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Sample records for mimicking human cis

  1. Cis-regulatory mutations in human disease

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Cis-acting regulatory sequences are required for the proper temporal and spatial control of gene expression. Variation in gene expression is highly heritable and a significant determinant of human disease susceptibility. The diversity of human genetic diseases attributed, in whole or in part, to mutations in non-coding regulatory sequences is on the rise. Improvements in genome-wide methods of associating genetic variation with human disease and predicting DNA with cis-regulatory potential are two of the major reasons for these recent advances. This review will highlight select examples from the literature that have successfully integrated genetic and genomic approaches to uncover the molecular basis by which cis-regulatory mutations alter gene expression and contribute to human disease. The fine mapping of disease-causing variants has led to the discovery of novel cis-acting regulatory elements that, in some instances, are located as far away as 1.5 Mb from the target gene. In other cases, the prior knowledge of the regulatory landscape surrounding the gene of interest aided in the selection of enhancers for mutation screening. The success of these studies should provide a framework for following up on the large number of genome-wide association studies that have identified common variants in non-coding regions of the genome that associate with increased risk of human diseases including, diabetes, autism, Crohn's, colorectal cancer, and asthma, to name a few. PMID:19641089

  2. Humanlike Robots - Synthetically Mimicking Humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph

    2012-01-01

    Nature inspired many inventions and the field of technology that is based on the mimicking or inspiration of nature is widely known as Biomimetics and it is increasingly leading to many new capabilities. There are numerous examples of biomimetic successes including the copying of fins for swimming, and the inspiration of the insects and birds flight. More and more commercial implementations of biomimetics are appearing and behaving lifelike and applications are emerging that are important to our daily life. Making humanlike robots is the ultimate challenge to biomimetics and, for many years, it was considered science fiction, but such robots are becoming an engineering reality. Advances in producing such robot are allowing them to perform impressive functions and tasks. The development of such robots involves addressing many challenges and is raising concerns that are related to fear of their application implications and potential ethical issues. In this paper, the state-of-the-art of humanlike robots, potential applications and challenges will be reviewed.

  3. Abundant raw material for cis-regulatory evolution in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rockman, Matthew V.; Wray, Gregory A.

    2002-01-01

    Changes in gene expression and regulation--due in particular to the evolution of cis-regulatory DNA sequences--may underlie many evolutionary changes in phenotypes, yet little is known about the distribution of such variation in populations. We present in this study the first survey of experimentally validated functional cis-regulatory polymorphism. These data are derived from more than 140 polymorphisms involved in the regulation of 107 genes in Homo sapiens, the eukaryote species with the most available data. We find that functional cis-regulatory variation is widespread in the human genome and that the consequent variation in gene expression is twofold or greater for 63% of the genes surveyed. Transcription factor-DNA interactions are highly polymorphic, and regulatory interactions have been gained and lost within human populations. On average, humans are heterozygous at more functional cis-regulatory sites (>16,000) than at amino acid positions (<13,000), in part because of an overrepresentation among the former in multiallelic tandem repeat variation, especially (AC)(n) dinucleotide microsatellites. The role of microsatellites in gene expression variation may provide a larger store of heritable phenotypic variation, and a more rapid mutational input of such variation, than has been realized. Finally, we outline the distinctive consequences of cis-regulatory variation for the genotype-phenotype relationship, including ubiquitous epistasis and genotype-by-environment interactions, as well as underappreciated modes of pleiotropy and overdominance. Ordinary small-scale mutations contribute to pervasive variation in transcription rates and consequently to patterns of human phenotypic variation.

  4. i-cisTarget 2015 update: generalized cis-regulatory enrichment analysis in human, mouse and fly.

    PubMed

    Imrichová, Hana; Hulselmans, Gert; Atak, Zeynep Kalender; Potier, Delphine; Aerts, Stein

    2015-07-01

    i-cisTarget is a web tool to predict regulators of a set of genomic regions, such as ChIP-seq peaks or co-regulated/similar enhancers. i-cisTarget can also be used to identify upstream regulators and their target enhancers starting from a set of co-expressed genes. Whereas the original version of i-cisTarget was focused on Drosophila data, the 2015 update also provides support for human and mouse data. i-cisTarget detects transcription factor motifs (position weight matrices) and experimental data tracks (e.g. from ENCODE, Roadmap Epigenomics) that are enriched in the input set of regions. As experimental data tracks we include transcription factor ChIP-seq data, histone modification ChIP-seq data and open chromatin data. The underlying processing method is based on a ranking-and-recovery procedure, allowing accurate determination of enrichment across heterogeneous datasets, while also discriminating direct from indirect target regions through a 'leading edge' analysis. We illustrate i-cisTarget on various Ewing sarcoma datasets to identify EWS-FLI1 targets starting from ChIP-seq, differential ATAC-seq, differential H3K27ac and differential gene expression data. Use of i-cisTarget is free and open to all, and there is no login requirement. Address: http://gbiomed.kuleuven.be/apps/lcb/i-cisTarget. PMID:25925574

  5. CREME: Cis-Regulatory Module Explorer for the Human Genome

    SciTech Connect

    Loots, G G; Sharan, R; Ovcharenko, I; Ben-Hur, A

    2004-02-11

    The binding of transcription factors to specific regulatory sequence elements is a primary mechanism for controlling gene transcription. Eukaryotic genes are often regulated by several transcription factors, whose binding sites are tightly clustered and form cis-regulatory modules. In this paper we present a web-server, CREME, for identifying and visualizing cis-regulatory modules in the promoter regions of a given set of potentially co-regulated genes. CREME relies on a database of putative transcription factor binding sites that have been annotated across the human genome using a library of position weight matrices and evolutionary conservation with the mouse and rat genomes. A search algorithm is applied to this dataset to identify combinations of transcription factors whose binding sites tend to co-occur in close proximity in the promoter regions of the input gene set. The identified cis-regulatory modules are statistically scored and significant combinations are reported and graphically visualized. Our web-server is available at http://creme.dcode.org/.

  6. Cis-retinol dehydrogenase: 9-cis-retinol metabolism and its effect on proliferation of human MCF7 breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Paik, Jisun; Blaner, William S.; Swisshelm, Karen . E-mail: kswiss@u.washington.edu

    2005-02-01

    9-Cis-retinoic acid (RA) suppresses cancer cell proliferation via binding and activation of nuclear receptors, retinoid X receptors (RXRs). In vivo, 9-cis-RA is formed through oxidation of 9-cis-retinol by cis-retinol dehydrogenase (cRDH), an enzyme that we characterized previously. Since 9-cis-RA is a potent inhibitor of breast cancer cell proliferation, we hypothesized that overexpression of cRDH in breast cancer cells would result in increased production of 9-cis-RA, which in turn would suppress cell proliferation. To investigate this hypothesis, MCF7 human breast carcinoma cells were transduced with cRDH cDNA (LRDHSN/MCF7), and the growth kinetics and retinoid profiles of cells were examined following treatment with 9-cis-retinol. LRDHSN/MCF7 cells showed a marked reduction in cell numbers (60-80%) upon treatment with 9-cis-retinol compared to vehicle alone. Within 24 h of treatment, approximately 75% of the 9-cis-retinol was taken up and metabolized by LRDHSN/MCF7 cells. Despite the rapid uptake and oxidation of 9-cis-retinol to 9-cis-retinal, 9-cis-RA was not formed in these cells. We detect at least one novel metabolite formed from both 9-cis-retinol and 9-cis-retinal that may play a role in inhibition of MCF7 cell proliferation. Our studies demonstrate that 9-cis-retinol in combination with cRDH inhibits breast cancer cell proliferation by production of retinol metabolites other than RA.

  7. The Influence of 13-cis Retinoic Acid on Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Juan; Kam, Wendy R.; Dieckow, Julia; Sullivan, David A.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. Meibomian gland dysfunction (MGD) is a primary cause of dry eye disease. One of the risk factors for MGD is exposure to 13-cis retinoic acid (13-cis RA), a metabolite of vitamin A. However, the mechanism is not well understood. We hypothesize that 13-cis RA inhibits cell proliferation, promotes cell death, alters gene and protein expressions, and attenuates cell survival pathways in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. To test our hypotheses, immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured with or without 13-cis RA for varying doses and time. Cell proliferation, cell death, gene expression, and proteins involved in proliferation/survival and inflammation were evaluated. Results. We found that 13-cis RA inhibited cell proliferation, induced cell death, and significantly altered the expression of 6726 genes, including those involved in cell proliferation, cell death, differentiation, keratinization, and inflammation, in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Further, 13-cis RA also reduced the phosphorylation of Akt and increased the generation of interleukin-1β and matrix metallopeptidase 9. Conclusions. Exposure to 13-cis RA inhibits cell proliferation, increases cell death, alters gene expression, changes signaling pathways, and promotes inflammatory mediator and protease expression in meibomian gland epithelial cells. These effects may be responsible, at least in part, for the 13-cis RA–related induction of MGD. PMID:23722388

  8. cis-Regulatory Mutations Are a Genetic Cause of Human Limb Malformations

    PubMed Central

    VanderMeer, Julia E.; Ahituv, Nadav

    2011-01-01

    The underlying mutations that cause human limb malformations are often difficult to determine, particularly for limb malformations that occur as isolated traits. Evidence from a variety of studies shows that cis-regulatory mutations, specifically in enhancers, can lead to some of these isolated limb malformations. Here, we provide a review of human limb malformations that have been shown to be caused by enhancer mutations and propose that cis-regulatory mutations will continue to be identified as the cause of additional human malformations as our understanding of regulatory sequences improves. PMID:21509892

  9. Humans mimicking animals: A cortical hierarchy for human vocal communication sounds

    PubMed Central

    Talkington, William J.; Rapuano, Kristina M.; Hitt, Laura; Frum, Chris A.; Lewis, James W.

    2012-01-01

    Numerous species possess cortical regions that are most sensitive to vocalizations produced by their own kind (conspecifics). In humans, the superior temporal sulci (STS) putatively represent homologous voice-sensitive areas of cortex. However, STS regions have recently been reported to represent auditory experience or “expertise” in general rather than showing exclusive sensitivity to human vocalizations per se. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging and a unique non-stereotypical category of complex human non-verbal vocalizations – human-mimicked versions of animal vocalizations – we found a cortical hierarchy in humans optimized for processing meaningful conspecific utterances. This left-lateralized hierarchy originated near primary auditory cortices and progressed into traditional speech-sensitive areas. These results suggest that the cortical regions supporting vocalization perception are initially organized by sensitivity to the human vocal tract in stages prior to the STS. Additionally, these findings have implications for the developmental time course of conspecific vocalization processing in humans as well as its evolutionary origins. PMID:22674283

  10. Adult human metapneumonovirus (hMPV) pneumonia mimicking Legionnaire's disease.

    PubMed

    Cunha, Burke A; Irshad, Nadia; Connolly, James J

    2016-01-01

    In adults hospitalized with viral pneumonias the main differential diagnostic consideration is influenza pneumonia. The respiratory viruses causing viral influenza like illnesses (ILIs), e.g., RSV may closely resemble influenza. Rarely, extrapulmonary findings of some ILIs may resemble Legionnaire's disease (LD), e.g., adenovirus, human parainfluenza virus (HPIV-3). We present a most unusual case of human metapneumonovirus pneumonia (hMPV) with some characteristic extrapulmonary findings characteristic of LD, e.g., relative bradycardia, as well as mildly elevated serum transaminases and hyphosphatemia. We believe this is the first reported case of hMPV pneumonia in a hospitalized adult that had some features of LD. PMID:26988110

  11. Identification of cis-suppression of human disease mutations by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Daniel M; Frangakis, Stephan G; Golzio, Christelle; Cassa, Christopher A; Kurtzberg, Joanne; Davis, Erica E; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Katsanis, Nicholas

    2015-08-13

    Patterns of amino acid conservation have served as a tool for understanding protein evolution. The same principles have also found broad application in human genomics, driven by the need to interpret the pathogenic potential of variants in patients. Here we performed a systematic comparative genomics analysis of human disease-causing missense variants. We found that an appreciable fraction of disease-causing alleles are fixed in the genomes of other species, suggesting a role for genomic context. We developed a model of genetic interactions that predicts most of these to be simple pairwise compensations. Functional testing of this model on two known human disease genes revealed discrete cis amino acid residues that, although benign on their own, could rescue the human mutations in vivo. This approach was also applied to ab initio gene discovery to support the identification of a de novo disease driver in BTG2 that is subject to protective cis-modification in more than 50 species. Finally, on the basis of our data and models, we developed a computational tool to predict candidate residues subject to compensation. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of cis-genomic context as a contributor to protein evolution; they provide an insight into the complexity of allele effect on phenotype; and they are likely to assist methods for predicting allele pathogenicity. PMID:26123021

  12. The impact of cis-acting polymorphisms on the human phenotype.

    PubMed

    Jones, Bryony L; Swallow, Dallas M

    2011-12-01

    Cis-acting polymorphisms that affect gene expression are now known to be frequent, although the extent and mechanisms by which such variation affects the human phenotype are, as yet, only poorly understood. Key signatures of cis-acting variation are differences in gene expression that are tightly associated with regulatory SNPs or expression Quantitative Trait Loci (eQTL) and an imbalance of allelic expression (AEI) in heterozygous samples. Such cis-acting sequence differences appear often to have been under selection within and between populations and are also thought to be important in speciation. Here we describe the example of lactase persistence. In medical research, variants that affect regulation in cis have been implicated in both monogenic and polygenic disorders, and in the metabolism of drugs. In this review we suggest that by further understanding common regulatory variations and how they interact with other genetic and environmental variables it will be possible to gain insight into important mechanisms behind complex disease, with the potential to lead to new methods of diagnosis and treatments. PMID:23205161

  13. Mimicking Retinal Development and Disease With Human Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Divya; Phillips, Jenny; Joseph Phillips, M; Gamm, David M

    2016-04-01

    As applications of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) continue to be refined and pursued, it is important to keep in mind that the strengths and weaknesses of this technology lie with its developmental origins. The remarkable capacity of differentiating hPSCs to recapitulate cell and tissue genesis has provided a model system to study stages of human development that were not previously amenable to investigation and experimentation. Furthermore, demonstration of developmentally appropriate, stepwise differentiation of hPSCs to specific cell types offers support for their authenticity and their suitability for use in disease modeling and cell replacement therapies. However, limitations to farming cells and tissues in an artificial culture environment, as well as the length of time required for most cells to mature, are some of the many issues to consider before using hPSCs to study or treat a particular disease. Given the overarching need to understand and modulate the dynamics of lineage-specific differentiation in stem cell cultures, this review will first examine the capacity of hPSCs to serve as models of retinal development. Thereafter, we will discuss efforts to model retinal disorders with hPSCs and present challenges that face investigators who aspire to use such systems to study disease pathophysiology and/or screen for therapeutics. We also refer readers to recent publications that provide additional insight and details on these rapidly evolving topics. PMID:27116663

  14. Automatic ECG quality scoring methodology: mimicking human annotators.

    PubMed

    Johannesen, Lars; Galeotti, Loriano

    2012-09-01

    An algorithm to determine the quality of electrocardiograms (ECGs) can enable inexperienced nurses and paramedics to record ECGs of sufficient diagnostic quality. Previously, we proposed an algorithm for determining if ECG recordings are of acceptable quality, which was entered in the PhysioNet Challenge 2011. In the present work, we propose an improved two-step algorithm, which first rejects ECGs with macroscopic errors (signal absent, large voltage shifts or saturation) and subsequently quantifies the noise (baseline, powerline or muscular noise) on a continuous scale. The performance of the improved algorithm was evaluated using the PhysioNet Challenge database (1500 ECGs rated by humans for signal quality). We achieved a classification accuracy of 92.3% on the training set and 90.0% on the test set. The improved algorithm is capable of detecting ECGs with macroscopic errors and giving the user a score of the overall quality. This allows the user to assess the degree of noise and decide if it is acceptable depending on the purpose of the recording. PMID:22902927

  15. Toward a Genome-Wide Reconstruction of Cis-Regulatory Networks in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Cecchini, Katharine R.; Banerjee, A. Raja; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2009-01-01

    The vast amount of recent progress made on the sequence of the human genome has allowed an unprecedented examination of cis-regulatory networks. These networks consist of functional elements such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, and insulators, and their coordinated activity is responsible for regulation of gene expression. Recent studies surveyed the entire genome, identifying novel elements and evaluating functional differences in respect to development. These investigations present the first steps towards a global regulatory map for expression in the human genome. PMID:19560550

  16. Evolutionarily Assembled cis-Regulatory Module at a Human Ciliopathy Locus

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jeong Ho; Silhavy, Jennifer L.; Lee, Ji Eun; Al-Gazali, Lihadh; Thomas, Sophie; Davis, Erica E.; Bielas, Stephanie L.; Hill, Kiley J.; Iannicelli, Miriam; Brancati, Francesco; Gabriel, Stacey B.; Russ, Carsten; Logan, Clare V.; Sharif, Saghira Malik; Bennett, Christopher P.; Abe, Masumi; Hildebrandt, Friedhelm; Diplas, Bill H.; Attié-Bitach, Tania; Katsanis, Nicholas; Rajab, Anna; Koul, Roshan; Sztriha, Laszlo; Waters, Elizabeth R.; Ferro-Novick, Susan; Woods, C. Geoffrey; Johnson, Colin A.; Valente, Enza Maria; Zaki, Maha S.; Gleeson, Joseph G.

    2013-01-01

    Neighboring genes are often coordinately expressed within cis-regulatory modules, but evidence that nonparalogous genes share functions in mammals is lacking. Here, we report that mutation of either TMEM138 or TMEM216 causes a phenotypically indistinguishable human ciliopathy, Joubert syndrome. Despite a lack of sequence homology, the genes are aligned in a head-to-tail configuration and joined by chromosomal rearrangement at the amphibian-to-reptile evolutionary transition. Expression of the two genes is mediated by a conserved regulatory element in the noncoding intergenic region. Coordinated expression is important for their interdependent cellular role in vesicular transport to primary cilia. Hence, during vertebrate evolution of genes involved in ciliogenesis, nonparalogous genes were arranged to a functional gene cluster with shared regulatory elements. PMID:22282472

  17. Human chorionic gonadotropin induces human macrophages to form intracytoplasmic vacuoles mimicking Hofbauer cells in human chorionic villi.

    PubMed

    Yamaguchi, Munekage; Ohba, Takashi; Tashiro, Hironori; Yamada, Gen; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2013-01-01

    The most characteristic morphological feature of macrophages in the stroma of placental villi, known as Hofbauer cells, is their highly vacuolated appearance. They also show positive immunostaining for human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and express messenger ribonucleic acid of the luteinizing hormone/chorionic gonadotropin receptor with a deletion of exon 9 (LH/CG-R Δ9). Maternal hCG enters fetal plasma through the mesenchyme of the placental villi and promotes male sexual differentiation in early pregnancy; therefore, excess hCG may induce aberrant genital differentiation and hCG must be adjusted at the fetomaternal interface. We hypothesized that hCG is regulated by Hofbauer cells and that their peculiar vacuoles are involved in a cell-specific function. To assess the morphological modification and expression of LH/CG-R Δ9 in human macrophages after hCG exposure, the present study examined phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA)-treated THP-1 cells, a human monocyte-macrophage cell line. hCG induced transient vacuole formation in PMA-treated THP-1 cells, morphologically mimicking Hofbauer cells. Immunocytochemistry showed that PMA-treated THP-1 cells incorporated hCG but not luteinizing hormone or follicle-stimulating hormone. Western blotting analyses demonstrated that PMA-treated THP-1 cells expressed an immunoreactive 60-kDa protein, designated as endogenous LH/CG-R Δ9. hCG induced a transient reduction in the LH/CG-R Δ9, which was synchronous with the appearance of cytoplasmic vacuoles. In conclusion, human macrophages regulating hCG via cytoplasmic LH/CG-R Δ9 mimic the morphological characteristics of Hofbauer cells. Their vacuoles may be associated with their cell-specific function to protect the fetus from exposure to excess maternal hCG during pregnancy. PMID:23128164

  18. Regulation of human PTCH1b expression by different 5' untranslated region cis-regulatory elements

    PubMed Central

    Ozretić, Petar; Bisio, Alessandra; Musani, Vesna; Trnski, Diana; Sabol, Maja; Levanat, Sonja; Inga, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    PTCH1 gene codes for a 12-pass transmembrane receptor with a negative regulatory role in the Hedgehog-Gli signaling pathway. PTCH1 germline mutations cause Gorlin syndrome, a disorder characterized by developmental abnormalities and tumor susceptibility. The autosomal dominant inheritance, and the evidence for PTCH1 haploinsufficiency, suggests that fine-tuning systems of protein patched homolog 1 (PTC1) levels exist to properly regulate the pathway. Given the role of 5' untranslated region (5'UTR) in protein expression, our aim was to thoroughly explore cis-regulatory elements in the 5'UTR of PTCH1 transcript 1b. The (CGG)n polymorphism was the main potential regulatory element studied so far but with inconsistent results and no clear association between repeat number and disease risk. Using luciferase reporter constructs in human cell lines here we show that the number of CGG repeats has no strong impact on gene expression, both at mRNA and protein levels. We observed variability in the length of 5'UTR and changes in abundance of the associated transcripts after pathway activation. We show that upstream AUG codons (uAUGs) present only in longer 5'UTRs could negatively regulate the amount of PTC1 isoform L (PTC1-L). The existence of an internal ribosome entry site (IRES) observed using different approaches and mapped in the region comprising the CGG repeats, would counteract the effect of the uAUGs and enable synthesis of PTC1-L under stressful conditions, such as during hypoxia. Higher relative translation efficiency of PTCH1b mRNA in HEK 293T cultured hypoxia was observed by polysomal profiling and Western blot analyses. All our results point to an exceptionally complex and so far unexplored role of 5'UTR PTCH1b cis-element features in the regulation of the Hedgehog-Gli signaling pathway. PMID:25826662

  19. Close sequence comparisons are sufficient to identify human cis-regulatory elements.

    PubMed

    Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Shoukry, Malak; Afzal, Veena; Rubin, Edward M; Couronne, Olivier; Pennacchio, Len A

    2006-07-01

    Cross-species DNA sequence comparison is the primary method used to identify functional noncoding elements in human and other large genomes. However, little is known about the relative merits of evolutionarily close and distant sequence comparisons. To address this problem, we identified evolutionarily conserved noncoding regions in primate, mammalian, and more distant comparisons using a uniform approach (Gumby) that facilitates unbiased assessment of the impact of evolutionary distance on predictive power. We benchmarked computational predictions against previously identified cis-regulatory elements at diverse genomic loci and also tested numerous extremely conserved human-rodent sequences for transcriptional enhancer activity using an in vivo enhancer assay in transgenic mice. Human regulatory elements were identified with acceptable sensitivity (53%-80%) and true-positive rate (27%-67%) by comparison with one to five other eutherian mammals or six other simian primates. More distant comparisons (marsupial, avian, amphibian, and fish) failed to identify many of the empirically defined functional noncoding elements. Our results highlight the practical utility of close sequence comparisons, and the loss of sensitivity entailed by more distant comparisons. We derived an intuitive relationship between ancient and recent noncoding sequence conservation from whole-genome comparative analysis that explains most of the observations from empirical benchmarking. Lastly, we determined that, in addition to strength of conservation, genomic location and/or density of surrounding conserved elements must also be considered in selecting candidate enhancers for in vivo testing at embryonic time points. PMID:16769978

  20. Bactericidal Activity of the Human Skin Fatty Acid cis-6-Hexadecanoic Acid on Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Cartron, Michaël L.; England, Simon R.; Chiriac, Alina Iulia; Josten, Michaele; Turner, Robert; Rauter, Yvonne; Hurd, Alexander; Sahl, Hans-Georg; Jones, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Human skin fatty acids are a potent aspect of our innate defenses, giving surface protection against potentially invasive organisms. They provide an important parameter in determining the ecology of the skin microflora, and alterations can lead to increased colonization by pathogens such as Staphylococcus aureus. Harnessing skin fatty acids may also give a new avenue of exploration in the generation of control measures against drug-resistant organisms. Despite their importance, the mechanism(s) whereby skin fatty acids kill bacteria has remained largely elusive. Here, we describe an analysis of the bactericidal effects of the major human skin fatty acid cis-6-hexadecenoic acid (C6H) on the human commensal and pathogen S. aureus. Several C6H concentration-dependent mechanisms were found. At high concentrations, C6H swiftly kills cells associated with a general loss of membrane integrity. However, C6H still kills at lower concentrations, acting through disruption of the proton motive force, an increase in membrane fluidity, and its effects on electron transfer. The design of analogues with altered bactericidal effects has begun to determine the structural constraints on activity and paves the way for the rational design of new antistaphylococcal agents. PMID:24709265

  1. Comprehensively Evaluating cis-Regulatory Variation in the Human Prostate Transcriptome by Using Gene-Level Allele-Specific Expression

    PubMed Central

    Larson, Nicholas B.; McDonnell, Shannon; French, Amy J.; Fogarty, Zach; Cheville, John; Middha, Sumit; Riska, Shaun; Baheti, Saurabh; Nair, Asha A.; Wang, Liang; Schaid, Daniel J.; Thibodeau, Stephen N.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of cis-acting regulatory variation in primary tissues has the potential to elucidate the genetic basis of complex traits and further our understanding of transcriptomic diversity across cell types. Expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) association analysis using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) data can improve upon the detection of cis-acting regulatory variation by leveraging allele-specific expression (ASE) patterns in association analysis. Here, we present a comprehensive evaluation of cis-acting eQTLs by analyzing RNA-seq gene-expression data and genome-wide high-density genotypes from 471 samples of normal primary prostate tissue. Using statistical models that integrate ASE information, we identified extensive cis-eQTLs across the prostate transcriptome and found that approximately 70% of expressed genes corresponded to a significant eQTL at a gene-level false-discovery rate of 0.05. Overall, cis-eQTLs were heavily concentrated near the transcription start and stop sites of affected genes, and effects were negatively correlated with distance. We identified multiple instances of cis-acting co-regulation by using phased genotype data and discovered 233 SNPs as the most strongly associated eQTLs for more than one gene. We also noted significant enrichment (25/50, p = 2E−5) of previously reported prostate cancer risk SNPs in prostate eQTLs. Our results illustrate the benefit of assessing ASE data in cis-eQTL analyses by showing better reproducibility of prior eQTL findings than of eQTL mapping based on total expression alone. Altogether, our analysis provides extensive functional context of thousands of SNPs in prostate tissue, and these results will be of critical value in guiding studies examining disease of the human prostate. PMID:25983244

  2. cis-Prenyltransferase: New Insights into Protein Glycosylation, Rubber Synthesis, and Human Diseases.

    PubMed

    Grabińska, Kariona A; Park, Eon Joo; Sessa, William C

    2016-08-26

    cis-Prenyltransferases (cis-PTs) constitute a large family of enzymes conserved during evolution and present in all domains of life. cis-PTs catalyze consecutive condensation reactions of allylic diphosphate acceptor with isopentenyl diphosphate (IPP) in the cis (Z) configuration to generate linear polyprenyl diphosphate. The chain lengths of isoprenoid carbon skeletons vary widely from neryl pyrophosphate (C10) to natural rubber (C>10,000). The homo-dimeric bacterial enzyme, undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase (UPPS), has been structurally and mechanistically characterized in great detail and serves as a model for understanding the mode of action of eukaryotic cis-PTs. However, recent experiments have revealed that mammals, fungal, and long-chain plant cis-PTs are heteromeric enzymes composed of two distantly related subunits. In this review, the classification, function, and evolution of cis-PTs will be discussed with a special emphasis on the role of the newly described NgBR/Nus1 subunit and its plants' orthologs as essential, structural components of the cis-PTs activity. PMID:27402831

  3. Cationic chlorophyl derivatives with SOD mimicking activity suppress the proliferation of human ovarian cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Y; Maniki, M; Nakamura, K

    1996-06-01

    Derivatives of chlorophyl, e.g. Fe-chlorin e6-Na, alpha, beta, gamma, delta-Tetraphenylporphine-tetrasulfonic acid disulfonic acid salt tetrahydrate (Fe-TPPTS) and alpha, beta, gamma, delta-Tetrakis (4-N-trimethylaminophenyl) porphine, tetra (p-toluensulfonate (Fe-TTMAPP), express SOD mimicking activity. Examination was made of suppressive effects of human cancer cell lines by derivatives of chlorophyl. Fe-TPPTS and Fe-TTMAPP suppressed proliferation of the human ovarian cancer cell lines but Fe-chlorin e6-Na failed to suppress the proliferation. Lipid peroxide was increased by application of Fe-TPPTS and Fe-TTMAPP, but decreased by application of Fe-chlorin e6-Na. SOD activity of the cancer cells did not change by application of these drugs. TPPTS and TTMAPP have a cationic charge but Fe-chlorin e6-Na has an anionic charge. It is suggested that charge of these drugs relates to the suppressive effects of the cancer cell proliferation. PMID:10851538

  4. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders

    PubMed Central

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C.; Ludwig, Leif S.; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I.; Sankaran, Vijay G.

    2016-01-01

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptional cis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  5. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes.

    PubMed

    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Lundmark, Anders; Ge, Bing; Pastinen, Tomi; Goodall, Alison H; Cambien, François; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2014-01-01

    We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52) were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10(-7) to 9.5×10(-89). The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25025429

  6. Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2008-05-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle.

  7. Human cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein has secondary thermal 9-cis-retinal isomerase activity.

    PubMed

    Bolze, Christin S; Helbling, Rachel E; Owen, Robin L; Pearson, Arwen R; Pompidor, Guillaume; Dworkowski, Florian; Fuchs, Martin R; Furrer, Julien; Golczak, Marcin; Palczewski, Krzysztof; Cascella, Michele; Stocker, Achim

    2014-01-01

    Cellular retinaldehyde-binding protein (CRALBP) chaperones 11-cis-retinal to convert opsin receptor molecules into photosensitive retinoid pigments of the eye. We report a thermal secondary isomerase activity of CRALBP when bound to 9-cis-retinal. UV/vis and (1)H NMR spectroscopy were used to characterize the product as 9,13-dicis-retinal. The X-ray structure of the CRALBP mutant R234W:9-cis-retinal complex at 1.9 Å resolution revealed a niche in the binding pocket for 9-cis-aldehyde different from that reported for 11-cis-retinal. Combined computational, kinetic, and structural data lead us to propose an isomerization mechanism catalyzed by a network of buried waters. Our findings highlight a specific role of water molecules in both CRALBP-assisted specificity toward 9-cis-retinal and its thermal isomerase activity yielding 9,13-dicis-retinal. Kinetic data from two point mutants of CRALBP support an essential role of Glu202 as the initial proton donor in this isomerization reaction. PMID:24328211

  8. Biorelevant media resistant co-culture model mimicking permeability of human intestine.

    PubMed

    Antoine, Delphine; Pellequer, Yann; Tempesta, Camille; Lorscheidt, Stefan; Kettel, Bernadette; Tamaddon, Lana; Jannin, Vincent; Demarne, Frédéric; Lamprecht, Alf; Béduneau, Arnaud

    2015-03-15

    Cell culture models are currently used to predict absorption pattern of new compounds and formulations in the human gastro-intestinal tract (GIT). One major drawback is the lack of relevant apical incubation fluids allowing mimicking luminal conditions in the GIT. Here, we suggest a culture model compatible with biorelevant media, namely Fasted State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FaSSIF) and Fed State Simulated Intestinal Fluid (FeSSIF). Co-culture was set up from Caco-2 and mucus-secreting HT29-MTX cells using an original seeding procedure. Viability and cytotoxicity assays were performed following incubation of FeSSIF and FaSSIF with co-culture. Influence of biorelevant fluids on paracellular permeability or transporter proteins were also evaluated. Results were compared with Caco-2 and HT29-MTX monocultures. While Caco-2 viability was strongly affected with FeSSIF, no toxic effect was detected for the co-cultures in terms of viability and lactate dehydrogenase release. The addition of FeSSIF to the basolateral compartment of the co-culture induced cytotoxic effects which suggested the apical mucus barrier being cell protective. In contrast to FeSSIF, FaSSIF induced a slight increase of the paracellular transport and both tested media inhibited partially the P-gp-mediated efflux in the co-culture. Additionally, the absorptive transport of propranolol hydrochloride, a lipophilic β-blocker, was strongly affected by biorelevant fluids. This study demonstrated the compatibility of the Caco-2/HT29-MTX model with some of the current biorelevant media. Combining biorelevant intestinal fluids with features such as mucus secretion, adjustable paracellular and P-gp mediated transports, is a step forward to more realistic in-vitro models of the human intestine. PMID:25601199

  9. "Effects of recombinant human erythropoietin high mimicking abuse doses on oxidative stress processes in rats".

    PubMed

    Bianchi, Sara; Fusi, Jonathan; Franzoni, Ferdinando; Giovannini, Luca; Galetta, Fabio; Mannari, Claudio; Guidotti, Emanuele; Tocchini, Leonardo; Santoro, Gino

    2016-08-01

    Although many studies highlight how long-term moderate dose of Recombinant Human Erythropoietin (rHuEPO) treatments result in beneficial and antioxidants effects, few studies take into account the effects that short-term high doses of rHuEPO (mimicking abuse conditions) might have on the oxidative stress processes. Thus, the aim of this study was to investigate the in vivo antioxidant activity of rHuEPO, administered for a short time and at high doses to mimic its sports abuse as doping. Male Wistar healthy rats (n=36) were recruited for the study and were treated with three different concentrations of rHuEPO: 7.5, 15, 30μg/kg. Plasma concentrations of erythropoietin, 8-epi Prostaglandin F2α, plasma and urinary concentrations of NOx were evaluated with specific assay kit, while hematocrit levels were analyzed with an automated cell counter. Antioxidant activity of rHuEPO was assessed analyzing the possible variation of the plasma scavenger capacity against hydroxylic and peroxylic radicals by TOSC (Total Oxyradical Scavenging Capacity) assay. Statistical analyses showed higher hematocrit values, confirmed by a statistically significant increase of plasmatic EPO concentration. An increase in plasma scavenging capacity against peroxyl and hydroxyl radicals, in 8-isoprostane plasmatic concentrations and in plasmatic and urinary levels of NOX were also found in all the treated animals, though not always statistically significant. Our results confirm the literature data regarding the antioxidant action of erythropoietin administered at low doses and for short times, whereas they showed an opposite incremental oxidative stress action when erythropoietin is administered at high doses. PMID:27470373

  10. A novel infant milk formula concept: Mimicking the human milk fat globule structure.

    PubMed

    Gallier, Sophie; Vocking, Karin; Post, Jan Andries; Van De Heijning, Bert; Acton, Dennis; Van Der Beek, Eline M; Van Baalen, Ton

    2015-12-01

    Human milk (HM) provides all nutrients to support an optimal growth and development of the neonate. The composition and structure of HM lipids, the most important energy provider, have an impact on the digestion, uptake and metabolism of lipids. In HM, the lipids are present in the form of dispersed fat globules: large fat droplets enveloped by a phospholipid membrane. Currently, infant milk formula (Control IMF) contains small fat droplets primarily coated by proteins. Recently, a novel IMF concept (Concept IMF) was developed with a different lipid architecture, Nuturis(®), comprising large fat droplets with a phospholipid coating. Confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), with appropriate fluorescent probes, and transmission electron microscopy were used to determine and compare the interfacial composition and structure of HM fat globules, Concept IMF fat droplets and Control IMF fat droplets. The presence of a trilayer-structured HM fat globule membrane, composed of phospholipids, proteins, glycoproteins and cholesterol, was confirmed; in addition exosome-like vesicles are observed within cytoplasmic crescents. The Control IMF fat droplets had a thick protein-only interface. The Concept IMF fat droplets showed a very thin interface composed of a mixture of phospholipids, proteins and cholesterol. Furthermore, the Concept IMF contained fragments of milk fat globule membrane, which has been suggested to have potential biological functions in infants. By mimicking more closely the structure and composition of HM fat globules, this novel IMF concept with Nuturis(®) may have metabolic and digestive properties that are more similar to HM compared to Control IMF. PMID:26432620

  11. Human immunodeficiency virus-positive secondary syphilis mimicking cutaneous T-cell lymphoma.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Michiko; Fujii, Yoshiyuki; Ozaki, Keiji; Urano, Yoshio; Iwasa, Masami; Nakamura, Shingen; Fujii, Shiro; Abe, Masahiro; Sato, Yasuharu; Yoshino, Tadashi

    2015-01-01

    Malignant syphilis or lues maligna is a severe form of secondary syphilis that was commonly reported in the pre-antibiotic era, and has now reemerged with the advent of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) epidemic. However, the characteristic histopathological findings of malignant syphilis remain controversial. The aim of this case report was to clarify the clinical and histopathological findings of HIV-positive malignant secondary syphilis. A Japanese man in his forties complained of fever, skin lesions, headache, and myalgia without lymphadenopathy during the previous 4 weeks. The skin lesions manifested as erythematous, nonhealing, ulcerated papules scattered on his trunk, extremities, palm, and face. Although the skin lesions were suspected to be cutaneous T-cell lymphomas on histological analyses, they lacked T-cell receptor Jγ rearrangement; moreover, immunohistochemical analyses confirmed the presence of spirochetes. The patient was administered antibiotics and anti-retroviral therapy, which dramatically improved the symptoms. On the basis of these observations of the skin lesions, we finally diagnosed the patient with HIV-associated secondary syphilis that mimicked cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. The patient's systemic CD4+ lymphocyte count was very low, and the infiltrate was almost exclusively composed of CD8+ atypical lymphocytes; therefore, the condition was easily misdiagnosed as cutaneous lymphoma. Although the abundance of plasma cells is a good indicator of malignant syphilis on skin histological analyses, in some cases, the plasma cell count may be very low. Therefore, a diagnosis of malignant secondary syphilis should be considered before making a diagnosis of primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma or lymphoma associated with HIV infection. PMID:26449225

  12. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Niles, Paul B.; Eppler, Dean B.; Kennedy, Kriss J.; Lewis, Ruthan.; Sullivan, Thomas A.

    2016-04-01

    Introduction: This talk will introduce the preliminary findings in support of NASA's Future Capabilities Team. In support of the ongoing studies conducted by NASA's Future Capabilities Team, we are tasked with collecting research objectives for the Proving Ground activities. The objectives could include but are certainly not limited to: demonstrating crew well being and performance over long duration missions, characterizing lunar volatiles, Earth monitoring, near Earth object search and identification, support of a far-side radio telescope, and measuring impact of deep space environment on biological systems. Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will begin enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long duration spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fundamental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground. Possible Architectures: Activities and objectives will be accomplished during the Proving Ground phase using a deep space habitat. This habitat will potentially be accompanied by a power/propulsion bus capable of moving the habitat to accomplish different objectives within cis-lunar space. This architecture can also potentially support staging of robotic and tele-robotic assets as well as

  13. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spann, James; Niles, Paul; Eppler, Dean; Kennedy, Kriss; Lewis, Ruthan; Sullivan, Thomas

    2016-07-01

    Introduction: This talk will introduce the preliminary findings in support of NASA's Future Capabilities Team. In support of the ongoing studies conducted by NASA's Future Capabilities Team, we are tasked with collecting re-search objectives for the Proving Ground activities. The objectives could include but are certainly not limited to: demonstrating crew well being and performance over long duration missions, characterizing lunar volatiles, Earth monitoring, near Earth object search and identification, support of a far-side radio telescope, and measuring impact of deep space environment on biological systems. Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will be enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long dura-tion spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fun-damental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground. Possible Architectures: Activities and objectives will be accomplished during the Proving Ground phase using a deep space habitat. This habitat will potentially be accompanied by a power/propulsion bus capable of moving the habitat to accomplish different objectives within cis-lunar space. This architecture can also potentially support stag-ing of robotic and tele-robotic assets as well as

  14. Metabolism in humans of cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid relative to palmitic, stearic, oleic and linoleic acids

    SciTech Connect

    Emken, E.A.; Rohwedder, W.K.; Adlof, R.O.; Rakoff, H.; Gulley, R.M.

    1987-07-01

    Mixtures of triglycerides containing deuterium-labeled hexadecanoic acid (16:0), octadecanoic acid (18:0), cis-9-octadecenoic acid (9c-18:1), cis-9,cis-12-octadecadienoic acid (9c, 12c-18:2) and cis-12,trans-15-octadecadienoic acid (12c,15t-18:2) were fed to two young-adult males. Plasma lipid classes were isolated from samples collected periodically over 48 hr. Incorporation and turnover of the deuterium-labeled fats in plasma lipids were followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of the methyl ester derivatives. Absorption of the deuterated fats was followed by GC-MS analysis of chylomicron triglycerides isolated by ultracentrifugation. Results were the following: (i) endogenous fat contributed about 40% of the total fat incorporated into chylomicron triglycerides; (ii) elongation, desaturation and chain-shortened products from the deuterated fats were not detected; (iii) the polyunsaturated isomer 12c,15t-18:2 was metabolically more similar to saturated and 9c-18:1 fatty acids than to 9c,12c-18:2; (iv) relative incorporation of 9c,12c-18:2 into phospholipids did not increase proportionally with an increase of 9c,12c-18:2 in the mixture of deuterated fats fed; (v) absorption of 16:0, 18:0, 9c-18:1, 9c,12c-18:2 and 12c,15t-18:2 were similar; and (vi) data for the 1- and 2-acyl positions of phosphatidylcholine and for cholesteryl ester fractions reflected the known high specificity of phosphatidylcholine acyltransferase and lecithin:cholesteryl acyltransferase for 9c,12c-18:2. These results illustrate that incorporation of dietary fatty acids into human plasma lipid classes is selectively controlled and that incorporation of dietary 9c,12c-18:2 is limited.

  15. Trans- and cis-2-phenylindole platinum(II) complexes as cytotoxic agents against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomé, Maria; López, Concepción; González, Asensio; Ozay, Bahadir; Quirante, Josefina; Font-Bardía, Mercè; Calvet, Teresa; Calvis, Carme; Messeguer, Ramon; Baldomá, Laura; Badía, Josefa

    2013-09-01

    The synthesis and characterization of the new 2-phenylindole derivative: C8H3N-2-C6H5-3NOMe-5OMe (3c) and the trans- and cis-isomers of [Pt(3c)Cl2(DMSO)] complexes (4c and 5c, respectively) are described. The crystal structures of 4c·CH2Cl2 and 5c confirm: (a) the existence of a Pt-Nindole bond, (b) the relative arrangement of the Cl- ligands [trans- (in 4c) or cis- (in 5c)] and (c) the anti-(E) configuration of the oxime. The cytotoxic assessment of C8H3N-2-(C6H4-4‧R1)-3NOMe-5R2 [with R1 = R2 = H (3a); R1 = Cl, R2 = H (3b) and R1 = H, R2 = OMe (3c)] and the geometrical isomers of [Pt(L)Cl2(DMSO)] with L = 3a-3c [trans- (4a-4c) and cis- (5a-5c), respectively] against human breast adenocarcinoma cell lines (MDA-MB231 and MCF-7) is also reported and reveals that all the platinum(II) complexes (except 4a) are more cytotoxic than cisplatin in front of the MCF7 cell line. Electrophoretic DNA migration studies of the synthesized compounds in the absence and in the presence of topoisomerase-I have been performed, in order to get further insights into their mechanism of action.

  16. NKG2D ligand MICA is retained in the cis-Golgi apparatus by human cytomegalovirus protein UL142.

    PubMed

    Ashiru, Omodele; Bennett, Neil J; Boyle, Louise H; Thomas, Mair; Trowsdale, John; Wills, Mark R

    2009-12-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) evades T-cell recognition by down-regulating expression of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I and II molecules on the surfaces of infected cells. Contrary to the "missing-self" hypothesis, HCMV-infected cells are refractory to lysis by natural killer (NK) cells. Inhibition of NK cell function is mediated by a number of HCMV immune evasion molecules, which operate by delivering inhibitory signals to NK cells and preventing engagement of activating ligands. One such molecule is UL142, which is an MHC class I-related glycoprotein encoded by clinical isolates and low-passage-number strains of HCMV. UL142 is known to down-modulate surface expression of MHC class I-related chain A (MICA), which is a ligand of the activating NK receptor NKG2D. However, the mechanism by which UL142 interferes with MICA is unknown. Here, we show that UL142 localizes predominantly to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and cis-Golgi apparatus. The transmembrane domain of UL142 mediates its ER localization, while we propose that the UL142 luminal domain is involved in its cis-Golgi localization. We also confirm that UL142 down-modulates surface expression of full-length MICA alleles while having no effect on the truncated allele MICA*008. However, we demonstrate for the first time that UL142 retains full-length MICA alleles in the cis-Golgi apparatus. In addition, we propose that UL142 interacts with nascent MICA en route to the cell surface but not mature MICA at the cell surface. Our data also demonstrate that the UL142 luminal and transmembrane domains are involved in recognition and intracellular sequestration of full-length MICA alleles. PMID:19793804

  17. Human Papillomavirus Type 18 cis-Elements Crucial for Segregation and Latency.

    PubMed

    Ustav, Mart; Castaneda, Fernando Rodriguez; Reinson, Tormi; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Stable maintenance replication is characteristic of the latency phase of HPV infection, during which the viral genomes are actively maintained as extrachromosomal genetic elements in infected proliferating basal keratinocytes. Active replication in the S-phase and segregation of the genome into daughter cells in mitosis are required for stable maintenance replication. Most of our knowledge about papillomavirus genome segregation has come from studies of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1), which have demonstrated that the E2 protein cooperates with cellular trans-factors and that E2 binding sites act as cis-regulatory elements in the viral genome that are essential for the segregation process. However, the genomic organization of the regulatory region in HPVs, and the properties of the viral proteins are different from those of their BPV-1 counterparts. We have designed a segregation assay for HPV-18 and used it to demonstrate that the E2 protein performs segregation in combination with at least two E2 binding sites. The cooperative binding of the E2 protein to two E2 binding sites is a major determinant of HPV-18 genome segregation, as demonstrated by the change in spacing between adjacent binding sites #1 and #2 in the HPV-18 Upstream Regulatory Region (URR). Duplication or triplication of the natural 4 bp 5'-CGGG-3' spacer between the E2 binding sites increased the cooperative binding of the E2 molecules as well as E2-dependent segregation. Removal of any spacing between these sites eliminated cooperative binding of the E2 protein and disabled segregation of the URR and HPV-18 genome. Transfer of these configurations of the E2 binding sites into viral genomes confirmed the role of the E2 protein and binding sites #1 and #2 in the segregation process. Additional analysis demonstrated that these sites also play an important role in the transcriptional regulation of viral gene expression from different HPV-18 promoters. PMID:26288015

  18. Human Papillomavirus Type 18 cis-Elements Crucial for Segregation and Latency

    PubMed Central

    Ustav, Mart; Castaneda, Fernando Rodriguez; Reinson, Tormi; Männik, Andres; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Stable maintenance replication is characteristic of the latency phase of HPV infection, during which the viral genomes are actively maintained as extrachromosomal genetic elements in infected proliferating basal keratinocytes. Active replication in the S-phase and segregation of the genome into daughter cells in mitosis are required for stable maintenance replication. Most of our knowledge about papillomavirus genome segregation has come from studies of bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV-1), which have demonstrated that the E2 protein cooperates with cellular trans-factors and that E2 binding sites act as cis-regulatory elements in the viral genome that are essential for the segregation process. However, the genomic organization of the regulatory region in HPVs, and the properties of the viral proteins are different from those of their BPV-1 counterparts. We have designed a segregation assay for HPV-18 and used it to demonstrate that the E2 protein performs segregation in combination with at least two E2 binding sites. The cooperative binding of the E2 protein to two E2 binding sites is a major determinant of HPV-18 genome segregation, as demonstrated by the change in spacing between adjacent binding sites #1 and #2 in the HPV-18 Upstream Regulatory Region (URR). Duplication or triplication of the natural 4 bp 5’-CGGG-3’ spacer between the E2 binding sites increased the cooperative binding of the E2 molecules as well as E2-dependent segregation. Removal of any spacing between these sites eliminated cooperative binding of the E2 protein and disabled segregation of the URR and HPV-18 genome. Transfer of these configurations of the E2 binding sites into viral genomes confirmed the role of the E2 protein and binding sites #1 and #2 in the segregation process. Additional analysis demonstrated that these sites also play an important role in the transcriptional regulation of viral gene expression from different HPV-18 promoters. PMID:26288015

  19. Different cis-acting DNA elements control expression of the human apolipoprotein AI gene in different cell types

    SciTech Connect

    Sastry, K.; Seedorf, U.; Karathanasis, S.K.

    1988-02-01

    In mammals, the gene coding for apolipoprotein AI (apoAI), a protein of the plasma lipid transport system, is expressed only in the liver and the intestine. A series of plasmids containing various lengths of sequences flanking the 5' end of the human apoAI gene were constructed and assayed for transient expression after introduction into cultured human hepatoma 9HepG2), colon carcinoma (Caco-2), and epithelial (HeLa) cells. The results showed that while most of these constructs are expressed in HepG2 and Caco-2 cells, none of them is expressed in HeLa cells. In addition, the results indicated that a DNA segment located between nucleotides -256 and -41 upstream from the transcription start site of this gene is necessary and sufficient for maximal levels of expression in HepG2 but not in Caco-2 cells, while a DNA segment located between nucleotides -2052 and -192 is required for maximal levels of expression in Caco-2 cells. Moreover, it was shown that the -256 to -41 DNA segment functions as a hepatoma cell-specific transcriptional enhancer with both homologous and heterologous promoters. These results indicate that different cis- and possibly trans-acting factors are involved in the establishment and subsequent regulation of expression of the apoAI gene in the mammalian liver and intestine.

  20. Mapping cis-Regulatory Domains in the Human Genome UsingMulti-Species Conservation of Synteny

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Prabhakar, Shyam; Poulin, Francis; Rubin, EdwardM.; Couronne, Olivier

    2005-06-13

    Our inability to associate distant regulatory elements with the genes that they regulate has largely precluded their examination for sequence alterations contributing to human disease. One major obstacle is the large genomic space surrounding targeted genes in which such elements could potentially reside. In order to delineate gene regulatory boundaries we used whole-genome human-mouse-chicken (HMC) and human-mouse-frog (HMF) multiple alignments to compile conserved blocks of synteny (CBS), under the hypothesis that these blocks have been kept intact throughout evolution at least in part by the requirement of regulatory elements to stay linked to the genes that they regulate. A total of 2,116 and 1,942 CBS>200 kb were assembled for HMC and HMF respectively, encompassing 1.53 and 0.86 Gb of human sequence. To support the existence of complex long-range regulatory domains within these CBS we analyzed the prevalence and distribution of chromosomal aberrations leading to position effects (disruption of a genes regulatory environment), observing a clear bias not only for mapping onto CBS but also for longer CBS size. Our results provide a genome wide data set characterizing the regulatory domains of genes and the conserved regulatory elements within them.

  1. Research Objectives for Human Missions in the Proving Ground of Cis-Lunar Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Niles, P. B.; Eppler, D. B.; Kennedy, K. J.; Lewis, R.; Spann, J. F.; Sullivan, T. A.

    2016-01-01

    Beginning in as early as 2023, crewed missions beyond low Earth orbit will begin enabled by the new capabilities of the SLS and Orion vehicles. This will initiate the "Proving Ground" phase of human exploration with Mars as an ultimate destination. The primary goal of the Proving Ground is to demonstrate the capability of suitably long duration spaceflight without need of continuous support from Earth, i.e. become Earth Independent. A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fundamental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In A major component of the Proving Ground phase is to conduct research activities aimed at accomplishing major objectives selected from a wide variety of disciplines including but not limited to: Astronomy, Heliophysics, Fundamental Physics, Planetary Science, Earth Science, Human Systems, Fundamental Space Biology, Microgravity, and In Situ Resource Utilization. Mapping and prioritizing the most important objectives from these disciplines will provide a strong foundation for establishing the architecture to be utilized in the Proving Ground.

  2. Enhancing fuzzy robot navigation systems by mimicking human visual perception of natural terrain traversibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tunstel, E.; Howard, A.; Edwards, D.; Carlson, A.

    2001-01-01

    This paper presents a technique for learning to assess terrain traversability for outdoor mobile robot navigation using human-embedded logic and real-time perception of terrain features extracted from image data.

  3. Insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity through interrogation of cis elements disrupted in human erythroid disorders.

    PubMed

    Wakabayashi, Aoi; Ulirsch, Jacob C; Ludwig, Leif S; Fiorini, Claudia; Yasuda, Makiko; Choudhuri, Avik; McDonel, Patrick; Zon, Leonard I; Sankaran, Vijay G

    2016-04-19

    Whole-exome sequencing has been incredibly successful in identifying causal genetic variants and has revealed a number of novel genes associated with blood and other diseases. One limitation of this approach is that it overlooks mutations in noncoding regulatory elements. Furthermore, the mechanisms by which mutations in transcriptionalcis-regulatory elements result in disease remain poorly understood. Here we used CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to interrogate three such elements harboring mutations in human erythroid disorders, which in all cases are predicted to disrupt a canonical binding motif for the hematopoietic transcription factor GATA1. Deletions of as few as two to four nucleotides resulted in a substantial decrease (>80%) in target gene expression. Isolated deletions of the canonical GATA1 binding motif completely abrogated binding of the cofactor TAL1, which binds to a separate motif. Having verified the functionality of these three GATA1 motifs, we demonstrate strong evolutionary conservation of GATA1 motifs in regulatory elements proximal to other genes implicated in erythroid disorders, and show that targeted disruption of such elements results in altered gene expression. By modeling transcription factor binding patterns, we show that multiple transcription factors are associated with erythroid gene expression, and have created predictive maps modeling putative disruptions of their binding sites at key regulatory elements. Our study provides insight into GATA1 transcriptional activity and may prove a useful resource for investigating the pathogenicity of noncoding variants in human erythroid disorders. PMID:27044088

  4. Multiple single-stranded cis elements are associated with activated chromatin of the human c-myc gene in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Michelotti, G A; Michelotti, E F; Pullner, A; Duncan, R C; Eick, D; Levens, D

    1996-01-01

    Transcription activation and repression of eukaryotic genes are associated with conformational and topological changes of the DNA and chromatin, altering the spectrum of proteins associated with an active gene. Segments of the human c-myc gene possessing non-B structure in vivo located with enzymatic and chemical probes. Sites hypertensive to cleavage with single-strand-specific S1 nuclease or the single-strand-selective agent potassium permanganate included the major promoters P1 and P2 as well as the far upstream sequence element (FUSE) and CT elements, which bind, respectively, the single-strand-specific factors FUSE-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K in vitro. Active and inactive c-myc genes yielded different patterns of S1 nuclease and permanganate sensitivity, indicating alternative chromatin configurations of active and silent genes. The melting of specific cis elements of active c-myc genes in vivo suggested that transcriptionally associated torsional strain might assist strand separation and facilitate factor binding. Therefore, the interaction of FUSE-binding protein and heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein K with supercoiled DNA was studied. Remarkably, both proteins recognize their respective elements torsionally strained but not as liner duplexes. Single-strand- or supercoil-dependent gene regulatory proteins may directly link alterations in DNA conformation and topology with changes in gene expression. PMID:8649373

  5. Long-range evolutionary constraints reveal cis-regulatory interactions on the human X chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Naville, Magali; Ishibashi, Minaka; Ferg, Marco; Bengani, Hemant; Rinkwitz, Silke; Krecsmarik, Monika; Hawkins, Thomas A.; Wilson, Stephen W.; Manning, Elizabeth; Chilamakuri, Chandra S. R.; Wilson, David I.; Louis, Alexandra; Lucy Raymond, F.; Rastegar, Sepand; Strähle, Uwe; Lenhard, Boris; Bally-Cuif, Laure; van Heyningen, Veronica; FitzPatrick, David R.; Becker, Thomas S.; Roest Crollius, Hugues

    2015-01-01

    Enhancers can regulate the transcription of genes over long genomic distances. This is thought to lead to selection against genomic rearrangements within such regions that may disrupt this functional linkage. Here we test this concept experimentally using the human X chromosome. We describe a scoring method to identify evolutionary maintenance of linkage between conserved noncoding elements and neighbouring genes. Chromatin marks associated with enhancer function are strongly correlated with this linkage score. We test >1,000 putative enhancers by transgenesis assays in zebrafish to ascertain the identity of the target gene. The majority of active enhancers drive a transgenic expression in a pattern consistent with the known expression of a linked gene. These results show that evolutionary maintenance of linkage is a reliable predictor of an enhancer's function, and provide new information to discover the genetic basis of diseases caused by the mis-regulation of gene expression. PMID:25908307

  6. Mimicking hair disorders by genetic manipulation of organ cultured human hair follicles

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jiang; Roop, Dennis R.

    2013-01-01

    Human hair follicles can be dissected out of the scalp skin and cultured in vitro in defined growth medium. Hair follicle organ cultures have previously been used to investigate the molecular and cellular mechanisms through which various factors regulate the maintenance and cycling of adult hair follicles. In this issue, Samuelov et al. transfected organ-cultured human hair follicles with siRNA nucleotides and suppressed the expression of the endogenous P-cadherin gene in follicular keratinocytes. Knocking-down the expression of P-cadherin in hair follicles in vitro recapitulated the hair follicle phenotype observed in patients with hypotrichosis with juvenile macular dystrophy (HJMD), and enabled the authors to establish a cause-effect relationship between loss of P-cadherin and suppression of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway and, upregulation of TGFβ2 during the development of the hair abnormalities observed in HJMD patients. PMID:22971919

  7. Bioelectronic Device Mimicking Human Sensory System based on Nanovesicle-Carbon Nanotube Hybrid Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Daesan; Jin, Hye; Lee, San; Kim, Tae; Park, Juhun; Song, Hyun; Park, Tai; Hong, Seunghun

    2013-03-01

    We have developed a nanovesicle-based bioelectronic nose (NBN) that could mimic the receptor-mediated signal transmission of human olfactory systems and recognize a specific odorant. The NBN was comprised of a single-walled carbon nanotube (CNT)-based field effect transistor and cell-derived nanovesicles containing human olfactory receptors and calcium ion signal pathways. Importantly, the NBN took advantages of cell signal pathways for sensing signal amplification. It enabled ~100 times higher sensitivity than that of previous bioelectronic noses based on only olfactory receptor protein and CNT transistors. The NBN sensors exhibited a high sensitivity of 1 fM detection limit and a human-like selectivity with single-carbon-atomic resolution. Furthermore, these sensors could mimic a receptor-mediated cellular signal transmission in live cells. This versatile sensor platform should be useful for the study of molecular recognition and biological processes on cell membranes and also for various practical applications such as food conditioning and medical diagnostics.

  8. Nanovesicle-based bioelectronic nose platform mimicking human olfactory signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Jin, Hye Jun; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Tae Hyun; Park, Juhun; Song, Hyun Seok; Park, Tai Hyun; Hong, Seunghun

    2012-05-15

    We developed a nanovesicle-based bioelectronic nose (NBN) that could recognize a specific odorant and mimic the receptor-mediated signal transmission of human olfactory systems. To build an NBN, we combined a single-walled carbon nanotube-based field effect transistor with cell-derived nanovesicles containing human olfactory receptors and calcium ion signal pathways. Importantly, the NBN took advantages of cell signal pathways for sensing signal amplification, enabling ≈ 100 times better sensitivity than that of previous bioelectronic noses based on only olfactory receptor protein and carbon nanotube transistors. The NBN sensors exhibited a human-like selectivity with single-carbon-atomic resolution and a high sensitivity of 1 fM detection limit. Moreover, this sensor platform could mimic a receptor-meditated cellular signal transmission in live cells. This sensor platform can be utilized for the study of molecular recognition and biological processes occurring at cell membranes and also for various practical applications such as food screening and medical diagnostics. PMID:22475887

  9. Multiple fractions of gamma rays induced resistance to cis-dichloro-diammineplatinum (II) and methotrexate in human HeLa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Osmak, M.; Perovic, S. )

    1989-06-01

    Previous irradiation could induce changes in the cell-sensitivity to additional cytotoxic agents. In this study we examined whether the sensitivity to additional cytotoxic agents was affected in cells irradiated with multiple fractions of gamma rays if these agents were given at the time when the lesions induced in DNA by radiation have already been repaired. Human cervix carcinoma HeLa cells were irradiated daily with 0.5 Gy of gamma rays five times a week for 6 weeks. When the fractionation regimen was completed, that is when the cells had accumulated the total dose of 15 Gy of gamma rays, the sensitivity of these cells to gamma rays, UV light, cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum (II) (cis-DDP), methotrexate (MTX), and hydroxyurea (HU) was examined and compared to control cells. Results revealed that preirradiated cells did not change sensitivity to gamma rays and UV light, but that they increased the resistance to cis-DDP, and MTX (especially for higher concentrations of MTX), and increased sensitivity to HU (for lower concentrations of HU). The increased resistance to cis-DDP was also measurable up to 30 days after the last dose of gamma rays. The results indicate that preirradiation of HeLa cells with multiple fractions of gamma rays could change their sensitivity to additional cytotoxic agents, and that this is a relatively long-lasting effect. Our results suggest that caution is needed in medical application of radiation combined with chemical treatment.

  10. Human brucellosis mimicking axial spondyloarthritis: a challenge for rheumatologists when applying the 2009 ASAS criteria.

    PubMed

    Ye, Cong; Shen, Gui-Fen; Li, Shou-Xin; Dong, Ling-Li; Yu, Yi-Kai; Tu, Wei; Zhu, Ying-Zi; Hu, Shao-Xian

    2016-06-01

    Although the development of the 2009 SpA classification criteria by Assessment of SpondyloArthritis international Society (ASAS) represents an important step towards a better definition of the early disease stage particularly in axial spondyloarthritis (axSpA), the specificity of the criteria has been criticized these days. As the commonest zoonotic infection worldwide, human brucellosis can mimic a large number of diseases, including SpA. This study was performed to determine the frequency of rheumatologic manifestations in patients with brucellosis and the chance of misdiagnosing them as having axSpA in central China. The results showed that clinical manifestations of axSpA could be observed in brucellosis. Over half of patients had back pain, and one fifth of the patients with back pain were less than 45 years old at onset and had the symptom for more than 3 months. Two young males were falsely classified as suffering from axSpA according to the ASAS criteria, and one with MRI proved sacroiliitis was once given Etanercept for treatment. Therefore, differential diagnosis including human brucellosis should always be kept in mind when applying the ASAS criteria, even in traditionally non-endemic areas. PMID:27376805

  11. Development and Characterization of Piezoelectric Artificial Cochlear with micro Actuator mimicking Human Cochlear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Y.; Kim, S.; Kwak, J.; Kang, H.; Lee, Y. H.; Park, S.; Kim, W.; Hur, S.

    2013-12-01

    This paper presents the development of piezoelectric artificial cochlear (P-AC) capable of analyzing incoming acoustic or mechanical signals without external power source. The P-AC consists of membrane part and package part. The package part provides liquid environment through which the incoming signal is transmitted to membrane part. The membrane part responds to the transmitted signal and local area of the membrane part vibrates differently depending on its local resonant frequency. Previously in our group, we have demonstrated the feasibility of the P-AC with trapezoidal membrane part as sound analyzer by using mouth simulator as a sound input. In this research, we modified the P-AC to have the membrane part of logarithmically varying width. Also by incorporating mico-actuator into the package part that mimic the function of stapes bone in middle ear, we created similar environment to cochlear where human basilar membrane vibrates. The fabricated P-AC successfully demonstrates frequency separation of incoming mechanical signal from micro-actuator into several frequency bands within human hearing range.

  12. Predicting tissue specific cis-regulatory modules in the human genome using pairs of co-occurring motifs

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Researchers seeking to unlock the genetic basis of human physiology and diseases have been studying gene transcription regulation. The temporal and spatial patterns of gene expression are controlled by mainly non-coding elements known as cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) and epigenetic factors. CRMs modulating related genes share the regulatory signature which consists of transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Identifying such CRMs is a challenging problem due to the prohibitive number of sequence sets that need to be analyzed. Results We formulated the challenge as a supervised classification problem even though experimentally validated CRMs were not required. Our efforts resulted in a software system named CrmMiner. The system mines for CRMs in the vicinity of related genes. CrmMiner requires two sets of sequences: a mixed set and a control set. Sequences in the vicinity of the related genes comprise the mixed set, whereas the control set includes random genomic sequences. CrmMiner assumes that a large percentage of the mixed set is made of background sequences that do not include CRMs. The system identifies pairs of closely located motifs representing vertebrate TFBSs that are enriched in the training mixed set consisting of 50% of the gene loci. In addition, CrmMiner selects a group of the enriched pairs to represent the tissue-specific regulatory signature. The mixed and the control sets are searched for candidate sequences that include any of the selected pairs. Next, an optimal Bayesian classifier is used to distinguish candidates found in the mixed set from their control counterparts. Our study proposes 62 tissue-specific regulatory signatures and putative CRMs for different human tissues and cell types. These signatures consist of assortments of ubiquitously expressed TFs and tissue-specific TFs. Under controlled settings, CrmMiner identified known CRMs in noisy sets up to 1:25 signal-to-noise ratio. CrmMiner was 21-75% more precise than a

  13. Aescin protection of human vascular endothelial cells exposed to cobalt chloride mimicked hypoxia and inflammatory stimuli.

    PubMed

    Montopoli, Monica; Froldi, Guglielmina; Comelli, Maria Cristina; Prosdocimi, Marco; Caparrotta, Laura

    2007-03-01

    Human vascular endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to CoCl2 as an in vitro model of hypoxia. Expression of VCAM-1 (vascular cell adhesion molecule), reduction of PECAM-1 (platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule) and cytoskeletal changes without alterations in cell viability were observed. HUVECs were also exposed to Escherichia coli lipopolysaccaride (LPS) as an in vitro model of inflammation: significant IL-6 release was measured. Pre-treatment of HUVECs with aescin prevented, in a concentration-dependent fashion (0.1-1 microM), the action of CoCl2 on VCAM-1 and PECAM-1, also preserving endothelial cell morphology. Furthermore, aescin pre-treatment reduced IL-6 release from LPS-activated vascular endothelium. PMID:17310430

  14. A mouse model mimicking human first night effect for the evaluation of hypnotics.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qi; Xu, Xin-Hong; Qu, Wei-Min; Lazarus, Michael; Urade, Yoshihiro; Huang, Zhi-Li

    2014-01-01

    In humans, a first night effect (FNE) is characterized by increased sleep latency and decreased total sleep time in an unfamiliar environment, but the mechanism and treatment options for this universally experienced acute insomnia are unclear. We continuously recorded electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyogram (EMG) and measured plasma corticosterone levels to develop a mouse FNE model by inducing acute insomnia in mice that have been placed in unfamiliar cage environments. The sleep latency of mice 'moved to clean cages' (MCC) was longer than that for mice 'moved to dirty ones' (MDC). As compared to MDC mice, MCC mice showed stronger decreases in the amount of non-rapid eye movement (non-REM, NREM) and REM sleep, with a lower power density of NREM sleep, increased fragmentation and decreased stage transitions from NREM sleep to wake, and higher variation in plasma corticosterone levels. Treatment of MCC mice with zolpidem, diazepam, raclopride, pyrilamine, except SCH23390 shortened NREM sleep latency. In addition, zolpidem significantly increased NREM and REM sleep with the increase in slow wave activity (1.00-2.75 Hz), while raclopride significantly increased NREM and REM sleep without changing the EEG power density in MCC mice, whereas diazepam increased sleep with a drastic decrease in power density of the frequency band between 1.00 and 4.00 Hz, diazepam also increased the frequency band between 9.75 and 24.75 Hz during NREM sleep. These results indicate that a MCC mouse can mimic a FNE phenotype of humans and that zolpidem and raclopride may be useful drugs to prevent acute insomnia, including FNE. PMID:24316349

  15. Transient Expression of Transgenic IL-12 in Mouse Liver Triggers Unremitting Inflammation Mimicking Human Autoimmune Hepatitis.

    PubMed

    Gil-Farina, Irene; Di Scala, Marianna; Salido, Eduardo; López-Franco, Esperanza; Rodríguez-García, Estefania; Blasi, Mercedes; Merino, Juana; Aldabe, Rafael; Prieto, Jesús; Gonzalez-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2016-09-15

    The etiopathogenesis of autoimmune hepatitis (AIH) remains poorly understood. In this study, we sought to develop an animal model of human AIH to gain insight into the immunological mechanisms driving this condition. C57BL/6 mice were i.v. injected with adeno-associated viral vectors encoding murine IL-12 or luciferase under the control of a liver-specific promoter. Organ histology, response to immunosuppressive therapy, and biochemical and immunological parameters, including Ag-specific humoral and cellular response, were analyzed. Mechanistic studies were carried out using genetically modified mice and depletion of lymphocyte subpopulations. Adeno-associated virus IL-12-treated mice developed histological, biochemical, and immunological changes resembling type 1 AIH, including marked and persistent liver mononuclear cell infiltration, hepatic fibrosis, hypergammaglobulinemia, anti-nuclear and anti-smooth muscle actin Abs, and disease remission with immunosuppressive drugs. Interestingly, transgenic IL-12 was short-lived, but endogenous IL-12 expression was induced, and both IL-12 and IFN-γ remained elevated during the entire study period. IFN-γ was identified as an essential mediator of liver damage, and CD4 and CD8 T cells but not NK, NKT, or B cells were essential executors of hepatic injury. Furthermore, both MHC class I and MHC class II expression was upregulated at the hepatocellular membrane, and induction of autoreactive liver-specific T cells was detected. Remarkably, although immunoregulatory mechanisms were activated, they only partially mitigated liver damage. Thus, low and transient expression of transgenic IL-12 in hepatocytes causes loss of tolerance to hepatocellular Ags, leading to chronic hepatitis resembling human AIH type 1. This model provides a practical tool to explore AIH pathogenesis and novel therapies. PMID:27511737

  16. Candidacidal Activity of Selected Ceragenins and Human Cathelicidin LL-37 in Experimental Settings Mimicking Infection Sites

    PubMed Central

    Durnaś, Bonita; Wnorowska, Urszula; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Deptuła, Piotr; Wątek, Marzena; Piktel, Ewelina; Głuszek, Stanisław; Gu, Xiaobo; Savage, Paul B.; Niemirowicz, Katarzyna; Bucki, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Fungal infections, especially those caused by antibiotic resistant pathogens, have become a serious public health problem due to the growing number of immunocompromised patients, including those subjected to anticancer treatment or suffering from HIV infection. In this study we assessed fungicidal activity of the ceragenins CSA-13, CSA-131 and CSA-192 against four fluconazole–resistant Candida strains. We found that ceragenins activity against planktonic Candida cells was higher than activity of human LL-37 peptide and synthetic cationic peptide omiganan. Compared to LL-37 peptide, ceragenins in the presence of DNase I demonstrated an increased ability to kill DNA-induced Candida biofilm. Microscopy studies show that treatment with LL-37 or ceragenins causes Candida cells to undergo extensive surface changes indicating surface membrane damage. This conclusion was substantiated by observation of rapid incorporation of FITC-labeled CSA-13, CSA-131 or LL-37 peptide into the more lipophilic environment of the Candida membrane. In addition to activity against Candida spp., ceragenins CSA-131 and CSA-192 display strong fungicidal activity against sixteen clinical isolates including Cryptococcus neoformans and Aspergillus fumigatus. These results indicate the potential of ceragenins for future development as new fungicidal agents. PMID:27315208

  17. Reduced membrane protein associated with resistance of human squamous carcinoma cells to methotrexate and cis-platinum.

    PubMed

    Bernal, S D; Speak, J A; Boeheim, K; Dreyfuss, A I; Wright, J E; Teicher, B A; Rosowsky, A; Tsao, S W; Wong, Y C

    1990-06-01

    A membrane protein recognized by monoclonal antibody SQM1 was identified in human squamous carcinomas, including those originating in the head and neck (SqCHN), lung and cervix. Cell lines derived from SqCHN of previously untreated patients expressed high amounts of this protein. In contrast, many cell lines established from SqCHN of patients previously treated with chemotherapy and/or radiation showed diminished amounts of this SQM1 protein. The expression of SQM1 antigen was determined in several SqCHN cell lines made resistant by exposure to methotrexate (MTX) in vitro. The parent cell lines all exhibited strong binding to SQM1 antibody. The MTX-resistant sublines showed much lower membrane binding of SQM1. The lowest SQM1 reactivity was found in cell lines with high resistance to MTX and with diminished rate of MTX transport. Some highly MTX-resistant cell lines which had high levels of dihydrofolate reductase, but which retained a high rate of MTX transport, also retained high levels of SQM1 binding. Reduced SQM1 protein was also found in SqCHN cells which developed resistance to the alkylating drug cis-latinum (CDDP) and which showed reduced membrane transport of CDDP. Cell growth kinetics and non-specific antigenic shifts were not responsible for the differences in SQM1 binding between the parent cell lines and their drug-resistant sublines. The finding of a novel protein which is reduced in cells resistant to MTX and CDDP could contribute to our understanding of the basic mechanisms of drug resistance. By detecting SQM1 protein in clinical specimens, it may be possible to monitor the development of drug resistance in tumors. PMID:2195318

  18. Human renal mesangial cells are a target for the anti-inflammatory action of 9-cis retinoic acid

    PubMed Central

    Manzano, V Moreno; Muñoz, J C Sepúlveda; Jiménez, J Rodriguez; Puyol, M Rodriguez; Puyol, D Rodriguez; Kitamura, M; Cazaña, F J Lucio

    2000-01-01

    Mesangial cells play an active role in the inflammatory response to glomerular injury. We have studied in cultured human mesangial cells (CHMC) several effects of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cRA), an activator of both retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and retinoid X receptors (RXRs). 9-cRA inhibited foetal calf serum-induced CHMC proliferation. It also prevented CHMC death induced by the inflammatory mediator H2O2. This preventive effect was not due to any increase in H2O2 catabolism and it persisted even when both catalase and glutathione synthesis were inhibited. Finally, 9-cRA diminished monocyte adhesion to FCS-stimulated CHMC. Interestingly, the retinoid also inhibited in FCS-stimulated cells the protein expression of two mesangial adhesion molecules, fibronectin and osteopontin, but it did not modify the protein expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 and vascular adhesion molecule-1. All major RARs and RXRs isotypes were expressed in CHMC regardless of the presence or absence of 9-cRA. Transcripts to RAR-α, RAR-β and RXR-α increased after incubation with 9-cRA whereas RXR-γ was inhibited, suggesting a major role for RARs and RXRs in 9-cRA-anti-inflammatory effects. 9-cRA was toxic only at 50 μM (a concentration 50–5000 times higher than required for the effects above). Cell death occurred by apoptosis, whose onset was associated with a pronounced increase in catalase activity and reduced glutathione content, being more effectively induced by all-trans retinoic acid. Modulation of the oxidant/antioxidant balance failed to inhibit apoptosis. We conclude that mesangial cells might be a target for the treatment of inflammatory glomerulopathies with 9-cRA. PMID:11139446

  19. A lettuce (Lactuca sativa) homolog of human Nogo-B receptor interacts with cis-prenyltransferase and is necessary for natural rubber biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Qu, Yang; Chakrabarty, Romit; Tran, Hue T; Kwon, Eun-Joo G; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2015-01-23

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an indispensable biopolymer used to manufacture diverse consumer products. Although a major source of natural rubber is the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is also known to synthesize natural rubber. Here, we report that an unusual cis-prenyltransferase-like 2 (CPTL2) that lacks the conserved motifs of conventional cis-prenyltransferase is required for natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce. CPTL2, identified from the lettuce rubber particle proteome, displays homology to a human NogoB receptor and is predominantly expressed in latex. Multiple transgenic lettuces expressing CPTL2-RNAi constructs showed that a decrease of CPTL2 transcripts (3-15% CPTL2 expression relative to controls) coincided with the reduction of natural rubber as low as 5%. We also identified a conventional cis-prenyltransferase 3 (CPT3), exclusively expressed in latex. In subcellular localization studies using fluorescent proteins, cytosolic CPT3 was relocalized to endoplasmic reticulum by co-occurrence of CPTL2 in tobacco and yeast at the log phase. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid data showed that CPTL2 and CPT3 interact. Yeast microsomes containing CPTL2/CPT3 showed enhanced synthesis of short cis-polyisoprenes, but natural rubber could not be synthesized in vitro. Intriguingly, a homologous pair CPTL1/CPT1, which displays ubiquitous expressions in lettuce, showed a potent dolichol biosynthetic activity in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that CPTL2 is a scaffolding protein that tethers CPT3 on endoplasmic reticulum and is necessary for natural rubber biosynthesis in planta, but yeast-expressed CPTL2 and CPT3 alone could not synthesize high molecular weight natural rubber in vitro. PMID:25477521

  20. A Lettuce (Lactuca sativa) Homolog of Human Nogo-B Receptor Interacts with cis-Prenyltransferase and Is Necessary for Natural Rubber Biosynthesis*

    PubMed Central

    Qu, Yang; Chakrabarty, Romit; Tran, Hue T.; Kwon, Eun-Joo G.; Kwon, Moonhyuk; Nguyen, Trinh-Don; Ro, Dae-Kyun

    2015-01-01

    Natural rubber (cis-1,4-polyisoprene) is an indispensable biopolymer used to manufacture diverse consumer products. Although a major source of natural rubber is the rubber tree (Hevea brasiliensis), lettuce (Lactuca sativa) is also known to synthesize natural rubber. Here, we report that an unusual cis-prenyltransferase-like 2 (CPTL2) that lacks the conserved motifs of conventional cis-prenyltransferase is required for natural rubber biosynthesis in lettuce. CPTL2, identified from the lettuce rubber particle proteome, displays homology to a human NogoB receptor and is predominantly expressed in latex. Multiple transgenic lettuces expressing CPTL2-RNAi constructs showed that a decrease of CPTL2 transcripts (3–15% CPTL2 expression relative to controls) coincided with the reduction of natural rubber as low as 5%. We also identified a conventional cis-prenyltransferase 3 (CPT3), exclusively expressed in latex. In subcellular localization studies using fluorescent proteins, cytosolic CPT3 was relocalized to endoplasmic reticulum by co-occurrence of CPTL2 in tobacco and yeast at the log phase. Furthermore, yeast two-hybrid data showed that CPTL2 and CPT3 interact. Yeast microsomes containing CPTL2/CPT3 showed enhanced synthesis of short cis-polyisoprenes, but natural rubber could not be synthesized in vitro. Intriguingly, a homologous pair CPTL1/CPT1, which displays ubiquitous expressions in lettuce, showed a potent dolichol biosynthetic activity in vitro. Taken together, our data suggest that CPTL2 is a scaffolding protein that tethers CPT3 on endoplasmic reticulum and is necessary for natural rubber biosynthesis in planta, but yeast-expressed CPTL2 and CPT3 alone could not synthesize high molecular weight natural rubber in vitro. PMID:25477521

  1. Closed traumatic brain injury model in sheep mimicking high-velocity, closed head trauma in humans.

    PubMed

    Grimmelt, A-C; Eitzen, S; Balakhadze, I; Fischer, B; Wölfer, J; Schiffbauer, H; Gorji, A; Greiner, C

    2011-08-01

    To date, there are only a few, non-evidence based, cerebroprotective therapeutic strategies for treatment and, accordingly, for prevention of secondary brain injuries following severe closed head trauma. In order to develop new therapy strategies, existing realistic animal models need to be advanced. The objective is to bridge standardized small animal models and actual patient medical care, since the results of experimental small animal studies often cannot be transferred to brain-injured humans. For improved standardization of high-velocity trauma, new trauma devices for initiating closed traumatic brain injury in sheep were developed. The following new devices were tested: 1. An anatomically shaped rubber bolt with an integrated oscillation absorber for prevention of skull fractures; 2. Stationary mounting of the bolt to guarantee stable experimental conditions; 3. Varying degrees of trauma severity, i. e., mild and severe closed traumatic brain injury, using different cartridges; and 4. Trauma analysis via high-speed video recording. Peritraumatic measurements of intracranial pressure, brain tissue pH, brain tissue oxygen, and carbon dioxide pressure, as well as neurotransmitter concentrations were performed. Cerebral injuries were documented with magnetic resonance imaging and compared to neuropathological results. Due to the new trauma devices, skull fractures were prevented. The high-speed video recording documented a realistic trauma mechanism for a car accident. Enhancement of extracellular glutamate, aspartate, and gamma amino butyric acid concentrations began 60 min after the trauma. Magnetic resonance imaging and neuropathological results showed characteristic injury patterns of mild, and severe, closed traumatic brain injury. The severe, closed traumatic brain injury group showed diffuse axonal injuries, traumatic subarachnoid hemorrhage, and hemorrhagic contusions with inconsistent distribution among the animals. The model presented here achieves

  2. Folding of barstar C40A/C82A/P27A and catalysis of the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerization by human cytosolic cyclophilin (Cyp18).

    PubMed Central

    Golbik, R.; Fischer, G.; Fersht, A. R.

    1999-01-01

    Refolding of b*C40A/C82A/P27A is comprised of several kinetically detectable folding phases. The slowest phase in refolding originates from trans-->cis isomerization of the Tyr47-Pro48 peptide bond being in cis conformation in the native state. This refolding phase can be accelerated by the peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase human cytosolic cyclophilin (Cyp18) with a kcat/K(M) of 254,000 M(-1) s(-1). The fast refolding phase is not influenced by the enzyme. PMID:10422840

  3. Role of conserved cis-regulatory elements in the post-transcriptional regulation of the human MECP2 gene involved in autism

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The MECP2 gene codes for methyl CpG binding protein 2 which regulates activities of other genes in the early development of the brain. Mutations in this gene have been associated with Rett syndrome, a form of autism. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of evolutionarily conserved cis-elements in regulating the post-transcriptional expression of the MECP2 gene and to explore their possible correlations with a mutation that is known to cause mental retardation. Results A bioinformatics approach was used to map evolutionarily conserved cis-regulatory elements in the transcribed regions of the human MECP2 gene and its mammalian orthologs. Cis-regulatory motifs including G-quadruplexes, microRNA target sites, and AU-rich elements have gained significant importance because of their role in key biological processes and as therapeutic targets. We discovered in the 5′-UTR (untranslated region) of MECP2 mRNA a highly conserved G-quadruplex which overlapped a known deletion in Rett syndrome patients with decreased levels of MeCP2 protein. We believe that this 5′-UTR G-quadruplex could be involved in regulating MECP2 translation. We mapped additional evolutionarily conserved G-quadruplexes, microRNA target sites, and AU-rich elements in the key sections of both untranslated regions. Our studies suggest the regulation of translation, mRNA turnover, and development-related alternative MECP2 polyadenylation, putatively involving interactions of conserved cis-regulatory elements with their respective trans factors and complex interactions among the trans factors themselves. We discovered highly conserved G-quadruplex motifs that were more prevalent near alternative splice sites as compared to the constitutive sites of the MECP2 gene. We also identified a pair of overlapping G-quadruplexes at an alternative 5′ splice site that could potentially regulate alternative splicing in a negative as well as a positive way in the MECP2 pre

  4. cis-1,2-Dichloroethylene

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    cis - 1,2 - Dichloroethylene ; CASRN 156 - 59 - 2 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Nonc

  5. Discovery of CTCF-Sensitive Cis-Spliced Fusion RNAs between Adjacent Genes in Human Prostate Cells

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Fujun; Song, Zhenguo; Babiceanu, Mihaela; Song, Yansu; Facemire, Loryn; Singh, Ritambhara; Adli, Mazhar; Li, Hui

    2015-01-01

    Genes or their encoded products are not expected to mingle with each other unless in some disease situations. In cancer, a frequent mechanism that can produce gene fusions is chromosomal rearrangement. However, recent discoveries of RNA trans-splicing and cis-splicing between adjacent genes (cis-SAGe) support for other mechanisms in generating fusion RNAs. In our transcriptome analyses of 28 prostate normal and cancer samples, 30% fusion RNAs on average are the transcripts that contain exons belonging to same-strand neighboring genes. These fusion RNAs may be the products of cis-SAGe, which was previously thought to be rare. To validate this finding and to better understand the phenomenon, we used LNCaP, a prostate cell line as a model, and identified 16 additional cis-SAGe events by silencing transcription factor CTCF and paired-end RNA sequencing. About half of the fusions are expressed at a significant level compared to their parental genes. Silencing one of the in-frame fusions resulted in reduced cell motility. Most out-of-frame fusions are likely to function as non-coding RNAs. The majority of the 16 fusions are also detected in other prostate cell lines, as well as in the 14 clinical prostate normal and cancer pairs. By studying the features associated with these fusions, we developed a set of rules: 1) the parental genes are same-strand-neighboring genes; 2) the distance between the genes is within 30kb; 3) the 5′ genes are actively transcribing; and 4) the chimeras tend to have the second-to-last exon in the 5′ genes joined to the second exon in the 3′ genes. We then randomly selected 20 neighboring genes in the genome, and detected four fusion events using these rules in prostate cancer and non-cancerous cells. These results suggest that splicing between neighboring gene transcripts is a rather frequent phenomenon, and it is not a feature unique to cancer cells. PMID:25658338

  6. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 Tax activates transcription of the human fra-1 gene through multiple cis elements responsive to transmembrane signals.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, H; Fujii, M; Niki, T; Tokuhara, M; Matsui, M; Seiki, M

    1993-01-01

    We have shown that Tax1 of human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 stimulates the expression of several cellular immediate-early genes (M. Fujii, T. Niki, T. Mori, T. Matsuda, M. Matsui, N. Nomura, and M. Seiki, Oncogene 6:1023-1029, 1991). In this study, the 5'-flanking region of the human fra-1 gene, which is a Tax1-inducible fos-related gene, was isolated and Tax1 or serum-responsive cis elements were analyzed to obtain further insight into the mechanism of Tax1 action. The 62-bp sequence starting 46 nucleotides upstream from the translation initiation site showed 71% homology with the sequence surrounding the TATA box of the c-fos promoter. Regulatory motifs identified in the c-fos promoter, such as an Ets-binding site, E boxes, a CArG box, c-fos AP-1 sites, and two retinoblastoma control elements, were also found upstream of the c-fos homology region. A 502-bp fragment containing these motifs mediated transcriptional activation by Tax1 or by serum in a transient transfection assay. Three independent Tax1-responsive regions (TRRs) were identified, and mutations in each revealed that one of the retinoblastoma control elements in TRR1 and the c-fos AP-1 sites in TRR2 and TRR3 were essential for the activation. Although TRR2 contains a CArG box-like sequence, it was a weak binding site for p67SRF, if it bound at all, and was not required for activation. All three TRRs could also mediate the signals stimulated by serum. Thus, Tax1 appears to activate fra-1 gene expression by means of a part of the cellular machinery similar to that which mediates growth signals. Images PMID:8230424

  7. Absorption and distribution of deuterium-labeled trans- and cis-11-octadecenoic acid in human plasma and lipoprotein lipids

    SciTech Connect

    Emken, E.A.; Rohwedder, W.K.; Adlof, R.O.; DeJarlais, W.J.; Gulley, R.M.

    1986-09-01

    Triglycerides of deuterium-labeled trans-11-, trans-11-cis-11- and cis-9-octadecenoic acid (11t-18:1-2H, 11c-18:1-2H) were simultaneously fed to two young adult male subjects. Plasma lipids from blood samples collected periodically for 48 hr were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy. The results indicate the delta 11-18:1-2H acids and 9c-18:1-2H were equally well absorbed; relative turnover rates were higher for the delta 11-18-1-2H acids in plasma triglycerides; incorporation of the delta 11-18:1-2H acids into plasma phosphatidylcholine was similar to 9c-18:1-2H, but distribution at the 1- and 2-acyl positions was substantially different; esterification of cholesterol with 11t-18:1 was extremely low; chain shortening of the delta 11-18:1-2H acids was 2-3 times greater than for 9c-18:1-2H; no evidence for desaturation or elongation of the 18:1-2H acids was detected; and a 40% isotopic dilution of the 18:1-2H acids in the chylomicron triglyceride fraction indicated the presence of a substantial intestinal triglyceride pool. Based on our present knowledge, these metabolic results for delta 11-18:1 acids present in hydrogenated oils and animal fats indicate that the delta 11 isomers are no more likely than 9c-18:1 to contribute to dietary fat-related health problems.

  8. Determinants of the Usage of Splice-Associated cis-Motifs Predict the Distribution of Human Pathogenic SNPs.

    PubMed

    Wu, XianMing; Hurst, Laurence D

    2016-02-01

    Where in genes do pathogenic mutations tend to occur and does this provide clues as to the possible underlying mechanisms by which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) cause disease? As splice-disrupting mutations tend to occur predominantly at exon ends, known also to be hot spots of cis-exonic splice control elements, we examine the relationship between the relative density of such exonic cis-motifs and pathogenic SNPs. In particular, we focus on the intragene distribution of exonic splicing enhancers (ESE) and the covariance between them and disease-associated SNPs. In addition to showing that disease-causing genes tend to be genes with a high intron density, consistent with missplicing, five factors established as trends in ESE usage, are considered: relative position in exons, relative position in genes, flanking intron size, splice sites usage, and phase. We find that more than 76% of pathogenic SNPs are within 3-69 bp of exon ends where ESEs generally reside, this being 13% more than expected. Overall from enrichment of pathogenic SNPs at exon ends, we estimate that approximately 20-45% of SNPs affect splicing. Importantly, we find that within genes pathogenic SNPs tend to occur in splicing-relevant regions with low ESE density: they are found to occur preferentially in the terminal half of genes, in exons flanked by short introns and at the ends of phase (0,0) exons with 3' non-"AGgt" splice site. We suggest the concept of the "fragile" exon, one home to pathogenic SNPs owing to its vulnerability to splice disruption owing to low ESE density. PMID:26545919

  9. Determinants of the Usage of Splice-Associated cis-Motifs Predict the Distribution of Human Pathogenic SNPs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, XianMing; Hurst, Laurence D.

    2016-01-01

    Where in genes do pathogenic mutations tend to occur and does this provide clues as to the possible underlying mechanisms by which single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) cause disease? As splice-disrupting mutations tend to occur predominantly at exon ends, known also to be hot spots of cis-exonic splice control elements, we examine the relationship between the relative density of such exonic cis-motifs and pathogenic SNPs. In particular, we focus on the intragene distribution of exonic splicing enhancers (ESE) and the covariance between them and disease-associated SNPs. In addition to showing that disease-causing genes tend to be genes with a high intron density, consistent with missplicing, five factors established as trends in ESE usage, are considered: relative position in exons, relative position in genes, flanking intron size, splice sites usage, and phase. We find that more than 76% of pathogenic SNPs are within 3–69 bp of exon ends where ESEs generally reside, this being 13% more than expected. Overall from enrichment of pathogenic SNPs at exon ends, we estimate that approximately 20–45% of SNPs affect splicing. Importantly, we find that within genes pathogenic SNPs tend to occur in splicing-relevant regions with low ESE density: they are found to occur preferentially in the terminal half of genes, in exons flanked by short introns and at the ends of phase (0,0) exons with 3′ non-“AGgt” splice site. We suggest the concept of the “fragile” exon, one home to pathogenic SNPs owing to its vulnerability to splice disruption owing to low ESE density. PMID:26545919

  10. The cis-acting elements involved in endonucleolytic cleavage of the 3' UTR of human IGF-II mRNAs bind a 50 kDa protein.

    PubMed

    Scheper, W; Holthuizen, P E; Sussenbach, J S

    1996-03-15

    Site-specific cleavage of human insulin-like growth factor II mRNAs requires two cis-acting elements, I and II, that are both located in the 3' untranslated region and separated by almost 2 kb. These elements can interact and form a stable RNA-RNA stem structure. In this study we have initiated the investigation of transacting factors involved in the cleavage of IGF-II mRNAs. The products of the cleavage reaction accumulate in the cytoplasm, suggesting that cleavage occurs in this cellular compartment. By electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we have identified a cytoplasmic protein with an apparent molecular weight of 48-50 kDa, IGF-II cleavage unit binding protein (ICU-BP), that binds to the stem structure formed by interaction of parts of the cis-acting elements I and II. The binding is resistant to high K+ concentrations and is dependent on Mg2+. In addition, ICU-BP binding is dependent on the cell density and correlates inversely with the IGM-II mRNA levels. In vivo cross-linking data show that this protein is associated with IGF-II mRNAs in vivo. PMID:8604329

  11. Tale of two isomers: complexities of human odor perception for cis- and trans-4-methylcyclohexane methanol from the chemical spill in West Virginia.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Daniel L; Phetxumphou, Katherine; Smiley, Elizabeth; Dietrich, Andrea M

    2015-02-01

    Application of gas chromatography with mass spectrometric and human olfactory "sniffer" detectors reveals the nature of odorous chemicals from an industrial chemical spill. Crude 4-methylcyclohexane methanol (4-MCHM) spilled in a river and then contaminated drinking water and air for over 300000 consumers living in West Virginia. Olfactory gas chromatography allows investigators to independently measure the odor of chemical components in a mixture. Crude 4-MCHM is comprised of several major cyclohexane components, four of which have distinct isomer pairs. The cis- and trans-4-MCHM isomers are the only components to have distinct odors at the concentrations used in this study. The trans-4-MCHM is the dominant odorant with descriptors of "licorice" and "sweet". Trans-4-MCHM has an air odor threshold concentration of 0.060 ppb-v (95% CI: 0.040-0.091). The odor threshold concentrations are not influenced by gender or age but are lower by a factor of 5 for individuals with prior exposure compared to naïve subjects. Individual trans-4-MCHM odor threshold concentrations vary by more than a factor of 100. The cis-4-MCHM isomer has approximately a 2000-fold higher odor threshold concentration, different descriptors, and an even wider individual response range. PMID:25541902

  12. Reduction of ormaplatin and cis-diamminetetrachloroplatinum(iv) by ascorbic acid and dominant thiols in human plasma: kinetic and mechanistic analyses.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jingran; Ren, Yanli; Huo, Shuying; Shen, Shigang; Xu, Jianzhong; Tian, Hongwu; Shi, Tiesheng

    2016-07-28

    The reductions of Pt(iv) anticancer prodrugs [Pt(dach)Cl4] (ormaplatin/tetraplatin), cis-[Pt(NH3)2Cl4], and cis,cis,trans-[Pt(NH3)2Cl2Br2] by the several dominant reductants in human plasma have been characterized kinetically in this work, including l-ascorbic acid (Asc), l-glutathione (GSH), l-cysteine (Cys), dl-homocysteine (Hcy), and a dipeptide Gly-Cys. All the reductions follow an overall second-order kinetics, being first-order each in [Pt(iv)] and in the [reductant]. A general reactivity trend of Asc < Hcy < Cys-Gly < GSH < Cys is clearly revealed for the reductions of [Pt(dach)Cl4] and [Pt(NH3)2Cl4] at 37.0 °C and pH 7.40. Analysis of the observed second-order rate constants k' implies that these Pt(iv) prodrugs have a very short lifetime (less than a minute) in human plasma and can hardly enter into cells before reduction and that Asc might not play a dominant role in the reduction process among the reductants. The reductions of [Pt(dach)Cl4] and [Pt(NH3)2Cl4] by Asc have been studied in a wide pH range, and a reaction mechanism has been proposed involving parallel reductions of the Pt(iv) complexes by the Asc protolytic species. Moreover, a halide-bridged (inner-sphere) electron transfer mode for the rate-determining steps is discussed in detail; several lines of evidence strongly bolster this type of electron transfer. Furthermore, the observed activation parameters corresponding to k' have been measured around pH 7.40. Analysis of the established k'-pH profiles indicates that k' is a composite of at least three parameters in the pH range of 5.74-7.40 and the measured activation parameters in this range do not correspond to a single rate-determining step. Consequently, the isokinetic relationship reported previously using the measured ΔH(‡) and ΔS(‡) in the above pH range might be an artifact since the relationship is not justified anymore when our new data are added. PMID:27327648

  13. CIS Implementation Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steward, Naomi; Wiles, Jeff

    This handbook for school and agency staff presents information on implementing a Career Information System (CIS). Section 1 describes the content, format, and use of CIS information files. Each type of file is discussed individually and sample printouts are included. Section 2 provides materials on QUEST, the twenty-one question process by which…

  14. Cis-Lunar Base Camp

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Merrill, Raymond G.; Goodliff, Kandyce E.; Mazanek, Daniel D.; Reeves, John D., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Historically, when mounting expeditions into uncharted territories, explorers have established strategically positioned base camps to pre-position required equipment and consumables. These base camps are secure, safe positions from which expeditions can depart when conditions are favorable, at which technology and operations can be tested and validated, and facilitate timely access to more robust facilities in the event of an emergency. For human exploration missions into deep space, cis-lunar space is well suited to serve as such a base camp. The outer regions of cis-lunar space, such as the Earth-Moon Lagrange points, lie near the edge of Earth s gravity well, allowing equipment and consumables to be aggregated with easy access to deep space and to the lunar surface, as well as more distant destinations, such as near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs) and Mars and its moons. Several approaches to utilizing a cis-lunar base camp for sustainable human exploration, as well as some possible future applications are identified. The primary objective of the analysis presented in this paper is to identify options, show the macro trends, and provide information that can be used as a basis for more detailed mission development. Compared within are the high-level performance and cost of 15 preliminary cis-lunar exploration campaigns that establish the capability to conduct crewed missions of up to one year in duration, and then aggregate mass in cis-lunar space to facilitate an expedition from Cis-Lunar Base Camp. Launch vehicles, chemical propulsion stages, and electric propulsion stages are discussed and parametric sizing values are used to create architectures of in-space transportation elements that extend the existing in-space supply chain to cis-lunar space. The transportation options to cis-lunar space assessed vary in efficiency by almost 50%; from 0.16 to 0.68 kg of cargo in cis-lunar space for every kilogram of mass in Low Earth Orbit (LEO). For the 15 cases, 5-year campaign

  15. Generation and Characterization of a Human/Mouse Chimeric GD2-Mimicking Anti-Idiotype Antibody Ganglidiximab for Active Immunotherapy against Neuroblastoma.

    PubMed

    Eger, Christin; Siebert, Nikolai; Seidel, Diana; Zumpe, Maxi; Jüttner, Madlen; Brandt, Sven; Müller, Hans-Peter; Lode, Holger N

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with proteins mimicking GD2 that is highly expressed on neuroblastoma (NB) cells is a promising strategy in treatment of NB, a pediatric malignancy with poor prognosis. We previously showed efficacy of ganglidiomab in vivo, a murine anti-idiotype (anti-Id) IgG1. In order to tailor immune responses to variable regions, we generated a new human/mouse chimeric anti-Id antibody (Ab) ganglidiximab by replacing murine constant fragments with corresponding human IgG1 regions. DNA sequences encoding for variable regions of heavy (VH) and light chains (VL) were synthesized by RT-PCR from total RNA of ganglidiomab-producing hybridoma cells and further ligated into mammalian expression plasmids with coding sequences for constant regions of human IgG1 heavy and light chains, respectively. We established a stable production cell line using Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells co-transfected with two expression plasmids driving the expression of either ganglidiximab heavy or light chain. After purification from supernatants, anti-idiotypic characteristics of ganglidiximab were demonstrated. Binding of ganglidiximab to anti-GD2 Abs of the 14.18 family as well as to NK-92tr cells expressing a GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (scFv(ch14.18)-zeta) was shown using standard ELISA and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Ganglidiximab binding affinities to anti-GD2 Abs were further determined by surface plasmon resonance technique. Moreover, binding of anti-GD2 Abs to the nominal antigen GD2 as well as GD2-specific Ab-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, CDC) was competitively inhibited by ganglidiximab. Finally, ganglidiximab was successfully used as a protein vaccine in vivo to induce a GD2-specific humoral immune response. In summary, we report generation and characterization of a new human/mouse chimeric anti-Id Ab ganglidiximab for active immunotherapy against NB. This Ab may be useful to tailor immune responses to the paratope regions mimicking GD2 overexpressed in NB

  16. Generation and Characterization of a Human/Mouse Chimeric GD2-Mimicking Anti-Idiotype Antibody Ganglidiximab for Active Immunotherapy against Neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Eger, Christin; Siebert, Nikolai; Seidel, Diana; Zumpe, Maxi; Jüttner, Madlen; Brandt, Sven; Müller, Hans-Peter; Lode, Holger N.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with proteins mimicking GD2 that is highly expressed on neuroblastoma (NB) cells is a promising strategy in treatment of NB, a pediatric malignancy with poor prognosis. We previously showed efficacy of ganglidiomab in vivo, a murine anti-idiotype (anti-Id) IgG1. In order to tailor immune responses to variable regions, we generated a new human/mouse chimeric anti-Id antibody (Ab) ganglidiximab by replacing murine constant fragments with corresponding human IgG1 regions. DNA sequences encoding for variable regions of heavy (VH) and light chains (VL) were synthesized by RT-PCR from total RNA of ganglidiomab-producing hybridoma cells and further ligated into mammalian expression plasmids with coding sequences for constant regions of human IgG1 heavy and light chains, respectively. We established a stable production cell line using Chinese hamster ovarian (CHO) cells co-transfected with two expression plasmids driving the expression of either ganglidiximab heavy or light chain. After purification from supernatants, anti-idiotypic characteristics of ganglidiximab were demonstrated. Binding of ganglidiximab to anti-GD2 Abs of the 14.18 family as well as to NK-92tr cells expressing a GD2-specific chimeric antigen receptor (scFv(ch14.18)-zeta) was shown using standard ELISA and flow cytometry analysis, respectively. Ganglidiximab binding affinities to anti-GD2 Abs were further determined by surface plasmon resonance technique. Moreover, binding of anti-GD2 Abs to the nominal antigen GD2 as well as GD2-specific Ab-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC, CDC) was competitively inhibited by ganglidiximab. Finally, ganglidiximab was successfully used as a protein vaccine in vivo to induce a GD2-specific humoral immune response. In summary, we report generation and characterization of a new human/mouse chimeric anti-Id Ab ganglidiximab for active immunotherapy against NB. This Ab may be useful to tailor immune responses to the paratope regions mimicking GD2 overexpressed in NB

  17. A human microsatellite DNA-mimicking oligodeoxynucleotide with CCT repeats negatively regulates TLR7/9-mediated innate immune responses via selected TLR pathways.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ran; Sun, Luguo; Bao, Musheng; Zhang, Yongsheng; Wang, Li; Wu, Xiuli; Hu, Dali; Liu, Yongjun; Yu, Yongli; Wang, Liying

    2010-03-01

    A human microsatellite DNA-mimicking ODN (MS ODN) composed of CCT repeats, designated as SAT05f, has been studied for its capacity of negatively regulating innate immunity induced by TLR7/TLR9 agonists in vitro and in mice. The result showed that SAT05f could down-regulate TLR7/9-dependent IFN-alpha production in cultured human PBMC stimulated by inactivated Flu virus PR8 or HSV-1 or CpG ODN or imiquimod, protect d-GalN-treated mice from lethal shock induced by TLR9 agonist, not by TLR3/4 agonist. In addition, SAT05f significantly inhibit IFN-alpha production from purified human plasmacytoid cells (pDCs) stimulated by CpG ODN. Interestingly, SAT05f could up-regulate CD80, CD86, and HLA-DR on the pDCs in vitro, implying that SAT05f-mediated inhibition on IFN-alpha production could be related to the activation of pDCs. The data suggest that SAT05f could be developed as a candidate medicament for the treatment of TLR7/9 activation-associated diseases by inhibiting TLR7/9 signaling pathways. PMID:20034855

  18. Facile Synthesis of cis-Dichloro-(1,4,7-Triazacyclononane) Platinum(II) and its Screening Against Human Ovarian Cancer (SK-OV-3) and Leukemia (K-562) Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Murnaghan, Aleisha M.

    2002-01-01

    A simple method for the preparation of cis-dichloro(1,4,7-triazacyclononane)platinum(II), cis-Pt(tacn)Cl2 is presented, together with the results of screening the compound against the K-562 (leukemia) and SK-OV-3 (ovarian) human cancer cell lines. While the compound shows no activity against K-562 cells, there is evidence for some cytotoxicity against SK-OV-3. The compound is much less effective than cisplatin, and its limited solubility restricts the useable concentration range. PMID:18475426

  19. A novel FGFR3-binding peptide inhibits FGFR3 signaling and reverses the lethal phenotype of mice mimicking human thanatophoric dysplasia

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Min; Yu, Ying; Qi, Huabing; Xie, Yangli; Su, Nan; Wang, Xiaofeng; Tan, Qiaoyan; Luo, Fengtao; Zhu, Ying; Wang, Quan; Du, Xiaolan; Xian, Cory J.; Liu, Peng; Huang, Haiyang; Shen, Yue; Deng, Chu-Xia; Chen, Di; Chen, Lin

    2012-01-01

    Gain-of-function mutations in fibroblast growth factor receptor-3 (FGFR3) lead to several types of human skeletal dysplasia syndromes including achondroplasia, hypochondroplasia and thanatophoric dysplasia (TD). Currently, there are no effective treatments for these skeletal dysplasia diseases. In this study, we screened, using FGFR3 as a bait, a random 12-peptide phage library and obtained 23 positive clones that share identical amino acid sequences (VSPPLTLGQLLS), named as peptide P3. This peptide had high binding specificity to the extracellular domain of FGFR3. P3 inhibited tyrosine kinase activity of FGFR3 and its typical downstream molecules, extracellular signal-regulated kinase/mitogen-activated protein kinase. P3 also promoted proliferation and chondrogenic differentiation of cultured ATDC5 chondrogenic cells. In addition, P3 alleviated the bone growth retardation in bone rudiments from mice mimicking human thanatophoric dysplasia type II (TDII). Finally, P3 reversed the neonatal lethality of TDII mice. Thus, this study identifies a novel inhibitory peptide for FGFR3 signaling, which may serve as a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of FGFR3-related skeletal dysplasia. PMID:23014564

  20. Novel vaccine peptide GV1001 effectively blocks β-amyloid toxicity by mimicking the extra-telomeric functions of human telomerase reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun-Hee; Lee, Kyu-Yong; Kim, Sangjae; Lee, Jessica Woojin; Choi, Na-Young; Lee, Eun-Hye; Lee, Young Joo; Lee, Sang-Hun; Koh, Seong-Ho

    2014-06-01

    GV1001 is a 16-amino-acid vaccine peptide derived from the human telomerase reverse transcriptase sequence. We investigated the effects of GV1001 against β-amyloid (Aβ) oligomer-induced neurotoxicity in rat neural stem cells (NSCs). Primary culture NSCs were treated with several concentrations of GV1001 and/or Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ oligomer for 48 hours. GV1001 protected NSCs against the Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ oligomer in a concentration-dependent manner. Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ concentration dependently decreased viability, proliferation, and mobilization of NSCs and GV1001 treatment restored the cells to wild-type levels. Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ increased free radical levels in rat NSCs while combined treatment with GV1001 significantly reduced these levels. In addition, GV1001 treatment of Aβ₂₅₋₃₅-injured NSCs increased the expression level of survival-related proteins, including mitochondria-associated survival proteins, and decreased the levels of death and inflammation-related proteins, including mitochondria-associated death proteins. Together, these results suggest that GV1001 possesses neuroprotective effects against Aβ₂₅₋₃₅ oligomer in NSCs and that these effects are mediated through mimicking the extra-telomeric functions of human telomerase reverse transcriptase, including the induction of cellular proliferation, anti-apoptotic effects, mitochondrial stabilization, and anti-aging and anti-oxidant effects. PMID:24439482

  1. Burying Dogs in Ancient Cis-Baikal, Siberia: Temporal Trends and Relationships with Human Diet and Subsistence Practices

    PubMed Central

    Losey, Robert J.; Garvie-Lok, Sandra; Leonard, Jennifer A.; Katzenberg, M. Anne; Germonpré, Mietje; Nomokonova, Tatiana; Sablin, Mikhail V.; Goriunova, Olga I.; Berdnikova, Natalia E.; Savel’ev, Nikolai A.

    2013-01-01

    The first objective of this study is to examine temporal patterns in ancient dog burials in the Lake Baikal region of Eastern Siberia. The second objective is to determine if the practice of dog burial here can be correlated with patterns in human subsistence practices, in particular a reliance on terrestrial mammals. Direct radiocarbon dating of a suite of the region’s dog remains indicates that these animals were given burial only during periods in which human burials were common. Dog burials of any kind were most common during the Early Neolithic (∼7–8000 B.P.), and rare during all other time periods. Further, only foraging groups seem to have buried canids in this region, as pastoralist habitation sites and cemeteries generally lack dog interments, with the exception of sacrificed animals. Stable carbon and nitrogen isotope data indicate that dogs were only buried where and when human diets were relatively rich in aquatic foods, which here most likely included river and lake fish and Baikal seal (Phoca sibirica). Generally, human and dog diets appear to have been similar across the study subregions, and this is important for interpreting their radiocarbon dates, and comparing them to those obtained on the region’s human remains, both of which likely carry a freshwater old carbon bias. Slight offsets were observed in the isotope values of dogs and humans in our samples, particularly where both have diets rich in aquatic fauna. This may result from dietary differences between people and their dogs, perhaps due to consuming fish of different sizes, or even different tissues from the same aquatic fauna. This paper also provides a first glimpse of the DNA of ancient canids in Northeast Asia. PMID:23696851

  2. Characterization of cis-acting elements regulating transcription of the human DF3 breast carcinoma-associated antigen (MUC1) gene.

    PubMed Central

    Abe, M; Kufe, D

    1993-01-01

    The present studies have examined the sequences responsible for regulating transcription of the human DF3 breast carcinoma-associated antigen (MUC1) gene. A region 1656 base pairs upstream to the DF3 transcription initiation site was fused to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene. Transient expression assays using a series of deleted constructs demonstrated that the region from position -618 contains the regulatory sequences necessary for DF3 transcription in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Further analysis with internal deletion vectors and heterologous promoter constructs indicated the involvement of cis-acting elements in the fragment extending from positions -598 to -485. By gel retardation and DNA footprinting, we have identified a protein in MCF-7 cells that recognizes sequences between positions -505 and -485. The results of Southwestern studies demonstrate that this protein has an apparent molecular mass of 45 kDa. Taken together, these results suggest that DF3 gene transcription is regulated by a previously undescribed transacting factor. Images PMID:8419933

  3. Identification of cis-acting repressive sequences within the negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Y C; Touzjian, N; Stenzel, M; Dorfman, T; Sodroski, J G; Haseltine, W A

    1990-01-01

    The negative regulatory element of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 is a 260-nucleotide-long sequence that decreases the rate of RNA transcription initiation specified by the long terminal repeat. This region has the potential to bind several cellular transcription factors. Here it is shown that sequences which recognize the NFAT-1 and USF cellular transcription factors contribute to this negative regulatory effect. The sequences within the negative regulatory element which resemble the AP-1 site and the URS do not negatively regulate human immunodeficiency virus long terminal repeat transcription initiation. PMID:2398545

  4. ATF3 Mediates Anti-Cancer Activity of Trans-10, cis-12-Conjugated Linoleic Acid in Human Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kui-Jin; Lee, Jihye; Park, Yeonhwa; Lee, Seong-Ho

    2015-01-01

    Conjugated linoleic acids (CLA) are a family of isomers of linoleic acid. CLA increases growth arrest and apoptosis of human colorectal cancer cells through an isomer-specific manner. ATF3 belongs to the ATF/CREB family of transcription factors and is associated with apoptosis in colorectal cancer. The present study was performed to investigate the molecular mechanism by which t10, c12-CLA stimulates ATF3 expression and apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells. t10, c12-CLA increased an apoptosis in human colorectal cancer cells in dose dependent manner. t10, c12-CLA induced ATF3 mRNA and luciferase activity of ATF3 promoter in a dose-dependent manner. The responsible region for ATF3 transcriptional activation by t10, c12-CLA is located between −147 and −1850 of ATF3 promoter. mRNA stability of ATF3 was not affected by t10, c12-CLA treatment. t10, c12-CLA increases GSK3β expression and suppresses IGF-1-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. The knockdown of ATF3 suppressed expression of GSK3β and NAG-1 and PARP cleavage. The results suggest that t10, c12-CLA induces apoptosis through ATF3-mediated pathway in human colorectal cancer cells. PMID:25767681

  5. Differential Allelic Expression in the Human Genome: A Robust Approach To Identify Genetic and Epigenetic Cis-Acting Mechanisms Regulating Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Serre, David; Gurd, Scott; Ge, Bing; Sladek, Robert; Sinnett, Donna; Harmsen, Eef; Bibikova, Marina; Chudin, Eugene; Barker, David L.; Dickinson, Todd; Fan, Jian-Bing; Hudson, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    The recent development of whole genome association studies has lead to the robust identification of several loci involved in different common human diseases. Interestingly, some of the strongest signals of association observed in these studies arise from non-coding regions located in very large introns or far away from any annotated genes, raising the possibility that these regions are involved in the etiology of the disease through some unidentified regulatory mechanisms. These findings highlight the importance of better understanding the mechanisms leading to inter-individual differences in gene expression in humans. Most of the existing approaches developed to identify common regulatory polymorphisms are based on linkage/association mapping of gene expression to genotypes. However, these methods have some limitations, notably their cost and the requirement of extensive genotyping information from all the individuals studied which limits their applications to a specific cohort or tissue. Here we describe a robust and high-throughput method to directly measure differences in allelic expression for a large number of genes using the Illumina Allele-Specific Expression BeadArray platform and quantitative sequencing of RT-PCR products. We show that this approach allows reliable identification of differences in the relative expression of the two alleles larger than 1.5-fold (i.e., deviations of the allelic ratio larger than 60∶40) and offers several advantages over the mapping of total gene expression, particularly for studying humans or outbred populations. Our analysis of more than 80 individuals for 2,968 SNPs located in 1,380 genes confirms that differential allelic expression is a widespread phenomenon affecting the expression of 20% of human genes and shows that our method successfully captures expression differences resulting from both genetic and epigenetic cis-acting mechanisms. PMID:18454203

  6. Tissue mimicking materials for dental ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Singh, Rahul S; Culjat, Martin O; Grundfest, Warren S; Brown, Elliott R; White, Shane N

    2008-04-01

    While acoustic tissue mimicking materials have been explored for a variety of soft and hard biological tissues, no dental hard tissue mimicking materials have been characterized. Tooth phantoms are necessary to better understand acoustic phenomenology within the tooth environment and to accelerate the advancement of dental ultrasound imaging systems. In this study, soda lime glass and dental composite were explored as surrogates for human enamel and dentin, respectively, in terms of compressional velocity, attenuation, and acoustic impedance. The results suggest that a tooth phantom consisting of glass and composite can effectively mimic the acoustic behavior of a natural human tooth. PMID:18396919

  7. Efficient expression of the human papillomavirus type 16 L1 protein in epithelial cells by using Rev and the Rev-responsive element of human immunodeficiency virus or the cis-acting transactivation element of simian retrovirus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Tan, W; Felber, B K; Zolotukhin, A S; Pavlakis, G N; Schwartz, S

    1995-01-01

    Production of the human papillomavirus (HPV) late gene products L1 and L2 is limited to terminally differentiated keratinocytes. Here, we demonstrate that mRNA encoding the HPV-16 L1 capsid protein contains cis-acting RNA elements that inhibit expression at the posttranscriptional level. While cytoplasmic L1 mRNA is detectable in transfected HeLa cells, L1 protein is not produced. We have identified at least one major inhibitory element that is located within the L1 open reading frame, whereas another negative element had been reported to lie in the 3'-untranslated region of L1. The presence of these elements may explain the lack of HPV late gene expression in undifferentiated epithelial cells. Efficient production of HPV-16 L1 could be achieved with posttranscriptional regulatory elements of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 or simian retrovirus type 1. L1 protein was expressed in the presence of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Rev from hybrid mRNAs containing the RNA binding site for Rev (Rev-responsive element). In addition, we have achieved efficient expression of L1 from hybrid mRNAs containing a cis-acting transactivation element from simian retrovirus type 1. Our data show that HPV-16 L1 protein production is regulated posttranscriptionally. This regulated expression may allow virus production in terminally differentiated epithelial cells and is probably a conserved and important mechanism for HPV expression. PMID:7637007

  8. Wild-type human γD-crystallin promotes aggregation of its oxidation-mimicking, misfolding-prone W42Q mutant.

    PubMed

    Serebryany, Eugene; King, Jonathan A

    2015-05-01

    Non-native protein conformers generated by mutation or chemical damage template aggregation of wild-type, undamaged polypeptides in diseases ranging from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis to cancer. We tested for such interactions in the natively monomeric human eye lens protein γd-crystallin, whose aggregation leads to cataract disease. The oxidation-mimicking W42Q mutant of γd-crystallin formed non-native polymers starting from a native-like state under physiological conditions. Aggregation occurred in the temperature range 35-45 °C, in which the mutant protein began to lose the native conformation of its N-terminal domain. Surprisingly, wild-type γd-crystallin promoted W42Q polymerization in a catalytic manner, even at mutant concentrations too low for homogeneous nucleation to occur. The presence of wild-type protein also downshifted the temperature range of W42Q aggregation. W42Q aggregation required formation of a non-native intramolecular disulfide bond but not intermolecular cross-linking. Transient WT/W42Q binding may catalyze this oxidative misfolding event in the mutant. That a more stable variant in a mixture can specifically promote aggregation of a less stable one rationalizes how extensive aggregation of rare damaged polypeptides can occur during the course of aging. PMID:25787081

  9. Dynamic morphological changes in the skulls of mice mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from gain-of-function mutation of FGFR2 (P253R)

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xiaolan; Weng, Tujun; Sun, Qidi; Su, Nan; Chen, Zhi; Qi, Huabing; Jin, Ming; Yin, Liangjun; He, Qifen; Chen, Lin

    2010-01-01

    Apert syndrome is caused mainly by gain-of-function mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. We have generated a mouse model (Fgfr2+/P253R) mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Pro253Arg mutation using the knock-in approach. This mouse model in general has the characteristic skull morphology similar to that in humans with Apert syndrome. To characterize the detailed changes of form in the overall skull and its major anatomic structures, euclidean distance matrix analysis was used to quantitatively compare the form and growth difference between the skulls of mutants and their wild-type controls. There were substantial morphological differences between the skulls of mutants and their controls at 4 and 8 weeks of age (P<0.01). The mutants showed shortened skull dimensions along the rostrocaudal axis, especially in their face. The width of the frontal bone and the distance between the two orbits were broadened mediolaterally. The neurocrania were significantly increased along the dorsoventral axis and slightly increased along the mediolateral axis, and also had anteriorly displayed opisthion along the rostrocaudal axis. Compared with wild-type, the mutant mandible had an anteriorly displaced coronoid process and mandibular condyle along the rostrocaudal axis. We further found that there was catch-up growth in the nasal bone, maxilla, zygomatic bone and some regions of the mandible of the mutant skulls during the 4–8-week interval. The above-mentioned findings further validate the Fgfr2+/P253R mouse strain as a good model for human Apert syndrome. The changes in form characterized in this study will help to elucidate the mechanisms through which the Pro253Arg mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 affects craniofacial development and causes Apert syndrome. PMID:20557404

  10. Dynamic morphological changes in the skulls of mice mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from gain-of-function mutation of FGFR2 (P253R).

    PubMed

    Du, Xiaolan; Weng, Tujun; Sun, Qidi; Su, Nan; Chen, Zhi; Qi, Huabing; Jin, Ming; Yin, Liangjun; He, Qifen; Chen, Lin

    2010-08-01

    Apert syndrome is caused mainly by gain-of-function mutations of fibroblast growth factor receptor 2. We have generated a mouse model (Fgfr2(+/P253R)) mimicking human Apert syndrome resulting from fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 Pro253Arg mutation using the knock-in approach. This mouse model in general has the characteristic skull morphology similar to that in humans with Apert syndrome. To characterize the detailed changes of form in the overall skull and its major anatomic structures, euclidean distance matrix analysis was used to quantitatively compare the form and growth difference between the skulls of mutants and their wild-type controls. There were substantial morphological differences between the skulls of mutants and their controls at 4 and 8 weeks of age (P < 0.01). The mutants showed shortened skull dimensions along the rostrocaudal axis, especially in their face. The width of the frontal bone and the distance between the two orbits were broadened mediolaterally. The neurocrania were significantly increased along the dorsoventral axis and slightly increased along the mediolateral axis, and also had anteriorly displayed opisthion along the rostrocaudal axis. Compared with wild-type, the mutant mandible had an anteriorly displaced coronoid process and mandibular condyle along the rostrocaudal axis. We further found that there was catch-up growth in the nasal bone, maxilla, zygomatic bone and some regions of the mandible of the mutant skulls during the 4-8-week interval. The above-mentioned findings further validate the Fgfr2(+/P253R) mouse strain as a good model for human Apert syndrome. The changes in form characterized in this study will help to elucidate the mechanisms through which the Pro253Arg mutation in fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 affects craniofacial development and causes Apert syndrome. PMID:20557404

  11. Rapamycin sensitivity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is mediated by a peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase related to human FK506-binding protein.

    PubMed Central

    Koltin, Y; Faucette, L; Bergsma, D J; Levy, M A; Cafferkey, R; Koser, P L; Johnson, R K; Livi, G P

    1991-01-01

    Rapamycin is a macrolide antifungal agent with structural similarity to FK506. It exhibits potent immunosuppressive properties analogous to those of both FK506 and cyclosporin A (CsA). Unlike FK506 and CsA, however, rapamycin does not inhibit the transcription of early T-cell activation genes, including interleukin-2, but instead appears to block downstream events leading to T-cell activation. FK506 and CsA receptor proteins (FKBP and cyclophilin, respectively) have been identified and shown to be distinct members of a class of enzymes that possess peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase (PPIase) activity. Despite the apparent differences in their mode of action, rapamycin and FK506 act as reciprocal antagonists in vivo and compete for binding to FKBP. As a means of rapidly identifying a target protein for rapamycin in vivo, we selected and genetically characterized rapamycin-resistant mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and isolated a yeast genomic fragment that confers drug sensitivity. We demonstrate that the resonse to rapamycin in yeast cells is mediated by a gene encoding a 114-amino-acid, approximately 13-kDa protein which has a high degree of sequence homology with human FKBP; we designated this gene RBP1 (for rapamycin-binding protein). The RBP1 protein (RBP) was expressed in Escherichia coli, purified to homogeneity, and shown to catalyze peptidyl-prolyl isomerization of a synthetic peptide substrate. PPIase activity was completely inhibited by rapamycin and FK506 but not by CsA, indicating that both macrolides bind to the recombinant protein. Expression of human FKBP in rapamycin-resistant mutants restored rapamycin sensitivity, indicating a functional equivalence between the yeast and human enzymes. Images PMID:1996117

  12. The meta-epigenomic structure of purified human stem cell populations is defined at cis-regulatory sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yong Mei; Golden, Aaron; Mar, Jessica C.; Einstein, Francine H.; Greally, John M.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanism and significance of epigenetic variability in the same cell type between healthy individuals are not clear. Here, we purify human CD34+ hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) from different individuals and find that there is increased variability of DNA methylation at loci with properties of promoters and enhancers. The variability is especially enriched at candidate enhancers near genes transitioning between silent and expressed states, and encoding proteins with leukocyte differentiation properties. Our findings of increased variability at loci with intermediate DNA methylation values, at candidate “poised” enhancers, and at genes involved in HSPC lineage commitment suggest that CD34+ cell subtype heterogeneity between individuals is a major mechanism for the variability observed. Epigenomic studies performed on cell populations, even when purified, are testing collections of epigenomes, or meta-epigenomes. Our findings show that meta-epigenomic approaches to data analysis can provide insights into cell subpopulation structure. PMID:25327398

  13. Cis-acting sequences from a human surfactant protein gene confer pulmonary-specific gene expression in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Korfhagen, T.R.; Glasser, S.W.; Wert, S.E.; Bruno, M.D.; Daugherty, C.C.; McNeish, J.D.; Stock, J.L.; Potter, S.S.; Whitsett, J.A. )

    1990-08-01

    Pulmonary surfactant is produced in late gestation by developing type II epithelial cells lining the alveolar epithelium of the lung. Lack of surfactant at birth is associated with respiratory distress syndrome in premature infants. Surfactant protein C (SP-C) is a highly hydrophobic peptide isolated from pulmonary tissue that enhances the biophysical activity of surfactant phospholipids. Like surfactant phospholipid, SP-C is produced by epithelial cells in the distal respiratory epithelium, and its expression increases during the latter part of gestation. A chimeric gene containing 3.6 kilobases of the promoter and 5{prime}-flanking sequences of the human SP-C gene was used to express diphtheria toxin A. The SP-C-diphtheria toxin A fusion gene was injected into fertilized mouse eggs to produce transgenic mice. Affected mice developed respiratory failure in the immediate postnatal period. Morphologic analysis of lungs from affected pups showed variable but severe cellular injury confined to pulmonary tissues. Ultrastructural changes consistent with cell death and injury were prominent in the distal respiratory epithelium. Proximal components of the tracheobronchial tree were not severely affected. Transgenic animals were of normal size at birth, and structural abnormalities were not detected in nonpulmonary tissues. Lung-specific diphtheria toxin A expression controlled by the human SP-C gene injured type II epithelial cells and caused extensive necrosis of the distal respiratory epithelium. The absence of type I epithelial cells in the most severely affected transgenic animals supports the concept that developing type II cells serve as precursors to type I epithelial cells.

  14. The dominant Anopheles vectors of human malaria in the Americas: occurrence data, distribution maps and bionomic précis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background An increasing knowledge of the global risk of malaria shows that the nations of the Americas have the lowest levels of Plasmodium falciparum and P. vivax endemicity worldwide, sustained, in part, by substantive integrated vector control. To help maintain and better target these efforts, knowledge of the contemporary distribution of each of the dominant vector species (DVS) of human malaria is needed, alongside a comprehensive understanding of the ecology and behaviour of each species. Results A database of contemporary occurrence data for 41 of the DVS of human malaria was compiled from intensive searches of the formal and informal literature. The results for the nine DVS of the Americas are described in detail here. Nearly 6000 occurrence records were gathered from 25 countries in the region and were complemented by a synthesis of published expert opinion range maps, refined further by a technical advisory group of medical entomologists. A suite of environmental and climate variables of suspected relevance to anopheline ecology were also compiled from open access sources. These three sets of data were then combined to produce predictive species range maps using the Boosted Regression Tree method. The predicted geographic extent for each of the following species (or species complex*) are provided: Anopheles (Nyssorhynchus) albimanus Wiedemann, 1820, An. (Nys.) albitarsis*, An. (Nys.) aquasalis Curry, 1932, An. (Nys.) darlingi Root, 1926, An. (Anopheles) freeborni Aitken, 1939, An. (Nys.) marajoara Galvão & Damasceno, 1942, An. (Nys.) nuneztovari*, An. (Ano.) pseudopunctipennis* and An. (Ano.) quadrimaculatus Say, 1824. A bionomics review summarising ecology and behaviour relevant to the control of each of these species was also compiled. Conclusions The distribution maps and bionomics review should both be considered as a starting point in an ongoing process of (i) describing the distributions of these DVS (since the opportunistic sample of occurrence

  15. Orientation-specific cis complementation by bulge- and loop-mutated human immunodeficiency virus type 1 TAR RNAs.

    PubMed

    Braddock, M; Powell, R; Sutton, J; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1994-12-01

    Tat activates human immunodeficiency type 1 gene expression by binding to TAR RNA. TAR comprises a partially base paired stem and hexanucleotide loop with a tripyrimidine bulge in the upper stem. In vitro, Tat binds to the bulge and upper stem, with no requirement for the loop. However, in vivo, loop sequences are critical for activation, implying that a loop binding cellular factor may be involved in the activation pathway. Given that activation appears to be a two-component system comprising a Tat-bulge interaction and a cellular factor-loop interaction, we considered that it might be possible to spatially separate the two components and retain activation. We have constructed a series of double TAR elements comprising various combinations of mutated TAR structures. Defective TARs with nucleotide substitutions in either the bulge or the loop complemented each other to give wild-type activation. However, the complementation was orientation specific, requiring the intact Tat binding site to reside on the 5'-proximal TAR. These data suggest that provided the wild-type orientation of the bulge and loop elements is retained, there is no requirement for them to coexist on the same TAR structure. PMID:7966633

  16. Fine-scale chromatin interaction maps reveal the cis-regulatory landscape of human lincRNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Wenxiu; Ay, Ferhat; Lee, Choli; Gulsoy, Gunhan; Deng, Xinxian; Cook, Savannah; Hesson, Jennifer; Cavanaugh, Christopher; Ware, Carol B.; Krumm, Anton; Shendure, Jay; Blau, C. Anthony; Disteche, Christine M.; Noble, William S.; Duan, ZhiJun

    2014-01-01

    High-throughput methods based on chromosome conformation capture (3C) have greatly advanced our understanding of the three-dimensional (3D) organization of genomes but are limited in resolution by their reliance on restriction enzymes (REs). Here we describe a method called DNase Hi-C for comprehensively mapping global chromatin contacts that uses DNase I for chromatin fragmentation, leading to greatly improved efficiency and resolution compared to Hi-C. Coupling this method with DNA capture technology provides a high-throughput approach for targeted mapping of fine-scale chromatin architecture. We applied targeted DNase Hi-C to characterize the 3D organization of 998 lincRNA (long intergenic noncoding RNA) promoters in two human cell lines, thereby revealing that expression of lincRNAs is tightly controlled by complex mechanisms involving both super-enhancers and the polycomb repressive complex. Our results provide the first glimpse of a cell type-specific 3D organization of lincRNA genes. PMID:25437436

  17. Naturally occurring rhodopsin mutation in the dog causes retinal dysfunction and degeneration mimicking human dominant retinitis pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Kijas, James W.; Cideciyan, Artur V.; Aleman, Tomas S.; Pianta, Michael J.; Pearce-Kelling, Susan E.; Miller, Brian J.; Jacobson, Samuel G.; Aguirre, Gustavo D.; Acland, Gregory M.

    2002-01-01

    Rhodopsin is the G protein-coupled receptor that is activated by light and initiates the transduction cascade leading to night (rod) vision. Naturally occurring pathogenic rhodopsin (RHO) mutations have been previously identified only in humans and are a common cause of dominantly inherited blindness from retinal degeneration. We identified English Mastiff dogs with a naturally occurring dominant retinal degeneration and determined the cause to be a point mutation in the RHO gene (Thr4Arg). Dogs with this mutant allele manifest a retinal phenotype that closely mimics that in humans with RHO mutations. The phenotypic features shared by dog and man include a dramatically slowed time course of recovery of rod photoreceptor function after light exposure and a distinctive topographic pattern to the retinal degeneration. The canine disease offers opportunities to explore the basis of prolonged photoreceptor recovery after light in RHO mutations and determine whether there are links between the dysfunction and apoptotic retinal cell death. The RHO mutant dog also becomes the large animal needed for preclinical trials of therapies for a major subset of human retinopathies. PMID:11972042

  18. Skin absorption and human exposure estimation of three widely discussed UV filters in sunscreens--In vitro study mimicking real-life consumer habits.

    PubMed

    Klimová, Z; Hojerová, J; Beránková, M

    2015-09-01

    Due to health concerns about safety, three UV-filters (Benzophenone-3, BP3, 10%; Ethylhexyl Methoxycinnamate, EHMC, 10%; Butyl Methoxydibenzoylmethane, BMDBM; 5%) were examined in vitro for absorption on full-thickness pig-ear skin, mimicking human in-use conditions. Kinetic profiles confirmed the rapid permeation of BP3; after the first hour of skin (frozen-stored) exposure to 2 mg/cm(2) (W/O sunscreen; recommended but unrealistic amount), about 0.5% of the applied dose passed into the receptor fluid. The absorption rate of filters was higher from W/O than from O/W emulsions. The fresh/frozen-stored skin permeability coefficient (0.83-0.54) for each UV filter was taken into account. Systemic Exposure Dosage of BP3, EHMC, BMDBM for humans as a consequence of (i) whole-body and (ii) face treatment with 0.5 mg/cm(2) of W/O sunscreen for 6-h skin exposure followed by washing and subsequent 18-h permeation (a realistic scenario) were estimated to be (i) 4744, 1032 and 1036 μg/kg-bw/day, and (ii) 153, 33 and 34 μg/kg-bw/day, respectively. From Margin of Safety for BP3, EHMC and BMDBM (i) 42, 485 and 192 as well as (ii) 1307; 15,151 and 5882, respectively, only the value of 42 (<100) for BP3 indicated a possible health risk. Escalation of a phobia towards all organic UV filters is undesirable. PMID:26151237

  19. Melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis.

    PubMed

    Wadhwa, Vibhor; Chhabra, Avneesh; Samet, Jonathan D

    2014-01-01

    Melorheostosis is an uncommon, sporadic, sclerosing bone lesion that may affect the adjacent soft tissues. It has been associated with many entities such as osteopoikilosis, soft tissue vascular malformations, bone and soft tissue tumors, nephrotic syndrome, segmental limb contractures, osteosarcoma, desmoid tumor, and mesenteric fibromatosis. Synovial osteochondromatosis is a benign neoplasia of the hyaline cartilage presenting as nodules in the subsynovial tissue of a joint or tendon sheath. The intra-articular extension of melorheostosis mimicking synovial osteochondromatosis has not been reported before. In this article, the authors describe an unusual case mimicking synovial chondromatosis arising as a result of melorheostosis and their characteristic imaging findings. PMID:25971832

  20. New invMED1 element cis-activates human multidrug-related MDR1 and MVP genes, involving the LRP130 protein.

    PubMed

    Labialle, Stéphane; Dayan, Guila; Gayet, Landry; Rigal, Dominique; Gambrelle, Joël; Baggetto, Loris G

    2004-01-01

    The MDR1 gene is a key component of the cytotoxic defense network and its overexpression results in the multidrug resistance (MDR) phenotype. However, the molecular mechanisms that regulate the MDR1 gene and coordinate multiple MDR-related genes expression are poorly understood. In a previous study, we identified a new 12 bp cis-activating region in the 5'-flanking region of the human MDR1 gene, which we called inverted MED1. In the present study, we characterized the precise binding element, which we named invMED1, and revealed the presence of the LRP130 protein as the nuclear factor. Its binding intensity increases with the endogenous MDR1 geneexpression and with the MDR level of CEM leukemia cells. Interestingly, the LRP130 level did not vary with the chemoresistance level. We observed the involvement of LRP130 in the transcriptional activity of the MDR1 gene promoter, and moreover, in that of the MDR-related, invMED1-containing, MVP gene promoter. We used siRNAs and transcriptional decoys in two unrelated human cancer cell lines to show the role of the invMED1/LRP130 couple in both MDR1 and MVP endogenous genes activities. We showed that invMED1 was localized in the -105/-100 and -148/-143 regions of the MDR1 and MVP gene promoters, respectively. In addition, since the invMED1 sequence is primarily located in the -160/-100 bp region of mammalian MDR-related genes, our results present the invMED1/LRP130 couple as a potential central regulator of the transcription of these genes. PMID:15272088

  1. Mimicking human expert interpretation of remotely sensed raster imagery by using a novel segmentation analysis within ArcGIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Le Bas, Tim; Scarth, Anthony; Bunting, Peter

    2015-04-01

    Traditional computer based methods for the interpretation of remotely sensed imagery use each pixel individually or the average of a small window of pixels to calculate a class or thematic value, which provides an interpretation. However when a human expert interprets imagery, the human eye is excellent at finding coherent and homogenous areas and edge features. It may therefore be advantageous for computer analysis to mimic human interpretation. A new toolbox for ArcGIS 10.x will be presented that segments the data layers into a set of polygons. Each polygon is defined by a K-means clustering and region growing algorithm, thus finding areas, their edges and any lineations in the imagery. Attached to each polygon are the characteristics of the imagery such as mean and standard deviation of the pixel values, within the polygon. The segmentation of imagery into a jigsaw of polygons also has the advantage that the human interpreter does not need to spend hours digitising the boundaries. The segmentation process has been taken from the RSGIS library of analysis and classification routines (Bunting et al., 2014). These routines are freeware and have been modified to be available in the ArcToolbox under the Windows (v7) operating system. Input to the segmentation process is a multi-layered raster image, for example; a Landsat image, or a set of raster datasets made up from derivatives of topography. The size and number of polygons are set by the user and are dependent on the imagery used. Examples will be presented of data from the marine environment utilising bathymetric depth, slope, rugosity and backscatter from a multibeam system. Meaningful classification of the polygons using their numerical characteristics is the next goal. Object based image analysis (OBIA) should help this workflow. Fully calibrated imagery systems will allow numerical classification to be translated into more readily understandable terms. Peter Bunting, Daniel Clewley, Richard M. Lucas and Sam

  2. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Rzechorzek, Nina M.; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R.; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J.A.; Hardingham, Giles E.; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2015-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling — conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  3. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions

    PubMed Central

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-RasG12D on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-RasG12D accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  4. K-Ras and cyclooxygenase-2 coactivation augments intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and Notch1 mimicking human pancreas lesions.

    PubMed

    Chiblak, Sara; Steinbauer, Brigitte; Pohl-Arnold, Andrea; Kucher, Dagmar; Abdollahi, Amir; Schwager, Christian; Höft, Birgit; Esposito, Irene; Müller-Decker, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Mutational activation of K-Ras is an initiating event of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas (PDAC) that may develop either from pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasia (PanIN) or intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMN). Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2)-derived prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) is causally related to pancreatic carcinogenesis. Here, we deciphered the impact of COX-2, a key modulator of inflammation, in concert with active mutant K-Ras(G12D) on tumor burden and gene expression signature using compound mutant mouse lines. Concomitant activation of COX-2 and K-Ras(G12D) accelerated the progression of pancreatic intraepithelial lesions predominantly with a cystic papillary phenotype resembling human IPMN. Transcriptomes derived from laser capture microdissected preneoplastic lesions of single and compound mutants revealed a signature that was significantly enriched in Notch1 signaling components. In vitro, Notch1 signaling was COX-2-dependent. In line with these findings, human IPMN stratified into intestinal, gastric and pancreatobillary types displayed Notch1 immunosignals with high prevalence, especially in the gastric lesions. In conclusion, a yet unknown link between activated Ras, protumorigenic COX-2 and Notch1 in IPMN onset was unraveled. PMID:27381829

  5. Hypothermic Preconditioning Reverses Tau Ontogenesis in Human Cortical Neurons and is Mimicked by Protein Phosphatase 2A Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Rzechorzek, Nina M; Connick, Peter; Livesey, Matthew R; Borooah, Shyamanga; Patani, Rickie; Burr, Karen; Story, David; Wyllie, David J A; Hardingham, Giles E; Chandran, Siddharthan

    2016-01-01

    Hypothermia is potently neuroprotective, but the molecular basis of this effect remains obscure. Changes in neuronal tau protein are of interest, since tau becomes hyperphosphorylated in injury-resistant, hypothermic brains. Noting inter-species differences in tau isoforms, we have used functional cortical neurons differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hCNs) to interrogate tau modulation during hypothermic preconditioning at clinically-relevant temperatures. Key tau developmental transitions (phosphorylation status and splicing shift) are recapitulated during hCN differentiation and subsequently reversed by mild (32 °C) to moderate (28 °C) cooling--conditions which reduce oxidative and excitotoxic stress-mediated injury in hCNs. Blocking a major tau kinase decreases hCN tau phosphorylation and abrogates hypothermic neuroprotection, whilst inhibition of protein phosphatase 2A mimics cooling-induced tau hyperphosphorylation and protects normothermic hCNs from oxidative stress. These findings indicate a possible role for phospho-tau in hypothermic preconditioning, and suggest that cooling drives human tau towards an earlier ontogenic phenotype whilst increasing neuronal resilience to common neurotoxic insults. This work provides a critical step forward in understanding how we might exploit the neuroprotective benefits of cooling without cooling patients. PMID:26870825

  6. Adventitial Vessel Growth and Progenitor Cells Activation in an Ex Vivo Culture System Mimicking Human Saphenous Vein Wall Strain after Coronary Artery Bypass Grafting

    PubMed Central

    Prandi, Francesca; Piola, Marco; Soncini, Monica; Colussi, Claudia; D’Alessandra, Yuri; Penza, Eleonora; Agrifoglio, Marco; Vinci, Maria Cristina; Polvani, Gianluca; Gaetano, Carlo; Fiore, Gianfranco Beniamino; Pesce, Maurizio

    2015-01-01

    Saphenous vein graft disease is a timely problem in coronary artery bypass grafting. Indeed, after exposure of the vein to arterial blood flow, a progressive modification in the wall begins, due to proliferation of smooth muscle cells in the intima. As a consequence, the graft progressively occludes and this leads to recurrent ischemia. In the present study we employed a novel ex vivo culture system to assess the biological effects of arterial-like pressure on the human saphenous vein structure and physiology, and to compare the results to those achieved in the presence of a constant low pressure and flow mimicking the physiologic vein perfusion. While under both conditions we found an activation of Matrix Metallo-Proteases 2/9 and of microRNAs-21/146a/221, a specific effect of the arterial-like pressure was observed. This consisted in a marked geometrical remodeling, in the suppression of Tissue Inhibitor of Metallo-Protease-1, in the enhanced expression of TGF-β1 and BMP-2 mRNAs and, finally, in the upregulation of microRNAs-138/200b/200c. In addition, the veins exposed to arterial-like pressure showed an increase in the density of the adventitial vasa vasorum and of cells co-expressing NG2, CD44 and SM22α markers in the adventitia. Cells with nuclear expression of Sox-10, a transcription factor characterizing multipotent vascular stem cells, were finally found in adventitial vessels. Our findings suggest, for the first time, a role of arterial-like wall strain in the activation of pro-pathologic pathways resulting in adventitial vessels growth, activation of vasa vasorum cells, and upregulation of specific gene products associated to vascular remodeling and inflammation. PMID:25689822

  7. Investigation of the binding of cis/trans-[MCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)](-) (M = Ru, Os) complexes to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Dömötör, Orsolya; Rathgeb, Anna; Kuhn, Paul-Steffen; Popović-Bijelić, Ana; Bačić, Goran; Enyedy, Eva Anna; Arion, Vladimir B

    2016-06-01

    Overall binding affinity of sodium or indazolium cis/trans-[MCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)] (M = Ru, Os) complexes towards human serum albumin (HSA) and high molecular mass components of the blood serum was monitored by ultrafiltration. HSA was found to be mainly responsible for the binding of the studied ruthenium and osmium complexes. In other words, this protein can provide a depot for the compounds and can affect their biodistribution and transport processes. In order to elucidate the HSA binding sites tryptophan fluorescence quenching studies and displacement reactions with the established site markers warfarin and dansylglycine were performed. Conditional stability constants for the binding to sites I and II on HSA were computed showing that the studied ruthenium and osmium complexes are able to bind into both sites with moderately strong affinity (logK' = 4.4-5.1). Site I is slightly more favored over site II for all complexes. No significant differences in the HSA binding properties were found for these metal complexes demonstrating negligible influence of the type of counterion (sodium vs indazolium), the metal ion center identity (Ru vs. Os) or the position of the nitrosyl group on the binding event. Electron paramagnetic resonance spin labeling of HSA revealed that indazolium trans-[RuCl4(1H-indazole)(NO)] and long-chain fatty acids show competitive binding to HSA. Moreover, this complex has a higher affinity for site I, but when present in excess, it is able to bind to site II as well, and displace fatty acids. PMID:26908285

  8. Urticaria mimickers in children.

    PubMed

    Mathur, Anubhav N; Mathes, Erin F

    2013-01-01

    Acute urticaria is a self-limited cutaneous condition marked by transient, erythematous, and pruritic wheals. It is a hypersensitivity response that is often secondary to infection, medications, or food allergies in children. In contrast, the urticarial "mimickers" described in this review article are often seen in the context of fever and extracutaneous manifestations in pediatric patients. The differential diagnosis ranges from benign and self-limited hypersensitivity responses to multisystem inflammatory diseases. Establishing the correct diagnosis of an urticarial rash in a pediatric patient is necessary to both prevent an unnecessary work up for self-limited conditions and to appropriately recognize and evaluate multisystem inflammatory disorders. Herein, we describe two cases to illustrate the clinical manifestations, laboratory findings, histopathology and differential diagnoses for several mimickers of acute urticaria including: urticaria multiforme, serum sickness like reaction, Henoch-Schönlein purpura, acute hemorrhagic edema of infancy, systemic onset juvenile idiopathic arthritis, cryopyrin associated periodic syndromes, and urticarial vasculitis. PMID:24552410

  9. Identification of the oleic acid ethanolamide (OEA) isomer cis-vaccenic acid ethanolamide (VEA) as a highly abundant 18:1 fatty acid ethanolamide in blood plasma from rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Röhrig, Waldemar; Waibel, Reiner; Perlwitz, Christopher; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Hoch, Tobias

    2016-09-01

    The endocannabinoid system is important in various physiological pathways, especially the regulation of food intake. It consists of endocannabinoids like 2-arachidonoyl-glycerol (2-AG) or the fatty acid ethanolamide archachidonoyl-ethanolamide (AEA) with binding affinity to cannabinoid receptors. Further, fatty acid ethanolamides (FAEAs) influence the endocannabinoid system without affecting cannabinoid receptors by using independent physiological pathways. Among FAEAs, oleic acid ethanolamide (OEA) gained importance because of its promising ability to reduce food intake. By ultrahigh-performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-ESI-MS/MS), we detected a chromatographically separated molecule in plasma samples from rats and humans with identical mass and fragmentation patterns as those of OEA. Via synthesis and extensive analysis of ethanolamides of different cis/trans- and position isomers of oleic acid (cis9-18:1), we could identify the unknown molecule as vaccenic acid (cis11-18:1) ethanolamide (VEA). In this study we identified VEA as the most abundant 18:1 FAEA in rat plasma and the second most abundant 18:1 FAEA in human plasma. PMID:27334716

  10. A cis-acting element in the promoter of human ether à go-go 1 potassium channel gene mediates repression by calcitriol in human cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cázares-Ordoñez, V; González-Duarte, R J; Díaz, L; Ishizawa, M; Uno, S; Ortíz, V; Ordoñez-Sánchez, M L; Makishima, M; Larrea, F; Avila, E

    2015-02-01

    The human ether à go-go 1 potassium channel (hEAG1) is required for cell cycle progression and proliferation of cancer cells. Inhibitors of hEAG1 activity and expression represent potential therapeutic drugs in cancer. Previously, we have shown that hEAG1 expression is downregulated by calcitriol in a variety of cancer cells. Herein, we provided evidence on the regulatory mechanism involved in such repressive effect in cells derived from human cervical cancer. Our results indicate that repression by calcitriol occurs at the transcriptional level and involves a functional negative vitamin D response element (nVDRE) E-box type in the hEAG1 promoter. The described mechanism in this work implies that a protein complex formed by the vitamin D receptor-interacting repressor, the vitamin D receptor, the retinoid X receptor, and the Williams syndrome transcription factor interact with the nVDRE in the hEAG1 promoter in the absence of ligand. Interestingly, all of these transcription factors except the vitamin D receptor-interacting repressor are displaced from hEAG1 promoter in the presence of calcitriol. Our results provide novel mechanistic insights into calcitriol mode of action in repressing hEAG1 gene expression. PMID:25495694

  11. Characterization of the human lipoprotein lipase (LPL) promoter: Evidence of two cis-regulatory regions, LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta] of importance for the differentation-linked induction of the LPL gene during adipogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Enerbaeck, S.; Ohlsson, B.G.; Samuelsson, L.; Bjursell, G. )

    1992-10-01

    When preadipocytes differentiate into adipocytes, several differentiation-linked genes are activated. Lipo-protein lipase (LPL) is one of the first genes induced during this process. To investigate early events in adipocyte development, we have focused on the transcriptional activation of the LPL gene. For this purpose, we have cloned and fused different parts of intragenic and flanking sequences with a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter gene. Transient transfection experiments and DNase I hypersensitivity assays indicate that several positive as well as negative elements contribute to transcriptional regulation of the LPL gene. When reporter gene constructs were stably introduced into preadipocytes, we were able to monitor and compare the activation patterns of different promoter deletion mutants at selected time points representing the process of adipocyte development. We could delimit two cis-regulatory elements important for gradual activation of the LPL gene during adipocyte development in vitro. These elements, LP-[alpha] (-702 to -666) and LP-[beta] (-468 to -430), contain a striking similarity to a consensus sequence known to bind the transcription factors HNF-3 and fork head. Results of gel mobility shift assays and DNase I and exonuclease III in vitro protection assays indicate that factors with DNA-binding properties similar to those of the HNF-3/fork head family of transcription factors are present in adipocytes and interact with LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta]. We also demonstrate that LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta] were both capable of conferring a differentiation-linked expression pattern to a heterolog promoter, thus mimicking the expression of the endogenous LPL gene during adipocyte differentiation. These findings indicate that interactions with LP-[alpha] and LP-[beta] could be a part of a differentiation switch governing induction of the LPL gene during adipocyte differentiation. 48 refs., 11 figs.

  12. Bispecific antibody mimicking factor VIII.

    PubMed

    Nogami, Keiji

    2016-05-01

    There are some issues in the current factor (F)VIII replacement therapy for severe hemophilia A. One is mental and physical burden for the multiple intravenous infusions, and the other is difficulty in the hemostatic treatment for the patients with FVIII inhibitor. The development of novel drug with fully hemostatic effect, simply procedure, and long-acting reaction has been expected. Recently, FVIIIa-mimicking humanized recombinant bispecific antibody (ACE910) against FIXa and FX was developed. In the non-human clinical study, primate model of acquired hemophilia A demonstrated that the ACE910 was effective on both on-going and spontaneous bleedings. A phase I clinical study was conducted in healthy adults by single subcutaneous infusion of ACE910, followed by the patients' part study, Japanese patients with severe hemophilia A without or with inhibitor were treated with once-weekly subcutaneous injection of ACE910 at three dose levels for 12 successive weeks. There was no significant adverse event related to ACE910 in the clinical and laboratorial findings, and t1/2 of ACE910 was ∼30 days. The median annual bleeding rates were reduced very markedly dose-dependently, independently of inhibitor. Furthermore, among the patients with dose escalation, bleeding rate was decreased as ACE910 dose was increased. In conclusion, ACE910 would have a number of promising features: its high subcutaneous bioavailability and long half-life make the patients possible to be injected subcutaneously with a once-a-week or less frequency. In addition, ACE910 would provide the bleeding prophylactic efficacy, independently of inhibitor. PMID:27207420

  13. Exon B of human surfactant protein A2 mRNA, alone or within its surrounding sequences, interacts with 14-3-3; role of cis-elements and secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    Noutsios, Georgios T.; Silveyra, Patricia; Bhatti, Faizah

    2013-01-01

    Human surfactant protein A, an innate immunity molecule, is encoded by two genes: SFTPA1 (SP-A1) and SFTPA2 (SP-A2). The 5′ untranslated (5′UTR) splice variant of SP-A2 (ABD), but not of SP-A1 (AD), contains exon B (eB), which is an enhancer for transcription and translation. We investigated whether eB contains cis-regulatory elements that bind trans-acting factors in a sequence-specific manner as well as the role of the eB mRNA secondary structure. Binding of cytoplasmic NCI-H441 proteins to wild-type eB, eB mutant, AD, and ABD 5′UTR mRNAs were studied by RNA electromobility shift assays (REMSAs). The bound proteins were identified by mass spectroscopy and specific antibodies (Abs). We found that 1) proteins bind eB mRNA in a sequence-specific manner, with two cis-elements identified within eB to be important; 2) eB secondary structure is necessary for binding; 3) mass spectroscopy and specific Abs in REMSAs identified 14-3-3 proteins to bind (directly or indirectly) eB and the natural SP-A2 (ABD) splice variant but not the SP-A1 (AD) splice variant; 4) other ribosomal and cytoskeletal proteins, and translation factors, are also present in the eB mRNA-protein complex; 5) knockdown of 14-3-3 β/α isoform resulted in a downregulation of SP-A2 expression. In conclusion, proteins including the 14-3-3 family bind two cis-elements within eB of hSP-A2 mRNA in a sequence- and secondary structure-specific manner. Differential regulation of SP-A1 and SP-A2 is mediated by the 14-3-3 protein family as well as by a number of other proteins that bind UTRs with or without eB mRNA. PMID:23525782

  14. Genome-wide significant schizophrenia risk variation on chromosome 10q24 is associated with altered cis-regulation of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Duarte, Rodrigo R R; Troakes, Claire; Nolan, Matthew; Srivastava, Deepak P; Murray, Robin M; Bray, Nicholas J

    2016-09-01

    Chromosome 10q24.32-q24.33 is one of the most robustly supported risk loci to emerge from genome-wide association studies (GWAS) of schizophrenia. However, extensive linkage disequilibrium makes it difficult to distinguish the actual susceptibility gene(s) at the locus, limiting its value for improving biological understanding of the condition. In the absence of coding changes that can account for the association, risk is likely conferred by altered regulation of one or more genes in the region. We, therefore, used highly sensitive measures of allele-specific expression to assess cis-regulatory effects associated with the two best-supported schizophrenia risk variants (SNP rs11191419 and indel ch10_104957618_I/rs202213518) on the primary positional candidates BORCS7, AS3MT, CNNM2, and NT5C2 in the human brain. Heterozygosity at rs11191419 was associated with increased allelic expression of BORCS7 and AS3MT in the fetal and adult brain, and with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in the adult brain. Heterozygosity at ch10_104957618_I was associated with reduced allelic expression of NT5C2 in both the fetal and adult brain. Comparisons between cDNA ratios in heterozygotes and homozygotes for the risk alleles indicated that cis-effects on NT5C2 expression in the adult dorsolateral prefrontal cortex could be largely accounted for by genotype at these two risk variants. While not excluding effects on other genes in the region, this study implicates altered neural expression of BORCS7, AS3MT, and NT5C2 in susceptibility to schizophrenia arising from genetic variation at the chromosome 10q24 locus. © 2016 The Authors. American Journal of Medical Genetics Part B: Neuropsychiatric Genetics Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27004590

  15. Structure, Energetics and Dynamics of Binding Coactivator Peptide to Human Retinoid X Receptor Alpha Ligand Binding Domain Complex with 9-cis-Retinoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Gang; Boerma, LeeAnn J; Cox, Bryan D; Qiu, Cheng; Kang, Sebyung; Smith, Craig D; Renfrow, Matthew B; Muccio, Donald D

    2010-01-01

    Retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are ligand-dependent nuclear receptors, which are activated by the potent agonist 9-cis retinoic acid (9cRA). 9cRA binds to the ligand binding domain (LBD) of RXRs, and recruits coactivator proteins for gene transcription. Using isothermal titration calorimetry, the binding of a 13-mer coactivator peptide, GRIP-1, to the hRXRα-LBD homodimer complex containing 9cRA (hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1) is reported between 20° and 37 °C. ΔG is temperature independent (−8.5 kcal/mol), and GRIP-1 binding is driven by ΔH (−9.2 kcal/mol) at 25 °C. ΔCp is large and negative (−401 cal/mol-K). The crystal structure of hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1 is reported at 2.05 Å. When the structures of hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1 and hRXRα-LBD:9cRA (1FBY) homodimers are compared, E453 and E456 on helix 12 bury and form ionic interactions with GRIP-1. R302 on helix 4 realigns to form new salt bridges to both E453 and E456. F277 (helix 3), F437 (helix 11), and F450 (helix 12) move toward the hydrophobic interior. The changes in the near-UV spectrum at 260 nm of the hRXRα-LBD:9cRA:GRIP-1 support this structural change. Helix 11 tilts toward helix 12 by ≈ 1 Å modifying the ring conformation of 9cRA. Hydrogen-deuterium exchange mass spectroscopy indicate GRIP-1 binding to hRXRα-LBD:9cRA significantly decreases the exchange rates for peptides containing helices 3 (F277), 4 (R302), 11 (F437) and 12 (E453; E456). The structural changes and loss of dynamics of the GRIP-1 bound structure are used to interpret the energetics of coactivator peptide binding to the agonist-bound hRXRα-LBD. PMID:21049972

  16. Selective inhibition of human immunodeficiency viruses by racemates and enantiomers of cis-5-fluoro-1-[2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-oxathiolan-5-yl]cytosine.

    PubMed Central

    Schinazi, R F; McMillan, A; Cannon, D; Mathis, R; Lloyd, R M; Peck, A; Sommadossi, J P; St Clair, M; Wilson, J; Furman, P A

    1992-01-01

    2',3'-Dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine (FTC) has been shown to be a potent and selective compound against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in acutely infected primary human lymphocytes. FTC is also active against human immunodeficiency virus type 2, simian immunodeficiency virus, and feline immunodeficiency virus in various cell culture systems, including human monocytes. The antiviral activity can be prevented by 2'-deoxycytidine, but not by other natural nucleosides, suggesting that FTC must be phosphorylated to be active and 2'-deoxycytidine kinase is responsible for the phosphorylation. By using chiral columns or enzymatic techniques, the two enantiomers of FTC were separated. The (-)-beta-enantiomer of FTC was about 20-fold more potent than the (+)-beta-enantiomer against human immunodeficiency virus type 1 in peripheral blood mononuclear cells and was also effective in thymidine kinase-deficient CEM cells. Racemic FTC and its enantiomers were nontoxic to human lymphocytes and other cell lines at concentrations of up to 100 microM. Studies with human bone marrow cells indicated that racemic FTC and its (-)-enantiomer had a median inhibitory concentration of > 30 microM. The (+)-enantiomer was significantly more toxic than the (-)-enantiomer to myeloid progenitor cells. The susceptibilities to FTC of pretherapy isolates in comparison with those of posttherapy 3'-azido-3'-deoxythymidine-resistant viruses in human lymphocytes were not substantially different. Similar results were obtained with well-defined 2',3'-dideoxyinosine- and nevirapine-resistant viruses. (-)-FTC-5'-triphosphate competitively inhibited human immunodeficiency virus type 1 reverse transcriptase, with an inhibition constant of 2.9 microM, when a poly(I)n.oligo(dC)19-24 template primer was used. These results suggest that further development of the (-)-Beta-enantiomer of FTC is warranted as an antiviral agent for infections caused by human immunodeficiency viruses. Images PMID:1283296

  17. Biodegradation of cis-1,2-Dichloroethene in Simulated Underground Thermal Energy Storage Systems.

    PubMed

    Ni, Zhuobiao; van Gaans, Pauline; Smit, Martijn; Rijnaarts, Huub; Grotenhuis, Tim

    2015-11-17

    Underground thermal energy storage (UTES) use has showed a sharp rise in numbers in the last decades, with aquifer thermal energy storage (ATES) and borehole thermal energy storage (BTES) most widely used. In many urban areas with contaminated aquifers, there exists a desire for sustainable heating and cooling with UTES and a need for remediation. We investigated the potential synergy between UTES and bioremediation with batch experiments to simulate the effects of changing temperature and liquid exchange that occur in ATES systems, and of only temperature change occurring in BTES systems on cis-DCE reductive dechlorination. Compared to the natural situation (NS) at a constant temperature of 10 °C, both UTES systems with 25/5 °C for warm and cold well performed significantly better in cis-DCE (cis-1,2-dichloroethene) removal. The overall removal efficiency under mimicked ATES and BTES conditions were respectively 13 and 8.6 times higher than in NS. Inoculation with Dehalococcoides revealed that their initial presence is a determining factor for the dechlorination process. Temperature was the dominating factor when Dehalococcoides abundance was sufficient. Stimulated biodegradation was shown to be most effective in the mimicked ATES warm well because of the combined effect of suitable temperature, sustaining biomass growth, and regular cis-DCE supply. PMID:26503690

  18. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer. PMID:24811556

  19. Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis mimicking gallbladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ewelukwa, Ofor; Ali, Omair; Akram, Salma

    2014-01-01

    Xanthogranulomatous cholecystitis (XGC) is a benign, uncommon variant of chronic cholecystitis characterised by focal or diffuse destructive inflammatory process of the gallbladder (GB). Macroscopically, it appears like yellowish tumour-like masses in the wall of the GB. This article reports on a 74-year-old woman with XGC mimicking GB cancer. PMID:24811556

  20. Atypical Cogan's syndrome mimicking encephalitis.

    PubMed

    Lepur, Dragan; Vranjican, Zoran; Himbele, Josip; Barsić, Bruno; Klinar, Igor

    2004-01-01

    Cogan's syndrome is a rare autoimmune multisystem disease. The main clinical features of typical Cogan's syndrome are vestibuloauditory dysfunction and interstitial keratitis. The authors present a case of atypical Cogan's syndrome with headache, fever, deafness, trigeminal neuralgia and electroencephalographic abnormality which mimicked viral encephalitis. PMID:15307593

  1. Kawasaki Disease Mimicking Retropharyngeal Abscess

    PubMed Central

    Srividhya, Vazhkudai Sridharan; Vasanthi, Thiruvengadam; Shivbalan, Somu

    2010-01-01

    Kawasaki disease is an acute, self-limiting febrile mucocutaneous vasculitis of infants and young children. Retropharyngeal lymphadenopathy is a rare presentation of Kawasaki disease. We present a case of Kawasaki disease mimicking a retropharyngeal abscess, with upper airway obstruction resulting in delayed diagnosis. PMID:20635457

  2. Thermal cis-trans isomerization of cis,cis-3,7-decadiene - A model for cis-1,4-polybutadiene

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golub, M. A.; Lee, W. M.

    1983-01-01

    The thermal cis-trans isomerization of cis,cis-3,7-decadiene (DD), a model compound for cis-PBD, is reported. It is demonstrated that the rather low E for the polyalkenamer isomerizations compared with that for the 2-olefins is not an artifact of the solid polymer structures, but rather is characteristic of both small and large molecules possessing pairs of nonconjugated vinylene double bonds in a suitable arrangement.

  3. cis-Dichloroplatinum(II) complexes tethered to dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-ones: synthesis and cytotoxicity in human cancer cell lines in vitro.

    PubMed

    Desbois, Nicolas; Pertuit, David; Moretto, Johnny; Cachia, Claire; Chauffert, Bruno; Bouyer, Florence

    2013-11-01

    A novel family of cisplatin-type complexes tethered to dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one topoisomerase inhibitor via a polymethylene chain and their nonplatinated counterparts were prepared. Their potential cytotoxicity was assessed in three human colorectal cancer cell lines HCT 116, SW480 and HT-29 and compared to the reference molecules cisplatin and oxaliplatin. Platinated compounds were poorly active whilst nonplatinated dibenzo[c,h][1,6]naphthyridin-6-one moieties exhibited higher cytotoxic properties than cisplatin and oxaliplatin whatever the length of the polymethylene chain; molecules containing the tri- and hexamethylene chain length were the most cytotoxic. PMID:24095763

  4. A negative cis-acting G-fer element participates in the regulation of expression of the human H-ferritin-encoding gene (FERH).

    PubMed

    Barresi, R; Sirito, M; Karsenty, G; Ravazzolo, R

    1994-03-25

    Ferritin (Fer) is the major iron storage protein in man. Its synthesis is regulated both at the translational and transcriptional levels. In previous studies on transcriptional regulation of the human H-ferritin-encoding gene (FERH), a 160-bp promoter segment was analyzed [Bevilacqua et al., Gene 111 (1992) 255-260]. In order to obtain a more complete view of the elements involved in the transcriptional regulation of FERH, we have studied, in a further upstream region of the human FERH promoter (pFERH), a sequence between -272 and -291, named G-fer, because it contains a stretch of ten G, which binds a nuclear factor present in different cell types. DNA-binding assays and competition experiments suggest that the factor binding to G-fer has binding properties very similar to inhibitory factor-1 (IF-1), an ubiquitous factor that interacts with G-rich elements in the promoters of the mouse type-I collagen genes. DNA transfection experiments in HeLa cells, using either a wild-type or mutated pFERH fused to a reporter gene, showed that a 3-bp substitution mutation, that abolished the binding of the specific factor to G-fer, increased the promoter activity, thus suggesting an inhibitory role for the G-fer element and its cognate trans-acting factor. PMID:8144027

  5. Identification of cis-acting sequences responsible for phorbol ester induction of human serum amyloid A gene expression via a nuclear factor kB-like transcription factor

    SciTech Connect

    Edbrooke, M.R.; Cheshire, J.K.; Woo, P.; Burt, B.W.

    1989-05-01

    The authors have analyzed the 5'-flanking region of one of the genes coding for the human acute-phase protein, serum amyloid A (SAA). They found that SAA mRNA could be increased fivefold in transfected cells by treatment with phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). To analyze this observation further, they placed a 265-base-pair 5' SAA fragment upstream of the reporter chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene and transfected this construct into HeLa cells. PMA treatment of these transient transfectants resulted in increased CAT expression. Nuclear proteins from PMA-treated HeLa cells bound to this DNA fragment, and methylation interference analysis showed that the binding was specific to the sequence GGGACTTTCC (between -82 and -91), a sequence previously described by others as the binding site for the nuclear factor NF/kappa/B. In a cotransfection competition experiment, they could abolish PMA-induced CAT activity by using cloned human immunodeficiency virus long-terminal-repeat DNA containing the NF/kappa/B-binding sequence. The same long-terminal-repeat DNA containing mutant NF/kappa/B-binding sequences did not affect CAT expression, which suggested that binding by an NF/kappa/B-like factor is required for increased SAA transcription.

  6. Two cis-DNA elements involved in myeloid-cell-specific expression and gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) activation of the human high-affinity Fc gamma receptor gene: a novel IFN regulatory mechanism.

    PubMed Central

    Perez, C; Wietzerbin, J; Benech, P D

    1993-01-01

    The human high-affinity receptor for the constant region of immunoglobulin G (human Fc gamma R1) is encoded by two mRNAs induced selectively by gamma interferon (IFN-gamma) and expressed in cells of myeloid lineage. The cis-DNA element (GRR) previously found to confer IFN-gamma responsiveness to this gene acts as an inducible enhancer and is the target of an IFN-gamma-activated factor(s) (GIRE-BP) in cells of different origins. Although the GRR motif is not related to the DNA elements involved in the regulation of other IFN-stimulated genes, GIRE-BP binding depends on the IFN-gamma-dependent activation of the 91-kDa protein known to be one of the factors of a transcriptional complex activated by IFN-alpha. Deletions of the Fc gamma R1 promoter allowed us to identify a 25-bp element, downstream from the GRR motif, conferring cell-type-specific expression. This element, called MATE (myeloid activating transcription element), is the DNA target for constitutive factors forming two complexes, MATE-BP1 and MATE-BP2. In accordance with the functional analysis, MATE-BP binding activities were detected in extracts prepared from myeloid cell lines such as THP-1, HL-60, and U-937 but not in HeLa cell extracts. The MATE motif is present not only in the promoter of other Fc receptor genes but also in several promoters of genes whose expression is restricted to monocytic cells. Our results suggest that human Fc gamma R1 gene expression in myeloid cells is initiated by the interaction of IFN-gamma-activated factors with cell-type-specific factors through their binding to the GRR and MATE motifs. Images PMID:8455606

  7. Disseminated histoplasmosis mimicking secondary syphilis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, Tony A; Holcomb, Maura J; Motaparthi, Kiran; Grekin, Sarah J; Hsu, Sylvia

    2011-01-01

    A 34-year-old, HIV-positive man living in Texas presented with a 2-week history of fever, malaise, myalgias, oral ulcers, and papules on his chest, back, face, and extremities, including the palms. Initially secondary syphilis was suspected. However, RPR was negative. Histopathologic examination revealed a lymphocytic infiltrate with numerous intra-histiocytic fungal organisms. GMS and PAS stains were positive, consistent with the diagnosis of histoplasmosis. We report a case of disseminated histoplasmosis clinically mimicking secondary syphilis. PMID:22136866

  8. Utilizing the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase pin1 as a probe of its phosphorylated target proteins. Examples of binding to nuclear proteins in a human kidney cell line and to tau in Alzheimer's diseased brain.

    PubMed

    Thorpe, J R; Morley, S J; Rulten, S L

    2001-01-01

    The human parvulin Pin1 is a member of the peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase group of proteins, which modulate the assembly, folding, activity, and transport of essential cellular proteins. Pin1 is a mitotic regulator interacting with a range of proteins that are phosphorylated before cell division. In addition, an involvement of Pin1 in the tau-related neurodegenerative brain disorders has recently been shown. In this context, Pin1 becomes depleted from the nucleus in Alzheimer's disease (AD) neurons when it is redirected to the large amounts of hyperphosphorylated tau associated with the neurofibrillary tangles. This depletion from the nucleus may ultimately contribute to neuron cell death. Recently we have devised a novel methodology in which exogenous Pin1 is used as a TEM probe for its target proteins. Here we extend this methodology to provide further evidence that Pin1 binds at enhanced levels to mitotic nuclear proteins and to hyperphosphorylated tau in AD brain. We suggest that exogenous Pin1 labeling can be used to elucidate the phosphorylation status of its target proteins in general and could specifically provide important insights into the development of tau-related neurodegenerative brain disorders. PMID:11118482

  9. Peptidylproline cis-trans-Isomerase Pin1 Interacts with Human T-Cell Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax and Modulates Its Activation of NF-κB▿

    PubMed Central

    Peloponese, Jean-Marie; Yasunaga, Junichiro; Kinjo, Takao; Watashi, Koichi; Jeang, Kuan-Teh

    2009-01-01

    Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) is an oncogenic retrovirus etiologically causal of adult T-cell leukemia (ATL). The virus encodes a Tax oncoprotein that functions in transcriptional regulation, cell cycle control, and transformation. ATL is a highly virulent cancer that is resistant to chemotherapeutic treatments. To understand this disease better, it is important to comprehend how HTLV-1 promotes cellular growth and survival. Tax activation of NF-κB is important for the proliferation and transformation of virus-infected cells. We show here that prolyl isomerase Pin1 is over expressed in HTLV-1 cell lines; Pin1 binds Tax and regulates Tax-induced NF-κB activation. PMID:19158244

  10. Cis and Trans Acting Factors Involved in Human Cytomegalovirus Experimental and Natural Latent Infection of CD14 (+) Monocytes and CD34 (+) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Pari, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    The parameters involved in human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) latent infection in CD14 (+) and CD34 (+) cells remain poorly identified. Using next generation sequencing we deduced the transcriptome of HCMV latently infected CD14 (+) and CD34 (+) cells in experimental as well as natural latency settings. The gene expression profile from natural infection in HCMV seropositive donors closely matched experimental latency models, and included two long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), RNA4.9 and RNA2.7 as well as the mRNAs encoding replication factors UL84 and UL44. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays on experimentally infected CD14 (+) monocytes followed by next generation sequencing (ChIP-Seq) were employed to demonstrate both UL84 and UL44 proteins interacted with the latent viral genome and overlapped at 5 of the 8 loci identified. RNA4.9 interacts with components of the polycomb repression complex (PRC) as well as with the MIE promoter region where the enrichment of the repressive H3K27me3 mark suggests that this lncRNA represses transcription. Formaldehyde Assisted Isolation of Regulatory Elements (FAIRE), which identifies nucleosome-depleted viral DNA, was used to confirm that latent mRNAs were associated with actively transcribed, FAIRE analysis also showed that the terminal repeat (TR) region of the latent viral genome is depleted of nucleosomes suggesting that this region may contain an element mediating viral genome maintenance. ChIP assays show that the viral TR region interacts with factors associated with the pre replication complex and a plasmid subclone containing the HCMV TR element persisted in latently infected CD14 (+) monocytes, strongly suggesting that the TR region mediates viral chromosome maintenance. PMID:23717203

  11. A point mutation of zebrafish c-cbl gene in the ring finger domain produces a phenotype mimicking human myeloproliferative disease.

    PubMed

    Peng, X; Dong, M; Ma, L; Jia, X-E; Mao, J; Jin, C; Chen, Y; Gao, L; Liu, X; Ma, K; Wang, L; Du, T; Jin, Y; Huang, Q; Li, K; Zon, L I; Liu, T; Deng, M; Zhou, Y; Xi, X; Zhou, Y; Chen, S

    2015-12-01

    Controlled self-renewal and differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) are critical for vertebrate development and survival. These processes are tightly regulated by the transcription factors, signaling molecules and epigenetic factors. Impaired regulations of their function could result in hematological malignancies. Using a large-scale zebrafish N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenesis screening, we identified a line named LDD731, which presented significantly increased HSPCs in hematopoietic organs. Further analysis revealed that the cells of erythroid/myeloid lineages in definitive hematopoiesis were increased while the primitive hematopoiesis was not affected. The homozygous mutation was lethal with a median survival time around 14-15 days post fertilization. The causal mutation was located by positional cloning in the c-cbl gene, the human ortholog of which, c-CBL, is found frequently mutated in myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) or acute leukemia. Sequence analysis showed the mutation in LDD731 caused a histidine-to-tyrosine substitution of the amino acid codon 382 within the RING finger domain of c-Cbl. Moreover, the myeloproliferative phenotype in zebrafish seemed dependent on the Flt3 (fms-like tyrosine kinase 3) signaling, consistent with that observed in both mice and humans. Our study may shed new light on the pathogenesis of MPN and provide a useful in vivo vertebrate model of this syndrome for screening drugs. PMID:26104663

  12. The dominant Anopheles vectors of human malaria in Africa, Europe and the Middle East: occurrence data, distribution maps and bionomic précis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background This is the second in a series of three articles documenting the geographical distribution of 41 dominant vector species (DVS) of human malaria. The first paper addressed the DVS of the Americas and the third will consider those of the Asian Pacific Region. Here, the DVS of Africa, Europe and the Middle East are discussed. The continent of Africa experiences the bulk of the global malaria burden due in part to the presence of the An. gambiae complex. Anopheles gambiae is one of four DVS within the An. gambiae complex, the others being An. arabiensis and the coastal An. merus and An. melas. There are a further three, highly anthropophilic DVS in Africa, An. funestus, An. moucheti and An. nili. Conversely, across Europe and the Middle East, malaria transmission is low and frequently absent, despite the presence of six DVS. To help control malaria in Africa and the Middle East, or to identify the risk of its re-emergence in Europe, the contemporary distribution and bionomics of the relevant DVS are needed. Results A contemporary database of occurrence data, compiled from the formal literature and other relevant resources, resulted in the collation of information for seven DVS from 44 countries in Africa containing 4234 geo-referenced, independent sites. In Europe and the Middle East, six DVS were identified from 2784 geo-referenced sites across 49 countries. These occurrence data were combined with expert opinion ranges and a suite of environmental and climatic variables of relevance to anopheline ecology to produce predictive distribution maps using the Boosted Regression Tree (BRT) method. Conclusions The predicted geographic extent for the following DVS (or species/suspected species complex*) is provided for Africa: Anopheles (Cellia) arabiensis, An. (Cel.) funestus*, An. (Cel.) gambiae, An. (Cel.) melas, An. (Cel.) merus, An. (Cel.) moucheti and An. (Cel.) nili*, and in the European and Middle Eastern Region: An. (Anopheles) atroparvus, An. (Ano

  13. Recycling Of Cis Photovoltaic Waste

    DOEpatents

    Drinkard, Jr., William F.; Long, Mark O.; Goozner; Robert E.

    1998-07-14

    A method for extracting and reclaiming metals from scrap CIS photovoltaic cells and associated photovoltaic manufacturing waste by leaching the waste with dilute nitric acid, skimming any plastic material from the top of the leaching solution, separating glass substrate from the leachate, electrolyzing the leachate to plate a copper and selenium metal mixture onto a first cathode, replacing the cathode with a second cathode, re-electrolyzing the leachate to plate cadmium onto the second cathode, separating the copper from selenium, and evaporating the depleted leachate to yield a zinc and indium containing solid.

  14. A New Mouse Model of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy Type 2I Homozygous for the Common L276I Mutation Mimicking the Mild Phenotype in Humans.

    PubMed

    Krag, Thomas O; Vissing, John

    2015-12-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2I (LGMD2I) is caused by mutations in the Fukutin-related protein (FKRP) gene, leading to inadequate glycosylation of α-dystroglycan, an important protein linking the extracellular matrix to the cytoskeleton. We created a mouse model of the common FKRP L276I mutation and a hemizygous FKRP L276I knockout model. We studied histopathology and protein expression in the models at different ages and found that homozygous FKRP L276I mice developed a mild progressive myopathy with increased muscle regeneration and fibrosis starting from 1 year of age. This was likely caused by progressive loss of α-dystroglycan-specific glycosylation, which was decreased by 78% at 20 months. The homozygous FKRP knockout was embryonic lethal, but the hemizygous L276I model resembled the homozygous FKRP L276I model at comparable ages. These models emphasize the importance of FKRP in maintaining proper glycosylation of α-dystroglycan. The mild progression in the homozygous FKRP L276I model resembles that in patients with LGMD2I who are homozygous for the L276I mutation. This animal model could, therefore, be relevant for understanding the pathophysiology of and developing a treatment strategy for the human disorder. PMID:26574668

  15. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes

    PubMed Central

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K.; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  16. Tissue-Mimicking Geometrical Constraints Stimulate Tissue-Like Constitution and Activity of Mouse Neonatal and Human-Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Cardiac Myocytes.

    PubMed

    Pilarczyk, Götz; Raulf, Alexandra; Gunkel, Manuel; Fleischmann, Bernd K; Lemor, Robert; Hausmann, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The present work addresses the question of to what extent a geometrical support acts as a physiological determining template in the setup of artificial cardiac tissue. Surface patterns with alternating concave to convex transitions of cell size dimensions were used to organize and orientate human-induced pluripotent stem cell (hIPSC)-derived cardiac myocytes and mouse neonatal cardiac myocytes. The shape of the cells, as well as the organization of the contractile apparatus recapitulates the anisotropic line pattern geometry being derived from tissue geometry motives. The intracellular organization of the contractile apparatus and the cell coupling via gap junctions of cell assemblies growing in a random or organized pattern were examined. Cell spatial and temporal coordinated excitation and contraction has been compared on plain and patterned substrates. While the α-actinin cytoskeletal organization is comparable to terminally-developed native ventricular tissue, connexin-43 expression does not recapitulate gap junction distribution of heart muscle tissue. However, coordinated contractions could be observed. The results of tissue-like cell ensemble organization open new insights into geometry-dependent cell organization, the cultivation of artificial heart tissue from stem cells and the anisotropy-dependent activity of therapeutic compounds. PMID:26751484

  17. Spilled Gallstones Mimicking Peritoneal Metastases

    PubMed Central

    Loan, William; Carey, Declan P.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Spillage of bile and gallstones due to accidental perforation of the gallbladder wall is often encountered during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. Although spilled stones were once considered harmless, there is increasing evidence that they can result in septic or other potential complications. Case Report: We report a case of spilled gallstones mimicking peritoneal metastases on radiological investigations; diagnosis was confirmed by diagnostic laparoscopy. Conclusion: Every effort should be made to retrieve spilled gallstones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy. When all the stones cannot be retrieved, it should be documented in the patient's medical records to avoid delay in the diagnosis of late complications. Diagnostic laparoscopy is useful when the radiological investigations are inconclusive. PMID:19366546

  18. [Severe PERM syndrom mimicking tetanus].

    PubMed

    Wallet, F; Didelot, A; Delannoy, B; Leray, V; Guerin, C

    2014-01-01

    We report the case of a 55-year-old man without significant medical history admitted to the ICU for a progressive paralysis mimicking life-threatening tetanus. Evolution with classical tetanus treatment was negative, with the need for ventilator support and worsening condition being life threatening. Uncommon evolution revealed a rare glycin antibody-associated hyperekplexia (progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity syndrome). Patient dramatically improved with immunosuppressive therapy including plasmatic exchanges, cyclophasmid and high dose corticoid infusions. Intensivists should be aware of this very rare syndrome whose treatment is the opposite of tetanus while presentation is very close. Optimal and treatment could lead to prolonged survival. PMID:25168299

  19. Delivery of human mesenchymal adipose-derived stem cells restores multiple urological dysfunctions in a rat model mimicking radical prostatectomy damages through tissue-specific paracrine mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Yiou, René; Mahrouf-Yorgov, Meriem; Trébeau, Céline; Zanaty, Marc; Lecointe, Cécile; Souktani, Richard; Zadigue, Patricia; Figeac, Florence; Rodriguez, Anne-Marie

    2016-02-01

    Urinary incontinence (UI) and erectile dysfunction (ED) are the most common functional urological disorders and the main sequels of radical prostatectomy (RP) for prostate cancer. Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) therapy holds promise for repairing tissue damage due to RP. Because animal studies accurately replicating post-RP clinical UI and ED are lacking, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the urological benefits of MSC in this setting. To determine whether and by which mechanisms MSC can repair damages to both striated urethral sphincter (SUS) and penis in the same animal, we delivered human multipotent adipose stem cells, used as MSC model, in an immunocompetent rat model replicating post-RP UI and ED. In this model, we demonstrated by using noninvasive methods in the same animal from day 7 to day 90 post-RP injury that MSC administration into both the SUS and the penis significantly improved urinary continence and erectile function. The regenerative effects of MSC therapy were not due to transdifferentiation and robust engraftment at injection sites. Rather, our results suggest that MSC benefits in both target organs may involve a paracrine process with not only soluble factor release by the MSC but also activation of the recipient's secretome. These two effects of MSC varied across target tissues and damaged-cell types. In conclusion, our work provides new insights into the regenerative properties of MSC and supports the ability of MSC from a single source to repair multiple types of damage, such as those seen after RP, in the same individual. Stem Cells 2016;34:392-404. PMID:26439006

  20. Evidence of Sulfur Mustard Exposure in Human Plasma by LC-ESI-MS-MS Detection of the Albumin-Derived Alkylated HETE-CP Dipeptide and Chromatographic Investigation of Its Cis/Trans Isomerism.

    PubMed

    Gandor, Felix; Gawlik, Michael; Thiermann, Horst; John, Harald

    2015-05-01

    Sulfur mustard (SM) is a chemical warfare agent that causes painful blisters and chemically modifies endogenous biomacromolecules by alkylation to hydroxyethylthioethyl (HETE) adducts representing valuable long-term markers for post-exposure analysis. The albumin adduct formed in human plasma in vitro (HETE bound to the side chain of cysteine 34) was isolated and cleaved by current lots of pronase primarily generating the internal modified dipeptide (HETE-cysteine-proline, HETE-CP) instead of the formerly reported HETE-CPF tripeptide. The analyte was detected by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization tandem-mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS-MS). In principle, HETE-CP undergoes a dynamic on-column equilibrium of cis-trans isomerism thus requiring separation at 50°C to obtain one narrow peak. Accordingly, we developed both a novel longer lasting but more sensitive microbore (1 mm i.d., flow 30 µL/min, cycle time 60 min, LOD 50 nM) and a faster, less sensitive narrowbore (2.1 mm i.d., 200 µL/min, cycle time 16 min, LOD 100 nM, both on Atlantis T3 material at 50°C) LC-ESI-MS-MS method suitable for verification analysis. The corresponding tri- and tetrapeptide, Q(HETE)-CPF were monitored simultaneously. HETE-CP peak areas were directly proportional to SM concentrations added to plasma in vitro (0.05-100 µM). Albumin adducts formed by deuterated SM (d8-SM) served as internal standard. PMID:25712440

  1. IRIS Toxicological Review of Cis-& Trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (External Review Draft)

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is conducting a peer review of the scientific basis supporting the human health hazard and dose-response assessment of cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene that will appear in the Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS) database.

  2. Vanillin, Cis-Terpin Hydrate, and Cis-Terpin as Ice Nucleators.

    PubMed

    Power, B A; Power, R F

    1965-05-21

    Vanillin, cis-terpin hydrate, and cis-terpin cause ice nucleation at relatively high threshold temperatures. Trace quantities of these substances should exist in the natural atmosphere and may act as ice nuclei. PMID:17820113

  3. Novel C-4 heteroaryl 13-cis-retinamide Mnk/AR degrading agents inhibit cell proliferation and migration and induce apoptosis in human breast and prostate cancer cells and suppress growth of MDA-MB-231 human breast and CWR22Rv1 human prostate tumor xenografts in mice.

    PubMed

    Mbatia, Hannah W; Ramalingam, Senthilmurugan; Ramamurthy, Vidya P; Martin, Marlena S; Kwegyir-Afful, Andrew K; Njar, Vincent C O

    2015-02-26

    The synthesis and in vitro and in vivo antibreast and antiprostate cancers activities of novel C-4 heteroaryl 13-cis-retinamides that modulate Mnk-eIF4E and AR signaling are discussed. Modifications of the C-4 heteroaryl substituents reveal that the 1H-imidazole is essential for high anticancer activity. The most potent compounds against a variety of human breast and prostate cancer (BC/PC) cell lines were compounds 16 (VNHM-1-66), 20 (VNHM-1-81), and 22 (VNHM-1-73). In these cell lines, the compounds induce Mnk1/2 degradation to substantially suppress eIF4E phosphorylation. In PC cells, the compounds induce degradation of both full-length androgen receptor (fAR) and splice variant AR (AR-V7) to inhibit AR transcriptional activity. More importantly, VNHM-1-81 has strong in vivo antibreast and antiprostate cancer activities, while VNHM-1-73 exhibited strong in vivo antibreast cancer activity, with no apparent host toxicity. Clearly, these lead compounds are strong candidates for development for the treatments of human breast and prostate cancers. PMID:25634130

  4. Black hole mimickers: Regular versus singular behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Lemos, Jose P. S.; Zaslavskii, Oleg B.

    2008-07-15

    Black hole mimickers are possible alternatives to black holes; they would look observationally almost like black holes but would have no horizon. The properties in the near-horizon region where gravity is strong can be quite different for both types of objects, but at infinity it could be difficult to discern black holes from their mimickers. To disentangle this possible confusion, we examine the near-horizon properties, and their connection with far away asymptotic properties, of some candidates to black mimickers. We study spherically symmetric uncharged or charged but nonextremal objects, as well as spherically symmetric charged extremal objects. Within the uncharged or charged but nonextremal black hole mimickers, we study nonextremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, of which a subclass are called black foils, and gravastars. Within the charged extremal black hole mimickers we study extremal {epsilon}-wormholes on the threshold of the formation of an event horizon, quasi-black holes, and wormholes on the basis of quasi-black holes from Bonnor stars. We elucidate whether or not the objects belonging to these two classes remain regular in the near-horizon limit. The requirement of full regularity, i.e., finite curvature and absence of naked behavior, up to an arbitrary neighborhood of the gravitational radius of the object enables one to rule out potential mimickers in most of the cases. A list ranking the best black hole mimickers up to the worst, both nonextremal and extremal, is as follows: wormholes on the basis of extremal black holes or on the basis of quasi-black holes, quasi-black holes, wormholes on the basis of nonextremal black holes (black foils), and gravastars. Since in observational astrophysics it is difficult to find extremal configurations (the best mimickers in the ranking), whereas nonextremal configurations are really bad mimickers, the task of distinguishing black holes from their mimickers seems to

  5. Odontogenic Keratocyst Mimicking Paradental Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Borgonovo, Andrea Enrico; Bernardini, Luigi; Francinetti, Paola

    2014-01-01

    Objective. The aim of this paper is to present an uncommon clinical and radiographic aspect of odontogenic keratocyst (OKC) mimicking paradental cyst. Methods. A 32-year-old female patient showed a well-delimited radiolucent lesion connected with the root of the left third molar with close anatomical relationship with the mandibular canal. The clinical, radiographic, and anamnestic features lead us to diagnose a paradental cyst that was treated by enucleation after extraction of the partially impacted tooth. Results. Histological analysis showed typical histological features of PKC such as the presence of a lining of stratified squamous epithelium with a well-defined basal layer of palisading columnar of cuboidal cells. Conclusion. Initial X-ray analysis and the position of the lesion related to the third mandibular tooth caused us to mistakenly diagnose a paradental cyst. We were only able to identify the cyst as an PKC rather than a paradental cyst after histological analysis. PMID:25114809

  6. Subaortic membrane mimicking hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Mark Joseph; Arruda-Olson, Adelaide; Gersh, Bernard; Geske, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    A 34-year-old man was referred for progressive angina and exertional dyspnoea refractory to medical therapy, with a presumptive diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM). Transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) revealed asymmetric septal hypertrophy without systolic anterior motion of the mitral valve leaflet and with no dynamic left ventricular outflow tract (LVOT) obstruction. However, the LVOT velocity was elevated at rest as well as with provocation, without the characteristic late peaking obstruction seen in HCM. Focused TTE to evaluate for suspected fixed obstruction demonstrated a subaortic membrane 2.2 cm below the aortic valve. Coronary CT angiography confirmed the presence of the subaortic membrane and was negative for concomitant coronary artery disease. Surgical resection of the subaortic membrane and septal myectomy resulted in significant symptomatic relief and lower LVOT velocities on postoperative TTE. This case reminds the clinician to carefully evaluate for alternative causes of LVOT obstruction, especially subaortic membrane, as a cause of symptoms mimicking HCM. PMID:26538250

  7. Suppression of blastogenesis and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells: intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) versus novel anti-human leucocyte antigen (HLA)-E monoclonal antibodies mimicking HLA-I reactivity of IVIg

    PubMed Central

    Ravindranath, M H; Terasaki, P I; Pham, T; Jucaud, V; Kawakita, S

    2014-01-01

    Activated CD4+ T cells undergo blastogenesis and proliferation and they express several surface receptors, including β2-microglobulin-free human leucocyte antigen (HLA) heavy chains (open conformers). Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) suppresses activated T cells, but the mechanism is unclear. IVIg reacts with HLA-Ia/Ib antigens but its reactivity is lost when the anti-HLA-E Ab is adsorbed out. Anti-HLA-E antibodies may bind to the peptides shared by HLA-E and the HLA-I alleles. These shared peptides are cryptic in intact HLA, but exposed in open conformers. The hypothesis that anti-HLA-E monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that mimic HLA-I reactivity of IVIg may suppress activated T cells by binding to the shared peptides of the open conformers on the T cell surface was tested by examining the relative binding affinity of those mAbs for open conformers coated on regular beads and for intact HLA coated on iBeads, and by comparing the effects on the suppression of phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-activated T cells of three entities: IVIg, anti-HLA-E mAbs that mimic IVIg [Terasaki Foundation Laboratory (TFL)-006 and (TFL)-007]; and anti-HLA-E antibodies that do not mimic IVIg (TFL-033 and TFL-037). Suppression of blastogenesis and proliferation of those T cells by both IVIg and the anti-HLA-E mAbs was dose-dependent, the dose required with mAbs 50–150-fold lower than with IVIg. TFL-006 and TFL-007 significantly suppressed blastogenesis and proliferation of activated CD4+ T cells, but neither the non-IVIg-mimicking mAbs nor control antibodies did so. The suppression may be mediated by Fab-binding of TFL-006/TFL-007 to the exposed shared peptides. The mAb binding to the open conformer may signal T cell deactivation because the open conformers have an elongated cytoplasmic tail with phosphorylation sites (tryosine320/serine335). PMID:24889882

  8. Pharmacokinetics, oral bioavailability, and metabolic disposition in rats of (-)-cis-5-fluoro-1-[2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-oxathiolan-5-yl] cytosine, a nucleoside analog active against human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis B virus.

    PubMed Central

    Frick, L W; St John, L; Taylor, L C; Painter, G R; Furman, P A; Liotta, D C; Furfine, E S; Nelson, D J

    1993-01-01

    The pharmacokinetics and metabolism of the potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus and anti-hepatitis B virus compound, (-)-cis-5-fluoro-1-[2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-oxathiolan-5-yl] cytosine (FTC), were investigated in male CD rats. Plasma clearance of 10 mg of FTC per kg of body weight was biexponential in rats, with a half-life at alpha phase of 4.7 +/- 1.1 min (mean +/- standard deviation) and a half-life at beta phase of 44 +/- 8.8 min (n = 5). The total body clearance of FTC was 1.8 +/- 0.1 liters/h/kg, and the oral bioavailability was 90% +/- 8%. The volume of distribution at steady state (Vss) was 1.5 +/- 0.1 liters/kg. Increasing the dose to 100 mg/kg slowed clearance to 1.5 +/- 0.2 liters/kg/h, lowered the Vss to 1.2 +/- 0.2 liters/kg, and reduced the oral bioavailability to 65% +/- 15%. FTC in the brains of rats was initially less than 2% of the plasma concentration but increased to 6% by 2 h postdose. Probenecid elevated levels of FTC in plasma as well as in brains but did not alter the brain-to-plasma ratio. The urinary and fecal recoveries of unchanged FTC after a 10-mg/kg intravenous dose were 87% +/- 3% and 5% +/- 1.6%, respectively. After a 10-mg/kg oral dose, respective urinary and fecal recoveries were 70% +/- 2.5% and 25% +/- 1.6%. Two sulfoxides of FTC were observed in the urine, accounting for 0.4% +/- 0.03% and 2.7% +/- 0.2% of the intravenous dose and 0.4% +/- 0.06% and 2.5% +/- 0.3% of the oral dose. Also observed were 5-fluorocytosine, representing 0.4% +/- 0.06% of the intravenous dose and 0.4% +/- 0.07% of the oral dose, and FTC glucuronide, representing 0.7% +/- 0.2% of the oral dose and 0.4% +/- 0.2% of the intravenous dose. Neither deaminated FTC nor 5-fluorouracil was observed in the urine (less than 0.2% of dose). The high oral availability and minimal metabolism of FTC encourage its further preclinical development. PMID:8285607

  9. Measurement of guided mode wavenumbers in soft tissue-bone mimicking phantoms using ultrasonic axial transmission.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jiangang; Foiret, Josquin; Minonzio, Jean-Gabriel; Talmant, Maryline; Su, Zhongqing; Cheng, Li; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-05-21

    Human soft tissue is an important factor that influences the assessment of human long bones using quantitative ultrasound techniques. To investigate such influence, a series of soft tissue-bone phantoms (a bone-mimicking plate coated with a layer of water, glycerol or silicon rubber) were ultrasonically investigated using a probe with multi-emitter and multi-receiver arrays in an axial transmission configuration. A singular value decomposition signal processing technique was applied to extract the frequency-dependent wavenumbers of several guided modes. The results indicate that the presence of a soft tissue-mimicking layer introduces additional guided modes predicted by a fluid waveguide model. The modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate covered by the soft-tissue phantom are only slightly modified compared to their counterparts in the free bone-mimicking plate, and they are still predicted by an elastic transverse isotropic two-dimensional waveguide. Altogether these observations suggest that the soft tissue-bone phantoms can be modeled as two independent waveguides. Even in the presence of the overlying soft tissue-mimicking layer, the modes propagating in the bone-mimicking plate can still be extracted and identified. These results suggest that our approach can be applied for the purpose of the characterization of the material and structural properties of cortical bone. PMID:22538382

  10. Bone tumor mimickers: A pictorial essay

    PubMed Central

    Mhuircheartaigh, Jennifer Ni; Lin, Yu-Ching; Wu, Jim S

    2014-01-01

    Focal lesions in bone are very common and many of these lesions are not bone tumors. These bone tumor mimickers can include numerous normal anatomic variants and non-neoplastic processes. Many of these tumor mimickers can be left alone, while others can be due to a significant disease process. It is important for the radiologist and clinician to be aware of these bone tumor mimickers and understand the characteristic features which allow discrimination between them and true neoplasms in order to avoid unnecessary additional workup. Knowing which lesions to leave alone or which ones require workup can prevent misdiagnosis and reduce patient anxiety. PMID:25114385

  11. Cis-elements governing trinucleotide repeat instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rolfsmeier, M L; Dixon, M J; Pessoa-Brandão, L; Pelletier, R; Miret, J J; Lahue, R S

    2001-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) instability in humans is governed by unique cis-elements. One element is a threshold, or minimal repeat length, conferring frequent mutations. Since thresholds have not been directly demonstrated in model systems, their molecular nature remains uncertain. Another element is sequence specificity. Unstable TNR sequences are almost always CNG, whose hairpin-forming ability is thought to promote instability by inhibiting DNA repair. To understand these cis-elements further, TNR expansions and contractions were monitored by yeast genetic assays. A threshold of approximately 15--17 repeats was observed for CTG expansions and contractions, indicating that thresholds function in organisms besides humans. Mutants lacking the flap endonuclease Rad27p showed little change in the expansion threshold, suggesting that this element is not altered by the presence or absence of flap processing. CNG or GNC sequences yielded frequent mutations, whereas A-T rich sequences were substantially more stable. This sequence analysis further supports a hairpin-mediated mechanism of TNR instability. Expansions and contractions occurred at comparable rates for CTG tract lengths between 15 and 25 repeats, indicating that expansions can comprise a significant fraction of mutations in yeast. These results indicate that several unique cis-elements of human TNR instability are functional in yeast. PMID:11290713

  12. Membrane interactions and conformational preferences of human and avian prion N-terminal tandem repeats: the role of copper(II) ions, pH, and membrane mimicking environments.

    PubMed

    Di Natale, Giuseppe; Pappalardo, Giuseppe; Milardi, Danilo; Sciacca, Michele F M; Attanasio, Francesco; La Mendola, Diego; Rizzarelli, Enrico

    2010-11-01

    The flexible N-terminal domain of the prion protein (PrP(c)) is believed to play a pivotal role in both trafficking of the protein through the cell membrane and its pathogenic conversion into the β sheet-rich scrapie isoform (PrP(sc)). Unlike mammalian PrP(c), avian prion proteins are not known to undergo any pathogenic conformational conversions. Consequently, some critical advances in our understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying prion pathogenesis are expected from comparative studies of the biophysical properties of the N-terminal domains of the two proteins. The present study addresses the role played by different environmental factors, i.e., copper(II), pH, and membrane-mimicking environments, in assisting the conformational preferences of huPrP60-91 and chPrP53-76, two soluble peptides encompassing the N-terminal copper(II) binding domains of the human and chicken prion proteins, respectively. Moreover, the membrane interactions of huPrP60-91, chPrP53-76, and their copper(II) complexes were evaluated by Trp fluorescence in conjunction with measurements of the variation in thermotropic properties of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) unilamellar vesicles. Circular dichroism experiments revealed that huPrP60-91 adopts a predominant polyproline II conformation in aqueous solution that is destabilized at basic pH or in the presence of trifluoroethanol (TFE). Unlike anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), which seems to stabilize the polyproline II conformation further, zwitterionic dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles do not affect the peptide structure. On the contrary, copper(II) promptly promotes an increase in β-turn-rich structures. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) and Trp fluorescence assays carried out on DPPC model membranes after incubation with huPrP60-91 showed a marked tendency of the peptide to slowly penetrate the lipid bilayer with a concomitant conformational transition toward an extended β-sheet-like structure

  13. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Tanrıverdi, Elif; Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Gül, Şule; Çörtük, Mustafa; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  14. Tracheobronchial Amyloidosis Mimicking Tracheal Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Özgül, Mehmet Akif; Uzun, Oğuz; Yaşar, Zehra; Acat, Murat; Arda, Naciye; Çetinkaya, Erdoğan

    2016-01-01

    Tracheobronchial amyloidosis is a rare presentation and accounts for about 1% of benign tumors in this area. The diagnosis of disease is delayed due to nonspecific pulmonary symptoms. Therapeutic approaches are required to control progressive pulmonary symptoms for most of the patients. Herein, we report a case of a 68-year-old man admitted with progressive dyspnea to our institution for further evaluation and management. He was initially diagnosed with and underwent management for bronchial asthma for two years but had persistent symptoms despite optimal medical therapy. Pulmonary computed tomography scan revealed severe endotracheal stenosis. Bronchoscopy was performed and showed endotracheal mass obstructing 70% of the distal trachea and mimicking a neoplastic lesion. The mass was successfully resected by mechanical resection, argon plasma coagulation (APC), and Nd-YAG laser during rigid bronchoscopy. Biopsy materials showed deposits of amorphous material by hematoxylin and eosin staining and these deposits were selectively stained with Congo Red. Although this is a rare clinical condition, this case indicated that carrying out a bronchoscopy in any patient complaining of atypical bronchial symptoms or with uncontrolled asthma is very important. PMID:27594885

  15. Plant growth inhibition by cis-cinnamoyl glucosides and cis-cinnamic acid.

    PubMed

    Hiradate, Syuntaro; Morita, Sayaka; Furubayashi, Akihiro; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Harada, Jiro

    2005-03-01

    Spiraea thunbergii Sieb. contains 1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (CG) and 6-O-(4'-hydroxy-2'-methylene-butyroyl)-1-O-cis-cinnamoyl-beta-D-glucopyranose (BCG) as major plant growth inhibiting constituents. In the present study, we determined the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG on root elongation of germinated seedlings of lettuce (Lactuca sativa), pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), red clover (Trifolium pratense), timothy (Phleum pratense), and bok choy (Brassica rapa var chinensis) in comparison with that of two well-known growth inhibitors, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and (+)-2-cis-4-trans-abscisic acid (cis-ABA), as well as two related chemicals of CG and BCG, cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA) and trans-cinnamic acid (trans-CA). The EC50 values for CG and BCG on lettuce were roughly one-half to one-quarter of the value for cis-ABA. cis-Cinnamic acid, which is a component of CG and BCG, possessed almost the same inhibitory activity of CG and BCG, suggesting that the essential chemical structure responsible for the inhibitory activity of CG and BCG is cis-CA. The cis-stereochemistry of the methylene moiety is apparently needed for high inhibitory activity, as trans-CA had an EC50 value roughly 100 times that of CG, BCG, and cis-CA. Growth inhibition by CG, BCG, and cis-CA was influenced by the nature of the soil in the growing medium: alluvial soil preserved the bioactivity, whereas volcanic ash and calcareous soils inhibited bioactivity. These findings indicate a potential role of cis-CA and its glucosides as allelochemicals for use as plant growth regulators in agricultural fields. PMID:15898503

  16. The Molecular Structure of cis-FONO

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Timothy J.; Dateo, Christopher E.; Rice, Julia E.; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The molecular structure of cis-FONO has been determined with the CCSD(T) correlation method using an spdf quality basis set. In agreement with previous coupled-cluster calculations but in disagreement with density functional theory, cis-FONO is found to exhibit normal bond distances. The quadratic and cubic force fields of cis-FONO have also been determined in order to evaluate the effect of vibrational averaging on the molecular geometry. Vibrational averaging is found to increase bond distances, as expected, but it does not affect the qualitative nature of the bonding. The CCSD(T)/spdf harmonic frequencies of cis-FONO support our previous assertion that a band observed at 1200 /cm is a combination band (upsilon(sub 3) + upsilon(sub 4)), and not a fundamental.

  17. Photoelectron Spectroscopy of cis-Nitrous Acid Anion (cis-HONO(-)).

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Allan M; Lehman, Julia H; McCoy, Anne B; Lineberger, W Carl

    2016-03-17

    We report photoelectron spectra of cis-HONO(-) formed from an association reaction of OH(-) and NO in a pulsed, plasma-entrainment ion source. The experimental data are assigned to the cis-HONO(-) isomer, which is predicted to be the global minimum on the anion potential energy surface. We do not find evidence for a significant contribution from trans-HONO(-). Electron photodetachment of cis-HONO(-) with 1613, 1064, 532, 355, and 301 nm photons accesses the ground X̃ (1)A' (S0) and excited ã (3)A″ (T1) states of neutral HONO. The photoelectron spectrum resulting from detachment forming cis-HONO (S0) exhibits a long vibrational progression, dominated by overtones and combination bands involving the central O-N stretching and ONO bending vibrations. This indicates that there is a significant change in the central O-N bond length between cis-HONO(-) and cis-HONO (S0). The electron affinity (EA) of cis-HONO is determined to be 0.356(8) eV. We also report the dissociation energy (D0) of cis-HONO(-), forming OH(-) + NO, as 0.594(9) eV, which is a factor of 4 decrease in the central O-N bond strength compared to neutral cis-HONO. The T1 state of cis-HONO is shown to be ∼2.3 eV higher in energy than cis-HONO (S0). Electron photodetachment to form cis-HONO (T1) accesses a transition state along the HO-NO bond dissociation coordinate. The resulting photoelectron spectrum exhibits broad peaks spaced by the terminal N═O stretching frequency. Electronic structure calculations and photoelectron spectrum simulations reported here show very good agreement with the experimental data. PMID:26886478

  18. Anisotropic microstructured poly(vinyl alcohol) tissue-mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Dawson, Andrew; Harris, Paul; Gouws, Gideon

    2010-07-01

    Novel microstructured PVA phantoms mimicking fibrous tissues have been developed using a simple freeze-casting process. Scanning electron micrographs reveal highly anisotropic microstructure with dimensions of the order of 5 to 100 microm. Characterization of an example phantom revealed acoustic properties consistent with those found in fibrous tissues. At 20 MHz, the velocity measured parallel to the microstructure orientation of 1555 ms(-1) was significantly greater than that perpendicular to the microstructure of 1537 ms(-1). The attenuation coefficient was measured to be 5 dBxmm(-1) and proportional to the 1.6 power of frequency, which is in good agreement with that for normal human myocardium. PMID:20639144

  19. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans --> cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-01

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ* excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ*-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ*-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed.

  20. Multiple Lung Abscesses Caused by Actinomyces graevenitzii Mimicking Acute Pulmonary Coccidioidomycosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagaoka, Kentaro; Yamamoto, Yoshihiro; Yanagihara, Katsunori; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Kohno, Shigeru

    2012-01-01

    Actinomyces graevenitzii is a newly recognized Actinomyces species that is seldom isolated from clinical specimens. A case of multiple pulmonary abscesses mimicking acute pulmonary coccidioidomycosis is described in this study, and the findings indicate that this organism is an opportunistic human pathogen. PMID:22760049

  1. Rare Mimickers of Exostosis: A Case Series

    PubMed Central

    Perubhotla, Lakshmi Manasa

    2016-01-01

    Exophytic growths from bones are a common entity. Osteochondroma is the most common benign exophytic lesion and we tend to diagnose every benign looking exophytic lesion as osteochondroma. Here we reported two entities of cases, one was Nora’s lesion and another one was supracondylar process of humerus, both of which were mimickers of osteochondroma and their salient and differentiating features from osteochondromas.

  2. Cis regius, a new species of Cis Latreille (Coleoptera: Ciidae) from Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Orsetti, Artur; Lopes-Andrade, Cristiano

    2016-01-01

    Cis Latreille is the most diverse genus of Ciidae with 350 species and a worldwide distribution (Oliveira et al. 2013). It houses more than a half of the described ciid species, but the available phylogenetic analyses based on molecular data suggest that Cis is polyphyletic (Buder et al. 2008; Lopes-Andrade & Grebennikov 2015). Currently, there is no thoroughly accepted subgeneric classification for Cis and parts of the species are organized into artificial species-groups (Lawrence 1971; Lopes-Andrade et al. 2003; Lopes-Andrade 2008; Oliveira et al. 2013). PMID:27470794

  3. Cis-acting determinants of paramutation.

    PubMed

    Hövel, Iris; Pearson, Nigel A; Stam, Maike

    2015-08-01

    Paramutation is an epigenetic phenomenon whereby in trans communication between homologous sequences leads to meiotically heritable epigenetic changes at one of the alleles. Cis-acting determinants of paramutation are DNA sequences and associated epigenetic modifications that are required for paramutation. Here, we review how characteristics of the underlying DNA sequences determine whether paramutation can occur and how they affect the behavior displayed by the various paramutation phenomena. Paramutation is strongly associated with repeated sequences, especially tandemly repeated sequences. Cis-acting determinants consisting of repeated sequences are consistent with the involvement of RNA-directed DNA methylation (RdDM) in plants and the PIWI-interacting RNA (piRNA) pathway in animals. In the RdDM-based model, siRNAs produced by paramutagenic loci would reinforce the silenced state of paramutagenic loci in cis and initiate transcriptional silencing of paramutable loci in trans. In this review, we discuss how sequence characteristics and epigenetic modifications of cis-acting sequences can trigger the recruitment of silencing machineries. PMID:26321497

  4. Analysis of rat cytosolic 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity and enzymatic characterization of rat ADHII.

    PubMed

    Popescu, G; Napoli, J L

    2000-01-01

    We report the characterization of two enzymes that catalyze NAD(+)-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity in rat liver cystol. Alcohol dehydrogenase class I (ADHI) contributes > 80% of the NA D+-dependent 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity recovered, whereas alcohol dehydrogenase class II (ADHII), not identified previously at the protein level, nor characterized enzymatically in rat, accounts for approximately 2% of the activity. Rat ADHII exhibits properties different from those described for human ADHII. Moreover, rat ADHII-catalyzed rates of ethanol dehydrogenation are markedly lower than octanol or retinoid dehydrogenation rates. Neither ethanol nor 4-methylpyrazole inhibits the 9-cis-retinol dehydrogenase activity of rat ADHII. We propose that ADHII represents the previously observed additional retinoid oxidation activity of rat liver cytosol which occurred in the presence of either ethanol or 4-methylpyrazole. We also show that human and rat ADHII differ considerably in enzymatic properties. PMID:10606766

  5. Cis and trans unsaturated phosphatidylcholine bilayers: A molecular dynamics simulation study.

    PubMed

    Kulig, Waldemar; Pasenkiewicz-Gierula, Marta; Róg, T

    2016-02-01

    Trans unsaturated lipids are uncommon in nature. In the human diet, they occur as natural products of ruminal bacteria or from industrial food processing like hydrogenation of vegetable oils. Consumption of trans unsaturated lipids has been shown to have a negative influence on human health; in particular, the risk of cardiovascular disease is higher when the amount of trans unsaturated lipids in the diet is elevated. In this study, we first performed quantum mechanical calculations to specifically and accurately parameterize cis and trans mono-unsaturated lipids and subsequently validated the newly derived parameter set. Then, we carried out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of lipid bilayers composed of cis or trans unsaturated lipids with and without cholesterol. Our results show that trans mono-unsaturated chains are more flexible than cis mono-unsaturated chains due to lower barriers for rotation around the single bonds next to the trans double bond than those next to the cis double bond. In effect, interactions between cholesterol and trans unsaturated chains are stronger than cis unsaturated chains, which results in a higher ordering effect of cholesterol in trans unsaturated bilayers. PMID:26187855

  6. Long-term follow-up of myelodysplastic syndrome patients with moderate/severe anaemia receiving human recombinant erythropoietin + 13-cis-retinoic acid and dihydroxylated vitamin D3: independent positive impact of erythroid response on survival.

    PubMed

    Crisà, Elena; Foli, Cristina; Passera, Roberto; Darbesio, Antonella; Garvey, Kimberly B; Boccadoro, Mario; Ferrero, Dario

    2012-07-01

    We previously reported a 60% erythroid response rate with recombinant erythropoietin + 13-cis retinoic acid + dihydroxylated vitamin D3 in 63 elderly myelodysplastic patients (median age 75 years) with unfavourable features for response to erythropoietin alone [70% transfusion-dependent, 35% refractory anaemia with ring sideroblasts/refractory anaemia with excess of blasts type 1 (RAEB1), 70% with International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) Intermediate-1 or -2]. This report updates that case study at a 7-year follow-up, and compared the impact on overall survival of erythroid response to known prognostic factors. The erythroid response duration (median 17 months; 22 in non-RAEB patients, with 20% patients in response after 6 years of therapy) was longer than in most studies with erythropoietin alone. Overall survival (median 55 months in non-RAEB, 15 in RAEB1 patients) was negatively affected by RAEB1 diagnosis, IPSS and WPSS intermediate scores and transfusion-dependence. In the multivariate analysis, erythroid response maintained an independent positive impact on survival, particularly in non-RAEB patients in the first 3 years from diagnosis (90% survival compared to 50% of non-responders). In conclusion, the long-term follow-up confirmed the achievement, by our combined treatment, of fairly long-lasting erythroid response in the majority of MDS patients with unfavourable prognostic features for response to erythropoietin: this translated in a survival benefit that was independent from other prognostic features. PMID:22571649

  7. Diffuse peritoneal deciduosis mimicking metastatic lesions

    PubMed Central

    Baroni Cruz, Dennis; Dhamer, Thricy; da Rocha, Vívian Wünderlich; Dupont, Roberta Finkler

    2014-01-01

    A 32-year-old woman with an uneventful antenatal period underwent a caesarean section for breech presentation. At laparotomy, there were multiple yellowish elastic nodules distributed along the parietal peritoneal surface, totalling over 30 lesions and worrying the surgical team. The conclusive diagnosis of peritoneal deciduosis was supported by pathological analysis (histology and immunohistochemistry). The present case reports an uncommon presentation of diffuse peritoneal deciduosis mimicking metastatic lesions. PMID:24526201

  8. Intracranial capillary hemangioma mimicking a dissociative disorder

    PubMed Central

    John, Santosh G.; Pillai, Unnikrishnan; Lacasse, Alexander

    2012-01-01

    Capillary hemangiomas, hamartomatous proliferation of vascular endothelial cells, are rare in the central nervous system (CNS). Intracranial capillary hemangiomas presenting with reversible behavioral abnormalities and focal neurological deficits have rarely been reported. We report a case of CNS capillary hemangioma presenting with transient focal neurological deficits and behavioral abnormalities mimicking Ganser's syndrome. Patient underwent total excision of the vascular malformation, resulting in complete resolution of his symptoms. PMID:24765434

  9. Foreign Body Mimicking a Dental Implant Radiographically.

    PubMed

    Demirkol, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Foreign bodies are often encountered in the maxillofacial region and can present in several ways. They frequently occur as a result of accidents, explosions, and gunshot injuries or because of iatrogenic factors in therapeutic interventions in daily dental practice. This report describes an unusual case of a broken elevator blade mimicking a dental implant embedded in alveolar bone radiographically, within the maxillary palatal mucosa during a traumatic maxillary right first molar extraction. PMID:26594991

  10. Status of flexible CIS research at ISET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Basol, B. M.; Kapur, V. K.; Minnick, A.; Halani, A.; Leidholm, C. R.

    1994-01-01

    Polycrystalline thin film solar cells fabricated on light-weight, flexible substrates are very attractive for space applications. In this work CulnSe2 (CIS) based thin film devices were processed on metallic foil substrates using the selenization technique. CIS deposition method involved reaction of electron-bean evaporated Cu-In precursor layers with a selenizing atmosphere at around 400 C. Several metallic foils such as Mo, Ti, Al, Ni, and Cu were evaluated as possible substrates for these devices. Solar cells with AM1.5 efficiencies of 9.0-9.34 percent and good mechanical integrity were demonstrated on Mo and Ti foils. Monolithic integration of these devices was also demonstrated up to 4 in x 4 in size.

  11. PDSS/IMC CIS user's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    The Spacelab Payload Development Support System PDSS Image Motion Compensator (IMC) computer interface simulation (CIS) user's manual is given. The software provides a real time interface simulation for the following IMC subsystems: the Dry Rotor Reference Unit, the Advanced Star/Target Reference Optical sensor, the Ultra Violet imaging telescope, the Wisconson Ultraviolet Photopolarimetry Experiment, the Cruciform Power distributor, and the Spacelab Experiment Computer Operating System.

  12. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species

    PubMed Central

    Spivak, Aaron T.; Stormo, Gary D.

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1) chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2) gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3) gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF) occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1) combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2) combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species. PMID:26772747

  13. Combinatorial Cis-regulation in Saccharomyces Species.

    PubMed

    Spivak, Aaron T; Stormo, Gary D

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene expression requires interactions between the cis-regulatory elements (CREs) controlling gene promoters. We developed a sensitive computational method to identify CRE combinations with conserved spacing that does not require genome alignments. When applied to seven sensu stricto and sensu lato Saccharomyces species, 80% of the predicted interactions displayed some evidence of combinatorial transcriptional behavior in several existing datasets including: (1) chromatin immunoprecipitation data for colocalization of transcription factors, (2) gene expression data for coexpression of predicted regulatory targets, and (3) gene ontology databases for common pathway membership of predicted regulatory targets. We tested several predicted CRE interactions with chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments in a wild-type strain and strains in which a predicted cofactor was deleted. Our experiments confirmed that transcription factor (TF) occupancy at the promoters of the CRE combination target genes depends on the predicted cofactor while occupancy of other promoters is independent of the predicted cofactor. Our method has the additional advantage of identifying regulatory differences between species. By analyzing the S. cerevisiae and S. bayanus genomes, we identified differences in combinatorial cis-regulation between the species and showed that the predicted changes in gene regulation explain several of the species-specific differences seen in gene expression datasets. In some instances, the same CRE combinations appear to regulate genes involved in distinct biological processes in the two different species. The results of this research demonstrate that (1) combinatorial cis-regulation can be inferred by multi-genome analysis and (2) combinatorial cis-regulation can explain differences in gene expression between species. PMID:26772747

  14. CIS product introduction: Progress and challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Wieting, R.D.

    1999-03-01

    Siemens Solar has now introduced its next generation of solar modules, the ST5 and ST10 modules based on thin film CuInSe{sub 2}-alloys. Experience with volume production of CIS modules is described including production statistics for 1{times}4-foot circuits with an average output of almost 40 watts, or nearly 11{percent} aperture efficiency. Module stability and package development is reviewed together with a survey of future manufacturing challenges. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  15. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R.; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  16. Plasmablastic Lymphoma Mimicking Acute Pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Inayat, Faisal; Virk, Hafeez Ul Hassan; Cheema, Ahmad R; Saif, Muhammad Wasif

    2016-01-01

    Background. Plasmablastic lymphoma (PBL) is a rare B-cell neoplasm. It predominantly occurs in the oral cavity of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients and exhibits a highly aggressive clinical behavior. Case Presentation. We describe an unusual case of a 37-year-old HIV-positive male who presented with acute pancreatitis secondary to multiple peripancreatic masses compressing the pancreas. Histopathological examination of the lesions showed diffuse and cohesive pattern of large B-cells resembling immunoblasts or plasmablasts. The neoplastic cells were positive for BOB1 and MUM1, partially positive for CD79a, and negative for CD20, CD56, CD138, CD3, CD5, AE1/AE3, and HHV8. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNA in situ hybridization was positive. These features were consistent with PBL. The patient was initiated on cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine, and prednisone (CHOP) chemotherapy, demonstrating a striking response. Conclusion. To our research, this is the first report of PBL with the initial presentation of acute pancreatitis. The findings in this case suggest that PBL should be included in the differential diagnosis of pancreatic and peripancreatic tumors. PMID:27034868

  17. Hazard identification of cis/trans-zearalenone through the looking-glass.

    PubMed

    Dellafiora, Luca; Galaverna, Gianni; Dall'Asta, Chiara; Cozzini, Pietro

    2015-12-01

    Among the food-related health issues, the presence of contaminants has a prominent role, due to the wide range of exogenous compounds that can occur in food commodities and to their large differences in structure and biological activity. A comprehensive assessment of the related risk is thus actually demanding in terms of time and facilities involved. In this context, the use of computational strategies can be an effective choice for supporting the hazard identification procedure at the early stage. In this work, we focused on the food contaminant zearalenone by comparing the trans and cis isomers, respectively the well-known mycoestrogen and its still largely understudied isomer. We estimated the possible effects exerted by human metabolism on the xenoestrogenicity of cis-ZEN by using a validated in silico strategy based on docking simulations and rescoring procedures. Similarly, the exploitation of the most promising enzymatic detoxifying routes designed for trans-ZEN - which relies on the enzyme lactono hydrolase from Clonostachys rosea - has been assessed for the cis-isomer as well. Our results showed that both isomers can act as functional analogues with respect to xenoestrogenic activity, and several cis-ZEN metabolites with high biological potential have been identified. On the contrary, in spite of the high degree of structural analogy, the cis isomer showed a pattern of interaction with the degrading enzyme in stark contrast with that observed for trans-ZEN. For these reasons, the outcomes presented herein strongly support the inclusion of cis-ZEN in further studies of occurrence, metabolism and bioactivity assessment, and suggest the need for a dedicated handling for the cis isomer in risk assessment studies. PMID:26391124

  18. Options for Staging Orbits in Cis-Lunar Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martinez, Roland; Whitley, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    NASA has been studying options to conduct missions beyond Low Earth Orbit, but within the Earth-Moon system, in preparation for deep space exploration including human missions to Mars. Referred to as the Proving Ground, this arena of exploration activities will enable the development of human spaceflight systems and operations to satisfy future exploration objectives beyond the cis-lunar environment. One option being considered includes the deployment of a habitable element or elements, which could be used as a central location for aggregation of supplies and resources for human missions in cis-lunar space and beyond. Characterizing candidate orbit locations for this asset and the impacts on system design and mission operations is important in the overall assessment of the options being considered. The orbits described in this paper were initially selected by taking advantage of previous studies conducted by NASA and the work of other authors. In this paper orbits are assessed for their relative attractiveness based on various factors. A set of constraints related to the capability of the combined Orion and SLS system to deliver humans and cargo to and from the orbit are evaluated. Deployed assets intended to spend multiple years in the Proving Ground would ideally require minimal station keeping costs to reduce the mass budget allocated to this function. Additional mission design drivers include eclipse frequency, potential for uninterrupted communication with deployed assets, thermal, attitude control, communications, and other operational implications. Also the ability to support potential lunar surface activities and excursion missions beyond Earth-Moon space is considered. The results of the characterization and evaluation of the selected orbits indicate a Near Rectilinear Orbit (NRO) is an attractive candidate as an aggregation point or staging location for operations. In this paper, the NRO is further described in terms which balance a number of key

  19. Options for Staging Orbits in Cis-Lunar Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, Ryan; Martinez, Roland

    2015-01-01

    NASA has been studying options to conduct missions beyond Low Earth Orbit, but within the Earth-Moon system, in preparation for deep space exploration including human missions to Mars. Referred to as the Proving Ground, this arena of exploration activities will enable the development of human spaceflight systems and operations to satisfy future exploration objectives beyond the cis-lunar environment. One option being considered includes the deployment of a habitable element or elements, which could be used as a central location for aggregation of supplies and resources for human missions in cis-lunar space and beyond. Characterizing candidate orbit locations for this asset and the impacts on system design and mission operations is important in the overall assessment of the options being considered. The orbits described in this paper were initially selected by taking advantage of previous studies conducted by NASA and the work of other authors. In this paper orbits are assessed for their relative attractiveness based on various factors. First, a set of constraints related to the capability of the combined Orion and SLS system to deliver humans and cargo to and from the orbit are evaluated. Second, the ability to support potential lunar surface activities is considered. Finally, deployed assets intended to spend multiple years in the Proving Ground would ideally require minimal station keeping costs to reduce the mass budget allocated to this function. Additional mission design drivers include potential for uninterrupted communication with deployed assets, thermal, communications, and other operational implications. The results of the characterization and evaluation of the selected orbits indicate a Near Rectilinear Orbit (NRO) is an attractive candidate as an aggregation point or staging location for operations. In this paper, the NRO is further described in terms which balance a number of key attributes that favor a variety of mission classes to meet multiple

  20. Evolutionary computation method for pattern recognition of cis-acting sites.

    PubMed

    Howard, Daniel; Benson, Karl

    2003-11-01

    This paper develops an evolutionary method that learns inductively to recognize the makeup and the position of very short consensus sequences, cis-acting sites, which are a typical feature of promoters in genomes. The method combines a Finite State Automata (FSA) and Genetic Programming (GP) to discover candidate promoter sequences in primary sequence data. An experiment measures the success of the method for promoter prediction in the human genome. This class of method can take large base pair jumps and this may enable it to process very long genomic sequences to discover gene specific cis-acting sites, and genes which are regulated together. PMID:14642656

  1. The Role of Cis-Lunar Space in Future Global Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bobskill, Marianne R.; Lupisella, Mark L.

    2012-01-01

    Cis-lunar space offers affordable near-term opportunities to help pave the way for future global human exploration of deep space, acting as a bridge between present missions and future deep space missions. While missions in cis-lunar space have value unto themselves, they can also play an important role in enabling and reducing risk for future human missions to the Moon, Near-Earth Asteroids (NEAs), Mars, and other deep space destinations. The Cis-Lunar Destination Team of NASA's Human Spaceflight Architecture Team (HAT) has been analyzing cis-lunar destination activities and developing notional missions (or "destination Design Reference Missions" [DRMs]) for cis-lunar locations to inform roadmap and architecture development, transportation and destination elements definition, operations, and strategic knowledge gaps. The cis-lunar domain is defined as that area of deep space under the gravitational influence of the earth-moon system. This includes a set of earth-centered orbital locations in low earth orbit (LEO), geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO), highly elliptical and high earth orbits (HEO), earth-moon libration or "Lagrange" points (E-ML1 through E-ML5, and in particular, E-ML1 and E-ML2), and low lunar orbit (LLO). To help explore this large possibility space, we developed a set of high level cis-lunar mission concepts in the form of a large mission tree, defined primarily by mission duration, pre-deployment, type of mission, and location. The mission tree has provided an overall analytical context and has helped in developing more detailed design reference missions that are then intended to inform capabilities, operations, and architectures. With the mission tree as context, we will describe two destination DRMs to LEO and GEO, based on present human space exploration architectural considerations, as well as our recent work on defining mission activities that could be conducted with an EML1 or EML2 facility, the latter of which will be an emphasis of this

  2. cis p-tau: early driver of brain injury and tauopathy blocked by antibody

    PubMed Central

    Mannix, Rebekah; Qiu, Jianhua; Moncaster, Juliet; Chen, Chun-Hau; Yao, Yandan; Lin, Yu-Min; Driver, Jane A; Sun, Yan; Wei, Shuo; Luo, Man-Li; Albayram, Onder; Huang, Pengyu; Rotenberg, Alexander; Ryo, Akihide; Goldstein, Lee E; Pascual-Leone, Alvaro; McKee, Ann C.; Meehan, William; Zhou, Xiao Zhen; Lu, Kun Ping

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI), characterized by acute neurological dysfunction, is one of the best known environmental risk factors for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) and Alzheimer's disease (AD), whose defining pathologic features include tauopathy made of phosphorylated tau (p-tau). However, tauopathy has not been detected in early stages after TBI and how TBI leads to tauopathy is unknown. Here we find robust cis p-tau pathology after sport- and military-related TBI in humans and mice. Acutely after TBI in mice and stress in vitro, neurons prominently produce cis p-tau, which disrupts axonal microtubule network and mitochondrial transport, spreads to other neurons, and leads to apoptosis. This process, termed “cistauosis”, appears long before other tauopathy. Treating TBI mice with cis antibody blocks cistauosis, prevents tauopathy development and spread, and restores many TBI-related structural and functional sequelae. Thus, cis p-tau is a major early driver after TBI and leads to tauopathy in CTE and AD, and cis antibody may be further developed to detect and treat TBI, and prevent progressive neurodegeneration after injury. PMID:26176913

  3. [A giant myxoid leiomyoma mimicking an inguinal hernia].

    PubMed

    Huszár, Orsolya; Zaránd, Attila; Szántó, Gyöngyi; Juhász, Viktória; Székely, Eszter; Novák, András; Molnár, Béla Ákos; Harsányi, László

    2016-03-01

    Leiomyoma is a rare, smooth muscle tumour that can occur everywhere in the human body. The authors present the history of a 60-year-old female, who had a giant, Mullerian type myxoid leiomyoma in the inguinal region mimicking acute abdominal symptoms. After examination the authors removed the soft tissue mass in the right femoral region reaching down in supine position to the middle third of the leg measuring 335 × 495 × 437 mm in greatest diameters in weight 33 kg. Reconstruction of the tissue defect was performed using oncoplastic guidelines. During the follow-up time no tumour recurrence was detected and the quality of life of the patient improved significantly. PMID:26920330

  4. Locust retinoid X receptors: 9-Cis-retinoic acid in embryos from a primitive insect

    PubMed Central

    Nowickyj, Shaun M.; Chithalen, James V.; Cameron, Don; Tyshenko, Michael G.; Petkovich, Martin; Wyatt, Gerard R.; Jones, Glenville; Walker, Virginia K.

    2008-01-01

    The retinoid X receptor (RXR) is activated by its often elusive cognate ligand, 9-cis-retinoic acid (9-cis-RA). In flies and moths, molting is mediated by a heterodimer ecdysone receptor consisting of the ecdysone monomer (EcR) and an RXR homolog, ultraspiracle (USP); the latter is believed to have diverged from its RXR origin. In the more primitive insect, Locusta migratoria (Lm), RXR is more similar to human RXRs than to USPs. LmRXR was detected in early embryos when EcR transcripts were absent, suggesting another role apart from ecdysone signaling. Recombinant LmRXRs bound 9-cis-RA and all-trans-RA with high affinity (IC50 = 61.2–107.7 nM; Kd = 3 nM), similar to human RXR. To determine whether specific binding had functional significance, the presence of endogenous retinoids was assessed. Embryos were extracted by using modified Bligh and Dyer and solid-phase protocols to avoid the oily precipitate that makes this material unsuitable for assay. These extracts contained retinoids (5.4 nM) as assessed by RA-inducible Cyp26A1-promoter luciferase reporter cell lines. Furthermore, the use of HPLC and MS confirmed the presence of retinoids and identified in any embryo, 9-cis-RA, in addition to all-trans-RA. We estimate that whole embryos contain 3 nM RA, including 9-cis-RA at a concentration of 1.6 nM. These findings strongly argue for a functional role for retinoids in primitive insects and favor a model where signaling through the binding of 9-cis-RA to its RXR is established relatively early in evolution and embryonic development. PMID:18606996

  5. Nontuberculous mycobacterial pulmonary disease mimicking lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Su Jin; Kim, Tae Jung; Lee, Jae-Ho; Park, Jeong-Soo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract To describe the features and clinical implications of computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), and percutaneous needle aspiration biopsy (PCNB) in pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial (NTM) disease manifesting as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. Among a cohort of 388 patients with NTM pulmonary disease, 14 patients with clinically and radiologically suspected lung cancer were included in our study. Two chest radiologists evaluated CT features, including lesion type (nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation), morphologic features (margin, degree of enhancement, calcification), and presence of accompanying findings suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease (bronchiectasis with clustered centrilobular nodules or upper-lobe cavitary lesions) by consensus. Diagnostic procedures for microbiologic diagnosis of NTM disease and clinical outcome were reviewed. Incidence of NTM pulmonary disease presenting as solitary nodule/mass (n = 8) or mass-like consolidation (n = 6) was 3.6% (14 of 388). Most lesions were detected incidentally during routine health check-up or evaluation of other disease (11 of 14, 79%). Lesions typically showed poor contrast-enhancement (9 of 12) and internal calcification (6 of 14). No lesions had CT features suggestive of NTM pulmonary disease. All 4 lesions for which PET/CT imaging was performed showed strong fluorodeoxyglucose uptake simulating malignant lesions (mean, 4.9; range, 3.6–7.8). PCNB revealed mycobacterial histology in 6 of 11 specimens and positive culture results were obtained for 7 of 7 specimens. NTM pulmonary disease may present as a solitary nodule, mass, or mass-like consolidation mimicking malignancy. CT features and PCNB are important to diagnose NTM disease mimicking lung cancer to avoid unnecessary surgery. PMID:27367996

  6. Primary cardiac lymphoma mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ga Yeon; Kim, Won Seog; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Choi, Jin-Oh; Jeon, Eun-Seok

    2013-05-01

    Primary cardiac lymphoma is a rare malignancy which has been described as thickened myocardium due to the infiltration of atypical lymphocytes and accompanying intracardiac masses. Here, we report a case of a primary cardiac lymphoma without demonstrable intracardiac masses, mimicking infiltrative cardiomyopathy. A 40-year-old male presented with exertional dyspnoea and was diagnosed as having restrictive cardiomyopathy with severely decreased LV systolic function. Endomyocardial biopsy was performed and the diagnosis of primary cardiac lymphoma was confirmed. After appropriate chemotherapy, he recovered his systolic function fully. PMID:23248217

  7. Neglected foreign body aspiration mimicking bronchial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Afghani, Reza; Khandashpour Ghomi, Mahmoud; Khandoozi, Seyed Reza; Yari, Behrouz

    2016-07-01

    Foreign body aspiration can occur in any age group, but it is more commonly seen in children. In adults, there is usually a predisposing condition that poses a risk of aspiration. If aspiration occurs, prompt diagnosis and extraction of the foreign body is needed to prevent early and late complications. We report a rare case of neglected foreign body aspiration in a 45-year-old schizophrenic opium addicted patient, which resulted in an occlusive lesion in the bronchus, mimicking bronchial carcinoma. PMID:27273232

  8. Surface hopping dynamics of direct trans → cis photoswitching of an azobenzene derivative in constrained adsorbate geometries.

    PubMed

    Floß, Gereon; Granucci, Giovanni; Saalfrank, Peter

    2012-12-21

    With ongoing miniaturization of electronic devices, the need for individually addressable, switchable molecules arises. An example are azobenzenes on surfaces which have been shown to be switchable between trans and cis forms. Here, we examine the "direct" (rather than substrate-mediated) channel of the trans → cis photoisomerization after ππ∗ excitation of tetra-tert-butyl-azobenzene physisorbed on surfaces mimicking Au(111) and Bi(111), respectively. In spirit of the direct channel, the electronic structure of the surface is neglected, the latter merely acting as a rigid platform which weakly interacts with the molecule via Van-der-Waals forces. Starting from thermal ensembles which represent the trans-form, sudden excitations promote the molecules to ππ∗-excited states which are non-adiabatically coupled among themselves and to a nπ∗-excited and the ground state, respectively. After excitation, relaxation to the ground state by internal conversion takes place, possibly accompanied by isomerization. The process is described here by "on the fly" semiclassical surface hopping dynamics in conjunction with a semiempirical Hamiltonian (AM1) and configuration-interaction type methods. It is found that steric constraints imposed by the substrate lead to reduced but non-vanishing, trans → cis reaction yields and longer internal conversion times than for the isolated molecule. Implications for recent experiments for azobenzenes on surfaces are discussed. PMID:23267492

  9. Phonons of the cis-polyacetylene chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faulques, Eric; Buisson, Jean-Pierre; Lefrant, Serge

    1995-12-01

    An investigation of the in-plane phonons of the cis-polyacetylene chain (CH)x and isotopic analogs (CD)x and (13CH)x is presented on the basis of a Fourier's dynamical D-matrix formalism. The conjugation is found to be similar to that of the trans-polyacetylene chain. Phonon dispersions have been calculated and follow the shapes predicted by Božović. Finally, the most interesting result is that phonon density of states exhibits van Hove singularities whose energies are close to those determined experimentally with incoherent inelastic neutron scattering.

  10. Environmental testing of CIS based modules

    SciTech Connect

    Willett, D.

    1995-11-01

    This report describes environmental testing of Siemen`s CIS modules. Charts and diagrams are presented on data concerning: temporary power loss of laminated mini-modules; the 50 thermal cycle test; the 10 humidity freeze cycle test; results after 1000 hours of exposure to damp heat; and interconnect test structures in damp heat testing. It is concluded that moisture ingress causes permanent increases in the series resistance of modules, and that improved packaging is needed for better high humidity reliability. Also, dry dark heat caused temporary power losses which were recovered in sunlight.

  11. US/CIS integrated NTRE concept

    SciTech Connect

    Bulman, M.J.; Culver, D.W.; McIlwain, M.C. ); D'yakov, E.K. ); Smetannikov, V.P. ); Rochow, R. )

    1993-01-10

    The team of Aerojet, Energopool and Babcock Wilcox has prepared a near-term Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine (NTRE) concept that takes advantage of mature fuel technology developed in the former Soviet Union. This proven, advanced fuel appreciably shortens the development schedule of this engine for Moon and Mars exploration. Our near term engine has a number of features that provide safety, mission performance, cost and risk benefits, including: (1) High temperature, long life CIS fuel, (2) high pressure, recuperated topping cycle, (3) assured restart, (4) long life, cooled nozzle with thin inner wall, (5) long life turbopumps, (6) heat radiation and electrical power generation, and (7) component integration energy.

  12. cis-Cinnamic acid selective suppressors distinct from auxin inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Katsuhiro; Nishikawa, Keisuke; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Fujii, Yoshiharu; Shindo, Mitsuru

    2014-01-01

    The activity of cis-cinnamic acid (cis-CA), one of the allelochemicals, in plants is very similar to that of indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), a natural auxin, and thus cis-CA has long been believed to be an analog of auxin. We have reported some structure-activity relationships studies by synthesizing over 250 cis-CA derivatives and estimating their inhibitory activities on root growth inhibition in lettuce. In this study, the compounds that showed low- or no-activity on root growth inhibition were recruited as candidates suppressors against cis-CA and/or auxin and tested for their activity. In the presence of cis-CA, lettuce root growth was inhibited; however, the addition of some cis-CA derivatives restored control-level root growth. Four compounds, (Z)-3-(4-isopropylphenyl)acrylic acid, (Z)-3-(3-butoxyphenyl)acrylic acid, (Z)-3-[3-(pentyloxy)phenyl]acrylic acid, and (Z)-3-(naphthalen-1-yl)acrylic acid were selected as candidates for a cis-CA selective suppressor they allowed the recovery of root growth from inhibition by cis-CA treatment without any effects on the IAA-induced effect or elongating activity by themselves. Three candidates significantly ameliorated the root shortening by the potent inhibitor derived from cis-CA. In brief, we have found some cis-CA selective suppressors which have never been reported from inactive cis-CA derivatives for root growth inhibition. cis-CA selective suppressors will play an important role in elucidating the mechanism of plant growth regulation. PMID:24881667

  13. Inflammatory Myofibroblastic Tumor Mimicking Apical Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Adachi, Makoto; Kiho, Kazuki; Sekine, Genta; Ohta, Takahisa; Matsubara, Makoto; Yoshida, Takakazu; Katsumata, Akitoshi; Tanuma, Jun-ichi; Sumitomo, Shinichiro

    2015-12-01

    Inflammatory myofibroblastic tumors (IMTs) are rare. IMTs of the head and neck occur in all age groups, from neonates to old age, with the highest incidence occurring in childhood and early adulthood. An IMT has been defined as a histologically distinctive lesion of uncertain behavior. This article describes an unusual case of IMT mimicking apical periodontitis in the mandible of a 42-year-old man. At first presentation, the patient showed spontaneous pain and percussion pain at teeth #28 to 30, which continued after initial endodontic treatment. Panoramic radiography revealed a radiolucent lesion at the site. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging showed osteolytic lesions, suggesting an aggressive neoplasm requiring incisional biopsy. Histopathological examination indicated an IMT. The lesion was removed en bloc under general anesthesia, and the patient manifested no clinical evidence of recurrence for 24 months. Lesions of nonendodontic origin should be included in the differential diagnosis of apical periodontitis. Every available diagnostic tool should be used to confirm the diagnosis. Cone-beam computed tomographic imaging is very helpful for differential diagnosis in IMTs mimicking apical periodontitis. PMID:26602450

  14. Imaging findings of mimickers of hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eunchae; Jang, Hyun-Jung

    2015-01-01

    Radiological imaging plays a crucial role in the diagnosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) as the noninvasive diagnosis of HCC in high-risk patients by typical imaging findings alone is widely adopted in major practice guidelines for HCC. While imaging techniques have markedly improved in detecting small liver lesions, they often detect incidental benign liver lesions and non-hepatocellular malignancy that can be misdiagnosed as HCC. The most common mimicker of HCC in cirrhotic liver is nontumorous arterioportal shunts that are seen as focal hypervascular liver lesions on dynamic contrast-enhanced cross-sectional imaging. Rapidly enhancing hemangiomas can be easily misdiagnosed as HCC especially on MR imaging with liver-specific contrast agent. Focal inflammatory liver lesions mimic HCC by demonstrating arterial-phase hypervascularity and subsequent washout on dynamic contrast-enhanced imaging. It is important to recognize the suggestive imaging findings for intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma (CC) as the management of CC is largely different from that of HCC. There are other benign mimickers of HCC such as angiomyolipomas and focal nodular hyperplasia-like nodules. Recognition of their typical imaging findings can reduce false-positive HCC diagnosis. PMID:26770920

  15. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; Waele, Kathleen De; Schepper, Jean De; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Baere, Elfride De

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements. PMID:26631348

  16. The role of cis regulatory evolution in maize domestication.

    PubMed

    Lemmon, Zachary H; Bukowski, Robert; Sun, Qi; Doebley, John F

    2014-11-01

    Gene expression differences between divergent lineages caused by modification of cis regulatory elements are thought to be important in evolution. We assayed genome-wide cis and trans regulatory differences between maize and its wild progenitor, teosinte, using deep RNA sequencing in F1 hybrid and parent inbred lines for three tissue types (ear, leaf and stem). Pervasive regulatory variation was observed with approximately 70% of ∼17,000 genes showing evidence of regulatory divergence between maize and teosinte. However, many fewer genes (1,079 genes) show consistent cis differences with all sampled maize and teosinte lines. For ∼70% of these 1,079 genes, the cis differences are specific to a single tissue. The number of genes with cis regulatory differences is greatest for ear tissue, which underwent a drastic transformation in form during domestication. As expected from the domestication bottleneck, maize possesses less cis regulatory variation than teosinte with this deficit greatest for genes showing maize-teosinte cis regulatory divergence, suggesting selection on cis regulatory differences during domestication. Consistent with selection on cis regulatory elements, genes with cis effects correlated strongly with genes under positive selection during maize domestication and improvement, while genes with trans regulatory effects did not. We observed a directional bias such that genes with cis differences showed higher expression of the maize allele more often than the teosinte allele, suggesting domestication favored up-regulation of gene expression. Finally, this work documents the cis and trans regulatory changes between maize and teosinte in over 17,000 genes for three tissues. PMID:25375861

  17. Microwave spectrum of cis-glyoxal.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Durig, J. R.; Tong, C. C.; Li, Y. S.

    1972-01-01

    The rotational spectrum of glyoxal has been investigated in the region from 18.0 to 40.0 GHz. Only B-type transitions were observed. Both Q-branch and R-branch assignments have been made for the ground state, and the Q-branch assignment has been made for the first excited state of the internal rotational mode. From relative intensity measurements of vibrational excited states, the torsional vibration is found to have a frequency of 114 plus or minus 8 per cm. From a consideration of the rotational constants, it is concluded that the isomer giving rise to the microwave spectrum is the planar cis form and not the gauche isomer. The dipole moment was determined to be 4.8 plus or minus 0.2 D.

  18. Prepare dispersed CIS nano-scale particles and spray coating CIS absorber layers using nano-scale precursors

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In this study, the Mo-electrode thin films were deposited by a two-stepped process, and the high-purity copper indium selenide-based powder (CuInSe2, CIS) was fabricated by hydrothermal process by Nanowin Technology Co. Ltd. From the X-ray pattern of the CIS precursor, the mainly crystalline phase was CIS, and the almost undetectable CuSe phase was observed. Because the CIS powder was aggregated into micro-scale particles and the average particle sizes were approximately 3 to 8 μm, the CIS power was ground into nano-scale particles, then the 6 wt.% CIS particles were dispersed into isopropyl alcohol to get the solution for spray coating method. Then, 0.1 ml CIS solution was sprayed on the 20 mm × 10 mm Mo/glass substrates, and the heat treatment for the nano-scale CIS solution under various parameters was carried out in a selenization furnace. The annealing temperature was set at 550°C, and the annealing time was changed from 5 to 30 min, without extra Se content was added in the furnace. The influences of annealing time on the densification, crystallization, resistivity (ρ), hall mobility (μ), and carrier concentration of the CIS absorber layers were well investigated in this study. PMID:24380376

  19. High-altitude cerebral oedema mimicking stroke.

    PubMed

    Yanamandra, Uday; Gupta, Amul; Patyal, Sagarika; Varma, Prem Prakash

    2014-01-01

    High-altitude cerebral oedema (HACO) is the most fatal high-altitude illness seen by rural physicians practising in high-altitude areas. HACO presents clinically with cerebellar ataxia, features of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) and coma. Early identification is important as delay in diagnosis can be fatal. We present two cases of HACO presenting with focal deficits mimicking stroke. The first patient presented with left-sided hemiplegia associated with the rapid deterioration in the sensorium. Neuroimaging revealed features suggestive of vasogenic oedema. The second patient presented with monoplegia of the lower limb. Neuroimaging revealed perfusion deficit in anterior cerebral artery territory. Both patients were managed with dexamethasone and they improved dramatically. Clinical picture and neuroimaging closely resembled acute ischaemic stroke in both cases. Thrombolysis in these patients would have been disastrous. Recent travel to high altitude, young age, absence of atherosclerotic risk factors and features of raised ICP concomitantly directed the diagnosis to HACO. PMID:24671373

  20. Lumbar Epidural Varix Mimicking Perineural Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Pusat, Serhat; Kural, Cahit; Aslanoglu, Atilla; Kurt, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    Lumbar epidural varices are rare and usually mimick lumbar disc herniations. Back pain and radiculopathy are the main symptoms of lumbar epidural varices. Perineural cysts are radiologically different lesions and should not be confused with epidural varix. A 36-year-old male patient presented to us with right leg pain. The magnetic resonance imaging revealed a cystic lesion at S1 level that was compressing the right root, and was interpreted as a perineural cyst. The patient underwent surgery via right L5 and S1 hemilaminectomy, and the lesion was coagulated and removed. The histopathological diagnosis was epidural varix. The patient was clinically improved and the follow-up magnetic resonance imaging showed the absence of the lesion. Lumbar epidural varix should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of the cystic lesions which compress the spinal roots. PMID:23741553

  1. Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst mimicking periapical cyst

    PubMed Central

    Rajalakshmi, R; Sreeja, C; Vijayalakshmi, D; Leelarani, V

    2013-01-01

    Orthokeratinised odontogenic cyst (OOC) denotes the odontogenic cyst that microscopically has an orthokeratinised epithelial lining. OOC is characterised by a less-aggressive behaviour and a low rate of recurrence. This report describes a case of OOC involving posterior part of the mandible that mimicked periapical cyst in a 14-year-old boy. The initial clinical diagnosis was given as periapical cyst based on the clinical and radiographical features. Enucleation of the cyst was performed and the specimen was sent for histopathological examination. A definite diagnosis of OOC was made by histopathological examination of the biopsy specimen. This case emphases on including OOC in the differential diagnosis of radiolucencies occurring in the periapical region of non-vital tooth. PMID:24099763

  2. Pulmonary Vein Stenosis Mimicking Nonspecific Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Linga, Karthika R.; Khoor, Andras; Phelan, Jonathan A.; Mira-Avendano, Isabel

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary vein stenosis (PVS) is a known complication after catheter ablation of arrhythmias. Surprisingly, little information is available on its manifestations in the lung. We describe the case of a 39-year-old woman who presented from an outside hospital with worsening shortness of breath after catheter ablation of pulmonary veins for atrial fibrillation. After an initial diagnosis of pneumonia and its nonimprovement with antibiotics, a surgical lung biopsy was done and interpreted as nonspecific interstitial pneumonia (NSIP) with vascular changes consistent with pulmonary arterial hypertension. Later, she was admitted to our institution where a transthoracic echocardiogram (TTE) and subsequent computed tomography (CT) angiogram of the heart showed severe stenosis of all four pulmonary veins. The previous lung biopsy was rereviewed and reinterpreted as severe parenchymal congestion mimicking NSIP. Our case demonstrates that PVS is an underrecognized complication of catheter ablation, and increased awareness among both clinicians and pathologists is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. PMID:26779359

  3. In vitro antitumor effects of two novel oligostilbenes, cis- and trans-suffruticosol D, isolated from Paeonia suffruticosa seeds.

    PubMed

    Almosnid, Nadin Marwan; Gao, Ying; He, Chunnian; Park, Hyo Sim; Altman, Elliot

    2016-02-01

    Naturally derived stilbenes have been shown to elicit cytotoxic, anti-steroidal, anti-mutagenic, anti-oxidative, anti-inflammatory, and antitumor bioactivities. Previous phytochemical studies revealed that the seeds of Paeonia suffruticosa are rich in natural stilbenes. In this study the antitumor effects and mechanism of action of the oligostilbene isomers, cis- and trans-suffruticosol D, isolated from the seeds of P. suffruticosa were examined. cis- and trans-suffruticosol D exhibited remarkable cytotoxicity against the human cancer cell lines A549 (lung), BT20 (breast), MCF-7 (breast), and U2OS (osteosarcoma), but showed significantly less toxicity to the normal human cell lines HMEC (breast) and HPL1A (lung). We also demonstrated that cis- and trans-suffruticosol D exerted their antitumor effects by provoking oxidative stress, stimulating apoptosis, decreasing the mitochondrial membrane potential, inhibiting cell motility, and blocking the NF-κB pathway in human lung cancer cells. In addition, we evaluated their respective bioefficacy and found that trans-suffruticosol D is more potent than cis-suffruticosol D. Collectively, our results suggest that cis- and trans-suffruticosol D could be promising chemotherapeutic agents against cancer. PMID:26647827

  4. The Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cell Cistrome: GATA Factor-Dependent cis-Regulatory Mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Hewitt, K J; Johnson, K D; Gao, X; Keles, S; Bresnick, E H

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptional regulators mediate the genesis and function of the hematopoietic system by binding complex ensembles of cis-regulatory elements to establish genetic networks. While thousands to millions of any given cis-element resides in a genome, how transcriptional regulators select these sites and how site attributes dictate functional output is not well understood. An instructive system to address this problem involves the GATA family of transcription factors that control vital developmental and physiological processes and are linked to multiple human pathologies. Although GATA factors bind DNA motifs harboring the sequence GATA, only a very small subset of these abundant motifs are occupied in genomes. Mechanistic studies revealed a unique configuration of a GATA factor-regulated cis-element consisting of an E-box and a downstream GATA motif separated by a short DNA spacer. GATA-1- or GATA-2-containing multiprotein complexes at these composite elements control transcription of genes critical for hematopoietic stem cell emergence in the mammalian embryo, hematopoietic progenitor cell regulation, and erythroid cell maturation. Other constituents of the complex include the basic helix-loop-loop transcription factor Scl/TAL1, its heterodimeric partner E2A, and the Lim domain proteins LMO2 and LDB1. This chapter reviews the structure/function of E-box-GATA composite cis-elements, which collectively constitute an important sector of the hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell cistrome. PMID:27137654

  5. U.S./CIS eye joint nuclear rocket venture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, John S.; Mcilwain, Melvin C.; Smetanikov, Vladimir; D'Yakov, Evgenij K.; Pavshuk, Vladimir A.

    1993-01-01

    An account is given of the significance for U.S. spacecraft development of a nuclear thermal rocket (NTR) reactor concept that has been developed in the (formerly Soviet) Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). The CIS NTR reactor employs a hydrogen-cooled zirconium hydride moderator and ternary carbide fuels; the comparatively cool operating temperatures associated with this design promise overall robustness.

  6. Automated assembly of oligosaccharides containing multiple cis-glycosidic linkages.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Heung Sik; Hurevich, Mattan; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-01-01

    Automated glycan assembly (AGA) has advanced from a concept to a commercial technology that rapidly provides access to diverse oligosaccharide chains as long as 30-mers. To date, AGA was mainly employed to incorporate trans-glycosidic linkages, where C2 participating protecting groups ensure stereoselective couplings. Stereocontrol during the installation of cis-glycosidic linkages cannot rely on C2-participation and anomeric mixtures are typically formed. Here, we demonstrate that oligosaccharides containing multiple cis-glycosidic linkages can be prepared efficiently by AGA using monosaccharide building blocks equipped with remote participating protecting groups. The concept is illustrated by the automated syntheses of biologically relevant oligosaccharides bearing various cis-galactosidic and cis-glucosidic linkages. This work provides further proof that AGA facilitates the synthesis of complex oligosaccharides with multiple cis-linkages and other biologically important oligosaccharides. PMID:27580973

  7. PBPK modeling of the cis- and trans-permethrin isomers and their major urinary metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Willemin, Marie-Emilie; Desmots, Sophie; Le Grand, Rozenn; Lestremau, François; Zeman, Florence A; Leclerc, Eric; Moesch, Christian; Brochot, Céline

    2016-03-01

    Permethrin, a pyrethroid insecticide, is suspected to induce neuronal and hormonal disturbances in humans. The widespread exposure of the populations has been confirmed by the detection of the urinary metabolites of permethrin in biomonitoring studies. Permethrin is a chiral molecule presenting two forms, the cis and the trans isomers. Because in vitro studies indicated a metabolic interaction between the trans and cis isomers of permethrin, we adapted and calibrated a PBPK model for trans- and cis-permethrin separately in rats. The model also describes the toxicokinetics of three urinary metabolites, cis- and trans-3-(2,2 dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethyl-(1-cyclopropane) carboxylic acid (cis- and trans-DCCA), 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3-PBA) and 4'OH-phenoxybenzoic acid (4'-OH-PBA). In vivo experiments performed in Sprague-Dawley rats were used to calibrate the PBPK model in a Bayesian framework. The model captured well the toxicokinetics of permethrin isomers and their metabolites including the rapid absorption, the accumulation in fat, the extensive metabolism of the parent compounds, and the rapid elimination of metabolites in urine. Average hepatic clearances in rats were estimated to be 2.4 and 5.7 L/h/kg for cis- and trans-permethrin, respectively. High concentrations of the metabolite 4'-OH-PBA were measured in urine compared to cis- and trans-DCCA and 3-PBA. The confidence in the extended PBPK model was then confirmed by good predictions of published experimental data obtained using the isomers mixture. The extended PBPK model could be extrapolated to humans to predict the internal dose of exposure to permethrin from biomonitoring data in urine. PMID:26802525

  8. In vitro micellarization and intestinal cell uptake of cis isomers of lycopene exceed those of all-trans lycopene.

    PubMed

    Failla, Mark L; Chitchumroonchokchai, Chureeporn; Ishida, Betty K

    2008-03-01

    The ratio of cis and all-trans lycopene (LYC) in human and animal tissues exceeds that in foods. The basis for this difference remains unknown, although differences in their stability, transport, and metabolism have been suggested. Here, we systematically compared the digestive stability, efficiency of micellarization, and uptake and intracellular stability of cis and all-trans isomers of LYC and carotenes using the coupled in vitro digestion and Caco-2 human intestinal cell model. Aril and oil from the carotenoid-rich gac fruit (Momordica cochinchinensis Spreng) were cooked with rice to provide a natural source of LYC and carotenes. The ratio of cis:trans isomers of LYC and beta-carotene was similar before and after simulated gastric and small intestinal digestion with recovery of total carotenoids in the digesta exceeding 70%. Micellarization of cis isomers of LYC during digestion of meals with both gac aril and oil was significantly greater than that of the all-trans isomer but less than for the carotenes. Uptake of cis isomers of LYC by Caco-2 cells was similar to that of carotenes and significantly greater than all-trans LYC. Micellarized carotenoids were relatively stable in micelles incubated in the cell culture environment and after accumulation in Caco-2 cells. These data suggest that the greater bioaccessibility of cis compared with all-trans isomers of LYC contributes to the enrichment of the cis isomers in tissues and that gac fruit is an excellent source of bioaccessible LYC and provitamin A carotenoids. PMID:18287353

  9. Enzyme-like effect of metmyoglobin on the thermal cis-trans isomerization of stilbazolium betaine.

    PubMed

    Pastukhov, A V; Vogel, V R; Kotelnikov, A I

    2000-06-01

    A photochromic compound, stilbazolium betaine M, when associated with metmyoglobin undergoes an accelerated thermal cis-trans isomerization. A study of the pH and ionic strength dependence of the isomerization reaction rate of the photochrome associated with metmyoglobin was performed. A comparative investigation of the reaction carried out in the presence of three proteins, metmyoglobin, apomyoglobin, and human albumin, indicates a specific influence of the heme pocket environment on the reaction. Possible mechanisms of the reaction acceleration are considered. PMID:10907741

  10. Oxylipin Signaling: A Distinct Role for the Jasmonic Acid Precursor cis-(+)-12-Oxo-Phytodienoic Acid (cis-OPDA)

    PubMed Central

    Dave, Anuja; Graham, Ian A.

    2012-01-01

    Oxylipins are lipid-derived compounds, many of which act as signals in the plant response to biotic and abiotic stress. They include the phytohormone jasmonic acid (JA) and related jasmonate metabolites cis-(+)-12-oxo-phytodienoic acid (cis-OPDA), methyl jasmonate, and jasmonoyl-L-isoleucine (JA-Ile). Besides the defense response, jasmonates are involved in plant growth and development and regulate a range of processes including glandular trichome development, reproduction, root growth, and senescence. cis-OPDA is known to possess a signaling role distinct from JA-Ile. The non-enzymatically derived phytoprostanes are structurally similar to cis-OPDA and induce a common set of genes that are not responsive to JA in Arabidopsis thaliana. A novel role for cis-OPDA in seed germination regulation has recently been uncovered based on evidence from double mutants and feeding experiments showing that cis-OPDA interacts with abscisic acid (ABA), inhibits seed germination, and increases ABA INSENSITIVE5 (ABI5) protein abundance. Large amounts of cis-OPDA are esterified to galactolipids in A. thaliana and the resulting compounds, known as Arabidopsides, are thought to act as a rapidly available source of cis-OPDA. PMID:22645585

  11. 9-Cis Retinoic Acid Promotes Lymphangiogenesis and Enhances Lymphatic Vessel Regeneration: Therapeutic Implications of 9-Cis Retinoic Acid for Secondary Lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Inho; Lee, Sunju; Chung, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yong Suk; Kim, Kyu Eui; Choi, Dongwon; Park, Eun Kyung; Yang, Dongyun; Ecoiffier, Tatiana; Monahan, John; Chen, Wen; Aguilar, Berenice; Lee, Ha Neul; Yoo, Jaehyuk; Koh, Chester J.; Chen, Lu; Wong, Alex K.; Hong, Young-Kwon

    2012-01-01

    Background The lymphatic system plays a key role in tissue fluid homeostasis and lymphatic dysfunction due to genetic defects or lymphatic vessel obstruction can cause lymphedema, disfiguring tissue swellings often associated with fibrosis and recurrent infections without available cures to date. In this study, retinoic acids (RAs) were determined to be a potent therapeutic agent that is immediately applicable to reduce secondary lymphedema. Methods and Results We report that RAs promote proliferation, migration and tube formation of cultured lymphatic endothelial cells (LECs) by activating FGF-receptor signaling. Moreover, RAs control the expression of cell-cycle checkpoint regulators such as p27Kip1, p57Kip2 and the aurora kinases through both an Akt-mediated non-genomic action and a transcription-dependent genomic action that is mediated by Prox1, a master regulator of lymphatic development. Moreover, 9-cisRA was found to activate in vivo lymphangiogenesis in animals based on mouse trachea, matrigel plug and cornea pocket assays. Finally, we demonstrate that 9-cisRA can provide a strong therapeutic efficacy in ameliorating the experimental mouse tail lymphedema by enhancing lymphatic vessel regeneration. Conclusions These in vitro and animal studies demonstrate that 9-cisRA potently activates lymphangiogenesis and promotes lymphatic regeneration in an experimental lymphedema model, presenting it as a promising novel therapeutic agent to treat human lymphedema patients. PMID:22275501

  12. Trans-10,cis-12 CLA increases adipocyte lipolysis and alters lipid droplet-associated proteins: role of mTOR and ERK signaling.

    PubMed

    Chung, Soonkyu; Brown, Jonathan Mark; Sandberg, Maria Boysen; McIntosh, Michael

    2005-05-01

    Lipid droplet-associated proteins play an important role in adipocyte triglyceride (TG) metabolism. Here, we show that trans-10,cis-12 conjugated linoleic acid (CLA), but not cis-9,trans-11 CLA, increased lipolysis and altered human adipocyte lipid droplet morphology. Before this change in morphology, there was a rapid trans-10,cis-12 CLA-induced increase in the accumulation of perilipin A in the cytosol, followed by the disappearance of perilipin A protein. In contrast, protein levels of adipose differentiation-related protein (ADRP) were increased in cultures treated with trans-10,cis-12 CLA. Immunostaining revealed that ADRP localized to the surface of small lipid droplets, displacing perilipin. Intriguingly, trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased ADRP protein expression to a much greater extent than ADRP mRNA without affecting stability, suggesting translational control of ADRP. To this end, we found that trans-10,cis-12 CLA increased activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin/p70 S6 ribosomal protein kinase/S6 ribosomal protein (mTOR/p70S6K/S6) pathway. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the trans-10,cis-12 CLA-mediated reduction of human adipocyte TG content is associated with the differential localization and expression of lipid droplet-associated proteins. This process involves both the translational control of ADRP through the activation of mTOR/p70S6K/S6 signaling and transcriptional control of perilipin A. PMID:15716587

  13. Germinating the 2050 Cis-Lunar Econosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Tinker, Michael L.; Nall, Mark E.; Wright, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In early 2013, the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Director and MSFC's Office of Strategic Analysis and Communications (OSAC) chartered a diverse team for a six-week "sprint" to speculate (in a disciplined manner) and paint (with broad brush strokes) a picture of how earth, space, and public/private entities might be operating and relating to each other...in the year 2100. Two 12-person groups of civil servants, one with members having 15 years or less of NASA experience and the other with more senior members, worked independently and then compared and integrated their conclusions. In 2014, the "Space 2100" team, with some new team members and different group boundaries, ran a longer sprint to a) develop more detailed estimates of the operations and economics of space activities in the vicinity of the Earth and Moon in the 2050 time frame, b) identify evolutionary steps and viable paths needed to make that a reality, and c) recommend actions to enable and invigorate those steps. This paper explores Space 2100's first two sprints and their projections of NASA's role in what will likely be a highly networked international space industry and cis-lunar infrastructure.

  14. Germinating the 2050 Cis-Lunar Econosphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, David W.; Curreri, Peter A.; Ferguson, Cynthia K.; Nall, Mark E.; Tinker, Michael L.; Wright, Gregory M.

    2015-01-01

    In early 2013, Marshall Space Flight Center's upper management chartered a diverse team for a six-week 'sprint' to speculate (in a disciplined manner) and paint (with broad brush strokes) a picture of how earth, space, and public/private entities might be operating and relating to each other... in the year 2100. Two 12-person groups of civil servants, one with members having 15 years or less of NASA experience and the other with more senior members, worked independently and then compared and integrated their conclusions. In 2014, the 'Space 2100' team, with some new team members and different group boundaries, ran a longer sprint to a) develop more detailed estimates of the operations and economics of space activities in the vicinity of the Earth and Moon in the 2050 time frame, b) identify evolutionary paths, barriers, and opportunities, and c) suggest actions and philosophies to enable and invigorate progress towards the vision. This paper explores Space 2100's first two sprints and their projections of NASA's role in what will likely be a highly networked, international space industry and cis-lunar infrastructure.

  15. Auditory-motor entrainment in vocal mimicking species

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    We have recently found robust evidence of motor entrainment to auditory stimuli in multiple species of non-human animal, all of which were capable of vocal mimicry. In contrast, the ability remained markedly absent in many closely related species incapable of vocal mimicry. This suggests that vocal mimicry may be a necessary precondition for entrainment. However, within the vocal mimicking species, entrainment appeared non-randomly, suggesting that other components besides vocal mimicry play a role in the capacity and tendency to entrain. Here we discuss potential additional factors involved in entrainment. New survey data show that both male and female parrots are able to entrain, and that the entrainment capacity appears throughout the lifespan. We suggest routes for future study of entrainment, including both developmental studies in species known to entrain and further work to detect entrainment in species not well represented in our dataset. These studies may shed light on additional factors necessary for entrainment in addition to vocal mimicry. PMID:20714417

  16. Microfabricated adhesive mimicking gecko foot-hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geim, A. K.; Dubonos, S. V.; Grigorieva, I. V.; Novoselov, K. S.; Zhukov, A. A.; Shapoval, S. Yu.

    2003-07-01

    The amazing climbing ability of geckos has attracted the interest of philosophers and scientists alike for centuries. However, only in the past few years has progress been made in understanding the mechanism behind this ability, which relies on submicrometre keratin hairs covering the soles of geckos. Each hair produces a miniscule force ~10-7 N (due to van der Waals and/or capillary interactions) but millions of hairs acting together create a formidable adhesion of ~10 N cm-2: sufficient to keep geckos firmly on their feet, even when upside down on a glass ceiling. It is very tempting to create a new type of adhesive by mimicking the gecko mechanism. Here we report on a prototype of such 'gecko tape' made by microfabrication of dense arrays of flexible plastic pillars, the geometry of which is optimized to ensure their collective adhesion. Our approach shows a way to manufacture self-cleaning, re-attachable dry adhesives, although problems related to their durability and mass production are yet to be resolved.

  17. Gallbladder melanoma mimicking acute acalculous cholecystitis.

    PubMed

    De Simone, P; Mainente, P; Bedin, N

    2000-06-01

    Gallbladder (GB) melanoma is a rare entity with a dismal prognosis. Its primary or secondary status is difficult to establish in the absence of an overt cutaneous localization. We report herein the case of a misdiagnosed GB melanoma mimicking acute acalculous cholecystitis that was treated by means of laparoscopic cholecystectomy (LC). A 54-year-old man was referred to our institution for acute cholecystitis. Apart from the ablation of some nevocytic nevi 7 years before admission, the patient's medical history was unremarkable. The ultrasound (US) examination showed a slightly enlarged acalculous gallbladder with thickened walls and a well-circumscribed polypoid mass in the fundus. The patient was treated medically and referred to LC. At surgery, some satellite nodules were visualized in the GB hepatic bed. The GB was removed, and two hepatic nodules were excised. Histology showed a pT3 melanoma. The patient underwent an open hepatic wedge resection 3 weeks after laparoscopy. No recurrence was observed at 6-month follow-up. To date, only one case of melanoma of the gallbladder treated with LC has been reported. GB melanoma is a diagnostic challenge when there is no evidence of a primary lesion. However, the occurrence of acalculous cholecystitis and a GB polyp in patients with a positive history of mole ablation should alert surgeons to the possibility of a melanoma. PMID:11265063

  18. Abdominal Mondor disease mimicking acute appendicitis

    PubMed Central

    Schuppisser, Myriam; Khallouf, Joe; Abbassi, Ziad; Erne, Michel; Vettorel, Denise; Paroz, Alexandre; Naiken, Surennaidoo P.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mondor disease (MD), a superficial thrombophlebitis of the thoraco-epigastric veins and their confluents is rarely reported in the literature. The superior epigastric vein is the most affected vessel but involvement of the inferior epigastric vessels or their branches have also been described. There is no universal consensus on treatment in the literature but most authors suggest symptomatic treatment with non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Case report We report the case of a marathon runner who presented with right iliac fossa pain mimicking the clinical symptomatology of an acute appendicitis. The history and the calculated Alvarado score were not in favor of an acute appendicitis. This situation motivated multiple investigations and we finally arrived at the diagnosis of MD. Discussion Acute appendicitis (AA) is the most common cause of surgical emergencies and one of the most frequent indications for an urgent abdominal surgical procedure around the world. In some cases, right lower quadrant pain remains unclear in spite of US, CT scan, and exclusion of urological and gynecological causes, thus we need to think of some rare pathologies like MD. Conclusion MD is often mentioned in the differential diagnosis of breast pathologies but rarely in abdominal pain assessment. It should be mentioned in the differential diagnosis of the right lower quadrant pain when the clinical presentation is unclear and when acute appendicitis has been excluded. Awareness of MD can avoid misdiagnosis and decrease extra costs by sparing unnecessary imaging. PMID:26803533

  19. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, A.A.; Yang, L.C.

    1995-12-19

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe{sub 2} where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor. 15 figs.

  20. Multi-phase back contacts for CIS solar cells

    DOEpatents

    Rockett, Angus A.; Yang, Li-Chung

    1995-01-01

    Multi-phase, single layer, non-interdiffusing M-Mo back contact metallized films, where M is selected from Cu, Ga, or mixtures thereof, for CIS cells are deposited by a sputtering process on suitable substrates, preferably glass or alumina, to prevent delamination of the CIS from the back contact layer. Typical CIS compositions include CuXSe.sub.2 where X is In or/and Ga. The multi-phase mixture is deposited on the substrate in a manner to provide a columnar microstructure, with micro-vein Cu or/and Ga regions which partially or fully vertically penetrate the entire back contact layer. The CIS semiconductor layer is then deposited by hybrid sputtering and evaporation process. The Cu/Ga-Mo deposition is controlled to produce the single layer two-phase columnar morphology with controllable Cu or Ga vein size less than about 0.01 microns in width. During the subsequent deposition of the CIS layer, the columnar Cu/Ga regions within the molybdenum of the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer tend to partially leach out, and are replaced by columns of CIS. Narrower Cu and/or Ga regions, and those with fewer inner connections between regions, leach out more slowly during the subsequent CIS deposition. This gives a good mechanical and electrical interlock of the CIS layer into the Cu/Ga-Mo back layer. Solar cells employing In-rich CIS semiconductors bonded to the multi-phase columnar microstructure back layer of this invention exhibit vastly improved photo-electrical conversion on the order of 17% greater than Mo alone, improved uniformity of output across the face of the cell, and greater Fill Factor.

  1. Non-harmful insertion of data mimicking computer network attacks

    DOEpatents

    Neil, Joshua Charles; Kent, Alexander; Hash, Jr, Curtis Lee

    2016-06-21

    Non-harmful data mimicking computer network attacks may be inserted in a computer network. Anomalous real network connections may be generated between a plurality of computing systems in the network. Data mimicking an attack may also be generated. The generated data may be transmitted between the plurality of computing systems using the real network connections and measured to determine whether an attack is detected.

  2. Two new species and nomenclatural changes in the Cis castaneus species group (Coleoptera, Ciidae).

    PubMed

    Królik, Roman

    2016-01-01

    Cis hanseni A. Strand, 1965 is a junior synonym of Cis matchanus Reitter, 1915 stat. nov. The lectotype for Cis matchanus Reitter, 1915 is designated and illustrated, together with its original data labels. Two new species-Cis lasoni sp. nov. and Cis lugowoji sp. nov. from the Talysh and Alborz Mts. (Azerbaijan, Iran)-are described. The body and terminalia of males are illustrated in detail. The definition of the Cis castaneus species group is discussed. PMID:27395144

  3. In Vitro Micellarization and Intestinal Cell Uptake of cis Isomers of Lycopene Exceed Those of All-trans Lycopene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ratio of cis and all-trans lycopene (LYC) in human and animal tissues exeeds that in foods. The basis for this difference remains unknown, although differences in their stability, transport, and metabolism have been suggested. Here we systematically compared the digestive stability, efficiency...

  4. Experimental validation of predicted mammalian erythroid cis-regulatory modules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Zhang, Ying; Cheng, Yong; Zhou, Yuepin; King, David C.; Taylor, James; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Kasturi, Jyotsna; Petrykowska, Hanna; Gibb, Brian; Dorman, Christine; Miller, Webb; Dore, Louis C.; Welch, John; Weiss, Mitchell J.; Hardison, Ross C.

    2006-01-01

    Multiple alignments of genome sequences are helpful guides to functional analysis, but predicting cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) accurately from such alignments remains an elusive goal. We predict CRMs for mammalian genes expressed in red blood cells by combining two properties gleaned from aligned, noncoding genome sequences: a positive regulatory potential (RP) score, which detects similarity to patterns in alignments distinctive for regulatory regions, and conservation of a binding site motif for the essential erythroid transcription factor GATA-1. Within eight target loci, we tested 75 noncoding segments by reporter gene assays in transiently transfected human K562 cells and/or after site-directed integration into murine erythroleukemia cells. Segments with a high RP score and a conserved exact match to the binding site consensus are validated at a good rate (50%–100%, with rates increasing at higher RP), whereas segments with lower RP scores or nonconsensus binding motifs tend to be inactive. Active DNA segments were shown to be occupied by GATA-1 protein by chromatin immunoprecipitation, whereas sites predicted to be inactive were not occupied. We verify four previously known erythroid CRMs and identify 28 novel ones. Thus, high RP in combination with another feature of a CRM, such as a conserved transcription factor binding site, is a good predictor of functional CRMs. Genome-wide predictions based on RP and a large set of well-defined transcription factor binding sites are available through servers at http://www.bx.psu.edu/. PMID:17038566

  5. Bioinformatic Identification of Conserved Cis-Sequences in Coregulated Genes.

    PubMed

    Bülow, Lorenz; Hehl, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Bioinformatics tools can be employed to identify conserved cis-sequences in sets of coregulated plant genes because more and more gene expression and genomic sequence data become available. Knowledge on the specific cis-sequences, their enrichment and arrangement within promoters, facilitates the design of functional synthetic plant promoters that are responsive to specific stresses. The present chapter illustrates an example for the bioinformatic identification of conserved Arabidopsis thaliana cis-sequences enriched in drought stress-responsive genes. This workflow can be applied for the identification of cis-sequences in any sets of coregulated genes. The workflow includes detailed protocols to determine sets of coregulated genes, to extract the corresponding promoter sequences, and how to install and run a software package to identify overrepresented motifs. Further bioinformatic analyses that can be performed with the results are discussed. PMID:27557771

  6. Workstation Designs for a Cis-Lunar Deep Space Habitat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howe, A. Scott

    2014-01-01

    Using the International Standard Payload Rack (ISPR) system, a suite of workstations required for deep space missions have been proposed to fill out habitation functions in an International Space Station (ISS) derived Cis-lunar Deep Space Habitat. This paper introduces the functional layout of the Cis-lunar habitat design, and describes conceptual designs for modular deployable work surfaces, General Maintenance Workstation (GMWS), In-Space Manufacturing Workstation (ISMW), Intra-Vehicular Activity Telerobotics Work Station (IVA-TRWS), and Galley / Wardroom.

  7. Vestibular toxicity of cis-2-pentenenitrile in the rat.

    PubMed

    Saldaña-Ruíz, Sandra; Hernández-Mir, Gerard; Sedó-Cabezón, Lara; Cutillas, Blanca; Llorens, Jordi

    2012-06-20

    cis-2-Pentenenitrile, an intermediate in the synthesis of nylon and other products, causes permanent behavioral deficits in rodents. Other low molecular weight nitriles cause degeneration either of the vestibular sensory hair cells or of selected neuronal populations in the brain. Adult male Long-Evans rats were exposed to cis-2-pentenenitrile (0, 1.25, 1.50, 1.75, or 2.0mmol/kg, oral, in corn oil) and assessed for changes in open field activity and rating scores in a test battery for vestibular dysfunction. Surface preparations of the vestibular sensory epithelia were observed for hair cell loss using scanning electron microscopy. A separate experiment examined the impact of pre-treatment with the universal CYP inhibitor,1-aminobenzotriazole, on the effect of cis-2-pentenenitrile on vestibular rating scores. The occurrence of degenerating neurons in the central nervous system was assessed by Fluoro-Jade C staining. cis-2-Pentenenitrile had a dose-dependent effect on body weight. Rats receiving 1.50mmol/kg or more of cis-2-pentenenitrile displayed reduced rearing activity in the open field and increased rating scores on the vestibular dysfunction test battery. Hair cell loss was observed in the vestibular sensory epithelia and correlated well with the behavioral deficits. Pre-treatment with 1-aminobenzotriazole blocked the behavioral effect. Fluoro-Jade C staining did not reveal significant neuronal degeneration in the central nervous system apart from neurite labeling in the olfactory glomeruli. We conclude that cis-2-pentenenitrile causes vestibular toxicity in a similar way to allylnitrile, cis-crotononitrile and 3,3'-iminodipropionitrile (IDPN), and also shares other targets such as the olfactory system with these other nitriles. The present data also suggest that CYP-mediated bioactivation is involved in cis-2-pentenenitrile toxicity. PMID:22546275

  8. Organic compounds in the C 3H 6O 3 family: Microwave spectrum of cis-cis dimethyl carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Widicus Weaver, S. L.; McGuire, B. A.; Blake, G. A.

    2010-11-01

    Geometry optimization calculations on 13 members of the C 3H 6O 3 family of organic species have been carried out to determine their relative binding energies. Dimethyl carbonate [(CH 3) 2CO 3] is one of the lower energy species in this family, which includes the C 3-sugars 1,3-dihydroxyacetone and glyceraldehyde. The microwave spectrum of dimethyl carbonate has been measured over the frequency range 8.4-25.3 GHz with several pulsed-beam Fourier-transform microwave spectrometers and from 227 GHz to 350 GHz with direct absorption spectrometers. The spectrum of the lowest-energy cis-cis conformer of dimethyl carbonate has been assigned, and ab initio electronic structure calculations of the three possible conformers have been performed. Stark effect measurements were carried out on the cis-cis conformer to provide accurate determinations of the dipole moment components.

  9. On the Mechanism of Action of the Antitumor Drug cis-Platin (cis-DDP) and its Second Generation Derivatives

    PubMed Central

    Aletras, Vasilis; Hadjiliadis, Denis; Hadjiliadis, Nick

    1995-01-01

    The present article attempts to summarise the elements of the mechanism of action of the antitumor drug cis¯-Platin presented the last few years. Highlights on the discovery, of the drug and the development of it’s second generation derivatives are presented, as well as the ways that cis¯-DDP reacts with biomolecules as DNA and proteins and their models e.g. nucleosides, nucleotides. Also the hydrolysis data are presented for cis¯-DDP and its’ inactive congener trans¯-DDP, as well as for the second generation drug carboplatin. Finally, usefull conclusions are given from this work, pointing out the unanswered questions about the action of cis¯-DDP as well as its differences in action, in comparison with trans¯-DDP. PMID:18472761

  10. Control of Biofilms with the Fatty Acid Signaling Molecule cis-2-Decenoic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Marques, Cláudia N. H.; Davies, David G.; Sauer, Karin

    2015-01-01

    Biofilms are complex communities of microorganisms in organized structures attached to surfaces. Importantly, biofilms are a major cause of bacterial infections in humans, and remain one of the most significant challenges to modern medical practice. Unfortunately, conventional therapies have shown to be inadequate in the treatment of most chronic biofilm infections based on the extraordinary innate tolerance of biofilms to antibiotics. Antagonists of quorum sensing signaling molecules have been used as means to control biofilms. QS and other cell-cell communication molecules are able to revert biofilm tolerance, prevent biofilm formation and disrupt fully developed biofilms, albeit with restricted effectiveness. Recently however, it has been demonstrated that Pseudomonas aeruginosa produces a small messenger molecule cis-2-decenoic acid (cis-DA) that shows significant promise as an effective adjunctive to antimicrobial treatment of biofilms. This molecule is responsible for induction of the native biofilm dispersion response in a range of Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria and in yeast, and has been shown to reverse persistence, increase microbial metabolic activity and significantly enhance the cidal effects of conventional antimicrobial agents. In this manuscript, the use of cis-2-decenoic acid as a novel agent for biofilm control is discussed. Stimulating the biofilm dispersion response as a novel antimicrobial strategy holds significant promise for enhanced treatment of infections and in the prevention of biofilm formation. PMID:26610524

  11. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P.; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H.; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D.; Wurtzel, Eleanore T.

    2015-01-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway leading to all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not certain whether isomerization was achieved by Z-ISO alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-to-trans isomerization of the 15–15′ C=C bond in 9,15,9′-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the following biosynthetic pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand-switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large, hydrophobic compound in a membrane is unprecedented. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially utilizes a novel chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  12. Control of carotenoid biosynthesis through a heme-based cis-trans isomerase.

    PubMed

    Beltrán, Jesús; Kloss, Brian; Hosler, Jonathan P; Geng, Jiafeng; Liu, Aimin; Modi, Anuja; Dawson, John H; Sono, Masanori; Shumskaya, Maria; Ampomah-Dwamena, Charles; Love, James D; Wurtzel, Eleanore T

    2015-08-01

    Plants synthesize carotenoids, which are essential for plant development and survival. These metabolites also serve as essential nutrients for human health. The biosynthetic pathway for all plant carotenoids occurs in chloroplasts and other plastids and requires 15-cis-ζ-carotene isomerase (Z-ISO). It was not known whether Z-ISO catalyzes isomerization alone or in combination with other enzymes. Here we show that Z-ISO is a bona fide enzyme and integral membrane protein. Z-ISO independently catalyzes the cis-trans isomerization of the 15-15' carbon-carbon double bond in 9,15,9'-cis-ζ-carotene to produce the substrate required by the subsequent biosynthetic-pathway enzyme. We discovered that isomerization depends upon a ferrous heme b cofactor that undergoes redox-regulated ligand switching between the heme iron and alternate Z-ISO amino acid residues. Heme b-dependent isomerization of a large hydrophobic compound in a membrane was previously undescribed. As an isomerase, Z-ISO represents a new prototype for heme b proteins and potentially uses a new chemical mechanism. PMID:26075523

  13. The identification of cis-regulatory elements: A review from a machine learning perspective.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifeng; Chen, Chih-Yu; Kaye, Alice M; Wasserman, Wyeth W

    2015-12-01

    The majority of the human genome consists of non-coding regions that have been called junk DNA. However, recent studies have unveiled that these regions contain cis-regulatory elements, such as promoters, enhancers, silencers, insulators, etc. These regulatory elements can play crucial roles in controlling gene expressions in specific cell types, conditions, and developmental stages. Disruption to these regions could contribute to phenotype changes. Precisely identifying regulatory elements is key to deciphering the mechanisms underlying transcriptional regulation. Cis-regulatory events are complex processes that involve chromatin accessibility, transcription factor binding, DNA methylation, histone modifications, and the interactions between them. The development of next-generation sequencing techniques has allowed us to capture these genomic features in depth. Applied analysis of genome sequences for clinical genetics has increased the urgency for detecting these regions. However, the complexity of cis-regulatory events and the deluge of sequencing data require accurate and efficient computational approaches, in particular, machine learning techniques. In this review, we describe machine learning approaches for predicting transcription factor binding sites, enhancers, and promoters, primarily driven by next-generation sequencing data. Data sources are provided in order to facilitate testing of novel methods. The purpose of this review is to attract computational experts and data scientists to advance this field. PMID:26499213

  14. A Cis-Lunar Propellant Infrastructure for Flexible Path Exploration and Space Commerce

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes a space infrastructure concept that exploits lunar water for propellant production and delivers it to users in cis-lunar space. The goal is to provide responsive economical space transportation to destinations beyond low Earth orbit (LEO) and enable in-space commerce. This is a game changing concept that could fundamentally affect future space operations, provide greater access to space beyond LEO, and broaden participation in space exploration. The challenge is to minimize infrastructure development cost while achieving a low operational cost. This study discusses the evolutionary development of the infrastructure from a very modest robotic operation to one that is capable of supporting human operations. The cis-lunar infrastructure involves a mix of technologies including cryogenic propellant production, reusable lunar landers, propellant tankers, orbital transfer vehicles, aerobraking technologies, and electric propulsion. This cislunar propellant infrastructure replaces Earth-launched propellants for missions beyond LEO. It enables users to reach destinations with smaller launchers or effectively multiplies the user s existing payload capacity. Users can exploit the expanded capacity to launch logistics material that can then be traded with the infrastructure for propellants. This mutually beneficial trade between the cis-lunar infrastructure and propellant users forms the basis of in-space commerce.

  15. Modeling DNA sequence-based cis-regulatory gene networks.

    PubMed

    Bolouri, Hamid; Davidson, Eric H

    2002-06-01

    Gene network analysis requires computationally based models which represent the functional architecture of regulatory interactions, and which provide directly testable predictions. The type of model that is useful is constrained by the particular features of developmentally active cis-regulatory systems. These systems function by processing diverse regulatory inputs, generating novel regulatory outputs. A computational model which explicitly accommodates this basic concept was developed earlier for the cis-regulatory system of the endo16 gene of the sea urchin. This model represents the genetically mandated logic functions that the system executes, but also shows how time-varying kinetic inputs are processed in different circumstances into particular kinetic outputs. The same basic design features can be utilized to construct models that connect the large number of cis-regulatory elements constituting developmental gene networks. The ultimate aim of the network models discussed here is to represent the regulatory relationships among the genomic control systems of the genes in the network, and to state their functional meaning. The target site sequences of the cis-regulatory elements of these genes constitute the physical basis of the network architecture. Useful models for developmental regulatory networks must represent the genetic logic by which the system operates, but must also be capable of explaining the real time dynamics of cis-regulatory response as kinetic input and output data become available. Most importantly, however, such models must display in a direct and transparent manner fundamental network design features such as intra- and intercellular feedback circuitry; the sources of parallel inputs into each cis-regulatory element; gene battery organization; and use of repressive spatial inputs in specification and boundary formation. Successful network models lead to direct tests of key architectural features by targeted cis-regulatory analysis. PMID

  16. Solid Phase Biosensors for Arsenic or Cadmium Composed of A trans Factor and cis Element Complex

    PubMed Central

    Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Kawakami, Yasunari; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2011-01-01

    The presence of toxic metals in drinking water has hazardous effects on human health. This study was conducted to develop GFP-based-metal-binding biosensors for on-site assay of toxic metal ions. GFP-tagged ArsR and CadC proteins bound to a cis element, and lost the capability of binding to it in their As- and Cd-binding conformational states, respectively. Water samples containing toxic metals were incubated on a complex of GFP-tagged ArsR or CadC and cis element which was immobilized on a solid surface. Metal concentrations were quantified with fluorescence intensity of the metal-binding states released from the cis element. Fluorescence intensity obtained with the assay significantly increased with increasing concentrations of toxic metals. Detection limits of 1 μg/L for Cd(II) and 5 μg/L for As(III) in purified water and 10 µg/L for Cd(II) and As(III) in tap water and bottled mineral water were achieved by measurement with a battery-powered portable fluorometer after 15-min and 30-min incubation, respectively. A complex of freeze dried GFP-tagged ArsR or CadC binding to cis element was stable at 4 °C and responded to 5 μg/L As(III) or Cd(II). The solid phase biosensors are sensitive, less time-consuming, portable, and could offer a protocol for on-site evaluation of the toxic metals in drinking water. PMID:22346629

  17. Solid phase biosensors for arsenic or cadmium composed of A trans factor and cis element complex.

    PubMed

    Siddiki, Mohammad Shohel Rana; Kawakami, Yasunari; Ueda, Shunsaku; Maeda, Isamu

    2011-01-01

    The presence of toxic metals in drinking water has hazardous effects on human health. This study was conducted to develop GFP-based-metal-binding biosensors for on-site assay of toxic metal ions. GFP-tagged ArsR and CadC proteins bound to a cis element, and lost the capability of binding to it in their As- and Cd-binding conformational states, respectively. Water samples containing toxic metals were incubated on a complex of GFP-tagged ArsR or CadC and cis element which was immobilized on a solid surface. Metal concentrations were quantified with fluorescence intensity of the metal-binding states released from the cis element. Fluorescence intensity obtained with the assay significantly increased with increasing concentrations of toxic metals. Detection limits of 1 μg/L for Cd(II) and 5 μg/L for As(III) in purified water and 10 µg/L for Cd(II) and As(III) in tap water and bottled mineral water were achieved by measurement with a battery-powered portable fluorometer after 15-min and 30-min incubation, respectively. A complex of freeze dried GFP-tagged ArsR or CadC binding to cis element was stable at 4 °C and responded to 5 μg/L As(III) or Cd(II). The solid phase biosensors are sensitive, less time-consuming, portable, and could offer a protocol for on-site evaluation of the toxic metals in drinking water. PMID:22346629

  18. CisMiner: Genome-Wide In-Silico Cis-Regulatory Module Prediction by Fuzzy Itemset Mining

    PubMed Central

    Navarro, Carmen; Lopez, Francisco J.; Cano, Carlos; Garcia-Alcalde, Fernando; Blanco, Armando

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic gene control regions are known to be spread throughout non-coding DNA sequences which may appear distant from the gene promoter. Transcription factors are proteins that coordinately bind to these regions at transcription factor binding sites to regulate gene expression. Several tools allow to detect significant co-occurrences of closely located binding sites (cis-regulatory modules, CRMs). However, these tools present at least one of the following limitations: 1) scope limited to promoter or conserved regions of the genome; 2) do not allow to identify combinations involving more than two motifs; 3) require prior information about target motifs. In this work we present CisMiner, a novel methodology to detect putative CRMs by means of a fuzzy itemset mining approach able to operate at genome-wide scale. CisMiner allows to perform a blind search of CRMs without any prior information about target CRMs nor limitation in the number of motifs. CisMiner tackles the combinatorial complexity of genome-wide cis-regulatory module extraction using a natural representation of motif combinations as itemsets and applying the Top-Down Fuzzy Frequent- Pattern Tree algorithm to identify significant itemsets. Fuzzy technology allows CisMiner to better handle the imprecision and noise inherent to regulatory processes. Results obtained for a set of well-known binding sites in the S. cerevisiae genome show that our method yields highly reliable predictions. Furthermore, CisMiner was also applied to putative in-silico predicted transcription factor binding sites to identify significant combinations in S. cerevisiae and D. melanogaster, proving that our approach can be further applied genome-wide to more complex genomes. CisMiner is freely accesible at: http://genome2.ugr.es/cisminer. CisMiner can be queried for the results presented in this work and can also perform a customized cis-regulatory module prediction on a query set of transcription factor binding sites provided by

  19. Ocular surface foreign bodies: novel findings mimicking ocular malignant melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Maudgil, A; Wagner, B E; Rundle, P; Rennie, I G; Mudhar, H S

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Malignant melanoma of the eye is an uncommon condition that is important to recognise. We describe three cases in which ocular foreign bodies have masqueraded as ocular malignant melanoma. Methods Interventional case reports. Results Case 1 describes diathermy-induced carbon particle implantation, during plaque therapy for the treatment of uveal melanoma, mimicking recurrence with extra-scleral invasion. Case 2 shows a foreign body called ‘mullite' mimicking conjunctival melanoma. Case 3 demonstrates a conjunctival foreign body called ‘illite' that mimicked a limbal melanocytic lesion, clinically thought to be either melanocytoma or melanoma. Conclusion This report highlights the importance of careful history taking, examination, and appropriate biopsy in cases of suspected malignant melanoma, to prevent unnecessary and potentially radical treatment. PMID:25104745

  20. DBMS UTILIZATION: A Corporate Information System (CIS) development approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rozett, P.

    1983-01-01

    The Corporate Information System (CIS), an integrated information system intended to tie the corporation together as a functioning entity, is described. In addition to being a major upgraded automated data processing system, the CIS is a management philosophy which recognizes data as a valuable corporate resource and which distinguishes between data and selected data, or information. It further recognizes that different users need different kinds of information. Plans for CIS development are discussed. It will offer its users not just after-the-fact data, but timely information in a format that is meaningful and useful to the particular user, so that the information can be applied in planning, controlling, and decision making by all levels of management. In effect, CIS will help the corporation itself to function as a total, integrated system by typing together administrative activities through information exchange. The CIS supports the operational, tactical control, and strategic planning functions of the corporation. Operational functions are the day-to-day processing necessary to support the corporation's work, such as purchasing and payroll.

  1. Innovative front end processing for next generation CIS module production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Probst, Volker; Jasenek, Axel; Sandfort, Christian; Letsch, Andreas; Koetschau, Immo; Hahn, Thomas; Feichtinger, Jochen; Eschrich, Heinz

    2015-08-01

    The successful implementation of two new process steps into an existing Cu(In,Ga)(Se,S)2 (CIS) production line was achieved. One, a newly developed back contact, aims for a better process control, as far as the transition of the metallic back contact to a selenide/metal bi-layer during CIS-formation is concerned. This was done by the introduction of a corrosion resistant barrier layer, which reliably stops chalcogenide diffusion from the top. By doing so, a back contact layer is obtained, with well defined properties in which the functionalities of the back electrode now is divided between two separated layers. The other development presented in this paper, tackles the complexity of CIS-module production and the interferences between the different processes required. By shifting the P1-scribing process after i-ZnO deposition, the process sequence for CIS is simplified and it will be shown that this new P1i exhibits superior properties as far as CIS morphology and groove quality is concerned.

  2. Cis-regulatory mechanisms governing stem and progenitor cell transitions

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kirby D.; Kong, Guangyao; Gao, Xin; Chang, Yuan-I; Hewitt, Kyle J.; Sanalkumar, Rajendran; Prathibha, Rajalekshmi; Ranheim, Erik A.; Dewey, Colin N.; Zhang, Jing; Bresnick, Emery H.

    2015-01-01

    Cis-element encyclopedias provide information on phenotypic diversity and disease mechanisms. Although cis-element polymorphisms and mutations are instructive, deciphering function remains challenging. Mutation of an intronic GATA motif (+9.5) in GATA2, encoding a master regulator of hematopoiesis, underlies an immunodeficiency associated with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Whereas an inversion relocalizes another GATA2 cis-element (−77) to the proto-oncogene EVI1, inducing EVI1 expression and AML, whether this reflects ectopic or physiological activity is unknown. We describe a mouse strain that decouples −77 function from proto-oncogene deregulation. The −77−/− mice exhibited a novel phenotypic constellation including late embryonic lethality and anemia. The −77 established a vital sector of the myeloid progenitor transcriptome, conferring multipotentiality. Unlike the +9.5−/− embryos, hematopoietic stem cell genesis was unaffected in −77−/− embryos. These results illustrate a paradigm in which cis-elements in a locus differentially control stem and progenitor cell transitions, and therefore the individual cis-element alterations cause unique and overlapping disease phenotypes. PMID:26601269

  3. Ultrafast cis-trans photoswitching: A model study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hahn, Susanne; Stock, Gerhard

    2002-01-01

    A quantum-mechanical model description of a molecular photoswitch is developed. It takes into account (i) the electronic curve crossing arising from the cis-trans twisting of a double bond, resulting in an ultrafast internal-conversion process of the system and (ii) the coupling of the initially excited chromophore (the "system") to the remaining degrees of freedom (the "bath"), affecting a vibrational cooling of the hot photoproducts. The latter mechanism is responsible for the localization of the molecule in the cis and trans configuration, respectively, thus determining the quantum yield of the photoreaction. Following a discussion of the validity and the numerical implementation of the Redfield formulation employed, detailed numerical studies of the time-dependent dissipative photoisomerization dynamics are presented. While the short-time dynamics (≲1 ps) is dominated by the coherent wave-packet motion of the system, the time evolution at larger times mainly reflects the interaction between system and bath. The quantum yield of the cis-trans forward reaction (Yc→t) and the trans-cis backward reaction (Yt→c) is shown to depend on the energy storage of the photoreaction and, in particular, on the form of the system-bath coupling. On the other hand, it is found that Yt→c=1-Yc→t, that is the population probabilities of the cis and trans configuration at long times do not depend on the initial preparation of the system.

  4. Heparin-mimicking multilayer coating on polymeric membrane via LbL assembly of cyclodextrin-based supramolecules.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie; Liu, Xinyue; Ma, Lang; Cheng, Chong; Shi, Wenbin; Nie, Chuanxiong; Zhao, Changsheng

    2014-12-10

    In this study, multifunctional and heparin-mimicking star-shaped supramolecules-deposited 3D porous multilayer films with improved biocompatibility were fabricated via a layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly method on polymeric membrane substrates. Star-shaped heparin-mimicking polyanions (including poly(styrenesulfonate-co-sodium acrylate; Star-PSS-AANa) and poly(styrenesulfonate-co-poly(ethylene glycol)methyl ether methacrylate; Star-PSS-EGMA)) and polycations (poly(methyl chloride-quaternized 2-(dimethylamino)ethyl methacrylate; Star-PMeDMA) were first synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) from β-cyclodextrin (β-CD) based cores. Then assembly of 3D porous multilayers onto polymeric membrane surfaces was carried out by alternating deposition of the polyanions and polycations via electrostatic interaction. The surface morphology and composition, water contact angle, blood activation, and thrombotic potential as well as cell viability for the coated heparin-mimicking films were systematically investigated. The results of surface ATR-FTIR spectra and XPS spectra verified successful deposition of the star-shaped supramolecules onto the biomedical membrane surfaces; scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) observations revealed that the modified substrate had 3D porous surface morphology, which might have a great biological influence on the biointerface. Furthermore, systematic in vitro investigation of protein adsorption, platelet adhesion, human platelet factor 4 (PF4, indicates platelet activation), activate partial thromboplastin time (APTT), thrombin time (TT), coagulation activation (thrombin-antithrombin III complex (TAT, indicates blood coagulant)), and blood-related complement activation (C3a and C5a, indicates inflammation potential) confirmed that the heparin-mimicking multilayer coated membranes exhibited ultralow blood component activations and excellent hemocompatibility. Meanwhile, after surface coating

  5. Munchausen syndrome mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine physical illness

    PubMed Central

    Almeida, Jaime; da Silva, Joaquim Alves; Xavier, Miguel; Gusmão, Ricardo

    2010-01-01

    Munchausen syndrome is a disorder in which patients intentionally produce symptoms mimicking physical or psychiatric illnesses with the aim to assume the sick role and to gain medical attention. Once a patient receives a Munchausen syndrome diagnosis every complaint made thence tends to be regarded with scepticism by clinical staff. However, it is possible that a bona fide illness, which might be disregarded, may coexist in these patients. We report a case of MS mimicking psychiatric disease with concomitant genuine acute physical illness. Despite the initial doubts about the veracity of the latter, due to its prompt recognition, treatment was successful. PMID:22798096

  6. Oxidative and reductive metabolism of 9-cis-retinoic acid in the rat. Identification of 13,14-dihydro-9-cis-retinoic acid and its taurine conjugate.

    PubMed

    Shirley, M A; Bennani, Y L; Boehm, M F; Breau, A P; Pathirana, C; Ulm, E H

    1996-03-01

    9-cis-Retinoic acid (9-cis-RA), a hormone that binds and activates all known retinoid receptor subtypes, is structurally similar to all-trans-retinoic acid and may share common metabolic fates. Both oral and intravenous doses of 9-cis-RA to rats led to hydroxylation and ketone formation at carbon-4. 9-Cis-RA also isomerized in vivo to 13-cis-retinoic acid, 9-cis, 13-cis-retinoic acid, and all-trans-retinoic acid. After administration of [11-3H]9-cis-RA, the proportion of plasma radioactivity that was volatile increased over time, which suggested that beta-oxidative chain-shortening of 9-cis-RA might occur. An equimolar mixture of [1-13C2H3]9-cis-RA and 9-cis-RA was administered to rats for stable-isotope-labeled metabolite production. A chromatographic peak that had a lambdamax = 290 nm vs. 348 nm for the parent compound, had a retention time similar to the parent, and yielded a 1:1 positive-ion isotope cluster at m/z 303/307 in its mass spectrum. NMR analysis revealed 9-cis and 13,14-dihydro configurations, indicating that 9-cis-RA can be metabolized in rat by reduction to 13,14-dihydro-9-cis-RA. An earlier-eluting HPLC peak that exhibited a lambdamax at 290 nm, and a negative-ion-MS isotope cluster at m/z 408/412 was observed during separations of rat liver extracts. LC/MS/MS analysis revealed product ions for this peak diagnostic for carboxylic acid taurine conjugates. In rats, reduction of 9-cis-RA to 13,14-dihydro-9-cis-RA may represent an initial step leading to beta-oxidation, although available data demonstrate it is conjugated with taurine to form a novel metabolite. PMID:8820419

  7. Oxidative trans to cis Isomerization of Olefins in Polyketide Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Tsuyoshi; Tsunematsu, Yuta; Hara, Kodai; Suzuki, Tomohiro; Kishimoto, Shinji; Kawagishi, Hirokazu; Noguchi, Hiroshi; Hashimoto, Hiroshi; Tang, Yi; Hotta, Kinya; Watanabe, Kenji

    2016-05-17

    Geometric isomerization can expand the scope of biological activities of natural products. The observed chemical diversity among the pseurotin-type fungal secondary metabolites is in part generated by a trans to cis isomerization of an olefin. In vitro characterizations of pseurotin biosynthetic enzymes revealed that the glutathione S-transferase PsoE requires participation of the bifunctional C-methyltransferase/epoxidase PsoF to complete the trans to cis isomerization of the pathway intermediate presynerazol. The crystal structure of the PsoE/glutathione/presynerazol complex indicated stereospecific glutathione-presynerazol conjugate formation is the principal function of PsoE. Moreover, PsoF was identified to have an additional, unexpected oxidative isomerase activity, thus making it a trifunctional enzyme which is key to the complexity generation in pseurotin biosynthesis. Through the study, we identified a novel mechanism of accomplishing a seemingly simple trans to cis isomerization reaction. PMID:27072782

  8. Effects of cis-beta-ocimene, cis-sabinene hydrate, and monoterpene and sesquiterpene mixtures on alfalfa pellet intake by lambs.

    PubMed

    Estell, R E; Fredrickson, E L; Anderson, D M; Remmenga, M D

    2008-06-01

    The transition of grasslands to shrub-dominated scrubland reduces livestock productivity and contributes to impoverished conditions for humans in arid and semiarid regions worldwide. Many shrubs that are increasing in dominance contain secondary compounds that deter browsing by herbivores. Knowledge concerning the effects of specific compounds in herbivore diets is limited but may provide useful insights into desertification. Flourensia cernua is a dominant shrub in the northern Chihuahuan Desert that contains an abundance of terpenes. Four experiments were conducted to determine the effects of terpenes on intake of alfalfa pellets by lambs. Two individual monoterpenes (cis-beta-ocimene and cis-sabinene hydrate) were examined in Exp. 1 and 2, and mixtures of monoterpenes (borneol, camphene, camphor, 1,8-cineole, limonene, myrcene, and alpha-pinene) and sesquiterpenes (beta-caryophyllene, caryophyllene oxide, alpha-copaene, and alpha-humulene) were examined in Exp. 3 and 4, respectively. Forty-five lambs (9 lambs/treatment) were individually fed treated alfalfa pellets for 20 min each morning for 5 d. Five treatments (0x, 0.5x, 1x, 2x, and 10x; multiples of the concentrations of the same terpenes in F. cernua) were applied to alfalfa pellets (637 g, DM basis) in an ethanol carrier. The experiments were preceded by a 10-d adaptation period of the lambs to untreated pellets. Except during the 20-min test, the lambs were maintained outdoors and fed untreated alfalfa pellets (total mean intake = 4.7% of BW, DM basis). Day x treatment interactions were detected (P < 0.04) in Exp. 1 and 4 because of a greater intake for 0x than for the other treatments on d 1 (Exp. 1) and a lower intake for the 10x treatment on d 1 and 2 (Exp. 4). A trend for decreased intake (g/kg of BW) as the concentration of the sesquiterpene mixture increased was observed in Exp. 3 (P = 0.093 for the linear contrast). Although there was a tendency for the sesquiterpene mixture to decrease intake, cis

  9. Pre-university Chemistry Students in a Mimicked Scholarly Peer Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rens, Lisette; Hermarij, Philip; Pilot, Albert; Beishuizen, Jos; Hofman, Herman; Wal, Marjolein

    2014-10-01

    Peer review is a significant component in scientific research. Introducing peer review into inquiry processes may be regarded as an aim to develop student understanding regarding quality in inquiries. This study examines student understanding in inquiry peer reviews among pre-university chemistry students, aged 16-17, when they enact a design of a mimicked scholarly peer review. This design is based on a model of a human activity system. Twenty-five different schools in Brazil, Germany, Poland and The Netherlands participated. The students (n = 880) conducted in small groups (n = 428) open inquiries on fermentation. All groups prepared an inquiry report for peer review. These reports were published on a website. Groups were randomly paired in an internet symposium, where they posted review comments to their peers. These responses were qualitatively analyzed on small groups' level of understanding regarding seven categories: inquiry question, hypothesis, management of control variables, accurate measurement, presenting results, reliability of results, discussion and conclusion. The mimicked scholarly review prompted a collective practice. Student understanding was significantly well on presenting results, discussion and conclusion, and significantly less on inquiry question and reliability of results. An enacted design, based on a model of a human activity system, created student understanding of quality in inquiries as well as an insight in a peer-reviewing practice. To what extent this model can be applied in a broader context of design research in science education needs further study.

  10. From Cis-Regulatory Elements to Complex RNPs and Back

    PubMed Central

    Gebauer, Fátima; Preiss, Thomas; Hentze, Matthias W.

    2012-01-01

    Messenger RNAs (mRNAs), the templates for translation, have evolved to harbor abundant cis-acting sequences that affect their posttranscriptional fates. These elements are frequently located in the untranslated regions and serve as binding sites for trans-acting factors, RNA-binding proteins, and/or small non-coding RNAs. This article provides a systematic synopsis of cis-acting elements, trans-acting factors, and the mechanisms by which they affect translation. It also highlights recent technical advances that have ushered in the era of transcriptome-wide studies of the ribonucleoprotein complexes formed by mRNAs and their trans-acting factors. PMID:22751153

  11. Cutaneous lymphoid hyperplasia mimicking cutaneous lymphoma in a hyperthyroid cat

    PubMed Central

    Snead, Elisabeth; Kerr, Moira; MacDonald, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    A 12-year-old neutered male domestic shorthair cat presented for chronic, localized, swelling and crusting of the left upper lip, weight loss, sporadic vomiting, and focal alopecia between the scapulae was diagnosed with hyperthyroidism and regional eosinophilic lymphadenitis. Treatment with methimazole exacerbated an underlying hypersensitivity disorder leading to marked generalized lymphadenopathy that histologically mimicked lymphoma. PMID:24155419

  12. Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Mimicking Granulomatosis with Polyangiitis

    PubMed Central

    Horowitz, Netanel; Ben-Itzhak, Ofer; Braun-Moscovici, Yolanda

    2016-01-01

    In a patient with systemic multiorgan disease with overlapping features, the differential diagnosis included infectious diseases, malignancies, and systemic autoimmune or inflammatory diseases. We present an unusual case of a young male with B cell lymphoma who presented with symptoms mimicking systemic vasculitis and review the existing literature. PMID:27293945

  13. Bronchial Aneurysms Mimicking Aortic Aneurysms: Endovascular Treatment in Two Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Vernhet, Helene; Bousquet, Claudine; Jean, Betty; Lesnik, Alvian; Durand, Gerard; Giron, Jacques; Senac, Jean Paul

    1999-05-15

    Bronchial artery dilatation and aneurysm formation is a potential complication of local inflammation, especially in bronchiectasis. When the bronchial artery has an ectopic origin from the inferior segment of the aortic arch, aneurysms may mimick aortic aneurysms. Despite this particular location, endovascular treatment is possible. We report two such aneurysms that were successfully embolized with steel coils.

  14. Mesenteric castleman disease mimicking superior mesenteric artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji-Soo; Park, Yang Jin; Kim, Young-Wook

    2015-02-01

    Castleman disease (CD) is known as a lymphoproliferative disorder, which is most commonly located in the mediastinum. CD occurring in the mesentery is very rare. We report a case of CD in the mesentery, which is mimicking a superior mesenteric artery aneurysm on computed tomography image. PMID:25463333

  15. Ectopic decidual reaction mimicking inguinal lymphoma on ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Prangsgaard, T; Lorentzen, T

    2014-01-01

    Ectopic decidual reaction has been described in various intraperitoneal locations. We present a case of unusual ectopic decidual reaction in the groin mimicking inguinal lymphoma on ultrasound in a pregnant woman. This case contributes evidence illustrating the variability of the clinical presentation of ectopic decidual reaction.

  16. Electrocardiographic artifact due to a mobile phone mimicking ventricular tachycardia.

    PubMed

    Duan, Xu

    2014-01-01

    A case of electrocardiographic artifact due to mobile a phone mimicking ventricular tachycardia was presented. The artifact was discriminated by close scrutiny of ECG and was attributed to a mobile phone because it was simultaneous with mobile phone game. PMID:24581928

  17. Postoperative fungal arteritis mimicking vasospasm--case report.

    PubMed

    Piotrowski, W P; Pilz, P

    1994-05-01

    Intracranial arteritis due to fungal infection is an uncommon complication of neurosurgical operations. A 36-year-old female developed arteritis caused by Aspergillus fumigatus at the site of the temporary clip following the clipping of an initially uncomplicated intracranial aneurysm. The inflammatory, slowly progressing vascular occlusion mimicked the vasospasm common in subarachnoid hemorrhage. PMID:7519756

  18. Left ventricular post-infraction pseudoaneurysm mimicking mitral valve endocarditis

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed as suffering from mitral valve endocarditis. The proper use of diagnostic modalities revealed a pseudo aneurysm of the left ventricle which was mimicking mitral valve vegetations. This allowed better planning of the subsequent operation. The optimal preoperative diagnostic studies are discussed along with the proper surgical treatment. PMID:24228621

  19. Left ventricular post-infraction pseudoaneurysm mimicking mitral valve endocarditis.

    PubMed

    Dedeilias, Panagiotis; Koukis, Ioannis; Roussakis, Antonios; Tsipas, Pantelis; Rouska, Effie

    2013-01-01

    In this report we present a patient who was initially diagnosed as suffering from mitral valve endocarditis. The proper use of diagnostic modalities revealed a pseudo aneurysm of the left ventricle which was mimicking mitral valve vegetations. This allowed better planning of the subsequent operation. The optimal preoperative diagnostic studies are discussed along with the proper surgical treatment. PMID:24228621

  20. Analytical and semipreparative chiral separation of cis-itraconazole on cellulose stationary phases by high-performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kurka, Ondřej; Kučera, Lukáš; Bednář, Petr

    2016-07-01

    cis-Itraconazole is a chiral antifungal drug administered as a racemate. The knowledge of properties of individual cis-itraconazole stereoisomers is vital information for medicine and biosciences as different stereoisomers of cis-itraconazole may possess different affinity to certain biological pathways in the human body. For this purpose, either chiral synthesis of enantiomers or chiral separation of racemate can be used. This paper presents a two-step high-performance liquid chromatography approach for the semipreparative isolation of four stereoisomers (two enantiomeric pairs) of itraconazole using polysaccharide stationary phases and volatile organic mobile phases without additives in isocratic mode. The approach used involves the separation of the racemate into three fractions (i.e. two pure stereoisomers and one mixed fraction containing the remaining two stereoisomers) in the first run and consequent separation of the collected mixed fraction in the second one. For this purpose, combination of cellulose tris-(4-methylbenzoate) and cellulose tris-(3,5-dimehylphenylcarbamate) columns with complementary selectivity for cis-itraconazole provided full separation of all four stereoisomers (with purity of each isomer > 97%). The stereoisomers were collected, their optical rotation determined and their identity confirmed based on the results of a previously published study. Pure separated stereoisomers are subjected to further biological studies. PMID:27240968

  1. Boronate Affinity Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Inhibition Assay of cis-Diol Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuangshou; Ye, Jin; Li, Xinglin; Liu, Zhen

    2016-05-17

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) has been essential for many applications, in which an appropriate donor-acceptor pair is the key. Traditional dye-to-dye combinations remain the working horses but are rather nonspecifically susceptive to environmental factors (such as ionic strength, pH, oxygen, etc.). Besides, to obtain desired selectivity, functionalization of the donor or acceptor is essential but usually tedious. Herein, we present fluorescent poly(m-aminophenylboronic acid) nanoparticles (poly(mAPBA) NPs) synthesized via a simple procedure and demonstrate a FRET scheme with suppressed environmental effects for the selective sensing of cis-diol biomolecules. The NPs exhibited stable fluorescence properties, resistance to environmental factors, and a Förster distance comparable size, making them ideal donor for FRET applications. By using poly(mAPBA) NPs and adenosine 5'-monophosphate modified graphene oxide (AMP-GO) as a donor and an acceptor, respectively, an environmental effects-suppressed boronate affinity-mediated FRET system was established. The fluorescence of poly(mAPBA) NPs was quenched by AMP-GO while it was restored when a competing cis-diol compounds was present. The FRET system exhibited excellent selectivity and improved sensitivity toward cis-diol compounds. Quantitative inhibition assay of glucose in human serum was demonstrated. As many cis-diol compounds such as sugars and glycoproteins are biologically and clinically significant, the FRET scheme presented herein could find more promising applications. PMID:27089186

  2. Précis of implicit nationalism.

    PubMed

    Hassin, Ran R; Ferguson, Melissa J; Kardosh, Rasha; Porter, Shanette C; Carter, Travis J; Dudareva, Veronika

    2009-06-01

    While the study of nationalism has received much attention throughout the social sciences and humanities, the experimental investigation of it lags behind. In this paper we review recent advances in the examination of implicit nationalism. In the first set of experiments we survey, the Palestinian, Israeli, Italian, and Russian flags were primed (or not, in the control conditions) and their effects on political thought and behavior were tested. In the second set the American or the Israeli flag was primed (or not) and prejudice toward African-Americans or Palestinians (respectively) was examined. The results of all experiments suggest that the implicit activation of national cues has far-reaching implications on political thought and behavior as well as on attitudes toward minorities. Under the assumption that the image of national flags is associated in memory with national ideologies, these results suggest that national ideologies can be implicitly pursued in a way that significantly affects our thoughts and behaviors. PMID:19580560

  3. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture... Model Plan. (a) General purpose and content—(1) Purpose. All State agencies are required to sufficiently.... (ii) State agencies that plan to automate operations using any method other than transfers will...

  4. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture... Model Plan. (a) General purpose and content—(1) Purpose. All State agencies are required to sufficiently.... (ii) State agencies that plan to automate operations using any method other than transfers will...

  5. 7 CFR 272.10 - ADP/CIS Model Plan.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false ADP/CIS Model Plan. 272.10 Section 272.10 Agriculture... Model Plan. (a) General purpose and content—(1) Purpose. All State agencies are required to sufficiently.... (ii) State agencies that plan to automate operations using any method other than transfers will...

  6. The CIS Database: Occupational Health and Safety Information Online.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siegel, Herbert; Scurr, Erica

    1985-01-01

    Describes document acquisition, selection, indexing, and abstracting and discusses online searching of the CIS database, an online system produced by the International Occupational Safety and Health Information Centre. This database comprehensively covers information in the field of occupational health and safety. Sample searches and search…

  7. Efficient direct ZnO/CIS solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Larry C.; William Addis, F.; Lei, Wenhua; Li, Jun

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes investigations of CIS solar cells with ZnO window layers deposited by MOCVD. These studies have been conducted with graded absorber CIS substrates obtained from Siemens Solar. Cell fabrication involves surface preparation of the Siemens substrate, growth of 200 to 400 Å of undoped ZnO by MOCVD, deposition of a highly conducting ZnO top contact layer and deposition of a Ni/Ag collector grid. MOCVD growth of ZnO is accomplished in a SPIRE 500XT reactor by reacting a zinc adduct and tetrahydrofuran. Processing development has been conducted by forming test cells on ZnO/CIS structures by depositing thin, transparent Al contacts 2.8 mm in diameter on top of the ZnO window layer to serve as contacts. Several cells have been completed with a total area efficiency ≥11.0%, with the best result being 11.3%. The best active area efficiency is approximately 12%. Other topics discussed include current-voltage characteristics of direct ZnO/CIS cells.

  8. Epistatic Interactions in the Arabinose Cis-Regulatory Element

    PubMed Central

    Lagator, Mato; Igler, Claudia; Moreno, Anaísa B.; Guet, Călin C.; Bollback, Jonathan P.

    2016-01-01

    Changes in gene expression are an important mode of evolution; however, the proximate mechanism of these changes is poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the effects of mutations within cis binding sites for transcription factors, or the nature of epistatic interactions between these mutations. Here, we tested the effects of single and double mutants in two cis binding sites involved in the transcriptional regulation of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon, a component of arabinose metabolism, using a synthetic system. This system decouples transcriptional control from any posttranslational effects on fitness, allowing a precise estimate of the effect of single and double mutations, and hence epistasis, on gene expression. We found that epistatic interactions between mutations in the araBAD cis-regulatory element are common, and that the predominant form of epistasis is negative. The magnitude of the interactions depended on whether the mutations are located in the same or in different operator sites. Importantly, these epistatic interactions were dependent on the presence of arabinose, a native inducer of the araBAD operon in vivo, with some interactions changing in sign (e.g., from negative to positive) in its presence. This study thus reveals that mutations in even relatively simple cis-regulatory elements interact in complex ways such that selection on the level of gene expression in one environment might perturb regulation in the other environment in an unpredictable and uncorrelated manner. PMID:26589997

  9. Peer Tutoring in the CIS Sandbox: Does It Work?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports on a student-created and facilitated peer-tutoring activity to assist first-year students in preparing for their final exam in an introductory information technology course. Tutors at the CIS Sandbox, a collaborative learning lab at an American university, offered a series of "Crunch Sessions" to their peers. This…

  10. Epistatic Interactions in the Arabinose Cis-Regulatory Element.

    PubMed

    Lagator, Mato; Igler, Claudia; Moreno, Anaísa B; Guet, Călin C; Bollback, Jonathan P

    2016-03-01

    Changes in gene expression are an important mode of evolution; however, the proximate mechanism of these changes is poorly understood. In particular, little is known about the effects of mutations within cis binding sites for transcription factors, or the nature of epistatic interactions between these mutations. Here, we tested the effects of single and double mutants in two cis binding sites involved in the transcriptional regulation of the Escherichia coli araBAD operon, a component of arabinose metabolism, using a synthetic system. This system decouples transcriptional control from any posttranslational effects on fitness, allowing a precise estimate of the effect of single and double mutations, and hence epistasis, on gene expression. We found that epistatic interactions between mutations in the araBAD cis-regulatory element are common, and that the predominant form of epistasis is negative. The magnitude of the interactions depended on whether the mutations are located in the same or in different operator sites. Importantly, these epistatic interactions were dependent on the presence of arabinose, a native inducer of the araBAD operon in vivo, with some interactions changing in sign (e.g., from negative to positive) in its presence. This study thus reveals that mutations in even relatively simple cis-regulatory elements interact in complex ways such that selection on the level of gene expression in one environment might perturb regulation in the other environment in an unpredictable and uncorrelated manner. PMID:26589997

  11. CIS and Information Technology Certifications: Education Program Trends and Implications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andersson, David; Reimers, Karl

    2009-01-01

    The fields of Computer Information Systems (CIS) and Information Technology (IT) are experiencing rapid change. In 2003, an analysis of IT degree programs and those of competing disciplines at 10 post-secondary institutions concluded that an information technology program is perceived differently from information systems and computer science. In…

  12. Creating a Collaborative Learning Community in the CIS Sandbox

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenberg, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to investigate the impact of transforming a traditional university computer lab to create a collaborative learning community known as the CIS Sandbox, by remodeling a physical space and supporting it with a virtual presence through the use of social media tools. The discussion applies Selander's "designs for…

  13. A Survey of Current Computer Information Science (CIS) Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Los Rios Community Coll. District, Sacramento, CA. Office of Institutional Research.

    This document is a survey designed to be completed by current students of Computer Information Science (CIS) in the Los Rios Community College District (LRCCD), which consists of three community colleges: American River College, Cosumnes River College, and Sacramento City College. The students are asked about their educational goals and how…

  14. cis- and trans-Stilbenes: Chromatographic Separation and Photochemical Isomerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levine, Samuel G.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Describes an experiment that is to be performed midway in the first semester of an undergraduate organic chemistry laboratory coinciding with the students' introduction to cis-trans isomerism in the study of alkenes. Discusses the apparatus, materials, experimental procedure, historical significance, and results. (CW)

  15. Structural Brain Network Characteristics Can Differentiate CIS from Early RRMS

    PubMed Central

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Kolber, Pierre; Luessi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Groppa, Sergiu

    2016-01-01

    Focal demyelinated lesions, diffuse white matter (WM) damage, and gray matter (GM) atrophy influence directly the disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify specific characteristics of GM and WM structural networks in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) in comparison to patients with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Twenty patients with CIS, 33 with RRMS, and 40 healthy subjects were investigated using 3 T-MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied, together with probabilistic tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps for WM and cortical thickness correlation analysis for GM, to determine the structural connectivity patterns. A network topology analysis with the aid of graph theoretical approaches was used to characterize the network at different community levels (modularity, clustering coefficient, global, and local efficiencies). Finally, we applied support vector machines (SVM) to automatically discriminate the two groups. In comparison to CIS subjects, patients with RRMS were found to have increased modular connectivity and higher local clustering, highlighting increased local processing in both GM and WM. Both groups presented increased modularity and clustering coefficients in comparison to healthy controls. SVM algorithms achieved 97% accuracy using the clustering coefficient as classifier derived from GM and 65% using WM from probabilistic tractography and 67% from modularity of FA maps to differentiate between CIS and RRMS patients. We demonstrate a clear increase of modular and local connectivity in patients with early RRMS in comparison to CIS and healthy subjects. Based only on a single anatomic scan and without a priori information, we developed an automated and investigator-independent paradigm that can accurately discriminate between patients with these clinically similar disease entities, and could thus complement the current dissemination-in-time criteria for

  16. Structural Brain Network Characteristics Can Differentiate CIS from Early RRMS.

    PubMed

    Muthuraman, Muthuraman; Fleischer, Vinzenz; Kolber, Pierre; Luessi, Felix; Zipp, Frauke; Groppa, Sergiu

    2016-01-01

    Focal demyelinated lesions, diffuse white matter (WM) damage, and gray matter (GM) atrophy influence directly the disease progression in patients with multiple sclerosis. The aim of this study was to identify specific characteristics of GM and WM structural networks in subjects with clinically isolated syndrome (CIS) in comparison to patients with early relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS). Twenty patients with CIS, 33 with RRMS, and 40 healthy subjects were investigated using 3 T-MRI. Diffusion tensor imaging was applied, together with probabilistic tractography and fractional anisotropy (FA) maps for WM and cortical thickness correlation analysis for GM, to determine the structural connectivity patterns. A network topology analysis with the aid of graph theoretical approaches was used to characterize the network at different community levels (modularity, clustering coefficient, global, and local efficiencies). Finally, we applied support vector machines (SVM) to automatically discriminate the two groups. In comparison to CIS subjects, patients with RRMS were found to have increased modular connectivity and higher local clustering, highlighting increased local processing in both GM and WM. Both groups presented increased modularity and clustering coefficients in comparison to healthy controls. SVM algorithms achieved 97% accuracy using the clustering coefficient as classifier derived from GM and 65% using WM from probabilistic tractography and 67% from modularity of FA maps to differentiate between CIS and RRMS patients. We demonstrate a clear increase of modular and local connectivity in patients with early RRMS in comparison to CIS and healthy subjects. Based only on a single anatomic scan and without a priori information, we developed an automated and investigator-independent paradigm that can accurately discriminate between patients with these clinically similar disease entities, and could thus complement the current dissemination-in-time criteria for

  17. Functionally conserved cis-regulatory elements of COL18A1 identified through zebrafish transgenesis.

    PubMed

    Kague, Erika; Bessling, Seneca L; Lee, Josephine; Hu, Gui; Passos-Bueno, Maria Rita; Fisher, Shannon

    2010-01-15

    Type XVIII collagen is a component of basement membranes, and expressed prominently in the eye, blood vessels, liver, and the central nervous system. Homozygous mutations in COL18A1 lead to Knobloch Syndrome, characterized by ocular defects and occipital encephalocele. However, relatively little has been described on the role of type XVIII collagen in development, and nothing is known about the regulation of its tissue-specific expression pattern. We have used zebrafish transgenesis to identify and characterize cis-regulatory sequences controlling expression of the human gene. Candidate enhancers were selected from non-coding sequence associated with COL18A1 based on sequence conservation among mammals. Although these displayed no overt conservation with orthologous zebrafish sequences, four regions nonetheless acted as tissue-specific transcriptional enhancers in the zebrafish embryo, and together recapitulated the major aspects of col18a1 expression. Additional post-hoc computational analysis on positive enhancer sequences revealed alignments between mammalian and teleost sequences, which we hypothesize predict the corresponding zebrafish enhancers; for one of these, we demonstrate functional overlap with the orthologous human enhancer sequence. Our results provide important insight into the biological function and regulation of COL18A1, and point to additional sequences that may contribute to complex diseases involving COL18A1. More generally, we show that combining functional data with targeted analyses for phylogenetic conservation can reveal conserved cis-regulatory elements in the large number of cases where computational alignment alone falls short. PMID:19895802

  18. Raloxifene protects against seizures and neurodegeneration in a mouse model mimicking epilepsy in postmenopausal woman.

    PubMed

    Pottoo, F H; Bhowmik, M; Vohora, D

    2014-12-18

    Epilepsy in menopausal women presents several challenges in the treatment including an increased risk of seizures due to hormone replacement therapy. We investigated the hypothesis if raloxifene, a selective oestrogen receptor modulator, could be employed to prevent behavioural seizures and morphological alterations in a mouse model mimicking epilepsy in postmenopausal women. Female mice were made ovotoxic by treatment with 4-vinylcyclohexene diepoxide (VCD) to mimic a postmenopausal state. They were then subjected to kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures and neurotoxicity, as assessed by microscopic examination of hippocampus, relevant to human temporal lobe epilepsy. VCD administration (for 15days followed by a drug-free period of 30days) induced ovotoxicity in mice as evidenced by reduced number of primary ovarian follicles. This was accompanied by a 62.4% reduction in serum oestradiol levels. The bone mineral density of ovotoxic mice, however, remained unaffected. Raloxifene (8mg/kg) reduced the seizure severity score in both normal and ovotoxic mice and protected against degeneration induced by KA in the CA3, CA1 sub-fields and hilus of the DG. Hippocampal TGF-β3 levels were not affected by any of the treatments. We show the potential protective role of raloxifene in preventing seizures and neuronal damage in a mouse model mimicking epilepsy in postmenopausal women which was found unrelated to hippocampal TGF-β3. Raloxifene might represent a novel therapeutic option for postmenopausal temporal lobe epileptic woman. PMID:25218046

  19. "Old" metal oxide affinity chromatography as "novel" strategy for specific capture of cis-diol-containing compounds.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shao-Ting; Huang, Wei; Deng, Yi-Fan; Gao, Qiang; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2014-09-26

    The metal oxide affinity chromatography (MOAC) materials have been extensively used for extraction of phosphate compounds in the past decade. Actually, some of these materials also possess adsorption affinity towards cis-diol-containing compounds, which was seldom explored in separation field so far. Here we present the proof-of-concept study to evaluate the feasibility of expanding MOAC for specific capture of cis-diol biomolecules. Benefitting from the high commercialisation of the metal oxide materials, such MOAC strategy possesses several advantages, like synthesis-free, low cost and high expandability. Firstly, the recognition of adenosine against 2'-deoxyadenosine was performed using zirconium oxide and cerium oxide, two typical commercial MOAC materials. The results showed that efficient adsorption and elution could be achieved easily by pH switching from basic to acidic. The isotherm curves demonstrated the adsorption process fitted well with Freundlich isotherm model and was spontaneous at room temperature (ΔG(0)<0) with an exothermic nature (ΔH(0)<0). Afterwards, the highly efficient and selective enrichment of various model cis-diol biomolecules, including ribonucleosides, glycopeptides and glycoproteins, was achieved using this MOAC strategy. Finally, the endogenous ribonucleosides and modified ribonucleosides were successfully purified from human urine sample, which demonstrated the potential application of MOAC materials in the enrichment of target compounds from complex biological samples. Besides the excellent performance of extraction for cis-diol-containing compounds, equally important is that these materials are commercially available with low cost, which makes the MOAC a promising strategy for the study of cis-diol biomolecules in metabolomics and proteomics. PMID:25138708

  20. Amitraz: a mimicker of organophosphate poisoning.

    PubMed

    Dhooria, Sahajal; Behera, Digambar; Agarwal, Ritesh

    2015-01-01

    Amitraz is used as an ectoparasiticide for dogs and cattle. Human poisoning due to amitraz may be misdiagnosed as organophosphate/carbamate (OPC) toxicity, since amitraz poisoning shares several clinical features (miosis, bradycardia and hypotension) encountered with OPC poisoning. A 19-year-old man with an alleged history of suicidal ingestion of a pesticide presented with drowsiness and was found to have constricted pupils, hypotension and bradycardia. He was diagnosed as a case of OPC poisoning and was treated with atropine and pralidoxime prior to presentation to our centre. Absence of a hypersecretory state, and the presence of hyperglycaemia and hypothermia along with a normal serum cholinesterase level suggested an alternate possibility. Retrieval of the poison container confirmed the diagnosis of amitraz poisoning. The patient made a rapid recovery with supportive management. Clinician awareness is key to successful management of this poisoning, which carries a good prognosis. PMID:26430228

  1. Primary choriocarcinoma of appendix mimicking acute appendicitis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Enam Murshed; Chakrabarti, Amrita; Dwary, Amit Dutt

    2015-01-01

    Choriocarcinoma is a malignant trophoblastic cancer, the incidence of primary choriocarcinoma (PCC) of the gastrointestinal tract (GIT) being extremely rare, with only 14 cases being reported in worldwide literature. Here we present an extremely rare case of PCCof the appendix in a 32-year-old male who presented with acute pain abdomen. Histopathological examination revealed PCC of the appendix. Examination of the testis was unremarkable. Further investigations revealed a very high serum beta-human chorionic gonadotropin (b-HCG) titer with a normal carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA). Radiological imaging showed multiple areas of liver metastasis. Chemotherapy-based treatment with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP) regime was advised, however the patient failed to follow-up for further management. PMID:26881617

  2. Mimicking Stem Cell Niches to Increase Stem Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Dellatore, Shara M.; Garcia, A. Sofia; Miller, William M.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Niches regulate lineage-specific stem cell self-renewal vs. differentiation in vivo and are comprised of supportive cells and extracellular matrix components arranged in a 3-dimensional topography of controlled stiffness in the presence of oxygen and growth factor gradients. Mimicking stem cell niches in a defined manner will facilitate production of the large numbers of stem cells needed to realize the promise of regenerative medicine and gene therapy. Progress has been made in mimicking components of the niche. Immobilizing cell-associated Notch ligands increased the self-renewal of hematopoietic (blood) stem cells. Culture on a fibrous scaffold that mimics basement membrane texture increased the expansion of hematopoietic and embryonic stem cells. Finally, researchers have created intricate patterns of cell-binding domains and complex oxygen gradients. PMID:18725291

  3. Rational Design of Pathogen-Mimicking Amphiphilic Materials as Nanoadjuvants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ulery, Bret D.; Petersen, Latrisha K.; Phanse, Yashdeep; Kong, Chang Sun; Broderick, Scott R.; Kumar, Devender; Ramer-Tait, Amanda E.; Carrillo-Conde, Brenda; Rajan, Krishna; Wannemuehler, Michael J.; Bellaire, Bryan H.; Metzger, Dennis W.; Narasimhan, Balaji

    2011-12-01

    An opportunity exists today for cross-cutting research utilizing advances in materials science, immunology, microbial pathogenesis, and computational analysis to effectively design the next generation of adjuvants and vaccines. This study integrates these advances into a bottom-up approach for the molecular design of nanoadjuvants capable of mimicking the immune response induced by a natural infection but without the toxic side effects. Biodegradable amphiphilic polyanhydrides possess the unique ability to mimic pathogens and pathogen associated molecular patterns with respect to persisting within and activating immune cells, respectively. The molecular properties responsible for the pathogen-mimicking abilities of these materials have been identified. The value of using polyanhydride nanovaccines was demonstrated by the induction of long-lived protection against a lethal challenge of Yersinia pestis following a single administration ten months earlier. This approach has the tantalizing potential to catalyze the development of next generation vaccines against diseases caused by emerging and re-emerging pathogens.

  4. Identification of tissue-specific cis-regulatory modules based on interactions between transcription factors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Xueping; Lin, Jimmy; Zack, Donald J; Qian, Jiang

    2007-01-01

    Background Evolutionary conservation has been used successfully to help identify cis-acting DNA regions that are important in regulating tissue-specific gene expression. Motivated by increasing evidence that some DNA regulatory regions are not evolutionary conserved, we have developed an approach for cis-regulatory region identification that does not rely upon evolutionary sequence conservation. Results The conservation-independent approach is based on an empirical potential energy between interacting transcription factors (TFs). In this analysis, the potential energy is defined as a function of the number of TF interactions in a genomic region and the strength of the interactions. By identifying sets of interacting TFs, the analysis locates regions enriched with the binding sites of these interacting TFs. We applied this approach to 30 human tissues and identified 6232 putative cis-regulatory modules (CRMs) regulating 2130 tissue-specific genes. Interestingly, some genes appear to be regulated by different CRMs in different tissues. Known regulatory regions are highly enriched in our predicted CRMs. In addition, DNase I hypersensitive sites, which tend to be associated with active regulatory regions, significantly overlap with the predicted CRMs, but not with more conserved regions. We also find that conserved and non-conserved CRMs regulate distinct gene groups. Conserved CRMs control more essential genes and genes involved in fundamental cellular activities such as transcription. In contrast, non-conserved CRMs, in general, regulate more non-essential genes, such as genes related to neural activity. Conclusion These results demonstrate that identifying relevant sets of binding motifs can help in the mapping of DNA regulatory regions, and suggest that non-conserved CRMs play an important role in gene regulation. PMID:17996093

  5. Pineal toxoplasmosis mimicking pineal tumor in an AIDS patient.

    PubMed

    Poon, T P; Behbahani, M; Matoso, I; Kim, B

    1994-07-01

    A pineal mass in a patient with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) is reported. Computed tomography (CT) scan revealed a nodular mass in the pineal region with foci of calcification and obstruction of the aqueduct mimicking a pineal tumor. At autopsy, the brain revealed a well-circumscribed lesion with central necrosis in the pineal region suggestive of toxoplasma and involving the periaqueductal area. Susceptibility of a patient with AIDS to opportunistic infections should be considered. PMID:8064908

  6. Primary ovarian and pararectal hydatid cysts mimicking pelvic endometriosis.

    PubMed

    Bozkurt, Murat; Bozkurt, Duygu Kara; Çil, Ahmet Said; Karaman, Mehmet

    2012-01-01

    We report a case of 48-year-old woman with multiple hydatid cysts in pararectal region and right paraovarian localization with an unusual sonographic and computed tomographic presentation mimicking a pelvic endometriosis. During laparotomy, multiple pararectal and right ovarian cysts resembling endometriosis were resected. Pathologic examination gives the diagnosis of hydatid cysts. Retrospectively, we investigate the primary infection but the patient had no history of hepatic and liver involvement, it is a case of primary infection. PMID:23456529

  7. Biliary Ascariasis Mimicking Colonic Tumor Infiltration of the Biliary System.

    PubMed

    Sundriyal, Deepak; Mittal, Gyanendra; Kumar, Sushil; Manjunath, Suraj; Sharma, Navneet; Gupta, Mahesh

    2015-09-01

    Ascariasis is a common problem in developing countries with poor hygiene and sanitation. It is endemic in India and usually seen in the northern states. Biliary ascariasis is an uncommon cause of obstructive jaundice. We present a case of carcinoma of hepatic flexure of colon in which the patient developed biliary ascariasis and posed a diagnostic challenge as it mimicked tumor infiltration of the biliary system. PMID:27217679

  8. Traumatic Thumb Radial Sagittal Band Injury Mimicking EPL Rupture.

    PubMed

    Dissanayake, Ravi M; Moore, Peter; McCarten, Gregory M

    2016-06-01

    We present the case of a closed traumatic disruption of the thumb radial sagittal band (RSB) that sonographically mimicked rupture of the extensor pollicis longus (EPL) tendon. This injury was treated with primary repair of the RSB and lead to a good functional outcome for the patient. This case report highlights how early recognition and treatment can lead to a good functional outcome. PMID:27454647

  9. Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia in a Premature Neonate Mimicking Neonatal Sepsis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ming-Luen; Yen, Hsiu-Ju; Chen, Shu-Jen; Hung, Giun-Yi; Tsao, Pei-Chen; Soong, Wen-Jue

    2016-04-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia (JMML) is a rare hematologic malignancy in children. Its presentations include anemia, thrombocytopenia, monocytosis, skin rash, marked hepatomegaly, and/or splenomegaly. Fever and respiratory involvement are common. Here, we report a case of a premature neonate with initial symptoms of respiratory distress. She gradually developed clinical manifestations of JMML that mimicked neonatal sepsis. Three weeks after birth, JMML was diagnosed. This is the first reported case of JMML presenting in a premature infant in Taiwan. PMID:24269860

  10. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  11. Localised pericardial effusion mimicking anterior myocardial infarction following coronary angiography.

    PubMed

    Acibuca, Aynur; Gerede, Demet M; Baris, Veysel O; Kilickap, Mustafa

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of pericarditis is important, especially in patients assumed to have acute coronary syndrome. Distinguishing these two conditions is vital but not always easy. Accurate diagnosis is essential to provide appropriate treatment as soon as possible and to avoid inappropriate invasive procedures. By highlighting this distinction, we report a case of pericarditis that occurred after percutaneous coronary intervention and mimicked acute coronary syndrome. PMID:26956614

  12. Osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis.

    PubMed

    Gopinathan, Nirmal Raj; Prakash, Mahesh; Saibaba, Balaji; Das, Ashim

    2016-01-01

    Osteofibrous dysplasia or ossifying fibroma is an uncommon benign fibro-osseous lesion of childhood, commonly described in the maxilla and the mandible. Among long bones, it usually presents in the tibia as a painless swelling or anterior bowing. Ossifying fibroma of clavicle has never been reported in English literature, to the best of our knowledge. Here, we would like to present an unusual case of osteofibrous dysplasia of clavicle clinically mimicking chronic osteomyelitis. PMID:27413281

  13. Mimicking Tissue Boundaries by Sharp Multiparameter Matrix Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sapudom, Jiranuwat; Rubner, Stefan; Martin, Steve; Pompe, Tilo

    2016-08-01

    Engineering interfaces of distinct extracellular compartments mimicking native tissues are key for in-depth in vitro studies on developmental and disease processes in biology and medicine. Sharp interfaces of extracellular matrices are constructed based on fibrillar collagen I networks with a multiparameter control of topology, mechanics, and composition, and their distinct impact on triggering the directionality of cancer cell migration is demonstrated. PMID:27125887

  14. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor radiographically mimicking a sinus mucocele.

    PubMed

    de Santana Santos, Thiago; Frota, Riedel; de Souza Andrade, Emanuel Sávio; de Oliveira E Silva, Emanuel Dias

    2013-03-01

    The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or Gorlin cyst is an uncommon lesion with a variable clinical behavior and considerable histopathologic diversity. The authors report a case of calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor that was being treated as a maxillary sinus mucocele. The possibility of mimicking numerous odontogenic and nonodontogenic lesions makes the calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor difficult for a clinical diagnosis. The present case demonstrates that a specific knowledge in oral pathology is required to differentiate odontogenic lesions. PMID:23524811

  15. Novel tissue mimicking materials for high frequency breast ultrasound phantoms.

    PubMed

    Cannon, Louise M; Fagan, Andrew J; Browne, Jacinta E

    2011-01-01

    The development and acoustical characterisation of a range of novel agar-based tissue mimicking material (TMMs) for use in clinically relevant, quality assurance (QA) and anthropomorphic breast phantoms are presented. The novel agar-based TMMs described in this study are based on a comprehensive, systematic variation of the ingredients in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) TMM. A novel, solid fat-mimicking material was also developed and acoustically characterised. Acoustical characterisation was carried out using an in-house scanning acoustic macroscope at low (7.5 MHz) and high frequencies (20 MHz), using the pulse-echo insertion technique. The speeds of sound range from 1490 to 1570 m. s(-1), attenuation coefficients range from 0.1 to 0.9 dB. cm(‑1). MHz(-1) and relative backscatter ranges from 0 to -20 dB. It was determined that tissues can be mimicked in terms of independently controllable speeds of sound and attenuation coefficients. These properties make these novel TMMs suitable for use in clinically relevant QA and anthropomorphic phantoms and would potentially be useful for other high frequency applications such as intravascular and small animal imaging. PMID:21084158

  16. Disruption of a long-range cis-acting regulator for Shh causes preaxial polydactyly.

    PubMed

    Lettice, Laura A; Horikoshi, Taizo; Heaney, Simon J H; van Baren, Marijke J; van der Linde, Herma C; Breedveld, Guido J; Joosse, Marijke; Akarsu, Nurten; Oostra, Ben A; Endo, Naoto; Shibata, Minoru; Suzuki, Mikio; Takahashi, Eiichi; Shinka, Toshikatsu; Nakahori, Yutaka; Ayusawa, Dai; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W; Heutink, Peter; Hill, Robert E; Noji, Sumihare

    2002-05-28

    Preaxial polydactyly (PPD) is a common limb malformation in human. A number of polydactylous mouse mutants indicate that misexpression of Shh is a common requirement for generating extra digits. Here we identify a translocation breakpoint in a PPD patient and a transgenic insertion site in the polydactylous mouse mutant sasquatch (Ssq). The genetic lesions in both lie within the same respective intron of the LMBR1/Lmbr1 gene, which resides approximately 1 Mb away from Shh. Genetic analysis of Ssq reveals that the Lmbr1 gene is incidental to the phenotype and that the mutation directly interrupts a cis-acting regulator of Shh. This regulator is most likely the target for generating PPD mutations in human. PMID:12032320

  17. Disruption of a long-range cis-acting regulator for Shh causes preaxial polydactyly

    PubMed Central

    Lettice, Laura A.; Horikoshi, Taizo; Heaney, Simon J. H.; van Baren, Marijke J.; van der Linde, Herma C.; Breedveld, Guido J.; Joosse, Marijke; Akarsu, Nurten; Oostra, Ben A.; Endo, Naoto; Shibata, Minoru; Suzuki, Mikio; Takahashi, Eiichi; Shinka, Toshikatsu; Nakahori, Yutaka; Ayusawa, Dai; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Scherer, Stephen W.; Heutink, Peter; Hill, Robert E.; Noji, Sumihare

    2002-01-01

    Preaxial polydactyly (PPD) is a common limb malformation in human. A number of polydactylous mouse mutants indicate that misexpression of Shh is a common requirement for generating extra digits. Here we identify a translocation breakpoint in a PPD patient and a transgenic insertion site in the polydactylous mouse mutant sasquatch (Ssq). The genetic lesions in both lie within the same respective intron of the LMBR1/Lmbr1 gene, which resides ≈1 Mb away from Shh. Genetic analysis of Ssq reveals that the Lmbr1 gene is incidental to the phenotype and that the mutation directly interrupts a cis-acting regulator of Shh. This regulator is most likely the target for generating PPD mutations in human. PMID:12032320

  18. Cis- and trans-zeatin differentially modulate plant immunity

    PubMed Central

    Großkinsky, Dominik; Edelsbrunner, Kerstin; Pfeifhofer, Hartwig; van der Graaff, Eric; Roitsch, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Phytohormones are essential regulators of various processes in plant growth and development. Several phytohormones are also known to regulate plant responses to environmental stress and pathogens. Only recently, cytokinins have been demonstrated to play an important role in plant immunity. Increased levels of cytokinins such as trans-zeatin, which are considered highly active, induced resistance against mainly (hemi)biotrophic pathogens in different plant species. In contrast, cis-zeatin is commonly regarded as a cytokinin exhibiting low or no activity. Here we comparatively study the impact of both zeatin isomers on the infection of Nicotiana tabacum by the (hemi)biotrophic microbial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae. We demonstrate a biological effect of cis-zeatin and a differential effect of the two zeatin isomers on symptom development, defense responses and bacterial multiplication. PMID:23656869

  19. [Transsexual wish and and cis-sexual defense].

    PubMed

    Sigusch, V

    1995-01-01

    The desire of trans-sexual patients to appropriate the physical attributes of the opposite sex via hormone treatment or surgery confronts psychoanalysis and sex research with problems that are not only psychological in nature. Sigusch uses the term "defence" here not only in a technical sense but also in an epistemological, discourse-analytic and disposition-analytic register. The general dispositions determining the reality of gender and gender difference are "cis-sexual" in nature. The polarity they display extends to the physical and manifests itself in the form of sexual binarism. The author coins the consciously neologistic term "cis-sexual" to describe individuals where physical gender and gender identity are completely and "naturally" co-extensive. Only the realization that "second-nature" is in reality primary can trigger the detotalization of so-called trans-sexuality that Sigusch is concerned to call into question. PMID:7480808

  20. Multicomponent reactions of methyl substituted all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexane aldehydes.

    PubMed

    Bykova, Tetiana; Al-Maharik, Nawaf; Slawin, Alexandra M Z; O'Hagan, David

    2016-01-21

    This paper reports the preparation of methyl substituted all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexanes prepared from a Birch reduction of benzoic acid, worked up with a methyl iodide quench. The resultant methylcyclohexadiene carboxylic acid was reduced to the alcohol, protected as an ether and then a sequence of functional group manipulations carried out to introduce four fluorines. The cyclohexadienyl ring was then epoxidised and the C-O bonds sequentially converted through deoxyfluorination reactions to two sets of isomers of all-cis tetrafluorocyclohexane isomers. The blocking methyl group renders the ring safe to hydrogen fluoride elimination. Deprotection of the benzylic ether and then oxidation gave aldehydes which were then used in Ugi and Passerini multicomponent reactions, allowing this facially polarised cyclohexane to be incorporated into peptidic structural motifs. PMID:26646211

  1. DNA interaction with cis- and trans- isomers of photosensitive surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unksov, I. N.; Kasyanenko, N. A.

    2014-12-01

    Interaction between DNA and photosensitive cationic surfactant in a solution is studied. Studies were conducted to examine the impact of the surfactant in its cis- conformation on the size of DNA molecule and also to investigate the phase behavior of the system depending on DNA and surfactant concentration. We conclude that trans- isomer of surfactant requires its smaller concentration to reach the DNA compaction compared with cis- isomer received by UV radiation of solutions. Studies of DNA-surfactant systems were performed by means of spectrophotometry and viscometry. Variation of surfactant concentration enables us to determine the precipitation zone on phase diagram. From the viscosity study it can be indicated that precipitation zone is narrower for UV-radiated surfactant and it shifts to higher surfactant concentration. Also we examine the reversibility of DNA compaction in systems with the surfactant in its trans- form.

  2. cis-platinum and ovarian carcinoma. In vitro chemosensitivity of cultured tumour cells from patients receiving high dose cis-platinum as first line treatment.

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, A. P.; Ford, C. H.; Newman, C. E.; Howell, A.

    1987-01-01

    A study on the in vitro sensitivity of tumour cells from patients with ovarian cancer has been carried out in parallel with a clinical study designed to evaluate the role of high-dose cis-platinum (CIS) as first-line chemotherapy. A total of 50 samples from 102 patients have been successfully cultured and screened for in vitro chemosensitivity to 7 drugs, including CIS. The malignant nature of cells growing in culture was confirmed using a combination of karyology, morphology and immunohistochemical staining with HMFG2. Tumours were graded as sensitive (less than 40% of control 3H-leucine incorporation), intermediate (41-60% of control) or resistant (greater than 61% of control) to CIS. Correlation of in vitro sensitivity to cis-platinum with clinical response to cis-platinum assessed using CT scan and second-look laparotomy, showed positive correlation in 9/11 (89%) patients (8 = S/S; 1 = R/R); positive correlation between in vitro sensitivity to phosphoramide mustard and clinical response was also found in 4/6 patients receiving cyclophosphamide (3 = S/S; 1 = R/R). All patients with sensitive tumours showed a clinical response to cis-platinum. Comparison of cis-platinum sensitivity with sensitivity to phosphoramide mustard and melphalan showed that some tumours were sensitive only to cis-platinum; resistance to cis-platinum and sensitivity to phosphoramide mustard/melphalan was an infrequent occurrence. Some tumours which were resistant to cis-platinum showed sensitivity to adriamycin and bleomycin, particularly those from untreated patients. Sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil and resistance to cis-platinum was found in approximately equal proportions of tumours in both the treated and untreated groups. PMID:3435704

  3. Thermodynamic State Ensemble Models of cis-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Marc S.; Cohen, Barak A.

    2012-01-01

    A major goal in computational biology is to develop models that accurately predict a gene's expression from its surrounding regulatory DNA. Here we present one class of such models, thermodynamic state ensemble models. We describe the biochemical derivation of the thermodynamic framework in simple terms, and lay out the mathematical components that comprise each model. These components include (1) the possible states of a promoter, where a state is defined as a particular arrangement of transcription factors bound to a DNA promoter, (2) the binding constants that describe the affinity of the protein–protein and protein–DNA interactions that occur in each state, and (3) whether each state is capable of transcribing. Using these components, we demonstrate how to compute a cis-regulatory function that encodes the probability of a promoter being active. Our intention is to provide enough detail so that readers with little background in thermodynamics can compose their own cis-regulatory functions. To facilitate this goal, we also describe a matrix form of the model that can be easily coded in any programming language. This formalism has great flexibility, which we show by illustrating how phenomena such as competition between transcription factors and cooperativity are readily incorporated into these models. Using this framework, we also demonstrate that Michaelis-like functions, another class of cis-regulatory models, are a subset of the thermodynamic framework with specific assumptions. By recasting Michaelis-like functions as thermodynamic functions, we emphasize the relationship between these models and delineate the specific circumstances representable by each approach. Application of thermodynamic state ensemble models is likely to be an important tool in unraveling the physical basis of combinatorial cis-regulation and in generating formalisms that accurately predict gene expression from DNA sequence. PMID:22479169

  4. Cluster Ion Spectrometry (CIS) Data Archiving in the CAA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dandouras, I. S.; Barthe, A.; Penou, E.; Brunato, S.; Reme, H.; Kistler, L. M.; Blagau, A.; Facsko, G.; Kronberg, E.; Laakso, H. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Cluster Active Archive (CAA) aims at preserving the four Cluster spacecraft data, so that they are usable in the long-term by the scientific community as well as by the instrument team PIs and Co-Is. This implies that the data are filed together with the descriptive and documentary elements making it possible to select and interpret them. The CIS (Cluster Ion Spectrometry) experiment is a comprehensive ionic plasma spectrometry package onboard the four Cluster spacecraft, capable of obtaining full three-dimensional ion distributions (about 0 to 40 keV/e) with a time resolution of one spacecraft spin (4 sec) and with mass-per-charge composition determination. The CIS package consists of two different instruments, a Hot Ion Analyser (HIA) and a time-of-flight ion Composition Distribution Function (CODIF) analyser. For the archival of the CIS data a multi-level approach has been adopted. The CAA archival includes processed raw data (Level 1 data), moments of the ion distribution functions (Level 2 data), and calibrated high-resolution data in a variety of physical units (Level 3 data). The latter are 3-D ion distribution functions and 2-D pitch-angle distributions. In addition, a software package has been developed to allow the CAA user to interactively calculate partial or total moments of the ion distributions. Instrument cross-calibration has been an important activity in preparing the data for archival. The CIS data archive includes also experiment documentation, graphical products for browsing through the data, and data caveats. In addition, data quality indexes are under preparation, to help the user. Given the complexity of an ion spectrometer, and the variety of its operational modes, each one being optimised for a different magnetospheric region or measurement objective, consultation of the data caveats by the end user will always be a necessary step in the data analysis.

  5. Proton irradiation of the CIS115 for the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soman, M. R.; Allanwood, E. A. H.; Holland, A. D.; Winstone, G. P.; Gow, J. P. D.; Stefanov, K.; Leese, M.

    2015-09-01

    The CIS115 is one of the latest CMOS Imaging Sensors designed by e2v technologies, with 1504x2000 pixels on a 7 μm pitch. Each pixel in the array is a pinned photodiode with a 4T architecture, achieving an average dark current of 22 electrons pixel-1 s-1 at 21°C measured in a front-faced device. The sensor aims for high optical sensitivity by utilising e2v's back-thinning and processing capabilities, providing a sensitive silicon thickness approximately 9 μm to 12 μm thick with a tuned anti-reflective coating. The sensor operates in a rolling shutter mode incorporating reset level subtraction resulting in a mean pixel readout noise of 4.25 electrons rms. The full well has been measured to be 34000 electrons in a previous study, resulting in a dynamic range of up to 8000. These performance characteristics have led to the CIS115 being chosen for JANUS, the high-resolution and wide-angle optical camera on the JUpiter ICy moon Explorer (JUICE). The three year science phase of JUICE is in the harsh radiation environment of the Jovian magnetosphere, primarily studying Jupiter and its icy moons. Analysis of the expected radiation environment and shielding levels from the spacecraft and instrument design predict the End Of Life (EOL) displacement and ionising damage for the CIS115 to be equivalent to 1010 10 MeV protons cm-2 and 100 krad(Si) respectively. Dark current and image lag characterisation results following initial proton irradiations are presented, detailing the initial phase of space qualification of the CIS115. Results are compared to the pre-irradiation performance and the instrument specifications and further qualification plans are outlined.

  6. History and Status of the CIS Customs Union

    SciTech Connect

    Lawson, T.M.; Erickson, S.A.

    1999-08-31

    This report explores the history of the CIS Customs Union and the major obstacles the Union faces in its implementation. Investigation of the Customs Union is necessary as its implementation could effect the Second Line of Defense (SLD) Program. Russian Customs contends that radiation detectors should not be installed along the Customs Union members borders of as the borders will be dissolved when the Union is implemented.

  7. City of Troitsk and Sooty Snow, Chelyabinsk, CIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    This view shows the industrial pollution around the Siberian city of Troitsk (54.0N, 61.0E). Troitsk is the smallest of a group of three heavy industrial cities east of the Urals, the others being Magnitogorsk and Chelyabinsk. All have been cited as being some of the worst industrial polluted cities in the CIS. Despite being the smallest of the three, Troitsk has the largest area of soot blackened snow. Respiratory diseases among the citizens are chronic.

  8. Cis and trans interactions between atlastin molecules during membrane fusion

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Tina Y.; Bian, Xin; Romano, Fabian B.; Shemesh, Tom; Rapoport, Tom A.; Hu, Junjie

    2015-01-01

    Atlastin (ATL), a membrane-anchored GTPase that mediates homotypic fusion of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) membranes, is required for formation of the tubular network of the peripheral ER. How exactly ATL mediates membrane fusion is only poorly understood. Here we show that fusion is preceded by the transient tethering of ATL-containing vesicles caused by the dimerization of ATL molecules in opposing membranes. Tethering requires GTP hydrolysis, not just GTP binding, because the two ATL molecules are pulled together most strongly in the transition state of GTP hydrolysis. Most tethering events are futile, so that multiple rounds of GTP hydrolysis are required for successful fusion. Supported lipid bilayer experiments show that ATL molecules sitting on the same (cis) membrane can also undergo nucleotide-dependent dimerization. These results suggest that GTP hydrolysis is required to dissociate cis dimers, generating a pool of ATL monomers that can dimerize with molecules on a different (trans) membrane. In addition, tethering and fusion require the cooperation of multiple ATL molecules in each membrane. We propose a comprehensive model for ATL-mediated fusion that takes into account futile tethering and competition between cis and trans interactions. PMID:25825753

  9. Ready access to functionally embellished cis-hydrindanes and cis-decalins: protecting group-free total syntheses of (±)-Nootkatone and (±)-Noreremophilane.

    PubMed

    Handore, Kishor L; Seetharamsingh, B; Reddy, D Srinivasa

    2013-08-16

    A simple and efficient synthesis of functionalized cis-hydrindanes and cis-decalins was achieved using a sequential Diels-Alder/aldol approach in a highly diastereoselective manner. The scope of this method was tested with a variety of substrates and was successfully applied to the synthesis of two natural products in racemic form. The highlights of the present work provide ready access to 13 new cis-hydrindanes/cis-decalins, a protecting group-free total synthesis of an insect repellent Nootkatone, and the first synthesis of a Noreremophilane using the shortest sequence. PMID:23855542

  10. Retention of configuration in nucleophilic vinylic halide substitution - Proton magnetic resonance spectra of cis- and trans- beta-styryldiphenylphosphine oxides.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguiar, A. M.; Daigle, D.

    1965-01-01

    Cis- and trans-beta-bromostyrene reaction with lithium diphenylphosphide in tetrahydrofuran producing cis- and trans-beta- styryldiphenylphosphine, discussing proton magnetic resonance and configuration retention

  11. Knockdown of platinum-induced growth differentiation factor 15 abrogates p27-mediated tumor growth delay in the chemoresistant ovarian cancer model A2780cis

    PubMed Central

    Meier, Julia C; Haendler, Bernard; Seidel, Henrik; Groth, Philip; Adams, Robert; Ziegelbauer, Karl; Kreft, Bertolt; Beckmann, Georg; Sommer, Anette; Kopitz, Charlotte

    2015-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms underlying the development of resistance to platinum-based treatment in patients with ovarian cancer remain poorly understood. This is mainly due to the lack of appropriate in vivo models allowing the identification of resistance-related factors. In this study, we used human whole-genome microarrays and linear model analysis to identify potential resistance-related genes by comparing the expression profiles of the parental human ovarian cancer model A2780 and its platinum-resistant variant A2780cis before and after carboplatin treatment in vivo. Growth differentiation factor 15 (GDF15) was identified as one of five potential resistance-related genes in the A2780cis tumor model. Although A2780-bearing mice showed a strong carboplatin-induced increase of GDF15 plasma levels, the basal higher GDF15 plasma levels of A2780cis-bearing mice showed no further increase after short-term or long-term carboplatin treatment. This correlated with a decreased DNA damage response, enhanced AKT survival signaling and abrogated cell cycle arrest in the carboplatin-treated A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, knockdown of GDF15 in A2780cis cells did not alter cell proliferation but enhanced cell migration and colony size in vitro. Interestingly, in vivo knockdown of GDF15 in the A2780cis model led to a basal-enhanced tumor growth, but increased sensitivity to carboplatin treatment as compared to the control-transduced A2780cis tumors. This was associated with larger necrotic areas, a lobular tumor structure and increased p53 and p16 expression of the carboplatin-treated shGDF15-A2780cis tumors. Furthermore, shRNA-mediated GDF15 knockdown abrogated p27 expression as compared to control-transduced A2780cis tumors. In conclusion, these data show that GDF15 may contribute to carboplatin resistance by suppressing tumor growth through p27. These data show that GDF15 might serve as a novel treatment target in women with platinum-resistant ovarian cancer. PMID:25490861

  12. Mapping Association between Long-Range Cis-Regulatory Regions and Their Target Genes Using Comparative Genomics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mongin, Emmanuel; Dewar, Ken; Blanchette, Mathieu

    In chordates, long-range cis-regulatory regions are involved in the control of transcription initiation (either as repressors or enhancers). They can be located as far as 1 Mb from the transcription start site of the target gene and can regulate more than one gene. Therefore, proper characterization of functional interactions between long-range cis-regulatory regions and their target genes remains problematic. We present a novel method to predict such interactions based on the analysis of rearrangements between the human and 16 other vertebrate genomes. Our method is based on the assumption that genome rearrangements that would disrupt the functional interaction between a cis-regulatory region and its target gene are likely to be deleterious. Therefore, conservation of synteny through evolution would be an indication of a functional interaction. We use our algorithm to classify a set of 1,406,084 putative associations from the human genome. This genome-wide map of interactions has many potential applications, including the selection of candidate regions prior to in vivo experimental characterization, a better characterization of regulatory regions involved in position effect diseases, and an improved understanding of the mechanisms and importance of long-range regulation.

  13. Binding affinities of CRBPI and CRBPII for 9-cis-retinoids

    PubMed Central

    Kane, Maureen A.; Bright, Frank V.; Napoli, Joseph L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cellular retinol binding-protein I (CRBPI) and cellular retinol binding-protein II (CRBPII) serve as intracellular retinoid chaperones that bind retinol and retinal with high affinity and facilitate substrate delivery to select enzymes that catalyze retinoic acid (RA) and retinyl ester biosynthesis. Recently, 9-cis-RA has been identified in vivo in the pancreas, where it contributes to regulating glucose-stimulated insulin secretion. In vitro, 9-cis-RA activates RXR (retinoid×receptors), which serve as therapeutic targets for treating cancer and metabolic diseases. Binding affinities and structure–function relationships have been well characterized for CRBPI and CRBPII with all-trans-retinoids, but not for 9-cis-retinoids. This study extended current knowledge by establishing binding affinities for CRBPI and CRBPII with 9-cis-retinoids. Methods We have determined apparent dissociation constants, Kd′, through monitoring binding of 9-cis-retinol, 9-cis-retinal, and 9-cis-RA with CRBPI and CRBPII by fluorescence spectroscopy, and analyzing the data with non-linear regression. We compared these data to the data we obtained for all-trans- and 13-cis-retinoids under identical conditions. Results CRBPI and CRBPII, respectively, bind 9-cis-retinol ( Kd′, 11 nM and 68 nM) and 9-cis-retinal ( Kd′, 8 nM and 5 nM) with high affinity. No significant 9-cis-RA binding was observed with CRBPI or CRBPII. Conclusions CRBPI and CRBPII bind 9-cis-retinol and 9-cis-retinal with high affinities, albeit with affinities somewhat lower than for all-trans-retinol and all-trans-retinal. General significance These data provide further insight into structure–binding relationships of cellular retinol binding-proteins and are consistent with a model of 9-cis-RA biosynthesis that involves chaperoned delivery of 9-cis-retinoids to enzymes that recognize retinoid binding-proteins. PMID:21382444

  14. Metabolic characteristics of 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) and anti-tumour activity of the 13-cis-retinoic acid metabolite 4-oxo-13-cis-retinoic acid in neuroblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Sonawane, Poonam; Cho, Hwang Eui; Tagde, Ashujit; Verlekar, Dattesh; Yu, Alice L; Reynolds, C Patrick; Kang, Min H

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose Isotretinoin (13-cis-retinoic acid; 13-cRA) is a differentiation inducer used to treat minimal residual disease after myeloablative therapy for high-risk neuroblastoma. However, more than 40% of children develop recurrent disease during or after 13-cRA treatment. The plasma concentrations of 13-cRA in earlier studies were considered subtherapeutic while 4-oxo-13-cis-RA (4-oxo-13-cRA), a metabolite of 13-cRA considered by some investigators as inactive, were greater than threefold higher than 13-cRA. We sought to define the metabolic pathways of 13-cRA and investigated the anti-tumour activity of its major metabolite, 4-oxo-13-cRA. Experimental Approach Effects of 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA on human neuroblastoma cell lines were assessed by DIMSCAN and flow cytometry for cell proliferation, MYCN down-regulation by reverse transcription PCR and immunoblotting, and neurite outgrowth by confocal microscopy. 13-cRA metabolism was determined using tandem MS in human liver microsomes and in patient samples. Key Results Six major metabolites of 13-cRA were identified in patient samples. Of these, 4-oxo-13-cRA was the most abundant, and 4-oxo-13-cRA glucuronide was also detected at a higher level in patients. CYP3A4 was shown to play a major role in catalysing 13-cRA to 4-oxo-13-cRA. In human neuroblastoma cell lines, 4-oxo-13-cRA and 13-cRA were equi-effective at inducing neurite outgrowth, inhibiting proliferation, decreasing MYCN mRNA and protein, and increasing the expression of retinoic acid receptor-β mRNA and protein levels. Conclusions and Implications We showed that 4-oxo-13-cRA is as active as 13-cRA against neuroblastoma cell lines. Plasma levels of both 13-cRA and 4-oxo-13-cRA should be evaluated in pharmacokinetic studies of isotretinoin in neuroblastoma. PMID:25039756

  15. Exonic remnants of whole-genome duplication reveal cis-regulatory function of coding exons

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xianjun; Navratilova, Pavla; Fredman, David; Drivenes, Øyvind; Becker, Thomas S.; Lenhard, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Using a comparative genomics approach to reconstruct the fate of genomic regulatory blocks (GRBs) and identify exonic remnants that have survived the disappearance of their host genes after whole-genome duplication (WGD) in teleosts, we discover a set of 38 candidate cis-regulatory coding exons (RCEs) with predicted target genes. These elements demonstrate evolutionary separation of overlapping protein-coding and regulatory information after WGD in teleosts. We present evidence that the corresponding mammalian exons are still under both coding and non-coding selection pressure, are more conserved than other protein coding exons in the host gene and several control sets, and share key characteristics with highly conserved non-coding elements in the same regions. Their dual function is corroborated by existing experimental data. Additionally, we show examples of human exon remnants stemming from the vertebrate 2R WGD. Our findings suggest that long-range cis-regulatory inputs for developmental genes are not limited to non-coding regions, but can also overlap the coding sequence of unrelated genes. Thus, exonic regulatory elements in GRBs might be functionally equivalent to those in non-coding regions, calling for a re-evaluation of the sequence space in which to look for long-range regulatory elements and experimentally test their activity. PMID:19969543

  16. Separate cis-trans Pathways Post-transcriptionally Regulate Murine CD154 (CD40 Ligand) Expression

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, B. JoNell; Wang, Xiao-Wei; Collins, Jane; Bloch, Donald; Bergeron, Alan; Henry, Brian; Terry, Benjamin M.; Zan, Moe; Mouland, Andrew J.; Rigby, William F. C.

    2008-01-01

    We report a role for CA repeats in the 3′-untranslated region (3′-UTR) in regulating CD154 expression. Human CD154 is encoded by an unstable mRNA; this instability is conferred in cis by a portion of its 3′-UTR that includes a polypyrimidine-rich region and CA dinucleotide repeat. We demonstrate similar instability activity with the murine CD154 3′-UTR. This instability element mapped solely to a conserved 100-base CU-rich region alone, which we call a CU-rich response element. Surprisingly, the CA dinucleotide-rich region also regulated reporter expression but at the level of translation. This activity was associated with poly(A) tail shortening and regulated by heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein L levels. We conclude that the CD154 3′-UTR contains dual cis-acting elements, one of which defines a novel function for exonic CA dinucleotide repeats. These findings suggest a mechanism for the association of 3′-UTR CA-rich response element polymorphisms with CD154 overexpression and the subsequent risk of autoimmune disease. PMID:18640985

  17. Estimation of thermal distribution in tissue-mimicking phantom made of carrageenan gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jungsoon; Jung, Jihee; Kim, Moojoon; Ha, Kanglyeol

    2015-07-01

    To probe the temperature elevation effect caused by ultrasound, the use of a tissue-mimicking phantom was newly suggested. Carrageenan gel was adopted to realize not only the required transparency for visualization but also the acoustic characteristics similar to those of human tissue. To visualize the temperature elevation effect inside the phantom, thermochromic film with a critical temperature of discoloration was introduced. From the visualized image, the temperature elevation due to planar and focused ultrasound in the phantom was obtained quantitatively. To verify the suggested method, the bioheat equation was solved numerically by the Fourier transform method. The theoretical results show good agreement with experimental ones regarding the temperature distribution while plane and focused ultrasound was irradiated into the phantom.

  18. Proposed Pharmacological Countermeasures Against Apoptotic Cell Death in Experimental Models Mimicking Space Environment Damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lulli, Matteo; Papucci, Laura; Witort, Ewa; Donnini, Martino; Lapucci, Andrea; Lazzarano, Stefano; Mazzoni, Tiziano; Simoncini, Madine; Falciani, Piergiuseppe; Capaccioli, Sergio

    2008-06-01

    Several damaging agents have been suggested to affect human vision during long term space travels. Recently, apoptosis induced by DNA-damaging agents has emerged as frequent pathogenetic mechanism of ophthalmologic pathologies. Here, we propose two countermeasures: coenzyme Q10 and bcl-2 downregulation preventing antisense oligoribonucleotides (ORNs), aimed to inhibit cellular apoptotic death. Our studies have been carried out on retina and neuronal cultured cells treated with the following apoptotic stimuli mimicking space environment: a several-day exposure to either 3H-labeled tymidine or to the genotoxic drug doxorubicin, UV irradiation, hypoxia and glucose/growth factor starvation (Locke medium). The preliminary results clearly indicate that CoQ10, as well as bcl-2 down-regulation preventing ORNs, significantly counteract apoptosis in response to different DNA damaging agents in cultured eye and in neuronal cells. This supports the possibility that both could be optimal countermeasures against ophthalmologic lesions during space explorations.

  19. OctreoScan positive Crohn's disease mimicking an ileal carcinoid tumor.

    PubMed

    Marko, Jamie; Lamba, Reema; Miller, Frank; Buchman, Alan; Spies, Stewart; Nikolaidis, Paul

    2008-01-01

    Somatostatin receptors have been identified in many tissues throughout the human body. Alterations in the expression of somatostatin receptors have been reported in many disease states including both tumorous and nontumorous conditions. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy utilizing OctreoScan (Mallinckrodt Medical, Inc., St. Louis, MO), a radiolabled form of octreotide, has been reported to be a highly sensitive imaging technique for identifying pathology, such as neuroendocrine tumors, that are somatostatin receptor dense. Unfortunately, many conditions cause an increase in the quantity of somatostatin receptors and therefore may cause false positive Octreoscans. In this report, we discuss the alterations in somatostatin receptors that occur with Crohn's disease and describe a case of an OctreoScan-positive inflammatory mass mimicking a carcinoid tumor. PMID:18097293

  20. Chronic oral treatment with 13-cis-retinoic acid (isotretinoin) or all-trans-retinoic acid does not alter depression-like behaviors in rats.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Sherry A; Cisneros, F Javier; Gough, B; Hanig, Joseph P; Berry, Kimberly J

    2005-10-01

    Oral treatment with the anti-acne drug Accutane (isotretinoin, 13-cis-retinoic acid) has been associated with suicide ideation and depression. Here, depression-like behaviors (i.e., behavioral despair and anhedonia) were quantified in adult Sprague-Dawley rats gavaged daily beginning at postnatal day (PND) 82 with 13-cis-RA (7.5 or 22.5 mg/kg) or all-trans-retinoic acid (10 or 15 mg/kg ). Tested at PND 130-131 in the Forced Swim Test, 7.5 mg/kg 13-cis-RA marginally decreased immobility and slightly increased climb/struggle durations whereas neither all-trans-retinoic acid group differed from controls. Voluntary saccharin solution (0.03%) intake at PND 102-104 and PND 151-153 was not different from controls in any treated group, although all RA-treated groups had lower intakes. Swim speed in a water maze at PND 180 was similar across groups, indicating no RA-induced differences in physical ability. Open field activity was mildly decreased at PND 91 in 7.5 mg/kg-treated males only, but it was within the control range at PND 119, 147, and 175. Thus, at serum levels similar to those in humans receiving the drug, chronic 13-cis-RA treatment did not severely affect depression-like behaviors in rats. These data do not substantiate the hypothesis of 13-cis-RA-induced depression. PMID:16033993

  1. Distinct binding determinants for 9-cis retinoic acid are located within AF-2 of retinoic acid receptor alpha.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, B F; Allenby, G; Janocha, R; Kazmer, S; Speck, J; Sturzenbecker, L J; Abarzúa, P; Levin, A A; Grippo, J F

    1994-01-01

    Retinoids exert their physiological action by interacting with two families of nuclear receptors, the retinoic acid receptors (RARs) and the retinoid X receptors (RXRs), which regulate gene expression by forming transcriptionally active heterodimeric RAR/RXR or homodimeric RXR/RXR complexes on DNA. Retinoid receptor activity resides in several regions, including the DNA and ligand binding domains, a dimerization interface, and both a ligand-independent (AF-1) and a ligand-dependent (AF-2) transactivation function. While 9-cis retinoic acid (RA) alone is the cognate ligand for the RXRs, both 9-cis RA and all-trans RA (t-RA) compete for binding with high affinity to the RARs. This latter observation suggested to us that the two isomers may interact with a common binding site. Here we report that RAR alpha has two distinct but overlapping binding sites for 9-cis RA and t-RA. Truncation of a human RAR alpha to 419 amino acids yields a receptor that binds both t-RA and 9-cis RA with high affinity, but truncation to amino acid 404 yields a mutant receptor that binds only t-RA with high affinity. Remarkably, this region also defines a C-terminal boundary for AF-2, as addition of amino acids 405 to 419 restores receptor-mediated gene activity to a truncated human RAR alpha lacking this region. It is interesting to speculate that binding of retinoid stereoisomers to unique sites within an RAR may function with AF-2 to cause differential activation of retinoid-responsive gene pathways. Images PMID:8139538

  2. Multimodal, 3D pathology-mimicking bladder phantom for evaluation of cystoscopic technologies (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee, Audrey K.

    2016-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) and blue light cystoscopy (BLC) have shown significant potential as complementary technologies to traditional white light cystoscopy (WLC) for early bladder cancer detection. Three-dimensional (3D) organ-mimicking phantoms provide realistic imaging environments for testing new technology designs, the diagnostic potential of systems, and novel image processing algorithms prior to validation in real tissue. Importantly, the phantom should mimic features of healthy and diseased tissue as they appear under WLC, BLC, and OCT, which are sensitive to tissue color and structure, fluorescent contrast, and optical scattering of subsurface layers, respectively. We present a phantom posing the hollow shape of the bladder and fabricated using a combination of 3D-printing and spray-coating with Dragon Skin (DS) (Smooth-On Inc.), a highly elastic polymer to mimic the layered structure of the bladder. Optical scattering of DS was tuned by addition of titanium dioxide, resulting in scattering coefficients sufficient to cover the human bladder range (0.49 to 2.0 mm^-1). Mucosal vasculature and tissue coloration were mimicked with elastic cord and red dye, respectively. Urethral access was provided through a small hole excised from the base of the phantom. Inserted features of bladder pathology included altered tissue color (WLC), fluorescence emission (BLC), and variations in layered structure (OCT). The phantom surface and underlying material were assessed on the basis of elasticity, optical scattering, layer thicknesses, and qualitative image appearance. WLC, BLC, and OCT images of normal and cancerous features in the phantom qualitatively matched corresponding images from human bladders.

  3. Modulation of multiple sclerosis by sunlight exposure: role of cis-urocanic acid.

    PubMed

    Correale, Jorge; Farez, Mauricio F

    2013-08-15

    The role of cis-urocanic acid (UCA) as a UV-mediated immunomodulator in MS patients was investigated. Plasma levels of cis-UCA were significantly lower in MS patients compared to controls. Stimulation of MBP- and MOG-specific T cells in the presence of cis-UCA, significantly increased IL-10, and inhibited IFN-γ production. PBMCs cultured in the presence of cis-UCA increased CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) regulatory T cell percentages. Dendritic cells cultured in the presence of cis-UCA significantly reduced Ag presentation capacity. Finally, cis-UCA activated the 5-HT2A receptor, inducing the increase in phosphorylated forms of ERK 1/2 and JNK2. Thus, in addition to vitamin D, cis-UCA also appears to be an additional UV-mediated immunomodulator. PMID:23800457

  4. Role of cis-Monounsaturated Fatty Acids in the Prevention of Coronary Heart Disease.

    PubMed

    Joris, Peter J; Mensink, Ronald P

    2016-07-01

    The effects of cis-monounsaturated fatty acids (cis-MUFAs) on the risk of coronary heart disease (CHD) and on CHD mortality are not clear. Also, dietary recommendations for cis-MUFA as derived by various organizations are not in agreement. Earlier studies have mainly focused on the effects of cis-MUFA on serum lipids and lipoproteins. More recent studies, however, have also addressed effects of cis-MUFA on other non-traditional CHD risk markers such as vascular function markers, postprandial vascular function, and energy intake and metabolism. Although well-designed randomized controlled trials with CHD events as endpoints are missing, several large prospective cohort studies have recently been published on the relationship between cis-MUFA and CHD risk. The aim of this paper is to review these new studies that have been published in the last 3 years on the effects of cis-MUFA on cardiovascular risk markers and CHD. PMID:27221500

  5. Characterization of Transverse Isotropy in Compressed Tissue Mimicking Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Urban, Matthew W.; Lopera, Manuela; Aristizabal, Sara; Amador, Carolina; Nenadic, Ivan; Kinnick, Randall R.; Weston, Alexander D.; Qiang, Bo; Zhang, Xiaoming; Greenleaf, James F.

    2015-01-01

    Tissues such as skeletal muscle and kidneys have well-defined structure that affects the measurements of mechanical properties. As an approach to characterize the material properties of these tissues, different groups have assumed that they are transversely isotropic (TI) and measure the shear wave velocity as it varies with angle with respect to the structural architecture of the organ. To refine measurements in these organs, it is desirable to have tissue mimicking phantoms that exhibit similar anisotropic characteristics. Some approaches involve embedding fibers into a material matrix. However, if a homogeneous solid is under compression due to a static stress, an acoustoelastic effect can manifest which makes the measured wave velocities change with the compression stress. We propose to exploit this characteristic to demonstrate that stressed tissue mimicking phantoms can be characterized as a TI material. We tested six phantoms made with different concentrations of gelatin and agar. Stress was applied by the weight of a water container centered on top of a plate on top of the phantom. A linear array transducer and a V-1 Verasonics system were used to induce and measure shear waves in the phantoms. The shear wave motion was measured using a compound plane wave imaging technique. Autocorrelation was applied to the received in-phase/quadrature data. The shear wave velocity, c, was estimated using a Radon transform method. The transducer was mounted on a rotating stage so measurements were made every 10° over a range of 0–360°, where the stress is applied along 0–180° direction. The shear moduli were estimated. A TI model was fit to the data and the fractional anisotropy was evaluated. This approach can be used to explore many configurations of transverse isotropy with the same phantom, simply by applying stress to the tissue mimicking phantom. PMID:26067038

  6. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nam, Soomin; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-01-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  7. Exophytic Atheroma Mimicking Papillary Fibroelastoma Adjacent to the Aortic Valve.

    PubMed

    Cho, Tomoki; Tokunaga, Shigehiko; Yasuda, Shota; Izubuchi, Ryo; Masuda, Munetaka

    2015-09-01

    Follow-up echocardiography in a 69-year-old man with alcoholic cardiomyopathy showed a mass above the aortic valve near the left coronary ostium. Transesophageal echocardiography and computed tomography suggested a papillary fibroelastoma with a high risk of embolism. At operation we found an exophytic atheroma adjacent to the left coronary artery orifice. The atheroma was removed, and the patient made an uneventful recovery. We describe this very rare case of an exophytic atheroma mimicking a papillary fibroelastoma situated at the left coronary orifice. PMID:26354633

  8. Bulky mediastinal aspergillosis mimicking cancer in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Stern, Jean-Baptiste; Wyplosz, Benjamin; Validire, Pierre; Angoulvant, Adela; Fregeville, Aude; Caliandro, Raffaele; Gossot, Dominique

    2014-10-01

    We describe the case of a previously healthy 42-year-old woman who presented with a chronic cough and occasional night sweats. Radiologic exploration showed a bulky mediastinal mass surrounding the aortic arch, associated with a left subclavicular lymph node and a cerebral round lesion, mimicking a disseminated lung cancer. Surgical left subclavicular and computed tomography-guided mediastinal biopsy specimens showed granulomatous patterns. Mycologic culture of both samples grew Aspergillus flavus. Resolution was obtained after 9 months of oral voriconazole therapy. PMID:25282220

  9. A popliteal giant synovial osteochondroma mimicking a parosteal osteosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Both giant synovial osteochondroma and parosteal osteosarcoma are rare musculo-skeletal tumors, often localized in the vicinity of the knee. Misdiagnosis of a malignant bone tumor can entail fatal consequences. Etiology of giant synovial osteochondroma is widely unsolved but is believed to originate from synovial chondromatosis, a mostly benign metaplasia of the synovial membrane. Parosteal osteosarcoma is a low-grade surface osteosarcoma with a propensity of local recurrence and the potential of distant metastasis and therefore requiring a different therapeutical approach. We report the case of a popliteal giant osteochondroma mimicking a parosteal osteosarcoma. Relevant facts of this rare entity regarding pathogenesis, treatment, and differential diagnoses will be discussed. PMID:24066980

  10. Lepra reaction with lucio phenomenon mimicking cutaneous vasculitis.

    PubMed

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra; Agarwal, Vikas

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  11. Lepra Reaction with Lucio Phenomenon Mimicking Cutaneous Vasculitis

    PubMed Central

    Misra, Durga Prasanna; Parida, Jyoti Ranjan; Chowdhury, Abhra Chandra; Pani, Krushna Chandra; Kumari, Niraj; Krishnani, Narendra

    2014-01-01

    Leprosy is a disease typically found in the tropics. Patients with leprosy can have varying presentation with constitutional symptoms, joint pains, skin nodules, and rarely a vasculitis-like picture with skin ulcers and neuropathy. We present a young lady who presented with the rare manifestation of skin infarcts mimicking cutaneous vasculitis, diagnosed on histopathology to have Lucio phenomenon on a background of lepromatous leprosy. With increasing migration and widespread use of biologic response modifiers, clinicians all over the world need to be aware of various presentations of leprosy as well as needing to keep an open mind while considering the differential diagnoses of vasculitis. PMID:25580317

  12. Unusual Case of Overt Aortic Dissection Mimicking Aortic Intramural Hematoma

    PubMed Central

    Disha, Kushtrim; Kuntze, Thomas; Girdauskas, Evaldas

    2016-01-01

    We report an interesting case in which overt aortic dissection mimicked two episodes of aortic intramural hematoma (IMH) (Stanford A, DeBakey I). This took place over the course of four days and had a major influence on the surgical treatment strategy. The first episode of IMH regressed completely within 15 hours after it was clinically diagnosed and verified using imaging techniques. The recurrence of IMH was detected three days thereafter, resulting in an urgent surgical intervention. Overt aortic dissection with evidence of an intimal tear was diagnosed intraoperatively. PMID:27066437

  13. Primary Renal Lymphoma Mimicking a Subcapsular Hematoma: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D.

    2013-01-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  14. Primary renal lymphoma mimicking a subcapsular hematoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Dedekam, Erik; Graham, Jess; Strenge, Karen; Mosier, Andrew D

    2013-08-01

    Primary renal lymphoma (PRL) is a rare entity with a history of controversy regarding its existence. Lymphomatous involvement of the kidney is more commonly seen secondarily to spread from an adjacent lymphomatous mass, rather than arising primarily from the kidney. PRL can mimic other renal lesions such as renal cell carcinoma, renal abscess, and metastasis; therefore, an early diagnosis is crucial to guide treatment and properly assess prognosis. We present a rare case of a 77 year-old male who presented with hematuria and PRL mimicking a subcapsular hematoma. PMID:24421949

  15. Isolated Gallbladder Intramucosal Metastatic Melanoma With Features Mimicking Lymphoepithelial Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lo, Amy A; Peevey, Joseph; Lo, Edward C; Guitart, Joan; Rao, M Sambasivia; Yang, Guang-Yu

    2015-08-01

    Malignant melanoma has a variety of morphologic patterns and can metastasize and mimic any type of neoplastic process creating significant diagnostic difficulty. When metastasis to the gastrointestinal system is identified, it is most commonly associated with widely metastatic disease. We report a rare case of isolated gallbladder intramucosal metastatic melanoma with features mimicking lymphoepithelial carcinoma in an adult patient who presented with cholecystitis. Additionally, we report the imaging and morphologic features and discuss the importance of these findings along with a clear clinical history and immunohistochemical profile to make a definitive diagnosis. PMID:26041740

  16. Subcutaneous Phaeohyphomycosis Due to Pyrenochaeta romeroi Mimicking a Synovial Cyst

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Aurélien; Levy, Bruno; Bouchand, Frédérique; Davido, Benjamin; Duran, Clara; Cristi, Marin; Felter, Adrien; Salomon, Jérôme; Ait Ammar, Nawel

    2016-01-01

    Opportunistic subcutaneous fungal infections are increasing nowadays due to the growing number of medical conditions causing immunosuppression, especially organ transplant. The incidence rate of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis is very low. Most studies found are case reports. They showed a wide variation of clinical presentations. Pyrenochaeta romeroi, a fungus from the Dematiaceae group is a saprophyte found in soil and plants and a possible causative agent of phaeohyphomycosis. We present a rare case of subcutaneous phaeohyphomycosis caused by P. romeroi mimicking a synovial cyst in a diabetic patient.

  17. Femoroacetabular impingement mimicking avascular osteonecrosis on bone scintigraphy

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, Juan Pablo; Domínguez, María Luz; Nogareda, Zulema; Gómez, María Asunción; Muñoz, Jose

    2016-01-01

    Femoroacetabular impingement (FAI) is a structural abnormality of proximal femur and/or acetabulum. It has been recently described, and there are limited reports in nuclear medicine literature because bone scintigraphy is not listed in its diagnostic protocol, but it should be included on differential diagnosis when evaluating patients, with hip-related symptoms because it may be misinterpreted as degenerative changes or avascular necrosis, and its early treatment avoid progression to osteoarthritis. We describe the case of a male who suffered from hip pain. Bone planar scintigraphic appearance mimicked avascular necrosis, but single photon emission computed tomography (CT) imaging and CT examination confirmed the diagnosis of FAI. PMID:27095871

  18. Xanthogranulomatous Appendicitis Mimicking Residual Burkitt's Lymphoma After Chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Nam, Soomin; Kang, Jeonghyun; Choi, Sung-Eun; Kim, Yu Ri; Baik, Seung Hyuk; Sohn, Seung-Kook

    2016-04-01

    The case of a 23-year-old female treated with aggressive high-dose therapy for Burkitt's lymphoma is reported. A positron emission tomography and computed tomography scan after completion of chemotherapy revealed a residual hypermetabolic lesion in the right pelvic cavity. A pelvic magnetic resonance imaging scan showed circumferential wall thickening at the tip of the appendix. A laparoscopic exploration and appendectomy were performed, and a pathologic examination of the resected appendix revealed xanthogranulomatous appendicitis. This is a rare case of a xanthogranulomatous appendicitis mimicking remnant Burkitt's lymphoma after completion of chemotherapy. PMID:27218100

  19. Methylmalonic acidemia mimicking diabetic ketoacidosis and septic shock in infants

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Navdeep; Malhotra, Ashwini; Chhabra, Sanjay; Chhabra, Sunny

    2015-01-01

    Methylmalonic acidemia (MMA) is most common inherited type of organic acidemia. It has diverse presentation in older infants without any initial apparent symptoms. MMA sometimes present with sudden metabolic decompensation, which may mimics common emergencies like septic shock and diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) without early recognition can be fatal. In born error of metabolism especially organic acidemia should be suspected in any infant presented with severe high anion gap metabolic acidosis. We report two cases of MMA in infants presented acutely mimicking DKA and septic shock. PMID:25810618

  20. An Adult Gastric Duplication Cyst Mimicking a Gastrointestinal Stromal Tumor.

    PubMed

    Yoda, Takenori; Furihata, Makoto; Nagao, Sayaka; Wada, Tomonori

    2016-01-01

    We herein describe a rare case of a 24-year-old man who presented with severe epigastralgia after consuming a considerable amount of broiled meat. Computed tomography revealed a cystic lesion adjacent to the distal stomach, with high intensity on T2-weighted magnetic resonance imaging. Upper endoscopy showed a cystic mass measuring 6 cm in diameter, mimicking a submucosal tumor adjacent to the pyloric valve, with duodenum invagination, characteristic of ball valve syndrome. Endoscopic ultrasonography showed that the lesion was contiguous through the first to the third layer of the stomach. Therefore, we performed distal gastrectomy. Pathology showed that the lesion was a gastric duplication cyst without malignancy. PMID:27580540

  1. Adaptive female-mimicking behavior in a scorpionfly.

    PubMed

    Thornhill, R

    1979-07-27

    This study provides a clear example of female-mimicking behavior by males in insects and evaluates quantitatively the adaptive significance of this behavior, which is poorly understood in many other organisms. Males of Hylobittacus apicalis provide females with a prey arthropod during copulation. Some males mimic female behavior when interacting with males that have captured nuptial prey, resulting in males stealing prey which they will use for copulation. Males that pirate prey copulate more frequently and probably incur fewer predation-related risks. PMID:17790854

  2. Primary hepatic tuberculosis mimicking intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma: report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Hepatic tuberculosis (TB) is usually associated with pulmonary or miliary TB, but primary hepatic TB is very uncommon even in countries with high prevalence of TB. The clinical manifestation of primary hepatic TB is atypical and imaging modalities are unhelpful for differential diagnosis of the liver mass. Image-guided needle biopsy is the best diagnostic method for primary hepatic TB. In the cases presented here, we did not perform liver biopsy because we believed the liver masses were cholangiocarcinoma, but primary hepatic TB was ultimately confirmed by postoperative pathology. Here we report two cases of patients who were diagnosed with primary hepatic TB mimicking mass-forming intrahepatic cholangiocarcinoma. PMID:26236700

  3. Giant submandibular gland duct sialolith mimicking an impacted canine tooth

    PubMed Central

    Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Bhullar, Kanwalpreet; Malhotra, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is the most common disease affecting the salivary glands and accounts for 80% of salivary gland disorders. Chronic sialolithiasis promotes stone formation. Size of the salivary stones may range from 0.1 mm to 30 mm or be even bigger. Those salivary stones, the size of which exceeds 15 mm in any one dimension or 1 g in weight are classified as giant sialoliths. Giant sialoliths of the submandibular gland duct are rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a giant sialolith of the submandibular gland duct mimicking an impacted mandibular canine tooth on routine radiographic examination and its surgical management through an intraoral approach. PMID:26668461

  4. Giant submandibular gland duct sialolith mimicking an impacted canine tooth.

    PubMed

    Bhullar, Ramandeep Singh; Dhawan, Amit; Bhullar, Kanwalpreet; Malhotra, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Sialolithiasis is the most common disease affecting the salivary glands and accounts for 80% of salivary gland disorders. Chronic sialolithiasis promotes stone formation. Size of the salivary stones may range from 0.1 mm to 30 mm or be even bigger. Those salivary stones, the size of which exceeds 15 mm in any one dimension or 1 g in weight are classified as giant sialoliths. Giant sialoliths of the submandibular gland duct are rarely reported. Here, we report a case of a giant sialolith of the submandibular gland duct mimicking an impacted mandibular canine tooth on routine radiographic examination and its surgical management through an intraoral approach. PMID:26668461

  5. A Giant Mature Cystic Teratoma Mimicking a Pleural Effusion

    PubMed Central

    Dorterler, Mustafa Erman; Boleken, Mehmet Emin; Koçarslan, Sezen

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of teratomas originating from more than a single germ layer are benign. Often, such teratomas are initially asymptomatic. Later symptoms are caused by the weight per se of the teratoma and include chest pain, cough, dyspnea, and/or recurrent attacks of pneumonia. A mediastinal teratoma is treated by total surgical resection of the mass. Here, we report a case of giant mature cystic teratoma mimicking a pleural effusion in the thorax at the 7-month-old female patient with a symptom of persistent pulmonary infection and tachypnea. PMID:26942032

  6. Symptomatic ecchordosis physaliphora mimicking as an intracranial arachnoid cyst.

    PubMed

    Filis, Andreas; Kalakoti, Piyush; Nanda, Anil

    2016-06-01

    Ecchordosis physaliphora (EP) is a rare, benign tumor derived from the notochordal remnants. Usually slow growing with an indolent course, most cases are incidental findings on autopsy. Limited data exists on symptomatic patients with EP. Diagnosis mainly relies on correlating histopathologic findings confirming the notochordal elements with MRI. We herein present a middle aged woman with symptomatic EP in the pre-pontine cistern that mimicked an arachnoid cyst on preoperative scans. Additionally, we emphasize the pathological and radiological characteristics of EP that could aid in prompt diagnosis of the lesion with emphasis on considering EP as a differential for mass lesions localized in the pre-pontine cistern. PMID:26778354

  7. Profiling of cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites by boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid monolithic capillary liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chu, Jie-Mei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-01-01

    RNA contains a large number of modified nucleosides. In the metabolic re-exchange of RNA, modified nucleosides cannot be recycled and are thus excreted from cells into biological fluids. Determination of endogenous modified nucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive cancers diagnostic methods. Here we prepared boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid capillary monolithic column (BOHCMC) that exhibited excellent selectivity toward the cis-diol-containing compounds. We then used the prepared BOHCMC as the on-line solid-phase microextraction (SPME) column and developed an on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method to comprehensively profile cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites in human urine. Forty-five cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites were successfully identified in human urine. And five ribose conjugates, for the first time, were identified existence in human urine in the current study. Furthermore, the relative quantification suggested 4 cis-diol-containing compounds (5'-deoxy-5'-methylthioadensine, N(4)-acetylcytidine, 1-ribosyl-N-propionylhistamine and N(2),N(2),7-trimethylguanosine) increased more than 1.5 folds in all the 3 types of examined cancers (lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer) compared to healthy controls. The on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method demonstrates a promising method for the comprehensive profiling of cis-diol-containing ribose conjugates in human urines, which provides an efficient strategy for the identification and discovery of biomarkers and may be used for the screening of cancers. PMID:25585609

  8. Profiling of cis-Diol-containing Nucleosides and Ribosylated Metabolites by Boronate-affinity Organic-silica Hybrid Monolithic Capillary Liquid Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Han-Peng; Qi, Chu-Bo; Chu, Jie-Mei; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2015-01-01

    RNA contains a large number of modified nucleosides. In the metabolic re-exchange of RNA, modified nucleosides cannot be recycled and are thus excreted from cells into biological fluids. Determination of endogenous modified nucleosides in biological fluids may serve as non-invasive cancers diagnostic methods. Here we prepared boronate-affinity organic-silica hybrid capillary monolithic column (BOHCMC) that exhibited excellent selectivity toward the cis-diol-containing compounds. We then used the prepared BOHCMC as the on-line solid-phase microextraction (SPME) column and developed an on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method to comprehensively profile cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites in human urine. Forty-five cis-diol-containing nucleosides and ribosylated metabolites were successfully identified in human urine. And five ribose conjugates, for the first time, were identified existence in human urine in the current study. Furthermore, the relative quantification suggested 4 cis-diol-containing compounds (5′-deoxy-5′-methylthioadensine, N4-acetylcytidine, 1-ribosyl-N-propionylhistamine and N2,N2,7-trimethylguanosine) increased more than 1.5 folds in all the 3 types of examined cancers (lung cancer, colorectal cancer, and nasopharyngeal cancer) compared to healthy controls. The on-line SPME-LC-MS/MS method demonstrates a promising method for the comprehensive profiling of cis-diol-containing ribose conjugates in human urines, which provides an efficient strategy for the identification and discovery of biomarkers and may be used for the screening of cancers. PMID:25585609

  9. Sulfinyl and sulfonyl derivatives of aryl substituted cis-1-thiadecalins

    SciTech Connect

    Klimenko, S.K.; Sorokin, N.N.; Tyrina, T.I.; Stolbova, T.V.

    1987-10-01

    Individual 2..cap alpha..-aryl- and 2..cap alpha..,4..cap alpha..-diaryl-cis-thiadecalin-1..beta..-oxides and 1,1-dioxides have been synthesized. The effect of sulfinyl and sulfonyl groups has been observed on the chemical shifts of carbon atoms in these conformationally homogeneous, stereochemically similar systems. IR spectra were obtained in mineral oil with a UR-20 spectrometer. /sup 13/C NMR spectra were obtained with a Varian FT-80A instrument (20 MHz) at 30/sup 0/. The spectra were parametrized with respect to the signal of the secondary standard, for which the signal of CDCl/sub 3/ solvent was used.

  10. Functional conservation of cis-regulatory elements of heat-shock genes over long evolutionary distances.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengying; Eichel, Kelsie; Ruvinsky, Ilya

    2011-01-01

    Transcriptional control of gene regulation is an intricate process that requires precise orchestration of a number of molecular components. Studying its evolution can serve as a useful model for understanding how complex molecular machines evolve. One way to investigate evolution of transcriptional regulation is to test the functions of cis-elements from one species in a distant relative. Previous results suggested that few, if any, tissue-specific promoters from Drosophila are faithfully expressed in C. elegans. Here we show that, in contrast, promoters of fly and human heat-shock genes are upregulated in C. elegans upon exposure to heat. Inducibility under conditions of heat shock may represent a relatively simple "on-off" response, whereas complex expression patterns require integration of multiple signals. Our results suggest that simpler aspects of regulatory logic may be retained over longer periods of evolutionary time, while more complex ones may be diverging more rapidly. PMID:21799932

  11. [Identification and mapping of cis-regulatory elements within long genomic sequences].

    PubMed

    Akopov, S B; Chernov, I P; Vetchinova, A S; Bulanenkova, S S; Nikolaev, L G

    2007-01-01

    The publication of the human and other metazoan genome sequences opened up the possibility for mapping and analysis of genomic regulatory elements. Unfortunately, experimental data on genomic positions of such sequences as enhancers, silencers, insulators, transcription terminators, and replication origins are very limited, especially at the whole genome level. As most genomic regulatory elements (e.g., enhancers) are generally gene-, tissue-, or cell-specific, the prediction of these elements in silico is often ambiguous. Therefore, the development of high-throughput experimental approaches for identification and mapping of genomic functional elements is highly desirable. In this review we discuss novel approaches to high-throughput experimental identification of mammalian genomes cis-regulatory elements which is a necessary step toward the complete genome annotation. PMID:18240562

  12. Lessons from Domestication: Targeting Cis-Regulatory Elements for Crop Improvement.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Gwen; Goossens, Alain; Pauwels, Laurens

    2016-06-01

    Domestication of wild plant species has provided us with crops that serve our human nutritional needs. Advanced DNA sequencing has propelled the unveiling of underlying genetic changes associated with domestication. Interestingly, many changes reside in cis-regulatory elements (CREs) that control the expression of an unmodified coding sequence. Sequence variation in CREs can impact gene expression levels, but also developmental timing and tissue specificity of expression. When genes are involved in multiple pathways or active in several organs and developmental stages CRE modifications are favored in contrast to mutations in coding regions, due to the lack of detrimental pleiotropic effects. Therefore, learning from domestication, we propose that CREs are interesting targets for genome editing to create new alleles for plant breeding. PMID:26876195

  13. Cytotoxic and anti-inflammatory activity of labdane and cis-clerodane type diterpenes.

    PubMed

    Demetzos, C; Dimas, K; Hatziantoniou, S; Anastasaki, T; Angelopoulou, D

    2001-10-01

    Two labdane type diterpenes, labd-13(E)-ene,-8alpha,15-diol (1) and labd-13(E)-ene,-8alpha,15-yl acetate (2) were isolated from the hexane extract of Cistus creticus subsp. eriocephalus (Viv.) Greuter & Burdet leaves, while (+)-19-acetoxy-cis-clerodan-3-en-15-oic acid (3) was isolated from the hexane extract of Cistus monspeliensis L. leaves. The compounds were examined for their in vitro cytostatic and cytotoxic activity against nine human leukemic cell lines, three of which exhibited a multidrug resistant phenotype. They were also evaluated for their anti-inflammatory activity in vivo on the back of hairless mice. The cytostatic and cytotoxic activity of the tested diterpenes followed the order 1>2>3. Topical application of the diterpenes on barrier disrupted skin did not seem to have a significant contribution to the repair rate of the skin barrier. PMID:11582537

  14. Dipole moments of trans- and cis-(4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM): obtaining the right conformer for the right reason.

    PubMed

    DeYonker, Nathan J; Charbonnet, Katherine A; Alexander, William A

    2016-07-21

    Accurate computational estimates of fundamental physical properties can be used as inputs in the myriad of extant models employed to predict toxicity, transport, and fate of contaminants. However, as molecular complexity of contaminants increases, it becomes increasingly difficult to determine the magnitude of the errors introduced by ignoring the 3D conformational space averaging within group-additivity and semi-empirical approaches. The importance of considering 3D molecular structure is exemplified for the dipole moments of cis and trans isomers of (4-methylcyclohexyl)methanol (4-MCHM). When 10 000 gallons of 4-MCHM was spilled into the Elk River in January 2014, a lack of toxicological data and environmental partitioning coefficients hindered the immediate protection of human health and the local water supply in West Virginia, USA. Post-spill analysis of the contaminants suggested that the cis and trans isomers had observably different partitioning coefficients and solubility, and thus differing environmental fates. Obtaining high-quality dipole moments using ab initio quantum chemical methods for the isomeric pair was crucial in validating their experimental differences in solubility [Environ. Sci. Technol. Lett., 2015, 2, 127]. The use of first principles electronic structure theory is further explored here to obtain accurate conformer relative energies and dipole moments of cis- and trans-4-MCHM. Overall, the MP2 aug-cc-pVDZ level of theory affords the best balance between accuracy and computational cost. PMID:27218124

  15. Balanced polymorphism in bottlenecked populations: the case of the CCR5 5' cis-regulatory region in Amazonian Amerindians.

    PubMed

    Ramalho, Rodrigo F; Santos, Eduardo J M; Guerreiro, João F; Meyer, Diogo

    2010-09-01

    The 5' cis-regulatory region of the CCR5 gene exhibits a strong signature of balancing selection in several human populations. Here we analyze the polymorphism of this region in Amerindians from Amazonia, who have a complex demographic history, including recent bottlenecks that are known to reduce genetic variability. Amerindians show high nucleotide diversity (pi = 0.27%) and significantly positive Tajima's D, and carry haplotypes associated with weak and strong gene expression. To evaluate whether these signatures of balancing selection could be explained by demography, we perform neutrality tests based on empiric and simulated data. The observed Tajima's D was higher than that of other world populations; higher than that found for 18 noncoding regions of South Amerindians, and higher than 99.6% of simulated genealogies, which assume nonequilibrium conditions. Moreover, comparing Amerindians and Asians, the Fst for CCR5 cis-regulatory region was unusually low, in relation to neutral markers. These findings indicate that, despite their complex demographic history, South Amerindians carry a detectable signature of selection on the CCR5 cis-regulatory region. PMID:20538030

  16. Isomerization of 11-cis-retinol to all-trans-retinol in bovine rod outer segments.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, T; Ishiguro, S; Tamai, M

    1998-05-01

    It is known that exogenous 11-cis-retinol inhibits the recovery of photosensitivity of bleached rod outer segments (ROS) and 11-cis-retinol exists in the interphotorecepter matrix. We examined the conversion of 11-cis-retinol with bovine ROS. ROS was incubated with 11-cis-retinol under dim red light. Retinoids were extracted from the reaction mixture with hexane and analyzed by HPLC coupled with a fluorescence spectrophotometer. Isomerization of 11-cis-retinol to all-trans-retinol was observed in the presence of ROS. This isomerization was not suppressed by heat treatment and did not have stereospecificity. In addition, we incubated purified rhodopsin and phospholipids extracted from ROS with 11-cis-retinol. Rhodopsin was found to isomerize 11-cis-retinol to all-trans-retinol as well as ROS, but phospholipids did not. In contrast, the phospholipids inhibited the isomerization of 11-cis-retinol to all-trans-retinol by the purified rhodopsin. Commercially available phospholipids, especially phosphatidylserine, also inhibited the isomerization. Our results suggest that rhodopsin has activity for the isomerization of 11-cis-retinol to all-trans-retinol and may play an important role in the detoxification of 11-cis-retinol in the ROS. PMID:9562631

  17. Occurrence of a novel cis,cis,cis-octadeca-3,9,12-trienoic (Z,Z,Z-octadeca-3,9,12-trienoic) acid in Chrysanthemum (tanacetum) zawadskii herb. (Compositae) seed oil.

    PubMed

    Tsevegsuren, Nanzad; Fujimoto, Kenshiro; Christie, William W; Endo, Yasushi

    2003-05-01

    A new octadecatrienoic acid (6.9%), found as a component of Chrysanthemum zawadskii Herb. (Asteraceae) seed oil, was shown to be the hitherto unknown cis,cis,cis-octadeca-3,9,12-trienoic acid. The oil also contained 8.6% of crepenynic acid in addition to the other common FA. The structures of the new unusual FA and other FA were confirmed by chromatographic (TLC, GC), spectroscopic (IR, UV, and NMR), and MS methods by using different chemical derivatizations (preparation of methyl ester, pyrrolidide, picolinyl esters, and dimethyloxazoline derivatives). PMID:12880115

  18. Cis-Diammine(Pyridine)Chloroplatinum(II), a Monofunctional Platinum(II) Antitumor Agent: Uptake, Structure, Function, And Prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Lovejoy, K.S.; Todd, R.C.; Zhang, S.; McCormick, M.S.; D'Aquino, J.A.; Reardon, J.T.; Sancar, A.; Giacomini, K.M.; Lippard, S.J.

    2009-05-19

    We have identified unique chemical and biological properties of a cationic monofunctional platinum(II) complex, cis-diammine(pyridine)chloroplatinum(II), cis-[Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(py)Cl]{sup +} or cDPCP, a coordination compound previously identified to have significant anticancer activity in a mouse tumor model. This compound is an excellent substrate for organic cation transporters 1 and 2, also designated SLC22A1 and SLC22A2, respectively. These transporters are abundantly expressed in human colorectal cancers, where they mediate uptake of oxaliplatin, cis-[Pt(DACH)(oxalate)] (DACH = trans-R,R-1,2-diaminocyclohexane), an FDA-approved first-line therapy for colorectal cancer. Unlike oxaliplatin, however, cDPCP binds DNA monofunctionally, as revealed by an x-ray crystal structure of cis-{l_brace}Pt(NH{sub 3}){sub 2}(py){r_brace}{sup 2+} bound to the N7 atom of a single guanosine residue in a DNA dodecamer duplex. Although the quaternary structure resembles that of B-form DNA, there is a base-pair step to the 5{prime} side of the Pt adduct with abnormally large shift and slide values, features characteristic of cisplatin intrastrand cross-links. cDPCP effectively blocks transcription from DNA templates carrying adducts of the complex, unlike DNA lesions of other monofunctional platinum(II) compounds like {l_brace}Pt(dien){r_brace}{sup 2+}. cDPCP-DNA adducts are removed by the nucleotide excision repair apparatus, albeit much less efficiently than bifunctional platinum-DNA intrastrand cross-links. These exceptional characteristics indicate that cDPCP and related complexes merit consideration as therapeutic options for treating colorectal and other cancers bearing appropriate cation transporters.

  19. Novel cis-selective and non-epimerisable C3 hydroxy azapodophyllotoxins targeting microtubules in cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kandil, Sahar; Wymant, Jennifer M.; Kariuki, Benson M.; Jones, Arwyn T.; McGuigan, Christopher; Westwell, Andrew D.

    2016-01-01

    Podophyllotoxin (PT) and its clinically used analogues are known to be powerful antitumour agents. These compounds contain a trans fused strained γ-lactone system, a feature that correlates to the process of epimerisation, whereby the trans γ-lactone system of ring D opens and converts to the more thermodynamically stable cis epimer. Since these cis epimers are known to be either less active or lacking antitumour activity, epimerisation is an undesirable feature from a chemotherapeutic point of view. To circumvent this problem, considerable efforts have been reported, amongst which is the synthesis of azapodophyllotoxins where the stereocentres at C2 and C3 are removed in order to preclude epimerisation. Herein we report the identification of a novel C3 hydroxy, cis-selective γ-lactone configuration of ring C in the azapodophyllotoxin scaffold, through an efficient stereoselective multicomponent reaction (MCR) involving fluorinated and non-fluorinated aldehydes. This configuration releases the highly strained trans γ-lactone system in podophyllotoxin analogues into the more thermodynamically stable cis γ-lactone motif and yet retains significantly potent activity. These compounds were evaluated against the human cancer lines MCF-7 and 22Rv1 in vitro. Fourteen out of the seventeen tested compounds exhibited sub-micromolar activity with IC50 values in the range of 0.11–0.91 μM, which is comparable and in some cases better than the activity profile of etoposide in this assay. Interestingly, we obtained strong evidence from spectroscopic and X-ray data analyses that the previously reported structure of similar analogues is not accurate. Molecular modelling performed using the podophyllotoxin binding site on β tubulin revealed a novel binding mode of these analogues. Furthermore, sub-cellular study of our compounds using immunolabelling and confocal microscopy analyses showed strong microtubule disruptive activity, particularly in dividing cells. PMID

  20. Cryptococcal Brainstem Abscess Mimicking Brain Tumors in an Immunocompetent Patient

    PubMed Central

    Hur, Jong Hee; Kim, Jang-Hee; Park, Seoung Woo

    2015-01-01

    Usually fungal infections caused by opportunistic and pathogenic fungi had been an important cause of morbidity and mortality among immunocompromised patients. However clinical data and investigations for immunocompetent pathogenic fungal infections had been rare and neglected into clinical studies. Especially Cryptococcal brainstem abscess cases mimicking brain tumors were also much more rare. So we report this unusual case. This 47-year-old man presented with a history of progressively worsening headache and nausea for 1 month and several days of vomituritions before admission. Neurological and laboratory examinations performed demonstrated no abnormal findings. Previously he was healthy and did not have any significant medical illnesses. A CT and MRI scan revealed enhancing 1.8×1.7×2.0 cm mass lesion in the left pons having central necrosis and peripheral edema compressing the fourth ventricle. And also positron emission tomogram scan demonstrated a hot uptake of fluoro-deoxy-glucose on the brainstem lesion without any evidences of systemic metastasis. Gross total mass resection was achieved with lateral suboccipital approach with neuronavigation system. Postoperatively he recovered without any neurological deficits. Pathologic report confirmed Cryptococcus neoformans and he was successively treated with antifungal medications. This is a previously unreported rare case of brainstem Cryptococcal abscess mimicking brain tumors in immunocompetent host without having any apparent typical meningeal symptoms and signs with resultant good neurosurgical recovery. PMID:25674344

  1. Gastric metastasis from salivary duct carcinoma mimicking primary gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Kanefumi; Takeno, Shinsuke; Nimura, Satoshi; Sugiyama, Yoshikazu; Sueta, Takayuki; Maki, Kenji; Kayashima, Yoshiyuki; Shiwaku, Hironari; Kato, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Tatsuya; Sasaki, Takamitsu; Yamashita, Yuichi

    2016-01-01

    Introduction We present a very rare case of gastric metastasis mimicking primary gastric cancer in a patient who had undergone surgery for salivary duct carcinoma. Presentation of case A 67-year-old man had been diagnosed as having right parotid cancer and had undergone a right parotidectomy and lymph node dissection. The histological diagnosis was salivary duct carcinoma. One year after the surgery, a positron emission tomography–computed tomography scan using fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) revealed an abnormal uptake of FDG in the left cervical, mediastinal, paraaortic, and cardiac lymph nodes; stomach; and pancreas. On gastroduodenoscopy, there was a huge, easily bleeding ulcer mimicking primary gastric cancer at the upper body of the stomach. Biopsy revealed poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma. Therefore, we were unable to differentiate between the primary gastric cancer and the metastatic tumor using gastroduodenoscopy and biopsy. Because of the uncontrollable bleeding from the gastric cancer, we performed an emergency palliative total gastrectomy. On histological examination, the gastric lesion was found to be metastatic carcinoma originating from the salivary duct carcinoma. Discussion In the presented case, we could not diagnose the gastric metastasis originating from the salivary duct carcinoma even by endoscopic biopsy. This is because the histological appearance of salivary duct carcinoma is similar to that of high-grade adenocarcinoma, thus, resembling primary gastric cancer. Conclusion When we perform endoscopic examination of patients with malignant neoplasias, a possibility of metastatic gastric cancer should be taken into consideration. PMID:27085106

  2. Characterization of various tissue mimicking materials for medical ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thouvenot, Audrey; Poepping, Tamie; Peters, Terry M.; Chen, Elvis C. S.

    2016-04-01

    Tissue mimicking materials are physical constructs exhibiting certain desired properties, which are used in machine calibration, medical imaging research, surgical planning, training, and simulation. For medical ultrasound, those specific properties include acoustic propagation speed and attenuation coefficient over the diagnostic frequency range. We investigated the acoustic characteristics of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) plastisol, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), and isopropanol using a time-of-light technique, where a pulse was passed through a sample of known thickness contained in a water bath. The propagation speed in PVC is approximately 1400ms-1 depending on the exact chemical composition, with the attenuation coefficient ranging from 0:35 dB cm-1 at 1MHz to 10:57 dB cm-1 at 9 MHz. The propagation speed in PDMS is in the range of 1100ms-1, with an attenuation coefficient of 1:28 dB cm-1 at 1MHz to 21:22 dB cm-1 at 9 MHz. At room temperature (22 °C), a mixture of water-isopropanol (7:25% isopropanol by volume) exhibits a propagation speed of 1540ms-1, making it an excellent and inexpensive tissue-mimicking liquid for medical ultrasound imaging.

  3. Primary thyroid paraganglioma mimicking medullary thyroid carcinoma: A case report

    PubMed Central

    YU, XING; WANG, YONG; WANG, PING; JI, CAI-HONG; MIAO, CHUN-DI; ZHENG, SHU

    2015-01-01

    Primary thyroid paraganglioma (TP) is an uncommon tumor, and in rare cases, this disease tends to mimic medullary thyroid carcinoma (MTC). The present study reports a rare case of primary TP mimicking thyroid carcinoma, accompanied by hyperthyroidism. A 30-year-old female presented with an anterior cervical mass. Pre-operative radiological studies and operative frozen section analysis indicated an atypical MTC. Primary TP was finally diagnosed by pathology and immunohistochemical staining. Laboratory examinations (thyroid hormones tests) and Tc99m emission computed tomography revealed hyperthyroidism. Gene analysis of TP-associated gene mutations was negative. Surgical resection was performed as a curative approach and there is currently no metastasis after 36 months of follow-up. Surgeons must be aware of this disease in order to ensure a correct diagnosis and to prevent them from performing unnecessary procedures. The current study presents a case of primary TP mimicking MTC, discusses the radiographic results and histological characteristics, and provides a review of the associated literature. PMID:26622613

  4. Cis-trans photoisomerization of fluorescent-protein chromophores.

    PubMed

    Voliani, Valerio; Bizzarri, Ranieri; Nifosì, Riccardo; Abbruzzetti, Stefania; Grandi, Elena; Viappiani, Cristiano; Beltram, Fabio

    2008-08-28

    Photochromic variants of fluorescent proteins are opening the way to a number of opportunities for high-sensitivity regioselective studies in the cellular environment and may even lead to applications in information and communication technology. Yet, the detailed photophysical processes at the basis of photoswitching have not been fully clarified. In this paper, we used synthetic FP chromophores to clarify the photophysical processes associated with the photochromic behavior. In particular, we investigated the spectral modification of synthetic chromophore analogues of wild-type green fluorescent protein (GFP), Y66F GFP (BFPF), and Y66W GFP (CFP) upon irradiation in solutions of different polarities. We found that the cis-trans photoisomerization mechanism can be induced in all the chromophores. The structural assignments were carried out both by NMR measurements and DFT calculations. Remarkably, we determined for the first time the spectra of neutral trans isomers in different solvents. Finally, we calculated the photoconversion quantum yields by absorption measurements under continuous illumination at different times and by a nanosecond laser-flash photolysis method. Our results indicate that cis-trans photoisomerization is a general mechanism of FP chromophores whose efficiency is modulated by the detailed mutant-specific protein environment. PMID:18671358

  5. Active Ageing in CIS Countries: Semantics, Challenges, and Responses

    PubMed Central

    Sidorenko, Alexandre; Zaidi, Asghar

    2013-01-01

    Although the CIS countries are connected together by the legacy of breaking away from the Soviet Union, they have had a distinctive transition course and are rather diverse in terms of the population ageing challenges and policy responses in place. The commonality is that a comprehensive national strategy on ageing is lacking, and many of necessary reforms were put aside owing to political uncertainties, lack of societal consensus, and financial instability. The notion of active ageing is associated with the term “accelerated ageing,” which is understood to be an individual living a life under harsh living conditions or a society experiencing rapid increases in the relative number of older persons, and therefore it carries a negative connotation. Yet, in the same spirit as the European Year for Active Ageing and Solidarity between Generations 2012, the CIS countries have initiated sectoral programmes towards enhancing employment of older workers, social participation of older people in the society in a wider sense and also measures promoting health and independent living of older persons. PMID:23346109

  6. Wavelength Dependent Cis-Trans Isomerization in Vision†

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Judy E.; Tauber, Michael J.; Mathies, Richard A.

    2005-01-01

    The primary event in vision is the light-driven cis-trans isomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in the G-protein coupled receptor rhodopsin. Early measurements showed that this photoisomerization has a reaction quantum yield Φ of ∼0.67 [Dartnall (1936) Proc. R. Soc. A 156, 158-170; Dartnall (1968) Vision Res. 8, 339-358] and suggested that the quantum yield was wavelength independent [Schneider (1939) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 170, 102-112]. Here we more accurately determine Φ 500) = 0.65 ± 0.01 and reveal that Φ surprisingly depends on the wavelength of the incident light. Although there is no difference in the quantum yield between 450 and 480 nm, the quantum yield falls significantly as the photon energy is reduced below 20 000 cm-1 (500 nm). At the reddest wavelength measured (570 nm), the quantum yield is reduced by 5 ± 1% relative to the 500 nm value. These experiments correct the long-held presumption that the quantum yield in vision is wavelength independent, and support the hypothesis that the 200 fs photoisomerization reaction that initiates vision is dictated by nonstationary excited-state vibrational wave packet dynamics. PMID:11705366

  7. Wavelength dependent cis-trans isomerization in vision.

    PubMed

    Kim, J E; Tauber, M J; Mathies, R A

    2001-11-20

    The primary event in vision is the light-driven cis-trans isomerization of the 11-cis-retinal chromophore in the G-protein coupled receptor rhodopsin. Early measurements showed that this photoisomerization has a reaction quantum yield phi of approximately 0.67 [Dartnall (1936) Proc. R. Soc. A 156, 158-170; Dartnall (1968) Vision Res. 8, 339-358] and suggested that the quantum yield was wavelength independent [Schneider (1939) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 170, 102-112]. Here we more accurately determine phi(500) = 0.65 +/- 0.01 and reveal that phi surprisingly depends on the wavelength of the incident light. Although there is no difference in the quantum yield between 450 and 480 nm, the quantum yield falls significantly as the photon energy is reduced below 20 000 cm(-1) (500 nm). At the reddest wavelength measured (570 nm), the quantum yield is reduced by 5 +/- 1% relative to the 500 nm value. These experiments correct the long-held presumption that the quantum yield in vision is wavelength independent, and support the hypothesis that the 200 fs photoisomerization reaction that initiates vision is dictated by nonstationary excited-state vibrational wave packet dynamics. PMID:11705366

  8. Acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in a patient with pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Emily K; Ek, Edmund; Croagh, Daniel; Spain, Lavinia A; Farrell, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    We report a case of acute chylous peritonitis mimicking acute appendicitis in a man with acute on chronic pancreatitis. Pancreatitis, both acute and chronic, causing the development of acute chylous ascites and peritonitis has rarely been reported in the English literature. This is the fourth published case of acute chylous ascites mimicking acute appendicitis in the literature. PMID:19824123

  9. An AB initio study of the cis- and trans -conformers of 1,3-butadiene, acrolein and glyoxal: evidence for a stabilizing interaction in cis-acrolein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    George, Philip; Bock, Charles W.; Trachtman, Mendel

    1980-12-01

    The cis- and trans-conformers of 1,3-butadiene, acrolein and glyoxal have been studied using the 4-31G and (7, 3) basis sets with full geometry optimization. The changes in geometry in going from the cis- to the trans-structures indicate that the terminal carbon and oxygen atoms in cis-acrolein are closer together than would otherwise be expected from the butadiene and glyoxal data, and that the hydrogens of the CH 2 group are also affected. These results, together with a comparison of the changes in force constants for key structural elements, suggest that some sort of attractive interaction is present in cis-acrolein. Δ ET, Δ EK, Δ Vee, Δ Vnn and Δ Ven are reported for the cis- trans isomerizations, the special geometrical features of the cis-conformer being reflected in Δ Vnn for the acrolein reaction. The positive Δ ET values for the disproportionation reactions of both conformers 2 acrolein → 1,3-butadiene + glyoxal show that the acrolein framework provides the most stable combination of the H 2C, CH- and O structural elements, while the bigger value for the cis-conformers affords additional evidence that the interaction in cis-acrolein is stabilizing in nature. However, in going from the trans- to the cis-structure neither the change in fC-H,C-H for the C-H that would be involved in an H- bond, nor the change in charge on the atoms in the C-H ⋯ O unit. based on Mulliken population analyses, are in accord with what would be expected for a hydrogen-bonding type of interaction. Instead the stabilization may be a manifestation of the different pattern of charge distribution along the polyene chain of acrolein, i.e. with the ends oppositely charged, compared to butadiene and glyoxal, in which the ends carry the same charge.

  10. Electronic optical response of molecules in intense fields: comparison of TD-HF, TD-CIS, and TD-CIS(D) approaches.

    PubMed

    Schlegel, H Bernhard; Smith, Stanley M; Li, Xiaosong

    2007-06-28

    Time-dependent Hartree-Fock (TD-HF) and time-dependent configuration interaction (TD-CI) methods with Gaussian basis sets have been compared in modeling the response of hydrogen molecule, butadiene, and hexatriene exposed to very short, intense laser pulses (760 nm, 3 cycles). After the electric field of the pulse returns to zero, the molecular dipole continues to oscillate due to the coherent superposition of excited states resulting from the nonadiabatic excitation caused by the pulse. The Fourier transform of this residual dipole gives a measure of the nonadiabatic excitation. For low fields, only the lowest excited states are populated, and TD-CI simulations using singly excited states with and without perturbative corrections for double excitations [TD-CIS(D) and TD-CIS, respectively] are generally in good agreement with the TD-HF simulations. At higher field strengths, higher states are populated and the methods begin to differ significantly if the coefficients of the excited states become larger than approximately 0.1. The response of individual excited states does not grow linearly with intensity because of excited state to excited state transitions. Beyond a threshold in the field strength, there is a rapid increase in the population of many higher excited states, possibly signaling an approach to ionization. However, without continuum functions, the present TD-HF and TD-CI calculations cannot model ionization directly. The TD-HF and TD-CIS simulations are in good accord because the excitation energies obtained by linear response TD-HF [also known as random phase approximation (RPA)] agree very well with those obtained from singly excited configuration interaction (CIS) calculations. Because CIS excitation energies with the perturbative doubles corrections [CIS(D)] are on average lower than the CIS excitation energies, the TD-CIS(D) response is generally stronger than TD-CIS. PMID:17614540

  11. Evaluation of 9-cis retinoic acid and mitotane as antitumoral agents in an adrenocortical xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Zoltán; Baghy, Kornélia; Hunyadi-Gulyás, Éva; Micsik, Tamás; Nyírő, Gábor; Rácz, Gergely; Butz, Henriett; Perge, Pál; Kovalszky, Ilona; Medzihradszky, Katalin F; Rácz, Károly; Patócs, Attila; Igaz, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The available drug treatment options for adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC) are limited. In our previous studies, the in vitro activity of 9-cis retinoic acid (9-cisRA) on adrenocortical NCI-H295R cells was shown along with its antitumoral effects in a small pilot xenograft study. Our aim was to dissect the antitumoral effects of 9-cisRA on ACC in a large-scale xenograft study involving mitotane, 9-cisRA and their combination. 43 male SCID mice inoculated with NCI-H295R cells were treated in four groups (i. control, ii. 9-cisRA, iii. mitotane, iv. 9-cisRA + mitotane) for 28 days. Tumor size follow-up, histological and immunohistochemical (Ki-67) analysis, tissue gene expression microarray, quantitative real-time-PCR for the validation of microarray results and to detect circulating microRNAs were performed. Protein expression was studied by proteomics and Western-blot validation. Only mitotane alone and the combination of 9-cisRA and mitotane resulted in significant tumor size reduction. The Ki-67 index was significantly reduced in both 9-cisRA and 9-cisRA+mitotane groups. Only modest changes at the mRNA level were found: the 9-cisRA-induced overexpression of apolipoprotein A4 and down-regulation of phosphodiesterase 4A was validated. The expression of circulating hsa-miR-483-5p was significantly reduced in the combined treatment group. The SET protein was validated as being significantly down-regulated in the combined mitotane+9-cisRA group. 9-cisRA might be a helpful additive agent in the treatment of ACC in combination with mitotane. Circulating hsa-miR-483-5p could be utilized for monitoring the treatment efficacy in ACC patients, and the treatment-induced reduction in protein SET expression might raise its relevance in ACC biology. PMID:26885453

  12. First start toward nuclear disarmament: CIS openness and compliance. Research report, August 1991-April 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Casteel, B.

    1992-04-01

    In the last six months we have seen significant changes in the Soviet Union which have radically altered that way we have conducted business. Now, it is no longer the Soviet Union, but the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS). We are now making wholesale unilateral cuts in our defense structure as the CIS is viewed as our friend and no longer the Evil Empire. We are supplying the CIS with food, loan credits, and even offering assistance to help them destroy nuclear weapons. Even though the world has changed, the CIS remains the only country on the face of the earth capable of destroying the United States in a nuclear holocaust.

  13. Formation of cis-coniferin in cell-free extracts of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh bark

    SciTech Connect

    Yamamoto, Etsuo; Inciong, M.E.J.; Davin, L.B.; Lewis, N.G. )

    1990-09-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh) bark exclusively accumulates cis-monolignols and their glucosidic conjugates; no evidence for the accumulation of trans-monolignols has been found. The glucosyltransferase from this source exhibits a very unusual substrate specificity for cis, and not trans, monolignols. This is further evidence that cis monolignols are involved in lignin formation in these plant tissues. Preliminary evidence for the existence of a novel trans-cis monolignol isomerase was obtained, in agreement with our contention that this isomerization is not photochemically mediated.

  14. Formation of cis-coniferin in cell-free extracts of Fagus grandifolia Ehrh bark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamamoto, E.; Inciong, E. J.; Davin, L. B.; Lewis, N. G.

    1990-01-01

    American beech (Fagus grandifolia Ehrh) bark exclusively accumulates cis-monolignols and their glucosidic conjugates; no evidence for the accumulation of trans-monolignols has been found. The glucosyltransferase from this source exhibits a very unusual substrate specificity for cis, and not trans, monolignols. This is further evidence that cis monolignols are involved in lignin formation in these plant tissues. Preliminary evidence for the existence of a novel trans-cis monolignol isomerase was obtained, in agreement with our contention that this isomerization is not photochemically mediated.

  15. Dissection of the cis-2-decenoic acid signaling network in Pseudomonas aeruginosa using microarray technique

    PubMed Central

    Rahmani-Badi, Azadeh; Sepehr, Shayesteh; Fallahi, Hossein; Heidari-Keshel, Saeed

    2015-01-01

    Many bacterial pathogens use quorum-sensing (QS) signaling to regulate the expression of factors contributing to virulence and persistence. Bacteria produce signals of different chemical classes. The signal molecule, known as diffusible signal factor (DSF), is a cis-unsaturated fatty acid that was first described in the plant pathogen Xanthomonas campestris. Previous works have shown that human pathogen, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, also synthesizes a structurally related molecule, characterized as cis-2-decenoic acid (C10: Δ2, CDA) that induces biofilm dispersal by multiple types of bacteria. Furthermore, CDA has been shown to be involved in inter-kingdom signaling that modulates fungal behavior. Therefore, an understanding of its signaling mechanism could suggest strategies for interference, with consequences for disease control. To identify the components of CDA signaling pathway in this pathogen, a comparative transcritpome analysis was conducted, in the presence and absence of CDA. A protein-protein interaction (PPI) network for differentially expressed (DE) genes with known function was then constructed by STRING and Cytoscape. In addition, the effects of CDA in combination with antimicrobial agents on the biofilm surface area and bacteria viability were evaluated using fluorescence microscopy and digital image analysis. Microarray analysis identified 666 differentially expressed genes in the presence of CDA and gene ontology (GO) analysis revealed that in P. aeruginosa, CDA mediates dispersion of biofilms through signaling pathways, including enhanced motility, metabolic activity, virulence as well as persistence at different temperatures. PPI data suggested that a cluster of five genes (PA4978, PA4979, PA4980, PA4982, PA4983) is involved in the CDA synthesis and perception. Combined treatments using both CDA and antimicrobial agents showed that following exposure of the biofilms to CDA, remaining cells on the surface were easily removed and killed by

  16. Brachyury, Foxa2 and the cis-Regulatory Origins of the Notochord.

    PubMed

    José-Edwards, Diana S; Oda-Ishii, Izumi; Kugler, Jamie E; Passamaneck, Yale J; Katikala, Lavanya; Nibu, Yutaka; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2015-12-01

    A main challenge of modern biology is to understand how specific constellations of genes are activated to differentiate cells and give rise to distinct tissues. This study focuses on elucidating how gene expression is initiated in the notochord, an axial structure that provides support and patterning signals to embryos of humans and all other chordates. Although numerous notochord genes have been identified, the regulatory DNAs that orchestrate development and propel evolution of this structure by eliciting notochord gene expression remain mostly uncharted, and the information on their configuration and recurrence is still quite fragmentary. Here we used the simple chordate Ciona for a systematic analysis of notochord cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), and investigated their composition, architectural constraints, predictive ability and evolutionary conservation. We found that most Ciona notochord CRMs relied upon variable combinations of binding sites for the transcription factors Brachyury and/or Foxa2, which can act either synergistically or independently from one another. Notably, one of these CRMs contains a Brachyury binding site juxtaposed to an (AC) microsatellite, an unusual arrangement also found in Brachyury-bound regulatory regions in mouse. In contrast, different subsets of CRMs relied upon binding sites for transcription factors of widely diverse families. Surprisingly, we found that neither intra-genomic nor interspecific conservation of binding sites were reliably predictive hallmarks of notochord CRMs. We propose that rather than obeying a rigid sequence-based cis-regulatory code, most notochord CRMs are rather unique. Yet, this study uncovered essential elements recurrently used by divergent chordates as basic building blocks for notochord CRMs. PMID:26684323

  17. Alu elements shape the primate transcriptome by cis-regulation of RNA editing

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background RNA editing by adenosine to inosine deamination is a widespread phenomenon, particularly frequent in the human transcriptome, largely due to the presence of inverted Alu repeats and their ability to form double-stranded structures – a requisite for ADAR editing. While several hundred thousand editing sites have been identified within these primate-specific repeats, the function of Alu-editing has yet to be elucidated. Results We show that inverted Alu repeats, expressed in the primate brain, can induce site-selective editing in cis on sites located several hundred nucleotides from the Alu elements. Furthermore, a computational analysis, based on available RNA-seq data, finds that site-selective editing occurs significantly closer to edited Alu elements than expected. These targets are poorly edited upon deletion of the editing inducers, as well as in homologous transcripts from organisms lacking Alus. Sequences surrounding sites near edited Alus in UTRs, have been subjected to a lesser extent of evolutionary selection than those far from edited Alus, indicating that their editing generally depends on cis-acting Alus. Interestingly, we find an enrichment of primate-specific editing within encoded sequence or the UTRs of zinc finger-containing transcription factors. Conclusions We propose a model whereby primate-specific editing is induced by adjacent Alu elements that function as recruitment elements for the ADAR editing enzymes. The enrichment of site-selective editing with potentially functional consequences on the expression of transcription factors indicates that editing contributes more profoundly to the transcriptomic regulation and repertoire in primates than previously thought. PMID:24485196

  18. Massively parallel cis-regulatory analysis in the mammalian central nervous system

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Susan Q.; Myers, Connie A.; Hughes, Andrew E.O.; Byrne, Leah C.; Flannery, John G.; Corbo, Joseph C.

    2016-01-01

    Cis-regulatory elements (CREs, e.g., promoters and enhancers) regulate gene expression, and variants within CREs can modulate disease risk. Next-generation sequencing has enabled the rapid generation of genomic data that predict the locations of CREs, but a bottleneck lies in functionally interpreting these data. To address this issue, massively parallel reporter assays (MPRAs) have emerged, in which barcoded reporter libraries are introduced into cells, and the resulting barcoded transcripts are quantified by next-generation sequencing. Thus far, MPRAs have been largely restricted to assaying short CREs in a limited repertoire of cultured cell types. Here, we present two advances that extend the biological relevance and applicability of MPRAs. First, we adapt exome capture technology to instead capture candidate CREs, thereby tiling across the targeted regions and markedly increasing the length of CREs that can be readily assayed. Second, we package the library into adeno-associated virus (AAV), thereby allowing delivery to target organs in vivo. As a proof of concept, we introduce a capture library of about 46,000 constructs, corresponding to roughly 3500 DNase I hypersensitive (DHS) sites, into the mouse retina by ex vivo plasmid electroporation and into the mouse cerebral cortex by in vivo AAV injection. We demonstrate tissue-specific cis-regulatory activity of DHSs and provide examples of high-resolution truncation mutation analysis for multiplex parsing of CREs. Our approach should enable massively parallel functional analysis of a wide range of CREs in any organ or species that can be infected by AAV, such as nonhuman primates and human stem cell–derived organoids. PMID:26576614

  19. Brachyury, Foxa2 and the cis-Regulatory Origins of the Notochord

    PubMed Central

    José-Edwards, Diana S.; Oda-Ishii, Izumi; Kugler, Jamie E.; Passamaneck, Yale J.; Katikala, Lavanya; Nibu, Yutaka; Di Gregorio, Anna

    2015-01-01

    A main challenge of modern biology is to understand how specific constellations of genes are activated to differentiate cells and give rise to distinct tissues. This study focuses on elucidating how gene expression is initiated in the notochord, an axial structure that provides support and patterning signals to embryos of humans and all other chordates. Although numerous notochord genes have been identified, the regulatory DNAs that orchestrate development and propel evolution of this structure by eliciting notochord gene expression remain mostly uncharted, and the information on their configuration and recurrence is still quite fragmentary. Here we used the simple chordate Ciona for a systematic analysis of notochord cis-regulatory modules (CRMs), and investigated their composition, architectural constraints, predictive ability and evolutionary conservation. We found that most Ciona notochord CRMs relied upon variable combinations of binding sites for the transcription factors Brachyury and/or Foxa2, which can act either synergistically or independently from one another. Notably, one of these CRMs contains a Brachyury binding site juxtaposed to an (AC) microsatellite, an unusual arrangement also found in Brachyury-bound regulatory regions in mouse. In contrast, different subsets of CRMs relied upon binding sites for transcription factors of widely diverse families. Surprisingly, we found that neither intra-genomic nor interspecific conservation of binding sites were reliably predictive hallmarks of notochord CRMs. We propose that rather than obeying a rigid sequence-based cis-regulatory code, most notochord CRMs are rather unique. Yet, this study uncovered essential elements recurrently used by divergent chordates as basic building blocks for notochord CRMs. PMID:26684323

  20. Ulcer in the basis of Zenker's diverticulum mimicking esophageal malignancy.

    PubMed Central

    Odemis, Bolent; Ataseven, Hilmi; Basar, Omer; Ertugrul, Ibrahim; Yüksel, Osman; Turhan, Nesrin

    2006-01-01

    Complications of Zenker's diverticulum are rare and include ulcer, bleeding and malignancy. Ulcer in the basis of diverticulum is a very rare complication and to date only four cases have been reported in the literature. Herein, we report a new case of ulcer in Zenker's diverticulum mimicking esophageal malignancy presumed to be due to aspirin and/or alcohol consumption. The exact diagnosis was troublesome and needed to perform diagnostic procedures repeatedly. The patient underwent external pharyngoesophageal diverticulectomy. We emphasize that endoscope should be withdrawn if any resistance is encountered during esophageal intubation-even with forward-viewing endoscope-especially when there is a Zenker's diverticulum suspicion and the patient receives ulcerogenic agents. Endoscopic examination should be performed prior to any definitive surgical procedure in all patients with Zenker's diverticulum. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:16895291

  1. Surgicel® granuloma mimicking ovarian cancer: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Cormio, Luigi; Cormio, Gennaro; Di Fino, Giuseppe; Scavone, Carmen; Sanguedolce, Francesca; Loizzi, Vera; Carrieri, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Surgicel® is an absorbable sterile mesh composed of oxidized cellulose that is used to control intraoperative capillary or venous bleeding, due to its capacity to bind hemoglobin, thus allowing the formation of an artificial clot. In the present study, a large granuloma mimicking ovarian cancer, which developed following placement of a Surgicel® sponge during a combined pubovaginal sling procedure and cystocele repair, is reported. The aim of the present case report is to emphasize the fact that hemostatic measures should be removed following their use, and to alert surgeons to the risk of using and leaving in situ oxidized cellulose. Furthermore, accurate evaluation of the surgical history of the patient should always be performed prior to attempting surgery. PMID:27446398

  2. Mimicking diffuse supernova antineutrinos with the sun as a source

    SciTech Connect

    Raffelt, G. G.; Rashba, T. I.

    2010-04-15

    Measuring the {nu}-bar{sub e} component of the cosmic diffuse supernova neutrino background (DSNB) is the next ambitious goal for low-energy neutrino astronomy. The largest flux is expected in the lowest accessible energy bin. However, for E {<=} 15 MeV a possible signal can be mimicked by a solar {nu}-bar{sub e} flux that originates from the usual {sup 8}B neutrinos by spin-flavor oscillations. We show that such an interpretation is possible within the allowed range of neutrino electromagnetic transition moments and solar turbulent field strengths and distributions. Therefore, an unambiguous detection of the DSNB requires a significant number of events at E {>=} 15 MeV.

  3. Metastatic gastrinoma in the breast mimicking primary solid papillary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Burt, Michael; Madan, Rashna; Fan, Fang

    2016-10-01

    We report a case of metastatic gastrinoma to the breast morphologically mimicking solid papillary carcinoma of the breast. A 59-year-old woman presented with a hypoechoic right breast mass that histologically revealed solid nests of small monotonous tumor cells, fibrovascular cores, and round to oval nuclei with fine chromatin and small nucleoli. Immunohistochemistry demonstrated chromogranin and synaptophysin positivity. Tumor prognostic markers showed weak positivity for estrogen receptor and negativity for progesterone receptor. Although an initial diagnosis of solid papillary carcinoma was rendered, subsequent identification of the patient's clinical history of pancreatic gastrinoma and an additional immunohistochemical stain for gastrin supported a diagnosis of metastatic gastrinoma. We report this rare case to increase awareness of metastatic neuroendocrine tumors in the breast. Multiple breast lesions and lack of expression of estrogen/progesterone hormone receptors should prompt careful review of the patient's clinical history to rule out metastatic neuroendocrine disease. PMID:27342908

  4. Leishmaniasis recidiva cutis of the lips mimicking granulomatous cheilitis.

    PubMed

    Ekiz, Özlem; Rifaioǧlu, Emine Nur; Şen, Bilge Bülbül; Çulha, Gülnaz; Özgür, Tümay; Doǧramaci, Asena Çiǧdem

    2015-01-01

    Leishmaniasis recidiva cutis (LRC) is an unusual form of acute cutaneous leishmaniasis. Herein, we present a case of LRC of the lips mimicking granulomatous cheilitis. An 8-year-old, Syrian child admitted with a swelling and disfigurement of his lips for 4 years. Abundant intra and extracellular Leishmania amastigotes were determined in the smear prepared from the lesion with Giemsa stain. Histopathology showed foamy histiocytes and leishmania parasites within the cytoplasm of macrophages in the epidermis and a dense dermal mixed type inflammatory cell infiltrate composed of lymphocytes, foamy histiocytes with multinucleated giant cells. On the basis of anamnestic data, the skin smears results, clinical and histopathologic findings, LRC was diagnosed. The patient was treated with meglumine antimoniate intramuscularly and fluconazole orally. Cryotherapy was applied to the residual papular lesions. The lesion improved markedly at the first month of the treatment. PMID:25814756

  5. Amiodarone-induced pulmonary toxicity mimicking acute pulmonary edema.

    PubMed

    Fabiani, Iacopo; Tacconi, Danilo; Grotti, Simone; Brandini, Rossella; Salvadori, Claudia; Caremani, Marcello; Bolognese, Leonardo

    2011-05-01

    Amiodarone is a highly effective antiarrhythmic drug. Its long-term use may, however, lead to several adverse effects, with pulmonary toxicity being the most serious. The article presents the case of a 78-year-old woman with a history of cardiac surgery, who after 2 years of amiodarone therapy for prophylactic treatment of atrial fibrillation developed amiodarone pneumonitis mimicking an acute pulmonary edema. The patient failed to respond to diuretic therapy and several courses of anti-infective therapy. Differential diagnosis of different causes of pulmonary infiltrates did not demonstrate any other abnormality. Lung biopsy findings were consistent with the diagnosis of amiodarone pneumonitis. Given the widespread use of amiodarone as an antiarrhythmic agent, pneumologists and cardiologists should consider this important adverse effect as a differential diagnosis of pulmonary distress refractory to therapy in all patients treated with amiodarone who present with respiratory symptoms and pneumonia-like illness. PMID:19924000

  6. A case of giant nodular posterior scleritis mimicking choroidal malignancy

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Andrea T; Luk, Fiona O; Chan, Carmen K

    2015-01-01

    To report a case of giant nodular posterior scleritis mimicking a choroidal tumor. A 42-year-old lady with systemic hypertension presented with a 1-week history of unilateral visual loss, pain and redness in her left eye. Examination showed sectoral anterior episcleritis in her left eye as well as a dome-shaped choroidal mass at the inferior-temporal periphery, associated with retinal hemorrhages and subretinal fluid. Systemic evaluation and imaging of the choroidal mass were performed and could not rule out amelanotic choroidal melanoma. At the same time, she was prescribed a 2-week course of oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) for her sectoral anterior episcleritis. The choroidal mass was found to have resolved completely right before her scheduled fine needle biospy. Diagnosis of nodular posterior scleritis and a trial of oral NSAID can be considered in patients presenting with a choroidal mass before any invasive procedure. PMID:26862098

  7. Spilled gallstones mimicking a retroperitoneal sarcoma following laparoscopic cholecystectomy.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Joo, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Hyun-Cheol

    2016-05-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become a standard treatment of symptomatic gallstone disease. Although spilled gallstones are considered harmless, unretrieved gallstones can result in intra-abdominal abscess. We report a case of abscess formation due to spilled gallstones after laparoscopic cholecystectomy mimicking a retroperitoneal sarcoma on radiologic imaging. A 59-year-old male with a surgical history of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy complicated by gallstones spillage presented with a 1 mo history of constant right-sided abdominal pain and tenderness. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a retroperitoneal sarcoma at the sub-hepatic space. On open exploration a 5 cm × 5 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The mass contained purulent material and gallstones. Final pathology revealed abscess formation and foreign body granuloma. Vigilance concerning the possibility of lost gallstones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is important. If possible, every spilled gallstone during surgery should be retrieved to prevent this rare complication. PMID:27158213

  8. Spilled gallstones mimicking a retroperitoneal sarcoma following laparoscopic cholecystectomy

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Bum-Soo; Joo, Sun-Hyung; Kim, Hyun-Cheol

    2016-01-01

    Laparoscopic cholecystectomy has become a standard treatment of symptomatic gallstone disease. Although spilled gallstones are considered harmless, unretrieved gallstones can result in intra-abdominal abscess. We report a case of abscess formation due to spilled gallstones after laparoscopic cholecystectomy mimicking a retroperitoneal sarcoma on radiologic imaging. A 59-year-old male with a surgical history of a laparoscopic cholecystectomy complicated by gallstones spillage presented with a 1 mo history of constant right-sided abdominal pain and tenderness. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging demonstrated a retroperitoneal sarcoma at the sub-hepatic space. On open exploration a 5 cm × 5 cm retroperitoneal mass was excised. The mass contained purulent material and gallstones. Final pathology revealed abscess formation and foreign body granuloma. Vigilance concerning the possibility of lost gallstones during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is important. If possible, every spilled gallstone during surgery should be retrieved to prevent this rare complication. PMID:27158213

  9. Basal cell adenoma of maxillary sinus mimicking ameloblastoma.

    PubMed

    Bhagde, Priya Anil; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare basaloid tumor, with only 20% of cases occurring in minor salivary glands. Histologically, BCA is characterized by the presence of basaloid cells and may frequently be mistaken with canalicular adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry may aid in arriving at a final diagnosis as in the present case. Reported here is a case of locally aggressive BCA. Histologically, the lesion mimicked ameloblastoma and other entities which posed a diagnostic challenge. There are no reports of BCA presenting as an aggressive lesion available in English literature so far; moreover, merely a single case of BCA of maxillary sinus has been previously reported to the best of our cognition. This case report highlights the rarity of this tumor with regards to its site of origin, clinical behavior and histopathological mimics. PMID:27194878

  10. Basal cell adenoma of maxillary sinus mimicking ameloblastoma

    PubMed Central

    Bhagde, Priya Anil; Barpande, Suresh Ramchandra; Bhavthankar, Jyoti Dilip; Humbe, Jayanti G

    2016-01-01

    Basal cell adenoma (BCA) is a rare basaloid tumor, with only 20% of cases occurring in minor salivary glands. Histologically, BCA is characterized by the presence of basaloid cells and may frequently be mistaken with canalicular adenoma, basal cell adenocarcinoma, adenoid cystic carcinoma and basaloid squamous cell carcinoma. Immunohistochemistry may aid in arriving at a final diagnosis as in the present case. Reported here is a case of locally aggressive BCA. Histologically, the lesion mimicked ameloblastoma and other entities which posed a diagnostic challenge. There are no reports of BCA presenting as an aggressive lesion available in English literature so far; moreover, merely a single case of BCA of maxillary sinus has been previously reported to the best of our cognition. This case report highlights the rarity of this tumor with regards to its site of origin, clinical behavior and histopathological mimics. PMID:27194878

  11. Engineered nanoparticles mimicking cell membranes for toxin neutralization.

    PubMed

    Fang, Ronnie H; Luk, Brian T; Hu, Che-Ming J; Zhang, Liangfang

    2015-08-01

    Protein toxins secreted from pathogenic bacteria and venomous animals rely on multiple mechanisms to overcome the cell membrane barrier to inflict their virulence effect. A promising therapeutic concept toward developing a broadly applicable anti-toxin platform is to administer cell membrane mimics as decoys to sequester these virulence factors. As such, lipid membrane-based nanoparticulates are an ideal candidate given their structural similarity to cellular membranes. This article reviews the virulence mechanisms employed by toxins at the cell membrane interface and highlights the application of cell-membrane mimicking nanoparticles as toxin decoys for systemic detoxification. In addition, the implication of particle/toxin nanocomplexes in the development of toxoid vaccines is discussed. PMID:25868452

  12. Primary oral leishmaniasis mimicking oral cancer: a case report.

    PubMed

    Celentano, A; Ruoppo, E; Mansueto, G; Mignogna, M D

    2015-04-01

    Primary mucosal leishmaniasis is a rare infectious disease, particularly in immunocompetent patients. We present a 50-year-old patient with a 6-week history of a painful lesion of the left buccal mucosa that mimicked cancer. The exophytic lesion looked invasive, and we took an incisional biopsy specimen to exclude cancer. The diagnosis of leishmaniasis was unexpected, and the patient was successfully treated with amphotericin B for five weeks. After five months the patient had a visceral recurrence. Chronic exophytic and ulcerated mucosal lesions that do not heal within 3-4 weeks should be regarded as the first signs of oral cancer, but primary oral leishmaniasis can easily mimic it. PMID:25701438

  13. Optofluidic phantom mimicking optical properties of porcine livers

    PubMed Central

    Long, Ruiqi; King, Travis; Akl, Tony; Ericson, M. Nance; Wilson, Mark; Coté, Gerard L.; McShane, Michael J.

    2011-01-01

    One strategy for assessing efficacy of a liver transplant is to monitor perfusion and oxygenation after transplantation. An implantable optical sensor is being developed to overcome inadequacies of current monitoring approaches. To facilitate sensor design while minimizing animal use, a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-based liver phantom was developed to mimic the optical properties of porcine liver in the 630-1000 nm wavelength range and the anatomical geometry of liver parenchyma. Using soft lithography to construct microfluidic channels in pigmented elastomer enabled the 2D approximation of hexagonal liver lobules with 15mm sinusoidal channels, which will allow perfusion with blood-mimicking fluids to facilitate the development of the liver perfusion and oxygenation monitoring system. PMID:21750766

  14. Epineurium-mimicking chitosan conduits for peripheral nervous tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Nawrotek, Katarzyna; Tylman, Michał; Rudnicka, Karolina; Gatkowska, Justyna; Wieczorek, Marek

    2016-11-01

    In this investigation, we report on a fabrication method of epineurium-mimicking tubular conduits based on electrodeposition from chitosan solution. The pre-enrichment of electrodeposition solution with hyaluronic acid and/or collagen components results in structures which structural, morphological, and physicochemical properties can be controlled. In order to determine the optimal composition of the initial chitosan solution resulting in conduits meeting the requirements imposed on peripheral nerve implants, we perform chemical, physical, and biological studies. Both the molecular weight of hyaluronic acid and the concentration of additives are found to be crucial for the final mechanical as well as biological performance of conduits. Because, the obtained structures show biocompatibility when contacting with a mouse hippocampal cell line (mHippoE-18), we further plan to test their application potential on an animal model. PMID:27516256

  15. Tissue-mimicking gel phantoms for thermal therapy studies.

    PubMed

    Dabbagh, Ali; Abdullah, Basri Johan Jeet; Ramasindarum, Chanthiriga; Abu Kasim, Noor Hayaty

    2014-10-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms that are currently available for routine biomedical applications may not be suitable for high-temperature experiments or calibration of thermal modalities. Therefore, design and fabrication of customized thermal phantoms with tailored properties are necessary for thermal therapy studies. A multitude of thermal phantoms have been developed in liquid, solid, and gel forms to simulate biological tissues in thermal therapy experiments. This article is an attempt to outline the various materials and techniques used to prepare thermal phantoms in the gel state. The relevant thermal, electrical, acoustic, and optical properties of these phantoms are presented in detail and the benefits and shortcomings of each type are discussed. This review could assist the researchers in the selection of appropriate phantom recipes for their in vitro study of thermal modalities and highlight the limitations of current phantom recipes that remain to be addressed in further studies. PMID:24626566

  16. High-Grade Sarcomas Mimicking Traumatic Intramuscular Hematomas

    PubMed Central

    Gomez, Pablo; Morcuende, Jose

    2004-01-01

    We reported on three patients with high-grade soft-tissue sarcomas mimicking traumatic intramuscular hematomas. Patients had an episode of trauma to the extremity, and after initial clinical and imaging evaluations they were considered to have muscular hematomas. The lesions increased in size over time, leading to further evaluations that demonstrated the actual diagnosis. We conducted a retrospective review of the clinical findings, magnetic resonance images, and computed tomography scans to assess characteristics that will help in the differential diagnosis. We conclude that intramuscular hematomas following trauma should be approached with a high degree of clinical suspicion. MRI analysis can be used as an important diagnostic tool, but the results must be seen in the context of the clinical history. MRI is not sensitive or specific enough to rule out malignancy. The diagnosis of a high-grade sarcoma must be considered in these patients and any doubt should be resolved with a biopsy. PMID:15296215

  17. Liquid optical phantoms mimicking spectral characteristics of laboratory mouse biotissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loginova, D. A.; Sergeeva, E. A.; Krainov, A. D.; Agrba, P. D.; Kirillin, M. Yu

    2016-06-01

    Optical phantoms mimicking optical properties of real biotissues in the visible and IR spectral regions are developed based on measurements of the spectral characteristics of ex vivo samples of laboratory mouse biotissues. The phantoms are composed of aqueous solutions of Lipofundin, Indian ink and red ink with different spectral characteristics. The deviations of the measured absorption and scattering coefficients of phantoms in the wavelength range 480 – 580 nm from the corresponding values for real biotissues do not exceed 25% and 2%, respectively. For phantoms in the wavelength region 580 – 880 nm, the deviations of the absorption coefficient do not exceed 40% and the deviations of the scattering coefficient do not exceed 25%. These values, in general, fall within the range of variations for different individual mice of one strain.

  18. Blood-Mimicking Fluid for Testing Ultrasonic Diagnostic Instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Kouhei; Yoshida, Tomoji; Sato, Kazuishi; Kondo, Toshio; Yasukawa, Kazuhiro; Miyamoto, Nobuaki; Taniguchi, Masahiko

    2012-07-01

    We present a blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) for the Doppler test object of medical diagnostic instruments. Accurate measurement in a flow Doppler test requires a BMF that has the acoustic velocity and density defined in the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) standard, and furthermore, they must be stable over time. To formulate a fluid with the desired density and acoustic velocity, we have developed a new fluid made of glycerine and water-soluble silicone oil. The new BMF includes dispersed polystyrene particles as scatterers. The density of the liquid can be adjusted to maintain it at the same value as that of the polystyrene particles, thus ensuring neutral buoyancy of the particles. The MBF was stable over a period of 2 weeks, during which the density and acoustic velocity did not change.

  19. Adenoid Cystic Carcinoma Mimicking an Oroantral Fistula: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Monteiro, Bárbara Vanessa de Brito; Grempel, Rafael Grotta; Gomes, Daliana Queiroga de Castro; Godoy, Gustavo Pina; Miguel, Márcia Cristina da Costa

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Adenoid cystic carcinoma (ACC) is one of the most frequent malignant salivary gland tumors, which commonly affects the minor salivary glands of the mouth and is rare in the nose and paranasal sinuses. In the maxillary sinus, ACC can mimic inflammatory diseases and has a poor prognosis. Objective To report a case of a 50-year-old man with ACC of the maxillary sinus whose clinical findings in the alveolar ridge mimicked an oroantral fistula. Case Report An excisional biopsy was performed and histopathologic analysis revealed ACC. Lung metastases and residual tumor in the maxillary sinus were detected by imaging methods. In view of the poor general health of the patient, no new surgical intervention was performed and he was only treated by radiotherapy and follow-up. Conclusion Although rare in the maxillary sinus, ACC should be included in the differential diagnosis of lesions affecting this site. PMID:25992095

  20. A Case of Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma Mimicking Granuloma Pyogenicum

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Won Woo; Chung, Ji Min; Jung, Kyoung Eun; Park, Jong Wook

    2008-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is well known for its frequent metastasis and particularly to the lungs, liver, bones and brain, but metastasis to the skin is rare. We report here on a case of metastatic RCC in a 73-year-old man who presented with a 1.5 cm sized, moist, beefy-red and exophytic nodule on the scalp. The lesion had grown rapidly for 2 months and it clinically mimicked granuloma pyogenicum. A skin biopsy revealed a solid mass composed of clear cells with clear cytoplasm and oval hyperchromatic nuclei, and they were arranged in an alveolar pattern. As skin metastasis from renal cell carcinoma signals widespread systemic metastasis and a poor prognosis, clinicians should conduct a careful inspection of the skin of a patient with RCC and they should also have a high index of suspicion for finding a primary internal organ malignancy in the RCC patients who present with a skin lesion. PMID:27303209

  1. Photochemical transformations of cis-1,2-dibenzoylalkenes

    SciTech Connect

    Lahiri, S.; Dabral, V.; Chauhan, S.M.S.; Chakachery, E.; Kumar, C.V.; Scaiano, J.C.; George, M.V.

    1980-01-01

    Photorearrangements of cis-1,2-dibenzoylalkenes such as 2,3-dibenzoylbicyclo(2.2.2)octa-2,5-diene (9), 2.3-dibenzoylbicyclo(2.2.2)oct-2-ene (21), 2,3-dibenzoylbicyclo(2.2.1)hept-2-ene (28), and 2,3-dibenzoylbicyclo-(2.2.1)hepta-2,5-diene (35) are reported. Irradiation of 9 in methanol gives a mixture of isomeric esters 13 (69%) and 14 (1%), whereas in benzene a mixture of carboxylic acids 10 (26%) and 11 (6%) and loctone 12 (23%) is formed. Similar rearrangements have been observed in the case of 21 and 28. Irradiation of 35 in benzene, however, gives mostly the quadricyclane 36. Laser flash-photolysis studies have shown that diradical intermediates such as 18 and 19 may be involved in the transformation of 9 to the different products. Similar diradical intermediates have been postulated in the rearrangements of 21 and 28.

  2. cis-Platinum in gynecologic cancer. III. Toxicity.

    PubMed

    Hall, D J; Diasio, R; Goplerud, D R

    1981-10-01

    The toxicity of cis-dichlorodiammineplatinum was evaluated in 41 patients who were treated for squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix or epithelial carcinoma of the ovary, with a dosage schedule of 60 mg/m2 every 3 weeks. Ototoxicity occurred in 33.3% of the patients serially tested, and anemia occurred in 48.8%. Leukopenia occurred in 29.9% and thrombocytopenia in 2.2% of courses administered. Nephrotoxicity was seen in 61% of patients as determined by evaluation of blood urea nitrogen and in 70.7% by serum creatinine elevation. Urine dipstick protein and 24 hour urinary protein determinations were evaluated. Suggestions are made in regard to the use of these determinations as a guide to modification of dose and duration of therapy. PMID:7197123

  3. Acoustical characterization of polysaccharide polymers tissue-mimicking materials.

    PubMed

    Cuccaro, Rugiada; Musacchio, Chiara; Giuliano Albo, P Alberto; Troia, Adriano; Lago, Simona

    2015-02-01

    Tissue-mimicking phantoms play a crucial role in medical ultrasound research because they can simulate biological soft tissues. In last years, many types of polymeric tissues have been proposed and characterized from an acoustical and a thermal point of view, but, rarely, a deep discussion about the quality of the measurements, in terms of the uncertainty evaluation, has been reported. In this work, considering the necessity to develop laboratory standards for the measurement of ultrasonic exposure and dose quantities, a detailed description of the experimental apparatuses for the sound speed and the attenuation coefficient measurements is given, focusing the attention on the uncertainty evaluation both of the results and analysis algorithms. In particular, this algorithm reveals a novel empirical relation, fixing a limit to the energy content (therefore limits the number of cycles) of the three parts in which the authors have proposed to divide the acoustical signal. Furthermore, the realisation of multi-components phantoms, Agar and Phytagel based tissue-mimicking gels along with others long chain molecules (dextrane or polyvinyl alcohol) and scattering materials (silicon carbide and kieselguhr) are investigated. This paper reports accurate speed of sound and attenuation coefficient measurements. Speed of sound is measured by a pulse-echo technique in far-field condition, using an optical glass buffer rod; while attenuation coefficient is determined by an insertion technique, using demineralized water as reference material. The experimental sound speed results are subjected to an overall estimated relative uncertainty of about 1.5% and the attenuation coefficient uncertainty is less than 2.5%. For the development of laboratory standards, a detailed analysis of the measurement uncertainty is fundamental to make sample properties comparable. The authors believe this study could represent the right direction to make phantoms characterizations referable and traceable

  4. State-resolved unimolecular dissociation of cis-cis HOONO: Product state distributions and action spectrum in the 2νOH band region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthews, Jamie; Sinha, Amitabha

    2005-03-01

    Nascent OH fragment product state distributions arising from unimolecular dissociation of room temperature HOONO, initiated by excitation in the region of the 2νOH band, are probed using laser-induced fluorescence at sub-Doppler resolution. Phase-space simulations of the measured OH rotational distributions are consistent with the dissociation dynamics being statistical and confirm that all major features in the room temperature action spectrum belong to the cis-cis conformer. The phase-space simulations also allow us to estimate the HO-ONO bond dissociation energy of cis-cis HOONO to be D0=19.9±0.5kcal /mol, which when combined with the known heat-of-formation data for the OH and NO2 fragments gives ΔHf0(cis-cisHOONO )=-2.5kcal/mol. In addition to fragment energy release, spectral features in the cis-cis HOONO action spectrum are examined with respect to their shifts upon N15 isotope substitution and through ab initio spectral simulation using a two-dimensional dipole surface that takes into account the influence of HOON torsional motion on the OH stretching overtone. The two-dimensional spectral simulations, using CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ dipole surface, qualitatively reproduces features appearing in the action spectrum and suggest that the strong broad feature occurring ˜570cm-1 to the blue of the cis-cis HOONO 2νOH peak, likely involve excitation of HOON-torsion/OH-stretch combination bands originating from thermally populated excited torsional states. A closer examination of the predictions of the two-dimensional model with experiments also reveals its limitations and suggests that a more elaborate treatment, one which includes several additional modes, will likely be required in order to fully explain the room temperature action spectrum. Ab initio calculations of the HOON torsional potential at the CCSD(T)/cc-pVTZ level of theory are also presented and confirm that cis-perp configuration does not correspond to a bound localized minimum on the HOONO potential

  5. A blood-mimicking fluid for particle image velocimetry with silicone vascular models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yousif, Majid Y.; Holdsworth, David W.; Poepping, Tamie L.

    2011-03-01

    For accurate particle image velocimetry measurements in hemodynamics studies, it is important to use a fluid with a refractive index ( n) matching that of the vascular models (phantoms) and ideally a dynamic viscosity matching human blood. In this work, a blood-mimicking fluid (BMF) composed of water, glycerol, and sodium iodide was formulated for a range of refractive indices to match most common silicone elastomers ( n = 1.40-1.43) and with corresponding dynamic viscosity within the average cited range of healthy human blood (4.4 ± 0.5 cP). Both refractive index and viscosity were attained at room temperature (22.2 ± 0.2°C), which eliminates the need for a temperature-control system. An optimally matched BMF, suitable for use in a vascular phantom ( n = 1.4140 ± 0.0008, Sylgard 184), was demonstrated with composition (by weight) of 47.38% water, 36.94% glycerol (44:56 glycerol-water ratio), and 15.68% sodium iodide salt, resulting in a dynamic viscosity of 4 .31 ± 0 .03 cP.

  6. Paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastaisis: A case report

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, RONGXING; ZHANG, MINJIA; CHENG, NANSHENG; ZHOU, YONG

    2016-01-01

    Typical human paragonimiasis demonstrates an elevated eosinophil count, positive immunoblot, nodular shadows of the lung and pleural thickening with pleural effusion, and these symptoms may be confused with chest cancer. In the present case, a rare case of human paragonimiasis mimicking chest cancer and abdominal wall metastasis is described, the 39-year-old male patient was admitted in our hospital for cough, weight loss 5 kg and a firm mass in right upper abdominal wall. The laboratory test showed unremarkable hematology and biochemistry results. Chest X-ray, Plain computed tomography of the chest and abdomen showed right pleural effusion, several nodules in right lower lung and a mass in the right upper abdominal wall. The initial diagnosis was lung or chest cancer with abdominal wall metastasis, and the abdominal wall mass was resected for the final diagnosis. The biopsy revealed eosinophilic granuloma with Charcot-Leyden crystal formation infiltrated in the muscular fibers. Subsequent to assessment of the antibodies against parasites, the final diagnosis of paragonimiasis was made. PMID:27313691

  7. Development and characterization of a blood mimicking fluid for high intensity focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yunbo; Maruvada, Subha; King, Randy L; Herman, Bruce A; Wear, Keith A

    2008-09-01

    A blood mimicking fluid (BMF) has been developed for the acoustic and thermal characterizations of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation devices. The BMF is based on a degassed and de-ionized water solution dispersed with low density polyethylene microspheres, nylon particles, gellan gum, and glycerol. A broad range of physical parameters, including attenuation coefficient, speed of sound, viscosity, thermal conductivity, and diffusivity, were characterized as a function of temperature (20-70 degrees C). The nonlinear parameter B/A and backscatter coefficient were also measured at room temperature. Importantly, the attenuation coefficient is linearly proportional to the frequency (2-8 MHz) with a slope of about 0.2 dB cm(-1) MHz(-1) in the 20-70 degrees C range as in the case of human blood. Furthermore, sound speed and bloodlike backscattering indicate the usefulness of the BMF for ultrasound flow imaging and ultrasound-guided HIFU applications. Most of the other temperature-dependent physical parameters are also close to the reported values in human blood. These properties make it a unique HIFU research tool for developing standardized exposimetry techniques, validating numerical models, and determining the safety and efficacy of HIFU ablation devices. PMID:19045670

  8. Short-term plasticity and long-term potentiation mimicked in single inorganic synapses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, Takeo; Hasegawa, Tsuyoshi; Tsuruoka, Tohru; Terabe, Kazuya; Gimzewski, James K.; Aono, Masakazu

    2011-08-01

    Memory is believed to occur in the human brain as a result of two types of synaptic plasticity: short-term plasticity (STP) and long-term potentiation (LTP; refs , , , ). In neuromorphic engineering, emulation of known neural behaviour has proven to be difficult to implement in software because of the highly complex interconnected nature of thought processes. Here we report the discovery of a Ag2S inorganic synapse, which emulates the synaptic functions of both STP and LTP characteristics through the use of input pulse repetition time. The structure known as an atomic switch, operating at critical voltages, stores information as STP with a spontaneous decay of conductance level in response to intermittent input stimuli, whereas frequent stimulation results in a transition to LTP. The Ag2S inorganic synapse has interesting characteristics with analogies to an individual biological synapse, and achieves dynamic memorization in a single device without the need of external preprogramming. A psychological model related to the process of memorizing and forgetting is also demonstrated using the inorganic synapses. Our Ag2S element indicates a breakthrough in mimicking synaptic behaviour essential for the further creation of artificial neural systems that emulate characteristics of human memory.

  9. High-affinity ligand probes of CD22 overcome the threshold set by cis ligands to allow for binding, endocytosis, and killing of B cells.

    PubMed

    Collins, Brian E; Blixt, Ola; Han, Shoufa; Duong, Bao; Li, Hongyi; Nathan, Jay K; Bovin, Nicolai; Paulson, James C

    2006-09-01

    CD22 (Siglec-2) is a key regulator of B cell signaling whose function is modulated by interaction with extracellular glycan ligands mediated through its N-terminal Ig domain. Its preferred ligand is the sequence Sia alpha2-6Gal that is abundantly expressed on N-linked glycans of B cell glycoproteins, and by binding to CD22 in cis causes CD22 to appear "masked" from binding to synthetic sialoside probes. Yet, despite the presence of cis ligands, CD22 redistributes to sites of cell contact by binding to trans ligands on neighboring cells. In this study, we demonstrate the dynamic equilibrium that exists between CD22 and its cis and trans ligands, using a high-affinity multivalent sialoside probe that competes with cis ligands and binds to CD22 on native human and murine B cells. Consistent with the constitutive endocytosis reported for CD22, the probes are internalized once bound, demonstrating that CD22 is an endocytic receptor that can carry ligand-decorated "cargo" to intracellular compartments. Conjugation of the sialoside probes to the toxin saporin resulted in toxin uptake and toxin-mediated killing of B lymphoma cell lines, suggesting an alternative approach for targeting CD22 for treatment of B cell lymphomas. PMID:16920935

  10. Organocatalytic, Diastereo- and Enantioselective Synthesis of Nonsymmetric cis-Stilbene Diamines: A Platform for the Preparation of Single-Enantiomer cis-Imidazolines for Protein–Protein Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The finding by scientists at Hoffmann-La Roche that cis-imidazolines could disrupt the protein–protein interaction between p53 and MDM2, thereby inducing apoptosis in cancer cells, raised considerable interest in this scaffold over the past decade. Initial routes to these small molecules (i.e., Nutlin-3) provided only the racemic form, with enantiomers being enriched by chromatographic separation using high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) and a chiral stationary phase. Reported here is the first application of an enantioselective aza-Henry approach to nonsymmetric cis-stilbene diamines and cis-imidazolines. Two novel mono(amidine) organocatalysts (MAM) were discovered to provide high levels of enantioselection (>95% ee) across a broad range of substrate combinations. Furthermore, the versatility of the aza-Henry strategy for preparing nonsymmetric cis-imidazolines is illustrated by a comparison of the roles of aryl nitromethane and aryl aldimine in the key step, which revealed unique substrate electronic effects providing direction for aza-Henry substrate–catalyst matching. This method was used to prepare highly substituted cis-4,5-diaryl imidazolines that project unique aromatic rings, and these were evaluated for MDM2-p53 inhibition in a fluorescence polarization assay. The diversification of access to cis-stilbene diamine-derived imidazolines provided by this platform should streamline their further development as chemical tools for disrupting protein–protein interactions. PMID:25017623

  11. A CIS (Clinical Information System) Quality Evaluation Tool for Nursing Care Services

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Seon Ah

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a tool to evaluate the quality of a clinical information system (CIS) conceived by nurses and conduct a pilot test with the developed tool as an initial assessment. CIS quality is required for successful implementation in information technology (IT) environments. The study started with the realization that…

  12. Columbia River Coordinated Information System (CIS), 1992-1993 Annual Report.

    SciTech Connect

    Rowe, Mike; Roger, Phillip B.; O'Connor, Dick

    1993-11-01

    The purposes of this report are to: (1) describe the project to date; (2) to document the work and accomplishments of the (CIS) project for Fiscal Year 1993; and (3) to provide a glimpse of future project direction. The concept of a Coordinated Information System (CIS) as an approach to meeting the growing needs for regionally standardized anadromous fish information.

  13. Planning "and" Sprinting: Use of a Hybrid Project Management Methodology within a CIS Capstone Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baird, Aaron; Riggins, Frederick J.

    2012-01-01

    An increasing number of information systems projects in industry are managed using hybrid project management methodologies, but this shift in project management methods is not fully represented in our CIS curriculums. CIS capstone courses often include an applied project that is managed with traditional project management methods (plan first,…

  14. Transfer of the EPA/NIH Chemical Information System (CIS) to Private Management.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kadec, Sarah T.; Jover, Antonio

    This paper discusses the programmatic concerns, the evaluation, and the ultimate decisions which led to the transfer of CIS (Chemical Information System) to the private sector. CIS is a complex, integrated system of some 20 chemical databases and data analysis programs which provide access to physical, toxicological, environmental effects, and…

  15. Room-temperature photochromism in cis- and trans-[Ru(bpy)2(dmso)2]2+.

    PubMed

    Rack, Jeffrey J; Mockus, Nicholas V

    2003-09-22

    We report on phototriggered Ru-S --> Ru-O and thermal Ru-O --> Ru-S intramolecular linkage isomerizations in cis- and trans-[Ru(bpy)2(dmso)2]2+. The cis complex features only S-bonded sulfoxides (cis-[S,S]), whereas the trans isomer is characterized by S- and O-bonded dmso ligands. Both cis-[S,S] and trans-[S,O] exhibit photochromism at room temperature in dmso solution and ionic liquid (IL). Rates of reaction in IL were monitored by UV-visible spectroscopy and are similar to those reported in dmso solution (k(O-->S) ranges from approximately 10(-3) to 10(-4) s(-1)). Cyclic voltammetric measurements of cis-[S,S] and trans-[S,O] are consistent with an electrochemically triggered linkage isomerism mechanism. While both cis-[S,S] and trans-[S,O] are photochromic at room temperature, neither complex is emissive. However, upon cooling to 77 K, cis-[S,S] exhibits LMCT (ligand-to-metal charge transfer) emission typical of many ruthenium polypyridine complexes. In contrast to cis-[S,S], trans-[S,O] does not show any detectable emission even at 77 K. PMID:12971743

  16. Design of cyclic peptides featuring proline predominantly in the cis conformation under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Malešević, Miroslav; Schumann, Michael; Jahreis, Günther; Fischer, Gunter; Lücke, Christian

    2012-09-24

    Turns are secondary-structure elements that are omnipresent in natively folded polypeptide chains. A large variety of four-residue β-turns exist, which differ mainly in the backbone dihedral angle values of the two central residues i+1 and i+2. The βVI-type turns are of particular biological interest because the i+2 residue is always a proline in the cis conformation and might thus serve as target of peptidyl prolyl cis/trans isomerases (PPIases). We have designed cyclic hexapeptides containing two proline residues that predominantly adopt the cis conformation in aqueous solution. NMR data and MD calculations indicated that the cyclic peptide sequences c-(-DXaa-Ser-Pro-DXaa-Lys-Pro-) result in highly symmetric backbone structures when both prolines are in the cis conformation and the D-amino acids are either alanine or phenylalanine residues. Replacement of the serine residue either by phosphoserine or by tyrosine compromises this symmetry, but further increases the cis conformation content of both prolines. As a result, we obtained a cyclic hexapeptide that exists almost exclusively as the cis-Pro/cis-Pro conformer but shows no cis/trans interconversion even in the presence of the PPIase Pin1, apparently due to an energetically quite favorable but highly restricted conformational space. PMID:22969011

  17. IRIS Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene (2010 Final)

    EPA Science Inventory

    The final Toxicological Review of cis- & trans-1,2-Dichloroethylene provides scientific support and rationale for the hazard and dose-response assessment pertaining to chronic exposure to cis- and trans-1,2-dichloroethylene. 1,2-Dichloroethylene is used as a solvent for wa...

  18. Reactivity of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) from isoprene and monoterpene ozonolysis toward SO2 and organic acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sipilä, M.; Jokinen, T.; Berndt, T.; Richters, S.; Makkonen, R.; Donahue, N. M.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Kurtén, T.; Paasonen, P.; Sarnela, N.; Ehn, M.; Junninen, H.; Rissanen, M. P.; Thornton, J.; Stratmann, F.; Herrmann, H.; Worsnop, D. R.; Kulmala, M.; Kerminen, V.-M.; Petäjä, T.

    2014-11-01

    Oxidation processes in Earth's atmosphere are tightly connected to many environmental and human health issues and are essential drivers for biogeochemistry. Until the recent discovery of the atmospheric relevance of the reaction of stabilized Criegee intermediates (sCIs) with SO2, atmospheric oxidation processes were thought to be dominated by a few main oxidants: ozone, hydroxyl radicals (OH), nitrate radicals and, e.g. over oceans, halogen atoms such as chlorine. Here, we report results from laboratory experiments at 293 K and atmospheric pressure focusing on sCI formation from the ozonolysis of isoprene and the most abundant monoterpenes (α-pinene and limonene), and subsequent reactions of the resulting sCIs with SO2 producing sulfuric acid (H2SO4). The measured total sCI yields were (0.15 ± 0.07), (0.27 ± 0.12) and (0.58 ± 0.26) for α-pinene, limonene and isoprene, respectively. The ratio between the rate coefficient for the sCI loss (including thermal decomposition and the reaction with water vapour) and the rate coefficient for the reaction of sCI with SO2, k(loss) /k(sCI + SO2), was determined at relative humidities of 10 and 50%. Observed values represent the average reactivity of all sCIs produced from the individual alkene used in the ozonolysis. For the monoterpene-derived sCIs, the relative rate coefficients k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) were in the range (2.0-2.4) × 1012 molecules cm-3 and nearly independent of the relative humidity. This fact points to a minor importance of the sCI + H2O reaction in the case of the sCI arising from α-pinene and limonene. For the isoprene sCIs, however, the ratio k(loss) / k(sCI + SO2) was strongly dependent on the relative humidity. To explore whether sCIs could have a more general role in atmospheric oxidation, we investigated as an example the reactivity of acetone oxide (sCI from the ozonolysis of 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene) toward small organic acids, i.e. formic and acetic acid. Acetone oxide was found to react faster

  19. Induction of chromosome aberrations by cis-platinum(II)diamminodichloride in Drosophila melanogaster

    SciTech Connect

    Brodberg, R.K.; Lyman, R.F.; Woodruff, R.C.

    1983-01-01

    The authors have determined the in vivo effects of cis-platinum(II)diamminodichloride (cis-PDD) treatment on the induction of chromosome aberrations in Drosophila melanogaster germ cells. cis-PDD treatment induces significant increases in chromosome breakage in all stages of spermatogenesis in a battery of test systems using ring or rod-X males and repair-proficient or deficient females. Since no increase in nondisjunction was induced by cis-PDD in either male or female germ cells, any aneuploidy inducing effects of this compound should result from its clastogenic action. They also find that mei-9 excision repair function is involved in the repair of cis-PDD-induced DNA lesions in a manner that provides additional evidence that partital and ring chromosome losses are not completely homologous.

  20. Single-Molecule Observation of a Mechanically Activated Cis-to-Trans Cyclopropane Isomerization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junpeng; Kouznetsova, Tatiana B; Craig, Stephen L

    2016-08-24

    The mechanochemical activation of cis-gem-difluorocyclopropane (cis-gDFC) mechanophore in toluene was characterized with single-molecule force spectroscopy. Unlike previously reported behavior in methyl benzoate (MB), two transitions are observed in the force vs extension curves of cis-gDFC polymers in toluene. The first transition occurs at the same force of ∼1300 pN observed previously in MB, but a second transition is observed at forces of ∼1800 pN that reveal the partial formation of the trans-gDFC isomer. The behavior is attributed to competing reactions of the cis-gDFC at the 1300 pN plateau: addition of oxygen to a ring-opened diradicaloid intermediate, and isomerization of cis-gDFC to its trans isomer. PMID:27500711

  1. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  2. Application of CIS to high-efficiency PV module fabrication. Phase 3 final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K.; Leidholm, C.R.; Halani, A.; Roe, R.; Norsworthy, G.

    1998-08-01

    During this research period, researchers at International Solar Electric Technology (ISET) concentrated their efforts on three different areas of research. Within the National CIS R and D Team, ISET participated in the substrate/Mo interactions working group and investigated issues such as Na diffusion from the soda-lime glass substrate into the Mo layers and CIS films. Researchers determined that the Na content within the Mo layers was not a strong function of the nature of the Mo film. However, they found that diffusion through the Mo layers was a function of the Mo film characteristics as well as a very strong function of the CIS growth process itself. Researchers showed conclusively that the Na resided on the grain boundaries of CIS layers. Another team activity involved evaluation of CdS-free CIS solar cells. ZnO/CIS junctions prepared by the two-stage process showed light-soaking effects. Cells left under illumination improved in efficiency and were similar to the CdS/CIS junctions. After storage in the dark, however, efficiency deteriorated greatly for the ZnO/CIS device, most of the decline coming from the open-circuit voltage values. Much of the effort during this period was spent on developing a low-cost, non-vacuum CIS deposition technique. The method developed involves particulate deposition and formation of precursor layers followed by the conversion of these layers into CIS. Test modules of 40--60 cm{sup 2} were adapted to understand the issues involved in this novel technology. At the present time, the submodule efficiencies are 6--7%. Single-cell efficiencies are in the 10--13% range.

  3. 9-cis β-Carotene Increased Cholesterol Efflux to HDL in Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Bechor, Sapir; Zolberg Relevy, Noa; Harari, Ayelet; Almog, Tal; Kamari, Yehuda; Ben-Amotz, Ami; Harats, Dror; Shaish, Aviv

    2016-01-01

    Cholesterol efflux from macrophages is a key process in reverse cholesterol transport and, therefore, might inhibit atherogenesis. 9-cis-β-carotene (9-cis-βc) is a precursor for 9-cis-retinoic-acid (9-cis-RA), which regulates macrophage cholesterol efflux. Our objective was to assess whether 9-cis-βc increases macrophage cholesterol efflux and induces the expression of cholesterol transporters. Enrichment of a mouse diet with βc from the alga Dunaliella led to βc accumulation in peritoneal macrophages. 9-cis-βc increased the mRNA levels of CYP26B1, an enzyme that regulates RA cellular levels, indicating the formation of RA from βc in RAW264.7 macrophages. Furthermore, 9-cis-βc, as well as all-trans-βc, significantly increased cholesterol efflux to high-density lipoprotein (HDL) by 50% in RAW264.7 macrophages. Likewise, food fortification with 9-cis-βc augmented cholesterol efflux from macrophages ex vivo. 9-cis-βc increased both the mRNA and protein levels of ABCA1 and apolipoprotein E (APOE) and the mRNA level of ABCG1. Our study shows, for the first time, that 9-cis-βc from the diet accumulates in peritoneal macrophages and increases cholesterol efflux to HDL. These effects might be ascribed to transcriptional induction of ABCA1, ABCG1, and APOE. These results highlight the beneficial effect of βc in inhibition of atherosclerosis by improving cholesterol efflux from macrophages. PMID:27447665

  4. Trapping and dynamic manipulation with magnetomotive photoacoustic imaging of targeted microspheres mimicking metastatic cancer cells trafficking in the vasculature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Chenwei; Xia, Jinjun; Pelivanov, Ivan; Hu, Xiaoge; Gao, Xiaohu; O'Donnell, Matthew

    2012-02-01

    Trapping and manipulation of micro-scale objects mimicking metastatic cancer cells in a flow field have been demonstrated with magnetomotive photoacoustic (mmPA) imaging. Coupled contrast agents combining gold nanorods (15 nm × 50 nm; absorption peak around 730 nm) with 15 nm diameter magnetic nanospheres were targeted to 10 μm polystyrene beads recirculating in a 1.6 mm diameter tube mimicking a human peripheral vessel. Targeted objects were then trapped by an external magnetic field produced by a dual magnet system consisting of two disc magnets separated by 6 cm to form a polarizing field (0.04 Tesla in the tube region) to magnetize the magnetic contrast agents, and a custom designed cone magnet array with a high magnetic field gradient (about 0.044 Tesla/mm in the tube region) producing a strong trapping force to magnetized contrast agents. Results show that polystyrene beads linked to nanocomposites can be trapped at flow rates up to 12 ml/min. It is shown that unwanted background in a photoacoustic image can be significantly suppressed by changing the position of the cone magnet array with respect to the tube, thus creating coherent movement of the trapped objects. This study makes mmPA imaging very promising for differential visualization of metastatic cells trafficking in the vasculature.

  5. Experimental Validation of ARFI Surveillance of Subcutaneous Hemorrhage (ASSH) Using Calibrated Infusions in a Tissue-Mimicking Model and Dogs.

    PubMed

    Geist, Rebecca E; DuBois, Chase H; Nichols, Timothy C; Caughey, Melissa C; Merricks, Elizabeth P; Raymer, Robin; Gallippi, Caterina M

    2016-09-01

    Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) Surveillance of Subcutaneous Hemorrhage (ASSH) has been previously demonstrated to differentiate bleeding phenotype and responses to therapy in dogs and humans, but to date, the method has lacked experimental validation. This work explores experimental validation of ASSH in a poroelastic tissue-mimic and in vivo in dogs. The experimental design exploits calibrated flow rates and infusion durations of evaporated milk in tofu or heparinized autologous blood in dogs. The validation approach enables controlled comparisons of ASSH-derived bleeding rate (BR) and time to hemostasis (TTH) metrics. In tissue-mimicking experiments, halving the calibrated flow rate yielded ASSH-derived BRs that decreased by 44% to 48%. Furthermore, for calibrated flow durations of 5.0 minutes and 7.0 minutes, average ASSH-derived TTH was 5.2 minutes and 7.0 minutes, respectively, with ASSH predicting the correct TTH in 78% of trials. In dogs undergoing calibrated autologous blood infusion, ASSH measured a 3-minute increase in TTH, corresponding to the same increase in the calibrated flow duration. For a measured 5% decrease in autologous infusion flow rate, ASSH detected a 7% decrease in BR. These tissue-mimicking and in vivo preclinical experimental validation studies suggest the ASSH BR and TTH measures reflect bleeding dynamics. PMID:26614530

  6. Cooperation between cis and trans influences in cis-Pt(II)(PPh(3))(2) complexes: structural, spectroscopic, and computational studies.

    PubMed

    Rigamonti, Luca; Forni, Alessandra; Manassero, Mario; Manassero, Carlo; Pasini, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    The relevance of cis and trans influences of some anionic ligands X and Y in cis-[PtX(2)(PPh(3))(2)] and cis-[PtXY(PPh(3))(2)] complexes have been studied by the X-ray crystal structures of several derivatives (X(2) = (AcO)(2) (3), (NO(3))(2) (5), Br(2) (7), I(2) (11); and XY = Cl(AcO) (2), Cl(NO(3)) (4), and Cl(NO(2)) (13)), density functional theory (DFT) calculations, and one bond Pt-P coupling constants, (1)J(PtP). The latter have allowed an evaluation of the relative magnitude of both influences. It is concluded that such influences act in a cooperative way and that the cis influence is not irrelevant when rationalizing the (1)J(PtP) values, as well as the experimental Pt-P bond distances. On the contrary, in the optimized geometries, evaluated through B3LYP/def2-SVP calculations, the cis influence was not observed, except for compounds ClPh (21), Ph(2) (22), and, to a lesser extent, Cl(NO(2)) (13) and (NO(2))(2) (14). A natural bond order analysis on the optimized structures, however, has shown how the cis influence can be related to the s-character of the Pt hybrid orbital involved in the Pt-P bonds and the net atomic charge on Pt. We have also found that in the X-ray structures of cis-[PtX(2)(PPh(3))(2)] complexes the two Pt-X and the two Pt-P bond lengths are different each other and are related to the conformation of the phosphine groups, rather than to the crystal packing, since this feature is observed also in the optimized geometries. PMID:19950913

  7. Study of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods using tissue mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Manickam, Kavitha; Machireddy, Ramasubba Reddy; Seshadri, Suresh

    2014-02-01

    A pilot study was carried out to investigate the performance of ultrasound stiffness imaging methods namely Ultrasound Elastography Imaging (UEI) and Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) Imaging. Specifically their potential for characterizing different classes of solid mass lesions was analyzed using agar based tissue mimicking phantoms. Composite tissue mimicking phantom was prepared with embedded inclusions of varying stiffness from 50 kPa to 450 kPa to represent different stages of cancer. Acoustic properties such as sound speed, attenuation coefficient and acoustic impedance were characterized by pulse echo ultrasound test at 5 MHz frequency and they are ranged from (1564 ± 88 to 1671 ± 124 m/s), (0.6915 ± 0.123 to 0.8268 ± 0.755 db cm(-1)MHz(-1)) and (1.61 × 10(6) ± 0.127 to 1.76 × 10(6) ± 0.045 kg m(-2)s(-1)) respectively. The elastic property Young's Modulus of the prepared samples was measured by conducting quasi static uni axial compression test under a strain rate of 0.5mm/min upto 10 % strain, and the values are from 50 kPa to 450 kPa for a variation of agar concentration from 1.7% to 6.6% by weight. The composite phantoms were imaged by Siemens Acuson S2000 (Siemens, Erlangen, Germany) machine using linear array transducer 9L4 at 8 MHz frequency; strain and displacement images were collected by UEI and ARFI. Shear wave velocity 4.43 ± 0.35 m/s was also measured for high modulus contrast (18 dB) inclusion and X.XX m/s was found for all other inclusions. The images were pre processed and parameters such as Contrast Transfer Efficiency and lateral image profile were computed and reported. The results indicate that both ARFI and UEI represent the abnormalities better than conventional US B mode imaging whereas UEI enhances the underlying modulus contrast into improved strain contrast. The results are corroborated with literature and also with clinical patient images. PMID:24083832

  8. Netherton Syndrome Mimicking Pustular Psoriasis: Clinical Implications and Response to Intravenous Immunoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Small, Alison M; Cordoro, Kelly M

    2016-05-01

    We present two cases of Netherton syndrome mimicking pustular psoriasis and discuss potential pathomechanisms of clinical and histologic similarities between Netherton syndrome and pustular psoriasis and implications for management. PMID:27086664

  9. Deciphering cis-regulatory control in inflammatory cells.

    PubMed

    Ghisletti, Serena; Natoli, Gioacchino

    2013-01-01

    In innate immune system cells, such as macrophages and dendritic cells, deployment of inducible gene expression programmes in response to microbes and danger signals requires highly precise regulatory mechanisms. The inflammatory response has to be tailored based on both the triggering stimulus and its dose, and it has to be unfolded in a kinetically complex manner that suits the different phases of the inflammatory process. Genomic characterization of regulatory elements in this context indicated that transcriptional regulators involved in macrophage specification act as pioneer transcription factors (TFs) that generate regions of open chromatin that enable the recruitment of TFs activated in response to external inputs. Therefore, competence for responses to a specific stimulus is programmed at an early stage of differentiation by factors involved in lineage commitment and maintenance of cell identity, which are responsible for the organization of a cell-type-specific cis-regulatory repertoire. The basic functional and organizational principles that regulate inflammatory gene expression in professional cells of the innate immune system provide general paradigms on the interplay between differentiation and environmental responses. PMID:23650641

  10. Distortions induced in DNA by cis-platinum interstrand adducts

    SciTech Connect

    Sip, M.; Schwartz, A.; Vovelle, F.; Ptak, M.; Leng, M. )

    1992-03-10

    A 22 base pair double-stranded oligonucleotide containing a unique interstrand adduct resulting from chelation of the two guanine residues within the central sequence d(TGCT/AGCA) by a cis-platinum residue has been studied by means of gel electrophoresis, chemical probes, and molecular mechanics. The anomalously slow electrophoretic mobility of the multimers of the platinated and ligated oligomers suggests that the platinated oligonucleotide is bent. The two cytosine residues (complementary to the platinated guanines) are hyperreactive to hydroxylamine, indicating a large exposure of the two bases to the solvent. The adduct does not induce a local denaturation within the flanking sequences since the adenine residues are not reactive with diethyl pyrocarbonate. This is confirmed by the nonreactivity of the complementary T residues with osmium tetraoxide. These results and the molecular mechanics modeling suggest that the interstrand adduct bends the double helix by approximately 55{degree} toward the major groove, that the double helix conserves its average twist angle, and that the distortion induced by the adduct is localized at the platinated sequence d(GC/CG).

  11. Oil and gas in carbonate rocks of the CIS basins

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V. )

    1993-09-01

    In petroleum basins of the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS), oil and gas fields in carbonate reservoirs have been discovered in rocks ranging from the Riphean to the Eocene. Most fields are found in cratonic carbonate formations deposited under arid climatic conditions. Regional seals are formed by salt, anhydrite, and dolomicrite. Multilayer reservoirs predominate, but massive reservoirs are common also. The distribution of reservoir types and their quality are strongly uneven. Many fields, including giant fields, are controlled by reefs. Depending on the paleoclimatic zone, the seals are composed of salt or, rarely, of shale. Massive reservoirs predominate, but the distribution of porosity and localization of zones of improved reservoir properties are variable and controlled by the morphogenetic types of the reefs. Carbonate formations deposited under humid climatic conditions contain much less hydrocarbon reserves. The seals are generally composed of shale. The reservoirs are stratal, rarely multilayer, and the fields are usually small. A number of fields, some of them highly productive, are present in Upper Cretaceous carbonate rocks of the North Caucasus region. The carbonates consist of the remains of planktonic organisms. Seals for the hydrocarbon pool are composed of shale. The reservoirs are massive and layered-massive. Fractures and stylolites play a leading role in controlling the reservoir properties.

  12. A Cis-Regulatory Map of the Drosophila Genome

    PubMed Central

    Nègre, Nicolas; Brown, Christopher D.; Ma, Lijia; Bristow, Christopher Aaron; Miller, Steven W.; Wagner, Ulrich; Kheradpour, Pouya; Eaton, Matthew L.; Loriaux, Paul; Sealfon, Rachel; Li, Zirong; Ishii, Haruhiko; Spokony, Rebecca F.; Chen, Jia; Hwang, Lindsay; Cheng, Chao; Auburn, Richard P.; Davis, Melissa B.; Domanus, Marc; Shah, Parantu K.; Morrison, Carolyn A.; Zieba, Jennifer; Suchy, Sarah; Senderowicz, Lionel; Victorsen, Alec; Bild, Nicholas A.; Grundstad, A. Jason; Hanley, David; MacAlpine, David M.; Mannervik, Mattias; Venken, Koen; Bellen, Hugo; White, Robert; Russell, Steven; Grossman, Robert L.; Ren, Bing; Gerstein, Mark; Posakony, James W.; Kellis, Manolis; White, Kevin P.

    2011-01-01

    Systematic annotation of gene regulatory elements is a major challenge in genome science. Direct mapping of chromatin modification marks and transcriptional factor binding sites genome-wide 1,2 has successfully identified specific subtypes of regulatory elements 3. In Drosophila several pioneering studies have provided genome-wide identification of Polycomb-Response Elements 4, chromatin states 5, transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) 6–9, PolII regulation 8, and insulator elements 10; however, comprehensive annotation of the regulatory genome remains a significant challenge. Here we describe results from the modENCODE cis-regulatory annotation project. We produced a map of the Drosophila melanogaster regulatory genome based on more than 300 chromatin immuno-precipitation (ChIP) datasets for eight chromatin features, five histone deacetylases (HDACs) and thirty-eight site-specific transcription factors (TFs) at different stages of development. Using these data we inferred more than 20,000 candidate regulatory elements and we validated a subset of predictions for promoters, enhancers, and insulators in vivo. We also identified nearly 2,000 genomic regions of dense TF binding associated with chromatin activity and accessibility. We discovered hundreds of new TF co-binding relationships and defined a TF network with over 800 potential regulatory relationships. PMID:21430782

  13. Design of polarization imaging system based on CIS and FPGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan-an; Liu, Li-gang; Yang, Kun-tao; Chang, Da-ding

    2008-02-01

    As polarization is an important characteristic of light, polarization image detecting is a new image detecting technology of combining polarimetric and image processing technology. Contrasting traditional image detecting in ray radiation, polarization image detecting could acquire a lot of very important information which traditional image detecting couldn't. Polarization image detecting will be widely used in civilian field and military field. As polarization image detecting could resolve some problem which couldn't be resolved by traditional image detecting, it has been researched widely around the world. The paper introduces polarization image detecting in physical theory at first, then especially introduces image collecting and polarization image process based on CIS (CMOS image sensor) and FPGA. There are two parts including hardware and software for polarization imaging system. The part of hardware include drive module of CMOS image sensor, VGA display module, SRAM access module and the real-time image data collecting system based on FPGA. The circuit diagram and PCB was designed. Stokes vector and polarization angle computing method are analyzed in the part of software. The float multiply of Stokes vector is optimized into just shift and addition operation. The result of the experiment shows that real time image collecting system could collect and display image data from CMOS image sensor in real-time.

  14. Detailed map of a cis-regulatory input function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setty, Y.; Mayo, A. E.; Surette, M. G.; Alon, U.

    2003-06-01

    Most genes are regulated by multiple transcription factors that bind specific sites in DNA regulatory regions. These cis-regulatory regions perform a computation: the rate of transcription is a function of the active concentrations of each of the input transcription factors. Here, we used accurate gene expression measurements from living cell cultures, bearing GFP reporters, to map in detail the input function of the classic lacZYA operon of Escherichia coli, as a function of about a hundred combinations of its two inducers, cAMP and isopropyl -D-thiogalactoside (IPTG). We found an unexpectedly intricate function with four plateau levels and four thresholds. This result compares well with a mathematical model of the binding of the regulatory proteins cAMP receptor protein (CRP) and LacI to the lac regulatory region. The model is also used to demonstrate that with few mutations, the same region could encode much purer AND-like or even OR-like functions. This possibility means that the wild-type region is selected to perform an elaborate computation in setting the transcription rate. The present approach can be generally used to map the input functions of other genes.

  15. Mechanism of cis-prenyltransferase reaction probed by substrate analogues

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Yen-Pin; Liu, Hon-Ge; Teng, Kuo-Hsun; Liang, Po-Huang

    2010-10-01

    Research highlights: {yields} The extremely slow trans-OPPS reaction using 2-Fluoro-FPP supports the sequential mechanism with the carbocation intermediate. {yields} The similar UPPS reaction rate under single turnover supports the concerted mechanism, without the carbocation intermediate. {yields} The secondary kinetic isotope effect also supports associate transition state for UPPS reaction, without the carbocation intermediate. -- Abstract: Undecaprenyl pyrophosphate synthase (UPPS) is a cis-type prenyltransferases which catalyzes condensation reactions of farnesyl diphosphate (FPP) with eight isopentenyl pyrophosphate (IPP) units to generate C{sub 55} product. In this study, we used two analogues of FPP, 2-fluoro-FPP and [1,1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]FPP, to probe the reaction mechanism of Escherichia coli UPPS. The reaction rate of 2-fluoro-FPP with IPP under single-turnover condition is similar to that of FPP, consistent with the mechanism without forming a farnesyl carbocation intermediate. Moreover, the deuterium secondary KIE of 0.985 {+-} 0.022 measured for UPPS reaction using [1,1-{sup 2}H{sub 2}]FPP supports the associative transition state. Unlike the sequential mechanism used by trans-prenyltransferases, our data demonstrate E. coli UPPS utilizes the concerted mechanism.

  16. Low Thrust, Deep Throttling, US/CIS Integrated NTRE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culver, Donald W.; Kolganov, Vyacheslav; Rochow, Richard F.

    1994-07-01

    In 1993 our international team performed a follow-on ``Nuclear Thermal Rocket Engine (NTRE) Extended Life Feasibility Assessment'' study for the Nuclear Propulsion Office (NPO) at NASAs Lewis Research Center. The main purpose of this study was to complete the 1992 study matrix to assess NTRE designs at thrust levels of 22.5, 11.3, and 6.8 tonnes, using Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) reactor technology. An additional Aerojet goal was to continue improving the NTRE concept we had generated. Deep throttling, mission performance optimized engine design parametrics, and reliability/cost enhancing engine system simplifications were studied, because they seem to be the last three basic design improvements sorely needed by post-NERVA NTRE. Deep throttling improves engine life by eliminating damaging thermal and mechanical shocks caused by after-cooling with pulsed coolant flow. Alternately, it improves mission performance with steady flow after-cooling by minimizing reactor over-cooling. Deep throttling also provides a practical transition from high pressures and powers of the high thrust power cycle to the low pressures and powers of our electric power generating mode. Two deep throttling designs are discussed; a workable system that was studied and a simplified system that is recommended for future study. Mission-optimized engine thrust/weight (T/W) and Isp predictions are included along with system flow schemes and concept sketches.

  17. Polypurine/polypyrimidine sequences as cis-acting transcriptional regulators.

    PubMed

    Brahmachari, S K; Sarkar, P S; Raghavan, S; Narayan, M; Maiti, A K

    1997-04-29

    Genome sequence information has generated increasing evidence for the claim that repetitive DNA sequences present within and around genes could play a important role in the regulation of gene expression. Polypurine/polypyrimidine sequences [poly(Pu/Py)] have been observed in the vicinity of promoters and within the transcribed regions of many genes. To understand whether such sequences influence the level of gene expression, we constructed several prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression vectors incorporating poly(Pu/Py) repeats both within and upstream of a reporter gene, lacZ (encoding beta-galactosidase), and studied its expression in vivo. We find that, in contrast to the situation in Escherichia coli, the presence of poly(Pu/Py) sequences within the gene does not significantly inhibit gene expression in mammalian cells. On the other hand, the presence of such sequences upstream of lacZ leads to a several-fold reduction of gene expression in mammalian cells. Similar down-regulation was observed when a structural cassette containing poly(Pu/Py) sequences upstream of lacZ was integrated into yeast chromosome V. Sequence analysis of the nine totally sequenced yeast chromosomes shows that a large number of such sequences occur upstream of ORFs. On the basis of our experimental results and DNA sequence analysis, we propose that these sequences can function as cis-acting transcriptional regulators. PMID:9185844

  18. NOT gate in a cis-trans photoisomerization model

    SciTech Connect

    Ndong, M.; Bomble, L.; Justum, Y.; Sugny, D.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2007-10-15

    We numerically study the implementation of a NOT gate by laser pulses in a model molecular system presenting two electronic surfaces coupled by nonadiabatic interactions. The two states of the bit are the fundamental states of the cis-trans isomers of the molecule. The gate is classical in the sense that it involves a one-qubit flip so that the encoding of the outputs is based on population analysis which does not take the phases into account. This gate can also be viewed as a double photoswitch process with the property that the same electric field controls the two isomerizations. As an example, we consider one-dimensional cuts in a model of the retinal in rhodopsin already proposed in the literature. The laser pulses are computed by the multitarget optimal control theory with chirped pulses as trial fields. Very high fidelities are obtained. We also examine the stability of the control when the system is coupled to a bath of oscillators modeled by an ohmic spectral density. The bath correlation time scale being smaller than the pulse duration, the dynamics is carried out in the Markovian approximation.

  19. NOT gate in a cis-trans photoisomerization model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ndong, M.; Bomble, L.; Sugny, D.; Justum, Y.; Desouter-Lecomte, M.

    2007-10-01

    We numerically study the implementation of a NOT gate by laser pulses in a model molecular system presenting two electronic surfaces coupled by nonadiabatic interactions. The two states of the bit are the fundamental states of the cis-trans isomers of the molecule. The gate is classical in the sense that it involves a one-qubit flip so that the encoding of the outputs is based on population analysis which does not take the phases into account. This gate can also be viewed as a double photoswitch process with the property that the same electric field controls the two isomerizations. As an example, we consider one-dimensional cuts in a model of the retinal in rhodopsin already proposed in the literature. The laser pulses are computed by the multitarget optimal control theory with chirped pulses as trial fields. Very high fidelities are obtained. We also examine the stability of the control when the system is coupled to a bath of oscillators modeled by an ohmic spectral density. The bath correlation time scale being smaller than the pulse duration, the dynamics is carried out in the Markovian approximation

  20. Characterization of a putative cis-regulatory element that controls transcriptional activity of the pig uroplakin II gene promoter

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Deug-Nam; Park, Mi-Ryung; Park, Jong-Yi; Cho, Ssang-Goo; Park, Chankyu; Oh, Jae-Wook; Song, Hyuk; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2011-07-01

    Highlights: {yields} The sequences of -604 to -84 bp of the pUPII promoter contained the region of a putative negative cis-regulatory element. {yields} The core promoter was located in the 5F-1. {yields} Transcription factor HNF4 can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. {yields} These features of the pUPII promoter are fundamental to development of a target-specific vector. -- Abstract: Uroplakin II (UPII) is a one of the integral membrane proteins synthesized as a major differentiation product of mammalian urothelium. UPII gene expression is bladder specific and differentiation dependent, but little is known about its transcription response elements and molecular mechanism. To identify the cis-regulatory elements in the pig UPII (pUPII) gene promoter region, we constructed pUPII 5' upstream region deletion mutants and demonstrated that each of the deletion mutants participates in controlling the expression of the pUPII gene in human bladder carcinoma RT4 cells. We also identified a new core promoter region and putative negative cis-regulatory element within a minimal promoter region. In addition, we showed that hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF4) can directly bind in the pUPII core promoter (5F-1) region, which plays a critical role in controlling promoter activity. Transient cotransfection experiments showed that HNF4 positively regulates pUPII gene promoter activity. Thus, the binding element and its binding protein, HNF4 transcription factor, may be involved in the mechanism that specifically regulates pUPII gene transcription.

  1. Cystic teratoma mimicking recurrent pleural effusion, complicated by Mycobacterium abscessus infection

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Radzi, Adli Azam; Bakar, Nor Salmah; Mohd Khalid, Mohd Shukry; Ismail, Ahmad Izuanuddin; Abdul Rani, Mohamed Fauzi

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Teratomas of anterior mediastinum are rare. They are often slow growing, asymptomatic, and detected incidentally on chest imaging. Mycobacterium abscessus (M. abscessus) is an acid‐fast bacillus that is classified as a pathogenic “rapid growing” non‐tuberculous mycobacteria. It is an uncommon cause of human pathology, which may cause skin and soft tissue infection after skin injury following inoculation, minor trauma, and surgery. Here, we present an unusual case of benign cystic teratoma mimicking recurrent pleural effusion, which was subsequently complicated by M. abscessus infection following thoracotomy. Cystic teratoma is rare, but it needs to be considered whenever clinical and investigative work‐up fails to provide a convincing diagnosis. A combined clinical, radiological, surgical, and histopathological assessment is important to arrive at the correct diagnosis. Rapidly growing mycobacteria needs to be included in the differential diagnosis of patients with non‐resolving infected post‐thoracotomy wound and who do not respond to broad‐spectrum antibiotics. PMID:27516884

  2. Noninvasive elasticity imaging in small vessels: validation on tissue-mimicking phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurice, Roch L.; Daronat, Michel; Pivert, Nicolas; Foster, F. S.; Cloutier, Guy

    2004-04-01

    Non-invasive ultrasound elastography (NIVE) was recently introduced to characterize mechanical properties of superficial arteries. In this paper, the feasibility of NIVE for the purpose of studying small vessels in humans and small animals is investigated. The experiments were performed in vitro on vessel-mimicking phantoms of 1.5-mm lumen diameter and 1.5-mm wall thickness. Polyvinyl alcohol cryogel (PVA-C) was used to create double layer vessel walls. The stiffness of the interior portion of the vessels was made softer. The vessels were insonified at 32 MHz with an ultrasound biomicroscope. Radial stress was applied within the lumen of the phantom by applying incremental static pressure steps with a column of a flowing mixture of water-glycerol. The Lagrangian speckle tissue model estimator was used to assess the 2D-strain tensor, and the composite Von Mises elastograms were then computed. The two-layer vessel walls were clearly identifiable. Strain values close to 3% were measured for the interior portion, whereas strains around 1% were noted for the stiffer outside layer. In conclusion, the feasibility of NIVE for small vessel elasticity imaging was demonstrated in vitro.

  3. hiPS-MSCs differentiation towards fibroblasts on a 3D ECM mimicking scaffold.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ruodan; Taskin, Mehmet Berat; Rubert, Marina; Seliktar, Dror; Besenbacher, Flemming; Chen, Menglin

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts are ubiquitous cells that constitute the stroma of virtually all tissues and play vital roles in homeostasis. The poor innate healing capacity of fibroblastic tissues is attributed to the scarcity of fibroblasts as collagen-producing cells. In this study, we have developed a functional ECM mimicking scaffold that is capable to supply spatial allocation of stem cells as well as anchorage and storage of growth factors (GFs) to direct stem cells differentiate towards fibroblasts. Electrospun PCL fibers were embedded in a PEG-fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel, which was infiltrated with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to form the 3D nanocomposite PFP-C. The human induced pluripotent stem cells derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPS-MSCs) with an advance in growth over adult MSCs were applied to validate the fibrogenic capacity of the 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The PFP-C scaffold was found not only biocompatible with the hiPS-MSCs, but also presented intriguingly strong fibroblastic commitments, to an extent comparable to the positive control, tissue culture plastic surfaces (TCP) timely refreshed with 100% CTGF. The novel scaffold presented not only biomimetic ECM nanostructures for homing stem cells, but also sufficient cell-approachable bio-signaling cues, which may synergistically facilitate the control of stem cell fates for regenerative therapies. PMID:25684543

  4. Quality assurance for ultrasound scanners using a durable tissue-mimicking phantom and radial MTF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaar, Marcus; Semturs, Friedrich; Figl, Michael; Hoffmann, Rainer; Hummel, Johann

    2014-03-01

    For the use in routine technical quality assurance (TQA) we developed a tissue-mimicking phantom and an evaluation algorithm. Key properties of US phantom materials are sound velocity and acoustic attenuation. For daily clinical use the material also has to be nontoxic, durable and easy in handling and maintenance. The base material of our phantom is Poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA), a synthetic polymer. By freezing the phantom body during the production process, it changes its sound velocity to closely match the one of the human body. The phantom's base form is a cuboid containing a large anechoic cylindric target. In routine QA it is required to gain comparable and reproducible results from a single image. To determine spatial resolution of phantom images, we calculate a modulation transfer function (MTF). We developed an algorithm, that calculates a radial MTF from a circular structure representing spatial resolution averaged across all directions. For evaluation of the algorithm, we created a set of synthetic images. A comparison of the results from a traditional slanted edge algorithm and our solution showed a close correlation. The US phantom was imaged with a commercial US-scanner at different sound frequencies. The computed MTFs of higher frequency images show higher transfer percentages in all spatial frequencies than the MTFs of lower frequency images. The results suggest that the proposed method produces clear statements about the spatial resolution of evaluated imaging devices. We therefore consider the method as suitable for application in technical quality assurance of diagnostic ultrasound scanners.

  5. hiPS-MSCs differentiation towards fibroblasts on a 3D ECM mimicking scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ruodan; Taskin, Mehmet Berat; Rubert, Marina; Seliktar, Dror; Besenbacher, Flemming; Chen, Menglin

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblasts are ubiquitous cells that constitute the stroma of virtually all tissues and play vital roles in homeostasis. The poor innate healing capacity of fibroblastic tissues is attributed to the scarcity of fibroblasts as collagen-producing cells. In this study, we have developed a functional ECM mimicking scaffold that is capable to supply spatial allocation of stem cells as well as anchorage and storage of growth factors (GFs) to direct stem cells differentiate towards fibroblasts. Electrospun PCL fibers were embedded in a PEG-fibrinogen (PF) hydrogel, which was infiltrated with connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) to form the 3D nanocomposite PFP-C. The human induced pluripotent stem cells derived mesenchymal stem cells (hiPS-MSCs) with an advance in growth over adult MSCs were applied to validate the fibrogenic capacity of the 3D nanocomposite scaffold. The PFP-C scaffold was found not only biocompatible with the hiPS-MSCs, but also presented intriguingly strong fibroblastic commitments, to an extent comparable to the positive control, tissue culture plastic surfaces (TCP) timely refreshed with 100% CTGF. The novel scaffold presented not only biomimetic ECM nanostructures for homing stem cells, but also sufficient cell-approachable bio-signaling cues, which may synergistically facilitate the control of stem cell fates for regenerative therapies. PMID:25684543

  6. Investigation of Tumor Cell Behaviors on a Vascular Microenvironment-Mimicking Microfluidic Chip

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Rong; Zheng, Wenfu; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Long, Yunze; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    The extravasation of tumor cells is a key event in tumor metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying tumor cell extravasation remains unknown, mainly hindered by obstacles from the lack of complexity of biological tissues in conventional cell culture, and the costliness and ethical issues of in vivo experiments. Thus, a cheap, time and labor saving, and most of all, vascular microenvironment-mimicking research model is desirable. Herein, we report a microfluidic chip-based tumor extravasation research model which is capable of simultaneously simulating both mechanical and biochemical microenvironments of human vascular systems and analyzing their synergistic effects on the tumor extravasation. Under different mechanical conditions of the vascular system, the tumor cells (HeLa cells) had the highest viability and adhesion activity in the microenvironment of the capillary. The integrity of endothelial cells (ECs) monolayer was destroyed by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a hemodynamic background, which facilitated the tumor cell adhesion, this situation was recovered by the administration of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs). This model bridges the gap between cell culture and animal experiments and is a promising platform for studying tumor behaviors in the vascular system. PMID:26631692

  7. Low-density lipoprotein-mimicking nanoparticles for tumor-targeted theranostic applications.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jeong Yu; Kim, Jin-Ho; Bae, Ki Hyun; Oh, Mi Hwa; Kim, Youngwook; Kim, Jee Seon; Park, Tae Gwan; Park, Keunchil; Lee, Jung Hee; Nam, Yoon Sung

    2015-01-14

    This study introduces multifunctional lipid nanoparticles (LNPs), mimicking the structure and compositions of low-density lipoproteins, for the tumor-targeted co-delivery of anti-cancer drugs and superparamagnetic nanocrystals. Paclitaxel (4.7 wt%) and iron oxide nanocrystals (6.8 wt%, 11 nm in diameter) are co-encapsulated within folate-functionalized LNPs, which contain a cluster of nanocrystals with an overall diameter of about 170 nm and a zeta potential of about -40 mV. The folate-functionalized LNPs enable the targeted detection of MCF-7, human breast adenocarcinoma expressing folate receptors, in T2 -weighted magnetic resonance images as well as the efficient intracellular delivery of paclitaxel. Paclitaxel-free LNPs show no significant cytotoxicity up to 0.2 mg mL(-1) , indicating the excellent biocompatibility of the LNPs for intracellular drug delivery applications. The targeted anti-tumor activities of the LNPs in a mouse tumor model suggest that the low-density lipoprotein-mimetic LNPs can be an effective theranostic platform with excellent biocompatibility for the tumor-targeted co-delivery of various anti-cancer agents. PMID:25137631

  8. Investigation of Tumor Cell Behaviors on a Vascular Microenvironment-Mimicking Microfluidic Chip.

    PubMed

    Huang, Rong; Zheng, Wenfu; Liu, Wenwen; Zhang, Wei; Long, Yunze; Jiang, Xingyu

    2015-01-01

    The extravasation of tumor cells is a key event in tumor metastasis. However, the mechanism underlying tumor cell extravasation remains unknown, mainly hindered by obstacles from the lack of complexity of biological tissues in conventional cell culture, and the costliness and ethical issues of in vivo experiments. Thus, a cheap, time and labor saving, and most of all, vascular microenvironment-mimicking research model is desirable. Herein, we report a microfluidic chip-based tumor extravasation research model which is capable of simultaneously simulating both mechanical and biochemical microenvironments of human vascular systems and analyzing their synergistic effects on the tumor extravasation. Under different mechanical conditions of the vascular system, the tumor cells (HeLa cells) had the highest viability and adhesion activity in the microenvironment of the capillary. The integrity of endothelial cells (ECs) monolayer was destroyed by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in a hemodynamic background, which facilitated the tumor cell adhesion, this situation was recovered by the administration of platinum nanoparticles (Pt-NPs). This model bridges the gap between cell culture and animal experiments and is a promising platform for studying tumor behaviors in the vascular system. PMID:26631692

  9. Organic Compounds in the C3H6O3 Family: Microwave Spectrum of cis-cis Dimethyl Carbonate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, B. A.; Widicus Weaver, S. L.; Lovas, F. J.; Plusquellic, D. F.; Blake, G. A.

    2011-05-01

    A number of recent spectroscopic and observational efforts have focused on simple sugars and sugar alcohols because of their importance in prebiotic astro- chemistry. The simplest sugar-related species, glycolaldehyde, has been detected in Sgr B2(N), as have its C2H4O2 structural isomers acetic acid and methyl formate. Additional studies of the C3-sugars with empirical formula C3H6O3, glyceraldehyde and dihydroxyacetone, resulted in no clear interstellar detection. Structural isomerism is extensive in interstellar clouds, and there is a high level of correlation between the relative energies of isomers and their relative abundances, with the lowest energy isomers detected in greatest abundance. The detected members of the C2H4O2 family, however, defy this trend, having relative abundances of (acetic acid):(glycolaldehyde):(methyl formate) of about 2:1:52, despite acetic acid being the lowest energy isomer. These puzzling abundance ratios and the lack of detection of the C3H6O3 sugars gives rise to the question: "Which is the most likely isomer in the C3H6O3 family to be detectable in inter- stellar clouds?" In an attempt to answer this question, we carried out geometry optimization calculations to determine the relative binding energies of the 13 members of the C3H6O3 family. Of the four lowest- energy isomers, only lactic acid [CH3CH(OH)COOH] and dimethyl carbonate [(CH3)2CO3] are commercially available, and lactic acid has been previously investigated spectroscopically. We have therefore conducted a laboratory study of dimethyl carbonate, measuring its rotational spectrum from 8.4 - 25.3 GHz using a Fourier-Transform microwave spectrometer, and from 227 - 350 GHz using a direct absorption spectrometer. We report on the theoretical calculations performed on the C3H6O3 family of isomers, the experimental studies of cis-cis dimethyl carbonate, and the implica- tions of these results for interstellar chemistry. The details of this work are also reported in Lovas et

  10. Wernicke's Encephalopathy Mimicking Acute Onset Stroke Diagnosed by CT Perfusion

    PubMed Central

    Advani, Rajiv; Kurz, Kathinka D.; Kurz, Martin W.

    2014-01-01

    Background. Metabolic syndromes such as Wernicke's encephalopathy may present with a sudden neurological deficit, thus mimicking acute onset stroke. Due to current emphasis on rapid admission and treatment of acute stroke patients, there is a significant risk that these stroke mimics may end up being treated with thrombolysis. Rigorous clinical and radiological skills are necessary to correctly identify such metabolic stroke mimics, in order to avoid doing any harm to these patients due to the unnecessary use of thrombolysis. Patient. A 51-year-old Caucasian male was admitted to our hospital with suspicion of an acute stroke due to sudden onset dysarthria and unilateral facial nerve paresis. Clinical examination revealed confusion and dysconjugate gaze. Computed tomography (CT) including a CT perfusion (CTP) scan revealed bilateral thalamic hyperperfusion. The use of both clinical and radiological findings led to correctly diagnosing Wernicke's encephalopathy. Conclusion. The application of CTP as a standard diagnostic tool in acute stroke patients can improve the detection of stroke mimics caused by metabolic syndromes as shown in our case report. PMID:24716022

  11. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A W

    2015-04-21

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel "magic boron" counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  12. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    PubMed Central

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods. PMID:26892989

  13. Bartonella henselae Infection: An Uncommon Mimicker of Autoimmune Disease.

    PubMed

    Maritsi, Despoina N; Zarganis, Diagoras; Metaxa, Zoi; Papaioannou, Georgia; Vartzelis, George

    2013-01-01

    We present a case of a seven-year-old immunocompetent female patient who developed systemic symptoms mimicking an autoimmune rather than an infectious disease. The patient presented with rash, biquotidian fever, night sweats, and arthralgias. There was no antecedent history of cat contact. Investigations showed increased inflammatory markers, leukocytosis, thrombocytosis, hypercalcemia, and raised angiotensin-converting enzyme. Interferon-gamma releasing assay for tuberculosis infection was negative. Abdominal imaging demonstrated multifocal lesions of the liver and spleen (later proved to be granulomata), chest X-ray showed enlarged hilar lymph nodes, and ophthalmology review revealed uveitis. Clinical, laboratory, and imaging features pointed towards sarcoidosis. Subsequently, raised titers (IgM 1 : 32, IgG 1 : 256) against Bartonella confirmed the diagnosis of B. henselae infection. She was treated with gentamycin followed by ciprofloxacin; repeat investigations showed complete resolution of findings. The presence of hepatic and splenic lesions in children with bartonellosis is well documented. Our case, however, exhibited certain unusual findings such as the coexistence of acute ocular and systemic involvement in an immunocompetent host. Serological testing is an inexpensive and effective way to diagnose bartonellosis in immunocompetent patients; we suggest that bartonella serology is included in the baseline tests performed on children with prolonged fever even in the absence of contact with cats in countries where bartonellosis is prevalent. PMID:23424700

  14. Development and characterization of a brain tumor mimicking fluorescence phantom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haj-Hosseini, Neda; Kistler, Benjamin; Wârdell, Karin

    2014-03-01

    Fluorescence guidance using 5-aminolevulinic acid (5-ALA) for brain tumor resection is a recent technique applied to the highly malignant brain tumors. Five-ALA accumulates as protoporphyrin IX fluorophore in the tumor cells in different concentrations depending on the tumor environment and cell properties. Our group has developed a fluorescence spectroscopy system used with a hand-held probe intra-operatively. The system has shown improvement of fluorescence detection and allows quantification that preliminarily correlates with tumor malignancy grade during surgery. However, quantification of fluorescence is affected by several factors including the initial fluorophore concentration, photobleaching due to operating lamps and attenuation from the blood. Accordingly, an optical phantom was developed to enable controlled fluorescence measurements and evaluation of the system outside of the surgical procedure. The phantom mimicked the optical properties of glioma at the specific fluorescence excitation wavelength when different concentrations of the fluorophore were included in the phantom. To allow evaluation of photobleaching, kinetics of fluorophore molecules in the phantom was restricted by solidifying the phantoms. Moreover, a model for tissue autofluorescence was added. The fluorescence intensity's correlation with fluorophore concentration in addition to the photobleaching properties were investigated in the phantoms and were compared to the clinical data measured on the brain tumor.

  15. Mimicking vernix caseosa--preparation and characterization of synthetic biofilms.

    PubMed

    Rissmann, Robert; Oudshoorn, Marion H M; Zwier, Raphaël; Ponec, Maria; Bouwstra, Joke A; Hennink, Wim E

    2009-05-01

    The multiple protecting and barrier-supporting properties of the creamy, white biofilm vernix caseosa (VC) before and after birth suggest that a VC biomimetic could be an innovative barrier cream for barrier-deficient skin. The aim of this study was the rational design and preparation of synthetic biofilms mimicking the unique composition and properties of natural VC. Hexagonal, highly hydrated hyperbranched polyglycerol microgel particles (30 microm in diameter) were embedded in a synthetic lanolin-based lipid mixture using a micromixer. In these formulations, the water content of the particles (i.e. 50% and 80%), an additional lipid coating of the particles and different particle/lipid ratios were varied. Characterization with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) showed a homogeneous distribution of the labeled particles in the lipid matrix. Regarding structural appearance, particle density and distribution, the formulations with a high particle/lipid ratio (5:1) resembled native VC very closely. Comparable results between native VC and the synthetic formulations were obtained concerning water handling properties, thermotropic behavior while lower elasticity and lower viscosity were observed for the synthetic biofilms. The biofilm formulations were stable for at least 1 month at 4 degrees C. In conclusion, our formulations mimic natural VC very closely and are promising candidates for in vivo studies. PMID:19429269

  16. Tuberculosis of the skull mimicking a bony tumor

    PubMed Central

    Rosli, Fadzlishah Johanabas; Haron, Rahmat

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of calvarial tuberculosis mimicking a solitary bone tumor, which was surgically removed. A 52-year-old female presented with a right forehead swelling, which gradually enlarged over the course of 2 years, with no symptoms or raised intracranial pressure or neurological deficits. Plain and contrast-enhanced brain computed tomography scans were done, revealing a punched-out lesion of the right frontal bone, with a nonenhancing lytic mass. With an initial diagnosis of an intraosseous meningioma, and later on intraoperatively thought to be a metastatic tumor, the mass was excised along with a rim of bone. Histopathological examination results came back as caseous necrosis, highly suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient was then treated with a 1 year regimen of anti-tuberculous medications. Tuberculosis of the cranium is a rare entity, and can mimic tumors or multiple myeloma. A high index of suspicion and knowledge is required for an early diagnosis. A combined surgical and medical therapy is curative. PMID:26889285

  17. Multimodal 3D cancer-mimicking optical phantom

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Gennifer T.; Lurie, Kristen L.; Zlatev, Dimitar V.; Liao, Joseph C.; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K.

    2016-01-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) organ-mimicking phantoms provide realistic imaging environments for testing various aspects of optical systems, including for evaluating new probe designs, characterizing the diagnostic potential of new technologies, and assessing novel image processing algorithms prior to validation in real tissue. We introduce and characterize the use of a new material, Dragon Skin (Smooth-On Inc.), and fabrication technique, air-brushing, for fabrication of a 3D phantom that mimics the appearance of a real organ under multiple imaging modalities. We demonstrate the utility of the material and technique by fabricating the first 3D, hollow bladder phantom with realistic normal and multi-stage pathology features suitable for endoscopic detection using the gold standard imaging technique, white light cystoscopy (WLC), as well as the complementary imaging modalities of optical coherence tomography and blue light cystoscopy, which are aimed at improving the sensitivity and specificity of WLC to bladder cancer detection. The flexibility of the material and technique used for phantom construction allowed for the representation of a wide range of diseased tissue states, ranging from inflammation (benign) to high-grade cancerous lesions. Such phantoms can serve as important tools for trainee education and evaluation of new endoscopic instrumentation. PMID:26977369

  18. Multimodal 3D cancer-mimicking optical phantom.

    PubMed

    Smith, Gennifer T; Lurie, Kristen L; Zlatev, Dimitar V; Liao, Joseph C; Ellerbee Bowden, Audrey K

    2016-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) organ-mimicking phantoms provide realistic imaging environments for testing various aspects of optical systems, including for evaluating new probe designs, characterizing the diagnostic potential of new technologies, and assessing novel image processing algorithms prior to validation in real tissue. We introduce and characterize the use of a new material, Dragon Skin (Smooth-On Inc.), and fabrication technique, air-brushing, for fabrication of a 3D phantom that mimics the appearance of a real organ under multiple imaging modalities. We demonstrate the utility of the material and technique by fabricating the first 3D, hollow bladder phantom with realistic normal and multi-stage pathology features suitable for endoscopic detection using the gold standard imaging technique, white light cystoscopy (WLC), as well as the complementary imaging modalities of optical coherence tomography and blue light cystoscopy, which are aimed at improving the sensitivity and specificity of WLC to bladder cancer detection. The flexibility of the material and technique used for phantom construction allowed for the representation of a wide range of diseased tissue states, ranging from inflammation (benign) to high-grade cancerous lesions. Such phantoms can serve as important tools for trainee education and evaluation of new endoscopic instrumentation. PMID:26977369

  19. Systemic Sarcoidosis Mimicking a Behavioural Variant of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    De Maindreville, Anne; Bedos, Line; Bakchine, Serge

    2015-01-01

    Among rare neurological manifestations, a progressive dementia may exceptionally be the revealing clinical feature of a sarcoidosis. Diagnosis may then be difficult, especially when systemic signs are missing or latent, with a risk of therapeutic delay. We report the first case of sarcoidosis mimicking a frontotemporal dementia. A 53-year-old man presented with a dementia clinically suggestive of frontotemporal dementia, progressing slowly for about 2 years. However, MRI revealed unusual aspects, mainly large areas of T2/FLAIR hypersignal within temporal regions and cerebellum, with nodular leptomeningeal and juxtacortical Gadolinium enhancement. The patient was finally diagnosed with a systemic sarcoidosis. We discuss the differential diagnosis based on MRI aspects and review the literature on the clinical, biological, and imaging features of sarcoidosis presenting with dementia. This case demonstrates that brain imaging remains mandatory in the exploration process of a patient with dementia. Although the patient presented with rather typical features of a behavioural variant of frontotemporal dementia, the MRI aspect was the key exploration that leaded to the diagnosis. PMID:26442161

  20. Modulated fluorophore signal recovery buried within tissue mimicking phantoms.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Saugata; Fan, Chaoyang; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Dickson, Robert M

    2013-10-01

    Optically modulated fluorescence from ∼140 nM Cy5 is visualized when embedded up to 6 mm within skin tissue mimicking phantoms, even in the presence of overwhelming background fluorescence and scatter. Experimental and finite element analysis (FEA)-based computational models yield excellent agreement in signal levels and predict biocompatible temperature changes. Using synchronously amplified fluorescence image recovery (SAFIRe), dual-laser excitation (primary laser: λ = 594 nm, 0.29 kW/cm(2); secondary laser: λ = 710 nm, 5.9 kW/cm(2), intensity-modulated at 100 Hz) simultaneously excites fluorescence and dynamically optically reverses the dark state buildup of primary laser-excited Cy5 molecules. As the modulated secondary laser both directly modulates Cy5 emission and is of lower energy than the collected Cy5 fluorescence, modulated Cy5 fluorescence in phantoms is free of obscuring background emission. The modulated fluorescence emission due to the secondary laser was recovered by Fourier transformation, yielding a specific and unique signature of the introduced fluorophores, with largely background-free detection, at excitation intensities close to the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for skin. Experimental and computational models agree to within 8%, validating the computational model. As modulated fluorescence depends on the presence of both lasers, depth information as a function of focal position is also readily obtained from recovered modulated signal strength. PMID:23692258

  1. Riboswitch structure: an internal residue mimicking the purine ligand

    PubMed Central

    Delfosse, Vanessa; Bouchard, Patricia; Bonneau, Eric; Dagenais, Pierre; Lemay, Jean-François; Lafontaine, Daniel A.; Legault, Pascale

    2010-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson–Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39–C65 and A39–U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation. PMID:20022916

  2. Mimicking biochar-albedo feedback in complex Mediterranean agricultural landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozzi, E.; Genesio, L.; Toscano, P.; Pieri, M.; Miglietta, F.

    2015-08-01

    Incorporation of charcoal produced by biomass pyrolysis (biochar) in agricultural soils is a potentially sustainable strategy for climate change mitigation. However, some side effects of large-scale biochar application need to be investigated. In particular a massive use of a low-reflecting material on large cropland areas may impact the climate via changes in surface albedo. Twelve years of MODIS-derived albedo data were analysed for three pairs of selected agricultural sites in central Italy. In each pair bright and dark coloured soil were identified, mimicking the effect of biochar application on the land surface albedo of complex agricultural landscapes. Over this period vegetation canopies never completely masked differences in background soil colour. This soil signal, expressed as an albedo difference, induced a local instantaneous radiative forcing of up to 4.7 W m-2 during periods of high solar irradiance. Biochar mitigation potential might therefore be reduced up to ˜30%. This study proves the importance of accounting for crop phenology and crop management when assessing biochar mitigation potential and provides more insights into the analysis of its environmental feedback.

  3. Acoustic resolution photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry in blood-mimicking fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunker, Joanna; Beard, Paul

    2016-02-01

    Photoacoustic Doppler velocimetry provides a major opportunity to overcome limitations of existing blood flow measuring methods. By enabling measurements with high spatial resolution several millimetres deep in tissue, it could probe microvascular blood flow abnormalities characteristic of many different diseases. Although previous work has demonstrated feasibility in solid phantoms, measurements in blood have proved significantly more challenging. This difficulty is commonly attributed to the requirement that the absorber spatial distribution is heterogeneous relative to the minimum detectable acoustic wavelength. By undertaking a rigorous study using blood-mimicking fluid suspensions of 3 μm absorbing microspheres, it was discovered that the perceived heterogeneity is not only limited by the intrinsic detector bandwidth; in addition, bandlimiting due to spatial averaging within the detector field-of-view also reduces perceived heterogeneity and compromises velocity measurement accuracy. These detrimental effects were found to be mitigated by high-pass filtering to select photoacoustic signal components associated with high heterogeneity. Measurement under-reading due to limited light penetration into the flow vessel was also observed. Accurate average velocity measurements were recovered using “range-gating”, which furthermore maps the cross-sectional velocity profile. These insights may help pave the way to deep-tissue non-invasive mapping of microvascular blood flow using photoacoustic methods.

  4. Laryngeal spasm mimicking asthma and vitamin d deficiency.

    PubMed

    Masoero, Monica; Bellocchia, Michela; Ciuffreda, Antonio; Ricciardolo, Fabio Lm; Rolla, Giovanni; Bucca, Caterina

    2014-05-01

    We present a woman with heterozygous carnitine palmitoyl transferase 2 (CPT-2) deficiency who in the last 6 months suffered from episodic dyspnea and choking. Symptoms could not be attributed to her muscular energy defect, since heterozygous CPT-2 deficiency is usually asymptomatic or causes only mild muscle fatigability. Myopathy is usually triggered by concurrent factors, either genetic (additional muscle enzymes defects) or acquired (metabolic stress). The patient was referred to our respiratory clinic for suspect bronchial asthma. Spirometry showed mild decrease in inspiratory flows. Methacholine challenge was negative. Dyspnea was triggered by hyperventilation-induced hypocapnia, which produced marked decrease in airflow rates, particularly in inspiratory flows, consistent with laryngospasm. Nutritional assessment of the patient showed low serum level of calcium and vitamin D, attributable to avoidance of milk and dairy products for lactose intolerance and to insufficient sunlight exposure. After calcium and vitamin D supplementation episodic laryngospasm disappeared and hypocapnic hyperventilation test induced very mild change in airflow rates. Calcium and vitamin D deficiency may favour laryngeal spasm mimicking asthma, particularly in subjects with underlying myopathy. PMID:24843804

  5. Synchrony and motor mimicking in chimpanzee observational learning.

    PubMed

    Fuhrmann, Delia; Ravignani, Andrea; Marshall-Pescini, Sarah; Whiten, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Cumulative tool-based culture underwrote our species' evolutionary success, and tool-based nut-cracking is one of the strongest candidates for cultural transmission in our closest relatives, chimpanzees. However the social learning processes that may explain both the similarities and differences between the species remain unclear. A previous study of nut-cracking by initially naïve chimpanzees suggested that a learning chimpanzee holding no hammer nevertheless replicated hammering actions it witnessed. This observation has potentially important implications for the nature of the social learning processes and underlying motor coding involved. In the present study, model and observer actions were quantified frame-by-frame and analysed with stringent statistical methods, demonstrating synchrony between the observer's and model's movements, cross-correlation of these movements above chance level and a unidirectional transmission process from model to observer. These results provide the first quantitative evidence for motor mimicking underlain by motor coding in apes, with implications for mirror neuron function. PMID:24923651

  6. Mimicking the magnetic properties of rare earth elements using superatoms

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Shi-Bo; Berkdemir, Cuneyt; Castleman, A. W.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REs) consist of a very important group in the periodic table that is vital to many modern technologies. The mining process, however, is extremely damaging to the environment, making them low yield and very expensive. Therefore, mimicking the properties of REs in a superatom framework is especially valuable but at the same time, technically challenging and requiring advanced concepts about manipulating properties of atom/molecular complexes. Herein, by using photoelectron imaging spectroscopy, we provide original idea and direct experimental evidence that chosen boron-doped clusters could mimic the magnetic characteristics of REs. Specifically, the neutral LaB and NdB clusters are found to have similar unpaired electrons and magnetic moments as their isovalent REs (namely Nd and Eu, respectively), opening up the great possibility in accomplishing rare earth mimicry. Extension of the superatom concept into the rare earth group not only further shows the power and advance of this concept but also, will stimulate more efforts to explore new superatomic clusters to mimic the chemistry of these heavy atoms, which will be of great importance in designing novel building blocks in the application of cluster-assembled nanomaterials. Additionally, based on these experimental findings, a novel “magic boron” counting rule is proposed to estimate the numbers of unpaired electrons in diatomic LnB clusters. PMID:25848014

  7. Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis mimicking prolactinoma with recurrent vision loss.

    PubMed

    Lok, Julie Y C; Yip, Nelson K F; Chong, Kelvin K L; Li, C L; Young, Alvin L

    2015-08-01

    Idiopathic hypertrophic pachymeningitis is a rare inflammatory condition with diffuse thickening of the dura mater, which may cause a compressive effect or vascular compromise. We report on a 28-year-old Chinese woman with a history of granulomatous mastitis 7 years previously and oligomenorrhoea, headache, blurred vision, and raised prolactin level 2 years previously, that was diagnosed as prolactinoma and treated conservatively with bromocriptine. However, she had recurrent bilateral vision loss when the bromocriptine was stopped. Her symptoms were resolved by high-dose steroid injection but remained steroid-dependent. Serial magnetic resonance imaging scan showed progressive diffuse thickening of the pachymeningitis with disappearance of pituitary apoplexy. Lumbar puncture showed lymphocytosis with no organisms. Open biopsy of the meninges was performed and histology showed features of inflammatory infiltrates and vasculitis. This is an unusual presentation of a rare condition in this age-group, with co-existing granulomatous mastitis and chronic otitis media, and is a diagnostic challenge mimicking pituitary macroadenoma and meningioma in initial magnetic resonance imaging scans. PMID:26238133

  8. Modulated Fluorophore Signal Recovery Buried within Tissue Mimicking Phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Saugata; Fan, Chaoyang; Hsiang, Jung-Cheng; Dickson, Robert M.

    2013-01-01

    Optically modulated fluorescence from ~140nM Cy5 is visualized when embedded up to 6 mm within skin tissue-mimicking phantoms, even in the presence of overwhelming background fluorescence and scatter. Experimental and finite element analysis (FEA)-based computational models yield excellent agreement in signal levels and predict biocompatible temperature changes. Using Synchronously Amplified Fluorescence Image Recovery (SAFIRe), dual laser excitation (primary laser: λ = 594nm, 0.29 kW/cm2; secondary laser: λ = 710nm, 5.9 kW/cm2, intensity-modulated at 100Hz) simultaneously excites fluorescence, and dynamically optically reverses the dark state buildup of primary laser-excited Cy5 molecules. As the modulated secondary laser both directly modulates Cy5 emission and is of lower energy than the collected Cy5 fluorescence, modulated Cy5 fluorescence in phantoms is free of obscuring background emission. The modulated fluorescence emission due to the secondary laser was recovered by Fourier transformation, yielding a specific and unique signature of the introduced fluorophores, with largely background-free detection, at excitation intensities close to the maximum permissible exposure (MPE) for skin. Experimental and computational models agree to within 8%, validating the computational model. As modulated fluorescence depends on the presence of both lasers, depth information as a function of focal position is also readily obtained from recovered modulated signal strength. PMID:23692258

  9. Mimicking Neural Stem Cell Niche by Biocompatible Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Regalado-Santiago, Citlalli; Juárez-Aguilar, Enrique; Olivares-Hernández, Juan David; Tamariz, Elisa

    2016-01-01

    Neural stem cells (NSCs) participate in the maintenance, repair, and regeneration of the central nervous system. During development, the primary NSCs are distributed along the ventricular zone of the neural tube, while, in adults, NSCs are mainly restricted to the subependymal layer of the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricles and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus in the hippocampus. The circumscribed areas where the NSCs are located contain the secreted proteins and extracellular matrix components that conform their niche. The interplay among the niche elements and NSCs determines the balance between stemness and differentiation, quiescence, and proliferation. The understanding of niche characteristics and how they regulate NSCs activity is critical to building in vitro models that include the relevant components of the in vivo niche and to developing neuroregenerative approaches that consider the extracellular environment of NSCs. This review aims to examine both the current knowledge on neurogenic niche and how it is being used to develop biocompatible substrates for the in vitro and in vivo mimicking of extracellular NSCs conditions. PMID:26880934

  10. Riboswitch Structure: an Internal Residue Mimicking the Purine Ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Delfosse, V.; Bouchard, P; Bonneau, E; Dagenais, P; Lemay, J; Lafontaine, D; Legault, P

    2009-01-01

    The adenine and guanine riboswitches regulate gene expression in response to their purine ligand. X-ray structures of the aptamer moiety of these riboswitches are characterized by a compact fold in which the ligand forms a Watson-Crick base pair with residue 65. Phylogenetic analyses revealed a strict restriction at position 39 of the aptamer that prevents the G39-C65 and A39-U65 combinations, and mutational studies indicate that aptamers with these sequence combinations are impaired for ligand binding. In order to investigate the rationale for sequence conservation at residue 39, structural characterization of the U65C mutant from Bacillus subtilis pbuE adenine riboswitch aptamer was undertaken. NMR spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography studies demonstrate that the U65C mutant adopts a compact ligand-free structure, in which G39 occupies the ligand-binding site of purine riboswitch aptamers. These studies present a remarkable example of a mutant RNA aptamer that adopts a native-like fold by means of ligand mimicking and explain why this mutant is impaired for ligand binding. Furthermore, this work provides a specific insight into how the natural sequence has evolved through selection of nucleotide identities that contribute to formation of the ligand-bound state, but ensures that the ligand-free state remains in an active conformation.

  11. Tuberculosis of the skull mimicking a bony tumor.

    PubMed

    Rosli, Fadzlishah Johanabas; Haron, Rahmat

    2016-01-01

    We present a rare case of calvarial tuberculosis mimicking a solitary bone tumor, which was surgically removed. A 52-year-old female presented with a right forehead swelling, which gradually enlarged over the course of 2 years, with no symptoms or raised intracranial pressure or neurological deficits. Plain and contrast-enhanced brain computed tomography scans were done, revealing a punched-out lesion of the right frontal bone, with a nonenhancing lytic mass. With an initial diagnosis of an intraosseous meningioma, and later on intraoperatively thought to be a metastatic tumor, the mass was excised along with a rim of bone. Histopathological examination results came back as caseous necrosis, highly suggestive of tuberculosis. The patient was then treated with a 1 year regimen of anti-tuberculous medications. Tuberculosis of the cranium is a rare entity, and can mimic tumors or multiple myeloma. A high index of suspicion and knowledge is required for an early diagnosis. A combined surgical and medical therapy is curative. PMID:26889285

  12. Moderately nonlinear ultrasound propagation in blood-mimicking fluid.

    PubMed

    Kharin, Nikolay A; Vince, D Geoffrey

    2004-04-01

    In medical diagnostic ultrasound (US), higher than-in-water nonlinearity of body fluids and tissue usually does not produce strong nonlinearly distorted waves because of the high absorption. The relative influence of absorption and nonlinearity can be characterized by the Gol'dberg number Gamma. There are two limiting cases in nonlinear acoustics: weak waves (Gamma < 1) or strong waves (Gamma > 1). However, at diagnostic frequencies in tissue and body fluids, the nonlinear effects and effects of absorption more likely are comparable (Gol'dberg number Gamma approximately 1). The aim of this work was to study the nonlinear propagation of a moderately nonlinear US second harmonic signal in a blood-mimicking fluid. Quasilinear solutions to the KZK equation are presented, assuming radiation from a flat and geometrically focused circular Gaussian source. The solutions are expressed in a new simplified closed form and are in very good agreement with those of previous studies measuring and modeling Gaussian beams. The solutions also show good agreement with the measurements of the beams produced by commercially available transducers, even without special Gaussian shading. PMID:15121252

  13. Thermal processing differentially affects lycopene and other carotenoids in cis-lycopene containing, tangerine tomatoes.

    PubMed

    Cooperstone, Jessica L; Francis, David M; Schwartz, Steven J

    2016-11-01

    Tangerine tomatoes, unlike red tomatoes, accumulate cis-lycopenes instead of the all-trans isomer. cis-Lycopene is the predominating isomeric form of lycopene found in blood and tissues. Our objective was to understand how thermal processing and lipid concentration affect carotenoid isomerisation and degradation in tangerine tomatoes. We conducted duplicated factorial designed experiments producing tangerine tomato juice and sauce, varying both processing time and lipid concentration. Carotenoids were extracted and analysed using high-performance liquid chromatography with photodiode array detection. Phytoene, phytofluene, ζ-carotene, neurosporene, tetra-cis-lycopene, all-trans-lycopene and other-cis-lycopenes were quantified. Tetra-cis-lycopene decreased with increasing heating time and reached 80% of the original level in sauce after processing times of 180min. All-trans-lycopene and other-cis-lycopenes increased with longer processing times. Total carotenoids and total lycopene decreased with increased heating times while phytoene and phytofluene were unchanged. These data suggest limiting thermal processing of tangerine tomato products if delivery of tetra-cis-lycopene is desirable. PMID:27211672

  14. Protein-coding cis-natural antisense transcripts have high and broad expression in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Shuhua; Lukens, Lewis

    2013-04-01

    Pairs of genes within eukaryotic genomes are often located on opposite DNA strands such that transcription generates cis-natural sense antisense transcripts (cis-NATs). This orientation of genes has been associated with the biogenesis of splice variants and natural antisense small RNAs. Here, in an analysis of currently available data, we report that within Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana), protein-coding cis-NATs are also characterized by high abundance, high coexpression, and broad expression. Our results suggest that a permissive chromatin environment may have led to the proximity of these genes. Compared with other genes, cis-NAT-encoding genes have enriched low-nucleosome-density regions, high levels of histone H3 lysine-9 acetylation, and low levels of H3 lysine-27 trimethylation. Promoters associated with broadly expressed genes are preferentially found in the 5' regulatory sequences of cis-NAT-encoding genes. Our results further suggest that natural antisense small RNA production from cis-NATs is limited. Small RNAs sequenced from natural antisense small RNA biogenesis mutants including dcl1, dcl2, dcl3, and rdr6 map to cis-NATs as frequently as small RNAs sequenced from wild-type plants. Future work will investigate if the positive transcriptional regulation of overlapping protein-coding genes contributes to the prevalence of these genes within other eukaryotic genomes. PMID:23457227

  15. Mechanism of Chloride Elimination from 3-Chloro- and 2,4-Dichloro-cis,cis-Muconate: New Insight Obtained from Analysis of Muconate Cycloisomerase Variant CatB-K169A†

    PubMed Central

    Kaulmann, Ursula; Kaschabek, Stefan R.; Schlömann, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Chloromuconate cycloisomerases of bacteria utilizing chloroaromatic compounds are known to convert 3-chloro-cis,cis-muconate to cis-dienelactone (cis-4-carboxymethylenebut-2-en-4-olide), while usual muconate cycloisomerases transform the same substrate to the bacteriotoxic protoanemonin. Formation of protoanemonin requires that the cycloisomerization of 3-chloro-cis,cis-muconate to 4-chloromuconolactone is completed by protonation of the exocyclic carbon of the presumed enol/enolate intermediate before chloride elimination and decarboxylation take place to yield the final product. The formation of cis-dienelactone, in contrast, could occur either by dehydrohalogenation of 4-chloromuconolactone or, more directly, by chloride elimination from the enol/enolate intermediate. To reach a better understanding of the mechanisms of chloride elimination, the proton-donating Lys169 of Pseudomonas putida muconate cycloisomerase was changed to alanine. As expected, substrates requiring protonation, such as cis,cis-muconate as well as 2- and 3-methyl-, 3-fluoro-, and 2-chloro-cis,cis-muconate, were not converted at a significant rate by the K169A variant. However, the variant was still active with 3-chloro- and 2,4-dichloro-cis,cis-muconate. Interestingly, cis-dienelactone and 2-chloro-cis-dienelactone were formed as products, whereas the wild-type enzyme forms protoanemonin and the not previously isolated 2-chloroprotoanemonin, respectively. Thus, the chloromuconate cycloisomerases may avoid (chloro-)protoanemonin formation by increasing the rate of chloride abstraction from the enol/enolate intermediate compared to that of proton addition to it. PMID:11443090

  16. Commercialization of CIS-Based Thin-Film PV: Final Technical Report, August 1998--November 2001

    SciTech Connect

    Tarrant, D. E.; Gay, R. R.

    2002-09-01

    This report describes the primary objectives of this subcontract, which are to scale up substrate size and to scale up production capacity of the baseline Siemens Solar Industries (SSI) CIS-based module process while introducing CIS-based products. The primary goals are to scale the substrate size from about 900 cm2 (1 ft2) to approximately 4000 cm2 by the middle of Phase II, and to achieve pilot production rates of 500 kW per year by the end of Phase III. Deliverables for the subcontract include CIS-based products and representative modules delivered to the NREL Module Testing Team for outdoor testing and evaluation.

  17. trans- cis Isomerism and acylimine formation in DsRed chromophore models: Intrinsic rotation barriers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olsen, Seth; Smith, Sean C.

    2006-07-01

    The chromophore of the red fluorescent protein DsRed contains an acylimine substituent to a GFP-like chromophore structure. The acylimine is formed from the trans peptide linkage between residues F65 and Q66 in immature DsRed, but has a cis configuration in the mature protein. The relationship between acylimine formation and trans- cis isomerization is unresolved. We have calculated bond rotation profiles for models of mature and immature DsRed chromophores using B3LYP DFT. The isomerization barrier is substantially reduced in acylimine-substituted models, providing prima facie evidence that acylimine formation precedes trans- cis isomerization in DsRed chromophores.

  18. Effects of BRCA2 cis-regulation in normal breast and cancer risk amongst BRCA2 mutation carriers

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Cis-acting regulatory single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at specific loci may modulate penetrance of germline mutations at the same loci by introducing different levels of expression of the wild-type allele. We have previously reported that BRCA2 shows differential allelic expression and we hypothesize that the known variable penetrance of BRCA2 mutations might be associated with this mechanism. Methods We combined haplotype analysis and differential allelic expression of BRCA2 in breast tissue to identify expression haplotypes and candidate cis-regulatory variants. These candidate variants underwent selection based on in silico predictions for regulatory potential and disruption of transcription factor binding, and were functionally analyzed in vitro and in vivo in normal and breast cancer cell lines. SNPs tagging the expression haplotypes were correlated with the total expression of several genes in breast tissue measured by Taqman and microarray technologies. The effect of the expression haplotypes on breast cancer risk in BRCA2 mutation carriers was investigated in 2,754 carriers. Results We identified common haplotypes associated with differences in the levels of BRCA2 expression in human breast cells. We characterized three cis-regulatory SNPs located at the promoter and two intronic regulatory elements which affect the binding of the transcription factors C/EBPα, HMGA1, D-binding protein (DBP) and ZF5. We showed that the expression haplotypes also correlated with changes in the expression of other genes in normal breast. Furthermore, there was suggestive evidence that the minor allele of SNP rs4942440, which is associated with higher BRCA2 expression, is also associated with a reduced risk of breast cancer (per-allele hazard ratio (HR) = 0.85, 95% confidence interval (CI) = 0.72 to 1.00, P-trend = 0.048). Conclusions Our work provides further insights into the role of cis-regulatory variation in the penetrance of disease-causing mutations

  19. CIS-lunar space infrastructure lunar technologies: Executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faller, W.; Hoehn, A.; Johnson, S.; Moos, P.; Wiltberger, N.

    1989-01-01

    Technologies necessary for the creation of a cis-Lunar infrastructure, namely: (1) automation and robotics; (2) life support systems; (3) fluid management; (4) propulsion; and (5) rotating technologies, are explored. The technological focal point is on the development of automated and robotic systems for the implementation of a Lunar Oasis produced by Automation and Robotics (LOAR). Under direction from the NASA Office of Exploration, automation and robotics were extensively utilized as an initiating stage in the return to the Moon. A pair of autonomous rovers, modular in design and built from interchangeable and specialized components, is proposed. Utilizing a buddy system, these rovers will be able to support each other and to enhance their individual capabilities. One rover primarily explores and maps while the second rover tests the feasibility of various materials-processing techniques. The automated missions emphasize availability and potential uses of Lunar resources, and the deployment and operations of the LOAR program. An experimental bio-volume is put into place as the precursor to a Lunar environmentally controlled life support system. The bio-volume will determine the reproduction, growth and production characteristics of various life forms housed on the Lunar surface. Physicochemical regenerative technologies and stored resources will be used to buffer biological disturbances of the bio-volume environment. The in situ Lunar resources will be both tested and used within this bio-volume. Second phase development on the Lunar surface calls for manned operations. Repairs and re-configuration of the initial framework will ensue. An autonomously-initiated manned Lunar oasis can become an essential component of the United States space program.

  20. Quasiperiodic orbit analysis of nonadiabatic cis-trans photoisomerization dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balzer, Birgit; Dilthey, Stefan; Hahn, Susanne; Thoss, Michael; Stock, Gerhard

    2003-08-01

    Adopting a multidimensional model of nonadiabatic cis-trans photoisomerization, quantum-mechanical and classical simulations of the ultrafast wave-packet dynamics associated with this photoreaction are presented. The quantum calculations demonstrate that nonadiabatic photoisomerization typically leads to a largely delocalized and diffuse wave function, which hampers an intuitive understanding of the dynamics in terms of specific nuclear motion. To facilitate a classical description, a recently proposed theoretical formulation is employed that affords an exact mapping of discrete electronic states onto continuous degrees of freedom and therefore provides a well-defined classical limit of a nonadiabatically coupled system. It is shown that a simple quasiclassical implementation of the mapping formulation is able to reproduce at least qualitatively the complex quantum dynamics of the system. In addition, the classical description allows us to characterize the nonadiabatic photoisomerization dynamics in terms of a few "quasiperiodic orbits." These orbits are close to a true unstable periodic orbit but are exactly periodic only with respect to the slow reaction coordinate of the system. Various types of quasiperiodic orbits of nonadiabatic photoisomerization are identified and analyzed. It is shown that the diffuse appearance of the quantum-mechanical wave function can be directly connected to irregular classical orbits propagating on vibronically coupled potential-energy surfaces. The chaotic behavior of the system is mainly caused by the relatively high energy corresponding to photoexcitation, the large anharmonicity of the isomerization potentials, and the reflection of the trajectory at surface crossings. The results demonstrate that quasiperiodic orbits represent a concept well suited to analyze the quantum dynamics of complex systems in terms of classical trajectories without the cumbersome search for periodic orbits.

  1. Interaction of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) with PM-2 DNA.

    PubMed

    Mong, S; Huang, C H; Prestayko, A W; Crooke, S T

    1980-09-01

    The interaction of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum(II) (CDDP) with PM-2 DNA was studied using two techniques: (a) agarose gel electrophoresis of PM-2 DNA conformation isomers after CDDP binding; and (b) viscometric measurement of different forms of CDDP-bound PM-2 DNA. In both systems, the results indicated that the DNA isomers interacted differently with CDDP. CDDP induced a decrease of viscosity upon interacting with single-strand broken relaxed circular (Form II) and double-strand broken linear (Form III) PM-2 DNA's. These observations are consistent with a "DNA shortening effect" proposed by Cohen et al. [Science (Wash. D. C.), 203: 1014-1016, 1979] and Macquet et al. [Biochimie (Paris), 60: 901-914, 1978] When covalently closed circular (Form I) PM-2 DNA was used, increasing concentrations of CDDP induced an initial slight increase and then decrease of electrophoretic mobility to the degree that it comigrated with CDDP-bound Form II DNA. Further addition of CDDP restored the electrophoretic mobility of Form I DNA. Corresponding changes in the viscosity of CDDP-bound Form I DNA showed an initial decrease, then an increase, and a final prolonged decrease of viscosity. These effects are similar but not identical to those induced by either DNA intercalators (e.g., ethidium bromide) or certain DNA denaturating agents (e.g., formaldehyde, ultraviolet light, alkali trichloroacetate, methylmercuric hydroxide, and carbodiimide). Thus, CDP may induce a DNA superhelix-unwinding process followed either by rewinding or a denaturation process or both. Quantitative analysis of the agarose gel electrophoretic pattern plus sucrose density gradient centrifugation studies also indicated that there was little DNA strand breakage induced by CDDP treatment. PMID:7191776

  2. FATP1 Inhibits 11-cis Retinol Formation via Interaction with the Visual Cycle Retinoid Isomerase RPE65 and Lecithin:Retinol Acyltransferase*

    PubMed Central

    Guignard, Thomas J. P.; Jin, Minghao; Pequignot, Marie O.; Li, Songhua; Chassigneux, Yolaine; Chekroud, Karim; Guillou, Laurent; Richard, Eric; Hamel, Christian P.; Brabet, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    The isomerization of all-trans retinol (vitamin A) to 11-cis retinol in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) is a key step in the visual process for the regeneration of the visual pigment chromophore, 11-cis retinal. LRAT and RPE65 are recognized as the minimal isomerase catalytic components. However, regulators of this rate-limiting step are not fully identified and could account for the phenotypic variability associated with inherited retinal degeneration (RD) caused by mutations in the RPE65 gene. To identify new RPE65 partners, we screened a porcine RPE mRNA library using a yeast two-hybrid assay with full-length human RPE65. One identified clone (here named FATP1c), containing the cytosolic C-terminal sequence from the fatty acid transport protein 1 (FATP1 or SLC27A1, solute carrier family 27 member 1), was demonstrated to interact dose-dependently with the native RPE65 and with LRAT. Furthermore, these interacting proteins colocalize in the RPE. Cellular reconstitution of human interacting proteins shows that FATP1 markedly inhibits 11-cis retinol production by acting on the production of all-trans retinyl esters and the isomerase activity of RPE65. The identification of this new visual cycle inhibitory component in RPE may contribute to further understanding of retinal pathogenesis. PMID:20356843

  3. Cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) induced acute renal failure (ARF): attempts at amelioration.

    PubMed

    Chopra, S; Kaufman, J; Flamenbaum, W

    1983-01-01

    Nephrotoxicity is a dose limiting feature of cis-diamminedichloroplatinum (DDP) cancer chemotherapy. We have previously developed a model of DDP induced acute renal failure in the rat, which is characterized by non oliguric progressive azotemia. Protocols have been established in humans to prevent or diminish DDP associated renal alterations during the course of cancer chemotherapy. The present studies were designed to evaluate the effect of prior diuretic therapy, with furosemide, and enhanced solute diuresis, using dextrose and water as the sole source of drinking fluid, on DDP induced acute renal failure in the rat. As compared to water drinking controls neither the diuretic nor the enhancement of osmotic excretion effected DDP associated mortality. The courses of the acute renal failure observed in all three study groups were similar; however, there was a suggestion in the surviving animals that these maneuvers may have contributed to a more rapid return in renal function among rats not dying of DDP induced acute renal failure. PMID:6684010

  4. cis-acting elements that confer lung epithelial cell expression of the CC10 gene.

    PubMed

    Stripp, B R; Sawaya, P L; Luse, D S; Wikenheiser, K A; Wert, S E; Huffman, J A; Lattier, D L; Singh, G; Katyal, S L; Whitsett, J A

    1992-07-25

    To define cis-acting genetic elements responsible for cell-specific transcriptional regulation of the CC10 gene, DNA sequences spanning nucleotides -2338 to +49 of the rat CC10 gene were linked to a reporter gene coding for chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT). In transient expression assays, CC10 sequences were capable of restricting CAT expression to a human lung adenocarcinoma cell line similar to pulmonary Clara cells. Transgenic mice harboring the hybrid RtCC10-CAT construct expressed high levels of CAT activity specifically within protein extracts of lung and trachea. Transcripts for the CAT reporter gene colocalized with those for the endogenous murine CC10 gene within the airways of transgenic mice. Functional analysis of deletion mutants identified stimulatory, inhibitory, and cell type-specific transcriptional regulatory elements. The results of gel retention and DNaseI protection assays suggest that a transcriptional stimulatory region located between -320 and -175, and a cell type-specific regulatory element located between -175 and +49, result from a series of protein-DNA interactions occurring at -220 to -205 and -128 to -86, respectively. Lung epithelial specific transcriptional regulatory elements described herein will be useful for expression of chimeric genes within epithelial cells lining the trachea, bronchi, and bronchioles of mice. PMID:1634515

  5. Superficial Phaeohyphomycosis Caused by Aureobasidium melanogenum Mimicking Tinea Nigra in an Immunocompetent Patient and Review of Published Reports.

    PubMed

    Chen, Wan-Ting; Tu, Mei-Eng; Sun, Pei-Lun

    2016-08-01

    Aureobasidium pullulans is a ubiquitous black yeast-like fungus belonging to order Dothideales. It was regarded as a contaminant, but is now considered a pathogen causing a wide range of human infections. We report a case of superficial phaeohyphomycosis in an immunocompetent patient with clinical presentations mimicking tinea nigra. On microscopic examination of lesion scales, multiple thick-walled, pigmented oval spores with septa were noted. A fungus with black mucoid colonies was repeatedly isolated from the lesions during the treatment course. This fungus was identified as A. melanogenum on the basis of morphological characteristics and subsequently confirmed by sequencing internal transcribed spacers of ribosomal DNA. The clinical presentations and microscopic findings of lesion scales were considerably similar to those of tinea nigra. However, fungal culturing proved that the causative pathogen was A. melanogenum rather than Hortaea werneckii. The patient might have acquired this infection during gardening activities. We also reviewed reported cases of cutaneous A. pullulans infection. PMID:26883514

  6. In vitro comparison of hepatic metabolism of 9cis-11 trans and 10trans-12cis isomers of CLA in the rat.

    PubMed

    Gruffat, Dominique; De La Torre, Anne; Chardigny, Jean-Michel; Durand, Denys; Loreau, Olivier; Sébédio, Jean-Louis; Bauchart, Dominique

    2003-02-01

    Hepatic metabolism of the two main isomers of CLA (9cis-11trans, 10trans-12cis C18:2) was compared to that of oleic acid (representative of the main plasma FA) in 16 rats by using the in vitro method of incubated liver slices. Liver tissue samples were incubated at 37 degrees C for 17 h under an atmosphere of 95% O2/5% CO2 in a medium supplemented with 0.75 mM of FA mixture (representative of circulating nonesterified FA) and with 55 microM [1-(14)C]9cis-11trans C18:2,11-(14)C]10trans-12cis C18:2, or 11-(14)C]oleate. The uptake of CLA by hepatocytes was similar for both isomers (9%) and was three times higher (P < 0.01) than for oleate (2.6%). The rate of CLA isomer oxidation was two times higher (49 and 40% of incorporated amounts of 9cis-11 trans and 10trans-12cis, respectively) than that of oleate (P < 0.01). Total oxidation of oleate and CLA isomers into [14CO2] was low (2 to 7% of total oxidized FA) compared to the partial oxidation (93 to 98%) leading to the production of [14C] acid-soluble products. CLA isomers escaping from catabolism were both highly desaturated (26.7 and 26.8%) into conjugated 18:3. Oleate and CLA isomers were mainly esterified into neutral lipids (70% of esterifled FA) and, to a lesser extent, into polar lipids (30%). They were slowly secreted as parts of VLDL particles (< 0.4% of FA incorporated into cells), the extent of secretion of oleate and of 10trans-12cis being 2.2-fold higher than that of 9cis-11trans (P < 0.02). In conclusion, this study clearly showed that both CLA isomers were highly catabolized by hepatocytes, reducing their availability for peripheral tissues. Moreover, more than 25% of CLA escaping from catabolism was converted into conjugated 18:3, the biological properties of which remain to be elucidated. PMID:12733748

  7. Geometry matters: inverse cytotoxic relationship for cis/trans-Ru(ii) polypyridyl complexes from cis/trans-[PtCl2(NH3)2].

    PubMed

    Wachter, Erin; Zamora, Ana; Heidary, David K; Ruiz, José; Glazer, Edith C

    2016-08-01

    Two thermally activated ruthenium(ii) polypyridyl complexes, cis-Ru(bpy)2Cl2 and trans-Ru(qpy)Cl2 were investigated to determine the impact of the geometric arrangement of the exchangable ligands on the potential of the compounds to act as chemotherapeutics. In contrast to the geometry requirements for cisplatin, trans-Ru(qpy)Cl2 was 7.1-9.5× more cytotoxic than cis-Ru(bpy)2Cl2. This discovery could open up a new area of metal-based chemotherapeutic research. PMID:27352966

  8. Quantitative comparison of cis-regulatory element (CRE) activities in transgenic Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Rogers, William A; Williams, Thomas M

    2011-01-01

    Gene expression patterns are specified by cis-regulatory element (CRE) sequences, which are also called enhancers or cis-regulatory modules. A typical CRE possesses an arrangement of binding sites for several transcription factor proteins that confer a regulatory logic specifying when, where, and at what level the regulated gene(s) is expressed. The full set of CREs within an animal genome encodes the organism's program for development, and empirical as well as theoretical studies indicate that mutations in CREs played a prominent role in morphological evolution. Moreover, human genome wide association studies indicate that genetic variation in CREs contribute substantially to phenotypic variation. Thus, understanding regulatory logic and how mutations affect such logic is a central goal of genetics. Reporter transgenes provide a powerful method to study the in vivo function of CREs. Here a known or suspected CRE sequence is coupled to heterologous promoter and coding sequences for a reporter gene encoding an easily observable protein product. When a reporter transgene is inserted into a host organism, the CRE's activity becomes visible in the form of the encoded reporter protein. P-element mediated transgenesis in the fruit fly species Drosophila (D.) melanogaster has been used for decades to introduce reporter transgenes into this model organism, though the genomic placement of transgenes is random. Hence, reporter gene activity is strongly influenced by the local chromatin and gene environment, limiting CRE comparisons to being qualitative. In recent years, the phiC31 based integration system was adapted for use in D. melanogaster to insert transgenes into specific genome landing sites. This capability has made the quantitative measurement of gene and, relevant here, CRE activity feasible. The production of transgenic fruit flies can be outsourced, including phiC31-based integration, eliminating the need to purchase expensive equipment and/or have proficiency at

  9. Mimicking Ribosomal Unfolding of RNA Pseudoknot in a Protein Channel.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xinyue; Xu, Xiaojun; Yang, Zhiyu; Burcke, Andrew J; Gates, Kent S; Chen, Shi-Jie; Gu, Li-Qun

    2015-12-23

    Pseudoknots are a fundamental RNA tertiary structure with important roles in regulation of mRNA translation. Molecular force spectroscopic approaches such as optical tweezers can track the pseudoknot's unfolding intermediate states by pulling the RNA chain from both ends, but the kinetic unfolding pathway induced by this method may be different from that in vivo, which occurs during translation and proceeds from the 5' to 3' end. Here we developed a ribosome-mimicking, nanopore pulling assay for dissecting the vectorial unfolding mechanism of pseudoknots. The pseudoknot unfolding pathway in the nanopore, either from the 5' to 3' end or in the reverse direction, can be controlled by a DNA leader that is attached to the pseudoknot at the 5' or 3' ends. The different nanopore conductance between DNA and RNA translocation serves as a marker for the position and structure of the unfolding RNA in the pore. With this design, we provided evidence that the pseudoknot unfolding is a two-step, multistate, metal ion-regulated process depending on the pulling direction. Most notably, unfolding in both directions is rate-limited by the unzipping of the first helix domain (first step), which is Helix-1 in the 5' → 3' direction and Helix-2 in the 3' → 5' direction, suggesting that the initial unfolding step in either pulling direction needs to overcome an energy barrier contributed by the noncanonical triplex base-pairs and coaxial stacking interactions for the tertiary structure stabilization. These findings provide new insights into RNA vectorial unfolding mechanisms, which play an important role in biological functions including frameshifting. PMID:26595106

  10. Metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma mimicking inflammatory breast carcinoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Njiaju, Uchenna O; Truica, Cristina I

    2010-02-01

    Prostate adenocarcinoma can manifest as a fairly indolent tumor or as a very aggressive cancer with significant invasive and metastatic potential. Common metastatic sites include bone, liver, lymph nodes, and adrenal glands. Dermatologic manifestations are rare. We present a case of a man who presented with breast skin changes that mimicked inflammatory breast carcinoma with specialized testing ultimately giving a diagnosis of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma. A 78-year-old man presented with left breast redness and swelling. Examination revealed an erythematous rash with subcutaneous edema over the left hemithoracic area. A breast ultrasound showed no focal mass, and a breast core biopsy had no evidence of tumor. A skin biopsy showed metastatic carcinoma in dermal lymphatics, and the tumor was found to have no estrogen or progesterone receptors or HER2 expression. Computed tomography scans, positron emission tomography, and a nuclear bone scan revealed widespread skeletal metastases. The patient received a 3-month course of capecitabine and cyclophosphamide with no improvement in his skin lesions. Subsequent immunohistochemical staining on the tumor specimen was positive for prostate-specific antigen (PSA) and alpha-methyl-CoA-racemase, confirming a diagnosis of metastatic prostatic adenocarcinoma. He received leuprolide and bicalutamide and demonstrated significant improvement with near-complete resolution of his skin lesions and a decrease in his PSA level. Prostatic adenocarcinoma presenting initially as a breast malignancy is a rarely recognizable clinical event. Undoubtedly, increased awareness and recognition of the rare entity described herein will allow for the prompt initiation of specific therapies, which might be of benefit to many patients. PMID:20133250

  11. Diffuse nesidioblastosis with hypoglycemia mimicking an insulinoma: a case report

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction We describe a case of diffuse nesidioblastosis in an adult patient who presented with exclusively fasting symptoms and a focal pancreatic 111In-pentetreotide uptake mimicking an insulinoma. Case presentation A 23-year-old Caucasian man had severe daily fasting hypoglycemia with glucose levels below 2mmol/L. Besides rare neuroglycopenic symptoms (confusion, sleepiness), he was largely asymptomatic. His investigations revealed low venous plasma glucose levels, high insulin and C-peptide levels and a 72-hour fast test that were all highly suggestive for an insulinoma. Abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging did not reveal any lesions. The sole imagery that was compatible with an insulinoma was a 111In-somatostatin receptor scintigraphy that showed a faint but definite focal tracer between the head and the body of the pancreas. However, this lesion could not be confirmed by endoscopic ultrasonography of the pancreas. Following duodenopancreatectomy, the histological findings were consistent with diffuse nesidioblastosis. Postoperatively, the patient continued to present with fasting hypoglycemia and was successfully treated with diazoxide. Conclusion In the absence of gastrointestinal surgery, nesidioblastosis is very rare in adults. In addition, nesidioblastosis is usually characterized by post-prandial hypoglycemia, whereas this patient presented with fasting hypoglycemia. This case also illustrates the risk for a false positive result of 111In-pentetreotide scintigraphy in the case of nesidioblastosis. Selective arterial calcium stimulation and venous sampling is the most reliable procedure for the positive diagnosis of insulinoma or nesidioblastosis and should be used to confirm any suspicion based on imaging modalities. PMID:23031644

  12. Mimicking Nonequilibrium Steady States with Time-Periodic Driving

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raz, O.; Subaşı, Y.; Jarzynski, C.

    2016-04-01

    Under static conditions, a system satisfying detailed balance generically relaxes to an equilibrium state in which there are no currents. To generate persistent currents, either detailed balance must be broken or the system must be driven in a time-dependent manner. A stationary system that violates detailed balance evolves to a nonequilibrium steady state (NESS) characterized by fixed currents. Conversely, a system that satisfies instantaneous detailed balance but is driven by the time-periodic variation of external parameters—also known as a stochastic pump (SP)—reaches a periodic state with nonvanishing currents. In both cases, these currents are maintained at the cost of entropy production. Are these two paradigmatic scenarios effectively equivalent? For discrete-state systems, we establish a mapping between nonequilibrium stationary states and stochastic pumps. Given a NESS characterized by a particular set of stationary probabilities, currents, and entropy production rates, we show how to construct a SP with exactly the same (time-averaged) values. The mapping works in the opposite direction as well. These results establish a proof of principle: They show that stochastic pumps are able to mimic the behavior of nonequilibrium steady states, and vice versa, within the theoretical framework of discrete-state stochastic thermodynamics. Nonequilibrium steady states and stochastic pumps are often used to model, respectively, biomolecular motors driven by chemical reactions and artificial molecular machines steered by the variation of external, macroscopic parameters. Our results loosely suggest that anything a biomolecular machine can do, an artificial molecular machine can do equally well. We illustrate this principle by showing that kinetic proofreading, a NESS mechanism that explains the low error rates in biochemical reactions, can be effectively mimicked by a constrained periodic driving.

  13. Mimicking the biological neural system using electronic logic circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirikera, Goutham R.; Shinde, Vishal; Kang, Inpil; Schulz, Mark J.; Shanov, Vesselin; Datta, Saurabh; Hurd, Doug; Westheider, Bo; Sundaresan, Mannur; Ghoshal, Anindya

    2004-07-01

    Detecting and locating cracks in structural components and joints that have high feature densities is a challenging problem in the field of Structural Health Monitoring. There have been advances in piezoelectric sensors, actuators, wave propagation, MEMS, and optical fiber sensors. However, few sensor-signal processing techniques have been applied to the monitoring of joints and complex structural geometries. This is in part because maintaining and analyzing a large amount of data obtained from a large number of sensors that may be needed to monitor joints for cracks is difficult. Reliable low cost assessment of the health of structures is crucial to maintain operational availability and productivity, reduce maintenance cost, and prevent catastrophic failure of large structures such as wind turbines, aircraft, and civil infrastructure. Recently, there have also been advances in development of simple passive techniques for health monitoring including a technique based on mimicking the biological neural system using electronic logic circuits. This technique aids in reducing the required number of data acquisition channels by a factor of ten or more and is able to predict the location of a crack within a rectangular grid or within an arbitrarily arranged network of continuous sensors or neurons. The current paper shows results obtained by implementing this method on an aluminum plate and joint. The plates were tested using simulated acoustic emissions and also loading via an MTS machine. The testing indicates that the neural system can monitor complex joints and detect acoustic emissions due to propagating cracks. High sensitivity of the neural system is needed, and further sensor development and testing on different types of joints is required. Also indicated is that sensor geometry, sensor location, signal filtering, and logic parameters of the neural system will be specific to the particular type of joint (material, thickness, geometry) being monitored. Also, a

  14. Thermochromic tissue-mimicking phantom for optimisation of thermal tumour ablation.

    PubMed

    Negussie, Ayele H; Partanen, Ari; Mikhail, Andrew S; Xu, Sheng; Abi-Jaoudeh, Nadine; Maruvada, Subha; Wood, Bradford J

    2016-05-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to (1) develop a novel tissue-mimicking thermochromic (TMTC) phantom that permanently changes colour from white to magenta upon heating above ablative temperatures, and (2) assess its utility for specific applications in evaluating thermal therapy devices. Materials and methods Polyacrylamide gel mixed with thermochromic ink was custom made to produce a TMTC phantom that changes its colour upon heating above biological ablative temperatures (> 60 °C). The thermal properties of the phantom were characterised, and compared to those of human tissue. In addition, utility of this phantom as a tool for the assessment of laser and microwave thermal ablation was examined. Results The mass density, thermal conductivity, and thermal diffusivity of the TMTC phantom were measured as 1033 ± 1.0 kg/m(3), 0.590 ± 0.015 W/m.K, and 0.145 ± 0.002 mm(2)/s, respectively, and found to be in agreement with reported values for human soft tissues. Heating the phantom with laser and microwave ablation devices produced clearly demarcated regions of permanent colour change geographically corresponding to regions with temperature elevations above 60 °C. Conclusion The TMTC phantom provides direct visualisation of ablation dynamics, including ablation volume and geometry as well as peak absolute temperatures within the treated region post-ablation. This phantom can be specifically tailored for different thermal therapy modalities, such as radiofrequency, laser, microwave, or therapeutic ultrasound ablation. Such modality-specific phantoms may enable better quality assurance, device characterisation, and ablation parameter optimisation, or optimise the study of dynamic heating parameters integral to drug device combination therapies relying upon heat. PMID:27099078

  15. Auditory Stimuli Mimicking Ambient Sounds Drive Temporal “Delta-Brushes” in Premature Infants

    PubMed Central

    Chipaux, Mathilde; Colonnese, Matthew T.; Mauguen, Audrey; Fellous, Laure; Mokhtari, Mostafa; Lezcano, Oscar; Milh, Mathieu; Dulac, Olivier; Chiron, Catherine; Khazipov, Rustem; Kaminska, Anna

    2013-01-01

    In the premature infant, somatosensory and visual stimuli trigger an immature electroencephalographic (EEG) pattern, “delta-brushes,” in the corresponding sensory cortical areas. Whether auditory stimuli evoke delta-brushes in the premature auditory cortex has not been reported. Here, responses to auditory stimuli were studied in 46 premature infants without neurologic risk aged 31 to 38 postmenstrual weeks (PMW) during routine EEG recording. Stimuli consisted of either low-volume technogenic “clicks” near the background noise level of the neonatal care unit, or a human voice at conversational sound level. Stimuli were administrated pseudo-randomly during quiet and active sleep. In another protocol, the cortical response to a composite stimulus (“click” and voice) was manually triggered during EEG hypoactive periods of quiet sleep. Cortical responses were analyzed by event detection, power frequency analysis and stimulus locked averaging. Before 34 PMW, both voice and “click” stimuli evoked cortical responses with similar frequency-power topographic characteristics, namely a temporal negative slow-wave and rapid oscillations similar to spontaneous delta-brushes. Responses to composite stimuli also showed a maximal frequency-power increase in temporal areas before 35 PMW. From 34 PMW the topography of responses in quiet sleep was different for “click” and voice stimuli: responses to “clicks” became diffuse but responses to voice remained limited to temporal areas. After the age of 35 PMW auditory evoked delta-brushes progressively disappeared and were replaced by a low amplitude response in the same location. Our data show that auditory stimuli mimicking ambient sounds efficiently evoke delta-brushes in temporal areas in the premature infant before 35 PMW. Along with findings in other sensory modalities (visual and somatosensory), these findings suggest that sensory driven delta-brushes represent a ubiquitous feature of the human sensory

  16. cis-3-Chloroacrylic Acid: A New Cotton Defoliant and Crop Desiccant.

    PubMed

    Herrett, R A; Kurtz, A N

    1963-09-20

    cis-3-Chloroacrylic acid is a potent cotton defoliant and a crop desiccant. Relationships between structure and activity indicate a relatively high degree of specificity, since minor modifications in structure result in loss of activity. PMID:17751800

  17. Selective Enrichment Yields Robust Ethene-Producing Dechlorinating Cultures from Microcosms Stalled at cis-Dichloroethene

    PubMed Central

    Delgado, Anca G.; Kang, Dae-Wook; Nelson, Katherine G.; Fajardo-Williams, Devyn; Miceli, Joseph F.; Done, Hansa Y.; Popat, Sudeep C.; Krajmalnik-Brown, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    Dehalococcoides mccartyi strains are of particular importance for bioremediation due to their unique capability of transforming perchloroethene (PCE) and trichloroethene (TCE) to non-toxic ethene, through the intermediates cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC). Despite the widespread environmental distribution of Dehalococcoides, biostimulation sometimes fails to promote dechlorination beyond cis-DCE. In our study, microcosms established with garden soil and mangrove sediment also stalled at cis-DCE, albeit Dehalococcoides mccartyi containing the reductive dehalogenase genes tceA, vcrA and bvcA were detected in the soil/sediment inocula. Reductive dechlorination was not promoted beyond cis-DCE, even after multiple biostimulation events with fermentable substrates and a lengthy incubation. However, transfers from microcosms stalled at cis-DCE yielded dechlorination to ethene with subsequent enrichment cultures containing up to 109 Dehalococcoides mccartyi cells mL−1. Proteobacterial classes which dominated the soil/sediment communities became undetectable in the enrichments, and methanogenic activity drastically decreased after the transfers. We hypothesized that biostimulation of Dehalococcoides in the cis-DCE-stalled microcosms was impeded by other microbes present at higher abundances than Dehalococcoides and utilizing terminal electron acceptors from the soil/sediment, hence, outcompeting Dehalococcoides for H2. In support of this hypothesis, we show that garden soil and mangrove sediment microcosms bioaugmented with their respective cultures containing Dehalococcoides in high abundance were able to compete for H2 for reductive dechlorination from one biostimulation event and produced ethene with no obvious stall. Overall, our results provide an alternate explanation to consolidate conflicting observations on the ubiquity of Dehalococcoides mccartyi and occasional stalling of dechlorination at cis-DCE; thus, bringing a new perspective to better

  18. An unexpected promiscuous activity of 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase: the cis-trans isomerisation of nitrostyrene.

    PubMed

    Zandvoort, Ellen; Geertsema, Edzard M; Baas, Bert-Jan; Quax, Wim J; Poelarends, Gerrit J

    2012-09-01

    Serendipitous switch: While exploring cis-nitrostyrene as a potential electrophile in Michael-type addition reactions catalysed by the enzyme 4-oxalocrotonate tautomerase (4-OT), it was unexpectedly found that 4-OT catalyses the isomerisation of cis-nitrostyrene to trans-nitrostyrene (k(cat) /K(m) = 1.9×10(3)  M(-1)  s(-1) ). PMID:22851288

  19. CisSERS: Customizable In Silico Sequence Evaluation for Restriction Sites.

    PubMed

    Sharpe, Richard M; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; Grimes, John; Galli, Marco; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Evans, Katherine; Kramer, David; Dhingra, Amit

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. CisSERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated to enhance the usefulness of the software. CisSERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, CisSERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from CisSERS enable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3'UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. CisSERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of CisSERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool CisSERS and results from in-silico and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that CisSERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies. PMID:27071032

  20. CisSERS: Customizable in silico sequence evaluation for restriction sites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Sharpe, Richard M.; Koepke, Tyson; Harper, Artemus; Grimes, John; Galli, Marco; Satoh-Cruz, Mio; Kalyanaraman, Ananth; Evans, Katherine; Kramer, David; Dhingra, Amit; et al

    2016-04-12

    High-throughput sequencing continues to produce an immense volume of information that is processed and assembled into mature sequence data. Here, data analysis tools are urgently needed that leverage the embedded DNA sequence polymorphisms and consequent changes to restriction sites or sequence motifs in a high-throughput manner to enable biological experimentation. CisSERS was developed as a standalone open source tool to analyze sequence datasets and provide biologists with individual or comparative genome organization information in terms of presence and frequency of patterns or motifs such as restriction enzymes. Predicted agarose gel visualization of the custom analyses results was also integrated tomore » enhance the usefulness of the software. CisSERS offers several novel functionalities, such as handling of large and multiple datasets in parallel, multiple restriction enzyme site detection and custom motif detection features, which are seamlessly integrated with real time agarose gel visualization. Using a simple fasta-formatted file as input, CisSERS utilizes the REBASE enzyme database. Results from CisSERSenable the user to make decisions for designing genotyping by sequencing experiments, reduced representation sequencing, 3’UTR sequencing, and cleaved amplified polymorphic sequence (CAPS) molecular markers for large sample sets. CisSERS is a java based graphical user interface built around a perl backbone. Several of the applications of CisSERS including CAPS molecular marker development were successfully validated using wet-lab experimentation. Here, we present the tool CisSERSand results from in-silico and corresponding wet-lab analyses demonstrating that CisSERS is a technology platform solution that facilitates efficient data utilization in genomics and genetics studies.« less