Science.gov

Sample records for mineral processing operations

  1. Process for the physical segregation of minerals

    DOEpatents

    Yingling, Jon C.; Ganguli, Rajive

    2004-01-06

    With highly heterogeneous groups or streams of minerals, physical segregation using online quality measurements is an economically important first stage of the mineral beneficiation process. Segregation enables high quality fractions of the stream to bypass processing, such as cleaning operations, thereby reducing the associated costs and avoiding the yield losses inherent in any downstream separation process. The present invention includes various methods for reliably segregating a mineral stream into at least one fraction meeting desired quality specifications while at the same time maximizing yield of that fraction.

  2. A Mineral Processing Field Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carmody, Maurice

    2014-01-01

    This article describes a field course in Cornwall looking at mineral processing with the focus on the chemistry involved. The course was split into two parts. The first looked at tin mining based around Penzance. This involved visiting mines, hunting for mineral samples, carrying out a stream survey and visiting the Camborne School of Mines…

  3. Mineral Processing Technology Roadmap

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2000-09-01

    This document represents the roadmap for Processing Technology Research in the US Mining Industry. It was developed based on the results of a Processing Technology Roadmap Workshop sponsored by the National Mining Association in conjunction with the US Department of Energy, Office of Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy, Office of Industrial Technologies. The Workshop was held January 24 - 25, 2000.

  4. Geochemical processes at mineral surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, J.A.; Hayes, K.F.

    1986-01-01

    This volume includes 32 papers which were presented at a symposium on geochemical processes at mineral-water interfaces in 1985 and which bring to bear on this area a very wide range of expertise. The discontinuities in properties which occur at the mineral-water interface have profound effects on the movement of naturally occurring ions. Weathering and precipitation processes control the concentrations and speciation of ions in natural waters and the movements of these within the hydrosphere; both classes of processes take place at mineral-water interfaces. After an introductory overview, the book is divided into seven major sections, each dealing with one of the aspects of the processes occurring at the mineral-water interface. Five papers deal with the physical properties of the mineral-water interface; these represent a well-balanced mix of experimental and theoretical (mathematical modeling) work. Adsorption phenomena are dealt with in another five papers; these are largely experimental in character. Ion-exchange processes are discussed in four papers, one of which addresses the use of relaxation methods to study ion exchange kinetics at the microscopic level. Spectroscopic techniques (including electron-spin resonance and Moessbauer spectroscopy) are utilized in four papers. Chemical reactions, mainly redox processes, at mineral-water interfaces are treated in four papers, one of which deals with non-biological organic reactions. Solid-solution formation and equilibria are the subjects of another set of four articles, and the last group of papers deals with the processes involved in precipitation and dissolution, including weathering.

  5. Tribology of earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.; Wilson, Rick D.

    2001-01-01

    Earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing each involve frequent, and often severe, mechanical interactions between metals, and between metals and abrasive nonmetallic and metallic materials (i.e., mineral bearing ores). The abrasive nature of ores causes significant wear to extracting, handling, and processing equipment. Consequently, wear in earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing operations results in the removal of large amounts of material from the wear surfaces of scraping, digging, and ore processing equipment. From an energy point of view, material wear of this nature is classified as an indirect tribological loss (Imhoff et al., 1985). Additionally, a significant amount of energy is expended to overcome frictional forces in the operation of all earthmoving, mining, and minerals processing machinery (i.e., a direct tribological loss). However, in these particular processes, wear losses are more than five times those of frictional losses. In general, the amount of material lost from a particular component in these operations, before it becomes unserviceable, is far greater than that which can be tolerated in typical metal-to-metal wear situations (e.g., lubricated bearing-shaft wear couples in machinery). Consequently, much of the equipment used in earthmoving, mining, and ore processing makes use of easily replaceable or repairable, and preferably low-cost, wear components. The mechanisms by which metal-to-metal and abrasive wear occurs, and the relationships between material properties and wear behavior, are reasonably well-understood in general terms. However, the specific wear mechanisms/wear material interactions that occur during earthmoving, digging, and the processing of ore are more complex, and depend on the wear material, and on the nature of abrasive, the type of loading, and the environment. As a result of this general knowledge, reliable predictions can be made regarding the performance of particular materials under a range of in

  6. Native Language Processing using Exegy Text Miner

    SciTech Connect

    Compton, J

    2007-10-18

    Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's New Architectures Testbed recently evaluated Exegy's Text Miner appliance to assess its applicability to high-performance, automated native language analysis. The evaluation was performed with support from the Computing Applications and Research Department in close collaboration with Global Security programs, and institutional activities in native language analysis. The Exegy Text Miner is a special-purpose device for detecting and flagging user-supplied patterns of characters, whether in streaming text or in collections of documents at very high rates. Patterns may consist of simple lists of words or complex expressions with sub-patterns linked by logical operators. These searches are accomplished through a combination of specialized hardware (i.e., one or more field-programmable gates arrays in addition to general-purpose processors) and proprietary software that exploits these individual components in an optimal manner (through parallelism and pipelining). For this application the Text Miner has performed accurately and reproducibly at high speeds approaching those documented by Exegy in its technical specifications. The Exegy Text Miner is primarily intended for the single-byte ASCII characters used in English, but at a technical level its capabilities are language-neutral and can be applied to multi-byte character sets such as those found in Arabic and Chinese. The system is used for searching databases or tracking streaming text with respect to one or more lexicons. In a real operational environment it is likely that data would need to be processed separately for each lexicon or search technique. However, the searches would be so fast that multiple passes should not be considered as a limitation a priori. Indeed, it is conceivable that large databases could be searched as often as necessary if new queries were deemed worthwhile. This project is concerned with evaluating the Exegy Text Miner installed in the New

  7. The mineralization processes in teleost fish scales.

    PubMed

    Schönbörner, A A; Boivin, G; Baud, C A

    1979-11-01

    In Teleost fish scales, growth and mineralization are continuous. Different mineralization processes can be distinguished. The external layer of the scale is the first to be mineralized and may be classified as the initial calcifying structure of the scale. The initial calcification loci are matrix vesicles of cellular origin always observed during the formation of this layer. This mineralization process takes place progressively, closely following the elaboration of the organic matrix in the scale periphery. The outer limiting and internal layers of the scale are developed after the external layer has been formed. A mineral substance is deposited without the mediation of matrix vesicles, but in contact with the previously mineralized external layer. This type of mineralization is called subsequential. However, the mineralization of the outer limiting layer closely follows the secretion of a collagen-free organic matrix and is thus different from the mineralization of the internal layer in which the calcification front remains remote from the collagen matrix surface and corresponds to a delayed mineralization process. The isolated calcifications (Mandl's corpuscles) which develop in the unmineralized laminae of the internal layer are mineralized in the absence of matrix vesicles and without making contact with a pre-existing calcified tissue, probably by a heterogeneous nucleation of the collagen fibrils. PMID:519703

  8. Mineral Process Chemistry: A Special Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dudeney, A. W. L.

    1982-01-01

    Mineral Process Chemistry is one of the special study options of the Nuffield Advanced Science course in chemistry. Following general comments on mineral process chemistry, the subject matter of the option is described, focusing on copper and china clay. (Author/JN)

  9. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  10. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  11. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  12. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  13. 36 CFR 292.68 - Mineral material operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Mineral material operations... NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Mineral Materials § 292.68 Mineral material... officer may approve contracts and permits for the sale or other disposal of mineral materials,...

  14. 2004-2005 MINERAL PROCESSING INITIATIVE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US-EPA Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA) has implemented a national initiative for the mineral processing and mining industry. As part of the initiative, US-EPA Region 4 inspected and conducted sampling at seven phosphate-processing facilities during this...

  15. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestiates the levels of metals such as oxoa...

  16. LEACHING OF METALS FROM MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The purpose of this project is to test the leaching of Mineral Processing Waste (MPW) contaminated with heavy metals using scientifically defendable leaching tests other than TCLP. Past experience and literature have shown that TCLP underestimates the levels of metals such as oxo...

  17. Roller presses -- Versatile equipment for mineral processing

    SciTech Connect

    Pietsch, W.

    1995-12-31

    Roller presses were first invented in the middle of the 19th century for the economical size enlargement of coal fines as fuels. In addition to contemporary coal briquetting, in fields such as smokeless fuel and form-coke, it was found that redesigned and modernized roller presses, which are now capable of exerting high forces, are versatile machines for many tasks in mineral processing. Today they are used for: the classic pressure agglomeration and the new high pressure comminution. In pressure agglomeration, the characteristics of fine minerals are improved by forming briquettes or granulated products from compacts. During size enlargement with roller presses briquettes are directly obtained while granular materials are produced by crushing and sizing of compacted sheets. A relatively new application of roller presses in mineral processing is the utilization of the crushing effect when brittle materials pass the nip area between the rollers. It was found that this crushing mechanism is very efficient thus saving energy, particularly in grinding circuits handling large capacities. The paper introduces the fundamentals of the process and describes the design as well as applications of modern roller presses in mineral processing.

  18. Recovering plastics for recycling by mineral processing techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchan, R.; Yarar, B.

    1995-02-01

    Patents and other literature on recycling post-consumer plastics from various sources (e.g., municipal solid waste) indicate that unit operations common to minerals processing have been seriously considered at various times. A review of the available literature and statistics on recoverable plastics reveals that only 2.4 percent is recycled. This article presents a flowsheet that we developed and tested in a bench-scale pilot plant. It shows that a combination of mineral processing techniques, including comminution, heavy media separation, and flotation, can be successfully adapted to the recycling of post-consumer plastics. The gamma flotation process, which operates on the basis of solution surface tension control to facilitate the separation of inherently hydrophobic solids, combined with the alkali-treatment of a mixed polyvinal chloride-polyethylene terephthalate feedstock generates clean polymer concentrates at high recoveries.

  19. Clays and other minerals in prebiotic processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paecht-Horowitz, M.

    1984-01-01

    Clays and other minerals have been investigated in context with prebiotic processes, mainly in polymerization of amino acids. It was found that peptides adsorbed on the clay, prior to polymerization, influence the reaction. The ratio between the amount of the peptides adsorbed and that of the clay is important for the yield as well as for the degrees of polymerization obtained. Adsorption prior to reaction produces a certain order in the aggregates of the clay particles which might induce better reaction results. Excess of added peptides disturbs this order and causes lesser degrees of polymerization. In addition to adsorption, clays are also able to occlude between their layers substances out of the environment, up to very high concentrations.

  20. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  1. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  2. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  3. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner... Training § 47.2 Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training. (a) This part applies to any operator producing or using a hazardous chemical to which a miner can be exposed under normal conditions...

  4. Operant Variability: Procedures and Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Machado, Armando; Tonneau, Francois

    2012-01-01

    Barba's (2012) article deftly weaves three main themes in one argument about operant variability. From general theoretical considerations on operant behavior (Catania, 1973), Barba derives methodological guidelines about response differentiation and applies them to the study of operant variability. In the process, he uncovers unnoticed features of…

  5. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    Minerals are important for your body to stay healthy. Your body uses minerals for many different jobs, including building bones, making ... regulating your heartbeat. There are two kinds of minerals: macrominerals and trace minerals. Macrominerals are minerals your ...

  6. Cementation process for minerals recovery from Salton Sea geothermal brines

    SciTech Connect

    Maimoni, A.

    1982-01-26

    The potential for minerals recovery from a 1000-MWe combined geothermal power and minerals recovery plant in the Salton Sea is examined. While the possible value of minerals recovered would substantially exceed the revenue from power production, information is insufficient to carry out a detailed economic analysis. The recovery of precious metals - silver, gold, and platinum - is the most important factor in determining the economics of a minerals recovery plant; however, the precious metals content of the brines is not certain. Such a power plant could recover 14 to 31% of the US demand for manganese and substantial amounts of zinc and lead. Previous work on minerals extraction from Salton Sea brines is also reviewed and a new process, based on a fluidized-bed cementation reaction with metallic iron, is proposed. This process would recover the precious metals, lead, and tin present in the brines.

  7. Bioleaching review part B: progress in bioleaching: applications of microbial processes by the minerals industries.

    PubMed

    Olson, G J; Brierley, J A; Brierley, C L

    2003-12-01

    This review describes the historical development and current state of metals leaching and sulfide mineral biooxidation by the minerals industries. During the past 20 years commercial processes employing microorganisms for mineral recovery have progressed from rather uncontrolled copper dump leaching to mineral oxidation and leaching in designed bioheaps for oxidation of refractory gold ores and for copper recovery. Also during this period of time, stirred tank bioleaching has been commercialized for cobalt recovery and for biooxidation of refractory gold ores. Chalcopyrite bioleaching in stirred tanks is on the verge of commercialization. Commercial applications of biohydrometallurgy have advanced due to favorable process economics and, in some cases, reduced environmental problems compared to conventional metal recovery processes such as smelting. Process development has included recognition of the importance of aeration of bioheaps, and improvements in stirred tank reactor design and operation. Concurrently, knowledge of the key microorganisms involved in these processes has advanced, aided by advances in molecular biology to characterize microbial populations. PMID:14566430

  8. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  9. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  10. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  11. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  12. 36 CFR 292.67 - Operating plan approval-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.67 Section 292.67 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.67 Operating plan approval—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Upon receipt of an operating...

  13. Signal and Image Processing Operations

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1995-05-10

    VIEW is a software system for processing arbitrary multidimensional signals. It provides facilities for numerical operations, signal displays, and signal databasing. The major emphasis of the system is on the processing of time-sequences and multidimensional images. The system is designed to be both portable and extensible. It runs currently on UNIX systems, primarily SUN workstations.

  14. Mineral homeostasis and regulation of mineralization processes in the skeletons of sharks, rays and relatives (Elasmobranchii).

    PubMed

    Dean, Mason N; Ekstrom, Laura; Monsonego-Ornan, Efrat; Ballantyne, Jim; Witten, P Eckhard; Riley, Cyrena; Habraken, Wouter; Omelon, Sidney

    2015-10-01

    Sharks, rays and other elasmobranch fishes are characterized by a skeletal type that is unique among living vertebrates, comprised predominantly of an unmineralized cartilage, covered by a thin outer layer of sub-millimeter, mineralized tiles called tesserae. The mineralized portion of the skeleton appears to grow only by apposition, adding material at the edges of each tessera; maintenance of non-mineralized joints between tesserae is therefore vital, with precise control of mineral deposition and inhibition at the many thousands of growth fronts in the skeleton. Yet, we have only scattered evidence as to how the elasmobranchs mineralize and grow their skeletons. In this review, we take an "environment to skeleton" approach, drawing together research from a vast range of perspectives to track calcium and phosphate from the typical elasmobranch habitats into and through the body, to their deposition at tesseral growth fronts. In the process, we discuss the available evidence for skeletal resorption capability, mineral homeostasis hormones, and nucleation inhibition mechanisms. We also outline relevant theories in crystal nucleation and typical errors in measurements of serum calcium and phosphate in the study of vertebrate biology. We assemble research that suggests consensus in some concepts in elasmobranch skeletal development, but also highlight the very large gaps in our knowledge, particularly in regards to endocrine functional networks and biomineralization mechanisms. In this way, we lay out frameworks for future directions in the study of elasmobranch skeletal biology with stronger and more comparative links to research in other disciplines and into other taxa. PMID:26546857

  15. Vocational Education Operations Analysis Process.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    California State Dept. of Education, Sacramento. Vocational Education Services.

    This manual on the vocational education operations analysis process is designed to provide vocational administrators/coordinators with an internal device to collect, analyze, and display vocational education performance data. The first section describes the system and includes the following: analysis worksheet, data sources, utilization, system…

  16. Monitoring iron mineralization processes using nuclear magnetic resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keating, Kristina

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) measurements can be used to probe the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of water in the pore space of geological materials. In geophysics, NMR relaxation measurements are used in to measure water content and estimate permeability in the top 100 m of Earth's surface. The goal of the research presented in this thesis is to determine if NMR can also be used in geophysical applications to monitor iron mineralization processes associated with contaminant remediation. The first part of the research presented in this thesis focuses on understanding the effect of iron mineral form and redox state on the NMR relaxation response of water in geologic material. Laboratory NMR measurements were made on Fe(III)-bearing minerals (ferrihydrite, lepidocrocite, goethite, and hematite), Fe(II)-bearing minerals (siderite, pyrite, and troilite), and a mixed valence iron-bearing mineral (magnetite). The results of these measurements show that the relaxation rate of water is strongly dependent on the mineral form of iron. Shown in the final section of this thesis are results from an experiment exploring temporal changes in the measured NMR relaxation rates during the reaction of ferrihydrite with aqueous Fe(II). These results show that NMR can be used to monitor temporal chemical changes in iron minerals. I conclude that this research shows that NMR indeed has the potential to be used as a tool for monitoring geochemical reactions associated with contaminant remediation.

  17. Atmospherically deposited trace metals from bulk mineral concentrate port operations.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Mark Patrick

    2015-05-15

    Although metal exposures in the environment have declined over the last two decades, certain activities and locations still present a risk of harm to human health. This study examines environmental dust metal and metalloid hazards (arsenic, cadmium, lead and nickel) associated with bulk mineral transport, loading and unloading port operations in public locations and children's playgrounds in the inner city of Townsville, northern Queensland. The mean increase in lead on post-play hand wipes (965 μg/m(2)/day) across all sites was more than 10-times the mean pre-play loadings (95 μg/m(2)/day). Maximum loading values after a 10-minute play period were 3012 μg/m(2), more than seven times the goal of 400 μg/m(2) used by the Government of Western Australia (2011). Maximum daily nickel post-play hand loadings (404 μg/m(2)) were more than 26 times above the German Federal Immission Control Act 2002 annual benchmark of 15 μg/m(2)/day. Repeat sampling over the 5-day study period showed that hands and surfaces were re-contaminated daily from the deposition of metal-rich atmospheric dusts. Lead isotopic composition analysis of dust wipes ((208)Pb/(207)Pb and (206)Pb/(207)Pb) showed that surface dust lead was similar to Mount Isa type ores, which are exported through the Port of Townsville. While dust metal contaminant loadings are lower than other mining and smelting towns in Australia, they exceeded national and international benchmarks for environmental quality. The lessons from this study are clear - even where operations are considered acceptable by managing authorities, targeted assessment and monitoring can be used to evaluate whether current management practices are truly best practice. Reassessment can identify opportunities for improvement and maximum environmental and human health protection. PMID:25706750

  18. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for...

  19. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for...

  20. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for...

  1. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for...

  2. 36 CFR 292.66 - Operating plan requirements-outstanding mineral rights.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-outstanding mineral rights. 292.66 Section 292.66 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NATIONAL RECREATION AREAS Smith River National Recreation Area Outstanding Mineral Rights § 292.66 Operating plan requirements—outstanding mineral rights. (a) Proposals for...

  3. 76 FR 79705 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-22

    ... the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur; Submitted for Office of..., ``Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur''. DATES: Submit... Continental Shelf for Minerals other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur. OMB Control Number: 1014-NEW. Abstract:...

  4. 77 FR 15118 - Information Collection Activities: Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-14

    ... Continental Shelf for Minerals Other Than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur; Submitted for Office of Management and Budget... Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur. This notice also provides the public a second... 282, Operations in the Outer Continental Shelf for Minerals Other than Oil, Gas, and Sulphur....

  5. Material instability hazards in mine-processing operations

    SciTech Connect

    Fredland, J.W.; Wu, K.K.; Kirkwood, D.W.

    1993-10-01

    Many accidents occur in the mining industry as a result of the instability of material during handling and processing operation. Accidents due to dump point instability at stockpiles, and at spoil or waste piles, for example, occur with alarming frequency. Miners must be trained to be better aware of these hazards. Information on safe working procedures at stockpiles and surge piles is provided. Mine operators must review their training and operating procedures regularly to ensure that hazardous conditions are avoided.

  6. 2005-2006 MINERAL PROCESSING AND MINING NATIONAL PRIORITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The US-EPA Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA) has implemented a national initiative for the mineral processing and mining industry. As part of the initiative, US-EPA Region 4 inspected and conducted sampling at nine of these facilities during this reporting pe...

  7. 2006-2007 MINERAL PROCESSING AND MINING NATIONAL PRIORITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Office of Enforcement and Compliance Assurance (OECA) established a national priority for the mineral processing and mining industry for federal fiscal years 2005 – 2007. In response to this initiative, US-EPA Region 4 inspected and conducted sampling at five of these fac...

  8. Pollution prevention in mining and mineral processing. Waste assessments for mines and mills. Special pub

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowsky, D.S.

    1995-06-01

    The Pollution Prevention Act of 1990 provides few specifics to assist the non-fuel mining and mineral processing industries of the United States in achieving pollution prevention (P2) compliance. The USBM has prepared this publication to help reduce or eliminate environmental pollution and to assure the viability of these segments of the domestic mining industry. The report includes worksheets designed to help operators of mining and milling facilities to establish a P2 program. The report can also be used by citizen and environmental groups, State and local governments, and academia to gain an understanding of P2 as it relates to mining and mineral processing.

  9. New mineral occurrences and mineralization processes: Wuda coal-fire gas vents of Inner Mongolia

    SciTech Connect

    Stracher, G.B.; Prakash, A.; Schroeder, P.; McCormack, J.; Zhang, X.M.; Van Dijk, P.; Blake, D.

    2005-12-01

    Five unique mineral assemblages that include the sulfates millosevichite, alunogen, anhydrite, tschermigite, coquimbite, voltaite, and godovikovite, as well as the halide salammoniac and an unidentified phase, according to X-ray diffraction and EDS data, were found as encrustations on quartzofeldspathic sand and sandstone adjacent to coal-fire gas vents associated with underground coal fires in the Wuda coalfield of Inner Mongolia. The mineral assemblage of alunogen, coquimbite, voltaite, and the unidentified phase collected front the same gas vent, is documented for the first time. Observations suggest that the sulfates millosevichite, alunogen, coquimbite, voltaite, godovikovite, and the unidentified phase, crystallized in response to a complex sequence of processes that include condensation, hydrothermal alteration, crystallization from solution, fluctuating vent temperatures, boiling, and dehydration reactions, whereas the halide salammoniac crystallized during the sublimation of coal-fire gas. Tschermigite and anhydrite formed by the reaction of coal-fire gas with quartzofelds pathic rock or by hydrothermal alteration of this rock and crystallization from an acid-rich aqueous solution. These minerals have potentially important environmental significance and may be vectors for the transmission of toxins. Coal fires also provide insight for the recognition in the geologic record of preserved mineral assemblages that are diagnostic of ancient fires.

  10. Minerals

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fish require the same minerals or inorganic elements as terrestrial animals for tissue formation, osmoregulation and various metabolic functions. Those required in large quantities are termed macro- or major minerals and those required in small quantities are called micro- or trace minerals. Fish ca...

  11. Lowering respirable dust exposures at mineral processing facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cecala, A.B.; Timko, R.J.; Thimons, E.D.

    1999-07-01

    This article discusses three research projects performed by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (formerly the Bureau of Mines), that reduce the respirable dust exposure of plant workers at mineral processing facilities. All three of these projects are very different but they all have same goal of reducing worker exposure to respirable dust at mineral processing facilities. The first project deals with a total mill ventilation system that reduces dust levels throughout an entire building and lowers the dust exposure of everyone working in the structure. The second project describes a bag and belt cleaner device that reduces the amount of dust on the outside of bags of product and primarily reduces the dust exposure of the bag stackers, as well as anyone handling the bags until their end use. The third project discusses how to reduce a worker's dust exposure from secondary dust sources through improved work practices. This area of research can potentially impact all workers at these facilities. All three of these research projects have been shown to significantly reduce the dust exposure of workers at mineral processing facilities.

  12. Copper isotopes as monitors of redox processes in hydrothermal mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markl, Gregor; Lahaye, Yann; Schwinn, Gregor

    2006-08-01

    The stable copper isotope composition of 79 samples of primary and secondary copper minerals from hydrothermal veins in the Schwarzwald mining district, South Germany, shows a wide variation in δ65Cu ranging from -2.92 to 2.41‰. We investigated primary chalcopyrite, various kinds of fahlores and emplectite, as well as supergene native copper, malachite, azurite, cuprite, tenorite, olivenite, pseudomalachite and chrysocolla. Fresh primary Cu(I) ores have at most localities copper isotope ratios ( δ65Cu values) of 0 ± 0.5‰ despite the fact that the samples come from mineralogically different types of deposits covering an area of about 100 by 50 km and that they formed during three different mineralization events spanning the last 300 Ma. Relics of the primary ores in oxidized samples (i.e., chalcopyrite relics in an iron oxide matrix with an outer malachite coating) display low isotope ratios down to -2.92‰. Secondary Cu(I) minerals such as cuprite have high δ65Cu values between 0.4 and 1.65‰, whereas secondary Cu(II) minerals such as malachite show a range of values between -1.55 and 2.41‰, but typically have values above +0.5‰. Within single samples, supergene oxidation of fresh chalcopyrite with a δ value of 0‰ causes significant fractionation on the scale of a centimetre between malachite (up to 1.49‰) and relict chalcopyrite (down to -2.92‰). The results show that—with only two notable exceptions—high-temperature hydrothermal processes did not lead to significant and correlatable variations in copper isotope ratios within a large mining district mineralized over a long period of time. Conversely, low-temperature redox processes seriously affect the copper isotope compositions of hydrothermal copper ores. While details of the redox processes are not yet understood, we interpret the range in compositions found in both primary Cu(I) and secondary Cu(II) minerals as a result of two competing controls on the isotope fractionation process

  13. A NOVEL APPROACH TO MINERAL CARBONATION: ENHANCING CARBONATION WHILE AVOIDING MINERAL PRETREATMENT PROCESS COST

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V.G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamadallah Bearat

    2005-10-01

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our first year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the

  14. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...

  15. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...

  16. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE...

  17. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Rules relating to separate operating mineral....614-3 Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines. (a) Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests—(1) General rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells,...

  18. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Election to aggregate separate operating mineral...) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.614-2 Election to aggregate separate operating mineral...(a) of the Revenue Act of 1964, to aggregate separate operating mineral interests, and,...

  19. MINERAL PROCESSING BY SHORT CIRCUITS IN PROTOPLANETARY DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    McNally, Colin P.; Hubbard, Alexander; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark; Ebel, Denton S.; D'Alessio, Paola E-mail: ahubbard@amnh.org E-mail: debel@amnh.org

    2013-04-10

    Meteoritic chondrules were formed in the early solar system by brief heating of silicate dust to melting temperatures. Some highly refractory grains (Type B calcium-aluminum-rich inclusions, CAIs) also show signs of transient heating. A similar process may occur in other protoplanetary disks, as evidenced by observations of spectra characteristic of crystalline silicates. One possible environment for this process is the turbulent magnetohydrodynamic flow thought to drive accretion in these disks. Such flows generally form thin current sheets, which are sites of magnetic reconnection, and dissipate the magnetic fields amplified by a disk dynamo. We suggest that it is possible to heat precursor grains for chondrules and other high-temperature minerals in current sheets that have been concentrated by our recently described short-circuit instability. We extend our work on this process by including the effects of radiative cooling, taking into account the temperature dependence of the opacity; and by examining current sheet geometry in three-dimensional, global models of magnetorotational instability. We find that temperatures above 1600 K can be reached for favorable parameters that match the ideal global models. This mechanism could provide an efficient means of tapping the gravitational potential energy of the protoplanetary disk to heat grains strongly enough to form high-temperature minerals. The volume-filling nature of turbulent magnetic reconnection is compatible with constraints from chondrule-matrix complementarity, chondrule-chondrule complementarity, the occurrence of igneous rims, and compound chondrules. The same short-circuit mechanism may perform other high-temperature mineral processing in protoplanetary disks such as the production of crystalline silicates and CAIs.

  20. A Novel Approach to Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Michael J. McKelvy; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2007-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly-stirred/circulating carbonation. We are exploring the mechanisms that govern carbonation reactivity and the impact that (1) modeling/controlling the slurry fluid-flow conditions, (2) varying the aqueous ion species/size and concentration (e.g., Li+, Na+, K+, Rb+, Cl-, HCO{sub 3}{sup -}), and (3) incorporating select sonication offer to enhance exfoliation and carbonation. Thus

  1. Minerals

    MedlinePlus

    ... your body needs in larger amounts. They include calcium, phosphorus, magnesium, sodium, potassium, chloride and sulfur. Your body needs just small amounts of trace minerals. These include iron, manganese, copper, iodine, zinc, cobalt, fluoride and selenium. The best way to ...

  2. 75 FR 16500 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-01

    ... Minerals Management Service Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (FONSI), prepared by MMS for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral- related activities proposed on the... to exploration, development, production, and transport of oil, gas, and mineral resources on...

  3. A Novel Approach To Mineral Carbonation: Enhancing Carbonation While Avoiding Mineral Pretreatment Process Cost

    SciTech Connect

    Michael J. McKelvy; Andrew V. G. Chizmeshya; Kyle Squires; Ray W. Carpenter; Hamdallah Bearat

    2006-06-21

    Known fossil fuel reserves, especially coal, can support global energy demands for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Unlike other CO{sub 2} sequestration candidate technologies that propose long-term storage, mineral sequestration provides permanent disposal by forming geologically stable mineral carbonates. Carbonation of the widely occurring mineral olivine (e.g., forsterite, Mg{sub 2}SiO{sub 4}) is a large-scale sequestration process candidate for regional implementation, which converts CO{sub 2} into the environmentally benign mineral magnesite (MgCO{sub 3}). The primary goal is cost-competitive process development. As the process is exothermic, it inherently offers low-cost potential. Enhancing carbonation reactivity is key to economic viability. Recent studies at the U.S. DOE Albany Research Center have established that aqueous-solution carbonation using supercritical CO{sub 2} is a promising process; even without olivine activation, 30-50% carbonation has been achieved in an hour. Mechanical activation (e.g., attrition) has accelerated the carbonation process to an industrial timescale (i.e., near completion in less than an hour), at reduced pressure and temperature. However, the activation cost is too high to be economical and lower cost pretreatment options are needed. Herein, we report our second year progress in exploring a novel approach that offers the potential to substantially enhance carbonation reactivity while bypassing pretreatment activation. As our second year progress is intimately related to our earlier work, the report is presented in that context to provide better overall understanding of the progress made. We have discovered that robust silica-rich passivating layers form on the olivine surface during carbonation. As carbonation proceeds, these passivating layers thicken, fracture and eventually exfoliate, exposing fresh olivine surfaces during rapidly

  4. Effect of food processing and preparation on mineral utilization.

    PubMed

    Johnson, P E

    1991-01-01

    While effects of various nutrients and certain non-nutrient components of food on mineral utilization have been intensively studied, less is known about the effects of food processing and preparation procedures. Fermentation during the production of beer, wine, yogurt, and African tribal foods affects bioavailability of Zn and Fe. Baking affects the chemical form of Fe in fortified bread products and these changes can affect its bioavailability. Availability of Fe in milk-based infant formula depends on whether Fe is added before or after heat processing. Food packaging (e.g., tin cans) can alter food composition and thus potentially affects mineral bioavailability. Maillard browning has been reported to cause slight decreases in Zn availability both in vitro and in humans. However, we found that feeding of highly browned casein-glucose products to rats as 5% of diet produced no effect on Zn absorption (59.5 +/- 8.2% vs 54.1 +/- 7.3%) or Fe absorption (45.6 +/- 7.7% vs 46.9 +/- 12.6%) for browned vs control, respectively; nor did we find any of the adverse health effects reported by others. We found no effect on stable Zn or Cu absorption in seven men when browned foods were fed, compared to the same diets without browning. Zinc absorption was 34 +/- 13% (browned) vs 24 +/- 15% (unbrowned), and Cu absorption was 55 +/- 5% vs 55 +/- 8% (p greater than 0.05). PMID:1897405

  5. NEP processing, operations, and disposal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stancati, Mike

    1993-01-01

    Several recent studies by ASAO/NPO staff members at LeRC and by other organizations have highlighted the potential benefits of using Nuclear Electric Propulsion (NEP) as the primary transportation means for some of the proposed missions of the Space Exploration Initiative. These include the potential to reduce initial mass in orbit and Mars transit time. Modular NEP configurations also introduce fully redundant main propulsion to Mars flight systems adding several abort or fall back options not otherwise available. Recent studies have also identified mission operations, such as on orbital assembly, refurbishment, and reactor disposal, as important discriminators for propulsion system evaluation. This study is intended to identify and assess 'end-to-end' operational issues associated with using NEP for transporting crews and cargo between Earth and Mars. We also include some consideration of lunar cargo transfer as well.

  6. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... aggregate separate operating mineral interests—(1) General rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells, a... rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells, a taxpayer who owns a separate operating mineral... mineral deposit except oil and gas deposits. For the purpose of the preceding sentence, the...

  7. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... aggregate separate operating mineral interests—(1) General rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells, a... rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells, a taxpayer who owns a separate operating mineral... mineral deposit except oil and gas deposits. For the purpose of the preceding sentence, the...

  8. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... aggregate separate operating mineral interests—(1) General rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells, a... rule. Except in the case of oil and gas wells, a taxpayer who owns a separate operating mineral... mineral deposit except oil and gas deposits. For the purpose of the preceding sentence, the...

  9. 25 CFR 215.23a - Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... minerals other than oil and gas. 215.23a Section 215.23a Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEAD AND ZINC MINING OPERATIONS AND LEASES, QUAPAW AGENCY § 215.23a Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. The provisions...

  10. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties—(1) General rule. If a taxpayer has more than one operating mineral interest in oil and gas wells...

  11. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties—(1) General rule. If a taxpayer has more than one operating mineral interest in oil and gas wells...

  12. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties—(1) General rule. If a taxpayer has more than one operating mineral interest in oil and gas wells...

  13. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... mineral interests for taxable years beginning after December 31, 1963, in the case of oil and gas wells. 1... oil and gas wells. (a) Election to treat separate operating mineral interests as separate properties—(1) General rule. If a taxpayer has more than one operating mineral interest in oil and gas wells...

  14. Performing process migration with allreduce operations

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Charles Jens; Peters, Amanda; Wallenfelt, Brian Paul

    2010-12-14

    Compute nodes perform allreduce operations that swap processes at nodes. A first allreduce operation generates a first result and uses a first process from a first compute node, a second process from a second compute node, and zeros from other compute nodes. The first compute node replaces the first process with the first result. A second allreduce operation generates a second result and uses the first result from the first compute node, the second process from the second compute node, and zeros from others. The second compute node replaces the second process with the second result, which is the first process. A third allreduce operation generates a third result and uses the first result from first compute node, the second result from the second compute node, and zeros from others. The first compute node replaces the first result with the third result, which is the second process.

  15. Electrochemical mineralization of the antibiotic levofloxacin by electro-Fenton-pyrite process.

    PubMed

    Barhoumi, Natija; Labiadh, Lazhar; Oturan, Mehmet A; Oturan, Nihal; Gadri, Abdellatif; Ammar, Salah; Brillas, Enric

    2015-12-01

    Levofloxacin is a large spectrum antibiotic from fluoroquinolones family, widely used and detected in natural waters. Here, this drug was degraded by a novel heterogeneous electro-Fenton (EF) process, so-called EF-pyrite, in which pyrite powder in suspension regulates the solution pH to 3.0 and supplies 0.2mM Fe(2+) as catalyst to the solution. Trials were performed with a stirred boron-doped diamond (BDD)/carbon-felt cell under O2 bubbling for cathodic H2O2 generation. Hydroxyl radicals formed from water oxidation at the BDD anode and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between Fe(2+) and H2O2 were the main oxidizing agents. The effect of applied current and antibiotic concentration over the mineralization rate and degree, mineralization current efficiency and specific energy consumption was studied. An almost total mineralization was achieved for a 0.23mM drug solution operating at 300mA for 8h. The kinetic decay of the drug was followed by reversed-phase HPLC and obeyed a pseudo-first-order reaction. Ion-exclusion HPLC analysis of treated solutions revealed that oxalic and oxamic acids, the most persistent final products, were the predominant pollutants remaining in solution at long electrolysis time. Ion chromatography analysis confirmed the release of F(-), NO3(-) and NH4(+) ions during levofloxacin mineralization. PMID:26291910

  16. Physics and chemistry of minerals under laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotova, O.; Leonenko, N.

    2016-04-01

    New experimental data of the influence of laser irradiation on the phase composition minerals of bauxite and red mud and their technological features have been represented. The mechanisms of formation of micro- and nanophases on mineral surfaces under the influence of laser irradiation were shown. It is underlined that changes of condition of surface atoms, concentration of metals, agglomeration of titanium minerals and new phase formation occurred under laser irradiation on bauxites and red mud.

  17. Defense waste processing facility radioactive operations. Part 1 - operating experience

    SciTech Connect

    Little, D.B.; Gee, J.T.; Barnes, W.M.

    1997-12-31

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, SC is the nation`s first and the world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction program and a 3 year non-radioactive test program, DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. This paper presents the results of the first 9 months of radioactive operations. Topics include: operations of the remote processing equipment reliability, and decontamination facilities for the remote processing equipment. Key equipment discussed includes process pumps, telerobotic manipulators, infrared camera, Holledge{trademark} level gauges and in-cell (remote) cranes. Information is presented regarding equipment at the conclusion of the DWPF test program it also discussed, with special emphasis on agitator blades and cooling/heating coil wear. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Defense Waste Processing Facility -- Radioactive operations -- Part 3 -- Remote operations

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, W.M.; Kerley, W.D.; Hughes, P.D.

    1997-06-01

    The Savannah River Site`s Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina is the nation`s first and world`s largest vitrification facility. Following a ten year construction period and nearly three years of non-radioactive testing, the DWPF began radioactive operations in March 1996. Radioactive glass is poured from the joule heated melter into the stainless steel canisters. The canisters are then temporarily sealed, decontaminated, resistance welded for final closure, and transported to an interim storage facility. All of these operations are conducted remotely with equipment specially designed for these processes. This paper reviews canister processing during the first nine months of radioactive operations at DWPF. The fundamental design consideration for DWPF remote canister processing and handling equipment are discussed as well as interim canister storage.

  19. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  20. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  1. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  2. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  3. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  4. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  5. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  6. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designatng Areas Unsuitable for...

  7. 30 CFR 921.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 921.764 Section 921.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designating Areas Unsuitable for...

  8. 30 CFR 933.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 933.764 Section 933.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS... mining operations. Part 764 of this chapter, State Processes for Designatng Areas Unsuitable for...

  9. 26 CFR 1.614-4 - Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning before January 1, 1964....614-4 Treatment under the Internal Revenue Code of 1939 with respect to separate operating mineral... been enacted. For purposes of this section, the term property means each separate operating...

  10. Measuring, managing and maximizing performance of mineral processing plants

    SciTech Connect

    Bascur, O.A.; Kennedy, J.P.

    1995-12-31

    The implementation of continuous quality improvement is the confluence of Total Quality Management, People Empowerment, Performance Indicators and Information Engineering. The supporting information technologies allow a mineral processor to narrow the gap between management business objectives and the process control level. One of the most important contributors is the user friendliness and flexibility of the personal computer in a client/server environment. This synergistic combination when used for real time performance monitoring translates into production cost savings, improved communications and enhanced decision support. Other savings come from reduced time to collect data and perform tedious calculations, act quickly with fresh new data, generate and validate data to be used by others. This paper presents an integrated view of plant management. The selection of the proper tools for continuous quality improvement are described. The process of selecting critical performance monitoring indices for improved plant performance are discussed. The importance of a well balanced technological improvement, personnel empowerment, total quality management and organizational assets are stressed.

  11. Bibliography of articles and reports on mineral-separation techniques, processes, and applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harmon, R. S.

    1971-01-01

    A bibliography of published articles and reports on mineral-separation techniques, processes, and applications is presented along with an author and subject index. This information is intended for use in the mineral-separation facility of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory at the NASA Manned Spacecraft Center and as an aid and reference to persons involved or interested in mineral separation.

  12. 30 CFR 47.2 - Operators and chemicals covered; initial miner training.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Purpose, Scope, Applicability, and Initial Miner... against these hazards, and the contents of the mine's HazCom program by September 23, 2002. Operators of... these hazards, and the contents of the mine's HazCom program by March 21, 2003....

  13. 77 FR 802 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations..., Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals..., 2011, for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities that were proposed on the Gulf...

  14. 75 FR 67994 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  15. 75 FR 67996 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral Proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  16. 76 FR 16632 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-24

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral Proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region. SUMMARY: The Bureau...), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities proposed on the Gulf...

  17. 76 FR 54782 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-02

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral Proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  18. 77 FR 57581 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-18

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of environmental documents prepared for ocs mineral..., gas, and mineral-related activities that were proposed in the Gulf of Mexico, or more...

  19. 76 FR 38673 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-01

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  20. 76 FR 11809 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Proposed Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY... availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral proposals by the Gulf of Mexico OCS Region... Impact (FONSI), prepared by BOEMRE for the following oil-, gas-, and mineral-related activities...

  1. REACTIVE MINERALS IN AQUIFERS: FORMATION PROCESSES AND QUANTITATIVE ANALYSIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation will focus on the occurrence, form, and characterization of reactive iron minerals in aquifers and soils. The potential for abiotic reductive transformations of contaminants at the mineral-water interface will be discussed along with available tools for site min...

  2. A process for reducing rocks and concentrating heavy minerals

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Thomas R.; Driscoll, Rhonda L.

    2016-01-01

    Once the rock is reduced to grains, it is necessary to separate the grains into paramagnetic and nonparamagnetic and heavy and light mineral fractions. In separating grains by property, those minerals chemically suited for radiometric dating are abundantly concentrated. Grams of mineralogical material can then be analyzed and characterized by multiple methods including trace element chemistry, laser ablation, and in particular, ion geochronology.

  3. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Guazzotti, S. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2007-02-01

    The accumulation of secondary acids and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured with an online single-particle mass spectrometer, the ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles correlate with air masses from different source regions. The uptake of secondary acids depended on the individual dust particle mineralogy; high amounts of nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while high amounts of sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by iron in the aluminosilicate dust is a possible explanation for this enrichment of sulphate, which has important consequences for the fertilization of remote oceans by soluble iron. This study shows the segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual aged dust particles for the first time. A transport and aging timeline provides an explanation for the observed segregation. Our data suggests that sulphate became mixed with the dust first. This implies that the transport pathway is more important than the reaction kinetics in determining which species accumulate on mineral dust. Early in the study, dust particles in volcanically influenced air masses were mixed predominately with sulphate. Dust mixed with chloride then dominated over sulphate and nitrate when a major dust front reached the R. V. Ronald Brown. We hypothesize that the rapid increase in chloride on dust was due to mixing with HCl(g) released from acidified sea salt particles induced by heterogeneous reaction with volcanic SO2(g), prior to the arrival of the dust front. The amount of ammonium mixed with dust correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent reports that they exist as external mixtures. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous mechanisms of

  4. Productive Skills for Process Operatives. Skills Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giles, L.; Kodz, J.; Evans, C.

    A study of process operatives examined the developments in processing work in 20 organizations within the chemical and food and drink processing industries. Seven exploratory interviews were followed by 20 employer interviews. Technological innovations caused job losses and layoffs. Organizational responses adopted to meet increasing competitive…

  5. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2004-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, wear problems of mineral processing equipment including screens, sieve bends, heavy media vessel, dewatering centrifuge, etc., were identified. A novel surface treatment technology, high density infrared (HDI) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated samples were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of AISI 4140 and ASTM A36 steels can be increased 3 and 5 folds, respectively by the application of HDI coatings.

  6. Understanding processes affecting mineral deposits in humid environments

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seal, Robert R., II; Ayuso, Robert A.

    2011-01-01

    Recent interdisciplinary studies by the U.S. Geological Survey have resulted in substantial progress toward understanding the influence that climate and hydrology have on the geochemical signatures of mineral deposits and the resulting mine wastes in the eastern United States. Specific areas of focus include the release, transport, and fate of acid, metals, and associated elements from inactive mines in temperate coastal areas and of metals from unmined mineral deposits in tropical to subtropical areas; the influence of climate, geology, and hydrology on remediation options for abandoned mines; and the application of radiogenic isotopes to uniquely apportion source contributions that distinguish natural from mining sources and extent of metal transport. The environmental effects of abandoned mines and unmined mineral deposits result from a complex interaction of a variety of chemical and physical factors. These include the geology of the mineral deposit, the hydrologic setting of the mineral deposit and associated mine wastes, the chemistry of waters interacting with the deposit and associated waste material, the engineering of a mine as it relates to the reactivity of mine wastes, and climate, which affects such factors as temperature and the amounts of precipitation and evapotranspiration; these factors, in turn, influence the environmental behavior of mineral deposits. The role of climate is becoming increasingly important in environmental investigations of mineral deposits because of the growing concerns about climate change.

  7. Mineralization at Titanium Surfaces is a Two-Step Process

    PubMed Central

    Nygren, Håkan; Ilver, Lars; Malmberg, Per

    2016-01-01

    Mapping the initial reaction of implants with blood or cell culture medium is important for the understanding of the healing process in bone. In the present study, the formation of low crystalline carbonated hydroxyapatite (CHA) onto commercially pure titanium (Ti) implants from cell culture medium and blood, is described as an early event in bone healing at implants. The Ti-implants were incubated with cell culture medium (DMEM) or whole blood and the surface concentration of Ca, P and HA was analyzed by XPS, EDX and Tof-SIMS. After incubation with DMEM for 16 h and 72 h, EDX and XPS analysis showed stable levels of Ca and P on the Ti-surface. ESEM images showed an even distribution of Ca and P. Further analysis of the XPS results indicated that CHA was formed at the implants. Analysis with ToF-SIMS yielded high m.w. fragments of HA, such as Ca2PO4 at m/z 174.9 and Ca3PO5 at m/z 230.8, as secondary ions at the Ti-surfaces. Analysis of implants incubated in blood for 16 h, with ToF-SIMS, showed initial formation of CHA yielding CaOH as secondary ion. The results indicate that early mineralization at Ti-surfaces is an important step in the healing of implants into bone. PMID:26999231

  8. Occurrence reporting and processing of operations information

    SciTech Connect

    1997-07-21

    DOE O 232.1A, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information, and 10 CFR 830.350, Occurrence Reporting and Processing of Operations Information (when it becomes effective), along with this manual, set forth occurrence reporting requirements for Department of Energy (DOE) Departmental Elements and contractors responsible for the management and operation of DOE-owned and -leased facilities. These requirements include categorization of occurrences related to safety, security, environment, health, or operations (``Reportable Occurrences``); DOE notification of these occurrences; and the development and submission of documented follow-up reports. This Manual provides detailed information for categorizing and reporting occurrences at DOE facilities. Information gathered by the Occurrence Reporting and processing System is used for analysis of the Department`s performance in environmental protection, safeguards and security, and safety and health of its workers and the public. This information is also used to develop lessons learned and document events that significantly impact DOE operations.

  9. Modeling operators' emergency response time for chemical processing operations.

    PubMed

    Murray, Susan L; Harputlu, Emrah; Mentzer, Ray A; Mannan, M Sam

    2014-01-01

    Operators have a crucial role during emergencies at a variety of facilities such as chemical processing plants. When an abnormality occurs in the production process, the operator often has limited time to either take corrective actions or evacuate before the situation becomes deadly. It is crucial that system designers and safety professionals can estimate the time required for a response before procedures and facilities are designed and operations are initiated. There are existing industrial engineering techniques to establish time standards for tasks performed at a normal working pace. However, it is reasonable to expect the time required to take action in emergency situations will be different than working at a normal production pace. It is possible that in an emergency, operators will act faster compared to a normal pace. It would be useful for system designers to be able to establish a time range for operators' response times for emergency situations. This article develops a modeling approach to estimate the time standard range for operators taking corrective actions or following evacuation procedures in emergency situations. This will aid engineers and managers in establishing time requirements for operators in emergency situations. The methodology used for this study combines a well-established industrial engineering technique for determining time requirements (predetermined time standard system) and adjustment coefficients for emergency situations developed by the authors. Numerous videos of workers performing well-established tasks at a maximum pace were studied. As an example, one of the tasks analyzed was pit crew workers changing tires as quickly as they could during a race. The operations in these videos were decomposed into basic, fundamental motions (such as walking, reaching for a tool, and bending over) by studying the videos frame by frame. A comparison analysis was then performed between the emergency pace and the normal working pace operations

  10. Mineral processing techniques for recycling investment casting shell

    SciTech Connect

    Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Nilsen, David N.; Dahlin, David C.; Hunt, Alton H.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-01-01

    The Albany Research Center of the U.S. Department of Energy used materials characterization and minerals beneficiation methods to separate and beneficially modify spent investment-mold components to identify recycling opportunities and minimize environmentally sensitive wastes. The physical and chemical characteristics of the shell materials were determined and used to guide bench-scale research to separate reusable components by mineral-beneficiation techniques. Successfully concentrated shell materials were evaluated for possible use in new markets.

  11. Bioelectro-Fenton: A sustainable integrated process for removal of organic pollutants from water: Application to mineralization of metoprolol.

    PubMed

    Olvera-Vargas, Hugo; Cocerva, Tatiana; Oturan, Nihal; Buisson, Didier; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-12-01

    The relevant environmental hazard related to the presence of pharmaceuticals in water sources requires the development of high effective and suitable wastewater treatment technologies. In the present work, a hybrid process coupling electro-Fenton (EF) process and aerobic biological treatment (Bio-EF process) was implemented for the efficient and cost-effective mineralization of beta-blocker metoprolol (MPTL) aqueous solutions. Firstly, operating factors influencing EF process were assessed. MTPL solutions were completely mineralized after 4h-electrolysis under optimal operating conditions and BDD anode demonstrated its oxidation superiority. The absolute rate constant of MTPL oxidation byOH (kMTPL) was determined by the competition kinetics method and found to be (1.72±0.04)×10(9)M(-1)s(-1). A reaction pathway for the mineralization of the drug was proposed based on the identification of oxidation by-products. Secondly, EF process was used as pre-treatment. An increase of BOD5/COD ratio from 0.012 to 0.44 was obtained after 1h EF treatment, along with 47% TOC removal and a significant decrease of toxicity, demonstrating the feasibility of a post-biological treatment. Finally, biological treatment successfully oxidized 43% of the total TOC content. An overall 90% mineralization of MPTL solutions was achieved by the Bio-EF process, demonstrating its potentiality for treating wastewater containing pharmaceutical residues. PMID:26707983

  12. 25 CFR 215.23a - Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. The provisions of... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. 215.23a Section 215.23a Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT...

  13. 25 CFR 215.23a - Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. The provisions of... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. 215.23a Section 215.23a Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT...

  14. 25 CFR 215.23a - Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. The provisions of... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suspension of operations and production on leases for minerals other than oil and gas. 215.23a Section 215.23a Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT...

  15. Direct observations of the atmospheric processing of Asian mineral dust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sullivan, R. C.; Guazzotti, S. A.; Sodeman, D. A.; Prather, K. A.

    2006-05-01

    The accumulation of secondary acid products and ammonium on individual mineral dust particles during ACE-Asia has been measured in real-time using ATOFMS. Changes in the amounts of sulphate, nitrate, and chloride mixed with dust particles corresponded to different air mass source regions. During volcanically influenced periods, dust mixed with sulphate dominated. This rapidly switched to dust predominantly mixed with chloride when the first Asian dust front reached the R/V Ronald Brown. We hypothesise that the high degree of mixing of dust with chloride was caused by the prior reaction of NOy(g) and volcanic SO2(g) with sea salt particles, reducing the availability of nitrate and sulphate precursors while releasing HCl(g), which then reacted with the incoming dust front. The segregation of sulphate from nitrate and chloride in individual dust particles is demonstrated for the first time. This is likely caused by the dust plume encountering elevated SO2(g) in the Chinese interior before reaching coastal urban areas polluted by both SO2(g) and NOx(g). This caused the fractions of dust mixed with nitrate and/or chloride to be strongly dependent on the total dust loadings, whereas dust mixed with sulphate did not show this same dust concentration dependence. Ammonium was also significantly mixed with dust and the amount correlated strongly with the total amount of secondary acid reaction products in the dust. Submicron dust and ammonium sulphate were internally mixed, contrary to frequent statements that they exist as an external mixture. The size distribution of the mixing state of dust with these secondary species validates previous models and mechanisms of the atmospheric processing of dust. The uptake of secondary acids was also dependent on the individual dust particle mineralogy; nitrate accumulated on calcium-rich dust while sulphate accumulated on aluminosilicate-rich dust. Oxidation of S(IV) to S(VI) by iron in the aluminosilicate-rich dust is a probable

  16. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2002-05-01

    Direct mineral carbonation was investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO[2] into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg[2]SiO[4]) or serpentine [Mg[3]Si[2]O[5](OH)[4

  17. Mineral trapping of CO2 in operated geothermal reservoirs - Numerical simulations on various scales

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kühn, Michael; Stanjek, Helge; Peiffer, Stefan; Clauser, Christoph

    2013-04-01

    A novel approach to store CO2 not only by hydrodynamic trapping within a reservoir, but to convert dissolved CO2 into the geochemically more stable form of calcite in a reaction with calcium obtained from dissolution of sulphates and alkalinity from feldspars or fly ashes is described here. The presentation gives answers to the key questions: • Where are potential geothermal reservoirs with anhydrite abundant? • Does the transfer of anhydrite into calcite work at all and what are the reaction rates? • What are probable alkalinity sources and how fast are they available? Numerical simulation is a means to quantify the entire process of CO2 storage and to deepen the understanding of the detailed chemical processes. We performed numerical simulations on multiple scales. The relevant scales reach from the micro or thin section scale (ca. 1 cm) to the reservoir scale (ca. 10 km). The idea is to provide constraints for smaller scale models from the larger scale and derive functionality from smaller scale models of processes which cannot be resolved in larger scale models, due to restrictions of discretization of the applied numerical mesh. With regard to the 3 questions above we can conclude that the combination of CO2 storage and geothermal energy production is generally feasible because candidate sites are available, anhydrite is transformable into calcite and alkalinity can be provided by fly ashes (Back et al. 2010) or even in-situ (Kühn and Clauser 2006). Based on our laboratory investigations and numerical studies we are able to estimate the storage potential for mineral trapping of CO2 in geothermal reservoirs (Kühn et al. 2009). On the one hand the maximum is unfortunately less than a million tons over the life time of a geothermal heating plant. On the other hand significant storage capacities are available in geological formations with regard to hydrodynamic trapping for millions of tonnes of carbon dioxide. This is why under the current circumstances

  18. Process operational readiness and operational readiness follow-on

    SciTech Connect

    Nertney, R.J.

    1987-02-01

    The first document in the SSDC (System Safety Development Center) series deals with the subject of Occupancy-Use Readiness. The material included in that manual provided the basis for development of the SSDC workshop in Operational Readiness. The original Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual, however, deals only generally with the subject of process safety; i.e., the safety of overall processes'' such as solar collection systems, nuclear reactors, and coal fired electrical plants. The manual also fails to detail the considerations involved in maintaining the state of readiness on a continuing basis. Both of the latter subjects are dealt with in some detail in the SSDC's Operational Readiness Workshop. The purpose of this document is to provide additional documentary material dealing with subjects introduced in SSDC-1, Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual, and SSDC-12, Safety Considerations in Evaluation of Maintenance Programs. In augmenting SSDC-1, Part 1 of this manual provides additional material related to process safety; in the case of SSDC-12, the subject of safety considerations in evaluation of maintenance programs is broadened in Part 2 to include maintenance of personnel systems and procedural systems as well as hardware. Maintenance'' is related more directly to the concept of operational readiness and an alternative analytical tree is provided for hardware maintenance program evaluation. 7 refs., 19 figs.

  19. Process operational readiness and operational readiness follow-on

    SciTech Connect

    Nertney, R.J.

    1992-11-01

    The first document in the System Safety Development Center (SSDC) series deals with the subject of Occupancy-Use Readiness. The material included in that manual provided the basis for development of the SSDC workshop in Operational Readiness. The original Occupancy Readiness Manual, however, deals only generally with the subject of process safety; i.e., the safety of overall processes'' such as solar collection systems, nuclear reactors, and coal fired electrical plants. The manual also fails to detail the considerations involved in maintaining the state of readiness on a continuing basis. Both of the latter subjects are dealt with in some detail in the SSDC's Operational Readiness Workshop. The purpose of this document is to provide additional documentary material dealing with subjects introduced in SSDC-1 Occupancy-Use Readiness Manual, and SSDC-12, Safety Considerations in Evaluation of Maintenance Programs. In augmenting SSDC-1, Part I of this manual provides additional material related to process safety; in the case of SSDC-12, the subject of safety considerations in evaluation of maintenance programs is broadened in Part II to include maintenance of personnel systems and procedural systems as well as hardware. Maintenance'' is related more directly to the concept of operational readiness and an alternative analytical tree is provided for hardware maintenance program evaluation.

  20. 30 CFR 942.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 942.764 Section 942.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE TENNESSEE § 942.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  1. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 939.764 Section 939.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  2. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  3. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 922.764 Section 922.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  4. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  5. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  6. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  7. 30 CFR 947.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 947.764 Section 947.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  8. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 939.764 Section 939.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  9. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  10. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 922.764 Section 922.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  11. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  12. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  13. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 922.764 Section 922.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  14. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 939.764 Section 939.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  15. 30 CFR 947.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 947.764 Section 947.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  16. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  17. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  18. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  19. 30 CFR 941.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 941.764 Section 941.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  20. 30 CFR 941.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 941.764 Section 941.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  1. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  2. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  3. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  4. 30 CFR 941.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 941.764 Section 941.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  5. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  6. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  7. 30 CFR 947.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 947.764 Section 947.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  8. 30 CFR 947.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 947.764 Section 947.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE WASHINGTON § 947.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  9. 30 CFR 937.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 937.764 Section 937.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE OREGON § 937.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  10. 30 CFR 941.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 941.764 Section 941.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE SOUTH DAKOTA § 941.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  11. 30 CFR 905.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 905.764 Section 905.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE CALIFORNIA § 905.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  12. 30 CFR 922.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 922.764 Section 922.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE MICHIGAN § 922.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  13. 30 CFR 903.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 903.764 Section 903.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE ARIZONA § 903.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  14. 30 CFR 939.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 939.764 Section 939.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE RHODE ISLAND § 939.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  15. 30 CFR 910.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 910.764 Section 910.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE GEORGIA § 910.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  16. 30 CFR 912.764 - Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal mining operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... surface coal mining operations. 912.764 Section 912.764 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR PROGRAMS FOR THE CONDUCT OF SURFACE MINING OPERATIONS WITHIN EACH STATE IDAHO § 912.764 Process for designating areas unsuitable for surface coal...

  17. Process for operating equilibrium controlled reactions

    DOEpatents

    Nataraj, Shankar; Carvill, Brian Thomas; Hufton, Jeffrey Raymond; Mayorga, Steven Gerard; Gaffney, Thomas Richard; Brzozowski, Jeffrey Richard

    2001-01-01

    A cyclic process for operating an equilibrium controlled reaction in a plurality of reactors containing an admixture of an adsorbent and a reaction catalyst suitable for performing the desired reaction which is operated in a predetermined timed sequence wherein the heating and cooling requirements in a moving reaction mass transfer zone within each reactor are provided by indirect heat exchange with a fluid capable of phase change at temperatures maintained in each reactor during sorpreaction, depressurization, purging and pressurization steps during each process cycle.

  18. Process redesign of production maintenance operations

    SciTech Connect

    Rankin, M.; Lowe, B.; Disney, V. Spilman, K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper describes a methodology for the systematic redesign of traditional production maintenance operations as they relate to subsurface failures of sucker rod pumped wells. The paper advocates an organized approach to process definition, refinement and redesign such that improvement objectives are clearly communicated, appropriate human and physical resources are brought to bear, and a system of improvement measurements becomes the overriding focus of the operation. Specific examples of the use of statistical process control tools in the production maintenance quality improvement effort are explored.

  19. Cask Processing Enclosure Specification/Operation - 12231

    SciTech Connect

    Gentry, Ronald

    2012-07-01

    Following an evaluation of throughput rates in the Hot Cell at the Transuranic Waste Processing Center and considering the variability in the waste with respect to actual dose rates a new approach to processing transuranic waste was necessary. Compounding the issue was the remote equipment poor reliability and high down-time. After considering all the factors, the evaluation resulted in the design and construction of a new waste processing area for handling the concrete casks that predominately contain contact handled transuranic (TRU) waste. The area is called the Cask Processing Enclosure and essentially the Cask Processing Enclosure mimics the projects current process techniques used for processing Contact Handled -TRU waste in the existing Box Breakdown Area and Glovebox. The Cask Processing Enclosure approach was developed based on a review of the RH processing throughput rates in the Hot Cell. As the process was reviewed consideration was given to the variability in the waste with respect to actual dose rates and the lack of equipment reliability and high wear in the Hot Cell. Based on that review, a new contact handled processing area for handling the concrete casks is being constructed and startup is expected shortly following WM2012. The Cask Processing Enclosure essentially mimics the projects current process techniques used for processing Contact Handled waste in the existing Box Breakdown Area and Glovebox and the design takes into consideration six years of operational experience. (authors)

  20. Process for the obtainment of boric acid from colemanite and/or howlite minerals

    SciTech Connect

    Polendo-Loredo, J.

    1988-07-12

    A process for obtaining boric acid from colemanite minerals, howlite minerals, or mixtures thereof is described comprising: treating the mineral with sulfuric acid to dissolve boron compounds; separating the solution thus formed from the insoluble solids in suspension; reacting the solution with hydrogen sulfide to precipitate arsenic and iron impurities; separating the impurities precipitated from the remaining solution; cooling the remaining solution to precipitate boric acid; and separating the boric acid from the remaining solution.

  1. Processing module operating methods, processing modules, and communications systems

    DOEpatents

    McCown, Steven Harvey; Derr, Kurt W.; Moore, Troy

    2014-09-09

    A processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a wireless communications device, requesting that the wireless communications device retrieve encrypted code from a web site and receiving the encrypted code from the wireless communications device. The wireless communications device is unable to decrypt the encrypted code. The method further includes using the processing module, decrypting the encrypted code, executing the decrypted code, and preventing the wireless communications device from accessing the decrypted code. Another processing module operating method includes using a processing module physically connected to a host device, executing an application within the processing module, allowing the application to exchange user interaction data communicated using a user interface of the host device with the host device, and allowing the application to use the host device as a communications device for exchanging information with a remote device distinct from the host device.

  2. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2000-08-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation before and/or during carbonation may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for cost optimization of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process.

  3. Operational efficiency in STS cargo processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    A multifaceted program is presented that addresses both the operational aspects of Shuttle-cargo integration and the needs of the STS Cargo Community. The program consists of the following key elements: (1) processing team awareness of cargo needs and requirements; (2) standardization of Orbiter preparation and cargo integration procedures and methods; (3) maximum application of state-of-the-art ADP techniques in all relevant areas; (4) continual review of cargo integration facility and ground system capabilities versus requirements and enhancement; (5) continual assessment of proposed cargo processing changes for safety and other needs; and (6) review of cargo processing philosophies, policies, and concepts for potential improvements.

  4. 78 FR 72096 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-12-02

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the availability of environmental documents prepared for OCS mineral... were prepared during the period July 1, 2013, through September 30, 2013, for oil, gas, and...

  5. 78 FR 47746 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-06

    ... Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations... (BOEM), Interior. ACTION: Notice of the Availability of Environmental Documents Prepared for OCS Mineral... were prepared during the period April 1, 2013, through June 30, 2013, for oil, gas, and...

  6. 77 FR 51107 - Mineral Range, Inc.-Acquisition and Operation Exemption-Rail Line of Lake Superior & Ishpeming...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-23

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board Mineral Range, Inc.--Acquisition and Operation Exemption--Rail Line of Lake Superior & Ishpeming Railroad Company Mineral Range, Inc. (MRI), a noncarrier, has filed a verified...

  7. Investigation of sulfur-bearing minerals in raw and processed oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Mason, G.M.

    1989-11-01

    Raw oil shale samples were investigated to provide baseline information on sulfur-bearing mineral composition. The sulfur-bearing mineral identified in raw oil in this study was primarily pyrite (FeS{sub 2}). Sulfur-bearing alteration minerals were gypsum (CaSO{sub 4}{center dot}2H{sub 2}O) and copiapite (Fe{sub 14}O{sub 3}(SO{sub 4}){sub 18}{center dot}63H{sub 2}O), which appeared as crystalline masses on the surfaces of sulfide minerals. Investigation of spent (or processed) oil shale demonstrated that heat-induced mineralogical reactions can drastically alter the crystalline structure of materials. Hexagonal pyrrhotite is the kinetically and structurally preferred sulfur-bearing mineral formed during oil shale processing. The Ca-monosulfide oldhamite was identified in processed Green River Formation oil shale resulting from WRI's TREE process. Oldhamite which has not been identified in terrestrial rocks, formed as a result of high sulfur gases present during the thermal processing of a Ca-rich oil shale. This work provided information concerning (1) thermal alteration of pyrite to pyrrhotite (and pyrrhotite-type minerals) and (2) the disclosure of a mineral not previously reported in oil shale. It is essential for processing and disposal considerations that metastable and unstable mineral forms be identified and more completely understood. Information concerning processing characteristics and sulfur-bearing mineral forms in raw and processed oil shale can be incorporated into the future strategies of solid waste management for fossil fuels. 56 refs., 21 figs., 3 tabs.

  8. A software architecture for automating operations processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, Kevin J.

    1994-01-01

    The Operations Engineering Lab (OEL) at JPL has developed a software architecture based on an integrated toolkit approach for simplifying and automating mission operations tasks. The toolkit approach is based on building adaptable, reusable graphical tools that are integrated through a combination of libraries, scripts, and system-level user interface shells. The graphical interface shells are designed to integrate and visually guide a user through the complex steps in an operations process. They provide a user with an integrated system-level picture of an overall process, defining the required inputs and possible output through interactive on-screen graphics. The OEL has developed the software for building these process-oriented graphical user interface (GUI) shells. The OEL Shell development system (OEL Shell) is an extension of JPL's Widget Creation Library (WCL). The OEL Shell system can be used to easily build user interfaces for running complex processes, applications with extensive command-line interfaces, and tool-integration tasks. The interface shells display a logical process flow using arrows and box graphics. They also allow a user to select which output products are desired and which input sources are needed, eliminating the need to know which program and its associated command-line parameters must be executed in each case. The shells have also proved valuable for use as operations training tools because of the OEL Shell hypertext help environment. The OEL toolkit approach is guided by several principles, including the use of ASCII text file interfaces with a multimission format, Perl scripts for mission-specific adaptation code, and programs that include a simple command-line interface for batch mode processing. Projects can adapt the interface shells by simple changes to the resources configuration file. This approach has allowed the development of sophisticated, automated software systems that are easy, cheap, and fast to build. This paper will

  9. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2005-08-01

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, a novel surface treatment technology, laser surface engineering (LSE) surface coating process was proposed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimen were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and AISI 4140 steels can be increased 10 and 25 folds, respectively by the application of LSE process. Initial field testing showed a 2 times improvement of the service life of a raw coal screen panel.

  10. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; R. Honaker; B. K. Parekh

    2007-09-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral and coal processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a significant improvement of the service life.

  11. Development of Advanced Surface Enhancement Technology for Decreasing Wear and Corrosion of Equipment Used for Mineral Processing

    SciTech Connect

    Daniel Tao; Craig A. Blue

    2006-07-20

    Equipment wear is a major concern in the mineral processing industry, which dramatically increases the maintenance cost and adversely affects plant operation efficiency. In this research, novel surface treatment technologies, High Density Infrared (HDI) and Laser Surface Engineering (LSE) surface coating processes were developed for the surface enhancement of selected mineral processing equipment. Microstructural and mechanical properties of the coated specimens were characterized. Laboratory-simulated wear tests were conducted to evaluate the tribological performance of the coated components. Test results indicate that the wear resistance of ASTM A36 (raw coal screen section) and can be significantly increased by applying HDI and LSE coating processes. Field testing has been performed using a LSE-treated screen panel and it showed a 2 times improvement of the service life.

  12. Tin-tungsten mineralizing processes in tungsten vein deposits: Panasqueira, Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecumberri-Sanchez, P.; Pinto, F.; Vieira, R.; Wälle, M.; Heinrich, C. A.

    2015-12-01

    Tungsten has a high heat resistance, density and hardness, which makes it widely applied in industry (e.g. steel, tungsten carbides). Tungsten deposits are typically magmatic-hydrothermal systems. Despite the economic significance of tungsten, there are no modern quantitative analytical studies of the fluids responsible for the formation of its highest-grade deposit type (tungsten vein deposits). Panasqueira (Portugal) is a tungsten vein deposit, one of the leading tungsten producers in Europe and one of the best geologically characterized tungsten vein deposits. In this study, compositions of the mineralizing fluids at Panasqueira have been determined through combination of detailed petrography, microthermometric measurements and LA-ICPMS analyses, and geochemical modeling has been used to determine the processes that lead to tungsten mineralization. We characterized the fluids related to the various mineralizing stages in the system: the oxide stage (tin and tungsten mineralization), the sulfide stage (chalcopyrite and sphalerite mineralization) and the carbonate stage. Thus, our results provide information on the properties of fluids related with specific paragenetic stages. Furthermore we used those fluid compositions in combination with host rock mineralogy and chemistry to evaluate which are the controlling factors in the mineralizing process. This study provides the first quantitative analytical data on fluid composition for tungsten vein deposits and evaluates the controlling mineralization processes helping to determine the mechanisms of formation of the Panasqueira tin-tungsten deposit and providing additional geochemical constraints on the local distribution of mineralization.

  13. Phosphate Mineral Deposits Characterization Using Multivariate Data and SOM-based Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreira, L. P.; da Cunha, L. S.; Friedel, M. J.; Campos, J. E.; de Mendonça, F. C.

    2014-12-01

    Phosphate deposits provide an important primary nutrient for fertilizer and agricultural industries worldwide in addition to feedstock for phosphate chemical processing plants. Phosphate mineral formation as well as its concentration may vary in tropical areas, due to strong weathering processes. Phosphate mineralization at Bonfim Hill, Central North Brazil, is stratiform, lens-shaped with deposition controlled by paleochannels and erosion controlling structures. Identification and characterization of phosphate mineral deposit at Bonfim Hill were performed analyzing geochemistry, electrical resistivity, x-ray fluorescence, mineral types and lithotypes using Kohonen's unsupervised neural network, the so-called self organizing maps (SOM). SOM-based data analysis enables and facilitates thorough investigations of multivariate data systems and provide additional statistical information compared to traditional methods.The geochemical and geophysical data set was also used to train and validate a SOM-based classification system to detect phosphate mineral deposit, achieving 78% of correct classification.

  14. Entering the operative correction machining processes CNC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nekrasov, R. Yu; Starikov, A. I.; Lasukov, A. A.

    2015-09-01

    The article describes the solution to the problem of compensation of errors occurring during machining on CNC machines. We propose a method of mathematical modeling of processes diagnostics and control of technological equipment. The results of the diagnosis of the CNC machine, as well as the mathematical model describing the dependence of the positioning error of the executive bodies of operating component of cutting force PZ, in the range of movement OX.

  15. Application of the electro-Fenton process for cutting fluid mineralization.

    PubMed

    Chachou, L; Gueraini, Y; Bouhalouane, Y; Poncin, S; Li, H Z; Bensadok, K

    2015-01-01

    Organic compound is the main pollutant in industrial effluent. Conventional wastewater treatment processes are inefficient for the removal of toxic or non-biodegradable organic pollutants. Advanced electrochemical depollution is a very efficient and economic method, suitable when the wastewater contains toxic and recalcitrant organic pollutants. The aim of the present study was to investigate the application of the electro-Fenton (EF) process for the degradation and mineralization of a stable oil-in-water emulsion (0.01% in v/v). The effects of operating parameters such as cathode material (graphite, Ti/Pt and steel), nature (Na2SO4, NaNO3 and NaCl) and dose of electrolyte (25-75 mM), initial ferrous ions concentration (1-75 mM), current intensity (0.1-0.2 A) and operating time, on chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency, were studied. Results showed that the EF method can be used efficiently for the degradation of stable cutting oil emulsion. For considered initial conditions (bubbling compressed air at 1 L/min, 0.15 A, pH 3, [Na2SO4]=0.05 M, [FeSO4]=0.015 M, COD0=400 mg O2/L), the best removal efficiencies were obtained under the following conditions: graphite as cathode material, 180 min for treatment duration and 0.05 M [Na2SO4]. For these conditions, treatment of 250 mL of emulsion led to 93.6% of cutting fluid mineralization, which correspond to 25 mg O2/L of final COD, 19 kWh/m3 of treated wastewater and 24.039 kWh/kg of COD removal. PMID:25666104

  16. Carbon dioxide sequestration by direct mineral carbonation: process mineralogy of feed and products

    SciTech Connect

    O'Connor, William K.; Dahlin, David C.; Rush, G.E.; Dahlin, Cheryl L.; Collins, W. Keith

    2001-01-01

    Direct mineral carbonation has been investigated as a process to convert gaseous CO2 into a geologically stable final form. The process utilizes a slurry of water, with bicarbonate and salt additions, mixed with a mineral reactant, such as olivine (Mg2SiO4) or serpentine [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4]. Carbon dioxide is dissolved into this slurry, resulting in dissolution of the mineral and precipitation of magnesium carbonate (MgCO3). Optimum results have been achieved using heat pretreated serpentine feed material and high partial pressure of CO2 (PCO2). Specific conditions include: 155?C; PCO2=185 atm; 15% solids. Under these conditions, 78% conversion of the silicate to the carbonate was achieved in 30 minutes. Process mineralogy has been utilized to characterize the feed and process products, and interpret the mineral dissolution and carbonate precipitation reaction paths.

  17. Geophysical signatures of disseminated iron minerals: A proxy for understanding subsurface biophysicochemical processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Aal, Gamal Z.; Atekwana, Estella A.; Revil, A.

    2014-09-01

    Previous studies have linked biogeophysical signatures to the presence of iron minerals resulting from distinct biophysicochemical processes. Utilizing geophysical methods as a proxy of such biophysicochemical processes requires an understanding of the geophysical signature of the different iron minerals. Laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the complex conductivity and magnetic susceptibility signatures of five iron minerals disseminated in saturated porous media under variable iron mineral content and grain size. Both pyrite and magnetite show high quadrature and inphase conductivities compared to hematite, goethite, and siderite, whereas magnetite was the highly magnetic mineral dominating the magnetic susceptibility measurements. The quadrature conductivity spectra of both pyrite and magnetite exhibit a well-defined characteristic relaxation peak below 10 kHz, not observed with the other iron minerals. The quadrature conductivity and magnetic susceptibility of individual and a mixture of iron minerals are dominated and linearly proportional to the mass fraction of the highly conductive (pyrite and magnetite) and magnetic (magnetite) iron minerals, respectively. The quadrature conductivity magnitude increased with decreasing grain size diameter of magnetite and pyrite with a progressive shift of the characteristic relaxation peak toward higher frequencies. The quadrature conductivity response of a mixture of different grain sizes of iron minerals is shown to be additive, whereas magnetic susceptibility measurements were insensitive to the variation in grain size diameters (1-0.075 mm). The integration of complex conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements can therefore provide a complimentary tool for the successful investigation of in situ biophysicochemical processes resulting in biotransformation or secondary iron mineral precipitation.

  18. Operational experiences with a miner/bolter in the Illinois basin

    SciTech Connect

    Hess, J.R.

    1994-12-31

    At the Freeman United Coal Mining Company`s Orient No. 6 Mine, located in Jefferson County near Waltonville, Illinois, a different concept in continuous mining development for longwall panels is being used. Faced with a common problem in longwall operations, development of territory for the longwall mining system, Freeman instituted a miner/bolter development machine to enhance the mining rates in the longwall panels. At Orient No. 6, mining occurs in the Herrin (Illinois No. 6) Coal seam. The seam has a thickness of about five to six feet; the overburden is 700 to 800 feet. The immediate roof is formed by the dark gray shale and the medium gray shale facies of the Energy Shale Member. While the shale normally forms a stable roof, the historical mining experience indicates that bed separation along the laminations can cause problems at the mining face. In continuous mining sections, the separating layers will fall, or they must be cut down. The floor is formed by clay stone; it is normally stable, except when wet. Because of the roof instability, the enhanced roof control features of the miner/bolter operation became a powerful driving force for this acquisition. Rather than developing the normal 18 to 20 feet before roof control is installed, it is now possible to control the roof immediately. Resin impregnated conventional bolts are used as roof support; lengths of seven to eight feet are used, in concert with a fourteen foot plank or steel plate.

  19. Development of a method for characterizing changes in coal and mineral surfaces resulting from beneficiation processes

    SciTech Connect

    Slomka, B.J.; Seward, K.J.; Dawson, M.R.; Buttermore, W.H.

    1989-01-01

    A novel method was developed for characterizing changes in coal and mineral surfaces resulting from sonication and other cleaning processes. This method employs a unique flow-cell to permit the dynamic measurement of dye adsorption on coal and mineral particle surfaces. The rates and extents of adsorption of ionic dyes on Illinois No. 6 coal were found to be dependent on mineral content and particle size of ground coal samples. A significant correlation was observed between the adsorbed quantity of dye and the total mineral content of coal. In preliminary experiments with methylene blue dye, clay was found to absorb significantly more of the dye than quartz, pyrite, calcite, or clean coal'' surfaces. By using dyes of differing adsorption selectivity, it is demonstrated that sonication reduces the apparent mineral content on the surface of coal. 9 refs., 7 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Homogeneous sonophotolysis of food processing industry wastewater: Study of synergistic effects, mineralization and toxicity removal.

    PubMed

    Durán, A; Monteagudo, J M; Sanmartín, I; Gómez, P

    2013-03-01

    The mineralization of industrial wastewater coming from food industry using an emerging homogeneous sonophotolytic oxidation process was evaluated as an alternative to or a rapid pretreatment step for conventional anaerobic digestion with the aim of considerably reducing the total treatment time. At the selected operation conditions ([H(2)O(2)]=11,750ppm, pH=8, amplitude=50%, pulse length (cycles)=1), 60% of TOC is removed after 60min and 98% after 180min when treating an industrial effluent with 2114ppm of total organic carbon (TOC). This process removed completely the toxicity generated during storing or due to intermediate compounds. An important synergistic effect between sonolysis and photolysis (H(2)O(2)/UV) was observed. Thus the sonophotolysis (ultrasound/H(2)O(2)/UV) technique significantly increases TOC removal when compared with each individual process. Finally, a preliminary economical analysis confirms that the sono-photolysis with H(2)O(2) and pretreated water is a profitable system when compared with the same process without using ultrasound waves and with no pretreatment. PMID:23122709

  1. Laser diagnostics of mineral matter and combustion processes in coal

    SciTech Connect

    Venkateswarlu, P.; George, M.C.; Sekhar, P.C.; Subbarao, V.

    1989-01-01

    This is the third report on this project. During the period covered by the first two reports (October 1, 1987 through August 30, 1988) a sample of low sulfur powdered coal was heated under vacuum from 25 to 1000{degrees}C at a heating rate of 5{degrees}C per minute. The vapors generated were analyzed by a Balzer Quadrupole Mass Spectrometer model QMG 511. The analysis showed that the major constituents of the vapors are aliphatic hydrocarbons. A second set of experiments were carried out to determine the mineral constituents in ash obtained by heating coal in a porcelain crucible at 400--500{degrees}C in a muffle furnace until all the coal was oxidized. Model 3030 Perkin Elmer Atomic Absorption Spectrophotometer was used with appropriate hollow cathode lamps. A dozen elements were identified. Al, Na, K and Fe were the most prominent. During this period we have made an extensive series of measurements on laser induced combustion of coal pellets made from coal powder. C{sub 2}, CN, CO, Na and K were identified from the spectra. We have also fabricated a burner for the study of coal combustion using laser spectroscopic techniques. 1 ref., 4 figs.

  2. GLOBAL OPERATIONAL ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW (GOER) PROCESS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Air Force Special Operations Command (AFSOC) is forging a new automated environmental planning tool for use by mission commanders, planners, operators, and environmental professionals for overseas and homeland defense operations. The GOER is an environmental tool with operational...

  3. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2002-11-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (1) its structural and chemical simplicity, (2) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (3) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This final report covers the overall progress of this grant.

  4. ATOMIC-LEVEL IMAGING OF CO2 DISPOSAL AS A CARBONATE MINERAL: OPTIMIZING REACTION PROCESS DESIGN

    SciTech Connect

    M.J. McKelvy; R. Sharma; A.V.G. Chizmeshya; H. Bearat; R.W. Carpenter

    2001-10-01

    Fossil fuels, especially coal, can support the energy demands of the world for centuries to come, if the environmental problems associated with CO{sub 2} emissions can be overcome. Permanent and safe methods for CO{sub 2} capture and disposal/storage need to be developed. Mineralization of stationary-source CO{sub 2} emissions as carbonates can provide such safe capture and long-term sequestration. Mg-rich lamellar-hydroxide based minerals (e.g., brucite and serpentine) offer a class of widely available, low-cost materials, with intriguing mineral carbonation potential. Carbonation of such materials inherently involves dehydroxylation, which can disrupt the material down to the atomic level. As such, controlled dehydroxylation, before and/or during carbonation, may provide an important parameter for enhancing carbonation reaction processes. Mg(OH){sub 2} was chosen as the model material for investigating lamellar hydroxide mineral dehydroxylation/carbonation mechanisms due to (i) its structural and chemical simplicity, (ii) interest in Mg(OH){sub 2} gas-solid carbonation as a potentially cost-effective CO{sub 2} mineral sequestration process component, and (iii) its structural and chemical similarity to other lamellar-hydroxide-based minerals (e.g., serpentine-based minerals) whose carbonation reaction processes are being explored due to their low-cost CO{sub 2} sequestration potential. Fundamental understanding of the mechanisms that govern dehydroxylation/carbonation processes is essential for minimizing the cost of any lamellar-hydroxide-based mineral carbonation sequestration process. This report covers the third year progress of this grant, as well as providing an integrated overview of the progress in years 1-3, as we have been granted a one-year no-cost extension to wrap up a few studies and publications to optimize project impact.

  5. 26 CFR 1.614-8 - Elections with respect to separate operating mineral interests for taxable years beginning after...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... more deposits, the joint development or production of which is logical, without taking tax benefits... interests agree to have the interests operated on a unified basis and further agree to share in production... any such co-owner to share in production from any operating mineral interests other than his own....

  6. Selected Geochemical Data for Modeling Near-Surface Processes in Mineral Systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Giles, Stuart A.; Granitto, Matthew; Eppinger, Robert G.

    2009-01-01

    The database herein was initiated, designed, and populated to collect and integrate geochemical, geologic, and mineral deposit data in an organized manner to facilitate geoenvironmental mineral deposit modeling. The Microsoft Access database contains data on a variety of mineral deposit types that have variable environmental effects when exposed at the ground surface by mining or natural processes. The data tables describe quantitative and qualitative geochemical analyses determined by 134 analytical laboratory and field methods for over 11,000 heavy-mineral concentrate, rock, sediment, soil, vegetation, and water samples. The database also provides geographic information on geology, climate, ecoregion, and site contamination levels for over 3,000 field sites in North America.

  7. Extraction of reusable water from a mineral mining process

    SciTech Connect

    Gleim, W.K.

    1982-01-19

    A method for the treatment of an aqueous effluent slime derived from a tar sand extraction process is disclosed. The effluent slime ph is adjusted to an acidic ph and treated with an anionic surface active agent to create flocculation of solid asphaltic material entrained within the slime. A solvent solution comprising chlorinated hydrocarbon and a solvent therefor is added so that upon centrifuging of the treated slime three physical layers of material comprising (1) water; (2) asphaltics in the solvent solution and (3) clay are formed.

  8. Atmospheric processing outside clouds increases soluble iron in mineral dust.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zongbo; Krom, Michael D; Bonneville, Steeve; Benning, Liane G

    2015-02-01

    Iron (Fe) is a key micronutrient regulating primary productivity in many parts of the global ocean. Dust deposition is an important source of Fe to the surface ocean, but most of this Fe is biologically unavailable. Atmospheric processing and reworking of Fe in dust aerosol can increase the bioavailable Fe inputs to the ocean, yet the processes are not well understood. Here, we experimentally simulate and model the cycling of Fe-bearing dust between wet aerosol and cloud droplets. Our results show that insoluble Fe in dust particles readily dissolves under acidic conditions relevant to wet aerosols. By contrast, under the higher pH conditions generally relevant to clouds, Fe dissolution tends to stop, and dissolved Fe precipitates as poorly crystalline nanoparticles. If the dust-bearing cloud droplets evaporated again (returning to the wet aerosol stage with low pH), those neo-formed Fe nanoparticles quickly redissolve, while the refractory Fe-bearing phases continue to dissolve gradually. Overall, the duration of the acidic, wet aerosol stage ultimately increases the amount of potentially bioavailable Fe delivered to oceans, while conditions in clouds favor the formation of Fe-rich nanoparticles in the atmosphere. PMID:25574950

  9. Evaluation of Mineral Deposits Along the Little Wind River, Riverton, WY, Processing Site

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, Sam; Dam, Wiliam

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the U.S.Department of Energy (DOE) began reassessing the former Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site area for potential contaminant sources impacting groundwater. A flood in 2010 along the Little Wind River resulted in increases in groundwater contamination (DOE 2013).This investigation is a small part of continued efforts by DOE and other stakeholders to update human health and ecological risk assessments, to make a comprehensive examination of all exposure pathways to ensure that the site remains protective through established institutional controls. During field inspections at the Riverton Site in 2013, a white evaporitic mineral deposit was identified along the bank of the Little Wind River within the discharge zone of the groundwater contamination plume. In December 2013, Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) personnel collected a sample for analysis by X-ray fluorescence (Figure 1 shows the type of material sampled). The sample had a uranium concentration of approximately 64 to 73 parts per million. Although the uranium in this mineral deposit is within the expected range for evaporatic minerals in the western United States (SRNL 2014), DOE determined that additional assessment of the mineral deposit was warranted. In response to the initial collection and analysis of a sample of the mineral deposit, DOE developed a work plan (Work Plan to Sample Mineral Deposits Along the Little Wind River, Riverton, Wyoming, Processing Site [DOE 2014]) to further define the extent of these mineral deposits and the concentration of the associated contaminants (Appendix A). The work plan addressed field reconnaissance, mapping, sampling, and the assessment of risk associated with the mineral deposits adjacent to the Little Wind River.

  10. The diesel exhaust in miners study: I. Overview of the exposure assessment process.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Patricia A; Coble, Joseph B; Vermeulen, Roel; Schleiff, Patricia; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T

    2010-10-01

    measured REC exposure level by facility ranged from 40 to 384 μg m⁻³ for the underground workers and from 2 to 6 μg m⁻³ for the surface workers. For one prevalent underground job, 'miner operator', the maximum annual REC exposure estimate by facility ranged up to 685% greater than the corresponding 1998-2001 value. A comparison of the historical CO estimates from the time trend models with 1976-1977 CO measurements not used in the modeling found an overall median relative difference of 29%. Other comparisons showed similar levels of agreement. The assessment process indicated large differences in REC exposure levels over time and across the underground operations. Method evaluations indicated that the final estimates were consistent with those from alternative time trend models and demonstrated moderate to high agreement with external data. PMID:20876233

  11. Exposure of workers in a mineral processing industry in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Julião, Lígia M Q C; Melo, Dunstana R; Sousa, Wanderson O; Santos, Maristela S; Fernandes, Paulo César; Godoy, Maria Luiza D P

    2007-01-01

    In Brazil there are many regions where the extraction mining and processing of ores containing elements of great economical importance as tin, niobium and tantalum. Some of these ores have uranium and thorium natural decay series associated. This study was carried out in a niobium mine, where is obtained concentrates of niobates-tantalates, cassiterite and zirconite. The aim of this study is the evaluation of the occupational exposure to uranium, thorium, niobium and tin through urine bioassay data. In order to have it, 105 urine samples were analysed: 17 samples of exposed workers collected after a working day, 49 samples of exposed workers collected before a working day and 39 samples of local non-exposed people, assigned as a control group. The samples were analysed by mass spectrometry. The obtained results showed that the average concentration of Nb, Sn and U in the exposed group is statistically higher than those found in the control group indicating an occupational exposure. For Th there were no statistically difference between the exposed and the control group. PMID:17369613

  12. Microbial mineralization of struvite: a promising process to overcome phosphate sequestering crisis.

    PubMed

    Sinha, Arvind; Singh, Amit; Kumar, Sumit; Khare, Sunil Kumar; Ramanan, Arunachalam

    2014-05-01

    Due to extensive exploitation of non-renewable phosphate minerals, their natural reserves will exhaust very soon. This necessitates looking for alternatives and an efficient methodology through which indispensable phosphorus can be harvested back. The current study was undertaken to explore the potential of a metallophilic bacterium Enterobacter sp. EMB19 for the recovery of phosphorus as phosphate rich mineral. A very low phosphate concentration strategy was adopted. The process led to the mineralization of phosphorus as homogeneous struvite crystals. For each gram of Epsom salt added, the cells effectively mineralized about 20% of the salt into struvite. The effect of different inorganic sources, culture profile and plausible mechanism involved in crystal formation was also explored. The synthesized struvite crystals typically possessed a prismatic crystal habit. The characterization and identification of the crystals were done using single crystal X-ray diffraction (SCXRD), powder X-ray diffraction (PXRD), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDAX) and fourier transform infrared (FTIR). The thermal characteristics were studied using thermo gravimetric analysis (TGA) and differential scanning calorimetric (DSC) processes. The synthesis of struvite by this bacterium seems to be a promising and viable strategy since it serves dual purpose (i) obtaining phosphorus and nitrogen rich fertilizer and (ii) conservation of natural phosphate reserves. This study is very significant in the sense that the process may be used for harvesting and synthesizing other valuable minerals. Also, it will provide new insights into phosphate biomineralization mechanisms. PMID:24531293

  13. Oriented hydroxyapatite in turkey tendon mineralized via the polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) process

    SciTech Connect

    Jee, S.S.; DiMasi, E.; Kasinath, R.K.; Kim, Y.Y.; Gower, L.

    2010-12-03

    Bone is a hierarchically structured composite which imparts it with unique mechanical properties and bioresorptive potential. These properties are primarily influenced by the underlying nanostructure of bone, which consists of nanocrystals of hydroxyapatite embedded and uniaxially aligned within collagen fibrils. There is also a small fraction of non-collagenous proteins in bone, and these are thought to play an important role in bone's formation. In our in vitro model system of bone formation, polyanionic peptides are used to mimic the role of the non-collagenous proteins. In our prior studies, we have shown that intrafibrillar mineralization can be achieved in synthetic reconstituted collagen sponges using a polymer-induced liquid-precursor (PILP) mineralization process. This led to a nanostructured arrangement of hydroxyapatite crystals within the individual fibrils which closely mimics that of bone. This report demonstrates that biogenic collagen scaffolds obtained from turkey tendon, which consist of densely packed and oriented collagen fibrils, can also be mineralized by the PILP process. Synchrotron X-ray diffraction studies show that the mineralization process leads to a high degree of crystallographic orientation at the macroscale, thus emulating that found in the biological system of naturally mineralizing turkey tendon.

  14. 43 CFR 3602.12 - How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false How does the mineral materials sales process affect other users of the same public lands? 3602.12 Section 3602.12 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINERAL...

  15. Nanoanalytical Electron Microscopy Reveals a Sequential Mineralization Process Involving Carbonate-Containing Amorphous Precursors.

    PubMed

    Nitiputri, Kharissa; Ramasse, Quentin M; Autefage, Hélène; McGilvery, Catriona M; Boonrungsiman, Suwimon; Evans, Nicholas D; Stevens, Molly M; Porter, Alexandra E

    2016-07-26

    A direct observation and an in-depth characterization of the steps by which bone mineral nucleates and grows in the extracellular matrix during the earliest stages of maturation, using relevant biomineralization models as they grow into mature bone mineral, is an important research goal. To better understand the process of bone mineralization in the extracellular matrix, we used nanoanalytical electron microscopy techniques to examine an in vitro model of bone formation. This study demonstrates the presence of three dominant CaP structures in the mineralizing osteoblast cultures: <80 nm dense granules with a low calcium to phosphate ratio (Ca/P) and crystalline domains; calcium phosphate needles emanating from a focus: "needle-like globules" (100-300 nm in diameter) and mature mineral, both with statistically higher Ca/P compared to that of the dense granules. Many of the submicron granules and globules were interspersed around fibrillar structures containing nitrogen, which are most likely the signature of the organic phase. With high spatial resolution electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) mapping, spatially resolved maps were acquired showing the distribution of carbonate within each mineral structure. The carbonate was located in the middle of the granules, which suggested the nucleation of the younger mineral starts with a carbonate-containing precursor and that this precursor may act as seed for growth into larger, submicron-sized, needle-like globules of hydroxyapatite with a different stoichiometry. Application of analytical electron microscopy has important implications in deciphering both how normal bone forms and in understanding pathological mineralization. PMID:27383526

  16. Predicting the Mineral Composition of Dust Aerosols. Part 1; Representing Key Processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perlwitz, J. P.; Garcia-Pando, C. Perez; Miller, R. L.

    2015-01-01

    Soil dust aerosols created by wind erosion are typically assigned globally uniform physical and chemical properties within Earth system models, despite known regional variations in the mineral content of the parent soil. Mineral composition of the aerosol particles is important to their interaction with climate, including shortwave absorption and radiative forcing, nucleation of cloud droplets and ice crystals, heterogeneous formation of sulfates and nitrates, and atmospheric processing of iron into bioavailable forms that increase the productivity of marine phytoplankton. Here, aerosol mineral composition is derived by extending a method that provides the composition of a wet-sieved soil. The extension accounts for measurements showing significant differences between the mineral fractions of the wetsieved soil and the emitted aerosol concentration. For example, some phyllosilicate aerosols are more prevalent at silt sizes, even though they are nearly absent at these diameters in a soil whose aggregates are dispersed by wet sieving. We calculate the emitted mass of each mineral with respect to size by accounting for the disintegration of soil aggregates during wet sieving. These aggregates are emitted during mobilization and fragmentation of the original undispersed soil that is subject to wind erosion. The emitted aggregates are carried far downwind from their parent soil. The soil mineral fractions used to calculate the aggregates also include larger particles that are suspended only in the vicinity of the source. We calculate the emitted size distribution of these particles using a normalized distribution derived from aerosol measurements. In addition, a method is proposed for mixing minerals with small impurities composed of iron oxides. These mixtures are important for transporting iron far from the dust source, because pure iron oxides are more dense and vulnerable to gravitational removal than most minerals comprising dust aerosols. A limited comparison to

  17. Kennedy Space Center Orion Processing Team Planning for Ground Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Letchworth, Gary; Schlierf, Roland

    2011-01-01

    Topics in this presentation are: Constellation Ares I/Orion/Ground Ops Elements Orion Ground Operations Flow Orion Operations Planning Process and Toolset Overview, including: 1 Orion Concept of Operations by Phase 2 Ops Analysis Capabilities Overview 3 Operations Planning Evolution 4 Functional Flow Block Diagrams 5 Operations Timeline Development 6 Discrete Event Simulation (DES) Modeling 7 Ground Operations Planning Document Database (GOPDb) Using Operations Planning Tools for Operability Improvements includes: 1 Kaizen/Lean Events 2 Mockups 3 Human Factors Analysis

  18. [Role of microscopic fungi in the process of weathering of pegmatite deposit rocks and minerals].

    PubMed

    Avakian, Z A; Karavaiko, G I; Mel'nikova, E O; Krutsko, V S; Ostroushko, Iu I

    1981-01-01

    The object of this work was to study the effect of microscopic fungi isolated from the weathering zone of a pegmatite deposit on the transport of elements and the degradation of rocks and minerals. Regardless of the chemical composition of rocks and minerals, microscopic fungi accelerated the leaching of elements as compared to the purely chemical process. The extraction of Li, Si, Al and Fe under the action of microorganisms increased by factors of 1.4-1.7, 2.7-4.0, 5.0-8.7 and 4-18, respectively. In the case of chemical weathering, the extraction of elements occurred at a high rate only at the beginning; then the process either decelerated or stopped. The mechanism of action of microscopic fungi on rocks and minerals is discussed as well as the role of these microorganisms in the weathering of spodumene and the surrounding rocks, pegmatites an shales, which occurs in the zone of hypergenesis. PMID:7194415

  19. Dewatering: Coal and mineral processing. (Latest citations from the COMPENDEX database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-05-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the technology of dewatering. Included is coverage of techniques, processes, and evaluations applied to coal processing, coal slurry preparation, ash treatments, and processing of other mineral ores. Mechanical devices, heating devices, filtering techniques, air drying, the use of surfactants and flocculants, and design techniques in dewatering systems are discussed. Dewatering of peats, sewage sludges, and industrial sludges are referenced in related bibliographies. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  20. Process for removal of mineral particulates from coal-derived liquids

    DOEpatents

    McDowell, William J.

    1980-01-01

    Suspended mineral solids are separated from a coal-derived liquid containing the solids by a process comprising the steps of: (a) contacting said coal-derived liquid containing solids with a molten additive having a melting point of 100.degree.-500.degree. C. in an amount of up to 50 wt. % with respect to said coal-derived liquid containing solids, said solids present in an amount effective to increase the particle size of said mineral solids and comprising material or mixtures of material selected from the group of alkali metal hydroxides and inorganic salts having antimony, tin, lithium, sodium, potassium, magnesium, calcium, beryllium, aluminum, zinc, molybdenum, cobalt, nickel, ruthenium, rhodium or iron cations and chloride, iodide, bromide, sulfate, phosphate, borate, carbonate, sulfite, or silicate anions; and (b) maintaining said coal-derived liquid in contact with said molten additive for sufficient time to permit said mineral matter to agglomerate, thereby increasing the mean particle size of said mineral solids; and (c) recovering a coal-derived liquid product having reduced mineral solids content. The process can be carried out with less than 5 wt. % additive and in the absence of hydrogen pressure.

  1. Proton microprobe studies of the mineralization process in selected organic matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rokita, E.; Cichocki, T.; Divoux, S.; Gonsior, B.; Höfert, M.; Jarczyk, L.; Strzalkowski, A.; Sych, M.

    1990-04-01

    The application of the proton-induced X-ray emission method in combination with a proton microprobe (micro-PIXE) to studies of the mineralization process in selected organic matrices is presented. The flat-bone mineralization of the skull of 17-19 days pregnancy mouse embryos is described in detail. The section thickness as well as concentrations of P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Zn and Br were determined using the raster- or line-scan irradiation mode. On the basis of Ca and P contents the amount of inorganic phase was determined for each sample under investigation, while the Ca/P ratio was used for the identification of the chemical compounds within inorganic material. In the embryonal bones we observed almost stoichiometric hydroxyapatite; however, in the intramembranaceous ossification of the young (17 day) animals, octacalcium phosphate was identified. At the given age of the embryo the amount of minerals is much higher in the femur bone than in flat bone. The micro-PIXE method furthermore turned out to be sensitive enough to study the mineralization accompanying malignant tumors. We have also observed the involvement of some trace elements in the development of the mineralization process. The last two observations are unattainable by histological staining.

  2. Process validation: achieving the Operational Qualification phase.

    PubMed

    Buffaloe, Vera

    2004-01-01

    The OQ phase of process validation is very important and is where the complete understanding of the process is determined by experimentation. This understanding is useful to: * establish optimal process parameters * understand variation that affect the process * aid in investigating process deviations. OQ is an important part of the entire process validation activity and essential to understanding a manufacturing process. The benefits of completing the OQ and overall process validation are the reasons that it makes business sense and receive the long-term benefits of producing high quality product and achieving customer satisfaction. PMID:15521514

  3. ARSENIC LEACHING FROM IRON RICH MINERAL PROCESSING WASTE: INFLUENCE OF PH AND REDOX POTENTIAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper presents the effect of pH and redox potential on the potential mobility of arsenic (As) from a contaminated mineral processing waste. The selected waste contained about 0.47 g kg-1 of As and 66.2 g kg-1 of iron (Fe). The characteristic of the wast...

  4. Leaching Behavior Of Mineral Processing Waste: Comparison Of Batch And Column Investigations

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this study, a comparison of laboratory batch and column experiments on metal release profile from a mineral processing waste (MPW) is presented. Batch (equilibrium) and column (dynamic) leaching tests were conducted on ground MPW at different liquid–solid ratios (LS) to determ...

  5. Formation Processes and Impacts of Reactive and Nonreactive Minerals in Permeable Reactive Barriers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., changes in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction,...

  6. FORMATION PROCESSES AND CONSEQUENCES OF REACTIVE AND NON-REACTIVE MINERAL PRECIPITATES IN PERMEABLE REACTIVE BARRIERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Mineral precipitates in zero-valent iron PRBs can be classified by formation processes into three groups: 1) those that result from changes in chemical conditions (i.e., change in pH, e.g., calcite); 2) those that are a consequence of microbial activity (i.e., sulfate reduction, ...

  7. Mineralization of the antibiotic levofloxacin in aqueous medium by electro-Fenton process: kinetics and intermediate products analysis.

    PubMed

    Yahya, Muna Sh; El Karbane, Miloud; Oturan, Nihal; El Kacemi, Kacem; Oturan, Mehmet A

    2016-05-01

    The present study investigates the feasibility of using electro-Fenton (EF) process for the oxidative degradation of antibiotic levofloxacin (LEV). The EF experiments have been performed in an electrochemical cell using a carbon-felt cathode. The effect of applied current in the range 60-500 mA and catalyst concentration in the range 0.05-0.5 mM on the kinetics of oxidative degradation and mineralization efficiency have been investigated. Degradation of LEV by hydroxyl radicals was found to follow pseudo-first-order reaction kinetics. The absolute rate constant for oxidative degradation of LEV by hydroxyl radical has been determined by a competition kinetics method and found to be (2.48 ± 0.18) × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1). An optimum current value of 400 mA and a catalyst (Fe(2+)) concentration of 0.1 mM were observed to be optimal for an effective degradation of LEV under our operating conditions. Mineralization of aqueous solution of LEV was performed by the chemical oxygen demand analysis and an almost mineralization degree (>91%) was reached at the end of 6 h of electrolysis. A number of intermediate products have been identified using high performance liquid chromatography and liquid chrmatography-mass spectrometry analyses. Based on these identified reaction intermediates, a plausible reaction pathway has been suggested for the mineralization process. The formation and evolution of [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text] ions released to the medium during the process were also discussed. PMID:26508263

  8. The Diesel Exhaust in Miners Study: I. Overview of the Exposure Assessment Process

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Patricia A.; Coble, Joseph B.; Vermeulen, Roel; Schleiff, Patricia; Blair, Aaron; Lubin, Jay; Attfield, Michael; Silverman, Debra T.

    2010-01-01

    measured REC exposure level by facility ranged from 40 to 384 μg m−3 for the underground workers and from 2 to 6 μg m−3 for the surface workers. For one prevalent underground job, ‘miner operator’, the maximum annual REC exposure estimate by facility ranged up to 685% greater than the corresponding 1998–2001 value. A comparison of the historical CO estimates from the time trend models with 1976–1977 CO measurements not used in the modeling found an overall median relative difference of 29%. Other comparisons showed similar levels of agreement. The assessment process indicated large differences in REC exposure levels over time and across the underground operations. Method evaluations indicated that the final estimates were consistent with those from alternative time trend models and demonstrated moderate to high agreement with external data. PMID:20876233

  9. 78 FR 12085 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean Energy...

  10. 78 FR 27422 - Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Bureau of Ocean Energy Management MMAA104000 Environmental Documents Prepared for Oil, Gas, and Mineral Operations by the Gulf of Mexico Outer Continental Shelf (OCS) Region AGENCY: Bureau of Ocean...

  11. 26 CFR 1.614-2 - Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Election to aggregate separate operating mineral interests under section 614(b) prior to its amendment by Revenue Act of 1964. 1.614-2 Section 1.614-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural...

  12. 26 CFR 1.614-3 - Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 7 2011-04-01 2009-04-01 true Rules relating to separate operating mineral interests in the case of mines. 1.614-3 Section 1.614-3 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) INCOME TAX (CONTINUED) INCOME TAXES (CONTINUED) Natural Resources § 1.614-3 Rules relating to separate...

  13. Mineralization of 2-chlorophenol by sequential electrochemical reductive dechlorination and biological processes.

    PubMed

    Arellano-González, Miguel Ángel; González, Ignacio; Texier, Anne-Claire

    2016-08-15

    In this work, a novel approach was applied to obtain the mineralization of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) in an electrochemical-biological combined system where an electrocatalytic dehydrogenation process (reductive dechlorination) was coupled to a biological denitrification process. Reductive dechlorination of 2-CP was conducted in an ECCOCEL-type reactor on a Pd-Ni/Ti electrode at a potential of -0.40V vs Ag/AgCl(s)/KCl(sat), achieving 100 percent transformation of 2-CP into phenol. The electrochemically pretreated effluent was fed to a rotating cylinder denitrifying bioreactor where the totality of phenol was mineralized by denitrification, obtaining CO2 and N2 as the end products. The total time required for 2-CP mineralization in the combined electrochemical-biological process was 7.5h. This value is close to those previously reported for electrochemical and advanced oxidation processes but in this case, an efficient process was obtained without accumulation of by-products or generation of excessive energy costs due to the selective electrochemical pretreatment. This study showed that the use of electrochemical reductive pretreatment combined with biological processes could be a promising technology for the removal of recalcitrant molecules, such as chlorophenols, from wastewaters by more efficient, rapid, and environmentally friendly processes. PMID:27131458

  14. Progress in bioleaching: part B: applications of microbial processes by the minerals industries.

    PubMed

    Brierley, Corale L; Brierley, James A

    2013-09-01

    This review presents developments and applications in bioleaching and mineral biooxidation since publication of a previous mini review in 2003 (Olson et al. Appl Microbiol Biotechnol 63:249-257, 2003). There have been discoveries of newly identified acidophilic microorganisms that have unique characteristics for effective bioleaching of sulfidic ores and concentrates. Progress has been made in understanding and developing bioleaching of copper from primary copper sulfide minerals, chalcopyrite, covellite, and enargite. These developments point to low oxidation-reduction potential in concert with thermophilic bacteria and archaea as a potential key to the leaching of these minerals. On the commercial front, heap bioleaching of nickel has been commissioned, and the mineral biooxidation pretreatment of sulfidic-refractory gold concentrates is increasingly used on a global scale to enhance precious metal recovery. New and larger stirred-tank reactors have been constructed since the 2003 review article. One biooxidation-heap process for pretreatment of sulfidic-refractory gold ores was also commercialized. A novel reductive approach to bioleaching nickel laterite minerals has been proposed. PMID:23877580

  15. Interface-coupled dissolution-precipitation processes during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruiz-Agudo, Encarnacion; King, Helen E.; Patiño-López, Luis D.; Putnis, Christine V.; Geisler, Thorsten; Rodriguez-Navarro, Carlos M.; Putnis, Andrew

    2015-04-01

    The chemical weathering of carbonate and silicate minerals on the Earth's surface controls important geochemical processes such as erosion rates and soil formation, ore genesis or climate evolution. The dissolution of most of these minerals is typically incongruent, and results in the formation of surface coatings (altered layers, also known as leached layers). These coatings may significantly affect mineral dissolution rates over geological timescales, and therefore a great deal of research has been conducted on them. However, the mechanism of leached layer formation is a matter of vigorous debate. Here we report on an in situ atomic force microscopy (AFM) and real-time Mach-Zehnder phase-shift interferometry (PSI) study of the dissolution of wollastonite, CaSiO3, and dolomite, CaMg(CO3)2, as an example of surface coating formation during acidic weathering of multicomponent minerals. Our in situ results provide clear direct experimental evidence that leached layers are formed in a tight interface-coupled two-step process: stoichiometric dissolution of the pristine mineral surfaces and subsequent precipitation of a secondary phase (silica in the case of wollastonite, or hydrated magnesium carbonate in the case of dolomite) from a supersaturated boundary layer of fluid in contact with the mineral surface. This occurs despite the bulk solution remaining undersaturated with respect to the secondary phase. The validation of such a mechanism given by the results reported here completely changes the conceptual framework concerning the mechanism of chemical weathering, and differs significantly from the concept of preferential leaching of cations postulated by most currently accepted incongruent dissolution models.

  16. 43 CFR 3809.432 - What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan of operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false What process will BLM follow in reviewing... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management Modifications of Plans of Operations § 3809.432 What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan...

  17. 43 CFR 3809.432 - What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan of operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false What process will BLM follow in reviewing... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management Modifications of Plans of Operations § 3809.432 What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan...

  18. 43 CFR 3809.432 - What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan of operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false What process will BLM follow in reviewing... MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER THE GENERAL MINING LAWS Surface Management Modifications of Plans of Operations § 3809.432 What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan...

  19. Method & apparatus for monitoring plasma processing operations

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Michael Lane; Ward, Pamela Denise; Stevenson, Joel O'Don

    2004-10-19

    The invention generally relates to various aspects of a plasma process and, more specifically, to the monitoring of such plasma processes. One aspect relates to a plasma monitoring module that may be adjusted in at least some manner so as to re-evaluate a previously monitored plasma process. For instance, optical emissions data on a plasma process that was previously monitored by the plasma monitoring module may be replayed through the plasma monitoring module after making at least one adjustment in relation to the plasma monitoring module.

  20. A Multi-Technique Approach to Understanding Camp-Wide Mineralization Processes in Archean VMS Deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharman, E. R.; Wing, B.; Taylor, B.; Jonasson, I.; Farquhar, J.; Dubé, B.

    2009-05-01

    Volcanogenic Massive Sulphide (VMS) deposits form on or below the seafloor, in association with submarine extrusive volcanism, and reflect the hydrothermal concentration of ore-forming components originating from various reservoirs within the submarine environment. A defining question about VMS deposits is the relative contributions of different sulfur sources to mineralization. Standard models for VMS formation include contributions from reduction of seawater sulfate, remobilization of sedimentary sulfur, and volcanic sources (e.g., direct magmatic degassing, hydrothermal dissolution of sulfides in volcanic wall rocks). We are using an array of geochemical techniques to assess a suite of sulphide mineral separates collected from numerous VMS deposits within the Archean Noranda camp of the Abitibi Belt, Superior Province, Canada. These techniques include ICP-MS analyses of dissolved sulphide separates, microprobe analysis, and multiple sulphur isotope analyses. Multiple sulphur isotope analysis provides a new and powerful tool for interpreting Archean ore deposits. In pre-2.45 Ga rocks, multiple sulphur isotope analyses (δ33S, δ34S, and δ36S) document mass-independent sulphur isotope fractionation (δ33S≠0.515×δ34S, δ36S≠1.9×δ34S), likely expressed because of the lack of an oxygenated atmosphere. Ore-forming processes in VMS deposits cannot create mass-independent fractionation; they can only dilute it away. Trace element geochemistry of sulphides has been used to identify where in a VMS system these minerals form, with contributions from sources such as sea-water, or from a plume having different geochemical 'footprints'. Coupled with multiple sulphur isotope measurements, trace element geochemistry can be used to help identify sulphur sources within Archean VMS deposits and can be used to interpret camp-wide ore-forming processes and controls on mineralization. This will in turn allow for a more comprehensive understanding of VMS mineralization

  1. Development Process for Science Operation Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ballester, Pascal

    2015-12-01

    Scientific software development at ESO involves defined processes for the main phases of project inception, monitoring of development performed by instrument consortia, application maintenance, and application support. We discuss the lessons learnt and evolution of the process for the next generation of tools and observing facilities.

  2. Radionuclides and radiation doses in heavy mineral sands and other mining operations in Mozambique.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Matine, Obete F; Taímo, Suzete; Oliveira, João M; Silva, Lídia; Malta, Margarida

    2014-01-01

    Sites at the littoral of Mozambique with heavy mineral sands exploited for ilmenite, rutile and zircon and inland mineral deposits exploited for tantalite, uranium and bauxite were surveyed for ambient radiation doses, and samples were collected for the determination of radionuclide concentrations. In heavy mineral sands, (238)U and (232)Th concentrations were 70±2 and 308±9 Bq kg(-1) dry weight (dw), respectively, whereas after separation of minerals, the concentrations in the ilmenite fraction were 2240±64 and 6125±485 Bq kg(-1) (dw), respectively. Tantalite displayed the highest concentrations with 44 738±2474 Bq kg(-1) of (238)U. Radiation exposure of workers in mining facilities is likely to occur at levels above the dose limit for members of the public (1 mSv y(-1)) and therefore radiation doses should be assessed as occupational exposures. Local populations living in these regions in general are not exposed to segregated minerals with high radionuclide concentrations. However, there is intensive artisanal mining and a large number of artisanal miners and their families may be exposed to radiation doses exceeding the dose limit. A radiation protection programme is therefore needed to ensure radiation protection of the public and workers of developing mining projects. PMID:23956048

  3. Investigation of operating variables in the fine coal dewatering and briquetting process

    SciTech Connect

    Kan, S.W.; Wilson, J.W.; Dharman, T.

    1998-04-01

    Illinois basin coals contain minerals, including pyrite, which are finely disseminated in micron-size particles. To liberate these mineral matters from the coal matrix, an ultra-fine grinding operation is required, followed by a wet physical cleaning process, such as column flotation. However, the resulting product possesses large surface areas that conventional dewatering techniques cannot perform effectively, and this creates transportation, storage and handling problems at utility plants. To take full advantage of these cleaning technologies, a new dewatering and coal consolidation method must be developed at the downstream end of the deep coal-cleaning process. Following an initial study at the University of Missouri-Rolla (UMR), briquetting was chosen to perform the dual purpose of dewatering and consolidating the fine coal. A bitumen-based emulsion, Orimulsion, proved to be an effective binder and dewatering agent in the briquetting process that assisted in the expulsion of water from the fine coal.

  4. Improved process control through real-time measurement of mineral content

    SciTech Connect

    Turler, Daniel; Karaca, Murat; Davis, William B.; Giauque, Robert D.; Hopkins, Deborah

    2001-11-02

    In a highly collaborative research and development project with mining and university partners, sensors and data-analysis tools are being developed for rock-mass characterization and real-time measurement of mineral content. Determining mineralogy prior to mucking in an open-pit mine is important for routing the material to the appropriate processing stream. A possible alternative to lab assay of dust and cuttings obtained from drill holes is continuous on-line sampling and real-time x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy. Results presented demonstrate that statistical analyses combined with XRF data can be employed to identify minerals and, possibly, different rock types. The objective is to create a detailed three-dimensional mineralogical map in real time that would improve downstream process efficiency.

  5. Decolorization and mineralization of Allura Red AC aqueous solutions by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes.

    PubMed

    Thiam, Abdoulaye; Sirés, Ignasi; Garrido, José A; Rodríguez, Rosa M; Brillas, Enric

    2015-06-15

    The decolorization and mineralization of solutions containing 230 mg L(-1) of the food azo dye Allura Red AC at pH 3.0 have been studied upon treatment by electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and photoelectro-Fenton (PEF). Experiments were performed with a stirred tank reactor containing a boron-doped diamond (BDD) or Pt anode and an air-diffusion cathode to generate H2O2. The main oxidants were hydroxyl radicals formed at the anode surface from water oxidation and in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between H2O2 and added Fe(2+). The oxidation ability increased in the sequence EO-H2O2 < EF < PEF and faster degradation was always obtained using BDD. PEF process with BDD yielded almost total mineralization following similar trends in SO4(2-), ClO4(-) and NO3(-) media, whereas in Cl(-) medium, mineralization was inhibited by the formation of recalcitrant chloroderivatives. GC-MS analysis confirmed the cleavage of the −N=N− bond with formation of two main aromatics in SO4(2-) medium and three chloroaromatics in Cl(-) solutions. The effective oxidation of final oxalic and oxamic acids by BDD along with the photolysis of Fe(III)-oxalate species by UVA light accounted for the superiority of PEF with BDD. NH4(+), NO3(-) and SO4(2-) ions were released during the mineralization. PMID:25734532

  6. 9 CFR 590.542 - Spray process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Spray process drying operations. 590..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.542 Spray process drying operations. (a) The drying room shall be... interrupted. (1) Spray nozzles, orifices, cores, or whizzers shall be cleaned immediately after cessation...

  7. 9 CFR 590.542 - Spray process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Spray process drying operations. 590..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.542 Spray process drying operations. (a) The drying room shall be... interrupted. (1) Spray nozzles, orifices, cores, or whizzers shall be cleaned immediately after cessation...

  8. 9 CFR 590.542 - Spray process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Spray process drying operations. 590..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.542 Spray process drying operations. (a) The drying room shall be... interrupted. (1) Spray nozzles, orifices, cores, or whizzers shall be cleaned immediately after cessation...

  9. 9 CFR 590.542 - Spray process drying operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Spray process drying operations. 590..., Processing, and Facility Requirements § 590.542 Spray process drying operations. (a) The drying room shall be... interrupted. (1) Spray nozzles, orifices, cores, or whizzers shall be cleaned immediately after cessation...

  10. Hydrochemical features and mineralization processes in coastal groundwater of Oualidia, Morocco

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadili, Ahmed; Najib, Saliha; Mehdi, Khalid; Riss, Joëlle; Makan, Abdelhadi; Boutayeb, Khadija; Guessir, Hakima

    2016-04-01

    The objective of this study is to identify the influence of different hydrochemical processes, potential salinity sources, and seawater intrusion on groundwater quality in the coastal region of Oualidia. For this purpose, chemical analyses were performed on 19 wells sampled during three campaigns: June and December, 2010 and May, 2011. Investigations were conducted to identify the significant chemical variations between different campaigns. In addition, chemical variations were controlled by two main factors, which are the distance from the coast and the morphological aspect. Furthermore, statistical analysis allows the identification of two clusters of samples. The first groups, near the ocean, are highly mineralized with dominance of Na+ and Cl- ions, while the second group, much farther from the coast, are slightly mineralized with dominance of Ca2+ and HCO3- ions. Besides, ionic ratio, ionic delta, saturation index, and Gibbs diagram were applied to evaluate geochemical processes responsible for groundwater mineralization. Results showed that salinity was due mainly to seawater intrusion, especially in the first kilometers from the ocean covering the first group of wells. Moreover, cation exchange between Na+, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+, evaporation, and evaporate dissolution are principal processes, which also contribute to groundwater salinization. In overall, this investigation provided a basis of geochemical data to effectively manage groundwater resource and efficiently mitigate impacts on aquifers.

  11. Criticality alarm system for plutonium process operations

    SciTech Connect

    Tyree, W H; Urano, H

    1981-05-25

    A criticality alarm system using neutron detection is described. The system includes a neutron detection unit with an internal operational testing mode. The unit uses a Li/sup 6/F foil for the production of alpha particles from a thermal neturon flux, a thorium-230 alpha particle source for the continuous monitoring of the raidation detection circuits, and an internal clock which produces an alarmed condition if the detector amplifier circuit fails. This neutron detector unit is designed to replace the existing neutron detector in the criticality alarm systems at Rocky Flats. Coincidence circuits, interface system and audio signal generators used in the output of the alarm system are described. The system meets the criteria for the American National Standards and the USDOE Manual Chapter for detection, alarm, and signal output requirements.

  12. Operational support considerations in Space Shuttle prelaunch processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuiling, Roelof L.

    1991-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of operational support for Space Shuttle payload processing at the John F. Kennedy Space Center. The paper begins with a discussion of the Shuttle payload processing operation itself. It discusses the major organizational roles and describes the two major classes of payload operations: Spacelab mission payload and vertically-installed payload operations. The paper continues by describing the Launch Site Support Team and the Payload Processing Test Team. Specific areas of operational support are then identified including security and access, training, transport and handling, documentation and scheduling. Specific references for further investigatgion are included.

  13. Quantitative computer simulations of extraterrestrial processing operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vincent, T. L.; Nikravesh, P. E.

    1989-01-01

    The automation of a small, solid propellant mixer was studied. Temperature control is under investigation. A numerical simulation of the system is under development and will be tested using different control options. Control system hardware is currently being put into place. The construction of mathematical models and simulation techniques for understanding various engineering processes is also studied. Computer graphics packages were utilized for better visualization of the simulation results. The mechanical mixing of propellants is examined. Simulation of the mixing process is being done to study how one can control for chaotic behavior to meet specified mixing requirements. An experimental mixing chamber is also being built. It will allow visual tracking of particles under mixing. The experimental unit will be used to test ideas from chaos theory, as well as to verify simulation results. This project has applications to extraterrestrial propellant quality and reliability.

  14. Mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furby, N. W.

    1973-01-01

    The characteristics of lubricants made from mineral oils are discussed. Types and compositions of base stocks are reviewed and the product demands and compositions of typical products are outlined. Processes for commercial production of mineral oils are examined. Tables of data are included to show examples of product types and requirements. A chemical analysis of three types of mineral oils is reported.

  15. Information processing in convex operational theories

    SciTech Connect

    Barnum, Howard Nelch; Wilce, Alexander G

    2008-01-01

    In order to understand the source and extent of the greater-than-classical information processing power of quantum systems, one wants to characterize both classical and quantum mechanics as points in a broader space of possible theories. One approach to doing this, pioneered by Abramsky and Coecke, is to abstract the essential categorical features of classical and quantum mechanics that support various information-theoretic constraints and possibilities, e.g., the impossibility of cloning in the latter, and the possibility of teleportation in both. Another approach, pursued by the authors and various collaborators, is to begin with a very conservative, and in a sense very concrete, generalization of classical probability theory--which is still sufficient to encompass quantum theory--and to ask which 'quantum' informational phenomena can be reproduced in this much looser setting. In this paper, we review the progress to date in this second programme, and offer some suggestions as to how to link it with the categorical semantics for quantum processes developed by Abramsky and Coecke.

  16. Hen uterine gene expression profiling during eggshell formation reveals putative proteins involved in the supply of minerals or in the shell mineralization process

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The chicken eggshell is a natural mechanical barrier to protect egg components from physical damage and microbial penetration. Its integrity and strength is critical for the development of the embryo or to ensure for consumers a table egg free of pathogens. This study compared global gene expression in laying hen uterus in the presence or absence of shell calcification in order to characterize gene products involved in the supply of minerals and / or the shell biomineralization process. Results Microarrays were used to identify a repertoire of 302 over-expressed genes during shell calcification. GO terms enrichment was performed to provide a global interpretation of the functions of the over-expressed genes, and revealed that the most over-represented proteins are related to reproductive functions. Our analysis identified 16 gene products encoding proteins involved in mineral supply, and allowed updating of the general model describing uterine ion transporters during eggshell calcification. A list of 57 proteins potentially secreted into the uterine fluid to be active in the mineralization process was also established. They were classified according to their potential functions (biomineralization, proteoglycans, molecular chaperone, antimicrobials and proteases/antiproteases). Conclusions Our study provides detailed descriptions of genes and corresponding proteins over-expressed when the shell is mineralizing. Some of these proteins involved in the supply of minerals and influencing the shell fabric to protect the egg contents are potentially useful biological markers for the genetic improvement of eggshell quality. PMID:24649854

  17. Business/Office Occupations Data Processing--Data Processing Concepts, Data Entry Operator, Computer Operator, Computer Programmer, Systems Analyst.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Dept. of Education, Nashville. Div. of Vocational-Technical Education.

    This data processing curriculum contains 23 units of instruction for an articulated program in the occupations of data processing. It consists of an introductory mini-series on data-processing concepts, as well as data entry operator, computer operator, programmer, and systems analyst units. Introductory materials include program goals and…

  18. Carbon Isotope Systematics in Mineral-Catalyzed Hydrothermal Organic Synthesis Processes at High Temperature and Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fu, Qi; Socki, R. A.; Niles, Paul B.

    2011-01-01

    Observation of methane in the Martian atmosphere has been reported by different detection techniques. Reduction of CO2 and/or CO during serpentization by mineral surface catalyzed Fischer-Tropsch Type (FTT) synthesis may be one possible process responsible for methane generation on Mars. With the evidence a recent study has discovered for serpentinization in deeply buried carbon rich sediments, and more showing extensive water-rock interaction in Martian history, it seems likely that abiotic methane generation via serpentinization reactions may have been common on Mars. Experiments involving mineral-catalyzed hydrothermal organic synthesis processes were conducted at 750 C and 5.5 Kbars. Alkanes, alcohols and carboxylic acids were identified as organic compounds. No "isotopic reversal" of delta C-13 values was observed for alkanes or carboxylic acids, suggesting a different reaction pathway than polymerization. Alcohols were proposed as intermediaries formed on mineral surfaces at experimental conditions. Carbon isotope data were used in this study to unravel the reaction pathways of abiotic formation of organic compounds in hydrothermal systems at high temperatures and pressures. They are instrumental in constraining the origin and evolution history of organic compounds on Mars and other planets.

  19. Relating sulfide mineral zonation and trace element chemistry to subsurface processes in the Reykjanes geothermal system, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Libbey, R. B.; Williams-Jones, A. E.

    2016-01-01

    The nature and distribution of sulfide minerals and their trace element chemistry in the seawater-dominated Reykjanes geothermal system was determined through the study of cuttings and core from wells that intersect different regions of the hydrothermal cell, from the near surface to depths of > 3000 m. The observed sulfide mineral zonation and trace element enrichment correlate well with the present-day thermal structure of the system. Isocubanite and pyrrhotite are confined to the deep, low permeability regions, whereas an assemblage of chalcopyrite and pyrite predominates in the main convective upflow path. The presence of marcasite in the uppermost regions of the system reflects weakly acidic conditions (pH < 5) marginal to the upflow, where outflow and downward percolating fluids have dissolved deeply exsolved CO2. The presence of "chalcopyrite disease" in sphalerite may be an indication that the system is experiencing a heating trend, following the logic of "zone-refining" in volcanogenic massive sulfide systems. Sulfide sulfur at all analyzed depths in the Reykjanes geothermal system was derived from a mixture of basaltic and reduced seawater sources. Petrographic evidence suggests that seawater-derived hydrothermal fluids have altered primary igneous sulfides in the host rocks, a process that has been proposed as a major control of aqueous sulfide production in mid-ocean ridge environments. Calculations show that igneous sulfides in the host basalts likely account for less than 5% of the total available ore metal budget in the system, however, their contribution to fluid metal budgets is probably significant because of their relatively high solubility. The processes documented by this study are likely analogous to those operating in the feeder and deep reaction zones of mid-ocean ridge seafloor hydrothermal systems. The results show that sulfide mineral zonation and trace element chemistry vary as a function of physicochemical parameters that are relevant

  20. Environmental Engineering Unit Operations and Unit Processes Laboratory Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Connor, John T., Ed.

    This manual was prepared for the purpose of stimulating the development of effective unit operations and unit processes laboratory courses in environmental engineering. Laboratory activities emphasizing physical operations, biological, and chemical processes are designed for various educational and equipment levels. An introductory section reviews…

  1. Process Operations Program is the First of Its Kind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elements of Technology, 1973

    1973-01-01

    The goal of the program is to produce a graduate with the technical background and expertise necessary for direct entry into a process operator training program in a petro-chemical plant. It is a unique program offered through Lambton College, Canada, in co-operation with the process industries in Sarnia's "Chemical Valley". (Author/DS)

  2. 43 CFR 3809.432 - What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan of operations?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false What process will BLM follow in reviewing a modification of my plan of operations? 3809.432 Section 3809.432 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) MINING CLAIMS UNDER...

  3. Assessment of hydrothermal processes associated with Proterozoic mineral systems in Finland using self-organizing maps.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lerssi, J.; Sorjonen-Ward, P.; Fraser, S. J.; Ruotsalainen, A.

    2009-04-01

    An increasingly urgent challenge in mineral system analysis is to extract relevant information from diverse datasets, and to effectively discriminate between "hydrothermal noise" and alteration and structures that may relate to significant mineralization potential. The interpretation of geophysical data is notorious for the problem of ambiguity in defining source dimensions and geometry. An additional issue, which also applies to geochemical and hyperspectral datasets, in terrain that has been overprinted by several tectonic, metamorphic and hydrothermal events, is that while anomalies represent the sum of geological processes affecting an area, we are usually interesting in extracting the signals diagnostic of a mineralizing event. Spatial analysis using weights of evidence, fuzzy logic and neural networks have been widely applied to mineral prospectivity assessment in recent years. Here however, we present an alternative, albeit complementary approach, based on the concept of self-organizing maps [1], in which natural patterns in large, unstructured datasets are derived, correlated and readily visualized, provides an alternative approach to analysis of geophysical and geochemical anomalies and integration with other geological data. We have applied SiroSOM software to airborne and ground magnetic, EM and radiometric data for two mutually adjacent areas in eastern Finland that have superficially similar structural architecture and geophysical expression, yet differ significantly in terms of mineral system character: (1) the Outokumpu Cu-Co-Zn-Ni system, hosted by metamorphosed serpentinites and their hydrothermal derivatives, which are usually highly magnetic due to both magnetite and pyrrhotite; (2) the Hammaslahti Cu-Zn system, hosted by coarse-clastic turbidites intercalated with mafic volcanics and graphitic pelites having characteristically intense magnetic and EM responses. Although the initial stage of the analysis is unsupervised, ongoing iteration and

  4. Peroxone mineralization of chemical oxygen demand for direct potable water reuse: Kinetics and process control.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tingting; Englehardt, James D

    2015-04-15

    Mineralization of organics in secondary effluent by the peroxone process was studied at a direct potable water reuse research treatment system serving an occupied four-bedroom, four bath university residence hall apartment. Organic concentrations were measured as chemical oxygen demand (COD) and kinetic runs were monitored at varying O3/H2O2 dosages and ratios. COD degradation could be accurately described as the parallel pseudo-1st order decay of rapidly and slowly-oxidizable fractions, and effluent COD was reduced to below the detection limit (<0.7 mg/L). At dosages ≥4.6 mg L(-1) h(-1), an O3/H2O2 mass ratio of 3.4-3.8, and initial COD <20 mg/L, a simple first order decay was indicated for both single-passed treated wastewater and recycled mineral water, and a relationship is proposed and demonstrated to estimate the pseudo-first order rate constant for design purposes. At this O3/H2O2 mass ratio, ORP and dissolved ozone were found to be useful process control indicators for monitoring COD mineralization in secondary effluent. Moreover, an average second order rate constant for OH oxidation of secondary effluent organics (measured as MCOD) was found to be 1.24 × 10(7) ± 0.64 × 10(7) M(-1) S(-1). The electric energy demand of the peroxone process is estimated at 1.73-2.49 kW h electric energy for removal of one log COD in 1 m(3) secondary effluent, comparable to the energy required for desalination of medium strength seawater. Advantages/disadvantages of the two processes for municipal wastewater reuse are discussed. PMID:25704155

  5. CO2-mineral Wettability and Implications for Understanding Leakage Processes from Geologic Carbon Sequestration Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clarens, A. F.; Edwards, I.; Wang, S.

    2011-12-01

    In geological carbon sequestration (GCS), leakage events will be difficult to predict because parcels of CO2 will travel over long length scales and encounter a number of heterogeneous formations and endogenous brine in their rise to the surface. A constitutive model of a rising parcel of CO2 includes at least three main forces: 1) buoyant forces, 2) surface tension forces, and 3) shear drag forces. Of these, surface tension forces are of great significance, especially for predicting capillary and mineral trapping, and are affected by surface tension and the three-phase contact angle between CO2, brine, and the solid host mineral surfaces. Very limited experimental data on contact angles in GCS relevant systems has been reported in the academic literature. Here, the contact angle of several of the rock and clay species prevailing near GCS sites, e.g. quartz, feldspar, calcite, kaolinite, smectite and illite, were measured under a range of relevant temperature, pressure and ionic strength conditions. The measurements were made in a custom-built high-pressure view cell by introducing precisely controlled pendant CO2 droplets of constant volume to smooth and clean mineral surfaces after saturating the surrounding brine with CO2 and images were recorded using a high resolution digital camera. Images were processed and the contact angle measured using ImageJ software with a plug-in designed for this purpose. To measure the contact angle of CO2 on clay surfaces, ultra-pure microscope glass slides were coated with cleaned and particle-size-separated clay particles using hydrolyzed polyvinyl alcohol to ensure adhesion and a continuous coating on the surface. The uniform morphology of the surface was confirmed using electron microscopy. Preliminary results demonstrate differences in contact angle between the tested minerals, with calcite > quartz > feldspar. The absolute differences between the minerals were on the order of 3-7%. The

  6. Mineral Properties and Dietary Value of Raw and Processed Stinging Nettle (Urtica dioica L.)

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yixiang; Ramirez, Elizabeth

    2013-01-01

    Stinging nettle (Urtica dioica L.) has a long history of usage and is currently receiving attention as a source of fiber and alternative medicine. In many cultures, nettle is also eaten as a leafy vegetable. In this study, we focused on nettle yield (edible portion) and processing effects on nutritive and dietary properties. Actively growing shoots were harvested from field plots and leaves separated from stems. Leaf portions (200 g) were washed and processed by blanching (1 min at 96–98°C) or cooking (7 min at 98-99°C) with or without salt (5 g·L−1). Samples were cooled immediately after cooking and kept in frozen storage before analysis. Proximate composition, mineral, amino acid, and vitamin contents were determined, and nutritive value was estimated based on 100 g serving portions in a 2000 calorie diet. Results show that processed nettle can supply 90%–100% of vitamin A (including vitamin A as β-carotene) and is a good source of dietary calcium, iron, and protein. We recommend fresh or processed nettle as a high-protein, low-calorie source of essential nutrients, minerals, and vitamins particularly in vegetarian, diabetic, or other specialized diets. PMID:26904610

  7. Numerical Study of Usage Efficiency of Multistage Filters on Mineral Leaching Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inkarbekov, Medet; Kuljabekov, Alibek; Alibayeva, Karlygash; Kaltayev, Aidarkhan

    2013-11-01

    The numerical study of the usage efficiency of the multistage filters setting technology is carried out on the basis of mathematical simulation. And its application on in-situ mineral leaching process is considered. So long as mineral bearing sandstone in deposit mostly is separated by interbedded layers of sands and clays, it's expedient to use multistage filters setting technology at the mineral extraction. A comparison of the extraction degree at single and multistage filters is implemented. The results of calculations show that the distribution of flow (inflow) on well height is not uniform. In the calculations the well accepted as high-permeability channel, depending on the construction of the filter. Obtained results for a multistage filters setting qualitatively conform to the experimental findings. Wellbore is considered as a surface with a constant reduced pressure in the bottomhole formation zone. But such assumption does not show a qualitative picture of the fluid flow in the bottomhole zone [Brovin K.G., Grabovnikov V.A., 1997]. To construct an accurate mathematical model it's necessary to use Navier-Stokes equation for the interior of a vertical wellbore, and the filtration law for modeling the filtration in the reservoir. Strictly speaking, it would have had to sew two laws on the contact surface of a rock and filter. Such review requires enormous computing, as far as computational grid must be sufficiently thick to cover the interior of the wellbore.

  8. Drinking water supply and mineralized groundwaters in the Aquitaine Basin (SW France): hydrodynamic and geochemical processes of acquisition of the mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malcuit, E.; Atteia, O.; Franceschi, M.; Negrel, P. J.; Petelet-Giraud, E.

    2012-12-01

    One of the main resources for drinking water in the sedimentary Aquitaine Basin (SW France) is the Eocene aquifer including several geological layers, which have different lithological, mineralogical and hydrodynamic properties. In this aquifer, mostly confined, a large area has been identified with high salinity and with anomalous levels of critical elements, such as sulfates and fluorides. This led to difficulties for the resource exploitation for drinking water supply of the population. Since the 1900's, many boreholes in the area for drinking water supply have locally modified the natural water flows of the system. This work has allowed i) understanding the origin of the mineralization of the waters, geochemical and isotopic characterization of groundwaters showed a common origin of the mineralization in all the study area; ii) identifying exactly the location of the minerals bearing sulfates and fluorides (gypsum, fluorite) within the layer defined as the Eocene aquifer; iii) constraint the geochemical and hydrodynamic processes. Finally, it allows defining and improving for the way for a sustainable management for drinking water resource in South-West of France. To understand the acquisition of the groundwaters' geochemistry, it is necessary to consider the lateral and vertical variations in facies and mineralogy, geochemical processes (mineral dissolution and/or precipitation, phenomenon of diffusion in contact with low permeability and mineralized layers) and local fluid mixing processes within the borehole and its immediate surroundings. Our investigation also showed the need for a precise and detailed knowledge of the vertical distribution of the hydrodynamic and geochemical properties of each layer. Indeed, the average concentration in the borehole water depends on the 10-3 to 1 meter scale variation of water fluxes and concentrations. Geochemical models, presented here, fully explain the composition of groundwaters across the study area and improve the

  9. The utilization natural mineral in the process of palm oil glycerolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mujdalipah, Siti

    2015-09-01

    The reaction of glycerolysis currently has weakness, which uses a catalyst with a high price and performed at a high temperature. Indonesia is rich in minerals that have the potential to be used as a catalyst. Besides that, the solvent allows the glycerolysis reaction done in a low temperature so that it can maintain the quality of product. The purpose of this research is to study the influence of a type of solvent and a type of natural mineral to the chemistry and physical characteristic of palm oil glycerolysis product. The research activity consists of four steps. The first is the analysis of chemistry characteristics of palm oil. The second is the process of palm oil as the effect of a type of solvent and a type of natural mineral factors. The third is the analysis of chemistry and physical characteristics of glycerolysis product. The last is the analysis of data. Based on the analysis variant at α=0.05, it shows that type of solvent and type of natural mineral doesnot influence significantly to the ability of glycerolysis product in decreasing the water surface tension and to the free glycerol content. The best product is able to decrease the water surface tension from 44.933 dyne/cm to 29.00 dyne/cm. It contains the free glycerol content of 1.30%, 1-monoglyceride content of 43.10%, acid number of 0.146 mg KOH/g sample, and it has simillar fatty acid composition with the raw material.

  10. Application of electrochemical advanced oxidation processes to the mineralization of the herbicide diuron.

    PubMed

    Pipi, Angelo R F; Sirés, Ignasi; De Andrade, Adalgisa R; Brillas, Enric

    2014-08-01

    Here, solutions with 0.185mM of the herbicide diuron of pH 3.0 have been treated by electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) like electrochemical oxidation with electrogenerated H2O2 (EO-H2O2), electro-Fenton (EF) and UVA photoelectro-Fenton (PEF) or solar PEF (SPEF). Trials were performed in stirred tank reactors of 100mL and in a recirculation flow plant of 2.5L using a filter-press reactor with a Pt or boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode and an air-diffusion cathode for H2O2 electrogeneration. Oxidant hydroxyl radicals were formed from water oxidation at the anode and/or in the bulk from Fenton's reaction between added Fe(2+) and generated H2O2. In both systems, the relative oxidation ability of the EAOPs increased in the sequence EO-H2O2processes were more powerful due to the photolysis of intermediates by UV radiation. In the stirred tank reactor, the PEF treatment with BDD was the most potent method, yielding 93% mineralization after 360 min at 100 mA cm(-2). In the flow plant, the SPEF process attained a maximum mineralization of 70% at 100 mA cm(-2). Lower current densities slightly reduced the mineralization degree in SPEF, enhancing the current efficiency and dropping the energy consumption. The diuron decay always obeyed a pseudo-first-order kinetics, with a much greater apparent rate constant in EF and SPEF compared to EO-H2O2. Oxalic and oxamic acids were detected as final carboxylic acids. Ammonium and chloride ions were also released, the latter ion being partially converted into chlorate and perchlorate ions at the BDD surface. PMID:24873706