynaptic AZ and ~0.025 μm2 in the rat. Our results reveal a robust difference in the biophysical properties of a well-defined synaptic connection of the cortical microcircuit of human and rodents. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.18167.001 PMID:27536876

  20. [Interneuronal frontal-amygdala interactions in cats trained for the quality of the reinforcement].

    PubMed

    Merzhanova, G Kh; Dolbakian, E E

    1998-01-01

    In eight cats the appetitive instrumental conditioned reflexes to light were elaborated by the method of "active choice" of reinforcement quality: the short-latency bar-pressing responses were reinforced with bread-meat mixture and the delayed responses were reinforced with meat. The animals differed in behavior strategy: six cats preferred the delayed pressings (the so-called "self-control" group), and two cats preferred the pressings with short delay (the so-called "impulsive" group). The multiunit activity in the basolateral amygdala and frontal cortex was recorded by chronically implanted nichrome semimicroelectrodes. The interactions of the neighboring neurons in the basolateral amygdala and the frontal cortex (within the local neuronal networks) and between the amygdalar and cortical neurons (distributed neuronal networks of amygdalar-frontal and fronto-amygdalar directions) were estimated by means of statistical crosscorrelation analysis of spike trains. The interneuronal cross-correlations were studied with delays in the range of 0-100 ms. The number of cross-correlations between the neuronal discharges both in the local and distributed networks was significantly higher in "impulsive" cats, mainly, with delays in the range of 0-30 ms. In both groups of animals the number of correlations was the highest during omissions of conditioned pressings, i.e., in cases of difficult choice of reinforcement. We suggest that the basolateral amygdala, frontal cortex, and amygdalar-frontal distributed neuronal networks are involved in the system of brain structures, which determine the individual features of animal behavior. PMID:9700904

  1. Hippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations: from interneurones to pyramidal cells, and back.

    PubMed

    Mann, Edward O; Radcliffe, Catrin A; Paulsen, Ole

    2005-01-01

    GABAergic interneurones are necessary for the emergence of hippocampal gamma-frequency network oscillations, during which they play a key role in the synchronization of pyramidal cell firing. However, it remains to be resolved how distinct interneurone subtypes contribute to gamma-frequency oscillations, in what way the spatiotemporal pattern of interneuronal input affects principal cell activity, and by which mechanisms the interneurones themselves are synchronized. Here we summarize recent evidence from cholinergically induced gamma-frequency network oscillations in vitro, showing that perisomatic-targeting GABAergic interneurones provide prominent rhythmic inhibition in pyramidal cells, and that these interneurones are synchronized by recurrent excitation. We conclude by presenting a minimal integrate-and-fire network model which demonstrates that this excitatory-inhibitory feedback loop is sufficient to explain the generation of intrahippocampal gamma-frequency oscillations. PMID:15539391

  2. Hindbrain interneurons and axon guidance signaling critical for breathing.

    PubMed

    Bouvier, Julien; Thoby-Brisson, Muriel; Renier, Nicolas; Dubreuil, Véronique; Ericson, Johan; Champagnat, Jean; Pierani, Alessandra; Chédotal, Alain; Fortin, Gilles

    2010-09-01

    Breathing is a bilaterally synchronous behavior that relies on a respiratory rhythm generator located in the brainstem. An essential component of this generator is the preBötzinger complex (preBötC), which paces inspirations. Little is known about the developmental origin of the interneuronal populations forming the preBötC oscillator network. We found that the homeobox gene Dbx1 controls the fate of glutamatergic interneurons required for preBötC rhythm generation in the mouse embryo. We also found that a conditional inactivation in Dbx1-derived cells of the roundabout homolog 3 (Robo3) gene, which is necessary for axonal midline crossing, resulted in left-right de-synchronization of the preBötC oscillator. Together, these findings identify Dbx1-derived interneurons as the core rhythmogenic elements of the preBötC oscillator and indicate that Robo3-dependent guidance signaling in these cells is required for bilaterally synchronous activity. PMID:20680010

  3. Muscarinic and dopaminergic receptor subtypes on striatal cholinergic interneurons

    SciTech Connect

    Dawson, V.L.; Dawson, T.M.; Wamsley, J.K. )

    1990-12-01

    Unilateral stereotaxic injection of small amounts of the cholinotoxin, AF64A, caused minimal nonselective tissue damage and resulted in a significant loss of the presynaptic cholinergic markers (3H)hemicholinium-3 (45% reduction) and choline acetyltransferase (27% reduction). No significant change from control was observed in tyrosine hydroxylase or tryptophan hydroxylase activity; presynaptic neuronal markers for dopamine- and serotonin-containing neurons, respectively. The AF64A lesion resulted in a significant reduction of dopamine D2 receptors as evidenced by a decrease in (3H)sulpiride binding (42% reduction) and decrease of muscarinic non-M1 receptors as shown by a reduction in (3H)QNB binding in the presence of 100 nM pirenzepine (36% reduction). Saturation studies revealed that the change in (3H)sulpiride and (3H)QNB binding was due to a change in Bmax not Kd. Intrastriatal injection of AF64A failed to alter dopamine D1 or muscarinic M1 receptors labeled with (3H)SCH23390 and (3H)pirenzepine, respectively. In addition, no change in (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase was observed. These results demonstrate that a subpopulation of muscarinic receptors (non-M1) are presynaptic on cholinergic interneurons (hence, autoreceptors), and a subpopulation of dopamine D2 receptors are postsynaptic on cholinergic interneurons. Furthermore, dopamine D1, muscarinic M1 and (3H)forskolin-labeled adenylate cyclase are not localized to striatal cholinergic interneurons.

  4. Hierarchical spike clustering analysis for investigation of interneuron heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Boehlen, Anne; Heinemann, Uwe; Henneberger, Christian

    2016-04-21

    Action potentials represent the output of a neuron. Especially interneurons display a variety of discharge patterns ranging from regular action potential firing to prominent spike clustering or stuttering. The mechanisms underlying this heterogeneity remain incompletely understood. We established hierarchical cluster analysis of spike trains as a measure of spike clustering. A clustering index was calculated from action potential trains recorded in the whole-cell patch clamp configuration from hippocampal (CA1, stratum radiatum) and entorhinal (medial entorhinal cortex, layer 2) interneurons in acute slices and simulated data. Prominent, region-dependent, but also variable spike clustering was detected using this measure. Further analysis revealed a strong positive correlation between spike clustering and membrane potentials oscillations but an inverse correlation with neuronal resonance. Furthermore, clustering was more pronounced when the balance between fast-activating K(+) currents, assessed by the spike repolarisation time, and hyperpolarization-activated currents, gauged by the size of the sag potential, was shifted in favour of fast K(+) currents. Simulations of spike clustering confirmed that variable ratios of fast K(+) and hyperpolarization-activated currents could underlie different degrees of spike clustering and could thus be crucial for temporally structuring interneuron spike output. PMID:26987719

  5. Emergent gamma synchrony in all-to-all interneuronal networks

    PubMed Central

    Ratnadurai-Giridharan, Shivakeshavan; Khargonekar, Pramod P.; Talathi, Sachin S.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the emergence of in-phase synchronization in a heterogeneous network of coupled inhibitory interneurons in the presence of spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP). Using a simple network of two mutually coupled interneurons (2-MCI), we first study the effects of STDP on in-phase synchronization. We demonstrate that, with STDP, the 2-MCI network can evolve to either a state of stable 1:1 in-phase synchronization or exhibit multiple regimes of higher order synchronization states. We show that the emergence of synchronization induces a structural asymmetry in the 2-MCI network such that the synapses onto the high frequency firing neurons are potentiated, while those onto the low frequency firing neurons are de-potentiated, resulting in the directed flow of information from low frequency firing neurons to high frequency firing neurons. Finally, we demonstrate that the principal findings from our analysis of the 2-MCI network contribute to the emergence of robust synchronization in the Wang-Buzsaki network (Wang and Buzsáki, 1996) of all-to-all coupled inhibitory interneurons (100-MCI) for a significantly larger range of heterogeneity in the intrinsic firing rate of the neurons in the network. We conclude that STDP of inhibitory synapses provide a viable mechanism for robust neural synchronization. PMID:26528174

  6. Controlling interneuron activity in Caenorhabditis elegans to evoke chemotactic behaviour.

    PubMed

    Kocabas, Askin; Shen, Ching-Han; Guo, Zengcai V; Ramanathan, Sharad

    2012-10-11

    Animals locate and track chemoattractive gradients in the environment to find food. With its small nervous system, Caenorhabditis elegans is a good model system in which to understand how the dynamics of neural activity control this search behaviour. Extensive work on the nematode has identified the neurons that are necessary for the different locomotory behaviours underlying chemotaxis through the use of laser ablation, activity recording in immobilized animals and the study of mutants. However, we do not know the neural activity patterns in C. elegans that are sufficient to control its complex chemotactic behaviour. To understand how the activity in its interneurons coordinate different motor programs to lead the animal to food, here we used optogenetics and new optical tools to manipulate neural activity directly in freely moving animals to evoke chemotactic behaviour. By deducing the classes of activity patterns triggered during chemotaxis and exciting individual neurons with these patterns, we identified interneurons that control the essential locomotory programs for this behaviour. Notably, we discovered that controlling the dynamics of activity in just one interneuron pair (AIY) was sufficient to force the animal to locate, turn towards and track virtual light gradients. Two distinct activity patterns triggered in AIY as the animal moved through the gradient controlled reversals and gradual turns to drive chemotactic behaviour. Because AIY neurons are post-synaptic to most chemosensory and thermosensory neurons, it is probable that these activity patterns in AIY have an important role in controlling and coordinating different taxis behaviours of the animal. PMID:23000898

  7. Decreased number of interneurons and increased seizures in neuropilin 2 deficient mice: Implications for autism and epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Gant, John C.; Thibault, Oliver; Blalock, Eric M.; Yang, Jun; Bachstetter, Adam; Kotick, James; Schauwecker, Paula E.; Hauser, Kurt F.; Smith, George M.; Mervis, Ron; Li, YanFang; Barnes, Gregory N.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Purpose Clinically, perturbations in the semaphorin signaling system have been associated with autism and epilepsy. The semaphorins have been implicated in guidance, migration, differentiation, and synaptic plasticity of neurons. The semaphorin 3F (Sema3F) ligand and its receptor, neuropilin 2 (NPN2) are highly expressed within limbic areas. NPN2 signaling may intimately direct the apposition of presynaptic and postsynaptic locations, facilitating the development and maturity of hippocampal synaptic function. To further understand the role of NPN2 signaling in central nevous system (CNS) plasticity, structural and functional alterations were assessed in NPN2 deficient mice. Methods In NPN2 deficient mice, we measured seizure susceptibility after kainic acid or pentylenetetrazol, neuronal excitability and synaptic throughput in slice preparations, principal and interneuron cell counts with immunocytochemical protocols, synaptosomal protein levels with immunoblots, and dendritic morphology with Golgi-staining. Results NPN2 deficient mice had shorter seizure latencies, increased vulnerability to seizure-related death, were more likely to develop spontaneous recurrent seizure activity after chemical challenge, and had an increased slope on input/output curves. Principal cell counts were unchanged, but GABA, parvalbumin, and neuropeptide Y interneuron cell counts were significantly reduced. Synaptosomal NPN2 protein levels and total number of GABAergic synapses were decreased in a gene dose-dependent fashion. CA1 pyramidal cells showed reduced dendritic length and complexity, as well as an increased number of dendritic spines. Discussion These data suggest the novel hypothesis that the Sema 3F signaling system's role in appropriate placement of subsets of hippocampal interneurons has critical downstream consequences for hippocampal function, resulting in a more seizure susceptible phenotype. PMID:18657176

  8. Parvalbumin interneurons mediate neuronal circuitry-neurogenesis coupling in the adult hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Song, Juan; Sun, Jiaqi; Moss, Jonathan; Wen, Zhexing; Sun, Gerald J.; Hsu, Derek; Zhong, Chun; Davoudi, Heydar; Christian, Kimberly M.; Toni, Nicolas; Ming, Guo-li; Song, Hongjun

    2014-01-01

    Using immunohistology, electron microscopy, electrophysiology and optogenetics, we show that proliferating adult hippocampal neural precursors receive immature GABAergic synaptic inputs from parvalbumin-expressing interneurons. Recently shown to suppress quiescent neural stem cell activation, parvalbumin interneuron activation promotes newborn neuronal progeny survival and development. Our study suggests a niche mechanism involving parvalbumin interneurons that couples local circuit activity to diametric regulation of two critical initial phases of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:24212671

  9. The control of sets of motoneurones by local interneurones in the locust.

    PubMed Central

    Burrows, M

    1980-01-01

    1. A motoneurone innervating a muscle in a hind leg of a locust is controlled in a graded manner by many non-spiking, local interneurones. There is overlap and fractionation of control between these interneurones. Some interneurones depolarize the motoneurone over part of its range, others hyperpolarize it, whilst some do both. 2. The interneurones organize the small number of motoneurones that innervate one muscle into overlapping sets of various sizes. A motoneurone can therefore be activated individually or in particular combinations with its fellow motoneurones. 3. The motoneurones innervating two muscles of a joint are also organized into overlapping sets by many local interneurones. This permits the motoneurones to the two muscles to be activated reciprocally, together, or independently. 4. One interneurone can elicit a co-ordinated movement of one, two or even three joints in a hind leg that are components of the normal behaviour of the locust. 5. A single interneurone acting alone does not usually elicit the maximum output from one motoneurone, nor a complete piece of behaviour. A stronger contraction of a muscle and a more complete movement results from the action of groups of interneurones. 6. It is suggested that local interneurones, exerting graded control over motoneurones are a major element in the organization of motor patterns in the locust. PMID:7359394

  10. Excitatory connections of nonspiking interneurones in the terminal abdominal ganglion of the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Namba, Hisaaki; Nagayama, Toshiki

    2015-08-01

    The output effects of the nonspiking interneurones in the crayfish terminal abdominal ganglion upon the uropod motor neurones were characterized using simultaneous intracellular recordings. Inhibitory interactions from nonspiking interneurones to the uropod motor neurones were one-way and chemically mediated. The depolarization of the motor neurones with current injection increased the amplitude of the nonspiking interneurone-mediated hyperpolarization, while hyperpolarization of the motor neurone decreased it. By contrast, excitatory interactions from the nonspiking interneurones to the motor neurones were not mediated via chemical synaptic transmissions. These excitatory connections with the slow motor neurones were one-way while connections with fast motor neurones were bidirectional. Nonspiking interneurone-mediated membrane depolarization of the motor neurones was not affected by the passage of hyperpolarizing current. Each motor neurone spike elicited a time-locked EPSP in the nonspiking interneurones with very short delay (0.2 ms) that suggested electrical coupling between nonspiking interneurones and motor neurones. Nonspiking interneurones directly control the organization of slow motor neurone activity, while they appear to regulate the background activity of the fast motor neurones. A single nonspiking interneurone is possible to inhibit some inter and/or motor neurones via direct chemical synapses and simultaneously excite other neurones via electrical synapses. PMID:26038269