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Sample records for mineral electronic components

  1. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is a compilation of X-ray tables and spectra recorded from various mineral matrices. Spectra were obtained using electron microprobe, equipped with LiF geared, curved crystal X-ray spectrometers, utilizing typical analytical operating conditions: 15 Kv acceleration potential, 0.02 microampere sample current as measured on a clinopyroxene standard (CP19). Tables and spectra are presented for the majority of elements, fluorine through uranium, occurring in mineral samples from lunar, meteoritic and terrestrial sources. Tables for each element contain relevant analytical information, i.e., analyzing crystal, X-ray peak, background and relative intensity information, X-ray interferences and a section containing notes on the measurement. Originally intended to cover silicates and oxide minerals the tables and spectra have been expanded to cover other mineral phases. Electron microprobe mineral analysis guide is intended as a spectral base to which additional spectra can be added as the analyst encounters new mineral matrices.

  2. Cooling system for electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2016-05-17

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  3. Cooling system for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Anderl, William James; Colgan, Evan George; Gerken, James Dorance; Marroquin, Christopher Michael; Tian, Shurong

    2015-12-15

    Embodiments of the present invention provide for non interruptive fluid cooling of an electronic enclosure. One or more electronic component packages may be removable from a circuit card having a fluid flow system. When installed, the electronic component packages are coincident to and in a thermal relationship with the fluid flow system. If a particular electronic component package becomes non-functional, it may be removed from the electronic enclosure without affecting either the fluid flow system or other neighboring electronic component packages.

  4. Advanced Power Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.

    2004-01-01

    This paper will give a description and status of the Advanced Power Electronics Materials and Components Technology program being conducted by the NASA Glenn Research Center for future aerospace power applications. The focus of this research program is on the following: 1) New and/or significantly improved dielectric materials for the development of power capacitors with increased volumetric efficiency, energy density, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and composite ceramic dielectrics and diamond-like carbon films; 2) New and/or significantly improved high frequency, high temperature, low loss soft magnetic materials for the development of transformers/inductors with increased power/energy density, electrical efficiency, and operating temperature. Materials being investigated include nanocrystalline and nanocomposite soft magnetic materials; 3) Packaged high temperature, high power density, high voltage, and low loss SiC diodes and switches. Development of high quality 4H- and 6H- SiC atomically smooth substrates to significantly improve device performance is a major emphasis of the SiC materials program; 4) Demonstration of high temperature (> 200 C) circuits using the components developed above.

  5. Thermoluminescence of the mineral components in granite

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, R.G.; Kierstead, J.A.; Levy, P.W.

    1982-01-01

    The thermoluminescence (TL) of the minerals in Climax Stock (Nevada, USA) granite has been studied. The principal mineral constituents are plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar and biotite. Pyrite, sphene apatite and zircon occur at one percent or less. All exhibit TL except biotite. The TL kinetics were determined for plagioclase, quartz, potassium feldspar and pyrite. Plagioclase and potassium feldspar exhibit second order and pyrite first orker kinetics. Natural TL of quartz follows second order and artificial TL first order kinetics. However, in these four minerals unrealistic kinetic parameters are often obtained; thus more general kinetics, e.g. interactive kinetics, may apply. 8 figures.

  6. Towards Prognostics for Electronics Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saha, Bhaskar; Celaya, Jose R.; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2013-01-01

    Electronics components have an increasingly critical role in avionics systems and in the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research field as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management information. This paper focuses on a prognostics application for electronics components within avionics systems, and in particular its application to an Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). This application utilizes the remaining useful life prediction, accomplished by employing the particle filter framework, leveraging data from accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. These tests induced thermal-electrical overstresses by applying thermal cycling to the IGBT devices. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  7. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.; Meirans, L.; Wapman, W.; Hwang, Y.; Koenig, L.; Petterson, B.

    1994-07-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene and chlorofluorocarbon solvents in cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates from electronic components. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  8. Electronic Components Subsystems and Equipment: a Compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Developments in electronic components, subsystems, and equipment are summarized. Topics discussed include integrated circuit components and techniques, circuit components and techniques, and cables and connectors.

  9. Automated cleaning of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Drotning, W.

    1994-03-01

    Environmental and operator safety concerns are leading to the elimination of trichloroethylene (TCE) and chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) solvents in electronic component cleaning processes that remove rosin flux, organic and inorganic contamination, and particulates. Present processes depend heavily on these solvents for manual spray cleaning of small components and subassemblies. Use of alternative solvent systems can lead to longer processing times and reduced quality. Automated spray cleaning can improve the quality of the cleaning process, thus enabling the productive use of environmentally conscious materials, while minimizing personnel exposure to hazardous materials. In addition, the use of robotic and automated systems can reduce the manual handling of parts that necessitates additional cleaning. We describe the development of a prototype robotic system for cleaning electronic components in a spray cleaning workcell. An important feature of the prototype system is the capability to generate the robot paths and motions automatically from the CAD models of the part to be cleaned, and to embed cleaning process knowledge into the automatically programmed operations.

  10. [Study of ozonization effects on mineral water components].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Y; Yang, L; Chen, Y; Sha, X

    1998-03-01

    The disinfection effects of ozonization and its influences on chemical components of mineral water were investigated. The results showed that ozone at the level of 0.5 mg/L and with the exposure time of 5 minutes effectively destroyed bacteria in mineral water. High level ozone showed no strong influences on some beneficial components, such as strontium and metasilicate and on some main components, such as bicarbonate, hardness and alkalinity, but slightly elevated pH value. Ozonization reduced the contents of total dissolved solids and oxygen demand, and decomposed some reductive contaminants such as ammonia, cyanide and phenols. Ozonization will convert part of the bromide into hypobromite and bromate. PMID:10682614

  11. Mineral components and anti-oxidant activities of tropical seaweeds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshi, Suzuki; Yumiko, Yoshie-Stark; Joko, Santoso

    2005-07-01

    Seaweeds are known to hold substances of high nutritional value; they are the richest resources of minerals important to the biochemical reactions in the human body. Seaweeds also hold non-nutrient compounds like dietary fiber and polyphenols. However, there is not enough information on the mineral compounds of tropical seaweeds. Also we are interested in the antioxidant activities of seaweeds, especially those in the tropical area. In this study, Indonesian green, brown and red algae were used as experimental materials with their mineral components analyzed by using an atomic absorption spectrophotometer. The catechins and flavonoids of these seaweeds were extracted with methanol and analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC); the antioxidant activities of these seaweeds were evaluated in a fish oil emulsion system. The mineral components of tropical seaweeds are dominated by calcium, potassium and sodium, as well as small amounts of copper, iron and zinc. A green alga usually contains epigallocatechin, gallocatechin, epigallocatechin gallate and catechin. However, catechin and its isomers are not found in some green and red algae. In the presence of a ferrous ion catalyst, all the methanol extracts from the seaweeds show significantly lower peroxide values of the emulsion than the control, and that of a green alga shows the strongest antioxidant activity. The highest chelation on ferrous ions is also found in the extract of this alga, which is significantly different from the other methanol extracts in both 3 and 24 h incubations.

  12. Extracellular electron transfer mechanisms between microorganisms and minerals.

    PubMed

    Shi, Liang; Dong, Hailiang; Reguera, Gemma; Beyenal, Haluk; Lu, Anhuai; Liu, Juan; Yu, Han-Qing; Fredrickson, James K

    2016-10-01

    Electrons can be transferred from microorganisms to multivalent metal ions that are associated with minerals and vice versa. As the microbial cell envelope is neither physically permeable to minerals nor electrically conductive, microorganisms have evolved strategies to exchange electrons with extracellular minerals. In this Review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms that underlie the ability of microorganisms to exchange electrons, such as c-type cytochromes and microbial nanowires, with extracellular minerals and with microorganisms of the same or different species. Microorganisms that have extracellular electron transfer capability can be used for biotechnological applications, including bioremediation, biomining and the production of biofuels and nanomaterials. PMID:27573579

  13. Bacteriostatic conformal coating for electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bland, C.; Le Doux, F. N.

    1967-01-01

    Coating for electronic components used in space applications has bacteriostatic qualities capable of hindering bacterial reproduction, both vegetative and sporulative viable microorganisms. It exhibits high electrical resistivity, a low outgassing rate, and is capable of restraining electronic components when subjected to mechanical vibrations.

  14. Carbon Nanotubes: Molecular Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srivastava, Deepak; Saini, Subhash; Menon, Madhu

    1997-01-01

    The carbon Nanotube junctions have recently emerged as excellent candidates for use as the building blocks in the formation of nanoscale molecular electronic networks. While the simple joint of two dissimilar tubes can be generated by the introduction of a pair of heptagon-pentagon defects in an otherwise perfect hexagonal graphene sheet, more complex joints require other mechanisms. In this work we explore structural characteristics of complex 3-point junctions of carbon nanotubes using a generalized tight-binding molecular-dynamics scheme. The study of pi-electron local densities of states (LDOS) of these junctions reveal many interesting features, most prominent among them being the defect-induced states in the gap.

  15. Energetic electron components at geosynchronous orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cayton, T. E.; Belian, R. D.; Gary, S. P.; Fritz, T. A.; Baker, D. N.

    1989-01-01

    Energy distribution functions have been derived from energetic (30-2000 keV) electron fluxes observed simultaneously by three geosynchronous orbit satellites throughout the year 1986. These distributions, as well as others derived from empirical models of outer magnetospheric electron fluxes, can be resolved into two distinct relativistic Maxwellian components which are each fully parameterized by a density and a temperature. A four-parameter characterization is presented which provides a new, simplified procedure for the interpretation of energetic electron data in the outer magnetosphere.

  16. Minerals in coal: a transmission electron microscopy study

    SciTech Connect

    Wert, C.A.; Hsieh, K.C.

    1983-01-01

    Techniques of electron microscopy have been applied to identification of minerals in coal and coal conversion products. The principal problem is making satisfactory thin-samples. Ion-milling has been used, but grinding and microtoming also show promise. Principal attention has been given to characterization of sulfides and clays, but many other minerals have been identified. Application of the technique to identification of the minerals in oil shale has been demonstrated. The great value of this method is the extraordinary detail with which mineral inclusions can be characterized. General topography, crystal type (including space group of complex crystalline forms), planar spacing and chemical composition can be determined using the large array of techniques available - bright and dark field imaging, electron diffraction, including convergent beam electron diffraction, x-ray emission spectroscopy and energy loss spectroscopy. 63 refences, 10 figures.

  17. Low-Temperature Electronic Components Being Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammond, Ahmad

    1999-01-01

    In many future NASA missions, such as deep space planetary exploration and the Next Generation Space Telescope, electrical components and systems must operate reliably and efficiently in extremely low temperature environments. Most modern electronic components cannot operate below moderately low operating temperatures (-40 to -55 C). The low-temperature electronics program at the NASA Lewis Research Center is focusing on the development and characterization of low-temperature components and the integration of the developed devices into demonstrable very low-temperature (-200 C) power systems such as dc-dc converters. Such low-temperature electronics will not only tolerate hostile environments but also will reduce system size and weight by eliminating radioisotope heating units, thereby reducing launch cost, improving reliability and lifetime, and increasing energy densities. Low-temperature electronic components will also have a great influence on terrestrial applications such as medical instrumentation, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic and antarctic exploration. Lewis researchers are now performing extensive evaluations of commercially available as well as custom-made devices. These include various types of energy storage and signal capacitors, power switching devices, magnetic and superconducting materials, and primary lithium batteries, to name a few.

  18. Prognostics for Electronics Components of Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Celaya, Jose R.; Saha, Bhaskar; Wysocki, Philip F.; Goebel, Kai F.

    2009-01-01

    Electronics components have and increasingly critical role in avionics systems and for the development of future aircraft systems. Prognostics of such components is becoming a very important research filed as a result of the need to provide aircraft systems with system level health management. This paper reports on a prognostics application for electronics components of avionics systems, in particular, its application to the Isolated Gate Bipolar Transistor (IGBT). The remaining useful life prediction for the IGBT is based on the particle filter framework, leveraging data from an accelerated aging tests on IGBTs. The accelerated aging test provided thermal-electrical overstress by applying thermal cycling to the device. In-situ state monitoring, including measurements of the steady-state voltages and currents, electrical transients, and thermal transients are recorded and used as potential precursors of failure.

  19. Applications of scanning electron microscopy to the study of mineral matter in peat

    SciTech Connect

    Raymond, R. Jr.; Andrejko, M.J.; Bardin, S.W.

    1983-01-01

    Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and energy dispersive spectrometry (EDS) have been used for in situ analysis of minerals in peats by combining methods for producing oriented microtome sections of peat with methods for critical point drying. The combined technique allows SEM analysis of the inorganic components and their associated botanical constituents, along with petrographic identification of the botanical constituents. In peat deposits with abundant fluvial- or marine-derived minerals, one may use the above technique and/or medium- or low-temperature ashing followed by x-ray diffraction to readily identify the various mineral components. However, in some freshwater environments the scarcity of non-silica minerals makes the above techniques impractical. By separating the inorganic residues from the peat, one can isolate the non-silica mineral matter in the SEM for analysis by EDS. Furthermore, such separation allows SEM analysis of features and textures of both silica and non-silica mineral particles that might otherwise be unidentifiable. Results indicate the occurrence of detritial minerals in both Okefenokee and Snuggedy Swamp peats, the presence of authigenic or diagenetic minerals growing within peats, and dissolution features on freshwater sponge spicules that may account for the absence of spicules in Tertiary lignites.

  20. Electron Correlation in 4-Component Relativistic Calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visscher, Luuk; Arnold, James O. (Technical Monitor)

    1994-01-01

    The full 4-component Dirac-Coulomb equation can nowadays be used in molecular calculations, The first step in solving this relativistic many-electron equation usually consists of solving the closed or open-shell Diarc-Fock equations. Like in non-relativistic calculations the outcome does not account for the effects of electron correlation. This can in principle be remedied by developing relativistic variants of electron correlation methods like Configuration Interaction or Coupled Cluster. In this talk the differences and similarities of such relativistic approaches as compared to non-relativistic methods will be reviewed. Results of Configuration Interaction calculations on the PtH molecule and on the MeF(sub 6, sup 2-) (Me= Co, Rh, Ir) complexes will be presented to give an impression of the kind of results that currently can be obtained.

  1. Cryogenic applications of commercial electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Harvey Moseley, S.; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-10-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2 K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG [1] and in the GISMO [2] camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  2. Cryogenic Applications of Commercial Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Ernest D.; Benford, Dominic J.; Forgione, Joshua B.; Moseley, S. Harvey; Wollack, Edward J.

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a range of techniques useful for constructing analog and digital circuits for operation in a liquid Helium environment (4.2K), using commercially available low power components. The challenges encountered in designing cryogenic electronics include finding components that can function usefully in the cold and possess low enough power dissipation so as not to heat the systems they are designed to measure. From design, test, and integration perspectives it is useful for components to operate similarly at room and cryogenic temperatures; however this is not a necessity. Some of the circuits presented here have been used successfully in the MUSTANG and in the GISMO camera to build a complete digital to analog multiplexer (which will be referred to as the Cryogenic Address Driver board). Many of the circuit elements described are of a more general nature rather than specific to the Cryogenic Address Driver board, and were studied as a part of a more comprehensive approach to addressing a larger set of cryogenic electronic needs.

  3. Measurement of Cu and Zn adsorption onto surficial sediment components: new evidence for less importance of clay minerals.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaoli; Li, Yu

    2011-05-30

    Clay minerals in surficial sediment samples, collected from the Songhua River in China, were separated via sedimentation after removal of Fe/Mn oxides and organic materials; Cu and Zn adsorption onto the sediment components was then evaluated. Clay minerals were examined via X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Clay minerals were found to consist mainly of illite, kaolinite, chlorite and an illite/smectite mixed layer. Non-clay minerals were dominated by quartz and orthoclase. The retention of Cu and Zn by clay minerals was 1.6 and 2.5 times, respectively, greater than that of the whole, untreated surficial sediment. Compared to the other critical components in sediments related to metal sorption (Mn oxides, Fe oxides and organic materials), the adsorption capacity of clay minerals was found to be relatively lower on a unit mass basis. These data suggest that, although clay minerals may be important in the adsorption of heavy metals to aquatic sediments, their role is less significant than Fe/Mn oxides and organic materials. PMID:21466918

  4. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Electronic signature components and controls. 11... SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Signatures § 11.200 Electronic signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall:...

  5. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Electronic signature components and controls. 11... SERVICES GENERAL ELECTRONIC RECORDS; ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES Electronic Signatures § 11.200 Electronic signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall:...

  6. Infrared extinction spectroscopy and micro-Raman spectroscopy of select components of mineral dust mixed with organic compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2013-06-01

    Radiative transfer calculations as well as satellite and ground-based retrieval algorithms often use Mie theory to account for atmospheric mineral dust. However, the approximations used in Mie theory are often not appropriate for mineral dust and can lead to inaccuracies in modeling optical properties. Analytic models that are based on Rayleigh theory and account for particle shapes can offer significant advantages when used to model the IR extinction of mineral dust in the accumulation size mode. Here we extend our investigations of the IR optical properties of mineral dust to include samples that have been processed with organic acids. In particular, we aerosolize several individual components of mineral dust with organic compounds that are common in the atmosphere. Through online and offline analysis of the resulting aerosol particles combining Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectroscopy, micro-Raman spectroscopy, and scanning electron microscopy, we have identified three distinct outcomes of the interactions, which depend on the nature of the mineral and the organic acid: reactions with segregation of the products within the particle, formation of a uniform coating on the particle, or a formation of external mixture when there is no significant chemical interaction. Analysis of FTIR extinction spectra of the different dust components that have undergone processing shows red shifts of the prominent IR resonance peaks. The extent of the red shift, which varies from 2 to 10 cm-1, depends on the mineral and the nature of the interaction. Spectral simulations showed that the deviation from Mie theory becomes even more pronounced for these processed mineral dust aerosol components.

  7. Infrared attenuated total reflectance spectroscopy: an innovative strategy for analyzing mineral components in energy relevant systems.

    PubMed

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Delle Piane, Claudio; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  8. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-10-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis.

  9. Infrared Attenuated Total Reflectance Spectroscopy: An Innovative Strategy for Analyzing Mineral Components in Energy Relevant Systems

    PubMed Central

    Müller, Christian Menno; Pejcic, Bobby; Esteban, Lionel; Piane, Claudio Delle; Raven, Mark; Mizaikoff, Boris

    2014-01-01

    The direct qualitative and quantitative determination of mineral components in shale rocks is a problem that has not been satisfactorily resolved to date. Infrared spectroscopy (IR) is a non-destructive method frequently used in mineral identification, yet challenging due to the similarity of spectral features resulting from quartz, clay, and feldspar minerals. This study reports on a significant improvement of this methodology by combining infrared attenuated total reflection spectroscopy (IR-ATR) with partial least squares (PLS) regression techniques for classifying and quantifying various mineral components present in a number of different shale rocks. The developed multivariate classification model was calibrated using pure component mixtures of the most common shale minerals (i.e., kaolinite, illite, montmorillonite, calcite, and quartz). Using this model, the IR spectra of 11 real-world shale samples were analyzed and evaluated. Finally, the performance of the developed IR-ATR method was compared with results obtained via X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. PMID:25358261

  10. [The balneotherapeutic components of sulfide-containing mineral waters].

    PubMed

    Khutoryansky, V A; Gorshkov, A G

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested in an early study that sulfanes may serve as a source of sulfur contained in hydrogen sulfide sources. We have performed derivatization of sulfanes, known to be present in the "Novonukutskaya" mineral water. The presence of polysulfanes in balneotherapeutic sulfide waters was confirmed by the HPLC-UV and chromato-mass spectrometric techniques. Derivatization of inorganic polysulfides was achieved by using the reaction with methyl iodide. It was shown that polysulfanes contained in the examined samples were metastable and disintegrated into So and H2S. Almost all molecular zero-valent sulfur was present in the form of S8. The application of HPLC allowed to determine the equilibrium concentration of molecular sulfur. The presence of the above compounds in therapeutic sulfide waters raises the question of the mechanism of their curative action. The authors hypothesize that it may be related to the high therapeutic potency of the substances obtained by steam distillation from the "Novonukutskaya" mineral water. PMID:26841531

  11. Imaging Cytoskeleton Components by Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Svitkina, Tatyana

    2016-01-01

    The cytoskeleton is a complex of detergent-insoluble components of the cytoplasm playing critical roles in cell motility, shape generation, and mechanical properties of a cell. Fibrillar polymers—actin filaments, microtubules, and intermediate filaments—are major constituents of the cytoskeleton, which constantly change their organization during cellular activities. The actin cytoskeleton is especially polymorphic, as actin filaments can form multiple higher order assemblies performing different functions. Structural information about cytoskeleton organization is critical for understanding its functions and mechanisms underlying various forms of cellular activity. Because of the nanometer-scale thickness of cytoskeletal fibers, electron microscopy (EM) is a key tool to determine the structure of the cytoskeleton. This article describes application of rotary shadowing (or metal replica) EM for visualization of the cytoskeleton. The procedure is applicable to thin cultured cells growing on glass coverslips and consists of detergent extraction of cells to expose their cytoskeleton, chemical fixation to provide stability, ethanol dehydration and critical point drying to preserve three-dimensionality, rotary shadowing with platinum to create contrast, and carbon coating to stabilize replicas. This technique provides easily interpretable three-dimensional images, in which individual cytoskeletal fibers are clearly resolved, and individual proteins can be identified by immunogold labeling. More importantly, replica EM is easily compatible with live cell imaging, so that one can correlate the dynamics of a cell or its components, e.g., expressed fluorescent proteins, with high resolution structural organization of the cytoskeleton in the same cell. PMID:26498781

  12. Bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization following orthograde mineral trioxide aggregate obturation: a scanning electron microscopy study.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jun Sang; Chang, Seok-Woo; Oh, So Ram; Perinpanayagam, Hiran; Lim, Sang-Min; Yoo, Yeon-Jee; Oh, Yeo-Rok; Woo, Sang-Bin; Han, Seung-Hyun; Zhu, Qiang; Kum, Kee-Yeon

    2014-12-01

    The time domain entombment of bacteria by intratubular mineralization following orthograde canal obturation with mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) was studied by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Single-rooted human premolars (n=60) were instrumented to an apical size #50/0.06 using ProFile and treated as follows: Group 1 (n=10) was filled with phosphate buffered saline (PBS); Group 2 (n=10) was incubated with Enterococcus faecalis for 3 weeks, and then filled with PBS; Group 3 (n=20) was obturated orthograde with a paste of OrthoMTA (BioMTA, Seoul, Korea) and PBS; and Group 4 (n=20) was incubated with E. faecalis for 3 weeks and then obturated with OrthoMTA-PBS paste. Following their treatments, the coronal openings were sealed with PBS-soaked cotton and intermediate restorative material (IRM), and the roots were then stored in PBS for 1, 2, 4, 8 or 16 weeks. After each incubation period, the roots were split and their dentin/MTA interfaces examined in both longitudinal and horizontal directions by SEM. There appeared to be an increase in intratubular mineralization over time in the OrthoMTA-filled roots (Groups 3 and 4). Furthermore, there was a gradual entombment of bacteria within the dentinal tubules in the E. faecalis inoculated MTA-filled roots (Group 4). Therefore, the orthograde obturation of root canals with OrthoMTA mixed with PBS may create a favorable environment for bacterial entombment by intratubular mineralization. PMID:25012869

  13. Pulmonary mineral dust. A study of ninety patients by electron microscopy, electron microanalysis, and electron microdiffraction.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, J. P.; Henoc, P.; Galle, P.; Pariente, R.

    1976-01-01

    The results of a study of 90 patients are presented. Intrapulmonary mineral deposits were characterized by electron diffraction and electron probe microanalysis. Using this method, pneumoconioses may be distinguidhed from other pneumopathies. In cases of pneumoconiosis, there exists a specific relationship between the etiology of the dust exposure and the crystallographic characteristics of the intrapulmonary deposits. The nature of the deposits may be indicative of a specific type of pneumoconiosis. This method is particularly useful in differentiating between asbestos bodies and ferruginous bodies. The value of the method in general and its importance in the study of pneumoconiosis are discussed. Images Figure 4 Figure 13 Figure 5 Figure 14 Figure 6 Figure 15 Figure 7 Figure 16 Figure 8 Figure 17 Figure 1 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 2 Figure 11 Figure 3 Figure 12 PMID:937507

  14. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including building bones, making ... regulating your heartbeat. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your ...

  15. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) study of minerals in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Hsieh, Kuang-Chien

    1982-01-01

    Minerals in eight coals from different mines were characterized in the micron-size range by using analytical transmission electron microscopy. Specimens were thinned by ion-milling wafers cut from these coals; a cold stage cooled by liquid nitrogen was used to reduce thermal degradation of the minerals by the ion-beam. Different mineral compounds were observed in different coals. The major minerals are clays, sulfides, oxides, carbonates and some minor-element-bearing phosphates. Clays (kaolinite, illite and others) have been most commonly found as either flat sheets or round globules. Iron sulfide was mostly found in the No. 5 and No. 6 coals from Illinois, distributed as massive polycrystals, as clusters of single crystals (framboids) or as isolated single crystals with size range down to some 0.25 microns. Other sulfides and some oxides were found in other coals with particle size as small as some 200 angstroms. Quartz, titanium oxides and many other carbonates and phosphate compounds were also characterized. Brief TEM work in the organic mass of coal was also introduced to study the nature of the coal macerals.

  16. Electronic Surface Structures of Coal and Mineral Particles

    SciTech Connect

    M.K. Mazumder; D.A. Lindquist; K.B. Tennal; Steve Trigwell; Steve Farmer; Albert Nutsukpul; Alex Biris

    2001-04-01

    Surface science studies related to tribocharging and charge separation studies were performed on electrostatic beneficiation of coal. In contrast to other cleaning methods, electrostatic beneficiation is a dry cleaning process requiring no water or subsequent drying. Despite these advantages, there is still uncertainty in implementing large scale commercial electrostatic beneficiation of coal. The electronic surface states of coal macerals and minerals are difficult to describe due to their chemical complexity and variability [1]. The efficiency in separation of mineral particles from organic macerals depends upon these surface states. Therefore, to further understand and determine a reason for the bipolar charging observed in coal separation, surface analysis studies using Ultra-violet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on coal samples and several materials that are used or considered for use in tribocharging. Electrostatic charging is a surface phenomenon, so the electronic surface states of the particles, which are influenced by the environmental conditions, determine both polarity and magnitude of tribocharging. UPS was used to measure the work function of the materials as typically used in ambient air. XPS was used to determine the surface chemistry in the form of contamination and degree of oxidation under the same environmental conditions. Mineral bearing coals are those amenable to electrostatic beneficiation. Three types of coal, Illinois No. 6, Pittsburgh No. 8, and Kentucky No. 9 were investigated in this study. Pulverized coal powder was tribocharged against copper. Pyritic and other ashes forming minerals in coal powders should charge with a negative polarity from triboelectrification, and organic macerals should acquire positive charge, according to the relative differences in the surface work functions between the material being charged and the charging medium. Different types of minerals

  17. 7 CFR 3201.80 - Electronic components cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Electronic components cleaners. 3201.80 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.80 Electronic components cleaners. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to wash or remove dirt or extraneous matter from electronic parts, devices, circuits, or...

  18. 7 CFR 3201.80 - Electronic components cleaners.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Electronic components cleaners. 3201.80 Section 3201... PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.80 Electronic components cleaners. (a) Definition. Products that are designed to wash or remove dirt or extraneous matter from electronic parts, devices, circuits, or...

  19. JPL preferred parts list: Reliable electronic components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Covey, R. E.; Scott, W. R.; Hess, L. M.; Steffy, T. G.; Stott, F. R.

    1982-01-01

    The JPL Preferred Parts List was prepared to provide a basis for selection of electronic parts for JPL spacecraft programs. Supporting tests for the listed parts were designed to comply with specific spacecraft environmental requirements. The list tabulates the electronic, magnetic, and electromechanical parts applicable to all JPL electronic equipment wherein reliability is a major concern. The parts listed are revelant to equipment supplied by subcontractors as well as fabricated at the laboratory.

  20. Predicting electronic component lifetime using thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moy, Richard Q.; Vargas, Raymund; Eubanks, Charles

    1991-03-01

    The concept of using IR imaging technology in locating failures in populated and unpopulated printed circuit boards (PCB) has been around since the mid 70's. However, the use of IR imaging technology in predicting component failure has been almost nonexistent. An IR workstation was developed to identify components that had become degraded as a result of aging, stress, or 'wear and tear'. Unlike previous work in IR diagnostic which uses a 'gold' image for comparison, the image history is developed on an individual board basis. The boards were subjected to both thermal and voltage stress to induce component degradation and failure. Preliminary results indicate that some components show a consisted thermal profile that may be used in predicating the lifetime of some components; other components exhibit no consisted thermal pattern change. Due to the varying statistical nature of stress to PCB modules during use in the field and the complexity of designing thermal simulations for each type of PCB module, designing a low cost IR workstation to predict component lifetime is not practical. However, a related application of the effort offers the means to significantly enhance the reliability of PCB modules which have large populations.

  1. Multilayer electronic component systems and methods of manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, Dane (Inventor); Wang, Guoan (Inventor); Kingsley, Nickolas D. (Inventor); Papapolymerou, Ioannis (Inventor); Tentzeris, Emmanouil M. (Inventor); Bairavasubramanian, Ramanan (Inventor); DeJean, Gerald (Inventor); Li, RongLin (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    Multilayer electronic component systems and methods of manufacture are provided. In this regard, an exemplary system comprises a first layer of liquid crystal polymer (LCP), first electronic components supported by the first layer, and a second layer of LCP. The first layer is attached to the second layer by thermal bonds. Additionally, at least a portion of the first electronic components are located between the first layer and the second layer.

  2. ELECTRONIC SURFACE STRUCTURES OF COAL AND MINERAL PARTICLES

    SciTech Connect

    M.K.Mazumder; D.A. Linduist; K.B. Tennal

    2001-04-01

    Surface science studies related to tribocharging and charge separation studies were performed on electrostatic beneficiation of coal. In contrast to other cleaning methods, electrostatic beneficiation is a dry cleaning process requiring no water or subsequent drying. Despite these advantages, there is still uncertainty in implementing large-scale commercial electrostatic beneficiation of coal. The electronic surface states of coal macerals and minerals are difficult to describe due to their chemical complexity and variability. The efficiency in separation of mineral particles from organic macerals depends upon these surface states. Therefore, to further understand and determine a reason for the bipolar charging observed in coal separation, surface analysis studies using Ultra-violet Photoelectron Spectroscopy (UPS) and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) were performed on coal samples and several materials that are used or considered for use in tribocharging. Electrostatic charging is a surface phenomenon, so the electronic surface states of the particles, which are influenced by the environmental conditions, determine both polarity and magnitude of tribocharging. UPS was used to measure the work function of the materials as typically used in ambient air. XPS was used to determine the surface chemistry in the form of contamination and degree of oxidation under the same environmental conditions.

  3. [Principal component analysis of mineral elements and fatty acids composition in flaxseed from ten different regions].

    PubMed

    Xing, Li; Zhao, Feng-Min; Cao, You-Fu; Wang, Mei; Mei, Shuai; Li, Shao-Ping; Cai, Zhi-Yong

    2014-09-01

    Flaxseed is a kind of biomass with high edible and medical value. It is rich in many kinds of nutrients and mineral elements. China is one of the important producing places of flaxseed. In order to explore the main characteristic constituents of mineral elements and fatty acids in flaxseed, the study of analyzing the mineral elements and fatty acid composition from 10 different regions was carried out. The contents of seventeen kinds of mineral elements in flaxseed were determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS). The contents of fatty acids of the flaxseed oil obtained under the same conditions were determined by gas chromatography-mass spectrometer (GC-MS). The principal component analysis (PCA) method was applied to the study of analyzing the mineral elements and fatty acid compositions in flaxseeds. The difference in mineral elements and fatty acids of flaxseed from different regions were discussed. The main characteristic constituents of mineral elements and fatty acids were analyzed. The results showed that K, Sr, Mg, Ni, Co, Cr, Cd, Se, Zn and Cu were the main characteristic constituents of the mineral elements. At the same time, C16:0, C18:0, C18: 2, C18:3, C20:0 and C20:1 were the main characteristic constituents of the fatty acids. The combination of ICP-MS, GS-MS and PCA can reveal the characteristics and difference of mineral elements and fatty acids from different regions. The results would provide important theoretical basis for the reasonable and effective utilization of flaxseed. PMID:25532360

  4. Electron probe microanalysis for high pressure minerals investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lavrentiev, Y. G.; Sobolev, N. V.; Korolyuk, V. N.; Usova, L. V.

    2007-12-01

    In the early 1968 in Siberian Branch of the Academy of Sciences of USSR, Novosibirsk, electron probe microanalyzer MS-46 was installed and started to operate for high pressure minerals EPMA investigation. In collaboration with Geophysical Laboratory of Carnegie Institution (Drs. F.R. Boyd, F. Schairer) a set of standards for silicates analysis was developed. Technique for quantitative analysis was developed (Lavrentiev et al., 1974, Zavodsk. Lab., v. 40, p. 657-661) and applied for the first in the USSR analyses of pyropes, associated with Siberian diamonds both as inclusions and xenoliths of diamondiferous peridotites (Sobolev et al., 1969, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, v. 188, p. 1141-1143; v. 189, p. 162-165). As a result of that research, unique Cr-rich subcalcic pyropes with high knorringite content were found in diamond-bearing kimberlites only and new mineralogical criteria for diamond exploration were developed (Sobolev 1971, Geol. Geofiz., v. 12, p. 70-80) which are still in use worldwide. Further development of electron probe instruments (JXA-5A, Camebax Micro, JXA-8100) and computers, as well as development of analysis technique led to creation of large analytical database. In another field of EPMA - determination of small concentrations of elements - for the first time importance of 0.01-0.3% Na2O admixtures in garnets (Sobolev, Lavrentiev, 1971, Contrib. Min. Petr., v. 31, p. 1-12) and K2O in clinopyroxenes (Sobolev et al., 1970, Dokl. Akad. Nauk SSSR, v. 192, p. 1349-1352) were demonstrated. Since then, determination of sodium content in EPMA of garnets and potassium in pyroxenes became a routine technique. Last generation analyzer (JXA-8100) provided record results down to 6 ppm in detection limit of Ni in pyropes (Lavrentiev et al., Rus. Geol. Geophys., 2006, v. 47, p. 1090-1093). As a result, application of EPMA for single mineral geothermometry (currently based mainly on PIXE method) becomes possible.

  5. State of the mineral component of rat bone tissue during hypokinesia and the recovery period

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Stupakov, G. P.; Pavlova, M. N.; Muradov, I. S.

    1980-01-01

    Experiments were conducted on young growing rats. Hypokinesia lasting from 20 to 200 days caused retarded gain in weight and volume of the femur and delayed development of the cortical layer of the diaphysis. In contrast, the density of the cortical layer of the femoral diaphysis increased due to elevation of the mineral saturation of the bone tissue microstructures. Incorporation of Ca into the bone tissue in hypokinesia had a tendency to reduce. Partial normalization of the bone tissue mineral component occurred during a 20 day recovery period following hypokinesia.

  6. Magnetic beneficiation of highland and hi-Ti mare soils - Rock, mineral, and glassy components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Lawrence A.; Oder, Robin R.

    1990-01-01

    The exploitation of lunar soil can provide valuable raw materials for in situ resource utilization at a lunar base. A study of magnetic characterization was undertaken of three mare and two highland soils obtained from NASA. Beneficiation of mare and highland soils by sizing and magnetic separation can effectively concentrate the important components of the soils (e.g., ilmenite, native Fe, plagioclase, and aggluminates). As a soil matures and the impact melts consume additional minerals and rocks, the modal percentage of the minerals will decrease. The 'normative' percentage will become much greater than the modal percentage. Therefore, greater efficiency of separation can be realized with the proper selection of maturity of the soil, as well as by secondary grinding to further liberate specific minerals from lithic fragments (e.g., ilmenite and plagioclase).

  7. Extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol components in an environmental aerosol chamber: IR resonance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogili, Praveen K.; Yang, K. H.; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    Mineral dust aerosol plays an important role in determining the physical and chemical equilibrium of the atmosphere. To better understand the impact that mineral dust aerosol may have on climate forcing and on remote sensing, we have initiated a study of the optical properties of important components of mineral dust aerosol including silicate clays (illite, kaolinite, and montmorillonite), quartz, anhydrite, and calcite. The extinction spectra are measured in an environmental simulation chamber over a broad wavelength range, which includes both the IR (650-5000 cm -1) and UV-vis (12,500-40,000 cm -1) spectral regions. In this paper, we focus on the IR region from 800 to 1500 cm -1, where many of these mineral dust constituents have characteristic vibrational resonance features. Experimental spectra are compared with Mie theory simulations based on published mineral optical constants. We find that Mie theory generally does a poor job in fitting the IR resonance peak positions and band profiles for nonspherical aerosols in the accumulation mode size range ( D˜0.1-2.5 μm). We explore particle shape effects on the IR resonance line profiles by considering analytic models for extinction of particles with characteristic shapes (i.e. disks, needles, and ellipsoids). Interestingly, Mie theory often appears to give more accurate results for the absorption line profiles of larger particles that fall in the coarse mode size range.

  8. The enabling technology for recovery of valued components from minerals in the upper and Mid Amur region

    SciTech Connect

    Sorokin, A.P.; Rimkevich, V.S.; Dem'yanova, L.P.; Artemenko, T.V.

    2009-05-15

    Based on the physico-technical operations involved in the mineral processing technologies, the optimal production conditions are found for refractory fiber materials, aluminium, silicium, their compounds and other valued components. Ecologically safe and efficient aggregate technologies are developed for recovery of valued components from nonmetallic minerals and anthracides (brown coals).

  9. Electrical and electronic devices and components: A compilation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    Components and techniques which may be useful in the electronics industry are described. Topics discussed include transducer technology, printed-circuit technology, solid state devices, MOS transistors, Gunn device, microwave antennas, and position indicators.

  10. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  11. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  12. 21 CFR 11.200 - Electronic signature components and controls.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... signature components and controls. (a) Electronic signatures that are not based upon biometrics shall: (1... signatures based upon biometrics shall be designed to ensure that they cannot be used by anyone other...

  13. Electronic component documentation in a research-laboratory environment

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, J.W.

    1982-08-01

    Documenting electronic components and assemblies used by design personnel at a scientific research laboratory is a challenge. Documentation must be both up-to-date and complete enough to provide designers the information they need for unusual applications. Yet, because of the relatively small quantities of components used, the documentation must be inexpensive to produce and distribute. Close interaction between technically-knowledgeable editor/writers and components engineers results in components documentation closely tailored to the needs of our design personnel. This paper discusses the philosophy underlying our efforts, as well as the organization, production, and distribution of our component documentation.

  14. Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish require the same minerals or inorganic elements as terrestrial animals for tissue formation, osmoregulation and various metabolic functions. Those required in large quantities are termed macro- or major minerals and those required in small quantities are called micro- or trace minerals. Fish ca...

  15. Electronics speckle interferometry applications for NDE of spacecraft structural components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rao, M. V.; Samuel, R.; Ananthan, A.; Dasgupta, S.; Nair, P. S.

    2008-09-01

    The spacecraft components viz., central cylinder, deck plates, solar panel substrates, antenna reflectors are made of aluminium/composite honeycomb sandwich construction. Detection of these defects spacecraft structural components is important to assess the integrity of the spacecraft structure. Electronic Speckle Interferometry (ESI) techniques identify the defects as anomalous regions in the interferometric fringe patterns of the specklegram while the component is suitably stressed to give rise to differential displacement/strain around the defective region. Calibration studies, different phase shifting methods associated with ESI and the development of a prototype Twin Head ESSI System (THESSIS) and its use for the NDE of a typical satellite structural component are presented.

  16. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M. V.

    2008-06-03

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  17. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.; Taylor, Craig M.

    2005-01-25

    Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components. The composition is a mixture of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier. The method includes exposing a substrate to at least one pulse of the composition in a supercritical state to remove photoresist materials from the substrate.

  18. Airborne mineral components and trace metals in Paris region: spatial and temporal variability.

    PubMed

    Poulakis, E; Theodosi, C; Bressi, M; Sciare, J; Ghersi, V; Mihalopoulos, N

    2015-10-01

    A variety of mineral components (Al, Fe) and trace metals (V, Cr, Mn, Ni, Cu, Zn, Cd, Pb) were simultaneously measured in PM2.5 and PM10 fractions at three different locations (traffic, urban, and suburban) in the Greater Paris Area (GPA) on a daily basis throughout a year. Mineral species and trace metal levels measured in both fractions are in agreement with those reported in the literature and below the thresholds defined by the European guidelines for toxic metals (Cd, Ni, Pb). Size distribution between PM2.5 and PM10 fractions revealed that mineral components prevail in the coarse mode, while trace metals are mainly confined in the fine one. Enrichment factor analysis, statistical analysis, and seasonal variability suggest that elements such as Mn, Cr, Zn, Fe, and Cu are attributed to traffic, V and Ni to oil combustion while Cd and Pb to industrial activities with regional origin. Meteorological parameters such as rain, boundary layer height (BLH), and air mass origin were found to significantly influence element concentrations. Periods with high frequency of northern and eastern air masses (from high populated and industrialized areas) are characterized by high metal concentrations. Finally, inner city and traffic emissions were also evaluated in PM2.5 fraction. Significant contributions (>50 %) were measured in the traffic site for Mn, Fe, Cr, Zn, and Cu, confirming that vehicle emissions contribute significantly to their levels, while in the urban site, the lower contributions (18 to 33 %) for all measured metals highlight the influence of regional sources on their levels. PMID:25982986

  19. Infrared extinction spectra of mineral dust aerosol: Single components and complex mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskina, Olga; Young, Mark A.; Kleiber, Paul D.; Grassian, Vicki H.

    2012-09-01

    Simultaneous Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) extinction spectra and aerosol size distributions have been measured for some components of mineral dust aerosol including feldspars (albite, oligoclase) and diatomaceous earth, as well as more complex authentic dust samples that include Iowa loess and Saharan sand. Spectral simulations for single-component samples, derived from Rayleigh-theory models for characteristic particle shapes, better reproduce the experimental spectra including the peak position and band shape compared to Mie theory. The mineralogy of the authentic dust samples was inferred using analysis of FTIR spectra. This approach allows for analysis of the mineralogy of complex multicomponent dust samples. Extinction spectra for the authentic dust samples were simulated from the derived sample mineralogy using published optical constant data for the individual mineral constituents and assuming an external mixture. Nonspherical particle shape effects were also included in the simulations and were shown to have a significant effect on the results. The results show that the position of the peak and the shape of the band of the IR characteristic features in the 800 to 1400 cm-1 spectral range are not well simulated by Mie theory. The resonance peaks are consistently shifted by more than +40 cm-1 relative to the experimental spectrum in the Mie simulation. Rayleigh model solutions for different particle shapes better predict the peak position and band shape of experimental spectra, even though the Rayleigh condition may not be strictly obeyed in these experiments.

  20. Current Space Station Experiments Investigating Component Level Electronics Repair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.

    2010-01-01

    The Soldering in a Reduced Gravity Experiment (SoRGE) and Component Repair Experiment (CRE)-1 are tests performed on the International Space Station to determine the techniques, tools, and training necessary to allow future crews to perform manual electronics repairs at the component level. SoRGE provides information on the formation and internal structure of through-hole solder joints, illustrating the challenges and implications of soldering in reduced gravity. SoRGE showed a significant increase in internal void defects for joints formed in low gravity compared to normal gravity. Methods for mitigating these void defects were evaluated using a modified soldering process. CRE-1 demonstrated the removal, cleaning, and replacement of electronics components by manual means on functional circuit boards. The majority of components successful passed a post-repair functional test demonstrating the feasibility of component-level repair within the confines of a spacecraft. Together, these tasks provide information to recommend material and tool improvements, training improvements, and future work to help enable electronics repairs in future space missions.

  1. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics.

    PubMed

    Ostfeld, Aminy E; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M; Lochner, Claire M; Arias, Ana C

    2015-01-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components-inductors, capacitors, and resistors-perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application. PMID:26514331

  2. Porphyrins as Molecular Electronic Components of Functional Devices

    PubMed Central

    Jurow, Matthew; Schuckman, Amanda E.; Batteas, James D.; Drain, Charles Michael

    2010-01-01

    The proposal that molecules can perform electronic functions in devices such as diodes, rectifiers, wires, capacitors, or serve as functional materials for electronic or magnetic memory, has stimulated intense research across physics, chemistry, and engineering for over 35 years. Because biology uses porphyrins and metalloporphyrins as catalysts, small molecule transporters, electrical conduits, and energy transducers in photosynthesis, porphyrins are an obvious class of molecules to investigate for molecular electronic functions. Of the numerous kinds of molecules under investigation for molecular electronics applications, porphyrins and their related macrocycles are of particular interest because they are robust and their electronic properties can be tuned by chelation of a metal ion and substitution on the macrocycle. The other porphyrinoids have equally variable and adjustable photophysical properties, thus photonic applications are potentiated. At least in the near term, realistic architectures for molecular electronics will require self-organization or nanoprinting on surfaces. This review concentrates on self-organized porphyrinoids as components of working electronic devices on electronically active substrates with particular emphasis on the effect of surface, molecular design, molecular orientation and matrix on the detailed electronic properties of single molecules. PMID:20936084

  3. Antenna with distributed strip and integrated electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Rodenbeck, Christopher T.; Payne, Jason A.; Ottesen, Cory W.

    2008-08-05

    An antenna comprises electrical conductors arranged to form a radiating element including a folded line configuration and a distributed strip configuration, where the radiating element can be in proximity to a ground conductor and/or arranged as a dipole. Embodiments of the antenna include conductor patterns formed on a printed wiring board, having a ground plane, spacedly adjacent to and coplanar with the radiating element. An antenna can comprise a distributed strip patterned on a printed wiring board, integrated with electronic components mounted on top of or below the distributed strip, and substantially within the extents of the distributed strip. Mounting of electronic components on top of or below the distributed strip has little effect on the performance of the antenna, and allows for realizing the combination of the antenna and integrated components in a compact form. An embodiment of the invention comprises an antenna including a distributed strip, integrated with a battery mounted on the distributed strip.

  4. 77 FR 51572 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Institution of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-24

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Institution of Investigation... United States after importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof... importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof that infringe one or...

  5. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body needs in larger amounts. They include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride and sulfur. Your body needs just small amounts of trace minerals. These include iron, manganese, copper, iodine, zinc, cobalt, fluoride and selenium. The best way to ...

  6. Electronic components and systems for cryogenic space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammoud, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S.; Elbuluk, M. E.; Overton, E.

    2002-05-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated in many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about -183 °C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation systems, and arctic exploration. An on-going R&D program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of reliable electronic devices and efficient power systems capable of surviving and operating in low temperature environments. An overview of the program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with selected data obtained from in-house electronic component and small system testing will also be discussed. .

  7. Infrared electronic absorption in a single-component molecular metal.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Akiko; Sasa, Masaaki; Suzuki, Wakako; Fujiwara, Emiko; Tanaka, Hisashi; Tokumoto, Madoka; Okano, Yoshinori; Fujiwara, Hideki; Kobayashi, Hayao

    2004-01-21

    The infrared spectra of the crystal of transition metal complex molecules with extended-TTF ligands, Ni(tmdt)2, which is the first single-component molecular metal that has a stable metallic state even at low temperatures, exhibited an extremely low-energy electronic absorption around 2200 cm-1 (tmdt = trimethylenetetrathiafulvalenedithiolate). The systematic shift of the absorption peaks for molecules similar to Ni(tmdt)2, which range from metallic to semiconducting crystals, shows that the single-component molecular conductors are composed of molecules with unprecedentedly small HOMO-LUMO gaps. PMID:14719914

  8. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics

    PubMed Central

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Lochner, Claire M.; Arias, Ana C.

    2015-01-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components—inductors, capacitors, and resistors—perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application. PMID:26514331

  9. Screen printed passive components for flexible power electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostfeld, Aminy E.; Deckman, Igal; Gaikwad, Abhinav M.; Lochner, Claire M.; Arias, Ana C.

    2015-10-01

    Additive and low-temperature printing processes enable the integration of diverse electronic devices, both power-supplying and power-consuming, on flexible substrates at low cost. Production of a complete electronic system from these devices, however, often requires power electronics to convert between the various operating voltages of the devices. Passive components—inductors, capacitors, and resistors—perform functions such as filtering, short-term energy storage, and voltage measurement, which are vital in power electronics and many other applications. In this paper, we present screen-printed inductors, capacitors, resistors and an RLC circuit on flexible plastic substrates, and report on the design process for minimization of inductor series resistance that enables their use in power electronics. Printed inductors and resistors are then incorporated into a step-up voltage regulator circuit. Organic light-emitting diodes and a flexible lithium ion battery are fabricated and the voltage regulator is used to power the diodes from the battery, demonstrating the potential of printed passive components to replace conventional surface-mount components in a DC-DC converter application.

  10. Analysis of minerals containing dissolved traces of the fluid phase components water and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freund, Friedemann

    1991-01-01

    Substantial progress has been made towards a better understanding of the dissolution of common gas/fluid phase components, notably H2O and CO2, in minerals. It has been shown that the dissolution mechanisms are significantly more complex than currently believed. By judiciously combining various solid state analytical techniques, convincing evidence was obtained that traces of dissolved gas/fluid phase components undergo, at least in part, a redox conversion by which they split into reduced H2 and and reduced C on one hand and oxidized oxygen, O(-), on the other. Analysis for 2 and C as well as for any organic molecules which may form during the process of co-segregation are still impeded by the omnipresent danger of extraneous contamination. However, the presence of O(-), an unusual oxidized form of oxygen, has been proven beyond a reasonable doubt. The presence of O(-) testifies to the fact that a redox reaction must have taken place in the solid state involving the dissolved traces of gas/fluid phase components. Detailed information on the techniques used and the results obtained are given.

  11. Copper-diamond composite substrates for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Davidson, H.L.; Colella, N.J.; Kerns, J.A.; Makowiecki, D.

    1995-01-25

    High-power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors are often limited by inability to keep the device junctions below their max rated operating temperature. Present high power multichip module and single chip package designs use substrate materials such as Si nitride or copper tungsten with thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/m{center_dot}K. We have developed a copper-diamond composite (Dymalloy) with a thermal conductivity of 420 W/m{center_dot}K, better than Cu, and an adjustable thermal expansion coefficient (TCE=5.5 ppM/C at 25 C), compatible with Si and GaAs. Because of the matched TCE, it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. The mechanical properties of the composite also make it attractive as an electronic component substrate material.

  12. Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of mineral dust components measured by a multi wavelength photoacoustic spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Utry, N.; Ajtai, T.; Pintér, M.; Tombácz, E.; Illés, E.; Bozóki, Z.; Szabó, G.

    2014-09-01

    Mass specific optical absorption coefficients of various mineral dust components including silicate clays (illite, kaolin and bentonite), oxides (quartz, hematite and rutile), and carbonate (limestone) were determined at wavelengths of 1064, 532, 355 and 266 nm. These values were calculated from aerosol optical absorption coefficients measured by a multi-wavelength photoacoustic (PA) instrument, the mass concentration and the number size distribution of the generated aerosol samples as well as the size transfer functions of the measuring instruments. These results are expected to have considerable importance in global radiative forcing calculations. They can also serve as reference for validating calculated wavelength dependent imaginary parts (κ) of complex refractive indices which up to now have been typically deduced from bulk phase measurements by using indirect measurement methods. Accordingly, the presented comparison of the measured and calculated aerosol optical absorption spectra revealed the strong need for standardized sample preparation and measurement methodology in case of bulk phase measurements.

  13. The Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion in harmonium atoms.

    PubMed

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Highly accurate Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion energies of the three-electron harmonium atoms in the (2)P- and (4)P+ states are obtained for 19 values of the confinement strength ω ranging from 10(-3) to 10(3). The computed data are consistent with their ω → 0 and ω → ∞ asymptotics that are given by closed-form algebraic expressions. Robust approximants that accurately reproduce the actual values of the energy components while strictly conforming to these limits are constructed, opening an avenue to stringent tests capable of predicting the performance of electronic structure methods for systems with varying extents of the dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation. The values of the correlation components, paired with the computed 1-matrices are expected to be particularly useful in the context of benchmarking of approximate density matrix functionals. PMID:25796229

  14. The Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion in harmonium atoms

    SciTech Connect

    Cioslowski, Jerzy

    2015-03-21

    Highly accurate Coulomb, exchange, and correlation components of the electron-electron repulsion energies of the three-electron harmonium atoms in the {sup 2}P{sub −} and {sup 4}P{sub +} states are obtained for 19 values of the confinement strength ω ranging from 10{sup −3} to 10{sup 3}. The computed data are consistent with their ω → 0 and ω → ∞ asymptotics that are given by closed-form algebraic expressions. Robust approximants that accurately reproduce the actual values of the energy components while strictly conforming to these limits are constructed, opening an avenue to stringent tests capable of predicting the performance of electronic structure methods for systems with varying extents of the dynamical and nondynamical electron correlation. The values of the correlation components, paired with the computed 1-matrices are expected to be particularly useful in the context of benchmarking of approximate density matrix functionals.

  15. Electronic Components and Systems for Cryogenic Space Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, R. L.; Hammoud, A.; Dickman, J. E.; Gerber, S.; Elbuluk, M. E.; Overton, E.

    2001-01-01

    Electronic components and systems capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures are anticipated in many future NASA space missions such as deep space probes and planetary surface exploration. For example, an unheated interplanetary probe launched to explore the rings of Saturn would reach an average temperature near Saturn of about - 183 C. In addition to surviving the deep space harsh environment, electronics capable of low temperature operation would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing payload development and launch costs. Terrestrial applications where components and systems must operate in low temperature environments include cryogenic instrumentation, superconducting magnetic energy storage, magnetic levitation transportation system, and arctic exploration. An on-going research and development program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on the development of reliable electronic devices and efficient power systems capable of surviving in low temperature environments. An overview of the program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with selected data obtained from in-house component testing will also be discussed. Ongoing research activities that are being performed in collaboration with various organizations will also be presented.

  16. Low-energy electron scattering by cellulose and hemicellulose components.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Eliane M; da Costa, Romarly F; Sanchez, Sergio d'A; Natalense, Alexandra P P; Bettega, Márcio H F; Lima, Marco A P; Varella, Márcio T do N

    2013-02-01

    We report elastic integral, differential and momentum transfer cross sections for low-energy electron scattering by the cellulose components β-D-glucose and cellobiose (β(1 → 4) linked glucose dimer), and the hemicellulose component β-D-xylose. For comparison with the β forms, we also obtain results for the amylose subunits α-D-glucose and maltose (α(1 → 4) linked glucose dimer). The integral cross sections show double peaked broad structures between 8 eV and 20 eV similar to previously reported results for tetrahydrofuran and 2-deoxyribose, suggesting a general feature of molecules containing furanose and pyranose rings. These broad structures would reflect OH, CO and/or CC σ* resonances, where inspection of low-lying virtual orbitals suggests significant contribution from anion states. Though we do not examine dissociation pathways, these anion states could play a role in dissociative electron attachment mechanisms, in case they were coupled to the long-lived π* anions found in lignin subunits [de Oliveira et al., Phys. Rev. A, 2012, 86, 020701(R)]. Altogether, the resonance spectra of lignin, cellulose and hemicellulose components establish a physical-chemical basis for electron-induced biomass pretreatment that could be applied to biofuel production. PMID:23247550

  17. Electronic Components and Circuits for Extreme Temperature Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Dickman, John E.; Gerber, Scott

    2003-01-01

    Planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electrical power management and control systems that are capable of efficient and reliable operation in very low temperature environments. Presently, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. Electronics capable of operation at cryogenic temperatures will not only tolerate the hostile environment of deep space but also reduce system size and weight by eliminating or reducing the radioisotope heating units and their associate structures; thereby reducing system development as well as launch costs. In addition, power electronic circuits designed for operation at low temperatures are expected to result in more efficient systems than those at room temperature. This improvement results from better behavior and tolerance in the electrical and thermal properties of semiconductor and dielectric materials at low temperatures. The Low Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electrical components, circuits, and systems suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices and systems for reliable use down to cryogenic temperatures. Some of the commercial-off-the-shelf as well as developed components that are being characterized include switching devices, resistors, magnetics, and capacitors. Semiconductor devices and integrated circuits including digital-to-analog and analog-to-digital converters, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators are also being investigated for potential use in low temperature applications. An overview of the NASA Glenn Research Center Low Temperature Electronic Program will be presented in this paper. A description of the low temperature test facilities along with

  18. Secondary Mineralization of Components in CV3 Chondrites: Nebular and Asteroidal Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, E. R. D.; Krot, A. N.; Zolensky, M. E.

    1995-09-01

    Our review of mineralogical variations among CV3 chondrites suggests that all components, chondrules, matrices, and CAIs, were affected by various degrees of secondary mineralization. Chondrules and CAIs are rimmed with fayalitic olivine [1, 2]; metal in all components is oxidized and sulfidized to magnetite, Ni-rich metal and sulfides [3]; silicates in all components are aqueously altered to phyllosilicates [4]; and nepheline, sodalite, wollastonite, and hedenbergite replace primary minerals in CAIs [5]. In those CV3s with altered CAIs, nepheline etc. are also present in chondrule mesostases [6] and in matrices [7]. Correlated occurrences of secondary minerals indicate that they have related origins. CV3 chondrites can be divided into three kinds according to their secondary features. Reduced CV3s (e.g., Efremovka) lack magnetite [8] and show minimal secondary features. Oxidized CV3s [8] generally show all features: those like Mokoia contain minor fayalitic rims, nepheline, etc, whereas those like Allende lack phyllosilicates but contain well developed fayalite rims and abundant nepheline, etc. Allende-like CV3 chondrites also contain abundant plate-like matrix olivine (Fa(sub)45-55). Similarities in chemistry and O isotopic composition and petrographic observations suggest that fayalitic rims and plate-like matrix olivine have related origins [1, 9]. The presence of secondary minerals in all components implies that alteration postdated component formation. The absence of secondary minerals in reduced CV3s indicates that CV3 oxidized formed from CV3 reduced-like material. Oxidized and reduced materials coexist in some breccias indicating a common parent asteroid. Nebular origins are widely accepted for most secondary features. To form fayalitic rims and matrix , Palme and colleagues [10, 11] suggest that chondritic components were briefly exposed to a hot (>1500 K), highly oxidizing nebula with H2O/H2 to about 1. Such an environment could have resulted from

  19. Ice nucleation by soil dusts: relative importance of mineral and biological components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel; Murray, Ben; Webb, Michael; Whale, Thomas; Atkinson, James; Baustian, Kelly; Malkin, Tamsin

    2013-04-01

    Dusts emitted from agricultural soils may represent a significant source of atmospheric particulates at mid-latitudes. Such dusts, which can be aerosolised by anthropogenic agricultural activities, have previously been estimated to be present in the atmosphere at sufficient number densities that they could potentially compete with other known ice nuclei. In contrast to soils from arid regions, such as the Sahara, fertile soils contain a larger fraction of biological material, which can lead to an enhancement in the ice nucleating ability of their associated dusts. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the relative efficacy of soil dust particles from fertile soils as IN. In particular, the relative contribution to the overall ice nucleating activity from both the biological and mineral components present remains unclear. Using a novel experimental methodology designed to increase sensitivity to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice nucleating activities of PM10 extracted from soils collected in England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10-12 to 10-6L, we have been able to characterise the ice active site densities in soils (estimated using a time-independent framework) at temperatures ranging from -5° C down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at ~ -36° C. To distinguish between biological and mineral IN in the soil dusts, we examined the effects of heat treatment and organic matter digestion with hydrogen peroxide on the ice nucleating activities of the soils. Both heat and H2O2 treatment reduced the ice nucleating ability of the soil dust particles at low supercoolings (T >-15° C) by up to two orders of magnitude, suggesting that the ice nucleating active sites are primarily biological in nature within this regime. However, below -15° C, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the

  20. Transmission electron microscopic examination of phosphoric acid fuel cell components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pebler, A.

    1986-01-01

    Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was used to physically characterize tested and untested phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) components. Those examined included carbon-supported platinum catalysts, carbon backing paper, and Teflon-bonded catalyst layers at various stages of fabrication and after testing in pressurized PAFC's. Applicability of electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy for identifying the various phases was explored. The discussion focuses on the morphology and size distribution of platinum, the morphology and structural aspects of Teflon in catalyst layers, and the structural evidence of carbon corrosion. Reference is made to other physical characterization techniques where appropriate. A qualitative model of the catalyst layer that emerged from the TEM studies is presented.

  1. Component Repair Experiment-1: An Experiment Evaluating Electronic Component-Level Repair During Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Easton, John W.; Struk, Peter M.

    2012-01-01

    The Component Repair Experiment-1 (CRE-1) examines the capability for astronauts to perform electronics repair tasks in space. The goal is to determine the current capabilities and limits for the crew, and to make recommendations to improve and expand the range of work that astronauts may perform. CRE-1 provided two-layer, functional circuit boards and replacement components, a small tool kit, written and video training materials, and 1 hr of hands on training for the crew slated to perform the experiment approximately 7 months prior to the mission. Astronauts Michael Fincke and Sandra Magnus performed the work aboard the International Space Station (ISS) in February and March 2009. The astronauts were able to remove and replace components successfully, demonstrating the feasibility of performing component-level electronics repairs within a spacecraft. Several unsuccessful tasks demonstrated areas in need of improvement. These include improved and longer training prior to a mission, an improved soldering iron with a higher operating temperature and steady power source, video training and practice boards for refresher work or practice before a repair, and improved and varied hand tools and containment system.

  2. 77 FR 34063 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof by reason of infringement of... certain electronics devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof...

  3. Electronic Components for use in Extreme Temperature Aerospace Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, Richard L.; Hammoud, Ahmad; Elbuluk, Malik

    2008-01-01

    Electrical power management and control systems designed for use in planetary exploration missions and deep space probes require electronics that are capable of efficient and reliable operation under extreme temperature conditions. Space-based infra-red satellites, all-electric ships, jet engines, electromagnetic launchers, magnetic levitation transport systems, and power facilities are also typical examples where the electronics are expected to be exposed to harsh temperatures and to operate under severe thermal swings. Most commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) devices are not designed to function under such extreme conditions and, therefore, new parts must be developed or the conventional devices need to be modified. For example, spacecraft operating in the cold environment of deep space carry a large number of radioisotope heating units in order to maintain the surrounding temperature of the on-board electronics at approximately 20 C. At the other end, built-in radiators and coolers render the operation of electronics possible under hot conditions. These thermal measures lead to design complexity, affect development costs, and increase size and weight. Electronics capable of operation at extreme temperatures, thus, will not only tolerate the hostile operational environment, but also make the overall system efficient, more reliable, and less expensive. The Extreme Temperature Electronics Program at the NASA Glenn Research Center focuses on research and development of electronics suitable for applications in the aerospace environment and deep space exploration missions. Research is being conducted on devices, including COTS parts, for potential use under extreme temperatures. These components include semiconductor switching devices, passive devices, DC/DC converters, operational amplifiers, and oscillators. An overview of the program will be presented along with some experimental findings.

  4. Radiation accident dosimetry on electronic components by OSL.

    PubMed

    Bassinet, C; Trompier, F; Clairand, I

    2010-02-01

    In the event of large-scale radiation accidents and considering a growing terrorism concern, non-invasive and sufficiently accurate retrospective dosimetry methods are necessary to carry out a fast population triage in order to determine which radiation-exposed individuals need medical treatment. Retrospective dosimetry using different electronic components such as resistors, capacitors, and integrated circuits present on mobile phone circuit boards have been considered. Their response has been investigated with luminescence techniques (OSL, IRSL, and TL). The majority of these electronic components exhibit radiation-induced luminescence signals, and the OSL technique seems the most promising for these materials. Results concerning three types of components that present the most interesting OSL characteristics (in terms of signal annealing and sensitivity) and that are the most often present on mobile phone circuit boards are presented. Preheating effects on OSL signal, sensitization, and dose-response curves from 0.7 to 27 Gy for resistors and from 0.7 to 160 Gy for capacitors and integrated circuits, dose recovery tests, and signal stability 10 h after irradiation have been studied and interests and limits of their use evaluated. PMID:20065718

  5. The ‘porin–cytochrome’ model for microbe-to-mineral electron transfer

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David J.; Butt, Julea N.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Shi, Liang; Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Baiden, Nanakow; Gates, Andrew J.; Marritt, Sophie; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2012-05-30

    Many species of bacteria can couple anaerobic growth to the respiratory reduction of insoluble minerals containing Fe(III) or Mn(III/IV). It has been suggested that in Shewanella species electrons cross the outer membrane to extracellular substrates via 'porin-cytochrome' electron transport modules. The molecular structure of an outer-membrane extracellular-facing deca-haem terminus for such a module has recently been resolved. It is debated how, once outside the cells, electrons are transferred from outer-membrane cytochromes to insoluble electron sinks. This may occur directly or by assemblies of cytochromes, perhaps functioning as 'nanowires', or via electron shuttles. Here we review recent work in this field and explore whether it allows for unification of the electron transport mechanisms supporting extracellular mineral respiration in Shewanella that may extend into other genera of Gram-negative bacteria.

  6. 77 FR 44671 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Receipt of... received a complaint entitled Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof, DN 2904... within the United States after importation of certain wireless consumer electronics devices...

  7. 78 FR 56245 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-12

    ... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for... limited exclusion order against certain wireless consumer electronics devices and components thereof... Corporation of Kyoto, Japan; Kyocera Communications, Inc. of San Diego, California; LG Electronics, Inc....

  8. 77 FR 27078 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-08

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof... Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones... electronic devices, including mobile phones and tablet computers, and components thereof. The complaint...

  9. 76 FR 22918 - In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-25

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components... States after importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  10. Optical-electronic system for express analysis of mineral raw materials dressability by color sorting method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alekhin, Artem A.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Petuhova, Darya B.

    2013-04-01

    Due to the depletion of solid minerals ore reserves and the involvement in the production of the poor and refractory ores a process of continuous appreciation of minerals is going. In present time at the market of enrichment equipment are well represented optical sorters of various firms. All these sorters are essentially different from each other by parameters of productivity, classes of particles sizes for processed raw, nuances of decision algorithm, as well as by color model (RGB, YUV, HSB, etc.) chosen to describe the color of separating mineral samples. At the same time there is no dressability estimation method for mineral raw materials without direct semi-industrial test on the existing type of optical sorter, as well as there is no equipment realizing mentioned dressability estimation method. It should also be note the lack of criteria for choosing of one or another manufacturer (or type) of optical sorter. A direct consequence of this situation is the "opacity" of the color sorting method and the rejection of its potential customers. The proposed solution of mentioned problems is to develop the dressability estimation method, and to create an optical-electronic system for express analysis of mineral raw materials dressability by color sorting method. This paper has the description of structure organization and operating principles of experimental model optical-electronic system for express analysis of mineral raw material. Also in this work are represented comparison results of the proposed optical-electronic system and the real color sorter.

  11. Microbial mineralization of VC and DCE under different terminal electron accepting conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1998-01-01

    Production of 14CO2 from [1,2-14C] dichloroethene (DCE) or [1,2-14C] vinyl chloride (VC) was quantified in aquifer and stream-bed sediment microcosms to evaluate the potential for microbial mineralization as a pathway for DCE and VC biodegradation under aerobic, Fe(III)-reducing, SO4-reducing, and methanogenic conditions. Mineralization of [1,2-14C] DCE and [1,2-14C] VC to 14CO2 decreased under increasingly reducing conditions, but significant mineralization was observed for both sediments even under anaerobic conditions. VC mineralization decreased in the order of aerobic > Fe(III)-reducing > SO4-reducing > methanogenic conditions. For both sediments, VC mineralization was greater than DCE mineralization under all electron-accepting conditions examined. For both sediments, DCE mineralization was at least two times greater under aerobic conditions than under anaerobic conditions. Although significant microbial mineralization of DCE was observed under anaerobic conditions, recovery of 14CO2 did not differ substantially between anaerobic treatments.

  12. Severe shock and vibration environments for electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez, D.R.

    1990-01-01

    Electronic components used in system applications must be qualified to mechanical shock and vibration environments. Often these environments are severe, requiring the development and use of special test techniques and procedures. Environmental specifications are based upon analytical model predictions and measured test data. Test specifications are determined after careful consideration of simulation techniques, input levels, dynamic behavior of the test fixturing, as well as an assessment of the degree of conservatism imposed by the specification and testing procedures. The process of determining component shock and vibration specifications is discussed, beginning with the initial description of system and subsystem level environments, and concluding with component level test specifications. Included is a discussion of the difference between environmental specifications and test specifications, and the instrumentation/measurement problems associated with obtaining valid field measurements for severe shock data. The role of finite element analysis in predicting the dynamic structural response of components is also explained. Shock data analysis techniques are described including both time-domain and frequency-domain characterizations of the data. The resonant plate shock testing technique for simulating severe shock environments is presented, including difficulties that arise in practical applications. 18 refs., 10 figs.

  13. High-temperature electronic components and circuit designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, H. T.

    Downhole logging instruments for geothermal application must have electronic circuits capable of operating from room temperature 250 C. A nondestructive evaluation instrument for geothermal wells requires a circuit that can be operated at high voltage and high current in order to provide high power output. In designing such a circuit, a high power, high speed, cold cathode switching tube was developed to be used as a substitute for SCRs or thyratrons. The possibility of using low leakage JFETs beyond their rated temperature in a circuit design is discussed. Commercial high temperature components are reviewed.

  14. Solder Reflow Failures in Electronic Components During Manual Soldering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teverovsky, Alexander; Greenwell, Chris; Felt, Frederick

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the solder reflow failures in electronic components that occur during manual soldering. It discusses the specifics of manual-soldering-induced failures in plastic devices with internal solder joints. The failure analysis turned up that molten solder had squeezed up to the die surface along the die molding compound interface, and the dice were not protected with glassivation allowing solder to short gate and source to the drain contact. The failure analysis concluded that the parts failed due to overheating during manual soldering.

  15. A new active solder for joining electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    SMITH,RONALD W.; VIANCO,PAUL T.; HERNANDEZ,CYNTHIA L.; LUGSCHEIDER,E.; RASS,I.; HILLEN,F.

    2000-05-11

    Electronic components and micro-sensors utilize ceramic substrates, copper and aluminum interconnect and silicon. The joining of these combinations require pre-metallization such that solders with fluxes can wet such combinations of metals and ceramics. The paper will present a new solder alloy that can bond metals, ceramics and composites. The alloy directly wets and bonds in air without the use flux or premetallized layers. The paper will present typical processing steps and joint microstructures in copper, aluminum, aluminum oxide, aluminum nitride, and silicon joints.

  16. HPM (high power microwave) testing of electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Antinone, R.; Ng, W.C.

    1989-05-10

    This report documents the results of a study of high power microwave (HPM) vulnerability of electronic components commonly used in weapon systems. The study was carried out at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory from August through October 1988. The objective of this study was to determine the threshold levels for upset or disturbance and damage of the devices under test (DUT). In these tests pulsed microwave energy was directly injected into the terminal of the DUT and in most cases a 50-ohm microstrip test fixture was used to ensure that 50-ohm transmission was maintained as close to the DUT as possible. 3 refs., 41 figs., 10 tabs.

  17. Dymalloy: A composite substrate for high power density electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Kerns, J.A.; Colella, N.J.; Makowiecki, D.; Davidson, H.L.

    1995-06-29

    High power density electronic components such as fast microprocessors and power semiconductors must operate below the maximum rated device junction temperature to ensure reliability. function temperatures are determined by the amount of heat generated and the thermal resistance from junction to the ambient thermal environment. Two of the Largest contributions to this thermal resistance are the die attach interface and the package base. A decrease in these resistances can allow increased component packing density in MCMs, reduction of heat sink volume in tightly packed systems, enable the use of higher performance circuit components, and improve reliability. The substrate for high power density devices is the primary thermal link between the junctions and the heat sink. Present high power multichip modules and single chip packages use substrate materials such as silicon nitride or copper tungsten that have thermal conductivity in the range of 200 W/mK. We have developed Dymalloy, a copper-diamond composite, that has a thermal conductivity of 420 W/mK and an adjustable coefficient of thermal expansion, nominally 5.5 ppm/C at 25 C, compatible with silicon and gallium arsenide. Because of the matched coefficient of thermal expansion it is possible to use low thermal resistance hard die attach methods. Dymalloy is a composite material made using micron size Type I diamond powder that has a published thermal conductivity of 600 to 1000 W/mK in a metal matrix that has a thermal conductivity of 350 W/mK. The region of chemical bonding between the matrix material and diamond is limited to approximately 1000 A to maintain a high effective thermal conductivity for the composite. The material may be fabricated in near net shapes. Besides having exceptional thermal properties, the mechanical properties of this material also make it an attractive candidate as an electronic component substrate material.

  18. Two-component magnetic structure of iron oxide nanoparticles mineralized in Listeria innocua protein cages

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usselman, Robert J.; Klem, Michael T.; Russek, Stephen E.; Young, Mark; Douglas, Trevor; Goldfarb, Ron B.

    2010-06-01

    Magnetometry was used to determine the magnetic properties of maghemite (γ-Fe2O3) nanoparticles formed within Listeria innocua protein cage. The electron magnetic resonance spectrum shows the presence of at least two magnetization components. The magnetization curves are explained by a sum of two Langevin functions in which each filled protein cage contains both a large magnetic iron oxide core plus an amorphous surface consisting of small noncoupled iron oxide spin clusters. This model qualitatively explains the observed decrease in the temperature dependent saturation moment and removes an unrealistic temperature dependent increase in the particle moment often observed in nanoparticle magnetization measurements.

  19. Nanoanalytical Electron Microscopy Reveals a Sequential Mineralization Process Involving Carbonate-Containing Amorphous Precursors.

    PubMed

    Nitiputri, Kharissa; Ramasse, Quentin M; Autefage, Hélène; McGilvery, Catriona M; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Evans, Nicholas D; Stevens, Molly M; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-07-26

    A direct observation and an in-depth characterization of the steps by which bone mineral nucleates and grows in the extracellular matrix during the earliest stages of maturation, using relevant biomineralization models as they grow into mature bone mineral, is an important research goal. To better understand the process of bone mineralization in the extracellular matrix, we used nanoanalytical electron microscopy techniques to examine an in vitro model of bone formation. This study demonstrates the presence of three dominant CaP structures in the mineralizing osteoblast cultures: <80 nm dense granules with a low calcium to phosphate ratio (Ca/P) and crystalline domains; calcium phosphate needles emanating from a focus: "needle-like globules" (100-300 nm in diameter) and mature mineral, both with statistically higher Ca/P compared to that of the dense granules. Many of the submicron granules and globules were interspersed around fibrillar structures containing nitrogen, which are most likely the signature of the organic phase. With high spatial resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping, spatially resolved maps were acquired showing the distribution of carbonate within each mineral structure. The carbonate was located in the middle of the granules, which suggested the nucleation of the younger mineral starts with a carbonate-containing precursor and that this precursor may act as seed for growth into larger, submicron-sized, needle-like globules of hydroxyapatite with a different stoichiometry. Application of analytical electron microscopy has important implications in deciphering both how normal bone forms and in understanding pathological mineralization. PMID:27383526

  20. The biological factors influence on the conversion of mineral components of Extremely Arid Desert Soils (Kazakhstan)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutovaya, Olga; Vasilenko, Elena; Lebedeva, Marina; Tkhakakhova, Azida

    2013-04-01

    Extremely arid soils of stony deserts (hamadas) along the southern periphery of the Ili Depression are considered to be analogous to extremely arid soils of Mongolia, also named as "ultra-arid primitive gray-brown soils." In general, the morphology of extremely arid soils of hamadas in the Ili Depression is similar to that of the soils of stony deserts in other parts of the world, including the Gobi, Atacama, and Tarim deserts. The diagnostics of the active communities of microorganisms were performed according to the method of Rybalkina-Kononenko. The exact identification of the living forms of microorganisms to the species level is not always possible with the use of this method. However, it allows us to study the physiological role of the microorganisms and their ecological functions, including the relationships with the soil matrix and other organisms. In particular, it is possible to estimate the contribution of the microorganisms to the transformation of mineral soil components. The obtained materials allow us to conclude that the extremely arid desert soils are characterized by the very high biological activity during short periods of the increased soil moistening after rare and strong rains. The diversity of living forms is very considerable; both prokaryotes (cyanobacteria, actinomycetes, and iron bacteria) and protists (green algae, diatoms, and dinoflagellates) are developed in the soil. Thus, during a short period after the rains, these microorganisms pass from the stage of anabiosis to the stage of active growth and reproduction. Then, upon drying of the soil, the biotic activity of the soil slows down and, finally, terminates. The organisms remain in the state of anabiosis until the next rain. During the period of active growth, the microorganisms compose a specific consortium of different species and exert a profound impact on the soil properties. They participate in the transformation of the soil minerals with the formation of amorphous substances

  1. Electron Transport at the Microbe–Mineral Interface: A Synthesis of Current Research Challenges

    SciTech Connect

    Richardson, David; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2012-12-01

    Many bacterial and archaeal species can couple growth to the respiratory reduction or oxidation of insoluble mineral oxides of transition metals. These solid substrates are abundant electron sinks and sources for life on Earth, but, since they are insoluble in water, they cannot enter the bacterial cells. So, to exploit these electron sinks and sources, specific respiratory electron-transfer mechanisms must overcome the physical limitations associated with electron transfer between a microbe and extracellular metal oxides. Recent microbiological, geochemical, biochemical, spectroscopic and structural work is beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanism and impacts of electron transfer at themicrobe–mineral interface from a nanometre to kilometre scale. The research field is attracting attention in applied quarters from those with interests in nanowires, microbial fuel cells, bioremediation and microbial cell factories.

  2. Electron transport at the microbe-mineral interface: a synthesis of current research challenges.

    PubMed

    Richardson, David J; Fredrickson, James K; Zachara, John M

    2012-12-01

    Many bacterial and archaeal species can couple growth to the respiratory reduction or oxidation of insoluble mineral oxides of transition metals. These solid substrates are abundant electron sinks and sources for life on Earth, but, since they are insoluble in water, they cannot enter the bacterial cells. So, to exploit these electron sinks and sources, specific respiratory electron-transfer mechanisms must overcome the physical limitations associated with electron transfer between a microbe and extracellular metal oxides. Recent microbiological, geochemical, biochemical, spectroscopic and structural work is beginning to shed light on the molecular mechanism and impacts of electron transfer at the microbe-mineral interface from a nanometre to kilometre scale. The research field is attracting attention in applied quarters from those with interests in nanowires, microbial fuel cells, bioremediation and microbial cell factories. PMID:23176448

  3. Patterns of spatial distribution of mineral components of the complex of gray forest soils Vladimir opolye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karpova, Dina; Chizhikova, Natalya; Starokozhko, Natalya; Hadyushina, Viktorya; Korotaeva, Valentina

    2014-05-01

    The aim of the work is the analysis of spatial distribution of soil fundamental characteristics - fine fractions content (less than 1, 1-5, 5-10 and more than 10 mkm) and their mineralogical composition. The experiments were carried out on the experimental field in Suzdal region in a trench (22 m length and 2 m depth) laid in upland, well-drained conditions. Soil samples from 5 different soil profiles were collected. Fractions were obtained by Gorbunov method. Mineralogical analysis were carried out by universal X-ray diffractometer (Carl Zeiss Jena, Germany). The dominant fraction is a coarse silt fraction, the sand fraction content is negligible. The soil is characterized by medium-textured loam composition from the above and a sandy loam composition in the bottom. Textural differentiation occured due to the distribution of clay fraction. The content of this fraction in plough horizons varies depending on addition of part of other horizons during plowing. The plogh-layer of the residual-carbonate agrogrey soil is characterized by higher (20-23 %) amount of fraction less than 1 mkm, in comparison with plough horizon above the second humus horizon (SHH ), where the amount of silt is 15-16 %. The main components of the fraction derived from the rock are complex mixed- lattice formations dominated by mica - smectite with a high proportion of smectite packages, mica - smectites with low content of smectite packages were in subordinate quantity. The next component is hydromica - a mixture of dioctahedral and trioctahedral varieties. Smectite phase and hydromica add up to 85-90 % of the silt component. The amount of kaolinite and chlorite usually range in 7-13 %. Kaolinite is generally imperfect, chlorite is magnesia-ferric. The presence of fine quartz and feldspars (less amount) is revealed. During the soil formation the redistribution of the above minerals whose behavior is caused by the type of soil is occurring. Agrogrey heavy-textured soils are characterized by

  4. Nanostructured component fabrication by electron beam-physical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jogender; Wolfe, Douglas E.

    2005-08-01

    Fabrication of cost-effective, nano-grained net-shaped components has brought considerable interest to Department of Defense, National Aeronautics and Space Administration, and Department of Energy. The objective of this paper is to demonstrate the versatility of electron beam-physical vapor deposition (EB-PVD) technology in engineering new nanostructured materials with controlled microstructure and microchemistry in the form of coatings and net-shaped components for many applications including the space, turbine, optical, biomedical, and auto industries. Coatings are often applied on components to extent their performance and life under severe environmental conditions including thermal, corrosion, wear, and oxidation. Performance and properties of the coatings depend upon their composition, microstructure, and deposition condition. Simultaneous co-evaporation of multiple ingots of different compositions in the high energy EB-PVD chamber has brought considerable interest in the architecture of functional graded coatings, nano-laminated coatings, and design of new structural materials that could not be produced economically by conventional methods. In addition, high evaporation and condensate rates allowed fabricating precision net-shaped components with nanograined microstructure for various applications. Using EB-PVD, nano-grained rhenium (Re) coatings and net-shaped components with tailored microstructure and properties were fabricated in the form of tubes, plates, and Re-coated spherical graphite cores. This paper will also present the results of various metallic and ceramic coatings including chromium, titanium carbide (TiC), titanium diboride (TiB2), hafnium nitride (HfN), titanium-boron-carbonitride (TiBCN), and partially yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) TBC coatings deposited by EB-PVD for various applications.

  5. Ice nucleation by soil dusts: relative importance of mineral dust and biogenic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D.; Murray, B. J.; Malkin, T. L.; Whale, T.; Umo, N. S.; Atkinson, J. D.; Price, H. C.; Baustian, K. J.; Browse, J.; Webb, M. E.

    2013-08-01

    Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20% to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10-12 to 10-6 L, we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (-6 °C) down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (-36 °C). At temperatures above 258 K (-15 °C) we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the ice nuclei stem from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that although only a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the enhanced IN activities of dusts generated from agricultural activities may play an important role in cloud glaciation, particularly at temperatures above 258 K.

  6. Ice Nucleation by Soil Dusts: Relative Importance of Mineral Dust and Biogenic Components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murray, B. J.; O'Sullivan, D.; Malkin, T. L.; Whale, T.; Umo, N.; Atkinson, J.; Price, H.; Baustian, K. J.; Browse, J.; Webb, M. E.

    2013-12-01

    Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20 % to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from pico- to micro- Liter , we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (-6 °C) down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (-36 °C). At temperatures above 258 K (-15 °C) we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that the ice nuclei stem from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that although only a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the enhanced IN activities of dusts generated from agricultural activities may play an important role in cloud glaciation, particularly at temperatures above 258 K.

  7. Ice nucleation by fertile soil dusts: relative importance of mineral and biogenic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, D.; Murray, B. J.; Malkin, T. L.; Whale, T. F.; Umo, N. S.; Atkinson, J. D.; Price, H. C.; Baustian, K. J.; Browse, J.; Webb, M. E.

    2014-02-01

    Agricultural dust emissions have been estimated to contribute around 20% to the global dust burden. In contrast to dusts from arid source regions, the ice-nucleating abilities of which have been relatively well studied, soil dusts from fertile sources often contain a substantial fraction of organic matter. Using an experimental methodology which is sensitive to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterised the immersion mode ice-nucleating activities of dusts (d < 11 µm) extracted from fertile soils collected at four locations around England. By controlling droplet sizes, which ranged in volume from 10-12 to 10-6 L (concentration = 0.02 to 0.1 st% dust), we have been able to determine the ice nucleation behaviour of soil dust particles at temperatures ranging from 267 K (-6° C) down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at about 237 K (-36° C). At temperatures above 258 K (-15° C) we find that the ice-nucleating activity of soil dusts is diminished by heat treatment or digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that a major fraction of the ice nuclei stems from biogenic components in the soil. However, below 258 K, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts, in particular the K-feldspar fraction, becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at lower temperatures. We conclude that dusts from agricultural activities could contribute significantly to atmospheric IN concentrations, if such dusts exhibit similar activities to those observed in the current laboratory study.

  8. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Operational Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) Operational Concept document was developed as a first step in developing the Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture (NASA/TM-2011-216956). The CLEAR operational concept defines how the system will be used by the Constellation Program and what needs it meets. The document creates scenarios for major elements of the CLEAR architecture. These scenarios are generic enough to apply to near-Earth, Moon, and Mars missions. The CLEAR operational concept involves basic assumptions about the overall program architecture and interactions with the CLEAR system architecture. The assumptions include spacecraft and operational constraints for near-Earth orbit, Moon, and Mars missions. This document addresses an incremental development strategy where capabilities evolve over time, but it is structured to prevent obsolescence. The approach minimizes flight hardware by exploiting Internet-like telecommunications that enables CLEAR capabilities to remain on Earth and to be uplinked as needed. To minimize crew time and operational cost, CLEAR exploits offline development and validation to support online teleoperations. Operational concept scenarios are developed for diagnostics, repair, and functional test operations. Many of the supporting functions defined in these operational scenarios are further defined as technologies in NASA/TM-2011-216956.

  9. Functional models of power electronic components for system studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tam, Kwa-Sur; Yang, Lifeng; Dravid, Narayan

    1991-01-01

    A novel approach to model power electronic circuits has been developed to facilitate simulation studies of system-level issues. The underlying concept for this approach is to develop an equivalent circuit, the functional model, that performs the same functions as the actual circuit but whose operation can be simulated by using larger time step size and the reduction in model complexity, the computation time required by a functional model is significantly shorter than that required by alternative approaches. The authors present this novel modeling approach and discuss the functional models of two major power electronic components, the DC/DC converter unit and the load converter, that are being considered by NASA for use in the Space Station Freedom electric power system. The validity of these models is established by comparing the simulation results with available experimental data and other simulation results obtained by using a more established modeling approach. The usefulness of this approach is demonstrated by incorporating these models into a power system model and simulating the system responses and interactions between components under various conditions.

  10. Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) System Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oeftering, Richard C.; Bradish, Martin A.; Juergens, Jeffrey R.; Lewis, Michael J.; Vrnak, Daniel R.

    2011-01-01

    This document captures the system architecture for a Component-Level Electronic-Assembly Repair (CLEAR) capability needed for electronics maintenance and repair of the Constellation Program (CxP). CLEAR is intended to improve flight system supportability and reduce the mass of spares required to maintain the electronics of human rated spacecraft on long duration missions. By necessity it allows the crew to make repairs that would otherwise be performed by Earth based repair depots. Because of practical knowledge and skill limitations of small spaceflight crews they must be augmented by Earth based support crews and automated repair equipment. This system architecture covers the complete system from ground-user to flight hardware and flight crew and defines an Earth segment and a Space segment. The Earth Segment involves database management, operational planning, and remote equipment programming and validation processes. The Space Segment involves the automated diagnostic, test and repair equipment required for a complete repair process. This document defines three major subsystems including, tele-operations that links the flight hardware to ground support, highly reconfigurable diagnostics and test instruments, and a CLEAR Repair Apparatus that automates the physical repair process.

  11. EPR and electronic absorption spectra of copper bearing turquoise mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, K. B. N.; Moorthy, L. R.; Reddy, B. J.; Vedanand, S.

    1988-10-01

    Electron paramagnetic resonance and optical absorption spectra of turquoise have been studied both at room and low temperatures. It is concluded from the EPR spectra that the ground state of Cu 2+ ion in turquoise is 2A g(d x2- y2) and it is sited in an elongated rhombic octahedron (D 2π). The observed absorption bands at 14970 and 18354 cm -1 are assigned at 2A g→ 2B 1 g( dx2- y2→ xy) and 2A g→[ su2B 3g(d x 2-y 2→d yz) respectively assuming D 2π symmetry which are inconsistent with EPR studies. The three bands in the NIR region are attributed to combinations of fundamental modes of the H 2O molecule present in the sample.

  12. Atmospheric ice nucleation by fertile soil dusts particles: Relative importance of mineral and biological components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Sullivan, Daniel; Murray, B. J.; Malkin, T. L.; Webb, M. E.; Whale, T. F.; Atkinson, J. D.; Baustian, K. J.

    2013-05-01

    Dusts emitted from agricultural soils may represent a significant source of atmospheric particulates at mid-latitudes. Such dusts, which can be aerosolised by anthropogenic agricultural activities, have previously been estimated to be present in the atmosphere at sufficient number densities that they could potentially compete with other known ice nuclei (IN). In contrast to soils from arid regions, such as the Sahara, fertile soils contain a larger fraction of biological material, which can lead to an enhancement in the ice nucleating ability of their associated dusts. However, considerable uncertainties remain regarding the relative efficacy of soil dust particles from fertile soils as IN. Using an experimental methodology designed to increase sensitivity to a wide range of ice nucleation efficiencies, we have characterized the immersion mode ice nucleating activities of sub 11 μm particles extracted from surface soils collected in four locations around England. By using a variety of droplet sizes, from pico-to micro-litre, we have been able to characterize the ice active site densities in soils (estimated using a time-independent framework) at temperatures ranging from -5°C down to the homogeneous limit of freezing at ˜ -36°C. At temperatures below -15°C, we find that the ice active site densities tend towards those expected from the mineral components in the soils, suggesting that the inorganic fraction of soil dusts becomes increasingly important in the initiation of the ice phase at large supercoolings. Conversely, above -15°C we find that the ice nucleating activity of the soils dusts was larger than expected from the mineral composition of the soils. The sites responsible for this high temperature ice nucleating activity were sensitive to heat treatment and digestion with hydrogen peroxide, suggesting that they are biological in origin. We conclude that although only being a relatively minor contributor to the global atmospheric dust burden, the

  13. The role of exogenous electron donors for accelerating 2,4,6-trichlorophenol biotransformation and mineralization.

    PubMed

    Yan, Ning; Li, Rongjie; Xu, Hua; Li, Ling; Yang, Lihui; Zhang, Yongming; Liu, Rui; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-06-01

    2,4,6-Trichlorophenol (TCP) is a biologically recalcitrant compound, but its biodegradation via reductive dechlorination can be accelerated by adding an exogenous electron donor. In this work, acetate and formate were evaluated for their ability to accelerate TCP reductive dechlorination, as well to accelerate mono-oxygenation of TCP's reduction product, phenol. Acetate and formate accelerated TCP reductive dechlorination, and the impact was proportional to the number of electron equivalents released by oxidation of the donor: 8 e(-) equivalents per mol for acetate, compared to 2 e(-) eq per mol for formate. The acceleration phenomenon was similar for phenol mono-oxygenation, and this increased the rate of TCP mineralization. Compared to endogenous electron equivalents generated by phenol mineralization, the impact of exogenous electron donor was stronger on a per-equivalent basis. PMID:27084768

  14. Arbitrary amplitude fast electron-acoustic solitons in three-electron component space plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mbuli, L. N.; Maharaj, S. K.; Bharuthram, R.; Singh, S. V.; Lakhina, G. S.

    2016-06-01

    We examine the characteristics of fast electron-acoustic solitons in a four-component unmagnetised plasma model consisting of cool, warm, and hot electrons, and cool ions. We retain the inertia and pressure for all the plasma species by assuming adiabatic fluid behaviour for all the species. By using the Sagdeev pseudo-potential technique, the allowable Mach number ranges for fast electron-acoustic solitary waves are explored and discussed. It is found that the cool and warm electron number densities determine the polarity switch of the fast electron-acoustic solitons which are limited by either the occurrence of fast electron-acoustic double layers or warm and hot electron number density becoming unreal. For the first time in the study of solitons, we report on the coexistence of fast electron-acoustic solitons, in addition to the regular fast electron-acoustic solitons and double layers in our multi-species plasma model. Our results are applied to the generation of broadband electrostatic noise in the dayside auroral region.

  15. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-04-05

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  16. Cooled electronic system with liquid-cooled cold plate and thermal spreader coupled to electronic component

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J.; Graybill, David P.; Iyengar, Madhusudan K.; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J.; Schmidt, Roger R.; Steinke, Mark E.

    2016-08-09

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled cold plate and a thermal spreader associated with the cold plate. The cold plate includes multiple coolant-carrying channel sections extending within the cold plate, and a thermal conduction surface with a larger surface area than a surface area of the component to be cooled. The thermal spreader includes one or more heat pipes including multiple heat pipe sections. One or more heat pipe sections are partially aligned to a first region of the cold plate, that is, where aligned to the surface to be cooled, and partially aligned to a second region of the cold plate, which is outside the first region. The one or more heat pipes facilitate distribution of heat from the electronic component to coolant-carrying channel sections of the cold plate located in the second region of the cold plate.

  17. High-temperature electronic components and circuit designs

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, H.T.

    1982-01-01

    Downhole logging instruments for geothermal application must have electronic circuits capable of operating from room temperature to 250/sup 0/C. Previous research was centered on low voltage/low current hybrid microcircuits. However, a nondestructive evaluation (NDE) instrument for geothermal wells requires a circuit that can be operated at high voltage and high current in order to provide high-power output. In designing such a circuit, Sandia Laboratories is developing a high-power, high-speed, cold-cathode switching tube to be used as a substitute for SCRs or thyratrons. The possibility of using low-leakage JFETs beyond their rated temperature in a circuit design will be discussed. Commercial high-temperature components will be reviewed.

  18. Emergency Dosimetry Using Ceramic Components in Personal Electronic Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kouroukla, E. C.; Bailiff, I. K.; Terry, I.

    2014-02-01

    The rapid assessment of radiation dose to members of the public exposed to significant levels of ionizing radiation during a radiological incident presents a significant difficulty in the absence of planned radiation monitoring. However, within most personal electronic devices components such as resistors with alumina substrates can be found that have potentially suitable properties as solid state dosimeters using luminescence measurement techniques. The suitability of several types of ceramic-based components (e.g., resonators, inductors and resistors) has been previously examined using optically stimulated luminescence (OSL) and thermoluminescence (TL) techniques to establish their basic characteristics for the retrospective determination of absorbed dose. In this paper, we present results obtained with aluminum oxide surface mount resistors extracted from mobile phones that further extend this work. Very encouraging results have been obtained related to the measurement of luminescence sensitivity, dose response, reusability, limit of detection, signal reproducibility and known-dose recovery. However, the alumina exhibits a rapid loss of the latent luminescence signal with time following irradiation attributed to athermal (or anomalous) fading. The issues related to obtaining a reliable correction protocol for this loss and the detailed examinations required of the fading behavior are discussed.

  19. Effects of mineral dust on the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components in a polluted Megacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karydis, V. A.; Tsimpidi, A. P.; Fountoukis, C.; Nenes, A.; Zavala, M.; Lei, W.; Molina, L. T.; Pandis, S. N.

    2009-04-01

    Aerosols play a significant role in the atmosphere having adverse impacts on human health and directly affecting air quality, visibility and climate change. One of the most challenging tasks for models is the prediction of the partitioning of the semivolatile inorganic aerosol components (ammonia, nitric acid, hydrochloric acid, etc) between the gas and particulate phases. Moreover, the effects of mineral aerosols in the atmosphere remain largely uncertain. As a result, most current models have serious difficulties in reproducing the observed particulate nitrate and chloride concentrations. The improved aerosol thermodynamic model ISORROPIA II (Fountoukis and Nenes, 2007) simulating explicitly the chemistry of Ca, Mg, and K salts has been linked to the regional chemical transport model PMCAMx (Gaydos et al., 2007). PMCAMx also includes the CMU inorganic aerosol growth module (Gaydos et al., 2003; Koo et al., 2003a) and the VSRM aqueous-phase chemistry module (Fahey and Pandis, 2001). The hybrid approach (Koo et al., 2003b) for modeling aerosol dynamics is applied in order to accurately simulate the inorganic components in the coarse mode. This approach assumes that the smallest particles are in equilibrium, while the condensation/evaporation equation is solved for the larger ones. PMCAMx is applied to the Mexico City Metropolitan Area (MCMA). The emission inventory has been improved and now includes more accurate dust and NaCl emissions. The April 2003 (MCMA Campaign) and the March 2006 (MILAGRO campaign) datasets are used to evaluate the inorganic aerosol module of PMCAMx in order to test our understanding of inorganic aerosol. The results from the new modeling framework are also compared with the results from the previous version of PMCAMx in order to investigate the influence of each of the added features to the formation of the semivolatile inorganic components. References Fountoukis, C. and Nenes, A., (2007). ISORROPIA II: a computationally efficient

  20. Electron Microprobe Analyses of Lithic Fragments and Their Minerals from Luna 20 Fines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, G. H.; Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Moore, R. B.; Moreland, G.; Dowty, E.; Prinz, M.; Keil, K.; Nehru, C. E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1973-01-01

    The bulk analyses (determined with the broad beam electron microprobe technique) of lithic fragments are given in weight percentages and are arranged according to the rock classification. Within each rock group the analyses are arranged in order of increasing FeO content. Thin section and lithic fragment numbers are given at the top of each column of analysis and correspond to the numbers recorded on photo mosaics on file in the Institute of Meteoritics. CIPW molecular norms are given for each analysis. Electron microprobe mineral analyses (given in oxide weight percentages), structural formulae and molecular end member values are presented for plagioclase, olivine, pyroxene and K-feldspar. The minerals are selected mostly from lithic fragments that were also analyzed for bulk composition. Within each mineral group the analyses are presented according to the section number and lithic fragment number. Within each lithic fragment the mineral analyses are arranged as follows: Plagioclase in order of increasing CaO; olivine and pyroexene in order of increasing FeO; and K-feldspar in order of increasing K2O. The mineral grains are identified at the top of each column of analysis by grain number and lithic fragment number.

  1. 77 FR 32996 - Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-04

    ... Microsoft Corporation (``Microsoft'') of Redmond, Washington. 76 FR 22918. The complaint, as amended... COMMISSION Certain Handheld Electronic Computing Devices, Related Software, and Components Thereof... importation of certain handheld electronic computing devices, related software, and components thereof...

  2. Electron Transfer at the Microbe-Mineral Interface: A Grand Challenge in Biogeochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.

    2008-06-01

    The interplay between microorganisms and minerals is a complex and dynamic process that has sculpted the geosphere for nearly the entire history of the Earth. The work of Dr. Terry Beveridge and colleagues provided some of the first insights into metal-microbe and mineral-microbe interactions and established a foundation for subsequent detailed investigations of interactions between microorganisms and minerals. Beveridge also envisioned that interdisciplinary approaches and teams would be required to explain how individual microbial cells interact with their immediate environment at nano- or sub-molecular scales and that through such approaches and using emerging technologies that the details of such interactions would be revealed at the molecular level. With this vision as incentive and inspiration, a multidisciplinary, collaborative team-based investigation was initiated to probe the process of electron transfer at the microbe-mineral interface. This grand challenge to this team was to address the hypothesis that multi-heme c-type cytochromes of dissimilatory metal reducing bacteria localized to the cell exterior function as the terminal reductases in electron transfer to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides. This question has been the subject of extensive investigation for years yet the answer has remained elusive. The team involves an integrated group of experimental and computational capabilities at DOE’s Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, as the collaborative focal point. The approach involves a combination of in vitro and in vivo biologic and biogeochemical experiments and computational analyses that, when integrated, provide a conceptual model of the electron transfer process. The resulting conceptual model will be evaluated by integrating and comparing various experimental, i.e., in vitro and in vivo ET kinetics, and theoretical results. Collectively the grand challenge will provide a detailed view of how organisms

  3. Basic studies on the role of components of Bacillus megaterium as flotation biocollectors in sulphide mineral separation.

    PubMed

    Vasanthakumar, Balasubramanian; Ravishankar, Honnavar; Subramanian, Sankaran

    2014-03-01

    Studies were carried out to assess the utility of the cellular and extracellular constituents of Bacillus megaterium for the flotation of sphalerite and galena minerals. Based on the flotation results on the individual minerals, it was observed that sphalerite was preferentially floated compared to galena. A maximum selectivity index (SI) value of 11.7 was achieved in the presence of the soluble fraction of the thermolysed cells, which was higher than that obtained with the intact cells (SI of 6.5) and the insoluble fraction of the thermolysed cells (SI of 9.6). The results of the various enzymatic treatment tests revealed that extracellular DNA played a vital role in the selective flotation of sphalerite. A noteworthy finding was that the single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) had a higher biocollector capacity vis-à-vis the double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), leading to better flotation efficiency. About 95 % recovery of sphalerite could be achieved from the mineral mixture by the combined addition of the ssDNA with the non-DNA components of the bacterial cells, resulting in a maximum SI of 19.1. Calcium and phosphate components of the nutrient media were found to be essential for better selectivity of separation of sphalerite. The mechanisms of microbe-mineral interaction are discussed. PMID:24085394

  4. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration.

  5. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    PubMed Central

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice C.; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, James K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-01-01

    The mineral-respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes, MtrC and MtrA, brought together inside a transmembrane porin, MtrB, to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system containing a pool of internalized electron carriers was used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, the established in vivo orientation, electron transfer from the interior electron carrier pool through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The rates were 103 times higher than those reported for reduction of goethite, hematite, and lepidocrocite by S. oneidensis, and the order of the reaction rates was consistent with those observed in S. oneidensis cultures. In contrast, established rates for single turnover reactions between purified MtrC and Fe(III) oxides were 103 times lower. By providing a continuous flow of electrons, the proteoliposome experiments demonstrate that conduction through MtrCAB directly to Fe(III) oxides is sufficient to support in vivo, anaerobic, solid-phase iron respiration. PMID:23538304

  6. 78 FR 38361 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... States after importation of certain portable electronic ] communications devices, including mobile phones... importation of certain portable electronic communications devices, including mobile phones and...

  7. Rapid electron exchange between surface-exposed bacterial cytochromes and Fe(III) minerals

    SciTech Connect

    White, Gaye F.; Shi, Zhi; Shi, Liang; Wang, Zheming; Dohnalkova, Alice; Marshall, Matthew J.; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2013-04-16

    The mineral respiring bacterium Shewanella oneidensis uses a protein complex, MtrCAB, composed of two decaheme cytochromes brought together inside a transmembrane porin to transport electrons across the outer membrane to a variety of mineral-based electron acceptors. A proteoliposome system that contains methyl viologen as an internalised electron carrier has been used to investigate how the topology of the MtrCAB complex relates to its ability to transport electrons across a lipid bilayer to externally-located Fe(III) oxides. With MtrA facing the interior and MtrC exposed on the outer surface of the phospholipid bilayer, direct electron transfer from the interior through MtrCAB to solid-phase Fe(III) oxides was demonstrated. The observed rates of conduction through the protein complex were 2 to 3 orders of magnitude higher than that observed in whole cells, demonstrating that direct electron exchange between MtrCAB and Fe(III) oxides is efficient enough to support in-vivo, anaerobic, solid phase iron respiration.

  8. In-situ high-pressure transmission electron microscopy of minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, J.; Buseck, P. R.

    2010-12-01

    We show that high-resolution studies are possible at high pressure and temperature within a transmission electron microscope (TEM). To achieve this goal, which avoids the crystallographic and chemical changes that can occur upon quenching, we use the unusual structural properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and fullerenes. These carbon materials, which are used as sample containers, contract under radiation by energetic electrons at elevated temperatures in a TEM. The result is compression of materials that have been encapsulated within these containers. We estimated pressures greater than 20 GPa from the Fourier transforms of high-resolution images of oxide particles such as ZnO and Sm2O3 under compression within CNTs. Using an arc-discharge technique, we recently also loaded olivine into fullerenes. Such ability to compress and then examine minerals in situ at high resolution opens up new possibilities for the high-pressure research of minerals.

  9. Recovery of precious metals from military electronic components

    SciTech Connect

    Gundiler, I.H.; Lutz, J.D.; Neiswander, P.G.

    1996-09-01

    Sandia National Laboratories developed a process to identify and remove the hazardous sub-components from dismantled weapons components utilizing real-time radiography and abrasive water-jet cutting. The components were then crushed, granulated, screened, and separated into an aluminium and a precious-and-base-metals fraction using air-tables. Plastics were further cleaned for disposal as non- hazardous waste.

  10. Analysis of the mineral acid-base components of acid-neutralizing capacity in Adirondack Lakes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munson, R. K.; Gherini, S. A.

    1993-04-01

    Mineral acids and bases influence pH largely through their effects on acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC). This influence becomes particularly significant as ANC approaches zero. Analysis of data collected by the Adirondack Lakes Survey Corporation (ALSC) from 1469 lakes throughout the Adirondack region indicates that variations in ANC in these lakes correlate well with base cation concentrations (CB), but not with the sum of mineral acid anion concentrations (CA). This is because (CA) is relatively constant across the Adirondacks, whereas CB varies widely. Processes that supply base cations to solution are ion-specific. Sodium and silica concentrations are well correlated, indicating a common source, mineral weathering. Calcium and magnesium also covary but do not correlate well with silica. This indicates that ion exchange is a significant source of these cations in the absence of carbonate minerals. Iron and manganese concentrations are elevated in the lower waters of some lakes due to reducing conditions. This leads to an ephemeral increase in CB and ANC. When the lakes mix and oxic conditions are restored, these ions largely precipitate from solution. Sulfate is the dominant mineral acid anion in ALSC lakes. Sulfate concentrations are lowest in seepage lakes, commonly about 40 μeq/L less than in drainage lakes. This is due in part to the longer hydraulic detention time in seepage lakes, which allows slow sulfate reduction reactions more time to decrease lake sulfate concentration. Nitrate typically influences ANC during events such as snowmelt. Chloride concentrations are generally low, except in lakes impacted by road salt.

  11. Electron transfer at the microbe-mineral interface: a grand challenge in biogeochemistry.

    PubMed

    Fredrickson, J K; Zachara, J M

    2008-06-01

    The interplay between microorganisms and minerals is a complex and dynamic process that has sculpted the geosphere for nearly the entire history of the Earth. The work of Dr Terry Beveridge and colleagues provided some of the first insights into metal-microbe and mineral-microbe interactions and established a foundation for subsequent detailed investigations of interactions between microorganisms and minerals. Beveridge also envisioned that interdisciplinary approaches and teams would be required to explain how individual microbial cells interact with their immediate environment at nano- or microscopic scales and that through such approaches and using emerging technologies that the details of such interactions would be revealed at the molecular level. With this vision as incentive and inspiration, a multidisciplinary, collaborative team-based investigation was initiated to probe the process of electron transfer (ET) at the microbe-mineral interface. The grand challenge to this team was to address the hypothesis that multiheme c-type cytochromes of dissimilatory metal-reducing bacteria localized to the cell exterior function as the terminal reductases in ET to Fe(III) and Mn(IV) oxides. This question has been the subject of extensive investigation for years, yet the answer has remained elusive. The team involves an integrated group of experimental and computational capabilities at US Department of Energy's Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, a national scientific user facility, as the collaborative focal point. The approach involves a combination of in vitro and in vivo biologic and biogeochemical experiments and computational analyses that, when integrated, provide a conceptual model of the ET process. The resulting conceptual model will be evaluated by integrating and comparing various experimental, i.e. in vitro and in vivo ET kinetics, and theoretical results. Collectively, the grand challenge will provide a detailed view of how organisms engage with

  12. Seasonal contribution of mineral dust and other major components to particulate matter at two remote sites in Central Asia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller-Schulze, Justin P.; Shafer, Martin; Schauer, James J.; Heo, Jongbae; Solomon, Paul A.; Lantz, Jeffrey; Artamonova, Maria; Chen, Boris; Imashev, Sanjar; Sverdlik, Leonid; Carmichael, Greg; DeMinter, Jeff

    2015-10-01

    Dust storms are significant contributors to ambient levels of particulate matter (PM) in many areas of the world. Central Asia, an area that is relatively understudied in this regard, is anticipated to be affected by dust storms due to its proximity to several major deserts that are in and generally surround Central Asia (e.g., the Aral Sea region, the Taklimakan desert in Western China). To investigate the relative importance of mineral dust (dust specifically composed of soil related minerals and oxides) in Central Asia, PM10 and PM2.5, and by difference, coarse particles (particles with diameters between 2.5 and 10 μm) were measured at two sites, Bishkek and Lidar Station Teplokluchenka (Lidar), in the Kyrgyz Republic. Samples were collected every other day from July 2008 to July 2009. Daily samples were analyzed for mass and organic and elemental carbon. Samples were also composited on a bi-weekly basis and analyzed for elemental constituents and ionic components. In addition, samples collected on days with relatively high and low PM concentrations were analyzed before, and separately, from the biweekly composites to investigate the chemical differences between the episodic events. Data from the episodic samples were averaged into the composited averages. Using the elemental component data, several observational models were examined to estimate the contribution of mineral dust to ambient PM levels. A mass balance was also conducted. Results indicate that at both sites, mineral dust (as approximated by the "dust oxide" model) and organic matter (OM) were the dominant contributors to PM10 and PM2.5. Mineral dust was a more significant contributor to the coarse PM (PM10-2.5) during high event samples at both sites, although the relative contribution is greater at the Lidar site (average ± standard deviation = 42 ± 29%) as compared with the Bishkek site (26 ± 16%). Principal Components Analysis (PCA) was performed using data from both sites, and PCA indicated

  13. 75 FR 38118 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof, and... importation, and the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices with image... certain electronic devices with image processing systems, components thereof, and associated software...

  14. Structural relations between collagen and mineral in bone as determined by high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Hodgens, K. J.; Arena, J.; Song, M. J.; McEwen, B. F.

    1996-01-01

    Aspects of the ultrastructural interaction between collagen and mineral crystals in embryonic chick bone have been examined by the novel technique of high voltage electron microscopic tomography to obtain three-dimensional information concerning extracellular calcification in this tissue. Newly mineralizing osteoid along periosteal surfaces of mid-diaphyseal regions from normal chick tibiae was embedded, cut into 0.25 microns thick sections, and documented at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high voltage electron microscope. The areas of the tissue studied contained electron dense mineral crystals associated with collagen fibrils, some marked by crystals disposed along their cylindrically shaped lengths. Tomographic reconstructions of one site with two mineralizing fibrils were computed from a 5 degrees tilt series of micrographs over a +/- 60 degrees range. Reconstructions showed that the mineral crystals were platelets of irregular shape. Their sizes were variable, measured here up to 80 x 30 x 8 nm in length, width, and thickness, respectively. The longest crystal dimension, corresponding to the c-axis crystallographically, was generally parallel to the collagen fibril long axis. Individual crystals were oriented parallel to one another in each fibril examined. They were also parallel in the neighboring but apparently spatially separate fibrils. Crystals were periodically (approximately 67 nm repeat distance) arranged along the fibrils and their location appeared to correspond to collagen hole and overlap zones defined by geometrical imaging techniques. The crystals appeared to be continuously distributed along a fibril, their size and number increasing in a tapered fashion from a relatively narrow tip containing smaller and infrequent crystals to wider regions having more densely packed and larger crystals. Defined for the first time by direct visual 3D imaging, these data describe the size, shape, location, orientation, and development of early crystals in normal

  15. Abundance and distribution of mineral components associated with Moses Rock (kimberlite) diatreme

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mustard, J. F.; Pieters, C. M.

    1986-01-01

    The surface mineralogy in and around Moses Rock diatreme, a kimberlite-bearing dike in SW Utah, was examined using internally calibrated Airborne Imaging Spectrometer (AIS) data. Distinct near-infrared absorption characteristics of clays, gypsum, and serpentine (a key marker for kinberlite concentration) allowed the surface units containing these components to be identified spatially and the relative abundance of each component measured. Within the dike itself, channels and dispersed components of kimberlite and blocks of country rocks were accurately determined.

  16. Electron Microprobe Analysis of Fe2+/Fe3+ in Minerals With low Total Iron Concentrations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creighton, S. D.; Matveev, S.; Stachel, T.; Luth, R. W.

    2004-12-01

    The development of the `flank method' by Höfer et al. (1994) has made it possible to quantify ferrous and ferric iron concentrations in minerals using the electron microprobe. The flank method makes use of the changes in both the wavelength and intensity of soft Fe Lα and Fe Lβ X-ray emission lines of minerals containing Fe3+ and Fe2+.By measuring at energies off the peak maxima (on the peaksAƒAøAøâ_sA¬Aøâ_zAø flanks) the differences due to variable ferric iron ratios are maximized, thus making the flank method much more sensitive than methods relying on either peak shifts or peak area ratios. Using a correction for self-absorption, the Fe3+/Fe2+ ratio of minerals may be accurately and precisely determined. The original flank method was developed for minerals with high total iron concentration e.g. Fe-rich garnet end-members (almandine, andradite, and skiagite), and Fe-oxides (wüstite). To make it applicable to minerals with total iron concentrations of less than 10 wt.% as is common in mantle-derived minerals, we have modified, in three ways, the flank method to significantly improve the precision. Firstly, we have increased the number of analyses per mineral grain to 400 thereby providing a far more representative mean. Secondly, because it is necessary to accurately reproduce the exact position of the spectrometer crystal for each flank measurement, we have eliminated the need to reposition the spectrometer by serially measuring each flank position. Thirdly, we compensate for instrumental drift by measuring two 10 μ m by 10 μ m grids (1 μ m spot size and spacing) for both flank positions. Each mineral grain is measured sequentially, collecting 200 analyses on the first flank position. The procedure is identically repeated for measurements on the second flank position. The elapsed time between each grid measurement is the same for all samples and drift for either flank position is eliminated by averaging. Using these modifications to the flank

  17. Electron Probe Microanalysis of REE in Eudialyte Group Minerals: Challenges and Solutions.

    PubMed

    Atanasova, Petya; Krause, Joachim; Möckel, Robert; Osbahr, Inga; Gutzmer, Jens

    2015-10-01

    Accurate quantification of the chemical composition of eudialyte group minerals (EGM) with the electron probe microanalyzer is complicated by both mineralogical and X-ray-specific challenges. These include structural and chemical variability, mutual interferences of X-ray lines, in particular of the rare earth elements, diffusive volatility of light anions and cations, and instability of EGM under the electron beam. A novel analytical approach has been developed to overcome these analytical challenges. The effect of diffusive volatility and beam damage is shown to be minimal when a square of 20×20 µm is scanned with a beam diameter of 6 µm at the fastest possible speed, while measuring elements critical to electron beam exposure early in the measurement sequence. Appropriate reference materials are selected for calibration considering their volatile content and composition, and supplementary offline overlap correction is performed using individual calibration factors. Preliminary results indicate good agreement with data from laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry demonstrating that a quantitative mineral chemical analysis of EGM by electron probe microanalysis is possible once all the parameters mentioned above are accounted for. PMID:26313878

  18. ELECTRONIC COMPONENT COOLING ALTERNATIVES: COMPRESSED AIR & LIQUID NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to evaluate tools used to troubleshoot circuit boards with known or suspected thermally intermittent components. ailure modes for thermally intermittent components are typically mechanical defects, such as cracks in solder paths or joints, or broken bon...

  19. ELECTRONIC COMPONENT COOLING ALTERNATIVES: COMPRESSED AIR AND LIQUID NITROGEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of this study was to evaluate topics used to troubleshoot circuit boards with known or suspected thermally intermittent components. Failure modes for thermally intermittent components are typically mechanical defects, such as cracks in solder paths or joints, or broken b...

  20. Determination of mass attenuation coefficients, effective atomic and electron numbers for some natural minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, I.; Demir, L.; Şahin, M.

    2009-09-01

    The total mass attenuation coefficients ( μ m) for SiO 2 {Quartz (1 1 0 1), Quartz (1 1 0 0) and Quartz (0 0 0 1)}, KAlSi 3O 8 {Orthoclase (0 1 0), Orthoclase (1 0 0)}, CaSO 4·2H 2O (gypsum), FeS 2 (pyrite) and Mg 2Si 2O 6 (pyroxene) natural minerals were measured at 22.1, 25.0, 59.5 and 88.0 keV photon energies. The γ- and X-rays were counted by a Si(Li) detector with a resolution of 160 eV at 5.9 keV. Atomic and electronic cross sections ( σ t and σ e), the effective atomic and electron numbers or electron densities ( Z eff and N eff) were determined using the obtained μ m values for investigated samples.

  1. Investigation of Mineral Transformations in Wet Supercritical CO2 by Electron Microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Arey, Bruce W.; Kovarik, Libor; Wang, Zheming; Felmy, Andrew R.

    2011-10-10

    The capture and storage of carbon dioxide and other greenhouse gases in deep geologic formations represents one of the most promising options for mitigating the impacts of greenhouse gases on global warming. In this regard, mineral-fluid interactions are of prime importance since such reactions can result in the long term sequestration of CO2 by trapping in mineral phases. Recently it has been recognized that interactions with neat to water-saturated non-aqueous fluids are of prime importance in understanding mineralization reactions since the introduced CO2 is likely to contain water initially or soon after injection and the supercritical CO2 (scCO2) is less dense than the aqueous phase which can result in a buoyant scCO2 plume contacting the isolating caprock. As a result, unraveling the molecular/microscopic mechanisms of mineral transformation in neat to water saturated scCO2 has taken on an added important. In this study, we are examining the interfacial reactions of the olivine mineral forsterite (Mg2SiO4) over a range of water contents up to and including complete water saturation in scCO2. The surface precipitates that form on the reacted forsterite grains are extremely fragile and difficult to experimentally characterize. In order to address this issue we have developed experimental protocols for preparing and imaging electron-transparent samples from fragile structures. These electron-transparent samples are then examined using a combination of STEM/EDX, FIB-TEM, and helium ion microscope (HIM) imaging (Figures 1-3). This combination of capabilities has provided unique insight into the geochemical processes that occur on scCO2 reacted mineral surfaces. The experimental procedures and protocols that have been developed also have useful applications for examining fragile structures on a wide variety of materials. This research was performed using EMSL, a national scientific user facility sponsored by the Department of Energy's Office of Biological and

  2. 27 CFR 73.11 - What are the required components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... components and controls for acceptable electronic signatures? 73.11 Section 73.11 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES AND PRACTICES ELECTRONIC SIGNATURES; ELECTRONIC SUBMISSION OF FORMS Electronic Signatures §...

  3. Electronic switching circuit uses complementary non-linear components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zucker, O. S.

    1972-01-01

    Inherent switching properties of saturable inductors and storage diodes are combined to perform large variety of electronic functions, such as pulse shaping, gating, and multiplexing. Passive elements replace active switching devices in generation of complex waveforms.

  4. Reproducible methods for calibrating the backscattered electron signal for quantitative assessment of mineral content in bone

    SciTech Connect

    Boyce, T.M.; Bloebaum, R.D.; Bachus, K.N.; Skedros, J.G. )

    1990-09-01

    Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging shows promise for orthopaedic and bone research. BSE images of bone may be captured on-line directly from the scanning electron microscope (SEM), and then analyzed to produce a backscattered electron profile (BSEP), a modified image graylevel histogram which is representative of the mineral content in bone. The goals of this work were (1) develop a reproducible graylevel calibration technique for bone specimens, and (2) determine a conservative time interval during which SEM operating conditions would remain stable. Calibration standards containing pure aluminum and pure magnesium wires were placed in the SEM with human cancellous bone. Baseline imaging conditions were first established by adjusting the SEM until the bone image displayed good resolution and graylevel separation between regions of different mineral content. Microscope brightness and contrast controls were randomly changed to initiate the new operating conditions of another imaging session, and graylevel values from the calibration metals were used to readjust the microscope back to baseline operating conditions. Weighted mean graylevel values of the BSEPs from calibration trials were compared to those of the baseline. Data showed that bone images could be reproduced within 1.2 percent. It was also concluded that our equipment required calibration checks at 20 minute intervals.

  5. Induced polarization of disseminated electronically conductive minerals: a semi-empirical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurin, Grigory; Titov, Konstantin; Ilyin, Yuri; Tarasov, Andrey

    2015-03-01

    We studied artificial ore models that contained galena, pyrite, magnetite, graphite and cryptomelane with the time domain induced polarization technique. The models were mixtures of sand and metallic-type, electronically conductive mineral particles. We varied the volumetric content of the particles, their mineral composition and average grain size, as well as the pore water salinity. Based on the Debye decomposition approach, we obtained relaxation time distributions, which contained peaks. From these distributions, we obtained the total chargeability and the peak relaxation time. We correlated these parameters with the particle mineral composition, grain size, particle content and the pore solution resistivity. We also compared the experimental data with the Wong model prediction, which was unable to explain the entire data set. The above-mentioned correlations, in conjunction with some previously published data, allowed us to formulate a new, semi-empirical model that links (1) the total chargeability with the volumetric content of the particles and the total chargeability of the host matrix and (2) the time constant with the particle mineralogy, the particle radius and the pore solution resistivity.

  6. Radiation tests of CMS RPC muon trigger electronic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buńkowski, Karol; Kassamakov, Ivan; Królikowski, Jan; Kierzkowski, Krzysztof; Kudła, Maciej; Maenpaa, Teppo; Poźniak, Krzysztof; Rybka, Dominik; Tuominen, Eija; Ungaro, Donatella; Wrochna, Grzegorz; Zabołotny, Wojciech

    2005-02-01

    The results of proton irradiation test of electronic devices, selected for the RPC trigger electronic system of the CMS detector, will be presented. For Xilinx Spartan-IIE FPGA the cross-section for Single Event Upsets (SEUs) in configuration bits was measured. The dynamic SEUs in flip-flops were also investigated, but not observed. For the FLASH memories no single upsets were detected. Only after irradiating with a huge dose permanent damages of devices were observed. For Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory (SDRAM), the SEU cross-section was measured.

  7. A gyro-oriented 3-component borehole magnetometer for mineral prospecting, with examples of its application

    SciTech Connect

    Bosum, W.; Eberle, D.; Rehli, H.J.

    1988-11-01

    A triple axis borehole magnetometer is described that consists of a Foerster-probe (fluxgate) triplet (sensitivity 1 nT), a Foerster-probe gradiometer (sensitivity 2 nT/40 cm), a gyro unit (mean angular drift approx 0.5/sup 0//h) which is equipped with accelerometers (sensitivity 1/100/sup 0/), and a data transmission unit (with multiplexer and 16-bit AD converter). The sensitive fluxgate-magnetometer can detect weakly magnetic or small source bodies. Data from the gyro and the accelerometers allow the 3-component magnetic field values to be transformed to north, east and vertical components. Since they do not rely on magnetically-determined directional data, the results are not disturbed by local anomalies of the magnetic declination. Furthermore, the magnetometer can also be used in vertical boreholes. 3-component measurements are carried out at discrete points in the neighbourhood of a source body to locate its position, and within the source body to determine the direction of magnetization. The strength of magnetization and information on magnetic classification are obtained by continuous measurement of one or more components within the source body. Calculation algorithms and computer programs are available to simplify data processing and interpretation. Survey examples are discussed.

  8. Electronic Office Hours: A Component of Distance Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wallace, F. Layne; Wallace, Susan R.

    2001-01-01

    Describes a technique to blend distance learning with traditional educational methods using electronic office hours to connect teachers and students outside the classroom. Explains the use of various existing computer mediated communication tools and techniques, including email, Usenet newsgroups, text-based conferences, video-based conferences,…

  9. 78 FR 34132 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-06

    ... COMMISSION Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof... published a notice (78 FR 12892, May 31, 2013) of receipt of complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission...

  10. New High Energy Electron Component of Earth Radiation Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dmitrenko, V. V.; Galper, A. M.; Gratchev, V. M.; Kirillov-Ugryumov, V. G.; Ulin, S. E.; Voronov, S. A.

    The Earth Radiation Belt (ERB) was discovered in the course of the first flights of Russian and American satellites with conventional instruments (gas discharge and scintillation counters), which made it possible to investigate many characteristics of trapped particles and simulate adequate radiation belt models. However, the experimental and theoretical evidence accumulated over recent time, needs more elaborate measurements for its interpretation. These measurements became feasible after the development of devices based on more perfect detectors (solid and gas-filled Cherenkov detectors, magnetic spectrometer, scintillation time-of-flight systems). The evidence requiring new direct measurements in the ERB was obtained in the late 1960s in the course of balloon flights carried out by Cosmophysics Laboratory of the Moscow Engineering and Physics Institute. In these flights a correlation between the high energy electron flux in the upper atmosphere and perturbations ofthe Earth's magnetosphere was established. This phenomenon could be explained assuming there exist high energy electron fluxes in the ERB. High energy electron fluxes in the ERB were recorded for the first time in the direct experiments carried out on board orbital station 'Salyut-6' (orbit altitude - 350 km, inclination 51.6 deg). A scintillation-Cherenkov telescope 'Elena' controlled by cosmonauts was preset to different programmed positions. The measurements were made in the periphery of the ERB, namely, in the part which goes as low as several hundred km in the Brazil Anomaly Region (BRA). The flux of electrons with energies above 30 MeV was up to 104 (m2s sr)-1.

  11. Electron microscopic examination of wastewater biofilm formation and structural components.

    PubMed Central

    Eighmy, T T; Maratea, D; Bishop, P L

    1983-01-01

    This research documents in situ wastewater biofilm formation, structure, and physiochemical properties as revealed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. Cationized ferritin was used to label anionic sites of the biofilm glycocalyx for viewing in thin section. Wastewater biofilm formation paralleled the processes involved in marine biofilm formation. Scanning electron microscopy revealed a dramatic increase in cell colonization and growth over a 144-h period. Constituents included a variety of actively dividing morphological types. Many of the colonizing bacteria were flagellated. Filaments were seen after primary colonization of the surface. Transmission electron microscopy revealed a dominant gram-negative cell wall structure in the biofilm constituents. At least three types of glycocalyces were observed. The predominant glycocalyx possessed interstices and was densely labeled with cationized ferritin. Two of the glycocalyces appeared to mediate biofilm adhesion to the substratum. The results suggest that the predominant glycocalyx of this thin wastewater biofilm serves, in part, to: (i) enclose the bacteria in a matrix and anchor the biofilm to the substratum and (ii) provide an extensive surface area with polyanionic properties. Images PMID:6881965

  12. 77 FR 11588 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-27

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof AGENCY: U... capturing and transmitting images and components thereof by reason of infringement of certain claims of U.S... capturing and transmitting images and components thereof by reason of infringement of one or more of...

  13. 77 FR 4059 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof; Receipt... Images, and Components Thereof, DN 2869; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest... for capturing and transmitting images, and components thereof. The complaint names Apple Inc....

  14. Composition and method for removing photoresist materials from electronic components

    DOEpatents

    Davenhall, Leisa B.; Rubin, James B.

    2002-01-01

    The invention is a combination of at least one dense phase fluid and at least one dense phase fluid modifier which can be used to contact substrates for electronic parts such as semiconductor wafers or chips to remove photoresist materials which are applied to the substrates during manufacture of the electronic parts. The dense phase fluid modifier is one selected from the group of cyclic, aliphatic or alicyclic compounds having the functional group: ##STR1## wherein Y is a carbon, oxygen, nitrogen, phosphorus or sulfur atom or a hydrocarbon group having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, a halogen or halogenated hydrocarbon group having from 1 to 10 carbon atoms, silicon or a fluorinated silicon group; and wherein R.sub.1 and R.sub.2 can be the same or different substituents; and wherein, as in the case where X is nitrogen, R.sub.1 or R.sub.2 may not be present. The invention compositions generally are applied to the substrates in a pulsed fashion in order to remove the hard baked photoresist material remaining on the surface of the substrate after removal of soft baked photoresist material and etching of the barrier layer.

  15. Reflectance Spectra of Five-Component Mineral Mixtures: Implications for Mixture Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzog, S. G.; Mustard, J. F.

    1996-03-01

    The surfaces of the terrestrial planets consist largely of particulate materials, or soils, whose compositions and particle size distributions are products of geologic processes. The reflectance spectrum of a particulate surface represents a systematic combination of the mineralogy and particle size distribution of the material. Both composition and grain size information are useful in geologic interpretation of a surface, but are convolved in a single reflectance spectrum. We used spectral mixture analysis to separate these parameters by modeling the reflectance of five-component laboratory soils which vary in grain size. We find that successful prediction of endmember compositions requires some knowledge of grain size distribution, and that the fine particles dominate the mixed spectrum in excess of volume fractions and intimate mixture model predictions.

  16. The Composition of Bovine Peritubular Dentin: Matching TOF-SIMS, Scanning Electron Microscopy and Biochemical Component Distributions

    PubMed Central

    Gotliv, Bat Ami; Veis, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    Peritubular dentin (PTD) is a hypermineralized phase within the dentinal tubules in some vertebrate teeth as an interface between the intertubular dentin (ITD) and the cell processes. Our aim has been to understand the composition, structure and role of PTD as a mineralized tissue. We have utilized the technique of time of flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (TOF-SIMS) to map the distribution of positive and negative inorganic ions as well as organic components in the fully mineralized, intact PTD structure in bovine tooth cross-sections, and correlated these with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) in standard and backscatter modes. In recent work, we developed a procedure to freeze fracture the teeth and separate PTD from the less dense ITD by the use of aqueous sodium phosphotungstate step density gradients, after degrading the ITD collagen with NaOCl. Here, PTD-containing fragments were characterized by SEM and TOF-SIMS surface structure analysis. The TOF-SIMS data show that the isolated PTD does not contain collagen, but its surface is rich in glutamic acid-containing protein(s). The TOF-SIMS spectra also indicated that the intact PTD fragments contain phospholipids, and chemical analyses showed phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol and phosphatidylcholine as the principal lipid components. In SEM sections, untreated PTD shows as a smooth collar around the tubule, but after digestion with ethylenediamine to remove all organic components, the porous nature of the mineral phase of small, thin platy apatite crystals becomes evident. Thus, the organic matrix of PTD appears to be a proteolipid-phospholipid complex. PMID:18728348

  17. Application of CO2 laser for electronic components soldering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mascorro-Pantoja, J.; Soto-Bernal, J. J.; Nieto-Pérez, M.; Gonzalez-Mota, R.; Rosales-Candelas, I.

    2011-10-01

    Laser provides a high controllable and localized spot for soldering joint formation and this is a valuable tool in Sn/Pb Soldering process on electronic industry, in recent years, laser beam welding has become an emerging welding technique, the use of laser in welding area is a high efficiency method. A 60 Watts CO2 continuous laser was used on this study, during welding experimental results indicated the laser could significantly improve speed and weld quality. In this work, the welding interactions of CO2 laser with Sn/Pb wire have been investigated in details through varying the energy ratios of laser. And at the same time, the effect of distance from laser spot to material.

  18. Ultrastructure of lamellae, mineral and matrix components of fish otolith twinned aragonite crystals: implications for estimating age in fish.

    PubMed

    Gauldie, R W

    1999-05-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) of the crystalline ultrastructure of otoliths fromPagrus major(Sparidae),Macruronus novaezelandiae(Merlucciidae),Oncorhynchus tshawytscha(Salmonidae),Sebastes alutus(Scorpaenidae), andHoplostethus atlanticus(Trachichthyidae) showed regular deposition of lamellae in the size range 13-490 nm. The orientation of lamellae in the {010} plane was the same as lamellae in crystals of mineral aragonite. Lamellae in mineral aragonite were in the size range 15-45 nm. Lamellae observed in the otolith ofM. novaezelandiaeby transmission electron microscopy showed a range of widths (25-225 nm) similar to lamellae observed by AFM. The observed lamella widths were in the size range that has been described for sub-daily and daily microincrements in otoliths. Observed lamellae widths were also in the size range of alpha-recoil trajectories of(222)Rn and provide a potential diffusion sink correction for the(222)Rn losses in radionuclide method of ageing otoliths. Comparison of the orientations of lamellae to templates based on the Bragg unit cell structure of twinned aragonite indicated that the lamellae resulted from polysynthetic twinning on the {010} aragonite crystal face. Additional cyclic twinning occurred on the {110} face of the aragonite crystal and sometimes led to pseudohexagonal crystals, whose sizes were orders of magnitude larger than lamellae. The organic matrix of the otolith was visible by atomic force and transmission electron microscopy at the nanometer level of resolution, but the organic matrix was confined to the {110} twinning plane of symmetry of the otolith crystal. PMID:18627853

  19. Application of Quantitative Analytical Electron Microscopy to the Mineral Content of Insect Cuticle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasch, Ron; Cribb, Bronwen W.; Barry, John; Palmer, Christopher M.

    2003-04-01

    Quantification of calcium in the cuticle of the fly larva Exeretonevra angustifrons was undertaken at the micron scale using wavelength dispersive X-ray microanalysis, analytical standards, and a full matrix correction. Calcium and phosphorus were found to be present in the exoskeleton in a ratio that indicates amorphous calcium phosphate. This was confirmed through electron diffraction of the calcium-containing tissue. Due to the pragmatic difficulties of measuring light elements, it is not uncommon in the field of entomology to neglect the use of matrix corrections when performing microanalysis of bulk insect specimens. To determine, firstly, whether such a strategy affects the outcome and secondly, which matrix correction is preferable, phi-rho (z) and ZAF matrix corrections were contrasted with each other and without matrix correction. The best estimate of the mineral phase was found to be given by using the phi-rho (z) correction. When no correction was made, the ratio of Ca to P fell outside the range for amorphous calcium phosphate, possibly leading to flawed interpretation of the mineral form when used on its own.

  20. An overview of the NASA electronic components information management system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kramer, G.; Waterbury, S.

    1991-01-01

    The NASA Parts Project Office (NPPO) comprehensive data system to support all NASA Electric, Electronic, and Electromechanical (EEE) parts management and technical data requirements is described. A phase delivery approach is adopted, comprising four principal phases. Phases 1 and 2 support Space Station Freedom (SSF) and use a centralized architecture with all data and processing kept on a mainframe computer. Phases 3 and 4 support all NASA centers and projects and implement a distributed system architecture, in which data and processing are shared among networked database servers. The Phase 1 system, which became operational in February of 1990, implements a core set of functions. Phase 2, scheduled for release in 1991, adds functions to the Phase 1 system. Phase 3, to be prototyped beginning in 1991 and delivered in 1992, introduces a distributed system, separate from the Phase 1 and 2 system, with a refined semantic data model. Phase 4 extends the data model and functionality of the Phase 3 system to provide support for the NASA design community, including integration with Computer Aided Design (CAD) environments. Phase 4 is scheduled for prototyping in 1992 to 93 and delivery in 1994.

  1. Apollo 15 rake sample microbreccias and non-mare rocks: Bulk rock, mineral and glass electron microprobe analyses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hlava, P. F.; Green, J. A.; Prinz, M.; Nehru, C. E.; Keil, K.; Dowty, E.; Bunch, T. E.

    1972-01-01

    Quantitative electron microprobe data of Apollo 15 nonmare rake samples are presented. Bulk analyses of lithic fragments in the nomare rocks (expressed in oxide weight-percent) and the corresponding CIPW molecular norms are given. The mineralogy of the rocks and lithic fragments are also given; structural formulae for complete analyses and molecular end-members for all mineral analyses are included. The mineral analyses include pyroxene, olivine, plagioclase, barian K-feldspar, spinel and ilmenite, cobaltian metallic nickel-iron as well as SiO2-K2O-rich residual glass. Electron micropobe analyses (oxide weight percent) of glasses in loose fines and microbreccia samples and their CIPW molecular norms are presented along with electron microprobe data on bulk, mineral, and matrix glass from chondrules.

  2. Three component plasma electron distribution in the intermediate ionized coma of Comet Giacobini-Zinner

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zwickl, R. D.; Baker, D. N.; Bame, S. J.; Feldman, W. C.; Fuselier, S. A.; Huebner, W. F.; McComas, D. J.; Young, D. T.

    1986-04-01

    The observation of three distinct components of the electron distribution function measured in the intermediate ionized coma (IIC) and plasma tail of Comet Giacobini-Zinner is reported. It is believed that the cold component represents electrons produced close to the comet nucleus by ionization of cometary matter and subsequent cooling by Coulomb collisions. The second component also appears to be composed of electrons produced by photoionization of cometary neutrals, but sufficiently far from the nucleus that the distributions are largely unaffected by Coulomb interactions. The hot component is probably a population of electrons originating in the solar wind. Throughout the IIC, the electrostatic potential of the spacecraft was very low (less than 0.8 eV), implying that ICE generated very little impact-produced plasma during its passage.

  3. 78 FR 63492 - Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-24

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office INTERNATIONAL TRADE COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Tablet Computers, and Components Thereof; Notice of Request for Statements on the Public Interest AGENCY: U.S. International Trade...

  4. Mineral and organic matrix interaction in normally calcifying tendon visualized in three dimensions by high-voltage electron microscopic tomography and graphic image reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Landis, W. J.; Song, M. J.; Leith, A.; McEwen, L.; McEwen, B. F.

    1993-01-01

    To define the ultrastructural accommodation of mineral crystals by collagen fibrils and other organic matrix components during vertebrate calcification, electron microscopic 3-D reconstructions were generated from the normally mineralizing leg tendons from the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. Embedded specimens containing initial collagen mineralizing sites were cut into 0.5-micron-thick sections and viewed and photographed at 1.0 MV in the Albany AEI-EM7 high-voltage electron microscope. Tomographic 3-D reconstructions were computed from a 2 degree tilt series of micrographs taken over a minimum angular range of +/- 60 degrees. Reconstructions of longitudinal tendon profiles confirm the presence of irregularly shaped mineral platelets, whose crystallographic c-axes are oriented generally parallel to one another and directed along the collagen long axes. The reconstructions also corroborate observations of a variable crystal length (up to 170 nm measured along crystallographic c-axes), the presence of crystals initially in either the hole or overlap zones of collagen, and crystal growth in the c-axis direction beyond these zones into adjacent overlap and other hole regions. Tomography shows for the first time that crystal width varies (30-45 nm) but crystal thickness is uniform (approximately 4-6 nm at the resolution limit of tomography); more crystals are located in the collagen hole zones than in the overlap regions at the earliest stages of tendon mineralization; the crystallographic c-axes of the platelets lie within +/- 15-20 degrees of one another rather than being perfectly parallel; adjacent platelets are spatially separated by a minimum of 4.2 +/- 1.0 nm; crystals apparently fuse in coplanar alignment to form larger platelets; development of crystals in width occurs to dimensions beyond single collagen hole zones; and a thin envelope of organic origin may be present along or just beneath the surfaces of individual mineral platelets. Implicit in the

  5. Effect of Three-year Multi-Component Exercise Training on Bone Mineral Density and Content in a Postmenopausal Woman with Osteoporosis: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    MOVASEGHI, Farzaneh; SADEGHI, Heydar

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the effect of 3-years of moderate multi-component exercise training on bone mineral density and bone mineral content in a female subject with osteoporosis. A 57-year-old postmenopausal woman, a known case of osteoporosis following an accident, participated in this study. Bone mineral density and bone mineral content was measured in the femoral neck area and the lumbar spine by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry. The measurements lasted four years, first year without any exercise training and three succeeding years with exercise intervention. After three years of exercise training, bone mineral density and bone mineral content were improved in both regions, despite the increase in age and decrease in weight. This case highlights the importance of exercise training in maintaining and increasing bone mineral density and bone mineral content of the spine and hip in post-menopausal women. Considering its positive effects, regular and lifelong exercise training must be incorporated into peoples’ life due to the chronic nature of bone loss in aging process. PMID:26284213

  6. Radiation studies of optical and electronic components used in astronomical satellite studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becher, J.; Kernell, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    The synchronous orbit of the IUE carries the satellite through Earth's outer electron belt. A 40 mCi Sr90 source was used to simulate these electrons. A 5 mCi source of Co60 was used to simulate bremmstrahlung. A 10 MeV electron Linac and a 1.7 MeV electron Van de Graaf wer used to investigate the energy dependence of radiation effects and to perform radiations at a high flux rate. A 100 MeV proton cyclotron was used to simulate cosmic rays. Results are presented for three instrument systems of the IUE and measurements for specific components are reported. The three instrument systems were the ultraviolet converter, the fine error sensor (FES), and the SEC vidicon camera tube. The components were optical glasses, electronic components, silicon photodiodes, and UV window materials.

  7. Comparison of spatial resolutions obtained with different signal components in scanning electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Merli, P G; Migliori, A; Nacucchi, M; Vittor Antisari, M

    1996-09-01

    Comparative studies on the ultimate spatial resolution of the Scanning Electron Microscope, using different components of the electron signal have been performed on specimens providing compositional contrast. By operating the microscope in conventional way as well as with a specifically designed set-up we have ascertained that the delocalized components of the signal provide a spatial resolution of the order of the beam size, even if the practical use can be limited by the noise. To amplify the contribution of the delocalized components of the signal, as backscattered electrons by a bulk specimen or forward scattered electrons by a thin specimen, we used a device consisting of a plate of a material with high secondary yield placed above or below the sample. An important practical implication arises from this study. A detecting system consisting of a standard Everhart-Thornley detector coupled with a converter of backscattered or transmitted electrons represents a high performance detecting device for low voltage observations. PMID:8961547

  8. Sequestered carbon on clay mineral probed by electron paramagnetic resonance and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Kátia Cylene; Mangrich, Antonio Salvio; Wypych, Fernando; Rodrigues-Filho, Ubirajara Pereira; Guimarães, José L; Schreiner, Wido H

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes the interaction among soil organic matter components with kaolinite, an important clay mineral present in tropical soils, especially in Brazil. XPS data show that the soil organic matter adsorbed on kaolinite has aromatic and aliphatic structures, with phenolic and/or alcoholic functions and carbonyl carbons (CO) of amide and/or carboxylic groups. The N1s spectrum of the kaolinite shows an asymmetric peak that is assigned to amide and protonated ammines probably from humin. The interaction between them is strong enough to resist chemical oxidative or reductive attack besides loose amide functionalities. EPR data show that reductive treatment reduces some Fe3+ of the kaolinite structure, loosing organic components. A schematic representation of the reduction of structural Fe3+ in the concentrated domains and consequently increased concentration of Fe3+ ions in diluted domains of the spectrum is presented. This reinforces the hypothesis that humin is a stable carbon sink in soils when adsorbed to clays. PMID:16146633

  9. Redox Linked Flavin Sites in Extracellular Decaheme Proteins Involved in Microbe-Mineral Electron Transfer.

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX8C disulfide that, when substituted for AX8A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen. PMID:26126857

  10. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; et al

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation ofmore » a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.« less

  11. Redox linked flavin sites in extracellular decaheme proteins involved in microbe-mineral electron transfer.

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, Marcus J.; White, Gaye F.; Norman, Michael; Tome-Fernandez, Alice; Ainsworth, Emma; Shi, Liang; Fredrickson, Jim K.; Zachara, John M.; Butt, Julea N.; Richardson, David J.; Clarke, Thomas A.

    2015-07-01

    Extracellular microbe-mineral electron transfer is a major driving force for the oxidation of organic carbon in many subsurface environments. Extracellular multi-heme cytochromes of the Shewenella genus play a major role in this process but the mechanism of electron exchange at the interface between cytochrome and acceptor is widely debated. The 1.8 Å x-ray crystal structure of the decaheme MtrC revealed a highly conserved CX₈C disulfide that, when substituted for AX₈A, severely compromised the ability of S. oneidensis to grow under aerobic conditions. Reductive cleavage of the disulfide in the presence of flavin mononucleotide (FMN) resulted in the reversible formation of a stable flavocytochrome. Similar results were also observed with other decaheme cytochromes, OmcA, MtrF and UndA. The data suggest that these decaheme cytochromes can transition between highly reactive flavocytochromes or less reactive cytochromes, and that this transition is controlled by a redox active disulfide that responds to the presence of oxygen.

  12. 78 FR 16531 - Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Eastman Kodak Company of Rochester, New York. 77 FR 11588-89 (Feb. 27, 2012). The complaint alleges a... COMMISSION Certain Electronic Devices for Capturing and Transmitting Images, and Components Thereof... images, and components thereof. The complaint further alleges that an industry in the United...

  13. 76 FR 58841 - Certain Digital Televisions and Components Thereof, and Certain Electronic Devices Having a Blu...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-22

    ... FR 12994-5 (Mar. 9, 2011). The complaints allege violations of section 337 of the Tariff Act of 1930...-Ray Disc Player and Components Thereof; Notice of Commission Determination Not To Review an Initial...; and 5,923,711, and of certain electronic devices having a Blu-Ray disc player and components...

  14. 76 FR 12994 - In the Matter of Certain Digital Televisions and Components Thereof, and Certain Electronic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-09

    ... Devices Having a Blu-Ray Disc Player and Components Thereof; Notice of Investigation AGENCY: U.S... within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices having a Blu-ray Disc player and... the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic devices having a...

  15. Electron-acoustic solitary waves in the presence of a suprathermal electron component

    SciTech Connect

    Danehkar, Ashkbiz; Saini, Nareshpal Singh; Kourakis, Ioannis; Hellberg, Manfred A.

    2011-07-15

    The nonlinear dynamics of electron-acoustic localized structures in a collisionless and unmagnetized plasma consisting of ''cool'' inertial electrons, ''hot'' electrons having a kappa distribution, and stationary ions is studied. The inertialess hot electron distribution thus has a long-tailed suprathermal (non-Maxwellian) form. A dispersion relation is derived for linear electron-acoustic waves. They show a strong dependence of the charge screening mechanism on excess suprathermality (through {kappa}). A nonlinear pseudopotential technique is employed to investigate the occurrence of stationary-profile solitary waves, focusing on how their characteristics depend on the spectral index {kappa}, and the hot-to-cool electron temperature and density ratios. Only negative polarity solitary waves are found to exist, in a parameter region which becomes narrower as deviation from the Maxwellian (suprathermality) increases, while the soliton amplitude at fixed soliton speed increases. However, for a constant value of the true Mach number, the amplitude decreases for decreasing {kappa}.

  16. Reliability considerations of electronics components for the deep underwater muon and neutrino detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Leskovar, B.

    1980-02-01

    The reliability of some electronics components for the Deep Underwater Muon and Neutrino Detection (DUMAND) System is discussed. An introductory overview of engineering concepts and technique for reliability assessment is given. Component reliability is discussed in the contest of major factors causing failures, particularly with respect to physical and chemical causes, process technology and testing, and screening procedures. Failure rates are presented for discrete devices and for integrated circuits as well as for basic electronics components. Furthermore, the military reliability specifications and standards for semiconductor devices are reviewed.

  17. Critical density for Landau damping in a two-electron-component plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Rupp, Constantin F.; López, Rodrigo A.; Araneda, Jaime A.

    2015-10-15

    The asymptotic evolution of an initial perturbation in a collisionless two-electron-component plasma with different temperatures is studied numerically. The transition between linear and nonlinear damping regimes is determined by slowly varying the density of the secondary electron-component using high-resolution Vlasov-Poisson simulations. It is shown that, for fixed amplitude perturbations, this transition behaves as a critical phenomenon with time scales and field amplitudes exhibiting power-law dependencies on the threshold density, similar to the critical amplitude behavior in a single-component plasma.

  18. QEMSCAN° (Quantitative Evaluation of Minerals by Scanning Electron Microscopy): capability and application to fracture characterization in geothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayling, B.; Rose, P. E.; Zemach, E.; Drakos, P. S.; Petty, S.

    2011-12-01

    Fractures are important conduits for fluids in geothermal systems, and the creation and maintenance of fracture permeability is a fundamental aspect of EGS (Engineered Geothermal System) development. Hydraulic or chemical stimulation techniques are often employed to achieve this. In the case of chemical stimulation, an understanding of the minerals present in the fractures themselves is desirable to better design a stimulation effort (i.e. which chemical to use and how much). Borehole televiewer surveys provide important information about regional and local stress regimes and fracture characteristics (e.g. fracture aperture), and XRD is useful for examining bulk rock mineralogy, but neither technique is able to quantify the distribution of these minerals in fractures. QEMSCAN° is a fully-automated micro-analysis system that enables quantitative chemical analysis of materials and generation of high-resolution mineral maps and images as well as porosity structure. It uses a scanning electron microscopy platform (SEM) with an electron beam source in combination with four energy-dispersive X-ray spectrometers (EDS). The measured backscattered electron and electron-induced secondary X-ray emission spectra are used to classify sample mineralogy. Initial applications of QEMSCAN° technology were predominantly in the minerals industry and application to geothermal problems has remained limited to date. In this pilot study, the potential application of QEMSCAN° technology to fracture characterization was evaluated using samples of representative mineralized fractures in two geothermal systems (Newberry Volcano, Oregon and Brady's geothermal field, Nevada). QEMSCAN° results were compared with XRD and petrographic techniques. Nine samples were analyzed from each field, collected from the drill core in the 1000-1500 m depth range in two shallow wells (GEO-N2 at Newberry Volcano and BCH-3 at Brady's). The samples were prepared as polished thin sections for QEMSCAN° analysis

  19. Melt rock components in KREEPy breccia 15205: Petrography and mineral chemistry of KREEP basalts and quartz-normative mare basalts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shervais, John W.; Vetter, Scott K.

    1993-01-01

    Many current models for the origin of lunar highland rocks feature as an essential component the assimilation of KREEPy material by primitive magmas parental to the Mg-rich suite and alkali suite plutonic rocks. Similar models have also been proposed for the origin of various mare basalt suites. However, any model which considers assimilation of KREEP an important petrologic process must sooner-or-later deal with the question: what is KREEP? Because pristine KREEP basalts are rare, and most known samples are small (e.g., 15382/15386), the geochemical variability of KREEP basalts is poorly known. Other KREEP compositions which are commonly used in these models include the hypothetical 'high-K KREEP' component of Warren and Wasson, which is derived from Apollo 14 soil data, and the 'superKREEP' quartz-monzodiorite 15405. Lunar breccia 15205 is a polymict regolith breccia that consists of approximately 20% KREEP basalt clasts and 20% quartz-normative basalt clasts in a KREEP-rich matrix. Bulk rock mixing calculations show that this sample comprises about 84% KREEP. The clasts range up to 1 cm in size, but most are considerably smaller. The primary aim is to characterize pristine KREEP basalts petrographically, to establish the range in chemical compositions of KREEP basalts, and to test models that were proposed for their origin. In addition, we may be able to extend the compositional range recognized in the quartz-normative basalt suite and cast some light on its origin as well. Preliminary whole rock geochemical data on the KREEP basalts are presented in a companion paper by M.M. Lindstrom and co-workers. Concentration is on petrography and mineral chemistry of these clasts, and the implications these data have for the origin of the different melt rock suites.

  20. Minerals and aligned collagen fibrils in tilapia fish scales: structural analysis using dark-field and energy-filtered transmission electron microscopy and electron tomography.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Mitsuhiro; Ogawa, Nobuhiro; Takeguchi, Masaki; Hashimoto, Ayako; Tagaya, Motohiro; Chen, Song; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Ikoma, Toshiyuki

    2011-10-01

    The mineralized structure of aligned collagen fibrils in a tilapia fish scale was investigated using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques after a thin sample was prepared using aqueous techniques. Electron diffraction and electron energy loss spectroscopy data indicated that a mineralized internal layer consisting of aligned collagen fibrils contains hydroxyapatite crystals. Bright-field imaging, dark-field imaging, and energy-filtered TEM showed that the hydroxyapatite was mainly distributed in the hole zones of the aligned collagen fibrils structure, while needle-like materials composed of calcium compounds including hydroxyapatite existed in the mineralized internal layer. Dark-field imaging and three-dimensional observation using electron tomography revealed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were mainly found in the matrix between the collagen fibrils. It was observed that hydroxyapatite and needle-like materials were preferentially distributed on the surface of the hole zones in the aligned collagen fibrils structure and in the matrix between the collagen fibrils in the mineralized internal layer of the scale. PMID:21899811

  1. The use of the scanning electron microscope in the determination of the mineral composition of Ballachulish slate

    SciTech Connect

    Walsh, Joan A.

    2007-11-15

    Slate is a fine-grained, low-grade metamorphic rock derived from argillaceous sediments or occasionally volcanic ash. Although most slates contain mainly quartz, chlorite and white mica, they vary considerably in their durability, some lasting centuries while others fail after a few years of service. A detailed characterisation of their mineralogy is required for the assessment of performance, and to establish the provenance of a used slate. A combination of methods was used to examine Ballachulish slates; XRD analysis to determine the principal minerals present, XRF analysis to determine the total chemical composition, and scanning electron microscopy to determine the chemical composition of individual minerals. It was found that the white mica in Ballachulish slate is phengite and the chlorite is ripidolite. Feldspar is present as albite and carbonate as ferroan dolomite. Several accessory minerals were also identified, including chloritoid, monzonite and zircon. There was considerable variation in the ratio of the principal minerals, making it impossible to identify used slates by this criterion. Instead, chemical composition of the individual minerals, and possibly key accessory minerals, should be used to determine the provenance of slates.

  2. Ulysses observations of electron and proton components in a magnetic cloud and related wave activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Osherovich, V. A.; Fainberg, J.; Stone, R. G.; MacDowall, R. J.; Phillips, J. L.; Balogh, A.

    1995-01-01

    In addition to a smooth rotation of the magnetic field vector, magnetic clouds have a low proton temperature T(sub p). Their expansion in the solar wind leads to depletion and therefore the ion component cools down. It has been shown recently that the electron component in magnetic clouds behaves differently: when the cloud expands, electron temperature Te anti correlates with density and therefore Te increases in the cloud, creating favorable conditions for the rise of ion-acoustic waves. For the magnetic cloud observed by Ulysses on June 10 - 12, 1993 at 4.64 AU at S 32.5 deg, we present observations for both electron and proton components and related plasma wave activity. Our results confirm the anti correlation between T(sub e) and electron density and also exhibit a high ratio of T(sub e)/T(sub P) in the cloud. Since Landau damping is not effective for T(sub e)/T(sub p) much greater than 1, Doppler shifted ion acoustic waves are expected in the cloud. Calculation of ion acoustic wave frequencies in the cloud and comparison with observed wave activity confirm this expectation. As in our previous work, we show that the electron component in the cloud obeys a polytropic law with gamma is less than 1 (gamma approximately equals 0.3-0.4). The dynamics of the magnetic cloud are determined to a large degree by the dominating electron pressure.

  3. Spectroscopic analysis of Martian meteorite ALH 84001 powder and applications for spectral identification of minerals and other soil components on Mars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bishop, Janice L.; Pieters, Carle M.; Hiroi, Takahiro; Mustard, John F.

    1998-07-01

    Spectroscopic measurement and analysis of Martian meteorites provide important information about the mineralogy of Mars, as well as necessary ground-truths for deconvolving remote sensing spectra of the Martian surface rocks. The spectroscopic properties of particulate ALH 84001 from 0.3 to 25 (m correctly identify low-Ca-pyroxene as the dominant mineralogy. Absorption bands due to electronic transitions of ferrous iron are observed at 0.94 and 1.97 (m that are typical for low-Ca-pyroxene. A strong, broad water band is observed near 3 (m that is characteristic of the water band typically associated with pyroxenes. Weaker features near 4.8, 5.2 and 6.2 (m are characteristic of particulate low-Ca-pyroxene, and can be readily distinguished from the features due to high-Ca-pyroxene and other silicate minerals. The reflectance minimum occurs near 8.6 (m for the ALH 84001 powder, which is more consistent with high-Ca-pyroxene and augite than low-Ca-pyroxene. The dominant mid-IR spectral features for the ALH 84001 powder are observed near 9 and 19.5 (m; however, there are multiple features in this region. These mid-IR features are generally characteristic of low-Ca-pyroxene, but cannot be explained by low-Ca-pyroxene alone. Spectral features from 2.5-5 (m are typically associated with water, organics and carbonates and have been studied in spectra of the ALH 84001, split 92 powder and ALH 84001, splits 92 and 271 chip surfaces. Weak features have been identified near 3.5 and 4 (m that are assigned to organic material and carbonates. Another feature is observed at 4.27 (m in many surface spots and in the powder, but has not yet been uniquely identified. Spectroscopic identification of minor organic and carbonate components in this probable piece of Mars suggests that detection of small amounts of organics and carbonates in the Martian surface regolith would also be possible using visible-infrared hyperspectral analyses. Laboratory spectroscopic analysis of Martian

  4. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    SciTech Connect

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-05-12

    Apparatus and method are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The apparatus includes a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  5. Thermoelectric-enhanced, liquid-based cooling of a multi-component electronic system

    DOEpatents

    Chainer, Timothy J; Graybill, David P; Iyengar, Madhusudan K; Kamath, Vinod; Kochuparambil, Bejoy J; Schmidt, Roger R; Steinke, Mark E

    2015-11-10

    Methods are provided for facilitating cooling of an electronic component. The methods include providing: a liquid-cooled structure, a thermal conduction path coupling the electronic component and the liquid-cooled structure, a coolant loop in fluid communication with a coolant-carrying channel of the liquid-cooled structure, and an outdoor-air-cooled heat exchange unit coupled to facilitate heat transfer from the liquid-cooled structure via, at least in part, the coolant loop. The thermoelectric array facilitates transfer of heat from the electronic component to the liquid-cooled structure, and the heat exchange unit cools coolant passing through the coolant loop by dissipating heat from the coolant to outdoor ambient air. In one implementation, temperature of coolant entering the liquid-cooled structure is greater than temperature of the outdoor ambient air to which heat is dissipated.

  6. Three-component Langmuir-Blodgett films consisting of surfactant, clay mineral, and lysozyme: construction and characterization.

    PubMed

    Miao, Shiding; Leeman, Hugo; De Feyter, Steven; Schoonheydt, Robert A

    2010-02-22

    The Langmuir-Blodgett (L-B) technique has been employed for the construction of hybrid films consisting of three components: surfactant, clay, and lysozyme (Lys). The surfactants are octadecylammonium chloride (ODAH) and octadecyl ester of rhodamine B (RhB18). The clays include saponite and laponite. Surface pressure versus area isotherms indicate that lysozyme is adsorbed by the surfactant-clay L-B film at the air-water interface without phase transition. The UV-visible spectra of the hybrid film ODAH-saponite-Lys show that the amount of immobilized lysozyme in the hybrid film is (1.3+/-0.2) ng mm(-2). The average surface area (Omega) per molecule of lysozyme is approximately 18.2 nm(2) in the saponite layer. For the multilayer film (ODAH-saponite-Lys)(n), the average amount of lysozyme per layer is (1.0+/-0.1) ng mm(-2). The amount of lysozyme found in the hybrid films of ODAH-laponite-Lys is at the detection limit of about 0.4 ng mm(-2). Attenuated total reflectance (ATR) FTIR spectra give evidence for clay layers, ODAH, lysozyme, and water in the hybrid film. The octadecylammonium cations are partially oxidized to the corresponding carbamate. A weak 1620 cm(-1) band of lysozyme in the hybrid films is reminiscent of the presence of lysozyme aggregates. AFM reveals evidence of randomly oriented saponite layers of various sizes and shapes. Individual lysozyme molecules are not resolved, but aggregates of about 20 nm in diameter are clearly seen. Some aggregates are in contact with the clay mineral layers, others are not. These aggregates are aligned in films deposited at a surface pressure of 20 mN m(-1). PMID:20104549

  7. [The evaluation of mineral crystallinity of mandibular bone tissue using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) in patients suffering from renal osteodystrophy].

    PubMed

    Wojtowicz, Andrzej; Dijakiewicz, Maciej; Wandzel, Barbara; Wesołowski, Piotr; Rutkowski, Bolesław; Fiedor, Piotr; Stachowicz, Wacław; Ostrowski, Kazimierz

    2006-01-01

    Mineral crystallinity of bone tissue is subject to changes during one's development, as well as in many systemic diseases, especially renal osteodystrophy. The aim of the study was qualitative evaluation of the mandibular bone tissue in patients suffering from renal osteodytrophy, treated with renal-replacement therapy: hemo-dialysis or allogeneic kidney transplantation. The mineral crystallinity coefficient was evaluated using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) based on the observation that ionizing radiation induces paramagnetic centers in hydroxyapatites. The concentration of these centers was used to establish an indicator of crystallinity rate which is a measure of the crystallinity of tissue mineral. On the basis of these results, it is possible to widen the indications for implantological treatment in specific clinical cases. PMID:17479865

  8. Mid-Infrared Spectroscopy Analysis of the Effects of Erbium, Chromium:Yattrium-Scandium-Gallium-Garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) Laser Irradiation on Bone Mineral and Organic Components.

    PubMed

    Benetti, Carolina; Ana, Patricia Aparecida; Bachmann, Luciano; Zezell, Denise Maria

    2015-12-01

    The effects of varying the energy density of a high-intensity erbium, chromium: yttrium-scandium-gallium-garnet (Er,Cr:YSGG) laser on the mineral and organic components of bone tissue were evaluated using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Bone samples obtained from the tibias of rabbits were irradiated with five energy densities (3, 6, 8, 12, and 15 J/cm(2)), and the effects on the carbonate to phosphate ratio and in the organic components were compared with those of nonirradiated samples. The increased temperature during the laser irradiation was also measured using infrared thermography to relate the observed spectral changes to the laser thermal effects. The analyses of the infrared spectra suggests that the irradiation with Er,Cr:YSGG promoted changes in bone tissue in both the mineral and organic components that depend on the laser energy density, pointing to the importance of using the proper energy density in clinical procedures. PMID:26555304

  9. Preparation of samples with both hard and soft phases for electron backscatter diffraction: examples from gold mineralization.

    PubMed

    Halfpenny, Angela; Hough, Robert M; Verrall, Michael

    2013-08-01

    Preparation of high-quality polished sample surfaces is an essential step in the collection of microanalytical data on the microstructures of minerals and alloys. Poorly prepared samples can yield insufficient or inconsistent results and, in the case of gold, potentially no data due to the "beilby" layer. Currently, preparation of ore samples is difficult as they commonly contain both hard and soft mineral phases. The aim of our research is to produce suitably polished sample surfaces, on all phases, for electron backscatter diffraction analysis. A combination of chemical-mechanical polishing (CMP) and broad ion-beam polishing (BIBP) was used to tackle the problem. Our results show that it is critical to perform CMP first, as it produces a suitable polish on the hard mineral phases but tends to introduce more damage to the soft mineral surfaces. BIBP is essential to produce a high-quality polish to the soft phases (gold). This is a highly efficient method of sample preparation and is important as it allows the complete quantification of ore textures and all constituent mineral phases, including soft alloys. PMID:23721665

  10. Marginal Adaptation of New Bioceramic Materials and Mineral Trioxide Aggregate: A Scanning Electron Microscopy Study

    PubMed Central

    Shokouhinejad, Noushin; Nekoofar, Mohmmad Hossein; Ashoftehyazdi, Kazem; Zahraee, Shohreh; Khoshkhounejad, Mehrfam

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: This study aimed to compare the marginal adaptation of new bioceramic materials, EndoSequence Root Repair Material (ERRM putty and ERRM paste), to that of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) as root-end filling materials. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six extracted human single-rooted teeth were prepared and obturated with gutta-percha and AH-26 sealer. The roots were resected 3 mm from the apex. Root-end cavities were then prepared with an ultrasonic retrotip. The specimens were divided into three groups (n=12) and filled with MTA, ERRM putty or ERRM paste. Epoxy resin replicas from the resected root-end surfaces and longitudinally sectioned roots were fabricated. The gaps at the material/dentin interface were measured using scanning electron microscope (SEM). Transversal, longitudinal, and overall gap sizes were measured for each specimen. The data were analyzed using the Kruskal-Wallis test. Results: In transversal sections, no significant difference was found between MTA, ERRM putty and ERRM paste (P=0.31). However, in longitudinal sections, larger gaps were evident between ERRM paste and dentinal walls compared to MTA and ERRM putty (P=0.002 and P=0.033, respectively). Considering the overall gap size values, the difference between three tested materials was not statistically significant (P=0.17). Conclusion: Within the limits of this study, the marginal adaptation of ERRM paste and putty was comparable to that of MTA. However, ERRM putty might be more suitable for filling the root-end cavities because of its superior adaptation compared to ERRM paste in longitudinal sections. PMID:24688585

  11. Linear electrostatic waves in a three-component electron-positron-ion plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugemana, A.; Lazarus, I. J.; Moolla, S.

    2014-12-01

    Analytical linear electrostatic waves in a magnetized three-component electron-positron-ion plasma are studied in the low-frequency limit. By using the continuity and momentum equations with Poisson's equation, the dispersion relation for the electron-positron-ion plasma consisting of cool ions, and hot Boltzmann electrons and positrons is derived. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. The present investigation contributes to nonlinear propagation of electrostatic waves in space and the laboratory.

  12. Linear electrostatic waves in a three-component electron-positron-ion plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mugemana, A. Moolla, S.; Lazarus, I. J.

    2014-12-15

    Analytical linear electrostatic waves in a magnetized three-component electron-positron-ion plasma are studied in the low-frequency limit. By using the continuity and momentum equations with Poisson's equation, the dispersion relation for the electron-positron-ion plasma consisting of cool ions, and hot Boltzmann electrons and positrons is derived. In the linear regime, the propagation of two possible modes and their evolution are studied. In the cases of parallel and perpendicular propagation, it is shown that these two possible modes are always stable. The present investigation contributes to nonlinear propagation of electrostatic waves in space and the laboratory.

  13. Phenomenological characteristic of the electron component in gamma-quanta initiated showers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nikolsky, S. I.; Stamenov, J. N.; Ushev, S. Z.

    1985-01-01

    The phenomenological characteristics of the electron component in showers initiated by primary gamma-quanta were analyzed on the basis of the Tien Shan experimental data. It is shown that the lateral distribution of the electrons ion gamma-quanta initiated showers can be described with NKG - function with age parameters bar S equals 0, 76 plus or minus 0, 02, different from the same parameter for normal showers with the same size bar S equals 0, 85 plus or minus 0, 01. The lateral distribution of the correspondent electron energy flux in gamma-quanta initiated showers is steeper as in normal cosmic ray showers.

  14. Suppression of electron scattering by the longitudinal components of tightly focused laser fields

    SciTech Connect

    Masuda, S.; Kando, M.; Kotaki, H.; Nakajima, K.

    2005-01-01

    Relativistic electron scattering by a high intensity linearly polarized Gaussian (TEM{sub 00} mode) laser beam is studied in detail using three-dimensional numerical simulations. It is observed that the longitudinal components of the electromagnetic field in a tight focus effectively suppress transverse electron scattering in the relativistic laser ponderomotive acceleration scheme. The simulations show that the relativistic ponderomotive acceleration can produce high quality electron bunches characterized by an extremely short bunch length of subfemtosecond, energy spread less than 1%, and normalized transverse emittance less than 10{pi} mm mrad.

  15. Thermoelectricity Generation and Electron-Magnon Scattering in a Natural Chalcopyrite Mineral from a Deep-Sea Hydrothermal Vent.

    PubMed

    Ang, Ran; Khan, Atta Ullah; Tsujii, Naohito; Takai, Ken; Nakamura, Ryuhei; Mori, Takao

    2015-10-26

    Current high-performance thermoelectric materials require elaborate doping and synthesis procedures, particularly in regard to the artificial structure, and the underlying thermoelectric mechanisms are still poorly understood. Here, we report that a natural chalcopyrite mineral, Cu1+x Fe1-x S2 , obtained from a deep-sea hydrothermal vent can directly generate thermoelectricity. The resistivity displayed an excellent semiconducting character, and a large thermoelectric power and high power factor were found in the low x region. Notably, electron-magnon scattering and a large effective mass was detected in this region, thus suggesting that the strong coupling of doped carriers and antiferromagnetic spins resulted in the natural enhancement of thermoelectric properties during mineralization reactions. The present findings demonstrate the feasibility of thermoelectric energy generation and electron/hole carrier modulation with natural materials that are abundant in the Earth's crust. PMID:26332260

  16. Influence of humic substances on Co[sup 2+] sorption by a subsurface mineral separate and its mineralogic components

    SciTech Connect

    Zachara, J.M.; Resch, C.T.; Smith, S.C. )

    1994-01-01

    The sorption of Co[sup 2+] (10[sup [minus]6] mol/L) was measured on subsurface mineral materials in the absence and presence of a sorbed leonardite humic acid (LHA) to (1) evaluate the sorptive role of mineral-bound humic substances, and (2) establish approaches to model metal ion binding in composite materials. The subsurface materials were a <2.0 [mu]m size fraction of an ultisol saprolite (CP) and this same material treated with dithonite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) to remove Fe-oxides (DCP). Comparable experiments (with and without LHA) were also performed with mineral sorbents representing dominant phases in the CP separate (gibbsite, Al-geothite, and kalonite) to evaluate their potential contributions to Co sorption. The mineral-bound LHA ranged in concentration between 0.1-0.4 mg-C/m[sup 2], representing approximately 0.7% of the subsurface isolate by mass. In solid-free suspensions, the affinity of LHA for Co increased with pH and decreasing I (K[sub d] ranging 20-450 L/g). Mineral-bound LHA increased Co sorption on all the sorbents by factors of 10-60%, with the greatest augmentation noted at pH values (4.5-6.5) where (1) maximum LHA sorption occurred, and (2) Co sorption to the mineral phase was weak and dominated by ion exchange. The LHA appeared simply to augment, rather than to change the intrinsic adsorption behavior of the mineral sorbents. Accordingly, predictions of the K[sub d] for Co on the LHA-coated subsurface materials (DCP, CP) based on a linear additivity model agreed well with the experimental data, suggesting that the complex humic-mineral association acted as a noninterative sorbent mixture at low aqueous Co concentrations.

  17. 76 FR 55944 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... filed by S3 Graphics Co. Ltd. and S3 Graphics Inc. (collectively, ``S3G''). 75 FR 38118 (July 1, 2010... 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles would be entitled to... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Devices With Image Processing Systems, Components Thereof,...

  18. Analytical modeling of multi-layered Printed Circuit Board dedicated to electronic component thermal characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monier-Vinard, Eric; Laraqi, Najib; Dia, Cheikh-Tidiane; Nguyen, Minh-Nhat; Bissuel, Valentin

    2015-01-01

    Electronic components are continuously getting smaller and embedding more and more powered functions which exacerbate the temperature rise in component/board interconnect areas. For still air conditions, the heat spreading of the component power is mainly done through the surrounding metallic planes of its electronic board. Their design optimization is henceforth mandatory to control the temperature and to preserve component reliability. To allow the electronic designer to early analyze the limits of the power dissipation of miniaturized devices, an analytical model of a multi-layered electronic board was established with the purpose to assess the validity of conventional board modeling approach. For decades, numerous authors have been promoting a homogenous single layer model that summed up the layers of the board using effective orthotropic thermal properties. The derived compact model depends on thermal properties approximation which is commonly based on parallel conduction model given a linear rule of mixture. The work presents the thermal behavior comparison of a detailed multi-layer representation to its deducted compact model for an extensive set of variable parameters, such as heat transfer coefficients, effective thermal conductivities calculation models, number of trace layers, trace coverage or source size. The results highlight the fact that the conventional practices for PCB modeling can dramatically underestimate source temperatures when their size is getting very small.

  19. 78 FR 71643 - Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Commission Determination To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-29

    ... (collectively ``Complainants''). 77 FR 51572-573 (August 24, 2012). The complaint alleges violations of section... 21, 2005, 70 FR 43251 (July 26, 2005). During this period, the subject articles would be entitled to... COMMISSION Certain Wireless Consumer Electronics Devices and Components Thereof; Commission Determination...

  20. 78 FR 32689 - Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-31

    ...Notice is hereby given that the U.S. International Trade Commission has received a complaint entitled Certain Portable Electronic Communications Devices, Including Mobile Phones and Components Thereof, DN 2958; the Commission is soliciting comments on any public interest issues raised by the complaint or complainant's filing under section 210.8(b) of the Commission's Rules of Practice and......

  1. A comparative study of the electron and photon components in photon-induced air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Sciascio, G.; D'Ettorre Piazzoli, B.; Iacovacci, M.

    1997-03-01

    A detailed simulation of the electromagnetic component of extensive air showers generated by 10 11-10 15 eV photons has been carried out by means of the EPAS code. We present and discuss the results concerning the longitudinal, lateral and temporal distributions of electrons and photons down to 1 MeV energy threshold.

  2. The Use of Backscattered Electron Imaging and Transmission Electron Microscopy to Assess Bone Architecture and Mineral Loci: Effect of Intermittent Slow-Release Sodium Fluoride Therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zerwekh, Joseph E.; Bellotto, Dennis; Prostak, Kenneth S.; Hagler, Herbert K.; Pak, Charles Y. C.

    1996-04-01

    Backscattered electron imaging (BEI) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the effects of treatment with intermittent slow-release sodium fluoride (SRNaF) and continuous calcium citrate on bone architecture and crystallinity. Examination was performed in nondecalcified biopsies obtained from patients following up to four years of therapy (placebo or SRNaF) and compared to pretreatment biopsies from each patient, as well as to bone from young, normal subjects. BEI images disclosed increased areas of recent bone formation following fluoride administration. There was no evidence of a mineralization defect in any biopsy and both cortical and trabecular architecture remained normal. TEM analysis demonstrated intrafibrillar platelike crystals and extrafibrillar needlelike crystals for both the pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as for the bone from young normal subjects. There was no evidence of increased crystal size or of an increase in extrafibrillar mineral deposition. These observations suggest that intermittent SRNaF and continuous calcium therapy exerts an anabolic action on the skeleton not accompanied by a mineralization defect or an alteration of bone mineral deposition. The use of BEI and TEM holds promise for the study of the pathophysiology and treatment of metabolic bone diseases.

  3. Determination of mineral components in the cultivation substrates of edible mushrooms and their uptake into fruiting bodies.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chang-Yun; Park, Jeong-Eun; Kim, Bo-Bae; Kim, Sun-Mi; Ro, Hyeon-Su

    2009-06-01

    The mineral contents of the cultivation substrates, fruiting bodies of the mushrooms, and the postharvest cultivation substrates were determined in cultivated edible mushrooms Pleurotus eryngii, Flammulina velutipes, and Hypsizigus marmoreus. The major mineral elements both in the cultivation substrates and in the fruiting bodies were K, Mg, Ca, and Na. Potassium was particularly abundant ranging 10~13 g/kg in the cultivation substrates and 26~30 g/kg in the fruiting bodies. On the contrary, the calcium content in the fruiting bodies was very low despite high concentrations in the cultivation substrates, indicating Ca in the cultivation substrates is in a less bio-available form or the mushrooms do not have efficient Ca uptake channels. Among the minor mineral elements determined in this experiment, Cu, Zn, and Ni showed high percentage of transfer from the cultivation substrates to the fruiting bodies. It is noteworthy that the mineral contents in the postharvest cultivation substrates were not changed significantly which implies that the spent cultivation substrates are nutritionally intact in terms of mineral contents and thus can be recycled as mineral sources and animal feeds. PMID:23983518

  4. 75 FR 28651 - In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of Certain Electronic Paper Towel Dispensing Devices and Components Thereof; Notice... the sale within the United States after importation of certain electronic paper towel dispensing... electronic paper towel dispensing devices or components thereof that infringe one or more of claims 1-7 of...

  5. Influence of humic substances on Co 2+ sorption by a subsurface mineral separate and its mineralogic components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zachara, J. M.; Resch, C. T.; Smith, S. C.

    1994-01-01

    The sorption of Co 2+ (10 -6 mol/L) was measured on subsurface mineral materials in the absence and presence of a sorbed leonardite humic acid (LHA) to (1) evaluate the sorptive role of mineral-bound humic substances, and (2) establish approaches to model metal ion binding in composite materials. The subsurface materials were a < 2.0 μm size fraction of an ultisol saprolite (CP) and this same material treated with dithionite-citrate-bicarbonate (DCB) to remove Fe-oxides (DCP). Comparable experiments (with and without LHA) were also performed with mineral sorbents representing dominant phases in the CP separate (gibbsite, Al-goethite, and kaolinite) to evaluate their potential contributions to Co sorption. The mineral-bound LHA ranged in concentration between 0.1-0.4 mg-C/m 2, representing approximately 0.7% of the subsurface isolate by mass. The sorption-desorption of LHA on the mineral surfaces, and its affinity for Co as a aqueous phase complexant were also determined. Batch measurements were employed (sorbents at 20-90 m 2/L; LHA-DOC at ≈11 mg-C/L) over a range in pH and ionic strength ( I) at I = 0.01 and 0.1 in NaClO 4. The LHA strongly sorbed to the subsurface mineral isolates (CP and DCP), and to all the specimen sorbents except kaolinite. Maximum sorption of LHA occurred at lower pH (≈4.5). In solid-free suspensions, the affinity of LHA for Co increased with pH and decreasing I ( Kd ranging 20-450 L/g). Mineral-bound LHA increased Co sorption on all the sorbents by factors of 10-60 %, with the greatest augmentation noted at pH values (4.5-6.5) where (1) maximum LHA sorption occurred, and (2) Co sorption to the mineral phase was weak and dominated by ion exchange. The LHA appeared simply to augment, rather than to change the intrinsic adsorption behavior of the mineral sorbents. Accordingly, predictions of the Kd for Co on the LHA-coated subsurface materials (DCP, CP) based on a linear additivity model agreed well with the experimental data, suggesting

  6. DEVELOPMENT OF MULTI-PHASE AND MULTI-COMPONENT FLOW MODEL WITH REACTION IN POROUS MEDIA FOR RISK ASSESSMENT ON SOIL CONTAMINATION DUE TO MINERAL OIL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakamoto, Yasuhide; Nishiwaki, Junko; Hara, Junko; Kawabe, Yoshishige; Sugai, Yuichi; Komai, Takeshi

    In late years, soil contamination due to mineral oil in vacant lots of oil factory and oil field has become obvious. Measure for soil contamina tion and risk assessment are neces sary for sustainable development of industrial activity. Especially, in addition to contaminated sites, various exposure paths for human body such as well water, soil and farm crop are supposed. So it is very important to comprehend the transport phenomena of contaminated material under the environments of soil and ground water. In this study, mineral oil as c ontaminated material consisting of mu lti-component such as aliphatic and aromatic series was modeled. Then numerical mode l for transport phenomena in surface soil and aquifer was constructed. On the basis of modeling for mineral oil, our numerical model consists of three-phase (oil, water and gas) forty three-component. This numerical model becomes base program for risk assessment system on soil contamination due to mineral oil. Using this numerical model, we carried out some numerical simulation for a laboratory-scale experiment on oil-water multi-phase flow. Relative permeability that dominate flow behavior in multi-phase condition was formulated and the validity of the numerical model developed in this study was considered.

  7. A review of current and future components for electronic warfare receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, J. H.; Grant, P. M.

    1981-05-01

    This paper addresses the role of conventional and new components in passive electronic warfare (EW) receivers. The various areas of EW are defined before restricting the discussion predominantly to the radar intercept problem at microwave frequencies. The operational parameters of conventional components are then reviewed including the multiplexer; crystal video, instantaneous frequency measurement (IFM), and scanning superheterodyne receivers. The significance of modularity, digital control, and hybrid combinations of components is highlighted. A brief description follows of the operational Cutlass EW equipment. New components based on surface-acoustic waves (SAW) and acoustooptic (AO) Bragg cells are then presented and their particular importance in channelized receivers, IFM's, and microscan receivers noted. Finally, a number of conclusions are drawn covering likely trends in EW receivers and the need for continuing development of large-scale integrated (LSI) circuits for signal sorting and overall digital management.

  8. Graphene radio frequency and microwave passive components for low cost wearable electronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xianjun; Leng, Ting; Hsin Chang, Kuo; Cing Chen, Jia; Novoselov, Kostya S.; Hu, Zhirun

    2016-06-01

    Graphene RF and microwave passive components such as coplanar waveguide transmission lines, open/short-circuited resonators and wideband antenna on paper substrate were designed, screen printed and characterized in this work. The experimental results demonstrate that the screen printed graphene passive components can be used for RF signal transmitting, processing and radiating/receiving; revealing that graphene ink can be a low cost alternative to much more expensive metal nanoparticle inks, such as silver nanoparticle ink. The screen printed graphene is processed at low temperature so that it is compatible with heat-sensitive flexible materials like papers, PTFE (Polytetrafluoroethylene) and textiles. The screen printed graphene passive components reported here are of high conductivity, high flexibility, light weight and low cost, making them ideal candidate for low cost wearable electronics. This work makes it prospective to manufacture RF and microwave passive components in mass production by screen printing in much lower cost to any other known techniques.

  9. Effects of particle shape, hematite content and semi-external mixing with carbonaceous components on the optical properties of accumulation mode mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, S. K.; Tripathi, S. N.; Aggarwal, S. G.; Arola, A.

    2010-12-01

    The radiative forcing estimation of the polluted mineral dust is limited due to lack of morphological analysis, mixing state with the carbonaceous components and the hematite content in the pure dust. The accumulation mode mineral dust has been found to mix with anthropogenically produced black carbon, organic carbon and brown carbon during long range transport. The above features of the polluted dust are not well accounted in the optical models and lead the uncertainty in the numerical estimation of their radiative impact. The Semi-external mixing being a prominent mixing of dust and carbonaceous components has not been studied in details so for compared to core-shell, internal and external mixing studies. In present study, we consider the pure mineral dust composed of non-metallic components (such as Quartz, Feldspar, Mica and Calcite) and metalic component like hematite (Fe2O3). The hematite percentage in the pure mineral dust governs its absorbance. Based on this hematite variation, the hematite fraction in pure mineral dust has been constrained between 0-8%. The morphological and mineralogical characterization of the polluted dust led to consider the three sphere, two sphere and two spheroid model shapes for polluted dust particle system. The pollution gives rise to various light absorbing aerosol components like black carbon, brown carbon and organic carbon (comprising of HUmic-Like Substances, HULIS) in the atmosphere. The entire above discussed model shapes have been considered for the mineral dust getting polluted with (1) organic carbon (especially HULIS component) (2) Brown carbon and (3) black carbon by making a semi-external mixture with pure mineral dust. The optical properties (like Single Scattering Albedo, SSA; Asymmetry parameter, g and Extinction efficiency, Qext) of above model shapes for the polluted dust have been computed using Discrete Dipole Approximation, DDA code. For above model shapes, the SSA was found to vary depending on hematite

  10. Approach to In Situ Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) for Constellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Oeftering, Richard C.

    2010-01-01

    Maintenance resupply is a significant issue for long duration space missions. Currently, the International Space Station (ISS) approaches maintenance primarily around replaceable modules called Orbital Replacement Units (ORU). While swapping out ORUs has served the ISS well keeping crew time for maintenance to a minimum, this approach assumes a substantial logistics capacity to provide replacement ORUs and return ORUs to Earth for repair. The ORUs used for ISS require relatively large blocks of replacement hardware even though the actual failed component may be several orders of magnitude smaller. The Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task was created to explore electronics repair down to the component level for future space missions. From 2006 to 2009, CLEAR was an activity under the Supportability project of the Exploration Technology Development Program. This paper describes the activities of CLEAR including making a case for component-level electronics repair, examination of current terrestrial repair hardware, and potential repair needs. Based on those needs, the CLEAR team proposes an architecture for an in-situ repair capability aboard a spacecraft or habitat. Additionally, this paper discusses recent progress toward developing in-space repair capabilities--including two spaceflight experiments-- and presents technology concepts which could help enable or benefit the same.

  11. Positron acoustic shock waves in four-component plasmas with nonthermal electrons and positrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, M. M.; Mamun, A. A.; Alam, M. S.

    2014-06-01

    Positron acoustic shock waves (PASWs) in an unmagnetized four-component plasma system consisting of a cold mobile viscous positron fluid, hot positrons and electrons following the nonthermal distributions of Cairns et al. [Geophys. Res. Lett. 22, 2709 (1995)], and immobile positive ions are studied both analytically and numerically. The well-known reductive perturbation method is used to derive the Burgers equation. The basic features of the PASWs are significantly modified by the effects of the kinematic viscosity, the nonthermal electrons and hot positrons, the ratio of the electron temperature to the hot positron temperature σ, and the ratio of the hot positron (electron) number density to the cold positron number density μ 1 ( μ 2). The importance of our results to various astrophysical and laboratory plasmas are concisely discussed.

  12. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.

    2014-07-02

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as +0.05 W m−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy and compare this both with simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 W m−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 W m−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in-situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  13. Modeling dust as component minerals in the Community Atmosphere Model: development of framework and impact on radiative forcing

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Scanza, R. A.; Mahowald, N.; Ghan, S.; Zender, C. S.; Kok, J. F.; Liu, X.; Zhang, Y.; Albani, S.

    2015-01-15

    The mineralogy of desert dust is important due to its effect on radiation, clouds and biogeochemical cycling of trace nutrients. This study presents the simulation of dust radiative forcing as a function of both mineral composition and size at the global scale, using mineral soil maps for estimating emissions. Externally mixed mineral aerosols in the bulk aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 4 (CAM4) and internally mixed mineral aerosols in the modal aerosol module in the Community Atmosphere Model version 5.1 (CAM5) embedded in the Community Earth System Model version 1.0.5 (CESM) are speciated into common mineral componentsmore » in place of total dust. The simulations with mineralogy are compared to available observations of mineral atmospheric distribution and deposition along with observations of clear-sky radiative forcing efficiency. Based on these simulations, we estimate the all-sky direct radiative forcing at the top of the atmosphere as + 0.05 Wm−2 for both CAM4 and CAM5 simulations with mineralogy. We compare this to the radiative forcing from simulations of dust in release versions of CAM4 and CAM5 (+0.08 and +0.17 Wm−2) and of dust with optimized optical properties, wet scavenging and particle size distribution in CAM4 and CAM5, −0.05 and −0.17 Wm−2, respectively. The ability to correctly include the mineralogy of dust in climate models is hindered by its spatial and temporal variability as well as insufficient global in situ observations, incomplete and uncertain source mineralogies and the uncertainties associated with data retrieved from remote sensing methods.« less

  14. Sequential energy and electron transfer in a three-component system aligned on a clay nanosheet.

    PubMed

    Fujimura, Takuya; Ramasamy, Elamparuthi; Ishida, Yohei; Shimada, Tetsuya; Takagi, Shinsuke; Ramamurthy, Vaidhyanathan

    2016-02-21

    To achieve the goal of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer across three molecules, a phenomenon often utilized in artificial light harvesting systems, we have assembled a light absorber (that also serves as an energy donor), an energy acceptor (that also serves as an electron donor) and an electron acceptor on the surface of an anionic clay nanosheet. Since neutral organic molecules have no tendency to adsorb onto the anionic surface of clay, a positively charged water-soluble organic capsule was used to hold neutral light absorbers on the above surface. A three-component assembly was prepared by the co-adsorption of a cationic bipyridinium derivative, cationic zinc porphyrin and cationic octaamine encapsulated 2-acetylanthracene on an exfoliated anionic clay surface in water. Energy and electron transfer phenomena were monitored by steady state fluorescence and picosecond time resolved fluorescence decay. The excitation of 2-acetylanthracene in the three-component system resulted in energy transfer from 2-acetylanthracene to zinc porphyrin with 71% efficiency. Very little loss due to electron transfer from 2-acetylanthracene in the cavitand to the bipyridinium derivative was noticed. Energy transfer was followed by electron transfer from the zinc porphyrin to the cationic bipyridinium derivative with 81% efficiency. Analyses of fluorescence decay profiles confirmed the occurrence of energy transfer and subsequent electron transfer. Merging the concepts of supramolecular chemistry and surface chemistry we realized sequential energy and electron transfer between three hydrophobic molecules in water. Exfoliated transparent saponite clay served as a matrix to align the three photoactive molecules at a close distance in aqueous solutions. PMID:26820105

  15. Radiation tolerance of opto-electronic components proposed for space-based quantum key distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Yue Chuan; Chandrasekara, Rakhitha; Cheng, Cliff; Ling, Alexander

    2015-11-01

    Plasma in low earth orbit can damage electronic components and potentially jeopardize scientific missions in space. Predicting the accumulated damage and understanding components' radiation tolerance are important in mission planning. In this manuscript, we report on the observed radiation tolerance of single photon detectors and a liquid crystal polarization rotator. We conclude that an uncooled Si APD could continue to operate from more than a month up to beyond the lifetime of the satellite depending on the orbit. The liquid crystal polarization rotator was also unaffected by the exposed dosage.

  16. Electronically tunable quadrature oscillator using grounded components with current and voltage outputs.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hua-Pin

    2014-01-01

    The electronically tunable quadrature oscillator using a single multiple-output current controlled current differencing transconductance amplifier (MO-CCCDTA) and grounded passive components is presented. The proposed configuration uses a single MO-CCCDTA, two grounded capacitors and one grounded resistor. Two high-output impedance quadrature current signals and two quadrature voltage signals with 90° phase difference. The oscillation condition and oscillation frequency of the proposed quadrature oscillator are independently controllable. The use of only grounded passive components makes the proposed circuit ideal for integrated circuit implementation. PMID:25121124

  17. Changes in the mineral density distribution in human bone with age: image analysis using backscattered electrons in the SEM.

    PubMed

    Reid, S A; Boyde, A

    1987-02-01

    We report a study to test the feasibility of studying mineral density distributions in bone using the backscattered electron signal in scanning electron microscopy. Samples were human sixth ribs ranging in age from 8 weeks to 59 years, embedded in polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA), cut, polished, and carbon coated. The proportions of pixels falling in a uniform set of gray level slices of the BSE signal were determined using a microcomputer-based image analysis system interfaced directly to the SEM. The amount of high-density bone gradually increased with age at the expense of low-density bone, and there was an associated compression of the range of the mineral density distribution. Age-related differences were noted between the density distributions in the outer and inner rib cortices. The distribution in the inner cortex in neonates was influenced by the inclusion of densely mineralized endochondral bone and cartilage trabeculae formed at the growth cartilage zone. In adults it appeared that greater bone turnover occurred in the outer cortex, perhaps reflecting a differential mechanical loading across the rib. The technique enabled rapid, unbiased discrimination between the bone of neonates, children, and adults. PMID:3455153

  18. Modeling of runaway electron damage for the design of tokamak plasma facing components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niemer, K. A.; Gilligan, J. G.; Croessmann, C. D.; Bolt, H. H.

    1990-04-01

    Cracking, craters, spotty damage (discoloration), and missing chunks of material have been observed on limiters and along the midplane of tokamak inner walls. This damage is assumed to be due to runaway electron discharges. These runaway electrons have been predicted to range in energy from a few MeV to several hundred MeV. The energy density from the runaway electron discharges ranges from 10 to 500 MJ/sq m over pulse lengths of 5 to 50 msec. The PTA code package is a three dimensional, time dependent, computational code package used to predict energy deposition, temperature rise, and damage on tokamak first wall and limiter materials form runaway electron impact. Two experiments were modeled to validate the PTA code package. The first experiment tested the thermal and structural response from high energy electron impact on different fusion materials, and the second experiment simulated runaway electrons scattering through a plasma facing surface (graphite) into an internal structure (copper). The PTA calculations compared favorably with the experimental results. In particular, the PTA models identified gap conductance, thermal contact, x ray generation in materials, and the placement of high stopping power materials as key factors in the design of plasma facing components, resistant to runaway electron damage.

  19. Electron paramagnetic resonance, optical absorption and Raman spectral studies on a pyrite/chalcopyrite mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Udayabhaskar Reddy, G.; Seshamaheswaramma, K.; Nakamura, Yoshinobu; Lakshmi Reddy, S.; Frost, Ray L.; Endo, Tamio

    2012-10-01

    Pyrite and chalcopyrite mineral samples from Mangampet barite mine, Kadapa, Andhra Pradesh, India are used in the present study. XRD data indicate that the pyrite mineral has a face centered cubic lattice structure with lattice constant 5.4179 Å. Also it possesses an average particle size of 91.9 nm. An EPR study on the powdered samples confirms the presence of iron in pyrite and iron and Mn(II) in chalcopyrite. The optical absorption spectrum of chalcopyrite indicates presence of copper which is in a distorted octahedral environment. NIR results confirm the presence of water fundamentals and Raman spectrum reveals the presence of water and sulfate ions.

  20. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    SciTech Connect

    Schwarze, G.E. ); Niedra, J.M. ); Frasca, A.J. ); Wieserman, W.R. )

    1993-01-15

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare-earth permanent magnets.

  1. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI High Capacity Power Project

    SciTech Connect

    Shwarze, G.E.; Niedra, J.M.; Frasca, A.J.; Wieserman, W.R.

    1994-09-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the CSTI high capacity power project will be presented in this paper: (1) Neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) Temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) Temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  2. Radiation and temperature effects on electronic components investigated under the CSTI high capacity power project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarze, Gene E.; Niedra, Janis M.; Frasca, Albert J.; Wieserman, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The effects of nuclear radiation and high temperature environments must be fully known and understood for the electronic components and materials used in both the Power Conditioning and Control subsystem and the reactor Instrumentation and Control subsystem of future high capacity nuclear space power systems. This knowledge is required by the designer of these subsystems in order to develop highly reliable, long-life power systems for future NASA missions. A review and summary of the experimental results obtained for the electronic components and materials investigated under the power management element of the Civilian Space Technology Initiative (CSTI) high capacity power project are presented: (1) neutron, gamma ray, and temperature effects on power semiconductor switches, (2) temperature and frequency effects on soft magnetic materials; and (3) temperature effects on rare earth permanent magnets.

  3. Calibration Telescope System of CWD NEVOD as a Detector of Electron and Muon Components of EAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amelchakov, M. B.; Bogdanov, A. G.; Zadeba, E. A.; Khokhlov, S. S.; Kokoulin, R. P.; Kompaniets, K. G.; Shulzhenko, I. A.; Shutenko, V. V.; Yashin, I. I.

    The paper describes the system of calibration telescopes as a part of the experimental complex NEVOD. The setup operation parameters were analysed during experimental series from 01/06/2013 to 21/01/2015. The technique of the charged particle local density spectrum reconstruction is described. The results of the local density spectrum measurements are presented for the EAS electron and muon components in different energy ranges of primary cosmic rays.

  4. Transmission Electron Microscopy of the Matrix Minerals in the Tagish Lake Carbonaceous Chondrite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikouchi, T.; Kasama, T.; Zolensky, M. E.; Tachikawa, O.

    2001-01-01

    We studied the Tagish Lake matrix minerals by TEM. The result shows similarities to CIs (and CRs) and differences from CMs, but its heterogeneity (e.g., carbonate abundance, saponite/serpentine ratio) suggests its complex history. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Recommendations for Enabling Manual Component Level Electronic Repair for Future Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struk, Peter M.; Easton, John W.; Funk, Gregory P.; Latta, Gary S.; Ganster, Andrew W.; Estes, Brett E.

    2011-01-01

    Long duration missions to the Moon and Mars pose a number of challenges to mission designers, controllers, and the crews. Among these challenges are planning for corrective maintenance actions which often require a repair. Current repair strategies on the International Space Station (ISS) rely primarily on the use of Orbital Replacement Units (ORUs), where a faulty unit is replaced with a spare, and the faulty unit typically returns to Earth for analysis and possible repair. The strategy of replace to repair has posed challenges even for the ISS program. Repairing faulty hardware at lower levels such as the component level can help maintain system availability in situations where no spares exist and potentially reduce logistic resupply mass.This report provides recommendations to help enable manual replacement of electronics at the component-level for future manned space missions. The recommendations include hardware, tools, containment options, and crew training. The recommendations are based on the work of the Component Level Electronics Assembly Repair (CLEAR) task of the Exploration Technology Development Program from 2006 to 2009. The recommendations are derived based on the experience of two experiments conducted by the CLEAR team aboard the International Space Station as well as a group of experienced Miniature/Microminiature (2M) electronics repair technicians and instructors from the U.S. Navy 2M Project Office. The emphasis of the recommendations is the physical repair. Fault diagnostics and post-repair functional test are discussed in other CLEAR reports.

  6. Microbial mineralization of cis-dichloroethene and vinyl chloride as a component of natural attenuation of chloroethene contaminants under conditions identified in the field as anoxic

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, Paul M.

    2012-01-01

    Chlororespiration is a key component of remediation at many chloroethene-contaminated sites. In some instances, limited accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products may suggest that natural attenuation is not adequate for site remediation. This conclusion is justified when evidence for parent compound (tetrachloroethene, PCE, or trichloroethene, TCE) degradation is lacking. For many chloroethene-contaminated shallow aquifer systems, however, non-conservative losses of the parent compounds are clear but the mass balance between parent compound attenuation and accumulation of reductive dechlorination daughter products is incomplete. Incomplete mass balance indicates a failure to account for important contaminant attenuation mechanisms, and is consistent with contaminant degradation to non-diagnostic mineralization products. An ongoing technical debate over the potential for mineralization of dichloroethene (DCE) and vinyl chloride (VC) to CO2 in the complete absence of diatomic oxygen has largely obscured the importance of microbial DCE/VC mineralization at dissolved oxygen (DO) concentrations below the current field standard (DO < 0.1-0.5 milligrams per liter) for nominally anoxic conditions. This study demonstrates that oxygen-based microbial mineralization of DCE and VC can be substantial under field conditions that are frequently characterized as "anoxic." Because mischaracterization of operant contaminant biodegradation processes can lead to expensive and ineffective remedial actions, a modified framework for assessing the potential importance of oxygen during chloroethene biodegradation was developed.

  7. The possibility of the formation of protocells and their structural components on the basis of the apatite matrix and cocrystallizing minerals.

    PubMed

    Kostetsky, Eduard Y

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents the author's theory on the possibility of simultaneous hard-phase synthesis of various organic molecules from gas-phase elements on the basis of the apatite matrix and cocrystallizing minerals (carbonate-apatite, calcite, mica). These molecules and their ensembles gave rise to living systems and protocells of the pro- and eukaryotic types. Synthesis might have occurred through gradual substitution of the mineral matrix by crystal organic matter. The structure and size of the molecules synthesized were determined by the structure, physical parameters, and arrangement of organizing centers in the crystal lattice. Apatite phosphates were embedded in a synthesized nucleic helix and their size and purine-pyrimidine complementarity were determined. Apatite and cocrystallizing minerals were seen to be involved in the synthesis of four basic classes of cell components: apatite-DNA and nucleoproteide complexes; carbonate-apatite-enzymes, other proteins involved in DNA replication, all RNA types and their complexes with the specific proteins and enzymes of transcription and translation; calcite-cytoskeletal proteins; and mica-membrane lipids and proteins. The evidence supporting this theory is presented. A possible mechanism to account for the transition from crystal through organo-mineral crystal to liquid crystal (protocell) and a model of the occurrence of the matrix mechanism of transcription and translation are proposed. Some principal problems in the biochemistry and molecular biology of the origin of life on the Earth are discussed. PMID:23345922

  8. A model for computing vibration induced stresses of electronic components in a general flexible mounting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Gustavo H. C.; Paupitz Gonçalves, Paulo J.

    2013-09-01

    This paper develops a novel full analytic model for vibration analysis of solid-state electronic components. The model is just as accurate as finite element models and numerically light enough to permit for quick design trade-offs and statistical analysis. The paper shows the development of the model, comparison to finite elements and an application to a common engineering problem. A gull-wing flat pack component was selected as the benchmark test case, although the presented methodology is applicable to a wide range of component packages. Results showed very good agreement between the presented method and finite elements and demonstrated the usefulness of the method in how to use standard test data for a general application. The properties E, G, A, I, J and κ need not be constants; they may all be functions of s.

  9. Electron spin resonance characterization of radical components in irradiated black pepper skin and core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamaoki, Rumi; Kimura, Shojiro; Ohta, Masatoshi

    2011-11-01

    Characteristics of free radical components of irradiated black pepper fruit (skin) and the pepper seed (core) were analyzed using electron spin resonance. A weak signal near g=2.005 was observed in black pepper before irradiation. Complex spectra near g=2.005 with three lines (the skin) or seven lines (the core) were observed in irradiated black pepper (both end line width; ca. 6.8 mT). The spectral intensities decreased considerably at 30 days after irradiation, and continued to decrease steadily thereafter. The spectra simulated on the basis of the content and the stability of radical components derived from plant constituents, including fiber, starch, polyphenol, mono- and disaccharide, were in good agreement with the observed spectra. Analysis showed that the signal intensities derived from fiber in the skin for an absorbed dose were higher, and the rates of decrease were lower, than that in the core. In particular, the cellulose radical component in the skin was highly stable.

  10. Principal component analysis of global maps of the total electronic content

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslennikova, Yu. S.; Bochkarev, V. V.

    2014-03-01

    In this paper we present results of the spatial distribution analysis of the total electron content (TEC) performed by the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) with the use of global maps of TEC provided by the JPL laboratory (Jet Propulsion Laboratory, NASA, USA) for the period from 2004 to 2010. We show that the obtained components of the decomposition of TEC essentially depend on the representation of the initial data and the method of their preliminary processing. We propose a technique for data centering that allows us to take into account the influence of diurnal and seasonal factors. We establish a correlation between amplitudes of the first components of the decomposition of TEC (connected with the equatorial anomaly) and the solar activity index F10.7, as well as with the flow of high energy particles of the solar wind.

  11. 78 FR 75336 - Notice of Intent To Grant an Exclusive License; Aviation Devices and Electronic Components, L.L.C.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE Department of Navy Notice of Intent To Grant an Exclusive License; Aviation Devices and Electronic Components... hereby gives notice of its intent to grant to Aviation Devices and Electronic Components, L.L.C....

  12. Evaluation of Power Electronic Components and Systems at Cryogenic Temperatures For Space Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elbuluk, Malik E.; Gerber, Scott; Hammoud, Ahmad; Patterson, Richard L.

    2005-01-01

    Power electronic circuits and systems designed for deep space applications and outer planetary exploration are required to operate reliably and efficiently under extreme temperature conditions. This requirement is dictated by the fact that the operational environments associated with some of the space missions would encompass temperatures as low as -183 C. The development and utilization of electronics capable of low temperature operation would not only fulfill the advanced technology requirements, but also would contribute to improving circuit performance, increasing system efficiency, and reducing development and launch costs. These benefits are generally achieved by the improved intrinsic properties of some of the electronic materials at low temperature, reduced device losses, and the elimination of heating elements used in conventional systems at low temperatures. Power electronic circuits are widely used in space power systems in the areas of power management, conditioning, and control. In this work, the performance of certain power electronic components and systems was investigated under low temperature. These include inductors, capacitors, pulse-width-modulation (PWM) controllers, and advanced commercial DC/DC converter modules. Different properties were determined as a function of temperature in the range of 20 C to -140 C, at various current and voltages levels. The experimental procedures along with the experimental data obtained are presented and discussed in this paper.

  13. Vibrational Analysis of Engine Components Using Neural-Net Processing and Electronic Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Fite, E. Brian; Mehmed, Oral; Thorp, Scott A.

    1998-01-01

    The use of computational-model trained artificial neural networks to acquire damage specific information from electronic holograms is discussed. A neural network is trained to transform two time-average holograms into a pattern related to the bending-induced-strain distribution of the vibrating component. The bending distribution is very sensitive to component damage unlike the characteristic fringe pattern or the displacement amplitude distribution. The neural network processor is fast for real-time visualization of damage. The two-hologram limit makes the processor more robust to speckle pattern decorrelation. Undamaged and cracked cantilever plates serve as effective objects for testing the combination of electronic holography and neural-net processing. The requirements are discussed for using finite-element-model trained neural networks for field inspections of engine components. The paper specifically discusses neural-network fringe pattern analysis in the presence of the laser speckle effect and the performances of two limiting cases of the neural-net architecture.

  14. Vibrational Analysis of Engine Components Using Neural-Net Processing and Electronic Holography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Decker, Arthur J.; Fite, E. Brian; Mehmed, Oral; Thorp, Scott A.

    1997-01-01

    The use of computational-model trained artificial neural networks to acquire damage specific information from electronic holograms is discussed. A neural network is trained to transform two time-average holograms into a pattern related to the bending-induced-strain distribution of the vibrating component. The bending distribution is very sensitive to component damage unlike the characteristic fringe pattern or the displacement amplitude distribution. The neural network processor is fast for real-time visualization of damage. The two-hologram limit makes the processor more robust to speckle pattern decorrelation. Undamaged and cracked cantilever plates serve as effective objects for testing the combination of electronic holography and neural-net processing. The requirements are discussed for using finite-element-model trained neural networks for field inspections of engine components. The paper specifically discusses neural-network fringe pattern analysis in the presence of the laser speckle effect and the performances of two limiting cases of the neural-net architecture.

  15. Assessment of Selected CERES Electronic Component Survivability under Simulated Overvoltage Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chapman, John J.; Grant, M. S.; Bockman, J.; Clark, V. M.; Hess, P. C.

    1999-01-01

    In August, 1998 a Clouds and the Earth's Radiant Energy System (CERES) instrument telemetry housekeeping parameter generated a yellow warning message that indicated an on-board + 15V Data Acquisition Assembly (DAA) power converter deregulation anomaly. An exhaustive investigation was undertaken to understand this anomaly and the long-term consequences which have severely reduced CERES operations on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) spacecraft. Among investigations performed were ground tests that approximated the on-board electronic circuitry using a small quantity of flight identical components exposed to maximum spacecraft bus over-voltage conditions. These components include monolithic integrated microcircuits that perform analog signal conditioning on instrument sensor signals and an analog- to-digital converter (ADC) for the entire DAA. All microcircuit packages have either a bipolar silicon design with internal current limiting protections or have a complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) design with bias protections. Ground tests that have been running for approximately 8 months have indicated that these components are capable of withstanding as much as twice their input supply voltage ratings without noticeable performance degradation. These data provide CERES operators with confidence of being able to continue science operations over the remaining life of the TRMM mission. This paper will discuss this anomaly and some possible causes, a simulator of affected electronics, test results, prognosis for future CERES operations, and conclusions.

  16. A world of minerals in your mobile device

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jenness, Jane E.; Ober, Joyce A.; Wilkins, Aleeza M.; Gambogi, Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Mobile phones and other high-technology communications devices could not exist without mineral commodities. More than one-half of all components in a mobile device—including its electronics, display, battery, speakers, and more—are made from mined and semiprocessed materials (mineral commodities). Some mineral commodities can be recovered as byproducts during the production and processing of other commodities. As an example, bauxite is mined for its aluminum content, but gallium is recovered during the aluminum production process. The images show the ore minerals (sources) of some mineral commodities that are used to make components of a mobile device. On the reverse side, the map and table depict the major source countries producing these mineral commodities along with how these commodities are used in mobile devices. For more information on minerals, visit http://minerals.usgs.gov.

  17. Quantitative determination of the mineral distribution in different collagen zones of calcifying tendon using high voltage electron microscopic tomography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McEwen, B. F.; Song, M. J.; Landis, W. J.

    1991-01-01

    High voltage electron microscopic tomography was used to make the first quantitative determination of the distribution of mineral between different regions of collagen fibrils undergoing early calcification in normal leg tendons of the domestic turkey, Meleagris gallopavo. The tomographic 3-D reconstruction was computed from a tilt series of 61 different views spanning an angular range of +/- 60 degrees in 2 degrees intervals. Successive applications of an interactive computer operation were used to mask the collagen banding pattern of either hole or overlap zones into separate versions of the reconstruction. In such 3-D volumes, regions specified by the mask retained their original image density while the remaining volume was set to background levels. This approach was also applied to the mineral crystals present in the same volumes to yield versions of the 3-D reconstructions that were masked for both the crystal mass and the respective collagen zones. Density profiles from these volumes contained a distinct peak corresponding only to the crystal mass. A comparison of the integrated density of this peak from each profile established that 64% of the crystals observed were located in the collagen hole zones and 36% were found in the overlap zones. If no changes in crystal stability occur once crystals are formed, this result suggests the possibilities that nucleation of mineral is preferentially and initially associated with the hole zones, nucleation occurs more frequently in the hole zones, the rate of crystal growth is more rapid in the hole zones, or a combination of these alternatives. All lead to the conclusion that the overall accumulation of mineral mass is predominant in the collagen hole zones compared to overlap zones during early collagen fibril calcification.

  18. Effect of six-month hypokinesia in dogs on mineral component, reconstruction and mechanical properties of bone tissue

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volozhin, A. I.; Pavlova, M. P.; Muradov, I. S.; Stupakov, G. P.; Korzhenyants, V. A.

    1980-01-01

    Ca45 incorporation into the bones of the limbs, particularly in the area of the muscle attachment increased in dogs as a result of 6 month hypokinesia. There were no phenomena of osteoporosis in the cortical layer of the diaphyses; however, changes in the form of osteons, an increase in the number of anastomoses between the channels and the thinning of the subperiosteal layer pointed to disturbances of the bone tissue reconstruction. Mineral saturation of the bone microstructures of the experimental dogs had a tendency to rise. No changes in the mechanical properties of the long bones occurred as a result of hypokinesia in dogs.

  19. Effect of Electrostatic Discharge on Electrical Characteristics of Discrete Electronic Components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wysocki, Phil; Vashchenko, Vladislav; Celaya, Jose; Saha, Sankalita; Goebel, Kai

    2009-01-01

    This article reports on preliminary results of a study conducted to examine how temporary electrical overstress seed fault conditions in discrete power electronic components that cannot be detected with reliability tests but impact longevity of the device. These defects do not result in formal parametric failures per datasheet specifications, but result in substantial change in the electrical characteristics when compared with pristine device parameters. Tests were carried out on commercially available 600V IGBT devices using transmission line pulse (TLP) and system level ESD stress. It was hypothesized that the ESD causes local damage during the ESD discharge which may greatly accelerate degradation mechanisms and thus reduce the life of the components. This hypothesis was explored in simulation studies where different types of damage were imposed to different parts of the device. Experimental results agree qualitatively with the simulation for a number of tests which will motivate more in-depth modeling of the damage.

  20. Two-semiconductive-component hybrid coordination polymers with controllable photo-induced electron-transfer properties.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jian-Jun; Chen, Yong; Lin, Mei-Jin; Huang, Chang-Cang; Dai, Wen-Xin

    2016-04-12

    Two semiconductive inorganic-organic hybrid coordination polymers constructed from metal iodide clusters and naphthalene diimide semiconductive components, [Cu2I2(DPNDI)]n () and [PbI2(DPNDI)]n () (DPNDI = N,N'-di-(4-pyridyl)-1,4,5,8-naphthalene diimide), have been synthesized and characterized. Although possessing similar 2D heterostructures, hybrids exhibited different photo-induced electron-transfer properties. Due to the higher HOMO energy level of the [Cu2I2]n chain than that of the [PbI2]n cluster, only hybrid can easily undergo intramolecular electron transfer to form a long-lived charge separated state, which may be applied in artificial photosynthesis. PMID:26985714

  1. Industrial process profiles for environmental use: Chapter 30. The electronic component manufacturing industry. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-04-01

    This report is one of a series constituting the catalog of Industrial Process Profiles for Environmental Use. Each industry sector is addressed as a separate chapter of the study. The catalog was developed for the purpose of compiling relevant information concerning air, water, and solid waste emissions from industries which employ similar technologies, have common types of environmental impacts, and supply their products for further processing or consumption to the same general population of customers. This report addresses the following segments of the electronic component manufacturing industry: semiconductors, SIC 3674; capacitors, SIC 3675; resistors, SIC 3676; transformer and inductors, SIC 3677; printed circuit boards, SIC 3679052; electron tubes, SIC 36711, 36713; and cathode ray tubes, SIC 36712, 3671385.

  2. The study of ionization by electron impact of a substance simulating spent nuclear fuel components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonov, N. N.; Bochkarev, E. I.; Gavrikov, A. V.; Samokhin, A. A.; Smirnov, V. P.

    2015-11-01

    Plasma sources of model substances are necessary to solve problems associated with development of the spent nuclear fuel (SNF) plasma separation method. Lead was chosen to simulate kinetic and dynamic properties of the heavy SNF components. In this paper we present the results of a study of a lead vapor discharge with a lead concentration of 1012-1013 cm-3. Ionization was carried out by an electron beam (with energy of up to 500 eV per electron) inside a centimeter gap between planar electrodes. The discharge was numerically modeled using the hydrodynamic and single-particle approximation. Current-voltage characteristics and single ionization efficiency were obtained as functions of the vapors concentration and thermoelectric current. An ion current of hundreds of microamperes at the ionization efficiency near tenths of a percent was experimentally obtained. These results are in good agreement with our model.

  3. ATF (Advanced Toroidal Facility) ECH (Electron Cyclotron Heating) waveguide component development and testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bigelow, T.S.; White, T.L.; Kimrey, H.D.

    1987-01-01

    The Advanced Toroidal Facility (ATF) Electron Cyclotron Heating (ECH) system presently under construction will consist of two 53.2-GHz, 200-kW continuous-wave (cw) gyrotrons with a mode-controlled waveguide system and polarized launcher optimized for maximum power in the ATF plasma. Several components, such as a waveguide mode-analyzing directional coupler, a TiO/sub 2/ mode absorber, miter bends, and a polarization-selectable beamed launcher, have been developed and tested. Laboratory results and initial high-power operation of the system are presented. 2 refs., 2 figs.

  4. Space Radiation Shielding Studies for Astronaut and Electronic Component Risk Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fuchs, Jordan Robert

    2010-01-01

    The dosimetry component of the Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) will design, develop and characterize the response of a suite of radiation detectors and supporting instrumentation and electronics with three primary goals that will: (1) Use established space radiation detection systems to characterize the primary and secondary radiation fields existing in the experimental test-bed zones during exposures at particle accelerator facilities. (2) Characterize the responses of newly developed space radiation detection systems in the experimental test-bed zones during exposures at particle accelerator facilities, and (3) Provide CRESSE collaborators with detailed dosimetry information in experimental test-bed zones.

  5. Process development for electron beam joining of ceramic and glass components

    SciTech Connect

    Turman, B.N.; Glass, S.J.; Yang, P.; Gerstle, F.P.; Halbleib, J.A.; Voth, T.E.; McKenzie, B.; Clifford, J.R.; Habiger, K.

    1997-11-01

    The purpose of this project is to develop and extend the electron beam joining process to applications related to Mo/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} cermets for neutron tube fabrication, glass seals for flat panel displays, and ceramics for structural applications. The key issue is the identification of the allowable operating ranges that produce thermal conditions favorable to robust joining and sealing. High strength, hermetic braze joints between ceramic components have been produced using high energy electron beams. With a penetration depth into a typical ceramic of {approximately} 1 cm for a 10 MeV electron beam, this method provides the capability for rapid, transient brazing operations where temperature control of heat sensitive components is essential. The method deposits energy directly into a buried joint, allowing otherwise inaccessible interfaces to be brazed. The combination of transient heating, with higher thermal conductivity, lower heat capacity, and lower melting temperature of braze metals relative to the ceramic materials, enables a pulsed high power beam to melt a braze metal without producing excessive ceramic temperatures. The authors have demonstrated the feasibility of this process related to ceramic coupons a well as ceramic and glass tubes and cylindrical shapes. The transient thermal response was predicted, using as input the energy absorption predicted from the coupled electron-photon and thermal transport analysis. The joining experiments were conducted with an RF linear accelerator at 10--13 MV. Joining experiments have provided high strength joints between alumina and alumina and between alumina and cermet joints in cylindrical geometry. These joints provided good hermetic seals.

  6. Identification of concrete deteriorating minerals by polarizing and scanning electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Gregerova, Miroslava; Vsiansky, Dalibor

    2009-07-15

    The deterioration of concrete represents one of the most serious problems of civil engineering worldwide. Besides other processes, deterioration of concrete consists of sulfate attack and carbonation. Sulfate attack results in the formation of gypsum, ettringite and thaumasite in hardened concrete. Products of sulfate attack may cause a loss of material strength and a risk of collapse of the concrete constructions. The authors focused especially on the microscopical research of sulfate attack. Concrete samples were taken from the Charles Bridge in Prague, Czech Republic. A succession of degrading mineral formation was suggested. Microscope methods represent a new approach to solving the deterioration problems. They enable evaluation of the state of concrete constructions and in cooperation with hydro-geochemistry, mathematics and statistics permit prediction of the durability of a structure. Considering the number of concrete constructions and their age, research of concrete deterioration has an increasing importance. The results obtained can also be useful for future construction, because they identify the risk factors associated with formation of minerals known to degrade structures.

  7. An ex-vivo comparative study of root-end marginal adaptation using grey mineral trioxide aggregate, white mineral trioxide aggregate, and Portland cement under scanning electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Baranwal, Akash Kumar; Paul, Mohan L.; Mazumdar, Dibyendu; Adhikari, Haridas Das; Vyavahare, Nishant K.; Jhajharia, Kapil

    2015-01-01

    Context: Where nonsurgical endodontic intervention is not possible, or it will not solve the problem, surgical endodontic treatment must be considered. A major cause of surgical endodontic failures is an inadequate apical seal, so the use of the suitable substance as root-end filling material that prevents egress of potential contaminants into periapical tissue is very critical. Aims: The aim of the present ex-vivo study was to compare and evaluate the three root-end filling materials of mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA) family (white MTA [WMTA], grey MTA [GMTA] and Portland cement [PC]) for their marginal adaptation at the root-end dentinal wall using scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Materials and Methods: Sixty human single-rooted teeth were decoronated, instrumented, and obturated with Gutta-percha. After the root-end resection and apical cavity preparation, the teeth were randomly divided into three-experimental groups (each containing 20 teeth) and each group was filled with their respective experimental materials. After longitudinal sectioning of root, SEM examination was done to determine the overall gap between retrograde materials and cavity walls in terms of length and width of the gap (maximum) at the interface. Descriptive statistical analysis was performed to calculate the means with corresponding standard errors, median and ranges along with an analysis of variance and Tukey's test. Results: The least overall gap was observed in GMTA followed by PC and WMTA. While after statistically analyzing the various data obtained from different groups, there was no significant difference among these three groups in terms of marginal adaptation. Conclusion: GMTA showed the best overall adaptation to root dentinal wall compared to PC and WMTA. Being biocompatible and cheaper, the PC may be an alternative but not a substitute for MTA. PMID:26430305

  8. A spatially weighted principal component analysis for multi-element geochemical data for mapping locations of felsic intrusions in the Gejiu mineral district of Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiuming; Bonham-Carter, Greame; Wang, Wenlei; Zhang, Shengyuan; Li, Wenchang; Qinglin, Xia

    2011-05-01

    Principal component analysis (PCA) is frequently used in geosciences for information extraction. In many applications, masking PCA has been used to create subsets of samples or sub-areas to enhance the effect of the main objects of interest. In this paper we suggest how the representativeness of samples or pixels can be quantified using a fuzzy membership function based on fuzzy set theory. In this new method, the relative importance of pixels or samples can be taken into account using a multivariate statistical method such as PCA. A Fuzzy Masking PCA is proposed and implemented in GeoDAS GIS on the basis of a spatially weighted PCA (SWPCA). This paper introduces the mathematical treatment of the fuzzy masking PCA and follows a case study of identifying the locations of intrusive bodies from geochemical data in the Gejiu mineral district in Yunnan, China. Power-law functions based on the inverse distance from mapped felsic intrusions are applied as weighting functions in FMPCA. The results indicate that fuzzy mask PCA increases the signal-noise ratio of the component representing igneous intrusions and decreases the influence of sedimentary rocks. The areas delineated as potential areas for new intrusions (including buried intrusions) are valuable guides for Sn mineral prospecting.

  9. [Mineralization of heart valves].

    PubMed

    Pawlikowski, M; Pfitzner, R

    1992-01-01

    Mineralization (calcification) of heart valves (mitral, aortic and aortic bioprosthesis) have been analyzed using; histology, x-ray diffraction, infrared spectroscopy, scanning microscopy, atomic absorption and electron microprobe. Obtained results showed the presence of two type of mineralization. First type is represented by grains composed of hydroxyapatite containing admixture of carbonates. This mineralization is seen macroscopically. Second type of mineralization is possible to determine only using chemical methods. It is represented by biological structures containing amount of Ca, P and other elements higher then normal heart valves. This second type of the mineralization conducts to the changes of physical features of the tissue. Both types of calcification develops because of the defects of atomic structure of biological components of heart valves (mainly collagen). These defects show the presence of free atomic bindings i.e. electric potential. Because of this, they are able to react with surrounding free joints, starting calcification. Defects of biological structures of heart valves are the results of infections, mechanical destruction of the valves etc. Calcification may be stopped on different stages of its development: or as secret calcification or may pass to the stage seen as apatite grains. PMID:1342999

  10. Clay Minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, Karl T.; Sanders, Rebecca L.; Washton, Nancy M.

    2014-03-14

    Clay minerals are important components of the environment and are involved or implicated in processes such as the uptake of pollutants and the release of nutrients and as potential platforms for a number of chemical reactions. Owing to their small particle sizes (typically, on the order of microns or smaller) and mixing with a variety of other minerals and soil components, advanced characterization methods are needed to study their structures, dynamics, and reactivities. In this article, we describe the use of solid-state NMR methods to characterize the structures and chemistries of clay minerals. Early one-pulse magic-angle spinning (MAS) NMR studies of 27Al and 29Si have now been enhanced and extended with new studies utilizing advanced methodologies (such as Multiple Quantum MAS) as well as studies of less-sensitive nuclei. In additional work, the issue of reactivity of clay minerals has been addressed, including studies of reactive surface area in the environment. Utilizations of NMR-sensitive nuclides within the clay minerals themselves, and in molecules that react with specific sites on the clay mineral surfaces, have aided in understanding the reactivity of these complex aluminosilicate systems.