Science.gov

Sample records for milford haven waterway

  1. Bioaccumulation surveillance in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Langston, W J; O'Hara, S; Pope, N D; Davey, M; Shortridge, E; Imamura, M; Harino, H; Kim, A; Vane, C H

    2012-01-01

    Biomonitoring of contaminants (metals, organotins, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), PCBs) was undertaken in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) and a reference site in the Tywi Estuary (St Ishmael/Ferryside) during 2007-2008. Bioindicator species encompassed various uptake routes-Fucus vesiculosus (dissolved contaminants); Littorina littorea (grazer); Mytilus edulis and Cerastoderma edule (suspension feeders); and Hediste (=Nereis) diversicolor (sediments). Differences in feeding and habitat preference have subtle implications for bioaccumulation trends though, with few exceptions, contaminant burdens in MHW were higher than the Tywi reference site, reflecting inputs. Elevated metal concentrations were observed at some MHW sites, whilst As and Se (molluscs and seaweed) were consistently at the higher end of the UK range. However, for most metals, distributions in MH biota were not exceptional. Several metal-species combinations indicated increases in bioavailability upstream, which may reflect the influence of geogenic/land-based sources-perhaps enhanced by lower salinity. TBT levels in MH mussels were below OSPAR toxicity thresholds and in the Tywi were close to zero. Phenyltins were not accumulated appreciably in M. edulis, whereas some H. diversicolor populations appear subjected to localized (historical) sources. PAHs in H. diversicolor were distributed evenly across most of MHW, although acenaphthene, fluoranthene, pyrene, benzo(a)anthracene and chrysene were highest at one site near the mouth; naphthalenes in H. diversicolor were enriched in the mid-upper Haven (a pattern seen in M. edulis for most PAHs). Whilst PAH (and PCB) concentrations in MH mussels were mostly above reference and OSPAR backgrounds, they are unlikely to exceed ecotoxicological thresholds. Bivalve Condition indices (CI) were highest at the Tywi reference site and at the seaward end of MH, decreasing upstream-giving rise to several significant (negative) relationships between CI and body burdens

  2. Sediment contaminant surveillance in Milford Haven Waterway.

    PubMed

    Little, D I; Bullimore, B; Galperin, Y; Langston, W J

    2016-01-01

    Sediment contaminants were monitored in Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) since 1978 (hydrocarbons) and 1982 (metals), with the aim of providing surveillance of environmental quality in one of the UK's busiest oil and gas ports. This aim is particularly important during and after large-scale investment in liquefied natural gas (LNG) facilities. However, the methods inevitably have changed over the years, compounding the difficulties of coordinating sampling and analytical programmes. After a review by the MHW Environmental Surveillance Group (MHWESG), sediment hydrocarbon chemistry was investigated in detail in 2010. Natural Resources Wales (NRW) contributed their MHW data for 2007 and 2012, collected to assess the condition of the Special Area of Conservation (SAC) designated under the European Union Habitats Directive. Datasets during 2007-2012 have thus been more comparable. The results showed conclusively that a MHW-wide peak in concentrations of sediment polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), metals and other contaminants occurred in late 2007. This was corroborated by independent annual monitoring at one centrally located station with peaks in early 2008 and 2011. The spatial and temporal patterns of recovery from the 2007 peak, shown by MHW-wide surveys in 2010 and 2012, indicate several probable causes of contaminant trends, as follows: atmospheric deposition, catchment runoff, sediment resuspension from dredging, and construction of two LNG terminals and a power station. Adverse biological effects predictable in 2007 using international sediment quality guidelines were independently tested by data from monitoring schemes of more than a decade duration in MHW (starfish, limpets) and in the wider SAC (grey seals). Although not proving cause and effect, many of these potential biological receptors showed a simultaneous negative response to the elevated 2007 contamination following intense dredging activity in 2006. Wetland bird counts were typically at a peak in

  3. Marine habitat mapping of the Milford Haven Waterway, Wales, UK: Comparison of facies mapping and EUNIS classification for monitoring sediment habitats in an industrialized estuary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carey, Drew A.; Hayn, Melanie; Germano, Joseph D.; Little, David I.; Bullimore, Blaise

    2015-06-01

    A detailed map and dataset of sedimentary habitats of the Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) was compiled for the Milford Haven Waterway Environmental Surveillance Group (MHWESG) from seafloor images collected in May, 2012 using sediment-profile and plan-view imaging (SPI/PV) survey techniques. This is the most comprehensive synoptic assessment of sediment distribution and benthic habitat composition available for the MHW, with 559 stations covering over 40 km2 of subtidal habitats. In the context of the MHW, an interpretative framework was developed that classified each station within a 'facies' that included information on the location within the waterway and inferred sedimentary and biological processes. The facies approach provides critical information on landscape-scale habitats including relative location and inferred sediment transport processes and can be used to direct future monitoring activities within the MHW and to predict areas of greatest potential risk from contaminant transport. Intertidal sediment 'facies' maps have been compiled in the past for MHW; this approach was expanded to map the subtidal portions of the waterway. Because sediment facies can be projected over larger areas than individual samples (due to assumptions based on physiography, or landforms) they represent an observational model of the distribution of sediments in an estuary. This model can be tested over time and space through comparison with additional past or future sample results. This approach provides a means to evaluate stability or change in the physical and biological conditions of the estuarine system. Initial comparison with past results for intertidal facies mapping and grain size analysis from grab samples showed remarkable stability over time for the MHW. The results of the SPI/PV mapping effort were cross-walked to the European Nature Information System (EUNIS) classification to provide a comparison of locally derived habitat mapping with European-standard habitat

  4. The distribution of the invasive non-native gastropod Crepidula fornicata in the Milford Haven Waterway, its northernmost population along the west coast of Britain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohn, Katrin; Richardson, Christopher A.; Jenkins, Stuart R.

    2015-12-01

    The invasive non-native gastropod Crepidula fornicata is well established in the Milford Haven Waterway (MHW) in south-west Wales, UK, since its first introduction to this ria in 1953. Whilst it reaches high densities within the MHW and has extended its range to the south of this ria, there has been very little northward expansion. Here, we report findings of a series of intertidal and subtidal surveys in 2009 and 2010 where we monitored the population density and the vertical distribution of C. fornicata at its northern range limit in Wales (the MHW). We also characterised the composition of the surface substrata of the seabed in the MHW to provide some insight into how the availability of certain settlement substrata may limit its distribution along the west coast of Britain. We found locally very dense aggregations (maximum 2748 ± 3859 individuals m-2, mean ± SD) in the shallow subtidal and low intertidal of the MHW. Subtidally, highest densities were found in areas of high gravel content (grain sizes ~16-256 mm), suggesting that the availability of this substrata type is beneficial for its establishment at a site. In the intertidal, on the other hand, high gravel content was indicative of low C. fornicata abundance, possibly because gravelly shores are an indicator of very exposed conditions that, at least in the intertidal, may result in high levels of early post-settlement mortality and low recruitment. C. fornicata was absent from the entrance of the MHW, possibly due to the lack of suitable settlement substrata. The presence of substantial populations in the MHW suggests that C. fornicata's population growth and potential expansion in Welsh coastal waters is not fully limited by prevailing environmental conditions in the region, but that other processes may affect its local distribution.

  5. 78 FR 48314 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Milford Haven Inlet, Hudgins, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-08

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Milford Haven Inlet, Hudgins, VA... Guard has issued a temporary deviation from the operating schedule that governs the VA State Route 223....m. March 31, 2014. ADDRESSES: The docket for this deviation, is available at...

  6. 66. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    66. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 68. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 67. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    67. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 69. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    69. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 65. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    65. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 63. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    63. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 64. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    64. New Haven Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. 62. New Haven Station Yards & Shops. New Haven, New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    62. New Haven Station Yards & Shops. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.50. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. 61. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: New Haven ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    61. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: New Haven Station. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 72.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. NEW HAVEN TOXICS INVENTORY

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA will be working with the New Haven Department of Health to collect data and create an inventory of toxic air pollutants in the New Haven area. Under section 112 of the Clean Air Act, EPA and cities and states are required to reduce cancer and non-cancer health risks in urb...

  16. 75 FR 19338 - FM TABLE OF ALLOTMENTS, Milford, Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-14

    ...The Audio Division seeks comments on a petition filed by Canyon Media Group, LLC, authorized assignee of Station KCLS(FM), Channel 269C2, Pioche, Nevada, requesting the substitution of Channel 288C for vacant Channel 285C at Milford, Utah. The reference coordinates for Channel 288C at Milford are 38-31-11 NL and 113-17-07 WL, at a site 27.6 kilometers (17.2 miles) northwest of...

  17. 76 FR 79112 - Radio Broadcasting Services; Milford, UT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-21

    ...The Audio Division, at the request of Canyon Media Group, LLC, allots FM Channel 288C and deletes FM Channel 285C at Milford, Utah. The allotment change is part of a hybrid rule making and FM application proposal. Channel 288C can be allotted at Milford, consistent with the minimum distance separation requirements of the Commission's rules, at coordinates 38-31-11 NL and 113-17-07 WL, with a......

  18. 75 FR 68779 - Milford Wind Coordinator Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Milford Wind Coordinator Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing November 2, 2010. Take notice that on November 1, 2010, Milford Wind Coordinator Phase I, LLC (Milford) filed an...

  19. Pitfalls of Transparency: Lessons Learned from the Milford Flats Fire

    SciTech Connect

    T. Hartwell; D. Shafer; J. Tappen; G. McCurdy; B. Hurley; D. Farmer

    2008-01-16

    The Community Environmental Monitoring Program (CEMP) consists of a network of 29 radiation and weather monitoring stations located over a 160,000-km2 area of southern Nevada, southwestern Utah, and southeastern California. The program provides stakeholders with a hands-on role in the monitoring for airborne radioactivity that could result from ongoing or past activities on the Nevada Test Site (NTS). The CEMP’s mission includes provisions for the transparency of the monitoring data as well as public accessibility to these data. This is accomplished through direct stakeholder participation, public outreach, and near real-time uploads of monitoring data to a publicly accessible web site located at http://cemp.dri.edu/. In early July 2007, a lightning strike ignited a wildfire just outside the city of Milford in southeastern Utah. This fire, named the Milford Flats Fire, grew rapidly and eventually became the largest wildfire in recorded history in the state, burning approximately 567 square miles. At about the same time, the pressurized ion chamber (PIC) located at the CEMP station in Milford began reporting average exposure rates that ranged from four to seven times normal for the area. Initially, it was believed that elevated readings could be a result of gamma-emitting radon progeny released by the fire and transported in smoke plumes. The U.S. Department of Energy issued a press release offering this as a possible first explanation, and the release received a great amount of attention, particularly in the state of Utah, where concerns were expressed that the fire could be causing re-suspension of radionuclides associated with fallout from past nuclear testing at the NTS. Subsequent analyses of particulate air filter samples obtained from the Milford station, as well as an examination of the data reported by the PIC, the timing of the incident, and diagnostic testing on the PIC, showed that the abnormal gamma readings were a result of instrument malfunction. WM

  20. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  1. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  2. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  3. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  4. 33 CFR 100.906 - Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. 100.906 Section 100.906 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... Grand Haven Coast Guard Festival Waterski Show, Grand Haven, MI. (a) Regulated Area. All waters of...

  5. 86. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    86. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops Roundhouse. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  6. 84. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    84. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops & Yards. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  7. 88. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    88. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops Roundhouse. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  8. 83. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    83. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops & Yards. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  9. 85. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    85. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops Roundhouse. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 80. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    80. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops & Yards. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 87. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    87. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops Roundhouse. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 79. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops with Roundhouse in foreground. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  13. 82. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    82. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops & Yards. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  14. 81. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    81. New York, New Haven & Hartford RR: East New Haven Shops & Yards. East New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  15. Evolution of vegetated waterways design

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In 1990, the USDA-ARS Hydraulic Engineering Research Unit (HERU) was recognized as a National Historic Landmark by ASABE for its groundbreaking work and development of vegetated waterways design procedures. In 2000, ASABE acknowledged the vegetated waterway design criteria as an Outstanding Achieve...

  16. Safe Haven roadway is tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A mobile launcher platform atop a crawler-transporter, moves into the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 2. As part of the Safe Haven project, a once-buried portion of the crawlerway was restored to enable rollout of a Shuttle from this third stacking area. The primary goal of the Safe Haven construction project was to strengthen readiness for hurricane season by expanding the VAB's storage capacity. The new area, in high bay 2, will allow NASA to preassemble stacks and still have room in the VAB to pull a Shuttle back from the pad if severe weather threatens. Potential rollouts of the Space Shuttle to the launch pad from high bay 2 will involve making a turn around the north side of the VAB in contrast to the straight rollouts from high bays 1 and 3, on the east side of the VAB facing the launch pads.

  17. Safe Haven roadway is tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A mobile launcher platform atop a crawler-transporter, heads to the open door of the Vehicle Assembly Building high bay 2. As part of the Safe Haven project, a once-buried portion of the crawlerway was restored to enable rollout of a Shuttle from this third stacking area. The primary goal of the Safe Haven construction project was to strengthen readiness for hurricane season by expanding the VAB's storage capacity. The new area, in high bay 2, will allow NASA to preassemble stacks and still have room in the VAB to pull a Shuttle back from the pad if severe weather threatens. Potential rollouts of the Space Shuttle to the launch pad from high bay 2 will involve making a turn around the north side of the VAB in contrast to the straight rollouts from high bays 1 and 3, on the east side of the VAB facing the launch pads.

  18. Safe Haven roadway is tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A crawler-transporter with mobile launcher platform on top moves along a portion of the once-buried crawlerway toward the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The road was restored as part of KSC's Safe Haven project. High bay 2 provides a third stacking area. The primary goal of the Safe Haven construction project was to strengthen readiness for hurricane season by expanding the VAB's storage capacity. The new area, in high bay 2, will allow NASA to preassemble stacks and still have room in the VAB to pull a Shuttle back from the pad if severe weather threatens. Potential rollouts of the Space Shuttle to the launch pad from high bay 2 will involve making a turn around the north side of the VAB in contrast to the straight rollouts from high bays 1 and 3, on the east side of the VAB facing the launch pads.

  19. Safe-haven locking device

    DOEpatents

    Williams, J.V.

    1984-04-26

    Disclosed is a locking device for eliminating external control of a secured space formed by fixed and movable barriers. The locking device uses externally and internally controlled locksets and a movable strike, operable from the secured side of the movable barrier, to selectively engage either lockset. A disengagement device, for preventing forces from being applied to the lock bolts is also disclosed. In this manner, a secured space can be controlled from the secured side as a safe-haven. 4 figures.

  20. 78. Ferry Street Bridge with East New Haven Shops in ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    78. Ferry Street Bridge with East New Haven Shops in upper left corner and last catenary gantry on mainline. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 74.38. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  1. 14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    14. CENTRIFUGAL FREQUENCY RELAY IN WAYSIDE CABINET, NEW HAVEN YARD - New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad, Automatic Signalization System, Long Island Sound shoreline between Stamford & New Haven, Stamford, Fairfield County, CT

  2. Safe Haven Laws and School Social Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kopels, Sandra

    2012-01-01

    "Safe haven" laws are designed to protect infants from being killed or otherwise harmed. This article examines the safe haven laws from the states that comprise the Midwest School Social Work Council and the variations between these laws regarding the age of the infant, where the infant can be left, who is allowed to leave the infant, whether…

  3. Safe Haven Laws as "Crime Control Theater"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hammond, Michelle; Miller, Monica K.; Griffin, Timothy

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: This article examines safe haven laws, which allow parents to legally abandon their infants. The main objective is to determine whether safe haven laws fit the criteria of "crime control theater", a term used to describe public policies that produce the appearance, but not the effect, of crime control, and as such are essentially…

  4. Bedrock Geologic Map of the New Milford Quadrangle, Litchfield and Fairfield Counties, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, Gregory J.

    2004-01-01

    The bedrock geology of the New Milford quadrangle, Litchfield and Fairfield Counties, Connecticut is described in this report. The database includes contacts of bedrock geologic units, faults, outcrops, structural geologic information, and photos.

  5. 60. Fair Street Interlocking & circuit breaker gantry. New Haven, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    60. Fair Street Interlocking & circuit breaker gantry. New Haven, New Haven Co., CT. Sec. 9108, MP 71.90. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  6. New Haven's School-Community Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Comer, James P.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the need for preservice education that prepares teachers and administrators to work collaboratively with support staff and develop a positive school climate. Includes a description of the New Haven Schools Project's support network for high-risk students. (MD)

  7. 76 FR 78641 - Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-19

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC, Milford Wind Corridor Phase I, LLC; Notice of...'s (Commission) June 16, 2011 Order.\\1\\ \\1\\ Cedar Creek Wind Energy, LLC and Milford Wind...

  8. Sediment budgeting of German waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Promny, M.

    2012-04-01

    Waterways today rarely have a sustainable sediment budget. Supply from upstream and lateral sources is blocked by barrages in many places. The transport capacity is strongly modified by means of planform and cross-section alterations. Many free-flowing river sections are subject to bed degradation, while impoundments tend to aggrade. This has consequences for the usability of navigation facilities, stability of structures (like bridge foundations and dykes) and groundwater levels. Consequently, sediment managements operations are commonplace, being challenging in economic and ecologic terms. A first step towards an improved sediment management is to establish the current sediment budget of a river. There are different methods to gain information about the sediment budget: - measurements of bed-load and suspended load transport - deductions from temporal development of bed-level development - deductions from temporal development of streamwise water-level measurements - deductions from temporal development of water-levels at gauges - bed-load tracer analyses - numerical modelling An overview of the methods used in sediment budgeting of German waterways at the Federal Institute of Hydrology will be given. Ongoing research based on the above mentioned methodology will be presented, with a special focus on the possible influence of climate change on sediment budgets.

  9. 114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    114. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  10. 113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    113. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  11. 112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    112. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: New London Station. New London, New London Co., CT. Sec. 4209, MP 123.00. - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between New York/Connecticut & Connecticut/Rhode Island State Lines, New Haven, New Haven County, CT

  12. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular... Commandant, Fourth Naval District, and such agencies as he may designate....

  13. 33 CFR 334.120 - Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...; naval aircraft bombing target area. 334.120 Section 334.120 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF....120 Delaware Bay off Milford Neck; naval aircraft bombing target area. (a) The danger zone. A circular... Commandant, Fourth Naval District, and such agencies as he may designate....

  14. First record of an arthropod from the Passaic Formation (Late Triassic), near Milford, New Jersey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metz, Robert

    2012-03-01

    Mudstones of the Triassic Passaic Formation, near Milford, New Jersey, have yielded the first evidence of an arthropod impression in that formation. Associated trace fossils include Helminthoidichnites, Lockeia, Scoyenia, Spongeliomorpha, and the reptile footprint Rhynchosauroides, representing the Scoyenia ichnofacies. Associated sedimentary structures include desiccation cracks and raindrop impressions. The Passaic sediments were deposited under shallow water lacustrine shoreline conditions subject to periodic subaerial exposure.

  15. Programs for Occupational Education for Grades 9-12 at Milford, Massachusetts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelhardt, David F.

    An occupational education and career education program was planned for the new Milford, Mass. high school in which "occupational education" was defined as stressing training and guidance for occupations requiring no more training than up through the fourteenth year. The program provides for the half-day student and for the 5- or 10-period per week…

  16. 77 FR 69447 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-19

    ... investment recommendations, along with updates of the Inland Marine Transportation System (IMTS) Levels of Service and the Impacts of Low Water on the Inland Waterways System. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT:...

  17. 75 FR 57264 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-20

    ... and the status of the Inland Waterways Trust Fund. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Mr. Mark R... permitted by the committee. Brenda S. Bowen, Army Federal Register Liaison Officer. BILLING CODE 3720-58-P...

  18. 78 FR 33971 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; City Waterway Also Known as Thea Foss Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ...; Thea Foss Waterway previously known as City Waterway, Tacoma, WA'' in the Federal Register (77 FR 69576... Register (77 FR 69562) to test the operating schedule under the proposed regulations. Under this temporary... permanently go into effect. DATES: This deviation is effective from 8 a.m. on June 15, 2013 to 8 a.m. June...

  19. 78 FR 31412 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Thea Foss Waterway Previously Known as City Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... Regulation; Thea Foss Waterway previously known as City Waterway, Tacoma, WA'' in the Federal Register (77 FR....m. and 8 a.m. is because openings between 10 p.m. and 8 a.m. are extremely rare. Over an 18...

  20. 76 FR 12 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-03

    ... Haven, Connecticut. The deviation allows the bridge to keep one lift span closed to facilitate scheduled... keep one lift span in the closed position from 8 a.m. on January 3, 2011 through 5 p.m. on January 6, 2011, and from 8 a.m. on January 10, 2011 through 5 p.m. on January 13, 2011. One lift span...

  1. 76 FR 18415 - Television Broadcasting Services; New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-04

    ...The Commission grants a petition for rulemaking filed by Connecticut Public Broadcasting, Inc. (``CPBI''), the licensee of noncommercial educational station WEDY, New Haven, Connecticut, requesting the substitution of channel *41 for channel *6 at New Haven. CPBI's channel *6 facility is subject to substantial levels of new interference from other post-transition stations' power increases, and......

  2. New Directions in New Haven: A Pathbreaking New Teacher Contract

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Zastrow, Claus

    2010-01-01

    Teachers in New Haven, Connecticut, recently ratified a contract that Education Secretary Arne Duncan praised as an "important progressive labor agreement" for its provisions on teacher evaluation and school reform. This article presents a conversation with David Cicarella, president of the New Haven Federation of Teachers, about the agreement.…

  3. 11. Whitney's Armory, Near New Haven, Ct., 1842 Photocopied from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. Whitney's Armory, Near New Haven, Ct., 1842 Photocopied from a woodcut in Henry Howe, Memoirs of the Most Eminent American Mechanics (New York, 1842), p. 124. The best early view of the filing shop and its raceway. See footnote 58. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  4. Haven Charter Schools: Separate by Design and Legally Questionable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eckes, Suzanne

    2015-01-01

    This article examines the legal and policy complexities involved with students who are self-selecting into haven charter schools. Haven charter schools are those that intend to create a safe place for students with complex histories who may have been intimidated by a dominant group in their former schools. For the purpose of this study, haven…

  5. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with this section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

  6. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with this section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

  7. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Engineers also has regulations dealing with this section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

  8. 77 FR 62435 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-15

    ... Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On... Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations (77 FR 27007). We received 1 comment. Specifically, Lake Carriers... wake damage to vessels and shore structures (See 60 FR 35701-01). Because the Detroit River Light...

  9. Geohydrology of, and simulation of ground-water flow in, the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer, Milford, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, P.T.; Mack, Thomas J.

    1992-01-01

    Hydrogeologic data collected since 1990 were assessed and a ground-water-flow model was refined in this study of the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer in Milford, New Hampshire. The hydrogeologic data collected were used to refine estimates of hydraulic conductivity and saturated thickness of the aquifer, which were previously calculated during 1988-90. In October 1990, water levels were measured at 124 wells and piezometers, and at 45 stream-seepage sites on the main stem of the Souhegan River, and on small tributary streams overlying the aquifer to improve an understanding of ground-water-flow patterns and stream-seepage gains and losses. Refinement of the ground-water-flow model included a reduction in the number of active cells in layer 2 in the central part of the aquifer, a revision of simulated hydraulic conductivity in model layers 2 and representing the aquifer, incorporation of a new block-centered finite-difference ground-water-flow model, and incorporation of a new solution algorithm and solver (a preconditioned conjugate-gradient algorithm). Refinements to the model resulted in decreases in the difference between calculated and measured heads at 22 wells. The distribution of gains and losses of stream seepage calculated in simulation with the refined model is similar to that calculated in the previous model simulation. The contributing area to the Savage well, under average pumping conditions, decreased by 0.021 square miles from the area calculated in the previous model simulation. The small difference in the contrib- uting recharge area indicates that the additional data did not enhance model simulation and that the conceptual framework for the previous model is accurate.

  10. Ground-water hydrology and simulated effects of development in the Milford area, an arid basin in southwestern Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, J.L.

    1998-01-01

    A three-dimensional, finite-difference model was constructed to simulate ground-water flow in the Milford area. The purpose of the study was to evaluate present knowledge and concepts of the ground-water system, to analyze the ability of the model to represent past and current (1984) conditions, and to estimate the effects of various ground-water development alternatives.

  11. The Supreme Court Permits Religious Groups To Use Public School Facilities: Good News Club v. Milford Central School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russo, Charles J.; Mawdsley, Ralph D.

    2001-01-01

    Reviews basis for U.S. Supreme Court's June 2001 decision in "Good News Club v. Milford Central School," where Court held that the Christian religious club for students had the Constitutional right under the Free Speech Clause to use public school facilities after school hours. Explains impact of decision on board of education policy. (Contains…

  12. 76 FR 7585 - General Motors Corporation Milford Proving Grounds Including On-Site Leased Workers From Adroit...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-10

    ... Register on July 7, 2010 (75 FR 39046). The workers supply support services related to the production of..., Non-IT Business Development and Engineering Application Support Teams Milford, MI; Amended... investigation shows that workers of the Non-IT Business Development Team and the Engineering...

  13. Digital waterway construction based on inland electronic navigation chart

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xue; Pan, Junfeng; Zhu, Weiwei

    2015-12-01

    With advantages of large capacity, long distance, low energy consumption, low cost, less land occupation and light pollution, inland waterway transportation becomes one of the most important constituents of the comprehensive transportation system and comprehensive water resources utilization in China. As one of "three elements" of navigation, waterway is the important basis for the development of water transportation and plays a key supporting role in shipping economic. The paper discuss how to realize the informatization and digitization of waterway management based on constructing an integrated system of standard inland electronic navigation chart production, waterway maintenance, navigation mark remote sensing and control, ship dynamic management, and water level remote sensing and report, which can also be the foundation of the intelligent waterway construction. Digital waterway construction is an information project and also has a practical meaning for waterway. It can not only meet the growing high assurance and security requirements for waterway, but also play a significant advantage in improving transport efficiency, reducing costs, promoting energy conservation and so on. This study lays a solid foundation on realizing intelligent waterway and building a smooth, efficient, safe, green modern inland waterway system, and must be considered as an unavoidable problem for the coordinated development between "low carbon" transportation and social economic.

  14. Tracking and predicting barges on inland waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, Duminda I; Hilliard, Michael R

    2013-01-01

    We present a non-linear, probabilistic prediction model developed and implemented to track spatial location and other navigation characteristics of a barge traveling on the inland waterway system. A pre-filter, to check the validity of the measurements, a non-linear speed estimation process, and a Kalman filter to predict the navigation solution of the barge is developed in this work. Due to the complex dynamics involved in the system, a non-linear stochastic model was developed in state space using system dynamics to represent the process and measurement systems while maintaining the fidelity of an actual system. The algorithm was verified using actual measurements obtained from multiple barges on multiple rivers acquired from different sensors. The results show a reliable and robust prediction algorithm for tracking inland waterway barges.

  15. 77 FR 26522 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-04

    ...In Accordance with 10(a)(2) of the Federal Advisory Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463), announcement is made of the forthcoming meeting. Name of Committee: Inland Waterways Users Board (Board). Date: June 6, 2012. Location: The OMNI William Penn Hotel, 530 William Penn Place, Pittsburgh, PA 15219 at 412-281-7100 or 1-800-843-6664 or www.omnihotels.com/FindAHotel/PittsburghWilliamPenn.aspx. Time:......

  16. 17. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: Readville Shops ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    17. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: Readville Shops with Sprague Street Bridge in background. Readville, Suffolk Co., MA. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  17. 16. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: Readville Shops. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    16. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: Readville Shops. Readville, Suffolk Co., MA. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  18. 18. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: Readville Shops. ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    18. New York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad: Readville Shops. Readville, Suffolk Co., MA. (Not on NEC). - Northeast Railroad Corridor, Amtrak Route between RI/MA State Line & South Station, Boston, Suffolk County, MA

  19. 214. RUSTIC BUS SHELTER, GUARDRAILS AND LAMP POST BELLE HAVEN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    214. RUSTIC BUS SHELTER, GUARDRAILS AND LAMP POST BELLE HAVEN BUS STOP WIDENING, 1932. - George Washington Memorial Parkway, Along Potomac River from McLean to Mount Vernon, VA, Mount Vernon, Fairfax County, VA

  20. Transforming an Urban School System: Progress of New Haven School Change and New Haven Promise Education Reforms (2010-2013). Technical Appendixes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Ethan; Ryan, Sarah; Daugherty, Lindsay; Schweig, Jonathan David; Bozick, Robert; Gonzalez, Gabriella C.

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the City of New Haven and New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) announced a sweeping K-12 educational reform, New Haven School Change. The district had three primary goals for School Change: (1) close the gap between the performance of NHPS students' and Connecticut students' averages on state tests, (2) cut the high school dropout rate in…

  1. Transforming an Urban School System: Progress of New Haven School Change and New Haven Promise Education Reforms (2010-2013). Research Report

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Bozick, Robert; Daugherty, Lindsay; Scherer, Ethan; Singh, Reema; Suárez, Mónica Jacobo; Ryan, Sarah

    2014-01-01

    In 2009, the City of New Haven and New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) announced a sweeping K-12 educational reform, New Haven School Change. The district had three primary goals for School Change: (1) close the gap between the performance of NHPS students' and Connecticut students' averages on state tests, (2) cut the high school dropout rate in…

  2. 77 FR 69576 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Thea Foss Waterway Previously Known as City Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-20

    ... Acronyms CFR Code of Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... Previously Known as City Waterway, Tacoma, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed...

  3. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  4. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  5. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  6. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  7. 33 CFR 62.49 - Intracoastal Waterway identification.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AIDS TO NAVIGATION UNITED STATES AIDS TO NAVIGATION SYSTEM The U.S. Aids to Navigation System § 62.49 Intracoastal Waterway identification. (a) In addition to the conventional signals, aids to navigation marking the Intracoastal Waterway exhibit unique yellow symbols to distinguish them from aids marking...

  8. 33 CFR 117.733 - New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway. 117.733 Section 117.733 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements New Jersey § 117.733 New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway. (a) The draw of the Route...

  9. 33 CFR 162.65 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Fla. 162.65 Section 162.65 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS...

  10. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    For the first time in Space Shuttle history, a fully stacked Shuttle Atlantis moves into high bay 2 (on the west side) of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). The VAB and nearby rock- paved crawlerway have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection '''Safe Haven''' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis began moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. After the successful Safe Haven fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  11. 25. Site plan by New Haven Water Company, c.1900 Photocopied ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    25. Site plan by New Haven Water Company, c.1900 Photocopied from property map, Mill River Division, Sheet 51, Map Collection, Armory Street Filtration Plant, New Haven Water Company, Hamden, Connecticut. - Eli Whitney Armory, West of Whitney Avenue, Armory Street Vicinity, Hamden, New Haven County, CT

  12. 77 FR 77073 - York Haven Power Company, LLC; Notice of Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-31

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission York Haven Power Company, LLC; Notice of Meeting On Wednesday, January 9, 2013, Commission staff will meet with York Haven Power Company, LLC (applicant) in Washington, DC. The... York Haven Hydroelectric Project No. 1888. The meeting will begin at 10 a.m. at the Federal...

  13. Evaluating rehabilitation efforts following the Milford Flat Fire: successes, failures, and controlling factors

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duniway, Michael C.; Palmquist, Emily C.; Miller, Mark E.

    2015-01-01

    Uncontrolled wildfire in arid and semiarid ecosystems has become an increasing concern in recent decades. Active rehabilitation of fire-affected areas is often quickly initiated to minimize long-term ecosystem damage. However, the complex soil-geomorphic-vegetation patterns and low and variable moisture conditions in these regions makes restoration challenging. To further inform these post-fire management decisions, we present results from 5 years of vegetation and sediment flux monitoring following the Milford Flat Fire in west-central Utah, USA. Our sampling design includes monitoring plots in areas not burned, areas burned but where no rehabilitation was attempted, and burned areas where various rehabilitation approaches were implemented. At each of the 25 plots, vegetation cover and composition data were collected annually, and wind-driven sediment flux was measured using passive dust traps. To evaluate effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in establishing desired species and limiting dominance of undesired species, we analyzed the temporal response of individual species and functional groups as well as community-level multivariate responses. The warm and dry conditions that persisted for approximately 12 months post-treatment, coupled with the surface disturbing rehabilitation approaches used, resulted in near-surface dust fluxes several orders of magnitude higher in treated areas than in unburned or burned areas where no rehabilitation occurred. These dry conditions and high surface sediment flux limited the establishment of seeded species in rehabilitation areas for nearly 3 years. Post-fire rehabilitation did not limit dominance by invasive annual species of concern. Perennial species composition in the areas burned but not subject to post-fire rehabilitation was relatively similar to unburned throughout the study period. In contrast, the burned plots where rehabilitation was attempted were characterized by no (<3%) perennial cover or, in

  14. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... design draft of 20 feet (maximum certified draft when fully loaded) travels into a taxable waterway with... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Certain types of commercial waterway... Inland Waterways § 48.4042-3 Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded. (a) Deep...

  15. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... design draft of 20 feet (maximum certified draft when fully loaded) travels into a taxable waterway with... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Certain types of commercial waterway... Inland Waterways § 48.4042-3 Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded. (a) Deep...

  16. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... design draft of 20 feet (maximum certified draft when fully loaded) travels into a taxable waterway with... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Certain types of commercial waterway... Inland Waterways § 48.4042-3 Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded. (a) Deep...

  17. The Student Trainer Clinical Experience at Lock Haven State College.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasi, David

    An integral part of the clinical experience for athletic trainers at Lock Haven State College (Pennsylvania) is training in first aid and learning to evaluate not only sport-related injuries but all injuries. Thorough knowledge is expected of athletic trainers in the areas of cardiopulmonary resuscitation, first aid, and treatment of…

  18. No Safe Haven: Children of Substance-Abusing Parents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Columbia Univ., New York, NY. Center on Addiction and Substance Abuse.

    This report analyzes data from a 2-year study of connections between substance abuse and child maltreatment, exposing how child welfare agencies and family court systems handle child custody decisions when parents are substance abusers. The six chapters are: (1) "Introduction and Executive Summary"; (2) "No Safe Haven for Children" (new and…

  19. 33 CFR 117.624 - Black River (South Haven).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Black River (South Haven). 117.624 Section 117.624 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Michigan § 117.624 Black River (South...

  20. 33 CFR 117.624 - Black River (South Haven).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Black River (South Haven). 117.624 Section 117.624 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Michigan § 117.624 Black River (South...

  1. 33 CFR 117.624 - Black River (South Haven).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Black River (South Haven). 117.624 Section 117.624 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Michigan § 117.624 Black River (South...

  2. 33 CFR 117.624 - Black River (South Haven).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Black River (South Haven). 117.624 Section 117.624 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Michigan § 117.624 Black River (South...

  3. 33 CFR 117.624 - Black River (South Haven).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Black River (South Haven). 117.624 Section 117.624 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Michigan § 117.624 Black River (South...

  4. The Role of Mass Wasting in the Post-LGM Evolution of Milford Sound, Fiordland, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykstra, Jesse; Davies, Timothy; Winkler, Stefan

    2010-05-01

    The geomorphic and sedimentary evolution of New Zealand's fiords have been influenced by their unique setting. Fiordland lies in a temperate marine climate zone, and is bounded to the west by an active transform plate boundary, where the Indo-Australian Plate collides with the Pacific Plate. The seismicity of Fiordland is dominated by the plate-boundary Alpine Fault, which runs immediately offshore of the popular tourist destination of Milford Sound; it has ruptured at least four times in the past 1000 years (the last time around 1717 A.D.), producing earthquakes of about magnitude 8. The probability of an earthquake of similar magnitude occurring along the Alpine Fault within the next 50 years is estimated at 65±15%. Fordland's active tectonic setting also gives rise to a very wet climate. The extreme topography of the Fiordland mountains forces up the prevailing westerly winds, resulting in mean annual precipitation of nearly 7 m at Milford Sound. During the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM), these unique climatic and tectonic conditions were favourable for the advance of tidewater glaciers, which deposited material in large fans at the edge of the narrow continental shelf. During the LGM, New Zealand was modestly glaciated, consequently the signature of global eustatic sea level change overrides any isostatic signature. Fiordland glaciers likely retreated very quickly (starting approximately 17,000 years ago), while global sea levels were still much lower than present day. Freshwater proglacial lakes would have occupied the basins during the early stages of glacial retreat, as marine transgression was blocked by entrance sills. Rapid retreat, and ultimately disappearance of valley glaciers would have resulted in a drastic reduction in sediment production and transport. Finally, eustatic sea level rise resulted in marine transgression, with freshwater lakes becoming estuaries. This proposed model for fiord evolution in south-western New Zealand is well supported by

  5. 77 FR 47331 - Regulated Navigation Area-New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac River, Mill River, New Haven, CT; Pearl...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-08

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms COTP Captain of the Port DHS Department of Homeland Security FR... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... River, Mill River, New Haven, CT; Pearl Harbor Memorial Bridge (Interstate 95) Construction...

  6. 78 FR 39998 - Safety Zone; Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks; Grand River; Grand Haven, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-03

    ...-9826. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Grand Haven 4th of July Fireworks; Grand... a State, local, or tribal government, in the aggregate, or by the private sector of...

  7. Interpolation of Reconnaissance Multibeam and Single-Beam Bathymetry Offshore of Milford, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, L.J.; Ackerman, S.D.; McMullen, K.Y.; Schattgen, P.T.; Schaer, J.D.; Doran, E.F.

    2008-01-01

    This report releases echosounder data from the northern part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) hydrographic survey H11044 in Long Island Sound, off Milford, Connecticut. The data have been interpolated and regridded into a complete-coverage data set and image of the sea floor. The grid produced as a result of the interpolation is at 10-m resolution. These data extend an already published set of reprocessed bathymetric data from the southern part of survey H11044. In Long Island Sound, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with NOAA and the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection, is producing detailed maps of the sea floor. Part of the current phase of research involves studies of sea-floor topography and its effect on the distributions of sedimentary environments and benthic habitats. This data set provides a more continuous perspective of the sea floor than was previously available. It helps to define topographic variability and benthic-habitat diversity for the area and improves our understanding of oceanographic processes controlling the distribution of sediments and benthic habitats. Inasmuch as precise information on environmental setting is important for selecting sampling sites and accurately interpreting point measurements, this data set can also serve as a base map for subsequent sedimentological, geochemical, and biological research.

  8. 77 FR 75556 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Louisiana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ... Boulevard bascule span drawbridge across the Harvey Canal Route, Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW), mile 2.8... temporary deviation from the operating schedule for the Bascule Span Bridge across the Harvey Canal...

  9. 77 FR 1405 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ... Harvey Locks, at Grand Lake, Cameron Parish, Louisiana. The deviation is necessary to allow for the safe... Lake Pontoon Bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 231.5 west of Harvey Lock (WHL),...

  10. Dickeya aquatica sp. nov., isolated from waterways.

    PubMed

    Parkinson, Neil; DeVos, Paul; Pirhonen, Minna; Elphinstone, John

    2014-07-01

    Pectinolytic Gram-negative bacteria were isolated from different waterways in the UK and Finland. Three strains (174/2(T), 181/2 and Dw054) had the same 16S rRNA gene sequences which shared 99% sequence similarity to species of the genus Dickeya, and a phylogeny of related genera confirmed attribution to this genus. Fatty acid profile analysis of all three strains found a high proportion of C16 : 1ω7c/C16 : 1ω7c and C16 : 0 fatty acids, and library profile searches found closest matches to Dickeya chrysanthemi. Production of a concatenated phylogeny using six loci, recA, gapA, atpD, gyrB, infB and rpoB, provided a high-resolution phylogeny which placed strains 174/2(T) and 181/2 as a distinct clade, separated from the other species of the genus Dickeya by a relatively long branch-length. DNA-DNA hybridization analysis with a limited number of reference species also supported the distinctiveness of strains 174/2(T) and 181/2 within the genus Dickeya. All three strains could be phenotypically distinguished from other species of the genus by fermentation of melibiose and raffinose but not D-arabinose or mannitol. The name Dickeya aquatica sp. nov. is proposed for the new taxon; the type strain is 174/2(T) ( = NCPPB 4580(T) = LMG 27354(T)). PMID:24719023

  11. Hydrostratigraphic mapping of the Milford-Souhegan glacial drift aquifer, and effects of hydrostratigraphy on transport of PCE, Operable Unit 1, Savage Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2010-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in the Town of Milford, New Hampshire, was underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume (as mapped in 1994) of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), most of which consisted of tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within highly transmissive stratified-drift deposits but also extends into underlying till and bedrock. The plume has been divided into two areas called Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit 2 (OU2), which is defined as the extended plume area outside of OU1. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier wall that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE and a series of injection and extraction wells to contain and remove contaminants. The barrier wall likely penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; in many places, it also penetrates the full thickness of the underlying basal till and sits atop bedrock.From 1998 to 2004, PCE concentrations decreased by an average of 80 percent at most wells outside the barrier wall. However, inside the barrier, PCE concentrations greater than 10,000 micrograms per liter (μg/L) still exist (2008). The remediation of these areas of recalcitrant PCE presents challenges to successful remediation.The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), Region 1, is studying the solute transport of VOCs (primarily PCE) in contaminated groundwater in the unconsolidated sediments (overburden) of the Savage site and specifically assisting in the evaluation of the effectiveness of remedial operations in the OU1 area. As part of this effort, the USGS analyzed the subsurface stratigraphy to help understand hydrostratigraphic controls on remediation.A combination of lithologic, borehole natural gamma-ray and electromagnetic (EM) induction logging, and test drilling has identified 11 primary

  12. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The sun is rising over the Atlantic Ocean (right) as Shuttle Atlantis sits outside the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) high bay 2 on the building's west side. This is the first time in Space Shuttle history that a fully stacked Shuttle is being moved into the space. The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection '''Safe Haven''' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis, the twin solid rocket boosters and external tank began moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. The 6-million pound crawler transporter carried the Mobile Launcher Platform and Space Shuttle around the north side of the VAB and into high bay 2. After the successful '''Safe Haven''' fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  13. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Shuttle Atlantis, with twin solid rocket boosters and external tank atop the Mobile Launcher Platform and Crawler-Transporter, moves in the predawn hours from high bay 2 in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). For the first time in Space Shuttle history, a fully stacked Shuttle is rolling around the north side of the VAB into high bay 2 on the building's west side. The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection '''Safe Haven''' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis began moving out of VAB high bay 1 at 2:59 a.m. EDT. After the successful '''Safe Haven''' fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  14. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Shuttle Atlantis, with twin solid rocket boosters and external tank atop the Mobile Launcher Platform and Crawler-Transporter, inches toward high bay 2, on the west side, in the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB). For the first time in Space Shuttle history, a fully stacked Shuttle is moving into the bay. The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection '''Safe Haven''' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis began moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. After the successful Safe Haven fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  15. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Just after sunup, Shuttle Atlantis sits outside the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) high bay 2 on the building's west side after completing a fit check . This is the first time in Space Shuttle history that a fully stacked Shuttle is being moved into the space. The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection 'Safe Haven' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis, the twin solid rocket boosters and external tank began moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. The 6-million pound crawler transporter carried the Mobile Launcher Platform and Space Shuttle around the north side of the VAB and into high bay 2. After the successful Safe Haven fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  16. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    For the first time in Space Shuttle history, a fully stacked Shuttle Atlantis is rolling into the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) high bay 2 on the building's west side. The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection 'Safe Haven' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis, the twin solid rocket boosters and external tank began moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. The 6-million pound crawler transporter carried the Mobile Launcher Platform and Space Shuttle around the north side of the VAB and into high bay 2. After the successful Safe Haven fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  17. A building is demolished as part of Safe Haven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The Butler Building at Kennedy Space Center is nearly demolished, with the help of the crane in the background. The building, which is near the Orbiter Processing Facility (right), is being demolished in order to extend the crawlerway leading to the high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), part of KSC's Safe Haven project. The goal of Safe Haven is to strengthen readiness for Florida's hurricane season by expanding the VAB's storage capacity. Construction includes outfitting the VAB with a third stacking area, in high bay 2, that will allow NASA to preassemble stacks and still have room in the VAB to pull a Shuttle back from the pad into the safety of the VAB if severe weather threatens. The VAB can withstand winds up to 125 mph.

  18. A building is demolished as part of Safe Haven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    The walls of the Butler Building at Kennedy Space Center come tumbling down, with the help of the crane in the background. The building, which is near the Orbiter Processing Facility, is being demolished in order to extend the crawlerway leading to the high bay of the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB), part of KSC's Safe Haven project. The goal of Safe Haven is to strengthen readiness for Florida's hurricane season by expanding the VAB's storage capacity. Construction includes outfitting the VAB with a third stacking area, in high bay 2, that will allow NASA to preassemble stacks and still have room in the VAB to pull a Shuttle back from the pad into the safety of the VAB if severe weather threatens. The VAB can withstand winds up to 125 mph.

  19. Predictive statistical models linking antecedent meteorological conditions and waterway bacterial contamination in urban waterways.

    PubMed

    Farnham, David J; Lall, Upmanu

    2015-06-01

    Although the relationships between meteorological conditions and waterway bacterial contamination are being better understood, statistical models capable of fully leveraging these links have not been developed for highly urbanized settings. We present a hierarchical Bayesian regression model for predicting transient fecal indicator bacteria contamination episodes in urban waterways. Canals, creeks, and rivers of the New York City harbor system are used to examine the model. The model configuration facilitates the hierarchical structure of the underlying system with weekly observations nested within sampling sites, which in turn were nested inside of the harbor network. Models are compared using cross-validation and a variety of Bayesian and classical model fit statistics. The uncertainty of predicted enterococci concentration values is reflected by sampling from the posterior predictive distribution. Issuing predictions with the uncertainty reasonably reflected allows a water manager or a monitoring agency to issue warnings that better reflect the underlying risk of exposure. A model using only antecedent meteorological conditions is shown to correctly classify safe and unsafe levels of enterococci with good accuracy. The hierarchical Bayesian regression approach is most valuable where transient fecal indicator bacteria contamination is problematic and drainage network data are scarce. PMID:25813489

  20. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion -- lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-01-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar–Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m−2 d−1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2–555.3 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0–44,010.7 g m−2 d−1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar–Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  1. Post-fire land treatments and wind erosion - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire, UT, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Mark E.; Bowker, Matthew A.; Reynolds, Richard L.; Goldstein, Harland L.

    2012-12-01

    We monitored sediment flux at 25 plots located at the northern end of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire (Lake Bonneville Basin, west-central Utah) to examine the effectiveness of post-fire rehabilitation treatments in mitigating risks of wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire. Maximum values were recorded during Mar-Jul 2009 when horizontal sediment fluxes measured with BSNE samplers ranged from 16.3 to 1251.0 g m-2 d-1 in unburned plots (n = 8; data represent averages of three sampler heights per plot), 35.2-555.3 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that were not treated (n = 5), and 21.0-44,010.7 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that received one or more rehabilitation treatments that disturbed the soil surface (n = 12). Fluxes during this period exhibited extreme spatial variability and were contingent on upwind landscape characteristics and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings downwind of treated areas with long treatment length and unstable fine sand. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to soil and fetch effects highlight the profound importance of landscape setting and soil properties as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. By Mar-Jul 2010, average flux for all plots declined by 73.6% relative to the comparable 2009 period primarily due to the establishment and growth of exotic annual plants rather than seeded perennial plants. Results suggest that treatments in sensitive erosion-prone settings generally exacerbated rather than mitigated wind erosion during the first 3 years post fire, although long-term effects remain uncertain.

  2. Global extent and distribution of artificial, residential waterways in estuaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltham, Nathan J.; Connolly, Rod M.

    2011-08-01

    Artificial residential waterways are now widespread in the world's estuaries. We used the global mapping tool, Google Earth, to determine that there are nearly 4000 linear km of artificial waterways globally, covering an area of 270 km 2. Residential waterways constructed as open, flow-through canal estates are at their greatest extent in North America (77% of global linear extent), where systems are typically longer and narrower, with more openings and dead-ends than systems elsewhere. The remaining canal estates are spread across all other continents except Antarctica: Asia (7%), Europe (7%), Oceania (7%), South America (0.9%), and Africa (0.6%). A relatively recent design change from open canals to artificial estuarine lakes with tidal barriers has occurred on all continents except Africa, most extensively in Australia (14 km 2 area, 57 independent systems). The extremely large expansion in artificial residential waterways aimed at increasing opportunities for waterfront living by humans has also modified and expanded estuarine habitat available to aquatic biota. Research can best underpin planning and management of these types of waterways by focussing on their value as habitat and their provision of other goods and services.

  3. A Study to Determine the Acceptance and Effectiveness of an Experimental Mobile Unit Which Serves Milford, Beaver, Delta, and Fillmore in Southern Utah.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Widmer, Grant W.

    The study determined the acceptance by high school students of a mobile-classroom approach to the teaching of electronics. Also investigated was the effectiveness of this teaching method with high school students in the southern Utah communities of Milford, Beaver, Delta, and Fillmore during the 1968-69 school year. As ascertained by the attitude…

  4. 76 FR 3516 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Belle Chasse, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-20

    ... governing the operation of the SR 23 bridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route... drawbridge across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), mile 3.8, at Belle...

  5. 77 FR 56587 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-13

    ... Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina. The safety zone extension would temporarily restrict... crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina. The contract... Intracoastal Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina (33 55'18'' N/078 04'22'' W). All...

  6. 78 FR 6208 - Drawbridge Operating Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Belle Chasse, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-30

    ... Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), mile 3.8, at Belle Chasse, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana. This... known as the Judge Perez Bridge, across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), mile 3... the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), mile 3.8, at Belle Chasse, Louisiana has...

  7. 75 FR 20619 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-20

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory... Mississippi River and related waterways. This meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The Committee...

  8. 75 FR 51097 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-18

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory... Mississippi River and related waterways. This meeting will be open to the public. DATES: The Committee...

  9. 76 FR 77119 - Special Local Regulations; Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Pompano...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-12

    ... Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Pompano Beach, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... Waterway in Pompano Beach, Florida during the Pompano Beach Holiday Boat Parade on Sunday, December 11... Santa Barbara, transit north on the Intracoastal Waterway, and end at the Hillsborough Bridge....

  10. 76 FR 54703 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC in the Federal Register (76 FR 124). We received... Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in...

  11. 76 FR 78151 - Special Local Regulations; Boca Raton Holiday Boat Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Boca Raton, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-16

    ... Parade, Intracoastal Waterway, Boca Raton, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule... Waterway in Boca Raton, Florida during the Boca Raton Holiday Boat Parade on Saturday, December 17, 2011... then head south on the Intracoastal Waterway to the Hillsborough Bridge, where the marine parade...

  12. 75 FR 65230 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...) entitled Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR in the Federal Register (75 FR... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine... Railroad Drawbridge across the Arkansas Waterway at Mile 67.4 at Pine Bluff, Arkansas. Vessel...

  13. 75 FR 2077 - Safety Zone; Todd Pacific Shipyards Vessel Launch, West Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-14

    ... Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone on the West Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, Washington. Entry... Pacific Shipyards, located at the entrance to the West Duwamish Waterway. DATES: This rule is...

  14. 75 FR 61094 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-04

    ... Waterway, Beaufort, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is... the Beaufort River (Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway). This bridge is also known as the Lady's Island... Waterway at mile 539.0 in Port Royal, South Carolina, vehicle traffic is currently being rerouted from...

  15. Preventing diabetes among Fair Haven families: a community-based approach to quality improvement.

    PubMed

    Chakkalakal, Rosette J; Camp, Anne W; Magenheimer, Elizabeth; Savoye, Mary; Lubsen, Julia; Lucas, Georgina; Rosenthal, Marjorie S

    2012-08-01

    In this paper, we describe our efforts to integrate the Diabetes Prevention Program and the Bright Bodies program into a coordinated intensive lifestyle intervention program for families living in Fair Haven, an underserved Hispanic neighborhood in New Haven, Connecticut with high rates of obesity and prediabetes in adults and children. PMID:22864501

  16. 78 FR 13479 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-28

    ... Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT,'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 1738) on..., Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard has... Regulations New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers,'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 1738). We...

  17. 75 FR 37308 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Grand River, Grand Haven, MI

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Grand River, Grand Haven, MI AGENCY....S. 31 Bridge at Mile 2.89 over the Grand River, at Grand Haven, MI. This deviation temporarily.... on July 5, 2010 and again from 10 p.m. on August 7, 2010 to 2 a.m. on August 8, 2010....

  18. Tighter Opioid Laws in U.S. Haven't Eased Misuse

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159503.html Tighter Opioid Laws in U.S. Haven't Eased Misuse Study of ... 2016 WEDNESDAY, June 22, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. laws designed to curb abuse of opioid painkillers haven' ...

  19. 48 CFR 252.236-7002 - Obstruction of navigable waterways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... waterways. 252.236-7002 Section 252.236-7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text...— (1) Promptly recover and remove any material, plant, machinery, or appliance which the...

  20. 48 CFR 252.236-7002 - Obstruction of navigable waterways.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... waterways. 252.236-7002 Section 252.236-7002 Federal Acquisition Regulations System DEFENSE ACQUISITION REGULATIONS SYSTEM, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE CLAUSES AND FORMS SOLICITATION PROVISIONS AND CONTRACT CLAUSES Text...— (1) Promptly recover and remove any material, plant, machinery, or appliance which the...

  1. 78 FR 25677 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulations; Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... Waterways Navigation Regulations published in the Federal Register of April 26, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-09853... notice of proposed rulemaking that appeared in the Federal Register of April 26, 2013 (78 FR 24697). The... April 26, 2013, in FR Doc. 2013-09853, on page 24697, contained an incorrect RIN Number,...

  2. WATER QUALITY STUDY OF THE ISLAND PARK WATERWAYS, IDAHO 1970

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study was initiated to examine some chemical, physical, and bacteriological aspects of the waterways of the Island Park recreational area, Idaho (17040202) in an effort to initiate local water quality standards, to identify sources of river abuse, and where possible, to lear...

  3. Bioassays on Illinois waterway dredged material. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, D.W.; Gibson, A.B.; Dillon, T.M.

    1992-12-01

    Sediment from the Illinois Waterway navigation channel is hydraulically dredged by the US Army Engineer District, Rock Island, and placed in the nearshore environment via pipeline. Water returning to the river can have a high-suspended solids load approaching fluid mud consistency. There is a concern that this return water may exceed the State of Illinois water quality standards for ammonia and have adverse effects on aquatic life. To address these concerns, composite sediment samples and site water collected from selected sites in the Illinois Waterway were evaluated in toxicity tests. Acute (48-hr) toxicity tests were conducted with two species, Pimephales promelas (the fathead minnow) and Daphnia magna (a freshwater cladoceran). A chronic (21-day) toxicity test was also conducted using Daphnia magna. Animals were exposed separately to different concentrations of filtered and unfiltered elutriates prepared from Acute, Cadmium, Daphnia magna, Pimephales promela, Ammonia, Chronic, Elutriate, Sediment, Bioassay, Cladoceran, Fathead minnow. Illinois Waterway edged material. Total ammonia concentrations were measured in all tests and the un-ionized fraction was calculated by adjusting for temperature and pH. Tests were conducted at the US Army Engineer Waterways Experiment Station, Vicksburg, MS. In addition, as part of an interlaboratory effort, a 48-hr acute toxicity test with Pimephales pomelas fry was conducted concurrently by the Hygienic Laboratory of the University of Iowa, Des Moines, IA.

  4. SEDIMENT DATA - ST. PAUL WATERWAY - TACOMA, WA - 1996 MONITORING DATA

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic Infauna Monitoring Data Files are Excel-format spreadsheet files which contain data presented in the St. Paul Waterway Area Remedial Action and Habitat Restoration Project, 1996 Monitoring Report. The files can be viewed directly or readily downlo aded and read into most ...

  5. 76 FR 66314 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-26

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard RIN 1625-1148 Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of Federal Advisory Committee Meeting. SUMMARY: The Lower Mississippi River..., issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Docket: For access to the docket to read...

  6. 33 CFR 117.968 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. 117.968 Section 117.968 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.968 Gulf Intracoastal...

  7. 33 CFR 117.968 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. 117.968 Section 117.968 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.968 Gulf Intracoastal...

  8. 33 CFR 117.968 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. 117.968 Section 117.968 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.968 Gulf Intracoastal...

  9. 33 CFR 117.968 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. 117.968 Section 117.968 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.968 Gulf Intracoastal...

  10. 33 CFR 117.968 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. 117.968 Section 117.968 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Texas § 117.968 Gulf Intracoastal...

  11. 78 FR 23849 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-23

    ... comments in response, therefore, the rule will go into effect as scheduled. DATES: The effective date of the direct final rule published January 23, 2013 (78 FR 4785) is confirmed as April 23, 2013. FOR... entitled, ``Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA'' in the Federal Register (78...

  12. 77 FR 22769 - Amendment to the Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-17

    ... of the various categories of commodities shipped on inland and intracoastal waterways. A primary user... approval of the Secretary of Defense, for a two-year term of service with annual renewals. A user or shipper may be represented on the Board for no more than two terms of service (four years); a user...

  13. 78 FR 4785 - Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-23

    ... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). D. Public Meeting We do not now plan... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 162 RIN 1625-AB95 Inland Waterways Navigation Regulation: Sacramento River... River. The restricted anchorage area was needed in the past to prevent non- government vessels...

  14. 10. MAP SHOWING 'THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTING LINES AND WATERWAYS OF ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MAP SHOWING 'THE ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTING LINES AND WATERWAYS OF THE TELLURIDE POWER COMPANY OF COLORADO'. THE AMES POWER STATION LIES AT THE FORK OF THE GORGE, LOWER LEFT OF CENTER IN THE PHOTOGRAPH. - Ames Hydroelectric Plant, Ames, San Miguel County, CO

  15. Shuttle Atlantis is used for Safe Haven fit check

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    At 6:30 a.m. EDT an aerial view captures a first in Space Shuttle history: a fully stacked Shuttle Atlantis is rolling into the Vehicle Assembly Building's (VAB) high bay 2 on the building's west side (center of photo). The VAB and nearby rock-paved crawlerway (circling to the left) have recently undergone major modifications to provide Shuttle flight hardware more storage space and protection 'Safe Haven' - from hurricanes or tropical storms. Atlantis, the twin solid rocket boosters and external tank began moving out of VAB high bay 1 on the east side at 2:59 a.m. EDT. The 6-million pound crawler transporter carried the Mobile Launcher Platform and Space Shuttle around the north side of the VAB and into high bay 2. To the right of the VAB is the turn basin. In the background can be seen both Launch Pads with the Atlantic Ocean behind them. After the successful Safe Haven fit check, Shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to roll out to Launch Pad 39B in preparation for the STS-106 launch on Sept. 8.

  16. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. (a... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay or with the Gulf of Mexico east and south......

  17. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Locks. All Government owned or operated locks and hurricane gate chambers and appurtenant structures in... District Engineers. The use, administration, and navigation of these waterways, Federal locks and hurricane..., hurricane gate chambers, spillways, or approaches thereto, or other Government structures, and...

  18. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Locks. All Government owned or operated locks and hurricane gate chambers and appurtenant structures in... District Engineers. The use, administration, and navigation of these waterways, Federal locks and hurricane..., hurricane gate chambers, spillways, or approaches thereto, or other Government structures, and...

  19. 33 CFR 207.160 - All waterways tributary to the Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay and all waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of... tributary to the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Fla.; use, administration, and navigation. (a... Atlantic Ocean south of Chesapeake Bay or with the Gulf of Mexico east and south of St. Marks, Florida....

  20. Wildfire, Land Management, and Aeolian Processes in Dryland Ecosystems - Lessons from the Milford Flat Fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, M. E.; Reynolds, R. L.; Goldstein, H.; Reheis, M. C.; Yount, J. C.

    2010-12-01

    Wildfire can increase risks of wind erosion through the removal of vegetation that protects soil, decreases wind velocity at the surface, and captures sediment. Post-fire rehabilitation treatments implemented by land-management agencies are intended to stabilize burned sites by facilitating the establishment of perennial vegetation, but treatments also can decrease erosion resistance through impacts on soil erodibility (aggregation and roughness) where treatments involve surface disturbance, and vegetation structure where treatments involve herbicide applications to suppress invasive exotic annuals. To begin examining these issues, 25 plots were established to monitor erosion resistance and dust emissions on a low-elevation portion of the 2007 Milford Flat Fire in the Lake Bonneville basin of west-central Utah. Post-fire dust emissions have exhibited an extreme degree of spatial variability. During Mar-Jun 2009, horizontal dust fluxes measured with BSNE samplers at 1 m above the ground surface ranged from 18 to 1,307 g m-2 d-1 in unburned plots (n=8), 25 to 565 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that were untreated (n=5), and 15 to 25,266 g m-2 d-1 in burned plots that received one or more treatments consisting of herbicide application, seeding with a rangeland drill, or chaining following aerial seeding (n=12). Fluxes have been highly contingent on landscape setting and surficial soil properties, with maximum fluxes recorded in settings characterized by a high degree of connectivity with upwind sources of unstable fine sands that abrade the surface, dislodge downwind soil particles, and contribute to positive feedbacks that generate avalanches of wind erosion. Nonlinear patterns of wind erosion attributable to this fetch effect highlight the profound importance of soil properties and landscape setting as spatial factors to be considered in evaluating risks of alternative post-fire rehabilitation strategies. During the Mar-Jul 2010 period, average dust flux had declined by

  1. Anticipating Terrorist Safe Havens from Instability Induced Conflict

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shearer, Robert; Marvin, Brett

    This chapter presents recent methods developed at the Center for Army Analysis to classify patterns of nation-state instability that lead to conflict. The ungoverned areas endemic to failed nation-states provide terrorist organizations with safe havens from which to plan and execute terrorist attacks. Identification of those states at risk for instability induced conflict should help to facilitate effective counter terrorism policy planning efforts. Nation-states that experience instability induced conflict are similar in that they share common instability factors that make them susceptible to experiencing conflict. We utilize standard pattern classification algorithms to identify these patterns. First, we identify features (political, military, economic and social) that capture the instability of a nation-state. Second, we forecast the future levels of these features for each nation-state. Third, we classify each future state’s conflict potential based upon the conflict level of those states in the past most similar to the future state.

  2. Operation Safe Haven: the needs of nurses caring for refugees.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Rhonda; Emrys, Elisabeth; Finney Lamb, Cathryn; Eagar, Sandy; Smith, Mitchell

    2003-06-01

    Nurses played a significant role in providing care to Kosovar and East Timorese refugees at the East Hills Reception Centre in Sydney, Australia, during Operation Safe Haven in 1999-2000. To ascertain the needs of nurses in this setting, 13 nurses participated in two focus group interviews, and two in-depth interviews were conducted with nursing managers. Qualitative thematic analysis was conducted on the resulting transcripts. Nurses reported that, overall, they had the necessary clinical skills but needed specific refugee health profiles and training in culturally competent and trauma-sensitive care. The nurses experienced trauma-related, cultural, environmental and role-related stressors. They used a variety of informal psychosocial supports but reported the need for ongoing counselling and debriefing. While clinical skills were considered important, nurses identified other factors as having more impact on their ability to provide comprehensive care for traumatized refugees, particularly their role as client advocates. PMID:12801250

  3. Work plan : targeted investigation to assess current conditions associated with the carbon tetrachloride plume downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility at Milford, Nebraska.

    SciTech Connect

    LaFreniere, L. M.; Environmental Science Division

    2008-07-09

    The Commodity Credit Corporation of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (CCC/USDA) formerly operated a grain storage facility at Milford, Nebraska. In May 2008, the CCC/USDA directed the Environmental Science Division of Argonne National Laboratory, as its technical consultant, to develop a work plan for a targeted investigation at the Milford site. The purpose of the targeted investigation is to assess the current extent and configuration of the carbon tetrachloride plume downgradient from the former CCC/USDA facility and proximal to the banks of the Big Blue River, which borders the area of concern to the east, southeast, and northeast. In 1995, carbon tetrachloride contamination was detected by the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services in a private drinking water well and a livestock well 1.25 mi south of Milford (Figure 1.1). The Trojan drinking water well is located directly downgradient (approximately 300 ft east) of the former CCC/USDA facility. Low levels of carbon tetrachloride contamination were also found in the Troyer livestock well, approximately 1,200 ft north of the former CCC/USDA facility.

  4. Investigating driver willingness to drive through flooded waterways.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Marti; Hamilton, Kyra

    2014-11-01

    Approximately 40% of all drowning deaths involve a motor vehicle. Regardless of its significance as a cause of flood-related mortality, there is continued prevalence of driving through flooded waterways in Australia and worldwide. We aimed to understand the motivational determinates of driving through flooded waterways in low and high-risk scenarios by utilizing an augmented theory of planned behaviour (TPB) with behavioural willingness as the outcome variable as well as the influence of additional predictors; namely perceived risk and past behaviour. Participants (n=174; Mage=27.43, SD=10.76) answered standard TPB-based questions in regards to attitudes, subjective norm, and perceived behavioural control (PBC), as well as additional variables of perceived risk (i.e., perceived susceptibility and perceived severity) and past behaviour. Support was found for the augmented TPB as attitude, subjective norm, and PBC predicted behavioural willingness. Support was also found for perceived severity in the high-risk but not the low-risk scenario. No support was found for perceived susceptibility. Past behaviour emerged as a significant predictor of willingness in the low and high-risk scenario. The findings provide support for an augmented TPB in understanding individuals' willingness to drive through flooded waterways, suggesting that a multi-strategy approach may be critical in attempts to reduce the incidence of such risky driving behaviour. PMID:25128902

  5. Hydrogeological and geotechnical aspects of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryan, Jack H.

    1985-03-01

    The Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway is in the East Gulf Coastal Plain physiographic province The River and Canal sections were constructed on the floodplain of the Tombigbee River Locks and dams in this section are founded on sediments of Upper Cretaceous age, composed predominantly of sands, clays, and silts of the Eutaw and Gordo formations The 39-mile long Divide Cut was excavated through higher topography which is underlain by these same formations, along with the McShan formation of similar character Bay Springs Lock and Dam, at the south end of the Divide Cut, is founded on shale of the Hartselle formation, which is Mississippian in age Comprehensive studies and tests were made to evaluate and monitor potential impacts of the waterway on the hydrogeologic environment Observations to date show that adverse impacts are very minimal overall, and these are partially offset by beneficial effects Geologic and groundwater conditions were primary factors in the location and design of major features of the waterway During construction, extensive control of groundwater and dewatering effort was required The excavation, utilization, and disposal of over 200 million cubic yards of material, construction of 10 locks and dams, and over 80 miles of canal were accomplished essentially as planned and designed within budget and ahead of schedule

  6. Biogeochemical Approaches to Assess PAH Pollution in an Urban Waterway.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Xianhao; Forsythe, Jennifer; Peterkin, Earl

    2015-12-01

    Biogeochemical approaches were applied to enhance the study on polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) pollution in an urban waterway. Chemical characterizations of PAHs in the studied area were identified, geochemical factors were revealed, and related mechanisms were discussed. It was found that, during summer, an early diagenetic process in the sediment could play a major role for the existence of high PAH concentrations, especially high molecular weight PAHs (≥ 4 rings), in the water column and sediment porewater. This effect could vary with tidal cycling, and higher PAH concentration in the water column would be expected during low tide. Other potential pollution sources were also evaluated in the studied creek. Results showed that pyrogenic sources dominated in the creek, generally. Nevertheless, petroleum products from a metal recycling plant could be an important point source to the waterway during wet weather. Comparing with previous studies in other waterways of the same watershed and published literature suggested that the limited toxicity to the ecosystem was only detected in sediments. More information needs to be collected during low tide for a more objective evaluation of PAH toxicity in the creek. PMID:26579786

  7. Pre-freshman enrichment program [University of New Haven

    SciTech Connect

    1997-06-01

    The Connecticut Pre-Engineering Program, Inc. (CPEP), is a collaboration of school districts, businesses, colleges, universities, government and community organizations whose mission and program efforts are aimed at increasing the pool of African-American, Hispanic, Native-American Indian, Asian American, Women and other under-represented minority students who pursue mathematics, science, engineering and other technological based college study and careers. CPEP provides enrichment programs and activities throughout the year in New Haven. Since 1987, CPEP has sponsored summer enrichment programs designed to motivate and stimulate middle school and high school students to pursue careers in mathematics, science, engineering and other technology related fields. Through the Summer Enrichment Program, CPEP has been able to better prepare under-represented and urban students with skills that will facilitate their accessing colleges and professionals careers. The essential premise of the program design and academic content is that targeted students must be taught and nurtured as to develop their self-confidence and personal ambitions so that they can seriously plan for and commit to college-level studies. The program stresses multi-disciplinary hands-on science and mathematics experience, group learning and research, and career exploration and academic guidance. Students study under the direction of school teachers and role model undergraduate students. Weekly field trips to industrial sites, science centers and the shoreline are included in this program.

  8. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven Curriculum and Educational Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilton, Sheena; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven is a program which aims at encouraging middle school girls to pursue careers in science. To accomplish this goal, each day at GSI features a different area of science; ``the material world,'' ``the chemical world,'' and ``the electromagnetic world'' are examples of the sessions held during the past two years. Every session features a short explanation of the science topic given by a volunteer and a variety of hands-on activities, which allow the girls to experiment with and absorb the concepts presented in the short presentations. Activities are selected based on their ability to visualize the concepts under study. The education philosophy of GSI is that if the students have the opportunity to perform science experiments themselves, rather than just watching others do it, and enjoy performing these experiments, then the students will be more confident in their ability to succeed in a scientific field. Thus, in addition to encouraging girls to learn as much science as they can, the volunteers work to ensure that the girls enjoy the program as well. By giving the girls the opportunity to explore science in a fun and exciting way, the girls begin to see themselves as capable of becoming scientists and are more inclined to pursue science in the future.

  9. Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven: Evaluating the Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knodell, Claire; Fleming, Bonnie

    2009-05-01

    Girls' Science Investigations (GSI) New Haven seeks to empower the girls of today to shape the science of tomorrow. Funded by the NSF and Yale University and held at Yale, this program was designed to motivate, empower, and interest middle school girls in developing the skills required to pursue a career in science during a day-long investigation of the session's featured topic in science. Yale students and female professors act as mentors and guide younger girls through an environment for understanding and exploring various disciplines of science through hands-on activities in a laboratory setting. GSI strives to close the gap between males and females one action-packed Saturday at a time. This paper evaluates the success of the program. Student participant evaluations over the past 2 years coupled with student testimony and GSI coordinator, instructors', and volunteers' interviews allowed for an analysis of GSI's ability to inspire girls to pursue careers in science. The data indicates that a majority of girls who attended the program were more inclined to continue their study of science. The positive results are detailed in the following paper which points to the hands-on activities and enthusiasm of instructors as integral to the program's success.

  10. An overview of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, Samuel R.

    1985-03-01

    When the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway of Mississippi and Alabama opened to commercial and recreational traffic on January 16, 1985—some 21 months ahead of schedule—it signaled the completion of the largest Army Corps of Engineers Civil Works project ever undertaken, and perhaps the last of its kind After more than a century of studies and re-studies and major funding battles in Congress, the Tennessee-Tombigbee construction faced, predictably, great opposition on environmental grounds The first major project to be completed under the National Environmental Policy Act, it brought environmental design to the same level of prominence as engineering design.

  11. New Haven Promise: An Early Look at College Preparation, Access, and Enrollment of New Haven Public School Students (2010-2013). Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Bozick, Robert; Daugherty, Lindsay; Scherer, Ethan; Singh, Reema; Suárez, Mónica Jacobo; Ryan, Sarah; Schweig, Jonathan

    2013-01-01

    In New Haven, stakeholders looking to enhance the city's economic development, attract more residents, reduce crime and incarceration, and improve residents' quality of life embarked on a new scholarship program that seeks to build a college-going culture for local students and the community as an avenue to achieve these goals. Recognizing that…

  12. Transforming an Urban Public School District: Tracking the Progress of New Haven Public Schools' Educational Reforms and the New Haven Promise Scholarship Program. Brief

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez, Gabriella C.; Bozick, Robert; Daugherty, Lindsay; Scherer, Ethan; Singh, Reema; Suarez, Monica; Ryan, Sarah; Schweig, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    New Haven Public Schools (NHPS) is an urban school district in Connecticut serving approximately 21,000 students in 46 schools, with nine high schools. Concerned that only about one-half of its students were meeting state proficiency standards in reading and math tests or graduating within four years of starting high school, NHPS and the City of…

  13. 75 FR 24740 - Recovery Policy RP9523.5, Debris Removal From Waterways

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Federal Emergency Management Agency Recovery Policy RP9523.5, Debris Removal From Waterways AGENCY... notice of the availability of the final Recovery Policy RP9523.5, Debris Removal from Waterways....

  14. CHANNEL EVOLUTION AND EROSION IN PAM-TREATED AND UNTREATED EXPERIMENTAL WATERWAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unprotected earthen waterways (e.g. grassed waterway before vegetation) and ephemeral gullies are prone to severe erosion. Previous research has suggested that polyacrylamide (PAM) may reduce erosion in areas of concentrated flow. This research tested the hypothesis that a PAM-treated channel would ...

  15. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the...

  16. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the...

  17. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the...

  18. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the...

  19. 33 CFR 209.180 - Temporary closure of waterway to navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Temporary closure of waterway to navigation. 209.180 Section 209.180 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE... navigation. (a) When an application is received for the temporary closure of a waterway for the...

  20. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable...

  1. 26 CFR 48.4042-3 - Certain types of commercial waterway transportation excluded.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... “voyage” means a round trip voyage. Therefore, if a vessel travels into the specified waterway system to... a vessel loaded with cargo travels into the specified waterway system with a draft sufficient to... ocean-going carriers solely to pick up or deliver international cargos. The tax exemption provided...

  2. 77 FR 75602 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-21

    ..., mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North Carolina. The safety zone extension will temporarily restrict vessel... 133 Fixed Bridge crossing the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 311.8, at Oak Island, North... Intracoastal Waterway crossing, mile 311.8, Oak Island, North Carolina. The notification requirement will...

  3. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable...

  4. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable...

  5. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable...

  6. 33 CFR 329.7 - Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Intrastate or interstate nature of waterway. 329.7 Section 329.7 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF... or interstate nature of waterway. A waterbody may be entirely within a state, yet still be capable...

  7. 77 FR 12994 - Safety Zone for Margate Bridge, Intracoastal Waterway; Margate, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone for Margate Bridge, Intracoastal Waterway... ensure safety while the Margate Bridge undergoes repairs, specifically a high priority fender system...: Sec. 165.T05-0096 Safety Zone for Margate Bridge, Intracoastal Waterway; Margate, NJ. (a)...

  8. 33 CFR 165.T05-1082 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Wrightsville Beach, NC. 165.T05-1082 Section 165.T05-1082 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  9. 33 CFR 165.T05-0741 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Carolina Beach, NC. 165.T05-0741 Section 165.T05-0741 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY REGULATED NAVIGATION AREAS AND LIMITED ACCESS AREAS...

  10. 76 FR 75505 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), Belle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-02

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers... the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), mile 3.8, at Belle Chasse,...

  11. 76 FR 76640 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), Belle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-08

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: In FR Vol. 76, No. 232, USCG 2011-0959, appearing on page 75507 in the issue of... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers..., Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), Belle Chasse, LA. That publication contained...

  12. 76 FR 73998 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), Belle...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-30

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers... Waterway (Algiers Alternate Route), mile 3.8, at Belle Chasse, Plaquemines Parish, Louisiana....

  13. 33 CFR 207.187 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations. 207.187 Section 207.187 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.187 Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.;...

  14. 33 CFR 207.187 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations. 207.187 Section 207.187 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.187 Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.;...

  15. 33 CFR 207.187 - Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.; special floodgate, lock and navigation regulations. 207.187 Section 207.187 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.187 Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Tex.;...

  16. 77 FR 64411 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Wrightsville Beach, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-22

    ...), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of deviation from drawbridge regulation.... 74 Bridge across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, NC. The... Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW) mile 283.1, at Wrightsville Beach, NC has a vertical clearance of 20 feet,...

  17. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  18. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  19. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  20. 33 CFR 165.806 - Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas-regulated navigation area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas... § 165.806 Sabine Neches Waterway, Texas—regulated navigation area. (a) The following is a regulated... thereto. (b) Unless otherwise authorized by the Captain of the Port, Port Arthur, Texas, tows on a...

  1. 76 FR 34848 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Elizabeth River, Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-15

    ... Waterway (AIWW), Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, VA'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 69879) and a notice... Waterway (AIWW), Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, VA'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 69906). We received... Bridge both open on the hour costing vessel traffic an extra hour. Even sailboats could make both...

  2. 75 FR 66306 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Little Rock, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-28

    ... Register (75 FR 105). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway... Baring Cross Railroad Drawbridge across the Arkansas Waterway at Mile 119.6 at Little Rock,...

  3. 76 FR 37700 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-28

    ... notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316... Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle Beach Triathlon. The Myrtle Beach...

  4. 75 FR 36313 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine Bluff, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-25

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Pine... proposes that operating procedures on the Rob Roy Drawbridge across the Arkansas Waterway at mile 67.4...

  5. 76 FR 79534 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW), Atlantic City, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ...) entitled Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW), Atlantic City, NJ in the Federal Register (76 FR 50161). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting... Waterway (NJICW), Atlantic City, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast...

  6. 75 FR 69906 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Elizabeth River, Southern...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-16

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008 issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... Waterway (AIWW), Elizabeth River, Southern Branch, VA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed... on navigation. This NPRM has been coordinated with the main commercial waterway user...

  7. 77 FR 1431 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Camp Lejeune, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-10

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Camp... proposes establishing a safety zone on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW) adjacent to Marine...

  8. 75 FR 30750 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway, Little Rock, AR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ... notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Arkansas Waterway... Waterway at mile 119.6 at Little Rock, AR, so that vessel operators will contact the remote...

  9. 75 FR 69371 - Safety Zone; Beaufort River/Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-12

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... Waterway, Beaufort, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY: The Coast... Intracoastal Waterway, South Carolina during the construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge,...

  10. 77 FR 5398 - Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Vicinity of Marine Corps Base, Camp Lejeune, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-03

    ... FR 1431). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and none was... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Vicinity of... Coast Guard is establishing a safety zone on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW) adjacent...

  11. 76 FR 5267 - Safety Zone; Beaufort River/Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Beaufort, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-31

    ... the Federal Register (75 FR 69371). We received two comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting... Waterway, Beaufort, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. ] SUMMARY: The Coast Guard... Waterway, South Carolina during construction and expansion of the J.E. McTeer Bridge, also referred to...

  12. 77 FR 14321 - Safety Zone; Myrtle Beach Triathlon, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-09

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... Intracoastal Waterway, Myrtle Beach, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... Waterway in Myrtle Beach, South Carolina during the Myrtle Beach Triathlon. The Myrtle Beach...

  13. 77 FR 22492 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-16

    ... Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR... Inland Waterway from East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION... regulations with the commercial and recreational waterway users that normally transit the bridge. Users of...

  14. CHANNEL EVOLUTION AND EROSION IN PAM-TREATED AND UNTREATED EXPERIMENTAL WATERWAYS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Unprotected earthen waterways (e.g., grassed waterways before vegetation) and ephemeral gullies are prone to severe erosion. Previous research has suggested that polyacrylamide (PAM) may reduce erosion in areas of concentrated flow. This research tested the hypothesis that a PAM-treated channel woul...

  15. Salmonella enterica Diversity in Central Californian Coastal Waterways

    PubMed Central

    Walters, Sarah P.; González-Escalona, Narjol; Son, Insook; Melka, David C.; Sassoubre, Lauren M.

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is one of the most important bacterial enteric pathogens worldwide. However, little is known about its distribution and diversity in the environment. The present study explored the diversity of 104 strains of Salmonella enterica isolated over 2 years from 12 coastal waterways in central California. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and multilocus sequence typing were used to probe species diversity. Seventy-four PFGE patterns and 38 sequence types (STs) were found, including 18 newly described STs. Nineteen of 25 PFGE patterns were indistinguishable from those of clinical isolates in PulseNet. The most common ST was consistent with S. enterica serovar Typhimurium, and other frequently detected STs were associated with the serovars Heidelberg and Enteritidis; all of these serovars are important etiologies of salmonellosis. An investigation into S. enterica biogeography was conducted at the level of ST and subspecies. At the ST and subspecies level, we found a taxon-time relationship but no taxon-area or taxon-environmental distance relationships. STs collected during wet versus dry conditions tended to be more similar; however, STs collected from waterways adjacent to watersheds with similar land covers did not tend to be similar. The results suggest that the lack of dispersal limitation may be an important factor affecting the diversity of S. enterica in the region. PMID:23624479

  16. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal). 162.40 Section 162.40 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS...

  17. 76 FR 14279 - Safety Zone; Todd Pacific Shipyards Vessel Roll-Out, West Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-16

    ..., West Duwamish Waterway, Seattle, WA AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. ] SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing a temporary safety zone in the West Duwamish Waterway in Seattle... Shipyards is conducting a vessel roll-out in the West Duwamish Waterway in Seattle, Washington on April...

  18. 33 CFR 162.75 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries, South and Southwest Passes and... WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 162.75 All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the... waters of the U.S. tributary to or connected by other waterways with the Gulf of Mexico between St....

  19. ORNL Trusted Corridors Project: Watts Bar Dam Inland Waterway Project

    SciTech Connect

    Walker, Randy M; Gross, Ian G; Smith, Cyrus M; Hill, David E

    2011-11-01

    Radiation has existed everywhere in the environment since the Earth's formation - in rocks, soil, water, and plants. The mining and processing of naturally occurring radioactive materials for use in medicine, power generation, consumer products, and industry inevitably generate emissions and waste. Radiological measuring devices have been used by industry for years to measure for radiation in undesired locations or simply identify radioactive materials. Since the terrorist attacks on the United States on 9-11-01 these radiation measuring devices have proliferated in many places in our nation's commerce system. DOE, TVA, the Army Corps and ORNL collaborated to test the usefulness of these devices in our nation's waterway system on this project. The purpose of the Watts Bar Dam ORNL Trusted Corridors project was to investigate the security, safety and enforcement needs of local, state and federal government entities for state-of-the-art sensor monitoring in regards to illegal cargo including utilization of the existing infrastructure. TVA's inland waterways lock system is a recognized and accepted infrastructure by the commercial carrier industry. Safety Monitoring activities included tow boat operators, commercial barges and vessels, recreational watercraft and their cargo, identification of unsafe vessels and carriers, and, monitoring of domestic and foreign commercial vessels and cargo identification. Safety Enforcement activities included cargo safety, tracking, identification of hazardous materials, waterway safety regulations, and hazardous materials regulations. Homeland Security and Law Enforcement Applications included Radiological Dispersive Devices (RDD) identification, identification of unsafe or illicit transport of hazardous materials including chemicals and radiological materials, and screening for shipments of illicit drugs. In the Fall of 2005 the SensorNet funding for the project expired. After several unsuccessful attempts to find a Federal sponsor

  20. Cruel wars and safe havens: humanitarian aid in Liberia 1989-1996.

    PubMed

    Outram, Q

    1997-09-01

    This article considers the role of military intervention by peace-keeping and peace-enforcement troops in the provision of humanitarian aid to Liberia during the armed conflicts of the past seven years. The article focuses on the role of the de facto safe haven which peace-keeping and enforcing troops protected in Liberia between 1990 and 1996 and puts the Liberian case in the context of the growing debate about the usefulness of military interventions in humanitarian emergencies. It argues that the safe haven has enabled significant humanitarian achievements but has also demonstrated fundamental failures. Central to these failures have been the absence of consent, under-resourcing and a loss of control of the safe haven to factional interests. PMID:9301136

  1. Mapping of Escherichia coli Sources Connected to Waterways in the Ruamahanga Catchment, New Zealand.

    PubMed

    Dymond, John R; Serezat, Dimitri; Ausseil, Anne-Gaelle E; Muirhead, Richard W

    2016-02-16

    Rivers and streams in New Zealand are natural with free access and used by many people for swimming and fishing. However, pastoral farming with free grazing animals is a common land use in New Zealand and faecal microorganisms from them often end up in waterways. These microorganisms can seriously affect human and animal health if ingested. This paper describes spatial modeling using GIS of Escherichia coli sources in a large catchment (350 000 ha), the Ruamahanga. By examining the pathway of water over and through soils, it is possible to determine whether E. coli sources are connected to waterways or not. The map of E. coli sources connected to waterways provides useful context to those setting water quality limits. This approach avoids the complexity of modeling the fate and transport of E. coli in waterways, yet still permits the assessment of catchment-wide mitigation and best management practice. Fencing of waterways would minimize E. coli sources directly defecated to water and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 35%. Introduction of dung beetles would minimize sources connected to waterways by overland flow and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 35%. Construction of dairy effluent ponds would minimize sources connected to waterways through high bypass flow in soils and would reduce total E. coli sources by approximately 25%. PMID:26771227

  2. Safe-haven laws focus on abandoned newborns and their mothers.

    PubMed

    Kunkel, Katherine A

    2007-10-01

    In the United States, 47 states have safe-haven laws that allow a mother to relinquish her newborn infant at a hospital emergency department or a manned fire station and maintain her anonymity. In addition to anonymity, immunity from prosecution is given to the mother, provided the relinquished newborn is unharmed and meets the age specified by the state's law. This article describes safe-haven laws and how they developed, barriers to successful use, nursing implications, and the nurse's role in increasing public awareness and influencing legislative policy. PMID:17889732

  3. Significance of Waterway Navigation Positioning Systems On Ship's Manoeuvring Safety

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galor, W.

    The main goal of navigation is to lead the ship to the point of destination safety and efficiently. Various factors may affect ship realisating this process. The ship movement on waterway are mainly limited by water area dimensions (surface and depth). These limitations cause the requirement to realise the proper of ship movement trajectory. In case when this re requirement cant't fulfil then marine accident may happend. This fact is unwanted event caused losses of human health and life, damage or loss of cargo and ship, pollution of natural environment, damage of port structures or blocking the port of its ports and lost of salvage operation. These losses in same cases can be catas- trophical especially while e.i. crude oil spilling could be place. To realise of safety navigation process is needed to embrace the ship's movement trajectory by waterways area. The ship's trajectory is described by manoeuvring lane as a surface of water area which is require to realise of safety ship movement. Many conditions affect to ship manoeuvring line. The main are following: positioning accuracy, ship's manoeuvring features and phenomena's of shore and ship's bulk common affecting. The accuracy of positioning system is most important. This system depends on coast navigation mark- ing which can range many kinds of technical realisation. Mainly used systems based on lights (line), radionavigation (local system or GPS, DGPS), or radars. If accuracy of positiong is higer, then safety of navigation is growing. This article presents these problems exemplifying with approaching channel to ports situated on West Pomera- nian water region.

  4. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented as a stereo anaglyph to show the scene three-dimensionally when viewed through red-blue glasses (with the red lens on the left).

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the

  5. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented in exaggerated color to enhance color differences among rocks, soils and sand.

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of

  6. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented in approximately true color.

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of the panorama, and that image will be released on

  7. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Color Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA01905

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA01905

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented as a stereo anaglyph to show the scene three-dimensionally when viewed through red-blue glasses (with the red lens on the left).

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest

  8. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Color Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Left-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA01905

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Right-eye view of a stereo pair for PIA01905

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented as a stereo anaglyph to show the scene three-dimensionally when viewed through red-blue glasses (with the red lens on the left).

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest

  9. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (Stereo)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented as a stereo anaglyph to show the scene three-dimensionally when viewed through red-blue glasses (with the red lens on the left).

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the

  10. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented in exaggerated color to enhance color differences among rocks, soils and sand.

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of

  11. 'McMurdo' Panorama from Spirit's 'Winter Haven'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This 360-degree view, called the 'McMurdo' panorama, comes from the panoramic camera (Pancam) on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit. From April through October 2006, Spirit has stayed on a small hill known as 'Low Ridge.' There, the rover's solar panels are tilted toward the sun to maintain enough solar power for Spirit to keep making scientific observations throughout the winter on southern Mars. This view of the surroundings from Spirit's 'Winter Haven' is presented in approximately true color.

    Oct. 26, 2006, marks Spirit's 1,000th sol of what was planned as a 90-sol mission. (A sol is a Martian day, which lasts 24 hours, 39 minutes, 35 seconds). The rover has lived through the most challenging part of its second Martian winter. Its solar power levels are rising again. Spring in the southern hemisphere of Mars will begin in early 2007. Before that, the rover team hopes to start driving Spirit again toward scientifically interesting places in the 'Inner Basin' and 'Columbia Hills' inside Gusev crater. The McMurdo panorama is providing team members with key pieces of scientific and topographic information for choosing where to continue Spirit's exploration adventure.

    The Pancam began shooting component images of this panorama during Spirit's sol 814 (April 18, 2006) and completed the part shown here on sol 932 (Aug. 17, 2006). The panorama was acquired using all 13 of the Pancam's color filters, using lossless compression for the red and blue stereo filters, and only modest levels of compression on the remaining filters. The overall panorama consists of 1,449 Pancam images and represents a raw data volume of nearly 500 megabytes. It is thus the largest, highest-fidelity view of Mars acquired from either rover. Additional photo coverage of the parts of the rover deck not shown here was completed on sol 980 (Oct. 5 , 2006). The team is completing the processing and mosaicking of those final pieces of the panorama, and that image will be released on

  12. Innovation and Change in American Education. Kensington Revisited: A Fifteen Year Follow-Up of an Innovative Elementary School and Its Faculty. Volume I--Chronicling the Milford School District: An Historical Context of the Kensington School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    This first volume of a six-volume study details the historical context of a particular school district (code-named "Milford") in order to examine the genesis and evolution of American education. The study's key research documents were the district school board's official minutes; additional modes of inquiry included participant observation,…

  13. Innovation and Change in American Education. Kensington Revisited: A Fifteen Year Follow-Up of an Innovative Elementary School and Its Faculty. Volume II--Milford's Recent History: The School District as Contemporary Context of the Kensington School. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Louis M.; And Others

    This second volume of a six-volume study updates and concludes the description of the historical development of a school district code-named "Milford," presented in volume I. Board minutes remain the primary source of data with increasing amounts of information from public documents, interviews, and observation of meetings. Following a brief…

  14. 76 FR 36314 - Safety Zone; Mile Marker 98.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway AGENCY: Coast Guard... imposing restrictions on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) between West Harvey Lock Gulf West (WHL... safety zone imposing restrictions on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (GIWW) between West Harvey Lock...

  15. 75 FR 1738 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-13

    ..., issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting... in effect year round. As a result, the Coast Guard implemented a temporary test deviation (74 FR... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven...

  16. An Idea Whose Time Had Come: Negotiating Teacher Evaluation Reform in New Haven, Connecticut

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donaldson, Morgaen L.; Papay, John P.

    2015-01-01

    This article examines New Haven (Connecticut) Public Schools' efforts to create a new teacher evaluation model in a collaborative manner. Based on semistructured interviews with nearly 100 educators, we develop a case study charting the progress of the new system, TEVAL, from an initial concept through early implementation. We find that John…

  17. Course Outlines in Business of the Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    The Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program was developed and implemented by students, faculty, and administrators over the three-year period from 1971 to 1974. The program offers high school students who complete graduation requirements in the first three years of the four-year program a combination of the following options for the senior year:…

  18. Course Outlines in Science of the Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    The Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program was developed and implemented by students, faculty, and administrators over the three-year period from 1971 to 1974. The program offers high school students who complete graduation requirements in the first three years of the four-year program a combination of the following options for the senior year:…

  19. THE SCHOOLS AND URBAN RENEWAL, A CASE STUDY FROM NEW HAVEN.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    FERRER, TERRY

    THE SPECIFIC ARCHITECTURAL PLANS FOR NEW SCHOOLS TO BE BUILT AS PART OF AN URBAN RENEWAL PROJECT IN NEW HAVEN ARE BRIEFLY DISCUSSED. OVER A 9-YEAR PERIOD 14 OBSOLETE SCHOOLS WILL BE REPLACED, TWO OTHERS AND ONE ANNEX WILL BE ABANDONED, AND 15 NEW SCHOOLS WILL BE BUILT. THESE CHANGES WILL BE BROUGHT ABOUT THROUGH COOPERATIVE PLANNING AMONG CITY…

  20. 77 FR 75917 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-26

    ... Operation Regulation; New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT,'' in the Federal Register (75 FR..., Quinnipiac and Mill Rivers, CT AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking; Reopening... Privacy Act notice regarding our public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the (73 FR 3316)....

  1. A Resource Compendium and Profile of the Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1975

    The Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program encourages high school students to complete graduation requirements early enough to leave the senior year free for relaxed investigation of a number of topics through elective courses and independent study. The incorporation of such concepts as open-space teaching, the open campus, work experience…

  2. Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program. Final Project Report [and] Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kinney, John F., Jr.; And Others

    The Senior Elective Program at New Jersey's Rumson-Fair Haven Regional High School was designed by eighteen students and six faculty members during the summer of 1971. Initiated to update curriculum to complement an open-space building exclusively for seniors, it included revamping the school calendar from four to five marking periods. Students…

  3. 77 FR 25740 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-01

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT... History has completed an inventory of human remains in consultation with the appropriate Indian tribes and... human remains may contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of the human...

  4. 78 FR 19302 - Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-29

    ... National Park Service Notice of Inventory Completion: Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History, New Haven, CT... History has completed an inventory of human remains and associated funerary objects, in consultation with... funerary objects may contact the Yale Peabody Museum of Natural History. Repatriation of the human...

  5. 40 CFR 81.26 - Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.26 Section 81.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING...

  6. 40 CFR 81.26 - Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.26 Section 81.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING PURPOSES Designation of Air Quality Control Regions...

  7. 40 CFR 81.26 - Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.26 Section 81.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING...

  8. 40 CFR 81.26 - Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 17 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.26 Section 81.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING...

  9. 40 CFR 81.26 - Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Hartford-New Haven-Springfield Interstate Air Quality Control Region. 81.26 Section 81.26 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) DESIGNATION OF AREAS FOR AIR QUALITY PLANNING...

  10. Course Outlines in Social Studies of the Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    The Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program was developed and implemented by students, faculty, and administrators over the three-year period from 1971 to 1974. The program offers high school students who complete graduation requirements in the first three years of the four-year program a combination of the following options for the senior year:…

  11. 78 FR 56745 - Bradley D. Bastow, D. O., South Haven, Michigan; Confirmatory Order Modifying License

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-13

    ... accordance with the NRC E-Filing rule (72 FR 49139, August 28, 2007). The E-Filing process requires... COMMISSION [Docket No. 030-35710; License No. 21-32316-01; EA-13-025; NRC-2013- 0208] Bradley D. Bastow, D. O., South Haven, Michigan; Confirmatory Order Modifying License I Bradley D. Bastow, D. O., (Dr. Bastow...

  12. Course Outlines in Industrial Arts of the Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    The Rumson-Fair Haven Senior Elective Program was developed and implemented by students, faculty, and administrators over the three-year period from 1971 to 1974. The program offers high school students who complete graduation requirements in the first three years of the four-year program a combination of the following options for the senior year:…

  13. Bedrock geology and outcrop fracture trends in the vicinity of the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Burton, William C.; Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site consists of an eastward-directed plume of volatile organic compounds, principally tetrachloroethylene (PCE), in alluvium and glacial sand and gravel in the Souhegan River valley, just south of the river and about 4 kilometers west of the town of Milford, New Hampshire. Sampling of monitoring wells at the site has helped delineate the extent of the plume and has determined that some contaminant has migrated into the underlying crystalline bedrock, including bedrock north of the river within 200 meters of a nearby residential development that was constructed in 1999. Borehole geophysical logging has identified a northeast preferential trend for bedrock fractures, which may provide a pathway for the migration of contaminant under and north of the Souhegan River. The current study investigates the bedrock geologic setting for the site, including its position relative to known regional geologic structures, and compiles new strike and dip measurements of joints in exposed bedrock to determine if there are dominant trends in orientation similar to what was found in the boreholes. The site is located on the northwestern limb of a northeast-trending regional anticlinorium that is southeast of the Campbell Hill fault zone. The Campbell Hill fault zone defines the contact between granite and gneiss of the anticlinorium and granite and schist to the northwest and is locally marked by lenses of massive vein quartz, minor faults, and fracture zones that could potentially affect plume migration. The fault zone was apparently not intercepted by any of the boreholes that were drilled to delineate the contaminant plume and therefore passes to the north of the northernmost borehole in the vicinity of the new residential area. Joints measured in surface exposures indicate a strong preferred direction of strike to the north-northeast corroborating the borehole data and previous outcrop and geophysical studies. The north-northeast preferred

  14. 77 FR 4247 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and Biscayne Bay, Miami, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-27

    ...), mile 1088.6, across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; and the Venetian Causeway Bridge (East), across... (West), mile 1088.6. The vertical clearance of the Venetian Causeway Bridge (West), across the...

  15. 76 FR 40617 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Near Hackberry, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-11

    ....8 west of Harvey Lock, near Hackberry, Calcasieu Parish, Louisiana. This deviation is necessary to... bridge on the SR 27 (Ellender Ferry) across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, mile 243.8, west of...

  16. Chemical analysis of sediment cores from the East Waterway (Everett, Washington). Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Crecelius, E.A.; Bloom, N.S.; Gurtisen, J.M.

    1984-06-01

    Chemical data for two sediment cores from the East Waterway of Everett, Washington, indicate that 20 to 30 cm of contaminated sediments are accumulating per year. The concentrations of several heavy metals (Pb, Hg and Cu), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and petroleum hydrocarbons increase with depth in the sediments suggesting contamination of this waterway has varied by as much as a factor of 10 during the last 5 years. 7 references, 9 figures, 12 tables.

  17. Comparison of Multi-Scale Digital Elevation Models for Defining Waterways and Catchments Over Large Areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, B.; McDougall, K.; Barry, M.

    2012-07-01

    Digital Elevation Models (DEMs) allow for the efficient and consistent creation of waterways and catchment boundaries over large areas. Studies of waterway delineation from DEMs are usually undertaken over small or single catchment areas due to the nature of the problems being investigated. Improvements in Geographic Information Systems (GIS) techniques, software, hardware and data allow for analysis of larger data sets and also facilitate a consistent tool for the creation and analysis of waterways over extensive areas. However, rarely are they developed over large regional areas because of the lack of available raw data sets and the amount of work required to create the underlying DEMs. This paper examines definition of waterways and catchments over an area of approximately 25,000 km2 to establish the optimal DEM scale required for waterway delineation over large regional projects. The comparative study analysed multi-scale DEMs over two test areas (Wivenhoe catchment, 543 km2 and a detailed 13 km2 within the Wivenhoe catchment) including various data types, scales, quality, and variable catchment input parameters. Historic and available DEM data was compared to high resolution Lidar based DEMs to assess variations in the formation of stream networks. The results identified that, particularly in areas of high elevation change, DEMs at 20 m cell size created from broad scale 1:25,000 data (combined with more detailed data or manual delineation in flat areas) are adequate for the creation of waterways and catchments at a regional scale.

  18. Waterway-View Imaging with a Small Unmanned Surface System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, S. N.; Peschel, J.

    2015-12-01

    This research investigated the use of a small unmanned surface system (USS) for waterway-view imaging in an intensively managed agricultural landscape. Tile drains commonly dewater landscapes into drainage tributaries so that land uses such as agricultural production can occur. The outlets of tile drain networks, which contribute to the water balance in a river network, are often located on private property and in most instances cannot be readily cataloged. Remote sensing presents one option for identifying tile drain networks but vegetation and other topographic occlusions may obstruct identification. This work presents a case study in the Upper Sangamon River Basin in East-Central Illinois for the use of a small USS utilizing visual sensing with a 360-degree camera as an alternative method of mapping agricultural tile drain outlets for improved hydrologic and hydraulic modeling. The results are expected to serve as groundwork for future design and refinement of small unmanned surface vehicles, as well as improved human interfaces for USS, and a foundation for better understanding human-machine interaction in USS applied to agricultural, riparian, and similar domains.

  19. TRACC: Algorithm for Predicting and Tracking Barges on Inland Waterways

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    2010-04-23

    Algorithm developed in this work is used to predict the location and estimate the traveling speed of a barge moving in inland waterway network. Measurements obtained from GPS or other systems are corrupted with measurement noise and reported at large, irregular time intervals. Thus, creating uncertainty about the current location of the barge and minimizing the effectiveness of emergency response activities in case of an accident or act of terrorism. Developing a prediction algorithm becomemore » a non-trivial problem due to estimation of speed becomes challenging, attributed to the complex interactions between multiple systems associated in the process. This software, uses systems approach in modeling the motion dynamics of the barge and estimates the location and speed of the barge at next, user defined, time interval. In this work, first, to estimate the speed a non-linear, stochastic modeling technique was developed that take local variations and interactions existing in the system. Output speed is then used as an observation in a statistically optimal filtering technique, Kalman filter, formulated in state-space to minimize numerous errors observed in the system. The combined system synergistically fuses the local information available with measurements obtained to predict the location and speed of traveling of the barge accurately.« less

  20. TRACC: Algorithm for Predicting and Tracking Barges on Inland Waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Randeniya, Duminda I.B.

    2010-04-23

    Algorithm developed in this work is used to predict the location and estimate the traveling speed of a barge moving in inland waterway network. Measurements obtained from GPS or other systems are corrupted with measurement noise and reported at large, irregular time intervals. Thus, creating uncertainty about the current location of the barge and minimizing the effectiveness of emergency response activities in case of an accident or act of terrorism. Developing a prediction algorithm become a non-trivial problem due to estimation of speed becomes challenging, attributed to the complex interactions between multiple systems associated in the process. This software, uses systems approach in modeling the motion dynamics of the barge and estimates the location and speed of the barge at next, user defined, time interval. In this work, first, to estimate the speed a non-linear, stochastic modeling technique was developed that take local variations and interactions existing in the system. Output speed is then used as an observation in a statistically optimal filtering technique, Kalman filter, formulated in state-space to minimize numerous errors observed in the system. The combined system synergistically fuses the local information available with measurements obtained to predict the location and speed of traveling of the barge accurately.

  1. 33 CFR 165.150 - New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac River, Mill River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... close the RNA for any situation the COTP determines would create an imminent hazard to waterway users in the RNA. Entry into the RNA during temporary closure is prohibited unless authorized by the COTP or... any vessel or equipment within the RNA. To assure wide advance notice of each closure among...

  2. 33 CFR 165.150 - New Haven Harbor, Quinnipiac River, Mill River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... close the RNA for any situation the COTP determines would create an imminent hazard to waterway users in the RNA. Entry into the RNA during temporary closure is prohibited unless authorized by the COTP or... any vessel or equipment within the RNA. To assure wide advance notice of each closure among...

  3. Detection of multi-drug resistant Escherichia coli in the urban waterways of Milwaukee, WI

    PubMed Central

    Kappell, Anthony D.; DeNies, Maxwell S.; Ahuja, Neha H.; Ledeboer, Nathan A.; Newton, Ryan J.; Hristova, Krassimira R.

    2015-01-01

    Urban waterways represent a natural reservoir of antibiotic resistance which may provide a source of transferable genetic elements to human commensal bacteria and pathogens. The objective of this study was to evaluate antibiotic resistance of Escherichia coli isolated from the urban waterways of Milwaukee, WI compared to those from Milwaukee sewage and a clinical setting in Milwaukee. Antibiotics covering 10 different families were utilized to determine the phenotypic antibiotic resistance for all 259 E. coli isolates. All obtained isolates were determined to be multi-drug resistant. The E. coli isolates were also screened for the presence of the genetic determinants of resistance including ermB (macrolide resistance), tet(M) (tetracycline resistance), and β-lactamases (blaOXA, blaSHV, and blaPSE). E. coli from urban waterways showed a greater incidence of antibiotic resistance to 8 of 17 antibiotics tested compared to human derived sources. These E. coli isolates also demonstrated a greater incidence of resistance to higher numbers of antibiotics compared to the human derived isolates. The urban waterways demonstrated a greater abundance of isolates with co-occurrence of antibiotic resistance than human derived sources. When screened for five different antibiotic resistance genes conferring macrolide, tetracycline, and β-lactam resistance, clinical E. coli isolates were more likely to harbor ermB and blaOXA than isolates from urban waterway. These results indicate that Milwaukee’s urban waterways may select or allow for a greater incidence of multiple antibiotic resistance organisms and likely harbor a different antibiotic resistance gene pool than clinical sources. The implications of this study are significant to understanding the presence of resistance in urban freshwater environments by supporting the idea that sediment from urban waterways serves as a reservoir of antibiotic resistance. PMID:25972844

  4. Geohydrology of, and nitrogen and chloride in, the glacial aquifer, Milford-Matamoras area, Pike County, Pennsylvania

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senior, L.A.

    1994-01-01

    The glacial aquifer that underlies the Routes 209 and 6 corridor between Milford and Matamoras, Pa., is one of the most productive in Pike County. The aquifer is comprised of unconsolidated glacial outwash and kame-terrace deposits that lie within a glacially carved valley now occupied by the Delaware River. Most businesses and residences along this narrow, 7-mile-long corridor rely on individual wells for water supply and septic systems for waste-water disposal. A study of nutrients and chloride in ground water in the glacial aquifer was conducted to determine the effect of these constituents contributed from septic systems and road runoff on ground-water quality. Sources of nutrients and chloride in the recharge zone upgradient of the aquifer include road and parking-lot runoff, septic systems, and precipitation. Nitrate and chloride from these sources can infiltrate and move in the direction of ground-water flow in the saturated zone of the aquifer. A water-table map based on 29 water levels measured in August 1991 indicates that the direction of ground-water flow is from the edges of the valley toward t he Delaware River but is nearly parallel to the Delaware River in the central area of the valley. The average concentrations of nitrogen and chloride in recharge and total annual loads of nitrogen and chloride to ground water were estimated for six areas with different population densities. These estimates assumed a recharge rate to the glacial aquifer of 20 inches per year and a 15 percent loss of chloride and nitrogen in the atmospheric precipitation to surface runoff. The estimated average concentration of nitrogen in recharge ranged from 2.5 to 10 mg/L (milligrams per liter), which corresponds to a total annual load of nitrogen as ammonium released from septic tanks and present in precipitation was oxidized to nitrate as the dominant nitrogen species in ground water. Contributions of nitrogen from septic tanks were greater than contributions from runoff

  5. Can a lamb reach a haven before being eaten by diffusing lions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabel, Alan; Majumdar, Satya N.; Panduranga, Nagendra K.; Redner, S.

    2012-05-01

    We study the survival of a single diffusing lamb on the positive half line in the presence of N diffusing lions that all start at the same position L to the right of the lamb and a haven at x = 0. If the lamb reaches this haven before meeting any lion, the lamb survives. We investigate the survival probability of the lamb, SN(x, L), as a function of N and the respective initial positions of the lamb and the lions, x and L. We determine SN(x, L) analytically for the special cases of N = 1 and N\\rightarrow \\infty . For large but finite N, we determine the unusual asymptotic form whose leading behavior is SN(z) ~ N-z2, with z = x/L. Simulations of the capture process very slowly converge to this asymptotic prediction as N reaches 10500.

  6. Operation Safe Haven: an evaluation of health surveillance and monitoring in an acute setting.

    PubMed

    Bennett, C; Mein, J; Beers, M; Harvey, B; Vemulpad, S; Chant, K; Dalton, C

    2000-02-17

    From May to June 1999, 3,920 ethnic Albanians from Kosovo arrived in Australia as part of Operation Safe Haven. These people were evacuated from refugee camps in the former Yugoslav Republic of Macedonia. Initial processing in Australia occurred at East Hills Reception Centre, and accommodation for the duration of stay was provided in eight Haven Centres in five States. The arrival of a large number of refugees in a short time frame is unprecedented in Australia. A health surveillance system was developed and critical health data were collected to assess health status and needs, plan care, monitor for potential outbreaks of communicable diseases, track service use, to meet international reporting requirements and document our response to this crisis. In this article the health surveillance system is evaluated and suggestions are offered for the formulation of specific guidelines necessary for health surveillance in acute settings. PMID:10758691

  7. 78 FR 30385 - Approval of Noise Compatibility Program for Tweed-New Haven Regional Airport

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ...The Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) announces its findings on the noise compatibility program submitted by the Tweed-New Haven Airport Authority under the provisions of Title I of the Aviation Safety and Noise Abatement Act of 1979 (Pub. L. 96-193) and 14 CFR part 150. These findings are made in recognition of the description of federal and non-federal responsibilities in Senate Report......

  8. Analyses of native water and dredged material from southern Louisiana waterways, 1975-76

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.; Higgins, Patricia C.

    1977-01-01

    From June 1975 to July 1976 the U.S. Geological Survey conducted nine dredging and seven postdredging studies related to water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Samples were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Mississippi River at Southwest Pass, Mississippi River at New Orleans, Bayou Rigaud near Grand Isle, Barataria Bay and Waterway, Bayou La Carpe near Houma, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Lower Atchafalaya River area, Intracoastal Waterway near Calumet, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. These studies were conductd to determine potential environmental effects of dredging activities in the waterways. The Geological survey collected, treated, and analyzed 383 water and water-sediment mixture samples from 85 dredging sites and 142 postdredging samples (72 sites). Water samples were collected 100 yards upstream and downstream from the dredge effluent, from the disposal area, and from the effluent outfall during the dredge phase of the study; samples were collected at former dredge sites during the postdredging phase. Samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients, and organic constituents. The analytical data are presented in tables. Sampling sites are shown on maps. (Woodard-USGS)

  9. Analysis of native water, bed material, and elutriate samples of major Louisiana waterways, 1975

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Demas, Charles R.

    1976-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, conducted a series of elutriate studies in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of Louisiana. As defined by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, an elutriate is the supernatant resulting from the vigorous 30-minute shaking of one part bottom sediment from the dredging site with four parts water (vol/vol) collected from the dredging site followed by one hour settling time and appropriate centrifugation and a 0.45-micron filtration. The elutriate studies were initiated to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in selected reaches of Louisiana waterways. The waterways investigated were the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet, Breton Sound, Mississippi River downstream from Baton Rouge, Bayou Long, Intracoastal Waterway (east and west of the Harvey Canal), Three Rivers area, Ouachita River, Barataria Bay, Houma Navigation Canal, Atchafalaya Bay (Ship Channel), Berwick Bay, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), Petite Anse area, and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. The Geological Survey collected 227 samples of native water and bed (bottom) material from 130 different sites. These samples (as well as elutriates prepared from mixtures of native water and bed material) were analyzed for selected metal, pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. An additional 116 bed samples collected at 58 sites were analyzed for selected pesticides; and 4 additional native-water samples from 2 sites were analyzed for selected metal pesticide, nutrient, and organic constituents. (Woodard-USGS)

  10. A Regional Waterway Management System for Balancing Recreational Boating and Resource Protection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swett, Robert A.; Listowski, Charles; Fry, Douglas; Boutelle, Stephen; Fann, David

    2009-06-01

    Florida’s coasts have been transformed over the past three decades as population growth and unprecedented demand for individual shore access to bays and estuaries led to the creation of residential canal developments. Thousands of miles of channels and basins were dredged as a by-product of this urbanization process. The navigable waterways that resulted are now being stressed by increasing boat traffic and canal-side activities. Recognizing their common goal to preserve the recreational and ecological value of southwest Florida waterways, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the four-county West Coast Inland Navigation District, and the University of Florida Sea Grant College Program signed a Memorandum of Agreement. The signatories agreed to develop a science-based Regional Waterway Management System (RWMS), which is a new approach to waterway planning and permitting based on carefully mapped channel depths, a census of actual boat populations, and the spatial extent of natural resources. The RWMS provides a comprehensive, regional overview of channel conditions and the geographic distribution and severity of existing impediments to safe navigation and resource protection. RWMS information and analyses result in regional-scale permitting to accommodate water-dependent uses while minimizing environmental impacts and reducing public expenditures. Compared with traditional approaches to waterway management, the science-based RWMS is relatively unbiased, objective, transparent, ecologically sound, and fiscally prudent.

  11. A regional waterway management system for balancing recreational boating and resource protection.

    PubMed

    Swett, Robert A; Listowski, Charles; Fry, Douglas; Boutelle, Stephen; Fann, David

    2009-06-01

    Florida's coasts have been transformed over the past three decades as population growth and unprecedented demand for individual shore access to bays and estuaries led to the creation of residential canal developments. Thousands of miles of channels and basins were dredged as a by-product of this urbanization process. The navigable waterways that resulted are now being stressed by increasing boat traffic and canal-side activities. Recognizing their common goal to preserve the recreational and ecological value of southwest Florida waterways, the Florida Department of Environmental Protection, the four-county West Coast Inland Navigation District, and the University of Florida Sea Grant College Program signed a Memorandum of Agreement. The signatories agreed to develop a science-based Regional Waterway Management System (RWMS), which is a new approach to waterway planning and permitting based on carefully mapped channel depths, a census of actual boat populations, and the spatial extent of natural resources. The RWMS provides a comprehensive, regional overview of channel conditions and the geographic distribution and severity of existing impediments to safe navigation and resource protection. RWMS information and analyses result in regional-scale permitting to accommodate water-dependent uses while minimizing environmental impacts and reducing public expenditures. Compared with traditional approaches to waterway management, the science-based RWMS is relatively unbiased, objective, transparent, ecologically sound, and fiscally prudent. PMID:19020927

  12. Sediment contamination and associates laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, L.B.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediments from 10 New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for metals, PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples. The results highlight the range and magnitude of sediment contamination in NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of some metals in sediments, compared with NY Bight sediment, were at least 10 times higher. Total PAHs reached 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). The sum of DDT, DDD, and DDE, the dominant pesticides, exceeded 3,000{micro}g/kg (dry weight). Total PCBs approached 3,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. Metals were bioaccumulated to a lesser degree. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated contaminants, along with sediment chemistry and benthic toxicity, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  13. Dissolved Mn Speciation and Ligand Characteristics in a Coastal Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oldham, V.; Jensen, L.; Luther, G. W., III

    2014-12-01

    Soluble manganese speciation (Mn(II) and Mn(III); 0.2 μm filtered) was measured along a salinity gradient in the Broadkill River, a coastal waterway bordered by wetlands and salt marshes in Delaware. We modified an established method of porphyrin (T-4(CP)P) addition, by incorporating a heating step and coupling a 100-cm cell to a UV/Vis detector, to achieve a 4.0 nM sample DL. Surface waters were collected from June to August, 2014 and total dissolved Mn (0.23 - 1.92 μM) first increased then decreased along the salinity gradient (31 ppt to freshwater). However, Mn speciation was highly variable; Mn(III) made up 0-49 % of the total dissolved Mn, where the highest Mn(III) values occurred at sites with high salt-marsh runoff. Mn(III) was not recoverable without the addition of a strong reducing agent, indicating that little or no weak ligand was present, and that a strong ligand was responsible for complexing Mn(III). An assessment of potential strong ligand character was made by precipitating humic matter, by acidifying subsamples to pH<1.5, then 100 μM Mn(III)-pyrophosphate was added to acidified supernatant samples and non-acidified samples. In non-acidified samples, the Mn(III)-pyrophosphate peak at 484 nm rapidly disappeared and was replaced by a broad peak at 400 nm and the resulting sample had a yellow color. Upon the addition of 500 μM desferrioxamine-B (DFOB) to the same sample, a peak at 310 nm appeared, indicating the formation of Mn(III)-DFOB. In acidified samples, the Mn(III)-pyrophosphate peak did not change. Humic matter, therefore, may be acting as an Mn(III) binding ligand, outcompeting pyrophosphate for Mn(III), however this natural ligand is outcompeted by a large excess of DFOB. The humic matter and increased Mn likely come from the salt marsh runoff during tidal exchange, and we observed that as salinity increased, the amount of humic binding decreased. These results present the first Mn speciation measurements along a salinity gradient in

  14. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... navigation. 207.100 Section 207.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.100 Inland waterway from Delaware River to... or pass through the waterway. Vessels carrying rods, poles, or other gear extending above the top...

  15. 33 CFR 165.T08-0433 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Atchafalaya River from Mile Marker 117 (Morgan City Railroad...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Atchafalaya River from Mile Marker 117 (Morgan City Railroad Bridge) to... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Atchafalaya River from Mile Marker 117 (Morgan City Railroad Bridge) to Mile Marker 0 (Simmesport, LA)....

  16. 75 FR 29695 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-27

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting At this time, we do not plan to hold a public meeting, but... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ] ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... waters through Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and the Sabine-Neches Waterway, extending...

  17. 75 FR 76280 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-08

    ... Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA in the Federal Register (75 FR 105). We... August 20, 2008, we published a notice of proposed rulemaking (NPRM; 73 FR 162) to establish a regulated... activities common to a working waterfront, covering approximately 30 acres of sediment in the waterway....

  18. 75 FR 65232 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-22

    ...-Neches Waterway, TX'' in the Federal Register (75 FR 29695). We received one comment on the proposed rule... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Interim rule with request...

  19. 33 CFR 165.514 - Safety Zone: Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway and connecting waters, vicinity of Marine Corps Base...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 1983. (b) Regulations. Notwithstanding the provisions of 33 CFR 334.440(e)(2)(i), no vessel may enter... Intracoastal Waterway and connecting waters, vicinity of Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. 165... Intracoastal Waterway and connecting waters, vicinity of Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune, North Carolina....

  20. Construction and maintenance procedure recommendations for proposed federal guidelines of safe havens for vehicles carrying Class A or Class B explosives

    SciTech Connect

    1985-02-10

    This document focuses on the design, construction, and maintenance of commercial safe havens operated by truck stops. In the context of this document, the term `safe haven` describes a designated area for parking motor vehicles transporting Class A or Class B explosives. Its objective is to inculcate acceptable construction practices and maintenance procedures in the organization of commercial safe havens in order to insure public safety.

  1. 33 CFR 165.T08-0434 - Safety Zone; Mile Marker 98.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf... § 165.T08-0434 Safety Zone; Mile Marker 98.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to Mile Marker 108.5 West of Harvey Lock Gulf Intracoastal Waterway. (a) Location. Waters of the...

  2. 77 FR 3609 - Safety Zone; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Mile Marker 35.2 to Mile Marker 35.5, Larose, Lafourche...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-25

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Mile Marker 35... the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Larose, Lafourche Parish, Louisiana. This temporary safety Zone is... construction of a new rip-rap barge impact barrier on the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway side of the new...

  3. 76 FR 45421 - Safety Zone; Houma Navigation Canal, From Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-29

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AAOO Safety Zone; Houma Navigation Canal, From Waterway Mile... the Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, Southwest of Bayou Plat, bank to.../Barriers in the Houma Navigation Canal, from Waterway Mile Markers 19.0 to 20.0, southwest of Bayou...

  4. 75 FR 23588 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Riviera Beach, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-04

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway.... SUMMARY: The Commander, Seventh Coast Guard District, has issued a temporary deviation from the regulation... questions on this rule, call or e-mail Mr. Gene Stratton, Bridge Management Specialist, Seventh...

  5. 77 FR 40513 - Safety Zone; Major Motion Picture Filming, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Southport, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    .... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice... Intracoastal Waterway due to the filming of a movie involving explosions and other dangerous stunts on water... filming of the movie, a delay in enacting this safety zone would be contrary to public interest. Under 5...

  6. 76 FR 38011 - Safety Zone; Hylebos Bridge Restoration, Hylebos Waterway, Tacoma, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ..., Hylebos Waterway, Tacoma, WA in the Federal Register (76 FR 14829). We received 0 comments on the proposed... concrete removal performed as part of the bridge restoration. DATES: This rule is effective from 6 a.m. on... restoration involves removal of deteriorated concrete from the Hylebos Bridge and refinishing the...

  7. 77 FR 35906 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak...

  8. 77 FR 44466 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak Island, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A. Regulatory History and Information On June 15, 2012 a Notice of Proposed Rule Making (NPRM) was published in 77 FR 35906... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Oak...

  9. 75 FR 28757 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway... New York Marine Trades Association, South Bay Cruising Club, and Sector Long Island Sound....

  10. 78 FR 6728 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-31

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 RIN 1625-AA09 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York... Federal Regulations DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... paragraph (i) to read as follows: Sec. 117.799 Long Island, New York Inland Waterway from East...

  11. Dissolved oxygen and pH relationships in northern Australian mangrove waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Boto, K.G.; Bunt, J.S.

    1981-01-01

    Consistent, highly significant linear correlations (R2 greater than or equal to 0.8) between pH and dissolved oxygen levels have been found in northern Australian mangrove waterways. These properties seem to be influenced by dissolved organic matter, mainly polyphenolic compounds, present in the creeks and tidal channel waters.

  12. 78 FR 48608 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AIWW), Chesapeake, VA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-09

    ... operation of the I64 Bridge across the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River, mile 7.1, at Chesapeake, VA. This deviation is necessary to facilitate maintenance work on the moveable... route for vessels transiting this section on the South Branch of the Elizabeth River; however,...

  13. Analyses of native water, bottom material, and elutriate samples of southern Louisiana waterways, 1977-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dupuy, Alton J.; Couvillion, Nolan P.

    1979-01-01

    From March 1977 to July 1978 the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers conducted a series of elutriate studies to determine water quality in selected reaches of major navigable waterways of southern Louisiana. Sample were collected from the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet areas; Mississippi River, South Pass; Baptiste Collette Bayou; Tiger Pass area; Baou Long; Bayou Barataria and Barataria Bay Waterway area (gulf section); Bayou Segnette Waterway, Lake Pontchartrain near Tangipahoa River mouth; Bayou Grand Caillou; Bayou la Carpe at Homa; Houma Navigation Canal and Terrebonne Bay; Bayou Boeuf, Bayou Chene, and Baou Black, Atchafalaya River Channel, Atchafalaya Bay; Old River Lock tailbay; Red River below mouth of Black River; Freshwaer Canal; Mermentau River and Lake Arthur Mermentau River outlet; and Calcasieu Ship Channel. The studies were initiated at the request of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to evaluate possible environmental effects of proposed dredging activities in those waterways. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and U.S. Geological Survey collected 189 samples of native water and 172 samples of bottom (bed) material from 163 different sites. A total of 117 elutriates (Mixtures of native water and bottom material) were prepared. The native water and elutriate samples were analyzed for selected metals, pesticides, nutrients organics, and pysical constituents. Particle-size determinations were made on bottom-material samples. (Kosco-USGS)

  14. Valuing ecosystem services of an impacted waterway in the Southwestern US

    EPA Science Inventory

    While many studies of ecosystem services focus on unaltered areas such as wilderness, management insight is also needed for those more impacted. This case study values ecosystem services of the Santa Cruz River, an effluent-dominated waterway in southern Arizona. Wastewater treat...

  15. 77 FR 35903 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed Rulemaking A... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway;...

  16. 77 FR 44463 - Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Emerald Isle, NC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... published in 77 FR 35903. We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting was requested, and... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway;...

  17. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia §...

  18. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia §...

  19. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Georgia §...

  20. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and...

  1. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Register citations affecting § 117.911, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the...

  2. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Register citations affecting § 117.911, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the...

  3. 33 CFR 117.911 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Little River to Savannah River. 117.911 Section 117.911 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Carolina § 117.911 Atlantic Intracoastal...

  4. 78 FR 38672 - Ocean Dumping; Sabine-Neches Waterway (SNWW) Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site Designation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-27

    ...The EPA is proposing to designate four new Ocean Dredged Material Disposal Site(s) (ODMDS) located offshore of Texas for the disposal of dredged material from the Sabine-Neches Waterway (SNWW), pursuant to the Marine Protection, Research and Sanctuaries Act, as amended (MPRSA). The new sites are needed for the disposal of additional dredged material associated with the SNWW Channel Improvement......

  5. Impact of inland shipping emissions on elemental carbon concentrations near waterways in The Netherlands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keuken, M. P.; Moerman, M.; Jonkers, J.; Hulskotte, J.; Denier van der Gon, H. A. C.; Hoek, G.; Sokhi, R. S.

    2014-10-01

    This study aims to quantify the impact of black carbon from inland shipping on air quality, expressed as elemental carbon (EC) near inland waterways in The Netherlands. Downwind measurements of particle numbers and EC were used to establish emission factors for EC from inland shipping using inverse modelling. These emission factors were combined with data on energy consumption to derive annual average emissions rates for all Dutch waterways. A line source model was applied to compute the contribution of inland shipping to annual average EC concentrations for around 140,000 people living within 200 m of busy waterways in The Netherlands. The results showed that they are exposed to additional EC concentrations of up to 0.5 μg EC per m3 depending on the shipping volume and distance from the waterway. In view of the envisaged growth in water transport, this underlines the need to reduce combustion emissions from inland shipping. Targeting “gross” polluters may be the most effective approach since 30% of ships cause more than 80% of the total emissions.

  6. 77 FR 24433 - Special Local Regulations; ODBA Draggin on the Waccamaw, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-24

    ...The Coast Guard proposes to establish special local regulations on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Bucksport, South Carolina during the ODBA Draggin on the Waccamaw, a series of high- speed boat races. The event is scheduled to take place on Saturday, June 23, 2012, and Sunday, June 24, 2012. Approximately 40 high-speed race boats are anticipated to participate in the races. These......

  7. 78 FR 16205 - Special Local Regulations; Dragging on the Waccamaw, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway; Bucksport, SC

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-14

    ...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting, but you may... Intracoastal Waterway in Bucksport, South Carolina during the Outboard Drag Boat Association (ODBA) dragging...

  8. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  9. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  10. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  11. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  12. 33 CFR 117.820 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. 117.820 Section 117.820 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST... North Carolina § 117.820 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Great Dismal Swamp Canal. The draw of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, mile 28.0 at South Mills, NC, shall operate as follows:...

  13. 77 FR 72737 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Dismal Swamp...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-12-06

    ... (Alternate Route), Dismal Swamp Canal, South Mills, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of temporary... deviation from the regulations governing the operation of the Great Dismal Swamp Canal Bridge, at mile 28.0, over the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (Alternate Route), Dismal Swamp Canal, South Mills, NC....

  14. 76 FR 12981 - Lower Mississippi River Waterway Safety Advisory Committee; Meeting

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... (RNA); Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey Canal, Algiers Canal, New Orleans, LA published in the Federal Register, Vol. 75, page 32275 (75 FR 32275), on June 8, 2010, Docket No. USCG-2009-0139, with corrections published July 12, 2010 (75 FR 39632). (7) Old Business....

  15. 78 FR 9814 - Drawbridge Operating Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Belle Chasse, LA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-12

    ... FR 6208 on January 30, 2013, and establishes the effective period of the deviation as being from 6 a... regulation in the Federal Register (78 FR 6208-6209). C.E.C., Inc, on behalf of the Louisiana Department of... bridge, also known as the Judge Perez Bridge, across the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway (Algiers...

  16. 75 FR 32275 - Regulated Navigation Area; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-08

    ... Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may... Waterway, Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, New Orleans, LA'' in the Federal Register (74 FR 22722). No public..., Inner Harbor Navigation Canal, Harvey Canal, Algiers Canal, New Orleans, LA AGENCY: Coast Guard,...

  17. 76 FR 63840 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Duwamish West Waterway, Seattle, WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-14

    ... of the Spokane Street Swing Bridge across the Duwamish West Waterway, mile 0.3, at Seattle, WA. This... Way Viaduct Tunnel construction, a major infrastructure improvement project. This temporary deviation benefits public health and safety by permitting more vehicle access across the bridge during peak...

  18. 78 FR 64178 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-28

    ... 1, 2014 (see 78 FR 23849, Apr. 23,2013 Coast Guard.) This deviation is necessary to facilitate a... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice...

  19. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at..., Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  20. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across... this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at Cap Lejeune, NC, between 7 a.m. and 7...

  1. 78 FR 47191 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Albemarle Sound to Sunset Beach, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW), Wrightsville Beach, NC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of... Wrightsville Beach, NC. The deviation is necessary to facilitate electrical system and equipment upgrades...

  2. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at..., Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges...

  3. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across... this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at Cap Lejeune, NC, between 7 a.m. and 7...

  4. 33 CFR 117.821 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. 117.821 Section 117.821 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... § 117.821 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Albermarle Sound to Sunset Beach. (a) The drawbridges across... this paragraph: (1) Onslow Beach Swing Bridge, mile 240.7, at Cap Lejeune, NC, between 7 a.m. and 7...

  5. 78 FR 22193 - Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach Triathlon Championship, Intracoastal Waterway; West...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ..., Intracoastal Waterway, West Palm Beach, FL'' in the Federal Register (78 FR 2916). We received no comments on...: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 100 RIN 1625-AA08 Special Local Regulations; West Palm Beach...

  6. 77 FR 421 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Long Island, New York Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-05

    ... bridge under a temporary deviation published on September 30, 2011, (76 FR 60733) and that work was... vessels of various sizes. On September 30, 2011, the Coast Guard published a temporary deviation (76 FR... Inland Waterway From East Rockaway Inlet to Shinnecock Canal, NY AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS....

  7. 78 FR 67999 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Treasure Island, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-13

    ... INFORMATION: Table of Acronyms DHS Department of Homeland Security FR Federal Register NPRM Notice of Proposed... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). 4. Public Meeting We... Waterway, Treasure Island, FL AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking. SUMMARY:...

  8. 77 FR 37810 - Special Local Regulations; ODBA Draggin' on the Waccamaw, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-25

    ... the Federal Register (76 FR 79571). We received no comments on the proposed rule. No public meeting..., Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Bucksport, SC AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Temporary final rule. SUMMARY: The Coast Guard is establishing special local regulations on the Atlantic Intracoastal...

  9. 76 FR 50161 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway (NJICW), Atlantic City, NJ

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ... (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public meeting. But you may submit a request... Waterway (NJICW), Atlantic City, NJ AGENCY: Coast Guard, DHS. ACTION: Notice of proposed rulemaking... of materials, performance, design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and...

  10. 78 FR 26799 - Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Beaumont, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-08

    ... the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public meeting: We do not now plan... SECURITY Coast Guard Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Beaumont, TX... construction to expand or modify marine terminal operations in an existing facility handling Liquefied...

  11. 78 FR 26056 - Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Nederland, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-03

    ... public dockets in the January 17, 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public meeting: We do... SECURITY Coast Guard Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Nederland... Coast Guard regulations, Sunoco Partners Marketing and Terminals has submitted a Letter of Intent and...

  12. REMOVING WATER-SOLUBLE HAZARDOUS MATERIAL SPILLS FROM WATERWAYS WITH CARBON

    EPA Science Inventory

    A model for the removal of water-soluble organic materials from water by carbon-filled, buoyant packets and panels is described. Based on this model, equations are derived for the removal of dissolved organic compounds from waterways by buoyant packets that are either (a) cycled ...

  13. DISPERSANT APPLICATION SYSTEM FOR THE U.S. COAST GUARD 32-FOOT WPB (WATERWAYS PATROL BOAT)

    EPA Science Inventory

    This illustrated report describes details of the fabrication, assembly, and operation of a lightweight, easily assembled system for dispensing chemical dispersants on oil spills. This system is designed to be fitted onto the aft deck of the U.S. Coast Guard 32-foot waterways patr...

  14. 77 FR 51470 - Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, St. Petersburg/Tampa, FL

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulations; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, St... bridges in St. Petersburg and Tampa, Florida. The deviations are necessary to allow for the safe... Building Ground Floor, Room W12-140, 1200 New Jersey Avenue SE., Washington, DC 20590, between 9 a.m. and...

  15. 33 CFR 117.261 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from St. Marys River to Key Largo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Editorial Note: For Federal Register citations affecting § 117.261, see the List of CFR Sections Affected... from St. Marys River to Key Largo. 117.261 Section 117.261 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....261 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from St. Marys River to Key Largo. (a) General. Public vessels...

  16. 33 CFR 117.261 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from St. Marys River to Key Largo.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at... from St. Marys River to Key Largo. 117.261 Section 117.261 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....261 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway from St. Marys River to Key Largo. (a) General. Public vessels...

  17. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Friday, except Federal holidays the draw need open only at 7 a.m., 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. (c)...

  18. 33 CFR 117.353 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., Savannah River to St. Marys River. 117.353 Section 117.353 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD....353 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, Savannah River to St. Marys River. (a) General. Public vessels of... Friday, except Federal holidays the draw need open only at 7 a.m., 8 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. (c)...

  19. 26 CFR 48.4042-1 - Tax on fuel used in commercial waterway transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ....) From the mouth of St. Mark's River, Florida, to Brownsville, Texas, 1,134.5 miles. For vessels..., Oklahoma, at RM 448.2. (5) Atchafalaya River. From RM 0 at its intersection with the Gulf Intracoastal....4). (8) Columbia River (Columbia-Snake Rivers Inland Waterways). From The Dalles at RM 191.5...

  20. 26 CFR 48.4042-1 - Tax on fuel used in commercial waterway transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ....) From the mouth of St. Mark's River, Florida, to Brownsville, Texas, 1,134.5 miles. For vessels..., Oklahoma, at RM 448.2. (5) Atchafalaya River. From RM 0 at its intersection with the Gulf Intracoastal....4). (8) Columbia River (Columbia-Snake Rivers Inland Waterways). From The Dalles at RM 191.5...

  1. 26 CFR 48.4042-1 - Tax on fuel used in commercial waterway transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ....) From the mouth of St. Mark's River, Florida, to Brownsville, Texas, 1,134.5 miles. For vessels..., Oklahoma, at RM 448.2. (5) Atchafalaya River. From RM 0 at its intersection with the Gulf Intracoastal....4). (8) Columbia River (Columbia-Snake Rivers Inland Waterways). From The Dalles at RM 191.5...

  2. 26 CFR 48.4042-1 - Tax on fuel used in commercial waterway transportation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ....): From the mouth of St. Mark's River, Florida, to Brownsville, Texas, 1,134.5 miles. For vessels..., Oklahoma, at RM 448.2. (5) Atchafalaya River: From RM 0 at its intersection with the Gulf Intracoastal....4). (8) Columbia River (Columbia-Snake Rivers Inland Waterways): From The Dalles at RM 191.5...

  3. Hydrology of and Current Monitoring Issues for the Chicago Area Waterway System, Northeastern Illinois

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Duncker, James J.; Johnson, Kevin K.

    2015-01-01

    The Chicago Area Waterway System (CAWS) consists of a combination of natural and manmade channels that form an interconnected navigable waterway of approximately 90-plus miles in the metropolitan Chicago area of northeastern Illinois. The CAWS serves the area as the primary drainage feature, a waterway transportation corridor, and recreational waterbody. The CAWS was constructed by the Metropolitan Water Reclamation District of Greater Chicago (MWRDGC). Completion of the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (initial portion of the CAWS) in 1900 breached a low drainage divide and resulted in a diversion of water from the Lake Michigan Basin. A U.S. Supreme Court decree (Consent Decree 388 U.S. 426 [1967] Modified 449 U.S. 48 [1980]) limits the annual diversion from Lake Michigan. While the State of Illinois is responsible for the diversion, the MWRDGC regulates and maintains water level and water quality within the CAWS by using several waterway control structures. The operation and control of water levels in the CAWS results in a very complex hydraulic setting characterized by highly unsteady flows. The complexity leads to unique gaging requirements and monitoring issues. This report provides a general discussion of the complex hydraulic setting within the CAWS and quantifies this information with examples of data collected at a range of flow conditions from U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gaging stations and other locations within the CAWS. Monitoring to address longstanding issues of waterway operation, as well as current (2014) emerging issues such as wastewater disinfection and the threat from aquatic invasive species, is included in the discussion.

  4. A model of navigation-induced currents in inland waterways and implications for juvenile fish displacement.

    PubMed

    Wolter, Christian; Arlinghaus, Robert; Sukhodolov, Alexander; Engelhardt, Christof

    2004-11-01

    The likely extension of commercial inland navigation in the future could increase hazards directly impacting on the nurseries of freshwater fish, especially for smaller individuals with limited swimming abilities. One limitation of the evaluation of inland navigation on fish assemblages is the lack of suitable hydraulic models. This article presents a hydraulic model to assess the increase of navigation-induced physical forces due to higher vessel speed, length, and drought in a low-flowing waterway related to maximum swimming performance of fish to (1) foresee hazards of enhancement of inland navigation, (2) derive construction measures to minimize the hydraulic impact on small fish, and (3) improve fish recruitment in waterways. The derived model computed current velocities induced by passing commercial vessels in inland waterways experimentally verified and parameterized in a German lowland waterway. Results were linked with a model of maximum fish swimming performance to elucidate consequences for freshwater fish populations. The absolute magnitude of navigation-induced current limits the availability of littoral habitats for small fish. Typical navigation-induced current velocities of 0.7-1 m/s in the straight reaches of waterways will be maintained by fish longer than 42 mm only. Smaller juveniles unable to withstand those currents could become washed out, injured, or displaced. In contrast, in small local bays, the navigation-induced current declined significantly. According to our model, in a 20-m extended bay, the return current drops below 0.11 m/s, corresponding to the maximum swimming speed of a 9-mm-long fish. Thus, enhancing shoreline development by connecting oxbows, tributaries, and especially by purpose-built bays limits the impact on fish recruitment without restricting navigation resulting in more precautionary and sustainable inland navigation. PMID:15549651

  5. Remediation of Hylebos Waterway (Tacoma, WA): A common sense approach to determining contaminated sediment volumes

    SciTech Connect

    Fuglevand, P.; Revelas, G.; Striplin, B.; Striplin, P.

    1995-12-31

    Hylebos Waterway is a three mile long industrial waterway located in Commencement Bay, Washington. A CERCLA program RI/FS, conducted in the mid-1980`s, found that surface sediments (0--2 cm) were contaminated with chlorinated organics, PAHs, and metals. An ongoing pre-remedial design effort, initiated in 1993, is evaluating natural recovery and four sediment confinement options for sediments that exceed programmatic sediment quality objectives: confined aquatic disposal, near-shore disposal, upland disposal, and in-place capping. The first three confinement options require dredging of contaminated sediments which, in turn, requires accurate determination of the three dimensional distribution of contaminated sediments. To place a maximum depth boundary on the sediment sampling approach, isopach maps were created by contouring the difference between the deepest historic dredging depth and current depth along the entire waterway. These isopach maps revealed the pattern of post-industrial sediment deposition in the waterway. For example, in some areas, little or no sediment accumulation had occurred in the navigation channel. Conversely, significant accumulation had occurred along some channel edges and in near-shore areas as the result of deposition, bank sloughing and historic dredging/filling activities. The isopach maps were used to place a lower depth boundary on waterway-wide sediment contamination and to establish the maximum core sampling depth required to reach ``native`` sediments, i.e., those below the deepest historic dredging depth and believed to be uncontaminated. Subsequent geo-technical and chemical analyses of the core samples confirmed the accuracy of the isopach approach. The data generated from this sampling effort are being used to estimate the areas and volumes of subtidal sediments requiring remedial action.

  6. Developing a public information and engagement portal of urban waterways with real-time monitoring and modeling.

    PubMed

    Cochrane, T A; Wicke, D; O'Sullivan, A

    2011-01-01

    Waterways can contribute to the beauty and livelihood of urban areas, but maintaining their hydro-ecosystem health is challenging because they are often recipients of contaminated water from stormwater runoff and other discharges. Public awareness of local waterways' health and community impacts to these waterways is usually poor due to of lack of easily available information. To improve community awareness of water quality in urban waterways in New Zealand, a web portal was developed featuring a real-time waterways monitoring system, a public forum, historical data, interactive maps, contaminant modelling scenarios, mitigation recommendations, and a prototype contamination alert system. The monitoring system featured in the web portal is unique in the use of wireless mesh network technology, direct integration with online modelling, and a clear target of public engagement. The modelling aims to show the origin of contaminants within the local catchment and to help the community prioritize mitigation efforts to improve water quality in local waterways. The contamination alert system aims to keep managers and community members better informed and to provide a more timely response opportunity to avert any unplanned or accidental contamination of the waterways. Preliminary feedback has been positive and is being supported by local and regional authorities. The system was developed in a cost-effective manner providing a community focussed solution for quantifying and mitigating key contaminants in urban catchments and is applicable and transferable to other cities with similar stormwater challenges. PMID:21252427

  7. Yale--New Haven History Education Project (H.E.P.). Summary Report 1970-1973. [And] Guide For Mini-Course Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seretny, Albert A.

    The Yale-New Haven History Education Project began in Spring 1970 with the expressed goal of improving the quality and relevance of secondary school history courses in New Haven's public schools. Thirty Yale history professors worked with a comparable number of high school teachers and created approximately eighty "mini-courses" in United States…

  8. Hydrology of the Winter Haven Chain of Lakes, Polk County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sinclair, W.C.; Reichenbaugh, R.C.

    1981-01-01

    Fourteen interconnected lakes in and around the city of Winter Haven, Polk County, Fla., form the Winter Haven Chain of Lakes. Levels of the lakes during the spring of 1976 were at a record low stage for the 31 years of record. During 1960-76, rainfall had been below average for all but 2 years, and departure from average rainfall totaled 72.34 inches. Fluctuations in stage of Lake Howard, representative of the chain, and of Lake Otis, the nearest isolated lake that has a reasonably long record of stage , were compared with other hydrologic variables. Analyses of lake stage and rainfall records indicate that deficient rainfall has been the key factor in the decline of lake levels in the area. Manipulation of lake levels, pumpage from the lakes and underlying aquifer, and urbanization of the watershed probably have affected the lakes as well, but records are not available to determine the significance of their effects. The surficial aquifer drains to the lakes. Water level in the underlying Floridan aquifer is everywhere lower than in any of the lakes, thus water moves from the lakes and surficial aquifer through the confining clay layer to the Floridan aquifer. (USGS)

  9. The Anne Frank Haven: A case of an alternative educational program in an integrative Kibbutz setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Peretz, Miriam; Giladi, Moshe; Dror, Yuval

    1992-01-01

    The essential features of the programme of the Anne Frank Haven are the complete integration of children from low SES and different cultural backgrounds with Kibbutz children; a holistic approach to education; and the involvement of the whole community in an "open" residential school. After 33 years, it is argued that the experiment has proved successful in absorbing city-born youth in the Kibbutz, enabling at-risk populations to reach significant academic achievements, and ensuring their continued participation in the dominant culture. The basic integration model consists of "layers" of concentric circles, in dynamic interaction. The innermost circle is the class, the learning community. The Kibbutz community and the foster parents form a supportive, enveloping circle, which enables students to become part of the outer community and to intervene in it. A kind of meta-environment, the inter-Kibbutz partnership and the Israeli educational system, influence the program through decision making and guidance. Some of the principles of the Haven — integration, community involvement, a year's induction for all new students, and open residential settings — could be useful for cultures and societies outside the Kibbutz. The real "secret" of success of an alternative educational program is the dedicated, motivated and highly trained staff.

  10. Safe Haven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miranda, Maria Eugenia

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses how college administrators are increasingly prioritizing dating violence prevention and intervention services. To combat dating violence, campus groups and programming are becoming more prevalent as increased awareness of dating violence forces students and administrators alike to address a problem that…

  11. Impact of Grassed Waterways and Compost Filter Socks on the Quality of Surface Runoff from Corn Fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface runoff from cropland frequently has high concentrations of nutrients and herbicides, particularly in the first few events after application. Grassed waterways can control erosion while transmitting this runoff offsite, but are generally ineffective in removing dissolved agrochemicals. In thi...

  12. 76 FR 5831 - Amdocs, Inc., Global Support Services, Advertising And Media AT&T Division, New Haven...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-02

    ... Federal Register on November 23, 2010 (75 FR 71461). The negative determination was based on the findings... Employment and Training Administration Amdocs, Inc., Global Support Services, Advertising And Media AT&T...., Global Support Services, Advertising and Media AT&T Division, New Haven, Connecticut (subject firm)....

  13. 76 FR 14697 - Amdocs, Inc., Global Support Services, Advertising and Media AT&T Division, New Haven, CT; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-17

    ... February 22, 2011 (76 FR 5831). The subject workers are engaged in employment related to the supply of... Employment and Training Administration Amdocs, Inc., Global Support Services, Advertising and Media AT&T..., Advertising and Media AT&T Division, New Haven, Connecticut to apply for Trade Adjustment Assistance (TAA)....

  14. Improving Ethnic Balance and Intergroup Relations; An Advisory Report to the Board of Education, New Haven Unified School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Bureau of Intergroup Relations.

    Using the findings of a field study and an analysis of school data, this report describes the ethnic and racial distribution of students in the New Haven (California) Unified School District and discusses the availability of educational opportunities and proper intergroup relations for minority-group students. Also, the report examines plant…

  15. 75 FR 30392 - York Haven Power Company, LLC; Notice of Dispute Resolution Panel Meeting and Technical Conference

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-01

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission York Haven Power Company, LLC; Notice of Dispute Resolution Panel Meeting and Technical Conference May 24, 2010. On May 19, 2010, Commission staff, in response to the filing of... Panel will hold a technical conference at the time and place noted below. The technical conference...

  16. Amazon dams and waterways: Brazil's Tapajós Basin plans.

    PubMed

    Fearnside, Philip M

    2015-09-01

    Brazil plans to build 43 "large" dams (>30 MW) in the Tapajós Basin, ten of which are priorities for completion by 2022. Impacts include flooding indigenous lands and conservation units. The Tapajós River and two tributaries (the Juruena and Teles Pires Rivers) are also the focus of plans for waterways to transport soybeans from Mato Grosso to ports on the Amazon River. Dams would allow barges to pass rapids and waterfalls. The waterway plans require dams in a continuous chain, including the Chacorão Dam that would flood 18,700 ha of the Munduruku Indigenous Land. Protections in Brazil's constitution and legislation and in international conventions are easily neutralized through application of "security suspensions," as has already occurred during licensing of several dams currently under construction in the Tapajós Basin. Few are aware of "security suspensions," resulting in little impetus to change these laws. PMID:25794814

  17. Hydrology, hydraulic, and sediment considerations of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Underwood, Kenneth D.; Imsand, F. Dewayne

    1985-03-01

    The planning, design, and construction of the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway was a massive undertaking Ten locks and dams were constructed that form lakes with a total water surface area of over 42,400 acres The overall length of the waterway is 234 miles and required the excavation and disposal of over 307 million cubic yards of material Because of the magnitude of the project and the many factors and complexities involved, this article can only serve as an overview of the topics presented During the course of the development of the project, many design memoranda and reports were generated which portray the details of design Some of the more pertinent of these design documents are listed in the references.

  18. 78 FR 34884 - Special Local Regulations; ODBA Draggin' on the Waccamaw, Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-11

    ...The Coast Guard is establishing a special local regulation on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in Bucksport, South Carolina during the Outboard Drag Boat Association (ODBA) Draggin' on the Waccamaw, a series of high-speed boat races. The event will take place on Saturday, June 22, 2012 and Sunday, June 23, 2013. Approximately 50 high-speed race boats are anticipated to participate in the......

  19. Interacting effects of vegetation and hydrogeomorphic complexity on nitrate in agricultural waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, A.; Cadenasso, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    Intensive cultivation in the California Central Valley has resulted in the loss of ~95% of riparian habitat. In addition, small streams have been replaced by denuded agricultural waterways to convey irrigation drainage high in nitrate (NO3). A variety of strategies are being used to increase riparian vegetation along agricultural waterways, but many of the ecological functions of these novel habitat features are unknown. An extensive study was conducted in summer 2014 to investigate which riparian ecosystem features are associated with variable NO3 levels in waterways draining irrigated cropland. Eighty sites were selected to represent a wide range of riparian vegetation, hydrogeomorphic features, and agricultural contexts. Sites were visited three times to correspond to the early, mid, and late irrigation season. At each visit, water samples were taken 300m apart and analyzed for turbidity, pH, temperature, and NO3. To characterized hydrogeomorphic complexity, the frequency of features associated with transient storage and increased retention time were quantified. Vegetation cover and structure on banks, foreshores, and in channels was also measured. Using a generalized linear model, we tested for the interaction of upstream [NO3-N] with vegetation and hydrogeomorphic variables to predict downstream [NO3-N], the dependent variable. As expected, upstream [NO3-N] strongly predicted downstream [NO3-N] and no features directly predicted downstream [NO3-N]. The frequency of hydrogeomorphic features, however, interacted with upstream [NO3-N] to predict downstream [NO3-N], indicating an effect of hydrogeomorphic complexity on NO3 from up to downstream. Vegetation factors did not interact with upstream [NO3-N], but woody vegetation cover was positively correlated with the frequency of hydrogeomorphic features. These findings support the use of woody riparian vegetation to increase NO3 retention in agricultural waterways, via an indirect association with hydrogeomorphic

  20. Soil sedimentology at Gusev Crater from Columbia Memorial Station to Winter Haven

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cabrol, N.A.; Herkenhoff, K. E.; Greeley, R.; Grin, E.A.; Schroder, C.; d'Uston, C.; Weitz, C.; Yingst, R.A.; Cohen, B. A.; Moore, J.; Knudson, A.; Franklin, B.; Anderson, R.C.; Li, R.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 3140 individual particles were examined in 31 soils along Spirit's traverse. Their size, shape, and texture were quantified and classified. They represent a unique record of 3 years of sedimentologic exploration from landing to sol 1085 covering the Plains Unit to Winter Haven where Spirit spent the Martian winter of 2006. Samples in the Plains Unit and Columbia Hills appear as reflecting contrasting textural domains. One is heterogeneous, with a continuum of angular-to-round particles of fine sand to pebble sizes that are generally dust covered and locally cemented in place. The second shows the effect of a dominant and ongoing dynamic aeolian process that redistributes a uniform population of medium-size sand. The texture of particles observed in the samples at Gusev Crater results from volcanic, aeolian, impact, and water-related processes. Copyright 2008 by the American Geophysical Union.

  1. Applying Community Organizing Principles to Assess Health Needs in New Haven, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Santilli, Alycia; Carroll-Scott, Amy; Ickovics, Jeannette R

    2016-05-01

    The Affordable Care Act added requirements for nonprofit hospitals to conduct community health needs assessments. Guidelines are minimal; however, they require input and representation from the broader community. This call echoes 2 decades of literature on the importance of including community members in all aspects of research design, a tenet of community organizing. We describe a community-engaged research approach to a community health needs assessment in New Haven, Connecticut. We demonstrate that a robust community organizing approach provided unique research benefits: access to residents for data collection, reliable data, leverage for community-driven interventions, and modest improvements in behavioral risk. We make recommendations for future community-engaged efforts and workforce development, which are important for responding to increasing calls for community health needs assessments. PMID:26985599

  2. Sediment trend analysis of the Hylebos Waterway: implications for liability allocations.

    PubMed

    McLaren, Patrick; Beveridge, R Paul

    2006-07-01

    Sediment trend analysis (STA) is a technique that determines the net patterns of sediment movement and their dynamic behavior or stability. The data required are the complete particle size distributions obtained from bottom grab samples collected in a regular grid over the area of interest. Appendix 1 provides the particular details of how STA is undertaken. Because many contaminants are known to associate with the natural particles contained in sedimentary deposits, STA can provide additional weight-of-evidence in ecological risk assessment, remedial investigation, remediation itself, and litigation issues. The STA was applied to 242 sediment samples collected from the Hylebos Waterway, Tacoma, Washington, USA, in support of remedial action planning, contaminant source identification, and ultimately allocation of legal liability for contamination. The Waterway itself comprises a narrow shipping channel extending 3 miles from Commencement Bay (Puget Sound) where it ends in a dredged turning basin (Upper Turning Basin). A 2nd dredged turning basin (Lower Turning Basin) is located about three-quarters of the distance down its length. Both sides of the channel are home to an extensive industrial complex associated with significant contaminant releases into the water. The area was declared a Superfund Site in the early 1980s. The results of the STA showed a consistent pattern of sediment transport directed from the mouth of the Waterway to the turning basin at its head. Divided into 5 separate transport environments (TEs), the sediments within the Waterway progress from transport in Dynamic Equilibrium near the mouth, to Total Deposition (type 1) in the vicinity of the Lower Turning Basin, followed by Total Deposition (type 2) in the Upper Turning Basin. Assuming that contaminants associate preferentially with the finer, rather than the coarser, components of the grain size distributions, a probable behavior of contaminants that can be contained in the sediments is

  3. U-Th-Pb geochronology of the Massabesic Gneiss and the granite near Milford, South-Central New Hampshire: New evidence for avalonian basement and taconic and alleghenian disturbances in Eastern New England

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Zartman, R.E.; Lyons, J.B.

    1979-01-01

    U-Th-Pb systematics for zircon and monazite from Massabesic Gneiss (paragneiss and orthogneiss) and the granite near Milford, New Hampshire, were determined. Zircon morphology suggests that the paragneiss may be volcaniclastic (igneous) in origin, and thus the age data probably record the date (minimum of 646 m.y.) at which the rock was extruded. A two-stage lead-loss model is proposed to explain the present array of data points on a concordia diagram. Orthogneiss ages range only narrowly and are clustered around 475 m.y. Data for the granite of Milford, New Hampshire, are scattered, but may be interpreted in terms of inheritance and modern lead loss, yielding a crystallization age of 275 m.y. This is the only known occurrence of Avalonian-type basement in New Hampshire and as such provides evidence for the location of the paleo-Africa-paleo- North America suture. The geochronology also further documents the occurrence of disturbances during the Ordovician and Permian. ?? 1979 Springer-Verlag.

  4. Spatial distribution of PAHs and associated laboratory-measured bioaccumulation in New York/New Jersey waterways

    SciTech Connect

    Rosman, L.B.; Barrows, E.S.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment core samples from New York/New Jersey waterways within the Hudson-Raritan Estuary and Long Island Sound were collected to depths representative of dredging activity. Sediment was also collected from a reference site in the New York Bight as a comparison. Composited core sediments representing each waterway were analyzed for PAHs, sediment grain size, and total organic carbon. To assess bioaccumulation, sand worms (Nereis virens) and blunt-nose clams (Macoma nasuta) were exposed for 28 days to sediment composites and to New York Bight sediment. Tissues were analyzed for the same constituents as the sediment samples, as well as for lipid content. The results highlight the range and magnitude of PAH concentrations in sediments of NY/NJ waterways. Concentrations of total PAHs ranged from undetected to 30,000 {micro}g/kg (dry weight). Tissues exposed to sediments from several waterways bioaccumulated organic compounds at concentrations as much as 10 times greater than those exposed to New York Bight sediments. The presence and extent of bioaccumulated compounds, along with benthic toxicity data, create a profile characterizing each waterway.

  5. Geochemical, isotopic, and dissolved gas characteristics of groundwater in a fractured crystalline-rock aquifer, Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2013-01-01

    Tetrachloroethylene (PCE), a volatile organic compound, was detected in groundwater from deep (more than (>) 300 feet (ft) below land surface) fractures in monitoring wells tapping a crystalline-rock aquifer beneath operable unit 1 (OU1) of the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site (Weston, Inc., 2010). Operable units define remedial areas of contaminant concern. PCE contamination within the fractured-rock aquifer has been designated as a separate operable unit, operable unit 3 (OU3; Weston, Inc., 2010). PCE contamination was previously detected in the overlying glacial sand and gravel deposits and basal till, hereafter termed the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift (MSGD) aquifer (Harte, 2004, 2006). Operable units 1 and 2 encompass areas within the MSGD aquifer, whereas the extent of the underlying OU3 has yet to be defined. The primary original source of contamination has been identified as a former manufacturing facility—the OK Tool manufacturing facility; hence OU1 sometimes has been referred to as the OK Tool Source Area (New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services, undated). A residential neighborhood of 30 to 40 houses is located in close proximity (one-quarter of a mile) from the PCE-contaminated monitoring wells. Each house has its own water-supply well installed in similar rocks as those of the monitoring wells, as indicated by the New Hampshire State geologic map (Lyons and others, 1997). An investigation was initiated in 2010 by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) region 1, and the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) to assess the potential for PCE transport from known contaminant locations (monitoring wells) to the residential wells. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and the NHDES entered into a cooperative agreement in 2011 to assist in the evaluation of PCE transport in the fractured-rock aquifer. Periodic sampling over the last decade by the USEPA and NHDES has yet to detect PCE in groundwater from the

  6. Sewage Contamination under Different Storm and Hydrologic Conditions in Three Urban Waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Templar, H.; Corsi, S.; McLellan, S. L.

    2014-12-01

    Fecal contamination in urban waterways is a major public and environmental health threat. Sanitary sewer and combined sewer overflows are major point sources of fecal pollution. Additionally, stormwater runoff and failing sewer infrastructure contribute fecal contamination and pathogens to urban waterways. Traditionally, fecal indicator bacteria such as E. coli, enterococci, and fecal coliforms are used to gauge fecal contamination in water; however, these general indicators are unable to distinguish fecal sources in the environment. This study used two human-specific fecal indicator bacteria to identify human sewage contamination in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, where three rivers form an estuary that discharges to Lake Michigan. Two-hour composite samples were collected at four sites, one in each of the three rivers and one in the estuary, to represent the entire hydrograph before, during, and after a rain event. Samples were collected throughout a variety of conditions, including dry-weather baseline, light and heavy rain events, and combined sewage overflows (CSOs). These samples were analyzed using quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assays to determine human sewage loads in each river during each type of event. Low levels of human indicators were found during dry-weather baseline conditions, and loads increased significantly (one to two orders of magnitude) during rain events. Sampling upstream of the estuary indicated sewage contamination was originating in the heavily urbanized part of the watersheds, likely a result of failing infrastructure. CSO events contributed the highest loads, which were on average ten-fold higher than rainfall events with no CSO. This information will be a useful for directing the efforts of local agencies and municipalities to investigate failing infrastructure, as well as agencies at the state and federal levels to create appropriate goals to address the human health concerns that are posed by sewage contamination in urban

  7. Using chloride and other ions to trace sewage and road salt in the Illinois Waterway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, W.R.; Panno, S.V.; Hackley, Keith C.; Hwang, H.-H.; Martinsek, A.T.; Markus, M.

    2010-01-01

    Chloride concentrations in waterways of northern USA are increasing at alarming rates and road salt is commonly assumed to be the cause. However, there are additional sources of Cl- in metropolitan areas, such as treated wastewater (TWW) and water conditioning salts, which may be contributing to Cl- loads entering surface waters. In this study, the potential sources of Cl- and Cl- loads in the Illinois River Basin from the Chicago area to the Illinois River's confluence with the Mississippi River were investigated using halide data in stream samples and published Cl- and river discharge data. The investigation showed that road salt runoff and TWW from the Chicago region dominate Cl- loads in the Illinois Waterway, defined as the navigable sections of the Illinois River and two major tributaries in the Chicago region. Treated wastewater discharges at a relatively constant rate throughout the year and is the primary source of Cl- and other elements such as F- and B. Chloride loads are highest in the winter and early spring as a result of road salt runoff which can increase Cl- concentrations by up to several hundred mg/L. Chloride concentrations decrease downstream in the Illinois Waterway due to dilution, but are always elevated relative to tributaries downriver from Chicago. The TWW component is especially noticeable downstream under low discharge conditions during summer and early autumn when surface drainage is at a minimum and agricultural drain tiles are not flowing. Increases in population, urban and residential areas, and roadways in the Chicago area have caused an increase in the flux of Cl- from both road salt and TWW. Chloride concentrations have been increasing in the Illinois Waterway since around 1960 at a rate of about 1 mg/L/a. The increase is largest in the winter months due to road salt runoff. Shallow groundwater Cl- concentrations are also increasing, potentially producing higher base flow concentrations. Projected increases in population and

  8. Epidemiological Features and Control Progress of Schistosomiasis in Waterway-Network Region in The People's Republic of China.

    PubMed

    Shi, L; Li, W; Wu, F; Zhang, J-F; Yang, K; Zhou, X-N

    2016-01-01

    Schistosomiasis was one of the most serious parasitic diseases in The People's Republic of China, and the endemic region was classified into three types according to the epidemiological characteristics and living conditions of the intermediate host. After more than 60years of efforts, schistosomiasis control programme has made great strides in waterway-network regions. We analyse the epidemic changes of schistosomiasis and its control progress through the schistosomiasis regions' documents and investigation data to evaluate the efficacy of the schistosomiasis control strategies in the waterway-network-type endemic region, which provides the basis for refinement of efforts, as well as summary of the Chinese schistosomiasis control experience in the waterway-network areas. PMID:27137444

  9. Simulation of solute transport of tetrachloroethylene in ground water of the glacial-drift aquifer at the Savage Municipal Well Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire, 1960-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2004-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, named after the former municipal water-supply well for the town of Milford, is underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), primarily tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within a highly transmissive sand-and-gravel unit, but also extends to an underlying till and bedrock unit. The plume logistically is divided into two areas termed Operable Unit No. 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit No. 2 (OU2), which is the extended plume area. PCE concentrations in excess of 100,000 parts per billion (ppb) had been detected in the OU1 area in 1995, indicating a likely Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) source. In the fall of 1998, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) installed a remedial system in OU1. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE, and a series of injection and extraction wells. The barrier primarily sits atop bedrock and penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; and in some places, the full thickness of the underlying basal till. The sand and gravel unit and the till comprise the aquifer termed the Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift aquifer (MSGD). Two-dimensional and three-dimensional finite-difference solute-transport models of the unconsolidated sediments (MSGD aquifer) were constructed to help evaluate solute-transport processes, assess the effectiveness of remedial activities in OU1, and to help design remedial strategies in OU2. The solute-transport models simulate PCE concentrations, and model results were compared to observed concentrations of PCE. Simulations were grouped into the following three time periods: an historical calibration of the distribution of PCE from the initial input (circa 1960) of PCE into the subsurface to the 1990s, a pre-remedial calibration from 1995

  10. Impact of grassed waterways and compost filter socks on the quality of surface runoff from corn fields.

    PubMed

    Shipitalo, Martin J; Bonta, James V; Dayton, Elizabeth A; Owens, Lloyd B

    2010-01-01

    Surface runoff from cropland frequently has high concentrations of nutrients and herbicides, particularly in the first few events after application. Grassed waterways can control erosion while transmitting this runoff offsite, but are generally ineffective in removing dissolved agrochemicals. In this study, we routed runoff from one tilled (0.67 ha) and one no-till watershed (0.79 ha) planted to corn (Zea mays L.) into parallel, 30-m-long grassed waterways. Two 46-cm-diam. filter socks filled with composted bark and wood chips were placed 7.5 m apart in the upper half of one waterway and in the lower half of the other waterway to determine if they decreased concentrations of sediment and dissolved chemicals. Automated samplers were used to obtain samples above and below the treated segments of the waterways for two crop years. The filter socks had no significant effect (P waterways used with the tilled watershed. The filter socks significantly increased the concentrations of Cl, NO(3)-N, PO(4)-P, SO(4), Ca, K, Na, and Mg in runoff from at least one watershed, probably due to soluble forms of these ions in the compost. The estimated additional amounts of these ions contributed by the socks each year ranged from 0.04 to 1.2 kg, thus were likely to be inconsequential. The filter socks contributed to a significant (P

  11. Terrain-influenced local wind forecasting for the Sasebo typhoon haven: Improved empirical techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feldmeier, Joel W.; Nuss, Wendell A.; Elsberry, Russell L.

    2014-08-01

    Although the Sasebo, Japan harbor is usually a "typhoon haven" from tropical cyclone (TC) winds due to terrain-blocking effects, in rare cases damaging winds occur that may be attributed to terrain channeling. An empirical parametric model technique is developed and tested that includes consideration of the TC wind structure, land frictional effects, and terrain influences affecting the maximum wind speeds in the harbor when TCs pass within 200 nautical miles of Sasebo. The terrain influence is represented by two sets of wind direction-dependent acceleration factors. The first set, which is directly from the ratio of the local wind to the adjusted parametric wind for TCs passages during 2003-2010, provides mean values that represent the terrain blocking and channeling effects, but the variability with wind direction may be suspect. The second set derived from a large sample of reanalysis winds not limited to TCs has better variability properties, but is not easily related to just the TC passages. A new nomogram modified to include TC wind structure has higher estimates of Sasebo sustained winds for some TC tracks that may be related to terrain influences, but is limited due to the number of TC structure estimates in the developmental sample. These empirical models have the advantage of ease and low cost for future use in also estimating the combined uncertainty in the local winds in Sasebo harbor due to TCs.

  12. The determination of nutritional requirements for Safe Haven Food Supply System (emergency/survival foods)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmed, Selina

    1987-01-01

    The Space Station Safe Haven Food System must sustain 8 crew members under emergency conditions for 45 days. Emergency Survival Foods are defined as a nutritionally balanced collection of high density food and beverages selected to provide for the survival of Space Station flight crews in contingency situations. Since storage volume is limited, the foods should be highly concentrated. A careful study of different research findings regarding starvation and calorie restricted diets indicates that a minimum nutritional need close to RDA is an important factor for sustaining an individual's life in a stressful environment. Fat, protein, and carbohydrates are 3 energy producing nutrients which play a vital role in the growth and maintenance process of human life. A lower intake of protein can minimize the water intake, but it causes a negative nitrogen balance and a lower performance level. Other macro and micro nutrients are also required for nutritional interrelationships to metabolize the other 3 nutrients to their optimum level. The various options for longer duration than 45 days are under investigation.

  13. 75 FR 71543 - Safety Zone; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Mile Marker 49.0 to 50.0, west of Harvey Locks, Bank to...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Gulf Intracoastal Waterway, Mile Marker 49.0 to 50.0, west of Harvey Locks, Bank to Bank, Bayou Blue Pontoon Bridge, Lafourche Parish, LA... temporary safety zone in the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway extending from Mile Marker 49.0 to Mile Marker...

  14. 76 FR 36318 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route From Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-22

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 165 RIN 1625-AA00 Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen..., design, or operation; test methods; sampling procedures; and related management systems practices) that...; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock. (a) Location....

  15. Reclamation of abandoned mined lands along th Upper Illinois Waterway using dredged material

    SciTech Connect

    Van Luik, A; Harrison, W

    1982-01-01

    Sediments were sampled and characterized from 28 actual or proposed maintenance-dredging locations in the Upper Illinois Waterway, that is, the Calumet-Sag Channel, the Des Plaines River downstream of its confluence with the Calumet-Sag Channel, and the Illinois River from the confluence of the Kankakee and Des Plaines rivers to Havana, Illinois. Sufficient data on chemical constituents and physical sediments were obtained to allow the classification of these sediments by currently applicable criteria of the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency for the identification of hazardous, persistent, and potentially hazardous wastes. By these criteria, the potential dredged materials studied were not hazardous, persistent, or potentially hazardous; they are a suitable topsoil/ reclamation medium. A study of problem abandoned surface-mined land sites (problem lands are defined as being acidic and/or sparsely vegetated) along the Illinois River showed that three sites were particularly well suited to the needs of the Corps of Engineers (COE) for a dredged material disposal/reclamation site. Thes sites were a pair of municipally owned sites in Morris, Illinois, and a small corporately owned site east of Ottawa, Illinois, and adjacent to the Illinois River. Other sites were also ranked as to suitability for COE involvement in their reclamation. Reclamation disposal was found to be an economically competitive alternative to near-source confined disposal for Upper Illinois Waterway dredged material.

  16. Assessment of vessel-generated waste quantities on the inland waterways of the Republic of Serbia.

    PubMed

    Presburger Ulnikovic, Vladanka; Vukic, Marija; Nikolic, Radosav

    2012-04-30

    To establish the quantity and structure of waste generated during inland vessel exploitation, it is necessary to determine the amount of traffic on the waterways, the number of vessel dockings that generate and deliver waste materials to ports, and the types of inland navigation vessels. Criteria must also be established for the calculation of estimated average waste quantities. This paper presents a methodology for the assessment of waste material quantities that was developed as part of the Technological Development Project TR 21037 of the Republic of Serbia. Required information on the amount of traffic, vessel types and numbers as well as the number of dockings was extracted from questionnaires and interviews with watermen and researchers. A set of criteria was defined in order to determine the number of passengers and crewmembers and to establish and classify quantities of vessel-generated waste (sanitary and fecal wastewater, bilge wastewater, waste oils, and solid waste). These data allowed for the Preliminary analysis of the national waterway traffic and transport infrastructure to be carried out. Results presented in this paper have triggered a number of recommendations for the construction of terminals and other facilities for the reception and management of waste streams, from the vessel where the waste is generated to the final destinations for waste processing and deposition. This is particularly applicable to countries who have not yet tackled the problem of vessel-generated waste. PMID:22325587

  17. Numerical prediction of hydrodynamic forces on a berthed ship induced by a passing ship in different waterway geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong-zhi; Zou, Zao-jian

    2016-04-01

    An investigation has been conducted to quantify the effect of waterway geometry on the form and magnitude of forces and moment experienced by a berthed ship due to a passing ship. By using the dynamic mesh technique and solving the unsteady RANS equations in conjunction with a RNG k- ɛ turbulence model, numerical simulation of the three-dimensional unsteady viscous flow around a passing ship and a berthed ship in different waterway geometries is conducted, and the hydrodynamic forces and moment acting on the berthed ship are calculated. The proposed method is verified by comparing the numerical results with existing empirical curves and a selection of results from model scale experiments. The calculated interaction forces and moment are presented for six different waterway geometries. The magnitude of the peak values and the form of the forces and moment on the berthed ship for different cases are investigated to assess the effect of the waterway geometry. The results of present study can provide certain guidance on safe maneuvering of a ship passing by a berthed ship.

  18. LABORATORY SEDIMENT TOXICITY TESTS, SEDIMENT CHEMISTRY AND DISTRIBUTION OF BENTHIC MACROINVERTEBRATES IN SEDIMENTS FROM THE KEWEENAW WATERWAY, MICHIGAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute laboratory sediment toxicity tests using the water flea Daphnia magna and the burrowing mayfly nymph Hexagenia limbata were conducted on sediments from two areas of the Keweenaw Waterway, Michigan, to determine whether the tests reflected the condition of benthic macroinver...

  19. 33 CFR 162.40 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... section in 33 CFR Part 207. ... cautioned that large deep draft ocean-going vessels and other large commercial vessels ply the canal, and... or tows must not overtake and attempt to pass other large vessels or tows in the waterway. All...

  20. 33 CFR 117.997 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River to the Albermarle and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.997 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the... Railroad bridge, mile 13.9, in Chesapeake, Virginia, shall be maintained in the open position; the draw...

  1. 33 CFR 117.997 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River to the Albermarle and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding Aids section of the printed volume and at www... REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.997 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the... Railroad bridge, mile 13.9, in Chesapeake, Virginia, shall be maintained in the open position; the draw...

  2. 33 CFR 117.997 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River to the Albermarle and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 117.997, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.997 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the... Railroad bridge, mile 13.9, in Chesapeake, Virginia, shall be maintained in the open position; the draw...

  3. 33 CFR 117.997 - Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the Elizabeth River to the Albermarle and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Register citations affecting § 117.997, see the List of CFR Sections Affected, which appears in the Finding... REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Virginia § 117.997 Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, South Branch of the... Railroad bridge, mile 13.9, in Chesapeake, Virginia, shall be maintained in the open position; the draw...

  4. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... transit the waterway, and other special conditions and requirements which will govern the movement of... transit the canal. (e) Anchorage and wharfage facilities. The anchorage basin at Chesapeake City and free... breadth of this type of tow which may transit the canal are as described in rules governing...

  5. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware Canal); use, administration, and navigation. 207.100 Section 207.100 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION...

  6. Sorbent-amended compost filter socks in grassed waterways reduce nutrient losses in surface runoff from corn fields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface runoff from fields used to grow row crops frequently has high concentrations of sediment, nutrients, and pesticides, particularly in the first few events after tillage and agrochemical application. Compost filter socks placed in grassed waterways can further reduce sediment concentration as ...

  7. 33 CFR 207.180 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... through with commercial craft (other than vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, as described in 46 CFR part...) Waterways. (1)-(5)(i) (ii) Algiers Canal between the Mississippi River and Bayou Barataria, La., and on.... Tows in excess of 55 feet wide desiring to move over Algiers Canal or Harvey Canal will...

  8. 33 CFR 207.180 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... through with commercial craft (other than vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, as described in 46 CFR part...) Waterways. (1)-(5)(i) (ii) Algiers Canal between the Mississippi River and Bayou Barataria, La., and on.... Tows in excess of 55 feet wide desiring to move over Algiers Canal or Harvey Canal will...

  9. 33 CFR 207.180 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... through with commercial craft (other than vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, as described in 46 CFR part...) Waterways. (1)-(5)(i) (ii) Algiers Canal between the Mississippi River and Bayou Barataria, La., and on.... Tows in excess of 55 feet wide desiring to move over Algiers Canal or Harvey Canal will...

  10. 33 CFR 207.180 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... through with commercial craft (other than vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, as described in 46 CFR part...) Waterways. (1)-(5)(i) (ii) Algiers Canal between the Mississippi River and Bayou Barataria, La., and on.... Tows in excess of 55 feet wide desiring to move over Algiers Canal or Harvey Canal will...

  11. 33 CFR 207.180 - All waterways tributary to the Gulf of Mexico (except the Mississippi River, its tributaries...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... through with commercial craft (other than vessels carrying dangerous cargoes, as described in 46 CFR part...) Waterways. (1)-(5)(i) (ii) Algiers Canal between the Mississippi River and Bayou Barataria, La., and on.... Tows in excess of 55 feet wide desiring to move over Algiers Canal or Harvey Canal will...

  12. COMPARISON OF THE RELATIVE SENSITIVITY OF THREE BENTHIC INVERTEBRATES TO COPPER CONTAMINATED SEDIMENTS FROM THE KEWEENAW WATERWAY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Keweenaw Peninsula in northern Michigan was once a major copper mining area and these mining activities were responsible for depositing tons of tailings in and around the Keweenaw Waterway. n recent years there has been concerned about possible toxic effects of the contaminat...

  13. 75 FR 30753 - Regulated Navigation Area; Thea Foss and Wheeler-Osgood Waterways EPA Superfund Cleanup Site...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-02

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... ] Superfund Cleanup Site, Commencement Bay, Tacoma, WA'' in the Federal Register (73 FR 162, Aug. 20, 2008... approximately 30 acres of sediment in the waterway. Discussion of Comments and Change During the comment...

  14. 76 FR 1519 - Security Zones; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-11

    ... and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX in the Federal Register (75 FR 29695). We received one comment on the... recommendation from that one comment and requesting further comments (75 FR 65232). No public meeting was... preamble, the Coast Guard adopts the interim rule amending 33 CFR part 165 that was published at 75...

  15. 77 FR 70174 - Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Houston and Texas City, TX

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-23

    ..., 2008, issue of the Federal Register (73 FR 3316). Public Meeting We do not now plan to hold a public... SECURITY Coast Guard Waterway Suitability Assessment for Expansion of Liquefied Gas Terminals; Houston and... modify marine terminal operations in an existing facility handling Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)...

  16. 33 CFR 165.819 - Security Zone; Sabine Bank Channel, Sabine Pass Channel and Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Sabine-Neches Waterway, TX. (a) Location. (1) The following LNG facility mooring basins are designated as fixed security zones whenever LNG carriers are moored within them: (i) Golden Pass LNG, Sabine TX: All...°45′50″ N, 093°55′17″ W. (ii) Sabine Pass LNG, Cameron Parish, LA: All mooring basin waters north of...

  17. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... vessels using the waterway. The District Engineer's representative is the Chesapeake City Resident Engineer. The Chesapeake City Resident Engineer through the dispatcher on duty will enforce these... transit the canal. (e) Anchorage and wharfage facilities. The anchorage basin at Chesapeake City and...

  18. 33 CFR 207.100 - Inland waterway from Delaware River to Chesapeake Bay, Del. and Md. (Chesapeake and Delaware...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... vessels using the waterway. The District Engineer's representative is the Chesapeake City Resident Engineer. The Chesapeake City Resident Engineer through the dispatcher on duty will enforce these... transit the canal. (e) Anchorage and wharfage facilities. The anchorage basin at Chesapeake City and...

  19. Aeration remediation of a polluted waterway increases near-surface coarse and culturable microbial aerosols.

    PubMed

    Dueker, M Elias; O'Mullan, Gregory D

    2014-04-15

    Aeration remediation is currently used in polluted urban waterways to increase oxygen levels in the water column. Recent studies have provided increasing evidence that the bursting of bubbles at water surfaces introduced by aeration, or other surface disturbances, can transfer viable bacteria to the air. In heavily sewage-polluted waterways these water-originated bacterial aerosols may pose as a health risk to recreators in small boats or residents inhabiting the shoreline. Nonetheless, few studies have explored aerosols above active aeration remediation projects in waterways or investigated how bacterial aerosols change with vertical distance from aeration activities. This study, conducted at the Newtown Creek superfund site in Brooklyn, NY, USA, measured coarse aerosol particles and culturable bacteria in near-surface air above waters undergoing aeration remediation. Regardless of aeration operation culturable bacterial fallout was greater near-surface (0.6m above water) than previously-reported measurements made at 2.5m. Molecular analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequences from isolated bacteria demonstrates that water and air shared a large number of bacterial genera and that the genera present in the near-surface aerosols (0.6m) contained water-associated Vibrio and Caulobacter, which were not present at 2.5m, despite the smaller sequence library size from the near-surface. Also, the near-surface microbial assemblage had significantly greater association with sequences detected previously in aquatic environments compared to the 2.5m library. We found compelling evidence that aeration activity contributed to this vertical gradient in bacterial aerosol concentrations and identity. Similar to results from 2.5m, concentrations of near-surface respirable coarse aerosols (<10 um) increased significantly when aeration was occurring. Culturable bacterial aerosol fallout was also greater near-surface when the aerator was on compared to simultaneous measurements made at 2

  20. Murphy's Law in New Milford

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gross, Jeannie

    1976-01-01

    The mandatory provision to make sixth grade classes in home economics and industrial arts at Schaghticoke Middle School coeducational created a controversy between the National Organization for Women and the John Birchers. (EC)

  1. Feasibility of Assessing Public Health Impacts of Air Pollution Reduction Programs on a Local Scale: New Haven Case Study

    PubMed Central

    Lobdell, Danelle T.; Isakov, Vlad; Baxter, Lisa; Touma, Jawad S.; Smuts, Mary Beth; Özkaynak, Halûk

    2011-01-01

    Background New approaches to link health surveillance data with environmental and population exposure information are needed to examine the health benefits of risk management decisions. Objective We examined the feasibility of conducting a local assessment of the public health impacts of cumulative air pollution reduction activities from federal, state, local, and voluntary actions in the City of New Haven, Connecticut (USA). Methods Using a hybrid modeling approach that combines regional and local-scale air quality data, we estimated ambient concentrations for multiple air pollutants [e.g., PM2.5 (particulate matter ≤ 2.5 μm in aerodynamic diameter), NOx (nitrogen oxides)] for baseline year 2001 and projected emissions for 2010, 2020, and 2030. We assessed the feasibility of detecting health improvements in relation to reductions in air pollution for 26 different pollutant–health outcome linkages using both sample size and exploratory epidemiological simulations to further inform decision-making needs. Results Model projections suggested decreases (~ 10–60%) in pollutant concentrations, mainly attributable to decreases in pollutants from local sources between 2001 and 2010. Models indicated considerable spatial variability in the concentrations of most pollutants. Sample size analyses supported the feasibility of identifying linkages between reductions in NOx and improvements in all-cause mortality, prevalence of asthma in children and adults, and cardiovascular and respiratory hospitalizations. Conclusion Substantial reductions in air pollution (e.g., ~ 60% for NOx) are needed to detect health impacts of environmental actions using traditional epidemiological study designs in small communities like New Haven. In contrast, exploratory epidemiological simulations suggest that it may be possible to demonstrate the health impacts of PM reductions by predicting intraurban pollution gradients within New Haven using coupled models. PMID:21335318

  2. STS-32 Columbia, OV-102, liftoff from KSC LC Pad 39A is reflected in waterway

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    STS-32 Columbia, Orbiter Vehicle (OV) 102, atop the external tank (ET) and flanked by two solid rocket boosters (SRBs) begins its ascent from the mobile launcher platform at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Launch Complex (LC) Pad 39A. Plumes of smoke billow from the SRBs and fill the surrounding area in a cloud. The glow of the SRB firings light up the fixed service structure (FSS) and the retracted rotating service structure (RSS). The 7:34:59:98 am Eastern Standard Time (EST) liftoff is reflected in a nearby waterway. A scheduled launch some 24 hours earlier had been cancelled because of dubious weather at the return-to-landing site (RTLS). OV-102's launch is highlighted against the early morning darkness.

  3. The possibility and timing for a sea waterway via the Lake Iznik (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpar, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Sea of Marmara is connected to the Black Sea through the Bosporus strait. The idea of another waterway existed between these seas during the late Quaternary is much of great interest to scientific community. Taking into account the marine microfaunal composition collected from lake surface sediments some researchers claim that there was an alternative waterway connection via the lakes of Iznik and Sapanca, located at the eastward extensions of the Gulf of Gemlik and Izmit Bay, respectively. In addition a Holocene age is suggested for the latest flooding event. On the contrary, other researchers who have questioned the possibility for a waterway connection through these lakes and the lower course of Sakarya River during the Holocene or the late Pleistocene, claim that a marine connection could not be possible for at least the past 500,000 years. On the basis of the global sea-level change and regional tectonic uplift rates, for example, a connection between the Lake Iznik and the Sea of Marmara may not have been possible after 310,000 years BP. Both of the lakes, representing adjacent E-W-oriented narrow depressions, are controlled by the transpressional effects of the northern and central segments of the North Anatolian Fault (NAF) zone since the Late Miocene - Pliocene. On the basis of available seismic reflection data, the deep trough along the southern margin of Lake Iznik has been evolved under the control of a releasing bend system. Similar to the Hersek Pass separating the outer and central sub-basins of the Izmit Bay at present, this system formed the Karsak Pass between the Lake Iznik and the Gulf of Gemlik, and the brackish waters discharged into the Sea of Marmara. At present, the central segment of the NAF cuts this system and extends towards the Gulf of Gemlik, which is separated from the Lake Iznik by the uplifted Karsak sill (+83 m), similar to the pressure ridge on the Hersek Delta. Therefore the main trough of the Lake Iznik existed before the

  4. Freshwater supply potential of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carswell, W.J.; Sanders, C.L., Jr.; Johnson, D.M.

    1988-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine the low-flow frequency of freshwater flow in the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway (AICW) near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina and to determine the effects of proposed freshwater withdrawals of 45 cu ft/sec at the location of the saltwater-freshwater interface. Discharges simulated in the AICW for 1982-86 using BRANCH one-dimensional flow model were used to establish a relation of 7-day average flows in the AICW to summed 7-day average flows of four tributary streams. This relation was used with the tributary records for 1954-86 climatic years to generate 7-day minimum flows of the AICW, which were then used to develop a low-flow frequency relation. The relation indicated that the 7-day, 10-year flow of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway is 192 ct ft/s. A relation of the mile position of the saltwater-freshwater interface to recorded specific conductances at Vereen 's Marina was established. The 1982-85 period of record of specific conductance was used to simulate interface positions which were then used to establish a relation of 7-day average interface position to 7-day average discharge of the AICW. This relation indicated that the 7-day average interface position would be at mile 355.5 for the 7Q10 and at mile 356.2 if 45 cu ft were withdrawn during the 7Q10. The analysis indicates that the AICW can provide a reliable supply of freshwater at the proposed withdrawal location at mi 363.3 in the vicinity of Myrtle Beach, even during the 7Q10 low-flow conditions. (USGS)

  5. Dynamics of Dissolved Inorganic Carbon in the Waterways of Antropogenically Influenced Closed Semi-Arid Basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jameel, M. Y.; Bowen, G. J.

    2014-12-01

    Inland aquatic carbon cycling is an important component of global carbon cycle and recent work has shown that anthropogenic activities can significantly alter the flux of terrestrial carbon through these systems to oceans and lakes. The study of dissolved carbon species in rivers provides detailed information about the natural and anthropogenic processing of carbon within a watershed. We measured water chemistry and stable isotope ratios (δ13C, δ18O, δ2H) of three major rivers (Bear, Jordan and Weber) seasonally, within the Great Salt Lake Basin to understand sources and processes governing the carbon cycling within the basin. Our preliminary data suggest strong correlation between the DIC concentration and land use/land cover for all the three waterways, with DIC increasing as the rivers flow through agricultural and urban regions. We also observed significant decrease in the DIC with the addition of fresh water from the tributaries which was most significant during the spring sampling. All the three rivers are super saturated in dissolved CO2 with respected to the atmospheric CO2 concentration, with pCO2 ranging from 1-5 times the atmospheric value and also showing strong seasonal variations. Coupling the pCO2 data with the isotopic value and concentration of DIC suggests that the variations within and among the rivers are manifestation of the different sources of DIC, further altered by in-situ processes such as organic respiration and photosynthesis. Our result suggest that human induced changes in land use and land cover have significantly altered the carbon budget of waterways of the Great Salt Lake Basin and carbon flux to the Great Salt Lake itself. Our future work will further quantify these changes, increasing our understanding of past, present and future changes in carbon cycling in closed semi-arid basins, and its importance in the global carbon cycle.

  6. 11. View from the east of bent #10 with bracing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    11. View from the east of bent #10 with bracing of underside of deck and track of metro north railroad - Bridge No. 00761, Spanning Housatonic River at State Route No. 15, Milford, New Haven County, CT

  7. 34. View from the north side of typical hanger detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. View from the north side of typical hanger detail, expansion joint and reinforcement plate over bent #7 - Bridge No. 00761, Spanning Housatonic River at State Route No. 15, Milford, New Haven County, CT

  8. 33. View from the north side of typical hanger detail, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    33. View from the north side of typical hanger detail, expansion joint and reinforcement plate between towers #8 and #9 - Bridge No. 00761, Spanning Housatonic River at State Route No. 15, Milford, New Haven County, CT

  9. Surface Changes Observed at Greeley Haven during Opportunity's Fifth Martian Winter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, J. R.; Bell, J. F.; Arvidson, R. E.; Herman, J. A.

    2012-12-01

    A series of images acquired by the Pancam imaging system on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity between Sols 2825 and 2946 (January to May, 2012) documented changes in surface dust and soils at Cape York (Meridiani Planum) while the rover was parked at its winter location (Greeley Haven) on the rim of Endeavour Crater. Observations included five 360° "albedo pans" acquired using the L1 filter (739 ± 338 nm) and seven multispectral image sets (754 nm, 535 nm, 432 nm) of a single scene near the rover disturbed by the wheels (Fig. 1). The albedo pan images were acquired using 2x2 pixel downsampling and 1 bit/pixel lossy wavelet-based compression, and were all acquired within 1 minute of 12:04 local true solar time (LTST) on each of the five sols (Martian day). The near-field images were acquired using lossless compression, and were all acquired within 1 minute of 12:23 LTST on each sol. All images were calibrated to relative reflectance using established algorithms and observations of the onboard calibration target. Because of minor pointing misregistration and/or slight rover motion (owing to the 15° slope on which the rover was parked), images required alignment using sub-pixel coregistration. Ratios between the earliest and later images documented changes in the scene. Several types of changes were observed over the 121-sol interval, likely caused by winds along the crater rim. These included: (1) albedo changes of the dark aeolian bedforms in the interior of Endeavour Crater; (2) brightening and darkening of ripples on dune faces associated with redistribution of dust; (3) darkening of some compressed rover tracks; and (4) brightening of disturbed areas near the rover tracks related to reappearance of high albedo granules as darker disturbed soil was winnowed away and loose spherules were removed. Changes in the solar azimuth and elevation (and hence phase angle) for the same LTST over 121 sols were only ~5°, so it is unlikely that the observed changes are

  10. "The orang lives almost next door" the correspondence between John Fulton (New Haven) and Willem Verhaart (Java).

    PubMed

    Koehler, Peter

    2006-03-01

    Between 1937 and 1959 John Fulton (1899-1960), Sterling Professor of Physiology at Yale University (New Haven) and Willem Verhaart (1889-1983), neuropsychiatrist at Batavia Medical School (Java, Dutch East Indies) corresponded on neuroanatomical topics. Verhaart had easy access to primate brains in Batavia and stayed at Fulton's lab as a Rockefeller fellow (1938-1939), learning techniques of surgery and histology of the primate brain in order to apply it in his own lab. The correspondence relates of their undertakings in research, the preparations for Verhaart's stay in New Haven, the failure of subsequent research plans because of World War II, the camp experiences in Asia by Verhaart, the period of restoration after the war, helped by Fulton, and the political changes (independence) in Indonesia that finally lead to Verhaart's return to the Netherlands in 1950, where he became professor of histology and Director of the Neurological Institute at Leiden University. The correspondence shows how neuroscientists from different parts of the world cooperated. Moreover it is an example of the gradual change from a German (like his teacher Winkler) to an Anglo-American orientation in medical science that started in the beginning of the nineteenth century. PMID:16443567

  11. Data Safe Havens and Trust: Toward a Common Understanding of Trusted Research Platforms for Governing Secure and Ethical Health Research.

    PubMed

    Lea, Nathan Christopher; Nicholls, Jacqueline; Dobbs, Christine; Sethi, Nayha; Cunningham, James; Ainsworth, John; Heaven, Martin; Peacock, Trevor; Peacock, Anthony; Jones, Kerina; Laurie, Graeme; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with the advances in big data-driven clinical research, the data safe haven concept has evolved over the last decade. It has led to the development of a framework to support the secure handling of health care information used for clinical research that balances compliance with legal and regulatory controls and ethical requirements while engaging with the public as a partner in its governance. We describe the evolution of 4 separately developed clinical research platforms into services throughout the United Kingdom-wide Farr Institute and their common deployment features in practice. The Farr Institute is a case study from which we propose a common definition of data safe havens as trusted platforms for clinical academic research. We use this common definition to discuss the challenges and dilemmas faced by the clinical academic research community, to help promote a consistent understanding of them and how they might best be handled in practice. We conclude by questioning whether the common definition represents a safe and trustworthy model for conducting clinical research that can stand the test of time and ongoing technical advances while paying heed to evolving public and professional concerns. PMID:27329087

  12. Data Safe Havens and Trust: Toward a Common Understanding of Trusted Research Platforms for Governing Secure and Ethical Health Research

    PubMed Central

    Nicholls, Jacqueline; Dobbs, Christine; Sethi, Nayha; Cunningham, James; Ainsworth, John; Heaven, Martin; Peacock, Trevor; Peacock, Anthony; Jones, Kerina; Laurie, Graeme; Kalra, Dipak

    2016-01-01

    In parallel with the advances in big data-driven clinical research, the data safe haven concept has evolved over the last decade. It has led to the development of a framework to support the secure handling of health care information used for clinical research that balances compliance with legal and regulatory controls and ethical requirements while engaging with the public as a partner in its governance. We describe the evolution of 4 separately developed clinical research platforms into services throughout the United Kingdom-wide Farr Institute and their common deployment features in practice. The Farr Institute is a case study from which we propose a common definition of data safe havens as trusted platforms for clinical academic research. We use this common definition to discuss the challenges and dilemmas faced by the clinical academic research community, to help promote a consistent understanding of them and how they might best be handled in practice. We conclude by questioning whether the common definition represents a safe and trustworthy model for conducting clinical research that can stand the test of time and ongoing technical advances while paying heed to evolving public and professional concerns. PMID:27329087

  13. Relationships between anthropogenic chemical contaminant exposure and associated changes in reproductive parameters in male English sole (Parophrys vetulus) collected from Hylebos Waterway, Puget Sound, Washington.

    PubMed

    Sol, Sean Y; Johnson, Lyndal L; Boyd, Daryle; Olson, O Paul; Lomax, Dan P; Collier, Tracy K

    2008-11-01

    Effects of chemical contaminant exposure on gonadal development in adult male English sole (Parophrys vetulus) from Hylebos Waterway and Colvos Passage, Puget Sound, Washington were investigated. Hylebos Waterway sediment is contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and organochlorines (OCs), and Colvos Passage, a nearby nonurban area, is minimally contaminated. Fish from Hylebos Waterway had higher concentrations of both PAHs and OCs in tissues than fish from Colvos Passage. Overall, little correlation was observed between PAH exposure and biological parameters, but strong correlations were observed between OCs and the biological parameters. Migration of fish from less contaminated areas into the Hylebos Waterway during the reproductive season might have influenced these results, based on temporal changes in fish age and contaminant concentrations. PMID:18274819

  14. WATER QUALITY, MERCURY, AND HEAVY METAL DEPOSITION STUDIES IN BIOLOGICAL SPECIMENS AND SEDIMENTS FOR ECOLOGICAL BASELINE DATA IN THE ISLAND PARK WATERWAYS SYSTEM, 1973

    EPA Science Inventory

    The water quality, mercury, and heavy metal deposition in biological specimens from the Island Park waterways (17040202) were measured to establish ecological baseline data. Neutron activation analysis was used to identify quantitatively and qualitatively approximately 20 differ...

  15. Results of a monitoring program of continuous water levels and physical water properties at the Operable Unit 1 area of the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site, Milford, New Hampshire, water years 2000-03

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2005-01-01

    The Milford-Souhegan glacial-drift (MSGD) aquifer, in south-central New Hampshire, is an important source of industrial, commercial, and domestic water. The MSGD aquifer was also an important source of drinking water for the town of Milford until it was found to contain high concentrations of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in the Savage and Keyes municipal-supply wells in the early 1980s. A VOC plume was found to cover part of the southwestern half of the MSGD aquifer. In September 1984, the site was designated a Superfund site, called the Savage Municipal Well Superfund site. The primary source area of contaminants was a former tool manufacturing facility (called the OK Tool facility, and now called the Operable Unit 1 (OU1) area) that disposed of solvents at the surface and in the subsurface. The facility was closed in 1987 and removed in 1998. A low-permeability containment barrier wall was constructed and installed in the overburden (MSGD aquifer) in 1998 to encapsulate the highest concentrations of VOCs, and a pump-and-treat remediation facility was also added. Remedial operations of extraction and injection wells started in May 1999. A network of water-level monitoring sites was implemented in water year 2000 (October 1, 1999, through September 30, 2000) in the OU1 area to help assess the effectiveness of remedial operations to mitigate the VOC plume, and to evaluate the effect of the barrier wall and remedial operations on the hydraulic connections across the barrier and between the overburden and underlying bedrock. Remedial extraction and injections wells inside and outside the barrier help isolate ground-water flow inside the barrier and the further spreading of VOCs. This report summarizes both continuous and selected periodic manual measurements of water level and physical water properties (specific conductance and water temperature) for 10 monitoring locations during water years 2000-03. Additional periodic manual measurements of water levels were

  16. Computation Of The Residual Radionuclide Activity Within Three Natural Waterways At The Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hiergesell, R. A.; Phifer, M. A.

    2014-01-07

    analysis data that had been collected for various SRS investigations, as well as the additional streambed and floodplain sampling and analysis data acquired more recently as part of the ongoing SRS IOU program, and associated specifically with the FMB, PB, and SC IOUs. Samples have been acquired along the waterways, within the stream channels themselves and in the adjacent floodplain zones. While Cs-137 is the most significant and abundant radionuclide associated with the SRS waterways, it is not the only radionuclide, hence work was conducted to evaluate all radionuclides present.

  17. Modeling evaluation of integrated strategies to meet proposed dissolved oxygen standards for the Chicago waterway system.

    PubMed

    Melching, Charles S; Ao, Yaping; Alp, Emre

    2013-02-15

    The Chicago Waterway System (CWS) is a 113.8 km branching network of navigable waterways controlled by hydraulic structures in which the majority of flow is treated sewage effluent and there are periods of substantial combined sewer overflow. The Illinois Pollution Control Board (IPCB) designated the majority of the CWS as Secondary Contact and Indigenous Aquatic Life Use waters in the 1970s and made small alterations to these designations in 1988. Between 1988 and 2002 substantial improvements in the pollution control and water-quality management facilities were made in the Chicago area. The results of a Use Attainability Analysis led the Illinois Environmental Protection Agency (IEPA) to propose the division of the CWS into two new aquatic life use classes with appropriate dissolved oxygen (DO) standards. To aid the IPCB in their deliberations regarding the appropriate water use classifications and DO standards for the CWS, the DUFLOW model that is capable of simulating hydraulics and water-quality processes under unsteady-flow conditions was used to evaluate integrated strategies of water-quality improvement facilities that could meet the proposed DO standards during representative wet (2001) and dry (2003) years. A total of 28 new supplementary aeration stations with a maximum DO load of 80 or 100 g/s and aerated flow transfers at three locations in the CWS would be needed to achieve the IEPA proposed DO standards 100% of the time for both years. A much simpler and less costly (≈one tenth of the cost) system of facilities would be needed to meet the IEPA proposed DO standards 90% of the time. In theory, the combinations of flow augmentation and new supplemental aeration stations can achieve 100% compliance with the IEPA proposed DO standards, however, 100% compliance will be hard to achieve in practice because of-(1) difficulties in determining when to turn on the aeration stations and (2) localized heavy loads of pollutants during storms that may yield

  18. Exploring the links between natural resource use and biophysical status in the waterways of the North Rupununi, Guyana.

    PubMed

    Mistry, Jayalaxshmi; Simpson, Matthews; Berardi, Andrea; Sandy, Yung

    2004-09-01

    The North Rupununi District in south-west Guyana is comprised of a mosaic of ecosystems, including savannas, wetlands and forests, and is home to the Makushi Amerindians, who depend on the waterways for their subsistence needs. With logging and mining seen as increasing threats to the region, it is necessary to look at methods for engaging stakeholders in monitoring the status of their natural resources. This paper presents the results of a pilot study carried out to investigate water use by the Makushi Amerindians, and collect baseline data on the hydro-morphological aspects of the waterways. Methods included informal interviews, the use of the River Habitat Survey (RHS), and water quality measurements. The results indicate the heavy reliance of the Makushi on the waterways for their daily lives, particularly on fishing. Although ponds and creeks are important sources of fish, the rivers provide much larger catches of a greater diversity of fish species, both in the wet and dry seasons. The physical characteristics of the water sources used by the Makushi are mainly associated with the surrounding habitat types: the savanna areas containing the more nutrient rich white-water rivers, and the tropical forest areas containing the less nutrient rich black-water rivers. This study indicates that at present there is no direct evidence of adverse impacts on the waterways used by the Makushi in terms of fish catches, habitat conditions and water quality. A monitoring scheme was set up using this study's outputs as a baseline from which any future changes can be compared. Further work is to be carried out over the next three years to produce monitoring and sustainable management procedures for the North Rupununi ecosystems, by linking the physical attributes of the environment to biodiversity and subsequently local livelihoods, and by building capacity of local stakeholders through training. PMID:15251219

  19. The impact of ornithogenic inputs on phosphorous transport from altered wetland soils to waterways in East Mediterranean ecosystem.

    PubMed

    Litaor, M Iggy; Reichmann, O; Dente, E; Naftaly, A; Shenker, M

    2014-03-01

    Large flocks of Eurasian crane (Grus grus, >35,000) have begun wintering in an altered wetland agro-ecosystem located in Northern Israel, a phenomenon that attracts more than 400,000 eco-tourists a year. A 100-ha plot has been used to feed the cranes in order to protect nearby fields. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of this bird's feeding practice on the P status of the altered wetland soils and waterways. We installed a series of wells at two depths (40 and 90 cm) between two major waterways in the feeding area and monitored the hydraulic heads and collected groundwater samples for elemental analyses. We collected six soil cores and four sediment samples from the waterways and conducted sequential P extraction. We found significant increase in groundwater soluble reactive P (SRP) (>0.5 mg l(-1)) compared with much lower concentrations (~0.06 mg l(-1)) collected in the period prior to the feeding. We found significant decrease in Fe((II)), Ca, and SO4 concentrations in the shallow groundwater (33, 208, and 213 mg l(-1), respectively) compared with the period prior to the feeding (47, 460, and 370 mg l(-1) respectively). An increase in the more labile P fraction was observed in soils and sediments compared with the period before the feeding. The P input by bird excrement to the feeding area was estimated around 700 kg P per season, while P removal by plant harvesting was estimated around 640 kg Pyr(-1). This finding supports the current eco-tourism practices in the middle of intensive farming area, suggesting little impact on waterways. PMID:24361445

  20. Riparian zones as havens for exotic plant species in the central grasslands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stohlgren, T.J.; Bull, K.A.; Otsuki, Y.; Villa, C.A.; Lee, M.

    1998-01-01

    species cover (log10 cover) was positively correlated with log10% N in the soil (r = 0.61, P = 0.11) at landscape scales. On average, we found that 85% (??5%) of the total number of exotic species in the sampling plots of a given management area could be found in riparian zones, while only 50% (??8%) were found in upland plots. We conclude that: (1 species-rich and productive riparian zones are particularly invasible in grassland ecosystems; and (2) riparian zones may act as havens, corridors, and sources of exotic plant invasions for upland sites and pose a significant challenge to land managers and conservation biologists.

  1. Assimilative capacity of the Waccamaw River and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 1989-92

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewes, P.A.; Conrads, P.A.

    1995-01-01

    The assimilative capacities of selected reaches of the Waccamaw River and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, were determined using results from water-quality simulations by the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model. The study area included tidally influenced sections of the Waccamaw River, the Pee Dee River, Bull Creek, and the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway. Hydrodynamic data for the Branched Lagrangian Transport Model were simulated using the U.S. Geological Survey BRANCH one-dimensional unsteady- flow model. Assimilative capacities were determined for four locations using low-, medium-, and high- flow conditions and the average dissolved-oxygen concentration for a 7-day period. Results indicated that for the Waccamaw River near Conway, the ultimate oxygen demand is 370 to 6,740 pounds per day for 7-day average streamflows of 17 to 1,500 cubic feet per second. For the Waccamaw River at Bucksport, the ultimate oxygen demand is 580 to 7,300 pounds per day for 7-day average streamflows of 62 to 1,180 cubic feet per second. For the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near North Myrtle Beach, simulations indicate ultimate oxygen demand is 5,100 to 10,000 pounds per day for 7-day average streamflows of 110 to 465 cubic feet per second. The ultimate oxygen demand for the Waccamaw River near Murrells Inlet is 11,000 to 230,000 pounds per day for 7-day average streamflows of 2,240 to 13,700 cubic feet per second.

  2. Evaluating the Impact of Conflict Resolution on Urban Children's Violence-Related Attitudes and Behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a Community-Academic Partnership

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community-academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the…

  3. A numerical study on ship-ship interaction in shallow and restricted waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwook

    2015-09-01

    In the present study, a numerical prediction method on the hydrodynamic interaction force and moment between two ships in shallow and restricted waterway is presented. Especially, the present study proposes a methodology to overcome the limitation of the two dimensional perturbation method which is related to the moored-passing ship interaction. The validation study was performed and compared with the experiment, firstly. Afterward, in order to propose a methodology in terms with the moored-passing ship interaction, further studies were performed for the moored-passing ship case with a Reynolds Averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) calculation which is using OpenFOAM with Arbitrary Coupled Mesh Interface (ACMI) technique and compared with the experiment result. Finally, the present study proposes a guide to apply the two dimensional perturbation method to the moored-passing ship interaction. In addition, it presents a possibility that the RANS calculation with ACMI can applied to the ship-ship interaction without using a overset moving grid technique.

  4. Managing the Arroyo Seco for Flood Prevention, Erosion Control, Waterway and Habitat Restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Sanchez, L; Wang, C; Laurant, J

    2003-02-06

    One of the most important tasks for a site facility manager is to ensure that appropriate channel erosion controls are applied to on-site drainage channels. These erosion controls must minimize risks to the public and structures. Water and sediment loads commonly originate from off-site sources and many of the traditional reactionary measures (installing rip-rap or some other form of bed or bank armor) simply transfer or delay the problem. State and federal agency requirements further complicate the management solution. One case in point is the Arroyo Seco, an intermittent stream that runs along the southwest corner of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) in Livermore, California. In 2001, LLNL contracted Questa Engineering Corporation to conduct hydraulic, geomorphic, and biological investigations and to prepare an alternatives and constraints analysis. From these investigations, LLNL has selected a water management plan that encompasses overall flood prevention, erosion control, and waterway and habitat restoration and enhancement elements. The most unique aspect of the Arroyo Seco management plan is its use of non-traditional and biotechnical techniques.

  5. In situ biomonitoring of caged, juvenile Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in the Lower Duwamish Waterway

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Matthew; Gillespie, Annika; Zhou, Guo-Dong; Zhang, Shu; Meador, James P.; Duncan, Bruce; Donnelly, Kirby; McDonald, Thomas

    2011-01-01

    Contaminated sediments may have wide-ranging impacts on human and ecological health. A series of in situ caged exposure studies using juvenile Chinook salmon was conducted in the Lower Duwamish Waterway (LDW). Chemical analysis of sediment, water, and fish tissue were completed. Additionally, in 2004, DNA adducts in hepatic and gill tissues were measured. Gills contained significantly higher DNA adducts at stations B2 and B4, prompting further analysis of gills in 2006 and 2007. Fluorescent aromatic compounds (FACs) in bile, and CYP1A1 in hepatic tissue were also measured during the 2006 and 2007, respectively. FACs in field-caged fish were comparable or significantly higher than wild-caught fish LDW fish and significantly higher than lab fish after only 8–10 days, demonstrating the equivalency of exposure to that of migrating salmon. Furthermore, selected biomarkers appear to be capable of detecting spikes in contamination between sampling years, emphasizing the need for multiple year data collection. PMID:21906759

  6. Relation of channel stability to scour at highway bridges over waterways in Maryland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Doheny, Edward J.

    1993-01-01

    Data from assessments of channel stability and observed-scour conditions at 876 highway bridges over Maryland waterways were entered into a database. Relations were found to exist among specific, deterministic variables and observed-scour and debris conditions. Relations were investigated between (1) high-flow angle of attack and pier- and abutment-footing exposure, (2)abutment location and abutment-footing exposure, (3) type of bed material and pier-footing exposure, (4) tree cover on channel banks and mass wasting of the channel banks, and (5) land use near the bridge and the presence of debris blockage at the bridge opening. The results of the investigation indicate the following: (1) The number of pier and abutment-footing exposures increased for increasing high-flow angles of attack, (2) the number of abutment-footing exposures increased for abutments that protrude into the channel, (3) pier-footing exposures were most common for bridges over streams with channel beds of gravel, (4) mass wasting of channel banks with tree cover of 50 percent or greater near the bridge was less than mass wasting of channel banks with tree cover of less than 50 percent near the bridge, and (5) bridges blockage than bridge in row crop and swamp basins.

  7. A summary of environmental issues and findings: Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McClure, Nathaniel D.

    1985-03-01

    The enactment of the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) had a substantial influence on the manner in which the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway (Tenn-Tom) was constructed The interdisciplinary approach, including a board of outside consultants functioning as environmental advisors, played a valuable role toward meeting the objectives of minimizing adverse impacts and maximizing the positive environmental aspects Several of the key environmental issues associated with the Tenn-Tom are addressed and the findings are presented impacts addressed include aquifer drawdown, waterlogging, water quality, interbasin transfer, mixing of species, endangered species, erosion, sedimentation, and loss of wildlife habitat Additional discussion is also presented to explain the findings and place the identified impacts into perspective While implementation of the Tenn-Tom involved losses and resource tradeoffs, measures have been incorporated into the project to mitigate for significant resource losses The evaluation, planning, and design process for the Tenn-Tom can serve as a model approach for compliance with NEPA and other environmental statutes

  8. Role of buffer strips in management of waterway pollution: A review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barling, Rowan D.; Moore, Ian D.

    1994-07-01

    A buffer strip can perform a multitude of functions, and these include channel stability, a filter for sediment and nutrients, water purification (e.g., bacteria and pathogens), a nondisturbance area, and the provision of terrestrial and stream habitat. These functions are reviewed with specific application to Australian conditions, and methods for modeling their performance are outlined. The primary focus is on the use of buffer strips to minimize waterway pollution from diffuse sources since their use is often justified on this basis. Particular attention is given to the conditions under which a buffer strip will act as an effective filter and the conditions under which it will fail. Buffer strips are most effective when the flow is shallow (nonsubmerged), slow, and enters the buffer strip uniformly along its length. Their sediment trapping performance decreases as the sediment particle size decreases. Nutrients are often preferentially attached to fine sediment. As a result, buffer strips are better filters of sediment than of nutrients. Buffer strips should only be considered as a secondary conservation practice after controlling the generation of pollutants at their source and, to be effective, buffer strips should always be carefully designed, installed, and maintained.

  9. Moving fluid mud sondes, optical and acoustic sensing methods in support of coastal waterway dredging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bostater, Charles R.; Rotkiske, Tyler

    2015-10-01

    Airborne, Satellite and In-Situ optical and acoustical imaging provides a means to characterize surface and subsurface water conditions in shallow marine systems. An important research topic to be studied during dredging operations in harbors and navigable waterways is the movement of fluidized muds before, during and after dredging operations. The fluid movement of the surficial sediments in the form of flocs, muck and mud is important to estimate in order to model the transport of solids material during dredging operations. Movement of highly turbid bottom material creates a lutocline or near bottom nephelometric layers, reduces the penetration of light reaching the water bottom. Monitoring and measurement systems recently developed for use in shallow marine areas, such as the Indian River Lagoon are discussed. Newly developed passive sondes and subsurface imaging are described. Methods and techniques for quantifying the mass density flux of total particulate matter demonstrate the use of multiple sensor systems for environmental monitoring and provide directional fluxes and movement of the fluidized solids. Airborne imaging of dredge site provide wide area surveillance during these activities. Passive sondes, optical imaging and acoustical sensors are used to understand horizontal and vertical mass flux processes. The passive sondes can be directionally oriented and are deployed during optical particle velocimetry system (OPVS) imaging of the flocs, particles and colloidal material motion. Comparison of the image based particle velocities are compared to electromagnetic and acoustic velocity imaging results. The newly developed imaging system provides a pathway for integration of subsurface hyperspectral imaging for particle compositional analysis.

  10. Evaluation of chemical, biological, and physical conditions in the Winter Haven chain of lakes, Florida, March-June 1976

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reichenbaugh, R.C.; Hughes, G.H.

    1977-01-01

    Reconnaissance of water-quality conditions of 14 interconnected navigable lakes, in and around Winter Haven, Fla., revealed that in March and May, 1976 most were eutrophic, on the basis of high nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) concentrations. Lakes Lulu and Shipp were the most enriched as a result of surface runoff from residential, agricultural, and highly urbanized areas, and many years of municipal and industrial waste effluent input. Phytoplankton counts were greater than a million cells per milliliter in some lakes sampled; algal blooms have ocurred, and water clarity was low. The level of Lake Howard fell to the lowest stage recorded in 31 years during May 1976. The record low was likely due to rainfall deficiency. Leakage of water through the lake beds to the ground-water system is also possible, but determination of the escaping water volume would require additional study. (Woodard-USGS)

  11. Has work replaced home as a haven? Re-examining Arlie Hochschild's Time Bind proposition with objective stress data.

    PubMed

    Damaske, Sarah; Smyth, Joshua M; Zawadzki, Matthew J

    2014-08-01

    Using innovative data with objective and subjective measures of stress collected from 122 employed men and women, this paper tests the thesis of the Time Bind by asking whether people report lower stress levels at work than at home. The study finds consistent support for the Time Bind hypothesis when examining objective stress data: when participants were at work they had lower values of the stress hormone cortisol than when they were at home. Two variables moderated this association - income and children at home - such that the work as haven effect was stronger for those with lower incomes and no children living at home. Participants also, however, consistently reported higher subjective stress levels on work days than on non-work days, which is in direct contrast to the Time Bind hypothesis. Although our overall findings support Hochschild's hypothesis that stress levels are lower at work, it appears that combining work and home increases people's subjective experience of daily stress. PMID:24869785

  12. "I live by shooting hill"-a qualitative exploration of conflict and violence among urban youth in New Haven, Connecticut.

    PubMed

    Shuval, Kerem; Massey, Zohar; Caughy, Margaret O; Cavanaugh, Brenda; Pillsbury, Charles A; Groce, Nora

    2012-02-01

    To elucidate urban youths' perceptions of conflict and violence we conducted a qualitative study among minority urban youths in New Haven, Connecticut. We utilized the ecological framework to explore the multilevel nature of the findings, and triangulated results with a parallel quantitative study. We found risk factors for violence at multiple levels including lack of interpersonal anger management skills (individual level); parents not physically present in the household (relationship level); residence in crime and gang-ridden neighborhoods (community level); and socioeconomic inequalities between neighborhoods, as reflected by participants' perception of the inadequacy of neighborhood resources to provide safety (societal level). Neighborhood resources were perceived as sparse, and police were not regarded as a protective factor (sometimes rather as racially discriminatory). Participants' statements pertaining to feelings of isolation, racism, and violence without strong parental, neighborhood, and school support may impede prosocial attitudes and behaviors throughout adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:22643467

  13. Project MotherCare: one hospital's response to the high perinatal death rate in New Haven, CT.

    PubMed

    Reguero, W; Crane, M

    1994-01-01

    Starling national statistics indicate that New Haven, CT, is the seventh poorest city of its size, in terms of per capita income, in the United States. In 1989, it was reported to have the highest rate of infant mortality--18.5 infant deaths per 1,000 live birth--in the nation for a city with more than 100,000 people. Seventy-five percent of all perinatal deaths are attributed to low birth weight infants. Adequate prenatal care is a proven means of reducing this risk. To further compound the problem, substance abuse among pregnant women has increased dramatically. Census tract data revealed that many of the infant deaths were localized to several well-defined areas of the city. Forty-four percent of the infant deaths were ascribed to extreme immaturity or other causes related to low birth weight. Approximately 21 percent of the pregnant population had either no prenatal care or care was begun late--after the first trimester. The traditional avenues for prenatal care have been ineffective; an innovative approach, one that can be replicated, was initiated. The Hospital of Saint Raphael's "Project MotherCare" embarked on an initiative to address these problems by reducing the access barriers to prenatal care regardless of insurance status or ability to pay. The mission was twofold: (a) to bring prenatal care to underserved neighborhoods of New Haven and (b) to identify the substance-abusing pregnant woman and deliver a continuum of services including prenatal care, counseling, social services, and referral to a drug treatment program. Community need caused the program to expand beyond prenatal services and provide additional primary care services to other residents of these neighborhoods. PMID:7938385

  14. Preliminary investigation of the effects of sea-level rise on groundwater levels in New Haven, Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bjerklie, David M.; Mullaney, John R.; Stone, Janet R.; Skinner, Brian J.; Ramlow, Matthew A.

    2012-01-01

    Global sea level rose about 0.56 feet (ft) (170 millimeters (mm)) during the 20th century. Since the 1960s, sea level has risen at Bridgeport, Connecticut, about 0.38 ft (115 mm), at a rate of 0.008 ft (2.56 mm + or - 0.58 mm) per year. With regional subsidence, and with predicted global climate change, sea level is expected to continue to rise along the northeast coast of the United States through the 21st century. Increasing sea levels will cause groundwater levels in coastal areas to rise in order to adjust to the new conditions. Some regional climate models predict wetter climate in the northeastern United States under some scenarios. Scenarios for the resulting higher groundwater levels have the potential to inundate underground infrastructure in lowlying coastal cities. New Haven is a coastal city in Connecticut surrounded and bisected by tidally affected waters. Monitoring of water levels in wells in New Haven from August 2009 to July 2010 indicates the complex effects of urban influence on groundwater levels. The response of groundwater levels to recharge and season varied considerably from well to well. Groundwater temperatures varied seasonally, but were warmer than what was typical for Connecticut, and they seem to reflect the influence of the urban setting, including the effects of conduits for underground utilities. Specific conductance was elevated in many of the wells, indicating the influence of urban activities or seawater in Long Island Sound. A preliminary steady-state model of groundwater flow for part of New Haven was constructed using MODFLOW to simulate current groundwater levels (2009-2010) and future groundwater levels based on scenarios with a rise of 3 ft (0.91 meters (m)) in sea level, which is predicted for the end of the 21st century. An additional simulation was run assuming a 3-ft rise in sea level combined with a 12-percent increase in groundwater recharge. The model was constructed from existing hydrogeologic information for the

  15. Analyses of water and dredged material from selected southern Louisiana waterways and selected areas in the Gulf of Mexico, 1976-78

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stallworth, Geraldine R.; Jordan, Helen F.

    1980-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey was requested by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers to provide water-quality data to evaluate the potential environmental effects of (1) dredging activities in selected navigable waterways of southern Louisiana and (2) the disposal of dredged material at selected areas in the Gulf of Mexico. Areas studied from September 1976 to May 1978 included five ocean disposal sites in the Gulf of Mexico, in addition to the following waterways: Baptiste, Collette Bayou, Mississippi River at Head of Passes and Southwest Pass, Mississippi River at Tiger Pass, Bayou Black, Intracoastal Waterway (Port Allen to Morgan City), and Calcasieu River and Ship Channel. Samples were analyzed for selected chemical, physical, and biological constituents. (USGS)

  16. Final environmental impact statement/report and 4(f) statement. Volume 1. Northeast corridor improvement project electrification: New Haven, CT to Boston, MA. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    1994-10-31

    This document is the final environmental impact statement and final environmental impact report (FEIS/R) on the proposal by the National Railroad Passenger Corporation (Amtrak) to complete the electrification of the Northeast Corridor main line by extending electric traction from New Haven, CT, to Boston, MA. This document (Volume I) is the main body of the FEIS/R and includes a 4(f) Statement on the proposed location of an electrification facility in the Great Swamp Wildlife Management Area.

  17. Controls on water acidification and de-oxygenation in an estuarine waterway, eastern Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, C.; Wood, M.; Haskins, P.; Ryffel, T.; Lin, J.

    2004-09-01

    The quality of soil and water was investigated in an estuarine floodplain system, eastern Australia. The backswamp portion of the floodplain is underlain by sulfidic sediments at depths about 0.5-0.9 m below the ground surface. Actual acid sulfate soils have developed due to sulfide oxidation as a consequence of land drainage since the early 1900s. These acid sulfate soils have a high measured total actual acidity (TAA, up to 500 mmol H +/kg). However, only a very small proportion (<2%) of this TAA occurs in a water-soluble form. Water quality monitoring in the creek (Rocky Mouth Creek) draining the estuarine embayment during the period from May 1998 to July 2000 shows that acidic flows (pH<4.5) of several months occurred intermittently in the upper reach of the creek. This may be attributed to the hydrolysis of Fe 3+ after the oxidation of Fe 2+ that is exported into the creek from acid sulfate soils through an artificial drain network. It is hypothesized that Fe 2+ is being generated by biological iron reduction, which consumes H + and thereby drives the conversion of retained acids to soluble acids. This allows the release of retained acids and subsequently the translocation of acids from soils to the adjacent waterway. Monitoring results also show clear responses of pH and dissolved oxygen (DO) to heavy rainfall events during the period of alternating high (>6) pH-dominated flows. Frequently, pH and DO levels in the creek water drop during flooding. Results from field investigation and experimental simulation suggest that DO depletion associated with organic matter decomposition takes place rapidly in the floodwater inundating the soils and this DO-depleted water has a significant capacity to further de-oxygenate any receiving water. However, the consumption of DO in floodwater is not clearly related to oxidation of Fe 2+. It is not certain what other DO consumers are involved in the process and further research is needed to fill this knowledge gap.

  18. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model of the St. Clair-Detroit River waterway in the Great Lakes basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2002-01-01

    The St. Clair-Detroit River waterway connects Lake Huron with Lake Erie in the Great Lakes basin to form part of the international boundary between the United States and Canada. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic model is developed to compute flow velocities and water levels as part of a source water assessment of public water intakes. The model, which uses the generalized finite-element code RMA2, discretizes the waterway into a mesh formed by 13,783 quadratic elements defined by 42,936 nodes. Seven steady-state scenarios are used to calibrate the model by adjusting parameters associated with channel roughness in 25 material zones. An inverse modeling code is used to systematically adjust model parameters and to determine their associated uncertainty by use of nonlinear regression. Calibration results show close agreement between simulated and expected flows in major channels and water levels at gaging stations. Sensitivity analyses describe the amount of information available to estimate individual model parameters, and quantify the utility of flow measurements at selected cross sections and water-level measurements at gaging stations. Further data collection, model calibration analysis, and grid refinements are planned to assess and enhance two-dimensional flow simulation capabilities describing the horizontal flow distributions in St. Clair and Detroit Rivers and circulation patterns in Lake St. Clair.

  19. Applicability of market-based instruments for safeguarding water quality in coastal waterways: Case study for Darwin Harbour, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greiner, Romy

    2014-02-01

    Water pollution of coastal waterways is a complex problem due to the cocktail of pollutants and multiplicity of polluters involved and pollution characteristics. Pollution control therefore requires a combination of policy instruments. This paper examines the applicability of market-based instruments to achieve effective and efficient water quality management in Darwin Harbour, Northern Territory, Australia. Potential applicability of instruments is examined in the context of biophysical and economic pollution characteristics, and experience with instruments elsewhere. The paper concludes that there is potential for inclusion of market-based instruments as part of an instrument mix to safeguard water quality in Darwin Harbour. It recommends, in particular, expanding the existing licencing system to include quantitative pollution limits for all significant point polluters; comprehensive and independent pollution monitoring across Darwin Harbour; public disclosure of water quality and emissions data; positive incentives for landholders in the Darwin Harbour catchment to improve land management practices; a stormwater offset program for greenfield urban developments; adoption of performance bonds for developments and operations which pose a substantial risk to water quality, including port expansion and dredging; and detailed consideration of a bubble licensing scheme for nutrient pollution. The paper offers an analytical framework for policy makers and resource managers tasked with water quality management in coastal waterways elsewhere in Australia and globally, and helps to scan for MBIs suitable in any given environmental management situation.

  20. Analysis of sediments and soils for chemical contamination for the design of US Navy homeport facility at East Waterway of Everett Harbor, Washington. Final report. [Macoma inquinata; Mytilus edulis

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J.W.; Crecelius, E.A.

    1985-03-01

    Contaminated sediments in the East Waterway of Everett Harbor, Washington, are extremely localized; they consist of a layer of organically-rich, fine sediments overlying a relatively cleaner, more sandy native material. The contaminated layer varies in thickness throughout the waterway from as much as 2 meters to only a few centimeters. Generally, the layer is thicker and more contaminated at the head of the waterway (northern end) and becomes thinner and less contaminated as one proceeds southerly out of the waterway and into Port Gardner. These sediments contain elevated levels of heavy metals and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and scattered concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB). Approximately 500,000 cubic yards of material exhibit elevated chemical contamination compared to Puget Sound background levels. The contaminated sediments in this waterway require biological testing before decisions can be made regarding the acceptability of unconfined disposal.

  1. Has Work Replaced Home as a Haven? Re-examining Arlie Hochschild's Time Bind Proposition with Objective Stress Data

    PubMed Central

    Damaske, Sarah; Smyth, Joshua M.; Zawadzki, Matthew J.

    2014-01-01

    Using innovative data with objective and subjective measures of stress collected from 122 employed men and women, this paper tests the thesis of the Time Bind by asking whether people report lower stress levels at work than at home. The study finds consistent support for the Time Bind hypothesis when examining objective stress data: when participants were at work they had lower values of the stress hormone cortisol than when they were at home. Two variables moderated this association – income and children at home – such that the work as haven effect was stronger for those with lower incomes and no children living at home. Participants also, however, consistently reported higher subjective stress levels on work days than on non-work days, which is in direct contrast to the Time Bind hypothesis. Although our overall findings support Hochschild's hypothesis that stress levels are lower at work, it appears that combining work and home increases people's subjective experience of daily stress. PMID:24869785

  2. A grassed waterway and earthen dams to control muddy floods from a cultivated catchment of the Belgian loess belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evrard, Olivier; Vandaele, Karel; van Wesemael, Bas; Bielders, Charles L.

    2008-08-01

    Muddy floods, i.e. runoff from cultivated areas carrying large quantities of soil, are frequent and widespread in the European loess belt. They are mainly generated in dry zero-order valleys and are nowadays considered as the most likely process transferring material eroded from cultivated hillslopes during the Holocene to the flood plain. The huge costs of muddy flood damages justify the urgent installation of control measures. In the framework of the 'Soil Erosion Decree' of the Belgian Flemish region, a 12 ha-grassed waterway and three earthen dams have been installed between 2002-2004 in the thalweg of a 300-ha cultivated dry valley in the Belgian loess belt. The measures served their purpose by preventing any muddy flood in the downstream village, despite the occurrence of several extreme rainfall events (with a maximum return period of 150 years). The catchment has been intensively monitored from 2005-2007 and 39 runoff events were recorded in that period. Peak discharge (per ha) was reduced by 69% between the upstream and the downstream extremities of the grassed waterway (GWW). Furthermore, runoff was buffered for 5-12 h behind the dams, and the lag time at the outlet of the catchment was thereby increased by 75%. Reinfiltration was also observed within the waterway, runoff coefficients decreasing by a mean of 50% between both extremities of the GWW. Sediment discharge was also reduced by 93% between the GWW's inflow and the outlet. Before the installation of the control measures, specific sediment yield (SSY) of the catchment reached 3.5 t ha - 1 yr - 1 and an ephemeral gully was observed nearly each year in the catchment. Since the control measures have been installed, no (ephemeral) gully has developed and the SSY of the catchment dropped to a mean of 0.5 t ha - 1 yr - 1 . Hence, sediment transfer from the cultivated dry valley to the alluvial plain should dramatically decrease. Total cost of the control measures that are built for a 20 year-period is

  3. Correlation of burnout syndrome with specific coping strategies, behaviors, and spiritual attitudes among interns at Yale University, New Haven, USA

    PubMed Central

    Doolittle, Benjamin R.; Windish, Donna M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: This study aimed to determine the correlation of burnout syndrome with specific coping strategies, behaviors, and spiritual attitudes among interns in internal medicine, primary care, and internal medicine/pediatrics residency programs at two institutions. Methods: Intern physicians completed anonymous voluntary surveys prior to starting the internship in June 2009 and in the middle of the internship in February 2010. Three validated survey instruments were used to explore burnout, coping, and spiritual attitudes: the Maslach Burnout Inventory, the COPE Inventory, and the Hatch Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale. The interns were in programs at the Yale University School of Medicine and a Yale-affiliated community hospital, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Results: The prevalence of self-identified burnout prior to starting the internship was 1/66 (1.5%) in June 2009, increasing to 10/53 (18.9%) in February 2010 (P<0.0001). From June 2009 to February 2010, the prevalence of high emotional exhaustion increased from 30/66 (45.5%) to 45/53 (84.9%) (P<0.0001), and that of high depersonalization increased from 42/66 (63.6%) to 45/53 (84.9%) (P=0.01). Interns who employed the strategies of acceptance and active coping were less likely to experience emotional exhaustion and depersonalization (P<0.05). Perceptions of high personal accomplishment was 75.5% and was positively correlated with total scores on the Hatch Spiritual Involvement and Beliefs Scale, as well as the internal/fluid and existential/meditative domains of that instrument. Specific behaviors did not impact burnout. Conclusion: Burnout increased during the intern year. Acceptance, active coping, and spirituality were correlated with less burnout. Specific behaviors were not correlated with burnout domains. PMID:26201403

  4. [Spatial Distribution and Potential Ecological Risk Assessment of Heavy Metals in Soils and Sediments in Shunde Waterway, Southern China].

    PubMed

    Cai, Yi-min; Chen, Wei-ping; Peng, Chi; Wang, Tie-yu; Xiao, Rong-bo

    2016-05-15

    Environmental quality of soils and sediments around water source area can influence the safety of potable water of rivers. In order to study the pollution characteristics, the sources and ecological risks of heavy metals Zn, Cr, Pb, Cu, Ni and Cd in water source area, surface soils around the waterway and sediments in the estuary of main tributaries were collected in Shunde, and ecological risks of heavy metals were assessed by two methods of potential ecological risk assessment. The mean contents of Zn, Cr, Pb, Cu, Ni and Cd in the surface soils were 186.80, 65.88, 54.56, 32.47, 22.65 and 0.86 mg · kg⁻¹ respectively, and they were higher than their soil background values except those of Cu and Ni. The mean concentrations of Zn, Cr, Pb, Cu, Ni and Cd in the sediments were 312.11, 111.41, 97.87, 92.32, 29.89 and 1.72 mg · kg⁻¹ respectively, and they were higher than their soil background values except that of Ni. The results of principal component analysis illustrated that the main source of Cr and Ni in soils was soil parent materials, and Zn, Pb, Cu and Cd in soils mainly came from wastewater discharge of local manufacturing industry. The six heavy metals in sediments mainly originated from industry emissions around the Shunde waterway. The results of potential ecological risk assessment integrating environmental bioavailability of heavy metals showed that Zn, Cu, Pb and Ni had a slight potential ecological risk. Cd had a slight potential ecological risk in surface soils, but a moderate potential ecological risk in surfaces sediments. Because the potential ecological risk assessment integrating environmental bioavailability of heavy metals took the soil properties and heavy metal forms into account, its results of risks were lower than those of Hakanson methods, and it could avoid overestimating the potential risks of heavy metals. PMID:27506029

  5. Evaluating the impact of conflict resolution on urban children's violence-related attitudes and behaviors in New Haven, Connecticut, through a community–academic partnership

    PubMed Central

    Shuval, Kerem; Pillsbury, Charles A.; Cavanaugh, Brenda; McGruder, La'Rie; McKinney, Christy M.; Massey, Zohar; Groce, Nora E.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous schools are implementing youth violence prevention interventions aimed at enhancing conflict resolution skills without evaluating their effectiveness. Consequently, we formed a community–academic partnership between a New Haven community-based organization and Yale's School of Public Health and Prevention Research Center to examine the impact of an ongoing conflict resolution curriculum in New Haven elementary schools, which had yet to be evaluated. Throughout the 2007–08 school year, 191 children in three schools participated in a universal conflict resolution intervention. We used a quasi-experimental design to examine the impact of the intervention on participants' likelihood of violence, conflict self-efficacy, hopelessness and hostility. Univariate and multivariable analyses were utilized to evaluate the intervention. The evaluation indicates that the intervention had little positive impact on participants' violence-related attitudes and behavior. The intervention reduced hostility scores significantly in School 1 (P < 0.01; Cohen's d = 0.39) and hopelessness scores in School 3 (P = 0.05, Cohen's d = 0.52); however, the intervention decreased the conflict self-efficacy score in School 2 (P = 0.04; Cohen's d = 0.23) and was unable to significantly change many outcome measures. The intervention's inability to significantly change many outcome measures might be remedied by increasing the duration of the intervention, adding additional facets to the intervention and targeting high-risk children. PMID:20444803

  6. Creating a Safe Haven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Dennis

    2003-01-01

    Examines security issues that planners must address at the programming and schematic design phase in key areas of the school building. They include the front door, safe halls and stairs, positive classrooms, and secure assembly. (EV)

  7. A Safe Haven.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lupinacci, Jeff

    2002-01-01

    Presents four key steps in planning for school security and creating a safe, secure environment for students: deterring the possibility of crime; detecting when something potentially troublesome has occurred; delaying criminals in order to give law enforcement officials the additional time needed to catch them; and recovering and continuing the…

  8. No Safe Havens.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trump, Kenneth S.; Lavarello, Curtis

    2003-01-01

    Discusses implications of national survey of school-based police that finds majority of respondents believe schools are vulnerable to a terrorist attack. Describes school board's role in improving school safety, steps school officials can take to reduce risk, and some practical, cost-effective measures to increase security. (PKP)

  9. Spirit Scans Winter Haven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At least three different kinds of rocks await scientific analysis at the place where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit will likely spend several months of Martian winter. They are visible in this picture, which the panoramic camera on Spirit acquired during the rover's 809th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 12, 2006). Paper-thin layers of light-toned, jagged-edged rocks protrude horizontally from beneath small sand drifts; a light gray rock with smooth, rounded edges sits atop the sand drifts; and several dark gray to black, angular rocks with vesicles (small holes) typical of hardened lava lie scattered across the sand.

    This view is an approximately true-color rendering that combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  10. Havens of Resilience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henderson, Nan

    2013-01-01

    Schools are natural environments for helping all children cultivate the resilience that resides within them. Research shows that schools are filled with the conditions that promote resilience (Werner, 2003). These include caring, encouraging relationships, role models, and mentors (Theron & Engelbrecht, 2012; Thomsen, 2002; Walsh, 2012); clear…

  11. Analysis of Salinity Intrusion in the Waccamaw River and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, 1995-2002

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Roehl, Edwin A., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Six reservoirs in North Carolina discharge into the Pee Dee River, which flows 160 miles through South Carolina to the coastal communities near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. During the Southeast's record-breaking drought from 1998 to 2003, salinity intrusions inundated a coastal municipal freshwater intake, limiting water supplies. To evaluate the effects of regulated flows of the Pee Dee River on salinity intrusion in the Waccamaw River and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the South Carolina Department of Natural Resources and a consortium of stakeholders entered into a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Geological Survey to apply data-mining techniques to the long-term time series to analyze and simulate salinity dynamics near the freshwater intakes along the Grand Strand of South Carolina. Salinity intrusion in tidal rivers results from the interaction of three principal forces?streamflow, mean tidal water levels, and tidal range. To analyze, model, and simulate hydrodynamic behaviors at critical coastal gages, data-mining techniques were applied to over 20 years of hourly streamflow, coastal water-quality, and water-level data. Artificial neural network models were trained to learn the variable interactions that cause salinity intrusions. Streamflow data from the 18,300-square-mile basin were input to the model as time-delayed variables and accumulated tributary inflows. Tidal inputs to the models were obtained by decomposing tidal water-level data into a 'periodic' signal of tidal range and a 'chaotic' signal of mean water levels. The artificial neural network models were able to convincingly reproduce historical behaviors and generate alternative scenarios of interest. To make the models directly available to all stakeholders along the Pee Dee and Waccamaw Rivers and Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, an easy-to-use decision support system (DSS) was developed as a spreadsheet application that integrates the historical database, artificial neural network models

  12. The impact of inland ships and recreational boats on measured NOx and ultrafine particle concentrations along the waterways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Zee, Saskia C.; Dijkema, Marieke B. A.; van der Laan, Jorrit; Hoek, Gerard

    2012-08-01

    In Amsterdam, many inhabitants reside in proximity to inland waters. The aim of this study was to assess the impact of passing inland ships and recreational boats, including touring boats, on the air quality near houses close to the water. A measurement campaign was performed at five sites in Amsterdam. Two sites were located along the inland waterways used by cargo ships and recreational boats. The other three sites were located along the canals in the historical city centre, used by touring boats and private recreational boats. At each site, measurements were performed at the waterside and at the facade of houses. Nitrogen oxides (NO and NO2) and ultrafine particles (particle number (PN) concentration), were measured continuously during one afternoon per site, while time and type of passing ships and road traffic was registered. Linear regression analysis was used to analyze the association between passing ships and concentration, adjusted for passing road traffic. There was substantial variation in the impact of passing ships on concentrations at each measuring site, as well as between sites. On average, cargo ships contributed 5 and 4 μg m-3 to NO and NO2, respectively, and 3000 particles cm-3 to PN concentration near houses during the sampling period. Peak concentrations were occasionally substantially higher. Emissions from touring boats had a small but significant impact on NO concentration near houses but not on NO2, with the exception of one site located near the edge of two canals, where boats use extra power to travel around the bent. At this site, touring boats contributed 5 μg m-3 to the local NO2 concentration. No consistent impact of touring boats on PN concentration was observed. Emissions from private recreational boats were not consistently associated with increased NOx or PN concentration. Road traffic intensity was low at the selected measurement sites. Nevertheless, a significant impact of passing diesel-operated delivery vans on house

  13. 33 CFR 165.T08-0432 - Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., Morgan City-Port Allen Route from Mile Marker 0 to Port Allen Lock. 165.T08-0432 Section 165.T08-0432... Limited Access Areas Eighth Coast Guard District § 165.T08-0432 Safety Zone; Waterway Closure, Morgan City... Water Way on the Morgan City—Port Allen route from MM 0 to the Port Allen lock. (b) Effective date....

  14. Effects of a remedial system and its operation on volatile organic compound-contaminated ground water, Operable Unit 1, Savage Municipal Well Superfund Site, Milford, New Hampshire, 1998-2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harte, Philip T.

    2006-01-01

    The Savage Municipal Well Superfund site in the Town of Milford, N.H., is underlain by a 0.5-square mile plume of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), mostly tetrachloroethylene (PCE). The plume occurs mostly within a highly transmissive sand and gravel layer, but also extends into underlying till and bedrock. The plume has been divided into two areas called Operable Unit 1 (OU1), which contains the primary source area, and Operable Unit 2 (OU2), which is defined as the extended plume area. PCE concentrations in excess of 100,000 parts per billion (ppb) had been detected in the OU1 area in 1995, indicating a likely Dense Non-Aqueous Phase Liquid (DNAPL) source. In the fall of 1998, the New Hampshire Department of Environmental Services (NHDES) and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) installed a remedial system in OU1 to contain and capture the dissolved VOC plume. The OU1 remedial system includes a low-permeability barrier wall that encircles the highest detected concentrations of PCE, and a series of injection and extraction wells to contain and remove contaminants. The barrier wall likely penetrates the full thickness of the sand and gravel; in most places, it also penetrates the full thickness of the underlying basal till and sits atop bedrock. Remedial injection and extraction wells have been operating since the spring of 1999 and include a series of interior (inside the barrier wall) injection and extractions wells and exterior (outside the barrier wall) injection and extraction wells. A recharge gallery outside the barrier wall receives the bulk of the treated water and reinjects it into the shallow aquifer. From 1998 to 2004, PCE concentrations decreased by an average of 80 percent at most wells outside the barrier wall. This decrease indicates (1) the barrier wall and interior extraction effectively contained high PCE concentrations inside the wall, (2) other sources of PCE did not appear to be outside of the wall, and (3) ambient ground

  15. Data compilation for assessing sediment and toxic chemical loads from the Green River to the lower Duwamish Waterway, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Black, Robert W.

    2014-01-01

    Between February and June 2013, the U.S. Geological Survey collected representative samples of whole water, suspended sediment, and (or) bed sediment from a single strategically located site on the Duwamish River, Washington, during seven periods of different flow conditions. Samples were analyzed by Washington-State-accredited laboratories for a large suite of compounds, including polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and other semivolatile compounds, polychlorinated biphenyl Aroclors and the 209 congeners, metals, dioxins/furans, volatile organic compounds, pesticides, butyltins, hexavalent chromium, and total organic carbon. Chemical concentrations associated with bulk bed sediment (<2 mm) and fine bed sediment (<62.5 μm) fractions were compared to chemical concentrations associated with suspended sediment. Bulk bed sediment concentrations generally were lower than fine bed sediment and suspended-sediment concentrations. Concurrent with the chemistry sampling, additional parameters were measured, including instantaneous river discharge, suspended-sediment concentration, sediment particle-size distribution, and general water-quality parameters. From these data, estimates of instantaneous sediment and chemical loads from the Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway were calculated.

  16. Mapping the potential distribution of the invasive Red Shiner, Cyprinella lutrensis (Teleostei: Cyprinidae) across waterways of the conterminous United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulos, Helen M.; Chernoff, Barry; Fuller, Pam L.; Butman, David

    2012-01-01

    Predicting the future spread of non-native aquatic species continues to be a high priority for natural resource managers striving to maintain biodiversity and ecosystem function. Modeling the potential distributions of alien aquatic species through spatially explicit mapping is an increasingly important tool for risk assessment and prediction. Habitat modeling also facilitates the identification of key environmental variables influencing species distributions. We modeled the potential distribution of an aggressive invasive minnow, the red shiner (Cyprinella lutrensis), in waterways of the conterminous United States using maximum entropy (Maxent). We used inventory records from the USGS Nonindigenous Aquatic Species Database, native records for C. lutrensis from museum collections, and a geographic information system of 20 raster climatic and environmental variables to produce a map of potential red shiner habitat. Summer climatic variables were the most important environmental predictors of C. lutrensis distribution, which was consistent with the high temperature tolerance of this species. Results from this study provide insights into the locations and environmental conditions in the US that are susceptible to red shiner invasion.

  17. Application of advanced diesel technology to inland waterway towboats three-wheel turbocharger system. Final report, Feb 88-Mar 91

    SciTech Connect

    Priebe, R.J.; Rowland, D.P.

    1991-03-01

    The report represents the development, test and evaluation of Three Wheel Turbocharger System on the DDC Series 149 Marine engine. The program included development and performance testing in a test cell and demonstration of the system in actual revenue service aboard an inland waterways towboat. The Detroit Diesel Series 149 Marine engines rated at 700 SHP were tested aboard the M/V ABBIE-C, owned and operated by Compass Marine Services, Inc. Both port and starboard engines were fully instrumented to measure engine operating parameters, propeller shaft torque and fuel consumption. The data was collected by a computer based data acquisition system. The development, testing and demonstration program consisted of six task levels including TWT System design and development, Towboat DDC 12V-149NA (2 engines) baseline testing and DDC 8V-149 engine testing with one engine configured as TIB/DDEC model and the second as TWT/DDEC model. The TWT system in conjunction with DDEC significantly improved air-fuel ratio and transient response of the 8V-149 TWT/DDEC engine which proved to be 15% more fuel efficient than the 12V-149NA engines.

  18. Chemical concentrations and instantaneous loads, Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway near Seattle, Washington, 2013–15

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conn, Kathleen E.; Black, Robert W.; Vanderpool-Kimura, Ann M.; Foreman, James R.; Peterson, Norman T.; Senter, Craig A.; Sissel, Stephen K.

    2015-01-01

    Median chemical concentrations in suspended-sediment samples were greater than median chemical concentrations in fine bed sediment (less than 62.5 µm) samples, which were greater than median chemical concentrations in paired bulk bed sediment (less than 2 mm) samples. Suspended-sediment concentration, sediment particle-size distribution, and general water-quality parameters were measured concurrent with the chemistry sampling. From this discrete data, combined with the continuous streamflow record, estimates of instantaneous sediment and chemical loads from the Green River to the Lower Duwamish Waterway were calculated. For most compounds, loads were higher during storms than during baseline conditions because of high streamflow and high chemical concentrations. The highest loads occurred during dam releases (periods when stored runoff from a prior storm is released from the Howard Hanson Dam into the upper Green River) because of the high river streamflow and high suspended-sediment concentration, even when chemical concentrations were lower than concentrations measured during storm events. 

  19. Biotic and abiotic controls on nitrogen leaching losses into waterways during successive bovine urine application to soil.

    PubMed

    Neilen, Amanda D; Chen, Chengrong R; Faggotter, Stephen J; Ellison, Tanya L; Burford, Michele A

    2016-07-01

    Cattle waste products high in nitrogen (N) that enter waterways via rainfall runoff can contribute to aquatic ecosystem health deterioration. It is well established that N leaching from this source can be reduced by plant assimilation, e.g. pasture grass. Additionally, N leaching can be reduced when there is sufficient carbon (C) in the soil such as plant litterfall to stimulate microbial processes, i.e. denitrification, which off-gas N from the soil profile. However, the relative importance of these two processes is not well understood. A soil microcosm experiment was conducted to determine the role of biotic processes, pasture grass and microbial activity, and abiotic processes such as soil sorption, in reducing N leaching loss, during successive additions of bovine urine. Pasture grass was the most effective soil cover in reducing N leaching losses, which leached 70% less N compared to exposed soil. Successive application of urine to the soil resulted in N accumulation, after which there was a breaking point indicated by high N leaching losses. This is likely to be due to the low C:N ratio within the soil profiles treated with urine (molar ratio 8:1) compared to water treated soils (30:1). In this experiment we examined the role of C addition in reducing N losses and showed that the addition of glucose can temporarily reduce N leaching. Overall, our results demonstrated that plant uptake of N was a more important process in preventing N leaching than microbial processes. PMID:27031296

  20. Coordinated Use of Mass Media for the Development and Delivery of Career Education. Final Report. [And A Study of Awareness of and Interest in the Career Education Program in the New Haven Area].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Starch Inra Hooper, Inc., Mamaroneck, NY.

    A pilot mass media campaign was conducted in New Haven, Connecticut, to acquaint the public with the concept of career education. For three weeks newspapers, television, and radio devoted time and space to the campaign which focused on one of the following topics each week: the need for planning in career development; career development; career…

  1. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 3): Drake Chemical Site (Phase 2), Lock Haven, Clinton County, Pennsylvania (second remedial action), May 1986. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-05-13

    The Drake Chemical site is located in Lock Haven, Clinton County, PA. Between 1962 and 1982 Drake Chemical, Inc. (DCI) manufactured batches of specialty, intermediate chemicals for producers of dyes, pharmaceuticals, cosmetics, herbicides, and pesticides. The herbicide Fenac, is a major site contaminant. The eight-acre inactive site contains six major buildings. There are about sixty process tanks used for acids, bases, and fuel oils. Also there are fire wastewater treatment lagoons. Chemical sludge and contaminated soil cover much of the open area while construction debris is about. The primary contaminants are inorganics and organics including toluene, benzene, TCE, and xylene. The cleanup action includes drainage and removal of the lagoons and treatment of drained liquid and sludge, removal of all tanks, buildings, and debris; decontamination of all metal structures salvagable as scrap; incineration of chemicals and analysis and disposal (if needed) of decontamination fluids. The estimated baseline capital cost for this remedy is $3,143,000.

  2. “I Live by Shooting Hill” – A Qualitative Exploration of Conflict and Violence among Urban Youth in New Haven, Connecticut

    PubMed Central

    Shuval, Kerem; Massey, Zohar; O Caughy, Margaret; Cavanaugh, Brenda; Pillsbury, Charles A; Groce, Nora

    2013-01-01

    To elucidate urban youths’ perceptions of conflict and violence we conducted a qualitative study among minority urban youths in New Haven, Connecticut. We utilized the ecological framework to explore the multilevel nature of the findings, and triangulated results with a parallel quantitative study. We found risk factors for violence at multiple levels including lack of interpersonal anger management skills (individual level); parents not physically present in the household (relationship level); residence in crime and gang-ridden neighborhoods (community level); and socioeconomic inequalities between neighborhoods, as reflected by participants’ perception of the inadequacy of neighborhood resources to provide safety (societal level). Neighborhood resources were perceived as sparse, and police were not regarded as a protective factor (sometimes rather as racially discriminatory). Participants’ statements pertaining to feelings of isolation, racism, and violence without strong parental, neighborhood, and school support may impede prosocial attitudes and behaviors throughout adolescence and young adulthood. PMID:22643467

  3. Protective Behaviour of Citizens to Transport Accidents Involving Hazardous Materials: A Discrete Choice Experiment Applied to Populated Areas nearby Waterways

    PubMed Central

    de Bekker-Grob, Esther W.; Bergstra, Arnold D.; Bliemer, Michiel C. J.; Trijssenaar-Buhre, Inge J. M.; Burdorf, Alex

    2015-01-01

    Background To improve the information for and preparation of citizens at risk to hazardous material transport accidents, a first important step is to determine how different characteristics of hazardous material transport accidents will influence citizens’ protective behaviour. However, quantitative studies investigating citizens’ protective behaviour in case of hazardous material transport accidents are scarce. Methods A discrete choice experiment was conducted among subjects (19–64 years) living in the direct vicinity of a large waterway. Scenarios were described by three transport accident characteristics: odour perception, smoke/vapour perception, and the proportion of people in the environment that were leaving at their own discretion. Subjects were asked to consider each scenario as realistic and to choose the alternative that was most appealing to them: staying, seeking shelter, or escaping. A panel error component model was used to quantify how different transport accident characteristics influenced subjects’ protective behaviour. Results The response was 44% (881/1,994). The predicted probability that a subject would stay ranged from 1% in case of a severe looking accident till 62% in case of a mild looking accident. All three transport accident characteristics proved to influence protective behaviour. Particularly a perception of strong ammonia or mercaptan odours and visible smoke/vapour close to citizens had the strongest positive influence on escaping. In general, ‘escaping’ was more preferred than ‘seeking shelter’, although stated preference heterogeneity among subjects for these protective behaviour options was substantial. Males were less willing to seek shelter than females, whereas elderly people were more willing to escape than younger people. Conclusion Various characteristics of transport accident involving hazardous materials influence subjects’ protective behaviour. The preference heterogeneity shows that information needs

  4. Predicted effects on ground water of construction of Divide Cut section, Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, northeastern Mississippi, using a digital model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McBride, Mark S.

    1981-01-01

    The Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway, connecting the Tennessee River in northeastern Mississippi with the Gulf of Mexico, is currently (1980) under construction. The Divide Section, the northernmost 39 miles of the Waterway, will consist, from north to south, of (1) a dredged channel, (2) the Divide Cut, and (3) an artifical lake impounded by the Bay Springs Dam. In all three , water will be at Tennessee River level. A three-dimensional digital model covering 3,273 square miles was constructed to simulate ground-water flow in the Gordo and Eutaw Formations and the Coffee Sand in the vicinity of the Divide Section. The model was calibrated to preconstruction water levels, then used to simulate the effects of stresses imposed by the construction of the Divide Section. The model indicates that the system stabilizes after major changes in conditions within a few months. The Divide Cut acts as a drain, lowering water levels as much as 55 feet. Drawdowns of 5 feet occur as much as 8 miles from the Cut. The 80-foot-high Bay Springs Dam raises ground-water levels by 5 feet as far as 6 miles from its impoundment. Drawdown is not likely to affect public water supplies significantly, but probably will adversely affect a relatively small number of private wells. (USGS)

  5. An Endangered Arboreal Specialist, the Western Ringtail Possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis), Shows a Greater Genetic Divergence across a Narrow Artificial Waterway than a Major Road.

    PubMed

    Yokochi, Kaori; Kennington, Winn Jason; Bencini, Roberta

    2016-01-01

    The fragmentation of habitats by roads and other artificial linear structures can have a profound effect on the movement of arboreal species due to their strong fidelity to canopies. Here, we used 12 microsatellite DNA loci to investigate the fine-scale spatial genetic structure and the effects of a major road and a narrow artificial waterway on a population of the endangered western ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis) in Busselton, Western Australia. Using spatial autocorrelation analysis, we found positive genetic structure in continuous habitat over distances up to 600 m. These patterns are consistent with the sedentary nature of P. occidentalis and highlight their vulnerability to the effects of habitat fragmentation. Pairwise relatedness values and Bayesian cluster analysis also revealed significant genetic divergences across an artificial waterway, suggesting that it was a barrier to gene flow. By contrast, no genetic divergences were detected across the major road. While studies often focus on roads when assessing the effects of artificial linear structures on wildlife, this study provides an example of an often overlooked artificial linear structure other than a road that has a significant impact on wildlife dispersal leading to genetic subdivision. PMID:26784921

  6. An Endangered Arboreal Specialist, the Western Ringtail Possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis), Shows a Greater Genetic Divergence across a Narrow Artificial Waterway than a Major Road

    PubMed Central

    Yokochi, Kaori

    2016-01-01

    The fragmentation of habitats by roads and other artificial linear structures can have a profound effect on the movement of arboreal species due to their strong fidelity to canopies. Here, we used 12 microsatellite DNA loci to investigate the fine-scale spatial genetic structure and the effects of a major road and a narrow artificial waterway on a population of the endangered western ringtail possum (Pseudocheirus occidentalis) in Busselton, Western Australia. Using spatial autocorrelation analysis, we found positive genetic structure in continuous habitat over distances up to 600 m. These patterns are consistent with the sedentary nature of P. occidentalis and highlight their vulnerability to the effects of habitat fragmentation. Pairwise relatedness values and Bayesian cluster analysis also revealed significant genetic divergences across an artificial waterway, suggesting that it was a barrier to gene flow. By contrast, no genetic divergences were detected across the major road. While studies often focus on roads when assessing the effects of artificial linear structures on wildlife, this study provides an example of an often overlooked artificial linear structure other than a road that has a significant impact on wildlife dispersal leading to genetic subdivision. PMID:26784921

  7. Keeping our waterways safe by equipping commercial vessels with appropriate sensor suites to enable pervasive surveillance of coastal and inland waterborne commercial traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feeley, Terry; Lavoie, James

    2010-04-01

    The US has over 58,000 miles of ocean shoreline, over 5500 hundred miles of Great Lakes shoreline, and over 3,500,000 miles of river and small lake shoreline. These waterways are critical to the nation's strategic, economic and societal well being. These assets must be protected from potential terrorist attacks. It is a daunting task for an open society to protect such a large and distributed area while still preserving the freedoms for its citizens to enjoy the natural beauty of our waterways. The US has a well developed fleet of merchant tugs and barges that engage in day to day commercial activity around the coasts, rivers and lakes of the country. This paper will discuss the notion of developing a nationwide mobile sensor network by equipping these barges and tugs with sensor suites that would feed data into a common operations' center. The data will be displayed to the first responder community and the vessel operators via data streams from Rite-View (a robust 3D modeling and simulation tool).

  8. Rivers: Nature's Wondrous Waterways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrison, David L.

    Rivers play a vital role in the life of the planet. They provide water for wildlife, plant life, and people, and they help to fertilize fields where corn and other crops grow. But how were these rivers made? This children's book takes readers/students on a journey down a river from its source at the top of a mountain to its mouth where it meets…

  9. Waterway Ice Thickness Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The ship on the opposite page is a U. S. Steel Corporation tanker cruising through the ice-covered waters of the Great Lakes in the dead of winter. The ship's crew is able to navigate safely by plotting courses through open water or thin ice, a technique made possible by a multi-agency technology demonstration program in which NASA is a leading participant. Traditionally, the Great Lakes-St. Lawrence Seaway System is closed to shipping for more than three months of winter season because of ice blockage, particularly fluctuations in the thickness and location of ice cover due to storms, wind, currents and variable temperatures. Shippers have long sought a system of navigation that would allow year-round operation on the Lakes and produce enormous economic and fuel conservation benefits. Interrupted operations require that industrial firms stockpile materials to carry them through the impassable months, which is costly. Alternatively, they must haul cargos by more expensive overland transportation. Studies estimate the economic benefits of year-round Great Lakes shipping in the hundreds of millions of dollars annually and fuel consumption savings in the tens of millions of gallons. Under Project Icewarn, NASA, the U.S. Coast Guard and the National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration collaborated in development and demonstration of a system that permits safe year-round operations. It employs airborne radars, satellite communications relay and facsimile transmission to provide shippers and ships' masters up-to-date ice charts. Lewis Research Center contributed an accurate methods of measuring ice thickness by means of a special "short-pulse" type of radar. In a three-year demonstration program, Coast Guard aircraft equipped with Side-Looking Airborne Radar (SLAR) flew over the Great Lakes three or four times a week. The SLAR, which can penetrate clouds, provided large area readings of the type and distribution of ice cover. The information was supplemented by short-pulse radar measurements of ice thickness. The radar data was relayed by a NOAA satellite to a ground station where NOAA analyzed it and created picture maps, such as the one shown at lower left, showing where icebreakers can cut paths easily or where shipping can move through thin ice without the aid of icebreakers. The ice charts were then relayed directly to the wheelhouses of ships operating on the Lakes. Following up the success of the Great Lakes program, the icewarn team applied its system in another demonstration, this one a similarly successful application designed to aid Arctic coast shipping along the Alaskan North Slope. Further improvement of the ice-monitoring system is planned. Although aircraft-mounted radar is effective, satellites could provide more frequent data. After the launch this year of Seasat, an ocean-monitoring satellite, NASA will conduct tests to determine the ice-mapping capability and accuracy of satellite radar images.

  10. Steady-state flow distribution and monthly flow duration in selected branches of St. Clair and Detroit rivers within the Great Lakes waterway

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, D.J.; Koschik, J.A.

    2001-01-01

    St. Clair and Detroit Rivers are connecting channels between Lake Huron and Lake Erie in the Great Lakes waterway, and form part of the boundary between the United States and Canada. St. Clair River, the upper connecting channel, drains 222,400 mi2 and has an average flow of about 182,000 ft3/s. Water from St. Clair River combines with local inflows and discharges into Lake St. Clair before flowing into Detroit River. In some reaches of St. Clair and Detroit Rivers, islands and dikes split the flow into two to four branches. Even when the flow in a reach is known, proportions of flows within individual branches of a reach are uncertain. Simple linear regression equations, subject to a flow continuity constraint, are developed to provide estimators of these proportions and flows. The equations are based on 533 paired measurements of flow in 13 reaches forming 31 branches. The equations provide a means for computing the expected values and uncertainties of steady-state flows on the basis of flow conditions specified at the upstream boundaries of the waterway. In 7 upstream reaches, flow is considered fixed because it can be determined on the basis of flows specified at waterway boundaries and flow continuity. In these reaches, the uncertainties of flow proportions indicated by the regression equations can be used directly to determine the uncertainties of the corresponding flows. In the remaining 6 downstream reaches, flow is considered uncertain because these reaches do not receive flow from all the branches of an upstream reach, or they receive flow from some branches of more than one upstream reach. Monte Carlo simulation analysis is used to quantify this increase in uncertainty associated with the propagation of uncertainties from upstream reaches to downstream reaches. To eliminate the need for Monte Carlo simulations for routine calculations, polynomial regression equations are developed to approximate the variation in uncertainties as a function of flow at the

  11. How ship wave action influences the sediment budget of a nature friendly bank protection in a confined, non-tidal waterway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Roo, S.; Vanhaute, L.; Troch, P.

    2012-04-01

    Failure of the concrete slab revetment resulted in progressive bank erosion along the Lys (Belgium), a confined, non-tidal waterway subject to heavy shipping traffic. In an attempt to reconcile both the technical and environmental requirements related to a river bank, restoration was carried out using a more ecologically sound, 'soft' engineering method. A nature friendly bank protection, consisting of off-bank timber piling in combination with (reed)vegetation in the shallow water zone behind, was installed. As a consequence of this effort towards a more sustainable and ecological design of the waterway, sediment redistribution and transport processes are however altered distinctly. Being a waterway subject to heavy shipping traffic (on monthly average 1700 ship passages), hydrodynamic ship wave action on this open, semi-natural bank protection also induces sediment (re)suspension and acts as a main contributor to sediment transport (in normal weather conditions). In order to identify the relevant transport processes caused by ship-generated wave forcing, a field measurement campaign took place in April 2011. By measuring instantaneous water velocities, suspended sediment concentrations and wave hydrodynamics with a high temporal resolution, the effects on the sediment budget were quantified. It is found that the driving forces for these processes are the ship's speed, its blockage coefficient and the distance of the sailing ship to the timber piling. Bottom shear stresses significantly increase to values up to 10 N/m2 during a ship passage. Being much higher than the critical shear stress of 1.5 N/m2 and lasting for several minutes, the fine as well as coarser fractions of bottom sediment are dislodged and (re)suspended. Wave height also correlates well with the amount of sediment suspension. The best predictor for bank erosion is the velocity at which the displaced water mass hits the river bank. These experimental results indicate a reduced yet continuing

  12. Tidal flow dynamics and background fluorescence of the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway in the vicinity of Sullivan’s Island and the Isle of Palms, South Carolina, 2011-12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Conrads, Paul A.; Journey, Celeste A.; Clark, Jimmy M.; Levesque, Victor A.

    2013-01-01

    To effectively plan site-specific studies to understand the connection between wastewater effluent and shellfish beds, data are needed concerning flow dynamics and background fluorescence in the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway near the effluent outfalls on Sullivan’s Island and the Isle of Palms. Tidal flows were computed by the U.S. Geological Survey for three stations and longitudinal water-quality profiles were collected at high and low tide. Flows for the three U.S. Geological Survey stations, the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway by the Isle of Palms Marina, the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway by the Ben M. Sawyer Memorial Bridge at Sullivan’s Island, and Breach Inlet, were computed for the 53-day period from December 4, 2011, to January 26, 2012. The largest flows occurred at Breach Inlet and ranged from -58,600 cubic feet per second (ft3/s) toward the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway to 63,300 ft3/s toward the Atlantic Ocean. Of the two stations on the Atlantic Intracoastal Waterway, the Sullivan’s Island station had the larger flows and ranged from -6,360 ft3/s to the southwest (toward Charleston Harbor) to 8,930 ft3/s to the northeast. Computed tidal flow at the Isle of Palms station ranged from -3,460 ft3/s toward the southwest to 6,410 ft3/s toward the northeast. The synoptic water-quality study showed that the stations were well mixed vertically and horizontally. All fluorescence measurements (recorded as rhodamine concentration) were below the accuracy of the sensor and the background fluorescence would not likely interfere with a dye-tracer study.

  13. Natural resource damage assessments in the United States: rules and procedures for compensation from spills of hazardous substances and oil in waterways under US jurisdiction.

    PubMed

    Ofiara, Douglas D

    2002-02-01

    Natural Resource Damage Assessment (NRDA) procedures in the US involve the use of uniform federally approved rules and procedures to assess economic losses and/or address restoration of injured resources that result from spills of hazardous substances and/or oil and petroleum substances in waterways under US jurisdiction. This effort started in the 1980s and involves two federal agencies that have developed separate federally approved procedures and rules, the US Department of Interior (US DOI) and the US Department of Commerce, National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (US DOC, NOAA). This paper provides a brief overview of the federal laws applicable to resource damage assessments in the US, review of NRDA rules and procedures, and progress to date regarding US cases. PMID:11981983

  14. In situ biomonitoring of juvenile Chinook salmon (Onchorhynchus tshawytscha) using biomarkers of chemical exposures and effects in a partially remediated urbanized waterway of the Puget Sound, WA

    SciTech Connect

    Browne, Eva; Kelley, Matthew; Zhou, Guo-Dong; He, Ling Yu; McDonald, Thomas; Wang, Shirley; Duncan, Bruce; Meador, James; Donnelly, Kirby; Gallagher, Evan

    2010-10-15

    In situ biomonitoring has been used to assess the effects of pollution on aquatic species in heavily polluted waterways. In the current study, we used in situ biomonitoring in conjunction with molecular biomarker analysis to determine the effects of pollutant exposure in salmon caged in the Duwamish waterway, a Pacific Northwest Superfund site that has been subject to remediation. The Duwamish waterway is an important migratory route for Pacific salmon and has received historic inputs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Juvenile pre-smolt Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) caged for 8 days in the three contaminated sites in close proximity within the Duwamish were analyzed for steady state hepatic mRNA expression of 7 exposure biomarker genes encompassing several gene families and known to be responsive to pollutants, including cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and CYP2K1, glutathione S-transferase {pi} class (GST-{pi}), microsomal GST (mGST), glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), UDP-glucuronyltransferase family 1 (UDPGT), and type 2 deiodinase (type 2 DI, or D2). Quantitation of gene expression was accomplished by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in assays developed specifically for Chinook salmon genes. Gill PAH-DNA adducts were assessed as a chemical effects biomarker using {sup 32}P-postlabeling. The biomarkers in the field-caged fish were analyzed with respect to caged animals maintained at the hatchery receiving flow-through water. Chemical analysis of sediment samples from three field sampling sites revealed relatively high concentrations of total PAHs in one site (site B2, 6711 ng/g dry weight) and somewhat lower concentrations of PAHs in two adjacent sites (sites B3 and B4, 1482 and 1987 ng/g, respectively). In contrast, waterborne PAHs at all of the sampling sites were relatively low (<1 ng/L). Sediment PCBs at the sites ranged from a low of 421 ng/g at site B3

  15. In situ biomonitoring of juvenile Chinook salmon (Onchorhynchus tshawytscha) using biomarkers of chemical exposures and effects in a partially remediated urbanized waterway of the Puget Sound, WA.

    PubMed

    Browne, Eva; Kelley, Matthew; Zhou, Guo-Dong; He, Ling Yu; McDonald, Thomas; Wang, Shirley; Duncan, Bruce; Meador, James; Donnelly, Kirby; Gallagher, Evan

    2010-10-01

    In situ biomonitoring has been used to assess the effects of pollution on aquatic species in heavily polluted waterways. In the current study, we used in situ biomonitoring in conjunction with molecular biomarker analysis to determine the effects of pollutant exposure in salmon caged in the Duwamish waterway, a Pacific Northwest Superfund site that has been subject to remediation. The Duwamish waterway is an important migratory route for Pacific salmon and has received historic inputs of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). Juvenile pre-smolt Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) caged for 8 days in the three contaminated sites in close proximity within the Duwamish were analyzed for steady state hepatic mRNA expression of 7 exposure biomarker genes encompassing several gene families and known to be responsive to pollutants, including cytochrome P4501A (CYP1A) and CYP2K1, glutathione S-transferase pi class (GST-pi), microsomal GST (mGST), glutamylcysteine ligase catalytic subunit (GCLC), UDP-glucuronyltransferase family 1 (UDPGT), and type 2 deiodinase (type 2 DI, or D2). Quantitation of gene expression was accomplished by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) in assays developed specifically for Chinook salmon genes. Gill PAH-DNA adducts were assessed as a chemical effects biomarker using (32)P-postlabeling. The biomarkers in the field-caged fish were analyzed with respect to caged animals maintained at the hatchery receiving flow-through water. Chemical analysis of sediment samples from three field sampling sites revealed relatively high concentrations of total PAHs in one site (site B2, 6711ng/g dry weight) and somewhat lower concentrations of PAHs in two adjacent sites (sites B3 and B4, 1482 and 1987ng/g, respectively). In contrast, waterborne PAHs at all of the sampling sites were relatively low (<1ng/L). Sediment PCBs at the sites ranged from a low of 421ng/g at site B3 to 1160ng

  16. Identifying the causes of sediment-associated toxicity in urban waterways in South China: incorporating bioavailabillity-based measurements into whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluation.

    PubMed

    Yi, Xiaoyi; Li, Huizhen; Ma, Ping; You, Jing

    2015-08-01

    Sediments in urban waterways of Guangzhou, China, were contaminated by a variety of chemicals and showed prevalent toxicity to benthic organisms. A combination of whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) and bioavailability-based extraction was used to identify the causes of sediment toxicity. Of the 6 sediment samples collected, 4 caused 100% mortality to Chironomus dilutus in 10-d bioassays, and the potential toxicants were assessed using TIE in these sediments after dilution. The results of phase I characterization showed that organic contaminants were the principal contributors to the mortality of the midges in 2 sediments and that metals and organics jointly caused the mortality in the other 2 sediments. Ammonia played no role in the mortality for any samples. Conventional toxic unit analysis in phase II testing identified Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn as the toxic metals, with cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, deltamethrin, and fipronils being the toxic organics. To improve the accuracy of identifying the toxicants, 4-step sequential extraction and Tenax extraction were conducted to analyze the bioavailability of the metals and organics, respectively. Bioavailable toxic unit analysis narrowed the list of toxic contributors, and the putative toxicants included 3 metals (Zn, Ni, and Pb) and 3 pesticides (cypermethrin, lambda-cyhalothrin, and fipronils). Metals contributed to the mortality in all sediments, but sediment dilution reduced the toxicity and confounded the characterization of toxicity contribution from metals in 2 sediments in phase I. Incorporating bioavailability-based measurements into whole-sediment TIE improved the accuracy of identifying the causative toxicants in urban waterways where multiple stressors occurred and contributed to sediment toxicity jointly. PMID:25753920

  17. Effects of hydrologic modifications on salinity and formation of hypoxia in the Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet and adjacent waterways, southeastern Louisiana, 2008 to 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Swarzenski, Christopher M.; Mize, Scott V.

    2014-01-01

    The Mississippi River-Gulf Outlet (MRGO) was constructed between 1958 and 1968 to provide a safer and shorter route between the Gulf of Mexico and the Port of New Orleans for ocean-going vessels. In 2006, the U.S. Congress directed the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) to develop and implement a plan to deauthorize a portion of the MRGO ship channel from its confluence with the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway to the Gulf of Mexico. In 2009, in accordance with plans submitted to Congress, the USACE built a rock barrier across the MRGO near Hopedale, Louisiana. Following Hurricane Katrina, Congress also authorized the USACE to implement the Hurricane Storm Damage Risk Reduction System (HSDRRS) by building structures in the MRGO and adjacent surface waters, to reduce vulnerability of this area to storm surge. The HSDRRS includes the Gulf Intracoastal Waterway-Lake Borgne Surge Barrier and Gate Complex near mile 58 of the deauthorized portion of the MRGO and the Seabrook Gate Complex on the Inner Harbor Navigation Canal (IHNC). By blocking or limiting tidal exchange in the MRGO, these barriers could affect water quality in the MRGO and nearby waters including Lake Pontchartrain, the IHNC, and Lake Borgne. In 2008, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the USACE, began a study to document the effects of the construction activities on salinity and dissolved oxygen in these surface waters. Data were collected from August 2008 through October 2012. Completion of the rock barrier in the vicinity of mile 35 in July 2009 reduced hydrologic circulation and separated the MRGO into two distinct salinity regimes, with substantially fresher conditions prevailing upstream from the rock barrier. The rock barrier also contributed to a zone of hypoxia (dissolved oxygen less than 2 milligrams per liter) that formed along the channel bottom during the warmer summer months in each year of this monitoring; the zone was much more developed downstream from the rock barrier. The most

  18. Parasite fauna of bream Abramis brama and roach Rutilus rutilus from a man-made waterway and a freshwater habitat in northern Germany.

    PubMed

    Rückert, Sonja; Klimpel, Sven; Palm, Harry Wilhelm

    2007-03-13

    Fifty specimens each of bream Abramis brama and roach Rutilus rutilus were examined for metazoan parasite fauna and trichodinid ciliates; 25 specimens of each species were collected from the Kiel Canal, a man-made waterway, and a nearby freshwater lake, the Dieksee. This is the first detailed parasitological examination of A. brama and R. rutilus at these locations: 30 parasite species were found, comprising 4 protozoans, 4 myxozoans, 5 digeneans, 3 monogeneans, 2 cestodes, 6 nematodes, 2 acanthocephalans, 3 crustaceans and 1 hirudinean. The crustacean Caligus lacustris occurred in both habitats while 2 other crustacean species, 2 acanthocephalans and 1 hirudinean were recorded exclusively for the lake habitat. Larval as well as adult stages of the different parasite species were found, indicating that both fish species act as intermediate and final hosts in both habitats. The Kiel Canal (total of 17 parasite species) showed a lower parasite species richness for A. brama and R. rutilus (14 and 10 parasite species, respectively) than the lake (25 parasite species). A. brama had a higher parasite richness (22 species) than R. rutilus (16 species) in the lake habitat. Most parasites collected were of freshwater origin. Consequently, the observed infection pattern of both fish species in the waterway is mainly influenced by the limited salinity tolerance of freshwater parasites, which are negatively affected even by a salinity of 2.3 to 4.5. In the central Kiel Canal, neither fish species was infected with marine parasites of low host specifity. These parasites are either limited by the low salinity at this sampling site (<4.5 to 6.0) or they cannot enter the canal due to the environmental conditions prevailing in this artificial brackish water habitat. Thus, the canal may comprise a natural barrier preventing the distribution of North Sea parasites into the Baltic Sea. However, the brackish water Baltic Sea nematodes Paracuaria adunca and Cosmocephalus obvelatus were

  19. Hydrodynamic simulation and particle-tracking techniques for identification of source areas to public-water intakes on the St. Clair-Detroit river waterway in the Great Lakes Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Holtschlag, David J.; Koschik, John A.

    2004-01-01

    Source areas to public water intakes on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway were identified by use of hydrodynamic simulation and particle-tracking analyses to help protect public supplies from contaminant spills and discharges. This report describes techniques used to identify these areas and illustrates typical results using selected points on St. Clair River and Lake St. Clair. Parameterization of an existing two-dimensional hydrodynamic model (RMA2) of the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway was enhanced to improve estimation of local flow velocities. Improvements in simulation accuracy were achieved by computing channel roughness coefficients as a function of flow depth, and determining eddy viscosity coefficients on the basis of velocity data. The enhanced parameterization was combined with refinements in the model mesh near 13 public water intakes on the St. Clair-Detroit River Waterway to improve the resolution of flow velocities while maintaining consistency with flow and water-level data. Scenarios representing a range of likely flow and wind conditions were developed for hydrodynamic simulation. Particle-tracking analyses combined advective movements described by hydrodynamic scenarios with random components associated with sub-grid-scale movement and turbulent mixing to identify source areas to public water intakes.

  20. Heading for Next Winter Haven

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Approaching its 47th month of a Mars surface mission originally planned to last three months, NASA's Spirit rover was also approaching the northern edge of a low plateau called 'Home Plate.' The rover's operators selected an area with north-facing slope there as a destination where Spirit would have its best chance of surviving low-solar-energy conditions of oncoming Martian winter.

    The yellow line on this map of the Home Plate area indicates Spirit's route from early February 2006, entering the mapped area from the north (top), to late November 2007, on the western edge of the bright-toned Home Plate plateau. The map covers an area about 160 meters (525 feet) across from west to east. Labels indicate the area intended for Spirit to spend many months spanning the rover's third Martian winter, the site where it spent about seven months (April to November 2006) spanning its second winter, and the site where it lost use of the drive motor for one of its six wheels.

    A north-facing slope helps Spirit maximizes electric output from its solar panels during winter months because Spirit is in the southern hemisphere of Mars, so the sun appears only in the northern sky during winter. For the third winter, which will reach its minimum solar-energy days in early June 2008, Spirit faces the challenge of having more dust on its solar panels than it had during its second winter.

    The base image for this map is a portion of a color image taken on Jan. 9, 2007, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.

  1. Nameless, New Haven, and Nicholls

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kurland, Jordan E.

    2008-01-01

    This article presents three recent American Association of University Professors (AAUP) cases that involved the dismissal of a senior non-tenure-track member of the faculty. The most recent case resulted in the investigating committee's report on Nicholls State University, a regional public institution in Louisiana. Preceding Nicholls was an…

  2. Stop Tax Haven Abuse Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Doggett, Lloyd [D-TX-25

    2011-07-27

    08/22/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Capital Markets and Government Sponsored Enterprises. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  3. America's Consumerocracy: No Safe Haven

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daily, Nancy Lee; Swain, Letitia Price; Huysman, Mary; Tarrant, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Recently the authors completed a course designed to expand and deepen their knowledge about America's consumerocracy and the methods that give it the immense power it has. As a result of their reading and shared thinking in this course, Teaching Adolescents in a Consumer Society, they feel strongly motivated and better prepared to craft…

  4. Innovative 'Artificial Mussels' technology for assessing spatial and temporal distribution of metals in Goulburn-Murray catchments waterways, Victoria, Australia: effects of climate variability (dry vs. wet years).

    PubMed

    Kibria, Golam; Lau, T C; Wu, Rudolf

    2012-12-01

    The "Artificial mussel" (AM), a novel passive sampling technology, was used for the first time in Australia in freshwater to monitor and assess the risk of trace metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb, and Zn). AMs were deployed at 10 sites within the Goulburn-Murray Water catchments, Victoria, Australia during a dry year (2009-2010) and a wet year (2010-2011). Our results showed that the AMs accumulated all the five metals. Cd, Pb, Hg were detected during the wet year but below detection limits during the dry year. At some sites close to orchards, vine yards and farming areas, elevated levels of Cu were clearly evident during the dry year, while elevated levels of Zn were found during the wet year; the Cu indicates localized inputs from the agricultural application of copper fungicide. The impacts from old mines were significantly less compared 'hot spots'. Our study demonstrated that climate variability (dry, wet years) can influence the metal inputs to waterways via different transport pathways. Using the AMs, we were able to identify various 'hot spots' of heavy metals, which may pose a potential risk to aquatic ecosystems (sub-lethal effects to fish) and public (via food chain metal bioaccumulation and biomagnification) in the Goulburn-Murray Water catchments. The State Protection Policy exempted artificial channels and drains from protection of beneficial use (including protection of aquatic ecosystems) and majority of sites ('hot spots') were located within artificial irrigation channels. PMID:23070068

  5. Barge loading facilities on Pickwick Reservoir, Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway mile 447. 5, right bank Yellow Creek embayment of Pickwick Lake

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-08

    The purpose of this Environmental Assessment (EA) is to evaluate the environmental consequences of approving, denying, or adopting reasonable alternatives to a request for approval of a roundwood barge loading facility on TVA property at Yellow Creek Inland Port, Tishomingo County, Mississippi. The applicant is Scott Paper Company (SPC), a Mobile, Alabama, based company whose address is Bay Bridge Road, P.O. Box 1347, Mobile, Alabama 36652. SPC proposes to use the facility to load approximately 75,000 cords of locally acquired hardwood logs per year for shipment down the Tennessee-Tombigbee Waterway (TTW) to its mill in Mobile for processing into paper products. The 10.38-acre tract of TVA land requested by SPC is located on the left bank of the Yellow Creek embayment of Pickwick Reservoir along the TTW at mile 447.5, approximately 11.5 miles upstream of Pickwick Lock and Dam and 0.5 miles south of the Yellow Creek Inland Port. If this request is approved, TVA would sell a 10-year term easement for use of the land pursuant to Public Law 87-852 at fair market value as determined by TVA.

  6. Dynamics of fecal indicator bacteria, bacterial pathogen genes, and organic wastewater contaminants in the Little Calumet River: Portage Burns Waterway, Indiana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Haack, Sheridan K.; Duris, Joseph W.

    2013-01-01

    Little information exists on the co-occurrence of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), bacterial pathogens, and organic wastewater-associated chemicals (OWCs) within Great Lakes tributaries. Fifteen watershed sites and one beach site adjacent to the Little Calumet River–Portage Burns Waterway (LCRPBW) on Lake Michigan were tested on four dates for pH, dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, chloride, color, ammonia- and nitrate-nitrogen, soluble phosphorus, sulfate, turbidity, and atrazine; for concentrations of FIB; and for genes indicating the presence of human-pathogenic enterococci (ENT) and of Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (EC) from various animal sources. Nineteen samples were also tested for 60 OWCs. Half of the watershed samples met EC recreational water quality standards; none met ENT standards. Human-wastewater-associated OWC detections were correlated with human-influence indicators such as population/km2, chloride concentrations, and the presence of WWTP effluents, but EC and ENT concentrations were not. Bacterial pathogen genes indicated rural human and several potential animal sources. OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern (musk fragrances AHTN and HHCB, alkylphenols, carbamazepine) and 3 bacterial pathogen genes were detected at the mouth of the LCRPBW, but no such OWCs and only 1 pathogen gene were detected at the beach. The LCRPBW has significant potential to deliver FIB, potential bacterial pathogens, and OWCs of human or ecosystem health concern to the nearshore of Lake Michigan, under conditions enhancing nearshore transport of the river plume. Nearshore mixing of lake and river water, and the lack of relationship between OWCs and FIB or pathogen genes, pose numerous challenges for watershed and nearshore assessment and remediation.

  7. Reply to Discussion: a critique of Possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the late Quaternary: evidence from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Geo-Marine Letters, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nazik, Atike; Meriç, Engin; Avşar, Niyazi

    2012-06-01

    In their discussion of our 2011 paper dealing with possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the "late" Quaternary, based on data from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Yaltırak et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 32:267-274, 2012) essentially reject the idea of any links whatsoever, be they between the Marmara Sea and the lakes İznik and Sapanca, or further to the Black Sea via the valley of the Sakarya River. The evidence they provide in support of their view, however, is essentially circumstantial, in part conjectural, and also inconclusive considering the findings in favour of linkage between the Marmara Sea and the lakes at the very least, while the proposed connection with the Sakarya River valley remains speculative because of the lack of unambiguous data. On the other hand, Yaltırak et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 32:267-274, 2012) do raise valid points of concern which deserve careful future investigation, the most important being the possibility of sample contamination from dumped marine sediment used for construction purposes along some parts of the shore of Lake İznik. We agree that a concerted multidisciplinary effort is required to address the many unresolved issues in connection with the potential waterways proposed by us and others before us.

  8. 76 FR 24372 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mispillion River, Milford, DE

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-02

    ... necessary bridge cleaning and painting of the bridge. DATES: This deviation is effective from 12 a.m. on May... this bridge is five feet at mean high water (MHW) in the closed position and unlimited in the open... at least 24 hours notice is given. The requested deviation is to accommodate painting and cleaning...

  9. Save Our Streams and Waterways.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Indiana State Dept. of Education, Indianapolis. Center for School Improvement and Performance.

    Protection of existing water supplies is critical to ensuring good health for people and animals alike. This program is aligned with the Izaak Walton League of American's Save Our Streams program which is based on the concept that students can greatly improve the quality of a nearby stream, pond, or river by regular visits and monitoring. The…

  10. Analysis of the Injection of a Heated, Turbulent Jet into a Moving Mainstream, with Emphasis on a Thermal Discharge in a Waterway. Ph.D. Thesis - Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An experimental and theoretical investigation was undertaken to study the trajectory and growth of thermal effluents having a range of discharge velocities and temperatures. The discharge of a turbulent effluent into a waterway was mathematically modeled as a submerged jet injection process by using an integral method which accounts for natural fluid mechanisms such as turbulence, entrainment, buoyancy, and heat transfer. The analytical results are supported by experimental data and demonstrate the usefulness of the theory for estimating the location and size of the effluent with respect to the discharge point. The capability of predicting jet flow properties, as well as two- and three-dimensional jet paths, was enhanced by obtaining the jet cross-sectional area during the solution of the conservation equations. Realistic estimates of temperature in the effluent were acquired by accounting for heat losses in the jet flow due to forced convection and to entrainment of free-stream fluid into the jet.

  11. Modeling the Relative Contributions of Sediments and Urban Runoff-Borne Particles to PCB (Polychlorinated Biphenyl) Levels in the Water and Foodchain of an Urbanized Waterway (Columbia Slough, Portland, OR, USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fish, W.; Nakae, Y.; Jan, F.

    2003-12-01

    The Columbia Slough is an urbanized waterway in Portland, OR, USA that provides important habitat for a wide range of species and recreational opportunities for humans. Of special concern in the Slough is the potential for human ingestion of fish containing elevated levels of persistent chlorinated compounds, particularly PCBs. Fish tissue analyses and exposure studies suggest the human population ingesting Slough fish may face a relatively high (>1:10 000) risk of an excess lifetime cancer fatality. Since only a few localized sources of PCB to the water way have been identified, attention has focused on two sources. The sediments are contaminated with PCB at relatively low levels (<30 ug/kg) but sediment inputs may be enhanced by a significant throughput of groundwater. The second potential source is urban runoff containing particles with PCB from historical low-level soil contamination or ongoing atmospheric inputs. We used a combination of field data and dynamic computer modeling to compare the relative contributions of PCB desorption from sediments (as enhanced by advective groundwater motion) and contaminated particulate matter from runoff. Most of the PCB in the trophic levels of the food chain studied can be attributed to input from legacy contamination in the sediments. However, urban runoff does present the potential for inducing a small long-term risk to fish-consumers.

  12. Discussion: a critique of Possible waterways between the Marmara Sea and the Black Sea in the late Quaternary: evidence from ostracod and foraminifer assemblages in lakes İznik and Sapanca, Turkey, Geo-Marine Letters, 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yaltırak, Cenk; Ülgen, Umut B.; Zabcı, Cengiz; Franz, Sven Oliver; Ön, Sena Akçer; Sakınç, Mehmet; Çağatay, M. Namık; Alpar, Bedri; Öztürk, Kurultay; Tunoğlu, Cemal; Ünlü, Selma

    2012-06-01

    The identification of past connection routes between the Black Sea and the Sea of Marmara, other than the traditional one through to the Bosphorus Strait, would be of considerable interest to the international scientific community. Nazik et al. (Geo-Mar Lett 31:75-86 (2011) doi:10.1007/s00367-010-0216-9) suggest the possibility of two alternative waterway connections via lakes Sapanca and İznik. Their Black Sea to Sea of Marmara multi-connection hypothesis, which is based on undated marine fossils collected in both lakes from surficial grab samples, conflicts with many earlier studies. In this contribution, the hypothesis and the underlying data are discussed in the light of previous tectonic, sedimentological and limnological findings showing that it is impossible to have had marine connections through lakes Sapanca and İznik during the last 11.5 ka. Global sea-level trends and tectonic uplift rates would accommodate a connection between the Sea of Marmara and Lake İznik in the middle Pleistocene. Uplift rates for the northern block of the North Anatolian Fault, when compared with the global sea-level curve, clearly indicate that there cannot have been a connection through the İzmit Gulf-Lake Sapanca-Sakarya Valley for at least the past 500 ka. Moreover, borehole sediments along the western shores of Lake Sapanca, which reach down to the bedrock, do not contain any marine fossils.

  13. Learning Havens for Stressed Adult Learners

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seay, Sandra E.

    2005-01-01

    Having stressful workdays is not the sole prerogative of adult students enrolled in educational leadership programs. According to a report released by the American Institute of Stress in 2002, 80% of adult workers felt stress in the workplace. From this it can be assumed that a certain amount of stress accompanies every adult who enters an evening…

  14. Spirit Scans Winter Haven (False Color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    At least three different kinds of rocks await scientific analysis at the place where NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit will likely spend several months of Martian winter. They are visible in this picture, which the panoramic camera on Spirit acquired during the rover's 809th sol, or Martian day, of exploring Mars (April 12, 2006). Paper-thin layers of light-toned, jagged-edged rocks protrude horizontally from beneath small sand drifts; a light gray rock with smooth, rounded edges sits atop the sand drifts; and several dark gray to black, angular rocks with vesicles (small holes) typical of hardened lava lie scattered across the sand.

    This view is a false-color rendering that combines images taken through the panoramic camera's 753-nanometer, 535-nanometer, and 432-nanometer filters.

  15. African Trypanosomes Find a Fat Haven

    PubMed Central

    Beverley, Stephen M.

    2016-01-01

    The African trypanosome was thought to primarily develop in the bloodstream and interstitial spaces of its mammalian host. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Trindade et al. (2016) report the surprising finding that during ongoing persistent infections in mice, a major fraction of the parasites reside within fatty tissues. PMID:27281564

  16. African Trypanosomes Find a Fat Haven.

    PubMed

    Beverley, Stephen M

    2016-06-01

    The African trypanosome was thought to primarily develop in the bloodstream and interstitial spaces of its mammalian host. In this issue of Cell Host & Microbe, Trindade et al. (2016) report the surprising finding that during ongoing persistent infections in mice, a major fraction of the parasites reside within fatty tissues. PMID:27281564

  17. Why I Haven't Retired

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geballe, Theodore H.

    2013-04-01

    What is written below is, as requested by the editor of AR Condensed Matter Physics, a set of recollections and insights gained from my personal trajectory that starts from my earliest years and continues on until now. I have been a participant in the growth of solid state physics from its early quantum insights to the highly popular foci of today’s vibrant condensed matter science community, while working at three institutions that helped spearhead this growth—UC Berkeley, Bell Labs, and Stanford University. It is rare to be actively involved in any creative enterprise for more than six decades. I credit my good fortune to stimulating science; great students and colleagues; a happy home; warm friendships; and, evidently, to my having inherited good genes.

  18. Simulation of hypothetical Asian carp egg and larvae development and transport in the Lockport, Brandon Road, Dresden Island, and Marseilles Pools of the Illinois Waterway by use of the Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murphy, Elizabeth A.; Garcia, Tatiana; Jackson, P. Ryan; Duncker, James J.

    2016-01-01

    As part of the Great Lakes and Mississippi River Interbasin Study, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) is conducting an assessment of the vulnerability of the Chicago Area Waterway System and Des Plaines River to Asian carp (specifically, Hypophthalmichthys nobilis (bighead carp) and Hypophthalmichthys molitrix (silver carp)) spawning and recruitment. As part of this assessment, the USACE requested the help of the U.S. Geological Survey in predicting the fate and transport of Asian carp eggs hypothetically spawned at the electric dispersal barrier on the Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal and downstream of the Brandon Road Lock and Dam on the Des Plaines River under dry weather flow and high water temperature conditions. The Fluvial Egg Drift Simulator (FluEgg) model predicted that approximately 80 percent of silver carp eggs spawned near the electric dispersal barrier would hatch within the Lockport and Brandon Road pools (as close as 3.6 miles downstream of the barrier) and approximately 82 percent of the silver carp eggs spawned near the Brandon Road Dam would hatch in the Des Plaines River (as close as 1.6 miles downstream from the gates of Brandon Road Lock). Extension of the FluEgg model to include the fate and transport of larvae until gas bladder inflation—the point at which the larvae begin to leave the drift—suggests that eggs spawned at the electric dispersal barrier would reach the gas bladder inflation stage primarily within the Dresden Island Pool, and those spawned at the Brandon Road Dam would reach this stage primarily within the Marseilles and Starved Rock Pools.

  19. Assessment of subsurface chlorinated solvent contamination using tree cores at the front street site and a former dry cleaning facility at the Riverfront Superfund site, New Haven, Missouri, 1999-2003

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schumacher, John G.; Struckhoff, Garrett C.; Burken, Joel G.

    2004-01-01

    Tree-core sampling has been a reliable and inexpensive tool to quickly assess the presence of shallow (less than about 30 feet deep) tetrachloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) contamination in soils and ground water at the Riverfront Superfund Site. This report presents the results of tree-core sampling that was successfully used to determine the presence and extent of chlorinated solvent contamination at two sites, the Front Street site (operable unit OU1) and the former dry cleaning facility, that are part of the overall Riverfront Superfund Site. Traditional soil and ground-water sampling at these two sites later confirmed the results from the tree-core sampling. Results obtained from the tree-core sampling were used to design and focus subsequent soil and ground-water investigations, resulting in substantial savings in time and site assessment costs. The Front Street site is a small (less than 1-acre) site located on the Missouri River alluvium in downtown New Haven, Missouri, about 500 feet from the south bank of the Missouri River. Tree-core sampling detected the presence of subsurface PCE contamination at the Front Street site and beneath residential property downgradient from the site. Core samples from trees at the site contained PCE concentrations as large as 3,850 mg-h/kg (micrograms in headspace per kilogram of wet core) and TCE concentrations as large as 249 mg-h/kg. Soils at the Front Street site contained PCE concentrations as large as 6,200,000 mg/kg (micrograms per kilogram) and ground-water samples contained PCE concentrations as large as 11,000 mg/L (micrograms per liter). The former dry cleaning facility is located at the base of the upland that forms the south bank of the Missouri River alluvial valley. Tree-core sampling did not indicate the presence of PCE or TCE contamination at the former dry cleaning facility, a finding that was later confirmed by the analyses of soil samples collected from the site. The lateral extent of PCE

  20. 77 FR 44222 - Inland Waterways Users Board

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-27

    ..., Institute for Water Resources, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, CEIWR-GM, 7701 Telegraph Road, Casey Building, Alexandria, Virginia 22315-3868; Ph: 703-428- 6438. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: The meeting is open to...