Science.gov

Sample records for minicomputers

  1. Minicomputer-controlled programmed oscillator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winkelstein, R.

    1971-01-01

    Two programmed oscillators have been constructed, each using a low-cost minicomputer for the calculation and control functions, and each contained in a single rack of equipment. They are capable of operation in a phase-tracking mode as well as a frequency-tracking mode. When given an ephemeris suitable for the planet Venus, these units maintained phase coherence of better than 5 deg rms at 2388 MHz.

  2. Towards Everyday Language Information Retrieval Systems via Minicomputers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, Colin; Jones, Kevin P.

    1979-01-01

    Surveys the current state of minicomputer-operated information systems capable of incorporating linguistic features, focusing on the Minicomputer Operated Retrieval (Partially Heuristic) System. Consideration is given to the automation of the indexing process and to available search strategies. (FM)

  3. A NASA family of minicomputer systems, Appendix A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deregt, M. P.; Dulfer, J. E.

    1972-01-01

    This investigation was undertaken to establish sufficient specifications, or standards, for minicomputer hardware and software to provide NASA with realizable economics in quantity purchases, interchangeability of minicomputers, software, storage and peripherals, and a uniformly high quality. The standards will define minicomputer system component types, each specialized to its intended NASA application, in as many levels of capacity as required.

  4. Minicomputer Capabilities Related to Meteorological Aspects of Emergency Response

    SciTech Connect

    Rarnsdell, J. V.; Athey, G. F.; Ballinger, M. Y.

    1982-02-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide the NRC staff involved in reviewing licensee emergency response plans with background information on the capabilities of minicomputer systems that are related to the collection and dissemination of meteorological infonmation. The treatment of meteorological information by organizations with existing emergency response capabilities is described, and the capabilities, reliability and availability of minicomputers and minicomputer systems are discussed.

  5. Minicomputer Games. Teacher's Guide. Classroom Lessons and Games Centered around the Papy Minicomputer...A Source of Rich Situations That Call for Mental Arithmetic and Quick Strategic Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    CEMREL, Inc., St. Louis, MO.

    This material describes two games, Minicomputer Tug-of-War and Minicomputer Golf. The Papy Minicomputer derives its name from George Papy, who invented and introduced it in the 1950's. The Minicomputer is seen as an abacus with the flavor of a computer in its schematic representation of numbers. Its manner of representation combines decimal…

  6. Integrated computer-aided design using minicomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.

    1980-01-01

    Computer-Aided Design/Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAD/CAM), a highly interactive software, has been implemented on minicomputers at the NASA Langley Research Center. CAD/CAM software integrates many formerly fragmented programs and procedures into one cohesive system; it also includes finite element modeling and analysis, and has been interfaced via a computer network to a relational data base management system and offline plotting devices on mainframe computers. The CAD/CAM software system requires interactive graphics terminals operating at a minimum of 4800 bits/sec transfer rate to a computer. The system is portable and introduces 'interactive graphics', which permits the creation and modification of models interactively. The CAD/CAM system has already produced designs for a large area space platform, a national transonic facility fan blade, and a laminar flow control wind tunnel model. Besides the design/drafting element analysis capability, CAD/CAM provides options to produce an automatic program tooling code to drive a numerically controlled (N/C) machine. Reductions in time for design, engineering, drawing, finite element modeling, and N/C machining will benefit productivity through reduced costs, fewer errors, and a wider range of configuration.

  7. A small inexpensive minicomputer system for speech research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, C. F.

    1975-01-01

    A small but very effective minicomputer-based speech processing system costing just over 30,000 dollars is described here. The hardware and software comprising the system are discussed as well as immediate and future research applications.

  8. Airfoil design by numerical optimization using a minicomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hicks, R. M.; Szelazek, C. A.

    1978-01-01

    A computer program developed for the automated design of low speed airfoils utilizes a generalized Joukowski method for aerodynamic analysis coupled with a conjugate gradient, penalty function, numerical optimization algorithm to give an efficient calculation technique for use with minicomputers. The program designs airfoils with a prescribed pressure distribution as well as those which minimize or maximize some aerodynamic force coefficient. At present the method is restricted to inviscid, incompressible flow. A typical design problem will execute in 4.5 hr on an HP 9830 minicomputer.

  9. Application of Minicomputers and Microcomputers to Information Handling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffiths, Jose-Marie

    This study assesses the application of both minicomputers and microcomputers to information-handling procedures and makes recommendations for automating such procedures, particularly in developing nations. The report is based on a survey of existing uses of small computing equipment in libraries, archives, and information centers which was…

  10. Finite element analysis in a minicomputer/mainframe environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Storaasli, O. O.; Murphy, R. C.

    1978-01-01

    Design considerations were evaluated for general purpose finite element systems to maximize performance when installed on distributed computer hardware/software systems. It is shown how the features of current minicomputers complement those of a modular implementation of the finite element method for increasing the control, speed, and visibility (interactive graphics) in solving structural problems at reduced cost. The approach used is to implement a finite element system in a distributed computer environment to solve structural problems and to explore alternatives in distributing finite element computations.

  11. Recent Trends in Minicomputer-Based Integrated Learning Systems for Reading and Language Arts Instruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balajthy, Ernest

    This paper discusses minicomputer-based ILSs (integrated learning systems), i.e., computer-based systems of hardware and software. An example of a minicomputer-based system in a school district (a composite of several actual districts) considers hardware, staffing, scheduling, reactions, problems, and training for a subskill-oriented reading…

  12. Migration of 1970s Minicomputer Controls to Modern Toolkit Software

    SciTech Connect

    Juras, R.C.; Meigs, M.J.; Sinclair, J.A.; Tatum, B.A.

    1999-11-13

    Controls for accelerators and associated systems at the Holifield Radioactive Ion Beam Facility (HRIBF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been migrated from 197Os-vintage minicomputers to a modern system based on Vista and EPICS toolkit software. Stability and capabilities of EPICS software have motivated increasing use of EPICS for accelerator controls. In addition, very inexpensive subsystems based on EPICS and the EPICS portable CA server running on Linux PCs have been implemented to control an ion source test facility and to control a building-access badge reader system. A new object-oriented, extensible display manager has been developed for EPICS to facilitate the transition to EPICS and will be used in place of MEDM. EPICS device support has been developed for CAMAC serial highway controls.

  13. Design Considerations in Development of Minicomputer-Based Computer Aided Instructional Hardware Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wells, C. H.

    A minicomputer-based computer-assisted instructional (CAI) system was designed at the University of Texas Medical Branch in an attempt to lower both the excessive hardware costs and the inordinate amount of time required for the preparation of each hour of instructional material associated with traditional CAI systems. A prototype system with an…

  14. Distributed Network and Multiprocessing Minicomputer State-of-the-Art Capabilities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theis, Douglas J.

    An examination of the capabilities of minicomputers and midicomputers now on the market reveals two basic items which users should evaluate when selecting computers for their own applications: distributed networking systems and multiprocessing architectures. Variables which should be considered in evaluating a distributed networking system…

  15. Interface for 15VSM-5 and Elektronika D3-28 minicomputers with digital measuring instruments

    SciTech Connect

    Udovichenko, N.A.; Polikarpov, Yu.I.; Makushkin, B.V.

    1987-07-01

    A device is described for data input (up to 8 decimal digits in 8421 code) into 15VSM-5 and Elektronika D3-28 minicomputers from four measuring instruments: a V7-21 voltmeter and three Ch3-54 frequency counters. Data from the voltmeter are entered by software interrogation and data from the frequency counters are entered by software interrupts. The device is implemented by TTL integrated circuits.

  16. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory's minicomputer vs. the laser. [computer predictions for laser tracking stations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cherniack, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Review of some of the problems encountered in replacing a CDC 6400, that was used for supplying a network of laser tracking stations with predictions, by an 8K Data General 1200 minicomputer with a teletype for I/O. Before the replacement, the predictions were expensive to compute and to transmit, and were clumsy logistically. The achieved improvements are described, along with every step it took to accomplish them, and the incurred costs.

  17. Interactive manipulation of photogrammetric data with the Zeiss-AS-programm system for minicomputers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hobbie, D.

    1980-03-01

    The company of Carl Zeiss, Oberkochen, presents the AS Program System for HP 1000 minicomputer, which allows interactive operation during digital measurements with on line connected mono- and stereocomparators as well as stereoplotters. Operation is based on the menu technique. By comparison with the off line technique, interactive operation reduces transfer errors, allows direct checking of measured data by computation and provides direct access to further programs for processing or on files.

  18. A brief description of the Medical Information Computer System (MEDICS). [real time minicomputer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moseley, E. C.

    1974-01-01

    The Medical Information Computer System (MEDICS) is a time shared, disk oriented minicomputer system capable of meeting storage and retrieval needs for the space- or non-space-related applications of at least 16 simultaneous users. At the various commercially available low cost terminals, the simple command and control mechanism and the generalized communication activity of the system permit multiple form inputs, real-time updating, and instantaneous retrieval capability with a full range of options.

  19. A Minicomputer Based Scheme for Turbulence Measurements with Pulsed Doppler Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Craig, J. I.; Saxena, Vijay; Giddens, D. P.

    1979-01-01

    The present paper describes the design and performance of a digital-based Doppler signal processing system that is currently being used in hemodynamics research on arteriosclerosis. The major emphasis is on the development of the digital signal processing technique and its implementation in a small but powerful minicomputer. The work reported on here is part of a larger ongoing effort that the authors are undertaking to study the structure of turbulence in blood flow and its relation to arteriosclerosis. Some of the techniques and instruments developed are felt to have a broad applicability to fluid mechanics and especially to pipe flow fluid mechanics.

  20. Potential of minicomputer/array-processor system for nonlinear finite-element analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strohkorb, G. A.; Noor, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The potential of using a minicomputer/array-processor system for the efficient solution of large-scale, nonlinear, finite-element problems is studied. A Prime 750 is used as the host computer, and a software simulator residing on the Prime is employed to assess the performance of the Floating Point Systems AP-120B array processor. Major hardware characteristics of the system such as virtual memory and parallel and pipeline processing are reviewed, and the interplay between various hardware components is examined. Effective use of the minicomputer/array-processor system for nonlinear analysis requires the following: (1) proper selection of the computational procedure and the capability to vectorize the numerical algorithms; (2) reduction of input-output operations; and (3) overlapping host and array-processor operations. A detailed discussion is given of techniques to accomplish each of these tasks. Two benchmark problems with 1715 and 3230 degrees of freedom, respectively, are selected to measure the anticipated gain in speed obtained by using the proposed algorithms on the array processor.

  1. Ruggedized minicomputer hardware and software topics, 1981: Proceedings of the 4th ROLM MIL-SPEC Computer User's Group Conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    Presentations of a conference on the use of ruggedized minicomputers are summarized. The following topics are discussed: (1) the role of minicomputers in the development and/or certification of commercial or military airplanes in both the United States and Europe; (2) generalized software error detection techniques; (3) real time software development tools; (4) a redundancy management research tool for aircraft navigation/flight control sensors; (5) extended memory management techniques using a high order language; and (6) some comments on establishing a system maintenance scheme. Copies of presentation slides are also included.

  2. An automatic sleep-stage analysis system with off-line high-speed processing using a super mini-computer.

    PubMed

    Kuwahara, H; Tanaka, M; Mizuki, Y; Suetsugi, M

    1996-01-01

    An automatic sleep analysis system using a super mini-computer was developed. The system improved and expanded the data processed by the mini-computer. It had the following features: 1) wave-forms were collected and analyzed at a high speed (reproduced at 10 or 20 times the speed of a data recorder) by an off-line procedure to utilize the computer resources more efficiently; 2) all information and the original wave-forms were output to a laser printer because of the lower cost and more efficient arrangement of the data; 3) various wave-form parameters were measured by wave-form analysis; 4) the application program was based on general-purpose language; and 5) wave-form reanalysis and reconstruction of the logic was easily implemented for automatic evaluation of the sleep stages. Automatic analysis of the sleep stages was impossible for 15 of 1484 periods (20 sec per period) with one of the cases analyzed, and 142 of 1484 periods had to be corrected because of erroneous identification. PMID:8942145

  3. Programmable Calculators and Minicomputers in Agriculture. A Symposium Exploring Computerized Decision-Making Aids and Their Extension to the Farm Level. Proceedings of a Symposium (Hot Springs, Arkansas, February 6-7, 1980)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bentley, Ernest, Ed.

    Ten papers presented at a symposium discuss the array of computerized decision-making aids currently available to farmers and ways to speed up the rate of adoption of computers by agriculturalists. Topics presented include the development of software for agricultural decision-making; the role of programmable calculators and minicomputers in…

  4. MCAI: Minicomputer-Aided Instruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Breneman, G. L.

    1973-01-01

    Discusses educational programs carried out by a minimum system which consists of a PDP-8/L computer with 4K memory and an ASR-33 teletype. Indicates that an entire curriculum with 450 students can be handled by simply adding some components. (CC)

  5. Educational Time-Sharing on a Minicomputer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tidball, Charles S.; Bon, Bruce B.

    A multi-language, time-sharing system (MTS-12) has been developed for the PDP-12, a Digital Equipment Corporation laboratory computer. This low-cost, core-resident system features program storage on LINC tape (3/4" magnetic tape on a 4" reel), access to the high-level interpreted FOCAL language, and a special variable storage in the user buffer…

  6. Where Will the Minicomputer Lead Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leeson, Marjorie M.

    1975-01-01

    The responsibility of individuals working with computers both the mini and the maxi, must not only be envisioned but must also be accepted as one of the greatest challenges ever to face mankind. (Author)

  7. Minicomputers in the Teaching Laboratory - An Example from Physics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, John E.; van den Berg, Willem H.

    Microcomputers are commonly interfaced to external devices in scientific, industrial, and consumer settings for data acquisition and for control. The general problem under consideration is the task of taking measurements of some continuous phenomenon, transforming them into digital form, and storing the data in the microcomputer for later use.…

  8. Gamma-Ray Spectrum Analysis Method for Minicomputers.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1984-01-24

    Version 00 SAMPO80 is a rapid and accurate analysis program for gamma-ray spectra measured with Ge(Li) or HPGe detectors. SAMPO80 consists of three separate parts, the shape calibration part SAMPOSHAPE, the peak search and fitting part SAMPOFIT, and the nuclide identification part SAMPOID.

  9. Linking of the mini-computer Electronik-100I and NR-9821A

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubkov, B. V.; Khromov, V. N.

    1979-01-01

    The means of transmitting digital information from the computer E-100I to the desk top calculator NR-9821A with the help of an intermediate carrier of information (perforated tape) is described. The means of removal of information from the computer E-100I in a form which is understandable for the NR-9821A are given. Instructions for the use and programming of the transcription of information onto magnetic tape from the perforated tape and from the keyboard of the calculator are included.

  10. Mini-Computers and the Building Trades: A Guide for Teachers of Vocational Education. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asplen, Donald; And Others

    These training materials are designed to help vocational education teachers introduce students to the utilization and installation of mini- and microcomputers in residential and small business buildings. It consists of two chapters. Chapter 1 contains general materials, designed to promote awareness, and chapter 2 contains materials which are…

  11. "A Fast Running Program For Minicomputer Based On Exact Derivative Of Optimization Criterions"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hugues, Edgar; Babolat, Claude; Bacchus, J. M.

    1983-10-01

    The very fast evolution of the Hardware and the software brings the optical designer to choice betwen two attitudes. 1) To use the services of a specialized company which is continusly devoloping optical programs. 2) To write its own programs and improve them according to the needs. Theory and experience have to help themselves to realize an harmonious balance in order to get product improvements through programs improvements. CERCO has choosen the second alternative.

  12. The chemical abundances of the Cassiopeia A fast-moving knots - Explosive nucleosynthesis on a minicomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnston, M. D.; Joss, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    A simplified nuclear reaction network for explosive nucleosynthesis calculations is described in which only the most abundant nuclear species and the most important reactions linking these species are considered. This scheme permits the exploration of many cases without excessive computational effort. Good agreement with previous calculations employing more complex reaction networks is obtained. This scheme is applied to the observed chemical abundances of the fast-moving knots in the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A and it is found that a wide range of initial conditions could yield the observed abundances. The abundances of four of the knots with significant and different amounts of elements heavier than oxygen are consistent with an origin in material of the same initial composition but processed at different peak temperatures and densities. Despite the observed high oxygen abundances and low abundances of light elements in the knots, they did not necessarily undergo incomplete oxygen burning; in fact, it is not even necessary that oxygen have been present in the initial composition. The agreement between the calculated and observed chemical abundances in Cas A and similar supernova remnants depends primarily upon the relevant nuclear physics and does not provide strong evidence in favor of any particular model of the supernova event.

  13. The Impact of Minicomputers and Microcomputers on the Software-Oriented Curriculum.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roehrkasse, Robert C.

    Discussed are the requirements of a software-oriented engineering curriculum that also includes use of computer hardware. Three areas are identified as necessary in such a curriculum: functional area users, systems programming, and mini-micro technology. Each of these areas is discussed in terms of instructional methods and suggested topics.…

  14. A General-Purpose Monte Carlo Gamma-Ray Transport Code System for Minicomputers.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1981-08-27

    Version 00 The OGRE code system was designed to calculate, by Monte Carlo methods, any quantity related to gamma-ray transport. The system is represented by two codes which treat slab geometry. OGRE-P1 computes the dose on one side of a slab for a source on the other side, and HOTONE computes energy deposition in addition. The source may be monodirectional, isotropic, or cosine distributed.

  15. A minicomputer interface for realtime operations: an application to operant conditioning.

    PubMed

    Mayor, S J; Wilson, J

    1975-09-01

    A PDP-12 interface was designed, constructed, and tested for realtime imput and output of binary information. Within limits this interface can be used with any peripheral device which operates in the binary mode. In addition to its generality of application the interface features include ease of expansion and low cost. A description of its design and operation is give here is terms of a typical application: the control of behavioral equipment (i.e. "Skinner Boxes") for operant conditioning. PMID:1164844

  16. The Development of a Highly Interactive Searching Technique for MORPHS--Minicomputer Operated Retrieval (Partially Heuristic) System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bell, C. L. M.; Jones, K. P.

    1980-01-01

    Explains, with supporting figures and flowcharts of programing logic, two search strategies introduced to the MORPHS System since 1976: one that employs the normal Boolean operators in strings without bracketing or in the form of marked steps, and one that treats a string of keywords as a compound word. (Author/JD)

  17. Algorithmization and programming of operator activities for parametric synthesis of speech using the CT-1 system controlled by the MERA 303 minicomputer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarkowski, A.

    1983-08-01

    The System of Programmed Synthesizer Service is proposed as a means of automating operator functions achieved during parametric speech synthesis with the help of the synthesizing computer system COMPUTALKER CT-1. The characteristics of the proposed system are described, with emphasis on the collaboration between the synthesizer and other internal devices within the computer system. The various functions of the system are shown in the form of block programs corresponding to the different functions. Complete evaluation of the system will be possible only after long-term synthetic speech experiments are concluded.

  18. Computer program and user documentation medical data tape retrieval system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    This volume provides several levels of documentation for the program module of the NASA medical directorate mini-computer storage and retrieval system. A biomedical information system overview describes some of the reasons for the development of the mini-computer storage and retrieval system. It briefly outlines all of the program modules which constitute the system.

  19. Downsizing a database platform for increased performance and decreased costs

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, M.M.; Tolendino, L.F.

    1993-06-01

    Technological advances in the world of microcomputers have brought forth affordable systems and powerful software than can compete with the more traditional world of minicomputers. This paper describes an effort at Sandia National Laboratories to decrease operational and maintenance costs and increase performance by moving a database system from a minicomputer to a microcomputer.

  20. A Successful Transition from Mini- to Microcomputer-Assisted Instruction: The Norfolk Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gull, Randall L.

    1980-01-01

    Reviews reasons for the decision to change from a timeshare minicomputer to microcomputers, financial considerations involved, the purchase of hardware, the problem posed by the lack of compatible software for the microcomputers, and the development of the Assisted Instructional Development System (AIDS) for adapting minicomputer software and…

  1. Microcomputer Backup to Online Circulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Intner, Sheila

    1981-01-01

    Describes the usage and advantages of microcomputers as an alternative to manual processing when the Great Neck Library minicomputer-based automated circulation system goes down for maintenance or repair. (RAA)

  2. Design and performance of a large vocabulary discrete word recognition system. Volume 2: Appendixes. [flow charts and users manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    The users manual for the word recognition computer program contains flow charts of the logical diagram, the memory map for templates, the speech analyzer card arrangement, minicomputer input/output routines, and assembly language program listings.

  3. Information Technology: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, William F.; Hawkins, Donald T.

    1981-01-01

    This selective annotated bibliography lists 86 references on the following topics: future technology for libraries, library automation, paperless information systems; computer conferencing and electronic mail, videotext systems, videodiscs, communications technology, networks, information retrieval, cataloging, microcomputers, and minicomputers.…

  4. Ensuring flat cuts in longwall mining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, R. A.; Currie, J. R.; Deaton, E. T.; Kissel, R. R.

    1979-01-01

    Minicomputer-controlled towed vehicle automatically determines flatness of wall of coal or other mineral as it is being cut by mining machine and allows machine operator to correct cut as necessary. Vehicle is used for longwall mining.

  5. Table-lookup algorithm for pattern recognition: ELLTAB (Elliptical Table)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. C., III; Eppler, W. G.

    1975-01-01

    Remotely sensed unit is assigned to category by merely looking up its channel readings in four-dimensional table. Approach makes it possible to process multispectral scanner data using a minicomputer.

  6. Transcription of the Workshop on General Aviation Advanced Avionics Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tashker, M. (Editor)

    1975-01-01

    Papers are presented dealing with the design of reliable, low cost, advanced avionics systems applicable to general aviation in the 1980's and beyond. Sensors, displays, integrated circuits, microprocessors, and minicomputers are among the topics discussed.

  7. Electron Optics Cannot Be Taught through Computation?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van der Merwe, J. P.

    1980-01-01

    Describes how certain concepts basic to electron optics may be introduced to undergraduate physics students by calculating trajectories of charged particles through electrostatic fields which can be evaluated on minicomputers with a minimum of programing effort. (Author/SA)

  8. Cooperative processing data bases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasta, Juzar

    1991-01-01

    Cooperative processing for the 1990's using client-server technology is addressed. The main theme is concepts of downsizing from mainframes and minicomputers to workstations on a local area network (LAN). This document is presented in view graph form.

  9. Turnkey CAD/CAM selection and evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moody, T.

    1980-01-01

    The methodology to be followed in evaluating and selecting a computer system for manufacturing applications is discussed. Main frames and minicomputers are considered. Benchmark evaluations, demonstrations, and contract negotiations are discussed.

  10. Automation of a guarded hot plate thermal conductivity instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Holland, L.L.

    1980-06-01

    The Thermo-Physics Corporation's GP-1800 guarded hot plate thermal conductivity instrument has been automated using a Digital Equipment Corporation PDP 11/35 minicomputer with an Industrial Control Subsystem Remote. Automation included constructing a hardware link between the instrument and the minicomputer system and designing, writing, and documenting software to perform equipment control, data acquisition, data reduction, and report generation. The software was designed and written so that non-programmers can run the thermal conductivity experiment.

  11. The revolution in data gathering systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cambra, J. M.; Trover, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    Data acquisition systems used in NASA's wind tunnels from the 1950's through the present time are summarized as a baseline for assessing the impact of minicomputers and microcomputers on data acquisition and data processing. Emphasis is placed on the cyclic evolution in computer technology which transformed the central computer system, and finally the distributed computer system. Other developments discussed include: medium scale integration, large scale integration, combining the functions of data acquisition and control, and micro and minicomputers.

  12. MINIS: Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Multipurpose Interactive NASA Information Systems (MINIS) was developed in response to the need for a data management system capable of operation on several different minicomputer systems. The desired system had to be capable of performing the functions of a LANDSAT photo descriptive data retrieval system while remaining general in terms of other acceptable user definable data bases. The system also had to be capable of performing data base updates and providing user-formatted output reports. The resultant MINI System provides all of these capabilities and several other features to complement the data management system. The MINI System is currently implemented on two minicomputer systems and is in the process of being installed on another minicomputer system. The MINIS is operational on four different data bases.

  13. Design of a microprocessor-based Control, Interface and Monitoring (CIM unit for turbine engine controls research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delaat, J. C.; Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    High speed minicomputers were used in the past to implement advanced digital control algorithms for turbine engines. These minicomputers are typically large and expensive. It is desirable for a number of reasons to use microprocessor-based systems for future controls research. They are relatively compact, inexpensive, and are representative of the hardware that would be used for actual engine-mounted controls. The Control, Interface, and Monitoring Unit (CIM) contains a microprocessor-based controls computer, necessary interface hardware and a system to monitor while it is running an engine. It is presently being used to evaluate an advanced turbofan engine control algorithm.

  14. Computer Program and User Documentation Medical Data Input System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, J.

    1971-01-01

    Several levels of documentation are presented for the program module of the NASA medical directorate minicomputer storage and retrieval system. The biomedical information system overview gives reasons for the development of the minicomputer storage and retrieval system. It briefly describes all of the program modules which constitute the system. A technical discussion oriented to the programmer is given. Each subroutine is described in enough detail to permit in-depth understanding of the routines and to facilitate program modifications. The program utilization section may be used as a users guide.

  15. A program for mass spectrometer control and data processing analyses in isotope geology; written in BASIC for an 8K Nova 1120 computer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Hope, J.

    1975-01-01

    A system is described which uses a minicomputer to control a surface ionization mass spectrometer in the peak switching mode, with the object of computing isotopic abundance ratios of elements of geologic interest. The program uses the BASIC language and is sufficiently flexible to be used for multiblock analyses of any spectrum containing from two to five peaks. In the case of strontium analyses, ratios are corrected for rubidium content and normalized for mass spectrometer fractionation. Although almost any minicomputer would be suitable, the model used was the Data General Nova 1210 with 8K memory. Assembly language driver program and interface hardware-descriptions for the Nova 1210 are included.

  16. A digital TV system for the detection of high speed human motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, R. C.

    1981-08-01

    Two array cameras and a force plate were linked to a PDP-11/34 minicomputer for an on-line recording of high speed human motion. A microprocessor-based interface system was constructed to allow preprocessing and coordinating of the video data before being transferred to the minicomputer. Control programs of the interface system are stored in the disk and loaded into the program storage areas of the microprocessor before the interface system starts its operation. Software programs for collecting and processing video and force data have been written. Experiments on the detection of human jumping have been carried out. Normal gait and amputee gait have also been recorded and analyzed.

  17. Study of systems and techniques for data base management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data management areas were studied to identify pertinent problems and issues that will affect future NASA data users in terms of performance and cost. Specific topics discussed include the identifications of potential NASA data users other than those normally discussed, consideration affecting the clustering of minicomputers, low cost computer system for information retrieval and analysis, the testing of minicomputer based data base management systems, ongoing work related to the use of dedicated systems for data base management, and the problems of data interchange among a community of NASA data users.

  18. Computer-Assisted Measurement and Classification of Strip-Chart Electrocardiograms

    PubMed Central

    Bogaty, Daniel; Kessler, Barry S.; Rios, J.C.

    1981-01-01

    A minicomputer-based system was designed to assist technicians in the measurement and coding of electrocardiographic data from strip-chart ECGs using a manually operated “tablet-digitizer” equipped with a magnifying reticle. This system allows digitizer/coders to cause transmission to the minicomputer of individual X, Y coordinate pairs each describing a successive point of inflection within a single ECG complex. Program segments use these coordinate pairs to calculate wave amplitudes, wave and interval durations, basic wave shape characteristics and, additionally, to code an ECG according to the “Minnesota Code” of Blackburn.

  19. A simulation approach to MIL-STD-1553 Multiplex Bus interfacing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lawson, R. J.; Murray, J.

    The technique developed for interfacing a 32 bit minicomputer to the MIL-STD-1553 Avionics Multiplex Bus (Mux Bus) in the F/A-18 Part Task Trainer is discussed. It is noted that the capability of access to the Mux Bus through a minicomputer provides the means of emulating any aircraft system the mission computer interfaces to in the aircraft. The capability of emulating the mission computer also exists for simulating real aircraft systems. The technique for recognizing bus requests for systems data required for simulation and responding to these requests within the timing constraints of 1553 is described, and details of bus operation specified by 1553 are given.

  20. Application of Adaptive Decision Aiding Systems to Computer-Assisted Instruction. Final Report, January-December 1974.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    May, Donald M.; And Others

    The minicomputer-based Computerized Diagnostic and Decision Training (CDDT) system described combines the principles of artificial intelligence, decision theory, and adaptive computer assisted instruction for training in electronic troubleshooting. The system incorporates an adaptive computer program which learns the student's diagnostic and…

  1. COED Transactions, Vol. XI, No. 7 & 8, July/August 1979. A Miniature Automated Warehouse: A Laboratory Teaching Device.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    A do-it-yourself laboratory course in automated systems designed at the University of Florida is described. Using a working model of a warehouse interfaced with a minicomputer as a working laboratory, the student gains hands-on experience in operations programing and applications of scheduling, materials handling, and heuristic optimization. (BT)

  2. Method of smoothing laser range observations by corrections of orbital parameters and station coordinates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lala, P.; Thao, Bui Van

    1986-11-01

    The first step in the treatment of satellite laser ranging data is its smoothing and rejection of incorrect points. The proposed method uses the comparison of observations with ephemerides and iterative matching of corresponding parameters. The method of solution and a program for a minicomputer are described. Examples of results for satellite Starlette are given.

  3. Surface Modeling, Solid Modeling and Finite Element Modeling. Analysis Capabilities of Computer-Assisted Design and Manufacturing Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nee, John G.; Kare, Audhut P.

    1987-01-01

    Explores several concepts in computer assisted design/computer assisted manufacturing (CAD/CAM). Defines, evaluates, reviews and compares advanced computer-aided geometric modeling and analysis techniques. Presents the results of a survey to establish the capabilities of minicomputer based-systems with the CAD/CAM packages evaluated. (CW)

  4. The Rise of K-12 Blended Learning: Profiles of Emerging Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staker, Heather

    2011-01-01

    Some innovations change everything. The rise of personal computers in the 1970s decimated the mini-computer industry. TurboTax forever changed tax accounting, and MP3s made libraries of compact discs obsolete. These innovations bear the traits of what Harvard Business School Professor Clayton M. Christensen terms a "disruptive innovation."…

  5. Teaching Tips.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kanervo, Ellen; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Contains teaching ideas from six journalism teachers on the following topics: teaching electronic editing, using minicomputers in an advertising media course, five ways to make grading stories easier, the point and code system of grading, student coverage of state government, and the "guided design" teaching technique. (RL)

  6. A practical multi-spectrum Hadamard Transform Spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, M. H.; Briotta, D. A., Jr.; Kamath, N.; Harwit, M. O.

    1975-01-01

    A Hadamard Transform Spectrometer (HTS) which simultaneously obtains fifteen infrared spectra, each having 255 spectral elements was constructed. Spectra are obtained essentially in real time through use of a minicomputer with 8K words of memory and a CRT display. This permits operation of the instrument in the field.

  7. DATA ACQUISITION SYSTEM FOR RAPID KINETIC EXPERIMENTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A data acquisition system has been developed to collect, analyze and store large volumes of rapid kinetic data measured from a stopped-flow spectrophotometer. A digital minicomputer, with an A/D converter, tape drive unit and formatter, analog recorder, oscilloscope, and input/ou...

  8. Microcomputer Page Layout (MicroPLA) Routine for Text-Graphic Materials: User's Guide. Technical Report 162.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyon, Rosalind; And Others

    Based on an earlier user's guide to a minicomputer page layout system called PLA (Terrell, 1982), this guide is designed for use in the development and production of text-graphic materials for training relatively unskilled technicians to perform complex procedures. A microcomputer version of PLA, MicroPLA uses the Commodore 8032 microcomputer to…

  9. Cloud Computing and the Power to Choose

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bristow, Rob; Dodds, Ted; Northam, Richard; Plugge, Leo

    2010-01-01

    Some of the most significant changes in information technology are those that have given the individual user greater power to choose. The first of these changes was the development of the personal computer. The PC liberated the individual user from the limitations of the mainframe and minicomputers and from the rules and regulations of centralized…

  10. Sun Series program for the REEDA System. [predicting orbital lifetime using sunspot values

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shankle, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    Modifications made to data bases and to four programs in a series of computer programs (Sun Series) which run on the REEDA HP minicomputer system to aid NASA's solar activity predictions used in orbital life time predictions are described. These programs utilize various mathematical smoothing technique and perform statistical and graphical analysis of various solar activity data bases residing on the REEDA System.

  11. An inexpensive vehicle speed detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broussard, P., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    Low-power minicomputer can plug into automobile cigarette lighter. It measures time it takes observed car to travel premeasured distance and provides immediate readout of speed. Potentially, detector could be manufactured for less than $200 per unit and would have very low maintenance cost.

  12. A Summary and Commentary on D. and S. Premack's "Original Intelligence"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greer, R. Douglas

    2006-01-01

    Some evolutionary cognitive and developmental psychologists propose that the human mind consists of domain-specific modules. These are characterized as self-contained "mini-computers" that process information of a certain kind. In their book, "Original Intelligence," the Premacks set out to provide a synthesis of evidence from various fields in…

  13. Integrated Computer-Aided Drafting Instruction (ICADI).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chen, C. Y.; McCampbell, David H.

    Until recently, computer-aided drafting and design (CAD) systems were almost exclusively operated on mainframes or minicomputers and their cost prohibited many schools from offering CAD instruction. Today, many powerful personal computers are capable of performing the high-speed calculation and analysis required by the CAD application; however,…

  14. New Information Technologies: Some Observations on What Is in Store for Libraries.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Black, John B.

    This outline of new technological developments and their applications in the library and information world considers innovations in three areas: automation, telecommunications, and the publishing industry. There is mention of the growth of online systems, minicomputers, microcomputers, and word processing; the falling costs of automation; the…

  15. Local Area Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bullard, David

    1983-01-01

    The proliferation of word processors, micro- and minicomputer systems, and other digital office equipment is causing major design changes in existing networks. Local Area Networks (LANs) which have adequately served terminal users in the past must now be redesigned. Implementation at Clemson is described. (MLW)

  16. An Off-Line Simulation System for Development of Real-Time FORTRAN Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, James W.

    Implementation of an ISA FORTRAN standard for executive functions and process input-output within a simulation system called MINIFOR provides a useful real-time program development tool for small single function, dedicated minicomputers having a FORTRAN compiler but limited program development aids. A FORTRAN-based pre-compiler is used off-line to…

  17. Computer Managed Instruction in Navy Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Middleton, Morris G.; And Others

    An investigation was made of the feasibility of computer-managed instruction (CMI) for the Navy. Possibilities were examined regarding a centralized computer system for all Navy training, minicomputers for remote classes, and shipboard computers for on-board training. The general state of the art and feasibility of CMI were reviewed, alternative…

  18. Data Input for Libraries: State-of-the-Art Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckland, Lawrence F.

    This brief overview of new manuscript preparation methods which allow authors and editors to set their own type discusses the advantages and disadvantages of optical character recognition (OCR), microcomputers and personal computers, minicomputers, and word processors for editing and database entry. Potential library applications are also…

  19. More vendors aim pitch at small hospitals.

    PubMed

    Gardner, E

    1992-10-01

    Computer vendors, operating in a sluggish market, are looking for business wherever they can find it, and small hospitals are virgin territory for many applications, including clinical and departmental systems. Sharply falling prices for minicomputers, microcomputers, printers and storage devices have cut the total cost of systems by at least 30% to 40%, putting them within the reach of smaller facilities. PMID:10121611

  20. Industrial robots and robotics

    SciTech Connect

    Kafrissen, S.; Stephens, M.

    1984-01-01

    This book discusses the study of robotics. It provides information of hardware, software, applications and economics. Eleven chapters examine the following: Minicomputers, Microcomputers, and Microprocessors; The Servo-Control System; The Activators; Robot Vision Systems; and Robot Workcell Environments. Twelve appendices supplement the data.

  1. Technological Discontinuities and Organizational Environments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tushman, Michael L.; Anderson, Philip

    1986-01-01

    Technological effects on environmental conditions are analyzed using longitudinal data from the minicomputer, cement, and airline industries. Technology evolves through periods of incremental change punctuated by breakthroughs that enhance or destroy the competence of firms. Competence-destroying discontinuities increase environmental turbulence;…

  2. Technological Discontinuities and Dominant Designs: A Cyclical Model of Technological Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Philip; Tushman, Michael L.

    1990-01-01

    Based on longitudinal studies of the cement, glass, and minicomputer industries, this article proposes a technological change model in which a technological breakthrough, or discontinuity, initiates an era of intense technical variation and selection, culminating in a single dominant design and followed by a period of incremental technical…

  3. Interactive initialization of heat flux parameters for numerical models using satellite temperature measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, T. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Progress made in HCMM research, including testing the interactive minicomputer system and preparation of a paper on the analysis of regional scale soil moisture patterns, is summarized. An exhibit on remote sensing including a videotape display of HCMM images, most of them of the State College area, was prepared.

  4. New starts in research and development, 1982

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grosson, J.

    1981-01-01

    An outline in slide form, of some areas of U.S. Navy research and development utilizing airborne minicomputers is presented. The following program considerations are addressed: (1) research and engineering management; (2) budgeting; (3) equipment specifications and construction materials; (4) computer applications; (5) technological capabilities, utilization, and transfer; and (6) military applications.

  5. Computer Series, 51: Bits and Pieces, 20.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moore, John W., Ed.

    1984-01-01

    Describes: Apple stereochemistry program; CNDO/2-INDO mini-computer calculations; direct linear plot procedure for enzyme kinetics calculations; construction of nonlinear Scatchard plots; simulation of mass spectral envelopes of polyisotopic elements; graphics with a dot-matrix printer; MINC computer in the physical chemistry laboratory; hallway…

  6. A Distributed Processing Approach to Payroll Time Reporting for a Large School District.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Freeman, Raoul J.

    1983-01-01

    Describes a system for payroll reporting from geographically disparate locations in which data is entered, edited, and verified locally on minicomputers and then uploaded to a central computer for the standard payroll process. Communications and hardware, time-reporting software, data input techniques, system implementation, and its advantages are…

  7. The Local Area Network (LAN) and Library Automation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Farr, Rick C.

    1983-01-01

    Discussion of the use of inexpensive microcomputers in local area information networks (LAN) notes such minicomputer problems as costs, capacity, downtime, and vendor dependence, and the advantages of using LAN in offices and libraries, less costly LAN upgrades, library vendors and LAN systems, and LAN problems. A 28-item bibliography is provided.…

  8. IPCS user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    McGoldrick, P.R.

    1980-12-11

    The Interprocess Communications System (IPCS) was written to provide a virtual machine upon which the Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS) for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) could be built. The hardware upon which the IPCS runs consists of nine minicomputers sharing some common memory.

  9. A Guide to Using the Bibliographic Features of the Integrated Library System (ILS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Susan G.

    This manual provides guidance in the use of the Integrated Library System (ILS), a library minicomputer system in which all automated library functions are processed against a single database. It is oriented toward ILS users with no ADP training or experience. Written in MUMPS, a higher-level language, the system includes the following…

  10. Radioactivities in returned lunar materials and in meteorites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fireman, E. L.

    1984-01-01

    Carbon 14 terrestial ages were determined with low level minicomputers and accelerator mass spectrometry on 1 Yamato and 18 Allan Hills and nearby sited meteorites. Techniques for an accelerator mass spectrometer which make C(14) measurements on small samples were developed. Also Be(10) concentrations were measured in Byrd core and Allan Hills ice samples.

  11. COMPUTER-CONTROLLED, REAL-TIME AUTOMOBILE EMISSIONS MONITORING SYSTEM

    EPA Science Inventory

    A minicomputer controlled automotive emissions sampling and analysis system (the Real-Time System) was developed to determine vehicular modal emissions over various test cycles. This data acquisition system can sample real-time emissions at a rate of 10 samples/s. A buffer utiliz...

  12. Distributed Administrative Management Information System (DAMIS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Juckiewicz, Robert; Kroculick, Joseph

    Columbia University's major program to distribute its central administrative data processing to its various schools and departments is described. The Distributed Administrative Management Information System (DAMIS) will link every department and school within the university via micrcomputers, terminals, and/or minicomputers to the central…

  13. A High Resolution Graphic Input System for Interactive Graphic Display Terminals. Appendix B.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Arsdall, Paul Jon

    The search for a satisfactory computer graphics input system led to this version of an analog sheet encoder which is transparent and requires no special probes. The goal of the research was to provide high resolution touch input capabilities for an experimental minicomputer based intelligent terminal system. The technique explored is compatible…

  14. Commonalities in Pedagogy Situating Cell Phone Use in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abend, Laurie Lafer

    2013-01-01

    Technology has become embedded in all aspects of students' lives as they increasingly rely on mobile technology devices such as cell phones to access and share information. Cell phones function as portable, affordable, and ubiquitous mini-computers, yet few teachers have leveraged the benefits of cell phone technology for teaching and learning…

  15. A Report on the Loading of MARC Format Bibliographic Records into HyperCard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenberg, Jason B.; Borgman, Christine L.

    1991-01-01

    Outlines a process for downloading MARC format bibliographic data into a form readable for an Apple Macintosh computer running HyperCard software. Loading procedures for two data sources--an OCLC format tape and records from UCLA's ORION public access catalog--are discussed, and the use of a minicomputer system is considered. (eight references)…

  16. The Use of Computer Networks in Data Gathering and Data Analysis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yost, Michael; Bremner, Fred

    This document describes the review, analysis, and decision-making process that Trinity University, Texas, went through to develop the three-part computer network that they use to gather and analyze EEG (electroencephalography) and EKG (electrocardiogram) data. The data are gathered in the laboratory on a PDP-1124, an analog minicomputer. Once…

  17. A practical Hadamard transform spectrometer for astronomical application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tai, M. H.

    1977-01-01

    The mathematical properties of Hadamard matrices and their application to spectroscopy are discussed. A comparison is made between Fourier and Hadamard transform encoding in spectrometry. The spectrometer is described and its laboratory performance evaluated. The algorithm and programming of inverse transform are given. A minicomputer is used to recover the spectrum.

  18. Implementing Computer-Assisted Instruction: The Garland Way.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douglas, Eli; Bryant, Deborah G.

    1985-01-01

    After much study, administrators at the Garland Independent School District (Texas) adopted a minicomputer-based system which provides curriculum development for kindergarten through grade 12. The process of implementing computer-assisted instruction in this district is described. Results after the first year and teacher training are examined. (JN)

  19. RAMAS: The RITL Automated Management System. Master Control and Periodicals Control Subsystems. Stockholm Papers in Library and Information Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ya-chun, Lian

    An automated minicomputer-based library management system is being developed at the Swedish Royal Institute of Technology Library (RITL). RAMAS (the RITL Automated Management System) currently deals with periodical check-in, claiming, index-handling, and binding control. A RAMAS bibliographic record can be accessed from eight different points…

  20. An Interactive, Interdisciplinary, On-Line Graphics System for Presenting and Manipulating Directed Graphs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beazley, William; And Others

    An interactive graphics system has been implemented for tutorial purposes and for research in man-machine communication of structural digraphs. An IMLAC intelligent terminal with ligthpen input is used in conjunction with a NOVA minicomputer. Successful application in linguistics and engineering problem solving are discussed, the latter in detail.…

  1. From Connectivity to Interoperability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moressi, William J.; McFadden, C. Brown

    1989-01-01

    The Academic Computing Center at Winthrop College has gone beyond simple connectivity in linking its three local area networks to each other and the campus minicomputer. The environmental impact of the installation of bridges and gateways on systems, personnel, and end users is described. (MLW)

  2. The ILS--The Pentagon Library's Experience.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mullane, Ruth

    1984-01-01

    Describes implementation of five subsystems of Integrated Library System's (ILS) version 2.1 (minicomputer-based automated library system) at the Pentagon Library: online catalog (search strategies, user acceptance); bibliographic subsystems (cataloging, retrospective conversion); circulation; serials check-in; administrative subsystem (report…

  3. An Examination of the Potential Relationship between Technology and Persistence among At-Risk College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hughey, Aaron W.; Manco, Charlene M.

    2012-01-01

    Academically underprepared college students, i.e., those identified as needing developmental (remedial) English, mathematics and reading courses in order to maximize their potential for academic success at college-level studies, were provided with the opportunity to rent, for a minimal, subsidized fee, mini-computers bundled with digital course…

  4. Evolution, Nature, Uses and Issues in the Creation of Local School District Comprehensive Information Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hathaway, Walter E.

    Efficient and convenient comprehensive information systems, long kept from coming into being by a variety of obstacles, are now made possible by the concept of distributive processing and the technology of micro- and mini-computer networks. Such systems can individualize instruction, group students efficiently, cut administrative costs, streamline…

  5. A distributed data base management capability for the deep space network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, A. I.

    1976-01-01

    The Configuration Control and Audit Assembly (CCA) is reported that has been designed to provide a distributed data base management capability for the DSN. The CCA utilizes capabilities provided by the DSN standard minicomputer and the DSN standard nonreal time high level management oriented programming language, MBASIC. The characteristics of the CCA for the first phase of implementation are described.

  6. A comprehensive package for DNA sequence analysis in FORTRAN IV for the PDP-11.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, J; Eckenrode, V K; Lemke, K; Phillips, G J; Schaeffer, S W

    1986-01-01

    A computer package written in Fortran-IV for the PDP-11 minicomputer is described. The package's novel features are: software for voice-entry of sequence data; a less memory intensive algorithm for optimal sequence alignment; and programs that fit statistical models to nucleic acid and protein sequences. PMID:3003673

  7. A Comprehensive Model for the Design of Micro and Mini Computer Systems in School Districts: A Guide for Developing Computer Systems for Local School Districts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Graczyk, Sandra L.; Kiser, Chester

    This administrative and instructional guide offers information and recommendations for computer design techniques based on literature sources and school district applications; design of micro- and mini-computer systems is intended for those with little or no experience. Chapter 1, "Planning for the Computer System: Choosing Purposes and Parts,"…

  8. Automatic processing system for shadowgraph and interference patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vereninov, I. A.; Lazarev, V. D.; Popov, S. S.; Tarasov, V. S.

    1987-01-01

    The design and operation of an automatic system for the processing of shadowgraph and interference images are described. The system includes a two-coordinate processing table with an optical system for the projection of transparent images onto the photodetector, an image filter in the photodetector field, and a device for controlling the movement of the table and transmitting information to the minicomputer.

  9. Modern programming language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feldman, G. H.; Johnson, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    Structural-programming language is especially-tailored for producing assembly language programs for MODCOMP II and IV mini-computes. Modern programming language consists of set of simple and powerful control structures that include sequencing alternative selection, looping, sub-module linking, comment insertion, statement continuation, and compilation termination capabilities.

  10. Description of the barium cloud vectoring systems developed for the PLACES test series

    SciTech Connect

    Finnell, R.T.

    1981-05-01

    The PLACES experiments were conducted to investigate the effects of ionospheric plasmas (created by barium vapor released from rockets) on satellite communications and navigation systems. Launcher setting angles for the rockets were provided by a minicomputer system made up of four subsystems. This report describes the subsystems which determined the barium cloud vectors from TV data alone and from combined radar/TV data.

  11. Atmospheric and Oceanographic Information Processing System (AOIPS) system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bracken, P. A.; Dalton, J. T.; Billingsley, J. B.; Quann, J. J.

    1977-01-01

    The development of hardware and software for an interactive, minicomputer based processing and display system for atmospheric and oceanographic information extraction and image data analysis is described. The major applications of the system are discussed as well as enhancements planned for the future.

  12. NEUTRON ACTIVATION ANALYSIS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETERMINATION OF TRACE ELEMENTS IN AMBIENT AIR COLLECTED ON GLASS-FIBER FILTERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Arsenic with 25 other elements are simultaneously determined in ambient air samples collected on glass-fiber filter composites at 250 United States sites. The instrumental neutron activation analysis (NAA) technique combined with the power of a dedicated mini-computer resulted in...

  13. The prediction of acoustical particle motion using an efficient polynomial curve fit procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, S. E.; Bernhard, R.

    1984-01-01

    A procedure is examined whereby the acoustic model parameters, natural frequencies and mode shapes, in the cavities of transportation vehicles are determined experimentally. The acoustic model shapes are described in terms of the particle motion. The acoustic modal analysis procedure is tailored to existing minicomputer based spectral analysis systems.

  14. A system for the management of requests at an image data bank. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Debarrosaguirre, J. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1984-01-01

    An automated system was implemented to supersede existing manual procedures in fulfilling user requests made to a remote sensing data bank, concerning specifically LANDSAT imagery. The system controls the several production steps from request entry to the shipment of each final product. Special solutions and techniques were employed due to the severe limitations, in both hardware and software of the host minicomputer system.

  15. Operating manual for the RRL 8 channel data logger

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paluch, E. J.; Shelton, J. D.; Gardner, C. S.

    1979-01-01

    A data collection device which takes measurements from external sensors at user specified time intervals is described. Three sensor ports are dedicated to temperature, air pressure, and dew point. Five general purpose sensor ports are provided. The user specifies when the measurements are recorded as well as when the information is read or stored in a minicomputer or a paper tape.

  16. Mission of the Future. Proceedings of the Annual Convention of the Association for the Development of Computer-Based Instructional Systems. Volume III: Users Interest Groups (San Diego, California, February 27 to March 1, 1979).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Association for the Development of Computer-based Instructional Systems.

    The third of three volumes of papers presented at the 1979 ADCIS convention, this collection includes 30 papers presented to special interest groups--implementation, minicomputer users, National Consortium for Computer Based Music Instruction, and PLATO users. Papers presented to the implementation interest group were concerned with faculty…

  17. Integrating and Interfacing Library Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boss, Richard W.

    1985-01-01

    This overview of local library online systems that integrate several functions covers functional integration, benefits of integrated systems, turnkey systems, minicomputer and microcomputer-based systems, interfacing automated systems, types of interfaces, linking homogenous and heterogeneous systems, role of vendors, library applications, linking…

  18. Mini or Maxi: Which Computer Is Right for You?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Nancy N.

    1979-01-01

    Selecting a type of computer system for instructional purposes does not depend upon the kind of instruction to be provided but on the features of the maxi- and minicomputer systems themselves. The features of each system must be considered in the context in which it will be used. (Author/CMV)

  19. An Historical Perspective on the Design of Computer-Assisted Instruction: Lessons from the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, Robert

    1989-01-01

    Presents a brief history of the development of computer-assisted instruction (CAI). Topics discussed include programmed instruction (PI); PLATO; CAI in elementary and secondary public schools; computer-managed instruction (CMI); administrative uses of computers; the development of minicomputers and microcomputers; educational software and its…

  20. Program for Development of Artificial Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, Gary; Culbert, Chris; Lopez, Frank

    1987-01-01

    C Language Integrated Production System (CLIPS) computer program is shell for developing expert systems. Designed to enable research, development, and delivery of artificial intelligence on conventional computers. Primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. Meets or out-performs most microcomputer- and minicomputer-based artificial-intelligence tools. Written in C.

  1. Computer Data Acquisition Applications in the Materials Science Laboratory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Eugene E., Ed.

    1980-01-01

    Described are applications of computer data acquisition to three laboratories in materials science at the United States Naval Academy. In each laboratory, data are input to a minicomputer, scaled using previously obtained and stored calibration factors to convert the transducer signals to load, displacement, temperature, etc., and then stored on…

  2. Decentralized nuclear materials management system at SNLA

    SciTech Connect

    James, R.M.

    1981-01-01

    This paper discusses the approach that Sandia took in deciding to implement a nuclear material control and accountability system on a stand-alone minicomputer despite the existence of a Univac 1108 and Univac 1100/82 centralized facility. The benefits which have been obtained by the decentralization and future applications are discussed.

  3. Cactus

    SciTech Connect

    Sexton, R.L.

    1983-03-01

    The CACTUS project (computer-aided control, tracking, and updating system) was initiated by the Bendix Kansas City Division to address specific work-in-process problems encountered in a cable department. Since then, the project has been expanded to additional electrical manufacturing departments because of potential productivity gains from the system. The philosophy of CACTUS is to add an element of distributed data proessing to the centralized data processing system currently in use for control of work in process. Under this system, the existing chain of communications between the host computer and the CRT terminals in a department is severed. A mini-computer established in the department communicates directly with the central system, and departmental communication is then established with the mini-computer. The advantages, disadvantages, operation performance, and economics of the system are discussed.

  4. TDRSS data handling and management system study. Ground station systems for data handling and relay satellite control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Results of a two-phase study of the (Data Handling and Management System DHMS) are presented. An original baseline DHMS is described. Its estimated costs are presented in detail. The DHMS automates the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS) ground station's functions and handles both the forward and return link user and relay satellite data passing through the station. Direction of the DHMS is effected via a TDRSS Operations Control Central (OCC) that is remotely located. A composite ground station system, a modified DHMS (MDHMS), was conceptually developed. The MDHMS performs both the DHMS and OCC functions. Configurations and costs are presented for systems using minicomputers and midicomputers. It is concluded that a MDHMS should be configured with a combination of the two computer types. The midicomputers provide the system's organizational direction and computational power, and the minicomputers (or interface processors) perform repetitive data handling functions that relieve the midicomputers of these burdensome tasks.

  5. Continuous fission-product monitor system at Oyster Creek. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, L.L.; Chulick, E.T.

    1980-10-01

    A continuous on-line fission product monitor has been installed at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station, Forked River, New Jersey. The on-line monitor is a minicomputer-controlled high-resolution gamma-ray spectrometer system. An intrinsic Ge detector scans a collimated sample line of coolant from one of the plant's recirculation loops. The minicomputer is a Nuclear Data 6620 system. Data were accumulated for the period from April 1979 through January 1980, the end of cycle 8 for the Oyster Creek plant. Accumulated spectra, an average of three a day, were stored on magnetic disk and subsequently analyzed for fisson products, Because of difficulties in measuring absolute detector efficiency, quantitative fission product concentrations in the coolant could not be determined. Data for iodine fission products are reported as a function of time. The data indicate the existence of fuel defects in the Oyster Creek core during cycle 8.

  6. A computer-aided design system geared toward conceptual design in a research environment. [for hypersonic vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    STACK S. H.

    1981-01-01

    A computer-aided design system has recently been developed specifically for the small research group environment. The system is implemented on a Prime 400 minicomputer linked with a CDC 6600 computer. The goal was to assign the minicomputer specific tasks, such as data input and graphics, thereby reserving the large mainframe computer for time-consuming analysis codes. The basic structure of the design system consists of GEMPAK, a computer code that generates detailed configuration geometry from a minimum of input; interface programs that reformat GEMPAK geometry for input to the analysis codes; and utility programs that simplify computer access and data interpretation. The working system has had a large positive impact on the quantity and quality of research performed by the originating group. This paper describes the system, the major factors that contributed to its particular form, and presents examples of its application.

  7. [Evolution over time of the electroencephalographic signal. Application in pharmacology].

    PubMed

    Devos, J E

    1978-01-01

    The dynamics of transition from wakefulness to drowsiness can be modified by psycho-active compounds. These two states of vigilance have different electroencephalographic characteristics, which can be also modified by the administration of substances. This paper describes a method intended to discriminate between these two aspects of drug action, using a mini-computer. Investigation of sleep-wakefulness cycles with continuous EEG and EMG recording necessitates an efficient method of data reduction. On-line computation of Hjorth parameters with a micro-computer, and further processing witha mini-computer has been used. A pharmacological approach to the study of sleep-wakefulness cycles is proposed; this avoids a strict distinction of sleep phases, and concentrates on the coninuum of vigilance states. Differents ways of showing drug-induced modifications on that continuum are presented with examples. PMID:213255

  8. Concepts leading to the IMAGE-100 hybrid interactive system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, T. F.; Sulester, J. M. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    As LACIE Procedure 1 evolved from the Classification and Mensuration Subsystem smallfields procedures, it became evident that two computational systems would have merit-the LACIE/Earth Resources Interactive Processing System based on a large IBM-360 computer oriented for operational use with high computational throughput, and a smaller, highly interactive system based on a PDP 11-45 minicomputer and its display system, the IMAGE-100. The latter had advantages for certain phases; notably, interactive spectral aids could be implemented quite rapidly. This would allow testing and development of Procedure 1 before its implementation on the LACIE/Earth Resources Interactive Processing System. The resulting minicomputer system, called the Classification and Mensuration Subsystem IMAGE-100 Hybrid System, allowed Procedure-1 operations to be performed interactively, except for clustering, classification, and automatic selection of best acquisitions, which were offloaded to the LACIE/Earth Resources Interactive Processing System.

  9. Two dimensional recursive digital filters for near real time image processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, D.; Sherrod, E.

    1980-01-01

    A program was designed toward the demonstration of the feasibility of using two dimensional recursive digital filters for subjective image processing applications that require rapid turn around. The concept of the use of a dedicated minicomputer for the processor for this application was demonstrated. The minicomputer used was the HP1000 series E with a RTE 2 disc operating system and 32K words of memory. A Grinnel 256 x 512 x 8 bit display system was used to display the images. Sample images were provided by NASA Goddard on a 800 BPI, 9 track tape. Four 512 x 512 images representing 4 spectral regions of the same scene were provided. These images were filtered with enhancement filters developed during this effort.

  10. Quantitative autoradiography with radiopharmaceuticals, Part 1: Digital film-analysis system by videodensitometry: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Yonekura, Y.; Brill, A.B.; Som, P.; Bennett, G.W.; Fand, I.

    1983-03-01

    A simple low-cost digital film-analysis system using videodensitometry was developed to quantitate autoradiograms. It is based on a TV-film analysis system coupled to a minicomputer. Digital sampling of transmitted light intensities through the autoradiogram is performed with 8-bit gray levels according to the selected array size (128 X 128 to 1024 X 1024). The performance characteristics of the system provide sufficient stability, uniformity, linearity, and intensity response for use in quantitative analysis. Digital images of the autoradiograms are converted to radioactivity content, pixel by pixel, using step-wedge standards. This type of low-cost system can be installed on conventional mini-computers commonly used in modern nuclear medical facilities. Quantitative digital autoradiography can play an important role, with applications stretching from dosimetry calculations of radiopharmaceuticals to metabolic studies in conjunction with positron-emission tomography.

  11. Escort: A data acquisition and display system to support research testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. L.

    1978-01-01

    Primarily designed to acquire data at steady state test conditions, the system can also monitor slow transients such as those generated in moving to a new test condition. The system configuration makes use of a microcomputer at the test site which acts as a communications multiplexer between the measurement and display devices and a centrally located minicomputer. A variety of measurement and display devices are supported using a modular approach. This allows each system to be configured with the proper combination of devices to meet the specific test requirements, while still leaving the option to add special interfaces when needed. Centralization of the minicomputer improves utilization through sharing. The creation of a pool of minis to provide data acquisition and display services to a variable number of running tests also offers other important advantages.

  12. Impact of some architectural features of the implementation of a concurrent pascal machine

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, K.H.; Abou-el-naga, A.

    1982-01-01

    The concurrent pascal machine (CPM), which is a virtual machine designed to support concurrent processes, was implemented on an 8-bit microcomputer as the beginning step toward constructing a fault-tolerant microcomputer network. The CPM architecture, whose first implementation was based on a PDP 11/45 minicomputer, reflects considerable influence of the PDP 11/45 architecture. The architectural differences between the 16-bit minicomputer and the 8-bit microcomputer which have significant impact on the difficulty of implementing CPMs are analyzed. Then some details on the implementation of the 16-bit virtual machine (CPM) on the 8-bit microcomuter are presented along with some approaches for tuning the CPM architecture to yield more efficient implementations on microcomputers. 7 references.

  13. Optical computer switching network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clymer, B.; Collins, S. A., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    The design for an optical switching system for minicomputers that uses an optical spatial light modulator such as a Hughes liquid crystal light valve is presented. The switching system is designed to connect 80 minicomputers coupled to the switching system by optical fibers. The system has two major parts: the connection system that connects the data lines by which the computers communicate via a two-dimensional optical matrix array and the control system that controls which computers are connected. The basic system, the matrix-based connecting system, and some of the optical components to be used are described. Finally, the details of the control system are given and illustrated with a discussion of timing.

  14. A flexible time recording and time correlation analysis system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shenhav, Nathan J.; Leiferman, Gabriel; Segal, Yitzhak; Notea, Amos

    1983-02-01

    A system was developed to digitize and record the time intervals between detection event pulses, feed to its input channels from a detection device. The accumulated data is transferred continuously in real time to a dise through a PDP 11/34 minicomputer. Even though the system was designed for a specific scope, i.e., the comparative study of passive neutron nondestructive assay methods. It can be characterized by its features as a general purpose time series recorder. The time correlation analysis is performed by software after completion of the data accumulation. The digitizing clock period is selectable and any value, larger than a minimum of 100 ns may be selected. Bursts of up to 128 events with a frequency up to 10 MHz may be recorded. With the present recorder-minicomputer combination, the maximal average recording frequency is 40 kHz.

  15. Techniques for digital enhancement of Landsat MSS data using an Apple II+ microcomputer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. A., Jr.; Cartin, K. F.

    1984-01-01

    The information provided by remotely sensed data collected from orbiting platforms has been useful in many research fields. Particularly convenient for evaluation are generally digital data stored on computer compatible tapes (CCT's). The major advantages of CCT's are the quality of the data and the accessibility to computer manipulation. Minicomputer systems are widely used for the required computer processing operations. However, microprocessor-related technological advances make it now possible to process CCT data with computing systems which can be obtained at a much lower price than minicomputer systems. A detailed description is provided of the design considerations of a microcomputer-based Digital Image Analysis System (DIAS). Particular attention is given to the algorithms which are incorporated for eighter edge enhancement or smoothing Landsat multispectral scanner data.

  16. Instrumentation, techniques and data reduction associated with airfoil testing programs at Wichita State University

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodgers, E. J.; Wentz, W. H., Jr.; Seetharam, H. C.

    1978-01-01

    Two dimensional airfoil testing was conducted at the Wichita State University Beech Wind Tunnel for a number of years. The instrumentation developed and adapted during this period of testing for determination of flow fields along with traversing mechanisms for these probes are discussed. In addition, some of the techniques used to account for interference effects associated with the apparatus used for this two dimensional testing are presented. The application of a minicomputer to the data reduction and presentation is discussed.

  17. Large aperture ac interferometer for optical testing.

    PubMed

    Moore, D T; Murray, R; Neves, F B

    1978-12-15

    A 20-cm clear aperture modified Twyman-Green interferometer is described. The system measures phase with an AC technique called phase-lock interferometry while scanning the aperture with a dual galvanometer scanning system. Position information and phase are stored in a minicomputer with disk storage. This information is manipulated with associated software, and the wavefront deformation due to a test component is graphically displayed in perspective and contour on a CRT terminal. PMID:20208642

  18. Flight simulators. Part 1: Present situation and trends. Part 2: Implications for training

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, D.; Volk, W.

    1977-01-01

    The present situation and developments in the technology of flight simulators based on digital computers are evaluated from the standpoint of training airline flight crews. Areas covered are minicomputers and their advantages in terms of cost, space and time savings, software data packets, motion simulation, visual simulation and instructor aids. The division of training time between aircraft and simulator training and the possible advantages from increased use of simulators are evaluated.

  19. [Quantified self movement--the new mantra of life insurance companies].

    PubMed

    Becher, St

    2016-06-01

    Wearables are small personal minicomputers that register biometric data. In such a way, the insurance industry hopes to create new sales opportunities and products, and simplify underwriting. Lower premiums will promote the use of wearables. The related possibilities and unanswered questions are discussed in this article. Utilisation of big data offers the insurance industry a range of new opportunities. The benefit must be proven in the future, however. PMID:27483687

  20. Laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clemmons, J. I., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A laser velocimeter (autocovariance) buffer interface (LVABI) was developed to serve as the interface between three laser velocimeter high speed burst counters and a minicomputer. A functional description is presented of the instrument and its unique features which allow the studies of flow velocity vector analysis, turbulence power spectra, and conditional sampling of other phenomena. Typical applications of the laser velocimeter using the LVABI are presented to illustrate its various capabilities.

  1. Simple digital pulse-programing circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langston, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    Pulse-sequencing circuit uses only shift register and Exclusive-OR gates. Circuit also serves as date-transition edge detector (for rising or falling edges). It is used in sample-and-hold, analog-to-digital conversion sequence control, multiphase clock logic, precise delay control computer control logic, edge detectors, other timing applications, and provides simple means to generate timing and control signals for data transfer, addressing, or mode control in microprocessors and minicomputers.

  2. TMS communications hardware. Volume 2: Bus interface unit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. S.; Hopkins, G. T.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype coaxial cable bus communication system used in the Trend Monitoring System to interconnect intelligent graphics terminals to a host minicomputer is described. The terminals and host are connected to the bus through a microprocessor-based RF modem termed a Bus Interface Unit (BIU). The BIU hardware and the Carrier Sense Multiple Access Listen-While-Talk protocol used on the network are described.

  3. Forth system for coherent-scatter radar data acquisition and processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rennier, A. D.; Bowhill, S. A.

    1985-01-01

    A real time collection system was developed for the Urbana coherent scatter radar system. The new system, designed for use with a microcomputer, has several advantages over the old system implemented with a minicomputer. The software used to collect the data is described as well as the processing software used to analyze the data. In addition a magnetic tape format for coherent scatter data exchange is given.

  4. Debugging in a multi-processor environment

    SciTech Connect

    Spann, J.M.

    1981-09-29

    The Supervisory Control and Diagnostic System (SCDS) for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) consists of nine 32-bit minicomputers arranged in a tightly coupled distributed computer system utilizing a share memory as the data exchange medium. Debugging of more than one program in the multi-processor environment is a difficult process. This paper describes what new tools were developed and how the testing of software is performed in the SCDS for the MFTF project.

  5. A portable millisecond-integration-time photoelectric photometer.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgraw, J. T.; Wells, D. C.; Wiant, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    Portable equipment for recording millisecond-integration-time photoelectric photometric data is described. Digital data are reliably recorded on standard 6.35 mm audio grade magnetic tape via a quadradial audio grade tape deck. The system is designed specifically for recording lunar occulations of stars, but the data recording technique is independent of the data source. Recovery of the data is made via minicomputer.

  6. A computer based ionospheric sounding and HF noise measuring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Earl, G. F.

    1980-09-01

    A system for the automated collection of ionospheric backscatter sounding and HF noise measurement data is described. The system was configured around a PDP 11/40 minicomputer and modified Barry Research FMCW sounding equipment. The real time digital signal processing associated with the backscatter sounder and noise measurement systems is discussed. The data are displayed and recorded in a calibrated mode, and examples are presented.

  7. Digital picture analysis in microphotometry of biological materials.

    PubMed

    Zimmer, H G

    1979-08-01

    Automatic evaluation of two-dimensional thin-layer-chromatograms exemplarily demonstrates the applicability of signal processing, image analysis, and pattern recognition to microphotometry by an enlarged dynamic range of the photometer, improved reproducibility by noise reduction, discrimination between objects and background, feature extraction and automatic classification of the results. Emphasis is put on simple procedures which are tested in routine work and can be implemented on minicomputers. PMID:480344

  8. Data base design for a worldwide multicrop information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Driggers, W. G.; Downs, J. M.; Hickman, J. R.; Packard, R. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    A description of the USDA Application Test System data base design approach and resources is presented. The data is described in detail by category, with emphasis on those characteristics which influenced the design most. It was concluded that the use of a generalized data base in support of crop assessment is a sound concept. The IDMS11 minicomputer base system is recommended for this purpose.

  9. Real-time flight test data distribution and display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesel, Michael C.; Hammons, Kevin R.

    1988-01-01

    Enhancements to the real-time processing and display systems of the NASA Western Aeronautical Test Range are described. Display processing has been moved out of the telemetry and radar acquisition processing systems super-minicomputers into user/client interactive graphic workstations. Real-time data is provided to the workstations by way of Ethernet. Future enhancement plans include use of fiber optic cable to replace the Ethernet.

  10. ART/Ada design project, phase 1: Project plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Bradley P.

    1988-01-01

    The plan and schedule for Phase 1 of the Ada based ESBT Design Research Project is described. The main platform for the project is a DEC Ada compiler on VAX mini-computers and VAXstations running the Virtual Memory System (VMS) operating system. The Ada effort and lines of code are given in tabular form. A chart is given of the entire project life cycle.

  11. Microcomputer-based digital image processing - A tutorial package for exploration geologists

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrington, J. A., Jr.; Cartin, K. F.

    1985-01-01

    An Apple II microcomputer-based software package for analysis of digital data developed at the University of Oklahoma, the Digital Image Analysis System (DIAS), provides a relatively low-cost, portable alternative to large, dedicated minicomputers for digital image processing education. Digital processing techniques for analysis of Landsat MSS data and a series of tutorial exercises for exploration geologists are described and evaluated. DIAS allows in-house training that does not interfere with computer-based prospect analysis objectives.

  12. Study of software application of airborne laser doppler system for severe storms measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alley, P. L.

    1979-01-01

    Significant considerations are described for performing a Severe Storms Measurement program in real time. Particular emphasis is placed on the sizing and timing requirements for a minicomputer-based system. Analyses of several factors which could impact the effectiveness of the system are presented. The analyses encompass the problems of data acquisition, data storage, data registration, correlation, and flow field computation, and error induced by aircraft motion, moment estimation, and pulse integration.

  13. Structure of cerium potassium sulfate 2K/sub 2/SO/sub 4/. Ce(SO/sub 4/)/sub 2/. 2H/sub 2/O

    SciTech Connect

    Dikareva, L.M.; Kuznetsov, V.Y.; Porai-Koshits, M.A.; Rogachev, D.L.

    1985-09-01

    Out of 4036 independent reflections, 3828 with I > 2 sigma were used in structural calculations effected by the program ''Syntex XTL'' on a Nova 1200 minicomputer and by the program ''Struktura'' on an ES-1022 computer. The heavy-atom method was used to make the final refinement to R = 0.037, taking account of the anisotropy of the thermal vibrations of the atoms. The atomic coordinates are listed in a table.

  14. A new theory for rapid calculation of the ground pattern of the incident sound intensity produced by a maneuvering jet airplane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barger, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    An approximate method for computing the jet noise pattern of a maneuvering airplane is described. The method permits one to relate the noise pattern individually to the influences of airplane speed and acceleration, jet velocity and acceleration, and the flight path curvature. The analytic formulation determines the ground pattern directly without interpolation and runs rapidly on a minicomputer. Calculated examples including a climbing turn and a simple climb pattern with a gradual throttling back are presented.

  15. A Workstation-Based Inpatient Clinical System in the Johns Hopkins Hospital

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Marvin; Tolchin, Stephen G.; Kahane, Stephen N.; Goldberg, Howard S.; Barta, Patrick

    1985-01-01

    The Johns Hopkins Hospital has initiated an ambitious program to apply modern technologies to the development of a new, comprehensive clinical information system. This system integrates many distinct functional subsystems using a local area network. One component of this system is a distributed inpatient clinical management system. This paper discusses a workstation-based design with minicomputer support. User interface requirements, system architecture, project plans and alternative approaches are discussed.

  16. X- And y-axis driver for rotating microspheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W.

    1979-01-01

    Apparatus for precise control of the motion and position of microspheres for examination of their interior and/or exterior. The apparatus includes an x- and y-axis driver mechanism controlled, for example, by a minicomputer for selectively rotating microspheres retained between a pair of manipulator arms having flat, smooth end surfaces. The driver mechanism includes an apertured plate and ball arrangement which provided for coupled equal and opposite movement of the manipulator arms in two perpendicular directions.

  17. Display system for imaging scientific telemetric information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zabiyakin, G. I.; Rykovanov, S. N.

    1979-01-01

    A system for imaging scientific telemetric information, based on the M-6000 minicomputer and the SIGD graphic display, is described. Two dimensional graphic display of telemetric information and interaction with the computer, in analysis and processing of telemetric parameters displayed on the screen is provided. The running parameter information output method is presented. User capabilities in the analysis and processing of telemetric information imaged on the display screen and the user language are discussed and illustrated.

  18. Functional definition and design of a USDA system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, S. M.; Dario, E. R.; Dickinson, G. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1979-01-01

    The fundamental definition and design of a U.S.D.A. system utilizing the LACIE technology avaliable as of June 1976, is discussed. The organization and methods described are focused on LACIE technology in terms of its transfer for use applications. The simulation of a feasible system design provided timely answers to system design questions, such as the ability of a minicomputer to handle the proposed geometrical correction of MSS data.

  19. Signal processing at the Poker Flat MST radar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    Signal processing for Mesosphere-Stratosphere-Troposphere (MST) radar is carried out by a combination of hardware in high-speed, special-purpose devices and software in a general-purpose, minicomputer/array processor. A block diagram of the signal processing system is presented, and the steps in the processing pathway are described. The current processing capabilities are given, and a system offering greater coherent integration speed is advanced which hinges upon a high speed preprocessor.

  20. On-Iine Management System for the Periodicals in JAERl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itabashi, Keizo; Mineo, Yukinobu

    The article describes the outlines of the on-line serials control system utilizing a mini-computer. The system is dealt with subscription, check-in, claiming, inquiry of serials information and binding of journals. In this system journal acquisition with serial arrival prediction in an on-line mode is carried on a priority principle to record the actual receipt of incoming issues.

  1. Smithsonian Astrophysical Observatory laser tracking systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pearlman, M. R.; Lanham, N. W.; Lehr, C. G.; Wohn, J.

    1977-01-01

    The four SAO laser satellite-ranging systems, located in Brazil, Peru, Australia, and Arizona, have been in operation for more than five years and have provided ranging data at accuracy levels of a meter or better. The paper examines system hardware (laser transmitter, the electronics, mount, photoreceiver, minicomputer, and station timing) and software (prediction program, calibration programs, and data handling and quick-look programs) and also considers calibration, station operation, and system performance.

  2. An implementation of the distributed programming structural synthesis system (PROSSS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, J. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A method is described for implementing a flexible software system that combines large, complex programs with small, user-supplied, problem-dependent programs and that distributes their execution between a mainframe and a minicomputer. The Programming Structural Synthesis System (PROSSS) was the specific software system considered. The results of such distributed implementation are flexibility of the optimization procedure organization and versatility of the formulation of constraints and design variables.

  3. Automation of the process of speech signal segmentation in an analogic-numeric system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domagala, P.

    Eighteen Polish words uttered by 12 voices (7 male and 5 female) were taperecorded and analyzed by computer. Numeric analysis of the dynamic spectrum was implemented using an algorithm composed of simple logical sentences on the MERA 303 minicomputer. Compared with the visual segmentation achieved in the spectrographic computer images, correctness of segmentation reached a level of about 94 percent. No differences were found in quality of segmentation between male and female utterances.

  4. Computer program modifications of Open-file report 82-1065; a comprehensive system for interpreting seismic-refraction and arrival-time data using interactive computer methods

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackermann, Hans D.; Pankratz, Leroy W.; Dansereau, Danny A.

    1983-01-01

    The computer programs published in Open-File Report 82-1065, A comprehensive system for interpreting seismic-refraction arrival-time data using interactive computer methods (Ackermann, Pankratz, and Dansereau, 1982), have been modified to run on a mini-computer. The new version uses approximately 1/10 of the memory of the initial version, is more efficient and gives the same results.

  5. Dedicated multiprocessor system for calculating Josephson-junction noise thermometer frequency variances at high speed

    SciTech Connect

    Cutkosky, R.D.

    1983-07-01

    A Josephson-junction noise thermometer produces a sequence of frequency readings from whose variations the temperature of the thermometer may be calculated. A preprocessor system has been constructed to collect the frequency readings delivered to an IEEE 488 bus by an ordinary counter operating at up to 1000 readings per second, perform the required calculations, and send summary information to a desk calculator or minicomputer on another 488 bus at a more convenient rate.

  6. Control system analysis and synthesis for a six degree-of-freedom universal Force-Reflecting Hand Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handlykken, M.; Turner, T.

    1980-01-01

    A six degree-of-freedom joystick with feedback motors, called the Force-Reflecting Hand Controller (FRHC) is used as control input for the human operator in a teleoperator system. The geometric and dynamic properties of the FRHC are entirely different from those of the manipulator being controlled. The paper discusses the analysis and synthesis of the control loop between the FRHC and the robot arm and examines the necessary position and force transformations. The controller is implemented through a dedicated minicomputer.

  7. Development of an infrared polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coffeen, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    AEROPOL infrared polarimeter was built for measurements microns between 1.1 and 3.5 microns, with a 1.5 degree field of view, using a wire grid polarization analyzer. A PbS detector is cooled by condensed Freon-13. The instrument operates under minicomputer control, giving a polarization least squares solution each 2.5 seconds. AEROPOL was flown on the NASA CV-990 aircraft, in a remote-sensing study of terrestrial cloud particle sizes and shapes.

  8. Processing PCM Data in Real Time

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wissink, T. L.

    1982-01-01

    Novel hardware configuration makes it possible for Space Shuttle launch processing system to monitor pulse-code-modulated data in real time. Using two microprogramable "option planes," incoming PCM data are monitored for changes at rate of one frame of data (80 16-bit words) every 10 milliseconds. Real-time PCM processor utilizes CPU in mini-computer and CPU's in two option planes.

  9. Full 3D microwave quasi-holographic imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castelli, Juan-Carlos; Tardivel, Francois

    A full 3D quasi-holographic image processing technique developed by ONERA is described. A complex backscattering coefficient of a drone scale model was measured for discrete values of the 3D backscattered wave vector in a frequency range between 4.5-8 GHz. The 3D image processing is implemented on a HP 1000 mini-computer and will be part of LASER 2 software to be used in three RCS measurement indoor facilities.

  10. Geometric assessment of image quality using digital image registration techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tisdale, G. E.

    1976-01-01

    Image registration techniques were developed to perform a geometric quality assessment of multispectral and multitemporal image pairs. Based upon LANDSAT tapes, accuracies to a small fraction of a pixel were demonstrated. Because it is insensitive to the choice of registration areas, the technique is well suited to performance in an automatic system. It may be implemented at megapixel-per-second rates using a commercial minicomputer in combination with a special purpose digital preprocessor.

  11. Segmentation of the speech signal based on changes in energy distribution in the spectrum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jassem, W.; Kudzdela, H.; Domagala, P.

    1983-08-01

    A simple algorithm is proposed for automatic phonetic segmentation of the acoustic speech signal on the MERA 303 desk-top minicomputer. The algorithm is verified with Polish linguistic material spoken by two subjects. The proposed algorithm detects approximately 80 percent of the boundaries between enunciated segments correctly, a result no worse than that obtained using more complex methods. Speech recognition programs are discussed as speech perception models, and the nature of categorical perception of human speech sounds is examined.

  12. TMS communications software. Volume 1: Computer interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. S.; Lenker, M. D.

    1979-01-01

    A prototype bus communications system, which is being used to support the Trend Monitoring System (TMS) as well as for evaluation of the bus concept is considered. Hardware and software interfaces to the MODCOMP and NOVA minicomputers are included. The system software required to drive the interfaces in each TMS computer is described. Documentation of other software for bus statistics monitoring and for transferring files across the bus is also included.

  13. TMS communications hardware. Volume 1: Computer interfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, J. S.; Weinrich, S. S.

    1979-01-01

    A prototpye coaxial cable bus communications system was designed to be used in the Trend Monitoring System (TMS) to connect intelligent graphics terminals (based around a Data General NOVA/3 computer) to a MODCOMP IV host minicomputer. The direct memory access (DMA) interfaces which were utilized for each of these computers are identified. It is shown that for the MODCOMP, an off-the-shell board was suitable, while for the NOVAs, custon interface circuitry was designed and implemented.

  14. FTIR (Fourier transform infrared) spectrophotometry for thin film monitors: Computer and equipment integration for enhanced capabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Cox, J.N.; Sedayao, J.; Shergill, G.; Villasol, R. ); Haaland, D.M. )

    1990-01-01

    Fourier transform infrared spectrophotometry (FTIR) is a valuable technique for monitoring thin films used in semiconductor device manufacture. Determinations of the constituent contents in borophosphosilicate (BPSG), phosphosilicate (PSG), silicon oxynitride (SiON:H,OH), and spin-on-glass (SOG) thin films are a few applications. Due to the nature of the technique, FTIR instrumentation is one of the most extensively computer-dependent pieces of equipment that is likely to be found in a microelectronics plant. In the role of fab monitor or reactor characterization tool, FTIR instruments can rapidly generate large amounts of data. By linking a local FTIR data station to a remote minicomputer its capabilities are greatly improved. We discuss three caused of enhancement. First, the FTIR in the fab area communicates and interacts in real time with the minicomputer: transferring data segments to it, instructing it to perform sophisticated processing, and returning the result to the operator in the fab. Characterizations of PSG thin films by this approach are discussed. Second, the spectra of large numbers of samples are processed locally. The large database is then transmitted to the minicomputer for study by statistical/graphics software. Results of CVD-reactor spatial profiling experiments for plasma SiON are presented. Third, processing of calibration spectra is performed on the minicomputer to optimize the accuracy and precision of a Partial Least Squares'' analysis mode. This model is then transferred to the data station in the fab. The analysis of BPSG thin films is discussed in this regard. The prospects for fully automated at-line monitoring and for real-time, in-situ monitoring will be discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  15. Application of a personal computer for the uncoupled vibration analysis of wind turbine blade and counterweight assemblies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, P. R.; Little, R. R.

    1985-01-01

    A research effort was undertaken to develop personal computer based software for vibrational analysis. The software was developed to analytically determine the natural frequencies and mode shapes for the uncoupled lateral vibrations of the blade and counterweight assemblies used in a single bladed wind turbine. The uncoupled vibration analysis was performed in both the flapwise and chordwise directions for static rotor conditions. The effects of rotation on the uncoupled flapwise vibration of the blade and counterweight assemblies were evaluated for various rotor speeds up to 90 rpm. The theory, used in the vibration analysis codes, is based on a lumped mass formulation for the blade and counterweight assemblies. The codes are general so that other designs can be readily analyzed. The input for the codes is generally interactive to facilitate usage. The output of the codes is both tabular and graphical. Listings of the codes are provided. Predicted natural frequencies of the first several modes show reasonable agreement with experimental results. The analysis codes were originally developed on a DEC PDP 11/34 minicomputer and then downloaded and modified to run on an ITT XTRA personal computer. Studies conducted to evaluate the efficiency of running the programs on a personal computer as compared with the minicomputer indicated that, with the proper combination of hardware and software options, the efficiency of using a personal computer exceeds that of a minicomputer.

  16. Computer utilization in the Food and Drug Administration's bureau of foods mass spectrometry laboratory.

    PubMed

    Dreifuss, P A; Dusold, L R

    1982-09-01

    A network of computers is being used to support the Food and Drug Administration's Bureau of Foods mass spectrometry facility. Five mass spectrometers are each interfaced to at least 2 of the 6 dedicated minicomputers in the laboratory. This multiple interfacing provides data acquisition and processing backup, reducing the overall down-time. Selected data from all of the minicomputers can be sent to FDA's main computers via a digital cartridge tape recorder or paper tape. The digital cartridge tape recorder records data that are output from a minicomputer terminal and then plays it back on a terminal which is on-line with the main computer. This main computer stores and edits data; plots spectra for reports, data banks, and publications; and carries out some data processing. Multiple interfacing also serves to supplement the capabilities of the 8-year-old Finnigan MAT (formerly Varian MAT) SS-100 data system (Sperry-Univac/V-76) with the newer and more powerful Finnigan MAT INCOS (Data General/Nova 3) data system. The SS-100 data system is also enhanced by the substitution of the 110 baud paper tape with a 9600 baud cartridge tape recorder for I/O of system bootstraps, BASIC programs, and raw data. PMID:7130097

  17. Calculating Storage Requirements for Office Practice Systems

    PubMed Central

    Stead, William W.; Hammond, William E.

    1985-01-01

    The disk space requirements of small and medium sized group practices using a comprehensive medical information system supported by either a micro-computer or a mini-computer are analyzed. Efficient operation requires that 23%-54% of a typical system disk be used for files other than patient records. Data is presented to allow prediction of both the number of records that will need to be maintained for a practice and the average size of each record based upon the type of data required by the practice.

  18. Transfer-function-parameter estimation from frequency response data: A FORTRAN program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, R. C.

    1975-01-01

    A FORTRAN computer program designed to fit a linear transfer function model to given frequency response magnitude and phase data is presented. A conjugate gradient search is used that minimizes the integral of the absolute value of the error squared between the model and the data. The search is constrained to insure model stability. A scaling of the model parameters by their own magnitude aids search convergence. Efficient computer algorithms result in a small and fast program suitable for a minicomputer. A sample problem with different model structures and parameter estimates is reported.

  19. Evaluation of Automated Hospital Data Management Systems (AHDMS)

    PubMed Central

    Young, Edward M.; Brian, Earl W.; Hardy, Dorcas R.; Kaplan, Alan; Childerston, James K.

    1980-01-01

    The introduction of advanced minicomputer technology has made a wide variety of information processing applications available to hospitals which could not previously afford the resources needed to develop and implement such systems. The impact of such systems on the operation of hospitals in the 100-300 bed size range is not fully understood. A preliminary examination of the type of system available to and implemented by hospitals of this size has revealed some system characteristics which have implications both for the ultimate evaluation of such systems and for the use of automated information systems in hospitals in general.

  20. An improved version of the table look-up algorithm for pattern recognition. [for MSS data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eppler, W. G.

    1974-01-01

    The table look-up approach to pattern recognition has been used for 3 years at several research centers in a variety of applications. A new version has been developed which is faster, requires significantly less core memory, and retains full precision of the input data. The new version can be used on low-cost minicomputers having 32K words (16 bits each) of core memory and fixed-point arithmetic; no special-purpose hardware is required. An initial FORTRAN version of this system can classify an ERTS computer-compatible tape into 24 classes in less than 15 minutes.

  1. Online assessment of a distributed processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehrlich, L. F.

    1980-01-01

    ORT (Operational Readiness Test) software allows one engineer to test readiness of 64 minicomputers and their peripherals from single console. Software makes roll call of computers and peripherals via common data buffer to check readiness of system in morning "wake up" or at other important times. Subsystems are tested in parallel to save time. "Watchdog" terminates test of any system that does not respond in time, so one failed system does not halt test sequence. Entire rollcall is complete in about 15 minutes. Software is designed for Space Shuttle prelaunch checkout, but approach should interest users of similar equipment.

  2. Acoustics measurements in normal jet impingement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleis, S. J.

    1977-01-01

    The dependence of far field acoustic measurements for a uniform jet on nozzle to plate spacing for small dimensionless spacings (h/d - 0.75 to 3.0) was investigated. Spectra from a real time analyzer were read and processed by an HP 2116 minicomputer in on-line mode. Similar data was generated for a fully developed pipe flow exit condition jet to compare with other investigations. The data base for normal jet impingement was extended to smaller values of nozzle to plate spacing. The effects of slight noise heating (30 deg rise) of the jet on the far field noise produced by the impinging jet are demonstrated.

  3. System of Programmed Modules for Measuring Photographs with a Gamma-Telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Averin, S. A.; Veselova, G. V.; Navasardyan, G. V.

    1978-01-01

    Physical experiments using tracking cameras resulted in hundreds of thousands of stereo photographs of events being received. To process such a large volume of information, automatic and semiautomatic measuring systems are required. At the Institute of Space Research of the Academy of Science of the USSR, a system for processing film information from the spark gamma-telescope was developed. The system is based on a BPS-75 projector in line with the minicomputer Elektronika 1001. The report describes this system. The various computer programs available to the operators are discussed.

  4. Comparison of existing digital image analysis systems for the analysis of Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Likens, W. C.; Wrigley, R. C.

    1984-01-01

    Most existing image analysis systems were designed with the Landsat Multi-Spectral Scanner in mind, leaving open the question of whether or not these systems could adequately process Thematic Mapper data. In this report, both hardware and software systems have been evaluated for compatibility with TM data. Lack of spectral analysis capability was not found to be a problem, though techniques for spatial filtering and texture varied. Computer processing speed and data storage of currently existing mini-computer based systems may be less than adequate. Upgrading to more powerful hardware may be required for many TM applications.

  5. Spherical wave decompostion approach to ultrasonic field calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Griffice, C.P.; Seydel, J.A.

    1981-12-01

    A simple, flexible, accurate, and comprehensive numerical method is presented for theoretically analyzing the diffraction field of a continuous wave transducer of arbitrary size, shape, and frequency. Using the extensively studied circular transducer for comparison, numerical results are shown for an unfocused transducer with uniform velocity excitation as well as for a focused transducer with Gaussian velocity excitation. Data concerning the execution time, program size, and convergence of the method are also presented for its implementation as a design tool on a minicomputer system.

  6. Evaluation of initial collector field performance at the Langley Solar Building Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Knoll, R. H.; Jensen, R. N.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal performance of the solar collector field for the NASA Langley Solar Building Test Facility is given for October 1976 through January 1977. An 1180 square meter solar collector field with seven collector designs helped to provide hot water for the building heating system and absorption air conditioner. The collectors were arranged in 12 rows with nominally 51 collectors per row. Heat transfer rates for each row are calculated and recorded along with sensor, insolation, and weather data every 5 minutes using a mini-computer. The agreement between the experimental and predicted collector efficiencies was generally within five percentage points.

  7. Use of functional mass in renal scintigraphy to detect segmental arterial lesions

    SciTech Connect

    Stibolt, T.B. Jr.; Bacher, J.D.; Dunnick, N.R.; Lock, A.; Jones, A.E.; Bailey, J.J.

    1982-04-01

    Renography using a gamma camera, a minicomputer, (/sup 123/I)orthoiodohippurate ((/sup 123/I)OIH), and a canine model was employed to evaluate computer-generated maps of regional renal function. Renograms were obtained before and after ligations of the right renal arterial branch in four dogs, with subsequent angiographic and histologic confirmation of the lesions. Postoperative time-activity curves were normal. Washout and persistence index in three of four right kidneys showed regional abnormality. Functional renal mapping may provide a clinical technique for evaluating human renal vascular hypertension.

  8. Development and Operation of a MUMPS Laboratory Information System: A Decade's Experience

    PubMed Central

    Miller, R. E.; Causey, J. P.; Moore, G. W.; Wilk, G. E.

    1988-01-01

    We describe more than a decade's experience with inhouse development and operation of a clinical laboratory computer system written in the MUMPS programming language for a 1000 bed teaching hospital. The JHLIS is a networked minicomputer system that supports accessioning, instrument monitoring, and result reporting for over 3000 specimens and 30,000 test results daily. Development and operation of the system accounts for 6% of the budget of the laboratories which have had a 70% increase in workload over the past decade. Our experience with purchased MUMPS software maintained and enhanced inhouse suggests an attractive alternative to lengthy inhouse development.

  9. Managing Data From Signal-Propagation Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, A. V.

    1989-01-01

    Computer programs generate characteristic plots from amplitudes and phases. Software system enables minicomputer to process data on amplitudes and phases of signals received during experiments in ground-mobile/satellite radio propagation. Takes advantage of file-handling capabilities of UNIX operating system and C programming language. Interacts with user, under whose guidance programs in FORTRAN language generate plots of spectra or other curves of types commonly used to characterize signals. FORTRAN programs used to process file-handling outputs into any of several useful forms.

  10. Robot welding process control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Romine, Peter L.

    1991-01-01

    This final report documents the development and installation of software and hardware for Robotic Welding Process Control. Primary emphasis is on serial communications between the CYRO 750 robotic welder, Heurikon minicomputer running Hunter & Ready VRTX, and an IBM PC/AT, for offline programming and control and closed-loop welding control. The requirements for completion of the implementation of the Rocketdyne weld tracking control are discussed. The procedure for downloading programs from the Intergraph, over the network, is discussed. Conclusions are made on the results of this task, and recommendations are made for efficient implementation of communications, weld process control development, and advanced process control procedures using the Heurikon.

  11. The Physician's Workstation: an example of end user integration of information systems.

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, J. E.; Berger, R. G.; Carey, T. S.; Rutledge, R.; Cleveland, T. J.; Kichak, J. P.; Ayscue, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Many hospitals today have implemented widely disparate information systems on mainframe and mini-computer hardware. The advent of network technology in hospitals has made it possible to access information in these systems. Unfortunately, the user interfaces to applications on these system are unique and difficult to learn, which makes them unsuitable for use by clinical services. In this paper we describe the development using rapid prototyping object-oriented programming tools of a Physician's Workstation which integrates information from five different applications running on three separate computer systems. PMID:1807772

  12. Data collection, computation and statistical analysis in psychophysiological experiments.

    PubMed

    Buzzi, R; Wespi, J; Zwimpfer, J

    1982-01-01

    The system was designed to allow simultaneous monitoring of eight bioelectrical signals together with the necessary event markers. The data inputs are pulse code modulated, recorded on magnetic tape, and then read into a minicomputer. The computer permits the determination of parameters for the following signals: electrocardiogram (ECG), respiration (RESP), skin conductance changes (SCC), electromyogram (EMG), plethysmogram (PLET), pulse transmission time (PTT), and electroencephalogram (EEG). These parameters are determined for time blocks of selectable duration and read into a mainframe computer for further statistical analysis. PMID:7183101

  13. On the development of an interactive resource information management system for analysis and display of spatiotemporal data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schell, J. A.

    1974-01-01

    The recent availability of timely synoptic earth imagery from the Earth Resources Technology Satellites (ERTS) provides a wealth of information for the monitoring and management of vital natural resources. Formal language definitions and syntax interpretation algorithms were adapted to provide a flexible, computer information system for the maintenance of resource interpretation of imagery. These techniques are incorporated, together with image analysis functions, into an Interactive Resource Information Management and Analysis System, IRIMAS, which is implemented on a Texas Instruments 980A minicomputer system augmented with a dynamic color display for image presentation. A demonstration of system usage and recommendations for further system development are also included.

  14. Implementation of the Integrated Library System: University of Maryland Health Sciences Library.

    PubMed

    Feng, C C; Freiburger, G; Knudsen, P C

    1983-07-01

    The Health Sciences Library, University of Maryland, has implemented the Integrated Library System (ILS), a minicomputer-based library automation system developed by the Lister Hill National Center for Biomedical Communications, National Library of Medicine. The process of moving a library from a manual to a computerized system required comprehensive planning and strong commitment by the staff. Implementation activities included hardware and software modification, conversion of manual files, staff training, and system publicity. ILS implementation resulted in major changes in procedures in the circulation, reference, and cataloging departments. PMID:6688748

  15. Consolidation of data base for Army generalized missile model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klenke, D. J.; Hemsch, M. J.

    1980-01-01

    Data from plume interaction tests, nose mounted canard configuration tests, and high angle of attack tests on the Army Generalized Missile model are consolidated in a computer program which makes them readily accessible for plotting, listing, and evaluation. The program is written in FORTRAN and will run on an ordinary minicomputer. It has the capability of retrieving any coefficient from the existing DATAMAN tapes and displaying it in tabular or plotted form. Comparisons of data taken in several wind tunnels and of data with the predictions of Program MISSILE2 are also presented.

  16. Data acquisition/reduction system for flight testing general aviation aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rummer, D. I.; Mosser, M. A.; Renz, R. R. L.

    1982-01-01

    The development of a data acquisition/reduction system for use in the flight testing of general aviation aircraft is described. Design objectives for the system are adequate accuracy, ease of installation and removal from aircraft, simplicity of operation, and low cost. A 16-channel working system has been constructed, and tested in the collection of flight test data from a Cessna 172 aircraft, which uses as the basis of its design an AIM65 microcomputer. Data is reduced with a MINC minicomputer system. Attention is given to the onboard installation of computer, battery and transducer modules incorporated by the system.

  17. ECG-gated emission computed tomography of the cardiac blood pool

    SciTech Connect

    Moore, M.L.; Murphy, P.H.; Burdine, J.A.

    1980-01-01

    ECG-gated cross-sectional images of the cardiac blood pool were produced using a specially constructed emission computed tomographic scanner. A pair of large-field-of-view cameras were mounted in opposition in a gantry that rotates 360/sup 0/ about the patient. The coordinates of each detected event, the output of a physiological synchronizer, and the position of the camera heads were input to a dedicated minicomputer which was used to produce the images. Display as a movie permitted evaluation of regional and global wall motion in cross section without the disadvantages of superimposed blood pools as obtained in nontomographic views.

  18. High-speed simulation of transients in nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    Wulff, W.; Cheng, H.S.; Lekach, S.V.; Mallen, A.N.

    1984-01-01

    A combination of advanced modeling techniques and modern, special-purpose peripheral minicomputer technology is presented which affords realistic predictions of plant transient and severe off-normal events in LWR power plants through on-line simulations at a speed ten times greater than actual process speeds. Results are shown for a BWR plant simulation. Results are shown to demonstrate computing capacity, accuracy, and speed. Simulation speeds have been achieved which are 110 times larger than those of a CDC-7600 mainframe computer or ten times greater than real-time speed.

  19. GEM: Statistical weather forecasting procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, R. G.

    1983-01-01

    The objective of the Generalized Exponential Markov (GEM) Program was to develop a weather forecast guidance system that would: predict between 0 to 6 hours all elements in the airways observations; respond instantly to the latest observed conditions of the surface weather; process these observations at local sites on minicomputing equipment; exceed the accuracy of current persistence predictions at the shortest prediction of one hour and beyond; exceed the accuracy of current forecast model output statistics inside eight hours; and be capable of making predictions at one location for all locations where weather information is available.

  20. Operator Station Design System - A computer aided design approach to work station layout

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    The Operator Station Design System is resident in NASA's Johnson Space Center Spacecraft Design Division Performance Laboratory. It includes stand-alone minicomputer hardware and Panel Layout Automated Interactive Design and Crew Station Assessment of Reach software. The data base consists of the Shuttle Transportation System Orbiter Crew Compartment (in part), the Orbiter payload bay and remote manipulator (in part), and various anthropometric populations. The system is utilized to provide panel layouts, assess reach and vision, determine interference and fit problems early in the design phase, study design applications as a function of anthropometric and mission requirements, and to accomplish conceptual design to support advanced study efforts.

  1. Development INTERDATA 8/32 computer system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sonett, C. P.

    1983-01-01

    The capabilities of the Interdata 8/32 minicomputer were examined regarding data and word processing, editing, retrieval, and budgeting as well as data management demands of the user groups in the network. Based on four projected needs: (1) a hands on (open shop) computer for data analysis with large core and disc capability; (2) the expected requirements of the NASA data networks; (3) the need for intermittent large core capacity for theoretical modeling; (4) the ability to access data rapidly either directly from tape or from core onto hard copy, the system proved useful and adequate for the planned requirements.

  2. Automated emergency meteorological response system

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, D W

    1980-01-01

    A sophisticated emergency response system was developed to aid in the evaluation of accidental releases of hazardous materials from the Savannah River Plant to the environment. A minicomputer system collects and archives data from both onsite meteorological towers and the National Weather Service. In the event of an accidental release, the computer rapidly calculates the trajectory and dispersion of pollutants in the atmosphere. Computer codes have been developed which provide a graphic display of predicted concentration profiles downwind from the source, as functions of time and distance.

  3. The library and its home computer: automation as if people mattered.

    PubMed Central

    Avriel, D

    1983-01-01

    To provide its users with quick and easy access to the library resources, the Muriel and Philip Berman National Medical Library, Jerusalem, between 1978 and 1982 developed an integrated library system (MAIMON) on a minicomputer. Because humans are the most important element of the library system, MAIMON's performance was evaluated in terms of benefits provided to patrons, library management, and library staff. After successfully adopting the system, users' needs and expectations have grown. How the existing system will be used and expanded to meet the new information demands at the library is discussed. Images PMID:6626802

  4. Transferability and data access issues. [decision information display system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ferreros, A. V.

    1981-01-01

    The evolution and current operational mode of the domestic information display system (DIDS) now known as the decision information display system are described. This minicomputer based system, developed from a NASA-generated image processing system, was designed to display federal statistical data for a variety of geographic areas in the form of choropleth maps. The application of DIDS in South Carolina is discussed as well as the progress made and issues that emerged in using the data base on a state and county level. The hardware base for the system, how this user friendly system works, and the possibility of transferring data to remote systems are examined.

  5. Programming for energy monitoring/display system in multicolor lidar system research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alvarado, R. C., Jr.; Allen, R. J.

    1982-01-01

    The Z80 microprocessor based computer program that directs and controls the operation of the six channel energy monitoring/display system that is a part of the NASA Multipurpose Airborne Differential Absorption Lidar (DIAL) system is described. The program is written in the Z80 assembly language and is located on EPROM memories. All source and assembled listings of the main program, five subroutines, and two service routines along with flow charts and memory maps are included. A combinational block diagram shows the interfacing (including port addresses) between the six power sensors, displays, front panel controls, the main general purpose minicomputer, and this dedicated microcomputer system.

  6. Experiments in data collection technology using satellites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, R. E.; Lewis, J. R.; Trudell, B. J.

    1977-01-01

    A variety of techniques potentially useful to data collection have been tested. An automatic data collection platform with a minicomputer collects and preprocesses data, then sends desired information when interrogated through a communication satellite. Position surveillance by tone-code ranging through communication satellites is automatic, real time and accurate. Emergency medical data transmissions from ambulances to hospitals can be extended to rural and remote areas by direct satellite links. A small platform can send emergency-related data through a satellite while the satellite is routinely relaying powerful communication signals. A low orbit satellite provides means to locate existing emergency locator beacons.

  7. Quantitative analysis of defects in silicon. Silicon sheet growth development for the large are silicon sheet task of the low-cost solar array project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Natesh, R.; Smith, J. M.; Bruce, T.; Oidwai, H. A.

    1980-01-01

    One hundred and seventy four silicon sheet samples were analyzed for twin boundary density, dislocation pit density, and grain boundary length. Procedures were developed for the quantitative analysis of the twin boundary and dislocation pit densities using a QTM-720 Quantitative Image Analyzing system. The QTM-720 system was upgraded with the addition of a PDP 11/03 mini-computer with dual floppy disc drive, a digital equipment writer high speed printer, and a field-image feature interface module. Three versions of a computer program that controls the data acquisition and analysis on the QTM-720 were written. Procedures for the chemical polishing and etching were also developed.

  8. User's operating procedures. Volume 3: Projects directorate information programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haris, C. G.; Harris, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the user's operating procedures for the scout project automatic data system, called SPADS is presented. SPADS is the results of the past seven years of software development on a prime mini-computer. SPADS was developed as a single entry, multiple cross-reference data management and information retrieval system for the automation of Project office tasks, including engineering, financial, managerial, and clerical support. This volume, three of three, provides the instructions to operate the projects directorate information programs in data retrieval and file maintenance via the user friendly menu drivers.

  9. MORPH-I (Ver 1.0) a software package for the analysis of scanning electron micrograph (binary formatted) images for the assessment of the fractal dimension of enclosed pore surfaces

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mossotti, Victor G.; Eldeeb, A. Raouf; Oscarson, Robert

    1998-01-01

    MORPH-I is a set of C-language computer programs for the IBM PC and compatible minicomputers. The programs in MORPH-I are used for the fractal analysis of scanning electron microscope and electron microprobe images of pore profiles exposed in cross-section. The program isolates and traces the cross-sectional profiles of exposed pores and computes the Richardson fractal dimension for each pore. Other programs in the set provide for image calibration, display, and statistical analysis of the computed dimensions for highly complex porous materials. Requirements: IBM PC or compatible; minimum 640 K RAM; mathcoprocessor; SVGA graphics board providing mode 103 display.

  10. Some computational aspects of the hals (harmonic analysis of x-ray line shape) method

    SciTech Connect

    Moshkina, T.I.; Nakhmanson, M.S.

    1986-02-01

    This paper discusses the problem of distinguishing the analytical line from the background and approximates the background component. One of the constituent parts of the program package in the procedural-mathematical software for x-ray investigations of polycrystalline substances in application to the DRON-3, DRON-2 and ADP-1 diffractometers is the SSF system of programs, which is designed for determining the parameters of the substructure of materials. The SSF system is tailored not only to Unified Series (ES) computers, but also to the M-6000 and SM-1 minicomputers.

  11. APSAS; an Automated Particle Size Analysis System

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poppe, Lawrence J.; Eliason, A.H.; Fredericks, J.J.

    1985-01-01

    The Automated Particle Size Analysis System integrates a settling tube and an electroresistance multichannel particle-size analyzer (Coulter Counter) with a Pro-Comp/gg microcomputer and a Hewlett Packard 2100 MX(HP 2100 MX) minicomputer. This system and its associated software digitize the raw sediment grain-size data, combine the coarse- and fine-fraction data into complete grain-size distributions, perform method of moments and inclusive graphics statistics, verbally classify the sediment, generate histogram and cumulative frequency plots, and transfer the results into a data-retrieval system. This system saves time and labor and affords greater reliability, resolution, and reproducibility than conventional methods do.

  12. Registration of Heat Capacity Mapping Mission day and night images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, K.; Hummer-Miller, S.; Sawatzky, D. L. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    Neither iterative registration, using drainage intersection maps for control, nor cross correlation techniques were satisfactory in registering day and night HCMM imagery. A procedure was developed which registers the image pairs by selecting control points and mapping the night thermal image to the daytime thermal and reflectance images using an affine transformation on a 1300 by 1100 pixel image. The resulting image registration is accurate to better than two pixels (RMS) and does not exhibit the significant misregistration that was noted in the temperature-difference and thermal-inertia products supplied by NASA. The affine transformation was determined using simple matrix arithmetic, a step that can be performed rapidly on a minicomputer.

  13. Integrating the university medical center. Phase one: providing an information backbone.

    PubMed Central

    Berry, S. J.; Reber, E.; Offeman, W. E.

    1991-01-01

    UCLA School of Medicine represents a diverse computing community where the creation of each individual network has been driven by applications, price/performance and functionality. Indeed, the ability to connect to other computers has had no bearing on selection. Yet, there exists a need to seamlessly connect the individual networks to other minicomputers, mainframes and remote computers. We have created a school wide backbone network that will enable an individual from a single workstation to access a wide variety of services residing on any number of machines. PMID:1807658

  14. An accelerated forth data-acquisition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowhill, S. A.; Rennier, A. D.

    1986-01-01

    A new data acquisition system was put into operation at Urbana in August 1984. It uses a standard Apple 2 microcomputer with 48 k RAM and a standard 5 1/4 inch floppy disk. Design criteria for the system is given. The system was implemented using fig-FORTH, a threaded interpretive language which permits easy interfacing to machine code. The throughput of this system is better by a factor of 6 than the PDP-15 minicomputer system previously used, and it has the real time display feature and provides the data in much more convenient form. The features which contribute to this improved performance is listed.

  15. Optical instrumentation engineering in science, technology and society; Proceedings of the Sixteenth Annual Technical Meeting, San Mateo, Calif., October 16-18, 1972

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Y. H.

    1973-01-01

    Visual tracking performance in instrumentation is discussed together with photographic pyrometry in an aeroballistic range, optical characteristics of spherical vapor bubbles in liquids, and the automatic detection and control of surface roughness by coherent diffraction patterns. Other subjects explored are related to instruments, sensors, systems, holography, and pattern recognition. Questions of data handling are also investigated, taking into account minicomputer image storage for holographic interferometry analysis, the design of a video amplifier for a 90 MHz bandwidth, and autostereoscopic screens. Individual items are announced in this issue.

  16. User's operating procedures. Volume 1: Scout project information programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. G.; Harris, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A review of the user's operating procedures for the Scout Project Automatic Data System, called SPADS is given. SPADS is the result of the past seven years of software development on a Prime minicomputer located at the Scout Project Office. SPADS was developed as a single entry, multiple cross reference data management and information retrieval system for the automation of Project office tasks, including engineering, financial, managerial, and clerical support. The instructions to operate the Scout Project Information programs in data retrieval and file maintenance via the user friendly menu drivers is presented.

  17. Alternatives in the complement and structure of NASA teleprocessing resources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The results are presented of a program to identify technical innovations which would have an impact on NASA data processing and describe as fully as possible the development work necessary to exploit them. Seven of these options for NASA development, as the opportunities to participate in and enhance the advancing information system technology were called, are reported. A detailed treatment is given of three of the options, involving minicomputers, mass storage devices and software development techniques. These areas were picked by NASA as having the most potential for improving their operations.

  18. Nova control system: goals, architecture, and system design

    SciTech Connect

    Suski, G.J.; Duffy, J.M.; Gritton, D.G.; Holloway, F.W.; Krammen, J.R.; Ozarski, R.G.; Severyn, J.R.; Van Arsdall, P.J.

    1982-05-19

    The control system for the Nova laser must operate reliably in a harsh pulse power environment and satisfy requirements of technical functionality, flexibility, maintainability and operability. It is composed of four fundamental subsystems: Power Conditioning, Alignment, Laser Diagnostics, and Target Diagnostics, together with a fifth, unifying subsystem called Central Controls. The system architecture utilizes a collection of distributed microcomputers, minicomputers, and components interconnected through high speed fiber optic communications systems. The design objectives, development strategy and architecture of the overall control system and each of its four fundamental subsystems are discussed. Specific hardware and software developments in several areas are also covered.

  19. The Earth Resources Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS) in university research and education: An operator oriented geobased information system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coker, B. L.; Kind, T. C.; Smith, W. F., Jr.; Weber, N. V.

    1981-01-01

    Created for analyzing and processing digital data such as that collected by multispectral scanners or digitized from maps, ELAS is designed for ease of user operation and includes its own FORTRAN operating monitor and an expandable set of application modules which are FORTRAN overlays. On those machines that do not support FORTRAN overlaying, the modules exist as subprograms. The subsystem can be implemented on most 16-bit or 32-bit machines and is capable of, but not limited to, operating on low-cost minicomputer systems. The recommended hardware configuration for ELAS and a representative listing of some operating and application modules are presented.

  20. User's operating procedures. Volume 2: Scout project financial analysis program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harris, C. G.; Haris, D. K.

    1985-01-01

    A review is presented of the user's operating procedures for the Scout Project Automatic Data system, called SPADS. SPADS is the result of the past seven years of software development on a Prime mini-computer located at the Scout Project Office, NASA Langley Research Center, Hampton, Virginia. SPADS was developed as a single entry, multiple cross-reference data management and information retrieval system for the automation of Project office tasks, including engineering, financial, managerial, and clerical support. This volume, two (2) of three (3), provides the instructions to operate the Scout Project Financial Analysis program in data retrieval and file maintenance via the user friendly menu drivers.

  1. A computer system to analyze showers in nuclear emulsions: Center Director's discretionary fund report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meegan, C. A.; Fountain, W. F.; Berry, F. A., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    A system to rapidly digitize data from showers in nuclear emulsions is described. A TV camera views the emulsions though a microscope. The TV output is superimposed on the monitor of a minicomputer. The operator uses the computer's graphics capability to mark the positions of particle tracks. The coordinates of each track are stored on a disk. The computer then predicts the coordinates of each track through successive layers of emulsion. The operator, guided by the predictions, thus tracks and stores the development of the shower. The system provides a significant improvement over purely manual methods of recording shower development in nuclear emulsion stacks.

  2. An experimental study of a hybrid adaptive control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizewski, E. F.; Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    A Liapunov type model reference adaptive control system with five adjustable gains is implemented using a PDP-11 digital computer and an EAI 380 analog computer. The plant controlled is a laboratory type dc servo system. It is made to follow closely a second order linear model. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing this rather complex design using only a minicomputer and a reasonable number of operational amplifiers. Also, it points out that satisfactory performance can be achieved even when certain assumptions necessary for the theory are not satisfied.

  3. UNIX-based data management system for the Mobile Satellite Propagation Experiment (PiFEx)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kantak, Anil V.

    1987-01-01

    A new method is presented for handling data resulting from Mobile Satellite propagation experiments such as the Pilot Field Experiment (PiFEx) conducted by JPL. This method uses the UNIX operating system and C programming language. The data management system is implemented on a VAX minicomputer. The system automatically divides the large data file housing data from various experiments under a predetermined format into various individual files containing data from each experiment. The system also has a number of programs written in C and FORTRAN languages to allow the researcher to obtain meaningful quantities from the data at hand.

  4. Gait Analysis Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Complete motion analysis laboratory has evolved out of analyzing walking patterns of crippled children at Stanford Children's Hospital. Data is collected by placing tiny electrical sensors over muscle groups of child's legs and inserting step-sensing switches in soles of shoes. Miniature radio transmitters send signals to receiver for continuous recording of abnormal walking pattern. Engineers are working to apply space electronics miniaturization techniques to reduce size and weight of telemetry system further as well as striving to increase signal bandwidth so analysis can be performed faster and more accurately using a mini-computer.

  5. U. S. GEOLOGICAL SURVEY'S NATIONAL REAL-TIME HYDROLOGIC INFORMATION SYSTEM USING GOES SATELLITE TECHNOLOGY.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shope, William G., Jr.

    1987-01-01

    The U. S. Geological Survey maintains the basic hydrologic data collection system for the United States. The Survey is upgrading the collection system with electronic communications technologies that acquire, telemeter, process, and disseminate hydrologic data in near real-time. These technologies include satellite communications via the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite, Data Collection Platforms in operation at over 1400 Survey gaging stations, Direct-Readout Ground Stations at nine Survey District Offices and a network of powerful minicomputers that allows data to be processed and disseminate quickly.

  6. On a photon-counting array using the Fairchild CCD-201

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Currie, D. G.

    1975-01-01

    The evaluation of certain performance parameters of the Fairchild CCD 201 and the proposed method of operation of an electron bombarded charge coupled device are described. Work in progress on the evaluation of the parameters relevant to remote, low noise operation is reported. These tests have been conducted using light input. The video data from the CCD are amplified, digitized, stored in a minicomputer memory, and then recorded on magnetic tape for analyzing. The device will be used in an array of sensors in the aperture plane of a telescope to discriminate between photoelectron events, and in the focal plane operating at single photoelectron sensitivity at a minimum of blooming and lag.

  7. An integrated information support system for the factory floor of an ammunition manufacturing plant

    SciTech Connect

    Schroeder, J.O.; Badalamente, R.V.; Crow, V.L.

    1988-11-01

    An integrated information support system provides information processing and management on the factory floor of an ammunition manufacturing plant. The system is designed as a distributed network of minicomputers, process control computers and personal computer workstations that interactively update a complex relational database. The system controls and analyzes production,quality, and maintenance functions. Attention to human factors engineering during design has resulted in minimum training time and high user acceptance. The paper presents the system's life-cycle history and a critique of the implementation approach and system design. 3 refs., 4 figs.

  8. Data base management study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Data base management techniques and applicable equipment are described. Recommendations which will assist potential NASA data users in selecting and using appropriate data base management tools and techniques are presented. Classes of currently available data processing equipment ranging from basic terminals to large minicomputer systems were surveyed as they apply to the needs of potential SEASAT data users. Cost and capabilities projections for this equipment through 1985 were presented. A test of a typical data base management system was described, as well as the results of this test and recommendations to assist potential users in determining when such a system is appropriate for their needs. The representative system tested was UNIVAC's DMS 1100.

  9. A Satellite Frost Forecasting System for Florida

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martsolf, J. D.

    1981-01-01

    Since the first of two minicomputers that are the main components of the satellite frost forecast system was delivered in 1977, the system has evolved appreciably. A geostationary operational environmental satellite (GOES) system provides the satellite data. The freeze of January 12-14, 1981, was documented with increasing interest in potential of such systems. Satellite data is now acquired digitally rather than by redigitizing the GOES-Tap transmissions. Data acquisition is now automated, i.e., the computers are programmed to operate the system with little, if any, operation intervention.

  10. Networking of microcomputers in the radiology department.

    PubMed

    Markivee, C R

    1985-10-01

    A microcomputer may be installed in any of several areas in a radiology department or office to automate data processing. Such areas include the reception desk, the transcription office, the quality-control station, and remote or satellite radiography rooms. Independent microcomputers can be interconnected by networking, using small hardware and software packages and cables, to effect communication between them, afford access to a common data base, and share peripheral devices such as hard disks and printers. A network of microcomputers can perform many of the functions of a larger minicomputer system at lower cost and can be assembled in small modules as budgetary constraints allow. PMID:3876011

  11. Close to real life. [solving for transonic flow about lifting airfoils using supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Victor L.; Bailey, F. Ron

    1988-01-01

    NASA's Numerical Aerodynamic Simulation (NAS) facility for CFD modeling of highly complex aerodynamic flows employs as its basic hardware two Cray-2s, an ETA-10 Model Q, an Amdahl 5880 mainframe computer that furnishes both support processing and access to 300 Gbytes of disk storage, several minicomputers and superminicomputers, and a Thinking Machines 16,000-device 'connection machine' processor. NAS, which was the first supercomputer facility to standardize operating-system and communication software on all processors, has done important Space Shuttle aerodynamics simulations and will be critical to the configurational refinement of the National Aerospace Plane and its intergrated powerplant, which will involve complex, high temperature reactive gasdynamic computations.

  12. Applications of intelligent-measurement systems in controlled-fusion research

    SciTech Connect

    Owen, E.W.; Shimer, D.W.; Lindquist, W.B.; Peterson, R.L.; Wyman, R.H.

    1981-06-22

    The paper describes the control and instrumentation for the Mirror Fusion Test Facility at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, California, USA. This large-scale scientific experiment in controlled thermonuclear fusion, which is currently being expanded, originally had 3000 devices to control and 7000 sensors to monitor. A hierarchical computer control system, is used with nine minicomputers forming the supervisory system. There are approximately 55 local control and instrumentation microcomputers. In addition, each device has its own monitoring equipment, which in some cases consists of a small computer. After describing the overall system a more detailed account is given of the control and instrumentation for two large superconducting magnets.

  13. A real time data acquisition system using the MIL-STD-1553B bus. [for transmission of data to host computer for control law processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peri, Frank, Jr.

    1992-01-01

    A flight digital data acquisition system that uses the MIL-STD-1553B bus for transmission of data to a host computer for control law processing is described. The instrument, the Remote Interface Unit (RIU), can accommodate up to 16 input channels and eight output channels. The RIU employs a digital signal processor to perform local digital filtering before sending data to the host. The system allows flexible sensor and actuator data organization to facilitate quick control law computations on the host computer. The instrument can also run simple control laws autonomously without host intervention. The RIU and host computer together have replaced a similar larger, ground minicomputer system with favorable results.

  14. Feasibility study: Replacement of the inoperative decommutating buffer subsystem for the instrumentation checkout complex in the Quality and Reliability Assurance Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilliard, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    A general purpose computer system, that is necessary for replacement of the present inoperative signal decommutator special purpose computer subsystem is described. The present decommutator subsystem has a very poor history of reliability and since April 1970, it has become inoperative because the core memory cannot be repaired. Functions of the present signal, decommutator subsystem are to receive, demultiplex, record in real time, playback in real time, and output to the SDS-930 control computer for analysis of the telemetry data. Recommendations for replacement of the inoperative telemetry decommutator subsystem are for the purchase of a mini-computer.

  15. Problems in processing multizonal video information at specialized complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shamis, V. A.

    1979-01-01

    Architectural requirements of a minicomputer-based specialized complex for automated digital analysis of multizonal video data are examined. The logic structure of multizonal video data and the complex mathematical provision required for the analysis of such data are described. The composition of the specialized complex, its operating system, and the required set of peripheral devices are discussed. It is noted that although much of the analysis can be automated, the operator-computer dialog mode is essential for certain stages of the analysis.

  16. F100 Multivariable Control Synthesis Program. Computer Implementation of the F100 Multivariable Control Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Soeder, J. F.

    1983-01-01

    As turbofan engines become more complex, the development of controls necessitate the use of multivariable control techniques. A control developed for the F100-PW-100(3) turbofan engine by using linear quadratic regulator theory and other modern multivariable control synthesis techniques is described. The assembly language implementation of this control on an SEL 810B minicomputer is described. This implementation was then evaluated by using a real-time hybrid simulation of the engine. The control software was modified to run with a real engine. These modifications, in the form of sensor and actuator failure checks and control executive sequencing, are discussed. Finally recommendations for control software implementations are presented.

  17. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, Berthold W. [Livermore, CA; Willenborg, David L. [Livermore, CA

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern.

  18. Manipulator for rotating and examining small spheres

    DOEpatents

    Weinstein, B.W.; Willenborg, D.L.

    1980-02-12

    A manipulator is disclosed which provides fast, accurate rotational positioning of a small sphere, such as an inertial confinement fusion target, which allows inspecting of the entire surface of the sphere. The sphere is held between two flat, flexible tips which move equal amounts in opposite directions. This provides rolling of the ball about two orthogonal axes without any overall translation. The manipulator may be controlled, for example, by an x- and y-axis driven controlled by a mini-computer which can be programmed to generate any desired scan pattern. 8 figs.

  19. Distributed data base systems with special emphasis toward POREL

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuhold, E. J.

    1984-01-01

    In the last few years a number of research and advanced development projects have resulted in distributed data base management prototypes. POREL, developed at the University of Stuttgart, is a multiuser, distributed, relational system developed for wide and local area networks of minicomputers and advanced micros. The general objectives of such data base systems and the architecture of POREL are discussed. In addition a comparison of some of the the existing distributed DMBS is included to provide the reader with information about the current state of the art.

  20. Evaluation of initial collector field performance at the Langley Solar Building Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boyle, R. J.; Jensen, R. N.; Knoll, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    The thermal performance of the solar collector field for the NASA Langley Solar Building Test Facility is given for October 1976 through January 1977. A 1,180 square meter solar collector field with seven collector designs helped to provide hot water for the building heating system and absorption air conditioner. The collectors were arranged in 12 rows with nominally 51 collectors per row. Heat transfer rates for each row were calculated and recorded along with sensor, insolation, and weather data every five minutes using a minicomputer. The agreement between the experimental and predicted collector efficiencies was generally within five percentage points.

  1. Data acquisition and command system for use with a microprocessor-based control chassis. [PIGMI-Pion Generation for Medical Irradiations

    SciTech Connect

    Halbig, J.K.; Klosterbuer, S.F.; Martinez, V.A. Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The Pion Generation for Medical Irradiations (PIGMI) program at the Los Alamos Scientific Laboratory is developing the technology to build smaller, less expensive, and more reliable proton linear accelerators for medical applications, and has designed a powerful, simple, inexpensive, and reliable control and data acquisition system that is central to the program development. The system is a NOVA-3D minicomputer interfaced to several outlying microprocessor-based controllers, which accomplish control and data acquisition through data I/O chasis. The equipment interface chassis, which can issue binary commands, read binary data, issue analog commands, and read timed and untimed analog data is described.

  2. The development of an engineering computer graphics laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, D. C.; Garrett, R. E.

    1975-01-01

    Hardware and software systems developed to further research and education in interactive computer graphics were described, as well as several of the ongoing application-oriented projects, educational graphics programs, and graduate research projects. The software system consists of a FORTRAN 4 subroutine package, in conjunction with a PDP 11/40 minicomputer as the primary computation processor and the Imlac PDS-1 as an intelligent display processor. The package comprises a comprehensive set of graphics routines for dynamic, structured two-dimensional display manipulation, and numerous routines to handle a variety of input devices at the Imlac.

  3. Fatigue-Crack-Growth Computer Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Forman, Royce G.; Shivakumar, V.; Newman, James C., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Fatigue Crack Growth (NASA/FLAGRO) computer program developed as aid in predicting growth of preexisting flaws and cracks in structural components of space systems. Is enhanced version of FLAGRO4 and incorporates state-of-the-art improvements in both fracture mechanics and computer technology. Provides fracture-mechanics analyst with computerized method of evaluating "safe-crack-growth-life" capabilities of structural components. Also used to evaluate tolerance to damage of structure of given design. Designed modular to facilitate revisions and operation on minicomputers. Written in FORTRAN 77.

  4. Conveyor system moves material continuously

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1983-12-01

    German technology and equipment is used in mining operations worldwide. A PHB Wesserhutte system is being used with face shovel, mobile crusher, crawler-mounted transfer conveyor, and shiftable conveyor which results in crushing and transporting the minerals to the processing plant in a continuous flow path. The entire process is controlled by a programmable logic controller (a mini-computer) and all systems are sequentially interlocked according to the material flow path. Working methods using the mobile crusher and conveying systems are illustrated.

  5. Development and Implementation of Kumamoto Technopolis Regional Database T-KIND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onoue, Noriaki

    T-KIND (Techno-Kumamoto Information Network for Data-Base) is a system for effectively searching information of technology, human resources and industries which are necessary to realize Kumamoto Technopolis. It is composed of coded database, image database and LAN inside technoresearch park which is the center of R & D in the Technopolis. It constructs on-line system by networking general-purposed computers, minicomputers, optical disk file systems and so on, and provides the service through public telephone line. Two databases are now available on enterprise information and human resource information. The former covers about 4,000 enterprises, and the latter does about 2,000 persons.

  6. Remote sensing of wetlands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butera, M. K.

    1983-01-01

    Results are given for three separate investigations of remote sensing over wetlands, including the delineations of roseau cane and mangrove from both Landsat and aircraft MSS data, and the delineation of wetland communities for potential waste assimilation in a coastal river floodplain from Landsat MSS data only. Attention is also given to data processing and analysis techniques of varying levels of sophistication, which must increase with surface cover diversity. All computer processing in these studies was performed on a minicomputer configured with the adequate memory, image display capability, and associated peripherals, using state-of-the-art digital MSS data analysis software.

  7. Earth Resources Laboratory Applications Software (ELAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Balcerek, T. W.

    1981-01-01

    Implementation of the Earth Resources Laboratory applications software (ELAS) system is described. A Data General Eclipse model S/230 minicomputer is employed for image processing of LANDSAT data. A 16 bit word is used, and the smaller addressability necessitates reducing some of the array sizes. All INTEGER*4 variables were changed to REAL. Interfacing the ELAS software to Data General's FORTRAN callable runtime routines required rewriting the input/output routines and the subroutines that bring in the various overlays. Overlay relinking is required when a change is made in resident routines. The ELAS system and its user documentation is evaluated.

  8. A computer-controlled instrumentation system for third octave analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faulcon, N. D.; Monteith, J. H.

    1978-01-01

    An instrumentation system is described which employs a minicomputer, a one-third octave band analyzer, and a time code/tape search unit for the automatic control and analysis of third-octave data. With this system the information necessary for data adjustment is formatted in such a way as to eliminate much operator interface, thereby substantially reducing the probability for error. A description of a program for the calculation of effective perceived noise level from aircraft noise data is included as an example of how this system can be used.

  9. Clinical application of a light-pen computer system for quantitative angiography

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alderman, E. L.

    1975-01-01

    The paper describes an angiographic analysis system which uses a video disk for recording and playback, a light-pen for data input, minicomputer processing, and an electrostatic printer/plotter for hardcopy output. The method is applied to quantitative analysis of ventricular volumes, sequential ventriculography for assessment of physiologic and pharmacologic interventions, analysis of instantaneous time sequence of ventricular systolic and diastolic events, and quantitation of segmental abnormalities. The system is shown to provide the capability for computation of ventricular volumes and other measurements from operator-defined margins by greatly reducing the tedium and errors associated with manual planimetry.

  10. Man-machine analysis of translation and work tasks of Skylab films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hosler, W. W.; Boelter, J. G.; Morrow, J. R., Jr.; Jackson, J. T.

    1979-01-01

    An objective approach to determine the concurrent validity of computer-graphic models is real time film analysis. This technique was illustrated through the procedures and results obtained in an evaluation of translation of Skylab mission astronauts. The quantitative analysis was facilitated by the use of an electronic film analyzer, minicomputer, and specifically supportive software. The uses of this technique for human factors research are: (1) validation of theoretical operator models; (2) biokinetic analysis; (3) objective data evaluation; (4) dynamic anthropometry; (5) empirical time-line analysis; and (6) consideration of human variability. Computer assisted techniques for interface design and evaluation have the potential for improving the capability for human factors engineering.

  11. Distributed information system (water fact sheet)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Harbaugh, A.W.

    1986-01-01

    During 1982-85, the Water Resources Division (WRD) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) installed over 70 large minicomputers in offices across the country to support its mission in the science of hydrology. These computers are connected by a communications network that allows information to be shared among computers in each office. The computers and network together are known as the Distributed Information System (DIS). The computers are accessed through the use of more than 1500 terminals and minicomputers. The WRD has three fundamentally different needs for computing: data management; hydrologic analysis; and administration. Data management accounts for 50% of the computational workload of WRD because hydrologic data are collected in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and the Pacific trust territories. Hydrologic analysis consists of 40% of the computational workload of WRD. Cost accounting, payroll, personnel records, and planning for WRD programs occupies an estimated 10% of the computer workload. The DIS communications network is shown on a map. (Lantz-PTT)

  12. LaRC local area networks to support distributed computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riddle, E. P.

    1984-01-01

    The Langley Research Center's (LaRC) Local Area Network (LAN) effort is discussed. LaRC initiated the development of a LAN to support a growing distributed computing environment at the Center. The purpose of the network is to provide an improved capability (over inteactive and RJE terminal access) for sharing multivendor computer resources. Specifically, the network will provide a data highway for the transfer of files between mainframe computers, minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers. An important influence on the overall network design was the vital need of LaRC researchers to efficiently utilize the large CDC mainframe computers in the central scientific computing facility. Although there was a steady migration from a centralized to a distributed computing environment at LaRC in recent years, the work load on the central resources increased. Major emphasis in the network design was on communication with the central resources within the distributed environment. The network to be implemented will allow researchers to utilize the central resources, distributed minicomputers, work stations, and personal computers to obtain the proper level of computing power to efficiently perform their jobs.

  13. Prescriptive concepts for advanced nuclear materials control and accountability systems

    SciTech Connect

    Whitty, W.J.; Strittmatter, R.B.; Ford, W.; Tisinger, R.M.; Meyer, T.H.

    1987-06-01

    Networking- and distributed-processing hardware and software have the potential of greatly enhancing nuclear materials control and accountability (MC and A) systems, from both safeguards and process operations perspectives, while allowing timely integrated safeguards activities and enhanced computer security at reasonable cost. A hierarchical distributed system is proposed consisting of groups of terminal and instruments in plant production and support areas connected to microprocessors that are connected to either larger microprocessors or minicomputers. These micros and/or minis are connected to a main machine, which might be either a mainframe or a super minicomputer. Data acquisition, preliminary input data validation, and transaction processing occur at the lowest level. Transaction buffering, resource sharing, and selected data processing occur at the intermediate level. The host computer maintains overall control of the data base and provides routine safeguards and security reporting and special safeguards analyses. The research described outlines the distribution of MC and A system requirements in the hierarchical system and distributed processing applied to MC and A. Implications of integrated safeguards and computer security concepts for the distributed system design are discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  14. Data Processing and Analysis Systems for JT-60U

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuda, T.; Totsuka, T.; Tsugita, T.; Oshima, T.; Sakata, S.; Sato, M.; Iwasaki, K.

    2002-09-15

    The JT-60U data processing system is a large computer complex gradually modernized by utilizing progressive computer and network technology. A main computer using state-of-the-art CMOS technology can handle {approx}550 MB of data per discharge. A gigabit ethernet switch with FDDI ports has been introduced to cope with the increase of handling data. Workstation systems with VMEbus serial highway drivers for CAMAC have been developed and used to replace many minicomputer systems. VMEbus-based fast data acquisition systems have also been developed to enlarge and replace a minicomputer system for mass data.The JT-60U data analysis system is composed of a JT-60U database server and a JT-60U analysis server, which are distributed UNIX servers. The experimental database is stored in the 1TB RAID disk of the JT-60U database server and is composed of ZENKEI and diagnostic databases. Various data analysis tools are available on the JT-60U analysis server. For the remote collaboration, technical features of the data analysis system have been applied to the computer system to access JT-60U data via the Internet. Remote participation in JT-60U experiments has been successfully conducted since 1996.

  15. Digital system for structural dynamics simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krauter, A. I.; Lagace, L. J.; Wojnar, M. K.; Glor, C.

    1982-01-01

    State-of-the-art digital hardware and software for the simulation of complex structural dynamic interactions, such as those which occur in rotating structures (engine systems). System were incorporated in a designed to use an array of processors in which the computation for each physical subelement or functional subsystem would be assigned to a single specific processor in the simulator. These node processors are microprogrammed bit-slice microcomputers which function autonomously and can communicate with each other and a central control minicomputer over parallel digital lines. Inter-processor nearest neighbor communications busses pass the constants which represent physical constraints and boundary conditions. The node processors are connected to the six nearest neighbor node processors to simulate the actual physical interface of real substructures. Computer generated finite element mesh and force models can be developed with the aid of the central control minicomputer. The control computer also oversees the animation of a graphics display system, disk-based mass storage along with the individual processing elements.

  16. Technology innovation and management in the US Bureau of the Census: Discussion and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.; Edwards, R.; Goeltz, R.; Hake, K.

    1990-09-01

    This report contains a set of recommendations prepared by Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for the US Bureau of the Census pertaining to technology innovation and management. Technology has the potential to benefit the Bureau's data collection, capture, processing, and analysis activities. The entire Bureau was represented from Decennial Census to Economic Programs and various levels of Bureau management and numerous experts in technology. Throughout the Bureau, workstations, minicomputers, and microcomputers have found their place along side the Bureau's mainframes. The Bureau's new computer file structure called the Topologically Integrated Geographic Encoding and Referencing data base (TIGER) represents a major innovation in geographic information systems and impressive progress has been made with Computer Assisted Telephone Interviewing (CATI). Other innovations, such as SPRING, which aims to provide Bureau demographic analysts with the capability of interactive data analysis on minicomputers, are in the initial stages of development. Recommendations fall into five independent, but mutually beneficial categories. (1) The ADP Steering Committee be disbanded and replaced with The Technology Forum. (2) Establishment of a Technology Review Committee (TRC), to be composed of technology experts from outside the Bureau. (3) Designate technological gurus. These individuals will be the Bureau's experts in new and innovative technologies. (4) Adopt a technology innovation process. (5) Establish an Advanced Technology Studies Staff (ATSS) to promote technology transfer, obtain funding for technological innovation, manage innovation projects unable to find a home in other divisions, evaluate innovations that cut across Bureau organizational boundaries, and provide input into Bureau technology analyses. (JF)

  17. Refractive index and absorption detector for liquid chromatography based on Fabry-Perot interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, E.S.; Woodruff, S.D.

    1984-06-19

    A refractive index and absorption detector are disclosed for liquid chromatography. It is based in part on a Fabry-Perot interferometer and is used for the improved detection of refractive index and absorption. It includes a Fabry-Perot interferometer having a normally fixed first partially reflecting mirror and a movable second partially reflecting mirror. A chromatographic flow-cell is positioned between the mirrors along the optical axis of a monochromatic laser beam passing through the interferometer. A means for deriving information about the interference fringes coming out of the interferometer is used with a mini-computer to compute the refractive index of the specimen injected into the flow cell. The minicomputer continuously scans the interferometer for continuous refractive index readings and outputs the continuous results of the scans on a chart recorder. The absorption of the specimen can concurrently be scanned by including a second optical path for an excitation laser which will not interfere with the first laser, but will affect the specimen so that absorption properties can be detected. By first scanning for the refractive index of the specimen, and then immediately adding the excitation laser and subsequently scanning for the refractive index again, the absorption of the specimen can be computed and recorded. 10 figs.

  18. Refractive index and absorption detector for liquid chromatography based on Fabry-Perot interferometry

    DOEpatents

    Yeung, Edward S.; Woodruff, Steven D.

    1984-06-19

    A refractive index and absorption detector for liquid chromatography. It is based in part on a Fabry-Perot interferometer and is used for the improved detection of refractive index and absorption. It includes a Fabry-Perot interferometer having a normally fixed first partially reflecting mirror and a movable second partially reflecting mirror. A chromatographic flow-cell is positioned between the mirrors along the optical axis of a monochromatic laser beam passing through the interferometer. A means for deriving information about the interference fringes coming out of the interferometer is used with a mini-computer to compute the refractive index of the specimen injected into the flow cell. The minicomputer continuously scans the interferometer for continuous refractive index readings and outputs the continuous results of the scans on a chart recorder. The absorption of the specimen can concurrently be scanned by including a second optical path for an excitation laser which will not interfere with the first laser, but will affect the specimen so that absorption properties can be detected. By first scanning for the refractive index of the specimen, and then immediately adding the excitation laser and subsequently scanning for the refractive index again, the absorption of the specimen can be computed and recorded.

  19. Coordination and establishment of centralized facilities and services for the University of Alaska ERTS survey of the Alaskan environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belon, A. E. (Principal Investigator)

    1972-01-01

    The author has identified the following significant results. Specifications have been prepared for the engineering design and construction of a digital color display unit which will be used for automatic processing of ERTS data. The color display unit is a disk refresh memory with computer interfaced input and a color cathode ray tube output display. The system features both analog and digital post disk data manipulation and a versatile color coding device suitable for displaying not only images, but also computer generated graphics such as diagrams, maps, and overlays. Input is from IBM compatible 9 track, 800 BPI tapes, as generated by an IBM 360 computer. ERTS digital tapes are read into the 360, where various analyses such as maximum likelihood classification are performed and the results are written on a magnetic tape which is the input to the color display unit. The greatest versatility in the data manipulation area is provided by the minicomputer built into the color display unit, which is off-line from the main 360 computer. The minicomputer is able to read any line from the refresh disk and place it in its 4K-16 bit memory. Considerable flexibility is available for post-processing enhancement of images by the investigator.

  20. A multiprocessor airborne lidar data system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, C. W.; Bailey, S. A.; Heath, G. E.; Piazza, C. R.

    A new multiprocessor data acquisition system was developed for the existing Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). This implementation simultaneously utilizes five single board 68010 microcomputers, the UNIX system V operating system, and the real time executive VRTX. The original data acquisition system was implemented on a Hewlett Packard HP 21-MX 16 bit minicomputer using a multi-tasking real time operating system and a mixture of assembly and FORTRAN languages. The present collection of data sources produce data at widely varied rates and require varied amounts of burdensome real time processing and formatting. It was decided to replace the aging HP 21-MX minicomputer with a multiprocessor system. A new and flexible recording format was devised and implemented to accommodate the constantly changing sensor configuration. A central feature of this data system is the minimization of non-remote sensing bus traffic. Therefore, it is highly desirable that each micro be capable of functioning as much as possible on-card or via private peripherals. The bus is used primarily for the transfer of remote sensing data to or from the buffer queue.

  1. A multiprocessor airborne lidar data system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wright, C. W.; Bailey, S. A.; Heath, G. E.; Piazza, C. R.

    1988-01-01

    A new multiprocessor data acquisition system was developed for the existing Airborne Oceanographic Lidar (AOL). This implementation simultaneously utilizes five single board 68010 microcomputers, the UNIX system V operating system, and the real time executive VRTX. The original data acquisition system was implemented on a Hewlett Packard HP 21-MX 16 bit minicomputer using a multi-tasking real time operating system and a mixture of assembly and FORTRAN languages. The present collection of data sources produce data at widely varied rates and require varied amounts of burdensome real time processing and formatting. It was decided to replace the aging HP 21-MX minicomputer with a multiprocessor system. A new and flexible recording format was devised and implemented to accommodate the constantly changing sensor configuration. A central feature of this data system is the minimization of non-remote sensing bus traffic. Therefore, it is highly desirable that each micro be capable of functioning as much as possible on-card or via private peripherals. The bus is used primarily for the transfer of remote sensing data to or from the buffer queue.

  2. VLSI research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodersen, R. W.

    1984-04-01

    A scaled version of the RISC II chip has been fabricated and tested and these new chips have a cycle time that would outperform a VAX 11/780 by about a factor of two on compiled integer C programs. The architectural work on a RISC chip designed for a Smalltalk implementation has been completed. This chip, called SOAR (Smalltalk On a RISC), should run program s4-15 times faster than the Xerox 1100 (Dolphin), a TTL minicomputer, and about as fast as the Xerox 1132 (Dorado), a $100,000 ECL minicomputer. The 1983 VLSI tools tape has been converted for use under the latest UNIX release (4.2). The Magic (formerly called Caddy) layout system will be a unified set of highly automated tools that cover all aspects of the layout process, including stretching, compaction, tiling and routing. A multiple window package and design rule checker for this system have just been completed and compaction and stretching are partially implemented. New slope-based timing models for the Crystal timing analyzer are now fully implemented and in regular use. In an accuracy test using a dozen critical paths from the RISC II processor and cache chips it was found that Crystal's estimates were within 5-10% of SPICE's estimates, while being a factor of 10,000 times faster.

  3. The Evolution of a Computerized Medical Information System

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, W. Ed; Stead, W. W.

    1986-01-01

    This paper presents the eighteen year history leading to the development of a computerized medical information system and discusses the factors which influenced its philosophy, design and implementation. This system, now called TMR, began as a single-user, tape-oriented minicomputer package and now exists as a multi-user, multi-database, multi-computer system capable of supporting a full range of users in both the inpatient and outpatient settings. The paper discusses why we did what we did, what worked, and what didn't work. Current projects are emphasized including networking and the integration of inpatient and outpatient functions into a single system. A theme of the paper is how hardware and software technological advancements, increasing sophistication of our users, our increasing experience, and just plain luck contributed to the success of TMR.

  4. Industrial Applications Of Optical Shaft Encoders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edmister, Brian W.

    1980-11-01

    The development of the microprocessor and mini-computer for industrial process control has made the optical shaft angle encoder a natural choice for a position feedback transducer. Many of these applications, however, require the encoder to operate reliably in extremely hostile environments. In response to this, the encoder manufacturer has been faced with reliability problems which fall into the following general categories: 1. Exposure to weather 2. Wide operating and storage temperature range 3. Exposure to corrosive chemicals 4. Severe shock and vibration 5. High electrical noise levels 6. Severe blows to encoder housing 7. Operation in explosive atmospheres Three of these applications expose the encoder to most of these environmental conditions: 1. A jack-up control position feedback for an offshore oil well drilling rig 2. A depth measurement system for oil well logging instrumentation 3. Elevation and azimuth feedback for a solar power plant heliostat

  5. CAMAPPLE: CAMAC interface to the Apple computer

    SciTech Connect

    Oxoby, G.J.; Trang, Q.H.; Williams, S.H.

    1981-04-01

    The advent of the personal microcomputer provides a new tool for the debugging, calibration and monitoring of small scale physics apparatus, e.g., a single detector being developed for a larger physics apparatus. With an appropriate interface these microcomputer systems provide a low cost (1/3 the cost of a comparable minicomputer system), convenient, dedicated, portable system which can be used in a fashion similar to that of portable oscilloscopes. Here, an interface between the Apple computer and CAMAC which is now being used to study the detector for a Cerenkov ring-imaging device is described. The Apple is particularly well-suited to this application because of its ease of use, hi-resolution graphics, peripheral bus and documentation support.

  6. Automation of production of semiconductor power devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kyuts, R. V.; Toomsoo, G. K.

    1984-10-01

    An informational consultative automatic system for control of technological processes is being developed. Then automatic control systems for groups of technological processes are being developed, essentially with a computer base. Its accounting functions include tracking of parts, statistical analysis of product lots, inspection and correction for excessive reject rate. Its control functions include adaptive simulation of technological processes, with stabilization and correction, and predicting characteristics. The software consists of general and special programs. The hardware consists of modular computers with expanded memory on three magnetic disks and four magnetic tapes, workshop terminals with teletypes, and testers. The data processing part consists of minicomputer with peripheral equipment. The testing part includes means of transporting as well as heating and cooling the test samples, and inserting them into the test circuit adequate electrical contact.

  7. Computer systems for automatic earthquake detection

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stewart, S.W.

    1974-01-01

    U.S Geological Survey seismologists in Menlo park, California, are utilizing the speed, reliability, and efficiency of minicomputers to monitor seismograph stations and to automatically detect earthquakes. An earthquake detection computer system, believed to be the only one of its kind in operation, automatically reports about 90 percent of all local earthquakes recorded by a network of over 100 central California seismograph stations. The system also monitors the stations for signs of malfunction or abnormal operation. Before the automatic system was put in operation, all of the earthquakes recorded had to be detected by manually searching the records, a time-consuming process. With the automatic detection system, the stations are efficiently monitored continuously. 

  8. Design and implementation of a medium speed communications interface and protocol for a low cost, refreshed display computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phyne, J. R.; Nelson, M. D.

    1975-01-01

    The design and implementation of hardware and software systems involved in using a 40,000 bit/second communication line as the connecting link between an IMLAC PDS 1-D display computer and a Univac 1108 computer system were described. The IMLAC consists of two independent processors sharing a common memory. The display processor generates the deflection and beam control currents as it interprets a program contained in the memory; the minicomputer has a general instruction set and is responsible for starting and stopping the display processor and for communicating with the outside world through the keyboard, teletype, light pen, and communication line. The processing time associated with each data byte was minimized by designing the input and output processes as finite state machines which automatically sequence from each state to the next. Several tests of the communication link and the IMLAC software were made using a special low capacity computer grade cable between the IMLAC and the Univac.

  9. The experimental results of a self tuning adaptive controller using online frequency identification. [for Galileo spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, W.-W.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A fourth-order laboratory dynamic system featuring very low structural damping and a noncolocated actuator-sensor pair has been used to test a novel real-time adaptive controller, implemented in a minicomputer, which consists of a state estimator, a set of state feedback gains, and a frequency-locked loop for real-time parameter identification. The adaptation algorithm employed can correct controller error and stabilize the system for more than 50 percent variation in the plant's natural frequency, compared with a 10 percent stability margin in frequency variation for a fixed gain controller having the same performance as the nominal plant condition. The very rapid convergence achievable by this adaptive system is demonstrated experimentally, and proven with simple, root-locus methods.

  10. A Scanning laser-velocimeter technique for measuring two-dimensional wake-vortex velocity distributions. [Langley Vortex Research Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gartrell, L. R.; Rhodes, D. B.

    1980-01-01

    A rapid scanning two dimensional laser velocimeter (LV) has been used to measure simultaneously the vortex vertical and axial velocity distributions in the Langley Vortex Research Facility. This system utilized a two dimensional Bragg cell for removing flow direction ambiguity by translating the optical frequency for each velocity component, which was separated by band-pass filters. A rotational scan mechanism provided an incremental rapid scan to compensate for the large displacement of the vortex with time. The data were processed with a digital counter and an on-line minicomputer. Vaporized kerosene (0.5 micron to 5 micron particle sizes) was used for flow visualization and LV scattering centers. The overall measured mean-velocity uncertainity is less than 2 percent. These measurements were obtained from ensemble averaging of individual realizations.

  11. Alsep data processing: How we processed Apollo Lunar Seismic Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Latham, G. V.; Nakamura, Y.; Dorman, H. J.

    1979-01-01

    The Apollo lunar seismic station network gathered data continuously at a rate of 3 x 10 to the 8th power bits per day for nearly eight years until the termination in September, 1977. The data were processed and analyzed using a PDP-15 minicomputer. On the average, 1500 long-period seismic events were detected yearly. Automatic event detection and identification schemes proved unsuccessful because of occasional high noise levels and, above all, the risk of overlooking unusual natural events. The processing procedures finally settled on consist of first plotting all the data on a compressed time scale, visually picking events from the plots, transferring event data to separate sets of tapes and performing detailed analyses using the latter. Many problems remain especially for automatically processing extraterrestrial seismic signals.

  12. How we processed Apollo lunar seismic data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Latham, G. V.; Dorman, H. J.

    1980-01-01

    The Apollo lunar seismic station network gathered data continuously at a rate of 3 x 10 to the 8th bits per day for nearly eight years until termination in September, 1977. The data were processed and analyzed using a PDP-15 minicomputer. On average, 1500 long-period seismic events were detected yearly. Automatic event detection and identification schemes proved unsuccessful because of occasional high noise levels and, above all, the risk of overlooking unusual natural events. The processing procedures which were finally chosen consist of plotting all the data on a compressed time scale, visually picking events from the plots, transferring event data to separate sets of tapes and performing detailed analyses using the latter. Many problems remain, especially in the automatic processing of extraterrestrial seismic signals.

  13. Computerized data acquisition and analysis for measuring thermal diffusivity. [in thermoelectric space applications materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chmielewski, A.; Wood, C.; Vandersande, J.

    1985-01-01

    JPL has been leading a concentrated effort to develop improved thermoelectric materials for space applications. Thermoelectric generators are an attractive source of electrical energy for space power because of lack of moving parts and slow degradation of performance. Thermoelectric material is characterized by: Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity and thermal conductivity. To measure the high temperature thermal conductivity is experimentally very difficult. However, it can be calculated from the specific heat and thermal diffusivity which are easier to measure at high temperatures, especially using the flash method. Data acquisition and analysis for this experiment were automated at JPL using inexpensive microcomputer equipment. This approach is superior to tedious and less accurate manual analysis of data. It is also preferred to previously developed systems utilizing expensive minicomputers or mainframes.

  14. Survey: Automated Field Operations and Services (AFOS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    The National Weather Service (NWS) is currently implementing a program for improving operations through automation of routine functions, improved communications capability, and improved management and presentation of data. The program, designated as Automation of Field Operations and Services (AFOS), uses high-speed data circuits, minicomputers, and dynamic display devices to rapidly collect, disseminate, and present data to forecasters and users on both a broadcast and a request basis. The initial system will be configured to serve facilities within the continental United States, Alaska, Hawaii, and Puerto Rico, with eventual expansion to provide international capability. This report discusses AFOS users, functions, and network and site configurations. The sections discuss current and future capability and workload in terms of the 10 data systems elements designated by NASA.

  15. High resolution Michelson interferometer for airborne infrared astronomical observations. 1: Concept and performance.

    PubMed

    Baluteau, J P; Anderegg, M; Moorwood, A F; Coron, N; Beckman, J E; Bussoletti, E; Hippelein, H H

    1977-07-01

    A Michelson interferometer has been built for use with the 91-cm telescope on NASA's Gerard P. Kuiper Airborne Observatory primarily to measure ir line emission from H 11 regions. Operation is in the rapid scan mode, and the achievable resolution is 0.02 cm(-1) in the wavelength range from 10 micro to around 300 micro. A minicomputer is used to provide on-line spectrum displays and to control and monitor the instrument performance. The design and use of the instrument is discussed, and a comparison is made between the theoretical performance and that actually achieved on the first flights when measurements of line emission from the Orion nebula and from the atmosphere were made. PMID:20168819

  16. Supervisory control and diagnostics system for the mirror fusion test facility: overview and status 1980

    SciTech Connect

    McGoldrick, P.R.

    1981-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF) is a complex facility requiring a highly-computerized Supervisory Control and Diagnostics System (SCDS) to monitor and provide control over ten subsystems; three of which require true process control. SCDS will provide physicists with a method of studying machine and plasma behavior by acquiring and processing up to four megabytes of plasma diagnostic information every five minutes. A high degree of availability and throughput is provided by a distributed computer system (nine 32-bit minicomputers on shared memory). Data, distributed across SCDS, is managed by a high-bandwidth Distributed Database Management System. The MFTF operators' control room consoles use color television monitors with touch sensitive screens; this is a totally new approach. The method of handling deviations to normal machine operation and how the operator should be notified and assisted in the resolution of problems has been studied and a system designed.

  17. NDE of simulated Space Shuttle tile disbonds

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahlberg, L.; Tittmann, B. R.; Elsley, R. K.

    1982-01-01

    A technique which involves the use of ultrasonic Lamb waves for assaying the structural integrity of adhesive bonds between layered materials on thin metal plates, particularly with regard to the Shuttle TPS, is presented. The Lamb waves are generated by a pulse impact, resulting in surface waves propagating radially at 2.4 mm/microsec. Trials were performed with the sound waves applied to samples, of aluminum similar to the Orbiter external skin, which were coated with Teflon and a RTV silicone screed. The goal was to detect localized debonded areas or potentially debonded areas, which, during reentry, could result in blistering of the aluminum skin. The ultrasonic probes are described, noting the usage of broadband ultrasonic harmonics and a minicomputer processor. The testing system was found to accurately identify weakened bonds by the ratio of high and low frequency component areas of the received signal of the Lamb waves sent across the surface.

  18. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System, Phase 1. Volume 2: Diagnostic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegler, F. J.; Christenson, D.; Gordon, M.; Kistler, R.; Lampert, S.; Marshall, R.; Mclaughlin, R.

    1974-01-01

    The MIDAS System is a third-generation, fast, multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from present and projected sensors. A principal objective of the MIDAS Program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turn-around time and significant gains in throughout. The hardware and software generated in Phase I of the over-all program are described. The system contains a mini-computer to control the various high-speed processing elements in the data path and a classifier which implements an all-digital prototype multivariate-Gaussian maximum likelihood decision algorithm operating 2 x 105 pixels/sec. Sufficient hardware was developed to perform signature extraction from computer-compatible tapes, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, and diagnose operation. Diagnostic programs used to test MIDAS' operations are presented.

  19. Multiprocessing computer system for sensory evoked potentials and EEG spectral analysis for clinical neurophysiology laboratory.

    PubMed

    Steben, J D; Streletz, L J; Fariello, R G

    1985-12-01

    A general-purpose minicomputer has been adapted and interfaced for the averaging and analysis of clinical evoked potentials and for compressed spectral arrays (CSA) of the routine EEG. In the first 2 years of operation, over 1,000 routine clinical studies of visual evoked potentials (VEP) and brainstem auditory evoked potentials (BAEP) have been performed with it, as well as over 100 CSAs and a variety of special and research studies. The CSA modality gives comparative frequency-domain pictures of left and right hemisphere power. An attached graphics terminal gives a live cumulative display of the EP and CSA. In addition, the system has automated and comprehensive physician-interactive graphics analysis and report generation capabilities. The reports are finalized versions used in the patient's chart, minimizing clerical efforts. PMID:3841553

  20. Data reduction programs for a laser radar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badavi, F. F.; Copeland, G. E.

    1984-01-01

    The listing and description of software routines which were used to analyze the analog data obtained from LIDAR - system are given. All routines are written in FORTRAN - IV on a HP - 1000/F minicomputer which serves as the heart of the data acquisition system for the LIDAR program. This particular system has 128 kilobytes of highspeed memory and is equipped with a Vector Instruction Set (VIS) firmware package, which is used in all the routines, to handle quick execution of different long loops. The system handles floating point arithmetic in hardware in order to enhance the speed of execution. This computer is a 2177 C/F series version of HP - 1000 RTE-IVB data acquisition computer system which is designed for real time data capture/analysis and disk/tape mass storage environment.

  1. Landsat electron beam recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grosso, P. F.; Whitley, J. P.

    A minicomputer-controlled electron beam recorder (EBR) presently in use at the Brazilian Government's Institute De Pesquisas Espaclais (INPE) satellite ground station is described. This 5-in.-film-size EBR is used to record both Landsat and SPOT satellite imagery in South America. A brief electron beam recorder technology review is presented. The EBR is capable of recording both vector and text data from computer-aided design, publishing, and line art systems and raster data from image scanners, raster image processors (RIPS), halftone/screen generators, and remote image sensors. A variety of image formats may be recorded on numerous film sizes (16 mm, 35 mm, 70 mm, 105 mm, 5-in, 5.5-in., and 9.5-in.). These recordings are used directly or optically enlarged depending on the final product.

  2. Study in molecular lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, G.; Kutz, H. D.; Cohen, L. K.; Billard, T. C.

    1984-10-01

    A sensitive LIF system was constructed, using a Nd:YAG plus dye laser. The signal was accumulated and analyzed by employing a Tektronix R7912 transient Digitizer and a PDP-11 minicomputer. Reactivity of HF (v=5) was studied. Using the same equipment, a time-delayed photoemission from a trialkali photosensitive semiconductor was observed and results are now being examined. Using 3-D trajectory calculations a new computational observable, the relative nonequilibrium distribution (RNED) function at the steady state was determined for the Br + Ar reaction at 3500K. It is characterized by one adjustable parameter equal to 12, while the transition state theory prescribes that it should be infinitely large. RNED will be used to test and refine modern theories of reaction kinetics.

  3. A multichannel PWM telemetry system for kinematic gait analysis.

    PubMed

    Harris, G F; Jeutter, D C; Bergner, B C; Matesi, D V; Pelc, N J

    1987-12-01

    A multichannel biotelemetry system using pulse-width modulation-frequency modulation (PWM-FM) is described in detail for laboratory construction. Its application in a kinematic gait-analysis system is demonstrated, employing minimally encumbering electrogoniometry and foot-contact switches. The triaxial electrogoniometers sense rotational joint motion, and four foot-switches under the sole of each foot provide information on placement and temporal contact. Signals from the multiple sensors are amplified, encoded by pulse-width modulation, and transmitted at an FM radio frequency of 107 MHz. Received data are decoded and then sampled by a minicomputer for analysis. Results from a comparative study of kinematic gait in five normal subjects and five children with cerebral palsy demonstrate system effectiveness in providing quantitative data and various intrasubject and intersubject gait differences. Factors reviewed in the analysis include swing and stance times; cadence; hip-joint motion in sagittal, coronal, and transverse planes; and sequence of foot placement. PMID:3431495

  4. Composite structural materials. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansell, G. S.; Loewy, R. G.; Wiberley, S. E.

    1980-01-01

    The use of filamentary composite materials in the design and construction of primary aircraft structures is considered with emphasis on efforts to develop advanced technology in the areas of physical properties, structural concepts and analysis, manufacturing, and reliability and life prediction. The redesign of a main spar/rib region on the Boeing 727 elevator near its actuator attachment point is discussed. A composite fabrication and test facility is described as well as the use of minicomputers for computer aided design. Other topics covered include (1) advanced structural analysis methids for composites; (2) ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite structures; (3) optimum combination of hardeners in the cure of epoxy; (4) fatigue in composite materials; (5) resin matrix characterization and properties; (6) postbuckling analysis of curved laminate composite panels; and (7) acoustic emission testing of composite tensile specimens.

  5. A Computer System for Processing Tumor Registry Data

    PubMed Central

    Leahey, Charles F.

    1981-01-01

    An interactive computer system for processing tumor registry data has been developed by the Washington, D.C. VA Medical Center Systems Development Group. The automated registry system replaces a manual registry, which had been implemented according to the guidelines established for Cancer Programs by the American College of Surgeons. A permanent on-line data base of patient data is maintained by a minicomputer at the medical center. A user oriented application program provides entry, edit, and retrieval of patient data in the following formats - Suspense, Master, Accession, and Follow-up registers, and in Abstract form. Data entered in any of the formats is stored in a common file, and is available as needed in any other format. The programs were written in the standard Mumps Language. Construction of the Tumor Registry application was greatly assisted by use of the File Manager, a data base file management package written in the standard Mumps language.

  6. Laboratory data manipulation tools basic data handling programs. Volume 2: Detailed software/hardware documentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1981-01-01

    The set of computer programs described allows for data definition, data input, and data transfer between the LSI-11 microcomputers and the VAX-11/780 minicomputer. Program VAXCOM allows for a simple method of textual file transfer from the LSI to the VAX. Program LSICOM allows for easy file transfer from the VAX to the LSI. Program TTY changes the LSI-11 operators console to the LSI's printing device. Program DICTIN provides a means for defining a data set for input to either computer. Program DATAIN is a simple to operate data entry program which is capable of building data files on either machine. Program LEDITV is an extremely powerful, easy to use, line oriented text editor. Program COPYSBF is designed to print out textual files on the line printer without character loss from FORTRAN carriage control or wide record transfer.

  7. Acquisition of quantitative physiological data and computerized image reconstruction using a single scan TV system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1976-01-01

    A single-scan radiography system has been interfaced to a minicomputer, and the combined system has been used with a variety of fluoroscopic systems and image intensifiers available in clinical facilities. The system's response range is analyzed, and several applications are described. These include determination of the gray scale for typical X-ray-fluoroscopic-television chains, measurement of gallstone volume in patients, localization of markers or other small anatomical features, determinations of organ areas and volumes, computer reconstruction of tomographic sections of organs in motion, and computer reconstruction of transverse axial body sections from fluoroscopic images. It is concluded that this type of system combined with a minimum of statistical processing shows excellent capabilities for delineating small changes in differential X-ray attenuation.

  8. Elemental composition of two cumulate rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Naeem, A.; Almohandis, A.A.

    1983-04-01

    Two cumulate rock samples K-185, K-250 from the Kapalagulu intrusion, W. Tanzania, were analyzed using X-ray fluorescence (XRF), wet chemical and neutron activation analysis (NAA) techniques. Major element oxides were determined by XRF and wet chemical methods, while the concentration of trace elements were measured by NAA, using high resolution Ge(Li) detector, minicomputer-based data acquisition system and off-line computer. The percentage of major oxides and sixteen trace elements have been reported. It has been found that Cr, Ni, and Co are highly concentrated in K-250 while Sc, and most of the major elements are more concentrated in K-185. The variation of major and trace elements in these two samples have been discussed.

  9. The Israeli National Medical Library's new minicomputerized on-line integrated system (MAIMON).

    PubMed

    Avriel, D; Miller, R; Fuchs, C

    1981-04-01

    An in-house library system based on a dedicated mini-computer has been in operation in the Israel National Medical Library since the summer of 1979. The integrated system, called MAIMON, features on-line access to bibliographic and circulation records. It replaces manual procedures in cataloging, searching, lending, and reservations. The system provides previously unavailable statistics on items in heavy use and demand, items to be removed from the active collection, and who uses what in the library. It is designed to be user cordial and to save users' time. The system has been very favorably accepted by patrons, and frees professional librarians from time-consuming clerical routine tasks. The system is evaluated in terms of performance, convenience, and cost. PMID:6784799

  10. Real time quality control of meteorological data used in SRP's emergency response system

    SciTech Connect

    Pendergast, M.M.

    1980-05-01

    The Savannah River Laboratory's WIND minicomputer system allows quick and accurate assessment of an accidental release at the Savannah River Plant using data from eight meteorological towers. The accuracy of the assessment is largely determined by the accuracy of the meteorological data; therefore quality control is important in an emergency response system. Real-time quality control of this data will be added to the WIND system to automatically identify inaccurate data. Currently, the system averages the measurements from the towers to minimize the influence of inaccurate data being used in calculations. The computer code used in the real-time quality control has been previously used to identify inaccurate measurements from the archived tower data.

  11. Investigation of creep by use of closed loop servo-hydraulic test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, H. C.; Yao, J. C.

    1981-01-01

    Creep tests were conducted by means of a closed loop servo-controlled materials test system. These tests are different from the conventional creep tests in that the strain history prior to creep may be carefully monitored. Tests were performed for aluminum alloy 6061-0 at 150 C and monitored by a PDP 11/04 minicomputer at a preset constant plastic-strain rate prehistory. The results show that the plastic-strain rate prior to creep plays a significant role in creep behavior. The endochronic theory of viscoplasticity was applied to describe the observed creep curves. The concepts of intrinsic time and strain rate sensitivity function are employed and modified according to the present observation.

  12. The spatial and logical organization of devices in an advanced industrial robot system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruoff, C. F.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the geometrical and device organization of a robot system which is based in part upon transformations of Cartesian frames and exchangeable device tree structures. It discusses coordinate frame transformations, geometrical device representation and solution degeneracy along with the data structures which support the exchangeable logical-physical device assignments. The system, which has been implemented in a minicomputer, supports vision, force, and other sensors. It allows tasks to be instantiated with logically equivalent devices and it allows tasks to be defined relative to appropriate frames. Since these frames are, in turn, defined relative other frames this organization provides a significant simplification in task specification and a high degree of system modularity.

  13. The experimental computer control of a two-dimensional hyperbolic system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yam, Y.; Lang, J. H.; Staelin, D. H.; Johnson, T. L.

    1985-01-01

    The experimental computer control of a two-dimensional hyperbolic system is described. The system consists of a 5-foot gold-coated rubber membrane mounted on a circular cylindrical drum. Seven electrodes reside on a command surface located behind the membrane inside the drum. These electrodes served as capacitive sensors and electrostatic force actuators of transverse membrane deflection. The membrane was modelled as flat, isotropic and uniformly tensioned. Transverse membrane deflections were expanded in normal modes. Controllers regulating membrane deflection are designed using aggregation and design procedures based upon sensor and actuator influence functions. The resulting control laws are implemented on a minicomputer in two sets of experiments. The experimental study confirms the theoretically predicted behavior of the system, usefulness of the aggregation and design procedures, and the expectation that spillover can be made a beneficial source of damping in residual systems.

  14. Diagnosis of alcoholic cirrhosis with the right-to-left hepatic lobe ratio: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Shreiner, D.P.; Barlai-Kovach, M.

    1981-02-01

    Since scans of cirrhotic livers commonly show a reduction in size and colloid uptake of the right lobe, a quantitative measure of uptake was made using a minicomputer to determine total counts in regions of interest defined over each lobe. Right-to-left ratios were then compared in 103 patients. For normal paitents the mean ratio +- 1 s.d. was 2.85 +- 0.65, and the mean for patients with known cirrhosis was 1.08 +- 0.33. Patients with other liver diseases had ratios similar to the normal group. The normal range of the right-to-left lobe ratio was 1.55 to 4.15. The sensitivity of the ratio for alcoholic cirrhosis was 85.7% and the specificity was 100% in this patient population. The right-to-left lobe ratio was more sensitive and specific for alcoholic cirrhosis than any other criterion tested. An hypothesis is described to explain these results.

  15. Development of a multiplane multispeed balancing system for turbine systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, M. R.

    1984-01-01

    A prototype high speed balancing system was developed for assembled gas turbine engine modules. The system permits fully assembled gas turbine modules to be operated and balanced at selected speeds up to full turbine speed. The balancing system is a complete stand-alone system providing all necesary lubrication and support hardware for full speed operation. A variable speed motor provides the drive power. A drive belt and gearbox provide rotational speeds up to 21,000 rpm inside a vacuum chamber. The heart of the system is a dedicated minicomputer with attendant data acquisition, storage and I/O devices. The computer is programmed to be completely interactive with the operator. The system was installed at CCAD and evaluated by testing 20 T55 power turbines and 20 T53 power turbines. Engine test results verified the performance of the high speed balanced turbines.

  16. Remote sensing information sciences research group: Browse in the EOS era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, John E.; Star, Jeffrey L.

    1989-01-01

    The problem of science data browse was examined. Given the tremendous data volumes that are planned for future space missions, particularly the Earth Observing System in the late 1990's, the need for access to large spatial databases must be understood. Work was continued to refine the concept of data browse. Further, software was developed to provide a testbed of the concepts, both to locate possibly interesting data, as well as view a small portion of the data. Build II was placed on a minicomputer and a PC in the laboratory, and provided accounts for use in the testbed. Consideration of the testbed software as an element of in-house data management plans was begun.

  17. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, W.H.

    1984-05-08

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N/sub 2/), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135/sup 0/C, or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135/sup 0/C as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N/sub 2/, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  18. Oxygen analyzer

    DOEpatents

    Benner, William H.

    1986-01-01

    An oxygen analyzer which identifies and classifies microgram quantities of oxygen in ambient particulate matter and for quantitating organic oxygen in solvent extracts of ambient particulate matter. A sample is pyrolyzed in oxygen-free nitrogen gas (N.sub.2), and the resulting oxygen quantitatively converted to carbon monoxide (CO) by contact with hot granular carbon (C). Two analysis modes are made possible: (1) rapid determination of total pyrolyzable oxygen obtained by decomposing the sample at 1135.degree. C., or (2) temperature-programmed oxygen thermal analysis obtained by heating the sample from room temperature to 1135.degree. C. as a function of time. The analyzer basically comprises a pyrolysis tube containing a bed of granular carbon under N.sub.2, ovens used to heat the carbon and/or decompose the sample, and a non-dispersive infrared CO detector coupled to a mini-computer to quantitate oxygen in the decomposition products and control oven heating.

  19. Using CLIPS in a distributed system: The Network Control Center (NCC) expert system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wannemacher, Tom

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes an intelligent troubleshooting system for the Help Desk domain. It was developed on an IBM-compatible 80286 PC using Microsoft C and CLIPS and an AT&T 3B2 minicomputer using the UNIFY database and a combination of shell script, C programs and SQL queries. The two computers are linked by a lan. The functions of this system are to help non-technical NCC personnel handle trouble calls, to keep a log of problem calls with complete, concise information, and to keep a historical database of problems. The database helps identify hardware and software problem areas and provides a source of new rules for the troubleshooting knowledge base.

  20. Correction factors for on-line microprobe analysis of multielement alloy systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Unnam, J.; Tenney, D. R.; Brewer, W. D.

    1977-01-01

    An on-line correction technique was developed for the conversion of electron probe X-ray intensities into concentrations of emitting elements. This technique consisted of off-line calculation and representation of binary interaction data which were read into an on-line minicomputer to calculate variable correction coefficients. These coefficients were used to correct the X-ray data without significantly increasing computer core requirements. The binary interaction data were obtained by running Colby's MAGIC 4 program in the reverse mode. The data for each binary interaction were represented by polynomial coefficients obtained by least-squares fitting a third-order polynomial. Polynomial coefficients were generated for most of the common binary interactions at different accelerating potentials and are included. Results are presented for the analyses of several alloy standards to demonstrate the applicability of this correction procedure.

  1. AI tools in computer based problem solving

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beane, Arthur J.

    1988-01-01

    The use of computers to solve value oriented, deterministic, algorithmic problems, has evolved a structured life cycle model of the software process. The symbolic processing techniques used, primarily in research, for solving nondeterministic problems, and those for which an algorithmic solution is unknown, have evolved a different model, much less structured. Traditionally, the two approaches have been used completely independently. With the advent of low cost, high performance 32 bit workstations executing identical software with large minicomputers and mainframes, it became possible to begin to merge both models into a single extended model of computer problem solving. The implementation of such an extended model on a VAX family of micro/mini/mainframe systems is described. Examples in both development and deployment of applications involving a blending of AI and traditional techniques are given.

  2. Debugging embedded computer programs. [tactical missile computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kemp, G. H.

    1980-01-01

    Every embedded computer program must complete its debugging cycle using some system that will allow real time debugging. Many of the common items addressed during debugging are listed. Seven approaches to debugging are analyzed to evaluate how well they treat those items. Cost evaluations are also included in the comparison. The results indicate that the best collection of capabilities to cover the common items present in the debugging task occurs in the approach where a minicomputer handles the environment simulation with an emulation of some kind representing the embedded computer. This approach can be taken at a reasonable cost. The case study chosen is an embedded computer in a tactical missile. Several choices of computer for the environment simulation are discussed as well as different approaches to the embedded emulator.

  3. Berkeley automated supernova search

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.; Pennypacker, C.R.; Muller, R.A.; Mast, T.S.; Crawford, F.S.; Burns, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    The Berkeley automated supernova search employs a computer controlled 36-inch telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to image 2500 galaxies per night. A dedicated minicomputer compares each galaxy image with stored reference data to identify supernovae in real time. The threshold for detection is m/sub v/ = 18.8. We plan to monitor roughly 500 galaxies in Virgo and closer every night, and an additional 6000 galaxies out to 70 Mpc on a three night cycle. This should yield very early detection of several supernovae per year for detailed study, and reliable premaximum detection of roughly 100 supernovae per year for statistical studies. The search should be operational in mid-1982.

  4. Instrumentation for controlling and monitoring environmental control and life support systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, P. Y.; Gyorki, J. R.; Wynveen, R. A.

    1978-01-01

    Advanced Instrumentation concepts for improving performance of manned spacecraft Environmental Control and Life Support Systems (EC/LSS) have been developed at Life Systems, Inc. The difference in specific EC/LSS instrumentation requirements and hardware during the transition from exploratory development to flight production stages are discussed. Details of prior control and monitor instrumentation designs are reviewed and an advanced design presented. The latter features a minicomputer-based approach having the flexibility to meet process hardware test programs and the capability to be refined to include the control dynamics and fault diagnostics needed in future flight systems where long duration, reliable operation requires in-flight hardware maintenance. The emphasis is on lower EC/LSS hardware life cycle costs by simplicity in instrumentation and using it to save crew time during flight operation.

  5. The Lockheed alternate partial polarizer universal filter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.

    1976-01-01

    A tunable birefringent filter using an alternate partial polarizer design has been built. The filter has a transmission of 38% in polarized light. Its full width at half maximum is .09A at 5500A. It is tunable from 4500 to 8500A by means of stepping motor actuated rotating half wave plates and polarizers. Wave length commands and thermal compensation commands are generated by a PPD 11/10 minicomputer. The alternate partial polarizer universal filter is compared with the universal birefringent filter and the design techniques, construction methods, and filter performance are discussed in some detail. Based on the experience of this filter some conclusions regarding the future of birefringent filters are elaborated.

  6. Wind tunnel evaluation of air-foil performance using simulated ice shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bragg, M. B.; Zaguli, R. J.; Gregorek, G. M.

    1982-01-01

    A two-phase wind tunnel test was conducted in the 6 by 9 foot Icing Research Tunnel (IRT) at NASA Lewis Research Center to evaluate the effect of ice on the performance of a full scale general aviation wing. In the first IRT tests, rime and glaze shapes were carefully documented as functions of angle of attack and free stream conditions. Next, simulated ice shapes were constructed for two rime and two glaze shapes and used in the second IRT tunnel entry. The ice shapes and the clean airfoil were tapped to obtain surface pressures and a probe used to measure the wake characteristics. These data were recorded and processed, on-line, with a minicomputer/digital data acquisition system. The effect of both rime and glaze ice on the pressure distribution, Cl, Cd, and Cm are presented.

  7. Scheduler software for tracking and data relay satellite system loading analysis: User manual and programmer guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Craft, R.; Dunn, C.; Mccord, J.; Simeone, L.

    1980-01-01

    A user guide and programmer documentation is provided for a system of PRIME 400 minicomputer programs. The system was designed to support loading analyses on the Tracking Data Relay Satellite System (TDRSS). The system is a scheduler for various types of data relays (including tape recorder dumps and real time relays) from orbiting payloads to the TDRSS. Several model options are available to statistically generate data relay requirements. TDRSS time lines (representing resources available for scheduling) and payload/TDRSS acquisition and loss of sight time lines are input to the scheduler from disk. Tabulated output from the interactive system includes a summary of the scheduler activities over time intervals specified by the user and overall summary of scheduler input and output information. A history file, which records every event generated by the scheduler, is written to disk to allow further scheduling on remaining resources and to provide data for graphic displays or additional statistical analysis.

  8. Cryogenic system for a superconducting spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, J.

    1983-03-01

    The Heavy Ion Spectrometer System (HISS) relies upon superconducting coils of cryostable, pool boiling design to provide a maximum particle bending field of 3 tesla. This paper describes the cryogenic facility including helium refrigeration, gas management, liquid nitrogen system, and the overall control strategy. The system normally operates with a 4 K heat load of 150 watts; the LN/sub 2/ circuits absorb an additional 4000 watts. 80K intercept control is by an LSI 11 computer. Total available refrigeration at 4K is 400 watts using reciprocating expanders at the 20K and 4K level. The minicomputer has the capability of optimizing overall utility input cost by varying operating points. A hybrid of pneumatic, analog, and digital control is successful in providing full time unattended operation. The 7m diameter magnet/cryostat assembly is rotatable through 180 degrees to provide a variety of spectrometer orientations.

  9. Binary chromatographic data and estimation of adsorbent porosities. [data for system n-heptane/n-pentane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meisch, A. J.

    1972-01-01

    Data for the system n-pentane/n-heptane on porous Chromosorb-102 adsorbent were obtained at 150, 175, and 200 C for mixtures containing zero to 100% n-pentane by weight. Prior results showing limitations on superposition of pure component data to predict multicomponent chromatograms were verified. The thermodynamic parameter MR0 was found to be a linear function of sample composition. A nonporous adsorbent failed to separate the system because of large input sample dispersions. A proposed automated data processing scheme involving magnetic tape recording of the detector signals and processing by a minicomputer was rejected because of resolution limitations of the available a/d converters. Preliminary data on porosity and pore size distributions of the adsorbents were obtained.

  10. MIDAS, prototype Multivariate Interactive Digital Analysis System, phase 1. Volume 1: System description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegler, F. J.

    1974-01-01

    The MIDAS System is described as a third-generation fast multispectral recognition system able to keep pace with the large quantity and high rates of data acquisition from present and projected sensors. A principal objective of the MIDAS program is to provide a system well interfaced with the human operator and thus to obtain large overall reductions in turnaround time and significant gains in throughput. The hardware and software are described. The system contains a mini-computer to control the various high-speed processing elements in the data path, and a classifier which implements an all-digital prototype multivariate-Gaussian maximum likelihood decision algorithm operating at 200,000 pixels/sec. Sufficient hardware was developed to perform signature extraction from computer-compatible tapes, compute classifier coefficients, control the classifier operation, and diagnose operation.

  11. TMAP4 User`s Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Jones, J.L.; Merrill, B.J.

    1992-06-12

    The Tritium Migration Analysis Program, Version 4 (TMAP4) has been developed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a safety analysis code, mainly to analyze tritium retention and loss in fusion reactor structures and systems during normal operation and accident conditions. TMAP4 incorporates one-dimensional thermal- and mass-diffusive transport and trapping calculations through structures and zero dimensional fluid transport between enclosures and across the interface between enclosures and structures. A key feature is the ability to input problem definition parameters as constants, interpolation tables, or FORTRAN equations. The code is specifically intended for use under a DOS operating system on PC-type mini-computers, but it has also been run successfully on workstations and mainframe computer systems. Use of the equation-input feature requires access to a FORTRAN-77 compiler and a linker program.

  12. TMAP4 User's Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Longhurst, G.R.; Holland, D.F.; Jones, J.L.; Merrill, B.J.

    1992-06-12

    The Tritium Migration Analysis Program, Version 4 (TMAP4) has been developed by the Fusion Safety Program at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) as a safety analysis code, mainly to analyze tritium retention and loss in fusion reactor structures and systems during normal operation and accident conditions. TMAP4 incorporates one-dimensional thermal- and mass-diffusive transport and trapping calculations through structures and zero dimensional fluid transport between enclosures and across the interface between enclosures and structures. A key feature is the ability to input problem definition parameters as constants, interpolation tables, or FORTRAN equations. The code is specifically intended for use under a DOS operating system on PC-type mini-computers, but it has also been run successfully on workstations and mainframe computer systems. Use of the equation-input feature requires access to a FORTRAN-77 compiler and a linker program.

  13. FINDS: A fault inferring nonlinear detection system. User's guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancraft, R. E.; Caglayan, A. K.

    1983-01-01

    The computer program FINDS is written in FORTRAN-77, and is intended for operation on a VAX 11-780 or 11-750 super minicomputer, using the VMS operating system. The program detects, isolates, and compensates for failures in navigation aid instruments and onboard flight control and navigation sensors of a Terminal Configured Vehicle aircraft in a Microwave Landing System environment. In addition, FINDS provides sensor fault tolerant estimates for the aircraft states which are then used by an automatic guidance and control system to land the aircraft along a prescribed path. FINDS monitors for failures by evaluating all sensor outputs simultaneously using the nonlinear analytic relationships between the various sensor outputs arising from the aircraft point mass equations of motion. Hence, FINDS is an integrated sensor failure detection and isolation system.

  14. A report on the ST ScI optical disk workstation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The STScI optical disk project was designed to explore the options, opportunities and problems presented by the optical disk technology, and to see if optical disks are a viable, and inexpensive, means of storing the large amount of data which are found in astronomical digital imagery. A separate workstation was purchased on which the development can be done and serves as an astronomical image processing computer, incorporating the optical disks into the solution of standard image processing tasks. It is indicated that small workstations can be powerful tools for image processing, and that astronomical image processing may be more conveniently and cost-effectively performed on microcomputers than on the mainframe and super-minicomputers. The optical disks provide unique capabilities in data storage.

  15. Computer graphics application in the engineering design integration system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glatt, C. R.; Abel, R. W.; Hirsch, G. N.; Alford, G. E.; Colquitt, W. N.; Stewart, W. A.

    1975-01-01

    The computer graphics aspect of the Engineering Design Integration (EDIN) system and its application to design problems were discussed. Three basic types of computer graphics may be used with the EDIN system for the evaluation of aerospace vehicles preliminary designs: offline graphics systems using vellum-inking or photographic processes, online graphics systems characterized by direct coupled low cost storage tube terminals with limited interactive capabilities, and a minicomputer based refresh terminal offering highly interactive capabilities. The offline line systems are characterized by high quality (resolution better than 0.254 mm) and slow turnaround (one to four days). The online systems are characterized by low cost, instant visualization of the computer results, slow line speed (300 BAUD), poor hard copy, and the early limitations on vector graphic input capabilities. The recent acquisition of the Adage 330 Graphic Display system has greatly enhanced the potential for interactive computer aided design.

  16. Evaluation of a computer aided X-ray fluorographic system. Part 2: Image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burch, S. F.; Cocking, S. J.

    1981-12-01

    The TV imagery from a computer aided X-ray fluorographic system has been digitally processed with an I2S model 70E image processor, controlled by a PDP 11/60 minicomputer. The image processor allowed valuable processing for detection of defects in cast components to be carried out at television frame rates. Summation of TV frames was used to reduce noise, and hence improve the thickness sensitivity of the system. A displaced differencing technique and interactive contrast enhancement were then used to improve the reliability of inspection by removing spurious blemishes and interferences lines, while simultaneously enhancing the visibility of real defects. The times required for these operations are given, and the benefits provided for X-ray fluorography are illustrated by the results from inspection of aero engine castings.

  17. Vibration in Planetary Gear Systems with Unequal Planet Stiffnesses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frater, J. L.; August, R.; Oswald, F. B.

    1982-01-01

    An algorithm suitable for a minicomputer was developed for finding the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a planetary gear system which has unequal stiffnesses between the Sun/planet and planet/ring gear meshes. Mode shapes are represented in the form of graphical computer output that illustrates the lateral and rotational motion of the three coaxial gears and the planet gears. This procedure permits the analysis of gear trains utilizing nonuniform mesh conditions and user specified masses, stiffnesses, and boundary conditions. Numerical integration of the equations of motion for planetary gear systems indicates that this algorithm offers an efficient means of predicting operating speeds which may result in high dynamic tooth loads.

  18. Telemetry Computer System at Wallops Flight Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, H.; Strock, J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper describes the Telemetry Computer System in operation at NASA's Wallops Flight Center for real-time or off-line processing, storage, and display of telemetry data from rockets and aircraft. The system accepts one or two PCM data streams and one FM multiplex, converting each type of data into computer format and merging time-of-day information. A data compressor merges the active streams, and removes redundant data if desired. Dual minicomputers process data for display, while storing information on computer tape for further processing. Real-time displays are located at the station, at the rocket launch control center, and in the aircraft control tower. The system is set up and run by standard telemetry software under control of engineers and technicians. Expansion capability is built into the system to take care of possible future requirements.

  19. Laboratory procedures used in the hot corrosion project

    SciTech Connect

    Jeys, T.R.

    1980-04-08

    The objective of the Hot Corrosion Project in the LLNL Metals and Ceramics Division is to study the physical and chemical mechanisms of corrosion of nickel, iron, and some of their alloys when these metals are subjected to oxidizing or sulfidizing environments at temperatures between 850 and 950/sup 0/C. To obtain meaningful data in this study, we must rigidly control many parameters. Parameters are discussed and the methods chosen to control them in this laboratory. Some of the mechanics and manipulative procedures that are specifically related to data access and repeatability are covered. The method of recording and processing the data from each experiment using an LS-11 minicomputer are described. The analytical procedures used to evaluate the specimens after the corrosion tests are enumerated and discussed.

  20. Automation software for a materials testing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive software system for automating much of the experimental process has recently been completed at the Lewis Research Center's high-temperature fatigue and structures laboratory. The system was designed to support experiment definition and conduct, results analysis and archiving, and report generation activities. This was accomplished through the design and construction of several software systems, as well as through the use of several commercially available software products, all operating on a local, distributed minicomputer system. Experimental capabilities currently supported in an automated fashion include both isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue and deformation testing capabilities. The future growth and expansion of this system will be directed toward providing multiaxial test control, enhanced thermomechanical test control, and higher test frequency (hundreds of hertz).

  1. Modern control techniques for accelerators

    SciTech Connect

    Goodwin, R.W.; Shea, M.F.

    1984-05-01

    Beginning in the mid to late sixties, most new accelerators were designed to include computer based control systems. Although each installation differed in detail, the technology of the sixties and early to mid seventies dictated an architecture that was essentially the same for the control systems of that era. A mini-computer was connected to the hardware and to a console. Two developments have changed the architecture of modern systems: (a) the microprocessor and (b) local area networks. This paper discusses these two developments and demonstrates their impact on control system design and implementation by way of describing a possible architecture for any size of accelerator. Both hardware and software aspects are included.

  2. Consistency versus Completeness in Medical Decision Making: Exemplar of 155 Patients Autopsied after Coronary Artery Bypass Graft Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Moore, G. William; Hutchins, Grover M.

    1982-01-01

    Diagnoses made at autopsy are usually yes-no (binary) decisions inferred from clinicopathologic data. A major conceptual problem in determining cause of death is that variables used in classifying some patients may be missing in other patients. A model with too few logical implications will be mathematically incomplete for small data sets; but a model too many implications may be inconsistent with large data sets. We examined the 155 patients autopsied after coronary artery bypass surgery from The Johns Hopkins Hospital autopsy database of 43200 cases. Diagnoses entered on a word processor and transmitted to a minicomputer were solved by the Quine-McCluskey algorithm. Our analysis disclosed that 41% of patients suffered a fatal complication of cardiac surgery; 43% had established surgical complications or unrelated causes of death; and in 17% of cases the cause of death was unexplained. Computerized symbolic logic analysis of medical information is useful in testing the completeness of a proposed set of causes of death.

  3. Who Wants to Be Moses? Information Leadership in the 1980s

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Colonel T. F.

    1982-01-01

    The technology of computer systems and the need for their effective use poses a series of significant problems in the health care delivery environment. There is a profusion of hardware, significant decreases in cost coupled with more significant increases in capability, a need for adequate application and support software, and a dire shortage of programmers. The onslaught of microcomputers and stand-alone minicomputer systems pose a serious challenge to the development of cohesive, coordinated and interfaced institution wide systems. The differences in approach between word processing and data processing systems and the obvious need for their future compatibility sets up an arena for turf competition that has serious potential consequences. A blurring of the distinction between voice and data communication systems further complicates the situation. These problems, along with the competition with industry for data processing professionals, present a formidable challenge for leadership. This paper discusses this challenge and how it can be met.

  4. An on-line method for the acquisition of medical information for computer processing as applied to radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Möller, T R; Gustafsson, T

    1977-06-01

    Based on a structured medical record, specially designed for patients with malignant disease, an on-line data capture system has been developed. This enables the collection of virtually any type of information contained in the patient's case notes. The structure of the record is described, with actual examples. The record is typed on a typewriter terminal linked to a mini-computer. Data is recorded as code + heading + value string. The headings are identified automatically, and an internal code generated, describing the type of information. Record keeping according to the principles described was introduced in clinical routine at the department in 1971. Data collection was implemented later that year, using an off-line magnetic tape encoder (IBM MT72). The system has been developed further and converted to a versatile on-line system. The data base, collected with these systems, now contains data on about 20,000 patients. PMID:862391

  5. CCD image data acquisition system for optical astronomy.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhat, P. N.; Patnaik, K.; Kembhavi, A. K.; Patnaik, A. R.; Prabhu, T. P.

    1990-11-01

    A complete image processing system based on a charge coupled device (CCD) has been developed at TIFR, Bombay, for use in optical astronomy. The system consists of a P-8600/B GEC CCD chip, a CCD controller, a VAX 11/725 mini-computer to carry out the image acquisition and display on a VS-11 monitor. All the necessary software and part of the hardware were developed locally, integrated together and installed at the Vainu Bappu Observatory at Kavalur. CCD as an imaging device and its advantages over the conventional photographic plate is briefly reviewed. The acquisition system is described in detail. The preliminary results are presented and the future research programme is outlined.

  6. Cost effective development of a Shuttle-based astronomical instrument control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parise, R. A.; Blum, A.; Budney, T. J.; Stone, R. W.

    1982-01-01

    The high level language FORTH is used for the electronic control of the Space Shuttle-based Ultraviolet Imaging Telescope, in a flight computer system which minimizes costs. The greater part of the breadboard version of the flight computer is assembled from commercially available components, reducing novel circuit design features and permitting simultaneous development of both hardware and software. The commercial boards are then refabricated on aluminum core heat conducting stock, using high reliability parts to produce the flight versions of the system. The system's ground support equipment employs a MINC-25 minicomputer which performs such functions as flight computer software development, PROM programming, test and integration support, and flight operations support. The implementation of these concepts in flight computer telescope controls is described.

  7. Advances in systems for interactive processing and display of meteorological data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hasler, A. F.

    1983-01-01

    Advances in systems for interactive processing and display of meteorological data are reviewed, with particular attention given to developments in hardware and software, meteorological data base, analysis and display, and systems availability. These developments include inexpensive minicomputers which give the user almost instantaneous results for many types of jobs; image terminals with the capability to enhance, quantify, animate, and compare image and graphical data; accessibility of a large meteorological data base and the capability of merging different types of data; and sophisticated analysis and multidimensional display techniques. Critical problems still to be solved include getting quick access to historical and real time data bases from any system and making it easy to transport software from one system to another.

  8. University of Missouri-Rolla cloud simulation facility - Proto II chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Daniel R.; Carstens, John C.; Hagen, Donald E.; Schmitt, John L.; Kassner, James L.

    1987-01-01

    The design and supporting systems for the cooled-wall expansion cloud chamber, designated Proto II, are described. The chamber is a 10-sided vertical cylinder designed to be operated with interior wall temperatures between +40 and -40 C, and is to be utilized to study microphysical processes active in atmospheric clouds and fogs. Temperatures are measured using transistor thermometers which have a range of + or - 50 C and a resolution of about + or - 0.001 C; and pressures are measured in the chamber by a differential strain gauge pressure transducer. The methods used for temperature and pressure control are discussed. Consideration is given to the chamber windows, optical table, photographic/video, optical attenuation, Mie scattering, and the scanning system for the chamber. The system's minicomputer and humidifier, sample preparation, and chamber flushing are examined.

  9. A statistical data analysis and plotting program for cloud microphysics experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, A. J.

    1981-01-01

    The analysis software developed for atmospheric cloud microphysics experiments conducted in the laboratory as well as aboard a KC-135 aircraft is described. A group of four programs was developed and implemented on a Hewlett Packard 1000 series F minicomputer running under HP's RTE-IVB operating system. The programs control and read data from a MEMODYNE Model 3765-8BV cassette recorder, format the data on the Hewlett Packard disk subsystem, and generate statistical data (mean, variance, standard deviation) and voltage and engineering unit plots on a user selected plotting device. The programs are written in HP FORTRAN IV and HP ASSEMBLY Language with the graphics software using the HP 1000 Graphics. The supported plotting devices are the HP 2647A graphics terminal, the HP 9872B four color pen plotter, and the HP 2608A matrix line printer.

  10. Selecting a labor information system. What to ask, what to avoid.

    PubMed

    Garcia, L

    1990-12-01

    Payroll expenses may account for over half of all of a hospital's expenses. Manual time card processing requires an abundance of staff time and can often result in costly errors. To alleviate this problem, many healthcare facilities are implementing computerized labor information systems. To minimize the risk of selecting the wrong system, hospital administrators should ask the following questions before committing to any computerized labor information system: Is the software designed for hospital use and easily adaptable to each hospital's unique policies? How flexible is the software's reporting system? Does it include automatic scheduling that creates generic schedules? Does the system have the capability of securing time and attendance records and documenting the audit trail? Does the system include an accurate and reliable badge reader? What type of hardware is best for the particular hospital--microcomputer, minicomputer, or mainframe? Finally, to guarantee successful software installation, the vendor should have extensive experience and documentation in the system's implementation. PMID:10108009

  11. Culvert analysis program for indirect measurement of discharge

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fulford, Janice M.

    1993-01-01

    A program based on the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) methods for indirectly computing peak discharges through culverts allows users to employ input data formats used by the water surface profile program (WSPRO). The program can be used to compute discharge rating surfaces or curves that describe the behavior of flow through a particular culvert or to compute discharges from measurements of upstream of the gradually varied flow equations and has been adapted slightly to provide solutions that minimize the need for the user to determine between different flow regimes. The program source is written in Fortran 77 and has been run on mini-computers and personal computers. The program does not use or require graphics capability, a color monitor, or a mouse.

  12. Evolution and Integration of Medical Laboratory Information System in an Asia National Medical Center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Po-Hsun; Chen, Sao-Jie; Lai, Jin-Shin

    This work elucidates the evolution of three generations of the laboratory information system in the National Taiwan University Hospital, which were respectively implemented in an IBM Series/1 mini-computer, a client/server and a plug-and-play HL7 interface engine environment respectively. The experience of using the HL7 healthcare information exchange in the hospital information system, laboratory information system, and automatic medical instruments over the past two decades are illustrated and discussed. The latest design challenge in developing intelligent laboratory information services is to organize effectively distributed and heterogeneous medical instruments through the message gateways. Such experiences had spread to some governmental information systems for different purposes in Taiwan; besides, the healthcare information exchange standard, software reuse mechanism, and application service provider adopted in developing the plug-and-play laboratory information system are also illustrated.

  13. A high pressure, high temperature combustor and turbine-cooling test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cochran, R. P.; Norris, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    A new test facility is being constructed for developing turbine-cooling and combustor technology for future generation aircraft gas turbine engines. Prototype engine hardware will be investigated in this new facility at gas stream conditions up to 2480 K average turbine inlet temperature and 4.14 x 10 to the 6th power n sq m turbine inlet pressure. The facility will have the unique feature of fully automated control and data acquisition through the use of an integrated system of mini-computers and programmable controllers which will result in more effective use of operating time, will limit the number of operators required, and will provide built in self protection safety systems. The facility and the planning and design considerations are described.

  14. Implementation of the DYMAC system at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility. Phase II report

    SciTech Connect

    Malanify, J.J.; Amsden, D.C.

    1982-08-01

    The DYnamic Materials ACcountability System - called DYMAC - performs accountability functions at the new Los Alamos Plutonium Processing Facility where it began operation when the facility opened in January 1978. A demonstration program, DYMAC was designed to collect and assess inventory information for safeguards purposes. It accomplishes 75% of its design goals. DYMAC collects information about the physical inventory through deployment of nondestructive assay instrumentation and video terminals throughout the facility. The information resides in a minicomputer where it can be immediately sorted and displayed on the video terminals or produced in printed form. Although the capability now exists to assess the collected data, this portion of the program is not yet implemented. DYMAC in its present form is an excellent tool for process and quality control. The facility operator relies on it exclusively for keeping track of the inventory and for complying with accountability requirements of the US Department of Energy.

  15. Flexible missile autopilot design studies with PC-MATLAB/386

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruth, Michael J.

    1989-01-01

    Development of a responsive, high-bandwidth missile autopilot for airframes which have structural modes of unusually low frequency presents a challenging design task. Such systems are viable candidates for modern, state-space control design methods. The PC-MATLAB interactive software package provides an environment well-suited to the development of candidate linear control laws for flexible missile autopilots. The strengths of MATLAB include: (1) exceptionally high speed (MATLAB's version for 80386-based PC's offers benchmarks approaching minicomputer and mainframe performance); (2) ability to handle large design models of several hundred degrees of freedom, if necessary; and (3) broad extensibility through user-defined functions. To characterize MATLAB capabilities, a simplified design example is presented. This involves interactive definition of an observer-based state-space compensator for a flexible missile autopilot design task. MATLAB capabilities and limitations, in the context of this design task, are then summarized.

  16. Proposed technology and procurement policy for SNAP III. Final report, April-September 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Schneidewind, N.F.

    1986-10-01

    The purpose of this report is to suggest ideas for the technology and procurement policy that would be appropriate for SNAP III in the next decade. Both technology and procurement policy are considered because it would be difficult to implement some of the technology proposed in this report without a change in procurement policy. The report describes the recommended architecture of SNAP III and the software acquisitions and procurements policies to support the architecture. Major recommendations are: Transition from minicomputer to microcomputer system; Transition to proven commercial office system; Use local area network technology; Acquire mass storage capability; Acquire improved graphics capability; Consider automating ship -- shore communications, and start to develop a procurement policy to support the acquisition of the above technology.

  17. Digital resolver for helicopter model blade motion analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniels, T. S.; Berry, J. D.; Park, S.

    1992-01-01

    The paper reports the development and initial testing of a digital resolver to replace existing analog signal processing instrumentation. Radiometers, mounted directly on one of the fully articulated blades, are electrically connected through a slip ring to analog signal processing circuitry. The measured signals are periodic with azimuth angle and are resolved into harmonic components, with 0 deg over the tail. The periodic nature of the helicopter blade motion restricts the frequency content of each flapping and yaw signal to the fundamental and harmonics of the rotor rotational frequency. A minicomputer is employed to collect these data and then plot them graphically in real time. With this and other information generated by the instrumentation, a helicopter test pilot can then adjust the helicopter model's controls to achieve the desired aerodynamic test conditions.

  18. Speech as a pilot input medium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plummer, R. P.; Coler, C. R.

    1977-01-01

    The speech recognition system under development is a trainable pattern classifier based on a maximum-likelihood technique. An adjustable uncertainty threshold allows the rejection of borderline cases for which the probability of misclassification is high. The syntax of the command language spoken may be used as an aid to recognition, and the system adapts to changes in pronunciation if feedback from the user is available. Words must be separated by .25 second gaps. The system runs in real time on a mini-computer (PDP 11/10) and was tested on 120,000 speech samples from 10- and 100-word vocabularies. The results of these tests were 99.9% correct recognition for a vocabulary consisting of the ten digits, and 99.6% recognition for a 100-word vocabulary of flight commands, with a 5% rejection rate in each case. With no rejection, the recognition accuracies for the same vocabularies were 99.5% and 98.6% respectively.

  19. Reconstruction Of Anatomical Shapes From Moire Contourographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saunders, Carl G.

    1983-07-01

    A Moire system which rotates an object in front of a slit camera has been used to obtain continuous photographic maps around amputee socket and shoe last shapes. Previous analysis methods required the use of IBM 370 hardware and extensive software overhead. Using a systematic manual digitizing technique and user-interactive FORTRAN software, the shape reconstruction has been easily performed on a PDP-11 minicomputer system. Both the digitizing technique and the software are oriented towards the shape reproduction process. Numerically controlled machining parameters are used to identify a "skewed" grid of required points along the cutter path. Linear interpolation and anti-interference techniques resulted in reproduction of shoe lasts to within 0.05 inches (1.2 millimeters) from the sensing axis. Difficulties were experienced in obtaining information to resolve the ends of the shapes. Current efforts focus on circumferential shape sensing of live subjects and automatic digitization of sensed data.

  20. A distributed data base management system. [for Deep Space Network

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryan, A. I.

    1975-01-01

    Major system design features of a distributed data management system for the NASA Deep Space Network (DSN) designed for continuous two-way deep space communications are described. The reasons for which the distributed data base utilizing third-generation minicomputers is selected as the optimum approach for the DSN are threefold: (1) with a distributed master data base, valid data is available in real-time to support DSN management activities at each location; (2) data base integrity is the responsibility of local management; and (3) the data acquisition/distribution and processing power of a third-generation computer enables the computer to function successfully as a data handler or as an on-line process controller. The concept of the distributed data base is discussed along with the software, data base integrity, and hardware used. The data analysis/update constraint is examined.

  1. AOIPS data base management systems support for GARP data sets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, J. P.

    1977-01-01

    A data base management system is identified, developed to provide flexible access to data sets produced by GARP during its data systems tests. The content and coverage of the data base are defined and a computer-aided, interactive information storage and retrieval system, implemented to facilitate access to user specified data subsets, is described. The computer programs developed to provide the capability were implemented on the highly interactive, minicomputer-based AOIPS and are referred to as the data retrieval system (DRS). Implemented as a user interactive but menu guided system, the DRS permits users to inventory the data tape library and create duplicate or subset data sets based on a user selected window defined by time and latitude/longitude boundaries. The DRS permits users to select, display, or produce formatted hard copy of individual data items contained within the data records.

  2. Study of cryogenic propellant systems for loading the space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Voth, R. O.; Steward, W. G.; Hall, W. J.

    1974-01-01

    Computer programs were written to model the liquid oxygen loading system for the space shuttle. The programs allow selection of input data through graphic displays which schematically depict the part of the system being modeled. The computed output is also displayed in the form of graphs and printed messages. Any one of six computation options may be selected. The first four of these pertain to thermal stresses, pressure surges, cooldown times, flow rates and pressures during cooldown. Options five and six deal with possible water hammer effects due to closing of valves, steady flow and transient response to changes in operating conditions after cooldown. Procedures are given for operation of the graphic display unit and minicomputer.

  3. Software for Digital Acquisition System and Application to Environmental Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copeland, G. E.

    1975-01-01

    Criteria for selection of a minicomputer for use as a core resident acquisition system were developed for the ODU Mobile Air Pollution Laboratory. A comprehensive data acquisition program named MONARCH was instituted in a DEC-8/E-8K 12-bit computer. Up to 32 analog voltage inputs are scanned sequentially, converted to BCD, and then to actual numbers. As many as 16 external devices (valves or any other two-state device) are controlled independently. MONARCH is written as a foreground-background program, controlled by an external clock which interrupts once per minute. Transducer voltages are averaged over user specified time intervals and, upon completion of any desired time sequence, outputted are: day, hour, minute, second; state of external valves; average value of each analogue voltage (E Format); as well as standard deviations of these values. Output is compatible with any serially addressed media.

  4. Contribution of the Spacelab data management system to lower cost space research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burger, J. J.; Tanner, E. R.

    1976-01-01

    This paper reviews the design and operation of the Spacelab data management system as it has evolved. Significant improvements and extensions of the original baseline system have been incorporated and will be discussed. They include the capability for the remote control of Spacelab subsystems, improved remote data acquisition units, a high-rate digital data multiplexer, and an improved high-rate digital recorder. Emphasis will be placed on the overall system aspects, including considerations on the use of minicomputers as an adjunct to the basic Spacelab data system. The approach for experiment related software production and integration will be addressed as well. The paper focuses on the contributions of the data management system in reducing the cost of research in Spacelab.

  5. Safeguards instrumentation: past, present, future

    SciTech Connect

    Higinbotham, W.A.

    1982-01-01

    Instruments are essential for accounting, for surveillance and for protection of nuclear materials. The development and application of such instrumentation is reviewed, with special attention to international safeguards applications. Active and passive nondestructive assay techniques are some 25 years of age. The important advances have been in learning how to use them effectively for specific applications, accompanied by major advances in radiation detectors, electronics, and, more recently, in mini-computers. The progress in seals has been disappointingly slow. Surveillance cameras have been widely used for many applications other than safeguards. The revolution in TV technology will have important implications. More sophisticated containment/surveillance equipment is being developed but has yet to be exploited. On the basis of this history, some expectations for instrumentation in the near future are presented.

  6. Networking and AI systems: Requirements and benefits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    The price performance benefits of network systems is well documented. The ability to share expensive resources sold timesharing for mainframes, department clusters of minicomputers, and now local area networks of workstations and servers. In the process, other fundamental system requirements emerged. These have now been generalized with open system requirements for hardware, software, applications and tools. The ability to interconnect a variety of vendor products has led to a specification of interfaces that allow new techniques to extend existing systems for new and exciting applications. As an example of the message passing system, local area networks provide a testbed for many of the issues addressed by future concurrent architectures: synchronization, load balancing, fault tolerance and scalability. Gold Hill has been working with a number of vendors on distributed architectures that range from a network of workstations to a hypercube of microprocessors with distributed memory. Results from early applications are promising both for performance and scalability.

  7. Fabrication of a focusing grating mirror by electron beam lithography.

    PubMed

    Hori, Y; Sogawa, F; Asakure, H; Kato, M; Serizawa, H

    1990-06-10

    A focusing grating mirror (FGM), which is a new computer generated holographic grating with functions of focusing lens and diffraction grating mirror, is proposed and fabricated, we believe, for the first time. A high speed and accurate electron beam writing system, based on a multitask minicomputer, 16-bit D/A converters with 64K-word static memories, and a scanning electron beam microscope, is developed and used to fabricate the FGMs comprising grating corrugations with chirp and bend structures. Excellent properties of the FGM are obtained, giving almost diffraction-limited spot size and the expected wavelength dispersion. The fabricated FGM is combined with a laser diode as an external cavity mirror to confirm the functions of direct optical feedback and wavelength selection, and the fundamental operation of an external-cavity laser is demonstrated. PMID:20567287

  8. Surface temperatures and temperature gradient features of the US Gulf Coast waters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huh, O. K.; Rouse, L. J., Jr.; Smith, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Satellite thermal infrared data on the Gulf of Mexico show that a seasonal cycle exists in the horizontal surface temperature structure. In the fall, the surface temperatures of both coastal and deep waters are nearly uniform. With the onset of winter, atmospheric cold fronts, which are accompanied by dry, low temperature air and strong winds, draw heat from the sea. A band of cooler water forming on the inner shelf expands, until a thermal front develops seaward along the shelf break between the cold shelf waters and the warmer deep waters of the Gulf. Digital analysis of the satellite data was carried out in an interactive mode using a minicomputer and software. A time series of temperature profiles illustrates the temporal and spatial changes in the sea-surface temperature field.

  9. Development and implementation of a low cost micro computer system for LANDSAT analysis and geographic data base applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faust, N.; Jordon, L.

    1981-01-01

    Since the implementation of the GRID and IMGRID computer programs for multivariate spatial analysis in the early 1970's, geographic data analysis subsequently moved from large computers to minicomputers and now to microcomputers with radical reduction in the costs associated with planning analyses. Programs designed to process LANDSAT data to be used as one element in a geographic data base were used once NIMGRID (new IMGRID), a raster oriented geographic information system, was implemented on the microcomputer. Programs for training field selection, supervised and unsupervised classification, and image enhancement were added. Enhancements to the color graphics capabilities of the microsystem allow display of three channels of LANDSAT data in color infrared format. The basic microcomputer hardware needed to perform NIMGRID and most LANDSAT analyses is listed as well as the software available for LANDSAT processing.

  10. Tritium Migration Analysis Program Version 4

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1991-06-12

    TMAP4 was developed as a safety analysis code, mainly to analyze tritium retention and loss in fusion reactor structures and systems during normal operational and accident conditions. It incorporates one-dimensional thermal and mass-diffusive transport and trapping calculations through structures and zero dimensional fluid transport between enclosures and across the interface between enclosures and structures. Diffusion structures may be linked together with other structures, and multiple structures may interact with an enclosure. A key feature ismore » the ability to input problem definition parameters as constants, interpolation tables, or FORTRAN equations. The code is specifically intended for use under a DOS operating system on PC type minicomputers, but it has also been run successfully on workstations and mainframe computer systems. Use of the equation-input feature requires access to a FORTRAN-77 compiler, and a linker program is required.« less

  11. Fourier emission infrared microspectrophotometer for surface analysis. I - Application to lubrication problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; King, V. W.

    1979-01-01

    A far-infrared interferometer was converted into an emission microspectrophotometer for surface analysis. To cover the mid-infrared as well as the far-infrared the Mylar beamsplitter was made replaceable by a germanium-coated salt plate, and the Moire fringe counting system used to locate the moveable Michelson mirror was improved to read 0.5 micron of mirror displacement. Digital electronics and a dedicated minicomputer were installed for data collection and processing. The most critical element for the recording of weak emission spectra from small areas was, however, a reflecting microscope objective and phase-locked signal detection with simultaneous referencing to a blackbody source. An application of the technique to lubrication problems is shown.

  12. Computer Information System For Nuclear Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cahill, P. T.; Knowles, R. J.....; Tsen, O.

    1983-12-01

    To meet the complex needs of a nuclear medicine division serving a 1100-bed hospital, a computer information system has been developed in sequential phases. This database management system is based on a time-shared minicomputer linked to a broadband communications network. The database contains information on patient histories, billing, types of procedures, doses of radiopharmaceuticals, times of study, scanning equipment used, and technician performing the procedure. These patient records are cycled through three levels of storage: (a) an active file of 100 studies for those patients currently scheduled, (b) a temporary storage level of 1000 studies, and (c) an archival level of 10,000 studies containing selected information. Merging of this information with reports and various statistical analyses are possible. This first phase has been in operation for well over a year. The second phase is an upgrade of the size of the various storage levels by a factor of ten.

  13. Lithology and aggregate quality attributes for the digital geologic map of Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knepper, D.H.; Green, G.N.; Langer, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    This geologic map was prepared as a part of a study of digital methods and techniques as applied to complex geologic maps. The geologic map was digitized from the original scribe sheets used to prepare the published Geologic Map of Colorado (Tweto 1979). Consequently the digital version is at 1:500,000 scale using the Lambert Conformal Conic map projection parameters of the state base map. Stable base contact prints of the scribe sheets were scanned on a Tektronix 4991 digital scanner. The scanner automatically converts the scanned image to an ASCII vector format. These vectors were transferred to a VAX minicomputer, where they were then loaded into ARC/INFO. Each vector and polygon was given attributes derived from the original 1979 geologic map.

  14. Auto covariance computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hepner, T. E.; Meyers, J. F. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    A laser velocimeter covariance processor which calculates the auto covariance and cross covariance functions for a turbulent flow field based on Poisson sampled measurements in time from a laser velocimeter is described. The device will process a block of data that is up to 4096 data points in length and return a 512 point covariance function with 48-bit resolution along with a 512 point histogram of the interarrival times which is used to normalize the covariance function. The device is designed to interface and be controlled by a minicomputer from which the data is received and the results returned. A typical 4096 point computation takes approximately 1.5 seconds to receive the data, compute the covariance function, and return the results to the computer.

  15. Automation in photogrammetry: Recent developments and applications (1972-1976)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, M.M.; Mikhail, E.M.

    1976-01-01

    An overview of recent developments in the automation of photogrammetry in various countries is presented. Conclusions regarding automated photogrammetry reached at the 1972 Congress in Ottawa are reviewed first as a background for examining the developments of 1972-1976. Applications are described for each country reporting significant developments. Among fifteen conclusions listed are statements concerning: the widespread practice of equipping existing stereoplotters with simple digitizers; the growing tendency to use minicomputers on-line with stereoplotters; the optimization of production of digital terrain models by progressive sampling in stereomodels; the potential of digitization of a photogrammetric model by density correlation on epipolar lines; the capabilities and economic aspects of advanced systems which permit simultaneous production of orthophotos, contours, and digital terrain models; the economy of off-line orthophoto systems; applications of digital image processing; automation by optical techniques; applications of sensors other than photographic imagery, and the role of photogrammetric phases in a completely automated cartographic system. ?? 1976.

  16. Outline of SCM data processing system onboard ETS-5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Sumio; Tamura, Takashi; Uesugi, Masato

    1992-08-01

    An overview of the operation of the Solar Cell Monitor (SCM) is presented. In minicomputer, SCM data are extracted from the telemetry data, data distribution at 17:00 (Japan Standard Time) plus or minus 15 minutes when the SCM entrance surface directly faces to the sun were obtained, SCM data sent in hexadecimal number system were engineeringly converted to analog values, and the results are recorded in each solar cell file. The data processed by mini computer are sent to personal computer through in site telephone circuit, and the data undergo the following three compensations: (1) for solar ray intensity variation due to the elliptic earth revolution orbit; (2) for the seasonal variation of angles between SCM entrance surface and the sun caused by the inclination of the earth's axis; and (3) for seasonal SCM temperature variation.

  17. Expert system for scheduling simulation lab sessions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lund, Chet

    1990-01-01

    Implementation and results of an expert system used for scheduling session requests for the Systems Engineering Simulator (SES) laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) are discussed. Weekly session requests are received from astronaut crew trainers, procedures developers, engineering assessment personnel, software developers, and various others who wish to access the computers, scene generators, and other simulation equipment available to them in the SES lab. The expert system under discussion is comprised of a data acquisition portion - two Pascal programs run on a personal computer - and a CLIPS program installed on a minicomputer. A brief introduction to the SES lab and its scheduling background is given. A general overview of the system is provided, followed by a detailed description of the constraint-reduction process and of the scheduler itself. Results from a ten-week trial period using this approach are discussed. Finally, a summary of the expert system's strengths and shortcomings are provided.

  18. CAD/CAM systems in machine construction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellwig, H.-E.; Paulus, M.

    1985-09-01

    A description is provided of the present status of Computer-Aided Design (CAD) and Computer-Aided Manufacturing (CAM) technology, taking into account applications, and risks related to the introduction and employment of CAD/CAM methods. The employment of CAD/CAM systems in the area of machine construction is discussed, giving attention to the situation in West Germany. With respect to the system component 'hardware', the transition to a new hardware generation is taking place. In addition to computer centers with large-scale computers, minicomputers and superminicomputers, designed especially for technical applications, have become available. However, existing CAD software does not yet permit the full exploitation of the changes in hardware technology. Attention is given to CAD potential and current utilization in various application areas, developments related to graphics and geometry, advantages of a suitable macro language, the current employment of CAD/CAM technology, and cost considerations.

  19. Advanced application flight experiment breadboard pulse compression radar altimeter program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Design, development and performance of the pulse compression radar altimeter is described. The high resolution breadboard system is designed to operate from an aircraft at 10 Kft above the ocean and to accurately measure altitude, sea wave height and sea reflectivity. The minicomputer controlled Ku band system provides six basic variables and an extensive digital recording capability for experimentation purposes. Signal bandwidths of 360 MHz are obtained using a reflective array compression line. Stretch processing is used to achieve 1000:1 pulse compression. The system range command LSB is 0.62 ns or 9.25 cm. A second order altitude tracker, aided by accelerometer inputs is implemented in the system software. During flight tests the system demonstrated an altitude resolution capability of 2.1 cm and sea wave height estimation accuracy of 10%. The altitude measurement performance exceeds that of the Skylab and GEOS-C predecessors by approximately an order of magnitude.

  20. Big Dee upgrade of the Doublet III diagnostic data acquisition computer system

    SciTech Connect

    McHarg, B.B. Jr.

    1983-12-01

    The Big Dee upgrade of the Doublet III tokamak facility will begin operation in 1986 with an initial quantity of data expected to be 10 megabytes per shot and eventually attaining 20 to 25 megabytes per shot. This is in comparison to the 4 to 5 megabytes of data currently acquired. To handle this greater quantity of data and to serve physics needs for significantly improved between-shot processing of data will require a substantial upgrade of the existing data acquisition system. The key points of the philosophy that have been adopted for the upgraded system to handle the greater quantity of data are (1) preserve existing hardware; (2) preserve existing software; (3) configure the system in a modular fashion; and (4) distribute the data acquisition over multiple computers. The existing system using ModComp CLASSIC 16 bit minicomputers is capable of handling 5 megabytes of data per shot.

  1. SIFT - Design and analysis of a fault-tolerant computer for aircraft control. [Software Implemented Fault Tolerant systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wensley, J. H.; Lamport, L.; Goldberg, J.; Green, M. W.; Levitt, K. N.; Melliar-Smith, P. M.; Shostak, R. E.; Weinstock, C. B.

    1978-01-01

    SIFT (Software Implemented Fault Tolerance) is an ultrareliable computer for critical aircraft control applications that achieves fault tolerance by the replication of tasks among processing units. The main processing units are off-the-shelf minicomputers, with standard microcomputers serving as the interface to the I/O system. Fault isolation is achieved by using a specially designed redundant bus system to interconnect the processing units. Error detection and analysis and system reconfiguration are performed by software. Iterative tasks are redundantly executed, and the results of each iteration are voted upon before being used. Thus, any single failure in a processing unit or bus can be tolerated with triplication of tasks, and subsequent failures can be tolerated after reconfiguration. Independent execution by separate processors means that the processors need only be loosely synchronized, and a novel fault-tolerant synchronization method is described.

  2. ANNIE - INTERACTIVE PROCESSING OF DATA BASES FOR HYDROLOGIC MODELS.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lumb, Alan M.; Kittle, John L.

    1985-01-01

    ANNIE is a data storage and retrieval system that was developed to reduce the time and effort required to calibrate, verify, and apply watershed models that continuously simulate water quantity and quality. Watershed models have three categories of input: parameters to describe segments of a drainage area, linkage of the segments, and time-series data. Additional goals for ANNIE include the development of software that is easily implemented on minicomputers and some microcomputers and software that has no special requirements for interactive display terminals. Another goal is for the user interaction to be based on the experience of the user so that ANNIE is helpful to the inexperienced user and yet efficient and brief for the experienced user. Finally, the code should be designed so that additional hydrologic models can easily be added to ANNIE.

  3. Automated search for supernovae

    SciTech Connect

    Kare, J.T.

    1984-11-15

    This thesis describes the design, development, and testing of a search system for supernovae, based on the use of current computer and detector technology. This search uses a computer-controlled telescope and charge coupled device (CCD) detector to collect images of hundreds of galaxies per night of observation, and a dedicated minicomputer to process these images in real time. The system is now collecting test images of up to several hundred fields per night, with a sensitivity corresponding to a limiting magnitude (visual) of 17. At full speed and sensitivity, the search will examine some 6000 galaxies every three nights, with a limiting magnitude of 18 or fainter, yielding roughly two supernovae per week (assuming one supernova per galaxy per 50 years) at 5 to 50 percent of maximum light. An additional 500 nearby galaxies will be searched every night, to locate about 10 supernovae per year at one or two percent of maximum light, within hours of the initial explosion.

  4. Spinal cord stimulators and radiotherapy: first case report and practice guidelines.

    PubMed

    Walsh, Lorraine; Guha, Daipayan; Purdie, Thomas G; Bedard, Philippe; Easson, Alexandra; Liu, Fei-Fei; Hodaie, Mojgan

    2011-01-01

    Spinal cord stimulators (SCS) are a well-recognised treatment modality in the management of a number of chronic neuropathic pain conditions, particularly failed back syndrome and radiculopathies. The implantable pulse generator (IPG) component of the SCS is designed and operates in a similar fashion to that of a cardiac pacemaker. The IPG consists of an electrical generator, lithium battery, transmitter/receiver and a minicomputer. When stimulated, it generates pulsed electrical signals which stimulate the dorsal columns of the spinal cord, thus alleviating pain. Analogous to a cardiac pacemaker, it can be potentially damaged by ionising radiation from a linear accelerator, in patients undergoing radiotherapy. Herein we report our clinical management of the first reported case of a patient requiring adjuvant breast radiotherapy who had a SCS in situ. We also provide useful practical recommendations on the management of this scenario within a radiation oncology department. PMID:22024340

  5. A method for diagnosing surface parameters using geostationary satellite imagery and a boundary-layer model. M.S. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polansky, A. C.

    1982-01-01

    A method for diagnosing surface parameters on a regional scale via geosynchronous satellite imagery is presented. Moisture availability, thermal inertia, atmospheric heat flux, and total evaporation are determined from three infrared images obtained from the Geostationary Operational Environmental Satellite (GOES). Three GOES images (early morning, midafternoon, and night) are obtained from computer tape. Two temperature-difference images are then created. The boundary-layer model is run, and its output is inverted via cubic regression equations. The satellite imagery is efficiently converted into output-variable fields. All computations are executed on a PDP 11/34 minicomputer. Output fields can be produced within one hour of the availability of aligned satellite subimages of a target area.

  6. Dynamic response of damaged angleplied fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.; Lark, R. F.

    1979-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to determine the effects of low level damage induced by monotonic load, cyclic load and/or residual stresses on the vibration frequencies and damping factors of fiber composite angleplied laminates. Two different composite systems were studied - low modulus fiber and ultra high modulus fiber composites. The results obtained showed that the frequencies and damping factors of angleplied laminates made from low modulus fiber composites are sensitive to low level damage while those made from ultra high modulus composites are not. Also, vibration tests may not be sufficiently sensitive to assess concentrated local damage in angleplied laminates. And furthermore, dynamic response determined from low-velocity impact coupled with the Fast Fourier Transform and packaged in a minicomputer can be a convenient procedure for assessing low-level damage in fiber composite angleplied laminates.

  7. An application of the Multi-Purpose System Simulation /MPSS/ model to the Monitor and Control Display System /MACDS/ at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration /NASA/ Goddard Space Flight Center /GSFC/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mill, F. W.; Krebs, G. N.; Strauss, E. S.

    1976-01-01

    The Multi-Purpose System Simulator (MPSS) model was used to investigate the current and projected performance of the Monitor and Control Display System (MACDS) at the Goddard Space Flight Center in processing and displaying launch data adequately. MACDS consists of two interconnected mini-computers with associated terminal input and display output equipment and a disk-stored data base. Three configurations of MACDS were evaluated via MPSS and their performances ascertained. First, the current version of MACDS was found inadequate to handle projected launch data loads because of unacceptable data backlogging. Second, the current MACDS hardware with enhanced software was capable of handling two times the anticipated data loads. Third, an up-graded hardware ensemble combined with the enhanced software was capable of handling four times the anticipated data loads.

  8. Computer software evaluation methodology and data base management system selection

    SciTech Connect

    Huntley, A.F.

    1986-04-01

    This document presents a Data Base Management System (DBMS) evaluation methodology that has been developed under the sponsorship of the Department of the Navy, Naval Management Systems Support Office (NAVMASSO), Norfolk, Virginia. NAVMASSO has recognized the need for a DBMS to support the Shipboard Nontactical Automated Data Processing Program (SNAP) and has tasked Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) with evaluating DBMSs that are available for the SNAP-I computer system - a Honeywell DPS-6 minicomputer - and the SNAP-II computer system - a Harris 300 minicomputer. In preparation for the SNAP-I/SNAP-II DBMS evaluation, ORNL has developed the DBMS evaluation methodology presented in this document. First, a discussion of the traditional computer software evaluation methodology is provided, with identification of aspects of the methodology that may cause the resulting evaluation to be deficient. A DBMS evaluation methodology that stresses the layered functionality of the software is then presented. The methodology requires a large amount of hands-on testing and allows evaluation team members to evaluate the software from the perspective of application developers and end-users who will use the system on a day-to-day basis. The document contains a discussion of several general considerations that must be evaluated. These are items that form a supportive environment and enhance the usability of the software, even though they may not affect the intrinsic functionality of the software. The technical facilities that define the limits of functionality of the software are then presented for evaluation. Areas where these facilities may not meet the desired functionality are identified. 14 refs.

  9. The History of the Data Systems AutoChemist® (ACH) and AutoChemist-PRISMA (PRISMA®): from 1964 to 1986

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Summary Objectives This paper presents the history of data system development steps (1964 – 1986) for the clinical analyzers AutoChemist®, and its successor AutoChemist PRISMA® (PRogrammable Individually Selective Modular Analyzer). The paper also partly recounts the history of development steps of the minicomputer PDP 8 from Digital Equipment. The first PDP 8 had 4 core memory boards of 1 K each and was large as a typical oven baking sheet and about 10 years later, PDP 8 was a “one chip microcomputer” with a 32 K memory chip. The fast developments of PDP 8 come to have a strong influence on the development of the data system for AutoChemist. Five major releases of the software were made during this period (1-5 MIACH). Results The most important aims were not only to calculate the results, but also be able to monitor their quality and automatically manage the orders, store the results in digital form for later statistical analysis and distribute the results to the physician in charge of the patient using thesame computer as the analyzer. Another result of the data system was the ability to customize AutoChemist to handle sample identification by using bar codes and the presentation of results to different types of laboratories. Conclusions Digital Equipment launched the PDP 8 just as a new minicomputer was desperately needed. No other known alternatives were available at the time. This was to become a key success factor for AutoChemist. That the AutoChemist with such a high capacity required a computer for data collection was obvious already in the early 1960s. That computer development would be so rapid and that one would be able to accomplish so much with a data system was even suspicious at the time. In total, 75; AutoChemist (31) and PRISMA (44) were delivered Worldwide The last PRISMA was delivered in 1987 to the Veteran Hospital Houston, TX USA PMID:24853032

  10. Evolution of the Mobile Information SysTem (MIST)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Thompson, Shelby; Archer, Ronald D.

    2008-01-01

    The Mobile Information SysTem (MIST) had its origins in the need to determine whether commercial off the shelf (COTS) technologies could improve intervehicular activities (IVA) on International Space Station (ISS) crew maintenance productivity. It began with an exploration of head mounted displays (HMDs), but quickly evolved to include voice recognition, mobile personal computing, and data collection. The unique characteristic of the MIST lies within its mobility, in which a vest is worn that contains a mini-computer and supporting equipment, and a headband with attachments for a HMD, lipstick camera, and microphone. Data is then captured directly by the computer running Morae(TM) or similar software for analysis. To date, the MIST system has been tested in numerous environments such as two parabolic flights on NASA's C-9 microgravity aircraft and several mockup facilities ranging from ISS to the Altair Lunar Sortie Lander. Functional capabilities have included its lightweight and compact design, commonality across systems and environments, and usefulness in remote collaboration. Human Factors evaluations of the system have proven the MIST's ability to be worn for long durations of time (approximately four continuous hours) with no adverse physical deficits, moderate operator compensation, and low workload being reported as measured by Corlett Bishop Discomfort Scale, Cooper-Harper Ratings, and the NASA Total Workload Index (TLX), respectively. Additionally, through development of the system, it has spawned several new applications useful in research. For example, by only employing the lipstick camera, microphone, and a compact digital video recorder (DVR), we created a portable, lightweight data collection device. Video is recorded from the participants point of view (POV) through the use of the camera mounted on the side of the head. Both the video and audio is recorded directly into the DVR located on a belt around the waist. This data is then transferred to

  11. Evaluation of three electronic report processing systems for preparing hydrologic reports of the U.S Geological Survey, Water Resources Division

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stiltner, G.J.

    1990-01-01

    In 1987, the Water Resources Division of the U.S. Geological Survey undertook three pilot projects to evaluate electronic report processing systems as a means to improve the quality and timeliness of reports pertaining to water resources investigations. The three projects selected for study included the use of the following configuration of software and hardware: Ventura Publisher software on an IBM model AT personal computer, PageMaker software on a Macintosh computer, and FrameMaker software on a Sun Microsystems workstation. The following assessment criteria were to be addressed in the pilot studies: The combined use of text, tables, and graphics; analysis of time; ease of learning; compatibility with the existing minicomputer system; and technical limitations. It was considered essential that the camera-ready copy produced be in a format suitable for publication. Visual improvement alone was not a consideration. This report consolidates and summarizes the findings of the electronic report processing pilot projects. Text and table files originating on the existing minicomputer system were successfully transformed to the electronic report processing systems in American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) format. Graphics prepared using a proprietary graphics software package were transferred to all the electronic report processing software through the use of Computer Graphic Metafiles. Graphics from other sources were entered into the systems by scanning paper images. Comparative analysis of time needed to process text and tables by the electronic report processing systems and by conventional methods indicated that, although more time is invested in creating the original page composition for an electronically processed report , substantial time is saved in producing subsequent reports because the format can be stored and re-used by electronic means as a template. Because of the more compact page layouts, costs of printing the reports were 15% to 25

  12. Multi-site magnetotelluric measurement system with real-time data analysis. Final technical report No. 210

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, J.D.; Bostick, F.X. Jr.; Smith, H.W.

    1981-09-01

    A magnetotelluric measurement system has been designed to provide a more cost effective electrical method for geothermal and mineral exploration. The theoretical requirements and sensitivities of the magnetotelluric inversion process were specifically addressed in determining system performance requirements. Significantly reduced instrument noise levels provide improved data quality, and simultaneous measurement at up to six locations provides reduced cost per site. Remotely located, battery powered, instrumentation packages return data to a central controlling site through a 2560 baud wire-line or radio link. Each remote package contains preamplifiers, data conditioning filters, and a 12-bit gain ranging A-D converter for frequencies from 0.001 Hz to 8 Hz. Data frequencies above 8 Hz are processed sequentially by a heterodyne receiver to reduce bandwidth to within the limits of the 2560 baud data link. The central data collection site provides overall control for the entire system. The system operator interacts with the system through a CRT terminal, and he receives hard copy from a matrix graphics printer. Data from the remote packages may be recorded in time sequence on a magnetic tape cartridge system, or an optional Hewlett-Packard 21MX minicomputer can be used to perform real-time frequency analysis. The results of this analysis provide feedback to the operator for improved evaluation of system performance and for selection of future measurement sites.

  13. 1985 ACSM-ASPRS Fall Convention, Indianapolis, IN, September 8-13, 1985, Technical Papers

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-01-01

    Papers are presented on Landsat image data quality analysis, primary data acquisition, cartography, geodesy, land surveying, and the applications of satellite remote sensing data. Topics discussed include optical scanning and interactive color graphics; the determination of astrolatitudes and astrolongitudes using x, y, z-coordinates on the celestial sphere; raster-based contour plotting from digital elevation models using minicomputers or microcomputers; the operational techniques of the GPS when utilized as a survey instrument; public land surveying and high technology; the use of multitemporal Landsat MSS data for studying forest cover types; interpretation of satellite and aircraft L-band synthetic aperture radar imagery; geological analysis of Landsat MSS data; and an interactive real time digital image processing system. Consideration is given to a large format reconnaissance camera; creating an optimized color balance for TM and MSS imagery; band combination selection for visual interpretation of thematic mapper data for resource management; the effect of spatial filtering on scene noise and boundary detail in thematic mapper imagery; the evaluation of the geometric quality of thematic mapper photographic data; and the analysis and correction of Landsat 4 and 5 thematic mapper sensor data.

  14. In-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 at 760 C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalluri, Sreeramesh; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1991-01-01

    Isothermal, in-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional fatigue experiments have been conducted at 760 C on uniform gage section, thin-walled tubular specimens of a wrought cobalt-base superalloy, Haynes 188. Test-control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. Fatigue lives of the in- and out-of-phase axial-torsional fatigue tests have been estimated with four different multiaxial fatigue life prediction models that were developed primarly for predicting axial-torsional fatigue lives at room temperature. The models investigated were: (1) the von Mises equivalent strain range; (2) the Modified Multiaxiality Factor Approach; (3) the Modified Smith-Watson-Topper Parameter; and (4) the critical shear plane method of Fatemi, Socie, and Kurath. In general, life predictions by the von Mises equivalent strain range model were within a factor of 2 for a majority of the tests and the predictions by the Modified Multiaxiality Factor Approach were within a factor of 2, while predictions of the Modified Smith-Watson-Topper Parameter and of the critical shear plane method of Fatemi, Socie, and Kurath were unconservative and conservative, respectively, by up to factors of 4. In some of the specimens tested under combined axial-torsional loading conditions, fatigue cracks initiated near extensometer indentations. Two design modifications have been proposed to the thin-walled tubular specimen to overcome this problem.

  15. SCAILET: An intelligent assistant for satellite ground terminal operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shahidi, A. K.; Crapo, J. A.; Schlegelmilch, R. F.; Reinhart, R. C.; Petrik, E. J.; Walters, J. L.; Jones, R. E.

    1993-01-01

    NASA Lewis Research Center has applied artificial intelligence to an advanced ground terminal. This software application is being deployed as an experimenter interface to the link evaluation terminal (LET) and was named Space Communication Artificial Intelligence for the Link Evaluation Terminal (SCAILET). The high-burst-rate (HBR) LET provides 30-GHz-transmitting and 20-GHz-receiving, 220-Mbps capability for wide band communications technology experiments with the Advanced Communication Technology Satellite (ACTS). The HBR-LET terminal consists of seven major subsystems. A minicomputer controls and monitors these subsystems through an IEEE-488 or RS-232 protocol interface. Programming scripts (test procedures defined by design engineers) configure the HBR-LET and permit data acquisition. However, the scripts are difficult to use, require a steep learning curve, are cryptic, and are hard to maintain. This discourages experimenters from utilizing the full capabilities of the HBR-LET system. An intelligent assistant module was developed as part of the SCAILET software. The intelligent assistant addresses critical experimenter needs by solving and resolving problems that are encountered during the configuring of the HBR-LET system. The intelligent assistant is a graphical user interface with an expert system running in the background. In order to further assist and familiarize an experimenter, an on-line hypertext documentation module was developed and included in the SCAILET software.

  16. Interactive initialization of heat flux parameters for numerical models using satellite temperature measurements. [Kansas and Indiana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, T. N. (Principal Investigator)

    1982-01-01

    A method for obtaining patterns of moisture availability (and net evaporation) from satellite infrared measurements employs Carlson's boundary layer model and a variety of image processing routines executed by a minicomputer. To test the method with regard to regional scale moisture analyses, two case studies were chosen because of the availability of HCMM data and because of the presence of a large horizontal gradient in antecedent precipitation and crp moisture index. Results show some correlation in both cases between antecedent precipitation and derived moisture availability. Apparently, regional-scale moisture availability patterns can be determined with some degree of fidelity but the values themselves may be useful only in the relative sense and significant to within plus or minus one category of dryness over a range of 4 or 5 categories between absolutely dry and field saturation. Preliminary results suggest that the derived moisture values correlate best with longer-term precipitation totals, suggesting that the infrared temperatures respond more sensitively to a relatively deep substrate layer.

  17. Development and evaluation of an automated reflectance microscope system for the petrographic characterization of bituminous coals

    SciTech Connect

    Hoover, D. S.; Davis, A.

    1980-10-01

    The development of automated coal petrographic techniques will lessen the demands on skilled personnel to do routine work. This project is concerned with the development and successful testing of an instrument which will meet these needs. The fundamental differences in reflectance of the three primary maceral groups should enable their differentiation in an automated-reflectance frequency histogram (reflectogram). Consequently, reflected light photometry was chosen as the method for automating coal petrographic analysis. Three generations of an automated system (called Rapid Scan Versions I, II and III) were developed and evaluated for petrographic analysis. Their basic design was that of a reflected-light microscope photometer with an automatic stage, interfaced with a minicomputer. The hardware elements used in the Rapid Scan Version I limited the system's flexibility and presented problems with signal digitization and measurement precision. Rapid Scan Version II was designed to incorporate a new microscope photometer and computer system. A digital stepping stage was incorporated into the Rapid Scan Version III system. The precision of reflectance determination of this system was found to be +- 0.02 percent reflectance. The limiting factor in quantitative interpretation of Rapid Scan reflectograms is the resolution of reflectance populations of the individual maceral groups. Statistical testing indicated that reflectograms were highly reproducible, and a new computer program, PETAN, was written to interpret the curves for vitrinite reflectance parameters ad petrographic.

  18. Sequential colour mapping system of brain potentials.

    PubMed

    Giard, M H; Peronnet, F; Pernier, J; Mauguiere, F; Bertrand, O

    1985-05-01

    We present a colour mapping system for the visualization of both the spatial scalp distribution and the temporal evolution of brain potentials. The system is applicable to recordings of auditory, visual and somatosensory potentials. It uses a Tektronix 4113 colour terminal connected to a Solar 16 (SEMS) mini-computer. The brain potentials are recorded on up to 16 scalp electrodes. The gain and the baseline are corrected separately on each channel. At each point of the scalp the potential is reconstructed by a linear interpolation of the measured potentials of the four nearest electrodes. Simultaneously n2 (1 less than n less than 8) colour maps can be presented on the screen. This allows the study of the temporal evolution of full scalp evoked potentials. The user chooses the two extreme latencies defining the time window to be explored and the latencies of the maps are regularly time-spaced within this window. In a typical case, in which four maps are desired, the latencies of the maps can be chosen independently. The 16-colour palette is predetermined but the user has three possibilities to establish the correspondence between the electrical potential and the colours. Examples are shown in the visual and somatosensory stimulation modalities. The advantages and limitations of such a representation are discussed. PMID:3849381

  19. A new approach for data acquisition at the JPL space simulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Terry C.

    1992-01-01

    In 1990, a personal computer based data acquisition system was put into service for the Space Simulators and Environmental Test Laboratory at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, California. The new system replaced an outdated minicomputer system which had been in use since 1980. This new data acquisition system was designed and built by JPL for the specific task of acquiring thermal test data in support of space simulation and thermal vacuum testing at JPL. The data acquisition system was designed using powerful personal computers and local-area-network (LAN) technology. Reliability, expandability, and maintainability were some of the most important criteria in the design of the data system and in the selection of hardware and software components. The data acquisition system is used to record both test chamber operational data and thermal data from the unit under test. Tests are conducted in numerous small thermal vacuum chambers and in the large solar simulator and range in size from individual components using only 2 or 3 thermocouples to entire planetary spacecraft requiring in excess of 1200 channels of test data. The system supports several of these tests running concurrently. The previous data system is described along with reasons for its replacement, the types of data acquired, the new data system, and the benefits obtained from the new system including information on tests performed to date.

  20. A UNIX interface to supercomputers

    SciTech Connect

    McBryan, O.A.

    1985-01-01

    We describe a convenient interface between UNIX-based work-stations or minicomputers, and supercomputers such as the CRAY series machines. Using this interface, the user can issue commands entirely on the UNIX system, with remote compilation, loading and execution performed on the supercomputer. The interface is not a remote login interface. Rather the domain of various UNIX utilities such as compilers, archivers and loaders are extended to include the CRAY. The user need know essentially nothing about the CRAY operating system, commands or filename restrictions. Standard UNIX utilities will perform CRAY operations transparently. UNIX command names and arguments are mapped to corresponding CRAY equivalents, suitable options are selected as needed, UNIX directory tree filenames are coerced to allowable CRAY names and all source and output files are automatically transferred between the machines. The primary purpose of the software is to allow the programmer to benefit from the interactive features of UNIX systems including screen editors, software maintenance utilities such as make and SCCS and in general to avail of the large set of UNIX text manipulation features. The interface was designed particularly to support development of very large multi-file programs, possibly consisting of hundreds of files and hundreds of thousands of lines of code. All CRAY source is kept on the work-station. We have found that using the software, the complete program development phase for a large CRAY application may be performed entirely on a work-station.

  1. The graphics and data acquisition software package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crosier, W. G.

    1981-01-01

    A software package was developed for use with micro and minicomputers, particularly the LSI-11/DPD-11 series. The package has a number of Fortran-callable subroutines which perform a variety of frequently needed tasks for biomedical applications. All routines are well documented, flexible, easy to use and modify, and require minimal programmer knowledge of peripheral hardware. The package is also economical of memory and CPU time. A single subroutine call can perform any one of the following functions: (1) plot an array of integer values from sampled A/D data, (2) plot an array of Y values versus an array of X values; (3) draw horizontal and/or vertical grid lines of selectable type; (4) annotate grid lines with user units; (5) get coordinates of user controlled crosshairs from the terminal for interactive graphics; (6) sample any analog channel with program selectable gain; (7) wait a specified time interval, and (8) perform random access I/O of one or more blocks of a sequential disk file. Several miscellaneous functions are also provided.

  2. Automated pneumatic transfer irradiation system for delayed neutron counting

    SciTech Connect

    Heifer, Paul G.; Millard, Hugh T. Jr.; Zermane, Albert J

    1982-07-01

    The Geological Survey TRIGA Reactor has been used for uranium and thorium neutron activation analysis by delayed neutron counting for the past eleven years. As the requirements for analysis increased the original General Atomic pneumatic system was upgraded in several stages. By 1979 we had reached the practical limits of safe through-put for that system and a new pneumatic transfer system was built. A single large Roots type blower is used to drive four individual transfer tubes simultaneously (two termini in the core and two outside the reflector). A microprocessor controls the operation and is paced by a minicomputer, which is also used to collect and reduce the counting data. Two irradiations and counting cycles are performed on each sample, one in the core, a Cd-lined terminus for thorium, and one in the reflector mounted terminus for uranium. Video displays at both the reactor console and the pneumatic system operating station indicate the status of the system and the locations of the samples at all times. This highly automated system is capable of 1,200 irradiations for delayed neutron counting in a 10 hour day, and, in addition, incorporates programmable versatility for other irradiation-counting experiments, and provides a high degree of reactor and radiological safety with only remote operator attention. (author)

  3. Software used with the flux mapper at the solar parabolic dish test site

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyazono, C.

    1984-01-01

    Software for data archiving and data display was developed for use on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) PDP-11/34A minicomputer for use with the JPL-designed flux mapper. The flux mapper is a two-dimensional, high radiant energy scanning device designed to measure radiant flux energies expected at the focal point of solar parabolic dish concentrators. Interfacing to the DEC equipment was accomplished by standard RS-232C serial lines. The design of the software was dicated by design constraints of the flux-mapper controller. Early attemps at data acquisition from the flux-mapper controller were not without difficulty. Time and personnel limitations result in an alternative method of data recording at the test site with subsequent analysis accomplished at a data evaluation location at some later time. Software for plotting was also written to better visualize the flux patterns. Recommendations for future alternative development are discussed. A listing of the programs used in the anaysis is included in an appendix.

  4. Lag in adaptation to lactose as a probe to the timing of permease incorporation into the cell membrane.

    PubMed Central

    Koch, A L

    1975-01-01

    If bacteria are incapable of forming and incorporating proteins into the cytoplasmic membranes in all phases of the cell cycle, then not all cells from an asynchronous culture should be capable of growth when switched to a new carbon and energy source whose metabolism requires new membrane function. The transfer of an inducible culture to low lactose provides such a situation since the cells cannot grow unless galactoside permease can function to concentrate the lactose internally. From such experiments, it was concluded that the Y gene product of the lac operon is synthesized, incorporated, and can start functioning in active transport, at any time throughout the bulk of the cell cycle. Not only were the lags before growth re-ensued much shorter than would be expected if the membrane transport capability could only be developed in a small portion of the cycle, but brief pulses of a gratuitous inducer shortened the lags much further. Three types of Escherichia coli ML 30 culture were studied: cells that had exhausted the limiting glucose; cells taken directly from glucose-limited chemostats; and a washed suspension of highly catabolite repressed cells from cultures grown in high levels of glucose and gluconate. The growth studies reported here were performed on-line with a minicomputer. They represent at least an order of magnitude increase in accuracy in estimating growth parameters over previous instrumentation. PMID:1100610

  5. A five-collector system for the simultaneous measurement of argon isotope ratios in a static mass spectrometer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stacey, J.S.; Sherrill, N.D.; Dalrymple, G.B.; Lanphere, M.A.; Carpenter, N.V.

    1981-01-01

    A system is described that utilizes five separate Faraday-cup collector assemblies, aligned along the focal plane of a mass spectrometer, to collect simultaneous argon ion beams at masses 36-40. Each collector has its own electrometer amplifier and analog-to-digital measuring channel, the outputs of which are processed by a minicomputer that also controls the mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer utilizes a 90?? sector magnetic analyzer with a radius of 23 cm, in which some degree of z-direction focussing is provided for all the ion beams by the fringe field of the magnet. Simultaneous measurement of the ion beams helps to eliminate mass-spectrometer memory as a significant source of measurement error during an analysis. Isotope ratios stabilize between 7 and 9 s after sample admission into the spectrometer, and thereafter changes in the measured ratios are linear, typically to within ??0.02%. Thus the multi-collector arrangement permits very short extrapolation times for computation of initial ratios, and also provides the advantages of simultaneous measurement of the ion currents in that errors due to variations in ion beam intensity are minimized. A complete analysis takes less than 10 min, so that sample throughput can be greatly enhanced. In this instrument, the factor limiting analytical precision now lies in short-term apparent variations in the interchannel calibration factors. ?? 1981.

  6. David Florida Laboratory Thermal Vacuum Data Processing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choueiry, Elie

    1994-01-01

    During 1991, the Space Simulation Facility conducted a survey to assess the requirements and analyze the merits for purchasing a new thermal vacuum data processing system for its facilities. A new, integrated, cost effective PC-based system was purchased which uses commercial off-the-shelf software for operation and control. This system can be easily reconfigured and allows its users to access a local area network. In addition, it provides superior performance compared to that of the former system which used an outdated mini-computer and peripheral hardware. This paper provides essential background on the old data processing system's features, capabilities, and the performance criteria that drove the genesis of its successor. This paper concludes with a detailed discussion of the thermal vacuum data processing system's components, features, and its important role in supporting our space-simulation environment and our capabilities for spacecraft testing. The new system was tested during the ANIK E spacecraft test, and was fully operational in November 1991.

  7. Managing for the next big thing. Interview by Paul Hemp.

    PubMed

    Ruettgers, M

    2001-01-01

    In this HBR interview, CEO Michael Ruettgers speaks in detail about the managerial practices that have allowed EMC to anticipate and exploit disruptive technologies, market opportunities, and business models ahead of its competitors. He recounts how the company repeatedly ventured into untested markets, ultimately transforming itself from a struggling maker of minicomputer memory boards into a data storage powerhouse and one of the most successful companies of the past decade. The company has achieved sustained and nearly unrivaled revenue, profit, and shareprice growth through a number of means. Emphasizing timing and speed, Ruettgers says, is critical. That's meant staggering products rather than developing them sequentially and avoiding the excessive refinements that slow time to market. Indeed, a sense of urgency, Ruettgers explains, has been critical to EMC's success. Processes such as quarterly goal setting and monthly forecasting meetings help maintain a sense of urgency and allow managers to get early glimpses of changes in the market. So does an environment in which personal accountability is stressed and the corporate focus is single-minded. Perhaps most important, the company has procedures to glean insights from customers. Intensive forums involving EMC engineers and leading-edge customers, who typically push for unconventional solutions to their problems, often yield new product features. Similarly, a customer service system that includes real-time monitoring of product use enables EMC to understand customer needs firsthand. PMID:11189457

  8. From Past Issues: The More Things Change...

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1998-07-01

    Though computers were still housed in large, air-conditioned rooms and were often programmed via decks of punched cards, a number of chemists were making effective use of them in teaching as well as research. Eight papers in this issue reported on computer programs. Castleberry, Culp, and Lagowski described an educational experiment in which the effectiveness of computer-based instruction was evaluated in a general chemistry course. Breneman reported on minicomputer-aided instruction, and others described programs that normalized grades, calculated heats of combustion, analyzed results of physical chemistry experiments, solved secular equations, calculated mass spectra, and calculated rate constants. Output devices were usually character based and graphics were rudimentary, as exemplified by the teletype plots of hydrogenic orbitals shown above. The editorial, "On Abandoning Grading and Reconsidering Standards" advocated neither and presented four arguments for maintaining traditional standards and realistic grades. This immediately followed half a decade when poor grades might result in being drafted and serving in Vietnam and student protests were based on government policy rather than whether or not to enforce rules against student drinking. Editor Lippincott pointed out that after several years few students return to thank a professor for making things easy, but many express appreciation for challenges that proved they could do more than they thought they could.

  9. Upgrading NASA/DOSE laser ranging system control computers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ricklefs, Randall L.; Cheek, Jack; Seery, Paul J.; Emenheiser, Kenneth S.; Hanrahan, William P., III; Mcgarry, Jan F.

    1993-01-01

    Laser ranging systems now managed by the NASA Dynamics of the Solid Earth (DOSE) and operated by the Bendix Field Engineering Corporation, the University of Hawaii, and the University of Texas have produced a wealth on interdisciplinary scientific data over the last three decades. Despite upgrades to the most of the ranging station subsystems, the control computers remain a mix of 1970's vintage minicomputers. These encompass a wide range of vendors, operating systems, and languages, making hardware and software support increasingly difficult. Current technology allows replacement of controller computers at a relatively low cost while maintaining excellent processing power and a friendly operating environment. The new controller systems are now being designed using IBM-PC-compatible 80486-based microcomputers, a real-time Unix operating system (LynxOS), and X-windows/Motif IB, and serial interfaces have been chosen. This design supports minimizing short and long term costs by relying on proven standards for both hardware and software components. Currently, the project is in the design and prototyping stage with the first systems targeted for production in mid-1993.

  10. An interferometric strain-displacement measurement system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharpe, William N., Jr.

    1989-01-01

    A system for measuring the relative in-plane displacement over a gage length as short as 100 micrometers is described. Two closely spaced indentations are placed in a reflective specimen surface with a Vickers microhardness tester. Interference fringes are generated when they are illuminated with a He-Ne laser. As the distance between the indentations expands or contracts with applied load, the fringes move. This motion is monitored with a minicomputer-controlled system using linear diode arrays as sensors. Characteristics of the system are: (1) gage length ranging from 50 to 500 micrometers, but 100 micrometers is typical; (2) least-count resolution of approximately 0.0025 micrometer; and (3) sampling rate of 13 points per second. In addition, the measurement technique is non-contacting and non-reinforcing. It is useful for strain measurements over small gage lengths and for crack opening displacement measurements near crack tips. This report is a detailed description of a new system recently installed in the Mechanisms of Materials Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center. The intent is to enable a prospective user to evaluate the applicability of the system to a particular problem and assemble one if needed.

  11. Pacific Missile Test Center Information Resources Management Organization (code 0300): The ORACLE client-server and distributed processing architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Beckwith, A. L.; Phillips, J. T.

    1990-06-10

    Computing architectures using distributed processing and distributed databases are increasingly becoming considered acceptable solutions for advanced data processing systems. This is occurring even though there is still considerable professional debate as to what truly'' distributed computing actually is and despite the relative lack of advanced relational database management software (RDBMS) capable of meeting database and system integrity requirements for developing reliable integrated systems. This study investigates the functionally of ORACLE data base management software that is performing distributed processing between a MicroVAX/VMS minicomputer and three MS-DOS-based microcomputers. The ORACLE database resides on the MicroVAX and is accessed from the microcomputers with ORACLE SQL*NET, DECnet, and ORACLE PC TOOL PACKS. Data gathered during the study reveals that there is a demonstrable decrease in CPU demand on the MicroVAX, due to distributed processing'', when the ORACLE PC Tools are used to access the database as opposed to database access from dumb'' terminals. Also discovered were several hardware/software constraints that must be considered in implementing various software modules. The results of the study indicate that this distributed data processing architecture is becoming sufficiently mature, reliable, and should be considered for developing applications that reduce processing on central hosts. 33 refs., 2 figs.

  12. Development of a remote control console for the HHIRF 25-MV tandem accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1991-09-01

    The CAMAC-based control system for the 25-MV Tandem Accelerator at HHIRF uses two Perkin-Elmer, 32-bit minicomputers: a message-switching computer and a supervisory computer. Two operator consoles are located on one of the six serial highways. Operator control is provided by means of a console CRT, trackball, assignable shaft encoders and meters. The message-switching computer transmits and receives control information on the serial highways. At present, the CRT pages with updated parameters can be displayed and parameters can be controlled only from the two existing consoles, one in the Tandem control room and the other in the ORIC control room. It has become necessary to expand the control capability to several other locations in the building. With the expansion of control and monitoring capability of accelerator parameters to other locations, the operators will be able to control and observe the result of the control action at the same time. Since the new control console will be PC-based, the existing page format will be changed. The PC will be communicating with the Perkin-Elmer through RS-232 and a communication software package. Hardware configuration has been established, a communication software program that reads the pages from the shared memory has been developed. In this paper, we present the implementation strategy, works completed, existing and new page format, future action plans, explanation of pages and use of related global variables, a sample session, and flowcharts.

  13. A remote control console for the HHIRF 25-MV Tandem Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Hasanul Basher, A.M.

    1993-09-01

    The CAMAC-based control system for the 25-MV Tandem Accelerator at HHIRF uses two Perkin-Elmer, 32-bit minicomputers: a message-switching computer and a supervisory computer. Two operator consoles are located on one of the six serial highways. Operator control is provided by means of a console CRT, trackball, assignable shaft encoders, and meters. The message-switching computer transmits and receives control information on the serial highways. At present, the CRT pages with updated parameters can be displayed and parameters can be controlled only from the two existing consoles, one in the Tandem control room and the other in the ORIC control room. It has become necessary to expand the control capability to several other locations in the building. With the expansion of control and monitoring capability of accelerator parameters to other locations, the operators will be able to control and observe the result of the control action at the same time. This capability will be useful in the new Radioactive Ion Beam project of the division. Since the new control console will be PC-based, the existing page format will be changed. The PC will be communicating with the Perkin-Elmer through RS-232 with the aid of a communication protocol. Hardware configuration has been established, a software program that reads the pages from the shared memory, and a communication protocol have been developed. The following sections present the implementation strategy, work completed, future action plans, and the functional details of the communication protocol.

  14. WATEQ4F - a personal computer Fortran translation of the geochemical model WATEQ2 with revised data base

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ball, J.W.; Nordstrom, D.K.; Zachmann, D.W.

    1987-01-01

    A FORTRAN 77 version of the PL/1 computer program for the geochemical model WATEQ2, which computes major and trace element speciation and mineral saturation for natural waters has been developed. The code (WATEQ4F) has been adapted to execute on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer. Two versions of the code are available, one operating with IBM Professional FORTRAN and an 8087 or 89287 numeric coprocessor, and one which operates without a numeric coprocessor using Microsoft FORTRAN 77. The calculation procedure is identical to WATEQ2, which has been installed on many mainframes and minicomputers. Limited data base revisions include the addition of the following ions: AlHS04(++), BaS04, CaHS04(++), FeHS04(++), NaF, SrC03, and SrHCO3(+). This report provides the reactions and references for the data base revisions, instructions for program operation, and an explanation of the input and output files. Attachments contain sample output from three water analyses used as test cases and the complete FORTRAN source listing. U.S. Geological Survey geochemical simulation program PHREEQE and mass balance program BALANCE also have been adapted to execute on an IBM PC or compatible microcomputer with a numeric coprocessor and the IBM Professional FORTRAN compiler. (Author 's abstract)

  15. The display of molecular models with the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egan, J. T.; Hart, J.; Burt, S. K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1982-01-01

    A visualization of molecular models can lead to a clearer understanding of the models. Sophisticated graphics devices supported by minicomputers make it possible for the chemist to interact with the display of a very large model, altering its structure. In addition to user interaction, the need arises also for other ways of displaying information. These include the production of viewgraphs, film presentation, as well as publication quality prints of various models. To satisfy these needs, the display capability of the Ames Interactive Modeling System (AIMS) has been enhanced to provide a wide range of graphics and plotting capabilities. Attention is given to an overview of the AIMS system, graphics hardware used by the AIMS display subsystem, a comparison of graphics hardware, the representation of molecular models, graphics software used by the AIMS display subsystem, the display of a model obtained from data stored in molecule data base, a graphics feature for obtaining single frame permanent copy displays, and a feature for producing multiple frame displays.

  16. Spent Fuel Test - Climax data acquisition system operations manual

    SciTech Connect

    Nyholm, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The Spent Fuel Test-Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercially generated, spent nuclear reactor fuel in granite rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies, together with 6 electrical simulators and 20 guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granite at the US Department of Energy Nevada Test Site. On June 2, 1978, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) secured funding for the SFT-C, and completed spent fuel emplacement May 28, 1980. The multi-year duration test is located in a remote area and is unattended much of the time. An extensive array of radiological safety and geotechnical instrumentation is deployed to monitor the test performance. A dual minicomputer-based data acquisition system (DAS) collects and processes data from more than 900 analog instruments. This report documents the software element of the LLNL developed SFT-C Data Acquisition System. It defines the operating system and hardware interface configurations, the special applications software and data structures, and support software.

  17. Spent fuel test. Climax data acquisition system integration report

    SciTech Connect

    Nyholm, R.A.; Brough, W.G.; Rector, N.L.

    1982-06-01

    The Spent Fuel Test - Climax (SFT-C) is a test of the retrievable, deep geologic storage of commercially generated, spent nuclear reactor fuel in granitic rock. Eleven spent fuel assemblies, together with 6 electrical simulators and 20 guard heaters, are emplaced 420 m below the surface in the Climax granite at the Nevada Test Site. On June 2, 1978, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) secured funding for the SFT-C, and completed spent fuel emplacement May 28, 1980. This multi-year duration test is located in a remote area and is unattended much of the time. An extensive array of radiological safety and geotechnical instrumentation is deployed to monitor the test performance. A dual minicomputer-based data acquisition system collects and processes data from more than 900 analog instruments. This report documents the design and functions of the hardware and software elements of the Data Acquisition System and describes the supporting facilities which include environmental enclosures, heating/air-conditioning/humidity systems, power distribution systems, fire suppression systems, remote terminal stations, telephone/modem communications, and workshop areas. 9 figures.

  18. New Development In Ndt Infrared Thermographic Techniques Help Assess Flaw Delaminations In Flight Hardware

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barney, J.; Decker, H.; Hodor, J.

    1985-01-01

    With the ever increasing demand of superstructures by the space and defense industries, detection of flaws, voids, and unbonded regions has acquired tremendous attention. New thermographic techniques make it now possible to quantize the extent of internal dam-age and to locate the specific layer in which the flaw exists in both honeycomb and composite structures. The usefulness of this technique was demonstrated when several aircraft wing assemblies catastrophically failed during recovery. A non-destructive (ND) test program was initiated to assess the quality of brand-new wings. The IR test revealed large unbonded areas between the wing spar and face skin in some of the wings. Results from cross section examination of these wings were in complete agreement with those of the IR scan. Emissivity correction techniques were sometimes mandatory to enhance the ability of the thermographic equipment to extract information regarding the flaws. With video recording fast documentation can be achieved, and if the system is coupled to a video processor (minicomputer), further non-real time analysis is possible (Fourier transform, image averaging, contrast stretching, image enhancement, etc.) of the area in question.

  19. An imaging system for PLIF/Mie measurements for a combusting flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wey, C. C.; Ghorashi, B.; Marek, C. J.; Wey, C.

    1990-01-01

    The equipment required to establish an imaging system can be divided into four parts: (1) the light source and beam shaping optics; (2) camera and recording; (3) image acquisition and processing; and (4) computer and output systems. A pulsed, Nd:YAG-pummped, frequency-doubled dye laser which can freeze motion in the flowfield is used for an illumination source. A set of lenses is used to form the laser beam into a sheet. The induced fluorescence is collected by an UV-enhanced lens and passes through an UV-enhanced microchannel plate intensifier which is optically coupled to a gated solid state CCD camera. The output of the camera is simultaneously displayed on a monitor and recorded on either a laser videodisc set of a Super VHS VCR. This videodisc set is controlled by a minicomputer via a connection to the RS-232C interface terminals. The imaging system is connected to the host computer by a bus repeater and can be multiplexed between four video input sources. Sample images from a planar shear layer experiment are presented to show the processing capability of the imaging system with the host computer.

  20. Measurement of fluorescent white effects and whiteness.

    PubMed

    Anders, G

    1975-01-01

    This report surveys the literature and describes various techniques of whiteness measurement and evaluation in current use. Measuring techniques are described for dealing separately with the effects obtained by bleaching, blueing and fluorescent whitening, and an example is given of the direct quantitative estimation of a fluorescent whitening agents (FWAs) on a substrate by measuring reflectance in the ultraviolet region. Another chapter deals with the colorimetric estimation of the whiteness and the shade of a fluorescent white using modern apparatus in conjunction with a programmable minicomputer. A new simple and universally applicab,e formula was worked out: W=D-Y+P-x+Q-y+C which has been successfully used in routine tests and which for the first time gives different weight to whiteness values corresponding to all shade preferences existing in theory. Each user can match the formula to his own preference by appropriate adjustment of the D, P, Q andC values. Y,x and y are the customary colorimetric values as standardized by the CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage). It was also found that with another formula the shades of fluorescent whitening effects (green to red tints) may be defined in a simple way. PMID:1064551

  1. Interactive Forecasting with the National Weather Service River Forecast System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, George F.; Page, Donna

    1993-01-01

    The National Weather Service River Forecast System (NWSRFS) consists of several major hydrometeorologic subcomponents to model the physics of the flow of water through the hydrologic cycle. The entire NWSRFS currently runs in both mainframe and minicomputer environments, using command oriented text input to control the system computations. As computationally powerful and graphically sophisticated scientific workstations became available, the National Weather Service (NWS) recognized that a graphically based, interactive environment would enhance the accuracy and timeliness of NWS river and flood forecasts. Consequently, the operational forecasting portion of the NWSRFS has been ported to run under a UNIX operating system, with X windows as the display environment on a system of networked scientific workstations. In addition, the NWSRFS Interactive Forecast Program was developed to provide a graphical user interface to allow the forecaster to control NWSRFS program flow and to make adjustments to forecasts as necessary. The potential market for water resources forecasting is immense and largely untapped. Any private company able to market the river forecasting technologies currently developed by the NWS Office of Hydrology could provide benefits to many information users and profit from providing these services.

  2. The New CERN PS control system overview and status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perriollat, F.; Serre, C.

    1994-12-01

    The CERN PS control system is being completely rejuvenated. The existing system, whose design options were frozen in 1978, uses 16 bit minicomputers for process computers and for conventional consoles and services. These are being replaced by the agreed CERN Standard Architecture, using UNIX workstations as operator interface and VME based processors or PC frontends, under LynxOS. All CAMAC is essentially preserved. The project covers about five years and proceeds in steps of one year. Swicht over takes place in the annual shutdown, early in each year. No interference with the machine operation schedule is tolerated and this implies that no extra machine stops are planned for controls. The first two steps have been completed and operate to the complete satisfaction of the users; the LPI (Lep Preinjector) machines run since March 92 and the Proton Linac was started in March 93. The control system of the Lead Linac is being commissioned during 93 and 94. The third step of rejuvenation concerns the Booster machine and is under implementation now. The paper describes the architecture, the techniques used, the major components and the experience gained up to the conference time.

  3. An experimental search for near-wall boundary conditions for large eddy simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, S. K.

    1982-01-01

    Instantaneous wall shear stress and streamwise velocities have been measured simultaneously in a flat plate, turbulent boundary layer at moderate Reynolds number in an effort to provide experimental support for large eddy simulations. Data were obtained by using a buried-wire wall shear gage and a hot-wire rake positioned in the log region of the flow. All data processing was accomplished with digital data analysis techniques on a minicomputer. Fluctuations of the instantaneous U plus versus Y plus profiles about a mean law of the wall are shown to be significant and complex. Peak cross-correlation values between wall shear stress and the velocities are high and reflect the passage of a large structure inclined at a small angle to the wall. Estimates of this angle are consistent with those made by other investigators. Conditional sampling techniques were used to detect the passage of various sizes and types of flow disturbances (events) and to estimate their mean frequency of occurrence. Events characterized by large and sudden streamwise accelerations were found to be highly coherent throughout the log region and were strongly correlated with large fluctuations in wall shear-stress. Phase randomness between the near-wall quantities and the outer velocities was small. The results suggest that the flow events detected by conditional sampling applied to velocities in the log region may be related to the bursting process.

  4. Confocal Laser Microscope Scanning Applied To Three-Dimensional Studies Of Biological Specimens.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franksson, Olof; Liljeborg, Anders; Carlsson, Kjell; Forsgren, Per-Ola

    1987-08-01

    The depth-discriminating property of confocal laser microscope scanners can be used to record the three-dimensional structure of specimens. A number of thin sections (approx. 1 μm thick) can be recorded by a repeated process of image scanning and refocusing of the microscope. We have used a confocal microscope scanner in a number of feasibility studies to investigate its possibilities and limitations. It has proved to be well suited for examining fluorescent specimens with a complicated three-dimensional structure, such as nerve cells. It has also been used to study orchid seeds, as well as cell colonies, greatly facilitating evaluation of such specimens. Scanning of the specimens is performed by a focused laser beam that is deflected by rotating mirrors, and the reflected or fluorescent light from the specimen is detected. The specimen thus remains stationary during image scanning, and is only moved stepwise in the vertical direction for refocusing between successive sections. The scanned images consist of 256*256 or 512*512 pixels, each pixel containing 8 bits of data. After a scanning session a large number of digital images, representing consecutive sections of the specimen, are stored on a disk memory. In a typical case 200 such 256*256 images are stored. To display and process this information in a meaningful way requires both appropriate software and a powerful computer. The computer used is a 32-bits minicomputer equipped with an array processor (FPS 100). The necessary software was developed at our department.

  5. Determination of physical and chemical states of lubricants in concentrated contacts, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.

    1979-01-01

    A Fourier emission infrared microspectrometer, set up on a vibration-proof optical table and interfaced to a dedicated minicomputer, was used to record infrared emission spectra from elastohydrodynamic bearing contacts. Its range was extended to cover the entire mid-infrared from 2 to 15 micron. A series of experiments with 5P4E polyphenyl ether showed the existence of a temperature gradient through the lubricant in an ehd contact, which is perpendicular to the flow direction. The experiments also show marked polarization of some of the spectral bands, indicating a molecular alignment. Alignment is less evident at high pressure than at low pressure. To account for this behavior, a model is suggested along the lines developed for the conformational changes observed in long-chain polymers when subjected to increased pressure--to accommodate closer packing, molecules become kinked and curl up. Experiments with a traction fluid showed periodic changes of flow pattern associated with certain spectral changes. These observations will be studied further. A study by infrared attenuated total reflection spectrophotometry was undertaken to determine whether gamma irradiation would change polyethylene wear specimens. The results were negative.

  6. Cellstat--A continuous culture system of a bacteriophage for the study of the mutation rate and the selection process at the DNA level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Husimi, Yuzuru; Nishigaki, Koichi; Kinoshita, Yasunori; Tanaka, Toyosuke

    1982-04-01

    A bacteriophage is continuously cultured in the flow of the host bacterial cell under the control of a minicomputer. In the culture, the population of the noninfected cell is kept constant by the endogeneous regulation mechanism, so it is called the ''cellstat'' culture. Due to the high dilution rate of the host cell, the mutant cell cannot be selected in the cellstat. Therefore, the cellstat is suitable for the study of the mutation rate and the selection process of a bacteriophage under well-defined environmental conditions (including physiological condition of the host cell) without being interfered by host-cell mutations. Applications to coliphage fd, a secretion type phage, are shown as a measurement example. A chimera between fd and a plasmid pBR322 is cultured more than 100 h. The process of population changeovers by deletion mutants indicates that the deletion hot spots exist in this cloning vector and that this apparatus can be used also for testing instability of a recombinant DNA.

  7. Review of the Water Resources Information System of Argentina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hutchison, N.E.

    1987-01-01

    A representative of the U.S. Geological Survey traveled to Buenos Aires, Argentina, in November 1986, to discuss water information systems and data bank implementation in the Argentine Government Center for Water Resources Information. Software has been written by Center personnel for a minicomputer to be used to manage inventory (index) data and water quality data. Additional hardware and software have been ordered to upgrade the existing computer. Four microcomputers, statistical and data base management software, and network hardware and software for linking the computers have also been ordered. The Center plans to develop a nationwide distributed data base for Argentina that will include the major regional offices as nodes. Needs for continued development of the water resources information system for Argentina were reviewed. Identified needs include: (1) conducting a requirements analysis to define the content of the data base and insure that all user requirements are met, (2) preparing a plan for the development, implementation, and operation of the data base, and (3) developing a conceptual design to inform all development personnel and users of the basic functionality planned for the system. A quality assurance and configuration management program to provide oversight to the development process was also discussed. (USGS)

  8. Self-Tuning Adaptive-Controller Using Online Frequency Identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chiang, W. W.; Cannon, R. H., Jr.

    1985-01-01

    A real time adaptive controller was designed and tested successfully on a fourth order laboratory dynamic system which features very low structural damping and a noncolocated actuator sensor pair. The controller, implemented in a digital minicomputer, consists of a state estimator, a set of state feedback gains, and a frequency locked loop (FLL) for real time parameter identification. The FLL can detect the closed loop natural frequency of the system being controlled, calculate the mismatch between a plant parameter and its counterpart in the state estimator, and correct the estimator parameter in real time. The adaptation algorithm can correct the controller error and stabilize the system for more than 50% variation in the plant natural frequency, compared with a 10% stability margin in frequency variation for a fixed gain controller having the same performance at the nominal plant condition. After it has locked to the correct plant frequency, the adaptive controller works as well as the fixed gain controller does when there is no parameter mismatch. The very rapid convergence of this adaptive system is demonstrated experimentally, and can also be proven with simple root locus methods.

  9. High frequency radar software reference manual for Product Two

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walden, D. C.; Winkelman, J. R.; Matheson, L. D.; Grubb, R. N.

    1984-03-01

    The Space Environment Laboratory (SEL) of NOAA developed a general purpose High Frequency (HF) Radar system capable of making most of the measurements of the ionosphere that can be made by coherent monostatic or bistatic radio wave sounding. This capability is provided by combining a very flexible, frequency-agile transmitter and receiver system with a digital control and signal processing system containing a general purpose 16-bit minicomputer for operator interaction and control. A manual is given which describes the software operating system written by the SEL staff to permit the Radar to be used for quite a wide range of standard measurements under simple operator control. The control language enables the user to exploit most of the capabilities of the instrument without having to program the system in detail. The manual is primarily directed at the user who needs to understand and use this capability. Secondarily, if used in conjunction with the computer manufacturer's system and language manuals, the SEL HF Radar Hardware manuals and the SEL source code listings, it should enable an experienced user to customize the software for special purposes or to produce new operating software.

  10. Commercial space development needs cheap launchers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benson, James William

    1998-01-01

    SpaceDev is in the market for a deep space launch, and we are not going to pay $50 million for it. There is an ongoing debate about the elasticity of demand related to launch costs. On the one hand there are the ``big iron'' NASA and DoD contractors who say that there is no market for small or inexpensive launchers, that lowering launch costs will not result in significantly more launches, and that the current uncompetitive pricing scheme is appropriate. On the other hand are commercial companies which compete in the real world, and who say that there would be innumerable new launches if prices were to drop dramatically. I participated directly in the microcomputer revolution, and saw first hand what happened to the big iron computer companies who failed to see or heed the handwriting on the wall. We are at the same stage in the space access revolution that personal computers were in the late '70s and early '80s. The global economy is about to be changed in ways that are just as unpredictable as those changes wrought after the introduction of the personal computer. Companies which fail to innovate and keep producing only big iron will suffer the same fate as IBM and all the now-extinct mainframe and minicomputer companies. A few will remain, but with a small share of the market, never again to be in a position to dominate.

  11. Simulation and analyses of the aeroassist flight experiment attitude update method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, J. R.

    1991-01-01

    A method which will be used to update the alignment of the Aeroassist Flight Experiment's Inertial Measuring Unit is simulated and analyzed. This method, the Star Line Maneuver, uses measurements from the Space Shuttle Orbiter star trackers along with an extended Kalman filter to estimate a correction to the attitude quaternion maintained by an Inertial Measuring Unit in the Orbiter's payload bay. This quaternion is corrupted by on-orbit bending of the Orbiter payload bay with respect to the Orbiter navigation base, which is incorporated into the payload quaternion when it is initialized via a direct transfer of the Orbiter attitude state. The method of updating this quaternion is examined through verification of baseline cases and Monte Carlo analysis using a simplified simulation, The simulation uses nominal state dynamics and measurement models from the Kalman filter as its real world models, and is programmed on Microvax minicomputer using Matlab, and interactive matrix analysis tool. Results are presented which confirm and augment previous performance studies, thereby enhancing confidence in the Star Line Maneuver design methodology.

  12. ERS-1 SAR data processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leung, K.; Bicknell, T.; Vines, K.

    1986-01-01

    To take full advantage of the synthetic aperature radar (SAR) to be flown on board the European Space Agency's Remote Sensing Satellite (ERS-1) (1989) and the Canadian Radarsat (1990), the implementation of a receiving station in Alaska is being studied to gather and process SAR data pertaining in particular to regions within the station's range of reception. The current SAR data processing requirement is estimated to be on the order of 5 minutes per day. The Interim Digital Sar Processor (IDP) which was under continual development through Seasat (1978) and SIR-B (1984) can process slightly more than 2 minutes of ERS-1 data per day. On the other hand, the Advanced Digital SAR Processore (ADSP), currently under development for the Shuttle Imaging Radar C (SIR-C, 1988) and the Venus Radar Mapper, (VMR, 1988), is capable of processing ERS-1 SAR data at a real time rate. To better suit the anticipated ERS-1 SAR data processing requirement, both a modified IDP and an ADSP derivative are being examined. For the modified IDP, a pipelined architecture is proposed for the mini-computer plus array processor arrangement to improve throughout. For the ADSP derivative, a simplified version is proposed to enhance ease of implementation and maintainability while maintaing real time throughput rates. These processing systems are discussed and evaluated.

  13. Modernization of the NASA IRTF Telescope Control System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pilger, Eric J.; Harwood, James V.; Onaka, Peter M.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the ongoing modernization of the NASA IR Telescope Facility Telescope Control System. A major mandate of this project is to keep the telescope available for observations throughout. Therefore, we have developed an incremental plan that will allow us to replace components of the software and hardware without shutting down the system. The current system, running under FORTH on a DEC LSI 11/23 minicomputer interfaced to a Bus and boards developed in house, will be replaced with a combination of a Sun SPARCstation running SunOS, a MicroSPARC based Single Board Computer running LynxOS, and various intelligent VME based peripheral cards. The software is based on a design philosophy originally developed by Pat Wallace for use on the Anglo Australian Telescope. This philosophy has gained wide acceptance, and is currently used in a number of observatories around the world. A key element of this philosophy is the division of the TCS into `Virtual' and `Real' parts. This will allow us to replace the higher level functions of the TCS with software running on the Sun, while still relying on the LSI 11/23 for performance of the lower level functions. Eventual transfer of lower level functions to the MicroSPARC system will then proceed incrementally through use of a Q-Bus to VME-Bus converter.

  14. User's guide for the VTRPE computer model. Final report, May 90-Sep 91

    SciTech Connect

    Ryan, F.J.

    1991-10-01

    This report is a user's guide to the VTRPE (variable terrain radio parabolic equation) computer model. It is designed to provide the reader with a summary of the physics and numerical methods used in the VTRPE model, along with detailed instructions on the model's use and operation. The VTRPE computer program is a range-dependent, tropospheric microwave propagation model that is based upon the split-step Fourier parabolic wave equation algorithm. The nominal applicable frequency range of the model is VHF to K-band. The VTRPE program is able to make predictions for microwave propagation over both land and water. The VTRPE code is a full-wave propagation model that solves the electromagnetic wave equations for the complex electric and magnetic radiation fields. The model accounts for the effects of nonuniform atmospheric refractivity fields, variable surface terrain, and varying surface dielectric properties on microwave propagation. The code is written in ANSI-77 FORTRAN with MILSPEC-1753 FORTRAN language extensions. The VTRPE program is currently configured to run under the UNIX operating system on SUN minicomputers and CONVEX supercomputers, and under MS-DOS on 80386/80486-based PC's.

  15. Augmented burst-error correction for UNICON laser memory. [digital memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lim, R. S.

    1974-01-01

    A single-burst-error correction system is described for data stored in the UNICON laser memory. In the proposed system, a long fire code with code length n greater than 16,768 bits was used as an outer code to augment an existing inner shorter fire code for burst error corrections. The inner fire code is a (80,64) code shortened from the (630,614) code, and it is used to correct a single-burst-error on a per-word basis with burst length b less than or equal to 6. The outer code, with b less than or equal to 12, would be used to correct a single-burst-error on a per-page basis, where a page consists of 512 32-bit words. In the proposed system, the encoding and error detection processes are implemented by hardware. A minicomputer, currently used as a UNICON memory management processor, is used on a time-demanding basis for error correction. Based upon existing error statistics, this combination of an inner code and an outer code would enable the UNICON system to obtain a very low error rate in spite of flaws affecting the recorded data.

  16. Evaluating Computer Capabilities in a Primary Care Practice-Based Research Network

    PubMed Central

    Ariza, Adolfo J.; Binns, Helen J.; Christoffel, Katherine Kaufer

    2004-01-01

    PURPOSE We wanted to assess computer capabilities in a primary care practice-based research network and to understand how receptive the practices were to new ideas for automation of practice activities and research. METHOD This study was conducted among members of the Pediatric Practice Research Group (PPRG). A survey to assess computer capabilities was developed to explore hardware types, software programs, Internet connectivity and data transmission; views on privacy and security; and receptivity to future electronic data collection approaches. RESULTS Of the 40 PPRG practices participating in the study during the autumn of 2001, all used IBM-compatible systems. Of these, 45% used stand-alone desktops, 40% had networked desktops, and approximately 15% used laptops and minicomputers. A variety of software packages were used, with most practices (82%) having software for some aspect of patient care documentation, patient accounting (90%), business support (60%), and management reports and analysis (97%). The main obstacles to expanding use of computers in patient care were insufficient staff training (63%) and privacy concerns (82%). If provided with training and support, most practices indicated they were willing to consider an array of electronic data collection options for practice-based research activities. CONCLUSIONS There is wide variability in hardware and software use in the pediatric practice setting. Implementing electronic data collection in the PPRG would require a substantial start-up effort and ongoing training and support at the practice site. PMID:15506573

  17. Pneumatic sample-transfer system for use with the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory rotating target neutron source (RTNS-I)

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, R.E.

    1981-07-01

    A pneumatic sample-transfer system is needed to be able to rapidly retrieve samples irradiated with 14-MeV neutrons at the Rotating Target Neutron Source (RTNS-I). The rabbit system, already in place for many years, has been refurbished with modern system components controlled by an LSI-11 minicomputer. Samples can now be counted three seconds after an irradiation. There are many uses for this expanded 14-MeV neutron activation capability. Several fission products difficult to isolate from mixed fission fragments can be produced instead through (n,p) or (n,..cap alpha..) reactions with stable isotopes. Mass-separated samples of Nd, Mo, and Se, for example, can be irradiated to produce Pr, Nb, and As radionuclides sufficient for decay scheme studies. The system may also be used for multielement fast-neutron activation analysis because the neutron flux is greater than 2 x 10/sup 11/ n/cm/sup 2/-sec. Single element analyses of Si and O are also possible. Finally, measurements of fast-neutron cross sections producing short-lived activation products can be performed with this system. A description of the rabbit system and instructions for its use are presented in this report.

  18. Rectification of terrain induced distortions in radar imagery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kwok, Ronald; Curlander, John C.; Pang, Shirley S.

    1987-01-01

    This paper describes a technique to generate geocoded synthetic aperture radar (SAR) imagery corrected for terrain induced geometric distortions. This algorithm transforms the raw slant range image, generated by the signal processor, into a map registered product, resampled to either Universal Transverse Mercator (UTM) or Polar Stereographic projections, and corrected for foreshortening. The technique utilizes the space platform trajectory information in conjunction with a digital elevation map (DEM) of the target area to generate an ortho-radar map with near-autonomous operation. The current procedure requires only two to three tie-points to compensate for the platform position uncertainty that results in translational error between the image and the DEM. This approach is unique in that it does not require generation of a simulated radar image from the DEM or a grid of tie-points to characterize the image-to-map distortions. Rather, it models the inherent distortions based on knowledge of the radar data collection characteristics, the signal Doppler parameters, and the local terrain height to automatically predict the registration transformation. This algorithm has been implemented on a minicomputer system equipped with an array processor and a large random-access memory to optimize the throughput.

  19. A system for processing Landsat and other georeferenced data for resource management applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitley, S. L.

    1979-01-01

    The NASA Earth Resources Laboratory has developed a transferrable system for processing Landsat and disparate data with capabilities for digital data classification, georeferencing, overlaying, and data base management. This system is known as the Earth Resources Data Analysis System. The versatility of the system has been demonstrated with applications in several disciplines. A description is given of a low-cost data system concept that is suitable for transfer to one's available in-house minicomputer or to a low-cost computer purchased for this purpose. Software packages are described that process Landsat data to produce surface cover classifications and that geographically reference the data to the UTM projection. Programs are also described that incorporate several sets of Landsat derived information, topographic information, soils information, rainfall information, etc., into a data base. Selected application algorithms are discussed and sample products are presented. The types of computers on which the low-cost data system concept has been implemented are identified, typical implementation costs are given, and the source where the software may be obtained is identified.

  20. Distribution and clearance of radioactive aerosol on the nasal mucosa.

    PubMed

    McLean, J A; Bacon, J R; Mathews, K P; Thrall, J H; Banas, J M; Hedden, J; Bayne, N K

    1984-03-01

    The distribution and clearance of aerosolized radioactive technetium 99m pertechnate in physiologic buffered saline was analyzed in four human adult asymptomatic volunteers following delivery into one nostril in the same manner as for nasal challenge testing (i.e., 0.1 ml via a 251 DeVilbiss atomizer powered by a compressor delivering 0.10 +/- 0.01 gm/spray). For comparison, squeeze bottles and spray bottles from commercial sources, a 114 and a 127 DeVilbiss atomizer, and a pipette were employed. Lateral imagery via minicomputer processing was used to determine both distribution and clearance of the radiotracer. The counts after 1 minute were lower following pipette delivery than with the other devices. None yielded discernable , wide-spread distribution of aerosol throughout the nasal cavity. Following delivery from the 251 atomizer, mean clearance at 17 minutes was 60.0%. Similar clearance rates were obtained with the other spraying methods except for lower values with the squeeze bottle. Analysis of six hour clearance studies by linear regression showed a relatively rapid initial phase, which is probably due largely to mucociliary clearance, and a prolonged late phase related to the very slow disappearance of residual material located far anteriorly in the nose. Achieving good initial retention and rapid clearance of material deposited anteriorly in the nose are desirable attributes of devices employed for administering materials intranasally. PMID:6328631

  1. A liquid ionisation detector for digital radiography of therapeutic megavoltage photon beams.

    PubMed

    Meertens, H; van Herk, M; Weeda, J

    1985-04-01

    Experiments with an ionisation detector were performed in order to determine whether it was possible to obtain high energy photon beam images for radiotherapy treatment verification. A small prototype detector with a field of view of 78 mm X 78 mm and constructed from printed circuit boards was used. The imaging area was a matrix ionisation chamber, filled with air or liquid (2,2,4-trimethylpentane). A minicomputer was used to control the data acquisition electronics and to reconstruct and restore the images. The images were displayed on a viewing console for computed tomography images. The liquid filled detector with a front-rear board separation of 1.0 mm gave the best results. The spatial resolution was about 3.8 mm with a density resolution of 0.5% for a data acquisition time of 120 s. Comparison of the liquid detector images with corresponding metal screen-film detector images showed that the image qualities were the same. An important advantage of the ionisation detector image is that grey scale modification, sharpening and smoothing by digital processing can easily be performed. PMID:3923505

  2. Crystal structure of cerium (IV)-di-potassium trisulfate monohydrate

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsov, V.Ya.; Dikareva, L.M.; Rogachev, D.L.; Porai-Koshits, M.A.

    1986-07-01

    The compound K2Ce(SO4)3 x H2O (I) was obtained in a study of the system Ce(SO4)2-K2SO4-H2O4-HO2 at 50-150C (1). The refined unit-cell parameters are: a = 20.600(3), b = 7.0744 (6), c = 18.583(3) A, US = 126.083(8), V = 2189(1) AT, Z = 8, rho/sub calc/ = 3.202(2) g/cmT, space group C2. The previously given unit-cell parameters are related to those given here by the matrices 100/010/0.5 0 1 and 100/010/-1 0-1. The intensities of 3416 independent reflections (3363 with I greater than or equal to 2sigma) and the unit cell parameters were measured on a Syntex P21 four-circle automatic diffractometer (lambdaMoK , theta/2 theta scanning at variable rate from 4 to 29.3 deg/min to theta = 60). The structural calculations were done on a Nova 1200 minicomputer by means of the Syntex XTL programs and on an ES 1022 computer by means of the Struktura programs. They used the heavy atom method; the final refinement over 3240 reflections (R = 0.071) was made allowing for the anisotropy of the thermal vibrations of the atoms.

  3. Text processing for technical reports (direct computer-assisted origination, editing, and output of text)

    SciTech Connect

    De Volpi, A.; Fenrick, M. R.; Stanford, G. S.; Fink, C. L.; Rhodes, E. A.

    1980-10-01

    Documentation often is a primary residual of research and development. Because of this important role and because of the large amount of time consumed in generating technical reports, particularly those containing formulas and graphics, an existing data-processing computer system has been adapted so as to provide text-processing of technical documents. Emphasis has been on accuracy, turnaround time, and time savings for staff and secretaries, for the types of reports normally produced in the reactor development program. The computer-assisted text-processing system, called TXT, has been implemented to benefit primarily the originator of technical reports. The system is of particular value to professional staff, such as scientists and engineers, who have responsibility for generating much correspondence or lengthy, complex reports or manuscripts - especially if prompt turnaround and high accuracy are required. It can produce text that contains special Greek or mathematical symbols. Written in FORTRAN and MACRO, the program TXT operates on a PDP-11 minicomputer under the RSX-11M multitask multiuser monitor. Peripheral hardware includes videoterminals, electrostatic printers, and magnetic disks. Either data- or word-processing tasks may be performed at the terminals. The repertoire of operations has been restricted so as to minimize user training and memory burden. Spectarial staff may be readily trained to make corrections from annotated copy. Some examples of camera-ready copy are provided.

  4. Tablet computers to support outpatient pulmonary rehabilitation in patients with COPD

    PubMed Central

    Ringbaek, Thomas J.; Lavesen, Marie; Lange, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background A minicomputer (tablet) with instructions and a training diary has the potential of facilitating adherence to pulmonary rehabilitation (PR). Objective To evaluate the effect of adding a tablet to a classic outpatient PR programme for COPD patients. Methods A total of 115 patients participated in a 7- to 10-week outpatient PR programme in groups of 10–12 individuals. Half of the groups were assigned to PR plus a tablet (tablet group) and the other groups were assigned to PR only (controls). Primary effect parameters were endurance shuttle walk time (ESWT) and disease-specific health status (COPD Assessment Test=CAT). Results The change in ESWT was significantly better in the control group (mean 167 sec) compared with the tablet group (mean 51 sec) (p<0.01), whereas the change in CAT score did not differ significantly between the two groups (−0.6 vs. −2.3) (p=0.17). Conclusions Compared with usual PR, no significant improvements were seen in the group equipped with the tablet after 7–10 weeks of rehabilitation. Future studies should focus on long-term effects. PMID:27225598

  5. Interactive geologic modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Glaeser, J.D.; Krajewski, S.A.

    1984-04-01

    Improved success in finding hydrocarbons and minerals depends on developing geologic models from seismic, gravity, and magnetic data that most closely approximate real-world settings. Although data processing remains the chore of mainframe and minicomputers, interpretations and modeling of geologic and geophysical information now are best accomplished on personal computers because these computers afford the explorationist maximum freedom to shape and fine tune geophysical evaluations. Three case histories use the GEOSIM geophysical modeling systems to delineate exploration targets. The first example is Silurian Niagaran reef trends in the Michigan basin. Here, differences in seismic reef anomalies result from variations in carbonate-evaporite stratigraphy encasing the reefs, reef geometry, and reef reservoir parameters. These variations which influence real seismic-response differences can be successfully matched using appropriate geologic models in generating synthetic seismic reef anomalies. The second example applies gravity and magnetic data to seismic modeling of a Wyoming coal field. Detailed seismic stratigraphy helps locate those portions of the field having multiple seams, although it does not resolve individual economic zones. Gravity data do identify pinchout margins of multiseam zones and pinchouts between principal coals. Magnetic data are then used to delineate the burn (clinker) margin. Seismic modeling of subtle stratigraphic traps is the broader area of exploration interest contained in the first 2 examples. In the third, successfully modeled and tested examples of lateral changes in deltaic facies and of faulted, unconformity-bounded continent-margin sequences are shown to be successful guides to reinterpretation of seismic data.

  6. The 1983-84 Connecticut 45-Hz-band field-strength measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bannister, P. R.

    1986-03-01

    Extremely low frequency (ELF) measurements are made of the transverse horizontal magnetic field strength received in Connecticut. The AN/BSR-1 receiver consists of an AN/UYK-20 minicomputer, a signal timing and interface unit (STIU), a rubidium frequency time standard, two magnetic tape recorders, and a preamplifier. The transmission source of these farfield (1.6-Mm range) measurements is the U.S. Navy's ELF Wisconsin Test Facility (WTF), located in the Chequamegon National Forest in north central Wisconsin, about 8 km south of the village of Clam Lake. The WTF consists of two 22.5-km antennas; one of which is situated approximately in the north-south (NS) direction and the other approximately in the east-west (EW) direction. Each antenna is grounded at both ends. The electrical axis of the WTF EW antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75Hz. The electrical axis of the WTF NS antenna is 11 deg east of north at 45 Hz and 14 deg east of north at 75 Hz. The WTF array can be steered electrically. Its radiated power is approximately 0.5 W at 45 Hz and 1 W at 75 Hz. This report will compare results of 45 Hz band data taken during 1983 to 1984 with previous 45 Hz band measurements.

  7. [Medical data in pathology--evaluation of a large collection. (530,000 diagnoses coded in SNOMED II)].

    PubMed

    Baumann, R P

    1999-10-01

    The paper is describing the design and the performance of the computerized system, from its introduction in 1982 until the present day. The first device, using the MUMPS language on a mini-computer, followed by a VAX computer with terminals have been replaced in 1996 by an application program, using ORACLE, based on the client-server concept. The content and the particularities of the different data groups are discussed, concerning the functional components of the data bank: 'PATIENTS', 'SPECIMEN', 'SENDERS', 'REPORT' and 'DIAGNOSES'. By means of examples, we demonstrate the chronological evolution of the registration of persons, the distribution of the diagnoses according to the organ systems, the possibilities to combine various lesions and an algorithm to assure that a given lesion is registered only once per patient. In first place, the efficiency and the reliability of manual coding by a pathologist using the Systematized Nomenclature of Medicine (SNOMED; 2nd edition [1979/1982]) is discussed. The data bank currently contains 530,000 diagnoses, distributed among on SNOMED's five main modules, obtained from 1500 autopsies, 140,000 surgical and 180,000 cytological specimens. Concluding the article, an analysis is made of desirable developments in the future with the aim of a better integration of the acquired information in routine work and an enhanced use of the medical content for epidemiological research or statistical analysis. PMID:10582493

  8. A communication and monitoring system for an underground coal mine, iron ore mine, and deep underground silver mine. Open file report Jun 73-Mar 78

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeron, A.A.; Collins, R.L.; Michels, J.L.

    1981-11-01

    Advanced communication and monitoring systems were developed and demonstrated in three underground mines representing different mining techniques, geographical areas, and material mined. The first was a large coal mine in western Pennsylvania using room-and-pillar techniques and continuous mining methods. The system developed provided private telephone channels, environmental monitoring, and control of underground equipment, all on a single coaxial cable, with all system operations under the direction of a minicomputer. The second was a magnetite ore mine in eastern Pennsylvania that used block caving mining techniques. A radio system was developed that provided two-way communications between trackless vehicles and roving personnel. A unique system of uhf-vhf repeaters combined with a 'leaky-feeder' transmission line offered operational and emergency features not previously found in mine communication systems. The third was a deep silver mine in the Cour d'Alene district of Idaho. This system utilizes a single wire pair to provide up to 14 voice channels. A combination of PBX, telephone carrier systems, and intercoms offered private conversations, selective signaling, and emergency backup communications.

  9. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications.

    PubMed

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications. PMID:26274961

  10. A geographic information system for resource managers based on multi-level remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. J.; Ridd, M. K.

    1985-01-01

    Procedures followed in developing a test case geographic information system derived primarily from remotely sensed data for the North Cache Soil Conservation District (SCD) in northern Utah are outlined. The North Cache SCD faces serious problems regarding water allocation, flood and geologic hazards, urban encroachment into prime farmland, soil erosion, and wildlife habitat. Four fundamental data planes were initially entered into the geo-referenced data base: (1) land use/land cover information for the agricultural and built-up areas of the valley obtained from various forms of aerial photography; (2) vegetation/land cover in mountains classified digitally from Landsat; (3) geomorphic terrain units derived from aerial photography and soil maps; and (4) digital terrain maps obtained from DMA digital data. The land use/vegetation/land cover information from manual photographic and Landsat interpretation were joined digitally into a single data plane with an integrated legend, and segmented into quadrangle units. These were merged with the digitized geomorphic units and the digital terrain data using a Prime 400 minicomputer. All data planes were geo-referenced to a UTM coordinate grid.

  11. A geographic information system for resource managers based on multi-level remote sensing data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, D. J.; Ridd, M. K.

    1984-01-01

    Procedures followed in developing a test case geographic information system derived primarily from remotely sensed data for the North Cache Soil Conservation District (SCD) in northern Utah are outlined. The North Cache SCD faces serious problems regarding water allocation, flood and geologic hazards, urban encroachment into prime farmland, soil erosion, and wildlife habitat. Four fundamental data planes were initially entered into the geo-referenced data base: (1) land use/land cover information for the agricultural and built-up areas of the valley obtained from various forms of aerial photography; (2) vegetation/land cover in mountains classified digitally from LANDSAT; (3) geomorphic terrain units derived from aerial photography and soil maps; and (4) digital terrain maps obtained from DMA digital data. The land use/vegetation/land cover information from manual photographic and LANDSAT interpretation were joined digitally into a single data plane with an integrated legend, and segmented into quadrangle units. These were merged with the digitized geomorphic units and the digital terrain data using a Prime 400 minicomputer. All data planes were geo-referenced to a UTM coordinate grid.

  12. Data acquisition and control of a Raman spectrometer using a DEC PDP 11/34 computer

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, D.P.; Fletcher, W.H.; Trimble, D.S.

    1987-06-01

    The Raman spectrometer system, located at Building K-1004L, which is operated by the members of the Process Chemistry section of the Materials and Chemistry Technology Department, has recently been extensively overhauled and upgraded. A significant portion of the efforts involved in the upgrading was in the conversion to a DEC PDP 11/34 mini-computer. The necessary changes and improvements made to the laser, the optical path, the monochromator and the signal collection unit are described. The primary objective of this report is to describe the actual interfacing of the spectrometer and its interface unit to the DEC computer. In addition, the seven operating routines which were adapted for or written especially for this system are described and examples of the system's performance and flexibility are included. The resulting spectrometer system has a markedly improved performance and reliability and allows the Process Chemistry section to readily examine virtually any class of samples which may be analyzed at room temperature with argon ion laser emission lines.

  13. H-coal fluid dynamics. Final report, August 1, 1977-December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-04-16

    This report presents the results of work aimed at understanding the hydrodynamic behavior of the H-Coal reactor. A summary of the literature search related to the fluid dynamic behavior of gas/liquid/solid systems has been presented. Design details of a cold flow unit were discussed. The process design of this cold flow model followed practices established by HRI in their process development unit. The cold fow unit has been used to conduct experiments with nitrogen, kerosene, or kerosene/coal char slurries, and HDS catalyst, which at room temperature have properties similar to those existing in the H-Coal reactor. Mineral oil, a high-viscosity liquid, was also used. The volume fractions occupied by gas/liquid slurries and catalyst particles were determined by several experimental techniques. The use of a mini-computer for data collection and calculation has greatly accelerated the analysis and reporting of data. Data on nitrogen/kerosene/HDS catalyst and coal char fines are presented in this paper. Correlations identified in the literature search were utilized to analyze the data. From this analysis it became evident that the Richardson-Zaki correlation describes the effect of slurry flow rate on catalyst expansion. Three-phase fluidization data were analyzed with two models.

  14. Pressure Measurement Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    System 8400 is an advanced system for measurement of gas and liquid pressure, along with a variety of other parameters, including voltage, frequency and digital inputs. System 8400 offers exceptionally high speed data acquisition through parallel processing, and its modular design allows expansion from a relatively inexpensive entry level system by the addition of modular Input Units that can be installed or removed in minutes. Douglas Juanarena was on the team of engineers that developed a new technology known as ESP (electronically scanned pressure). The Langley ESP measurement system was based on miniature integrated circuit pressure-sensing transducers that communicated pressure information to a minicomputer. In 1977, Juanarena formed PSI to exploit the NASA technology. In 1978 he left Langley, obtained a NASA license for the technology, introduced the first commercial product, the 780B pressure measurement system. PSI developed a pressure scanner for automation of industrial processes. Now in its second design generation, the DPT-6400 is capable of making 2,000 measurements a second and has 64 channels by addition of slave units. New system 8400 represents PSI's bid to further exploit the $600 million U.S. industrial pressure measurement market. It is geared to provide a turnkey solution to physical measurement.

  15. AESOP XX: summary of proceedings. [Gatlinburg, Tennessee, April 24 to 26, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    1980-03-01

    The 20th meeting of the Association for Energy Systems, Operations, and Programming (AESOP) was held in Gatlinburg, Tennessee, on April 24 to 26, 1979. Representatives of DOE Headquarters discussed the effects that new security and privacy regulations will have on automatic data processing operations. The status and future possibilities of the Business Management Information System (BMIS) were also discussed. Then representatives of various DOE offices and contractors presented reports on various topics. This report contains two-page summaries of the papers presented at the meeting. Session topics and titles of papers were as follows: Washington report (New ADP issues; BMIS: the Business Management Information System; Nuclear weapons and the computer); Improving the productivity of the computing analyst/programer (What productivity improvement tools are available; Rocky Flats experience with SDM/70; Albuquerque Operations Office experience with SDM/70; Planning and project management; Minicomputer standards and programer productivity; MRC productivity gains through applications development tools); User viewpoints and expectations of data processing (User perspectives on computer applications; User viewpoints on environmental studies; Planning and implementing a procurement system; Two sides of the DP coin); Data base management (Use of data base systems within DOE; Future trends in data base hardware; Future trends in data base software; Toward automating the data base design process); and Management discussions. Complete versions of three of the papers have already been cited in ERA. These can be located by reference to the entry CONF-790431-- in the Report Number Index. (RWR)

  16. Coaxial jets with and without swirl

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ribeiro, M. M.; Whitelaw, J. H.

    1980-02-01

    Measured values of mean velocity, Reynolds stresses and probability density distributions of fluctuating velocity are reported for the turbulent coaxial jets, with and without swirl, emerging into stagnant surroundings from a long pipe and an annulus concentric with the pipe. They were obtained using hot-wire anemometry and on-line data processing with the aid of a mini-computer. The results show that non-swirling coaxial flow configurations approach a self-similar state in a much smaller distance than that of the round jet, for velocity ratios ranging between 0.65 to 1.5; this is due to the mixing layer and vortex shedding that occur in the region downstream of the separation wall between the two streams. In the presence of swirl, the coaxial jet was found to develop at a faster rate. An assessment of turbulence models, based on Reynolds stress closures, suggests that previous assumptions for turbulent diffusion of turbulent kinetic energy are in error.

  17. ANL statement of site strategy for computing workstations

    SciTech Connect

    Fenske, K.R.; Boxberger, L.M.; Amiot, L.W.; Bretscher, M.E.; Engert, D.E.; Moszur, F.M.; Mueller, C.J.; O'Brien, D.E.; Schlesselman, C.G.; Troyer, L.J.

    1991-11-01

    This Statement of Site Strategy describes the procedure at Argonne National Laboratory for defining, acquiring, using, and evaluating scientific and office workstations and related equipment and software in accord with DOE Order 1360.1A (5-30-85), and Laboratory policy. It is Laboratory policy to promote the installation and use of computing workstations to improve productivity and communications for both programmatic and support personnel, to ensure that computing workstations acquisitions meet the expressed need in a cost-effective manner, and to ensure that acquisitions of computing workstations are in accord with Laboratory and DOE policies. The overall computing site strategy at ANL is to develop a hierarchy of integrated computing system resources to address the current and future computing needs of the laboratory. The major system components of this hierarchical strategy are: Supercomputers, Parallel computers, Centralized general purpose computers, Distributed multipurpose minicomputers, and Computing workstations and office automation support systems. Computing workstations include personal computers, scientific and engineering workstations, computer terminals, microcomputers, word processing and office automation electronic workstations, and associated software and peripheral devices costing less than $25,000 per item.

  18. History of Robotic and Remotely Operated Telescopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genet, Russell M.

    2011-03-01

    While automated instrument sequencers were employed on solar eclipse expeditions in the late 1800s, it wasn't until the 1960s that Art Code and associates at Wisconsin used a PDP minicomputer to automate an 8-inch photometric telescope. Although this pioneering project experienced frequent equipment failures and was shut down after a couple of years, it paved the way for the first space telescopes. Reliable microcomputers initiated the modern era of robotic telescopes. Louis Boyd and I applied single board microcomputers with 64K of RAM and floppy disk drives to telescope automation at the Fairborn Observatory, achieving reliable, fully robotic operation in 1983 that has continued uninterrupted for 28 years. In 1985 the Smithsonian Institution provided us with a suburb operating location on Mt. Hopkins in southern Arizona, while the National Science Foundation funded additional telescopes. Remote access to our multiple robotic telescopes at the Fairborn Observatory began in the late 1980s. The Fairborn Observatory, with its 14 fully robotic telescopes and staff of two (one full and one part time) illustrates the potential for low operating and maintenance costs. As the information capacity of the Internet has expanded, observational modes beyond simple differential photometry opened up, bringing us to the current era of real-time remote access to remote observatories and global observatory networks. Although initially confined to smaller telescopes, robotic operation and remote access are spreading to larger telescopes as telescopes from afar becomes the normal mode of operation.

  19. The first "space" vegetables have been grown in the "SVET" greenhouse by means of controlled environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Ivanova, T N; Bercovich YuA; Mashinskiy, A L; Meleshko, G I

    1992-04-01

    The paper describes the project "SVET"--the creating of a small dimensions space greenhouse of new generation. By means of minicomputer, "SVET" is full-automatic operating and controlling environmental conditions system in the higher plants growth unit. A number of studies have selected the radish and cabbage vegetables as a potentially important crop for CELSS (short term cycle of vegetation). The "SVET" space greenhouse has been mounted on the "CRYSTAL" technological module which docked to the "MIR" orbital space station on June 10, 1990. Soviet cosmonauts Balandin and Solovyov started the first experiments with the greenhouse on June 15, 1990. The preliminary results of the seeds cultivation for the first 54-days period in "SVET" are presented. Morphometrical characteristics of the plants, brought back to the Earth are given. The vegetation peculiarities, such as the plants growth and the development slowing-down, or the dry substance contents raising are noted. For the first time, the root crop of radish plants at microgravity conditions, are produced. Characteristics of controlled plants' environment parameters and an estimation of functional properties of control and regulation systems of the "SVET" greenhouse in space flight according to telemetry data is given. PMID:11541047

  20. A C Language Implementation of the SRO (Murdock) Detector/Analyzer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Murdock, James N.; Halbert, Scott E.

    1991-01-01

    A signal detector and analyzer algorithm was described by Murdock and Hutt in 1983. The algorithm emulates the performance of a human interpreter of seismograms. It estimates the signal onset, the direction of onset (positive or negative), the quality of these determinations, the period and amplitude of the signal, and the background noise at the time of the signal. The algorithm has been coded in C language for implementation as a 'blackbox' for data similar to that of the China Digital Seismic Network. A driver for the algorithm is included, as are suggestions for other drivers. In all of these routines, plus several FIR filters that are included as well, floating point operations are not required. Multichannel operation is supported. Although the primary use of the code has been for in-house processing of broadband and short period data of the China Digital Seismic Network, provisions have been made to process the long period and very long period data of that system as well. The code for the in-house detector, which runs on a mini-computer, is very similar to that of the field system, which runs on a microprocessor. The code is documented.

  1. Remote sensing of tropospheric gases and aerosols with airborne DIAL system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Browell, E. V.

    1983-01-01

    The multipurpose airborne DIAL system developed at NASA Langley Research Center is characterized, and the published results of tropospheric O3, H2O, and aerosol-backscatter remote-sensing experiments performed in 1980 and 1981 are summarized. The system comprises two tunable dye lasers pumped by frequency-doubled Nd:YAG lasers, dielectric-coated steering optics, a 36-cm-diameter Cassegrain receiver telescope, gateable photomultiplier tubes, and a minicomputer data-processing unit for real-time calculation of gas concentrations and backscattering profiles. The transmitted energy of the 100-microsec-separated dye-laser pulses is 40, 80, or 50 mJ/pulse at around 300, 600, or 720-nm wavelength, respectively. Good agreement was found between DIAL-remote-sensed and in-situ H2O and O3 profiles of the lower troposphere and O3 profiles of the tropopause region, and the usefulness of DIAL backscattering measurements in the study of boundary-layer and tropospheric dynamics is demonstrated. The feasibility of DIAL sensing of power-plant or urban plume SO2, of urban-area (or rural-area column-content) NO2, and of temperature and H2O (simultaneously using a third laser) has been suggested by simulation studies.

  2. Distribution of computer functionality for accelerator control at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1985-01-01

    A set of physical and functional system components and their interconnection protocols have been established for all controls work at the AGS. Portions of these designs were tested as part of enhanced operation of the AGS as a source of polarized protons and additional segments will be implemented during the continuing construction efforts which are adding heavy ion capability to our facility. Included in our efforts are the following computer and control system elements: a broad band local area network, which embodies MODEMS; transmission systems and branch interface units; a hierarchical layer, which performs certain data base and watchdog/alarm functions; a group of work station processors (Apollo's) which perform the function of traditional minicomputer host(s) and a layer, which provides both real time control and standardization functions for accelerator devices and instrumentation. Data base and other accelerator functionality is assigned to the most correct level within our network for both real time performance, long-term utility, and orderly growth.

  3. Distribution of computer functionality for accelerator control at the Brookhaven AGS

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, A.; Clifford, T.; Frankel, R.

    1985-10-01

    A set of physical and functional system components and their interconnection protocols have been established for all controls work at the AGS. Portions of these designs were tested as part of enhanced operation of the AGS as a source of polarized protons and additional segments will be implemented during the continuing construction efforts which are adding heavy ion capability to our facility. Included in our efforts are the following computer and control system elements: a broad band local area network, which embodies MODEMS; transmission systems and branch interface units; a hierarchical layer, which performs certain data base and watchdog/alarm functions; a group of work station processors (Apollo's) which perform the function of traditional minicomputer host(s) and a layer, which provides both real time control and standardization functions for accelerator devices and instrumentation. Data base and other accelerator functionality is assigned to the most correct level within our network for both real time performance, long-term utility, and orderly growth.

  4. A real-time electronic imaging system for solar X-ray observations from sounding rockets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, J. M.; Ting, J. W.; Gerassimenko, M.

    1979-01-01

    A real-time imaging system for displaying the solar coronal soft X-ray emission, focussed by a grazing incidence telescope, is described. The design parameters of the system, which is to be used primarily as part of a real-time control system for a sounding rocket experiment, are identified. Their achievement with a system consisting of a microchannel plate, for the conversion of X-rays into visible light, and a slow-scan vidicon, for recording and transmission of the integrated images, is described in detail. The system has a quantum efficiency better than 8 deg above 8 A, a dynamic range of 1000 coupled with a sensitivity to single photoelectrons, and provides a spatial resolution of 15 arc seconds over a field of view of 40 x 40 square arc minutes. The incident radiation is filtered to eliminate wavelengths longer than 100 A. Each image contains 3.93 x 10 to the 5th bits of information and is transmitted to the ground where it is processed by a mini-computer and displayed in real-time on a standard TV monitor.

  5. Integration and software for thermal test of heat rate sensors. [space shuttle external tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wojciechowski, C. J.; Shrider, K. R.

    1982-01-01

    A minicomputer controlled radiant test facility is described which was developed and calibrated in an effort to verify analytical thermal models of instrumentation islands installed aboard the space shuttle external tank to measure thermal flight parameters during ascent. Software was provided for the facility as well as for development tests on the SRB actuator tail stock. Additional testing was conducted with the test facility to determine the temperature and heat flux rate and loads required to effect a change of color in the ET tank external paint. This requirement resulted from the review of photographs taken of the ET at separation from the orbiter which showed that 75% of the external tank paint coating had not changed color from its original white color. The paint on the remaining 25% of the tank was either brown or black, indicating that it had degraded due to heating or that the spray on form insulation had receded in these areas. The operational capability of the facility as well as the various tests which were conducted and their results are discussed.

  6. Three-axis electron-beam test facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dayton, J. A., Jr.; Ebihara, B. T.

    1981-01-01

    An electron beam test facility, which consists of a precision multidimensional manipulator built into an ultra-high-vacuum bell jar, was designed, fabricated, and operated at Lewis Research Center. The position within the bell jar of a Faraday cup which samples current in the electron beam under test, is controlled by the manipulator. Three orthogonal axes of motion are controlled by stepping motors driven by digital indexers, and the positions are displayed on electronic totalizers. In the transverse directions, the limits of travel are approximately + or - 2.5 cm from the center with a precision of 2.54 micron (0.0001 in.); in the axial direction, approximately 15.0 cm of travel are permitted with an accuracy of 12.7 micron (0.0005 in.). In addition, two manually operated motions are provided, the pitch and yaw of the Faraday cup with respect to the electron beam can be adjusted to within a few degrees. The current is sensed by pulse transformers and the data are processed by a dual channel box car averager with a digital output. The beam tester can be operated manually or it can be programmed for automated operation. In the automated mode, the beam tester is controlled by a microcomputer (installed at the test site) which communicates with a minicomputer at the central computing facility. The data are recorded and later processed by computer to obtain the desired graphical presentations.

  7. Fluctuations in tension during contraction of single muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Borejdo, J; Morales, M F

    1977-01-01

    We have searched for fluctuations in the steady-state tension developed by stimulated single muscle fibers. Such tension "noise" is expected to be present as a result of the statistical fluctuations in the number and/or state of myosin cross-bridges interacting with thin filament sites at any time. A sensitive electro-optical tension transducer capable of resolving the expected fluctuations in magnitude and frequency was constructed to search for the fluctuations. The noise was analyzed by computing the power spectra and amplitude of stochastic fluctuations in the photomultiplier counting rate, which was made proportional to muscle force. The optical system and electronic instrumentation together with the minicomputer software are described. Tensions were measured in single skinned glycerinated rabbit psoas muscle fibers in rigor and during contraction and relaxation. The results indicate the presence of fluctuations in contracting muscles and a complete absence of tension noise in eith rigor or relaxation. Also, a numerical method was developed to simulate the power spectra and amplitude of fluctuations, given the rate constants for association and dissociation of the cross-bridges and actin. The simulated power spectra and the frequency distributions observed experimentally are similar. PMID:922123

  8. Sarcomere length dispersion in single skeletal muscle fibers and fiber bundles.

    PubMed

    Paolini, P J; Sabbadini, R; Roos, K P; Baskin, R J

    1976-08-01

    Light diffraction patterns produced by single skeletal muscle fibers and small fiber bundles of Rana pipiens semitendinosus have been examined at rest and during tetanic contraction. The muscle diffraction patterns were recorded with a vidicon camera interfaced to a minicomputer. Digitized video output was analyzed on-line to determine mean sarcomere length, line intensity, and the distribution of sarcomere lengths. The occurrence of first-order line intensity and peak amplitude maxima at approximately 3.0 mum is interpreted in terms of simple scattering theory. Measurements made along the length of a singel fiber reveal small variations in calculated mean sarcomere length (SD about 1.2%) and its percent dispersion (2.1% +/- 0.8%). Dispersion in small multifiber preparations increases approximately linearly with fiber number (about 0.2% per fiber) to a maximum of 8-10% in large bundles. Dispersion measurements based upon diffraction line analysis are comparable to SDs calculated from length distribution histograms obtained by light micrography of the fiber. First-order line intensity decreases by about 40% during tetanus; larger multifibered bundles exhibit substantial increases in sarcomere dispersion during contraction, but single fibers show no appreciable dispersion change. These results suggest the occurrence of asynchronous static or dynamic axial disordering of thick filaments, with a persistence in long range order of sarcomere spacing during contraction in single fibers. PMID:1084766

  9. Mathematical models for space shuttle ground systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tory, E. G.

    1985-01-01

    Math models are a series of algorithms, comprised of algebraic equations and Boolean Logic. At Kennedy Space Center, math models for the Space Shuttle Systems are performed utilizing the Honeywell 66/80 digital computers, Modcomp II/45 Minicomputers and special purpose hardware simulators (MicroComputers). The Shuttle Ground Operations Simulator operating system provides the language formats, subroutines, queueing schemes, execution modes and support software to write, maintain and execute the models. The ground systems presented consist primarily of the Liquid Oxygen and Liquid Hydrogen Cryogenic Propellant Systems, as well as liquid oxygen External Tank Gaseous Oxygen Vent Hood/Arm and the Vehicle Assembly Building (VAB) High Bay Cells. The purpose of math modeling is to simulate the ground hardware systems and to provide an environment for testing in a benign mode. This capability allows the engineers to check out application software for loading and launching the vehicle, and to verify the Checkout, Control, & Monitor Subsystem within the Launch Processing System. It is also used to train operators and to predict system response and status in various configurations (normal operations, emergency and contingent operations), including untried configurations or those too dangerous to try under real conditions, i.e., failure modes.

  10. Puff-Plume Atmospheric Deposition Model.

    Energy Science and Technology Software Center (ESTSC)

    1992-06-24

    Version: 00 PFPL is an interactive transport and diffusion program developed for real-time calculation of the location and concentration of toxic or radioactive materials during an accidental release. Deposition calculations are included. The potential exists at the Savannah River Plant for releases of either toxic gases or radionuclides. The automated system developed to provide real-time information on the trajectory and concentration of an accidental release consists of meteorological towers, a minicomputer, and a network ofmore » terminals called the Weather Information and Display (WIND) System. PFPL which simulates either instantaneous (puff) or continuous (plume) releases is the primary code used at Savannah River for emergency response. Data files are provided for demonstration. The software for archiving the required on-line meteorological data is not included. Subroutines used for graphic display of results and operational control of the DEC VT100 and Tektronix terminals in the terminal network are included. Anyone wishing t use these routines must make appropriate modifications to the file TERMINALS.DAT. The DAT files provided were copied during the afternoon of December 28, 1983. Test runs attempting to use these files should specify release times on or before that date. Any user wishing to obtain numerical output only form the model based on conditions in his locality must supply appropriate wind data for the program.« less

  11. SYSTEM DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE FOR THE RECENT DIII-D NEUTRAL BEAM COMPUTER UPGRADE

    SciTech Connect

    PHILLIPS,J.C; PENAFLOR,B.G; PHAM,N.Q; PIGLOWSKI,D.A

    2003-10-01

    OAK-B135 This operating year marks an upgrade to the computer system charged with control and data acquisition for neutral beam injection system's heating at the DIII-D National Fusion Facility, funded by the US Department of Energy and operated by General Atomics (GA). This upgrade represents the third and latest major revision to a system which has been in service over twenty years. The first control and data acquisition computers were four 16 bit mini computers running a proprietary operating system. Each of the four controlled two ion source over dedicated CAMAC highway. In a 1995 upgrade, the system evolved to be two 32 bit Motorola mini-computers running a version of UNIX. Each computer controlled four ion sources with two CAMAC highways per CPU. This latest upgrade builds on this same logical organization, but makes significant advances in cost, maintainability, and the degree to which the system is open to future modification. The new control and data acquisition system is formed of two 2 GHz Intel Pentium 4 based PC's, running the LINUX operating system. Each PC drives two CAMAC serial highways using a combination of Kinetic Systems PCI standard CAMAC Hardware Drivers and a low-level software driver written in-house expressly for this device. This paper discusses the overall system design and implementation detail, describing actual operating experience for the initial six months of operation.

  12. Computer measurement and representation of the heart in two and three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, D.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the measurement and display by minicomputer of cardiac images obtained from fluoroscopy to permit an accurate assessment of functional changes are discussed. Heart contours and discrete points can be digitized automatically or manually, with the recorded image in a video, cine, or print format. As each frame is digitized it is assigned a code name identifying the data source, experiment, run, view, and frame, and the images are filed for future reference in any sequence. Two views taken at the same point in the heart cycle are used to compute the spatial position of the ventricle apex and the midpoint of the aortic valve. The remainder of the points on the chamber border are corrected for the linear distortion of the X-rays by projection to a plane containing the chord between the apex and the aortic valve center and oriented so that lines perpendicular to the chord are parallel to the image intensifier face. The image of the chamber surface is obtained by generating circular cross sections with diameters perpendicular to the major chord. The transformed two- and three-dimensional imagery can be displayed in either static or animated form using a graphics terminal.

  13. High Frequency Sampling of TTL Pulses on a Raspberry Pi for Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy Applications

    PubMed Central

    Tivnan, Matthew; Gurjar, Rajan; Wolf, David E.; Vishwanath, Karthik

    2015-01-01

    Diffuse Correlation Spectroscopy (DCS) is a well-established optical technique that has been used for non-invasive measurement of blood flow in tissues. Instrumentation for DCS includes a correlation device that computes the temporal intensity autocorrelation of a coherent laser source after it has undergone diffuse scattering through a turbid medium. Typically, the signal acquisition and its autocorrelation are performed by a correlation board. These boards have dedicated hardware to acquire and compute intensity autocorrelations of rapidly varying input signal and usually are quite expensive. Here we show that a Raspberry Pi minicomputer can acquire and store a rapidly varying time-signal with high fidelity. We show that this signal collected by a Raspberry Pi device can be processed numerically to yield intensity autocorrelations well suited for DCS applications. DCS measurements made using the Raspberry Pi device were compared to those acquired using a commercial hardware autocorrelation board to investigate the stability, performance, and accuracy of the data acquired in controlled experiments. This paper represents a first step toward lowering the instrumentation cost of a DCS system and may offer the potential to make DCS become more widely used in biomedical applications. PMID:26274961

  14. Definition study for photovoltaic residential prototype system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Imamura, M. S.; Hulstrom, R. L.; Cookson, C.; Waldman, B. H.; Lane, R. A.

    1976-01-01

    A parametric sensitivity study and definition of the conceptual design is presented. A computer program containing the solar irradiance, solar array, and energy balance models was developed to determine the sensitivities of solar insolation and the corresponding solar array output at five sites selected for this study as well as the performance of several solar array/battery systems. A baseline electrical configuration was chosen, and three design options were recommended. The study indicates that the most sensitive parameters are the solar insolation and the inverter efficiency. The baseline PST selected is comprised of a 133 sg m solar array, 250 ampere hour battery, one to three inverters, and a full shunt regulator to limit the upper solar array voltage. A minicomputer controlled system is recommended to provide the overall control, display, and data acquisition requirements. Architectural renderings of two photovoltaic residential concepts, one above ground and the other underground, are presented. The institutional problems were defined in the areas of legal liabilities during and after installation of the PST, labor practices, building restrictions and architectural guides, and land use.

  15. Fluid dynamics of double diffusive systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koseff, J. R.

    1991-04-01

    A study of mixing processes in doubly diffusive systems is being conducted. Continuous gradients of two diffusing components (heat and salinity in our case) are being used as initial conditions, and forcing is introduced by lateral heatings and surface shear. The goals of the proposed work include: (1) quantification of the effects of finite amplitude disturbances on stable, double diffusive systems, particularly with respect to lateral heating, (2) development of an improved understanding of the physical phenomena present in wind-driven shear flows in double diffusive stratified environments, (3) increasing our knowledge-base on turbulent flow in stratified environments and how to represent it, and (4) formulation of a numerical code for such flows. The work is being carried out in an experimental facility which is located in the Stanford Environmental Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, and on laboratory minicomputers and CRAY computers. In particular, our overall goals are as follows: (1) develop more general stability and scaling criteria for the destabilization of doubly-stratified systems, (2) further study the variation of flow structure and scales with Rayleigh ratio and lateral heating ratio, (3) further delineate the mechanisms governing convective layer formation and merging, (4) study the mixing processes within the convective layers and across interfaces, and estimate the heat and mass fluxes in such a system, (5) quantify the effects of turbulence and coherent structures (due to a wind-driven surface shear) on a doubly stratified system, and (6) study the interaction between surface shear and side-wall heating destabilization mechanisms.

  16. Design and implementation of a control and data acquisition system for pellet injectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baylor, L.R.; Burris, R.D.; Greenwood, D.E.; Stewart, K.A.

    1985-01-01

    A stand-alone control and data acquisition system for pellet injectors has been designed and implemented to support pellet injector development at Oak Ridge Laboratory (ORNL) and to enable ORNL pellet injectors to be installed on various fusion experimental devices. The stand-alone system permits LOCAL operation of the injector from a nearby panel and REMOTE operation from the experiment control room. Major components of the system are (1) an Allen-Bradley PLC 2/30 programmable controller, (2) a VAX minicomputer, and (3) a CAMAC serial highway interface. The programmable logic controller (PLC) is used to perform all control functions of the injector. In LOCAL, the operator interface is provided by an intelligent panel system that has a keypad and pushbutton module programmed from the PLC. In REMOTE, the operator interfaces via a VAX-based color graphics display and uses a trackball and keyboard to issue commands. Communications between the remote and local controls and to the fusion experiment supervisory system are via the CAMAC highway. The VAX archives transient data from pellet shots and trend data acquired from the PLC. Details of the hardware and software design and the operation of the system are presented in this paper. 3 refs., 1 fig.

  17. The first "space" vegetables have been grown in the "SVET" greenhouse using controlled environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, T. N.; Bercovich, Yu. A.; Mashinskiy, A. L.; Meleshko, G. I.

    The paper describes the "SVET" project—a new generation of space greenhouse with small dimensions. Through the use of a minicomputer, "SVET" is fully capable of automatically operating and controlling environmental systems for higher plant growth. A number of preliminary studies have shown the radish and cabbage to be potentially important crops for CELSS (Closed Environmental Life Support System). The "SVET" space greenhouse was mounted on the "CRYSTAL" technological module docked to the Mir orbital space station on 10 June 1990. Soviet cosmonauts Balandin and Solovyov started the first experiments with the greenhouse on 15 June 1990. Preliminary results of seed cultivation over an initial 54-day period in "SVET" are presented. Morphometrical characteristics of plants brought back to Earth are given. Alteration in plant characteristics, such as growth and developmental changes, or morphological contents were noted. A crop of radish plants was harvested under microgravity conditions. Characteristics of plant environmental control parameters and an estimation of functional properties of control and regulation systems of the "SVET" greenhouse in space flight as received via telemetry data is reported.

  18. Study of a hybrid multispectral processor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, R. E.; Kriegler, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    A hybrid processor is described offering enough handling capacity and speed to process efficiently the large quantities of multispectral data that can be gathered by scanner systems such as MSDS, SKYLAB, ERTS, and ERIM M-7. Combinations of general-purpose and special-purpose hybrid computers were examined to include both analog and digital types as well as all-digital configurations. The current trend toward lower costs for medium-scale digital circuitry suggests that the all-digital approach may offer the better solution within the time frame of the next few years. The study recommends and defines such a hybrid digital computing system in which both special-purpose and general-purpose digital computers would be employed. The tasks of recognizing surface objects would be performed in a parallel, pipeline digital system while the tasks of control and monitoring would be handled by a medium-scale minicomputer system. A program to design and construct a small, prototype, all-digital system has been started.

  19. Transferring ecosystem simulation codes to supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schulbach, C. H.

    1995-01-01

    Many ecosystem simulation computer codes have been developed in the last twenty-five years. This development took place initially on main-frame computers, then mini-computers, and more recently, on micro-computers and workstations. Supercomputing platforms (both parallel and distributed systems) have been largely unused, however, because of the perceived difficulty in accessing and using the machines. Also, significant differences in the system architectures of sequential, scalar computers and parallel and/or vector supercomputers must be considered. We have transferred a grassland simulation model (developed on a VAX) to a Cray Y-MP/C90. We describe porting the model to the Cray and the changes we made to exploit the parallelism in the application and improve code execution. The Cray executed the model 30 times faster than the VAX and 10 times faster than a Unix workstation. We achieved an additional speedup of 30 percent by using the compiler's vectoring and 'in-line' capabilities. The code runs at only about 5 percent of the Cray's peak speed because it ineffectively uses the vector and parallel processing capabilities of the Cray. We expect that by restructuring the code, it could execute an additional six to ten times faster.

  20. High strain rate properties of unidirectional composites, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Daniel, I. M.

    1991-01-01

    Experimental methods were developed for testing and characterization of composite materials at strain rates ranging from quasi-static to over 500 s(sup -1). Three materials were characterized, two graphite/epoxies and a graphite/S-glass/epoxy. Properties were obtained by testing thin rings 10.16 cm (4 in.) in diameter, 2.54 cm (1 in.) wide, and six to eight plies thick under internal pressure. Unidirectional 0 degree, 90 degree, and 10 degree off-axis rings were tested to obtain longitudinal, transverse, and in-plane shear properties. In the dynamic tests internal pressure was applied explosively through a liquid and the pressure was measured with a calibrated steel ring. Strains in the calibration and specimen rings were recorded with a digital processing oscilloscope. The data were processed and the equation of motion solved numerically by the mini-computer attached to the oscilloscope. Results were obtained and plotted in the form of dynamic stress-strain curves. Longitudinal properties which are governed by the fibers do not vary much with strain rate with only a moderate (up to 20 percent) increase in modulus. Transverse modulus and strength increase sharply with strain rate reaching values up to three times the static values. The in-plane shear modulus and shear strength increase noticeably with strain rate by up to approximately 65 percent. In all cases ultimate strains do not vary significantly with strain rates.

  1. GEEF: a geothermal engineering and economic feasibility model. Description and user's manual

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-09-01

    The model is designed to enable decision makers to compare the economics of geothermal projects with the economics of alternative energy systems at an early stage in the decision process. The geothermal engineering and economic feasibility computer model (GEEF) is written in FORTRAN IV language and can be run on a mainframe or a mini-computer system. An abbreviated version of the model is being developed for usage in conjunction with a programmable desk calculator. The GEEF model has two main segments, namely (i) the engineering design/cost segment and (ii) the economic analysis segment. In the engineering segment, the model determines the numbers of production and injection wells, heat exchanger design, operating parameters for the system, requirement of supplementary system (to augment the working fluid temperature if the resource temperature is not sufficiently high), and the fluid flow rates. The model can handle single stage systems as well as two stage cascaded systems in which the second stage may involve a space heating application after a process heat application in the first stage.

  2. Instrument Pointing Subsystem /IPS/ design and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hammesfahr, A. E.

    1981-01-01

    The Instrument Pointing Subsystem (IPS), currently under development at Dornier System, is a most versatile Spacelab subsystem providing precision pointing capabilities to any single or clustered group of scientific instruments observing inertially fixed or moving targets. The IPS comprises a three-axis gimbal system mounted to the payload aft end and a payload clamping assembly for support of the IPS mounted experiments during Orbiter launch and landing phases. The IPS control system is based on the inertial reference of a three-axis gyro package being updated by the payload mounted IPS star/sun trackers and operated in a gimbal mounted minicomputer. It enables inertial stabilization as well as slewing and target tracking operations. The functional and operational control is performed via the Spacelab S/S computer and its display and keyboard, thereby establishing a flexible and responsive operator interface in the Spacelab Module and the Orbiter AFD enabling optimized display and keyboard entries for any operational mode. The AFD accommodates in addition a hardwired panel serving for IPS emergency operations. Incorporated Experiment supporting services consist of several independent power sources, three Experiment Computer Remote Acquisition Units and direct data links to IPS and Spacelab which provide maximum flexibility for operation of independent experiment clusters and for an operational interlock between IPS and its payload.

  3. [The effect of the motion of forefoot joint at the force exerted upon the floor during walking exercise].

    PubMed

    Maeda, A; Nishizono, H; Ebashi, H; Shibayama, H

    1993-11-01

    In walking exercise the human body is exposed to external forces. Some of them are produced by constraints such as surface, shoes or opponent. In kick action of walking, the ground reaction force (GRF) is the most important external force. The magnitude of the GRF, its direction, and point of application have an influence on the load on the human body. The purpose of this study is to clarify the role of forefoot joint (artt. metatarsophalangeae) at the force exerted upon the floor during kick action of walking. The device used in this study to analyze the GRF and its three components consists of Kistler's force platform. Output from force transducer was collected online with a TEAC data recorder and MEM-4101 minicomputer. The impact force measurements were taken from the anterior-posterior force time curves at the take-off for 1 subject walking 10 trials at 2 m/sec with 2 different pairs of shoes (Shoes 1: thin sole of 4mm, and Shoes 2: thick sole of 40mm) and without shoes. High speed (200f/sec) cinematography was also used to analyze the angular displacement of forefoot joint at the take-off of walking exercise. The force acting at the forefoot joint may produce the anterior-posterior force of the GRF which is defined as the propelling power acting on the human body during walking exercise. The result showed that the impact force peak occurred 40-60 msec before take-off and the propelling part of kick action accounted for only about 6% of the external force.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:8123187

  4. Ferromagnetism in doped or undoped spintronics nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiang, You

    2010-10-01

    Much interest has been sparked by the discovery of ferromagnetism in a range of oxide doped and undoped semiconductors. The development of ferromagnetic oxide semiconductor materials with giant magnetoresistance (GMR) offers many advantages in spintronics devices for future miniaturization of computers. Among them, TM-doped ZnO is an extensively studied n-type wide-band-gap (3.36 eV) semiconductor with a tremendous interest as future mini-computer, blue light emitting, and solar cells. In this talk, Co-doped ZnO and Co-doped Cu2O semiconductor nanoclusters are successfully synthesized by a third generation sputtering-gas-aggregation cluster technique. The Co-doped nanoclusters are ferromagnetic with Curie temperature above room temperature. Both of Co-doped nanoclusters show positive magnetoresistance (PMR) at low temperature, but the amplitude of the PMRs shows an anomalous difference. For similar Co doping concentration at 5 K, PMR is greater than 800% for Co-doped ZnO but only 5% for Co-doped Cu2O nanoclusters. Giant PMR in Co-doped ZnO which is attributed to large Zeeman splitting effect has a linear dependence on applied magnetic field with very high sensitivity, which makes it convenient for the future spintronics applications. The small PMR in Co-doped Cu2O is related to its vanishing density of states at Fermi level. Undoped Zn/ZnO core-shell nanoparticle gives high ferromagnetic properties above room temperature due to the defect induced magnetization at the interface.

  5. Two dimensional NMR of liquids and oriented molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Gochin, M.

    1987-02-01

    Chapter 1 discusses the quantum mechanical formalism used for describing the interaction between magnetic dipoles that dictates the appearance of a spectrum. The NMR characteristics of liquids and liquid crystals are stressed. Chapter 2 reviews the theory of multiple quantum and two dimensional NMR. Properties of typical spectra and phase cycling procedures are discussed. Chapter 3 describes a specific application of heteronuclear double quantum coherence to the removal of inhomogeneous broadening in liquids. Pulse sequences have been devised which cancel out any contribution from this inhomogeneity to the final spectrum. An interpretation of various pulse sequences for the case of /sup 13/C and /sup 1/H is given, together with methods of spectral editing by removal or retention of the homo- or heteronuclear J coupling. The technique is applied to a demonstration of high resolution in both frequency and spatial dimensions with a surface coil. In Chapter 4, multiple quantum filtered 2-D spectroscopy is demonstrated as an effective means of studying randomly deuterated molecules dissolved in a nematic liquid crystal. Magnitudes of dipole coupling constants have been determined for benzene and hexane, and their signs and assignments found from high order multiple quantum spectra. For the first time, a realistic impression of the conformation of hexane can be estimated from these results. Chapter 5 is a technical description of the MDB DCHIB-DR11W parallel interface which has been set up to transfer data between the Data General Nova 820 minicomputer, interfaced to the 360 MHz spectrometer, and the Vax 11/730. It covers operation of the boards, physical specifications and installation, and programs for testing and running the interface.

  6. [Fluorescence of dental porcelain: material and methods].

    PubMed

    Monsénégo, G; Burdairon, G; Porte, C; Naud, C

    1990-06-01

    Dental porcelain emits some fluorescence under the action of ultra-violet rays. This emission may be at the origin of errors in the choice of the colour of a crown. In order to study this fluorescence phenomenon, the following experimental protocol has been developed: 363.8 nm exciting radiation isolated from the emission by an Argon laser; Fluorescence emitted by the sample and dispersed via a spectrometer, protected by a stop-U.V. filter; Influx collected by a photomultiplier, then directed, after passage in a picoamperemeter, toward a mini-computer programmed to print the spectra; Correction of the spectra by a tungsten lamp used at the 2,600 K colour temperature; Use of reference spectra. On the same graph, the sample spectra are represented in solid lines, while the spectrum of the enamel used as a reference is shown as a dotted line. The results show that: Enamel has a fluorescence spectrum which has the shape of a wide band, with a maximum of 450 nm (characteristic of a blue-green shade) and a slow decrease up to 680 nm. The enamel fluorescence does not depend on the colour of the tooth; Dentine has a distribution spectrum which is similar to that of enamel but is three times fuller; The spectra of the ceramic samples reveal: a wide band due to transition metals, fine lines due to rare earth (terbium and europium). When the saturation degree of the ceramic increases, its fluorescence colour varies due to the relative increase in the amplitude of the lines in relation to the bands. Thus, when the sample colour progresses from B1 to B4, its fluorescence colour becomes greener.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2207845

  7. Computer-generated speech

    SciTech Connect

    Aimthikul, Y.

    1981-12-01

    This thesis reviews the essential aspects of speech synthesis and distinguishes between the two prevailing techniques: compressed digital speech and phonemic synthesis. It then presents the hardware details of the five speech modules evaluated. FORTRAN programs were written to facilitate message creation and retrieval with four of the modules driven by a PDP-11 minicomputer. The fifth module was driven directly by a computer terminal. The compressed digital speech modules (T.I. 990/306, T.S.I. Series 3D and N.S. Digitalker) each contain a limited vocabulary produced by the manufacturers while both the phonemic synthesizers made by Votrax permit an almost unlimited set of sounds and words. A text-to-phoneme rules program was adapted for the PDP-11 (running under the RSX-11M operating system) to drive the Votrax Speech Pac module. However, the Votrax Type'N Talk unit has its own built-in translator. Comparison of these modules revealed that the compressed digital speech modules were superior in pronouncing words on an individual basis but lacked the inflection capability that permitted the phonemic synthesizers to generate more coherent phrases. These findings were necessarily highly subjective and dependent on the specific words and phrases studied. In addition, the rapid introduction of new modules by manufacturers will necessitate new comparisons. However, the results of this research verified that all of the modules studied do possess reasonable quality of speech that is suitable for man-machine applications. Furthermore, the development tools are now in place to permit the addition of computer speech output in such applications.

  8. COMPUTER MODEL OF TEMPERATURE DISTRIBUTION IN OPTICALLY PUMPED LASER RODS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Farrukh, U. O.

    1994-01-01

    Managing the thermal energy that accumulates within a solid-state laser material under active pumping is of critical importance in the design of laser systems. Earlier models that calculated the temperature distribution in laser rods were single dimensional and assumed laser rods of infinite length. This program presents a new model which solves the temperature distribution problem for finite dimensional laser rods and calculates both the radial and axial components of temperature distribution in these rods. The modeled rod is either side-pumped or end-pumped by a continuous or a single pulse pump beam. (At the present time, the model cannot handle a multiple pulsed pump source.) The optical axis is assumed to be along the axis of the rod. The program also assumes that it is possible to cool different surfaces of the rod at different rates. The user defines the laser rod material characteristics, determines the types of cooling and pumping to be modeled, and selects the time frame desired via the input file. The program contains several self checking schemes to prevent overwriting memory blocks and to provide simple tracing of information in case of trouble. Output for the program consists of 1) an echo of the input file, 2) diffusion properties, radius and length, and time for each data block, 3) the radial increments from the center of the laser rod to the outer edge of the laser rod, and 4) the axial increments from the front of the laser rod to the other end of the rod. This program was written in Microsoft FORTRAN77 and implemented on a Tandon AT with a 287 math coprocessor. The program can also run on a VAX 750 mini-computer. It has a memory requirement of about 147 KB and was developed in 1989.

  9. The digital geologic map of Colorado in ARC/INFO format

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Gregory N.

    1992-01-01

    This geologic map was prepared as a part of a study of digital methods and techniques as applied to complex geologic maps. The geologic map was digitized from the original scribe sheets used to prepare the published Geologic Map of Colorado (Tweto 1979). Consequently the digital version is at 1:500,000 scale using the Lambert Conformal Conic map projection parameters of the state base map. Stable base contact prints of the scribe sheets were scanned on a Tektronix 4991 digital scanner. The scanner automatically converts the scanned image to an ASCII vector format. These vectors were transferred to a VAX minicomputer, where they were then loaded into ARC/INFO. Each vector and polygon was given attributes derived from the original 1979 geologic map. This database was developed on a MicroVAX computer system using VAX V 5.4 nd ARC/INFO 5.0 software. UPDATE: April 1995, The update was done solely for the purpose of adding the abilitly to plot to an HP650c plotter. Two new ARC/INFO plot AMLs along with a lineset and shadeset for the HP650C design jet printer have been included. These new files are COLORADO.650, INDEX.650, TWETOLIN.E00 and TWETOSHD.E00. These files were created on a UNIX platform with ARC/INFO 6.1.2. Updated versions of INDEX.E00, CONTACT.E00, LINE.E00, DECO.E00 and BORDER.E00 files that included the newly defined HP650c items are also included. * Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Descriptors: The Digital Geologic Map of Colorado in ARC/INFO Format Open-File Report 92-050

  10. The digital geologic map of Colorado in ARC/INFO format, Part A. Documentation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Green, Gregory N.

    1992-01-01

    This geologic map was prepared as a part of a study of digital methods and techniques as applied to complex geologic maps. The geologic map was digitized from the original scribe sheets used to prepare the published Geologic Map of Colorado (Tweto 1979). Consequently the digital version is at 1:500,000 scale using the Lambert Conformal Conic map projection parameters of the state base map. Stable base contact prints of the scribe sheets were scanned on a Tektronix 4991 digital scanner. The scanner automatically converts the scanned image to an ASCII vector format. These vectors were transferred to a VAX minicomputer, where they were then loaded into ARC/INFO. Each vector and polygon was given attributes derived from the original 1979 geologic map. This database was developed on a MicroVAX computer system using VAX V 5.4 nd ARC/INFO 5.0 software. UPDATE: April 1995, The update was done solely for the purpose of adding the abilitly to plot to an HP650c plotter. Two new ARC/INFO plot AMLs along with a lineset and shadeset for the HP650C design jet printer have been included. These new files are COLORADO.650, INDEX.650, TWETOLIN.E00 and TWETOSHD.E00. These files were created on a UNIX platform with ARC/INFO 6.1.2. Updated versions of INDEX.E00, CONTACT.E00, LINE.E00, DECO.E00 and BORDER.E00 files that included the newly defined HP650c items are also included. * Any use of trade, product, or firm names is for descriptive purposes only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Government. Descriptors: The Digital Geologic Map of Colorado in ARC/INFO Format Open-File Report 92-050

  11. Side-scan sonar mapping: Pseudo-real-time processing and mosaicking techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Danforth, W.W.; Schwab, W.C.; O'Brien, T.F. ); Karl, H. )

    1990-05-01

    The US Geological Survey (USGS) surveyed 1,000 km{sup 2} of the continental shelf off San Francisco during a 17-day cruise, using a 120-kHz side-scan sonar system, and produced a digitally processed sonar mosaic of the survey area. The data were processed and mosaicked in real time using software developed at the Lamont-Doherty Geological Observatory and modified by the USGS, a substantial task due to the enormous amount of data produced by high-resolution side-scan systems. Approximately 33 megabytes of data were acquired every 1.5 hr. The real-time sonar images were displayed on a PC-based workstation and the data were transferred to a UNIX minicomputer where the sonar images were slant-range corrected, enhanced using an averaging method of desampling and a linear-contrast stretch, merged with navigation, geographically oriented at a user-selected scale, and finally output to a thermal printer. The hard-copy output was then used to construct a mosaic of the survey area. The final product of this technique is a UTM-projected map-mosaic of sea-floor backscatter variations, which could be used, for example, to locate appropriate sites for sediment sampling to ground truth the sonar imagery while still at sea. More importantly, reconnaissance surveys of this type allow for the analysis and interpretation of the mosaic during a cruise, thus greatly reducing the preparation time needed for planning follow-up studies of a particular area.

  12. Integrating real-time digital signal processing capability into a large research and development facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manges, W. W.; Mallinak-Glassell, J. T.; Breeding, J. E.; Jansen, J. M., Jr.; Tate, R. M.; Bentz, R. R.

    The Instrumentation and Controls Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory recently developed and installed a large scale, real-time measurement system for the world's largest pressurized water tunnel. This water tunnel, the Large Cavitation Channel (LCC) provides a research and development facility for the study of acoustic phenomena to aid in model testing of new naval ship and submarine designs. The LCC design required the development of a near-field beamformer in addition to extending the range of real-time processing capability to frequencies unavailable at other facilities. The beamformer acquires and processes time-domain acoustic data at 9.5 MB/s from up to 45 hydrophones while performing 200 million floating-point operations per second, producing a time-integrated, spatially filtered, frequency-domain data set with improved signal-to-noise ratio. The acoustic processing software provides for the real-time analysis of acoustic data. Up to 128 facility sensors are sampled, time stamped, and stored at 600 kB/s. The system generates information for acoustic phenomena and facility measurements in real-time so that the operator can make facility adjustments to control the running equipment. This real-time control of facility conditions requires that the measurement system integrate facility and acoustic data for simultaneous display to the operator in engineering units via high-end workstations. A dual-host minicomputer configuration with high-end workstations connected via an Ethernet networking cluster controls and integrates measurement and display subsystems. The hardware and software architecture is described in this paper.

  13. Research Directed at Developing a Classical Theory to Describe Isotope Separation of Polyatomic Molecules Illuminated by Intense Infrared Radiation. Final Report for period May 7, 1979 to September 30, 1979; Extension December 31, 1997

    DOE R&D Accomplishments Database

    Lamb, W. E. Jr.

    1981-12-01

    This final report describes research on the theory of isotope separation produced by the illumination of polyatomic molecules by intense infrared laser radiation. This process is investigated by treating the molecule, sulfur hexafluoride, as a system of seven classical particles that obey the Newtonian equations of motion. A minicomputer is used to integrate these differential equations. The particles are acted on by interatomic forces, and by the time-dependent electric field of the laser. We have a very satisfactory expression for the interaction of the laser and the molecule which is compatible with infrared absorption and spectroscopic data. The interatomic potential is capable of improvement, and progress on this problem is still being made. We have made several computer runs of the dynamical behavior of the molecule using a reasonably good model for the interatomic force law. For the laser parameters chosen, we find that typically the molecule passes quickly through the resonance region into the quasi-continuum and even well into the real continuum before dissociation actually occurs. When viewed on a display terminal, the motions are exceedingly complex. As an aid to the visualization of the process, we have made a number of 16 mm movies depicting a three-dimensional representation of the motion of the seven particles. These show even more clearly the enormous complexity of the motions, and make clear the desirability of finding ways of characterizing the motion in simple ways without giving all of the numerical detail. One of the ways to do this is to introduce statistical parameters such as a temperature associated with the distribution of kinetic energies of the single particle. We have made such an analysis of our data runs, and have found favorable indications that such methods will prove useful in keeping track of the dynamical histories.

  14. Research, development and demonstration of nickel-zinc batteries for electric vehicle propulsion. Annual report, 1979. [70 W/lb

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-06-01

    This second annual report under Contract No. 31-109-39-4200 covers the period July 1, 1978 through August 31, 1979. The program demonstrates the feasibility of the nickel-zinc battery for electric vehicle propulsion. The program is divided into seven distinct but highly interactive tasks collectively aimed at the development and commercialization of nickel-zinc technology. These basic technical tasks are separator development, electrode development, product design and analysis, cell/module battery testing, process development, pilot manufacturing, and thermal management. A Quality Assurance Program has also been established. Significant progress has been made in the understanding of separator failure mechanisms, and a generic category of materials has been specified for the 300+ deep discharge (100% DOD) applications. Shape change has been reduced significantly. A methodology has been generated with the resulting hierarchy: cycle life cost, volumetric energy density, peak power at 80% DOD, gravimetric energy density, and sustained power. Generation I design full-sized 400-Ah cells have yielded in excess of 70 W/lb at 80% DOD. Extensive testing of cells, modules, and batteries is done in a minicomputer-based testing facility. The best life attained with electric vehicle-size cell components is 315 cycles at 100% DOD (1.0V cutoff voltage), while four-cell (approx. 6V) module performance has been limited to about 145 deep discharge cycles. The scale-up of processes for production of components and cells has progressed to facilitate component production rates of thousands per month. Progress in the area of thermal management has been significant, with the development of a model that accurately represents heat generation and rejection rates during battery operation. For the balance of the program, cycle life of > 500 has to be demonstrated in modules and full-sized batteries. 40 figures, 19 tables. (RWR)

  15. Utility Monitoring for the Antiproton Source

    SciTech Connect

    McConnell, D.

    1984-06-11

    The purpose of the utility portion of the FIRUS system is to alert humans in the main control room, at Phillips farm, and in building 10 control room when either environmental conditions are unhealthy for antiproton source devices, or electrical or mechanical equipment is malfunctioning. When first envisioned, the FIRUS system consisted of the following equipment: (1) 2 FIRUS mini-computers (wall mounted, 1 fire, 1 utility); (2) emergency power supply (also wall mounted); (3) coax hardline communication cable; (4) Junction boxes; (5) contact points and analog transducers; (6) three-pair 18 gage shielded cable; and (7) silent printer. Each mini can monitor 16 contact points or 15 analog points or a combination of contact and analog points. Each contact point can be more than one physical point if the points are wired in series. An alarm then indicates anyone of a group of points has opened. The following devices/quantities are proposed to be monitored by the utility portion of the FIRUS system: (1) sump pumps; (2) LCW (Low Conductivity Water); (3) auxiliary generator; (4) service building temperatures; (5) stub room/tunnel temperature; and (6) stub room/tunnel humidity. After the number of quantities to be monitored (see table I) was determined, it was found that two or three minis would be required, or a FIRUS crate could be used. A FIRUS crate is an 'old beam transfer crate' with 25 slots which hold cards to either monitor 16 contact points or 15 analog points. The space requirement for the crate system is about half a relay rack. The emergency power supply could remain wall mounted, or it could be rack mounted with the firus crate. Conversations with Al Franck and Rich Mahler concerning availability, expandability, cabling, and cost indicate that the FIRUS crate is the preperable option for the antiproton source.

  16. Temperature distributions from interstitial rf electrode hyperthermia systems: theoretical predictions.

    PubMed

    Strohbehn, J W

    1983-11-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in the use of hyperthermia as an adjuvant modality to radiation and chemotherapy in the treatment of cancer. One of the more promising techniques is the application of an rf voltage to an array of electrodes inserted directly into the tumor. The electrodes are usually small, hollow stainless steel needles that are inserted as the first step in a brachytherapy procedure. By applying a voltage between the needles, an rf current is induced in the tissue, resulting in joule heating. In this paper, we calculate numerically the temperature distributions for an array of such needles. In our model we assume a two-dimensional problem, i.e. infinitely long needles, and a homogeneous medium. Blood flow effects are included in the calculation. The results show that for low blood perfusion rates, e.g., on the order of 3 ml/100 gm X min, very smooth temperature distributions result, and the electrodes can be spaced fairly far apart. However, for blood flow rates on the order of 20 ml/100 gm X min the temperature distributions are not smooth, and there are hot spots around the electrodes and cool regions between them. However, if the electrodes are spaced about 1 cm apart and the voltages are adjusted to optimize the temperature distribution then reasonably good results should be achievable. The equation is solved using a finite difference technique. By applying the superpostion principle, we are able to introduce a procedure which substantially reduces the amount of core storage required and results in reasonably efficient run times on a moderate size mini-computer. PMID:6643161

  17. Eddy-current inspection for steam generator tubing program. Annual progress report for period ending December 31, 1979

    SciTech Connect

    Dodd, C.V.; Deeds, W.E.; McClung, R.W.

    1980-07-01

    Eddy-current methods provide the best in-service inspection of steam generator tubing, but present techniques can produce ambiguity because of the many independent variables that affect the signals. The current development program has used mathematical models and developed or modified computer programs to design optimum probes, instrumentation, and techniques for multifrequency, multiproperty examinations. Interactive calculations and experimental measurements have been made with the use of modular eddy-current instrumentation and a minicomputer. These establish the coefficients for the complex equations that define the values of the desired properties (and the attainable accuracy) despite changes in other significant variables. The computer programs for calculating the accuracy with which various properties can be measured indicate that the tubing wall thickness and the defect size can be measured much more accurately than is currently required, even when other properties are varying. Our experimental measurements have confirmed these results, although more testing is needed for all the different combinations of cases and different types of defects. To facilitate the extensive laboratory scanning of the matrix of specimens that are necessary to develop algorithms for detection and analysis for all the possible combinations of positions of flaws, tube supports, and probe coils, we have designed, constructed, and begun operation of a computer-controlled automatic positioner. We have demonstrated the ability to overcome the large signals produced by the edge of the tube supports. An advanced microcomputer has been designed, constructed, and installed in the instrumentation to control the examination and provide real-time calculations of the desired properties for display recording during the scanning of the tube.

  18. Development and application of Fourier transform infrared spectroscopic techniques to the characterization of coal and oil shale

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, R.W.

    1982-01-01

    The development of application programs for infrared spectroscopy has been an ongoing proposition for a number of years. This development, however, was accelerated with the advent of Fourier transform infared (FT-IR) instruments and their built-in mini-computers. The uses and pitfalls of several of these routines are discussed in this thesis. A least-squares curve resolving program has been developed and the use of this program is also discussed. The analysis of complex, multicomponent polymeric materials, such as coal and oil shale, by conventional infrared spectroscopy has been a difficult problem. The use of FT-IR spectroscopy for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of these types of materials is discussed. A characterization of oil shale from the Mahogany Zone of the Green River Formation has been obtained by FT-IR. A quantitative analysis of the mineral component by FT-IR spectroscopy is shown to be comparable to that obtained by x-ray diffraction when considering broad mineral types, i.e., carbonates. Methods for the FT-IR analysis of the organic component, both from the whole shale and from kerogen specimens, have been refined. There is a good correlation between the intensity of alkyl bands and Fisher assay yields. An assessment is made of the applicability of extinction coefficients obtained from paraffins to their use in quantitative analysis in oil shales. A quantitative analysis of OH content in coal by FT-IR is comparable to that done by other methods (i.e., chemical and NMR). An analysis is also made of the various types of OH groups in coal.

  19. Immunoglobulin surface-binding kinetics studied by total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, N L; Axelrod, D

    1983-01-01

    An experimental application of total internal reflection with fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (TIR/FCS) is presented. TIR/FCS is a new technique for measuring the binding and unbinding rates and surface diffusion coefficient of fluorescent-labeled solute molecules in equilibrium at a surface. A laser beam totally internally reflects at the solid-liquid interface, selectively exciting surface-adsorbed molecules. Fluorescence collected by a microscope from a small, well-defined surface area approximately 5 micron2 spontaneously fluctuates as solute molecules randomly bind to, unbind from, and/or diffuse along the surface in chemical equilibrium. The fluorescence is detected by a photomultiplier and autocorrelated on-line by a minicomputer. The shape of the autocorrelation function depends on the bulk and surface diffusion coefficients, the binding rate constants, and the shape of the illuminated and observed region. The normalized amplitude of the autocorrelation function depends on the average number of molecules bound within the observed area. TIR/FCS requires no spectroscopic or thermodynamic change between dissociated and complexed states and no extrinsic perturbation from equilibrium. Using TIR/FCS, we determine that rhodamine-labeled immunoglobulin and insulin each nonspecifically adsorb to serum albumin-coated fused silica with both reversible and irreversible components. The characteristic time of the most rapidly reversible component measured is approximately 5 ms and is limited by the rate of bulk diffusion. Rhodamine-labeled bivalent antibodies to dinitrophenyl (DNP) bind to DNP-coated fused silica virtually irreversibly. Univalent Fab fragments of these same antibodies appear to specifically bind to DNP-coated fused silica, accompanied by a large amount of nonspecific binding. TIR/FCS is shown to be a feasible technique for measuring absorption/desorption kinetic rates at equilibrium. In suitable systems where nonspecific binding is low, TIR

  20. Kinematics and Rotational Dynamics of Multi-Linkage Systems and the Control of a Planar Two-Link System in the Air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langer, Franz Dieter

    In this dissertation the kinematics of a computer model of the human body, the rotational dynamics for a system of an arbitrary number of connected rigid links, the control of a planar two-link system in the air, and the computation of holonomic and simple nonholonomic constraint forces or torques of multi-linkage systems are studied. The human body is represented by twenty-three body segments, which are made up of wire-basket solids of revolution. The kinematics of its motion in three-dimensional space are projected on a two-dimensional display screen. The emphasis of this study is placed on the implementation and optimization of computer graphic related algorithms in a minicomputer environment, on software organization, and on data base generation for animation. Two important issues in dynamics, the determination and systematic symbolic generation of the rotational equations of motion, are investigated next. Constraints due to a constant angular momentum are included. The controllability of the rotational dynamics of a planar two-link system are analyzed using methods of linear and nonlinear control theory. The inverse attitude control problem is defined for the above mentioned system and is solved by transforming the ill-posed boundary value problem into a well-posed one. Digital computer simulations are performed to demonstrate that linear state feedback ensures that the nonlinear, two link system is capable of tracing a pre-specified reference trajectory. It is shown that the above mentioned, partially controllable system does not exhibit numerical instabilities during simulations if the constraint to which it is subjected is a linear function of the state variables of the system. The application, derivation, and computation of holonomic and simple nonholonomic constraint forces, or torques, in imbedded mechanical systems is studied. The analysis comprises a comparison of three different algorithms of computing the above type of constraint forces and torques

  1. [Electronic eikonometer: Measurement tests displayed on stereoscopic screen].

    PubMed

    Bourdy, C; James, Y

    2016-05-01

    We propose the presentation on a stereoscopic screen of the electronic eikonometer tests intended for analysis and measurement of perceptual effects of binocular disparity. These tests, so-called "built-in magnification tests" are constructed according to the same principle as those of preceding eikonometers (disparity variation parameters being included in each test presentation, which allows, for test observation and measurements during the examination, the removing of any intermediate optical system). The images of these tests are presented separately to each eye, according to active or passive stereoscopic screen technology: (1) Ogle Spatial Test to measure aniseikonia; (2) Fixation Disparity test: binocular nonius; (3) retinal correspondence test evaluated by nonius horopter; (4) stereoscopic test using Julesz' random-dot stereograms (RDS). All of these tests, with their variable parameters included, are preprogrammed by means of an associated mini-computer. This new system (a single screen for the presentation of tests for the right eye and left eye) will be much simpler to reproduce and install for all practitioners interested in the functional exploration of binocular vision. We develop the suitable methodology adapted to each type of examination, as well as manipulations to be performed by the operator. We then recall the possibilities for reducing aniseikonia thanks to some theoretical studies previously performed by matrix calculation of the size of the retinal images for different types of eye (emmetropia, axial or conformation anisometropia, aphakia) and for different means of correction (glasses, contact lenses, implants). Software for achieving these different tests is available, on request, at this address: eiconometre.electronique@gmail.com. PMID:27185662

  2. Acoustic systems for the measurement of streamflow

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laenen, Antonius; Smith, Winchell

    1983-01-01

    The acoustic velocity meter (AVM), also referred to as an ultrasonic flowmeter, has been an operational tool for the measurement of streamflow since 1965. Very little information is available concerning AVM operation, performance, and limitations. The purpose of this report is to consolidate information in such a manner as to provide a better understanding about the application of this instrumentation to streamflow measurement. AVM instrumentation is highly accurate and nonmechanical. Most commercial AVM systems that measure streamflow use the time-of-travel method to determine a velocity between two points. The systems operate on the principle that point-to-point upstream travel-time of sound is longer than the downstream travel-time, and this difference can be monitored and measured accurately by electronics. AVM equipment has no practical upper limit of measurable velocity if sonic transducers are securely placed and adequately protected. AVM systems used in streamflow measurement generally operate with a resolution of ?0.01 meter per second but this is dependent on system frequency, path length, and signal attenuation. In some applications the performance of AVM equipment may be degraded by multipath interference, signal bending, signal attenuation, and variable streamline orientation. Presently used minicomputer systems, although expensive to purchase and maintain, perform well. Increased use of AVM systems probably will be realized as smaller, less expensive, and more conveniently operable microprocessor-based systems become readily available. Available AVM equipment should be capable of flow measurement in a wide variety of situations heretofore untried. New signal-detection techniques and communication linkages can provide additional flexibility to the systems so that operation is possible in more river and estuary situations.

  3. a Portable Apparatus for Absolute Measurements of the Earth's Gravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zumberge, Mark Andrew

    We have developed a new, portable apparatus for making absolute measurements of the acceleration due to the earth's gravity. We use the method of interferometrically determining the acceleration of a freely falling corner -cube prism. The falling object is surrounded by a chamber which is driven vertically inside a fixed vacuum chamber. This falling chamber is servoed to track the falling corner -cube to shield it from drag due to background gas. In addition, the drag-free falling chamber removes the need for a magnetic release, shields the falling object from electrostatic forces, and provides a means of both gently arresting the falling object and quickly returning it to its start position, to allow rapid acquisition of data. A synthesized long period isolation device reduces the noise due to seismic oscillations. A new type of Zeeman laser is used as the light source in the interferometer, and is compared with the wavelength of an iodine stabilized laser. The times of occurrence of 45 interference fringes are measured to within 0.2 nsec over a 20 cm drop and are fit to a quadratic by an on-line minicomputer. 150 drops can be made in ten minutes resulting in a value of g having a precision of 3 to 6 parts in 10('9). Systematic errors have been determined to be less than 5 parts in 10('9) through extensive tests. Three months of gravity data have been obtained with a reproducibility ranging from 5 to 10 parts in 10('9). The apparatus has been designed to be easily portable. Field measurements are planned for the immediate future. An accuracy of 6 parts in 10('9) corresponds to a height sensitivity of 2 cm. Vertical motions in the earth's crust and tectonic density changes that may precede earthquakes are to be investigated using this apparatus.

  4. Design of a real-time wind turbine simulator using a custom parallel architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, John A.; Gluck, R.; Sridhar, S.

    1995-01-01

    The design of a new parallel-processing digital simulator is described. The new simulator has been developed specifically for analysis of wind energy systems in real time. The new processor has been named: the Wind Energy System Time-domain simulator, version 3 (WEST-3). Like previous WEST versions, WEST-3 performs many computations in parallel. The modules in WEST-3 are pure digital processors, however. These digital processors can be programmed individually and operated in concert to achieve real-time simulation of wind turbine systems. Because of this programmability, WEST-3 is very much more flexible and general than its two predecessors. The design features of WEST-3 are described to show how the system produces high-speed solutions of nonlinear time-domain equations. WEST-3 has two very fast Computational Units (CU's) that use minicomputer technology plus special architectural features that make them many times faster than a microcomputer. These CU's are needed to perform the complex computations associated with the wind turbine rotor system in real time. The parallel architecture of the CU causes several tasks to be done in each cycle, including an IO operation and the combination of a multiply, add, and store. The WEST-3 simulator can be expanded at any time for additional computational power. This is possible because the CU's interfaced to each other and to other portions of the simulation using special serial buses. These buses can be 'patched' together in essentially any configuration (in a manner very similar to the programming methods used in analog computation) to balance the input/ output requirements. CU's can be added in any number to share a given computational load. This flexible bus feature is very different from many other parallel processors which usually have a throughput limit because of rigid bus architecture.

  5. Some Problems and Solutions in Transferring Ecosystem Simulation Codes to Supercomputers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skiles, J. W.; Schulbach, C. H.

    1994-01-01

    Many computer codes for the simulation of ecological systems have been developed in the last twenty-five years. This development took place initially on main-frame computers, then mini-computers, and more recently, on micro-computers and workstations. Recent recognition of ecosystem science as a High Performance Computing and Communications Program Grand Challenge area emphasizes supercomputers (both parallel and distributed systems) as the next set of tools for ecological simulation. Transferring ecosystem simulation codes to such systems is not a matter of simply compiling and executing existing code on the supercomputer since there are significant differences in the system architectures of sequential, scalar computers and parallel and/or vector supercomputers. To more appropriately match the application to the architecture (necessary to achieve reasonable performance), the parallelism (if it exists) of the original application must be exploited. We discuss our work in transferring a general grassland simulation model (developed on a VAX in the FORTRAN computer programming language) to a Cray Y-MP. We show the Cray shared-memory vector-architecture, and discuss our rationale for selecting the Cray. We describe porting the model to the Cray and executing and verifying a baseline version, and we discuss the changes we made to exploit the parallelism in the application and to improve code execution. As a result, the Cray executed the model 30 times faster than the VAX 11/785 and 10 times faster than a Sun 4 workstation. We achieved an additional speed-up of approximately 30 percent over the original Cray run by using the compiler's vectorizing capabilities and the machine's ability to put subroutines and functions "in-line" in the code. With the modifications, the code still runs at only about 5% of the Cray's peak speed because it makes ineffective use of the vector processing capabilities of the Cray. We conclude with a discussion and future plans.

  6. Fluid dynamics of double diffusive systems

    SciTech Connect

    Koseff, J.R.

    1988-05-01

    A study of mixing processes in doubly diffusive systems is being conducted. Continuous gradients of two diffusing components (heat and salinity) are being used as initial conditions, and forcing is introduced by lateral heating, surface shear and sloping boundaries. The goals of the proposed work include: quantification of the effects of finite amplitude disturbances on stable, double diffusive systems, particularly with respect to lateral heating, development of an improved understanding of the physical phenomena present in wind-driven shear flows in double diffusive stratified environments, increasing our knowledge-base on turbulent flow in stratified environments and how to represent it, and formulation of numerical code for such flows. The work is being carried out in a new experimental facility at Stanford and on laboratory minicomputers and CRAY computers. In particular we are focusing on the following key issues. The formation and propagation of double diffusive intrusions away from a heated wall and the effects of lateral heating on the double diffusive system; The interaction between the double diffusively influenced fluxes and the turbulence induced fluxes; The formation of gravitational intrusions; and The influence of double diffusive gradients on mixed layer deepening. The goals of the project were as follows. Physical experiments: Construct experimental facility; Modify and fabricate instrument rakes; Develop sampling and calibration software; Develop stratification techniques; Conduct flow visualization studies; Qualify wind tunnel over a range of wind speeds. Numerical experiments: Adapt REMIXCS to handle turbulent flows; Investigate approaches for specifying wind field; Perform calculations for low wind speeds. With the exception of the wind tunnel qualification, all the tasks have already been completed and we are now conducting quantitative experiments. 2 figs.

  7. Structural Analysis Made 'NESSUSary'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Everywhere you look, chances are something that was designed and tested by a computer will be in plain view. Computers are now utilized to design and test just about everything imaginable, from automobiles and airplanes to bridges and boats, and elevators and escalators to streets and skyscrapers. Computer-design engineering first emerged in the 1970s, in the automobile and aerospace industries. Since computers were in their infancy, however, architects and engineers during the time were limited to producing only designs similar to hand-drafted drawings. (At the end of 1970s, a typical computer-aided design system was a 16-bit minicomputer with a price tag of $125,000.) Eventually, computers became more affordable and related software became more sophisticated, offering designers the "bells and whistles" to go beyond the limits of basic drafting and rendering, and venture into more skillful applications. One of the major advancements was the ability to test the objects being designed for the probability of failure. This advancement was especially important for the aerospace industry, where complicated and expensive structures are designed. The ability to perform reliability and risk assessment without using extensive hardware testing is critical to design and certification. In 1984, NASA initiated the Probabilistic Structural Analysis Methods (PSAM) project at Glenn Research Center to develop analysis methods and computer programs for the probabilistic structural analysis of select engine components for current Space Shuttle and future space propulsion systems. NASA envisioned that these methods and computational tools would play a critical role in establishing increased system performance and durability, and assist in structural system qualification and certification. Not only was the PSAM project beneficial to aerospace, it paved the way for a commercial risk- probability tool that is evaluating risks in diverse, down- to-Earth application

  8. Networking mass spectrometer data systems for improved productivity and electronic archiving of data.

    PubMed

    Hayward, M J; Robandt, P V; Meek, J T; Thomson, M L

    1993-09-01

    Several Finngan-MAT mass spectrometer data systems were networked together to achieve the following two primary objectives: (1) to allow access to mass spectrometry data and data processing functions from remote locations without affecting simultaneous data acquisition at the instruments, and (2) to electronically archive mass spectrometry data at a central location on a high-capacity, fast-access device that allows rapid retrieval of archived data for all data processing operations at all locations. UNIX workstations, IBM PC/AT-compatible computers, and Data General Nova minicomputers were connected via Ethernet interfaces to allow rapid data transfer among all systems as well as X-Windows access to UNIX-based systems. Bridging techniques were used to isolate possible high-traffic areas of the network and to enable security measures for adequate protection of files. Additionally, serial connections were made through a Northern Telecom phone system to provide remote terminal access to the Data General Nova-based systems. Use of these connectivity techniques significantly improved productivity by allowing retrieval, processing, and printing of data from remote locations, such as office areas, without affecting data acquisition, processing, and printing performed simultaneously at the instruments. For archival purposes, data files are electronically stored on high-capacity magneto-optical disks for rapid retrieval. A highcapacity fixed disk is also available for centralized temporary data file storage. A Digital Equipment Corporation DECstation 2100 UNIX workstation was used as the file server for centralized data storage while being simultaneously utilized as the data system computer for one of the mass spectrometers. Utilization of this UNIX-based file server system in conjunction with Ethernet connectivity techniques provides a centralized, rapid-access, high-capacity, cost- and space-efficient method for electronic archival of mass spectrometry raw data recorded

  9. Rapid calculation of functional maps of glucose metabolic rate and individual model rate parameters from serial 2-FDG images

    SciTech Connect

    Koeppe, R.A.; Holden, J.E.; Hutchins, G.D.

    1985-05-01

    The authors have developed a method for the rapid pixel-by-pixel estimation of glucose metabolic rate from a dynamic sequence of PCT images acquired over 40 minutes following venous bolus injection of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-glucose (2-FDG). The calculations are based on the conventional four parameter model. The dephosphorylation rate (k/sub 4/) cannot be reliably estimated from only 40 minutes of data; however, neglecting dephosphorylation can nonetheless introduce significant biases into the parameter estimation processes. In the authors' method, the rate is constrained to fall within a small range about a presumed value. Computer simulation studies show that this constraint greatly reduces the systematic biases in the other three fitted parameters and in the metabolic rate that arise from the assumption of no dephosphorylation. The parameter estimation scheme used is formally identical to one originally developed for dynamic methods of cerebral blood flow estimation. Estimation of metabolic rate and the individual model rate parameters k/sub 1/, k/sub 2/, and k/sub 3/, can be carried out for each pixel sequence of a 100 x 100 pixel image in less than two minutes on our PDP 11/60 minicomputer with floating point processor. While the maps of k/sub 2/ amd k/sub 3/ are quite noisy, accurate estimates of average values can be attained for regions of a few cm/sup 2/. The maps of metabolic rate offer many advantages in addition to that of direct visualization. These include improved statistical precision and the avoidance of averaging failure in the fitting of heterogeneous regions.

  10. Cyclic Axial-Torsional Deformation Behavior of a Cobalt-Base Superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1995-01-01

    The cyclic, high-temperature deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-base super-alloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. This is accomplished through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue database has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gage section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. The fatigue behavior of Haynes 188 at 760 C under axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional loads and the monotonic and cyclic deformation behaviors under axial and torsional loads have been previously reported. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress ,versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain. and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic in-phase and out-of-phase axial-torsional tests. For in-phase tests, three different values of the proportionality constant lambda (the ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude, are examined, viz. 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 degrees with lambda equals 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress-strain and the maximum shear stress-maximum engineering shear strain (Tresca) curves. Comparisons are also made between the hardening behaviors of cyclic axial, torsional, and combined in-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 0) and out-of-phase (lambda = 1.73 and phi = 90') axial-torsional fatigue tests. These comparisons

  11. Cyclic axial-torsional deformation behavior of a cobalt-base superalloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bonacuse, Peter J.; Kalluri, Sreeramesh

    1992-01-01

    Multiaxial loading, especially at elevated temperature, can cause the inelastic response of a material to differ significantly from that predicted by simple flow rules, i.e., von Mises or Tresca. To quantify some of these differences, the cyclic high-temperature, deformation behavior of a wrought cobalt-based superalloy, Haynes 188, is investigated under combined axial and torsional loads. Haynes 188 is currently used in many aerospace gas turbine and rocket engine applications, e.g., the combustor liner for the T800 turboshaft engine for the RAH-66 Comanche helicopter and the liquid oxygen posts in the main injector of the space shuttle main engine. The deformation behavior of this material is assessed through the examination of hysteresis loops generated from a biaxial fatigue test program. A high-temperature axial, torsional, and combined axial-torsional fatigue data base has been generated on Haynes 188 at 760 C. Cyclic loading tests have been conducted on uniform gauge section tubular specimens in a servohydraulic axial-torsional test rig. Test control and data acquisition were accomplished with a minicomputer. In this paper, the cyclic hardening characteristics and typical hysteresis loops in the axial stress versus axial strain, shear stress versus engineering shear strain, axial strain versus engineering shear strain, and axial stress versus shear stress spaces are presented for cyclic, in-phase and out-of-phase, axial torsional tests. For in-phase tests three different values of the proportionality constant, lambda (ratio of engineering shear strain amplitude to axial strain amplitude), are examined, viz., 0.86, 1.73, and 3.46. In the out-of-phase tests, three different values of the phase angle, phi (between the axial and engineering shear strain waveforms), are studied, viz., 30, 60, and 90 deg with lambda = 1.73. The cyclic hardening behaviors of all the tests conducted on Haynes 188 at 760 C are evaluated using the von Mises equivalent stress

  12. Implementation of an advanced clinical and administrative hospital information system.

    PubMed

    Vegoda, P R; Dyro, J F

    1986-01-01

    Over the last six years since University Hospital opened, the University Hospital Information System (UHIS) has continued to evolve to what is today an advanced administrative and clinical information system. At University Hospital UHIS is the way of conducting business. A wide range of patient care applications are operational including Patient Registration, ADT for Inpatient/Outpatient/Emergency Room visits, Advanced Order Entry/Result Reporting, Medical Records, Lab Automated Data Acquisition/Quality Control, Pharmacy, Radiology, Dietary, Respiratory Therapy, ECG, EEG, Cardiology, Physical/Occupational Therapy and Nursing. These systems and numerous financial systems have been installed in a highly tuned, efficient computer system. All applications are real-time, on-line, and data base oriented. Each system is provided with multiple data security levels, forward file recovery, and dynamic transaction backout of in-flight tasks. Sensitive medical information is safeguarded by job function passwords, identification codes, need-to-know master screens and terminal keylocks. University Hospital has an IBM 3083 CPU with five 3380 disk drives, four dual density tape drives, and a 3705 network controller. The network of 300 terminals and 100 printers is connected to the computer center by an RF broadband cable. The software is configured around the IBM/MVS operating system using CICS as the telecommunication monitor, IMS as the data base management system and PCS/ADS as the application enabling tool. The most extensive clinical system added to UHIS is the Physiological Monitoring/Patient Data Management System with serves 92 critical care beds. In keeping with the Hospital's philosophy of integrated computing, the PMS/PDMS with its network of minicomputers was linked to the UHIS system. In a pilot program, remote access to UHIS through the IBM personal computer has been implemented in several physician offices in the local community, further extending the communications

  13. Two-Dimensional Analysis of Narrow Gate Effects in Micron and Submicron Mosfets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Shao-Shiun

    Variations of the device characteristics due to the geometry effects in narrow gate MOSFETs, such as threshold voltage shift and subthreshold characteristics, are important factors in designing next generation MOS-VLSI circuits. It is well known that numerical methods, using the exact 2 -D solutions of the transport equation and Poisson's equation for studying the geometry effect of small MOSFETs, are more accurate than simple charge-control analysis. The 2-D numerical model of Ji and Sah demonstrated important design features of the threshold voltage of narrow gate MOSFETs. However, studies of MOSFET characteristics using 2-D numerical analysis, which take into account the effects of all the device parameters, such as gate oxide thickness, backgate bias, and substrate doping, are lacking. Particularly, the analysis of the subthreshold characteristic for narrow gate MOSFETs was not reported before. The ideas in Ji-Sah's depletion approximation model, as well as their analysis method, have been extended to take into account the electrons and holes in the numerical solution of Poisson's equation. Using a super-minicomputer (VAX-11/750), a new 2-D program (NAROMOS-II) using the finite difference method has been developed in this thesis. Based on the 2-D results and device physics, a threshold voltage model and a subthreshold characteristics model for CAD of MOS-VLSI are proposed to describe the geometry effect of narrow gate MOSFETs. These models are based on the extraction of four model parameters: two for the threshold voltage model, and two for the subthreshold characteristics model. All of these model parameters can be verified numerically or experimentally. Results for the threshold voltage model compare favorably with numerical and reported experimental data. Dependences of the device performance on the device parameters are then investigated, using the above analysis techniques. Simple forms of the models of the threshold voltage shift and subthreshold

  14. LOOK- A TEXT FILE DISPLAY PROGRAM

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vavrus, J. L.

    1994-01-01

    The LOOK program was developed to permit a user to examine a text file in a psuedo-random access manner. Many engineering and scientific programs generate large amounts of printed output. Often this output needs to be examined in only a few places. On mini-computers (like the DEC VAX) high-speed printers are usually at a premium. One alternative is to save the output in a text file and examine it with a text editor. The slowness of a text editor, the possibility of inadvertently changing the output, and other factors make this an unsatisfactory solution. The LOOK program provides the user with a means of rapidly examining the contents of an ASCII text file. LOOK's basis of operation is to open the text file for input only and then access it in a block-wise fashion. LOOK handles the text formatting and displays the text lines on the screen. The user can move forward or backward in the file by a given number of lines or blocks. LOOK also provides the ability to "scroll" the text at various speeds in the forward or backward directions. The user can perform a search for a string (or a combination of up to 10 strings) in a forward or backward direction. Also, user selected portions of text may be extracted and submitted to print or placed in a file. Additional features available to the LOOK user include: cancellation of an operation with a keystroke, user definable keys, switching mode of operation (e.g. 80/132 column), on-line help facility, trapping broadcast messages, and the ability to spawn a sub-process to carry out DCL functions without leaving LOOK. The LOOK program is written in FORTRAN 77 and MACRO ASSEMBLER for interactive execution and has been implemented on a DEC VAX computer using VAX/VMS with a central memory requirement of approximately 430K of 8 bit bytes. LOOK operation is terminal independent but will take advantage of the features of the DEC VT100 terminal if available. LOOK was developed in 1983.

  15. Applications of research from the U.S. Geological Survey program, assessment of regional earthquake hazards and risk along the Wasatch Front, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gori, Paula L., (Edited By)

    1993-01-01

    engineering studies. Translated earthquake hazard maps have also been developed to identify areas that are particularly vulnerable to various causes of damage such as ground shaking, surface rupturing, and liquefaction. The implementation of earthquake hazard reduction plans are now under way in various communities in Utah. The results of a survey presented in this paper indicate that technical public officials (planners and building officials) have an understanding of the earthquake hazards and how to mitigate the risks. Although the survey shows that the general public has a slightly lower concern about the potential for economic losses, they recognize the potential problems and can support a number of earthquake mitigation measures. The study suggests that many community groups along the Wasatch Front, including volunteer groups, business groups, and elected and appointed officials, are ready for action-oriented educational programs. These programs could lead to a significant reduction in the risks associated with earthquake hazards. A DATA BASE DESIGNED FOR URBAN SEISMIC HAZARDS STUDIES: A computerized data base has been designed for use in urban seismic hazards studies conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey. The design includes file structures for 16 linked data sets, which contain geological, geophysical, and seismological data used in preparing relative ground response maps of large urban areas. The data base is organized along relational data base principles. A prototype urban hazards data base has been created for evaluation in two urban areas currently under investigation: the Wasatch Front region of Utah and the Puget Sound area of Washington. The initial implementation of the urban hazards data base was accomplished on a microcomputer using dBASE III Plus software and transferred to minicomputers and a work station. A MAPPING OF GROUND-SHAKING INTENSITIES FOR SALT LAKE COUNTY, UTAH: This paper documents the development of maps showing a

  16. Obituary: Arthur Dodd Code (1923-2009)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marché, Jordan D., II

    2009-12-01

    future course of stellar astronomy," a prediction strongly borne out in the decades that followed. In 1959, Code founded the Space Astronomy Laboratory (SAL) within the UW Department of Astronomy. Early photometric and spectrographic equipment was test-flown aboard NASA's X-15 rocket plane and Aerobee sounding rockets. Along with other SAL personnel, including Theodore E. Houck, Robert C. Bless, and John F. McNall, Code (as principal investigator) was responsible for the design of the Wisconsin Experiment Package (WEP) as one of two suites of instruments to be flown aboard the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO), which represented a milestone in the advent of space astronomy. With its seven reflecting telescopes feeding five filter photometers and two scanning spectrometers, WEP permitted the first extended observations in the UV portion of the spectrum. After the complete failure of the OAO-1 spacecraft (launched in 1966), OAO-2 was successfully launched on 7 December 1968 and gathered data on over a thousand celestial objects during the next 50 months, including stars, nebulae, galaxies, planets, and comets. These results appeared in a series of more than 40 research papers, chiefly in the Ap.J., along with the 1972 monograph, The Scientific Results from the Orbiting Astronomical Observatory (OAO-2), edited by Code. Between the OAO launches, other SAL colleagues of Code developed the Wisconsin Automatic Photoelectric Telescope (or APT), the first computer-controlled (or "robotic") telescope. Driven by a PDP-8 mini-computer, it routinely collected atmospheric extinction data. Code was also chosen principal investigator for the Wisconsin Ultraviolet Photo-Polarimeter Experiment (or WUPPE). This used a UV-sensitive polarimeter designed by Kenneth Nordsieck that was flown twice aboard the space shuttles in 1990 and 1995. Among other findings, WUPPE observations demonstrated that interstellar dust does not appreciably change the direction of polarization of starlight

  17. Computer networks: making the decision to join one.

    PubMed

    Massy, W F

    1974-11-01

    I began this article with the thesis that the director of a university computer center is in a double bind. He is under increasing pressure because of competition with networks and minicomputers at the same time that his funding base is weakening. The breadth of demand for computer services, and the cost of developing new services, are increasing dramatically. The director is pressed by budget officers and internal economics to run more efficiently, but if in so doing he fails to meet new needs or downgrades effectiveness for some existing users he runs the risks of losing demand to the competition and hence worsening his immediate financial problems. The impact of networks on this state of affairs might be, briefly, as follows: 1) The centrally planned computer utility would take these pressures off the individual campus computer center and lodge them in a state, regional, or perhaps even a national network organization. While this might be desirable in some cases (depending on the scale of operations), I believe that economies of scale would tend to be more than offset by diseconomies in planning, management, and control; by a reduction of responsiveness to users' needs; and by a slowing of the rate of innovation in computing. 2) The distributive network substitutes a "market economy" for a centrally planned one. Subject to a certain amount of planning and regulation, which might be undertaken by colleges and universities themselves, individual researchers can tap larger markets for services, and participating institutions can obtain at least part of their computing needs on a variable cost basis at prices determined by competition. 3) Membership in a distributive network with sufficient breadth and depth of resources can emancipate the director of the computer center by widening options and allowing him to serve more effectively the steadily broadening range of legitimate academic and research computing needs without his having to stretch his internal resources

  18. CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (IBM PC VERSION WITH CLIPSITS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, , .

    1994-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The PC version and the Macintosh

  19. CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (IBM PC VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riley, G.

    1994-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The PC version and the Macintosh

  20. CLIPS - C LANGUAGE INTEGRATED PRODUCTION SYSTEM (MACINTOSH VERSION)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, C.

    1994-01-01

    The C Language Integrated Production System, CLIPS, is a shell for developing expert systems. It is designed to allow artificial intelligence research, development, and delivery on conventional computers. The primary design goals for CLIPS are portability, efficiency, and functionality. For these reasons, the program is written in C. CLIPS meets or outperforms most micro- and minicomputer based artificial intelligence tools. CLIPS is a forward chaining rule-based language. The program contains an inference engine and a language syntax that provide a framework for the construction of an expert system. It also includes tools for debugging an application. CLIPS is based on the Rete algorithm, which enables very efficient pattern matching. The collection of conditions and actions to be taken if the conditions are met is constructed into a rule network. As facts are asserted either prior to or during a session, CLIPS pattern-matches the number of fields. Wildcards and variables are supported for both single and multiple fields. CLIPS syntax allows the inclusion of externally defined functions (outside functions which are written in a language other than CLIPS). CLIPS itself can be embedded in a program such that the expert system is available as a simple subroutine call. Advanced features found in CLIPS version 4.3 include an integrated microEMACS editor, the ability to generate C source code from a CLIPS rule base to produce a dedicated executable, binary load and save capabilities for CLIPS rule bases, and the utility program CRSV (Cross-Reference, Style, and Verification) designed to facilitate the development and maintenance of large rule bases. Five machine versions are available. Each machine version includes the source and the executable for that machine. The UNIX version includes the source and binaries for IBM RS/6000, Sun3 series, and Sun4 series computers. The UNIX, DEC VAX, and DEC RISC Workstation versions are line oriented. The PC version and the Macintosh