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Sample records for mimetics activate trkb

  1. Activation of Muscular TrkB by its Small Molecular Agonist 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone Sex-Dependently Regulates Energy Metabolism in Diet-Induced Obese Mice

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Chi Bun; Tse, Margaret Chui Ling; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Shuai; Schmidt, Robin; Otten, Reed; Liu, Liegang; Ye, Keqiang

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Chronic activation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) receptor TrkB is a potential method to prevent development of obesity, but the short half-life and nonbioavailable nature of BDNF hampers validation of the hypothesis. We report here that activation of muscular TrkB by the BDNF mimetic, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), is sufficient to protect the development of diet-induced obesity in female mice. Using in vitro and in vivo models, we found that 7,8-DHF treatment enhanced the expression of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) and AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity in skeletal muscle, which resulted in increased systemic energy expenditure, reduced adiposity, and improved insulin sensitivity in female mice fed a high-fat diet. This antiobesity activity of 7,8-DHF is muscular TrkB-dependent as 7,8-DHF cannot mitigate diet-induced obesity in female muscle-specific TrkB knockout mice. Hence, our data reveal that chronic activation of muscular TrkB is useful in alleviating obesity and its complications. PMID:25754472

  2. 5-HT7 receptor activation promotes an increase in TrkB receptor expression and phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Samarajeewa, Anshula; Goldemann, Lolita; Vasefi, Maryam S.; Ahmed, Nawaz; Gondora, Nyasha; Khanderia, Chandni; Mielke, John G.; Beazely, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The serotonin (5-HT) type 7 receptor is expressed throughout the CNS including the cortex and hippocampus. We have previously demonstrated that the application of 5-HT7 receptor agonists to primary hippocampal neurons and SH-SY5Y cells increases platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) receptor expression and promotes neuroprotection against N-methyl-D-aspartate-(NMDA)-induced toxicity. The tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor is one of the receptors for brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and is associated with neurodevelopmental and neuroprotective effects. Application of LP 12 to primary cerebral cortical cultures, SH-SY5Y cells, as well as the retinal ganglion cell line, RGC-5, increased both the expression of full length TrkB as well as its basal phosphorylation state at tyrosine 816. The increase in TrkB expression and phosphorylation was observed as early as 30 min after 5-HT7 receptor activation. In addition to full-length TrkB, kinase domain-deficient forms may be expressed and act as dominant-negative proteins toward the full length receptor. We have identified distinct patterns of TrkB isoform expression across our cell lines and cortical cultures. Although TrkB receptor expression is regulated by cyclic AMP and Gαs-coupled GPCRs in several systems, we demonstrate that, depending on the model system, pathways downstream of both Gαs and Gα12 are involved in the regulation of TrkB expression by 5-HT7 receptors. Given the number of psychiatric and degenerative diseases associated with TrkB/BDNF deficiency and the current interest in developing 5-HT7 receptor ligands as pharmaceuticals, identifying signaling relationships between these two receptors will aid in our understanding of the potential therapeutic effects of 5-HT7 receptor ligands. PMID:25426041

  3. BDNF heightens the sensitivity of motor neurons to excitotoxic insults through activation of TrkB

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hu, Peter; Kalb, Robert G.; Walton, K. D. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The survival promoting and neuroprotective actions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are well known but under certain circumstances this growth factor can also exacerbate excitotoxic insults to neurons. Prior exploration of the receptor through which BDNF exerts this action on motor neurons deflects attention away from p75. Here we investigated the possibility that BDNF acts through the receptor tyrosine kinase, TrkB, to confer on motor neurons sensitivity to excitotoxic challenge. We blocked BDNF activation of TrkB using a dominant negative TrkB mutant or a TrkB function blocking antibody, and found that this protected motor neurons against excitotoxic insult in cultures of mixed spinal cord neurons. Addition of a function blocking antibody to BDNF to mixed spinal cord neuron cultures is also neuroprotective indicating that endogenously produced BDNF participates in vulnerability to excitotoxicity. We next examined the intracellular signaling cascades that are engaged upon TrkB activation. Previously we found that inhibition of the phosphatidylinositide-3'-kinase (PI3'K) pathway blocks BDNF-induced excitotoxic sensitivity. Here we show that expression of a constitutively active catalytic subunit of PI3'K, p110, confers excitotoxic sensitivity (ES) upon motor neurons not incubated with BDNF. Parallel studies with purified motor neurons confirm that these events are likely to be occuring specifically within motor neurons. The abrogation of BDNF's capacity to accentuate excitotoxic insults may make it a more attractive neuroprotective agent.

  4. Identification of a low–molecular weight TrkB antagonist with anxiolytic and antidepressant activity in mice

    PubMed Central

    Cazorla, Maxime; Prémont, Joël; Mann, Andre; Girard, Nicolas; Kellendonk, Christoph; Rognan, Didier

    2011-01-01

    The neurotrophin brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) have emerged as key mediators in the pathophysiology of several mood disorders, including anxiety and depression. However, therapeutic compounds that interact with TrkB receptors have been difficult to develop. Using a combination of structure-based in silico screening and high-capacity functional assays in recombinant and neuronal cells, we identified a low–molecular weight TrkB ligand (ANA-12) that prevented activation of the receptor by BDNF with a high potency. ANA-12 showed direct and selective binding to TrkB and inhibited processes downstream of TrkB without altering TrkA and TrkC functions. KIRA-ELISA analysis demonstrated that systemic administration of ANA-12 to adult mice decreased TrkB activity in the brain without affecting neuronal survival. Mice administered ANA-12 demonstrated reduced anxiety- and depression-related behaviors on a variety of tests predictive of anxiolytic and antidepressant properties in humans. This study demonstrates that structure-based virtual screening strategy can be an efficient method for discovering potent TrkB-selective ligands that are active in vivo. We further propose that ANA-12 may be a valuable tool for studying BDNF/TrkB signaling and may constitute a lead compound for developing the next generation of therapeutic agents for the treatment of mood disorders. PMID:21505263

  5. Increased Cortical Synaptic Activation of TrkB and Downstream Signaling Markers in a Mouse Model of Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nosheny, RL; Belichenko, PV; Busse, BL; Weissmiller, AM; Dang, V; Das, D; Fahimi, A; Salehi, A; Smith, SJ; Mobley, WC

    2015-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS), trisomy 21, is characterized by synaptic abnormalities and cognitive deficits throughout the lifespan and with development of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) neuropathology and progressive cognitive decline in adults. Synaptic abnormalities are also present in the Ts65Dn mouse model of DS, but which synapses are affected and the mechanisms underlying synaptic dysfunction are unknown. Here we show marked increases in the levels and activation status of TrkB and associated signaling proteins in cortical synapses in Ts65Dn mice. Proteomic analysis at the single synapse level of resolution using array tomography (AT) uncovered increased colocalization of activated TrkB with signaling endosome related proteins, and demonstrated increased TrkB signaling. The extent of increases in TrkB signaling differed in each of the cortical layers examined and with respect to the type of synapse, with the most marked increases seen in inhibitory synapses. These findings are evidence of markedly abnormal TrkB-mediated signaling in synapses. They raise the possibility that dysregulated TrkB signaling contributes to synaptic dysfunction and cognitive deficits in DS. PMID:25753471

  6. Vagal Nerve Stimulation Rapidly Activates Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Receptor TrkB in Rat Brain

    PubMed Central

    Frazer, Alan

    2012-01-01

    Background Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS) has been approved for treatment-resistant depression. Many antidepressants increase expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in brain or activate, via phosphorylation, its receptor, TrkB. There have been no studies yet of whether VNS would also cause phosphorylation of TrkB. Methods Western blot analysis was used to evaluate the phosphorylation status of TrkB in the hippocampus of rats administered VNS either acutely or chronically. Acute effects of VNS were compared with those caused by fluoxetine or desipramine (DMI) whereas its chronic effects were compared with those of sertraline or DMI. Results All treatments, given either acutely or chronically, significantly elevated phosphorylation of tyrosines 705 and 816 on TrkB in the hippocampus. However, only VNS increased the phosphorylation of tyrosine 515, with both acute and chronic administration causing this effect. Pretreatment with K252a, a nonspecific tyrosine kinase inhibitor, blocked the phosphorylation caused by acute VNS at all three tyrosines. Downstream effectors of Y515, namely Akt and ERK, were also phosphorylated after acute treatment with VNS, whereas DMI did not cause this effect. Conclusion VNS rapidly activates TrkB phosphorylation and this effect persists over time. VNS-induced phosphorylation of tyrosine 515 is distinct from the effect of standard antidepressant drugs. PMID:22563458

  7. Activation of TrkB with TAM-163 results in opposite effects on body weight in rodents and non-human primates.

    PubMed

    Perreault, Mylène; Feng, Guo; Will, Sarah; Gareski, Tiffany; Kubasiak, David; Marquette, Kimberly; Vugmeyster, Yulia; Unger, Thaddeus J; Jones, Juli; Qadri, Ariful; Hahm, Seung; Sun, Ying; Rohde, Cynthia M; Zwijnenberg, Raphael; Paulsen, Janet; Gimeno, Ruth E

    2013-01-01

    Strong genetic data link the Tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) and its major endogenous ligand brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to the regulation of energy homeostasis, with loss-of-function mutations in either gene causing severe obesity in both mice and humans. It has previously been reported that peripheral administration of the endogenous TrkB agonist ligand neurotrophin-4 (NT-4) profoundly decreases food intake and body weight in rodents, while paradoxically increasing these same parameters in monkeys. We generated a humanized TrkB agonist antibody, TAM-163, and characterized its therapeutic potential in several models of type 2 diabetes and obesity. In vitro, TAM-163 bound to human and rodent TrkB with high affinity, activated all aspects of the TrkB signaling cascade and induced TrkB internalization and degradation in a manner similar to BDNF. In vivo, peripheral administration of TAM-163 decreased food intake and/or body weight in mice, rats, hamsters, and dogs, but increased food intake and body weight in monkeys. The magnitude of weight change was similar in rodents and non-human primates, occurred at doses where there was no appreciable penetration into deep structures of the brain, and could not be explained by differences in exposures between species. Rather, peripherally administered TAM-163 localized to areas in the hypothalamus and the brain stem located outside the blood-brain barrier in a similar manner between rodents and non-human primates, suggesting differences in neuroanatomy across species. Our data demonstrate that a TrkB agonist antibody, administered peripherally, causes species-dependent effects on body weight similar to the endogenous TrkB ligand NT-4. The possible clinical utility of TrkB agonism in treating weight regulatory disorder, such as obesity or cachexia, will require evaluation in man. PMID:23700410

  8. Autocrine activity of BDNF induced by the STAT3 signaling pathway causes prolonged TrkB activation and promotes human non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Bo; Liang, Yan; He, Zheng; An, Yunhe; Zhao, Weihong; Wu, Jianqing

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of the neurotrophin superfamily, which has been implicated in the pathophysiology of the nervous system. Recently, several studies have suggested that BDNF and/or its receptor, tropomyosin related kinase B (TrkB), are involved in tumor growth and metastasis in several cancers, including prostate cancer, neuroblastoma, pancreatic ductal carcinoma, hepatocellular carcinoma, and lung cancer. Despite the increasing emphasis on BDNF/TrkB signaling in human tumors, how it participates in primary tumors has not yet been determined. Additionally, little is known about the molecular mechanisms that elicit signaling downstream of TrkB in the progression of non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In this study, we report the significant expression of BDNF in NSCLC samples and show that BDNF stimulation increases the synthesis of BDNF itself through activation of STAT3 in lung cancer cells. The release of BDNF can in turn activate TrkB signaling. The activation of both TrkB and STAT3 contribute to downstream signaling and promote human non-small-cell lung cancer proliferation. PMID:27456333

  9. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone protects 6-OHDA and MPTP induced dopaminergic neurons degeneration through activation of TrkB in rodents.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dandan; Shi, Ying; Wang, Jun; Lin, Qing; Sun, Yi; Ye, Keqiang; Yan, Qiao; Zhang, Hai

    2016-05-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a notably important neurotrophin which regulates neuronal survival and differentiation in the nervous system. However, its clinical usage is particularly limited. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF), which acts as a selective agonist of BDNF receptor TrkB, is reported to possess neuroprotective effects both in vitro and in vivo. Here we explored the potent neuroprotective effects of 7,8-DHF in 6-OHDA induced rat and MPTP induced mouse model of Parkinsonism. The results demonstrated that treatment with 7,8-DHF in drinking water for four weeks (two weeks before 6-OHDA+two weeks after 6-OHDA lesion) significantly improved dopamine-mediated behaviors in 6-OHDA rat model, and prevented the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra (SN). Phospho-Y816-TrkB immunostaining showed that TrkB phosphorylation was significantly elevated in the SN in 7,8-DHF pretreated group, indicating 7,8-DHF activated TrkB and likely contributed to its neuroprotective effects. 7,8-DHF also protected acute MPTP neurotoxicity in mice but did not affect the climbing behavior in pole test. Thus our study indicates the neuroprotective properties of 7,8-DHF through the activation of TrkB, which provides a novel therapeutic treatment for Parkinson's disease. PMID:27019033

  10. δ-Opioid Receptor Activation Rescues the Functional TrkB Receptor and Protects the Brain from Ischemia-Reperfusion Injury in the Rat

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Xuesong; Guo, Jingchun; Zhu, Min; Li, Minwei; Wu, Gencheng; Xia, Ying

    2013-01-01

    Objectives δ-opioid receptor (DOR) activation reduced brain ischemic infarction and attenuated neurological deficits, while DOR inhibition aggravated the ischemic damage. The underlying mechanisms are, however, not well understood yet. In this work, we asked if DOR activation protects the brain against ischemic injury through a brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) -TrkB pathway. Methods We exposed adult male Sprague-Dawley rats to focal cerebral ischemia, which was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO). DOR agonist TAN-67 (60 nmol), antagonist Naltrindole (100 nmol) or artificial cerebral spinal fluid was injected into the lateral cerebroventricle 30 min before MCAO. Besides the detection of ischemic injury, the expression of BDNF, full-length and truncated TrkB, total CREB, p-CREB, p-ATF and CD11b was detected by Western blot and fluorescence immunostaining. Results DOR activation with TAN-67 significantly reduced the ischemic volume and largely reversed the decrease in full-length TrkB protein expression in the ischemic cortex and striatum without any appreciable change in cerebral blood flow, while the DOR antagonist Naltrindole aggregated the ischemic injury. However, the level of BDNF remained unchanged in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus at 24 hours after MCAO and did not change in response to DOR activation or inhibition. MCAO decreased both total CREB and pCREB in the striatum, but not in the cortex, while DOR inhibition promoted a further decrease in total and phosphorylated CREB in the striatum and decreased pATF-1 expression in the cortex. In addition, MCAO increased C11b expression in the cortex, striatum and hippocampus, and DOR activation specifically attenuated the ischemic increase in the cortex but not in the striatum and hippocampus. Conclusions DOR activation rescues TrkB signaling by reversing ischemia/reperfusion induced decrease in the full-length TrkB receptor and reduces brain injury in ischemia/reperfusion PMID

  11. TrkB activation by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone increases synapse AMPA subunits and ameliorates spatial memory deficits in a mouse model of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Gao, Lei; Tian, Mi; Zhao, Hong-Yun; Xu, Qian-Qian; Huang, Yu-Ming; Si, Qun-Cao; Tian, Qing; Wu, Qing-Ming; Hu, Xia-Min; Sun, Li-Bo; McClintock, Shawn M; Zeng, Yan

    2016-02-01

    We recently demonstrated that activation of tyrosine receptor kinase B (TrkB) by 7, 8-dihydroxyflavone (7, 8-DHF), the selective TrkB agonist, increased surface alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazole-propionic acid (AMPA) receptors (AMPARs) AMPA receptor subunit GluR1 (GluA1) subunit expression at the synapses of Fragile X Syndrome mutant mice. This present study investigated the effects of 7, 8-DHF on both memory function and synapse structure in relation to the synapse protein level of AMPARs in the Tg2576 Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. The study found that chronic oral administration of 7, 8-DHF significantly improved spatial memory and minimized dendrite loss in the hippocampus of Tg2576 mice. A key feature of 7, 8-DHF action was the increased expression of both GluA1 and GluA2 at synapses. Interestingly, 7, 8-DHF had no effect on the attenuation of amyloid precursor protein or Aβ exhibiting in the Tg2576 AD brains, yet it activated the phosphorylation of TrkB receptors and its downstream signals including CaMKII, Akt, Erk1/2, and cAMP-response element-binding protein. Importantly, cyclotraxin B (a TrkB inhibitor), U0126 (a Ras-ERK pathway inhibitor), Wortmannin (an Akt phosphorylation inhibitor), and KN-93 (a CaMKII inhibitor) counteracted the enhanced expression and phosphorylation of AMPAR subunits induced by 7, 8-DHF. Collectively, our results demonstrated that 7, 8-DHF acted on TrkB and resolved learning and memory impairments in the absence of reduced amyloid in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice partially through improved synaptic structure and enhanced synaptic AMPARs. The findings suggest that the application of 7, 8-DHF may be a promising new approach to improve cognitive abilities in AD. We provided extensive data demonstrating that 7, 8-dihydroflavone, the TrkB agonist, improved Tg2576 mice spatial memory. This improvement is correlated with a reversion to normal values of GluA1 and GluA2 AMPA receptor subunits and dendritic

  12. Brain ischaemia induces shedding of a BDNF-scavenger ectodomain from TrkB receptors by excitotoxicity activation of metalloproteinases and γ-secretases.

    PubMed

    Tejeda, Gonzalo S; Ayuso-Dolado, Sara; Arbeteta, Raquel; Esteban-Ortega, Gema M; Vidaurre, Oscar G; Díaz-Guerra, Margarita

    2016-04-01

    Stroke remains a leading cause of death and disability in the world with limited therapies available to restrict brain damage or improve functional recovery after cerebral ischaemia. A promising strategy currently under investigation is the promotion of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling through tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptors, a pathway essential for neuronal survival and function. However, TrkB and BDNF-signalling are impaired by excitotoxicity, a primary pathological process in stroke also associated with neurodegenerative diseases. Pathological imbalance of TrkB isoforms is critical in neurodegeneration and is caused by calpain processing of BDNF high affinity full-length receptor (TrkB-FL) and an inversion of the transcriptional pattern of the Ntrk2 gene, to favour expression of the truncated isoform TrkB-T1 over TrkB-FL. We report here that both TrkB-FL and neuronal TrkB-T1 also undergo ectodomain shedding by metalloproteinases activated after ischaemic injury or excitotoxic damage of cortical neurons. Subsequently, the remaining membrane-bound C-terminal fragments (CTFs) are cleaved by γ-secretases within the transmembrane region, releasing their intracellular domains (ICDs) into the cytosol. Therefore, we identify TrkB-FL and TrkB-T1 as new substrates of regulated intramembrane proteolysis (RIP), a mechanism that highly contributes to TrkB-T1 regulation in ischaemia but is minor for TrkB-FL which is mainly processed by calpain. However, since the secreted TrkB ectodomain acts as a BDNF scavenger and significantly alters BDNF/TrkB signalling, the mechanism of RIP could contribute to neuronal death in excitotoxicity. These results are highly relevant since they reveal new targets for the rational design of therapies to treat stroke and other pathologies with an excitotoxic component. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26712630

  13. PKC activation sensitizes basal-like breast cancer cell lines to Smac mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Cornmark, L; Holmgren, C; Masoumi, K; Larsson, C

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for novel strategies to initiate cancer cell death. One approach is the use of Smac mimetics, which antagonize inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs). Recent studies have shown that combinations of Smac mimetics such as LBW242 or LCL161 in combination with chemotherapeutic agents increase cancer cell death. Here we show that the protein kinase C (PKC) activator TPA together with the Smac mimetic LBW242 induces cell death in two basal breast cancer cell lines (MDA-MB-468 and BT-549) that are resistant to Smac mimetic as single agent. Ten other LBW242-insensitive cancer cell lines were not influenced by the TPA+LBW242 combination. The TPA+LBW242 effect was suppressed by the PKC inhibitor GF109203X, indicating dependence on PKC enzymatic activity. The PKC effect was mediated via increased synthesis and release of TNFα, which can induce death in the presence of Smac mimetics. The cell death, coinciding with caspase-3 cleavage, was suppressed by caspase inhibition and preceded by the association of RIP1 with caspase-8, as seen in complex II formation. Smac mimetics, but not TPA, induced the non-canonical NF-κB pathway in both MDA-MB-231 and MDA-MB-468 cells. Blocking the canonical NF-κB pathway suppressed TPA induction of TNFα in MDA-MB-468 cells whereas isolated downregulation of either the canonical or non-canonical pathways did not abolish the Smac mimetic induction of the NF-κB driven genes TNFα and BIRC3 in MDA-MB-231 cells although the absolute levels were suppressed. A combined downregulation of the canonical and non-canonical pathways further suppressed TNFα levels and inhibited Smac mimetic-mediated cell death. Our data suggest that in certain basal breast cancer cell lines co-treatment of TPA with a Smac mimetic induces cell death highlighting the potential of using these pathways as molecular targets for basal-like breast cancers. PMID:27551497

  14. Downregulation of Bim by brain-derived neurotrophic factor activation of TrkB protects neuroblastoma cells from paclitaxel but not etoposide or cisplatin-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Zhang, J; Liu, Z; Woo, C-W; Thiele, C J

    2007-02-01

    Chemoresistance and increased expression of TrkB and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are biomarkers of poor prognosis in tumors from patients with neuroblastoma (NB). Previously, we found BDNF activation of TrkB through PI3K/Akt protects NB from etoposide/cisplatin-induced cell death. In this study, the role of Bim, a proapoptotic protein, was investigated. Bim was involved in paclitaxel but not etoposide or cisplatin-induced cell death in NB cells. Pharmacological and genetic studies showed that BDNF-induced decreases in Bim were regulated by MAPK and not PI3K/Akt pathway. Both MAPK and PI3K pathways were involved in BDNF protection of NB cells from paclitaxel-induced cell death, while PI3K predominantly mediated BDNF protection of NB cells from etoposide or cisplatin-induced cell death. These data indicate that different chemotherapeutic drugs induce distinct death pathways and growth factors utilize different signal transduction pathways to modulate the effects of chemotherapy on cells. PMID:16778834

  15. Triple-enzyme mimetic activity of nickel-palladium hollow nanoparticles and their application in colorimetric biosensing of glucose.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qingqing; Zhang, Lingling; Shang, Changshuai; Zhang, Zhiquan; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-04-01

    We demonstrate that nickel-palladium hollow nanoparticles (NiPd hNPs) exhibit triple-enzyme mimetic activity: oxidase-like activity, peroxidase-like activity and catalase-like activity. As peroxidase mimetics, the catalytic activity of NiPd hNPs was investigated in detail. On this basis, a simple glucose biosensor with a wide linear range and low detection limit was developed. PMID:27009927

  16. Effect of mimetic CDK9 inhibitors on HIV-1 activated transcription

    PubMed Central

    Van Duyne, Rachel; Guendel, Irene; Jaworski, Elizabeth; Sampey, Gavin; Klase, Zachary; Chen, Hao; Zeng, Chen; Kovalskyy, Dmytro; el Kouni, Mahmoud H.; Lepene, Benjamin; Patanarut, Alexis; Nekhai, Sergei; Price, David H.; Kashanchi, Fatah

    2013-01-01

    Potent antiretroviral therapy (ART) has transformed HIV-1 infection into a chronic manageable disease; however drug resistance remains a common problem that limits the effectiveness and clinical benefits of this type of treatment. The discovery of viral reservoirs in the body, in which HIV-1 may persist, has helped to explain why therapeutic eradication of HIV-1 has proved so difficult. In the current study we utilized a combination of structure based analysis of Cyclin/CDK complexes with our previously published Tat peptide derivatives. We modeled the Tat peptide inhibitors with CDKs and found a particular pocket which showed the most stable binding site (Cavity 1) using in silico analysis. Furthermore, we were able to find peptide mimetics that bound to similar regions using in silico searches of a chemical library, followed by cell based biological assays. Using these methods we obtained the first generation mimetic drugs and tested these compounds on HIV-1 LTR activated transcription. Using biological assays followed by similar in silico analysis to find a 2nd generation drugs resembling the original mimetic, we found the new targets of Cavity 1 and Cavity 2 regions on CDK9. We examined the 2nd generation mimetic against various viral isolates, and observed a generalized suppression of most HIV-1 isolates. Finally, the drug inhibited viral replication in humanized mouse models of Rag2-/-γc-/- with no toxicity to the animals at tested concentrations. Our results suggest that it may be possible to model peptide inhibitors into available crystal structures and further find drug mimetics using in silico analysis. PMID:23247501

  17. Pituitary Adenylate Cyclase-Activating Peptide in the Central Amygdala Causes Anorexia and Body Weight Loss via the Melanocortin and the TrkB Systems.

    PubMed

    Iemolo, Attilio; Ferragud, Antonio; Cottone, Pietro; Sabino, Valentina

    2015-07-01

    Growing evidence suggests that the pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating polypeptide (PACAP)/PAC1 receptor system represents one of the main regulators of the behavioral, endocrine, and autonomic responses to stress. Although induction of anorexia is a well-documented effect of PACAP, the central sites underlying this phenomenon are poorly understood. The present studies addressed this question by examining the neuroanatomical, behavioral, and pharmacological mechanisms mediating the anorexia produced by PACAP in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA), a limbic structure implicated in the emotional components of ingestive behavior. Male rats were microinfused with PACAP (0-1 μg per rat) into the CeA and home-cage food intake, body weight change, microstructural analysis of food intake, and locomotor activity were assessed. Intra-CeA (but not intra-basolateral amygdala) PACAP dose-dependently induced anorexia and body weight loss without affecting locomotor activity. PACAP-treated rats ate smaller meals of normal duration, revealing that PACAP slowed feeding within meals by decreasing the regularity and maintenance of feeding from pellet-to-pellet; postprandial satiety was unaffected. Intra-CeA PACAP-induced anorexia was blocked by coinfusion of either the melanocortin receptor 3/4 antagonist SHU 9119 or the tyrosine kinase B (TrKB) inhibitor k-252a, but not the CRF receptor antagonist D-Phe-CRF(12-41). These results indicate that the CeA is one of the brain areas through which the PACAP system promotes anorexia and that PACAP preferentially lessens the maintenance of feeding in rats, effects opposite to those of palatable food. We also demonstrate that PACAP in the CeA exerts its anorectic effects via local melanocortin and the TrKB systems, and independently from CRF. PMID:25649277

  18. SOD mimetic activity and antiproliferative properties of a novel tetra nuclear copper (II) complex.

    PubMed

    Weintraub, Sagiv; Moskovitz, Yoni; Fleker, Ohad; Levy, Ariel R; Meir, Aviv; Ruthstein, Sharon; Benisvy, Laurent; Gruzman, Arie

    2015-12-01

    The search for novel anticancer therapeutic agents is an urgent and important issue in medicinal chemistry. Here, we report on the biological activity of the copper-based bioinorganic complex Cu4 (2,4-di-tert-butyl-6-(1H-imidazo- [1, 10] phenanthrolin-2-yl)phenol)4]·10 CH3CN (2), which was tested in rat L6 myotubes, mouse NSC-34 motor neurone-like cells, and HepG-2 human liver carcinoma. Upon 96 h incubation, 2 exhibited a significant cytotoxic effect on all three types of cells via activation of two cell death mechanisms (apoptosis and necrosis). Complex 2 exhibited better potency and efficacy than the canonical cytotoxic drug cisplatin. Moreover, during shorter incubations, complex 2 demonstrated a significant SOD mimetic activity, and it was more effective and more potent than the well-known SOD mimetic TEMPOL. In addition, complex 2 was able to interact with DNA and, cleave DNA in the presence of sodium ascorbate. This study shows the potential of using polynuclear redox active compounds for developing novel anticancer drugs through SOD-mimetic redox pathways. PMID:26547749

  19. Role of phosphate on stability and catalase mimetic activity of cerium oxide nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Singh, Ragini; Singh, Sanjay

    2015-08-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CeNPs) have been recently shown to scavenge reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (ROS and RNS) in different experimental model systems. CeNPs (3+) and CeNPs (4+) have been shown to exhibit superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase mimetic activity, respectively. Due to their nanoscale dimension, CeNPs are expected to interact with the components of biologically relevant buffers and medium, which could alter their catalytic properties. We have demonstrated earlier that CeNPs (3+) interact with phosphate and lose the SOD activity. However, very little is known about the interaction of CeNPs (4+) with the phosphate and other anions, predominantly present in biological buffers and their effects on the catalase mimetic-activity of these nanoparticles. In this study, we report that catalase mimetic-activity of CeNPs (4+) is resistant to the phosphate anions, pH changes and composition of cell culture media. Given the abundance of phosphate anions in the biological system, it is likely that internalized CeNPs would be influenced by cytoplasmic and nucleoplasmic concentration of phosphate. PMID:26011425

  20. Calorimetric studies of the interactions of metalloenzyme active site mimetics with zinc-binding inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Sophia G; Burns, Philip T; Miceli, Amanda M; Grice, Kyle A; Karver, Caitlin E; Jin, Lihua

    2016-07-19

    The binding of drugs to metalloenzymes is an intricate process that involves several interactions, including binding of the drug to the enzyme active site metal, as well as multiple interactions between the drug and the enzyme residues. In order to determine the free energy contribution of Zn(2+) binding by known metalloenzyme inhibitors without the other interactions, valid active site zinc structural mimetics must be formed and binding studies need to be performed in biologically relevant conditions. The potential of each of five ligands to form a structural mimetic with Zn(2+) was investigated in buffer using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry (ITC). All five ligands formed strong 1 : 1 (ligand : Zn(2+)) binary complexes. The complexes were used in further ITC experiments to study their interaction with 8-hydroxyquinoline (8-HQ) and/or acetohydroxamic acid (AHA), two bidentate anionic zinc-chelating enzyme inhibitors. It was found that tetradentate ligands were not suitable for creating zinc structural mimetics for inhibitor binding in solution due to insufficient coordination sites remaining on Zn(2+). A stable binary complex, [Zn(BPA)](2+), which was formed by a tridentate ligand, bis(2-pyridylmethyl)amine (BPA), was found to bind one AHA in buffer or a methanol : buffer mixture (60 : 40 by volume) at pH 7.25 or one 8-HQ in the methanol : buffer mixture at pH 6.80, making it an effective structural mimetic for the active site of zinc metalloenzymes. These results are consistent with the observation that metalloenzyme active site zinc ions have three residues coordinated to them, leaving one or two sites open for inhibitors to bind. Our findings indicate that Zn(BPA)X2 can be used as an active site structural mimetic for zinc metalloenzymes for estimating the free energy contribution of zinc binding to the overall inhibitor active site interactions. Such use will help aid in the rational design of inhibitors to a variety of zinc metalloenzymes

  1. BAX-BAK1-independent LC3B lipidation by BH3 mimetics is unrelated to BH3 mimetic activity and has only minimal effects on autophagic flux.

    PubMed

    Reljic, Boris; Conos, Stephanie; Lee, Erinna F; Garnier, Jean-Marc; Dong, Li; Lessene, Guillaume; Fairlie, W Douglas; Vaux, David L; Lindqvist, Lisa M

    2016-07-01

    Inhibition of prosurvival BCL2 family members can induce autophagy, but the mechanism is controversial. We have provided genetic evidence that BCL2 family members block autophagy by inhibiting BAX and BAK1, but others have proposed they instead inhibit BECN1. Here we confirm that small molecule BH3 mimetics can induce BAX- and BAK1-independent MAP1LC3B/LC3B lipidation, but this only occurred at concentrations far greater than required to induce apoptosis and dissociate canonical BH3 domain-containing proteins that bind more tightly than BECN1. Because high concentrations of a less-active enantiomer of ABT-263 also induced BAX- and BAK1-independent LC3B lipidation, induction of this marker of autophagy appears to be an off-target effect. Indeed, robust autophagic flux was not induced by BH3 mimetic compounds in the absence of BAX and BAK1. Therefore at concentrations that are on target and achievable in vivo, BH3 mimetics only induce autophagy in a BAX- and BAK1-dependent manner. PMID:27172402

  2. Activity of antimicrobial peptide mimetics in the oral cavity: II. Activity against periopathogenic biofilms and anti-inflammatory activity.

    PubMed

    Hua, J; Scott, R W; Diamond, G

    2010-12-01

    Whereas periodontal disease is ultimately of bacterial etiology, from multispecies biofilms of gram-negative anaerobic microorganisms, much of the deleterious effects are caused by the resultant epithelial inflammatory response. Hence, development of a treatment that combines anti-biofilm antibiotic activity with anti-inflammatory activity would be of great utility. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) such as defensins are naturally occurring peptides that exhibit broad-spectrum activity as well as a variety of immunomodulatory activities. Furthermore, bacteria do not readily develop resistance to these agents. However, clinical studies have suggested that they do not represent optimal candidates for exogenous therapeutic agents. Small-molecule mimetics of these AMPs exhibit similar activities to the parent peptides, in addition to having low toxicity, high stability and low cost. To determine whether AMP mimetics have the potential for treatment of periodontal disease, we examined the activity of one mimetic, mPE, against biofilm cultures of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Metabolic assays as well as culture and biomass measurement assays demonstrated that mPE exhibits potent activity against biofilm cultures of both species. Furthermore, as little as 2 μg ml(-1) mPE was sufficient to inhibit interleukin-1β-induced secretion of interleukin-8 in both gingival epithelial cells and THP-1 cells. This anti-inflammatory activity is associated with a reduction in activation of nuclear factor-κB, suggesting that mPE can act both as an anti-biofilm agent in an anaerobic environment and as an anti-inflammatory agent in infected tissues. PMID:21040516

  3. Molecular Design, Structures, and Activity of Antimicrobial Peptide-Mimetic Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Takahashi, Haruko; Palermo, Edmund F.; Yasuhara, Kazuma; Caputo, Gregory A.

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need for new antibiotics which are effective against drug-resistant bacteria without contributing to resistance development. We have designed and developed antimicrobial copolymers with cationic amphiphilic structures based on the mimicry of naturally occurring antimicrobial peptides. These copolymers exhibit potent antimicrobial activity against a broad spectrum of bacteria including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with no adverse hemolytic activity. Notably, these polymers also did not result in any measurable resistance development in E. coli. The peptide-mimetic design principle offers significant flexibility and diversity in the creation of new antimicrobial materials and their potential biomedical applications. PMID:23832766

  4. A biologically active peptide mimetic of N-acetylgalactosamine/galactose

    PubMed Central

    Eggink, Laura L; Hoober, J Kenneth

    2009-01-01

    Background Glycosylated proteins and lipids are important regulatory factors whose functions can be altered by addition or removal of sugars to the glycan structure. The glycans are recognized by sugar-binding lectins that serve as receptors on the surface of many cells and facilitate initiation of an intracellular signal that changes the properties of the cells. We identified a peptide that mimics the ligand of an N-acetylgalactosamine (GalNAc)-specific lectin and asked whether the peptide would express specific biological activity. Findings A 12-mer phage display library was screened with a GalNAc-specific lectin to identify an amino acid sequence that binds to the lectin. Phage particles that were eluted from the lectin with free GalNAc were considered to have been bound to a GalNAc-binding site. Peptides were synthesized with the selected sequence as a quadravalent structure to facilitate receptor crosslinking. Treatment of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for 24 h with the peptide stimulated secretion of interleukin-8 (IL-8) but not of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-10, or tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The secretion of IL-21 was stimulated as strongly with the peptide as with interferon-γ. Conclusion The data indicate that the quadravalent peptide has biological activity with a degree of specificity. These effects occurred at concentrations in the nanomolar range, in contrast to free sugars that generally bind to proteins in the micro- to millimolar range. PMID:19284521

  5. BDNF/TrkB Signaling as a Potential Novel Target in Pediatric Brain Tumors: Anticancer Activity of Selective TrkB Inhibition in Medulloblastoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Thomaz, Amanda; Jaeger, Mariane; Buendia, Marienela; Bambini-Junior, Victorio; Gregianin, Lauro José; Brunetto, Algemir Lunardi; Brunetto, André T; de Farias, Caroline Brunetto; Roesler, Rafael

    2016-07-01

    Medulloblastoma (MB) is the most common malignant pediatric brain tumor. Deregulation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)/tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) signaling has been associated with increased proliferative capabilities, invasiveness, and chemoresistance in several types of cancer. However, the relevance of this pathway in MB remains unknown. Here, we show that the selective TrkB inhibitor N-[2-[[(hexahydro-2-oxo-1H-azepin-3-yl)amino]carbonyl]phenyl]-benzo[b]thiophene-2-carboxamide (ANA-12) markedly reduced the viability and survival of human cell lines representative of different MB molecular subgroups. These findings provide the first evidence supporting further investigation of TrkB inhibition as a potential novel strategy for MB treatment. PMID:26614346

  6. Potent Bivalent Smac Mimetics: Effect of the Linker on Binding to Inhibitor of Apoptosis Proteins (IAPs) and Anticancer Activity

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Haiying; Liu, Liu; Lu, Jianfeng; Bai, Longchuan; Li, Xiaoqin; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; McEachern, Donna; Yang, Chao-Yie; Qiu, Su; Yi, Han; Sun, Duxin; Wang, Shaomeng

    2011-01-01

    We have synthesized and evaluated a series of non-peptidic, bivalent Smac mimetics as antagonists of the inhibitor of apoptosis proteins and new anticancer agents. All these bivalent Smac mimetics bind to full-length XIAP with low nanomolar affinities and function as ultra-potent antagonists of XIAP. While these Smac mimetics bind to cIAP1/2 with similar low nanomolar affinities, their potencies to induce degradation of cIAP1/2 proteins in cells differ by more than 100-fold. The most potent bivalent Smac mimetics inhibit cell growth with IC50 values from 1–3 nM in the MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line and are 100-times more potent than the least potent compounds. Determination of intracellular concentrations for several representative compounds showed that the linkers in these bivalent Smac mimetics significantly affect their intracellular concentrations, hence the overall cellular activity. Compound 27 completely inhibits tumor growth in the MDA-MB-231 xenografts, while causing no signs of toxicity in the animals. PMID:21462933

  7. Neurotrophins Acting Via TRKB Receptors Activate the JAGGED1-NOTCH2 Cell-Cell Communication Pathway to Facilitate Early Ovarian Development

    PubMed Central

    Dorfman, Mauricio D.; Kerr, Bredford; Garcia-Rudaz, Cecilia; Paredes, Alfonso H.; Dissen, Gregory A.

    2011-01-01

    Tropomyosin-related kinase (TRK) receptor B (TRKB) mediates the supportive actions of neurotrophin 4/5 and brain-derived neurotrophic factor on early ovarian follicle development. Absence of TRKB receptors reduces granulosa cell (GC) proliferation and delays follicle growth. In the present study, we offer mechanistic insights into this phenomenon. DNA array and quantitative PCR analysis of ovaries from TrkB-null mice revealed that by the end of the first week of postnatal life, Jagged1, Hes1, and Hey2 mRNA abundance is reduced in the absence of TRKB receptors. Although Jagged1 encodes a NOTCH receptor ligand, Hes1 and Hey2 are downstream targets of the JAGGED1-NOTCH2 signaling system. Jagged1 is predominantly expressed in oocytes, and the abundance of JAGGED1 is decreased in TrkB−/− oocytes. Lack of TRKB receptors also resulted in reduced expression of c-Myc, a NOTCH target gene that promotes entry into the cell cycle, but did not alter the expression of genes encoding core regulators of cell-cycle progression. Selective restoration of JAGGED1 synthesis in oocytes of TrkB−/− ovaries via lentiviral-mediated transfer of the Jagged1 gene under the control of the growth differentiation factor 9 (Gdf9) promoter rescued c-Myc expression, GC proliferation, and follicle growth. These results suggest that neurotrophins acting via TRKB receptors facilitate early follicle growth by supporting a JAGGED1-NOTCH2 oocyte-to-GC communication pathway, which promotes GC proliferation via a c-MYC-dependent mechanism. PMID:22028443

  8. Intrinsic and chemo-sensitizing activity of SMAC-mimetics on high-risk childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Schirmer, M; Trentin, L; Queudeville, M; Seyfried, F; Demir, S; Tausch, E; Stilgenbauer, S; Eckhoff, S M; Meyer, L H; Debatin, K-M

    2016-01-01

    SMAC-mimetics represent a targeted therapy approach to overcome apoptosis resistance in many tumors. Here, we investigated the efficacy of the SMAC-mimetic BV6 in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (BCP-ALL). In ALL cell lines, intrinsic apoptosis sensitivity was associated with rapid cIAP degradation, NF-κB activation, TNF-α secretion and induction of an autocrine TNF-α-dependent cell death loop. This pattern of responsiveness was also observed upon ex vivo analysis of 40 primograft BCP-ALL samples. Treatment with BV6 induced cell death in the majority of ALL primografts including leukemias with high-risk and poor-prognosis features. Inhibition of cell death by the TNF receptor fusion protein etanercept demonstrated that BV6 activity is dependent on TNF-α. In a preclinical NOD/SCID/huALL model of high-risk ALL, marked anti-leukemia effectivity and significantly prolonged survival were observed upon BV6 treatment. Interestingly, also in vivo, intrinsic SMAC-mimetic activity was mediated by TNF-α. Importantly, BV6 increased the effectivity of conventional induction therapy including vincristine, dexamethasone and asparaginase leading to prolonged remission induction. These data suggest SMAC-mimetics as an important addendum to efficient therapy of pediatric BCP-ALL. PMID:26775704

  9. Smac mimetic triggers necroptosis in pancreatic carcinoma cells when caspase activation is blocked.

    PubMed

    Hannes, Sabine; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Fulda, Simone

    2016-09-28

    Evasion of apoptosis represents a key mechanism of treatment resistance of pancreatic cancer (PC) and contributes to the poor prognosis of this cancer type. Here, we report that induction of necroptosis is an alternative strategy to trigger programmed cell death in apoptosis-resistant PC cells. We show that the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (Smac) mimetic BV6 that antagonizes inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins induces necroptosis in PC cells in which apoptosis is blocked by the caspase inhibitor zVAD.fmk. Intriguingly, BV6 switches autocrine/paracrine production of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α by PC cells into a death signal and also acts in concert with exogenously supplied TNFα to trigger necroptosis, when caspase activation is simultaneously blocked. BV6 stimulates TNFα production and formation of the receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1/RIP3-containing necrosome complex in PC cells. Knockdown of TNF receptor 1 (TNFR1) protects PC cells from BV6- or BV6/TNFα-mediated cell death, demonstrating that TNFα autocrine/paracrine signaling by PC cells contributes to BV6-induced necroptosis. Importantly, genetic silencing of receptor interacting protein kinase 3 (RIPK3) or mixed lineage kinase domain-like protein (MLKL) significantly rescues PC cells from BV6- or BV6/TNFα-induced cell death. Similarly, pharmacological inhibition of RIP1, RIP3 or MLKL significantly reduces BV6- or BV6/TNFα-stimulated cell death. By demonstrating that Smac mimetics can bypass resistance to apoptosis by triggering necroptosis as an alternative form of programmed cell death, our findings have important implications for the design of new treatment concepts for PC. PMID:27267809

  10. Heparan sulfate mimetic PG545-mediated antilymphoma effects require TLR9-dependent NK cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Brennan, Todd V.; Lin, Liwen; Brandstadter, Joshua D.; Rendell, Victoria R.; Dredge, Keith; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2015-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which serves as a barrier to tumor invasion and metastasis. Heparanase promotes tumor growth by cleaving HS chains of proteoglycan and releasing HS-bound angiogenic growth factors and facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the ECM. HS mimetics, such as PG545, have been developed as antitumor agents and are designed to suppress angiogenesis and metastasis by inhibiting heparanase and competing for the HS-binding domain of angiogenic growth factors. However, how PG545 exerts its antitumor effect remains incompletely defined. Here, using murine models of lymphoma, we determined that the antitumor effects of PG545 are critically dependent on NK cell activation and that NK cell activation by PG545 requires TLR9. We demonstrate that PG545 does not activate TLR9 directly but instead enhances TLR9 activation through the elevation of the TLR9 ligand CpG in DCs. Specifically, PG545 treatment resulted in CpG accumulation in the lysosomal compartment of DCs, leading to enhanced production of IL-12, which is essential for PG545-mediated NK cell activation. Overall, these results reveal that PG545 activates NK cells and that this activation is critical for the antitumor effect of PG545. Moreover, our findings may have important implications for improving NK cell–based antitumor therapies. PMID:26649979

  11. Heparan sulfate mimetic PG545-mediated antilymphoma effects require TLR9-dependent NK cell activation.

    PubMed

    Brennan, Todd V; Lin, Liwen; Brandstadter, Joshua D; Rendell, Victoria R; Dredge, Keith; Huang, Xiaopei; Yang, Yiping

    2016-01-01

    Heparan sulfate (HS) is an essential component of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which serves as a barrier to tumor invasion and metastasis. Heparanase promotes tumor growth by cleaving HS chains of proteoglycan and releasing HS-bound angiogenic growth factors and facilitates tumor invasion and metastasis by degrading the ECM. HS mimetics, such as PG545, have been developed as antitumor agents and are designed to suppress angiogenesis and metastasis by inhibiting heparanase and competing for the HS-binding domain of angiogenic growth factors. However, how PG545 exerts its antitumor effect remains incompletely defined. Here, using murine models of lymphoma, we determined that the antitumor effects of PG545 are critically dependent on NK cell activation and that NK cell activation by PG545 requires TLR9. We demonstrate that PG545 does not activate TLR9 directly but instead enhances TLR9 activation through the elevation of the TLR9 ligand CpG in DCs. Specifically, PG545 treatment resulted in CpG accumulation in the lysosomal compartment of DCs, leading to enhanced production of IL-12, which is essential for PG545-mediated NK cell activation. Overall, these results reveal that PG545 activates NK cells and that this activation is critical for the antitumor effect of PG545. Moreover, our findings may have important implications for improving NK cell-based antitumor therapies. PMID:26649979

  12. Enzyme-mimetic effects of gold@platinum nanorods on the antioxidant activity of ascorbic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yu-Ting; He, Weiwei; Wamer, Wayne G.; Hu, Xiaona; Wu, Xiaochun; Lo, Y. Martin; Yin, Jun-Jie

    2013-01-01

    Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge DPPH radicals and superoxide radicals. These results demonstrate that Au@Pt nanorods can reduce the antioxidant activity of AA. Therefore, it is necessary to consider the effects of using Pt nanoparticles together with other reducing agents or antioxidants such as AA due to the oxidase-like property of Au@Pt nanorods.Au@Pt nanorods were prepared by growing platinum nanodots on gold nanorods. Using electron spin resonance (ESR), we determined that the mechanisms for oxidation of ascorbic acid (AA) by Au@Pt nanorods and ascorbic acid oxidase (AAO) were kinetically similar and yielded similar products. In addition we observed that Au@Pt nanorods were stable with respect to temperature and pH. Using UV-VIS spectroscopy, the apparent kinetics of enzyme-mimetic activity of Au@Pt nanorods were studied and compared with the activity of AAO. With the help of ESR, we found that Au@Pt nanorods did not scavenge hydroxyl radicals but inhibited the antioxidant ability of AA for scavenging hydroxyl radicals produced by photoirradiating solutions containing titanium dioxide and zinc oxide. Moreover, the Au@Pt nanorods reduced the ability of AA to scavenge

  13. Thioredoxin-mimetic peptide CB3 lowers MAPKinase activity in the Zucker rat brain.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Khomsky, Lena; Trus, Michael; Ben-Yehuda, Hila; Lenhard, James M; Liang, Yin; Martin, Tonya; Atlas, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a high risk factor for dementia. High glucose may be a risk factor for dementia even among persons without diabetes, and in transgenic animals it has been shown to cause a potentiation of indices that are pre-symptomatic of Alzheimer's disease. To further elucidate the underlying mechanisms linking inflammatory events elicited in the brain during oxidative stress and diabetes, we monitored the activation of mitogen-activated kinsase (MAPKs), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 MAP kinases (p38(MAPK)), and extracellular activating kinsae1/2 (ERK1/2) and the anti-inflammatory effects of the thioredoxin mimetic (TxM) peptides, Ac-Cys-Pro-Cys-amide (CB3) and Ac-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-amide (CB4) in the brain of male leptin-receptor-deficient Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Daily i.p. injection of CB3 to ZDF rats inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK and p38(MAPK), and prevented the expression of thioredoxin-interacting-protein (TXNIP/TBP-2) in ZDF rat brain. Although plasma glucose/insulin remained high, CB3 also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-ribose activating kinase (AMPK) and inhibited p70(S6K) kinase in the brain. Both CB3 and CB4 reversed apoptosis induced by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase as monitored by decreasing caspase 3 cleavage and PARP dissociation in SH-SY5Y cells. The decrease in JNK and p38(MAPK) activity in the absence of a change in plasma glucose implies a decrease in oxidative or neuroinflammatory stress in the ZDF rat brain. CB3 not only attenuated MAPK phosphorylation and activated AMPK in the brain, but it also diminished apoptotic markers, most likely acting via the MAPK-AMPK-mTOR pathway. These results were correlated with CB3 and CB4 inhibiting inflammation progression and protection from oxidative stress induced apoptosis in human neuronal cells. We suggest that by attenuating neuro-inflammatory processes in the brain Trx1 mimetic peptides could become beneficial for preventing neurological

  14. Thioredoxin-mimetic peptide CB3 lowers MAPKinase activity in the Zucker rat brain☆

    PubMed Central

    Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Khomsky, Lena; Trus, Michael; Ben-Yehuda, Hila; Lenhard, James M.; Liang, Yin; Martin, Tonya; Atlas, Daphne

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes is a high risk factor for dementia. High glucose may be a risk factor for dementia even among persons without diabetes, and in transgenic animals it has been shown to cause a potentiation of indices that are pre-symptomatic of Alzheimer's disease. To further elucidate the underlying mechanisms linking inflammatory events elicited in the brain during oxidative stress and diabetes, we monitored the activation of mitogen-activated kinsase (MAPKs), c-jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 MAP kinases (p38MAPK), and extracellular activating kinsae1/2 (ERK1/2) and the anti-inflammatory effects of the thioredoxin mimetic (TxM) peptides, Ac-Cys-Pro-Cys-amide (CB3) and Ac-Cys-Gly-Pro-Cys-amide (CB4) in the brain of male leptin-receptor-deficient Zucker diabetic fatty (ZDF) rats and human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Daily i.p. injection of CB3 to ZDF rats inhibited the phosphorylation of JNK and p38MAPK, and prevented the expression of thioredoxin-interacting-protein (TXNIP/TBP-2) in ZDF rat brain. Although plasma glucose/insulin remained high, CB3 also increased the phosphorylation of AMP-ribose activating kinase (AMPK) and inhibited p70S6K kinase in the brain. Both CB3 and CB4 reversed apoptosis induced by inhibiting thioredoxin reductase as monitored by decreasing caspase 3 cleavage and PARP dissociation in SH-SY5Y cells. The decrease in JNK and p38MAPK activity in the absence of a change in plasma glucose implies a decrease in oxidative or neuroinflammatory stress in the ZDF rat brain. CB3 not only attenuated MAPK phosphorylation and activated AMPK in the brain, but it also diminished apoptotic markers, most likely acting via the MAPK–AMPK–mTOR pathway. These results were correlated with CB3 and CB4 inhibiting inflammation progression and protection from oxidative stress induced apoptosis in human neuronal cells. We suggest that by attenuating neuro-inflammatory processes in the brain Trx1 mimetic peptides could become beneficial for preventing neurological

  15. Collagen-binding VEGF mimetic peptide: Structure, matrix interaction, and endothelial cell activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Tania R.

    Long term survival of artificial tissue constructs depends greatly on proper vascularization. In nature, differentiation of endothelial cells and formation of vasculature are directed by dynamic spatio-temporal cues in the extracellular matrix that are difficult to reproduce in vitro. In this dissertation, we present a novel bifunctional peptide that mimics matrix-bound vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), which can be used to encode spatially controlled angiogenic signals in collagen-based scaffolds. The peptide, QKCMP, contains a collagen mimetic domain (CMP) that binds to type I collagen by a unique triple helix hybridization mechanism and a VEGF mimetic domain (QK) with pro-angiogenic activity. We demonstrate QKCMP's ability to hybridize with native and heat denatured collagens through a series of binding studies on collagen and gelatin substrates. Circular dichroism experiments show that the peptide retains the triple helical structure vital for collagen binding, and surface plasmon resonance study confirms the molecular interaction between the peptide and collagen strands. Cell culture studies demonstrate QKCMP's ability to induce endothelial cell morphogenesis and network formation as a matrix-bound factor in 2D and 3D collagen scaffolds. We also show that the peptide can be used to spatially modify collagen-based substrates to promote localized endothelial cell activation and network formation. To probe the biological events that govern these angiogenic cellular responses, we investigated the cell signaling pathways activated by collagen-bound QKCMP and determined short and long-term endothelial cell response profiles for p38, ERK1/2, and Akt signal transduction cascades. Finally, we present our efforts to translate the peptide's in vitro bioactivity to an in vivo burn injury animal model. When implanted at the wound site, QKCMP functionalized biodegradable hydrogels induce enhanced neovascularization in the granulation tissue. The results show QKCMP

  16. An investigation of the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional Pd-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Jingping; Chen, Xiaolan; Shi, Saige; Mo, Shiguang; Zheng, Nanfeng

    2015-11-01

    In this work, we investigated the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional (2D) Pd-based nanostructures (e.g. Pd nanosheets, Pd@Au and Pd@Pt nanoplates) and found that they possess intrinsic peroxidase-, oxidase- and catalase-like activities. These nanostructures were able to activate hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen for catalyzing the oxidation of organic substrates, and decompose hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen. More systematic investigations revealed that the peroxidase-like activities of these Pd-based nanomaterials were highly structure- and composition-dependent. Among them, Pd@Pt nanoplates displayed the highest peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings, Pd-based nanostructures were applied for the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose, and also the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2. This work offers a promising prospect for the application of 2D noble metal nanostructures in biocatalysis.In this work, we investigated the mimetic enzyme activity of two-dimensional (2D) Pd-based nanostructures (e.g. Pd nanosheets, Pd@Au and Pd@Pt nanoplates) and found that they possess intrinsic peroxidase-, oxidase- and catalase-like activities. These nanostructures were able to activate hydrogen peroxide or dissolved oxygen for catalyzing the oxidation of organic substrates, and decompose hydrogen peroxide to generate oxygen. More systematic investigations revealed that the peroxidase-like activities of these Pd-based nanomaterials were highly structure- and composition-dependent. Among them, Pd@Pt nanoplates displayed the highest peroxidase-like activity. Based on these findings, Pd-based nanostructures were applied for the colorimetric detection of H2O2 and glucose, and also the electro-catalytic reduction of H2O2. This work offers a promising prospect for the application of 2D noble metal nanostructures in biocatalysis. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: TEM images, EDX and dispersion stability of Pd-based nanomaterials

  17. Requirement of TrkB for synapse elimination in developing cerebellar Purkinje cells

    PubMed Central

    Bosman, Laurens W. J.; Hartmann, Jana; Barski, Jaroslaw J.; Lepier, Alexandra; Noll-Hussong, Michael; Reichardt, Louis F.; Konnerth, Arthur

    2009-01-01

    The receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB and its ligands, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4/5), are critically important for growth, survival and activity-dependent synaptic strengthening in the central nervous system. These TrkB-mediated actions occur in a highly cell-type specific manner. Here we report that cerebellar Purkinje cells, which are richly endowed with TrkB receptors, develop a normal morphology in trkB-deficient mice. Thus, in contrast to other types of neurons, Purkinje cells do not need TrkB for dendritic growth and spine formation. Instead, we find a moderate delay in the maturation of GABAergic synapses and, more importantly, an abnormal multiple climbing fiber innervation in Purkinje cells in trkB-deficient mice. Thus, our results demonstrate an involvement of TrkB receptors in synapse elimination and reveal a new role for receptor tyrosine kinases in the brain. PMID:17940915

  18. Self-Assembling Glucagon-Like Peptide 1-Mimetic Peptide Amphiphiles for Enhanced Activity and Proliferation of Insulin-Secreting Cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Saahir; Sur, Shantanu; Newcomb, Christina J.; Appelt, Elizabeth A.

    2012-01-01

    Current treatment for type 1 diabetes mellitus requires daily insulin injections that fail to produce physiological glycemic control. Islet cell transplantation has been proposed as a permanent cure but is limited by loss of β-cell viability and function. These limitations could potentially be overcome by relying on the activity of glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1), which acts on β-cells to promote insulin release, proliferation, and survival. We have developed a peptide amphiphile (PA) molecule incorporating a peptide mimetic for GLP-1. This GLP-1-mimetic PA self-assembles into one-dimensional nanofibers that stabilize the active secondary structure of GLP-1 and can be cross-linked by calcium ions to form a macroscopic gel capable of cell encapsulation and 3-dimensional culture. The GLP-1-mimetic PA nanofibers were found to stimulate insulin secretion from rat insulinoma (RINm5f) cells to a significantly greater extent than the mimetic peptide alone and to a level equivalent to that of the clinically used agonist exendin-4. The activity of the GLP-1-mimetic PA is glucose-dependent, lipid-raft dependent, and partially PKA-dependent consistent with native GLP-1. The GLP-1-mimetic PA also completely abrogates inflammatory cytokine-induced cell death to the level of untreated controls. When used as a PA gel to encapsulate RINm5f cells, the GLP-1-mimetic PA stimulates insulin secretion and proliferation in a cytokine-resistant manner that is significantly greater than a non-bioactive PA gel containing exendin-4. Due to its self-assembling property and bioactivity, the GLP-1-mimetic PA can be incorporated into previously developed islet cell transplantation protocols with the potential for significant enhancement of β-cell viability and function. PMID:22342354

  19. Leukocyte mimetic polysaccharide microparticles tracked in vivo on activated endothelium and in abdominal aortic aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bonnard, Thomas; Serfaty, Jean-Michel; Journé, Clément; Ho Tin Noe, Benoît; Arnaud, Denis; Louedec, Liliane; Derkaoui, Sidi Mohammed; Letourneur, Didier; Chauvierre, Cédric; Le Visage, Catherine

    2014-08-01

    We have developed injectable microparticles functionalized with fucoidan, in which sulfated groups mimic the anchor sites of P-selectin glycoprotein ligand-1 (PSGL-1), one of the principal receptors supporting leukocyte adhesion. These targeted microparticles were combined with a fluorescent dye and a T2(∗) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) contrast agent, and then tracked in vivo with small animal imaging methods. Microparticles of 2.5μm were obtained by a water-in-oil emulsification combined with a cross-linking process of polysaccharide dextran, fluorescein isothiocyanate dextran, pullulan and fucoidan mixed with ultrasmall superparamagnetic particles of iron oxide. Fluorescent intravital microscopy observation revealed dynamic adsorption and a leukocyte-like behaviour of fucoidan-functionalized microparticles on a calcium ionophore induced an activated endothelial layer of a mouse mesentery vessel. We observed 20times more adherent microparticles on the activated endothelium area after the injection of functionalized microparticles compared to non-functionalized microparticles (197±11 vs. 10±2). This imaging tool was then applied to rats presenting an elastase perfusion model of abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) and 7.4T in vivo MRI was performed. Visual analysis of T2(∗)-weighted MR images showed a significant contrast enhancement on the inner wall of the aneurysm from 30min to 2h after the injection. Histological analysis of AAA cryosections revealed microparticles localized inside the aneurysm wall, in the same areas in which immunostaining shows P-selectin expression. The developed leukocyte mimetic imaging tool could therefore be relevant for molecular imaging of vascular diseases and for monitoring biologically active areas prone to rupture in AAA. PMID:24769117

  20. Low molecular weight, non-peptidic agonists of TrkA receptor with NGF-mimetic activity

    PubMed Central

    Scarpi, D; Cirelli, D; Matrone, C; Castronovo, G; Rosini, P; Occhiato, E G; Romano, F; Bartali, L; Clemente, A M; Bottegoni, G; Cavalli, A; De Chiara, G; Bonini, P; Calissano, P; Palamara, A T; Garaci, E; Torcia, M G; Guarna, A; Cozzolino, F

    2012-01-01

    Exploitation of the biologic activity of neurotrophins is desirable for medical purposes, but their protein nature intrinsically bears adverse pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we report synthesis and biologic characterization of a novel class of low molecular weight, non-peptidic compounds with NGF (nerve growth factor)-mimetic properties. MT2, a representative compound, bound to Trk (tropomyosin kinase receptor)A chain on NGF-sensitive cells, as well as in cell-free assays, at nanomolar concentrations and induced TrkA autophosphorylation and receptor-mediated internalization. MT2 binding involved at least two amino-acid residues within TrkA molecule. Like NGF, MT2 increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and Akt proteins and production of MKP-1 phosphatase (dual specificity phosphatase 1), modulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, sustained survival of serum-starved PC12 or RDG cells, and promoted their differentiation. However, the intensity of such responses was heterogenous, as the ability of maintaining survival was equally possessed by NGF and MT2, whereas the induction of differentiation was expressed at definitely lower levels by the mimetic. Analysis of TrkA autophosphorylation patterns induced by MT2 revealed a strong tyrosine (Tyr)490 and a limited Tyr785 and Tyr674/675 activation, findings coherent with the observed functional divarication. Consistently, in an NGF-deprived rat hippocampal neuronal model of Alzheimer Disease, MT2 could correct the biochemical abnormalities and sustain cell survival. Thus, NGF mimetics may reveal interesting investigational tools in neurobiology, as well as promising drug candidates. PMID:22764098

  1. Low molecular weight, non-peptidic agonists of TrkA receptor with NGF-mimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Scarpi, D; Cirelli, D; Matrone, C; Castronovo, G; Rosini, P; Occhiato, E G; Romano, F; Bartali, L; Clemente, A M; Bottegoni, G; Cavalli, A; De Chiara, G; Bonini, P; Calissano, P; Palamara, A T; Garaci, E; Torcia, M G; Guarna, A; Cozzolino, F

    2012-01-01

    Exploitation of the biologic activity of neurotrophins is desirable for medical purposes, but their protein nature intrinsically bears adverse pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we report synthesis and biologic characterization of a novel class of low molecular weight, non-peptidic compounds with NGF (nerve growth factor)-mimetic properties. MT2, a representative compound, bound to Trk (tropomyosin kinase receptor)A chain on NGF-sensitive cells, as well as in cell-free assays, at nanomolar concentrations and induced TrkA autophosphorylation and receptor-mediated internalization. MT2 binding involved at least two amino-acid residues within TrkA molecule. Like NGF, MT2 increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 and Akt proteins and production of MKP-1 phosphatase (dual specificity phosphatase 1), modulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation,sustained survival of serum-starved PC12 or RDG cells, and promoted their differentiation. However, the intensity of such responses was heterogenous, as the ability of maintaining survival was equally possessed by NGF and MT2, whereas the induction of differentiation was expressed at definitely lower levels by the mimetic. Analysis of TrkA autophosphorylation patterns induced by MT2 revealed a strong tyrosine (Tyr)490 and a limited Tyr785 and Tyr674/675 activation, findings coherent with the observed functional divarication. Consistently, in an NGF-deprived rat hippocampal neuronal model of Alzheimer Disease, MT2 could correct the biochemical abnormalities and sustain cell survival. Thus, NGF mimetics may reveal interesting investigational tools in neurobiology, as well as promising drug candidates. PMID:22951986

  2. Low molecular weight, non-peptidic agonists of TrkA receptor with NGF-mimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Scarpi, D; Cirelli, D; Matrone, C; Castronovo, G; Rosini, P; Occhiato, E G; Romano, F; Bartali, L; Clemente, A M; Bottegoni, G; Cavalli, A; De Chiara, G; Bonini, P; Calissano, P; Palamara, A T; Garaci, E; Torcia, M G; Guarna, A; Cozzolino, F

    2012-01-01

    Exploitation of the biologic activity of neurotrophins is desirable for medical purposes, but their protein nature intrinsically bears adverse pharmacokinetic properties. Here, we report synthesis and biologic characterization of a novel class of low molecular weight, non-peptidic compounds with NGF (nerve growth factor)-mimetic properties. MT2, a representative compound, bound to Trk (tropomyosin kinase receptor)A chain on NGF-sensitive cells, as well as in cell-free assays, at nanomolar concentrations and induced TrkA autophosphorylation and receptor-mediated internalization. MT2 binding involved at least two amino-acid residues within TrkA molecule. Like NGF, MT2 increased phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 and Akt proteins and production of MKP-1 phosphatase (dual specificity phosphatase 1), modulated p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activation, sustained survival of serum-starved PC12 or RDG cells, and promoted their differentiation. However, the intensity of such responses was heterogenous, as the ability of maintaining survival was equally possessed by NGF and MT2, whereas the induction of differentiation was expressed at definitely lower levels by the mimetic. Analysis of TrkA autophosphorylation patterns induced by MT2 revealed a strong tyrosine (Tyr)490 and a limited Tyr785 and Tyr674/675 activation, findings coherent with the observed functional divarication. Consistently, in an NGF-deprived rat hippocampal neuronal model of Alzheimer Disease, MT2 could correct the biochemical abnormalities and sustain cell survival. Thus, NGF mimetics may reveal interesting investigational tools in neurobiology, as well as promising drug candidates. PMID:22764098

  3. Mimetic Attractors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Muhammad; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Ratbay

    2016-05-01

    In this paper,we investigate the mathematical modeling for the cosmological attractors propagated in mimetic gravity upon which an interacting dark energy-dark matter is supposed to be existed. The average value of the interaction of these percentages, namely Γ i say, may be used to investigate generally the modeling of an attractor; the actual value could only be determined by data in any particular case. We have seen, for example, that it was led to investigate the subject of initially invariant submanifolds.

  4. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic

    SciTech Connect

    Avdic, Vanja; Zhang, Pamela; Lanouette, Sylvain; Voronova, Anastassia; Skerjanc, Ilona; Couture, Jean-Francois

    2011-08-24

    The SET1 family of methyltransferases carries out the bulk of histone H3 Lys-4 methylation in vivo. One of the common features of this family is the regulation of their methyltransferase activity by a tripartite complex composed of WDR5, RbBP5, and Ash2L. To selectively probe the role of the SET1 family of methyltransferases, we have developed a library of histone H3 peptide mimetics and report herein the characterization of an N{alpha} acetylated form of histone H3 peptide (N{alpha}H3). Binding and inhibition studies reveal that the addition of an acetyl moiety to the N terminus of histone H3 significantly enhances its binding to WDR5 and prevents the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by the WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L complex. The crystal structure of N{alpha}H3 in complex with WDR5 reveals that a high-affinity hydrophobic pocket accommodates the binding of the acetyl moiety. These results provide the structural basis to control WDR5-RbBP5-Ash2L-MLL1 activity and a tool to manipulate stem cell differentiation programs.-Avdic, V., Zhang, P., Lanouette, S., Voronova, A., Skerjanc, I., Couture, J.-F. Fine-tuning the stimulation of MLL1 methyltransferase activity by a histone H3-based peptide mimetic.

  5. Structure-Activity Studies of Brassinosteroids and the Search for Novel Analogues and Mimetics with Improved Bioactivity.

    PubMed

    Back, Thomas G.; Pharis, Richard P.

    2003-12-01

    A number of novel brassinosteroid analogues were synthesized and subjected to the rice leaf lamina inclination bioassay. Modified B-ring analogues included lactam, thiolactone, cyclic ether, ketone, hydroxyl, and exocyclic methylene derivatives of brassinolide. Those derivatives containing polar functional groups retained considerable bioactivity, whereas the exocyclic methylene compounds were devoid of activity. Analogues containing normal alkyl and cycloalkyl substituents at C-24 (in place of the isopropyl group of brassinolide) showed an inverse relationship between activity and chain length or ring size, respectively. The corresponding cyclopropyl and cyclobutyl derivatives were significantly more active than brassinolide and appear to be the most potent brassinosteroids reported to date. When synergized with the auxin indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), their bioactivity can be further enhanced by 1-2 orders of magnitude. The cyclopropyl derivative, when coapplied with the auxin naphthaleneacetic acid, gave a significant increase in yield of wheat in a field trial. Certain 25- and 26-hydroxy derivatives are known metabolites of brassinosteroids. All of the C-25 stereoisomers of 25-hydroxy, 26-hydroxy, and 25,26-dihydroxy derivatives of brassinolide were prepared and shown to be much less active than brassinolide. This indicates that they are likely metabolic deactivation products of the parent phytohormone. A series of methyl ethers of brassinolide was synthesized to block deactivation by glucosylation of the free hydroxyl groups. The most significant finding was that the compound where three of the four hydroxyl groups (at C-3, C-22, and C-23) had been converted to methyl ethers retained substantial bioactivity. This type of modification could, in theory, allow brassinolide or 24-epibrassinolide to resist deactivation and thus offer greater persistence in field applications. A series of nonsteroidal mimetics of brassinolide was designed and synthesized. Two of the

  6. SORLA-mediated trafficking of TrkB enhances the response of neurons to BDNF.

    PubMed

    Rohe, Michael; Hartl, Daniela; Fjorback, Anja Nawarecki; Klose, Joachim; Willnow, Thomas E

    2013-01-01

    Stimulation of neurons with brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) results in robust induction of SORLA, an intracellular sorting receptor of the VPS10P domain receptor gene family. However, the relevance of SORLA for BDNF-induced neuronal responses has not previously been investigated. We now demonstrate that SORLA is a sorting factor for the tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB) that facilitates trafficking of this BDNF receptor between synaptic plasma membranes, post-synaptic densities, and cell soma, a step critical for neuronal signal transduction. Loss of SORLA expression results in impaired neuritic transport of TrkB and in blunted response to BDNF in primary neurons; and it aggravates neuromotoric deficits caused by low BDNF activity in a mouse model of Huntington's disease. Thus, our studies revealed a key role for SORLA in mediating BDNF trophic signaling by regulating the intracellular location of TrkB. PMID:23977241

  7. Targeting p38 or MK2 Enhances the Anti-Leukemic Activity of Smac-Mimetics.

    PubMed

    Lalaoui, Najoua; Hänggi, Kay; Brumatti, Gabriela; Chau, Diep; Nguyen, Nhu-Y N; Vasilikos, Lazaros; Spilgies, Lisanne M; Heckmann, Denise A; Ma, Chunyan; Ghisi, Margherita; Salmon, Jessica M; Matthews, Geoffrey M; de Valle, Elisha; Moujalled, Donia M; Menon, Manoj B; Spall, Sukhdeep Kaur; Glaser, Stefan P; Richmond, Jennifer; Lock, Richard B; Condon, Stephen M; Gugasyan, Raffi; Gaestel, Matthias; Guthridge, Mark; Johnstone, Ricky W; Munoz, Lenka; Wei, Andrew; Ekert, Paul G; Vaux, David L; Wong, W Wei-Lynn; Silke, John

    2016-02-01

    Birinapant is a smac-mimetic (SM) in clinical trials for treating cancer. SM antagonize inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins and simultaneously induce tumor necrosis factor (TNF) secretion to render cancers sensitive to TNF-induced killing. To enhance SM efficacy, we screened kinase inhibitors for their ability to increase TNF production of SM-treated cells. We showed that p38 inhibitors increased TNF induced by SM. Unexpectedly, even though p38 is required for Toll-like receptors to induce TNF, loss of p38 or its downstream kinase MK2 increased induction of TNF by SM. Hence, we show that the p38/MK2 axis can inhibit or promote TNF production, depending on the stimulus. Importantly, clinical p38 inhibitors overcame resistance of primary acute myeloid leukemia to birinapant. PMID:26859455

  8. Effects of trkB knockout on topography and ocular segregation of uncrossed retinal projections.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Jennifer; Frost, Douglas O

    2009-05-01

    TrkB is an important receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor and NT4, members of the neurotrophin family. TrkB signaling is crucial in many activity-dependent and activity-independent processes of neural development. Here, we investigate the role of trkB signaling in the development of two distinct, organizational features of retinal projections--the segregation of crossed and uncrossed retinal inputs along the "lines of projection" that represent a single point in the visual field and the "retinotopic" mapping of retinofugal axons within their cerebral targets. Using anterograde tracing, we obtained quantitative measures of the distribution of retinal projections in the dorsal nucleus of the lateral geniculate body (LGd) and superior colliculus (SC) of wild-type mice and mice homozygous for constitutive null mutation (knockout) of the full-length trkB receptor (trkB(FL)(-/-)). In trkB(FL)(-/-) mice, uncrossed retinal projections cluster normally but there is a topographic expansion in the distribution of these clusters across the SC. By contrast, the absence of trkB signaling has no significant effect on the segregation of crossed and uncrossed retinal projections along the lines of projection in LGd or SC. We conclude that the normal topographic organization of uncrossed retinal projections depends upon trkB signaling, whereas the segregation of crossed and uncrossed retinal projections is trkB-independent. We also found that in trkB(FL)(-/-) mice, neuronal number was reduced in the LGd and SC and in the caudate-putamen. Previous studies by ourselves and others have shown that the number of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) is unchanged in trkB(FL)(-/-) mice. Together, these results demonstrate that there is no matching of the numbers of RGCs with neuronal numbers in the LGd or SC. PMID:19283373

  9. Distinct requirements for TrkB and TrkC signaling in target innervation by sensory neurons

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Postigo, Antonio; Calella, Anna Maria; Fritzsch, Bernd; Knipper, Marlies; Katz, David; Eilers, Andreas; Schimmang, Thomas; Lewin, Gary R.; Klein, Rudiger; Minichiello, Liliana

    2002-01-01

    Signaling by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) via the TrkB receptor, or by neurotrophin-3 (NT3) through the TrkC receptor support distinct populations of sensory neurons. The intracellular signaling pathways activated by Trk (tyrosine kinase) receptors, which in vivo promote neuronal survival and target innervation, are not well understood. Using mice with TrkB or TrkC receptors lacking the docking site for Shc adaptors (trkB(shc/shc) and trkC(shc/shc) mice), we show that TrkB and TrkC promote survival of sensory neurons mainly through Shc site-independent pathways, suggesting that these receptors use similar pathways to prevent apoptosis. In contrast, the regulation of target innervation appears different: in trkB(shc/shc) mice neurons lose target innervation, whereas in trkC(shc/shc) mice the surviving TrkC-dependent neurons maintain target innervation and function. Biochemical analysis indicates that phosphorylation at the Shc site positively regulates autophosphorylation of TrkB, but not of TrkC. Our findings show that although TrkB and TrkC signals mediating survival are largely similar, TrkB and TrkC signals required for maintenance of target innervation in vivo are regulated by distinct mechanisms.

  10. Cosmology with Mimetic Matter

    SciTech Connect

    Chamseddine, Ali H.; Mukhanov, Viatcheslav; Vikman, Alexander E-mail: viatcheslav.Mukhanov@lmu.de

    2014-06-01

    We consider minimal extensions of the recently proposed Mimetic Dark Matter and show that by introducing a potential for the mimetic non-dynamical scalar field we can mimic nearly any gravitational properties of the normal matter. In particular, the mimetic matter can provide us with inflaton, quintessence and even can lead to a bouncing nonsingular universe. We also investigate the behaviour of cosmological perturbations due to a mimetic matter. We demonstrate that simple mimetic inflation can produce red-tilted scalar perturbations which are largely enhanced over gravity waves.

  11. Radiosensitization of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma by a SMAC-mimetic compound, SM-164, requires activation of caspases

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; McEachern, Donna; Li, Wenyan; Davis, Mary A.; Li, Hua; Morgan, Meredith A.; Bai, Longchuan; Sebolt, Jonathan T.; Sun, Haiying; Lawrence, Theodore S.; Wang, Shaomeng; Sun, Yi

    2011-01-01

    Chemoradiation is the treatment of choice for locally advanced head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). However, radioresistance, which contributes to local recurrence, remains a significant therapeutic problem. In this study, we characterized SM-164, a small SMAC mimetic compound that promotes degradation of cIAP-1 (also known as BIRC2) and releases active caspases from XIAP inhibitory binding, as a radiosensitizing agent in HNSCC cells. We found that SM-164 at nanomolar concentrations induced radiosensitization in some HNSCC cell lines in a manner dependent on intrinsic sensitivity to caspase activation and apoptosis induction. Blockage of caspase activation via siRNA knockdown or a pan-caspase inhibitor, z-VAD-fmk largely abrogated SM-164 radiosensitization. On the other hand, the resistant lines with a high level of BCL-2 that blocks caspase activation and apoptosis induction became sensitive to radiation upon BCL-2 knockdown. Mechanistic studies revealed that SM-164 radiosensitization in sensitive cells was associated with NFκB activation and TNFα secretion, followed by activation of caspases-8 and -9, leading to enhanced apoptosis. Finally, SM-164 also radiosensitized human tumor xenograft, while causing minimal toxicity. Thus, SM-164 is a potent radiosensitizer via a mechanism involving caspase activation and holds promise for future clinical development as a novel class of radiosensitizer for the treatment of a subset of head and neck cancer patients. PMID:21282353

  12. Incubation of Methamphetamine Craving Is Associated with Selective Increases in Expression of Bdnf and Trkb, Glutamate Receptors, and Epigenetic Enzymes in Cue-Activated Fos-Expressing Dorsal Striatal Neurons

    PubMed Central

    Rubio, F. Javier; Zeric, Tamara; Bossert, Jennifer M.; Kambhampati, Sarita; Cates, Hannah M.; Kennedy, Pamela J.; Liu, Qing-Rong; Cimbro, Raffaello; Hope, Bruce T.; Nestler, Eric J.

    2015-01-01

    Cue-induced methamphetamine seeking progressively increases after withdrawal (incubation of methamphetamine craving), but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. We determined whether this incubation is associated with alterations in candidate genes in dorsal striatum (DS), a brain area implicated in cue- and context-induced drug relapse. We first measured mRNA expression of 24 candidate genes in whole DS extracts after short (2 d) or prolonged (1 month) withdrawal in rats following extended-access methamphetamine or saline (control condition) self-administration (9 h/d, 10 d). We found minimal changes. Next, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting, we compared gene expression in Fos-positive dorsal striatal neurons, which were activated during “incubated” cue-induced drug-seeking tests after prolonged withdrawal, with nonactivated Fos-negative neurons. We found significant increases in mRNA expression of immediate early genes (Arc, Egr1), Bdnf and its receptor (Trkb), glutamate receptor subunits (Gria1, Gria3, Grm1), and epigenetic enzymes (Hdac3, Hdac4, Hdac5, GLP, Dnmt3a, Kdm1a) in the Fos-positive neurons only. Using RNAscope to determine striatal subregion and cell-type specificity of the activated neurons, we measured colabeling of Fos with Drd1 and Drd2 in three DS subregions. Fos expression was neither subregion nor cell-type specific (52.5 and 39.2% of Fos expression colabeled with Drd1 and Drd2, respectively). Finally, we found that DS injections of SCH23390 (C17H18ClNO), a D1-family receptor antagonist known to block cue-induced Fos induction, decreased incubated cue-induced methamphetamine seeking after prolonged withdrawal. Results demonstrate a critical role of DS in incubation of methamphetamine craving and that this incubation is associated with selective gene-expression alterations in cue-activated D1- and D2-expressing DS neurons. PMID:26019338

  13. Mice lacking TrkB in parvalbumin-positive cells exhibit sexually dimorphic behavioral phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lucas, Elizabeth K; Jegarl, Anita; Clem, Roger L

    2014-11-01

    Activity-dependent brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling through receptor tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) is required for cued fear memory consolidation and extinction. Although BDNF is primarily secreted from glutamatergic neurons, TrkB is expressed by other genetically defined cells whose contributions to the behavioral effects of BDNF remain poorly understood. Parvalbumin (PV)-positive interneurons, which are highly enriched in TrkB, are emerging as key regulators of fear memory expression. We therefore hypothesized that activity-dependent BDNF signaling in PV-interneurons may modulate emotional learning. To test this hypothesis, we utilized the LoxP/Cre system for conditional deletion of TrkB in PV-positive cells to examine the impact of cell-autonomous BDNF signaling on Pavlovian fear conditioning and extinction. However, behavioral abnormalities indicative of vestibular dysfunction precluded the use of homozygous conditional knockouts in tests of higher cognitive functioning. While vestibular dysfunction was apparent in both sexes, female conditional knockouts exhibited an exacerbated phenotype, including extreme motor hyperactivity and circling behavior, compared to their male littermates. Heterozygous conditional knockouts were spared of vestibular dysfunction. While fear memory consolidation was unaffected in heterozygotes of both sexes, males exhibited impaired extinction consolidation compared to their littermate controls. Our findings complement evidence from human and rodent studies suggesting that BDNF signaling promotes consolidation of extinction and point to PV-positive neurons as a discrete population that mediates these effects in a sex-specific manner. PMID:25127683

  14. Critical role of trkB receptors in reactive axonal sprouting and hyperexcitability after axonal injury

    PubMed Central

    Aungst, Stephanie; England, Pamela M.

    2013-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) causes many long-term neurological complications. Some of these conditions, such as posttraumatic epilepsy, are characterized by increased excitability that typically arises after a latent period lasting from months to years, suggesting that slow injury-induced processes are critical. We tested the hypothesis that trkB activation promotes delayed injury-induced hyperexcitability in part by promoting reactive axonal sprouting. We modeled penetrative TBI with transection of the Schaffer collateral pathway in knock-in mice having an introduced mutation in the trkB receptor (trkBF616A) that renders it susceptible to inhibition by the novel small molecule 1NMPP1. We observed that trkB activation was increased in area CA3 1 day after injury and that expression of a marker of axonal growth, GAP43, was increased 7 days after lesion. Extracellular field potentials in stratum pyramidale of area CA3 in acute slices from sham-operated and lesioned mice were normal in control saline. Abnormal bursts of population spikes were observed under conditions that were mildly proconvulsive but only in slices taken from mice lesioned 7–21 days earlier and not in slices from control mice. trkB activation, GAP43 upregulation, and hyperexcitability were diminished by systemic administration of 1NMPP1 for 7 days after the lesion. Synaptic transmission from area CA3 to area CA1 recovered 7 days after lesion in untreated mice but not in mice treated with 1NMPP1. We conclude that trkB receptor activation and reactive axonal sprouting are critical factors in injury-induced hyperexcitability and may contribute to the neurological complications of TBI. PMID:23155176

  15. Effects of novel small compounds targeting TrkB on neuronal cell survival and depression-like behavior.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Mayu; Takatori, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yohko; Suganami, Akiko; Hoshino, Tyuji; Tamura, Yutaka; Nakagawara, Akira

    2016-07-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its high affinity receptor tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB) are involved in neuronal survival, maintenance, differentiation and synaptic plasticity. Deficiency of BDNF was reported to be associated with psychological disorders such as depression. Hence we examined proliferative effect of 11 candidate TrkB agonistic compounds in TrkB-expressing SH-SY5Y cells, via a hypothesis that some candidate compounds identified in our previous in silico screening for a small molecule targeting the BDNF binding domain of TrkB should activate TrkB signaling. In the present study, two promising compounds, 48 and 56, were identified and subsequently assessed for their ability to induce TrkB phosphorylation in vitro and in vivo. Likewise those seen in BDNF, the compounds mediated TrkB phosphorylation was blocked by the Trk inhibitor, K252a. Since BDNF-TrkB signaling deficiency is associated with the pathogenesis of depression and reactivation of this signaling by antidepressants is a cause of the pathogenic state recovery, the compounds were subjected to the assessment for forced swim test, which is a mouse model of depression. We found that compound 48 significantly reduced mouse immobility time compared with the control vehicle injection, suggesting the confirmation of hypothetical antidepressant-like efficacy of 48 compound in vivo. Thus, our present study demonstrated that compound 48, selected through in silico screening, is a novel activator of TrkB signaling and a potential antidepressant molecule. PMID:27166149

  16. Structural basis of activation-dependent binding of ligand-mimetic antibody AL-57 to integrin LFA-1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Hongmin; Liu, Jin-huan; Yang, Wei; Springer, Timothy; Shimaoka, Motomu; Wang, Jia-huai

    2010-09-21

    The activity of integrin LFA-1 ({alpha}{sub L}{beta}{sub 2}) to its ligand ICAM-1 is regulated through the conformational changes of its ligand-binding domain, the I domain of {alpha}{sub L} chain, from an inactive, low-affinity closed form (LA), to an intermediate-affinity form (IA), and then finally, to a high-affinity open form (HA). A ligand-mimetic human monoclonal antibody AL-57 (activated LFA-1 clone 57) was identified by phage display to specifically recognize the affinity-upregulated I domain. Here, we describe the crystal structures of the Fab fragment of AL-57 in complex with IA, as well as in its unligated form. We discuss the structural features conferring AL-57's strong selectivity for the high affinity, open conformation of the I domain. The AL-57-binding site overlaps the ICAM-1 binding site on the I domain. Furthermore, an antibody Asp mimics an ICAM Glu by forming a coordination to the metal-ion dependent adhesion site (MIDAS). The structure also reveals better shape complementarity and a more hydrophobic interacting interface in AL-57 binding than in ICAM-1 binding. The results explain AL-57's antagonistic mimicry of LFA-1's natural ligands, the ICAM molecules.

  17. Defining specificity and on-target activity of BH3-mimetics using engineered B-ALL cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Koss, Brian; Ryan, Jeremy; Budhraja, Amit; Szarama, Katherine; Yang, Xue; Bathina, Madhavi; Cardone, Michael H.; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Letai, Anthony; Opferman, Joseph T.

    2016-01-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is a resistance to the induction of programmed cell death that is mediated by selection of cells with elevated expression of anti-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family. To counter this resistance, new therapeutic agents known as BH3-mimetic small molecules are in development with the goal of antagonizing the function of anti-apoptotic molecules and promoting the induction of apoptosis. To facilitate the testing and modeling of BH3-mimetic agents, we have developed a powerful system for evaluation and screening of agents both in culture and in immune competent animal models by engineering mouse leukemic cells and re-programming them to be dependent on exogenously expressed human anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members. Here we demonstrate that this panel of cell lines can determine the specificity of BH3-mimetics to individual anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members (BCL-2, BCL-XL, BCL-W, BFL-1, and MCL-1), demonstrate whether cell death is due to the induction of apoptosis (BAX and BAK-dependent), and faithfully assess the efficacy of BH3-mimetic small molecules in pre-clinical mouse models. These cells represent a robust and valuable pre-clinical screening tool for validating the efficacy, selectivity, and on-target action of BH3-mimetic agents. PMID:26862853

  18. Defining specificity and on-target activity of BH3-mimetics using engineered B-ALL cell lines.

    PubMed

    Koss, Brian; Ryan, Jeremy; Budhraja, Amit; Szarama, Katherine; Yang, Xue; Bathina, Madhavi; Cardone, Michael H; Nikolovska-Coleska, Zaneta; Letai, Anthony; Opferman, Joseph T

    2016-03-01

    One of the hallmarks of cancer is a resistance to the induction of programmed cell death that is mediated by selection of cells with elevated expression of anti-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family. To counter this resistance, new therapeutic agents known as BH3-mimetic small molecules are in development with the goal of antagonizing the function of anti-apoptotic molecules and promoting the induction of apoptosis. To facilitate the testing and modeling of BH3-mimetic agents, we have developed a powerful system for evaluation and screening of agents both in culture and in immune competent animal models by engineering mouse leukemic cells and re-programming them to be dependent on exogenously expressed human anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members. Here we demonstrate that this panel of cell lines can determine the specificity of BH3-mimetics to individual anti-apoptotic BCL-2 family members (BCL-2, BCL-XL, BCL-W, BFL-1, and MCL-1), demonstrate whether cell death is due to the induction of apoptosis (BAX and BAK-dependent), and faithfully assess the efficacy of BH3-mimetic small molecules in pre-clinical mouse models. These cells represent a robust and valuable pre-clinical screening tool for validating the efficacy, selectivity, and on-target action of BH3-mimetic agents. PMID:26862853

  19. Syntheses of vanadyl and zinc(II) complexes of 1-hydroxy-4,5,6-substituted 2(1H)-pyrimidinones and their insulin-mimetic activities.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Mika; Wakasugi, Kei; Saito, Ryota; Adachi, Yusuke; Yoshikawa, Yutaka; Sakurai, Hiromu; Katoh, Akira

    2006-02-01

    Control of the glucose level in the blood plasma has been achieved in vitro and in vivo by administration of vanadium and zinc in form of inorganic salts. It has been shown that elements are poorly absorbed in their inorganic forms and required high doses which have been associated with undesirable side effects. Many researchers, therefore, have focused on metal complexes that were prepared from VOSO(4) or ZnSO(4) and low-molecular-weight bidentate ligands. Seven kinds of 1-hydroxy-4,6-disubstituted and 1-hydroxy-4,5,6-trisubstituted-2(1H)-pyrimidinones were synthesized by reaction of N-benzyloxyurea and beta-diketones and subsequent removal of the protecting group. Six kinds of 1-hydroxy-4-(substituted)amino-2(1H)-pyrimidinones were synthesized by the substitution reaction of 1-benzyloxy-4-(1',2',4'-triazol-1'-yl)-2(1H)-pyrimidinone with various alkyl amines or amino acids. Treatment with VOSO(4) and ZnSO(4) or Zn(OAc)(2) afforded vanadyl(IV) and zinc(II) complexes which were characterized by means of (1)H NMR, IR, EPR, and UV-vis spectroscopies, and combustion analysis. The in vitro insulin-mimetic activity of these complexes was evaluated from 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC(50)) on free fatty acid (FFA) release from isolated rat adipocytes treated with epinephrine. Vanadyl complexes of 4,6-disubstituted-2(1H)-pyrimidinones showed higher insulin-mimetic activities than those of 4,5,6-trisubstituted ones. On the other hand, Zn(II) complexes showed lower insulin-mimetic activities than VOSO(4) and ZnSO(4) as positive controls. It was found that the balance of the hydrophilicity and/or hydrophobicity is important for higher insulin-mimetic activity. The in vivo insulin-mimetic activity was evaluated with streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats. Blood glucose levels were lowered from hyperglycemic to normal levels after the treatment with bis(1,2-dihydro-4,6-dimethyl-2-oxo-1-pyrimidinolato)oxovanadium(IV) by daily intraperitoneal injections. The improvement in

  20. Molecular determinants and interaction data of cyclic peptide inhibitor with the extracellular domain of TrkB receptor

    PubMed Central

    Chitranshi, Nitin; Gupta, Vivek; Dheer, Yogita; Gupta, Veer; Vander Wall, Roshana; Graham, Stuart

    2016-01-01

    TrkB is a high affinity receptor for the brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its phosphorylation stimulates activation of several intracellular signalling pathways linked to cellular growth, differentiation and maintenance. Identification of various activators and inhibitors of the TrkB receptor and greater understanding their binding mechanisms is critical to elucidate the biochemical and pharmacological pathways and analyse various protein crystallization studies. The data presented here is related to the research article entitled “Brain Derived neurotrophic factor is involved in the regulation of glycogen synthase kinase 3β (GSK3β) signalling” [1]. Cyclotraxin B (CTXB) is a disulphide bridge linked cyclic peptide molecule that interacts with TrkB receptor and inhibits the BDNF/TrkB downstream signalling. This article reports for the first time binding mechanism and interaction parameters of CTXB with the TrkB receptor. The molecular model of CTXB has been generated and it’s docking with TrkB domain carried out to determine the critical residues involved in the protein peptide interaction. PMID:26909388

  1. Role of TrkB in the anxiolytic-like and antidepressant-like effects of vagal nerve stimulation: Comparison with desipramine.

    PubMed

    Shah, A P; Carreno, F R; Wu, H; Chung, Y A; Frazer, A

    2016-05-13

    A current hypothesis regarding the mechanism of antidepressant (AD) action suggests the involvement of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). Consistent with this hypothesis, the receptor for BDNF (and neurotrophin 4/5 (NT-4/5)), Tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), is activated in rodents by treatment with classical AD drugs. Vagal nerve stimulation (VNS), a therapy for treatment resistant depression (TRD), also activates TrkB in rodents. However, the role of this receptor in the therapeutic effects of VNS is unclear. In the current study, the involvement of TrkB in the effects of VNS was investigated in rats using its inhibitor, K252a. Anxiolytic-like and AD-like effects were analyzed using the novelty suppressed feeding test (NSFT) and forced swim test (FST), respectively. K252a blocked the anxiolytic-like effect of chronic VNS treatment and the AD-like effect of acute VNS treatment. By contrast, blocking TrkB did not prevent either the anxiolytic-like or AD-like effect of chronic treatment with desipramine (DMI), a selective noradrenergic reuptake inhibitor; it did, however, block the acute effect of DMI in the FST. To examine whether the activation of TrkB caused by either VNS or DMI is ligand-dependent, use was made of TrkB-Fc, a molecular scavenger for ligands of TrkB. Intraventricular administration of TrkB-Fc blocked the acute activation of TrkB induced by either treatment, indicating that treatment-induced activation of this receptor is ligand-dependent. The behavioral results highlight differences in the involvement of TrkB in the chronic effects of an AD drug and a stimulation therapy as well as its role in acute versus chronic effects of DMI. PMID:26899129

  2. Iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles conjugated with a conformationally blocked α-Tn antigen mimetic for macrophage activation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manuelli, Massimo; Fallarini, Silvia; Lombardi, Grazia; Sangregorio, Claudio; Nativi, Cristina; Richichi, Barbara

    2014-06-01

    Among new therapies to fight tumors, immunotherapy is still one of the most promising and intriguing. Thanks to the ongoing structural elucidation of several tumor antigens and the development of innovative antigen carriers, immunotherapy is in constant evolution and it is largely used either alone or in synergy with chemotherapy/radiotherapy. With the aim to develop fully synthetic immunostimulants we have recently developed a mimetic of the α-Tn mucin antigen, a relevant tumor antigen. The 4C1 blocked mimetic 1, unique example of an α-Tn mimetic antigen, was functionalized with an ω-phosphonate linker and used to decorate iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), employed as multivalent carriers. MNPs, largely exploited for supporting and carrying biomolecules, like antibodies, drugs or antigens, consent to combine in the same nanometric system the main features of an inorganic magnetic core with a bioactive organic coating. The superparamagnetic glyconanoparticles obtained, named GMNPs, are indeed biocompatible and immunoactive, and they preserve suitable characteristics for use as heat mediators in the magnetic fluid hyperthermia (MFH) treatment of tumors. All together these properties make GMNPs attracting devices for innovative tumor treatment.Among new therapies to fight tumors, immunotherapy is still one of the most promising and intriguing. Thanks to the ongoing structural elucidation of several tumor antigens and the development of innovative antigen carriers, immunotherapy is in constant evolution and it is largely used either alone or in synergy with chemotherapy/radiotherapy. With the aim to develop fully synthetic immunostimulants we have recently developed a mimetic of the α-Tn mucin antigen, a relevant tumor antigen. The 4C1 blocked mimetic 1, unique example of an α-Tn mimetic antigen, was functionalized with an ω-phosphonate linker and used to decorate iron oxide superparamagnetic nanoparticles (MNPs), employed as multivalent

  3. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    PubMed

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-21

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications. PMID:25921601

  4. Allosteric Activation of a G Protein-coupled Receptor with Cell-penetrating Receptor Mimetics*

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ping; Leger, Andrew J.; Baleja, James D.; Rana, Rajashree; Corlin, Tiffany; Nguyen, Nga; Koukos, Georgios; Bohm, Andrew; Covic, Lidija; Kuliopulos, Athan

    2015-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) are remarkably versatile signaling systems that are activated by a large number of different agonists on the outside of the cell. However, the inside surface of the receptors that couple to G proteins has not yet been effectively modulated for activity or treatment of diseases. Pepducins are cell-penetrating lipopeptides that have enabled chemical and physical access to the intracellular face of GPCRs. The structure of a third intracellular (i3) loop agonist, pepducin, based on protease-activated receptor-1 (PAR1) was solved by NMR and found to closely resemble the i3 loop structure predicted for the intact receptor in the on-state. Mechanistic studies revealed that the pepducin directly interacts with the intracellular H8 helix region of PAR1 and allosterically activates the receptor through the adjacent (D/N)PXXYYY motif through a dimer-like mechanism. The i3 pepducin enhances PAR1/Gα subunit interactions and induces a conformational change in fluorescently labeled PAR1 in a very similar manner to that induced by thrombin. As pepducins can potentially be made to target any GPCR, these data provide insight into the identification of allosteric modulators to this major drug target class. PMID:25934391

  5. Differential response of head and neck cancer cell lines to TRAIL or Smac mimetics is associated with the cellular levels and activity of caspase-8 and caspase-10

    PubMed Central

    Raulf, N; El-Attar, R; Kulms, D; Lecis, D; Delia, D; Walczak, H; Papenfuss, K; Odell, E; Tavassoli, M

    2014-01-01

    Background: Current treatment strategies for head and neck cancer are associated with significant morbidity and up to 50% of patients relapse, highlighting the need for more specific and effective therapeutics. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) and Smac mimetics (SMs) are promising anticancer agents, but their effect on head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) remains unknown. Methods: We examined the response of a panel of nine HNSCC cell lines to TRAIL and SMs and investigated the mechanism of cell type-specific response by functional analysis. Results: Head and neck cancer cell lines revealed a converse response pattern with three cell lines being highly sensitive to Smac-164 (SM) but resistant to TRAIL, whereas the other six were sensitive to TRAIL but resistant to SM. Distinct protein expression and activation patterns were found to be associated with susceptibility of HNSCC cell lines to TRAIL and SM. Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand sensitivity was associated with high caspase-8 and Bid protein levels, and TRAIL-sensitive cell lines were killed via the type II extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Smac mimetic-sensitive cells expressed low levels of caspase-8 and Bid but had high TNF-α expression. Smac mimetic-induced cell death was associated with caspase-10 activation, suggesting that in the absence of caspase-8, caspase-10 mediates response to SM. Cotreatment with TNF-α sensitised the resistant cells to SM, demonstrating a decisive role for TNF-α-driven feedback loop in SM sensitivity. Conclusions: Tumour necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand and SMs effectively kill HNSCC cell lines and therefore represent potential targeted therapeutics for head and neck cancer. Distinct molecular mechanisms determine the sensitivity to each agent, with levels of TNF-α, caspase-8, Bid and caspase-10 providing important predictive biomarkers of response to these agents. PMID:25314064

  6. Synthesis, structural characterization and catalytic activity of a multifunctional enzyme mimetic oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex.

    PubMed

    Si, Tapan K; Paul, Shiv S; Drew, Michael G B; Mukherjea, Kalyan K

    2012-05-21

    The synthesis and structural characterization of a novel oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex [VO(O(2))(PAH)(phen)] containing the ligands 2-phenylacetohydroxamic acid (PAHH) and 1,10-phenanthroline (phen) has been accomplished. The oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex was found to mimic both vanadate-dependent haloperoxidase (VHPO) activity as well as nuclease activity through effective interaction with DNA. The complex is the first example of a structurally characterized stable oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex with a coordinated bi-dentate hydroximate moiety (-CONHO(-)) from 2-phenylacetohydroximate (PAH). The oxoperoxovanadium(V) complex has been used as catalyst for the peroxidative bromination reaction of some unsaturated alcohols (e.g. 4-pentene-1-ol, 1-octene-3-ol and 9-decene-1-ol) in the presence of H(2)O(2) and KBr. The catalytic products have been characterized by GC-MS analysis and spectrophotometric methods. The DNA binding of this complex has been established with CT DNA whereas the DNA cleavage was demonstrated with plasmid DNA. The interactions of the complex with DNA have been monitored by electronic absorption and fluorescence emission spectroscopy. Viscometric measurements suggest that the compound is a DNA intercalator. The nuclease activity of this complex was confirmed by gel electrophoresis studies. PMID:22441646

  7. Unimodular-mimetic cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nojiri, S.; Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-06-01

    We combine the unimodular gravity and mimetic gravity theories into a unified theoretical framework, which is proposed to provide a suggestive proposal for a framework that may assist in the discussion and search for a solution to the cosmological constant problem and the dark matter issue. After providing the formulation of the unimodular mimetic gravity and investigating all the new features that the vacuum unimodular gravity implies, by using the underlying reconstruction method, we realize some well known cosmological evolutions, with some of these being exotic for the ordinary Einstein–Hilbert gravity. Specifically we provide the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity description of the de Sitter cosmology and of the perfect fluid with constant equation of state cosmology. As we demonstrate, these cosmologies can be realized by vacuum mimetic unimodular gravity, without the existence of any matter fluid source. Moreover, we investigate how cosmologically viable cosmologies, which are compatible with the recent observational data, can be realized by the vacuum unimodular mimetic gravity. Since in some cases, a graceful exit from inflation problem might exist, we provide a qualitative description of the mechanism that can potentially generate the graceful exit from inflation in these theories, by searching for the unstable de Sitter solutions in the context of unimodular mimetic theories of gravity.

  8. Mimetic finite difference method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Manzini, Gianmarco; Shashkov, Mikhail

    2014-01-01

    The mimetic finite difference (MFD) method mimics fundamental properties of mathematical and physical systems including conservation laws, symmetry and positivity of solutions, duality and self-adjointness of differential operators, and exact mathematical identities of the vector and tensor calculus. This article is the first comprehensive review of the 50-year long history of the mimetic methodology and describes in a systematic way the major mimetic ideas and their relevance to academic and real-life problems. The supporting applications include diffusion, electromagnetics, fluid flow, and Lagrangian hydrodynamics problems. The article provides enough details to build various discrete operators on unstructured polygonal and polyhedral meshes and summarizes the major convergence results for the mimetic approximations. Most of these theoretical results, which are presented here as lemmas, propositions and theorems, are either original or an extension of existing results to a more general formulation using polyhedral meshes. Finally, flexibility and extensibility of the mimetic methodology are shown by deriving higher-order approximations, enforcing discrete maximum principles for diffusion problems, and ensuring the numerical stability for saddle-point systems.

  9. Converting One-Face α-Helix Mimetics into Amphiphilic α-Helix Mimetics as Potent Inhibitors of Protein-Protein Interactions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Hoon; Oh, Misook; Kim, Hyun Soo; Lee, Huisun; Im, Wonpil; Lim, Hyun-Suk

    2016-01-11

    Many biologically active α-helical peptides adopt amphiphilic helical structures that contain hydrophobic residues on one side and hydrophilic residues on the other side. Therefore, α-helix mimetics capable of mimicking such amphiphilic helical peptides should possess higher binding affinity and specificity to target proteins. Here we describe an efficient method for generating amphiphilic α-helix mimetics. One-face α-helix mimetics having hydrophobic side chains on one side was readily converted into amphiphilic α-helix mimetics by introducing appropriate charged residues on the opposite side. We also demonstrate that such two-face amphiphilic α-helix mimetics indeed show remarkably improved binding affinity to a target protein, compared to one-face hydrophobic α-helix mimetics. We believe that generating a large combinatorial library of these amphiphilic α-helix mimetics can be valuable for rapid discovery of highly potent and specific modulators of protein-protein interactions. PMID:26651509

  10. Insight into the mechanism revealing the peroxidase mimetic catalytic activity of quaternary CuZnFeS nanocrystals: colorimetric biosensing of hydrogen peroxide and glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalui, Amit; Pradhan, Bapi; Thupakula, Umamahesh; Khan, Ali Hossain; Kumar, Gundam Sandeep; Ghosh, Tanmay; Satpati, Biswarup; Acharya, Somobrata

    2015-05-01

    Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been evaluated by catalytic oxidation of the peroxidase substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). CZIS NCs demonstrate the synergistic effect of elemental composition and photoactivity towards peroxidase-like activity. The quaternary CZIS NCs show enhanced intrinsic peroxidase-like activity compared to the binary NCs with the same constituent elements. Intrinsic peroxidase-like activity has been correlated with the energy band position of CZIS NCs extracted using scanning tunneling spectroscopy and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy. Kinetic analyses indicate Michaelis-Menten enzyme kinetic model catalytic behavior describing the rate of the enzymatic reaction by correlating the reaction rate with substrate concentration. Typical color reactions arising from the catalytic oxidation of TMB over CZIS NCs with H2O2 have been utilized to establish a simple and sensitive colorimetric assay for detection of H2O2 and glucose. CZIS NCs are recyclable catalysts showing high efficiency in multiple uses. Our study may open up the possibility of designing new photoactive multi-component alloyed NCs as enzyme mimetics in biotechnology applications.Artificial enzyme mimetics have attracted immense interest recently because natural enzymes undergo easy denaturation under environmental conditions restricting practical usefulness. We report for the first time chalcopyrite CuZnFeS (CZIS) alloyed nanocrystals (NCs) as novel biomimetic catalysts with efficient intrinsic peroxidase-like activity. Novel peroxidase activities of CZIS NCs have been

  11. 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, a small molecular TrkB agonist, is useful for treating various BDNF-implicated human disorders.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chaoyang; Chan, Chi Bun; Ye, Keqiang

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) regulates a variety of biological processes predominantly via binding to the transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB. It is a potential therapeutic target in numerous neurological, mental and metabolic disorders. However, the lack of efficient means to deliver BDNF into the body imposes an insurmountable hurdle to its clinical application. To address this challenge, we initiated a cell-based drug screening to search for small molecules that act as the TrkB agonist. 7,8-Dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) is our first reported small molecular TrkB agonist, which has now been extensively validated in various biochemical and cellular systems. Though binding to the extracellular domain of TrkB, 7,8-DHF triggers TrkB dimerization to induce the downstream signaling. Notably, 7,8-DHF is orally bioactive that can penetrate the brain blood barrier (BBB) to exert its neurotrophic activities in the central nervous system. Numerous reports suggest 7,8-DHF processes promising therapeutic efficacy in various animal disease models that are related to deficient BDNF signaling. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge on the binding activity and specificity, structure-activity relationship, pharmacokinetic and metabolism, and the pre-clinical efficacy of 7,8-DHF against some human diseases. PMID:26740873

  12. A novel apolipoprotein C-II mimetic peptide that activates lipoprotein lipase and decreases serum triglycerides in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice.

    PubMed

    Amar, Marcelo J A; Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T

    2015-02-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25395590

  13. A Novel Apolipoprotein C-II Mimetic Peptide That Activates Lipoprotein Lipase and Decreases Serum Triglycerides in Apolipoprotein E–Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Toshihiro; Sakurai-Ikuta, Akiko; Sviridov, Denis; Freeman, Lita; Ahsan, Lusana; Remaley, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) mimetic peptides are currently being developed as possible new agents for the treatment of cardiovascular disease based on their ability to promote cholesterol efflux and their other beneficial antiatherogenic properties. Many of these peptides, however, have been reported to cause transient hypertriglyceridemia due to inhibition of lipolysis by lipoprotein lipase (LPL). We describe a novel bihelical amphipathic peptide (C-II-a) that contains an amphipathic helix (18A) for binding to lipoproteins and stimulating cholesterol efflux as well as a motif based on the last helix of apolipoprotein C-II (apoC-II) that activates lipolysis by LPL. The C-II-a peptide promoted cholesterol efflux from ATP-binding cassette transporter ABCA1-transfected BHK cells similar to apoA-I mimetic peptides. Furthermore, it was shown in vitro to be comparable to the full-length apoC-II protein in activating lipolysis by LPL. When added to serum from a patient with apoC-II deficiency, it restored normal levels of LPL-induced lipolysis and also enhanced lipolysis in serum from patients with type IV and V hypertriglyceridemia. Intravenous injection of C-II-a (30 mg/kg) in apolipoprotein E–knockout mice resulted in a significant reduction of plasma cholesterol and triglycerides of 38 ± 6% and 85 ± 7%, respectively, at 4 hours. When coinjected with the 5A peptide (60 mg/kg), the C-II-a (30 mg/kg) peptide was found to completely block the hypertriglyceridemic effect of the 5A peptide in C57Bl/6 mice. In summary, C-II-a is a novel peptide based on apoC-II, which promotes cholesterol efflux and lipolysis and may therefore be useful for the treatment of apoC-II deficiency and other forms of hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:25395590

  14. Synthetic oligosaccharides as heparin-mimetics displaying anticoagulant properties.

    PubMed

    Avci, Fikri Y; Karst, Nathalie A; Linhardt, Robert J

    2003-01-01

    Heparin and low molecular weight heparins are major clinical anticoagulants and the drugs of choice for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis. The discovery of an antithrombin binding domain in heparin focused interest on understanding the mechanism of heparin's antithrombotic/ anticoagulant activity. Various heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides have been prepared in an effort to replace polydisperse heparin and low molecular weight heparins with a structurally-defined anticoagulant. The goal of attaining a heparin-mimetic with no unwanted side-effects has also provided motivation for these efforts. This article reviews structure-activity relationship (SAR) of structurally-defined heparin-mimetic oligosaccharides. PMID:14529394

  15. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Effects on Oligodendrocyte Progenitors of the Basal Forebrain Are Mediated Through TrkB and the MAP Kinase Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Van’t Veer, Ashlee; Du, Yangzhou; Fischer, Tanya Z.; Boetig, Deborah R.; Wood, Melissa R.; Dreyfus, Cheryl F.

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has indicated that BDNF increases the differentiation of basal forebrain (BF) oligodendrocytes (OLGs) in culture through the mediation of trkB and the MAPK pathway (Du et al. [2006a,b] Mol. Cell. Neurosci. 31:366–375; J. Neurosci. Res. 84:1692–1702). In the present work, effects of BDNF on BF OLG progenitor cells (OPCs) were examined. BDNF increased DNA synthesis of OPCs, as assessed by thymidine and bro-modeoxyuridine incorporation. Effects of BDNF on DNA synthesis were mediated through the trkB receptor and not the p75 receptor, as shown by inhibitors that block neurotrophin binding to the receptors and by the phosphorylation of trkB. TrkB can activate the mitogenactivated protein kinase (MAPK), phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3-K), and phospholipase C-γ (PLC-γ) pathways. BDNF elicited the phosphorylation of MAPK and Akt, a kinase downstream of PI3K, but not PLC-γ in OPCs. Through the use of specific inhibitors to the MAPK and PI3-K pathways, it was found that the MAPK pathway was responsible for the effect of BDNF on DNA synthesis. These data indicate that BDNF affects OPC proliferation and development through the mediation of trkB and the MAPK pathway. PMID:18752299

  16. Cholesterol overload induces apoptosis in SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells through the up regulation of flotillin-2 in the lipid raft and the activation of BDNF/Trkb signaling.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yen-Ning; Lin, Ching-I; Liao, Hsiang; Liu, Chin-Yu; Chen, Yue-Hua; Chiu, Wan-Chun; Lin, Shyh-Hsiang

    2016-07-22

    Epidemiological investigations have shown that Alzheimer's disease (AD) is one of the most common neurodegenerative diseases. It has been indicated that the cholesterol concentration in the brain of AD patients is higher than that in normal people. In this study, we investigated the effects of cholesterol concentrations, 0, as the control, 3.125, 12.5, and 25μM, on cholesterol metabolism, neuron survival, AD-related protein expressions, and cell morphology and apoptosis using SH-SY5Y human neuroblastoma cells. We observed that expressions of cholesterol hydroxylase (Cyp46), flotillin-2 (a marker of lipid raft content), and truncated tyrosine kinase B (TrkBtc) increased, while expressions of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and full-length TrkB (TrkBfl) decreased as the concentration of cholesterol loading increased. Down-regulation of the PI3K-Akt-glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β cascade and cell apoptosis were also observed at higher concentrations of cholesterol, along with elevated levels of β-amyloid (Aβ), β-secretase (BACE), and reactive oxygen species (ROS). In conclusion, we found that cholesterol overload in neuronal cells imbalanced the cholesterol homeostasis and increased the protein expressions causing cell apoptosis, which illustrates the neurodegenerative pathology of abnormally elevated cholesterol concentrations found in AD patients. PMID:27155148

  17. Fc-fusion mimetics.

    PubMed

    Khalili, H; Khaw, P T; Brocchini, S

    2016-06-24

    The Fc-fusion mimetic RpR 2[combining low line] was prepared by disulfide bridging conjugation using PEG in the place of the Fc. RpR 2[combining low line] displayed higher affinity for VEGF than aflibercept. This is caused primarily by a slower dissociation rate, which can prolong a drug at its site of action. RpRs have considerable potential for development as stable, organ specific therapeutics. PMID:27127811

  18. Sigma-1 Receptor Enhances Neurite Elongation of Cerebellar Granule Neurons via TrkB Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, Yuriko; Fujita, Yuki; Shibata, Kumi; Mori, Megumi; Yamashita, Toshihide

    2013-01-01

    Sigma-1 receptor (Sig-1R) is an integral membrane protein predominantly expressed in the endoplasmic reticulum. Sig-1R demonstrates a high affinity to various synthetic compounds including well-known psychotherapeutic drugs in the central nervous system (CNS). For that, it is considered as an alternative target for psychotherapeutic drugs. On the cellular level, when Sig-1R is activated, it is known to play a role in neuroprotection and neurite elongation. These effects are suggested to be mediated by its ligand-operated molecular chaperone activity, and/or upregulation of various Ca2+ signaling. In addition, recent studies show that Sig-1R activation induces neurite outgrowth via neurotrophin signaling. Here, we tested the hypothesis that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite elongation through activation of tropomyosin receptor kinase (Trk), a family of neurotrophin receptors. We found that 2-(4-morpholinethyl)1-phenylcyclohexanecarboxylate (PRE-084), a selective Sig-1R agonist, significantly promoted neurite outgrowth, and K252a, a Trk inhibitor, attenuated Sig-1R-mediated neurite elongation in cerebellar granule neurons (CGNs). Moreover, we revealed that Sig-1R interacts with TrkB, and PRE-084 treatment enhances phosphorylation of Y515, but not Y706. Thus, our results indicate that Sig-1R activation promotes neurite outgrowth in CGNs through Y515 phosphorylation of TrkB. PMID:24116072

  19. Collagen-Gelatin Mixtures as Wound Model, and Substrates for VEGF-Mimetic Peptide Binding and Endothelial Cell Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Tania R.; Stahl, Patrick J.; Li, Yang; Yu, S. Michael

    2015-01-01

    In humans, high level of collagen remodeling is seen during normal physiological events such as bone renewal, as well as in pathological conditions, such as arthritis, tumor growth and other chronic wounds. Our lab recently discovered that collagen mimetic peptide (CMP) is able to hybridize with denatured collagens at these collagen remodeling sites with high affinity. Here, we show that the CMP's high binding affinity to denatured collagens can be utilized to deliver angiogenic signals to scaffolds composed of heat-denatured collagens (gelatins). We first demonstrate hybridization between denatured collagens and QKCMP, a CMP with pro-angiogenic QK domain. We show that high levels of QKCMP can be immobilized to a new artificial matrix containing both fibrous type I collagen and heat denatured collagen through triple helix hybridization, and that the QKCMP is able to stimulate early angiogenic response of endothelial cells (ECs). We also show that the QKCMP can bind to excised tissues from burn injuries in cutaneous mouse model, suggesting its potential for promoting neovascularization of burn wounds. PMID:25584990

  20. TrkB agonist, 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, reduces the clinical and pathological severity of a murine model of multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Makar, Tapas K; Nimmagadda, Vamshi K C; Singh, Ishwar S; Lam, Kristal; Mubariz, Fahad; Judge, Susan I V; Trisler, David; Bever, Christopher T

    2016-03-15

    7,8-Dihydroxyflavone (DHF), is a recently described TrkB agonist that readily crosses the blood brain barrier. We treated C57Bl/6 mice with MOG--induced EAE daily with DHF starting on the day of disease induction. Clinical severity of impairment was reduced throughout the course of disease. Pathological examination of brains and spinal cords on day 28 showed that DHF treatment increased the phosphorylation of TrkB and activated downstream signaling pathways including AKT and STAT3 and reduced inflammation, demyelination and axonal loss compared to EAE controls. DHF treatment duplicated the central nervous system effects of brain derived neurotrophic factor in the EAE. PMID:26943953

  1. Expression and localisation of BDNF, NT4 and TrkB in proliferative vitreoretinopathy.

    PubMed

    Ghazi-Nouri, Seyed M S; Ellis, James S; Moss, Stephen; Limb, G Astrid; Charteris, David G

    2008-05-01

    Exogenous brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is known to rescue ganglion cell death after optic nerve injury. Its mechanism of action is believed to be indirect via glial cells in the retina. In this study we investigated the changes in expression and localisation of BDNF, neurotrophin-4 (NT4) and their common receptor (TrkB) in retinectomy sections of patients with proliferative vitreoretinopathy (PVR). Nine full-thickness retinectomy specimens obtained at retinal reattachment surgery for PVR were fixed in 4% paraformaldehyde immediately after excision and compared to similarly processed normal donor retinas (4 eyes). Agarose-embedded sections (100 microm thick) were double labelled for immunohistochemistry by confocal microscopy, with antibodies against BDNF, NT4, TrkB, rod opsin, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP), cellular retinaldehyde binding protein (CRALBP) and Brn3. This study demonstrates expression of NT4 by ganglion cells and shows expression of BDNF and NT4 in the outer photoreceptor segments is downregulated during PVR, whilst NT4 is markedly upregulated throughout the retina during this condition. The findings here suggest that NT4 may play a neural protective role during the development of PVR. It also shows that upregulation of NT4 in PVR is localised to Müller glial cells, indicating either over-expression of this factor by Müller cells or that Müller cells internalise NT4 for trafficking across the retina. TrkB expression was not observed in PVR retina. The observations that Müller glia demonstrate upregulation of NT4 suggests that retinal injury may lead to activation of this neurotrophin by Müller cells as part of their neuroprotective functions. PMID:18405896

  2. Distribution and phenotype of TrkB oligodendrocyte lineage cells in the adult rat spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Aminata P; Deer, Matthew R; Isaacson, Lori G

    2014-09-25

    The distribution and phenotype of a previously undescribed population of nonneuronal cells in the intact spinal cord that expresses TrkB, the cognate receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and neurotrophin 4 (NT-4), were characterized by examining the extent of co-localization of TrkB with NG2, which identifies oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPCs) or CC1, a marker for mature oligodendrocytes (OLs). All TrkB nonneuronal cells expressed Olig2, confirming their role in the OL lineage. Similar to OPCs and OLs, TrkB cells resided in gray and white matter of the spinal cord in similar abundance. Less than 2% of TrkB cells expressed NG2, while over 80% of TrkB cells in the adult spinal cord co-expressed CC1. Most OPCs did not express detectable levels of TrkB, however a small OPC pool (~5%) showed TrkB immunoreactivity. The majority of mature OLs (~65%) expressed TrkB, but a population of mature OLs (~36%) did not express TrkB at detectable levels, and 17% of TrkB nonneuronal cells did not express NG2 or CC1. Approximately 20% of the TrkB nonneuronal population in the ventral horn resided in close proximity to motor neurons and were categorized as perineuronal. We conclude that TrkB is expressed by several pools of OL lineage cells in the adult spinal cord. These findings are important in understanding the neurotrophin regulation of OL lineage cells in the adult spinal cord. PMID:25072185

  3. Small molecule TrkB agonist deoxygedunin protects nigrostriatal dopaminergic neurons from 6-OHDA and MPTP induced neurotoxicity in rodents.

    PubMed

    Nie, Shuke; Xu, Yan; Chen, Guiqin; Ma, Kai; Han, Chao; Guo, Zhenli; Zhang, Zhentao; Ye, Keqiang; Cao, Xuebing

    2015-12-01

    Dopaminergic neurons loss in the substantia nigra (SN) and dopamine (DA) content loss in the striatum correlate well with disease severity in Parkinson's disease (PD). Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a member of neurotrophin family and is necessary for the survival and development of DA neurons in the SN. Deficits in BDNF/TrkB receptors signaling contribute to the dysfunction of PD. Deoxygedunin, a derivative of gedunin produced from Indian neem tree, binds TrkB receptor and activates TrkB and its downstream signaling cascades in a BDNF-independent manner, and possesses neuroprotective effects in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we tested the neuroprotective effects of deoxygedunin in 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA)-lesioned rat model and 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced mice model of Parkinson's disease. Rats were treated with deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for one month started two weeks before 6-OHDA lesion (pre-treatment), or for two weeks right after lesion (post-treatment), with isovolumetric vehicle as control and normal. Mice were given deoxygedunin 5 mg/kg (i.p.) for 2 weeks and administrated with MPTP twice at the dose of 20 mg/kg (i.p.) on day 7. The results revealed that pretreatment with deoxygedunin improved PD models' behavioral performance and reduced dopaminergic neurons loss in SN, associated with the activation of TrkB receptors and its two major signaling cascades involving mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K). Thus, our current study indicates that deoxygedunin, as a small molecule TrkB agonist, displays prominent neuroprotective properties, providing a novel therapeutic strategy for treating Parkinson's disease. PMID:26282118

  4. Impaired TrkB Signaling Underlies Reduced BDNF-Mediated Trophic Support of Striatal Neurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington's Disease.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Khanh Q; Rymar, Vladimir V; Sadikot, Abbas F

    2016-01-01

    The principal projection neurons of the striatum are critically dependent on an afferent supply of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for neurotrophic support. These neurons express TrkB, the cognate receptor for BDNF, which activates signaling pathways associated with neuronal survival and phenotypic maintenance. Impairment of the BDNF-TrkB pathway is suspected to underlie the early dysfunction and prominent degeneration of striatal neurons in Huntington disease (HD). Some studies in HD models indicate that BDNF supply is reduced, while others suggest that TrkB signaling is impaired earlier in disease progression. It remains important to determine whether a primary defect in TrkB signaling underlies reduced neurotrophic support and the early vulnerability of striatal neurons in HD. Using the transgenic R6/2 mouse model of HD we found that prior to striatal degeneration there are early deficits in striatal protein levels of activated phospho-TrkB and the downstream-regulated protein DARPP-32. In contrast, total-TrkB and BDNF protein levels remained normal. Primary neurons cultured from R6/2 striatum exhibited reduced survival in response to exogenous BDNF applications. Moreover, BDNF activation of phospho-TrkB and downstream signal transduction was attenuated in R6/2 striatal cultures. These results suggest that neurotrophic support of striatal neurons is attenuated early in disease progression due to defects in TrkB signal transduction in the R6/2 model of HD. PMID:27013968

  5. Impaired TrkB Signaling Underlies Reduced BDNF-Mediated Trophic Support of Striatal Neurons in the R6/2 Mouse Model of Huntington’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Khanh Q.; Rymar, Vladimir V.; Sadikot, Abbas F.

    2016-01-01

    The principal projection neurons of the striatum are critically dependent on an afferent supply of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) for neurotrophic support. These neurons express TrkB, the cognate receptor for BDNF, which activates signaling pathways associated with neuronal survival and phenotypic maintenance. Impairment of the BDNF-TrkB pathway is suspected to underlie the early dysfunction and prominent degeneration of striatal neurons in Huntington disease (HD). Some studies in HD models indicate that BDNF supply is reduced, while others suggest that TrkB signaling is impaired earlier in disease progression. It remains important to determine whether a primary defect in TrkB signaling underlies reduced neurotrophic support and the early vulnerability of striatal neurons in HD. Using the transgenic R6/2 mouse model of HD we found that prior to striatal degeneration there are early deficits in striatal protein levels of activated phospho-TrkB and the downstream-regulated protein DARPP-32. In contrast, total-TrkB and BDNF protein levels remained normal. Primary neurons cultured from R6/2 striatum exhibited reduced survival in response to exogenous BDNF applications. Moreover, BDNF activation of phospho-TrkB and downstream signal transduction was attenuated in R6/2 striatal cultures. These results suggest that neurotrophic support of striatal neurons is attenuated early in disease progression due to defects in TrkB signal transduction in the R6/2 model of HD. PMID:27013968

  6. Stimulation of neuropeptide Y gene expression by brain-derived neurotrophic factor requires both the phospholipase Cgamma and Shc binding sites on its receptor, TrkB.

    PubMed Central

    Williams, A G; Hargreaves, A C; Gunn-Moore, F J; Tavaré, J M

    1998-01-01

    In PC12 cells, it has been previously reported that nerve growth factor stimulates neuropeptide Y (NPY) gene expression. In the current study we examined the signalling pathways involved in this effect by transiently expressing in PC12 cells the receptor (TrkB) for the related neurotrophin, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF). BDNF caused a 3-fold induction of luciferase expression from a transiently co-transfected plasmid possessing the firefly luciferase gene under the control of the NPY promoter. This effect of BDNF was completely blocked by either a Y484F mutation in TrkB (which blocks high-affinity Shc binding to TrkB) or by a Y785F substitution [which blocks the binding, phosphorylation and activation of phospholipase Cgamma (PLCgamma)]. Activation of the NPY promoter by neurotrophin-3 in PC12 cells overexpressing TrkC was also completely blocked by a naturally occurring kinase insert which prevents the high-affinity binding of Shc and PLCgamma. NPY promoter activation by BDNF was blocked by PD98059, suggesting a role for mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAP kinase). Stimulation of NPY gene expression by PMA, but not by BDNF, was blocked by Ro-31-8220, a protein kinase C inhibitor, excluding a role for this serine/threonine protein kinase in the effect of BDNF. In addition, BDNF did not cause an elevation in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration. Taken together, our results suggest that stimulation of the NPY promoter by BDNF requires the simultaneous activation of two distinct pathways; one involves Shc and MAP kinase, and the other appears to be PLCgamma-independent but requires an intact tyrosine-785 on TrkB and so may involve an effector of TrkB signalling that remains to be identified. PMID:9677306

  7. A Small Molecule TrkB Ligand Reduces Motor Impairment and Neuropathology in R6/2 and BACHD Mouse Models of Huntington's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Simmons, Danielle A.; Belichenko, Nadia P.; Yang, Tao; Condon, Christina; Monbureau, Marie; Shamloo, Mehrdad; Jing, Deqiang; Massa, Stephen M.

    2013-01-01

    Loss of neurotrophic support in the striatum caused by reduced brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels plays a critical role in Huntington's disease (HD) pathogenesis. BDNF acts via TrkB and p75 neurotrophin receptors (NTR), and restoring its signaling is a prime target for HD therapeutics. Here we sought to determine whether a small molecule ligand, LM22A-4, specific for TrkB and without effects on p75NTR, could alleviate HD-related pathology in R6/2 and BACHD mouse models of HD. LM22A-4 was administered to R6/2 mice once daily (5–6 d/week) from 4 to 11 weeks of age via intraperitoneal and intranasal routes simultaneously to maximize brain levels. The ligand reached levels in the R6/2 forebrain greater than the maximal neuroprotective dose in vitro and corrected deficits in activation of striatal TrkB and its key signaling intermediates AKT, PLCγ, and CREB. Ligand-induced TrkB activation was associated with a reduction in HD pathologies in the striatum including decreased DARPP-32 levels, neurite degeneration of parvalbumin-containing interneurons, inflammation, and intranuclear huntingtin aggregates. Aggregates were also reduced in the cortex. Notably, LM22A-4 prevented deficits in dendritic spine density of medium spiny neurons. Moreover, R6/2 mice given LM22A-4 demonstrated improved downward climbing and grip strength compared with those given vehicle, though these groups had comparable rotarod performances and survival times. In BACHD mice, long-term LM22A-4 treatment (6 months) produced similar ameliorative effects. These results support the hypothesis that targeted activation of TrkB inhibits HD-related degenerative mechanisms, including spine loss, and may provide a disease mechanism-directed therapy for HD and other neurodegenerative conditions. PMID:24285878

  8. TrkB receptor signaling in the nucleus tractus solitarius mediates the food intake-suppressive effects of hindbrain BDNF and leptin

    PubMed Central

    Spaeth, Andrea M.; Kanoski, Scott E.; Hayes, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and TrkB receptor signaling contribute to the central nervous system (CNS) control of energy balance. The role of hindbrain BDNF/TrkB receptor signaling in energy balance regulation is examined here. Hindbrain ventricular BDNF suppressed body weight through reductions in overall food intake and meal size and by increasing core temperature. To localize the neurons mediating the energy balance effects of hindbrain ventricle-delivered BDNF, ventricle subthreshold doses were delivered directly to medial nucleus tractus solitarius (mNTS). mNTS BDNF administration reduced food intake significantly, and this effect was blocked by preadministration of a highly selective TrkB receptor antagonist {[N2–2-2-Oxoazepan-3-yl amino]carbonyl phenyl benzo (b)thiophene-2-carboxamide (ANA-12)}, suggesting that TrkB receptor activation mediates hindbrain BDNF's effect on food intake. Because both BDNF and leptin interact with melanocortin signaling to reduce food intake, we also examined whether the intake inhibitory effects of hindbrain leptin involve hindbrain-specific BDNF/TrkB activation. BDNF protein content within the dorsal vagal complex of the hindbrain was increased significantly by hindbrain leptin delivery. To assess if BDNF/TrkB receptor signaling acts downstream of leptin signaling in the control of energy balance, leptin and ANA-12 were coadministered into the mNTS. Administration of the TrkB receptor antagonist attenuated the intake-suppressive effects of leptin, suggesting that mNTS TrkB receptor activation contributes to the mediation of the anorexigenic effects of hindbrain leptin. Collectively, these results indicate that TrkB-mediated signaling in the mNTS negatively regulates food intake and, in part, the intake inhibitory effects of leptin administered into the NTS. PMID:22374757

  9. Cylindrical solutions in mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Momeni, Davood; Myrzakulov, Kairat; Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Raza, Muhammad

    2016-06-01

    This paper is devoted to investigate cylindrical solutions in mimetic gravity. The explicit forms of the metric of this theory, namely mimetic-Kasner (say) have been obtained. In this study we have noticed that the Kasner's family of exact solutions needs to be reconsidered under this type of modified gravity. A no-go theorem is proposed for the exact solutions in the presence of a cosmological constant.

  10. TrkB Receptor Signalling: Implications in Neurodegenerative, Psychiatric and Proliferative Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Vivek K.; You, Yuyi; Gupta, Veer Bala; Klistorner, Alexander; Graham, Stuart L.

    2013-01-01

    The Trk family of receptors play a wide variety of roles in physiological and disease processes in both neuronal and non-neuronal tissues. Amongst these the TrkB receptor in particular has attracted major attention due to its critical role in signalling for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin-3 (NT3) and neurotrophin-4 (NT4). TrkB signalling is indispensable for the survival, development and synaptic plasticity of several subtypes of neurons in the nervous system. Substantial evidence has emerged over the last decade about the involvement of aberrant TrkB signalling and its compromise in various neuropsychiatric and degenerative conditions. Unusual changes in TrkB signalling pathway have also been observed and implicated in a range of cancers. Variations in TrkB pathway have been observed in obesity and hyperphagia related disorders as well. Both BDNF and TrkB have been shown to play critical roles in the survival of retinal ganglion cells in the retina. The ability to specifically modulate TrkB signalling can be critical in various pathological scenarios associated with this pathway. In this review, we discuss the mechanisms underlying TrkB signalling, disease implications and explore plausible ameliorative or preventive approaches. PMID:23670594

  11. The TIR/BB-loop mimetic AS-1 attenuates mechanical stress-induced cardiac fibroblast activation and paracrine secretion via modulation of large tumor suppressor kinase 1.

    PubMed

    Fan, Min; Song, Juan; He, Yijie; Shen, Xin; Li, Jiantao; Que, Linli; Zhu, Guoqing; Zhu, Quan; Cai, Xin; Ha, Tuanzhu; Chen, Qi; Xu, Yong; Li, Chuanfu; Li, Yuehua

    2016-06-01

    The TIR/BB-loop mimetic AS-1 has been reported to prevent cardiac hypertrophy by inhibiting interleukin-1 receptor (IL-1R)-mediated myeloid differentiation primary response gene 88 (MyD88)-dependent signaling. To date, it remains unknown whether and if so how AS-1 contributes to mechanical stress (MS)-induced cardiac fibroblast activation, a key process in pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling and heart failure. Here, we show that phosphorylation and expression of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1), a key molecule in the Hippo-Yes associated protein (YAP) signaling pathway, were down-regulated in primary neonatal rat cardiac fibroblasts (NRCFs) in response to MS and in the hearts of mice subjected to transverse aortic constriction (TAC) procedure; AS-1 treatment was able to restore LATS1 phosphorylation and expression both in vitro and in vivo. AS-1 treatment suppressed the induction of proliferation, differentiation and collagen synthesis in response to MS in NRCFs. AS-1 also ameliorated cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and apoptosis through dampening paracrine secretion of stretched cardiac fibroblasts. In mice, AS-1 treatment could protect against TAC-induced cardiac hypertrophy, myocardial fibrosis and heart failure. Of note, LATS1 depletion using siRNA completely abrogated the inhibitory effects of AS-1 on NRCFs under MS including accelerated proliferation, differentiation, enhanced ability to produce collagen and augmented paracrine secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β) to induce cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. Therefore, our results delineate a previously unrecognized role for LATS1 in cardiac fibroblast to mediate the beneficial effects of AS-1 in preventing pressure overload-induced cardiac remodeling and heart failure. PMID:26964796

  12. Short Peptide Type I Interferon Mimetics: Therapeutics for Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis, Melanoma, and Viral Infections

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Chulbul M.

    2014-01-01

    The classical canonical model of interferon (IFN) signaling focuses solely on the activation of STAT transcription factors, which limits the model in terms of specific gene activation, associated epigenetic events, and IFN mimetic development. Accordingly, we have developed a noncanonical model of IFN signaling and report the development of short type I IFN peptide mimetic peptides based on the model. The mimetics, human IFNα1(152–189), human IFNβ(150–187), and ovine IFNτ(156–195) are derived from the C-terminus of the parent IFNs and function intracellularly based on the noncanonical model. Vaccinia virus produces a decoy IFN receptor (B18R) that inhibits type I IFN, but the IFN mimetics bypass B18R for effective antiviral activity. By contrast, both parent IFNs and mimetics inhibited vesicular stomatitis virus. The mimetics also possessed anti-tumor activity against murine melanoma B16 tumor cells in culture and in mice, including synergizing with suppressor of cytokine signaling 1 antagonist. Finally, the mimetics were potent therapeutics against experimental allergic encephalomyelitis, a mouse model of multiple sclerosis. The mimetics lack toxic side effects of the parent IFNs and, thus, are a potent therapeutic replacement of IFNs as therapeutics. PMID:24811478

  13. Role of Neurotrophin Receptor TrkB in the Maturation of Rod Photoreceptors and Establishment of Synaptic Transmission to the Inner Retina

    PubMed Central

    Rohrer, Baerbel; Korenbrot, Juan I.; LaVail, Matthew M.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Xu, Baoji

    2009-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts through TrkB, a receptor with kinase activity, and mitigates light-induced apoptosis in adult mouse rod photoreceptors. To determine whether TrkB signaling is necessary for rod development and function, we examined the retinas of mice lacking all isoforms of the TrkB receptor. Rod migration and differentiation occur in the mutant retina, but proceed at slower rates than in wild-type mice. In postnatal day 16 (P16) mutants, rod outer segment dimensions and rhodopsin content are comparable with those of photoreceptors in P12 wild type (WT). Quantitative analyses of the photoreceptor component in the electroretinogram (ERG) indicate that the gain and kinetics of the rod phototransduction signal in dark-adapted P16 mutant and P12 WT retinas are similar. In contrast to P12 WT, however, the ERG in mutant mice entirely lacks a b-wave, indicating a failure of signal transmission in the retinal rod pathway. In the inner retina of mutant mice, although cells appear anatomically and immunohistochemically normal, they fail to respond to prolonged stroboscopic illumination with the normal expression of c-fos. Absence of the b-wave and failure of c-fos expression, in view of anatomically normal inner retinal cells, suggest that lack of TrkB signaling causes a defect in synaptic signaling between rods and inner retinal cells. Retinal pigment epithelial cells and cells in the inner retina, including Müller, amacrine, and retinal ganglion cells, express the TrkB receptor, but rod photoreceptors do not. Moreover, inner retinal cells respond to exogenous BDNF with c-fos expression and extracellular signal-regulated kinase phosphorylation. Thus, interactions of rods with TrkB-expressing cells must be required for normal rod development. PMID:10516311

  14. A glycosaminoglycan mimetic peptide nanofiber gel as an osteoinductive scaffold.

    PubMed

    Tansik, Gulistan; Kilic, Erden; Beter, Mustafa; Demiralp, Bahtiyar; Kiziltas Sendur, Gullu; Can, Nuray; Ozkan, Huseyin; Ergul, Elif; Guler, Mustafa O; Tekinay, Ayse B

    2016-08-16

    Biomineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM) plays a crucial role in bone formation. Functional and structural biomimetic native bone ECM components can therefore be used to change the fate of stem cells and induce bone regeneration and mineralization. Glycosaminoglycan (GAG) mimetic peptide nanofibers can interact with several growth factors. These nanostructures are capable of enhancing the osteogenic activity and mineral deposition of osteoblastic cells, which is indicative of their potential application in bone tissue regeneration. In this study, we investigated the potential of GAG-mimetic peptide nanofibers to promote the osteogenic differentiation of rat mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) in vitro and enhance the bone regeneration and biomineralization process in vivo in a rabbit tibial bone defect model. Alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity and Alizarin red staining results suggested that osteogenic differentiation is enhanced when rMSCs are cultured on GAG-mimetic peptide nanofibers. Moreover, osteogenic marker genes were shown to be upregulated in the presence of the peptide nanofiber system. Histological and micro-computed tomography (Micro-CT) observations of regenerated bone defects in rabbit tibia bone also suggested that the injection of a GAG-mimetic nanofiber gel supports cortical bone deposition by enhancing the secretion of an inorganic mineral matrix. The volume of the repaired cortical bone was higher in GAG-PA gel injected animals. The overall results indicate that GAG-mimetic peptide nanofibers can be utilized effectively as a new bioactive platform for bone regeneration. PMID:27447002

  15. Novel tungsten carbide nanorods: an intrinsic peroxidase mimetic with high activity and stability in aqueous and organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Li, Nan; Yan, Ya; Xia, Bao-Yu; Wang, Jing-Yuan; Wang, Xin

    2014-04-15

    Tungsten carbide nanorods (WC NRs) are demonstrated for the first time to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity towards typical peroxidase substrates, such as 3, 3', 5, 5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) and ο-phenylenediamine (OPD) in the presence of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). The reactions catalyzed by these nanorods follow the Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The excellent catalytic performance of WC NRs could be attributed to their intrinsic catalytic activity to efficiently accelerate the electron-transfer process and facilitate the decomposition of H2O2 to generate more numbers of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Based upon the strong peroxidase-like activity of these WC NRs, a colorimetric sensor for H2O2 is designed, which provides good response towards H2O2 concentration over a range of 2×10(-7)-8×10(-5) M with a detection limit of 60 nM. Moreover, the peroxidase-like activities of WC NRs with TMB as the substrate are investigated in both protic and aprotic organic media, showing different colorimetric reactions from that performed in aqueous solutions. In comparison with the natural horse radish peroxidase, WC NR exhibits excellent robustness of catalytic activity and considerable reusability, thus making it a promising mimic of peroxidase catalysts. PMID:24325981

  16. Nicotinic Acid-Mediated Activation of Both Membrane and Nuclear Receptors towards Therapeutic Glucocorticoid Mimetics for Treating Multiple Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Penberthy, W. Todd

    2009-01-01

    Acute attacks of multiple sclerosis (MS) are most commonly treated with glucocorticoids, which can provide life-saving albeit only temporary symptomatic relief. The mechanism of action (MOA) is now known to involve induction of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) and interleukin-10 (IL-10), where IL-10 requires subsequent heme oxygenase-1 (HMOX-1) induction. Ectopic expression studies reveal that even small changes in expression of IDO, HMOX-1, or mitochondrial superoxide dismutase (SOD2) can prevent demyelination in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) animal models of MS. An alternative to glucocorticoids is needed for a long-term treatment of MS. A distinctly short list of endogenous activators of both membrane G-protein-coupled receptors and nuclear peroxisome proliferating antigen receptors (PPARs) demonstrably ameliorate EAE pathogenesis by MOAs resembling that of glucocorticoids. These dual activators and potential MS therapeutics include endocannabinoids and the prostaglandin 15-deoxy-Δ12,14-PGJ2. Nicotinamide profoundly ameliorates and prevents autoimmune-mediated demyelination in EAE via maintaining levels of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), without activating PPAR nor any G-protein-coupled receptor. By comparison, nicotinic acid provides even greater levels of NAD than nicotinamide in many tissues, while additionally activating the PPARγ-dependent pathway already shown to provide relief in animal models of MS after activation of GPR109a/HM74a. Thus nicotinic acid is uniquely suited for providing therapeutic relief in MS. However nicotinic acid is unexamined in MS research. Nicotinic acid penetrates the blood brain barrier, cures pellagric dementia, has been used for over 50 years clinically without toxicity, and raises HDL concentrations to a greater degree than any pharmaceutical, thus providing unparalleled benefits against lipodystrophy. Summary analysis reveals that the expected therapeutic benefits of high-dose nicotinic acid

  17. Investigating the Efficacy of Novel TrkB Agonists to Augment Stroke Recovery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warraich, Zuha

    Stroke remains the leading cause of adult disability in developed countries. Most survivors live with residual motor impairments that severely diminish independence and quality of life. After stroke, the only accepted treatment for these patients is motor rehabilitation. However, the amount and kind of rehabilitation required to induce clinically significant improvements in motor function is rarely given due to the constraints of our current health care system. Research reported in this dissertation contributes towards developing adjuvant therapies that may augment the impact of motor rehabilitation and improve functional outcome. These studies have demonstrated reorganization of maps within motor cortex as a function of experience in both healthy and brain-injured animals by using intracortical microstimulation technique. Furthermore, synaptic plasticity has been identified as a key neural mechanism in directing motor map plasticity, evidenced by restoration of movement representations within the spared cortical tissue accompanied by increase in synapse number translating into motor improvement after stroke. There is increasing evidence that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) modulates synaptic and morphological plasticity in the developing and mature nervous system. Unfortunately, BDNF itself is a poor candidate because of its short half-life, low penetration through the blood brain barrier, and activating multiple receptor units, p75 and TrkB on the neuronal membrane. In order to circumvent this problem efficacy of two recently developed novel TrkB agonists, LM22A-4 and 7,8-dihydroxyflavone, that actively penetrate the blood brain barrier and enhance functional recovery. Findings from these dissertation studies indicate that administration of these pharmacological compounds, accompanied by motor rehabilitation provide a powerful therapeutic tool for stroke recovery.

  18. DevR (DosR) mimetic peptides impair transcriptional regulation and survival of Mycobacterium tuberculosis under hypoxia by inhibiting the autokinase activity of DevS sensor kinase

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Two-component systems have emerged as compelling targets for antibacterial drug design for a number of reasons including the distinct histidine phosphorylation property of their constituent sensor kinases. The DevR-DevS/DosT two component system of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb) is essential for survival under hypoxia, a stress associated with dormancy development in vivo. In the present study a combinatorial peptide phage display library was screened for DevS histidine kinase interacting peptides with the aim of isolating inhibitors of DevR-DevS signaling. Results DevS binding peptides were identified from a phage display library after three rounds of panning using DevS as bait. The peptides showed sequence similarity with conserved residues in the N-terminal domain of DevR and suggested that they may represent interacting surfaces between DevS and DevR. Two DevR mimetic peptides were found to specifically inhibit DevR-dependent transcriptional activity and restrict the hypoxic survival of M. tb. The mechanism of peptide action is majorly attributed to an inhibition of DevS autokinase activity. Conclusions These findings demonstrate that DevR mimetic peptides impede DevS activation and that intercepting DevS activation at an early step in the signaling cascade impairs M. tb survival in a hypoxia persistence model. PMID:25048654

  19. TrkB gene therapy by adeno-associated virus enhances recovery after cervical spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Gálvez, Gabriel; Zambrano, Juan M; Diaz Soto, Juan C; Zhan, Wen-Zhi; Gransee, Heather M; Sieck, Gary C; Mantilla, Carlos B

    2016-02-01

    Unilateral cervical spinal cord hemisection at C2 (C2SH) interrupts descending bulbospinal inputs to phrenic motoneurons, paralyzing the diaphragm muscle. Recovery after C2SH is enhanced by brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signaling via the tropomyosin-related kinase subtype B (TrkB) receptor in phrenic motoneurons. The role for gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV)-mediated delivery of TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is not known. The present study determined the therapeutic efficacy of intrapleural delivery of AAV7 encoding for full-length TrkB (AAV-TrkB) to phrenic motoneurons 3 days post-C2SH. Diaphragm EMG was recorded chronically in male rats (n=26) up to 21 days post-C2SH. Absent ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity was verified 3 days post-C2SH. A greater proportion of animals displayed recovery of ipsilateral diaphragm EMG activity during eupnea by 14 and 21 days post-SH after AAV-TrkB (10/15) compared to AAV-GFP treatment (2/11; p=0.031). Diaphragm EMG amplitude increased over time post-C2SH (p<0.001), and by 14 days post-C2SH, AAV-TrkB treated animals displaying recovery achieved 48% of the pre-injury values compared to 27% in AAV-GFP treated animals. Phrenic motoneuron mRNA expression of glutamatergic AMPA and NMDA receptors revealed a significant, positive correlation (r(2)=0.82), with increased motoneuron NMDA expression evident in animals treated with AAV-TrkB and that displayed recovery after C2SH. Overall, gene therapy using intrapleural delivery of AAV-TrkB to phrenic motoneurons is sufficient to promote recovery of diaphragm activity, adding a novel potential intervention that can be administered after upper cervical spinal cord injury to improve impaired respiratory function. PMID:26607912

  20. The catalytic activity of Ag2S-montmorillonites as peroxidase mimetic toward colorimetric detection of H2O2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qingyun; Jiang, Yanling; Zhang, Leyou; Zhou, Xinpei; Lv, Xintian; Ding, Yanyuan; Sun, Lifang; Chen, Pengpeng; Yin, Hailiang

    2016-08-01

    Nanocomposites based on silver sulfide (Ag2S) and Ca-montmorillonite (Ca(2+)-MMT) were synthesized by a simple hydrothermal method. The nanocomposites were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and Fourier transform infrared spectra (FTIR). The as-prepared Ag2S-MMT nanocomposites were firstly demonstrated to possess intrinsic peroxidase-like activity and could rapidly catalytically oxidize the substrate 3,3',5,5'-tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) in the presence of H2O2 to produce a blue product which can be seen by the naked eye in only one minute. The experimental results revealed that the Ag2S-MMT nanocomposites exhibit higher thermal durance. Based on the TMB-H2O2 catalyzed color reaction, the Ag2S-MMT nanocomposites were exploited as a new type of biosensor for detection and estimation of H2O2 through a simple, cheap and selective colorimetric method. PMID:27157733

  1. Upregulation of TrkB Promotes Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition and Anoikis Resistance in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Wei; Qiu, Haifeng; Yang, Tingting; Luo, Xin; Zhang, Huijuan; Wan, Xiaoping

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms governing the metastasis of endometrial carcinoma (EC) are poorly defined. Recent data support a role for the cell surface receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB in the progression of several human tumors. Here we present evidence for a direct role of TrkB in human EC. Immunohistochemical analysis revealed that TrkB and its secreted ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), are more highly expressed in EC than in normal endometrium. High TrkB levels correlated with lymph node metastasis (p<0.05) and lymphovascular space involvement (p<0.05) in EC. Depletion of TrkB by stable shRNA-mediated knockdown decreased the migratory and invasive capacity of cancer cell lines in vitro and resulted in anoikis in suspended cells. Conversely, exogenous expression of TrkB increased cell migration and invasion and promoted anoikis resistance in suspension culture. Furthermore, over-expression of TrkB or stimulation by BDNF resulted in altered the expression of molecular mediators of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT). RNA interference (RNAi)-mediated depletion of the downstream regulator, Twist, blocked TrkB-induced EMT-like transformation. The use of in vivo models revealed decreased peritoneal dissemination in TrkB-depleted EC cells. Additionally, TrkB-depleted EC cells underwent mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and anoikis in vivo. Our data support a novel function for TrkB in promoting EMT and resistance to anoikis. Thus, TrkB may constitute a potential therapeutic target in human EC. PMID:23936232

  2. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) inhibitors from Morinda citrifolia (Noni) and their insulin mimetic activity.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Phi-Hung; Yang, Jun-Li; Uddin, Mohammad N; Park, So-Lim; Lim, Seong-Il; Jung, Da-Woon; Williams, Darren R; Oh, Won-Keun

    2013-11-22

    As part of our ongoing search for new antidiabetic agents from medicinal plants, we found that a methanol extract of Morinda citrifolia showed potential stimulatory effects on glucose uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. Bioassay-guided fractionation of this active extract yielded two new lignans (1 and 2) and three new neolignans (9, 10, and 14), as well as 10 known compounds (3-8, 11-13, and 15). The absolute configurations of compounds 9, 10, and 14 were determined by ECD spectra analysis. Compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed inhibitory effects on PTP1B enzyme with IC50 values of 21.86 ± 0.48, 15.01 ± 0.20, 16.82 ± 0.42, and 4.12 ± 0.09 μM, respectively. Furthermore, compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 showed strong stimulatory effects on 2-NBDG uptake in 3T3-L1 adipocyte cells. This study indicated the potential of compounds 3, 6, 7, and 15 as lead molecules for antidiabetic agents. PMID:24224843

  3. Bio-mimetic surface engineering of plasmid-loaded nanoparticles for active intracellular trafficking by actin comet-tail motility.

    PubMed

    Ng, Chee Ping; Goodman, Thomas T; Park, In-Kyu; Pun, Suzie H

    2009-02-01

    Intracellular transport after endosomal escape presents one of the major barriers for efficient non-viral gene delivery because plasmid DNA and synthetic nanoparticulate carriers suffer from significantly restricted diffusion in the cytoplasm. We postulate that forces generated by actin polymerization, a mechanism used by several bacterial pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes, can be harnessed to propel nanoparticles within the cytoplasm and thereby overcome diffusional limitations associated with gene transport in the cell cytoplasm. In this work, we synthesized and characterized plasmid DNA-containing nanoparticles modified with ActA protein, the single protein in L. monocytogenes responsible for activating actin polymerization and initiating actin comet-tail propulsion. The motility of the ActA-modified nanoparticles was assessed in Xenopus laevis cytoplasmic extract supplemented with fluorescently labeled actin. Nanoparticle motility was monitored using multi-color, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy for the formation of actin comet tails attached to the fluorescently labeled vehicle. We observed particle motility with velocities approximately 0.06 microm/s with anionic-charged plasmid carriers formed from either poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) or 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DOPC) liposomes, but interestingly not with cationic particles assembled by encapsulation of plasmid with either polyethylenimine (PEI) or 1,2-dioleoyl-3-trimethylammonium-propane/1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine (DOTAP/DOPE) lipids. Control particles coated with albumin instead of ActA also showed no motility. Taken together, we have demonstrated the feasibility of translating the comet-tail propulsion mechanism to synthetic drug carriers as a potential approach to overcome intracellular transport barriers, and also have identified appropriate gene delivery systems that can be employed for this mechanism. PMID:19046764

  4. Bio-mimetic Flow Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Haecheon

    2009-11-01

    Bio-mimetic engineering or bio-mimetics is the application of biological methods and systems found in nature to the study and design of engineering systems and modern technology (from Wikipedia). The concept itself is old, but successful developments have been made recently, especially in the research field of flow control. The objective of flow control based on the bio-mimetic approach is to develop novel concepts for reducing drag, increasing lift and enhancing aerodynamic performance. For skin friction reduction, a few ideas have been suggested such as the riblet from shark, compliant surface from dolphin, microbubble injection and multiple front-body curvature from penguin, and V-shaped protrusion from sailfish. For form drag reduction, several new attempts have been also made recently. Examples include the V-shaped spanwise grooves from saguaro cactus, overall shape of box fish, longitudinal grooves on scallop shell, bill of swordfish, hooked comb on owl wing, trailing-edge protrusion on dragonfly wing, and fillet. For the enhancement of aerodynamic performance, focuses have been made on the birds, fish and insects: e.g., double layered feather of landing bird, leading-edge serration of humpback-whale flipper, pectoral fin of flying fish, long tail on swallowtail-butterfly wing, wing flapping motion of dragonfly, and alula in birds. Living animals adapt their bodies to better performance in multi purposes, but engineering requires single purpose in most cases. Therefore, bio-mimetic approaches often produce excellent results more than expected. However, they are sometimes based on people's wrong understanding of nature and produce unwanted results. Successes and failures from bio-mimetic approaches in flow control will be discussed in the presentation.

  5. The 5' leader of the mRNA encoding the mouse neurotrophin receptor TrkB contains two internal ribosomal entry sites that are differentially regulated.

    PubMed

    Timmerman, Stephanie L; Pfingsten, Jennifer S; Kieft, Jeffrey S; Krushel, Les A

    2008-01-01

    A single internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) in conjunction with IRES transactivating factors (ITAFs) is sufficient to recruit the translational machinery to a eukaryotic mRNA independent of the cap structure. However, we demonstrate that the mouse TrkB mRNA contains two independent IRESes. The mouse TrkB mRNA consists of one of two 5' leaders (1428 nt and 448 nt), both of which include the common 3' exon (Ex2, 344 nt). Dicistronic RNA transfections and in vitro translation of monocistronic RNA demonstrated that both full-length 5' leaders, as well as Ex2, exhibit IRES activity indicating the IRES is located within Ex2. Additional analysis of the upstream sequences demonstrated that the first 260 nt of exon 1 (Ex1a) also contains an IRES. Dicistronic RNA transfections into SH-SY5Y cells showed the Ex1a IRES is constitutively active. However, the Ex2 IRES is only active in response to retinoic acid induced neural differentiation, a state which correlates with the synthesis of the ITAF polypyrimidine tract binding protein (PTB1). Correspondingly, addition or knock-down of PTB1 altered Ex2, but not Ex1a IRES activity in vitro and ex vivo, respectively. These results demonstrate that the two functionally independent IRESes within the mouse TrkB 5' leader are differentially regulated, in part by PTB1. PMID:18779873

  6. Mimetics of Hormetic Agents: Stress-Resistance Triggers

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, Joan Smith

    2010-01-01

    Mimetics of hormetic agents offer a novel approach to adjust dose to minimize the risk of toxic response, and maximize the benefit of induction of at least partial physiological conditioning. Nature selected and preserved those organisms and triggers that promote tolerance to stress. The induced tolerance can serve to resist that challenge and can repair previous age, disease, and trauma damage as well to provide a more youthful response to other stresses. The associated physiological conditioning may include youthful restoration of DNA repair, resistance to oxidizing pollutants, protein structure and function repair, improved immunity, tissue remodeling, adjustments in central and peripheral nervous systems, and altered metabolism. By elucidating common pathways activated by hormetic agent’s mimetics, new strategies for intervention in aging, disease, and trauma emerge. Intervention potential in cancer, diabetes, age-related diseases, infectious diseases, cardiovascular diseases, and Alzheimer’s disease are possible. Some hormetic mimetics exist in pathways in primitive organisms and are active or latent in humans. Peptides, oligonucleotides, and hormones are among the mimetics that activate latent resistance to radiation, physical endurance, strength, and immunity to physiological condition tolerance to stress. Co-activators may be required for expression of the desired physiological conditioning health and rejuvenation benefits. PMID:20221297

  7. Expression of BDNF and TrkB Phosphorylation in the Rat Frontal Cortex During Morphine Withdrawal are NO Dependent.

    PubMed

    Peregud, Danil I; Yakovlev, Alexander A; Stepanichev, Mikhail Yu; Onufriev, Mikhail V; Panchenko, Leonid F; Gulyaeva, Natalia V

    2016-08-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) mediates pharmacological effects of opiates including dependence and abstinence. Modulation of NO synthesis during the induction phase of morphine dependence affects manifestations of morphine withdrawal syndrome, though little is known about mechanisms underlying this phenomenon. Neurotrophic and growth factors are involved in neuronal adaptation during opiate dependence. NO-dependent modulation of morphine dependence may be mediated by changes in expression and activity of neurotrophic and/or growth factors in the brain. Here, we studied the effects of NO synthesis inhibition during the induction phase of morphine dependence on the expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), glial-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), nerve growth factor (NGF), and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF1) as well as their receptors in rat brain regions after spontaneous morphine withdrawal in dependent animals. Morphine dependence in rats was induced within 6 days by 12 injections of morphine in increasing doses (10-100 mg/kg), and NO synthase inhibitor L-N(G)-nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (10 mg/kg) was given 1 h before each morphine injection. The expression of the BDNF, GDNF, NGF, IGF1, and their receptors in the frontal cortex, striatum, hippocampus, and midbrain was assessed 40 h after morphine withdrawal. L-NAME treatment during morphine intoxication resulted in an aggravation of the spontaneous morphine withdrawal severity. Morphine withdrawal was accompanied by upregulation of BDNF, IGF1, and their receptors TrkB and IGF1R, respectively, on the mRNA level in the frontal cortex, and only BDNF in hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME administration during morphine intoxication decreased abstinence-induced upregulation of these mRNAs in the frontal cortex, hippocampus and midbrain. L-NAME prevented from abstinence-induced elevation of mature but not pro-form of BDNF polypeptide in the frontal cortex. While morphine abstinence did not affect TrkB

  8. Collagen Mimetic Peptides: Progress Towards Functional Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yu, S. Michael; Li, Yang; Kim, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, collagen mimetic peptides (CMPs) have been used for elucidating the structure of the collagen triple helix and the factors responsible for its stabilization. The wealth of fundamental knowledge on collagen structure and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions accumulated over the past decades has led to a recent burst of research exploring the potential of CMPs to recreate the higher order assembly and biological function of natural collagens for biomedical applications. Although a large portion of such research is still at an early stage, the collagen triple helix has become a promising structural motif for engineering self-assembled, hierarchical constructs similar to natural tissue scaffolds which are expected to exhibit unique or enhanced biological activities. This paper reviews recent progress in the field of collagen mimetic peptides that bears both direct and indirect implications to engineering collagen-like materials for potential biomedical use. Various CMPs and collagen-like proteins that mimic either structural or functional characteristics of natural collagens are discussed with particular emphasis on providing helpful information to bioengineers and biomaterials scientists interested in collagen engineering. PMID:26316880

  9. Thyroid hormone-dependent development of early cortical networks: temporal specificity and the contribution of trkB and mTOR pathways.

    PubMed

    Westerholz, Sören; de Lima, Ana D; Voigt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Early in neocortical network development, triiodothyronine (T3) promotes GABAergic neurons' population increase, their somatic growth and the formation of GABAergic synapses. In the presence of T3, GABAergic interneurons form longer axons and conspicuous axonal arborizations, with an increased number of putative synaptic boutons. Here we show that the increased GABAergic axonal growth is positively correlated with the proximity to non-GABAergic neurons (non-GABA). A differential innervation emerges from a T3-dependent decrease of axonal length in fields with low density of neuronal cell bodies, combined with an increased bouton formation in fields with high density of neuronal somata. T3 addition to deprived networks after the first 2 weeks of development did not rescue deficits in the GABAergic synaptic bouton distribution, or in the frequency and duration of spontaneous bursts. During the critical 2-week-period, GABAergic signaling is depolarizing as revealed by calcium imaging experiments. Interestingly, T3 enhanced the expression of the potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), and accelerated the developmental shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing GABAergic signaling in non-GABA. The T3-related increase of spontaneous network activity was remarkably reduced after blockade of either tropomyosin-receptor kinase B (trkB) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. T3-dependent increase in GABAergic neurons' soma size was mediated mainly by mTOR signaling. Conversely, the T3-dependent selective increase of GABAergic boutons near non-GABAergic cell bodies is mediated by trkB signaling only. Both trkB and mTOR signaling mediate T3-dependent reduction of the GABAergic axon extension. The circuitry context is relevant for the interaction between T3 and trkB signaling, but not for the interactions between T3 and mTOR signaling. PMID:23964198

  10. Thyroid hormone-dependent development of early cortical networks: temporal specificity and the contribution of trkB and mTOR pathways

    PubMed Central

    Westerholz, Sören; de Lima, Ana D.; Voigt, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Early in neocortical network development, triiodothyronine (T3) promotes GABAergic neurons' population increase, their somatic growth and the formation of GABAergic synapses. In the presence of T3, GABAergic interneurons form longer axons and conspicuous axonal arborizations, with an increased number of putative synaptic boutons. Here we show that the increased GABAergic axonal growth is positively correlated with the proximity to non-GABAergic neurons (non-GABA). A differential innervation emerges from a T3-dependent decrease of axonal length in fields with low density of neuronal cell bodies, combined with an increased bouton formation in fields with high density of neuronal somata. T3 addition to deprived networks after the first 2 weeks of development did not rescue deficits in the GABAergic synaptic bouton distribution, or in the frequency and duration of spontaneous bursts. During the critical 2-week-period, GABAergic signaling is depolarizing as revealed by calcium imaging experiments. Interestingly, T3 enhanced the expression of the potassium-chloride cotransporter 2 (KCC2), and accelerated the developmental shift from depolarizing to hyperpolarizing GABAergic signaling in non-GABA. The T3-related increase of spontaneous network activity was remarkably reduced after blockade of either tropomyosin-receptor kinase B (trkB) or mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathways. T3-dependent increase in GABAergic neurons' soma size was mediated mainly by mTOR signaling. Conversely, the T3-dependent selective increase of GABAergic boutons near non-GABAergic cell bodies is mediated by trkB signaling only. Both trkB and mTOR signaling mediate T3-dependent reduction of the GABAergic axon extension. The circuitry context is relevant for the interaction between T3 and trkB signaling, but not for the interactions between T3 and mTOR signaling. PMID:23964198

  11. Template synthesis, spectroscopic characterization and preliminary insulin-mimetic activity of oxovanadium(IV) complexes with N2O2 diazadioxa macrocycles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, M. L.; Sengupta, S. K.; Pandey, O. P.

    A new series of diazadioxa oxovanadium(IV) macrocyclic complexes of type [VO(mac)]SO4 have been synthesized via the condensation reaction of a 3-(phenyl/substituted phenyl)-4-amino-5-hydrazino-1,2,4-triazole (H2L) with salicylaldehyde/2-hydroxyacetophenone and 1,4-dibromobutane in the presence of oxovanadium(IV) sulfate in ethanol. All the newly synthesized compounds were characterized on the basis of elemental analyses, conductance measurements, magnetic properties, spectral (UV-Vis, IR, EPR) and XRD studies. The particle size of the complexes has been calculated from XRD spectra using Debye-Scherrer formula and these are found to be in 31-32 nm range. The efficacy of two macrocyclic complexes was also studied in streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats over a period of 30 days. The administration of these complexes in diabetic rats reversed the diabetic effect due to their insulin-mimetic effects.

  12. A synthetic heparan sulfate-mimetic peptide conjugated to a mini CD4 displays very high anti- HIV-1 activity independently of coreceptor usage.

    PubMed

    Connell, Bridgette Janine; Baleux, Françoise; Coic, Yves-Marie; Clayette, Pascal; Bonnaffé, David; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues

    2012-01-27

    The HIV-1 envelope gp120, which features both the virus receptor (CD4) and coreceptor (CCR5/CXCR4) binding sites, offers multiple sites for therapeutic intervention. However, the latter becomes exposed, thus vulnerable to inhibition, only transiently when the virus has already bound cellular CD4. To pierce this defense mechanism, we engineered a series of heparan sulfate mimicking tridecapeptides and showed that one of them target the gp120 coreceptor binding site with μM affinity. Covalently linked to a CD4-mimetic that binds to gp120 and renders the coreceptor binding domain available to be targeted, the conjugated tridecapeptide now displays nanomolar affinity for its target. Using solubilized coreceptors captured on top of sensorchip we show that it inhibits gp120 binding to both CCR5 and CXCR4 and in peripheral blood mononuclear cells broadly inhibits HIV-1 replication with an IC(50) of 1 nM. PMID:22284360

  13. BDNF and its TrkB receptor in human fracture healing.

    PubMed

    Kilian, Olaf; Hartmann, Sonja; Dongowski, Nicole; Karnati, Srikanth; Baumgart-Vogt, Eveline; Härtel, Frauke V; Noll, Thomas; Schnettler, Reinhard; Lips, Katrin Susanne

    2014-09-01

    Fracture healing is a physiological process of repair which proceeds in stages, each characterized by a different predominant tissue in the fracture gap. Matrix reorganization is regulated by cytokines and growth factors. Neurotrophins and their receptors might be of importance to osteoblasts and endothelial cells during fracture healing. The aim of this study was to examine the presence of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its tropomyosin-related kinase B receptor (TrkB) during human fracture healing. BDNF and TrkB were investigated in samples from human fracture gaps and cultured cells using RT-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Endothelial cells and osteoblastic cell lines demonstrated a cytoplasmic staining pattern of BDNF and TrkB in vitro. At the mRNA level, BDNF and TrkB were expressed in the initial and osteoid formation phase of human fracture healing. In the granulation tissue of fracture gap, both proteins--BDNF and TrkB--are concentrated in endothelial and osteoblastic cells at the margins of woven bone suggesting their involvement in the formation of new vessels. There was no evidence of BDNF or TrkB during fracture healing in chondrocytes of human enchondral tissue. Furthermore, BDNF is absent in mature bone. Taken together, BDNF and TrkB are involved in vessel formation and osteogenic processes during human fracture healing. The detection of BDNF and its TrkB receptor during various stages of the bone formation process in human fracture gap tissue were shown for the first time. The current study reveals that both proteins are up-regulated in human osteoblasts and endothelial cells in fracture healing. PMID:24984919

  14. Birinapant (TL32711), a bivalent SMAC mimetic, targets TRAF2-associated cIAPs, abrogates TNF-induced NF-κB activation, and is active in patient-derived xenograft models.

    PubMed

    Benetatos, Christopher A; Mitsuuchi, Yasuhiro; Burns, Jennifer M; Neiman, Eric M; Condon, Stephen M; Yu, Guangyao; Seipel, Martin E; Kapoor, Gurpreet S; Laporte, Matthew G; Rippin, Susan R; Deng, Yijun; Hendi, Mukta S; Tirunahari, Pavan K; Lee, Yu-Hua; Haimowitz, Thomas; Alexander, Matthew D; Graham, Martin A; Weng, David; Shi, Yigong; McKinlay, Mark A; Chunduru, Srinivas K

    2014-04-01

    The acquisition of apoptosis resistance is a fundamental event in cancer development. Among the mechanisms used by cancer cells to evade apoptosis is the dysregulation of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. The activity of the IAPs is regulated by endogenous IAP antagonists such as SMAC (also termed DIABLO). Antagonism of IAP proteins by SMAC occurs via binding of the N-terminal tetrapeptide (AVPI) of SMAC to selected BIR domains of the IAPs. Small molecule compounds that mimic the AVPI motif of SMAC have been designed to overcome IAP-mediated apoptosis resistance of cancer cells. Here, we report the preclinical characterization of birinapant (TL32711), a bivalent SMAC-mimetic compound currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Birinapant bound to the BIR3 domains of cIAP1, cIAP2, XIAP, and the BIR domain of ML-IAP in vitro and induced the autoubiquitylation and proteasomal degradation of cIAP1 and cIAP2 in intact cells, which resulted in formation of a RIPK1:caspase-8 complex, caspase-8 activation, and induction of tumor cell death. Birinapant preferentially targeted the TRAF2-associated cIAP1 and cIAP2 with subsequent inhibition of TNF-induced NF-κB activation. The activity of a variety of chemotherapeutic cancer drugs was potentiated by birinapant both in a TNF-dependent or TNF-independent manner. Tumor growth in multiple primary patient-derived xenotransplant models was inhibited by birinapant at well-tolerated doses. These results support the therapeutic combination of birinapant with multiple chemotherapies, in particular, those therapies that can induce TNF secretion. PMID:24563541

  15. Slitrk5 Mediates BDNF-Dependent TrkB Receptor Trafficking and Signaling.

    PubMed

    Song, Minseok; Giza, Joanna; Proenca, Catia C; Jing, Deqiang; Elliott, Mark; Dincheva, Iva; Shmelkov, Sergey V; Kim, Jihye; Schreiner, Ryan; Huang, Shu-Hong; Castrén, Eero; Prekeris, Rytis; Hempstead, Barbara L; Chao, Moses V; Dictenberg, Jason B; Rafii, Shahin; Chen, Zhe-Yu; Rodriguez-Boulan, Enrique; Lee, Francis S

    2015-06-22

    Recent studies in humans and in genetic mouse models have identified Slit- and NTRK-like family (Slitrks) as candidate genes for neuropsychiatric disorders. All Slitrk isotypes are highly expressed in the CNS, where they mediate neurite outgrowth, synaptogenesis, and neuronal survival. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying these functions are not known. Here, we report that Slitrk5 modulates brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent biological responses through direct interaction with TrkB receptors. Under basal conditions, Slitrk5 interacts primarily with a transsynaptic binding partner, protein tyrosine phosphatase δ (PTPδ); however, upon BDNF stimulation, Slitrk5 shifts to cis-interactions with TrkB. In the absence of Slitrk5, TrkB has a reduced rate of ligand-dependent recycling and altered responsiveness to BDNF treatment. Structured illumination microscopy revealed that Slitrk5 mediates optimal targeting of TrkB receptors to Rab11-positive recycling endosomes through recruitment of a Rab11 effector protein, Rab11-FIP3. Thus, Slitrk5 acts as a TrkB co-receptor that mediates its BDNF-dependent trafficking and signaling. PMID:26004511

  16. Expression of the TrkB neurotrophin receptor by thymic macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    García-Suárez, O; Hannestad, J; Esteban, I; Sainz, R; Naves, F J; Vega, J A

    1998-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that some members of the neurotrophic factor family of neurotrophins could be implicated in the regulation of immune responses. Neurotrophins, as well as their tyrosine kinase signal-transducing receptors (the so-called Trk neurotrophin receptors), have been detected in different lymphoid tissues, although their cellular localization is not well known. In this study we used single and double immunohistochemistry to localize TrkB in situ in the rat thymus (in animals from 0 days to 2 years of age), in cytospin preparations of rat thymic cells, and in two mouse monocyte-macrophage cell lines (RAW 264.7 and J774A.1). We found TrkB protein expression in a subpopulation of cells in the corticomedullary junction, which simultaneously expressed the rat macrophage marker ED1. The density of TrkB-expressing cells increased with age, reaching maximal values at 2 years. Conversely, no evidence of TrkB protein expression could be found in dendritic cells, epithelial cells or thymocytes. Thymic macrophages in cytospin preparations, as well as in the mouse monocyte macrophage cell lines, also expressed TrkB protein. Although the possible function of TrkB in the thymic macrophage remains to be clarified, present findings add further evidence to the proposed role of neurotrophins in the immune system. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figures 4 and 5 PMID:9741346

  17. Signal transduction mechanism of a peptide mimetic of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed

    Subramaniam, Prem S; Flowers, Lawrence O; Haider, S Mohammed I; Johnson, Howard M

    2004-05-11

    The C-terminus of interferon-gamma (IFNgamma) contains a nuclear localization sequence (NLS) required for the activation and nuclear translocation of the transcription factor STAT1alpha and induction of IFNgamma-activated genes. On the basis of this and other studies, we developed a peptide mimetic of IFNgamma that possesses the IFNgamma functions of antiviral activity and upregulation of MHC class II molecules. The mimetic also shares with IFNgamma the ability to induce the activation and nuclear translocation of STAT1alpha and the IFNgamma receptor (IFNGR)-1 subunit. The mimetic, IFNgamma(95-132), is a peptide that consists of the C-terminal residues 95-132 of murine IFNgamma and contains a required alpha-helical domain and the NLS of IFNgamma. In this study, we determined the mechanism of the intracellular action of the mimetic at the level of signal transduction. We show that the mimetic mediates the nuclear transport of IFNGR-1 through its interaction with IFNGR-1 cytoplasmic region 253-287 via both the helical region and the NLS of IFNgamma(95-132). Alanine substitutions of the NLS of the mimetic showed that the NLS was required for nuclear translocation and that the nuclear transport properties of the mimetic correlated with its ability to bind IFNGR-1. These data also show that the NLS of IFNgamma(95-132) can interact simultaneously with IFNGR-1 and the nuclear import machinery. We found that in in vitro nuclear transport assays tyrosine-phosphorylated STAT1alpha failed to undergo nuclear translocation in the presence of nuclear import factors, but was transported to nucleus in the presence of IFNgamma(95-132) and JAK2-phosphorylated IFNGR-1, to which STAT1alpha binds, as a complex of IFNgamma(95-132)/IFNGR-1/STAT1alpha. Thus, the mimetic, which possesses IFNgamma function, is directly involved as a chaperone in the nuclear transport of STAT1alpha and shares this mechanism of action with that previously described for IFNgamma. The mimetic, like IFNgamma, is

  18. Smac mimetics increase cancer cell response to chemotherapeutics in a TNF-α-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Probst, BL; Liu, L; Ramesh, V; Li, L; Sun, H; Minna, JD; Wang, L

    2011-01-01

    Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (Smac) is a mitochondrial protein released into the cytosol during apoptosis. Smac mimetics have recently been touted as a novel therapeutic to induce apoptosis in cancer cells. The ability of Smac mimetics to induce apoptosis in vitro has been shown to be dependent upon both XIAP neutralization and cancer cell autocrine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) production. In this study we provide new evidence for the utility of Smac mimetics in combination with conventional chemotherapy agents to exacerbate caspase activation and induce cancer cell death. Furthermore, we find that the combination effect is because of a multifaceted mechanism involving both inhibition of cell proliferation by the chemotherapy agents and an enhanced autocrine TNF-α feedback loop by the Smac mimetic/chemotherapy agent combination. Surprisingly, although genotoxic agents typically induce apoptosis through the mitochondrial intrinsic pathway, we show that this synergism is mediated through a TNF-α/RIP1-dependent pathway, leading to activation of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway. Finally, we report that autocrine TNF-α contributes to Smac mimetic-induced tumor regression as a single agent or in combination with chemotherapeutics in xenograft mouse models. Collectively, we provide mechanistic and applicable data to support translational studies in the use of a Smac mimetic/chemotherapy antineoplasm modality. PMID:20431601

  19. The trkB Tyrosine Protein Kinase Is a Receptor for Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor and Neurotrophin-3

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Rüdiger; Nanduri, Venkata; Jing, Shuqian; Lamballe, Fabienne; Tapley, Peter; Bryant, Sherri; Cordon-Cardo, Carlos; Jones, Kevin R.; Reichardt, Louis F.; Barbacid, Mariano

    2009-01-01

    Summary trkB is a tyrosine protein kinase gene highly related to trk, a proto-oncogene that encodes a receptor for nerve growth factor (NGF) and neurotrophin-3 (NT-3). trkB expression is confined to structures of the central and peripheral nervous systems, suggesting it also encodes a receptor for neurotrophic factors. Here we show that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and NT-3, but not NGF, can induce rapid phosphorylation on tyrosine of gp145trkB, one of the receptors encoded by trkB. BDNF and NT-3 can induce DNA synthesis in quiescent NIH 3T3 cells that express gp145trkB. Cotransfection of plasmids encoding gp145trkB and BDNF or NT-3 leads to transformation of recipient NIH 3T3 cells. In these assays, BDNF elicits a response at least two orders of magnitude higher than NT-3. Finally, 125I-NT-3 binds to NIH 3T3 cells expressing gp145trkB; binding can be competed by NT-3 and BDNF but not by NGF. These findings indicate that gp145trkB may function as a neurotrophic receptor for BDNF and NT-3. PMID:1649702

  20. AB038. High tropomyosin related kinase (TrkB) expression induces epithelial-mesenchymal transition, anoikis resistance and metastasis in prostatic cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Zeng-Shu; Bai, Zhi-Ming; Liu, Zhen-Xiang; Zhang, Chong

    2016-01-01

    Background The neurotrophic receptor tropomyosin related kinase (TrkB) is associated with tumor progression in neuroblastoma and certain human malignancies. Recent reports indicate TrkB may participate in the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). E-cadherin, an important EMT regulator, and three E-cadherin repressors, Twist, Snail and Zeb1, are critical for TrkB to induce EMT. This study investigates whether TrkB induces EMT in PC-3 cells and its possible molecular mechanisms. Methods The biological role of TrkB in CRC was analyzed using RNA interference against TrkB in the PC-3 cell line to assess tumor progression and the expression of some proteins key to EMT in vitro and in vivo. Results In vitro, cell proliferation, colony formation, migration, and invasion were significantly inhibited by TrkB knockdown, while the anoikis rate increased in TrkB siRNA-transfected cells compared to control. After TrkB knockdown, expressions of the proteins key to EMT, including Twist, Snail and Zeb1 in siTrkB were significantly down-regulated; conversely, E-cadherin expression was up-regulated. In vivo, high expression of TrkB promoted tumorigenesis and metastasis in nude mice with prostatic cancer. Conclusions High TrkB expression enhances malignant potential in terms of proliferation, migration, invasion, and anoikis resistance in PC-3 cells. These results indicate TrkB could induce EMT and play an important role in prostate cancer progression to metastasis.

  1. Alterations of BDNF and trkB mRNA Expression in the 6-Hydroxydopamine-Induced Model of Preclinical Stages of Parkinson’s Disease: An Influence of Chronic Pramipexole in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Berghauzen-Maciejewska, Klemencja; Wardas, Jadwiga; Kosmowska, Barbara; Głowacka, Urszula; Kuter, Katarzyna; Ossowska, Krystyna

    2015-01-01

    Our recent study has indicated that a moderate lesion of the mesostriatal and mesolimbic pathways in rats, modelling preclinical stages of Parkinson’s disease, induces a depressive-like behaviour which is reversed by chronic treatment with pramipexole. The purpose of the present study was to examine the role of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) signalling in the aforementioned model of depression. Therefore, we investigated the influence of 6-hydoxydopamine (6-OHDA) administration into the ventral region of the caudate-putamen on mRNA levels of BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinase B (trkB) receptor. The BDNF and trkB mRNA levels were determined in the nigrostriatal and limbic structures by in situ hybridization 2 weeks after the operation. Pramipexole (1 mg/kg sc twice a day) and imipramine (10 mg/kg ip once a day) were injected for 2 weeks. The lesion lowered the BDNF and trkB mRNA levels in the hippocampus [CA1, CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG)] and amygdala (basolateral/lateral) as well as the BDNF mRNA content in the habenula (medial/lateral). The lesion did not influence BDNF and trkB expression in the caudate-putamen, substantia nigra, nucleus accumbens (shell and core) and ventral tegmental area (VTA). Chronic imipramine reversed the lesion-induced decreases in BDNF mRNA in the DG. Chronic pramipexole increased BDNF mRNA, but decreased trkB mRNA in the VTA in lesioned rats. Furthermore, it reduced BDNF and trkB mRNA expression in the shell and core of the nucleus accumbens, BDNF mRNA in the amygdala and trkB mRNA in the caudate-putamen in these animals. The present study indicates that both the 6-OHDA-induced dopaminergic lesion and chronic pramipexole influence BDNF signalling in limbic structures, which may be related to their pro-depressive and antidepressant activity in rats, respectively. PMID:25739024

  2. A Novel Peptide Thrombopoietin Mimetic Designing and Optimization Using Computational Approach

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Vimal Kishor; Kumar, Neeraj; Kalsan, Manisha; Saini, Abhishek; Chandra, Ramesh

    2016-01-01

    Thrombopoietin receptor (TPOR) is a cytokine receptor protein present on the cell surface. The activation of TPOR by thrombopoietin (TPO) (a glycoprotein hormone) triggers an intracellular cascade of megakaryocytopoiesis for the formation of platelets. Recent studies on ex vivo megakaryocytopoiesis have evolved the possibilities of therapeutics uses. These findings have paved the way for the development of various TPO alternatives (recombinant TPO, peptide, and non-peptide TPO mimetics), which are useful in regenerative medicine. However, these alternatives possess various limitations such as induction of autoimmune effects, high production cost, low specificity, and hence activity. In the present study, a novel peptidic TPO mimetic was designed through computational studies by studying the binding sites of TPO and TMP to TPOR and analogs of known mimetics. Screening of combinatorial library was done through molecular docking using ClusPro. These studies indicated mimetic-9 as a significant molecule since it was found to have better binding score of −938.8 kcal/mol with seven hydrogen bonds and a high number of hydrophobic interactions, than known mimetic TMP with docking score of −798.4 kcal/mol and TMP dimer with docking score of −811.9 kcal/mol for TPOR. Mimetic9-TPOR complex was further assessed by the molecular dynamics simulation, and their complex was found to be stable with an RMSD value of 0.091 Å. While studying the parameters, mimetic-9 was found to have overall good physiochemical properties with positive grand average hydropathy (GRAVY) score and high instability index score and was found to be localized in the extracellular region. The designed mimetic-9 might prove to be a useful lead molecule for mimicking the role of TPO for in vitro platelet production with higher efficiency.

  3. Inhibition of TrkB limits development of the zebra finch song system.

    PubMed

    Beach, Linda Qi; Tang, Yu Ping; Kerver, Halie; Wade, Juli

    2016-07-01

    Large sexual dimorphisms exist in the zebra finch song system. Masculinization may be mediated by both estradiol and expression of one or more Z-genes (males: ZZ; females: ZW). Roles of the Z-gene tyrosine kinase B (TrkB) in HVC in masculinizing both HVC and one of its targets the robust nucleus of the arcopallium (RA), were tested using siRNA administration in juvenile males at two ages (post-hatching days 15-17 or 25-27). Birds were euthanized 10 days later. Potential interactions or additive effects with estradiol were evaluated by treating males with the estrogen synthesis inhibitor fadrozole. Females treated with estradiol were also exposed to the siRNA at the later age. Local inhibition of TrkB in males of both ages reduced the volume of HVC, an effect due to a change in cell number and not cell size. In the older males, in which the treatment spanned the period when the projection from HVC to RA grows, TrkB inhibition reduced the volume of RA and the relative number of cells within it. TrkB siRNA in HVC decreased the volume of and soma size in the RA of females, and the projection from HVC to RA in both sexes. Estradiol in females masculinized various aspects of the song system, and its effect in masculinizing the volume of RA was decreased by TrkB inhibition. However, effects of fadrozole in males were limited. The data indicate that TrkB is involved in masculinizing the song system, but for most measures it probably does not work in concert with E2. PMID:27086969

  4. Caloric restriction and exercise "mimetics'': Ready for prime time?

    PubMed

    Handschin, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Exercise and diet are powerful interventions to prevent and ameliorate various pathologies. The development of pharmacological agents that confer exercise- or caloric restriction-like phenotypic effects is thus an appealing therapeutic strategy in diseases or even when used as life-style and longevity drugs. Such so-called exercise or caloric restriction "mimetics" have so far mostly been described in pre-clinical, experimental settings with limited translation into humans. Interestingly, many of these compounds activate related signaling pathways, most often postulated to act on the common downstream effector peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator 1α (PGC-1α) in skeletal muscle. In this review, resveratrol and other exercise- and caloric restriction "mimetics" are discussed with a special focus on feasibility, chances and limitations of using such compounds in patients as well as in healthy individuals. PMID:26658171

  5. ApoA-I mimetics.

    PubMed

    Stoekenbroek, R M; Stroes, E S; Hovingh, G K

    2015-01-01

    A wealth of evidence indicates that plasma levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) are inversely related to the risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Consequently, HDL-C has been considered a target for therapy in order to reduce the residual CVD burden that remains significant, even after application of current state-of-the-art medical interventions. In recent years, however, a number of clinical trials of therapeutic strategies that increase HDL-C levels failed to show the anticipated beneficial effect on CVD outcomes. As a result, attention has begun to shift toward strategies to improve HDL functionality, rather than levels of HDL-C per se. ApoA-I, the major protein component of HDL, is considered to play an important role in many of the antiatherogenic functions of HDL, most notably reverse cholesterol transport (RCT), and several therapies have been developed to mimic apoA-I function, including administration of apoA-I, mutated variants of apoA-I, and apoA-I mimetic peptides. Based on the potential anti-inflammatory effects, apoA-I mimetics hold promise not only as anti-atherosclerotic therapy but also in other therapeutic areas. PMID:25523005

  6. Bradykinin antagonists modified with dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers.

    PubMed

    Alcaro, Maria C; Vinci, Valerio; D'Ursi, Anna M; Scrima, Mario; Chelli, Mario; Giuliani, Sandro; Meini, Stefania; Di Giacomo, Marcello; Colombo, Lino; Papini, Anna Maria

    2006-05-01

    Bradykinin (BK) is involved in a wide variety of pathophysiological processes. Potent BK peptide antagonists can be developed introducing constrained unnatural amino acids, necessary to force the secondary structure of the molecule. In this paper, we report a structure-activity relationship study of two peptide analogues of the potent B2 antagonist HOE 140 by replacing the D-Tic-Oic dipeptide with conformationally constrained dipeptide mimetic beta-turn inducers. PMID:16504505

  7. Anti-endotoxic activity and structural basis for human MD-2·TLR4 antagonism of tetraacylated lipid A mimetics based on βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN scaffold.

    PubMed

    Garate, Jose Antonio; Stöckl, Johannes; Fernández-Alonso, María del Carmen; Artner, Daniel; Haegman, Mira; Oostenbrink, Chris; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Beyaert, Rudi; Heine, Holger; Kosma, Paul; Zamyatina, Alla

    2015-07-01

    Interfering with LPS binding by the co-receptor protein myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) represents a useful approach for down-regulation of MD-2·TLR4-mediated innate immune signaling, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including sepsis syndrome. The antagonistic activity of a series of novel synthetic tetraacylated bis-phosphorylated glycolipids based on the βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN scaffold was assessed in human monocytic macrophage-like cell line THP-1, dendritic cells and human epithelial cells. Two compounds were shown to inhibit efficiently the LPS-induced inflammatory signaling by down-regulation of the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12 to background levels. The binding of the tetraacylated by (R)-3-hydroxy-fatty acids (2 × C12, 2 × C14), 4,4'-bisphosphorylated βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN-based lipid A mimetic DA193 to human MD-2 was calculated to be 20-fold stronger than that of Escherichia coli lipid A. Potent antagonistic activity was related to a specific molecular shape induced by the β,α(1↔1)-diglucosamine backbone. 'Co-planar' relative arrangement of the GlcN rings was inflicted by the double exo-anomeric conformation around both glycosidic torsions in the rigid β,α(1↔1) linkage, which was ascertained using NOESY NMR experiments and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to the native lipid A ligands, the binding affinity of βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN-based lipid A mimetics to human MD-2 was independent on the orientation of the diglucosamine backbone of the synthetic antagonist within the binding pocket of hMD-2 (rotation by 180°) allowing for two equally efficient binding modes as shown by molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:25394365

  8. Anti-endotoxic activity and structural basis for human MD-2·TLR4 antagonism of tetraacylated lipid A mimetics based on βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Garate, Jose Antonio; Stöckl, Johannes; del Carmen Fernández-Alonso, María; Artner, Daniel; Haegman, Mira; Oostenbrink, Chris; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Beyaert, Rudi; Heine, Holger; Kosma, Paul

    2015-01-01

    Interfering with LPS binding by the co-receptor protein myeloid differentiation factor 2 (MD-2) represents a useful approach for down-regulation of MD-2·TLR4-mediated innate immune signaling, which is implicated in the pathogenesis of a variety of human diseases, including sepsis syndrome. The antagonistic activity of a series of novel synthetic tetraacylated bis-phosphorylated glycolipids based on the βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN scaffold was assessed in human monocytic macrophage-like cell line THP-1, dendritic cells and human epithelial cells. Two compounds were shown to inhibit efficiently the LPS-induced inflammatory signaling by down-regulation of the expression of TNF-α, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10 and IL-12 to background levels. The binding of the tetraacylated by (R)-3-hydroxy-fatty acids (2 × C12, 2 × C14), 4,4′-bisphosphorylated βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN-based lipid A mimetic DA193 to human MD-2 was calculated to be 20-fold stronger than that of Escherichia coli lipid A. Potent antagonistic activity was related to a specific molecular shape induced by the β,α(1↔1)-diglucosamine backbone. ‘Co-planar’ relative arrangement of the GlcN rings was inflicted by the double exo-anomeric conformation around both glycosidic torsions in the rigid β,α(1↔1) linkage, which was ascertained using NOESY NMR experiments and confirmed by molecular dynamics simulation. In contrast to the native lipid A ligands, the binding affinity of βGlcN(1↔1)αGlcN-based lipid A mimetics to human MD-2 was independent on the orientation of the diglucosamine backbone of the synthetic antagonist within the binding pocket of hMD-2 (rotation by 180°) allowing for two equally efficient binding modes as shown by molecular dynamics simulation. PMID:25394365

  9. Christianson syndrome protein NHE6 modulates TrkB endosomal signaling required for neuronal circuit development

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Michael; Yang, Unikora; Gong, Jingyi; Ellisor, Debra; Kauer, Julie A.; Morrow, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Neuronal arborization is regulated by cell autonomous and non-autonomous mechanisms including endosomal signaling via BDNF/TrkB. The endosomal Na+/H+ exchanger 6 (NHE6) is mutated in a new autism-related disorder. NHE6 functions to permit proton leak from endosomes yet the mechanisms causing disease are unknown. We demonstrate that loss of NHE6 results in over-acidification of the endosomal compartment and attenuated TrkB signaling. Mouse brains with disrupted NHE6 display reduced axonal and dendritic branching, reduced synapse number and circuit strength. Site-directed mutagenesis shows that the proton leak function of NHE6 is required for neuronal arborization. We find that TrkB receptor co-localizes to NHE6-associated endosomes. TrkB protein and phosphorylation are reduced in NHE6 mutant neurons in response to BDNF signaling. Finally, exogenous BDNF rescues defects in neuronal arborization. We propose that NHE6 mutation leads to circuit defects that are in part due to impoverished neuronal arborization that may be treatable by enhanced TrkB signaling. PMID:24035762

  10. Acid-sensing ion channel 2 (asic 2) and trkb interrelationships within the intervertebral disc

    PubMed Central

    Cuesta, Antonio; Viña, Eliseo; Cabo, Roberto; Vázquez, Gorka; Cobo, Ramón; García-Suárez, Olivia; García-Cosamalón, José; Vega, José A

    2015-01-01

    The cells of the intervertebral disc (IVD) have an unusual acidic and hyperosmotic microenvironment. They express acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs), gated by extracellular protons and mechanical forces, as well as neurotrophins and their signalling receptors. In the nervous tissues some neurotrophins regulate the expression of ASICs. The expression of ASIC2 and TrkB in human normal and degenerated IVD was assessed using quantitative-PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemistry. Moreover, we investigated immunohistochemically the expression of ASIC2 in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. ASIC2 and TrkB mRNAs were found in normal human IVD and both increased significantly in degenerated IVD. ASIC2 and TrkB proteins were also found co-localized in a variable percentage of cells, being significantly higher in degenerated IVD than in controls. The murine IVD displayed ASIC2 immunoreactivity which was absent in the IVD of TrkB-deficient mice. Present results demonstrate the occurrence of ASIC2 and TrkB in the human IVD, and the increased expression of both in pathological IVD suggest their involvement in IVD degeneration. These data also suggest that TrkB-ligands might be involved in the regulation of ASIC2 expression, and therefore in mechanisms by which the IVD cells accommodate to low pH and hypertonicity. PMID:26617738

  11. Unimodular mimetic F(R) inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-07-01

    We propose the unimodular-mimetic F(R) gravity theory, to resolve cosmological constant problem and dark matter problem in a unified geometric manner. We demonstrate that such a theory naturally admits accelerating universe evolution. Furthermore, we construct unimodular-mimetic F(R) inflationary cosmological scenarios compatible with the Planck and BICEP2/Keck-Array observational data. We also address the graceful exit issue, which is guaranteed by the existence of unstable de Sitter vacua.

  12. TrkB receptors are required for follicular growth and oocyte survival in the mammalian ovary

    PubMed Central

    Paredes, Alfonso; Romero, Carmen; Dissen, Gregory A.; DeChiara, Tom M.; Reichardt, Louis; Cornea, Anda; Ojeda, Sergio R.; Xu, Baoji

    2009-01-01

    Although it is well established that both follicular assembly and the initiation of follicle growth in the mammalian ovary occur independently of pituitary hormone support, the factors controlling these processes remain poorly understood. We now report that neurotrophins (NTs) signaling via TrkB receptors are required for the growth of newly formed follicles. Both neurotrophin-4/5 (NT-4) and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), the preferred TrkB ligands, are expressed in the infantile mouse ovary. Initially, they are present in oocytes, but this site of expression switches to granulosa cells after the newly assembled primordial follicles develop into growing primary follicles. Full-length kinase domain-containing TrkB receptors are expressed at low and seemingly unchanging levels in the oocytes and granulosa cells of both primordial and growing follicles. In contrast, a truncated TrkB isoform lacking the intracellular domain of the receptor is selectively expressed in oocytes, where it is targeted to the cell membrane as primary follicles initiate growth. Using gene-targeted mice lacking all TrkB isoforms, we show that the ovaries of these mice or those lacking both NT-4 and BDNF suffer a stage-selective deficiency in early follicular development that compromises the ability of follicles to grow beyond the primary stage. Proliferation of granulosa cells— required for this transition—and expression of FSH receptors (FSHR), which reflects the degree of biochemical differentiation of growing follicles, are reduced in trkB-null mice. Ovaries from these animals grafted under the kidney capsule of wild-type mice fail to sustain follicular growth and show a striking loss of follicular organization, preceded by massive oocyte death. These results indicate that TrkB receptors are required for the early growth of ovarian follicles and that they exert this function by primarily supporting oocyte development as well as providing granulosa cells with a proliferative

  13. Small-molecule BH3 mimetic and pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor AT-101 enhances the antitumor efficacy of cisplatin through inhibition of APE1 repair and redox activity in non-small-cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Tao; Shan, Jinlu; Li, Mengxia; Qing, Yi; Qian, Chengyuan; Wang, Guangjie; Li, Qing; Lu, Guoshou; Li, Chongyi; Peng, Yu; Luo, Hao; Zhang, Shiheng; Yang, Yuxing; Cheng, Yi; Wang, Dong; Zhou, Shu-Feng

    2015-01-01

    AT-101 is a BH3 mimetic and pan-Bcl-2 inhibitor that has shown potent anticancer activity in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) in murine models, but failed to show clinical efficacy when used in combination with docetaxel in NSCLC patients. Our recent study has demonstrated that AT-101 enhanced the antitumor effect of cisplatin (CDDP) in a murine model of NSCLC via inhibition of the interleukin-6/signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) pathway. This study explored the underlying mechanisms for the enhanced anticancer activity of CDDP by AT-101. Our results show that, when compared with monotherapy, AT-101 significantly enhanced the inhibitory effects of CDDP on proliferation and migration of A549 cells and on tube formation and migration in human umbilical vein endothelial cells. AT-101 promoted the proapoptotic activity of CDDP in A549 cells. AT-101 also enhanced the inhibitory effect of CDDP on DNA repair and redox activities of apurinic/apyrimidinic endonuclease 1 (APE1) in A549 cells. In tumor tissues from nude mice treated with AT-101 plus CDDP or monotherapy, the combination therapy resulted in greater inhibition of angiogenesis and tumor cell proliferation than the monotherapy. These results suggest that AT-101 can enhance the antitumor activity of CDDP in NSCLC via inhibition of APE1 DNA repair and redox activities and by angiogenesis and induction of apoptosis, but other mechanisms cannot be excluded. We are now conducting a Phase II trial to examine the clinical efficacy and safety profile of combined use of AT-101 plus CDDP in advanced NSCLC patients. PMID:26089640

  14. EXPERIENCE-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF TRKB ISOFORMS IN RODENT VISUAL CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    Bracken, Bethany K.; Turrigiano, Gina G.

    2010-01-01

    Within primary visual cortex (V1), BDNF signaling through its high affinity receptor TrkB is important for normal development and experience-dependent plasticity. TrkB is expressed in several alternatively spliced isoforms, including full length TrkB (TrkB.FL), and several truncated isoforms (TrkB.T1, TrkB.T2 and TrkB.T4) that lack the intracellular tyrosine kinase domain. These isoforms are important components of BDNF signaling, yet little is known about the developmental or experience-dependent regulation of their expression. Using immunohistochemistry, we found TrkB.FL and TrkB.T1 expressed in interneurons and pyramidal neurons within V1, but not in cortical astrocytes. We used real-time PCR to quantify changes in mRNA expression of BDNF, the four TrkB isoforms, and the low affinity receptor P75NTR during normal development, and in response to visual deprivation at two different ages. BDNF expression increased between postnatal days 10 (P10) and P30, and was rapidly down-regulated by 3 days of visual deprivation during both the pre-critical period (P14–P17) and the critical period (P18–P21). Over the same developmental period expression of each TrkB isoform was regulated independently; TrkB.T1 increased, TrkB.FL and TrkB.T2 decreased, and TrkB.T4 showed transient changes. Neither brief visual deprivation nor prolonged dark-rearing induced changes in TrkB.FL or TrkB.T1 expression. However, TrkB.T4 expression was reduced by brief visual deprivation, while TrkB.T4, TrkB.T2 and P75NTR were up-regulated by prolonged dark-rearing into the critical period. Our data indicate that TrkB isoform expression can be selectively regulated by visual experience, and may contribute to experience-dependent cortical plasticity. PMID:19224567

  15. Appetite Enhancement and Weight Gain by Peripheral Administration of TrkB Agonists in Non-Human Primates

    PubMed Central

    Lin, John C.; Tsao, David; Barras, Paul; Bastarrachea, Raul A.; Boyd, Bob; Chou, Joyce; Rosete, Rodnie; Long, Hua; Forgie, Alison; Abdiche, Yasmina; Dilley, Jeanette; Stratton, Jennifer; Garcia, Carlos; Sloane, David L.; Comuzzie, Anthony G.; Rosenthal, Arnon

    2008-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the receptor tyrosine kinase TrkB pathway resulted in hyperphagia and morbid obesity in human and rodents. Conversely, peripheral or central stimulation of TrkB by its natural ligands BDNF or NT4 reduced body weight and food intake in mice, supporting the idea that TrkB is a key anorexigenic signal downstream of the melanocortin-4 receptor (Mc4r) system. Here we show that in non-human primates TrkB agonists were anorexigenic when applied centrally, but surprisingly orexigenic, leading to gain in appetite, body weight, fat deposits and serum leptin levels, when given peripherally. The orexigenic and pro-obesity effects of peripherally administered TrkB agonists appear to be dose dependent, not associated with fluid retention nor with evidence of receptor down regulation. Our findings revealed that TrkB signaling exerts dual control on energy homeostasis in the primates that could be targeted for the treatment of either wasting disorders or obesity. PMID:18382675

  16. Cosmological perturbations in mimetic Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroja, Frederico; Bartolo, Nicola; Karmakar, Purnendu; Matarrese, Sabino

    2016-04-01

    We study linear scalar perturbations around a flat FLRW background in mimetic Horndeski gravity. In the absence of matter, we show that the Newtonian potential satisfies a second-order differential equation with no spatial derivatives. This implies that the sound speed for scalar perturbations is exactly zero on this background. We also show that in mimetic G3 theories the sound speed is equally zero. We obtain the equation of motion for the comoving curvature perturbation (first order differential equation) and solve it to find that the comoving curvature perturbation is constant on all scales in mimetic Horndeski gravity. We find solutions for the Newtonian potential evolution equation in two simple models. Finally we show that the sound speed is zero on all backgrounds and therefore the system does not have any wave-like scalar degrees of freedom.

  17. Small-molecule trkB agonists promote axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves

    PubMed Central

    English, Arthur W.; Liu, Kevin; Nicolini, Jennifer M.; Mulligan, Amanda M.; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-01-01

    Treatments with two-small molecule tropomyosin receptor kinase B (trkB) ligands, 7,8 dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) and deoxygedunin, were evaluated for their ability to promote the regeneration of cut axons in injured peripheral nerves in mice in which sensory and motor axons are marked by YFP. Peripheral nerves were cut and repaired with grafts from strain-matched, nonfluorescent donors and secured in place with fibrin glue. Lengths of profiles of regenerating YFP+ axons were measured 2 wk later from confocal images. Axon regeneration was enhanced when the fibrin glue contained dilutions of 500-nM solution of either small-molecule trkB agonist. In mice in which the neurotrophin receptor trkB is knocked out selectively in neurons, axon regeneration is very weak, and topical treatment with 7,8 DHF had no effect on axon regeneration. Similar treatments with deoxygedunin had only a modest effect. In conditional BDNF knockout mice, topical treatments with either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin resulted in a reversal of the poor regeneration found in controls and produced significant enhancement of regeneration. In WT mice treated with 2 wk of daily i.p. injections of either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin (5 mg/kg), regenerating axon profiles were nearly twice as long as in controls. Restoration of direct muscle responses evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation to pretransection levels over an 8-wk survival period was found only in the treated mice. Treatments with either small-molecule trkB agonist enhanced axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation after peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:24043773

  18. Small-molecule trkB agonists promote axon regeneration in cut peripheral nerves.

    PubMed

    English, Arthur W; Liu, Kevin; Nicolini, Jennifer M; Mulligan, Amanda M; Ye, Keqiang

    2013-10-01

    Treatments with two-small molecule tropomyosin receptor kinase B (trkB) ligands, 7,8 dihydroxyflavone (7,8 DHF) and deoxygedunin, were evaluated for their ability to promote the regeneration of cut axons in injured peripheral nerves in mice in which sensory and motor axons are marked by YFP. Peripheral nerves were cut and repaired with grafts from strain-matched, nonfluorescent donors and secured in place with fibrin glue. Lengths of profiles of regenerating YFP(+) axons were measured 2 wk later from confocal images. Axon regeneration was enhanced when the fibrin glue contained dilutions of 500-nM solution of either small-molecule trkB agonist. In mice in which the neurotrophin receptor trkB is knocked out selectively in neurons, axon regeneration is very weak, and topical treatment with 7,8 DHF had no effect on axon regeneration. Similar treatments with deoxygedunin had only a modest effect. In conditional BDNF knockout mice, topical treatments with either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin resulted in a reversal of the poor regeneration found in controls and produced significant enhancement of regeneration. In WT mice treated with 2 wk of daily i.p. injections of either 7,8 DHF or deoxygedunin (5 mg/kg), regenerating axon profiles were nearly twice as long as in controls. Restoration of direct muscle responses evoked by sciatic nerve stimulation to pretransection levels over an 8-wk survival period was found only in the treated mice. Treatments with either small-molecule trkB agonist enhanced axon regeneration and muscle reinnervation after peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:24043773

  19. Effects of the Chinese traditional prescription Xiaoyaosan decoction on chronic immobilization stress-induced changes in behavior and brain BDNF, TrkB, and NT-3 in rats.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jia-Xu; Li, Wei; Zhao, Xin; Yang, Jian-Xing

    2008-08-01

    The Xiaoyaosan (XYS) decoction, a Chinese traditional prescription containing eight commonly used herbs, has been used for treatment of mental disorders such as depression for centuries in China. However, the mechanism underlying its antidepressant activity is poorly understood. In rats with chronic immobilization stress (CIS), we examined the effects of the XYS decoction on tail suspension behavior and the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), tyroxine hydroxylase (TrkB), and neurotrophin 3 (NT-3) in the frontal cortex and hippocampus. Rats subjected to CIS exhibited decreases in weight-gain, food intake, and ambulation in the open field test; they also showed an increase in immobility in the tail suspension test. These were all attenuated by the XYS decoction. Biochemically, the XYS decoction also reversed CIS-induced decreases in BDNF and increases in TrkB and NT-3 in the frontal cortex and the hippocampal CA(1) subregion. The behavioral effects of the XYS were correlated to the biochemical actions. These results suggest that the XYS decoction produces an antidepressant-like effect, which appears to be involved by BDNF in the brain. PMID:17647101

  20. Antibody mimetics: promising complementary agents to animal-sourced antibodies.

    PubMed

    Baloch, Abdul Rasheed; Baloch, Abdul Wahid; Sutton, Brian J; Zhang, Xiaoying

    2016-01-01

    Despite their wide use as therapeutic, diagnostic and detection agents, the limitations of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have inspired scientists to design the next generation biomedical agents, so-called antibody mimetics that offer many advantages over conventional antibodies. Antibody mimetics can be constructed by protein-directed evolution or fusion of complementarity-determining regions through intervening framework regions. Substantial progress in exploiting human, butterfly (Pieris brassicae) and bacterial systems to design and select mimetics using display technologies has been made in the past 10 years, and one of these mimetics [Kalbitor® (Dyax)] has made its way to market. Many challenges lie ahead to develop mimetics for various biomedical applications, especially those for which conventional antibodies are ineffective, and this review describes the current characteristics, construction and applications of antibody mimetics compared to animal-sourced antibodies. The possible limitations of mimetics and future perspectives are also discussed. PMID:25264572

  1. A BDNF loop-domain mimetic acutely reverses spontaneous apneas and respiratory abnormalities during behavioral arousal in a mouse model of Rett syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kron, Miriam; Lang, Min; Adams, Ian T.; Sceniak, Michael; Longo, Frank; Katz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Reduced levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) are thought to contribute to the pathophysiology of Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurodevelopmental disorder caused by loss-of-function mutations in the gene encoding methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 (MeCP2). In Mecp2 mutant mice, BDNF deficits have been associated with breathing abnormalities, a core feature of RTT, as well as with synaptic hyperexcitability within the brainstem respiratory network. Application of BDNF can reverse hyperexcitability in acute brainstem slices from Mecp2-null mice, suggesting that therapies targeting BDNF or its receptor, TrkB, could be effective at acute reversal of respiratory abnormalities in RTT. Therefore, we examined the ability of LM22A-4, a small-molecule BDNF loop-domain mimetic and TrkB partial agonist, to modulate synaptic excitability within respiratory cell groups in the brainstem nucleus tractus solitarius (nTS) and to acutely reverse abnormalities in breathing at rest and during behavioral arousal in Mecp2 mutants. Patch-clamp recordings in Mecp2-null brainstem slices demonstrated that LM22A-4 decreases excitability at primary afferent synapses in the nTS by reducing the amplitude of evoked excitatory postsynaptic currents and the frequency of spontaneous and miniature excitatory postsynaptic currents. In vivo, acute treatment of Mecp2-null and -heterozygous mutants with LM22A-4 completely eliminated spontaneous apneas in resting animals, without sedation. Moreover, we demonstrate that respiratory dysregulation during behavioral arousal, a feature of human RTT, is also reversed in Mecp2 mutants by acute treatment with LM22A-4. Together, these data support the hypothesis that reduced BDNF signaling and respiratory dysfunction in RTT are linked, and establish the proof-of-concept that treatment with a small-molecule structural mimetic of a BDNF loop domain and a TrkB partial agonist can acutely reverse abnormal breathing at rest and in response to behavioral arousal

  2. Substrate-Assisted Inhibition of Ubiquitin-like Protein-Activating Enzymes: The NEDD8 E1 Inhibitor MLN4924 Forms a NEDD8-AMP Mimetic In Situ

    SciTech Connect

    Brownell, James E.; Sintchak, Michael D.; Gavin, James M.; Liao, Hua; Bruzzese, Frank J.; Bump, Nancy J.; Soucy, Teresa A.; Milhollen, Michael A.; Yang, Xiaofeng; Burkhardt, Anne L.; Ma, Jingya; Loke, Huay-Keng; Lingaraj, Trupti; Wu, Dongyun; Hamman, Kristin B.; Spelman, James J.; Cullis, Courtney A.; Langston, Steven P.; Vyskocil, Stepan; Sells, Todd B.; Mallender, William D.; Visiers, Irache; Li, Ping; Claiborne, Christopher F.; Rolfe, Mark; Bolen, Joseph B.; Dick, Lawrence R.

    2010-11-15

    The NEDD8-activating enzyme (NAE) initiates a protein homeostatic pathway essential for cancer cell growth and survival. MLN4924 is a selective inhibitor of NAE currently in clinical trials for the treatment of cancer. Here, we show that MLN4924 is a mechanism-based inhibitor of NAE and creates a covalent NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct catalyzed by the enzyme. The NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct resembles NEDD8 adenylate, the first intermediate in the NAE reaction cycle, but cannot be further utilized in subsequent intraenzyme reactions. The stability of the NEDD8-MLN4924 adduct within the NAE active site blocks enzyme activity, thereby accounting for the potent inhibition of the NEDD8 pathway by MLN4924. Importantly, we have determined that compounds resembling MLN4924 demonstrate the ability to form analogous adducts with other ubiquitin-like proteins (UBLs) catalyzed by their cognate-activating enzymes. These findings reveal insights into the mechanism of E1s and suggest a general strategy for selective inhibition of UBL conjugation pathways.

  3. Emerging roles of ARHGAP33 in intracellular trafficking of TrkB and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders.

    PubMed

    Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Ryota; Sakoori, Kazuto; Sugaya, Yuki; Tanimura, Asami; Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohi, Kazutaka; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Kiyama, Yuji; Konno, Kohtarou; Inoue, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Inoue, Takafumi; Numata, Shusuke; Ohnuma, Tohru; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Manabe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Kano, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins is essential for neurons to detect various extracellular factors during the formation and refinement of neural circuits. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the trafficking of neurotrophin receptors to synapses remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that a brain-enriched sorting nexin, ARHGAP33, is a new type of regulator for the intracellular trafficking of TrkB, a high-affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor. ARHGAP33 knockout (KO) mice exhibit reduced expression of synaptic TrkB, impaired spine development and neuropsychiatric disorder-related behavioural abnormalities. These deficits are rescued by specific pharmacological enhancement of TrkB signalling in ARHGAP33 KO mice. Mechanistically, ARHGAP33 interacts with SORT1 to cooperatively regulate TrkB trafficking. Human ARHGAP33 is associated with brain phenotypes and reduced SORT1 expression is found in patients with schizophrenia. We propose that ARHGAP33/SORT1-mediated TrkB trafficking is essential for synapse development and that the dysfunction of this mechanism may be a new molecular pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26839058

  4. Emerging roles of ARHGAP33 in intracellular trafficking of TrkB and pathophysiology of neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Nakazawa, Takanobu; Hashimoto, Ryota; Sakoori, Kazuto; Sugaya, Yuki; Tanimura, Asami; Hashimotodani, Yuki; Ohi, Kazutaka; Yamamori, Hidenaga; Yasuda, Yuka; Umeda-Yano, Satomi; Kiyama, Yuji; Konno, Kohtarou; Inoue, Takeshi; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Inoue, Takafumi; Numata, Shusuke; Ohnuma, Tohru; Iwata, Nakao; Ozaki, Norio; Hashimoto, Hitoshi; Watanabe, Masahiko; Manabe, Toshiya; Yamamoto, Tadashi; Takeda, Masatoshi; Kano, Masanobu

    2016-01-01

    Intracellular trafficking of receptor proteins is essential for neurons to detect various extracellular factors during the formation and refinement of neural circuits. However, the precise mechanisms underlying the trafficking of neurotrophin receptors to synapses remain elusive. Here, we demonstrate that a brain-enriched sorting nexin, ARHGAP33, is a new type of regulator for the intracellular trafficking of TrkB, a high-affinity receptor for brain-derived neurotrophic factor. ARHGAP33 knockout (KO) mice exhibit reduced expression of synaptic TrkB, impaired spine development and neuropsychiatric disorder-related behavioural abnormalities. These deficits are rescued by specific pharmacological enhancement of TrkB signalling in ARHGAP33 KO mice. Mechanistically, ARHGAP33 interacts with SORT1 to cooperatively regulate TrkB trafficking. Human ARHGAP33 is associated with brain phenotypes and reduced SORT1 expression is found in patients with schizophrenia. We propose that ARHGAP33/SORT1-mediated TrkB trafficking is essential for synapse development and that the dysfunction of this mechanism may be a new molecular pathology of neuropsychiatric disorders. PMID:26839058

  5. Site-Directed Mutagenesis of Human Cytosolic Sulfotransferase (SULT) 2B1b to Phospho-mimetic Ser348Asp Results in an Isoform With Increased Catalytic Activity

    PubMed Central

    Salman, Emily D.; He, Dongning; Runge-Morris, Melissa; Kocarek, Thomas A.; Falany, Charles N.

    2011-01-01

    Human SULT2B1b is distinct from other SULT isoforms due to the presence of unique amino (N)- and carboxy (C)-terminal peptides. Using site-directed mutagenesis, it was determined that phosphorylation of Ser348 was associated with nuclear localization. To investigate the effects of this phosphorylation of Ser348 on activity and cellular localization, an in silico molecular mimic was generated by mutating Ser348 to an Asp. The Asp residue mimics the shape and charge of a phospho-Ser and homology models of SULT2B1b-phospho-S348 and SULT2B1b-S348D suggest a similar significant structural rearrangement in the C-terminal peptide. To evaluate the functional consequences of this post-translational modification and predicted rearrangement, 6His-SULT2B1b-S348D was synthesized, expressed, purified and characterized. The 6His-SULT2B1b-S348D has a specific activity for DHEA sulfation ten-fold higher than recombinant 6His-SULT2B1b (209.6 and 21.8 pmol·min−1·mg−1, respectively). Similar to native SULT2B1b, gel filtration chromatography showed SULT2B1b-S348D was enzymatically active as a homodimer. Stability assays comparing SULT2B1b and SUL2B1b-S348 demonstrated that SULT2B1b is 60% less thermostable than SULT2B1b-348D. The increased stability and sulfation activity allowed for better characterization of the sulfation kinetics for putative substrates as well as the determination of dissociation constants that were difficult to obtain with wild-type (WT) 6His-SULT2B1b. The KDs for DHEA and PAPS binding to 6His-SULT2B1b-S348D were 650 ± 7 nM and 265 ± 4 nM, respectively, whereas KDs for binding of substrates to the WT enzyme could not be determined. Characterization of the molecular mimic SULT2B1b-S348D provides a better understanding for the role of the unique structure of SULT2B1b and its effect on sulfation activity, and has allowed for improved kinetic characterization of the SULT2B1b enzyme. PMID:21855633

  6. Increased Cx32 expression in spinal cord TrkB oligodendrocytes following peripheral axon injury.

    PubMed

    Coulibaly, Aminata P; Isaacson, Lori G

    2016-08-01

    Following injury to motor axons in the periphery, retrograde influences from the injury site lead to glial cell plasticity in the vicinity of the injured neurons. Following the transection of peripherally located preganglionic axons of the cervical sympathetic trunk (CST), a population of oligodendrocyte (OL) lineage cells expressing full length TrkB, the cognate receptor for brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), is significantly increased in number in the spinal cord. Such robust plasticity in OL lineage cells in the spinal cord following peripheral axon transection led to the hypothesis that the gap junction communication protein connexin 32 (Cx32), which is specific to OL lineage cells, was influenced by the injury. Following CST transection, Cx32 expression in the spinal cord intermediolateral cell column (IML), the location of the parent cell bodies, was significantly increased. The increased Cx32 expression was localized specifically to TrkB OLs in the IML, rather than other cell types in the OL cell lineage, with the population of Cx32/TrkB cells increased by 59%. Cx32 expression in association with OPCs was significantly decreased at one week following the injury. The results of this study provide evidence that peripheral axon injury can differentially affect the gap junction protein expression in OL lineage cells in the adult rat spinal cord. We conclude that the retrograde influences originating from the peripheral injury site elicit dramatic changes in the CNS expression of Cx32, which in turn may mediate the plasticity of OL lineage cells observed in the spinal cord following peripheral axon injury. PMID:27246301

  7. Dynamic expression of TrkB receptor protein on proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse dentate gyrus

    PubMed Central

    Donovan, Michael H.; Yamaguchi, Masahiro; Eisch, Amelia J.

    2008-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is implicated in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis, presumably via its primary receptor, TrkB, but controversy exists about how BDNF affects neurogenesis (e.g. proliferation vs. survival/differentiation). This controversy arises, in part, due to the lack of information about if and when TrkB is expressed on adult neural precursors in vivo. Using multiple methods to analyze proliferating and maturing cells in the adult mouse subgranular zone (SGZ), we find that the proportion of proliferating cells that are TrkB-IR is low and it remains low for at least one week following BrdU labeling, but increases as neuroblasts mature. Use of the nestin-GFP transgenic mouse revealed the likelihood of being TrkB-IR increased with presumed maturity of the cell type. Stem-like cells, which rarely divide, were likely to express TrkB. However, early progenitors and late progenitors, which are still in the cell cycle had rare TrkB expression. Immature neuroblasts, however, were more likely to express TrkB, especially as their morphology became more mature. Taken together, these findings emphasize that expression of TrkB protein is closely linked to progression towards neuronal maturity. This provides evidence that maturing cells but not proliferating cells in the adult mouse SGZ have the molecular machinery necessary to respond directly to BDNF. Furthermore, these findings lay critical groundwork for further exploration of the role of BDNF-TrkB signaling in regulation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis. PMID:18240316

  8. Metal complexes as "protein surface mimetics".

    PubMed

    Hewitt, Sarah H; Wilson, Andrew J

    2016-07-28

    A key challenge in chemical biology is to identify small molecule regulators for every single protein. However, protein surfaces are notoriously difficult to recognise with synthetic molecules, often having large flat surfaces that are poorly matched to traditional small molecules. In the surface mimetic approach, a supramolecular scaffold is used to project recognition groups in such a manner as to make multivalent non-covalent contacts over a large area of protein surface. Metal based supramolecular scaffolds offer unique advantages over conventional organic molecules for protein binding, including greater stereochemical and geometrical diversity conferred through the metal centre and the potential for direct assessment of binding properties and even visualisation in cells without recourse to further functionalisation. This feature article will highlight the current state of the art in protein surface recognition using metal complexes as surface mimetics. PMID:27353704

  9. Non-local F(R)-mimetic gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Myrzakulov, Ratbay; Sebastiani, Lorenzo

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we study non-local F(R)-mimetic gravity. We implement mimetic gravity in the framework of non-local F(R)-theories of gravity. Given some specific class of models and using a potential on the mimetic field, we investigate some scenarios related to the early-time universe, namely the inflation and the cosmological bounce, which bring to Einstein's gravity with cold dark matter at the late-time.

  10. No-mimetic furoxans: arylsulphonylfuroxans and related compounds.

    PubMed

    Ferioli, R; Fazzini, A; Folco, G C; Fruttero, R; Calvino, R; Gasco, A; Bongrani, S; Civelli, M

    1993-01-01

    A new class of methylfuroxans and methylfurazans arylthio, arylsulphinyl and arylsulphonyl substituted, characterized by vasodilating and antiaggregatory properties, is described. Vasodilating activity, tested on rabbit aortic rings percontracted with 1 microM noradrenaline, is enhanced by N-oxidation of the furazan ring and is maximized by increase of the sulphur atom oxidation level. Compounds 4-methyl-3-(p-methoxyphenylsulphonyl) furoxan 6c, 3-phenyl-4-phenylsulphonylfuroxan 10, 4-phenyl-3-phenylsulphonylfuroxan 11 and 3,4-bis(phenyl-sulphonyl)furoxan 12 (EC50 values ranging between 0.055-1.07 microM), seem to be promising since they show the highest potency as well as maximal efficacy, causing complete reversal of noradrenaline induced contraction. The structure-activity relationship, observed in the platelet aggregation test, is substantially similar to that reported for the vasodilating activity, in line with the general profile of these drugs as putative NO-mimetic derivatives. PMID:8108310

  11. Cosmological perturbations in a mimetic matter model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsumoto, Jiro; Odintsov, Sergei D.; Sushkov, Sergey V.

    2015-03-01

    We investigate the cosmological evolution of a mimetic matter model with arbitrary scalar potential. The cosmological reconstruction—which is the method for constructing a model for an arbitrary evolution of the scale factor—is explicitly performed for different choices of potential. The cases where the mimetic matter model shows the evolution as cold dark matter (CDM), the w CDM model, dark matter and dark energy with a dynamical O m (z ) [where O m (z )≡[(H (z )/H0)2-1 ]/[(1 +z )3-1 ] ], and phantom dark energy with a phantom-nonphantom crossing are presented in detail. The cosmological perturbations for such evolutions are studied in the mimetic matter model. For instance, the evolution behavior of the matter density contrast (which is different than the usual one, i.e., δ ¨+2 H δ ˙-κ2ρ δ /2 =0 ) is investigated. The possibility of a peculiar evolution of δ in the model under consideration is shown. Special attention is paid to the behavior of the matter density contrast near the future singularity, where the decay of perturbations may occur much earlier than the singularity.

  12. NEC violation in mimetic cosmology revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ijjas, Anna; Ripley, Justin; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-09-01

    In the context of Einstein gravity, if the null energy condition (NEC) is satisfied, the energy density in expanding space-times always decreases while in contracting space-times the energy density grows and the universe eventually collapses into a singularity. In particular, no non-singular bounce is possible. It is, though, an open question if this energy condition can be violated in a controlled way, i.e., without introducing pathologies, such as unstable negative-energy states or an imaginary speed of sound. In this letter, we will re-examine the claim that the recently proposed mimetic scenario can violate the NEC without pathologies. We show that mimetic cosmology is prone to gradient instabilities even in cases when the NEC is satisfied (except for trivial examples). Most interestingly, the source of the instability is always the Einstein-Hilbert term in the action. The matter stress-energy component does not contribute spatial gradient terms but instead makes the problematic curvature modes dynamical. We also show that mimetic cosmology can be understood as a singular limit of known, well-behaved theories involving higher-derivative kinetic terms and discuss ways of removing the instability.

  13. Designing a small molecule erythropoietin mimetic.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, Frank

    2015-01-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a protein made by the kidneys in response to low red blood cell count that is secreted into the bloodstream and binds to a receptor on hematopoietic stem cells in the bone marrow inducing them to become new red blood cells. EPO made with recombinant DNA technology was brought to market in the 1980s to treat anemia caused by kidney disease and cancer chemotherapy. Because EPO infusion was able to replace blood transfusions in many cases, it rapidly became a multibillion dollar per year drug and as the first biologic created with recombinant technology it launched the biotech industry. For many years intense research was focused on creating a small molecule orally available EPO mimetic. The Robert Wood Johnson (RWJ) group seemed to definitively establish that only large peptides with a minimum of 60 residues could replace EPO, as anything less was not a full agonist. An intense study of the published work led me to hypothesize that the size of the mimetic is not the real issue, but the symmetry making and breaking of the EPO receptor induced by the ligand is the key to activating the stem cells. This analysis meant that residues in the binding site of the receptor deemed absolutely essential for ligand binding and activation from mutagenesis experiments, were probably not really that important. My fundamental hypotheses were: (a) the symmetric state of the homodimeric receptor is the most stable state and thus must be the off-state, (b) a highly localized binding site exists at a pivot point where the two halves of the receptor meet, (c) small molecules can be created that have high potency for this site that will be competitive with EPO and thus can displace the protein-protein interaction, (d) small symmetric molecules will stabilize the symmetric off-state of the receptor, and (e) a key asymmetry in the small molecule will stabilize a mirror image asymmetry in the receptor resulting in the stabilization of the on-state and proliferation of

  14. A New Aspect of the TrkB Signaling Pathway in Neural Plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Ohira, K; Hayashi, M

    2009-01-01

    In the central nervous system (CNS), the expression of molecules is strictly regulated during development. Control of the spatiotemporal expression of molecules is a mechanism not only to construct the functional neuronal network but also to adjust the network in response to new information from outside of the individual, i.e., through learning and memory. Among the functional molecules in the CNS, one of the best-studied groups is the neurotrophins, which are nerve growth factor (NGF)-related gene family molecules. Neurotrophins include NGF, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), neurotrophin 3 (NT-3), and NT-4/5 in the mammal. Among neurotrophins and their receptors, BDNF and tropomyosin-related kinases B (TrkB) are enriched in the CNS. In the CNS, the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway fulfills a wide variety of functions throughout life, such as cell survival, migration, outgrowth of axons and dendrites, synaptogenesis, synaptic transmission, and remodeling of synapses. Although the same ligand and receptor, BDNF and TrkB, act in these various developmental events, we do not yet understand what kind of mechanism provokes the functional multiplicity of the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway. In this review, we discuss the mechanism that elicits the variety of functions performed by the BDNF-TrkB signaling pathway in the CNS as a tool of pharmacological therapy. PMID:20514207

  15. Small peptides as potent mimetics of the protein hormone erythropoietin.

    PubMed

    Wrighton, N C; Farrell, F X; Chang, R; Kashyap, A K; Barbone, F P; Mulcahy, L S; Johnson, D L; Barrett, R W; Jolliffe, L K; Dower, W J

    1996-07-26

    Random phage display peptide libraries and affinity selective methods were used to isolate small peptides that bind to and activate the receptor for the cytokine erythropoietin (EPO). In a panel of in vitro biological assays, the peptides act as full agonists and they can also stimulate erythropoiesis in mice. These agonists are represented by a 14- amino acid disulfide-bonded, cyclic peptide with the minimum consensus sequence YXCXXGPXTWXCXP, where X represents positions allowing occupation by several amino acids. The amino acid sequences of these peptides are not found in the primary sequence of EPO. The signaling pathways activated by these peptides appear to be identical to those induced by the natural ligand. This discovery may form the basis for the design of small molecule mimetics of EPO. PMID:8662529

  16. A platelet-mimetic paradigm for metastasis-targeted nanomedicine platforms.

    PubMed

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L; Master, Alyssa M; Pan, Victor; Howard, Gregory P; Sen Gupta, Anirban

    2013-03-11

    There is compelling evidence that, beyond their traditional role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets play a significant role in mediating hematologic mechanisms of tumor metastasis by directly and indirectly interacting with pro-metastatic cancer cells. With this rationale, we hypothesized that platelets can be an effective paradigm to develop nanomedicine platforms that utilize platelet-mimetic interaction mechanisms for targeted diagnosis and therapy of metastatic cancer cells. Here we report on our investigation of the development of nanoconstructs that interact with metastatic cancer cells via platelet-mimetic heteromultivalent ligand-receptor pathways. For our studies, pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was studied for its surface expression of platelet-interactive receptors, in comparison to another low-metastatic human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Certain platelet-interactive receptors were found to be significantly overexpressed on the MDA-MB-231 cells, and these cells showed significantly enhanced binding interactions with active platelets compared to MCF-7 cells. Based upon these observations, two specific receptor interactions were selected, and corresponding ligands were engineered onto the surface of liposomes as model nanoconstructs, to enable platelet-mimetic binding to the cancer cells. Our model platelet-mimetic liposomal constructs showed enhanced targeting and attachment of MDA-MB-231 cells compared to the MCF-7 cells. These results demonstrate the promise of utilizing platelet-mimetic constructs in modifying nanovehicle constructs for metastasis-targeted drug as well as modifying surfaces for ex-vivo cell enrichment diagnostic technologies. PMID:23360320

  17. Social variables exert selective pressures in the evolution and form of primate mimetic musculature.

    PubMed

    Burrows, Anne M; Li, Ly; Waller, Bridget M; Micheletta, Jerome

    2016-04-01

    Mammals use their faces in social interactions more so than any other vertebrates. Primates are an extreme among most mammals in their complex, direct, lifelong social interactions and their frequent use of facial displays is a means of proximate visual communication with conspecifics. The available repertoire of facial displays is primarily controlled by mimetic musculature, the muscles that move the face. The form of these muscles is, in turn, limited by and influenced by phylogenetic inertia but here we use examples, both morphological and physiological, to illustrate the influence that social variables may exert on the evolution and form of mimetic musculature among primates. Ecomorphology is concerned with the adaptive responses of morphology to various ecological variables such as diet, foliage density, predation pressures, and time of day activity. We present evidence that social variables also exert selective pressures on morphology, specifically using mimetic muscles among primates as an example. Social variables include group size, dominance 'style', and mating systems. We present two case studies to illustrate the potential influence of social behavior on adaptive morphology of mimetic musculature in primates: (1) gross morphology of the mimetic muscles around the external ear in closely related species of macaque (Macaca mulatta and Macaca nigra) characterized by varying dominance styles and (2) comparative physiology of the orbicularis oris muscle among select ape species. This muscle is used in both facial displays/expressions and in vocalizations/human speech. We present qualitative observations of myosin fiber-type distribution in this muscle of siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes), and human to demonstrate the potential influence of visual and auditory communication on muscle physiology. In sum, ecomorphologists should be aware of social selective pressures as well as ecological ones, and that observed morphology might

  18. A Platelet-Mimetic Paradigm for Metastasis-Targeted Nanomedicine Platforms

    PubMed Central

    Modery-Pawlowski, Christa L.; Master, Alyssa M.; Pan, Victor; Howard, Gregory; Gupta, Anirban Sen

    2013-01-01

    There is compelling evidence that beyond their traditional role in hemostasis and thrombosis, platelets play a significant role in mediating hematologic mechanisms of tumor metastasis by directly and indirectly interacting with pro-metastatic cancer cells. With this rationale, we hypothesized that platelets can be an effective paradigm to develop nanomedicine platforms that utilize platelet-mimetic interaction mechanisms for targeted diagnosis and therapy of metastatic cancer cells. Here we report on our investigation of the development of nanoconstructs that interact with metastatic cancer cells via platelet-mimetic heteromultivalent ligand-receptor pathways. For our studies, pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231 was studied for its surface expression of platelet-interactive receptors, in comparison to another low-metastatic human breast cancer cell line, MCF-7. Certain platelet-interactive receptors were found to be significantly over-expressed on the MDA-MB-231 cells and these cells showed significantly enhanced binding interactions with active platelets compared to MCF-7 cells. Based upon these observations, two specific receptor interactions were selected and corresponding ligands were engineered onto the surface of liposomes as model nanoconstructs, to enable platelet-mimetic binding to the cancer cells. Our model platelet-mimetic liposomal constructs showed enhanced targeting and attachment of MDA-MB-231 cells compared to the MCF-7 cells. These results demonstrate the promise of utilizing platelet-mimetic constructs in modifying nanovehicle constructs for metastasis-targeted drug as well as modifying surfaces for ex-vivo cell enrichment diagnostic technologies. PMID:23360320

  19. Selective Requirement for Maintenance of Synaptic Contacts onto Motoneurons by Target-Derived trkB Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Synaptic contacts onto motoneurons were studied in mice in which the gene for the trkB neurotrophin receptor was knocked out selectively in a subset of spinal motoneurons. The extent of contacts by structures immunoreactive for either of two different vesicular glutamate transporters (VGLUT1 and VGLUT2), the vesicular GABA transporter, or glutamic acid decarboxylase 67 (GAD67) with the somata of motoneurons, was studied in wild type and trkB knockout cells in tamoxifen treated male and female SLICK-trkB−/− mice. Selective knockout of the trkB gene resulted in a marked reduction in contacts made by VGLUT2- and GAD67-immunoreactive structures in both sexes and a significant reduction in contacts containing only glycine in male mice. No reduction was found for glycinergic contacts in female mice or for VGLUT1 immunoreactive contacts in either sex. Signaling through postsynaptic trkB receptors is considered to be an essential part of a cellular mechanism for maintaining the contacts of some, but not all, synaptic contacts onto motoneurons. PMID:27433358

  20. TrkB gene transfer does not alter hippocampal neuronal loss and cognitive deficits following traumatic brain injury in mice

    PubMed Central

    Conte, Valeria; Raghupathi, Ramesh; Watson, Deborah J.; Fujimoto, Scott; Royo, Nicolas C.; Marklund, Niklas; Stocchetti, Nino; McIntosh, Tracy K.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose The ability of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) to attenuate secondary damage and influence behavioral outcome after experimental traumatic brain injury (TBI) remains controversial. Because TBI can result in decreased expression of the trkB receptor, thereby preventing BDNF from exerting potential neuroprotective effects, the contribution of both BDNF and its receptor trkB to hippocampal neuronal loss and cognitive dysfunction were evaluated. Methods Full-length trkB was overexpressed in the left hippocampus of adult C57Bl/6 mice using recombinant adeno-associated virus serotype 2/5 (rAAV 2/5). EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein) expression was present at two weeks after AAV-EGFP injection and remained sustained up to four weeks after the injection. At 2 weeks following gene transduction, mice were subjected to parasagittal controlled cortical impact (CCI) brain injury, followed by either BDNF or PBS infusion into the hippocampus. Results No differences were observed in learning ability at two weeks post-injury or in motor function from 48 hours to two weeks among treatment groups. The number of surviving pyramidal neurons in the CA2-CA3 region of the hippocampus was also not different among treatment groups. Conclusions These data suggest that neither overexpression of trkB, BNDF infusion or their combination affects neuronal survival or behavioral outcome following experimental TBI in mice. PMID:18431005

  1. Disformal transformations, veiled General Relativity and Mimetic Gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Deruelle, Nathalie; Rua, Josephine E-mail: rua@cbpf.br

    2014-09-01

    In this Note we show that Einstein's equations for gravity are generically invariant under ''disformations''. We also show that the particular subclass when this is not true yields the equations of motion of ''Mimetic Gravity''. Finally we give the ''mimetic'' generalization of the Schwarzschild solution.

  2. Effects of developmental alcohol exposure vs. intubation stress on BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of neonatal rats.

    PubMed

    Boschen, K E; Criss, K J; Palamarchouk, V; Roth, T L; Klintsova, A Y

    2015-06-01

    Third trimester-equivalent alcohol exposure causes significant deficits in hippocampal and cortical neuroplasticity, resulting in alterations to dendritic arborization, hippocampal adult neurogenesis, and performance on learning tasks. The current study investigated the impact of neonatal alcohol exposure (postnatal days 4-9, 5.25 g/kg/day) on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the hippocampal and frontal cortex of infant Long-Evans rats. Levels of BDNF protein were increased in the hippocampus, but not frontal cortex, of alcohol-exposed rats 24h after the last dose, when compared with undisturbed (but not sham-intubated) control animals. BDNF protein levels showed a trend toward increase in hippocampus of sham-intubated animals as well, suggesting an effect of the intubation procedure. TrkB protein was increased in the hippocampus of alcohol-exposed animals compared to sham-intubated pups, indicating an alcohol-specific effect on receptor expression. In addition, expression of bdnf total mRNA in alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups was enhanced in the hippocampus; however, there was a differential effect of alcohol and intubation stress on exon I- and IV-specific mRNA transcripts. Further, plasma corticosterone was found to be increased in both alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups compared to undisturbed animals. Upregulation of BDNF could potentially represent a neuroprotective mechanism activated following alcohol exposure or stress. The results suggest that alcohol exposure and stress have both overlapping and unique effects on BDNF, and highlight the need for the stress of intubation to be taken into consideration in studies that implement this route of drug delivery. PMID:25805052

  3. Effects of developmental alcohol exposure vs. intubation stress on BDNF and TrkB expression in the hippocampus and frontal cortex of neonatal rats

    PubMed Central

    Boschen, K.E.; Criss, K.J.; Palamarchouk, V.; Roth, T.L.; Klintsova, A.Y.

    2015-01-01

    Third trimester-equivalent alcohol exposure causes significant deficits in hippocampal and cortical neuroplasticity, resulting in alterations to dendritic arborization, hippocampal adult neurogenesis, and performance on learning tasks. The current study investigated the impact of neonatal alcohol exposure (postnatal days 4–9, 5.25 g/kg/day) on expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and the tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) receptor in the hippocampal and frontal cortex of infant Long-Evans rats. Levels of BDNF protein were increased in the hippocampus, but not frontal cortex, of alcohol-exposed rats 24 hrs after the last dose, when compared with undisturbed (but not sham-intubated) control animals. BDNF protein levels showed a trend towards increase in hippocampus of sham-intubated animals as well, suggesting an effect of the intubation procedure. TrkB protein was increased in the hippocampus of alcohol-exposed animals compared to sham-intubated pups, indicating an alcohol-specific effect on receptor expression. In addition, expression of bdnf total mRNA in alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups was enhanced in the hippocampus; however, there was a differential effect of alcohol and intubation stress on exon I- and IV-specific mRNA transcripts. Further, plasma corticosterone was found to be increased in both alcohol-exposed and sham-intubated pups compared to undisturbed animals. Upregulation of BDNF could potentially represent a neuroprotective mechanism activated following alcohol exposure or stress. The results suggest that alcohol exposure and stress have both overlapping and unique effects on BDNF, and highlight the need for the stress of intubation to be taken into consideration in studies that implement this route of drug delivery. PMID:25805052

  4. Deoxygedunin, a natural product with potent neurotrophic activity in mice.

    PubMed

    Jang, Sung-Wuk; Liu, Xia; Chan, Chi Bun; France, Stefan A; Sayeed, Iqbal; Tang, Wenxue; Lin, Xi; Xiao, Ge; Andero, Raul; Chang, Qiang; Ressler, Kerry J; Ye, Keqiang

    2010-01-01

    Gedunin, a family of natural products from the Indian neem tree, possess a variety of biological activities. Here we report the discovery of deoxygedunin, which activates the mouse TrkB receptor and its downstream signaling cascades. Deoxygedunin is orally available and activates TrkB in mouse brain in a BDNF-independent way. Strikingly, it prevents the degeneration of vestibular ganglion in BDNF -/- pups. Moreover, deoxygedunin robustly protects rat neurons from cell death in a TrkB-dependent manner. Further, administration of deoxygedunin into mice displays potent neuroprotective, anti-depressant and learning enhancement effects, all of which are mediated by the TrkB receptor. Hence, deoxygedunin imitates BDNF's biological activities through activating TrkB, providing a powerful therapeutic tool for treatment of various neurological diseases. PMID:20644624

  5. Towards protein-based viral mimetics for cancer therapies.

    PubMed

    Unzueta, Ugutz; Céspedes, María Virtudes; Vázquez, Esther; Ferrer-Miralles, Neus; Mangues, Ramón; Villaverde, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    High resistance and recurrence rates, together with elevated drug clearance, compel the use of maximum-tolerated drug doses in cancer therapy, resulting in high-grade toxicities and limited clinical applicability. Promoting active drug accumulation in tumor tissues would minimize such issues and improve therapeutic outcomes. A new class of therapeutic drugs suitable for the task has emerged based on the concept of virus-mimetic nanocarriers, or 'artificial viruses'. Among the spectrum of materials under exploration in nanocarrier research, proteins offer unparalleled structural and functional versatility for designing virus-like molecular vehicles. By exhibiting 'smart' functions and biomimetic traits, protein-based nanocarriers will be a step ahead of the conventional drug-protein conjugates already in the clinic in ensuring efficient delivery of passenger antitumor drugs. PMID:25805413

  6. A cosmological solution to mimetic dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, Hassan

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, a cosmological solution to Mimetic Dark Matter (MDM) for an exponential potential is provided. Then a solution for the 0-i perturbed Einstein differential equation of MDM is obtained based on an exponential potential that satisfies inflation for some initial conditions. Another general potential is suggested that incorporates inflation too. Then quantum perturbations are included. The constants in the model can be tuned to be in agreement with the fluctuation amplitude of the cosmic microwave background (CMB) radiation. Finally, the spectral index is calculated for the suggested potentials. Moreover, MDM is shown to be a viable model to produce dark matter, inflation, and CMB's fluctuation.

  7. Spinal adenosine A2a receptor activation elicits long-lasting phrenic motor facilitation.

    PubMed

    Golder, Francis J; Ranganathan, Lavanya; Satriotomo, Irawan; Hoffman, Michael; Lovett-Barr, Mary Rachael; Watters, Jyoti J; Baker-Herman, Tracy L; Mitchell, Gordon S

    2008-02-27

    Acute intermittent hypoxia elicits a form of spinal, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-dependent respiratory plasticity known as phrenic long-term facilitation. Ligands that activate G(s)-protein-coupled receptors, such as the adenosine 2a receptor, mimic the effects of neurotrophins in vitro by transactivating their high-affinity receptor tyrosine kinases, the Trk receptors. Thus, we hypothesized that A2a receptor agonists would elicit phrenic long-term facilitation by mimicking the effects of BDNF on TrkB receptors. Here we demonstrate that spinal A2a receptor agonists transactivate TrkB receptors in the rat cervical spinal cord near phrenic motoneurons, thus inducing long-lasting (hours) phrenic motor facilitation. A2a receptor activation increased phosphorylation and new synthesis of an immature TrkB protein, induced TrkB signaling through Akt, and strengthened synaptic pathways to phrenic motoneurons. RNA interference targeting TrkB mRNA demonstrated that new TrkB protein synthesis is necessary for A2a-induced phrenic motor facilitation. A2a receptor activation also increased breathing in unanesthetized rats, and improved breathing in rats with cervical spinal injuries. Thus, small, highly permeable drugs (such as adenosine receptor agonists) that transactivate TrkB receptors may provide an effective therapeutic strategy in the treatment of patients with ventilatory control disorders, such as obstructive sleep apnea, or respiratory insufficiency after spinal injury or during neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:18305238

  8. Type I Collagen and Collagen Mimetics as Angiogenesis Promoting Superpolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Twardowski, T.; Fertala, A.; Orgel, J.P.R.O.; San Antonio, J.D.

    2008-07-18

    Angiogenesis, the development of blood vessels from the pre-existing vasculature, is a key component of embryogenesis and tissue regeneration. Angiogenesis also drives pathologies such as tumor growth and metastasis, and hemangioma development in newborns. On the other hand, promotion of angiogenesis is needed in tissues with vascular insufficiencies, and in bioengineering, to endow tissue substitutes with appropriate microvasculatures. Therefore, much research has focused on defining mechanisms of angiogenesis, and identifying pro- and anti-angiogenic molecules. Type I collagen, the most abundant protein in humans, potently stimulates angiogenesis in vitro and in vivo. Crucial to its angiogenic activity appears to be ligation and possibly clustering of endothelial cell (EC) surface {alpha}1{beta}1/{alpha}2{beta}1 integrin receptors by the GFPGER502-507 sequence of the collagen fibril. However, additional aspects of collagen structure and function that may modulate its angiogenic properties are discussed. Moreover, type I collagen and fibrin, another angiogenic polymer, share several structural features. These observations suggest strategies for creating 'angiogenic superpolymers', including: modifying type I collagen to influence its biological half-life, immunogenicity, and integrin binding capacity; genetically engineering fibrillar collagens to include additional integrin binding sites or angiogenic determinants, and remove unnecessary or deleterious sequences without compromising fibril integrity; and exploring the suitability of poly(ortho ester), PEG-lysine copolymer, tubulin, and cholesteric cuticle as collagen mimetics, and suggesting means of modifying them to display ideal angiogenic properties. The collagenous and collagen mimetic angiogenic superpolymers described here may someday prove useful for many applications in tissue engineering and human medicine.

  9. Functional Mimetics of the HIV-1 CCR5 Co-Receptor Displayed on the Surface of Magnetic Liposomes

    PubMed Central

    Kuzmina, Alona; Vaknin, Karin; Gdalevsky, Garik; Vyazmensky, Maria; Marks, Robert S.; Taube, Ran

    2015-01-01

    Chemokine G protein coupled receptors, principally CCR5 or CXCR4, function as co-receptors for HIV-1 entry into CD4+ T cells. Initial binding of the viral envelope glycoprotein (Env) gp120 subunit to the host CD4 receptor induces a cascade of structural conformational changes that lead to the formation of a high-affinity co-receptor-binding site on gp120. Interaction between gp120 and the co-receptor leads to the exposure of epitopes on the viral gp41 that mediates fusion between viral and cell membranes. Soluble CD4 (sCD4) mimetics can act as an activation-based inhibitor of HIV-1 entry in vitro, as it induces similar structural changes in gp120, leading to increased virus infectivity in the short term but to virus Env inactivation in the long term. Despite promising clinical implications, sCD4 displays low efficiency in vivo, and in multiple HIV strains, it does not inhibit viral infection. This has been attributed to the slow kinetics of the sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and to the failure to obtain sufficient sCD4 mimetic levels in the serum. Here we present uniquely structured CCR5 co-receptor mimetics. We hypothesized that such mimetics will enhance sCD4-induced HIV Env inactivation and inhibition of HIV entry. Co-receptor mimetics were derived from CCR5 gp120-binding epitopes and functionalized with a palmitoyl group, which mediated their display on the surface of lipid-coated magnetic beads. CCR5-peptidoliposome mimetics bound to soluble gp120 and inhibited HIV-1 infectivity in a sCD4-dependent manner. We concluded that CCR5-peptidoliposomes increase the efficiency of sCD4 to inhibit HIV infection by acting as bait for sCD4-primed virus, catalyzing the premature discharge of its fusion potential. PMID:26629902

  10. Differential effects of superoxide dismutase and superoxide dismutase/catalase mimetics on human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Shah, Manisha H; Liu, Guei-Sheung; Thompson, Erik W; Dusting, Gregory J; Peshavariya, Hitesh M

    2015-04-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) such as superoxide and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) have been implicated in development and progression of breast cancer. In the present study, we have evaluated the effects of the superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 on superoxide and H2O2 formation as well as proliferation, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. Superoxide and H2O2 production was examined using dihydroethidium and Amplex red assays, respectively. Cell viability and adhesion were measured using a tetrazolium-based MTT assay. Cell proliferation was determined using trypan blue assay. Cell cycle progression was analyzed using flow cytometry. Clonal expansion of a single cell was performed using a colony formation assay. Cell migration was measured using transwell migration assay. Dual luciferase assay was used to determine NF-κB reporter activity. EUK 134 effectively reduced both superoxide and H2O2, whereas MnTmPyP removed superoxide but enhanced H2O2 formation. EUK 134 effectively attenuated viability, proliferation, clonal expansion, adhesion, and migration of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In contrast, MnTmPyP only reduced clonal expansion of MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cells but had no effect on adhesion and cell cycle progression. Tumor necrosis factor-alpha-induced NF-κB activity was reduced by EUK 134, whereas MnTmPyP enhanced this activity. These data indicate that the SOD mimetic MnTmPyP and the SOD/catalase mimetic EUK 134 exert differential effects on breast cancer cell growth. Inhibition of H2O2 signaling using EUK 134-like compound might be a promising approach to breast cancer therapy. PMID:25794772

  11. Amylin structure-function relationships and receptor pharmacology: implications for amylin mimetic drug development.

    PubMed

    Bower, Rebekah L; Hay, Debbie L

    2016-06-01

    Amylin is an important, but poorly understood, 37 amino acid glucoregulatory hormone with great potential to target metabolic diseases. A working example that the amylin system is one worth developing is the FDA-approved drug used in insulin-requiring diabetic patients, pramlintide. However, certain characteristics of pramlintide pharmacokinetics and formulation leave considerable room for further development of amylin-mimetic compounds. Given that amylin-mimetic drug design and development is an active area of research, surprisingly little is known about the structure/function relationships of amylin. This is largely due to the unfavourable aggregative and solubility properties of the native peptide sequence, which are further complicated by the composition of amylin receptors. These are complexes of the calcitonin receptor with receptor activity-modifying proteins. This review explores what is known of the structure-function relationships of amylin and provides insights that can be drawn from the closely related peptide, CGRP. We also describe how this information is aiding the development of more potent and stable amylin mimetics, including peptide hybrids. PMID:27061187

  12. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are alsomore » satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.« less

  13. A spectral mimetic least-squares method

    SciTech Connect

    Bochev, Pavel; Gerritsma, Marc

    2014-09-01

    We present a spectral mimetic least-squares method for a model diffusion–reaction problem, which preserves key conservation properties of the continuum problem. Casting the model problem into a first-order system for two scalar and two vector variables shifts material properties from the differential equations to a pair of constitutive relations. We also use this system to motivate a new least-squares functional involving all four fields and show that its minimizer satisfies the differential equations exactly. Discretization of the four-field least-squares functional by spectral spaces compatible with the differential operators leads to a least-squares method in which the differential equations are also satisfied exactly. Additionally, the latter are reduced to purely topological relationships for the degrees of freedom that can be satisfied without reference to basis functions. Furthermore, numerical experiments confirm the spectral accuracy of the method and its local conservation.

  14. Caloric Restriction Mimetics Enhance Anticancer Immunosurveillance.

    PubMed

    Pietrocola, Federico; Pol, Jonathan; Vacchelli, Erika; Rao, Shuan; Enot, David P; Baracco, Elisa E; Levesque, Sarah; Castoldi, Francesca; Jacquelot, Nicolas; Yamazaki, Takahiro; Senovilla, Laura; Marino, Guillermo; Aranda, Fernando; Durand, Sylvère; Sica, Valentina; Chery, Alexis; Lachkar, Sylvie; Sigl, Verena; Bloy, Norma; Buque, Aitziber; Falzoni, Simonetta; Ryffel, Bernhard; Apetoh, Lionel; Di Virgilio, Francesco; Madeo, Frank; Maiuri, Maria Chiara; Zitvogel, Laurence; Levine, Beth; Penninger, Josef M; Kroemer, Guido

    2016-07-11

    Caloric restriction mimetics (CRMs) mimic the biochemical effects of nutrient deprivation by reducing lysine acetylation of cellular proteins, thus triggering autophagy. Treatment with the CRM hydroxycitrate, an inhibitor of ATP citrate lyase, induced the depletion of regulatory T cells (which dampen anticancer immunity) from autophagy-competent, but not autophagy-deficient, mutant KRAS-induced lung cancers in mice, thereby improving anticancer immunosurveillance and reducing tumor mass. Short-term fasting or treatment with several chemically unrelated autophagy-inducing CRMs, including hydroxycitrate and spermidine, improved the inhibition of tumor growth by chemotherapy in vivo. This effect was only observed for autophagy-competent tumors, depended on the presence of T lymphocytes, and was accompanied by the depletion of regulatory T cells from the tumor bed. PMID:27411589

  15. Cyclic thrombospondin-1 mimetics: grafting of a thrombospondin sequence into circular disulfide-rich frameworks to inhibit endothelial cell migration

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J.; Daly, Norelle L.

    2015-01-01

    Tumour formation is dependent on nutrient and oxygen supply from adjacent blood vessels. Angiogenesis inhibitors can play a vital role in controlling blood vessel formation and consequently tumour progression by inhibiting endothelial cell proliferation, sprouting and migration. The primary aim of the present study was to design cyclic thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) mimetics using disulfide-rich frameworks for anti-angiogenesis therapies and to determine whether these peptides have better potency than the linear parent peptide. A short anti-angiogenic heptapeptide fragment from TSP-1 (GVITRIR) was incorporated into two cyclic disulfide-rich frameworks, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II) and SFTI-1 (sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1). The cyclic peptides were chemically synthesized and folded in oxidation buffers, before being tested in a series of in vitro evaluations. Incorporation of the bioactive heptapeptide fragment into the cyclic frameworks resulted in peptides that inhibited microvascular endothelial cell migration, and had no toxicity against normal primary human endothelial cells or cancer cells. Importantly, all of the designed cyclic TSP-1 mimetics were far more stable than the linear heptapeptide in human serum. The present study has demonstrated a novel approach to stabilize the active region of TSP-1. The anti-angiogenic activity of the native TSP-1 active fragment was maintained in the new TSP-1 mimetics and the results provide a new chemical approach for the design of TSP-1 mimetics. PMID:26464514

  16. Cyclic thrombospondin-1 mimetics: grafting of a thrombospondin sequence into circular disulfide-rich frameworks to inhibit endothelial cell migration.

    PubMed

    Chan, Lai Yue; Craik, David J; Daly, Norelle L

    2015-01-01

    Tumour formation is dependent on nutrient and oxygen supply from adjacent blood vessels. Angiogenesis inhibitors can play a vital role in controlling blood vessel formation and consequently tumour progression by inhibiting endothelial cell proliferation, sprouting and migration. The primary aim of the present study was to design cyclic thrombospondin-1 (TSP-1) mimetics using disulfide-rich frameworks for anti-angiogenesis therapies and to determine whether these peptides have better potency than the linear parent peptide. A short anti-angiogenic heptapeptide fragment from TSP-1 (GVITRIR) was incorporated into two cyclic disulfide-rich frameworks, namely MCoTI-II (Momordica cochinchinensis trypsin inhibitor-II) and SFTI-1 (sunflower trypsin inhibitor-1). The cyclic peptides were chemically synthesized and folded in oxidation buffers, before being tested in a series of in vitro evaluations. Incorporation of the bioactive heptapeptide fragment into the cyclic frameworks resulted in peptides that inhibited microvascular endothelial cell migration, and had no toxicity against normal primary human endothelial cells or cancer cells. Importantly, all of the designed cyclic TSP-1 mimetics were far more stable than the linear heptapeptide in human serum. The present study has demonstrated a novel approach to stabilize the active region of TSP-1. The anti-angiogenic activity of the native TSP-1 active fragment was maintained in the new TSP-1 mimetics and the results provide a new chemical approach for the design of TSP-1 mimetics. PMID:26464514

  17. Nuclear receptors and AMPK: can exercise mimetics cure diabetes?

    PubMed

    Wall, Christopher E; Yu, Ruth T; Atkins, Anne R; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M

    2016-07-01

    Endurance exercise can lead to systemic improvements in insulin sensitivity and metabolic homeostasis, and is an effective approach to combat metabolic diseases. Pharmacological compounds that recapitulate the beneficial effects of exercise, also known as 'exercise mimetics', have the potential to improve disease symptoms of metabolic syndrome. These drugs, which can increase energy expenditure, suppress hepatic gluconeogenesis, and induce insulin sensitization, have accordingly been highly scrutinized for their utility in treating metabolic diseases including diabetes. Nevertheless, the identity of an efficacious exercise mimetic still remains elusive. In this review, we highlight several nuclear receptors and cofactors that are putative molecular targets for exercise mimetics, and review recent studies that provide advancements in our mechanistic understanding of how exercise mimetics exert their beneficial effects. We also discuss evidence from clinical trials using these compounds in human subjects to evaluate their efficacy in treating diabetes. PMID:27106806

  18. Postsynaptic TrkB signaling has distinct roles in spine maintenance in adult visual cortex and hippocampus

    PubMed Central

    Chakravarthy, Sridhara; Saiepour, M. Hadi; Bence, Matthew; Perry, Sean; Hartman, Robin; Couey, Jonathan J.; Mansvelder, Huibert D.; Levelt, Christiaan N.

    2006-01-01

    In adult primary visual cortex (V1), dendritic spines are more persistent than during development. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) increases synaptic strength, and its levels rise during cortical development. We therefore asked whether postsynaptic BDNF signaling through its receptor TrkB regulates spine persistence in adult V1. This question has been difficult to address because most methods used to alter TrkB signaling in vivo affect cortical development or cannot distinguish between pre- and postsynaptic mechanisms. We circumvented these problems by employing transgenic mice expressing a dominant negative TrkB–EGFP fusion protein in sparse pyramidal neurons of the adult neocortex and hippocampus, producing a Golgi-staining-like pattern. In adult V1, expression of dominant negative TrkB-EGFP resulted in reduced mushroom spine maintenance and synaptic efficacy, accompanied by an increase in long and thin spines and filopodia. In contrast, mushroom spine maintenance was unaffected in CA1, indicating that TrkB plays fundamentally different roles in structural plasticity in these brain areas. PMID:16418274

  19. TTIP is a novel protein that interacts with the truncated T1 TrkB neurotrophin receptor.

    PubMed

    Kryl, D; Barker, P A

    2000-12-29

    Alternative splicing of the TrkB gene produces a full length tyrosine kinase receptor as well as two truncated isoforms that contain extracellular and transmembrane domains but lack the kinase domain and have unique C terminal tails. The function of the truncated TrkB isoforms is unclear and to gain insights into their function, we have isolated a protein from 15N neuroblastoma cells that specifically binds the TrkB.T1 isoform. Pulldown experiments using a GST fusion protein containing the TrkB.T1 intracellular domain identified a 61 kDa protein from radiolabeled 15N lysates. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments showed that the 61 kDa protein interacted with epitope-tagged TrkB.T1 overexpressed in 15N cells as well as with TrkB.T1 which was endogenously expressed. Peptide competition experiments revealed that the protein, designated TTIP (for Truncated TrkB Interacting Protein), showed specific binding to the TrkB.T1 tail. MALDI MS and MS/MS analysis has revealed that TTIP is a novel protein not yet listed in the current databases. PMID:11162451

  20. The Role of BH3-Mimetic Drugs in the Treatment of Pediatric Hepatoblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Lieber, Justus; Armeanu-Ebinger, Sorin; Fuchs, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Pediatric hepatoblastoma (HB) is commonly treated by neoadjuvant chemotherapy and surgical tumor resection according to international multicenter trial protocols. Complete tumor resection is essential and survival rates up to 95% have now been achieved in those tumors classified as standard-risk HB. Drug resistance and occurrence of metastases remain the major challenges in the treatment of HB, especially in high-risk tumors. These conditions urgently require the development of alternative therapeutic strategies. One of those alternatives is the modulation of apoptosis in HB cells. HBs regularly overexpress anti-apoptotic proteins of the Bcl-family in comparison to healthy liver tissue. This fact may contribute to the development of chemoresistance of HB cells. Synthetic small inhibitory molecules with BH3-mimetic effects, such as ABT-737 and obatoclax, enhance the susceptibility of tumor cells to different cytotoxic drugs and thereby affect initiator proteins of the apoptosis cascade via the intrinsic pathway. Besides additive effects on HB cell viability when used in combination with cytotoxic drugs, BH3-mimetics also play a role in preventing metastasation by reducing adhesion and inhibiting cell migration abilities. Presumably, including additive BH3-mimetic drugs into existing therapeutic regimens in HB patients might allow dose reduction of established cytotoxic drugs and thereby associated immanent side effects, while maintaining the antitumor activity. Furthermore, reduction of tumor growth and inhibition of tumor cell dissemination may facilitate complete surgical tumor resection, which is mandatory in this tumor type resulting in improved survival rates in high-risk HB. Currently, there are phase I and phase II clinical trials in several cancer entities using this potential target. This paper reviews the available literature regarding the use of BH3-mimetic drugs as single agents or in combination with chemotherapy in various malignancies and focuses on

  1. Combining Basal Insulin Analogs with Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Basal insulin analogs are recognized as an effective method of achieving and maintaining glycemic control for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, the progressive nature of the disease means that some individuals may require additional ways to maintain their glycemic goals. Intensification in these circumstances has traditionally been achieved by the addition of short-acting insulin to cover postprandial glucose excursions that are not targeted by basal insulin. However, intensive insulin regimens are associated with a higher risk of hypoglycemia and weight gain, which can contribute to a greater burden on patients. The combination of basal insulin with a glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) mimetic is a potentially attractive solution to this problem for some patients with type 2 diabetes. GLP-1 mimetics target postprandial glucose and should complement the activity of basal insulins; they are also associated with a relatively low risk of associated hypoglycemia and moderate, but significant, weight loss. Although the combination has not been approved by regulatory authorities, preliminary evidence from mostly small-scale studies suggests that basal insulins in combination with GLP-1 mimetics do provide improvements in A1c and postprandial glucose with concomitant weight loss and no marked increase in the risk of hypoglycemia. These results are promising, but further studies are required, including comparisons with basal–bolus therapy, before the complex value of this association can be fully appreciated. PMID:21711120

  2. Antidepressant Effects of TrkB Ligands on Depression-Like Behavior and Dendritic Changes in Mice After Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ji-chun; Wu, Jin; Fujita, Yuko; Yao, Wei; Ren, Qian; Yang, Chun; Li, Su-xia; Shirayama, Yukihiko

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB), signaling represent potential therapeutic targets for major depressive disorder. The purpose of this study is to examine whether TrkB ligands show antidepressant effects in an inflammation-induced model of depression. Methods: In this study, we examined the effects of TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (7,8-DHF) and TrkB antagonist ANA-12 on depression-like behavior and morphological changes in mice previously exposed to lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Protein levels of BDNF, phospho-TrkB (p-TrkB), and TrkB in the brain regions were also examined. Results: LPS caused a reduction of BDNF in the CA3 and dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and prefrontal cortex (PFC), whereas LPS increased BDNF in the nucleus accumbens (NAc). Dexamethason suppression tests showed hyperactivity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in LPS-treated mice. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of 7,8-DHF showed antidepressant effects on LPS-induced depression-like behavior, and i.p. pretreatment with ANA-12 blocked its antidepressant effects. Surprisingly, ANA-12 alone showed antidepressant-like effects on LPS-induced depression-like behavior. Furthermore, bilateral infusion of ANA-12 into the NAc showed antidepressant effects. Moreover, LPS caused a reduction of spine density in the CA3, DG, and PFC, whereas LPS increased spine density in the NAc. Interestingly, 7,8-DHF significantly attenuated LPS-induced reduction of p-TrkB and spine densities in the CA3, DG, and PFC, whereas ANA-12 significantly attenuated LPS-induced increases of p-TrkB and spine density in the NAc. Conclusions: The results suggest that LPS-induced inflammation may cause depression-like behavior by altering BDNF and spine density in the CA3, DG, PFC, and NAc, which may be involved in the antidepressant effects of 7,8-DHF and ANA-12, respectively. PMID:25628381

  3. Cerebral Response to Peripheral Challenge with a Viral Mimetic.

    PubMed

    Konat, Gregory

    2016-02-01

    It has been well established that peripheral inflammation resulting from microbial infections profoundly alters brain function. This review focuses on experimental systems that model cerebral effects of peripheral viral challenge. The most common models employ the induction of the acute phase response via intraperitoneal injection of a viral mimetic, polyinosinic-polycytidylic acid (PIC). The ensuing transient surge of blood-borne inflammatory mediators induces a "mirror" inflammatory response in the brain characterized by the upregulated expression of a plethora of genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and other inflammatory/stress proteins. These inflammatory mediators modify the activity of neuronal networks leading to a constellation of behavioral traits collectively categorized as the sickness behavior. Sickness behavior is an important protective response of the host that has evolved to enhance survival and limit the spread of infections within a population. However, a growing body of clinical data indicates that the activation of inflammatory pathways in the brain may constitute a serious comorbidity factor for neuropathological conditions. Such comorbidity has been demonstrated using the PIC paradigm in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease, prion disease and seizures. Also, prenatal or perinatal PIC challenge has been shown to disrupt normal cerebral development of the offspring resulting in phenotypes consistent with neuropsychiatric disorders, such as schizophrenia and autism. Remarkably, recent studies indicate that mild peripheral PIC challenge may be neuroprotective in stroke. Altogether, the PIC challenge paradigm represents a unique heuristic model to elucidate the immune-to-brain communication pathways and to explore preventive strategies for neuropathological disorders. PMID:26526143

  4. Theoretical studies on the interactions of XIAP-BIR3 domain with bicyclic and tricyclic core monovalent Smac mimetics.

    PubMed

    Ling, Baoping; Dong, Lihua; Zhang, Rui; Wang, Zhiguo; Liu, Yongjun; Liu, Chengbu

    2010-11-01

    X-linked IAP can bind caspase-9 and inhibit its activity. Mitochondrial protein Smac/DIABLO can also interact with XIAP and relieve the inhibition on caspase-9 to induce apoptosis. A series of artificial Smac mimetics have been used to mimic the Smac N-terminal tetrapeptide AVPI to bind to XIAP-BIR3, but these structural diverse mimetics exhibited distinct binding affinities. To get an insight into the binding nature and optimize the structures, molecular docking and dynamics simulations were used to study the binding of XIAP-BIR3 with three groups of Smac mimetics. The docking results reveal that these Smac mimetics anchored on the surface groove of XIAP-BIR3 and superimposed well with AVPI. The modifications on the seven-membered ring of bicyclic core segment do not strengthen the binding affinity, while a benzyl introduced to the five-membered ring is favorable to the binding. Molecular dynamics simulations on three typical systems show that these complexes are very stable. Hydrogen bonds between the bicyclic core segment and Thr308 play critical roles in maintaining the stability of complex. The binding free energies calculated by MM_PBSA method are consistent with the experimental results. PMID:20980180

  5. Constitutive p53 heightens mitochondrial apoptotic priming and favors cell death induction by BH3 mimetic inhibitors of BCL-xL.

    PubMed

    Le Pen, J; Laurent, M; Sarosiek, K; Vuillier, C; Gautier, F; Montessuit, S; Martinou, J C; Letaï, A; Braun, F; Juin, P P

    2016-01-01

    Proapoptotic molecules directly targeting the BCL-2 family network are promising anticancer therapeutics, but an understanding of the cellular stress signals that render them effective is still elusive. We show here that the tumor suppressor p53, at least in part by transcription independent mechanisms, contributes to cell death induction and full activation of BAX by BH3 mimetic inhibitors of BCL-xL. In addition to mildly facilitating the ability of compounds to derepress BAX from BCL-xL, p53 also provides a death signal downstream of anti-apoptotic proteins inhibition. This death signal cooperates with BH3-induced activation of BAX and it is independent from PUMA, as enhanced p53 can substitute for PUMA to promote BAX activation in response to BH3 mimetics. The acute sensitivity of mitochondrial priming to p53 revealed here is likely to be critical for the clinical use of BH3 mimetics. PMID:26844698

  6. An overview on antidiabetic medicinal plants having insulin mimetic property

    PubMed Central

    Patel, DK; Prasad, SK; Kumar, R; Hemalatha, S

    2012-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders acquiring around 2.8% of the world's population and is anticipated to cross 5.4% by the year 2025. Since long back herbal medicines have been the highly esteemed source of medicine therefore, they have become a growing part of modern, high-tech medicine. In view of the above aspects the present review provides profiles of plants (65 species) with hypoglycaemic properties, available through literature source from various database with proper categorization according to the parts used, mode of reduction in blood glucose (insulinomimetic or insulin secretagogues activity) and active phytoconstituents having insulin mimetics activity. From the review it was suggested that, plant showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belongs to the family Leguminoseae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, Moraceae, Rosaceae and Araliaceae. The most active plants are Allium sativum, Gymnema sylvestre, Citrullus colocynthis, Trigonella foenum greacum, Momordica charantia and Ficus bengalensis. The review describes some new bioactive drugs and isolated compounds from plants such as roseoside, epigallocatechin gallate, beta-pyrazol-1-ylalanine, cinchonain Ib, leucocyandin 3-O-beta-d-galactosyl cellobioside, leucopelargonidin-3- O-alpha-L rhamnoside, glycyrrhetinic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, strictinin, isostrictinin, pedunculagin, epicatechin and christinin-A showing significant insulinomimetic and antidiabetic activity with more efficacy than conventional hypoglycaemic agents. Thus, from the review majorly, the antidiabetic activity of medicinal plants is attributed to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, coumarins and other constituents which show reduction in blood glucose levels. The review also discusses the management aspect of diabetes mellitus using these plants and their active principles. PMID:23569923

  7. An overview on antidiabetic medicinal plants having insulin mimetic property.

    PubMed

    Patel, D K; Prasad, S K; Kumar, R; Hemalatha, S

    2012-04-01

    Diabetes mellitus is one of the common metabolic disorders acquiring around 2.8% of the world's population and is anticipated to cross 5.4% by the year 2025. Since long back herbal medicines have been the highly esteemed source of medicine therefore, they have become a growing part of modern, high-tech medicine. In view of the above aspects the present review provides profiles of plants (65 species) with hypoglycaemic properties, available through literature source from various database with proper categorization according to the parts used, mode of reduction in blood glucose (insulinomimetic or insulin secretagogues activity) and active phytoconstituents having insulin mimetics activity. From the review it was suggested that, plant showing hypoglycemic potential mainly belongs to the family Leguminoseae, Lamiaceae, Liliaceae, Cucurbitaceae, Asteraceae, Moraceae, Rosaceae and Araliaceae. The most active plants are Allium sativum, Gymnema sylvestre, Citrullus colocynthis, Trigonella foenum greacum, Momordica charantia and Ficus bengalensis. The review describes some new bioactive drugs and isolated compounds from plants such as roseoside, epigallocatechin gallate, beta-pyrazol-1-ylalanine, cinchonain Ib, leucocyandin 3-O-beta-d-galactosyl cellobioside, leucopelargonidin-3- O-alpha-L rhamnoside, glycyrrhetinic acid, dehydrotrametenolic acid, strictinin, isostrictinin, pedunculagin, epicatechin and christinin-A showing significant insulinomimetic and antidiabetic activity with more efficacy than conventional hypoglycaemic agents. Thus, from the review majorly, the antidiabetic activity of medicinal plants is attributed to the presence of polyphenols, flavonoids, terpenoids, coumarins and other constituents which show reduction in blood glucose levels. The review also discusses the management aspect of diabetes mellitus using these plants and their active principles. PMID:23569923

  8. Bio-mimetic optical sensor for structural deflection measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Wright, Cameron H. G.; Streeter, Robert W.; Khan, Md. A.; Barrett, Steven F.

    2014-03-01

    Reducing the environmental impact of aviation is a primary goal of NASA aeronautics research. One approach to achieve this goal is to build lighter weight aircraft, which presents complex challenges due to a corresponding increase in structural flexibility. Wing flexibility can adversely affect aircraft performance from the perspective of aerodynamic efficiency and safety. Knowledge of the wing position during flight can aid active control methods designed to mitigate problems due to increased wing flexibility. Current approaches to measuring wing deflection, including strain measurement devices, accelerometers, or GPS solutions, and new technologies such as fiber optic strain sensors, have limitations for their practical application to flexible aircraft control. Hence, it was proposed to use a bio-mimetic optical sensor based on the fly-eye to track wing deflection in real-time. The fly-eye sensor has several advantages over conventional sensors used for this application, including light weight, low power requirements, fast computation, and a small form factor. This paper reports on the fly-eye sensor development and its application to real-time wing deflection measurement.

  9. Synthesis of glycosaminoglycan mimetics through sulfation of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Al-Horani, Rami A; Karuturi, Rajesh; Verespy, Stephen; Desai, Umesh R

    2015-01-01

    In nearly all cases of biological activity of sulfated GAGs, the sulfate group(s) are critical for interacting with target proteins. A growing paradigm is that appropriate small, sulfated, nonsaccharide GAG mimetics can be designed to either mimic or interfere with the biological functions of natural GAG sequences resulting in the discovery of either antagonist or agonist agents. A number of times these sulfated NSGMs can be computationally designed based on the parent GAG-protein interaction. The small sulfated NSGMs may possess considerable aromatic character so as to engineer hydrophobic, hydrogen-bonding, Coulombic or cation-pi forces in their interactions with target protein(s) resulting in higher specificity of action relative to parent GAGs. The sulfated NSGMs can be easily synthesized in one step from appropriate natural polyphenols through chemical sulfation under microwave-based conditions. We describe step-by-step procedures to perform microwave-based sulfation of several small polyphenol scaffolds so as to prepare homogenous NSGMs containing one to more than 10 sulfate groups per molecule in high yields. PMID:25325944

  10. Dispersal of mimetic seeds of three species of Ormosia (Leguminosae)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Foster, M.S.; DeLay, L.S.

    1998-01-01

    Seeds with 'imitation arils' appear wholly or partially covered by pulp or aril but actually carry no fleshy material. The mimetic seed hypothesis to explain this phenomenon proposes a parasitic relationship in which birds are deceived into dispersing seeds that resemble bird-dispersed fruits, without receiving a nutrient reward. The hard-seed for grit hypothesis proposes a mutualistic relationship in which large, terrestrial birds swallow the exceptionally hard 'mimetic' seeds as grit for grinding the softer seeds on which they feed. They defecate, dispersing the seeds, and abrade the seed surface, enhancing germination. Any fruit mimicry is incidental. Fruiting trees of Ormosia spp. (Leguminosae: Papilionoideae) were observed to ascertain mechanisms of seed dispersal and the role of seemingly mimetic characteristics of the seeds in that dispersal. Seed predation and seed germination were also examined. Ormosia isthamensis and O. macrocalyx (but not O. bopiensis) deceived arboreally-foraging frugivorous birds into taking their mimetic seeds, although rates of seed dispersal were low. These results are consistent with the mimetic seed hypothesis. On the other hand, the rates of disappearance of seeds from the ground under the Ormosia trees, hardness of the seeds, and enhancement of germination with the abrasion of the seed coat are all consistent with the hard-seed for grit hypothesis.

  11. Tunicate-mimetic nanofibrous hydrogel adhesive with improved wet adhesion.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Kim, Sangsik; Lee, Dohoon; Hwang, Dong Soo

    2015-07-01

    The main impediment to medical application of biomaterial-based adhesives is their poor wet adhesion strength due to hydration-induced softening and dissolution. To solve this problem, we mimicked the wound healing process found in tunicates, which use a nanofiber structure and pyrogallol group to heal any damage on its tunic under sea water. We fabricated a tunicate-mimetic hydrogel adhesive based on a chitin nanofiber/gallic acid (a pyrogallol acid) composite. The pyrogallol group-mediated cross-linking and the nanofibrous structures improved the dissolution resistance and cohesion strength of the hydrogel compared to the amorphous polymeric hydrogels in wet condition. The tunicate-mimetic adhesives showed higher adhesion strength between fully hydrated skin tissues than did fibrin glue and mussel-mimetic adhesives. The tunicate mimetic hydrogels were produced at low cost from recyclable and abundant raw materials. This tunicate-mimetic adhesive system is an example of how natural materials can be engineered for biomedical applications. PMID:25841348

  12. Involvement of TrkB- and p75NTR-signaling pathways in two contrasting forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakuragi, Shigeo; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Ogura, Akihiko

    2013-11-01

    The repetition of experience is often necessary to establish long-lasting memory. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying this repetition-dependent consolidation of memory remain unclear. We previously observed in organotypic slice cultures of the rodent hippocampus that repeated inductions of long-term potentiation (LTP) led to a slowly developing long-lasting synaptic enhancement coupled with synaptogenesis. We also reported that repeated inductions of long-term depression (LTD) produced a long-lasting synaptic suppression coupled with synapse elimination. We proposed these phenomena as useful in vitro models for analyzing repetition-dependent consolidation. Here, we hypothesized that the enhancement and suppression are mediated by the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-TrkB signaling pathway and the proBDNF-p75NTR pathway, respectively. When we masked the respective pathways, reversals of the enhancement and suppression resulted. These results suggest the alternative activation of the p75NTR pathway by BDNF under TrkB-masking conditions and of the TrkB pathway by proBDNF under p75NTR-masking conditions, thus supporting the aforementioned hypothesis.

  13. Administration of the TrkB receptor agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone prevents traumatic stress-induced spatial memory deficits and changes in synaptic plasticity.

    PubMed

    Sanz-García, Ancor; Knafo, Shira; Pereda-Pérez, Inmaculada; Esteban, José A; Venero, César; Armario, Antonio

    2016-09-01

    Post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) occurs after exposure to traumatic situations and it is characterized by cognitive deficits that include impaired explicit memory. The neurobiological bases of such PTSD-associated memory alterations are yet to be elucidated and no satisfactory treatment for them exists. To address this issue, we first studied whether a single exposure of young adult rats (60 days) to immobilization on boards (IMO), a putative model of PTSD, produces long-term behavioral effects (2-8 days) similar to those found in PTSD patients. Subsequently, we investigated whether the administration of the TrkB agonist 7,8-dihydroxyflavone (DHF) 8 h after stress (therapeutic window) ameliorated the PTSD-like effect of IMO and the associated changes in synaptic plasticity. A single IMO exposure induced a spatial memory impairment similar to that found in other animal models of PTSD or in PTSD patients. IMO also increased spine density and long-term potentiation (LTP) in the CA3-CA1 pathway. Significantly, DHF reverted both spatial memory impairment and the increase in LTP, while it produced no effect in the controls. These data provide novel insights into the possible neurobiological substrate for explicit memory impairment in PTSD patients, supporting the idea that the activation of the BDNF/TrkB pathway fulfils a protective role after severe stress. Administration of DHF in the aftermath of a traumatic experience might be relevant to prevent its long-term consequences. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27068341

  14. Involvement of TrkB- and p75NTR-signaling pathways in two contrasting forms of long-lasting synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Sakuragi, Shigeo; Tominaga-Yoshino, Keiko; Ogura, Akihiko

    2013-01-01

    The repetition of experience is often necessary to establish long-lasting memory. However, the cellular mechanisms underlying this repetition-dependent consolidation of memory remain unclear. We previously observed in organotypic slice cultures of the rodent hippocampus that repeated inductions of long-term potentiation (LTP) led to a slowly developing long-lasting synaptic enhancement coupled with synaptogenesis. We also reported that repeated inductions of long-term depression (LTD) produced a long-lasting synaptic suppression coupled with synapse elimination. We proposed these phenomena as useful in vitro models for analyzing repetition-dependent consolidation. Here, we hypothesized that the enhancement and suppression are mediated by the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF)-TrkB signaling pathway and the proBDNF-p75NTR pathway, respectively. When we masked the respective pathways, reversals of the enhancement and suppression resulted. These results suggest the alternative activation of the p75NTR pathway by BDNF under TrkB-masking conditions and of the TrkB pathway by proBDNF under p75NTR-masking conditions, thus supporting the aforementioned hypothesis. PMID:24212565

  15. BDNF-induced presynaptic facilitation of GABAergic transmission in the hippocampus of young adults is dependent of TrkB and adenosine A2A receptors.

    PubMed

    Colino-Oliveira, Mariana; Rombo, Diogo M; Dias, Raquel B; Ribeiro, Joaquim A; Sebastião, Ana M

    2016-06-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and adenosine are widely recognized as neuromodulators of glutamatergic transmission in the adult brain. Most BDNF actions upon excitatory plasticity phenomena are under control of adenosine A2A receptors (A2ARs). Concerning gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-mediated transmission, the available information refers to the control of GABA transporters. We now focused on the influence of BDNF and the interplay with adenosine on phasic GABAergic transmission. To assess this, we evaluated evoked and spontaneous synaptic currents recorded from CA1 pyramidal cells in acute hippocampal slices from adult rat brains (6 to 10 weeks old). BDNF (10-100 ng/mL) increased miniature inhibitory postsynaptic current (mIPSC) frequency, but not amplitude, as well as increased the amplitude of inhibitory postsynaptic currents (IPSCs) evoked by afferent stimulation. The facilitatory action of BDNF upon GABAergic transmission was lost in the presence of a Trk inhibitor (K252a, 200 nM), but not upon p75(NTR) blockade (anti-p75(NTR) IgG, 50 μg/mL). Moreover, the facilitatory action of BDNF onto GABAergic transmission was also prevented upon A2AR antagonism (SCH 58261, 50 nM). We conclude that BDNF facilitates GABAergic signaling at the adult hippocampus via a presynaptic mechanism that depends on TrkB and adenosine A2AR activation. PMID:26897393

  16. Characterization of Potent SMAC Mimetics that Sensitize Cancer Cells to TNF Family-Induced Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Welsh, Kate; Milutinovic, Snezana; Ardecky, Robert J; Gonzalez-Lopez, Marcos; Ganji, Santhi Reddy; Teriete, Peter; Finlay, Darren; Riedl, Stefan; Matsuzawa, Shu-Ichi; Pinilla, Clemencia; Houghten, Richard; Vuori, Kristiina; Reed, John C; Cosford, Nicholas D P

    2016-01-01

    Members of the Inhibitor of APoptosis (IAP) protein family suppress apoptosis within tumor cells, particularly in the context of immune cell-mediated killing by the tumor necrosis factor (TNF) superfamily cytokines. Most IAPs are opposed endogenously by the second mitochondrial activator of caspases (SMAC), which binds to selected baculovirus IAP repeat (BIR) domains of IAPs to displace interacting proteins. The development of SMAC mimetics as novel anticancer drugs has gained impetus, with several agents now in human clinical trials. To further understand the cellular mechanisms of SMAC mimetics, we focused on IAP family members cIAP1 and cIAP2, which are recruited to TNF receptor complexes where they support cell survival through NF-κB activation while suppressing apoptosis by preventing caspase activation. We established fluorescence polarization (FP) assays for the BIR2 and BIR3 domains of human cIAP1 and cIAP2 using fluorochrome-conjugated SMAC peptides as ligands. A library of SMAC mimetics was profiled using the FP assays to provide a unique structure activity relationship (SAR) analysis compared to previous assessments of binding to XIAP. Potent compounds displayed mean inhibitory binding constants (Ki) of 9 to 27 nM against the BIR3 domains of cIAP1 and cIAP2, respectively. Selected compounds were then characterized using cytotoxicity assays in which a cytokine-resistant human tumor cell line was sensitized to either TNF or lymphotoxin-α (LT-α). Cytotoxicity correlated closely with cIAP1 and cIAP2 BIR3 binding activity with the most potent compounds able to reduce cell viability by 50%. Further testing demonstrated that active compounds also inhibit RIP1 binding to BIR3 of cIAP1 and cIAP2 in vitro and reduce steady-state cIAP1 protein levels in cells. Altogether, these data inform the SAR for our SMAC mimetics with respect to cIAP1 and cIAP2, suggesting that these IAP family members play an important role in tumor cell resistance to cytotoxicity

  17. Influences of Membrane Mimetic Environments on Membrane Protein Structures

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Huan-Xiang; Cross, Timothy A.

    2013-01-01

    The number of membrane protein structures in the Protein Data Bank is becoming significant and growing. Here, the transmembrane domain structures of the helical membrane proteins are evaluated to assess the influences of the membrane mimetic environments. Toward this goal, many of the biophysical properties of membranes are discussed and contrasted with those of the membrane mimetics commonly used for structure determination. Although the mimetic environments can perturb the protein structures to an extent that potentially gives rise to misinterpretation of functional mechanisms, there are also many structures that have a native-like appearance. From this assessment, an initial set of guidelines is proposed for distinguishing native-like from nonnative-like membrane protein structures. With experimental techniques for validation and computational methods for refinement and quality assessment and enhancement, there are good prospects for achieving native-like structures for these very important proteins. PMID:23451886

  18. Changes in expression of BDNF and its receptors TrkB and p75NTR in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence.

    PubMed

    Xu, R; Duan, S R; Zhao, J W; Wang, C Y

    2015-08-01

    Chronic ethanol consumption can produce learning and memory deficits. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptors affect the pathogenesis of alcoholism. In this study, we examined the expression of BDNF, tropomyosin receptor kinase B (TrkB) and p75 neurotrophin receptor (p75NTR) in the hippocampus of a dog model of chronic alcoholism and abstinence. Twenty domestic dogs (9-10 months old, 15-20 kg; 10 males and 10 females) were obtained from Harbin Medical University. A stable alcoholism model was established through ad libitum feeding, and anti-alcohol drug treatment (Zhong Yao Jie Jiu Ling, the main ingredient was the stems of watermelon; developed in our laboratory), at low- and high-doses, was carried out. The Zhong Yao Jie Jiu Ling was effective for the alcoholism in dogs. The morphology of hippocampal neurons was evaluated using hematoxylin-eosin staining. The number and morphological features of BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR-positive neurons in the dentate gyrus (DG), and the CA1, CA3 and CA4 regions of the hippocampus were observed using immunohistochemistry. One-way ANOVA was used to determine differences in BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR expression. BDNF, TrkB and p75NTR-positive cells were mainly localized in the granular cell layer of the DG and in the pyramidal cell layer of the CA1, CA3 and CA4 regions (DG>CA1>CA3>CA4). Expression levels of both BDNF and TrkB were decreased in chronic alcoholism, and increased after abstinence. The CA4 region appeared to show the greatest differences. Changes in p75NTR expression were the opposite of those of BDNF and TrkB, with the greatest differences observed in the DG and CA4 regions. PMID:26108098

  19. The Life of the Mimetic Starfish, 2000-2012.

    PubMed

    Brown, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This article is written from the perspective of the artist, programmer, and exhibitor of the Mimetic Starfish, a gestural responsive ALife artwork first created for the Millennium Dome in 2000 and recently exhibited at the Emoção Art.ficial in Brazil in 2012. The author concludes with the suggestion that despite the advances in technology and the ubiquitous presence of touch and gestural interfaces, it is the underlying aesthetic and socially engaging qualities of the Mimetic Starfish that ensure its currency, presence, relevance, and continuing exhibition. PMID:26280068

  20. From Complex Natural Products to Simple Synthetic Mimetics by Computational De Novo Design.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, Lukas; Rodrigues, Tiago; Neuhaus, Claudia S; Schneider, Petra; Schneider, Gisbert

    2016-06-01

    We present the computational de novo design of synthetically accessible chemical entities that mimic the complex sesquiterpene natural product (-)-Englerin A. We synthesized lead-like probes from commercially available building blocks and profiled them for activity against a computationally predicted panel of macromolecular targets. Both the design template (-)-Englerin A and its low-molecular weight mimetics presented nanomolar binding affinities and antagonized the transient receptor potential calcium channel TRPM8 in a cell-based assay, without showing target promiscuity or frequent-hitter properties. This proof-of-concept study outlines an expeditious solution to obtaining natural-product-inspired chemical matter with desirable properties. PMID:27111835

  1. Novel thrombin inhibitors incorporating non-basic partially saturated heterobicyclic P1-arginine mimetics.

    PubMed

    Peterlin-Masic, Lucija; Mlinsek, Gregor; Solmajer, Tomaz; Trampus-Bakija, Alenka; Stegnar, Mojca; Kikelj, Danijel

    2003-03-10

    The design, synthesis and biological activity of non-covalent thrombin inhibitors incorporating 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroindazole, 2-methyl-4,5,6,7-tetrahydroindazole, 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoindole, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazoline and 5,6,7,8-tetrahydroquinazolin-2-amine as novel, partially saturated, heterobicyclic P(1)-arginine side-chain mimetics is described. The binding mode of the most potent candidate in the series co-crystallized with human alpha-thrombin, which exhibited an in vitro K(i) of 140nM and more that 478-fold selectivity against trypsin, is discussed. PMID:12617892

  2. Differential role of RIP1 in Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization of neuroblastoma cells

    PubMed Central

    Czaplinski, Sebastian; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Torkov, Alica; SeggewiΔ, Dominik; Hugle, Manuela; Fulda, Simone

    2015-01-01

    We explored the potential of Smac mimetics, which antagonize Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, for chemosensitization of neuroblastoma (NB). Here, we report that Smac mimetics, e.g. BV6, prime NB cells for chemotherapeutics including the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin (DOX) and vinca alkaloids such as Vincristine (VCR), Vinblastine (VBL) and Vinorelbine (VNR). Additionally, BV6 acts in concert with DOX or VCR to suppress long-term clonogenic growth. While BV6 causes rapid downregulation of cellular IAP (cIAP)1 protein and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation, DOX/BV6- or VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis occurs independently of NF-κB or TNFα signaling, since overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor or the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α-blocking antibody Enbrel fail to block cell death. Mechanistic studies reveal that Receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 is required for DOX/BV6-, but not for VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis, since transient or stable knockdown of RIP1 or the pharmacological RIP1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 significantly reduce apoptosis. By comparison, VCR/BV6-mediated apoptosis critically depends on the mitochondrial pathway. VCR/BV6 cotreatment causes phosphorylation of BCL-2 during mitotic arrest, enhanced activation of BAX and BAK and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Additionally, overexpression of BCL-2 profoundly suppresses VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis. Thus, BV6 sensitizes NB cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via distinct initial signaling mechanisms depending on the chemotherapeutic drug. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights into Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization of NB. PMID:26575016

  3. Differential role of RIP1 in Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization of neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Czaplinski, Sebastian; Abhari, Behnaz Ahangarian; Torkov, Alica; Seggewiß, Dominik; Hugle, Manuela; Fulda, Simone

    2015-12-01

    We explored the potential of Smac mimetics, which antagonize Inhibitor of Apoptosis (IAP) proteins, for chemosensitization of neuroblastoma (NB). Here, we report that Smac mimetics, e.g. BV6, prime NB cells for chemotherapeutics including the topoisomerase II inhibitor doxorubicin (DOX) and vinca alkaloids such as Vincristine (VCR), Vinblastine (VBL) and Vinorelbine (VNR). Additionally, BV6 acts in concert with DOX or VCR to suppress long-term clonogenic growth. While BV6 causes rapid downregulation of cellular IAP (cIAP)1 protein and nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-κB) activation, DOX/BV6- or VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis occurs independently of NF-κB or TNFα signaling, since overexpression of dominant-negative IκBα superrepressor or the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF)α-blocking antibody Enbrel fail to block cell death. Mechanistic studies reveal that Receptor-interacting protein (RIP)1 is required for DOX/BV6-, but not for VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis, since transient or stable knockdown of RIP1 or the pharmacological RIP1 inhibitor necrostatin-1 significantly reduce apoptosis. By comparison, VCR/BV6-mediated apoptosis critically depends on the mitochondrial pathway. VCR/BV6 cotreatment causes phosphorylation of BCL-2 during mitotic arrest, enhanced activation of BAX and BAK and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Additionally, overexpression of BCL-2 profoundly suppresses VCR/BV6-induced apoptosis. Thus, BV6 sensitizes NB cells to chemotherapy-induced apoptosis via distinct initial signaling mechanisms depending on the chemotherapeutic drug. These findings provide novel mechanistic insights into Smac mimetic-mediated chemosensitization of NB. PMID:26575016

  4. Nobiletin Ameliorates the Deficits in Hippocampal BDNF, TrkB, and Synapsin I Induced by Chronic Unpredictable Mild Stress

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing; Zhou, Ying; Liu, Bin-Bin; Liu, Qing; Geng, Di; Weng, Lian-Jin; Yi, Li-Tao

    2013-01-01

    Background. Our previous study has demonstrated that nobiletin could reverse the behavioral alterations in stressed mice. However, the relation of its antidepressant-like action with neurotrophic molecular expression remains unknown. This study aimed to explore the antidepressant-like mechanism of nobiletin related to the neurotrophic system in rats exposed to chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS). Methods. Depressive-like anhedonia (assessed by sucrose preference) and serum corticosterone secretion were evaluated in the CUMS, followed by brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), its tropomyosin-related kinase receptor B (TrkB), and the downstream target synapsin I expressions in the hippocampus. Results. Anhedonia, which occurred within week 2, was rapidly ameliorated by nobiletin. While fluoxetine needed additional 2 weeks to improve the anhedonia. In addition, nobiletin administration for 5 weeks significantly ameliorated CUMS-induced increase in serum corticosterone levels. Furthermore, we also found that CUMS-induced deficits of hippocampal BDNF, TrkB, and synapsin I were ameliorated by nobiletin. Conclusions. Taken together, these findings suggest that nobiletin produces rapidly acting antidepressant-like responses in the CUMS and imply that BDNF-TrkB pathway may play an important role in the antidepressant-like effect of nobiletin. PMID:23573124

  5. Dark energy oscillations in mimetic F (R ) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odintsov, S. D.; Oikonomou, V. K.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we address the problem of dark energy oscillations in the context of mimetic F (R ) gravity with potential. The issue of dark energy oscillations can be a problem in some models of ordinary F (R ) gravity, and a remedy that can make the oscillations milder is to introduce additional modifications in the functional form of the F (R ) gravity. As we demonstrate, the power-law modifications are not necessary in the mimetic F (R ) case, and by appropriately choosing the mimetic potential and the Lagrange multiplier, it is possible to make the oscillations almost vanish at the end of the matter domination era and during the late-time acceleration era. We examine the behavior of the dark energy equation of state parameter and of the total effective equation of state parameter as functions of the redshift, and we compare the resulting picture with the ordinary F (R ) gravity case. As we also show that the present day values of the dark energy equation of state parameter and of the total effective equation of state parameter are in better agreement with the observational data, in comparison to the ordinary F (R ) gravity case. Finally, we study the evolution of the growth factor as a function of the redshift for all the mimetic models we use.

  6. The Co-Occurrence of Quotatives with Mimetic Performances.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buchstaller, Isabelle

    2003-01-01

    This paper discusses mimesis, the direct representation and total imitation of an event. It studies the co-occurrence of quotative verbs with mimetic enactment based on two corpora of U.S. American English, both available through the University of Pennsylvania Data Consortium. The Switchboard Corpus has 542 speakers ranging in age from 20-60 years…

  7. Therapeutic Applications of Incretin Mimetics for Metabolic Diseases: Preclinical Studies

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exenatide (exendin-4) is an incretin mimetic peptide that shares several glucoregulatory actions with the endogenous incretin GLP-1. In addition to its actions on glucose control, exenatide produces effects to reduce food intake and body weight in all species studied. GLP-1 and exenatide have also b...

  8. Multi-Facial, Non-Peptidic α-Helix Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Lanning, Maryanna E.; Fletcher, Steven

    2015-01-01

    α-Helices often recognize their target proteins at protein–protein interfaces through more than one recognition face. This review describes the state-of-the-art in the design of non-peptidic α-helix mimetics that reproduce functionality from multiple faces of an α-helix. PMID:26404384

  9. Redox regulation of Smac mimetic-induced cell death.

    PubMed

    Fulda, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Cell death and survival programs are controlled by the cellular redox state, which is typically dysregulated during oncogenesis. A recent study reports that the inhibition of antioxidant defenses resulting from glutathione depletion can prime acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells for death induced by Smac mimetics. PMID:27308489

  10. Cell outer membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles: preparation, characterization and cytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Liang, Fei; Kong, Lingheng; Zheng, Lina; Fan, Tao

    2015-01-01

    A negatively charged copolymer poly (MPC-co-AMPS) of 2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine (MPC) and 2-acrylamide-2-methyl propane sulfonic acid (AMPS) was designed and synthesized. Chitosan nanoparticles with cell outer membrane mimetic structure were prepared by electrostatic interaction between the sulfonic acid groups of poly (MPC-co-AMPS) and the protonated amino groups of chitosan. Effects of factors on influencing the particle size, distribution, and stability were investigated. The experimental results showed that cell membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles with controllable and homogeneous size ranged from 100 to 300 nm were prepared at the concentration of 0.1-2.0 mg/mL and the charge ratio of 0.5-1.1. Chitosan nanoparticles prepared can exist stably for more than 45 days when placed at 4 °C and pH < 7.5. The cytotoxicity of the chitosan nanoparticles reduced significantly after surface modification with cell membrane mimetic structure, meeting the basic requirements of biomedical materials. The results suggest cell membrane mimetic chitosan nanoparticles prepared with polyanion and polycation obtain good biological compatibility and immune stealth ability, which has important academic significance and great application prospects. PMID:26230052

  11. Bio-Mimetic Sensors Based on Molecularly Imprinted Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Algieri, Catia; Drioli, Enrico; Guzzo, Laura; Donato, Laura

    2014-01-01

    An important challenge for scientific research is the production of artificial systems able to mimic the recognition mechanisms occurring at the molecular level in living systems. A valid contribution in this direction resulted from the development of molecular imprinting. By means of this technology, selective molecular recognition sites are introduced in a polymer, thus conferring it bio-mimetic properties. The potential applications of these systems include affinity separations, medical diagnostics, drug delivery, catalysis, etc. Recently, bio-sensing systems using molecularly imprinted membranes, a special form of imprinted polymers, have received the attention of scientists in various fields. In these systems imprinted membranes are used as bio-mimetic recognition elements which are integrated with a transducer component. The direct and rapid determination of an interaction between the recognition element and the target analyte (template) was an encouraging factor for the development of such systems as alternatives to traditional bio-assay methods. Due to their high stability, sensitivity and specificity, bio-mimetic sensors-based membranes are used for environmental, food, and clinical uses. This review deals with the development of molecularly imprinted polymers and their different preparation methods. Referring to the last decades, the application of these membranes as bio-mimetic sensor devices will be also reported. PMID:25196110

  12. The SMAC mimetic, LCL-161, reduces survival in aggressive MYC-driven lymphoma while promoting susceptibility to endotoxic shock.

    PubMed

    West, A C; Martin, B P; Andrews, D A; Hogg, S J; Banerjee, A; Grigoriadis, G; Johnstone, R W; Shortt, J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) antagonize caspase activation and regulate death receptor signaling cascades. LCL-161 is a small molecule second mitochondrial activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic, which both disengages IAPs from caspases and induces proteasomal degradation of cIAP-1 and -2, resulting in altered signaling through the NFκB pathway, enhanced TNF production and sensitization to apoptosis mediated by the extrinsic pathway. SMAC mimetics are undergoing clinical evaluation in a range of hematological malignancies. Burkitt-like lymphomas are hallmarked by a low apoptotic threshold, conveying sensitivity to a range of apoptosis-inducing stimuli. While evaluating LCL-161 in the Eμ-Myc model of aggressive Burkitt-like lymphoma, we noted unexpected resistance to apoptosis induction despite 'on-target' IAP degradation and NFκB activation. Moreover, LCL-161 treatment of lymphoma-bearing mice resulted in apparent disease acceleration concurrent to augmented inflammatory cytokine-release in the same animals. Indiscriminate exposure of lymphoma patients to SMAC mimetics may therefore be detrimental due to both unanticipated prolymphoma effects and increased susceptibility to endotoxic shock. PMID:27043662

  13. The SMAC mimetic, LCL-161, reduces survival in aggressive MYC-driven lymphoma while promoting susceptibility to endotoxic shock

    PubMed Central

    West, A C; Martin, B P; Andrews, D A; Hogg, S J; Banerjee, A; Grigoriadis, G; Johnstone, R W; Shortt, J

    2016-01-01

    Inhibitor of apoptosis proteins (IAPs) antagonize caspase activation and regulate death receptor signaling cascades. LCL-161 is a small molecule second mitochondrial activator of caspase (SMAC) mimetic, which both disengages IAPs from caspases and induces proteasomal degradation of cIAP-1 and -2, resulting in altered signaling through the NFκB pathway, enhanced TNF production and sensitization to apoptosis mediated by the extrinsic pathway. SMAC mimetics are undergoing clinical evaluation in a range of hematological malignancies. Burkitt-like lymphomas are hallmarked by a low apoptotic threshold, conveying sensitivity to a range of apoptosis-inducing stimuli. While evaluating LCL-161 in the Eμ-Myc model of aggressive Burkitt-like lymphoma, we noted unexpected resistance to apoptosis induction despite ‘on-target' IAP degradation and NFκB activation. Moreover, LCL-161 treatment of lymphoma-bearing mice resulted in apparent disease acceleration concurrent to augmented inflammatory cytokine-release in the same animals. Indiscriminate exposure of lymphoma patients to SMAC mimetics may therefore be detrimental due to both unanticipated prolymphoma effects and increased susceptibility to endotoxic shock. PMID:27043662

  14. The BCL-2 protein family, BH3-mimetics and cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Delbridge, A R D; Strasser, A

    2015-01-01

    Escape from apoptosis is a key attribute of tumour cells and facilitates chemo-resistance. The ‘BCL-2-regulated' or ‘intrinsic' apoptotic pathway integrates stress and survival signalling to govern whether a cancer cell will live or die. Indeed, many pro-apoptotic members of the BCL-2 family have demonstrated tumour-suppression activity in mouse models of cancer and are lost or repressed in certain human cancers. Conversely, overexpression of pro-survival BCL-2 family members promotes tumorigenesis in humans and in mouse models. Many of the drugs currently used in the clinic mediate their therapeutic effects (at least in part) through the activation of the BCL-2-regulated apoptotic pathway. However, initiators of this apoptotic pathway, such as p53, are mutated, lost or silenced in many human cancers rendering them refractory to treatment. To counter such resistance mechanisms, a novel class of therapeutics, ‘BH3-mimetics', has been developed. These drugs directly activate apoptosis by binding and inhibiting select antiapoptotic BCL-2 family members and thereby bypass the requirement for upstream initiators, such as p53. In this review, we discuss the role of the BCL-2 protein family in the development and treatment of cancer, with an emphasis on mechanistic studies using well-established mouse models of cancer, before describing the development and already recognised potential of the BH3-mimetic compounds. PMID:25952548

  15. Exercise-mimetic AICAR transiently benefits brain function

    PubMed Central

    Guerrieri, Davide; van Praag, Henriette

    2015-01-01

    Exercise enhances learning and memory in animals and humans. The role of peripheral factors that may trigger the beneficial effects of running on brain function has been sparsely examined. In particular, it is unknown whether AMP-kinase (AMPK) activation in muscle can predict enhancement of brain plasticity. Here we compare the effects of running and administration of AMPK agonist 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide 1-β-D-ribofuranoside (AICAR, 500 mg/kg), for 3, 7 or 14 days in one-month-old male C57BL/6J mice, on muscle AMPK signaling. At the time-points where we observed equivalent running- and AICAR-induced muscle pAMPK levels (7 and 14 days), cell proliferation, synaptic plasticity and gene expression, as well as markers of oxidative stress and inflammation in the dentate gyrus (DG) of the hippocampus and lateral entorhinal cortex (LEC) were evaluated. At the 7-day time-point, both regimens increased new DG cell number and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) protein levels. Furthermore, microarray analysis of DG and LEC tissue showed a remarkable overlap between running and AICAR in the regulation of neuronal, mitochondrial and metabolism related gene classes. Interestingly, while similar outcomes for both treatments were stable over time in muscle, in the brain an inversion occurred at fourteen days. The compound no longer increased DG cell proliferation or neurotrophin levels, and upregulated expression of apoptotic genes and inflammatory cytokine interleukin-1β. Thus, an exercise mimetic that produces changes in muscle consistent with those of exercise does not have the same sustainable positive effects on the brain, indicating that only running consistently benefits brain function. PMID:26286955

  16. Preclinical Pharmacokinetic Analysis of NOV-002, a Glutathione Disulfide Mimetic

    PubMed Central

    Uys, Joachim D.; Manevich, Yefim; DeVane, Lindsay C.; He, Lin; Garret, Tracy E.; Pazoles, Christopher J.; Tew, Kenneth D.; Townsend, Danyelle M.

    2010-01-01

    Summary NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is in Phase III clinical trials for the treatment of advanced non-small cell lung cancer and other oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Nonlinear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of ~13 mins with an AUC of 1.18 μg.h/ml, a Cmax of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  17. Preclinical pharmacokinetic analysis of NOV-002, a glutathione disulfide mimetic.

    PubMed

    Uys, J D; Manevich, Y; Devane, L C; He, L; Garret, T E; Pazoles, C J; Tew, K D; Townsend, D M

    2010-09-01

    NOV-002 is a glutathione disulfide (GSSG) mimetic that is the subject of clinical investigation in oncology indications. GSSG is reduced by glutathione reductase (GR) to form glutathione (GSH), thereby maintaining redox homeostasis. The purpose of the study was to report the pharmacokinetic properties of NOV-002 and evaluate the effect that NOV-002 elicits in redox homeostasis. The pharmacokinetic analysis and tissue distribution of NOV-002 and GSH was evaluated in mice following a dose of 250 mg/kg, i.p. The redox potential and total protein thiol status was calculated. Here we show that NOV-002 is a substrate for GR and that GSH is a primary metabolite. Non-linear pharmacokinetic modeling predicted that the estimated absorption and elimination rate constants correspond to a half-life of approximately 13 min with an AUC of 1.18 μgh/mL, a C(max) of 2.16 μg/ml and a volume of distribution of 42.61 L/kg. In addition, measurement of the redox potential and total protein thiol status indicated the generation of a transient oxidative signal in the plasma compartment after administration of NOV-002. These results indicate that NOV-002 exerts kinetic and dynamic effects in mice consistent with the GSSG component as the active pharmacological constituent of the drug. A longer-lasting decrease in total plasma free thiol content was also seen, suggesting that the oxidative effect of the GSSG from NOV-002 was impacting redox homeostasis. PMID:20359856

  18. Characterization of Phospho-(Tyrosine)-Mimetic Calmodulin Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Stateva, Silviya R.; Salas, Valentina; Benaim, Gustavo; Menéndez, Margarita; Solís, Dolores; Villalobo, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Calmodulin (CaM) phosphorylated at different serine/threonine and tyrosine residues is known to exert differential regulatory effects on a variety of CaM-binding enzymes as compared to non-phosphorylated CaM. In this report we describe the preparation and characterization of a series of phospho-(Y)-mimetic CaM mutants in which either one or the two tyrosine residues present in CaM (Y99 and Y138) were substituted to aspartic acid or glutamic acid. It was expected that the negative charge of the respective carboxyl group of these amino acids mimics the negative charge of phosphate and reproduce the effects that distinct phospho-(Y)-CaM species may have on target proteins. We describe some physicochemical properties of these CaM mutants as compared to wild type CaM, after their expression in Escherichia coli and purification to homogeneity, including: i) changes in their electrophoretic mobility in the absence and presence of Ca2+; ii) ultraviolet (UV) light absorption spectra, far- and near-UV circular dichroism data; iii) thermal stability in the absence and presence of Ca2+; and iv) Tb3+-emitted fluorescence upon tyrosine excitation. We also describe some biochemical properties of these CaM mutants, such as their differential phosphorylation by the tyrosine kinase c-Src, and their action as compared to wild type CaM, on the activity of two CaM-dependent enzymes: cyclic nucleotide phosphodiesterase 1 (PDE1) and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) assayed in vitro. PMID:25830911

  19. Morphological differences in adipose tissue and changes in BDNF/Trkb expression in brain and gut of a diet induced obese zebrafish model.

    PubMed

    Montalbano, Giuseppe; Mania, Manuela; Guerrera, Maria Cristina; Abbate, Francesco; Laurà, Rosaria; Navarra, Michele; Vega, Jose A; Ciriaco, Emilia; Germanà, Antonino

    2016-03-01

    Obesity is a multifactorial disease generated by an alteration in balance between energy intake and expenditure, also dependent on genetic and non-genetic factors. Moreover, various nuclei of the hypothalamus receive and process peripheral stimuli from the gastrointestinal tract, controlling food intake and therefore energy balance. Among anorexigenic molecules, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) acts through the tyrosine-kinase receptor TrkB. Numerous data demonstrate that the BDNF/TrkB system has a fundamental role in the control of food intake and body weight. Quantitative PCR and immunohistochemistry for both BDNF and TrkB were used to determine changes in levels in the brain and gastro-intestinal tract of an experimental zebrafish model of diet-induced obesity. Overfed animals showed increased weight and body mass index as well as accumulation of adipose tissue in the visceral, subcutaneous and hepatic areas. These changes were concomitant with decreased levels of BDNF mRNA in the gastro-intestinal tract and increased expression of TrkB mRNA in the brain. Overfeeding did not change the density of cells displaying immunoreactivity for BDNF or TrkB in the brain although both were significantly diminished in the gastro-intestinal tract. These results suggest an involvement of the BDNF/TrkB system in the regulation of food intake and energy balance in zebrafish, as in mammals. PMID:26617157

  20. Intravenous administration of adipose tissue-derived stem cells enhances nerve healing and promotes BDNF expression via the TrkB signaling in a rat stroke model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Zheng, Wei; Bai, Hongying; Wang, Jin; Wei, Ruili; Wen, Hongtao; Ning, Hanbing

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown the beneficial effects of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) transplantation in stroke. However, the molecular mechanism by which transplanted ADSCs promote nerve healing is not yet elucidated. In order to make clear the molecular mechanism for the neuroprotective effects of ADSCs and investigate roles of the BDNF–TrkB signaling in neuroprotection of ADSCs, we, therefore, examined the neurological function, brain water content, and the protein expression in middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) rats with or without ADSCs transplantation. ADSCs were transplanted intravenously into rats at 30 minutes after MCAO. K252a, an inhibitor of TrkB, was administered into rats by intraventricular and brain stereotaxic injection. Modified neurological severity score tests were performed to measure behavioral outcomes. The results showed that ADSCs significantly alleviated neurological deficits and reduced brain water content in MCAO rats. The protein expression levels of BDNF and TrkB significantly increased in the cortex of MCAO rats with ADSCs treatment. However, K252a administration reversed the ADSCs-induced elevation of BDNF, TrkB, and Bcl-2 and reduction of Bax protein in MCAO rats. ADSCs promote BDNF expression via the TrkB signaling and improve functional neurological recovery in stroke rats. PMID:27330296

  1. DNA methylation-dependent regulation of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes in human hepatocellular carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Jin, Wook; Lee, Jong-Joo; Kim, Min Soo; Son, Byung Ho; Cho, Yong Kyun; Kim, Hyoung-Pyo

    2011-03-04

    Research highlights: {yields} Expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC is significantly elevated in human hepatocellular carcinoma. {yields} Downregulation of Trks is correlated with their promoter hypermethylation. {yields} Inhibiting DNA methylation restored expression of Trks in normal liver cell lines. {yields} Trks promote the proliferation of hepatocellular carcinoma. {yields} Trks induce expression of the metastatic regulator, Twist. -- Abstract: The tropomyosin-related kinase (Trk) family of neurotrophin receptors, TrkA, TrkB and TrkC, has been implicated in the growth and survival of human cancers. Here we report that Trks are frequently overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) from patients and human liver cancer cell lines. To unravel the underlying molecular mechanism(s) for this phenomenon, DNA methylation patterns of CpG islands in TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes were examined in normal and cancer cell lines derived from liver. A good correlation was observed between promoter hypermethylation and lower expression of TrkA, TrkB, and TrkC genes, which was supported by the data that inhibiting DNA methylation with 5-azacytidine restored expression of those genes in normal liver cell lines. Furthermore, Trks promoted the proliferation of HepG2 and induced expression of the metastatic regulator, Twist. These results suggest that Trks may contribute to growth and metastasis of liver cancer.

  2. The action of mimetic peptides on connexins protects fibroblasts from the negative effects of ischemia reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Glass, Beverley J.; Hu, Rebecca G.; Phillips, Anthony R. J.; Becker, David L.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Connexins have been proposed as a target for therapeutic treatment of a variety of conditions. The main approaches have been by antisense or small peptides specific against connexins. Some of these peptides enhance communication while others interfere with connexin binding partners or bind to the intracellular and extracellular loops of connexins. Here, we explored the mechanism of action of a connexin mimetic peptide by evaluating its effect on gap junction channels, connexin protein levels and hemichannel activity in fibroblast cells under normal conditions and following ischemia reperfusion injury which elevates Cx43 levels, increases hemichannel activity and causes cell death. Our results showed that the effects of the mimetic peptide were concentration-dependent. High concentrations (100-300 μM) significantly reduced Cx43 protein levels and GJIC within 2 h, while these effects did not appear until 6 h when using lower concentrations (10-30 μM). Cell death can be reduced when hemichannel opening and GJIC were minimised. PMID:26471768

  3. Alpha-Asarone, a Major Component of Acorus gramineus, Attenuates Corticosterone-Induced Anxiety-Like Behaviours via Modulating TrkB Signaling Process

    PubMed Central

    Sur, Bongjun; Yeom, Mijung; Shim, Insop; Lee, Hyejung

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the anxiolytic-like activity of α-asarone (AAS) from Acorus gramineus in an experimental rat model of anxiety induced by repeated administration of the exogenous stress hormone corticosterone (CORT). The putative anxiolytic effect of AAS was studied in behavioral tests of anxiety, such as the elevated plus maze (EPM) test and the hole-board test (HBT) in rats. For 21 consecutive days, male rats received 50, 100, or 200 mg/kg AAS (i.p.) 30 min prior to a daily injection of CORT. Dysregulation of the HPA axis in response to the repeated CORT injections was confirmed by measuring serum levels of CORT and the expression of corticotrophin-releasing factor (CRF) in the hypothalamus. Daily AAS (200 mg/kg) administration increased open-arm exploration significantly in the EPM test, and it increased the duration of head dipping activity in the HBT. It also blocked the increase in tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) and decreased mRNA expression of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor, TrkB, in the hippocampus. These results indicated that the administration of AAS prior to high-dose exogenous CORT significantly improved anxiety-like behaviors, which are associated with modification of the central noradrenergic system and with BDNF function in rats. The current finding may improve understanding of the neurobiological mechanisms responsible for changes in emotions induced by repeated administration of high doses of CORT or by elevated levels of hormones associated with chronic stress. Thus, AAS did exhibit an anxiolytic-like effects in animal models of anxiety. PMID:24976758

  4. Association between Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms of the Tyrosine Kinase Receptor B (TrkB) and Post-Stroke Depression in China

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qian; Hu, Jia; Shang, Xianjin; Huang, Xianjun; Ge, Liang; Zhou, Taofeng

    2015-01-01

    Background Polymorphisms of the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) have been investigated as candidate genes for post-stroke depression (PSD), and its receptor, neurotrophic tyrosine kinase receptor B (TrkB), has been associated with depression. However, no further data have yet reported the association between PSD and polymorphisms in TrkB. This study aims to investigate whether a relationship exists between TrkB polymorphisms and PSD. Methods A total of 312 depression patients (PSD patients) and 472 non-depression patient controls (NPSD patients) were recruited. All patients were evaluated using the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD) to determine depression severity, and PSD patients were diagnosed in accordance with DSM-V criteria. Three single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), namely, rs1187323, rs1212171, and rs1778929, in the TrkB gene were genotyped by high-resolution melt analysis. Results The SNP rs1778929 was significantly more associated with incident PSD in participants with the TT genotype than in those with CC (OR 0.482, 95% CI: 0.313–0.744). In terms of rs1187323, stroke was significantly more associated with incident depression in participants with the AC genotype than in those with AA (OR 0.500, 95% CI: 0.368–0.680). The minor allele (T) of rs1778929 (P = 0.024, OR = 0.725, 95% CI = 0.590–0.890) and the minor allele (C) of rs1187323 (P = 0.000, OR = 0.598, 95% CI = 0.466–0.767) were found to be significantly associated with PSD. Neither genotype nor allele frequencies of rs1212171 showed statistically significant differences between PSD and NPSD patients. Conclusions The results suggest that rs1778929 and rs1187323 in the TrkB gene are significantly associated with post-stroke depression in the Chinese population. Further studies are necessary to confirm our findings. PMID:26641254

  5. Synthesis of cellulose nanocrystals carrying tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands and inhibition of alphavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Zoppe, Justin O; Ruottinen, Ville; Ruotsalainen, Janne; Rönkkö, Seppo; Johansson, Leena-Sisko; Hinkkanen, Ari; Järvinen, Kristiina; Seppälä, Jukka

    2014-04-14

    We present two facile approaches for introducing multivalent displays of tyrosine sulfate mimetic ligands on the surface of cellulose nanocrystals (CNCs) for application as viral inhibitors. We tested the efficacy of cellulose nanocrystals, prepared either from cotton fibers or Whatman filter paper, to inhibit alphavirus infectivity in Vero (B) cells. Cellulose nanocrystals were produced by sulfuric acid hydrolysis leading to nanocrystal surfaces decorated with anionic sulfate groups. When the fluorescent marker expressing Semliki Forest virus vector, VA7-EGFP, was incubated with CNCs, strong inhibition of virus infectivity was achieved, up to 100 and 88% for cotton and Whatman CNCs, respectively. When surface sulfate groups of CNCs were exchanged for tyrosine sulfate mimetic groups (i.e. phenyl sulfonates), improved viral inhibition was attained. Our observations suggest that the conjugation of target-specific functionalities to CNC surfaces provides a means to control their antiviral activity. Multivalent CNCs did not cause observable in vitro cytotoxicity to Vero (B) cells or human corneal epithelial (HCE-T) cells, even within the 100% virus-inhibitory concentrations. Based on the similar chemistry of known polyanionic inhibitors, our results suggest the potential application of CNCs as inhibitors of other viruses, such as human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and herpes simplex viruses. PMID:24628489

  6. Evidence for a Müllerian mimetic radiation in Asian pitvipers.

    PubMed

    Sanders, K L; Malhotra, A; Thorpe, R S

    2006-05-01

    Müllerian mimicry, in which toxic species gain mutual protection from shared warning signals, is poorly understood in vertebrates, reflecting a paucity of examples. Indirect evidence for mimicry is found if monophyletic species or clades show parallel geographic variation in warning patterns. Here, we evaluate a hypothesis of Müllerian mimicry for the pitvipers in Southeast Asia using a phylogeny derived from DNA sequences from four combined mitochondrial regions. Mantel matrix correlation tests show that conspicuous red colour pattern elements are significantly associated with sympatric and parapatric populations in four genera. To our knowledge, this represents the first evidence of a Müllerian mimetic radiation in vipers. The putative mimetic patterns are rarely found in females. This appears paradoxical in light of the Müllerian prediction of monomorphism, but may be explained by divergent selection pressures on the sexes, which have different behaviours. We suggest that biased predation on active males causes selection for protective warning coloration, whereas crypsis is favoured in relatively sedentary females. PMID:16600892

  7. The polysialic acid mimetics 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine facilitate nervous system repair.

    PubMed

    Saini, Vedangana; Lutz, David; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a large negatively charged glycan mainly attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Several studies have shown that it is important for correct formation of brain circuitries during development and for synaptic plasticity, learning and memory in the adult. PSA also plays a major role in nervous system regeneration following injury. As a next step for clinical translation of PSA based therapeutics, we have previously identified the small organic compounds 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine as PSA mimetics. Activity of 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine had been confirmed in assays with neural cells from the central and peripheral nervous system in vitro and shown to be independent of their function as serotonin receptor 5-HT1B/1D agonist or cytostatic drug, respectively. As we show here in an in vivo paradigm for spinal cord injury in mice, 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine enhance regain of motor functions, axonal regrowth, motor neuron survival and remyelination. These data indicate that 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine may be re-tasked from their current usage as a 5-HT1B/1D agonist or cytostatic drug to act as mimetics for PSA to stimulate regeneration after injury in the mammalian nervous system. PMID:27324620

  8. Prussian blue nanoparticles as peroxidase mimetics for sensitive colorimetric detection of hydrogen peroxide and glucose.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Weimin; Ma, Diao; Du, Jianxiu

    2014-03-01

    Prussian blue nanoparticles (PB NPs) exhibits an intrinsic peroxidase-like catalytic activity towards the hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-mediated oxidation of classical peroxidase substrate 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) diammonium salt to produce a colored product. The catalysis follows Michaelis-Menen kinetics and shows strong affinity for H2O2. Using PB NPs as a peroxidase mimetics, a colorimetric method was developed for the detection of 0.05-50.0 μM H2O2, with a detection limit of 0.031 μM. When the catalytic reaction of PB NPs was coupled with the reaction of glucose oxidation catalyzed by glucose oxidase, a sensitive and selective colorimetric method for the detection of glucose was realized. The limit of detection for glucose was determined to be as low as 0.03 μM and the linear range was from 0.1 μM to 50.0 μM. The method was successfully applied to the determination of glucose in human serum. Compared with other nanomaterials-based peroxidase mimetics, PB NPs provides 10-100 times higher sensitivity toward the detection of H2O2 and glucose. The detection platform developed showed great potential applications in varieties of physiological importance substances when merged with appropriate H2O2-producing oxidases. PMID:24468383

  9. The polysialic acid mimetics 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine facilitate nervous system repair

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Vedangana; Lutz, David; Kataria, Hardeep; Kaur, Gurcharan; Schachner, Melitta; Loers, Gabriele

    2016-01-01

    Polysialic acid (PSA) is a large negatively charged glycan mainly attached to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM). Several studies have shown that it is important for correct formation of brain circuitries during development and for synaptic plasticity, learning and memory in the adult. PSA also plays a major role in nervous system regeneration following injury. As a next step for clinical translation of PSA based therapeutics, we have previously identified the small organic compounds 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine as PSA mimetics. Activity of 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine had been confirmed in assays with neural cells from the central and peripheral nervous system in vitro and shown to be independent of their function as serotonin receptor 5-HT1B/1D agonist or cytostatic drug, respectively. As we show here in an in vivo paradigm for spinal cord injury in mice, 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine enhance regain of motor functions, axonal regrowth, motor neuron survival and remyelination. These data indicate that 5-nonyloxytryptamine and vinorelbine may be re-tasked from their current usage as a 5-HT1B/1D agonist or cytostatic drug to act as mimetics for PSA to stimulate regeneration after injury in the mammalian nervous system. PMID:27324620

  10. Downregulation of the PHLDA1 gene in IMR-32 neuroblastoma cells increases levels of Aurora A, TRKB and affects proteins involved in apoptosis and autophagy pathways.

    PubMed

    Durbas, Małgorzata; Horwacik, Irena; Boratyn, Elżbieta; Rokita, Hanna

    2016-08-01

    We have recently shown that mRNA and protein of PHLDA1 (pleckstrin-homology-like domain family A, member  1) were by far the most upregulated molecules upon treatment of IMR-32 cells with the anti-GD2 ganglioside monoclonal antibody 14G2a. Hence, we decided to study functions of PHLDA1 using human neuroblastoma IMR-32 cells as a model. Here, we show that constitutive expression of mRNA and protein of the PHLDA1 gene in IMR-32 cells was inversely correlated with transcript of the AURKA gene and Aurora A oncoprotein. Next, we silenced PHLDA1 expression in IMR-32 cells using an shRNA interference method. We report that IMR-32 cells with stable downregulation of PHLDA1 showed enhanced cellular ATP levels and an increase in mitochondrial membrane potential, as compared to control and non-transduced cells. We demonstrated that downregulation of PHLDA1 leads to a significant increase in expression of Aurora A and TRKB that are markers of poor prognosis in neuroblastoma. Also, we measured an increase in Aurora A and Akt kinases phosphorylation in the cells. Most importantly, PHLDA1-silenced cells were less susceptible to apoptosis than control cells, as shown by the lower expression of cleaved caspase-3 and PARP as well as a decreased activity of caspase-3 and -7. Our study negatively correlates expression of PHLDA1 and Aurora A in IMR-32 cells and sheds new light on functions of PHLDA1 in the neuroblastoma tumor cells, suggesting its role as a pro-apoptotic protein. Additionally, our results show possible links of the protein to regulation of features of mitochondria and formation of autophagosomes. PMID:27278006

  11. Exosome mimetics: a novel class of drug delivery systems

    PubMed Central

    Kooijmans, Sander AA; Vader, Pieter; van Dommelen, Susan M; van Solinge, Wouter W; Schiffelers, Raymond M

    2012-01-01

    The identification of extracellular phospholipid vesicles as conveyors of cellular information has created excitement in the field of drug delivery. Biological therapeutics, including short interfering RNA and recombinant proteins, are prone to degradation, have limited ability to cross biological membranes, and may elicit immune responses. Therefore, delivery systems for such drugs are under intensive investigation. Exploiting extracellular vesicles as carriers for biological therapeutics is a promising strategy to overcome these issues and to achieve efficient delivery to the cytosol of target cells. Exosomes are a well studied class of extracellular vesicles known to carry proteins and nucleic acids, making them especially suitable for such strategies. However, the considerable complexity and the related high chance of off-target effects of these carriers are major barriers for translation to the clinic. Given that it is well possible that not all components of exosomes are required for their proper functioning, an alternative strategy would be to mimic these vesicles synthetically. By assembly of liposomes harboring only crucial components of natural exosomes, functional exosome mimetics may be created. The low complexity and use of well characterized components strongly increase the pharmaceutical acceptability of such systems. However, exosomal components that would be required for the assembly of functional exosome mimetics remain to be identified. This review provides insights into the composition and functional properties of exosomes, and focuses on components which could be used to enhance the drug delivery properties of exosome mimetics. PMID:22619510

  12. TrkB reduction exacerbates Alzheimer's disease-like signaling aberrations and memory deficits without affecting β-amyloidosis in 5XFAD mice

    PubMed Central

    Devi, L; Ohno, M

    2015-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and its receptor tropomyosin-related kinase B (TrkB) significantly decrease early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, it remains unclear whether BDNF/TrkB reductions may be mechanistically involved in the pathogenesis of AD. To address this question, we generated 5XFAD transgenic mice with heterozygous TrkB knockout (TrkB+/–·5XFAD), and tested the effects of TrkB reduction on AD-like features in this mouse model during an incipient stage that shows only modest amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology and retains normal mnemonic function. TrkB+/– reduction exacerbated memory declines in 5XFAD mice at 4–5 months of age as assessed by the hippocampus-dependent spontaneous alternation Y-maze task, while the memory performance was not affected in TrkB+/– mice. Meanwhile, TrkB+/–·5XFAD mice were normal in nest building, a widely used measure for social behavior, suggesting the memory-specific aggravation of AD-associated behavioral impairments. We found no difference between TrkB+/–·5XFAD and 5XFAD control mice in cerebral plaque loads, Aβ concentrations including total Aβ42 and soluble oligomers and β-amyloidogenic processing of amyloid precursor protein. Interestingly, reductions in hippocampal expression of AMPA/NMDA glutamate receptor subunits as well as impaired signaling pathways downstream to TrkB such as CREB (cAMP response element-binding protein) and Akt/GSK-3β (glycogen synthase kinase-3β) were observed in TrkB+/–·5XFAD mice but not in 5XFAD mice. Among these signaling aberrations, only Akt/GSK-3β dysfunction occurred in TrkB+/– mice, while others were synergistic consequences between TrkB reduction and subthreshold levels of Aβ in TrkB+/–·5XFAD mice. Collectively, our results indicate that reduced TrkB does not affect β-amyloidosis but exacerbates the manifestation of hippocampal mnemonic and signaling dysfunctions in early AD. PMID:25942043

  13. In Situ Enzymatically Generated Photoswitchable Oxidase Mimetics and Their Application for Colorimetric Detection of Glucose Oxidase.

    PubMed

    Cao, Gen-Xia; Wu, Xiu-Ming; Dong, Yu-Ming; Li, Zai-Jun; Wang, Guang-Li

    2016-01-01

    In this study, a simple and amplified colorimetric assay is developed for the detection of the enzymatic activity of glucose oxidase (GOx) based on in situ formation of a photoswitchable oxidase mimetic of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS quantum dots (QDs). GOx catalyzes the oxidation of 1-thio-β-d-glucose to give 1-thio-β-d-gluconic acid which spontaneously hydrolyzes to β-d-gluconic acid and H₂S; the generated H₂S instantly reacts with Cd(2+) in the presence of Na₃PO₄ to give PO₄(3-)-stabilized CdS QDs in situ. Under visible-light (λ ≥ 400 nm) stimulation, the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs are a new style of oxidase mimic derived by producing some active species, such as h⁺, (•)OH, O₂(•-) and a little H₂O₂, which can oxidize the typical substrate (3,3,5,5-tetramethylbenzydine (TMB)) with a color change. Based on the GOx-triggered growth of the oxidase mimetics of PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs in situ, we developed a simple and amplified colorimetric assay to probe the enzymatic activity of GOx. The proposed method allowed the detection of the enzymatic activity of GOx over the range from 25 μg/L to 50 mg/L with a low detection limit of 6.6 μg/L. We believe the PO₄(3-)-capped CdS QDs generated in situ with photo-stimulated enzyme-mimicking activity may find wide potential applications in biosensors. PMID:27409598

  14. Thioredoxin-mimetic peptides (TXM) reverse auranofin induced apoptosis and restore insulin secretion in insulinoma cells.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kutner, Moshe; Khomsky, Lena; Trus, Michael; Aisner, Yonatan; Niv, Masha Y; Benhar, Moran; Atlas, Daphne

    2013-04-01

    The thioredoxin reductase/thioredoxin system (TrxR/Trx1) plays a major role in protecting cells from oxidative stress. Disruption of the TrxR-Trx1 system keeps Trx1 in the oxidized state leading to cell death through activation of the ASK1-Trx1 apoptotic pathway. The potential mechanism and ability of tri- and tetra-oligopeptides derived from the canonical -CxxC- motif of the Trx1-active site to mimic and enhance Trx1 cellular activity was examined. The Trx mimetics peptides (TXM) protected insulinoma INS 832/13 cells from oxidative stress induced by selectively inhibiting TrxR with auranofin (AuF). TXM reversed the AuF-effects preventing apoptosis, and increasing cell-viability. The TXM peptides were effective in inhibiting AuF-induced MAPK, JNK and p38(MAPK) phosphorylation, in correlation with preventing caspase-3 cleavage and thereby PARP-1 dissociation. The ability to form a disulfide-bridge-like conformation was estimated from molecular dynamics simulations. The TXM peptides restored insulin secretion and displayed Trx1 denitrosylase activity. Their potency was 10-100-fold higher than redox reagents like NAC, AD4, or ascorbic acid. Unable to reverse ERK1/2 phosphorylation, TXM-CB3 (NAc-Cys-Pro-Cys amide) appeared to function in part, through inhibiting ASK1-Trx dissociation. These highly effective anti-apoptotic effects of Trx1 mimetic peptides exhibited in INS 832/13 cells could become valuable in treating adverse oxidative-stress related disorders such as diabetes. PMID:23327993

  15. The BH3 Mimetic Obatoclax Accumulates in Lysosomes and Causes Their Alkalinization.

    PubMed

    Stamelos, Vasileios A; Fisher, Natalie; Bamrah, Harnoor; Voisey, Carolyn; Price, Joshua C; Farrell, William E; Redman, Charles W; Richardson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Obatoclax belongs to a class of compounds known as BH3 mimetics which function as antagonists of Bcl-2 family apoptosis regulators. It has undergone extensive preclinical and clinical evaluation as a cancer therapeutic. Despite this, it is clear that obatoclax has additional pharmacological effects that contribute to its cytotoxic activity. It has been claimed that obatoclax, either alone or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapeutics, induces an autophagic form of cell death. In addition, obatoclax has been shown to inhibit lysosomal function, but the mechanism of this has not been elucidated. We have evaluated the mechanism of action of obatoclax in eight ovarian cancer cell lines. Consistent with its function as a BH3 mimetic, obatoclax induced apoptosis in three cell lines. However, in the remaining cell lines another form of cell death was evident because caspase activation and PARP cleavage were not observed. Obatoclax also failed to show synergy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, chemotherapeutic agents which we have previously shown to be synergistic with authentic Bcl-2 family antagonists. Obatoclax induced a profound accumulation of LC-3 but knockdown of Atg-5 or beclin had only minor effects on the activity of obatoclax in cell growth assays suggesting that the inhibition of lysosomal function rather than stimulation of autophagy may play a more prominent role in these cells. To evaluate how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function, confocal microscopy studies were conducted which demonstrated that obatoclax, which contains two basic pyrrole groups, accumulates in lysosomes. Studies using pH sensitive dyes demonstrated that obatoclax induced lysosomal alkalinization. Furthermore, obatoclax was synergistic in cell growth/survival assays with bafilomycin and chloroquine, two other drugs which cause lysosomal alkalinization. These studies explain, for the first time, how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function and suggest that lysosomal

  16. The BH3 Mimetic Obatoclax Accumulates in Lysosomes and Causes Their Alkalinization

    PubMed Central

    Stamelos, Vasileios A.; Fisher, Natalie; Bamrah, Harnoor; Voisey, Carolyn; Price, Joshua C.; Farrell, William E.; Redman, Charles W.; Richardson, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Obatoclax belongs to a class of compounds known as BH3 mimetics which function as antagonists of Bcl-2 family apoptosis regulators. It has undergone extensive preclinical and clinical evaluation as a cancer therapeutic. Despite this, it is clear that obatoclax has additional pharmacological effects that contribute to its cytotoxic activity. It has been claimed that obatoclax, either alone or in combination with other molecularly targeted therapeutics, induces an autophagic form of cell death. In addition, obatoclax has been shown to inhibit lysosomal function, but the mechanism of this has not been elucidated. We have evaluated the mechanism of action of obatoclax in eight ovarian cancer cell lines. Consistent with its function as a BH3 mimetic, obatoclax induced apoptosis in three cell lines. However, in the remaining cell lines another form of cell death was evident because caspase activation and PARP cleavage were not observed. Obatoclax also failed to show synergy with carboplatin and paclitaxel, chemotherapeutic agents which we have previously shown to be synergistic with authentic Bcl-2 family antagonists. Obatoclax induced a profound accumulation of LC-3 but knockdown of Atg-5 or beclin had only minor effects on the activity of obatoclax in cell growth assays suggesting that the inhibition of lysosomal function rather than stimulation of autophagy may play a more prominent role in these cells. To evaluate how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function, confocal microscopy studies were conducted which demonstrated that obatoclax, which contains two basic pyrrole groups, accumulates in lysosomes. Studies using pH sensitive dyes demonstrated that obatoclax induced lysosomal alkalinization. Furthermore, obatoclax was synergistic in cell growth/survival assays with bafilomycin and chloroquine, two other drugs which cause lysosomal alkalinization. These studies explain, for the first time, how obatoclax inhibits lysosomal function and suggest that lysosomal

  17. BDNF-TRKB signaling system of the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter is implicated in the panicolytic-like effect of antidepressant drugs.

    PubMed

    Casarotto, Plinio C; Santos, Paula C dos; Lucas, Guilherme A; Biojone, Caroline; Pobbe, Roger L H; Vilela-Costa, Heloisa H; Joca, Samia R L; Guimarães, Francisco S; Zangrossi, Hélio

    2015-06-01

    A wealth of evidence implicates the BDNF-TRKB system in the therapeutic effects of antidepressant drugs (ADs) on mood disorders. However, little is known about the involvement of this system in the panicolytic property also exerted by these compounds. In the present study we evaluated the participation of the BDNF-TRKB system of the dorsal periaqueductal gray matter (DPAG), a core structure involved in the pathophysiology of panic disorder, in AD-induced panicolytic-like effects in rats. The results showed that short- (3 days) or long-term (21 days) systemic treatment with the tricyclic ADs imipramine, clomipramine or desipramine increased BDNF levels in the DPAG. Only longterm treatment with the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor fluoxetine was able to increase BDNF levels in this structure. After 21-day treatment, fluoxetine and the three tricyclic ADs used also increased BDNF concentration in the hippocampus, a key area implicated in their mood-related actions. Neither in the DPAG nor hippocampus did long-term treatment with the standard anxiolytics diazepam, clonazepam or buspirone affect BDNF levels. Imipramine, both after short and long-term administration, and fluoxetine under the latter regimen, raised the levels of phosphorylated TRKB in the DPAG. Short-term treatment with imipramine or BDNF microinjection inhibited escape expression in rats exposed to the elevated T maze, considered as a panicolytic-like effect. This anti-escape effect was attenuated by the intra-DPAG administration of the TRK receptor antagonist k252a. Altogether, our data suggests that facilitation of the BDNF-TRKB system in the DPAG is implicated in the panicolytic effect of ADs. PMID:25840741

  18. Adolescent testosterone influences BDNF and TrkB mRNA and neurotrophin-interneuron marker relationships in mammalian frontal cortex.

    PubMed

    Purves-Tyson, Tertia D; Allen, Katherine; Fung, Samantha; Rothmond, Debora; Noble, Pam L; Handelsman, David J; Shannon Weickert, Cynthia

    2015-11-01

    Late adolescence in males is a period of increased susceptibility for the onset of schizophrenia, coinciding with increased circulating testosterone. The cognitive deficits prevalent in schizophrenia may be related to unhealthy cortical interneurons, which are trophically dependent on brain derived neurotrophic factor. We investigated, under conditions of depleted (monkey and rat) and replaced (rat) testosterone over adolescence, changes in gene expression of cortical BDNF and TrkB transcripts and interneuron markers and the relationships between these mRNAs and circulating testosterone. Testosterone removal by gonadectomy reduced gene expression of some BDNF transcripts in monkey and rat frontal cortices and the BDNF mRNA reduction was prevented by testosterone replacement. In rat, testosterone replacement increased the potential for classical TrkB signalling by increasing the full length to truncated TrkB mRNA ratio, whereas in the monkey cortex, circulating testosterone was negatively correlated with the TrkB full length/truncated mRNA ratio. We did not identify changes in interneuron gene expression in monkey frontal cortex in response to gonadectomy, and in rat, we showed that only somatostatin mRNA was decreased by gonadectomy but not restored by testosterone replacement. We identified complex and possibly species-specific, relationships between BDNF/TrkB gene expression and interneuron marker gene expression that appear to be dependent on the presence of testosterone at adolescence in rat and monkey frontal cortices. Taken together, our findings suggest there are dynamic relationships between BDNF/TrkB and interneuron markers that are dependent on the presence of testosterone but that this may not be a straightforward increase in testosterone leading to changes in BDNF/TrkB that contributes to interneuron health. PMID:26088421

  19. Regulation of cancer stem-like cell differentiation by Smac mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Fulda, Simone

    2014-01-01

    Small-molecule antagonists of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins such as Smac mimetics are considered promising cancer therapeutics through the engagement of cell death pathways. Recent evidence suggests that Smac mimetics perform additional nonapoptotic functions by initiating differentiation in cancer stem-like cells, opening new perspectives for their future clinical application. PMID:27308334

  20. The consequences of selective inhibition of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) tyrosine705 phosphorylation by phosphopeptide mimetic prodrugs targeting the Src homology 2 (SH2) domain.

    PubMed

    McMurray, John S; Mandal, Pijus K; Liao, Warren S; Klostergaard, Jim; Robertson, Fredika M

    2012-10-01

    Herein we review our progress on the development of phosphopeptide-based prodrugs targeting the SH2 domain of STAT3 to prevent recruitment to cytokine and growth factor receptors, activation, nuclear translocation and transcription of genes involved in cancer. We developed high affinity phosphopeptides (K I = 46-200 nM). Corresponding prodrugs inhibited constitutive and IL-6 induced Tyr705 phosphorylation at 0.5-1 μM in a variety of human cancer cell lines. They were not cytotoxic at 5 μM in vitro but they inhibited tumor growth in a human xenograft breast cancer model in mice, accompanied by reduced VEGF expression and angiogenesis. PMID:24058783

  1. Phylogenetic Codivergence Supports Coevolution of Mimetic Heliconius Butterflies

    PubMed Central

    Hoyal Cuthill, Jennifer; Charleston, Michael

    2012-01-01

    The unpalatable and warning-patterned butterflies Heliconius erato and Heliconius melpomene provide the best studied example of mutualistic Müllerian mimicry, thought–but rarely demonstrated–to promote coevolution. Some of the strongest available evidence for coevolution comes from phylogenetic codivergence, the parallel divergence of ecologically associated lineages. Early evolutionary reconstructions suggested codivergence between mimetic populations of H. erato and H. melpomene, and this was initially hailed as one of the most striking known cases of coevolution. However, subsequent molecular phylogenetic analyses found discrepancies in phylogenetic branching patterns and timing (topological and temporal incongruence) that argued against codivergence. We present the first explicit cophylogenetic test of codivergence between mimetic populations of H. erato and H. melpomene, and re-examine the timing of these radiations. We find statistically significant topological congruence between multilocus coalescent population phylogenies of H. erato and H. melpomene. Cophylogenetic historical reconstructions support repeated codivergence of mimetic populations, from the base of the sampled radiations. Pairwise distance correlation tests, based on our coalescent analyses plus recently published AFLP and wing colour pattern gene data, also suggest that the phylogenies of H. erato and H. melpomene show significant topological congruence. Divergence time estimates, based on a Bayesian coalescent model, suggest that the evolutionary radiations of H. erato and H. melpomene occurred over the same time period, and are compatible with a series of temporally congruent codivergence events. Our results suggest that differences in within-species genetic divergence are the result of a greater overall effective population size for H. erato relative to H. melpomene and do not imply incongruence in the timing of their phylogenetic radiations. Repeated codivergence between M

  2. Cisplatin-induced apoptosis in non-small-cell lung cancer cells is dependent on Bax- and Bak-induction pathway and synergistically activated by BH3-mimetic ABT-263 in p53 wild-type and mutant cells.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Masaru; Nakajima, Wataru; Seike, Masahiro; Gemma, Akihiko; Tanaka, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-29

    Cisplatin is a highly effective anticancer drug for treatment of various tumors including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), and is especially useful in cases nonresponsive to molecular-targeted drugs. Accumulating evidence has shown that cisplatin activates the p53-dependent apoptotic pathway, but it also induces apoptosis in p53-mutated cancer cells. Here we demonstrated that DNA-damage inducible proapoptotic BH3 (Bcl-2 homology region 3)-only Bcl-2 family members, Noxa, Puma, Bim and Bid, are not involved in cisplatin-induced apoptosis in human NSCLC cell lines. In contrast, the expression of proapoptotic multidomain Bcl-2-family members, Bak and Bax, was induced by cisplatin in p53-dependent and -independent manners, respectively. Moreover, in wild-type p53-expressing cells, cisplatin mainly used the Bak-dependent apoptotic pathway, but this apoptotic pathway shifted to the Bax-dependent pathway by loss-of-function of p53. Furthermore, both Bak- and Bax-induced apoptosis was enhanced by the antiapoptotic Bcl-2 family member, Bcl-XL knockdown, but not by Mcl-1 knockdown. From this result, we tested the effect of ABT-263 (Navitoclax), the specific inhibitor of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, but not Mcl-1, and found that ABT-263 synergistically enhanced cisplatin-induced apoptosis in NSCLC cells in the presence or absence of p53. These results indicate a novel regulatory system in cisplatin-induced NSCLC cell apoptosis, and a candidate efficient combination chemotherapy method against lung cancers. PMID:26996126

  3. Recombinant Elastin-Mimetic Biomaterials: Emerging Applications in Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wookhyun; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2010-01-01

    Biomaterials derived from protein-based block copolymers are increasingly investigated for potential application in medicine. In particular, recombinant elastin block copolymers provide significant opportunities to modulate material microstructure and can be processed in various forms, including particles, films, gels, and fiber networks. As a consequence, biological and mechanical responses of elastin-based biomaterials are tunable through precise control of block size and amino acid sequence. In this review, the synthesis of a set of elastin-mimetic triblock copolymers and their diverse processing methods for generating material platforms currently applied in medicine will be discussed. PMID:20441783

  4. Mimetic discretization of two-dimensional magnetic diffusion equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipnikov, Konstantin; Reynolds, James; Nelson, Eric

    2013-08-01

    In case of non-constant resistivity, cylindrical coordinates, and highly distorted polygonal meshes, a consistent discretization of the magnetic diffusion equations requires new discretization tools based on a discrete vector and tensor calculus. We developed a new discretization method using the mimetic finite difference framework. It is second-order accurate on arbitrary polygonal meshes and a consistent calculation of the Joule heating is intrinsic within it. The second-order convergence rates in L2 and L1 norms were verified with numerical experiments.

  5. A Smac Mimetic Reduces TNF Related Apoptosis Inducing Ligand (TRAIL)-Induced Invasion and Metastasis of Cholangiocarcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fingas, Christian D.; Blechacz, Boris R. A.; Smoot, Rory L.; Guicciardi, Maria E.; Mott, Justin; Bronk, Steve F.; Werneburg, Nathan W.; Sirica, Alphonse E.; Gores, Gregory J.

    2010-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) cells paradoxically express tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL), a death ligand that, failing to kill CCA cells, instead promotes their tumorigenicity and especially the metastatic behaviors of cell migration and invasion. Second mitochondria-derived activator of caspase (smac) mimetics are promising cancer therapeutic agents that enhance proapoptotic death receptor signaling by causing cellular degradation of inhibitor of apoptosis (IAP) proteins. Our aim was to examine the in vitro and in vivo effects of the smac mimetic JP1584 in CCA. Despite JP1584-mediated loss of cellular inhibitor of apoptosis-1 (cIAP-1) and cIAP-2, TRAIL failed to induce apoptosis in KMCH-1, TFK-1, and BDEneu CCA cells; a finding consistent with a downstream block in death signaling. Because cIAP-1 and cIAP-2 also promote nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) activation by the canonical pathway, the effect of JP1584 on this signaling pathway was examined. Treatment with JP1584 inhibited TRAIL-induced NF-κB activation as well as TRAIL-mediated up-regulation of the NF-κB target gene, matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7). JP1584 also reduced TRAIL-mediated CCA cell migration and invasion in vitro. Finally, in a syngeneic rat orthotopic CCA model, JP1584 administration reduced MMP7 messenger RNA levels and extrahepatic metastases. Conclusion Although the smac mimetic JP1584 does not sensitize cells to apoptosis, it reduces TRAIL-induced CCA cell metastatic behavior. These data support the emerging concept that IAPs are prometastatic and represent targets for antimetastatic therapies. PMID:20683954

  6. Immunohistochemical localization of BDNF-, TrkB- and TrkA-like proteins in the teleost lateral line system

    PubMed Central

    Germana, A; Catania, S; Cavallaro, M; González-Martínez, T; Ciriaco, E; Hannestad, J; Vega, JA

    2002-01-01

    The lateral line system, formed of both superficial (pit organs) and canal neuromasts, is one of the major mechanosensory systems in fish. It has always been assumed that this system depends on neurotrophins and their cognate Trk receptors for development and maintenance, as has been shown in other mechanosensitive systems of vertebrates. However, until now this issue has not been specifically addressed. In this study we used immunohistochemistry to investigate the occurrence and localization both of neurotrophins (NGF-, BDNF- and NT-3-like) and of Trk-like proteins (TrkA-, TrkB-, TrkC-like) in alevins of Salmo salar and S. trutta. All cells in the pit organs of S. salar displayed strong immunoreactivity for TrkB-like and BDNF-like, whereas they were restricted to the hair cells in S. trutta. The hair, supporting and mantle cells of S. salar, and the mantle cells of S. trutta, also expressed TrkA-like immunoreactivity. In the canal neuromasts BDNF-, TrkA- and TrkB-like proteins were present in all cells, without differences between species. NGF-, NT-3- and TrkC-like immunoreactivity were never detected. The present results suggest that mechanoreceptive hair cells, as well as supporting cells, in the lateral line system are under the control of the BDNF–TrkB-like complex, and probably of ligands of TrkA-like receptors. PMID:12090394

  7. Synthesis, Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic and Anticancer Activities of Metal Complexes of 2,2-Dimethylpentanedioic Acid(2dmepdaH2) and 3,3-Dimethylpentanedioic acid(3dmepdaH2): X-Ray Crystal Structures of [Cu(3dmepda)(bipy)]2· 6H2O and [Cu(2dmepda)(bipy)(EtOH)]2· 4EtOH (bipy = 2,2′Bipyridine)

    PubMed Central

    Devereux, Michael; McCann, Malachy; O'Shea, Denis; O'Connor, Mark; Kiely, Eileen; McKee, Vickie; Naughton, Declan; Fisher, Anna; Kellett, Andrew; Walsh, Maureen; Egan, Denise; Deegan, Carol

    2006-01-01

    2,2-dimethylpentanedioic acid (2dmepdaH2) and 3,3-dimethylpentanedioic acid (3dmepdaH2) reacted with copper(II) acetate to give [Cu(2dmepda)(H2O)3]2 (1) and [Cu(3dmepda)(H2O)3]2 (2). Reaction of (1) and (2) with 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2′-bipyridine yielded [Cu(2dmepda)(phen)(H2O)]20.5phen (3), [Cu(2dmepda)(bipy)(H2O)]2 (4), [Cu(2dmepda)(bipy)(EtOH)]2· 2EtOH (4A), [Cu(3dmepda)(phen)(H2O)]2 (5), and [Cu(3dmepda)(bipy)(H2O)]2· (6). The structures of (4A) and (6) each consists of a [Cu(bipy)(dicarboxylate)(solvent)]2 dimer. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity of the novel copper complexes and their manganese analogues was investigated. The dimethyl sulphoxide(DMSO) soluble complexes (1)–(4) and (6) were assessed for their cancer chemotherapeutic potential towards hepatocellular carcinoma and kidney adenocarcinoma cell lines. The 1,10-phenanthroline containing complex [Cu(2dmepda)(phen)(H2O)]20.5phen (3) was the most potent with activity that compares well to that of cisplatin. PMID:17497019

  8. Synthesis, Superoxide Dismutase Mimetic and Anticancer Activities of Metal Complexes of 2,2-Dimethylpentanedioic Acid(2dmepdaH(2)) and 3,3-Dimethylpentanedioic acid(3dmepdaH(2)): X-Ray Crystal Structures of [Cu(3dmepda)(bipy)](2). 6H(2)O and [Cu(2dmepda)(bipy)(EtOH)](2). 4EtOH (bipy = 2,2'Bipyridine).

    PubMed

    Devereux, Michael; McCann, Malachy; O'shea, Denis; O'connor, Mark; Kiely, Eileen; McKee, Vickie; Naughton, Declan; Fisher, Anna; Kellett, Andrew; Walsh, Maureen; Egan, Denise; Deegan, Carol

    2006-01-01

    2,2-dimethylpentanedioic acid (2dmepdaH(2)) and 3,3-dimethylpentanedioic acid (3dmepdaH(2)) reacted with copper(II) acetate to give [Cu(2dmepda)(H(2)O)(3)](2) (1) and [Cu(3dmepda)(H(2)O)(3)](2) (2). Reaction of (1) and (2) with 1,10-phenanthroline and 2,2'-bipyridine yielded [Cu(2dmepda)(phen)(H(2)O)](2)0.5phen (3), [Cu(2dmepda)(bipy)(H(2)O)](2) (4), [Cu(2dmepda)(bipy)(EtOH)](2). 2EtOH (4A), [Cu(3dmepda)(phen)(H(2)O)](2) (5), and [Cu(3dmepda)(bipy)(H(2)O)](2). (6). The structures of (4A) and (6) each consists of a [Cu(bipy)(dicarboxylate)(solvent)](2) dimer. The superoxide dismutase (SOD) mimetic activity of the novel copper complexes and their manganese analogues was investigated. The dimethyl sulphoxide(DMSO) soluble complexes (1)-(4) and (6) were assessed for their cancer chemotherapeutic potential towards hepatocellular carcinoma and kidney adenocarcinoma cell lines. The 1,10-phenanthroline containing complex [Cu(2dmepda)(phen)(H(2)O)](2)0.5phen (3) was the most potent with activity that compares well to that of cisplatin. PMID:17497019

  9. Inhibition of Salmonella enterica Biofilm Formation Using Small-Molecule Adenosine Mimetics

    PubMed Central

    Koopman, Jacob A.; Marshall, Joanna M.; Bhatiya, Aditi; Eguale, Tadesse; Kwiek, Jesse J.

    2014-01-01

    Biofilms have been widely implicated in chronic infections and environmental persistence of Salmonella enterica, facilitating enhanced colonization of surfaces and increasing the ability of the bacteria to be transmitted to new hosts. Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi biofilm formation on gallstones from humans and mice enhances gallbladder colonization and bacterial shedding, while Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium biofilms facilitate long-term persistence in a number of environments important to food, medical, and farming industries. Salmonella regulates expression of many virulence- and biofilm-related processes using kinase-driven pathways. Kinases play pivotal roles in phosphorylation and energy transfer in cellular processes and possess an ATP-binding pocket required for their functions. Many other cellular proteins also require ATP for their activity. Here we test the hypothesis that pharmacological interference with ATP-requiring enzymes utilizing adenosine mimetic compounds would decrease or inhibit bacterial biofilm formation. Through the screening of a 3,000-member ATP mimetic library, we identified a single compound (compound 7955004) capable of significantly reducing biofilm formation by S. Typhimurium and S. Typhi. The compound was not bactericidal or bacteriostatic toward S. Typhimurium or cytotoxic to mammalian cells. An ATP-Sepharose affinity matrix technique was used to discover potential protein-binding targets of the compound and identified GroEL and DeoD. Compound 7955004 was screened against other known biofilm-forming bacterial species and was found to potently inhibit biofilms of Acinetobacter baumannii as well. The identification of a lead compound with biofilm-inhibiting capabilities toward Salmonella provides a potential new avenue of therapeutic intervention against Salmonella biofilm formation, with applicability to biofilms of other bacterial pathogens. PMID:25313216

  10. Road to Exercise Mimetics: Targeting Nuclear Receptors in Skeletal Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Weiwei; Atkins, Annette R; Yu, Ruth T.; Downes, Michael; Evans, Ronald M.

    2014-01-01

    Skeletal muscle comprises the largest organ in the human body and is the major site for energy expenditure. It exhibits remarkable plasticity in response to physiological stimuli such as exercise. Physical exercise remodels skeletal muscle and enhances its capability to burn calories, which has been shown to be beneficial for many clinical conditions including metabolic syndrome and cancer. Nuclear receptors (NRs) comprise a class of transcription factors found only in metazoans that regulate major biological processes such as reproduction, development, and metabolism. Recent studies have demonstrated crucial roles for NRs and their co-regulators in regulating skeletal muscle energy metabolism and exercise-induced muscle remodeling. While nothing can fully replace exercise, development of exercise mimetics that enhance or even substitute for the beneficial effects of physical exercise would be of great benefit. The unique property of NRs that allows modulation by endogenous or synthetic ligands makes them bona fide therapeutic targets. In this review, we present an overview of the current understanding of NRs and their co-regulators in skeletal muscle oxidative metabolism and summarize recent progress in the development of exercise mimetics that target NRs and their co-regulators. PMID:24280961