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Sample records for minimal photoautotroph non-coding

  1. Blueprint for a minimal photoautotrophic cell: conserved and variable genes in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Simpler biological systems should be easier to understand and to engineer towards pre-defined goals. One way to achieve biological simplicity is through genome minimization. Here we looked for genomic islands in the fresh water cyanobacteria Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (genome size 2.7 Mb) that could be used as targets for deletion. We also looked for conserved genes that might be essential for cell survival. Results By using a combination of methods we identified 170 xenologs, 136 ORFans and 1401 core genes in the genome of S. elongatus PCC 7942. These represent 6.5%, 5.2% and 53.6% of the annotated genes respectively. We considered that genes in genomic islands could be found if they showed a combination of: a) unusual G+C content; b) unusual phylogenetic similarity; and/or c) a small number of the highly iterated palindrome 1 (HIP1) motif plus an unusual codon usage. The origin of the largest genomic island by horizontal gene transfer (HGT) could be corroborated by lack of coverage among metagenomic sequences from a fresh water microbialite. Evidence is also presented that xenologous genes tend to cluster in operons. Interestingly, most genes coding for proteins with a diguanylate cyclase domain are predicted to be xenologs, suggesting a role for horizontal gene transfer in the evolution of Synechococcus sensory systems. Conclusions Our estimates of genomic islands in PCC 7942 are larger than those predicted by other published methods like SIGI-HMM. Our results set a guide to non-essential genes in S. elongatus PCC 7942 indicating a path towards the engineering of a model photoautotrophic bacterial cell. PMID:21226929

  2. Non Coding RNA Molecules as Potential Biomarkers in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    De Leeneer, Kim; Claes, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    The pursuit of minimally invasive biomarkers is a challenging but exciting area of research. Clearly, such markers would need to be sensitive and specific enough to aid in the detection of breast cancer at an early stage, would monitor progression of the disease, and could predict the individual patient's response to treatment. Unfortunately, to date, markers with such characteristics have not made it to the clinic for breast cancer. Past years, many studies indicated that the non-coding part of our genome (the so called 'junk' DNA), may be an ideal source for these biomarkers. In this chapter, the potential use of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs as biomarkers will be discussed. PMID:26530371

  3. The non-coding RNAs as riboregulators

    PubMed Central

    Erdmann, Volker A.; Barciszewska, Miroslawa Z.; Szymanski, Maciej; Hochberg, Abraham; Groot, Nathan de; Barciszewski, Jan

    2001-01-01

    The non-coding RNAs database (http://biobases.ibch.poznan.pl/ncRNA/) contains currently available data on RNAs, which do not have long open reading frames and act as riboregulators. Non-coding RNAs are involved in the specific recognition of cellular nucleic acid targets through complementary base pairing to control cell growth and differentiation. Some of them are connected with several well known developmental and neuro­behavioral disorders. We have divided them into four groups. This paper is a short introduction to the database and presents its latest, updated edition. PMID:11125087

  4. Non-Coding RNAs in Transcriptional Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yung-Chia Ariel; Aravin, Alexei A.

    2015-01-01

    Transcriptional gene silencing guided by small RNAs is a process conserved from protozoa to mammals. Small RNAs loaded into Argonaute family proteins direct repressive histone modifications or DNA cytosine methylation to homologous regions of the genome. Small RNA-mediated transcriptional silencing is required for many biological processes, including repression of transposable elements, maintaining the genome stability/integrity, and epigenetic inheritance of gene expression. Here we will summarize the current knowledge about small RNA biogenesis and mechanisms of transcriptional regulation in plants, Drosophila, C. elegans and mice. Furthermore, a rapidly growing number long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated as important players in transcription regulation. We will discuss current models for long non-coding RNA-mediated gene regulation. PMID:26120554

  5. Non-coding RNAs in lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ricciuti, Biagio; Mecca, Carmen; Crinò, Lucio; Baglivo, Sara; Cenci, Matteo; Metro, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    The discovery that protein-coding genes represent less than 2% of all human genome, and the evidence that more than 90% of it is actively transcribed, changed the classical point of view of the central dogma of molecular biology, which was always based on the assumption that RNA functions mainly as an intermediate bridge between DNA sequences and protein synthesis machinery. Accumulating data indicates that non-coding RNAs are involved in different physiological processes, providing for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. They are important regulators of gene expression, cellular differentiation, proliferation, migration, apoptosis, and stem cell maintenance. Alterations and disruptions of their expression or activity have increasingly been associated with pathological changes of cancer cells, this evidence and the prospect of using these molecules as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets, make currently non-coding RNAs among the most relevant molecules in cancer research. In this paper we will provide an overview of non-coding RNA function and disruption in lung cancer biology, also focusing on their potential as diagnostic, prognostic and predictive biomarkers. PMID:25593996

  6. Biogeography of photoautotrophs in the high polar biome

    PubMed Central

    Pointing, Stephen B.; Burkhard Büdel; Convey, Peter; Gillman, Len N.; Körner, Christian; Leuzinger, Sebastian; Vincent, Warwick F.

    2015-01-01

    The global latitudinal gradient in biodiversity weakens in the high polar biome and so an alternative explanation for distribution of Arctic and Antarctic photoautotrophs is required. Here we identify how temporal, microclimate and evolutionary drivers of biogeography are important, rather than the macroclimate features that drive plant diversity patterns elsewhere. High polar ecosystems are biologically unique, with a more central role for bryophytes, lichens and microbial photoautotrophs over that of vascular plants. Constraints on vascular plants arise mainly due to stature and ontogenetic barriers. Conversely non-vascular plant and microbial photoautotroph distribution is correlated with favorable microclimates and the capacity for poikilohydric dormancy. Contemporary distribution also depends on evolutionary history, with adaptive and dispersal traits as well as legacy influencing biogeography. We highlight the relevance of these findings to predicting future impacts on diversity of polar photoautotrophs and to the current status of plants in Arctic and Antarctic conservation policy frameworks. PMID:26442009

  7. Non-coding genome functions in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Cebola, Inês; Pasquali, Lorenzo

    2016-01-01

    Most of the genetic variation associated with diabetes, through genome-wide association studies, does not reside in protein-coding regions, making the identification of functional variants and their eventual translation to the clinic challenging. In recent years, high-throughput sequencing-based methods have enabled genome-scale high-resolution epigenomic profiling in a variety of human tissues, allowing the exploration of the human genome outside of the well-studied coding regions. These experiments unmasked tens of thousands of regulatory elements across several cell types, including diabetes-relevant tissues, providing new insights into their mechanisms of gene regulation. Regulatory landscapes are highly dynamic and cell-type specific and, being sensitive to DNA sequence variation, can vary with individual genomes. The scientific community is now in place to exploit the regulatory maps of tissues central to diabetes etiology, such as pancreatic progenitors and adult islets. This giant leap forward in the understanding of pancreatic gene regulation is revolutionizing our capacity to discriminate between functional and non-functional non-coding variants, opening opportunities to uncover regulatory links between sequence variation and diabetes susceptibility. In this review, we focus on the non-coding regulatory landscape of the pancreatic endocrine cells and provide an overview of the recent developments in this field. PMID:26438568

  8. Microdroplet photobioreactor for the photoautotrophic culture of microalgal cells.

    PubMed

    Sung, Young Joon; Kim, Jaoon Young Hwan; Bong, Ki Wan; Sim, Sang Jun

    2016-02-01

    Microalgae, unicellular photoautotrophic microorganisms, have attracted great attention for the production of biofuel and high-value products, but the commercial use of microalgae has been limited by low photosynthetic productivity. To overcome this limitation, it is required to develop an efficient platform for the rapid evaluation of photoautotrophic growth performance and productivity of microalgal strains. Here we describe a droplet-based photobioreactor for high-throughput analysis of the photoautotrophic growth of microalgal cells. By integrating micropillar arrays and adjusting the height of the microchamber, we could accurately monitor the growth kinetics of microalgae in an immobilized microdroplet and improve the transfer rate of CO2 into the microdroplet photobioreactor with an increased contact area between the microdroplet and PDMS surface. The improvement of CO2 transfer into the microdroplet was also confirmed by improved microalgal cell growth and a decrease in pH measured using colorimetric and fluorescence-based assays. The photoautotrophic growth kinetics of Chlorella vulgaris were measured under different CO2 concentrations (ambient, 1%, 2.5%, 5% and 7.5%) and light intensity (35, 55, 100, 150, and 200 μmol photons per m(2) per s) conditions, which are key factors for photoautotrophic growth. Chlorella vulgaris in a microdroplet showed better cell growth performance compared to a flask culture due to the reduced shading effects and improved mass transfer. Finally, we could evaluate the photoautotrophic growth performance of four microalgal strains (Chlorella vulgaris, Chlorella protothecoides, Chlorella sorokiniana and Neochloris oleoabundans) for 120 hours. These results demonstrate that our microdroplet system can be used as an efficient photobioreactor for the rapid evaluation of the photoautotrophic growth of microalgal strains under various conditions. PMID:26673975

  9. Fluorescence characteristics of photoautotrophic soybean cells.

    PubMed

    Xu, C; Rogers, S M; Goldstein, C; Widholm, J M; Govindjee

    1989-08-01

    We report here the first measurements on chlorophyll (Chl) a fluorescence characteristics of photoautotrophic soybean cells (cell lines SB-P and SBI-P). The cell fluorescence is free from severe distortion problems encountered in higher plant leaves. Chl a fluorescence spectra at 77 K show, after correction for the spectral sensitivity of the photomultiplier and the emission monochromator, peaks at 688, 696 and 745 nm, representing antenna systems of photosystem II-CP43 and CP47, and photosystem I, respectively. Calculations, based on the complementary area over the Chl a fluorescence induction curve, indicated a ratio of 6 of the mobile plastoquinone (including QB) to the primary stable electron acceptor, the bound plastoquinone QA. A ratio of one between the secondary stable electron acceptor, bound plastoquinone QB, and its reduced form QB (-) was obtained by using a double flash technique. Owing to this ratio, the flash number dependence of the Chl a fluorescence showed a distinct period of four, implying a close relationship to the 'S' state of the oxygen evolution mechanism. Analysis of the QA (-) reoxidation kinetics showed (1) the halftime of each of the major decay components (∼ 300 μs fast and ∼ 30 ms slow) increases with the increase of diuron and atrazine concentrations; and (2) the amplitudes of the fast and the slow components change in a complementary fashion, the fast component disappearing at high concentrations of the inhibitors. This implies that the inhibitors used are able to totally displace QB. In intact soybean cells, the relative amplitude of the 30 ms to 300 μs component is higher (40:60) than that in spinach chloroplasts (30:70), implying a larger contribution of the centers with unbound QB. SB-P and SBI-P soybean cells display a slightly different sensitivity of QA (-) decay to inhibitors. PMID:24424528

  10. Non-coding landscapes of colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ragusa, Marco; Barbagallo, Cristina; Statello, Luisa; Condorelli, Angelo Giuseppe; Battaglia, Rosalia; Tamburello, Lucia; Barbagallo, Davide; Di Pietro, Cinzia; Purrello, Michele

    2015-01-01

    For two decades Vogelstein’s model has been the paradigm for describing the sequence of molecular changes within protein-coding genes that would lead to overt colorectal cancer (CRC). This model is now too simplistic in the light of recent studies, which have shown that our genome is pervasively transcribed in RNAs other than mRNAs, denominated non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The discovery that mutations in genes encoding these RNAs [i.e., microRNAs (miRNAs), long non-coding RNAs, and circular RNAs] are causally involved in cancer phenotypes has profoundly modified our vision of tumour molecular genetics and pathobiology. By exploiting a wide range of different mechanisms, ncRNAs control fundamental cellular processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, migration, angiogenesis and apoptosis: these data have also confirmed their role as oncogenes or tumor suppressors in cancer development and progression. The existence of a sophisticated RNA-based regulatory system, which dictates the correct functioning of protein-coding networks, has relevant biological and biomedical consequences. Different miRNAs involved in neoplastic and degenerative diseases exhibit potential predictive and prognostic properties. Furthermore, the key roles of ncRNAs make them very attractive targets for innovative therapeutic approaches. Several recent reports have shown that ncRNAs can be secreted by cells into the extracellular environment (i.e., blood and other body fluids): this suggests the existence of extracellular signalling mechanisms, which may be exploited by cells in physiology and pathology. In this review, we will summarize the most relevant issues on the involvement of cellular and extracellular ncRNAs in disease. We will then specifically describe their involvement in CRC pathobiology and their translational applications to CRC diagnosis, prognosis and therapy. PMID:26556998

  11. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease

    PubMed Central

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G.; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  12. Non-coding RNAs and atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Hernando, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) represent a class of RNA molecules that typically do not code for proteins. Emerging data suggest that ncRNAs play an important role in several physiological and pathological conditions such as cancer and cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) including atherosclerosis. The best-characterized ncRNAs are the microRNAs (miRNAs), which are small, ~22 nucleotide (nt) sequences of RNA that regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level through transcript degradation or translational repression. MiRNAs control several aspects of atherosclerosis including endothelial cell, vascular smooth cell, and macrophage functions as well as lipoprotein metabolism. Apart from miRNAs, recently ncRNAs, especially long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), have emerged as important potential regulators of the progression of atherosclerosis. However, the molecular mechanism of their regulation and function as well as significance of other ncRNAs such as small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) during atherogenesis is largely unknown. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in the field, highlighting the importance of ncRNAs in atherosclerosis and discuss their potential use as therapeutic targets in CVDs. PMID:24623179

  13. Non coding RNAs in aortic aneurysmal disease.

    PubMed

    Duggirala, Aparna; Delogu, Francesca; Angelini, Timothy G; Smith, Tanya; Caputo, Massimo; Rajakaruna, Cha; Emanueli, Costanza

    2015-01-01

    An aneurysm is a local dilatation of a vessel wall which is >50% its original diameter. Within the spectrum of cardiovascular diseases, aortic aneurysms are among the most challenging to treat. Most patients present acutely after aneurysm rupture or dissection from a previous asymptomatic condition and are managed by open surgical or endovascular repair. In addition, patients may harbor concurrent disease contraindicating surgical intervention. Collectively, these factors have driven the search for alternative methods of identifying, monitoring and treating aortic aneurisms using less invasive approaches. Non-coding RNA (ncRNAs) are emerging as new fundamental regulators of gene expression. The small microRNAs have opened the field of ncRNAs capturing the attention of basic and clinical scientists for their potential to become new therapeutic targets and clinical biomarkers for aortic aneurysm. More recently, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have started to be actively investigated, leading to first exciting reports, which further suggest their important and yet largely unexplored contribution to vascular physiology and disease. This review introduces the different ncRNA types and focus at ncRNA roles in aorta aneurysms. We discuss the potential of therapeutic interventions targeting ncRNAs and we describe the research models allowing for mechanistic studies and clinical translation attempts for controlling aneurysm progression. Furthermore, we discuss the potential role of microRNAs and lncRNAs as clinical biomarkers. PMID:25883602

  14. Non-coding RNA repertoires in malignant pleural mesothelioma.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Leah; Finn, Stephen P; Cuffe, Sinead; Gray, Steven G

    2015-12-01

    Malignant pleural mesothelioma (MPM) is a rare malignancy, with extremely poor survival rates. There are limited treatment options, with no second line standard of care for those who fail first line chemotherapy. Recent advances have been made to characterise the underlying molecular mechanisms of mesothelioma, in the hope of providing new targets for therapy. With the discovery that non-coding regions of our DNA are more than mere junk, the field of research into non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has exploded in recent years. Non-coding RNAs have diverse and important roles in a variety of cellular processes, but are also implicated in malignancy. In the following review, we discuss two types of non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs, in terms of their role in the pathogenesis of MPM and their potential as both biomarkers and as therapeutic targets in this disease. PMID:26791801

  15. Non-coding RNAs in epithelial immunity to Cryptosporidium infection

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Rui; Feng, Yaoyu; Chen, Xian-Ming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Cryptosporidium spp. is a protozoan parasite that infects the gastrointestinal epithelium and causes diarrhoeal disease worldwide. It is one of the most common pathogens responsible for moderate to severe diarrhoea in children younger than 2 years. Because of the ‘minimally invasive’ nature of Cryptosporidium infection, mucosal epithelial cells are critical to the host’s anti-Cryptosporidium immunity. Gastrointestinal epithelial cells not only provide the first and most rapid defence against Cryptosporidium infection, they also mobilize immune effector cells to the infection site to activate adaptive immunity. Recent advances in genomic research have revealed the existence of a large number of non-protein-coding RNA transcripts, so called non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), in mammalian cells. Some ncRNAs may be key regulators for diverse biological functions, including innate immune responses. Specifically, ncRNAs may modulate epithelial immune responses at every step of the innate immune network following Cryptosporidium infection, including production of antimicrobial molecules, expression of cytokines/chemokines, release of epithelial cell-derived exosomes, and feedback regulation of immune homoeostasis. This review briefly summarizes the current science on ncRNA regulation of innate immunity to Cryptosporidium, with a focus on microRNA-associated epithelial immune responses. PMID:24828969

  16. Mapping photoautotrophic metabolism with isotopically nonstationary (13)C flux analysis.

    PubMed

    Young, Jamey D; Shastri, Avantika A; Stephanopoulos, Gregory; Morgan, John A

    2011-11-01

    Understanding in vivo regulation of photoautotrophic metabolism is important for identifying strategies to improve photosynthetic efficiency or re-route carbon fluxes to desirable end products. We have developed an approach to reconstruct comprehensive flux maps of photoautotrophic metabolism by computational analysis of dynamic isotope labeling measurements and have applied it to determine metabolic pathway fluxes in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC6803. Comparison to a theoretically predicted flux map revealed inefficiencies in photosynthesis due to oxidative pentose phosphate pathway and malic enzyme activity, despite negligible photorespiration. This approach has potential to fill important gaps in our understanding of how carbon and energy flows are systemically regulated in cyanobacteria, plants, and algae. PMID:21907300

  17. Disruption of photoautotrophic intertidal mats by filamentous fungi.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Cátia; Staal, Marc; Falkoski, Daniel; de Vries, Ronald P; Middelboe, Mathias; Brussaard, Corina P D

    2015-08-01

    Ring-like structures, 2.0-4.8 cm in diameter, observed in photosynthetic microbial mats on the Wadden Sea island Schiermonnikoog (the Netherlands) showed to be the result of the fungus Emericellopsis sp. degrading the photoautotrophic top layer of the mat. The mats were predominantly composed of cyanobacteria and diatoms, with large densities of bacteria and viruses both in the top photosynthetic layer and in the underlying sediment. The fungal attack cleared the photosynthetic layer; however, no significant effect of the fungal lysis on the bacterial and viral abundances could be detected. Fungal-mediated degradation of the major photoautotrophs could be reproduced by inoculation of non-infected mat with isolated Emericellopsis sp., and with an infected ring sector. Diatoms were the first re-colonizers followed closely by cyanobacteria that after about 5 days dominated the space. The study demonstrated that the fungus Emericellopsis sp. efficiently degraded a photoautotrophic microbial mat, with potential implications for mat community composition, spatial structure and productivity. PMID:25728280

  18. Towards structural classification of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2016-01-01

    While long non-coding RNAs play key roles in disease and development, few structural studies have been performed to date for this emerging class of RNAs. Previous structural studies are reviewed, and a pipeline is presented to determine secondary structures of long non-coding RNAs. Similar to riboswitches, experimentally determined secondary structures of long non-coding RNAs for one species, may be used to improve sequence/structure alignments for other species. As riboswitches have been classified according to their secondary structure, a similar scheme could be used to classify long non-coding RNAs. This article is part of a Special Issue titled: Clues to long noncoding RNA taxonomy1, edited by Dr. Tetsuro Hirose and Dr. Shinichi Nakagawa. PMID:26537437

  19. Circulating Non-coding RNA as Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ferracin, Manuela; Lupini, Laura; Mangolini, Alessandra; Negrini, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggested that colorectal cancer influences the types and quantity of nucleic acids - especially microRNAs - detected in the bloodstream. Concentration of circulating (cell-free) microRNAs, and possibly of other non-coding RNAs, could therefore serve as valuable colorectal cancer biomarker and could deliver insight into the disease process. This chapter addresses the recent discoveries on circulating microRNA and long non-coding RNA as diagnostic or prognostic biomarkers in colorectal cancer. PMID:27573900

  20. Functional roles of non-coding Y RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Madzia P.; Krude, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs are involved in a multitude of cellular processes but the biochemical function of many small non-coding RNAs remains unclear. The family of small non-coding Y RNAs is conserved in vertebrates and related RNAs are present in some prokaryotic species. Y RNAs are also homologous to the newly identified family of non-coding stem-bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) in nematodes, for which potential physiological functions are only now emerging. Y RNAs are essential for the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in vertebrates and, when bound to the Ro60 protein, they are involved in RNA stability and cellular responses to stress in several eukaryotic and prokaryotic species. Additionally, short fragments of Y RNAs have recently been identified as abundant components in the blood and tissues of humans and other mammals, with potential diagnostic value. While the number of functional roles of Y RNAs is growing, it is becoming increasingly clear that the conserved structural domains of Y RNAs are essential for distinct cellular functions. Here, we review the biochemical functions associated with these structural RNA domains, as well as the functional conservation of Y RNAs in different species. The existing biochemical and structural evidence supports a domain model for these small non-coding RNAs that has direct implications for the modular evolution of functional non-coding RNAs. PMID:26159929

  1. Long non-coding RNA PVT1 and cancer.

    PubMed

    Cui, Ming; You, Lei; Ren, Xiaoxia; Zhao, Wenjing; Liao, Quan; Zhao, Yupei

    2016-02-26

    Genome-wide sequencing technologies have led to the identification of many non-coding RNAs and revealed an important role for these molecules in cancer. Although there have been many studies on the role of short non-coding RNAs in cancer, much work remains to characterize the functions of long non-coding RNAs. PVT1, a long non-coding RNA encoded by the human PVT1 gene, is located in the well-known cancer-related region 8q24, also known as the 8q24 'gene desert.' PVT1 has three main molecular mechanisms of action: participating in DNA rearrangements, encoding microRNAs, and interacting with MYC. Studies on the association between PVT1 and cancer have shown that PVT1 is a potential oncogene in a variety of cancer types. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms of PVT1 in cancer remain unknown. Further studies of PVT1 will be required to test the utility of this molecule as a target for cancer diagnosis and therapy, and they should also increase our understanding of the role of long non-coding RNAs in tumorigenesis. PMID:26850852

  2. Non-coding RNAs in Mammary Gland Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, Gurveen K; Milevskiy, Michael J G; Wilson, Wesley; Shewan, Annette M; Brown, Melissa A

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are untranslated RNA molecules that function to regulate the expression of numerous genes and associated biochemical pathways and cellular functions. NcRNAs include small interfering RNAs (siRNAs), microRNAs (miRNAs), PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). They participate in the regulation of all developmental processes and are frequently aberrantly expressed or functionally defective in disease. This Chapter will focus on the role of ncRNAs, in particular miRNAs and lncRNAs, in mammary gland development and disease. PMID:26659490

  3. Non-coding RNA in neural function, disease, and aging

    PubMed Central

    Szafranski, Kirk; Abraham, Karan J.; Mekhail, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Declining brain and neurobiological function is arguably one of the most common features of human aging. The study of conserved aging processes as well as the characterization of various neurodegenerative diseases using different genetic models such as yeast, fly, mouse, and human systems is uncovering links to non-coding RNAs. These links implicate a variety of RNA-regulatory processes, including microRNA function, paraspeckle formation, RNA–DNA hybrid regulation, nucleolar RNAs and toxic RNA clearance, amongst others. Here we highlight these connections and reveal over-arching themes or questions related to recently appreciated roles of non-coding RNA in neural function and dysfunction across lifespan. PMID:25806046

  4. Photoautotrophic microorganisms as a carbon source for temperate soil invertebrates.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Olaf; Dyckmans, Jens; Schrader, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    We tested experimentally if photoautotrophic microorganisms are a carbon source for invertebrates in temperate soils. We exposed forest or arable soils to a (13)CO2-enriched atmosphere and quantified (13)C assimilation by three common animal groups: earthworms (Oligochaeta), springtails (Hexapoda) and slugs (Gastropoda). Endogeic earthworms (Allolobophora chlorotica) and hemiedaphic springtails (Ceratophysella denticulata) were highly (13)C enriched when incubated under light, deriving up to 3.0 and 17.0%, respectively, of their body carbon from the microbial source in 7 days. Earthworms assimilated more (13)C in undisturbed soil than when the microbial material was mixed into the soil, presumably reflecting selective surface grazing. By contrast, neither adult nor newly hatched terrestrial slugs (Deroceras reticulatum) grazed on algal mats. Non-photosynthetic (13)CO2 fixation in the dark was negligible. We conclude from these preliminary laboratory experiments that, in addition to litter and root-derived carbon from vascular plants, photoautotrophic soil surface microorganisms (cyanobacteria, algae) may be an ecologically important carbon input route for temperate soil animals that are traditionally assigned to the decomposer channel in soil food web models and carbon cycling studies. PMID:26740559

  5. Non-coding RNAs in cancer brain metastasis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Kerui; Sharma, Sambad; Venkat, Suresh; Liu, Keqin; Zhou, Xiaobo; Watabe, Kounosuke

    2016-01-01

    More than 90% of cancer death is attributed to metastatic disease, and the brain is one of the major metastatic sites of melanoma, colon, renal, lung and breast cancers. Despite the recent advancement of targeted therapy for cancer, the incidence of brain metastasis is increasing. One reason is that most therapeutic drugs can't penetrate blood-brain-barrier and tumor cells find the brain as sanctuary site. In this review, we describe the pathophysiology of brain metastases to introduce the latest understandings of metastatic brain malignancies. This review also particularly focuses on non-coding RNAs and their roles in cancer brain metastasis. Furthermore, we discuss the roles of the extracellular vesicles as they are known to transport information between cells to initiate cancer cell-microenvironment communication. The potential clinical translation of non-coding RNAs as a tool for diagnosis and for treatment is also discussed in this review. At the end, the computational aspects of non-coding RNA detection, the sequence and structure calculation and epigenetic regulation of non-coding RNA in brain metastasis are discussed. PMID:26709907

  6. Beyond the proteome: non-coding regulatory RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Szymański, Maciej; Barciszewski, Jan

    2002-01-01

    A variety of RNA molecules have been found over the last 20 years to have a remarkable range of functions beyond the well-known roles of messenger, ribosomal and transfer RNAs. Here, we present a general categorization of all non-coding RNAs and briefly discuss the ones that affect transcription, translation and protein function. PMID:12049667

  7. The tumour hypoxia induced non-coding transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Choudhry, Hani; Harris, Adrian L; McIntyre, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Recent investigations have highlighted the importance of the non-coding genome in regions of hypoxia in tumours. Such regions are frequently found in solid tumours, and are associated with worse patient survival and therapy resistance. Hypoxia stabilises the transcription factors, hypoxia inducible factors (HIF1α and HIF2α) which coordinate transcriptomic changes that occur in hypoxia. The changes in gene expression induced by HIF1α and HIF2α contribute to many of the hallmarks of cancer phenotypes and enable tumour growth, survival and invasion in the hypoxic tumour microenvironment. Non-coding RNAs, in particular microRNAs (miRNAs), which regulate mRNA stability and translation, and long-non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which have diverse functions including chromatin modification and transcriptional regulation, are also important in enabling the key hypoxia regulated processes. They have roles in the regulation of metabolism, angiogenesis, autophagy, invasion and metastasis in the hypoxic microenvironment. Furthermore, HIF1α and HIF2α expression and stabilisation are also regulated by both miRNAs and lncRNAs. Here we review the recent developments in the expression, regulation and functions of miRNAs, lncRNAs and other non-coding RNA classes in tumour hypoxia. PMID:26806607

  8. Uncovering RNA Editing Sites in Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Picardi, Ernesto; D’Erchia, Anna Maria; Gallo, Angela; Montalvo, Antonio; Pesole, Graziano

    2014-01-01

    RNA editing is an important co/post-transcriptional molecular process able to modify RNAs by nucleotide insertions/deletions or substitutions. In human, the most common RNA editing event involves the deamination of adenosine (A) into inosine (I) through the adenosine deaminase acting on RNA proteins. Although A-to-I editing can occur in both coding and non-coding RNAs, recent findings, based on RNA-seq experiments, have clearly demonstrated that a large fraction of RNA editing events alter non-coding RNAs sequences including untranslated regions of mRNAs, introns, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), and low molecular weight RNAs (tRNA, miRNAs, and others). An accurate detection of A-to-I events occurring in non-coding RNAs is of utmost importance to clarify yet unknown functional roles of RNA editing in the context of gene expression regulation and maintenance of cell homeostasis. In the last few years, massive transcriptome sequencing has been employed to identify putative RNA editing changes at genome scale. Despite several efforts, the computational prediction of A-to-I sites in complete eukaryotic genomes is yet a challenging task. We have recently developed a software package, called REDItools, in order to simplify the detection of RNA editing events from deep sequencing data. In the present work, we show the potential of our tools in recovering A-to-I candidates from RNA-Seq experiments as well as guidelines to improve the RNA editing detection in non-coding RNAs, with specific attention to the lncRNAs. PMID:25538940

  9. Photoautotrophic Growth of Soybean Cells in Suspension Culture

    PubMed Central

    Horn, Michael E.; Sherrard, Joseph H.; Widholm, Jack M.

    1983-01-01

    Highly chlorophyllous photomixotrophic callus was visually selected from callus originating from soybean (Glycine max (L.) Merr. var. Corsoy) cotyledon. Suspension cultures initiated from this callus became photoautotrophic under continuous light with an atmosphere of 5% CO2 (balance air). Dry weight increases of 1000 to 1400% in the 2-week subculture period have been observed. The cellular Chl content ranged from 4.4 to 5.9 micrograms per milligram dry weight which is about 75 to 90% of the Chl content in soybean leaves under equivalent illumination (300 micro-Einsteins per square meter per second). No growth can be observed in the dark in sucrose-lacking medium or in the presence of 0.5 micromolar 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea, a concentration which does not inhibit heterotrophic growth (on sucrose). Photoautotrophic growth has an absolute requirement for elevated CO2 concentrations (>1%). During the 14-day subculture period, growth (fresh weight and dry weight) is logarithmic. Photosynthesis quickly increases after day 4, reaching a peak of 83 micromoles CO2 incorporated per milligram Chl per hour while dark respiration decreases 90% from day 2 to day 6. The pH of the growth medium quickly drops from 7.0 to 4.5 before slowly increasing to 5.0 by day 14. At this pH range and light intensity (200-300 microEinsteins per square meter per second), no O2 evolution could be detected although at high pH and light intensity O2 evolution was recorded. PMID:16663019

  10. Long non-coding RNAs and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    YU, FU-JUN; ZHENG, JIAN-JIAN; DONG, PEI-HONG; FAN, XIAO-MING

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in next-generation sequencing technology in transcriptome analysis have helped identify numerous non-coding RNAs. The long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) is commonly defined as an RNA molecule with a length of 200 bp-100 kbp that lacks protein-coding potential. LncRNAs play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression, including chromatin modification, transcription and post-transcriptional processing. It has been confirmed that dysregulation of lncRNAs is associated with a number of human diseases, particularly tumors. In this study, we focused on the most extensively investigated lncRNAs in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). The biological functions and molecular mechanisms of the majority of lncRNAs have yet to be investigated. The improved knowledge on lncRNAs in HCC may help identify lncRNAs that may be used as novel prognostic markers and therapeutic targets. PMID:25469263

  11. Functional annotation of non-coding sequence variants

    PubMed Central

    Ritchie, Graham R. S.; Dunham, Ian; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Identifying functionally relevant variants against the background of ubiquitous genetic variation is a major challenge in human genetics. For variants that fall in protein-coding regions our understanding of the genetic code and splicing allow us to identify likely candidates, but interpreting variants that fall outside of genic regions is more difficult. Here we present a new tool, GWAVA, which supports prioritisation of non-coding variants by integrating a range of annotations. PMID:24487584

  12. Transcription control by long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Faust, Tyler

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have been found to regulate many cellular processes and thus expand the functional genetic repertoire contained within the genome. With the recent advent of genomic tools, it is now evident that these RNA molecules play central regulatory roles in many transcriptional programs. Here we discuss how they are targeted to promoters in several cases and how they operate at specific points in the transcription cycle to precisely control gene expression. PMID:22414755

  13. Dysregulation of non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qing; Zhang, Ren-Wen; Sui, Peng-Cheng; He, Hai-Tao; Ding, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is one of the most common cancers in the world and a significant threat to the health of patients, especially those from China and Japan. The prognosis for patients with late stage GC receiving the standard of care treatment, including surgery, chemotherapy and radiotherapy, remains poor. Developing novel treatment strategies, identifying new molecules for targeted therapy, and devising screening techniques to detect this cancer in its early stages are needed for GC patients. The discovery of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), primarily microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), helped to elucidate the mechanisms of tumorigenesis, diagnosis and treatment of GC. Recently, significant research has been conducted on non-coding RNAs and how the regulatory dysfunction of these RNAs impacts the tumorigenesis of GC. In this study, we review papers published in the last five years concerning the dysregulation of non-coding RNAs, especially miRNAs and lncRNAs, in GC. We summarize instances of aberrant expression of the ncRNAs in GC and their effect on survival-related events, including cell cycle regulation, AKT signaling, apoptosis and drug resistance. Additionally, we evaluate how ncRNA dysregulation affects the metastatic process, including the epithelial-mesenchymal transition, stem cells, transcription factor activity, and oncogene and tumor suppressor expression. Lastly, we determine how ncRNAs affect angiogenesis in the microenvironment of GC. We further discuss the use of ncRNAs as potential biomarkers for use in clinical screening, early diagnosis and prognosis of GC. At present, no ideal ncRNAs have been identified as targets for the treatment of GC. PMID:26494954

  14. The Landscape of long non-coding RNA classification

    PubMed Central

    St Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2015-01-01

    Advances in the depth and quality of transcriptome sequencing have revealed many new classes of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNA classification has mushroomed to accommodate these new findings, even though the real dimensions and complexity of the non-coding transcriptome remain unknown. Although evidence of functionality of specific lncRNAs continues to accumulate, conflicting, confusing, and overlapping terminology has fostered ambiguity and lack of clarity in the field in general. The lack of fundamental conceptual un-ambiguous classification framework results in a number of challenges in the annotation and interpretation of non-coding transcriptome data. It also might undermine integration of the new genomic methods and datasets in an effort to unravel function of lncRNA. Here, we review existing lncRNA classifications, nomenclature, and terminology. Then we describe the conceptual guidelines that have emerged for their classification and functional annotation based on expanding and more comprehensive use of large systems biology-based datasets. PMID:25869999

  15. Incorporating Non-Coding Annotations into Rare Variant Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Tom G.; Campbell, Colin; Timpson, Nicholas J; Gaunt, Tom R.

    2016-01-01

    Background The success of collapsing methods which investigate the combined effect of rare variants on complex traits has so far been limited. The manner in which variants within a gene are selected prior to analysis has a crucial impact on this success, which has resulted in analyses conventionally filtering variants according to their consequence. This study investigates whether an alternative approach to filtering, using annotations from recently developed bioinformatics tools, can aid these types of analyses in comparison to conventional approaches. Methods & Results We conducted a candidate gene analysis using the UK10K sequence and lipids data, filtering according to functional annotations using the resource CADD (Combined Annotation-Dependent Depletion) and contrasting results with ‘nonsynonymous’ and ‘loss of function’ consequence analyses. Using CADD allowed the inclusion of potentially deleterious intronic variants, which was not possible when filtering by consequence. Overall, different filtering approaches provided similar evidence of association, although filtering according to CADD identified evidence of association between ANGPTL4 and High Density Lipoproteins (P = 0.02, N = 3,210) which was not observed in the other analyses. We also undertook genome-wide analyses to determine how filtering in this manner compared to conventional approaches for gene regions. Results suggested that filtering by annotations according to CADD, as well as other tools known as FATHMM-MKL and DANN, identified association signals not detected when filtering by variant consequence and vice versa. Conclusion Incorporating variant annotations from non-coding bioinformatics tools should prove to be a valuable asset for rare variant analyses in the future. Filtering by variant consequence is only possible in coding regions of the genome, whereas utilising non-coding bioinformatics annotations provides an opportunity to discover unknown causal variants in non-coding

  16. Dynamic energy budgets in syntrophic symbiotic relationships between heterotrophic hosts and photoautotrophic symbionts.

    PubMed

    Muller, Erik B; Kooijman, Sebastiaan A L M; Edmunds, Peter J; Doyle, Francis J; Nisbet, Roger M

    2009-07-01

    In this paper we develop and investigate a dynamic energy budget (DEB) model describing the syntrophic symbiotic relationship between a heterotrophic host and an internal photoautotrophic symbiont. The model specifies the flows of matter and energy among host, symbiont and environment with minimal complexity and uses the concept of synthesizing units to describe smoothly the assimilation of multiple limiting factors, in particular inorganic carbon and nitrogen, and irradiance. The model has two passive regulation mechanisms: the symbiont shares only photosynthate that it cannot use itself, and the host delivers only excess nutrients to the symbiont. With parameter values plausible for scleractinian corals, we show that these two regulation mechanisms suffice to obtain a stable symbiotic relationship under constant ambient conditions, provided those conditions support sustenance of host and symbiont. Furthermore, the symbiont density in the host varies relatively little as a function of ambient food density, inorganic nitrogen and irradiance. This symbiont density tends to increase with light deprivation or nitrogen enrichment, either directly or via food. We also investigate the relative benefit each partner derives from the relationship and conclude that this relationship may shift from mutualism to parasitism as environmental conditions change. PMID:19285512

  17. Non-Coding RNAs in Primary Liver Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ghidini, Michele; Braconi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Over the past few years, many studies have evaluated the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. ncRNAs were shown to have diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential in HCC. In this manuscript, we review the latest major discoveries concerning microRNAs and long ncRNAs in HCC pathogenesis, and discuss the potentials and the limitations for their use in clinical practice. PMID:26131450

  18. Non-Coding RNAs in Primary Liver Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ghidini, Michele; Braconi, Chiara

    2015-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a primary malignancy of the liver with poor prognosis and limited therapeutic options. Over the past few years, many studies have evaluated the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. ncRNAs were shown to have diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic potential in HCC. In this manuscript, we review the latest major discoveries concerning microRNAs and long ncRNAs in HCC pathogenesis, and discuss the potentials and the limitations for their use in clinical practice. PMID:26131450

  19. Biotransformations of monoterpenes by photoautotrophic micro-organisms.

    PubMed

    Balcerzak, L; Lipok, J; Strub, D; Lochyński, S

    2014-12-01

    Monoterpenes are widely used in food technology, cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries and as compounds of agricultural importance. It is known that compounds comprising this class can be transformed by a variety of organisms, namely by: bacteria, fungi, yeasts, plants or isolated enzymes. Biotransformations, as one of the most important tools of green chemistry, allow obtaining new products using whole cells of micro-organisms or isolated enzymes in mild reaction conditions. Therefore, biotransformations of monoterpenes, by different type of reaction such as: epoxidation, oxidation and stereoselective hydroxylation, resulted in the production of so desired, enantiomerically defined compounds that can be advised as natural seem to be interesting. Bearing in mind that such processes are carried out also by easy to maintain, photoautotrophic micro-organisms cultivated at large scale, this paper is focused on biotransformations of acyclic, monocyclic and bicyclic monoterpenes by freshwater or haliphylic cyanobacteria and microalgae on the way of mainly stereoselective hydroxylation. Moreover, aspects of potential industrial application of obtained products in medicine, perfume, cosmetics and food industry are discussed. PMID:25175902

  20. A photoautotrophic source for lycopane in marine water columns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeham, Stuart G.; Freeman, Katherine H.; Pease, Tamara K.; Hayes, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    Suspended particulate matter and recent sediments from diverse oceanic sites have been investigated for their contents of lycopane. Lycopane was present in all samples, including both oxic and anoxic water column and sediments. The highest concentrations in the water column were found in surface waters of the central Pacific gyre (1.5 ng/L) and in the anoxic waters of the Cariaco Trench (1.1 ng/L) and the Black Sea (0.3 ng/L). Vertical concentration profiles suggest that lycopane is probably algal in origin. Moreover, biogeochemical conditions in anoxic zones apparently result in a secondary production of lycopane from an as yet unidentified precursor. Compound-specific carbon isotopic analyses have been carried out on lycopane from water column and sediment samples. Isotopic compositions of lycopane range between -23.6 and -32.9 percent and are consistent with a photoautotrophic origin. We postulate that some lycopane is produced in surface waters of the ocean, while additional lycopane is produced in anoxic zones by anaerobic microbial action on an algal precursor.

  1. Main photoautotrophic components of biofilms in natural draft cooling towers.

    PubMed

    Hauer, Tomáš; Čapek, Petr; Böhmová, Petra

    2016-05-01

    While photoautotrophic organisms are an important component of biofilms that live in certain regions of natural draft cooling towers, little is known about these communities. We therefore examined 18 towers at nine sites to identify the general patterns of community assembly in three distinct tower parts, and we examined how community structures differ depending on geography. We also compared the newly acquired data with previously published data. The bottom sections of draft cooling towers are mainly settled by large filamentous algae, primarily Cladophora glomerata. The central portions of towers host a small amount of planktic algae biomass originating in the cooling water. The upper fourths of towers are colonized by biofilms primarily dominated by cyanobacteria, e.g., members of the genera Gloeocapsa and Scytonema. A total of 41 taxa of phototrophic microorganisms were identified. Species composition of the upper fourth of all towers was significantly affected by cardinal position. There was different species composition at positions facing north compared to positions facing south. West- and east-facing positions were transitory and highly similar to each other in terms of species composition. Biofilms contribute to the degradation of paint coatings inside towers. PMID:26508444

  2. Non-coding RNAs: Classification, Biology and Functioning.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Sonja; Kretz, Markus

    2016-01-01

    One of the long-standing principles of molecular biology is that DNA acts as a template for transcription of messenger RNAs, which serve as blueprints for protein translation. A rapidly growing number of exceptions to this rule have been reported over the past decades: they include long known classes of RNAs involved in translation such as transfer RNAs and ribosomal RNAs, small nuclear RNAs involved in splicing events, and small nucleolar RNAs mainly involved in the modification of other small RNAs, such as ribosomal RNAs and transfer RNAs. More recently, several classes of short regulatory non-coding RNAs, including piwi-associated RNAs, endogenous short-interfering RNAs and microRNAs have been discovered in mammals, which act as key regulators of gene expression in many different cellular pathways and systems. Additionally, the human genome encodes several thousand long non-protein coding RNAs >200 nucleotides in length, some of which play crucial roles in a variety of biological processes such as epigenetic control of chromatin, promoter-specific gene regulation, mRNA stability, X-chromosome inactivation and imprinting. In this chapter, we will introduce several classes of short and long non-coding RNAs, describe their diverse roles in mammalian gene regulation and give examples for known modes of action. PMID:27573892

  3. Viroids, infectious long non-coding RNAs with autonomous replication.

    PubMed

    Gago-Zachert, Selma

    2016-01-01

    Transcriptome deep-sequencing studies performed during the last years confirmed that the vast majority of the RNAs transcribed in higher organisms correspond to several types of non-coding RNAs including long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The study of lncRNAs and the identification of their functions, is still an emerging field in plants but the characterization of some of them indicate that they play an important role in crucial regulatory processes like flowering regulation, and responses to abiotic stress and plant hormones. A second group of lncRNAs present in plants is formed by viroids, exogenous infectious subviral plant pathogens well known since many years. Viroids are composed of circular RNA genomes without protein-coding capacity and subvert enzymatic activities of their hosts to complete its own biological cycle. Different aspects of viroid biology and viroid-host interactions have been elucidated in the last years and some of them are the main topic of this review together with the analysis of the state-of-the-art about the growing field of endogenous lncRNAs in plants. PMID:26319312

  4. Non-coding RNAs: the architects of eukaryotic complexity.

    PubMed

    Mattick, J S

    2001-11-01

    Around 98% of all transcriptional output in humans is non-coding RNA. RNA-mediated gene regulation is widespread in higher eukaryotes and complex genetic phenomena like RNA interference, co-suppression, transgene silencing, imprinting, methylation, and possibly position-effect variegation and transvection, all involve intersecting pathways based on or connected to RNA signaling. I suggest that the central dogma is incomplete, and that intronic and other non-coding RNAs have evolved to comprise a second tier of gene expression in eukaryotes, which enables the integration and networking of complex suites of gene activity. Although proteins are the fundamental effectors of cellular function, the basis of eukaryotic complexity and phenotypic variation may lie primarily in a control architecture composed of a highly parallel system of trans-acting RNAs that relay state information required for the coordination and modulation of gene expression, via chromatin remodeling, RNA-DNA, RNA-RNA and RNA-protein interactions. This system has interesting and perhaps informative analogies with small world networks and dataflow computing. PMID:11713189

  5. Atrazine tolerance mechanism(s) in photoautotrophic potato cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smeda, R.J.; Hasegawa, P.M.; Weller, S.C. )

    1989-04-01

    A photoautotrophic potato cell line (variant) was isolated and is capable of sustained growth in media containing in the herbicide atrazine at concentration up to 100 x greater than the lethal concentration for the unselected (wild type) cell line (1.0 {mu}M). Fresh weight doubling times of variant cells in the presence or absence of 1.0 {mu}M atrazine were identical to wild type cells grown in the absence of atrazine. Maintenance of variant cells up to 10 passages in the absence of atrazine resulted in a reduction in the concentration of atrazine necessary to inhibit fresh weight gain by 99% (ID{sub 99}) from 100 to 80 {mu}M. Comparison of {sup 14}C-atrazine uptake indicated wild type cells accumulated up to 2.5-fold more atrazine than varient cells within 72h of exposure but no differences were detected thereafter. Electron transport of both isolated chloroplasts and intact cells were significantly inhibited in the wild type cell line by 1.0 {mu}M atrazine but unaffected in the variant cell line by atrazine concentrations up to 10 {mu}M. After 30 days in the presence of 1.0 {mu}M atrazine, wild type cells did not significantly metabolize atrazine, however, variant cells reduced atrazine concentrations to <0.05 {mu}M regardless if the initial atrazine concentration was 1.0 or 10.0 {mu}M. Both metabolism of atrazine and alterations within the chloroplast (potentially a reduction in atrazine binding affinity) appear to be important components of tolerance within variant cells.

  6. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  7. Non-coding RNAs in DNA damage response

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yunhua; Lu, Xiongbin

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide studies have revealed that human and other mammalian genomes are pervasively transcribed and produce thousands of regulatory non-protein-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including miRNAs, siRNAs, piRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Emerging evidences suggest that these ncRNAs also play a pivotal role in genome integrity and stability via the regulation of DNA damage response (DDR). In this review, we discuss the recent finding on the interplay of ncRNAs with the canonical DDR signaling pathway, with a particular emphasis on miRNAs and lncRNAs. While the expression of ncRNAs is regulated in the DDR, the DDR is also subjected to regulation by those DNA damage-responsive ncRNAs. In addition, the roles of those Dicer- and Drosha-dependent small RNAs produced in the vicinity of double-strand breaks sites are also described. PMID:23226613

  8. Regulatory Roles of Non-Coding RNAs in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jun; Song, Yong-Xi; Ma, Bin; Wang, Jia-Jun; Sun, Jing-Xu; Chen, Xiao-Wan; Zhao, Jun-Hua; Yang, Yu-Chong; Wang, Zhen-Ning

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have recently gained attention because of their involvement in different biological processes. An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that mutations or abnormal expression of ncRNAs are closely associated with various diseases including cancer. The present review is a comprehensive examination of the aberrant regulation of ncRNAs in colorectal cancer (CRC) and a summary of the current findings on ncRNAs, including long ncRNAs, microRNAs, small interfering RNAs, small nucleolar RNAs, small nuclear RNAs, Piwi-interacting RNAs, and circular RNAs. These ncRNAs might become novel biomarkers and targets as well as potential therapeutic tools for the treatment of CRC in the near future and this review may provide important clues for further research on CRC and for the selection of effective therapeutic targets. PMID:26307974

  9. Non-coding RNAs in mammalian sexual development.

    PubMed

    McFarlane, L; Wilhelm, D

    2009-01-01

    The present decade is witnessing a paradigm shift in our understanding of gene regulation. RNA, once relegated to an intermediary between DNA and protein, has emerged as a key contributor in the coordination of complex developmental pathways. For sexually reproducing organisms, propagation of the species is accomplished via an elaborate sexual phenotype. In mammals this consists of a highly complex cell lineage that has the capacity for intricate self-differentiation whilst maintaining the potential to generate all cell types upon fertilization. In addition, mammals possess a diverse range of somatic reproductive tissues and organs that often undergo dynamic morphological changes in response to a variety of external and internal cues. Although the protein component required to mediate these processes continues to be vigorously investigated, it is becoming increasingly apparent that an understanding of the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) component is required to develop a comprehensive picture of mammalian sexual development. PMID:20197714

  10. Non-coding RNAs Functioning in Colorectal Cancer Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Fanale, Daniele; Barraco, Nadia; Listì, Angela; Bazan, Viviana; Russo, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the hypothesis of the presence of tumor-initiating cancer stem cells (CSCs) has received a considerable support. This model suggested the existence of CSCs which, thanks to their self-renewal properties, are able to drive the expansion and the maintenance of malignant cell populations with invasive and metastatic potential in cancer. Increasing evidence showed the ability of such cells to acquire self-renewal, multipotency, angiogenic potential, immune evasion, symmetrical and asymmetrical divisions which, along with the presence of several DNA repair mechanisms, further enhance their oncogenic potential making them highly resistant to common anticancer treatments. The main signaling pathways involved in the homeostasis of colorectal (CRC) stem cells are the Wnt, Notch, Sonic Hedgehog, and Bone Morfogenic Protein (BMP) pathways, which are mostly responsible for all the features that have been widely referred to stem cells. The same pathways have been identified in colorectal cancer stem cells (CRCSCs), conferring a more aggressive phenotype compared to non-stem CRC cells. Recently, several evidences suggested that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) may play a crucial role in the regulation of different biological mechanisms in CRC, by modulating the expression of critical stem cell transcription factors that have been found active in CSCs. In this chapter, we will discuss the involvement of ncRNAs, especially microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), in stemness acquisition and maintenance by CRCSCs, through the regulation of pathways modulating the CSC phenotype and growth, carcinogenesis, differentiation, and epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT). PMID:27573896

  11. The Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO): a comprehensive resource for the unification of non-coding RNA biology.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jingshan; Eilbeck, Karen; Smith, Barry; Blake, Judith A; Dou, Dejing; Huang, Weili; Natale, Darren A; Ruttenberg, Alan; Huan, Jun; Zimmermann, Michael T; Jiang, Guoqian; Lin, Yu; Wu, Bin; Strachan, Harrison J; He, Yongqun; Zhang, Shaojie; Wang, Xiaowei; Liu, Zixing; Borchert, Glen M; Tan, Ming

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, sequencing technologies have enabled the identification of a wide range of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Unfortunately, annotation and integration of ncRNA data has lagged behind their identification. Given the large quantity of information being obtained in this area, there emerges an urgent need to integrate what is being discovered by a broad range of relevant communities. To this end, the Non-Coding RNA Ontology (NCRO) is being developed to provide a systematically structured and precisely defined controlled vocabulary for the domain of ncRNAs, thereby facilitating the discovery, curation, analysis, exchange, and reasoning of data about structures of ncRNAs, their molecular and cellular functions, and their impacts upon phenotypes. The goal of NCRO is to serve as a common resource for annotations of diverse research in a way that will significantly enhance integrative and comparative analysis of the myriad resources currently housed in disparate sources. It is our belief that the NCRO ontology can perform an important role in the comprehensive unification of ncRNA biology and, indeed, fill a critical gap in both the Open Biological and Biomedical Ontologies (OBO) Library and the National Center for Biomedical Ontology (NCBO) BioPortal. Our initial focus is on the ontological representation of small regulatory ncRNAs, which we see as the first step in providing a resource for the annotation of data about all forms of ncRNAs. The NCRO ontology is free and open to all users, accessible at: http://purl.obolibrary.org/obo/ncro.owl. PMID:27152146

  12. Long non-coding RNAs in cancer drug resistance development.

    PubMed

    Majidinia, Maryam; Yousefi, Bahman

    2016-09-01

    The presence or emergence of chemoresistance in tumor cells is a major burden in cancer therapy. While drug resistance is a multifactorial phenomenon arising from altered membrane transport of drugs, altered drug metabolism, altered DNA repair, reduced apoptosis rate and alterations of drug metabolism, it can also be linked to genetic and epigenetic factors. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have important regulatory roles in many aspects of genome function including gene transcription, splicing, and epigenetics as well as biological processes involved in cell cycle, cell differentiation, development, and pluripotency. As such, it may not be surprising that some lncRNAs have been recently linked to carcinogenesis and drug resistance/sensitivity. Research is accelerating to decipher the exact molecular mechanism of lncRNA-regulated drug resistance and its therapeutic implications. In this article, we will review the structure, biogenesis, and mode of action of lncRNAs. Then, the involvement of lncRNAs in drug resistance will be discussed in detail. PMID:27427176

  13. Non-coding RNAs, the cutting edge of histone messages.

    PubMed

    Köhn, Marcel; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-04-01

    In metazoan the 3'-end processing of histone mRNAs is a conserved process involving the concerted action of many protein factors and the non-coding U7 snRNA. Recently, we identified that the processing of histone pre-mRNAs is promoted by an additional ncRNA, the Y3-derived Y3** RNA. U7 modulates the association of the U7 snRNP whereas Y3** promotes recruitment of CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor) proteins to nascent histone transcripts at histone locus bodies (HLBs) in mammals. This enhances the 3'-end cleavage of nascent histone pre-mRNAs and modulates HLB assembly. Here we discuss new insights in the role of ncRNAs in the spatiotemporal control of histone synthesis. We propose that ncRNAs scaffold the formation of functional protein-RNA complexes and their sequential deposition on nascent histone pre-mRNAs at HLBs. These findings add to the multiple roles of ncRNAs in controlling gene expression and may provide new avenues for targeting histone synthesis in cancer. PMID:26909464

  14. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Haematological Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Garitano-Trojaola, Andoni; Agirre, Xabier; Prósper, Felipe; Fortes, Puri

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are functional RNAs longer than 200 nucleotides in length. LncRNAs are as diverse as mRNAs and they normally share the same biosynthetic machinery based on RNA polymerase II, splicing and polyadenylation. However, lncRNAs have low coding potential. Compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs are preferentially nuclear, more tissue specific and expressed at lower levels. Most of the lncRNAs described to date modulate the expression of specific genes by guiding chromatin remodelling factors; inducing chromosomal loopings; affecting transcription, splicing, translation or mRNA stability; or serving as scaffolds for the organization of cellular structures. They can function in cis, cotranscriptionally, or in trans, acting as decoys, scaffolds or guides. These functions seem essential to allow cell differentiation and growth. In fact, many lncRNAs have been shown to exert oncogenic or tumor suppressor properties in several cancers including haematological malignancies. In this review, we summarize what is known about lncRNAs, the mechanisms for their regulation in cancer and their role in leukemogenesis, lymphomagenesis and hematopoiesis. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of lncRNAs in diagnosis, prognosis and therapy in cancer, with special attention to haematological malignancies. PMID:23887658

  15. Ageing and the Small, Non-Coding RNA World

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Masaomi; Slack, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    MicroRNAs, a class of small, non-coding RNAs, are now widely known for their importance in many aspects of biology. These small regulatory RNAs have critical functions in diverse biological events, including development and disease. Recent findings show that microRNAs are essential for lifespan determination in the model organisms, C. elegans and Drosophila, suggesting that microRNAs are also involved in the complex process of ageing. Further, short RNA fragments derived from longer parental RNAs, such as transfer RNA cleavage fragments, have now emerged as a novel class of regulatory RNAs that inhibit translation in response to stress. In addition, the RNA editing pathway is likely to act in the double-stranded RNA-mediated silencing machinery to suppress unfavorable RNA interference activity in the ageing process. These multiple, redundant layers in gene regulatory networks may make it possible to both stably and flexibly regulate genetic pathways in ensuring robustness of developmental and ageing processes. PMID:22504407

  16. Community structure of non-coding RNA interaction network.

    PubMed

    Nacher, Jose C

    2013-01-01

    Rapid technological advances have shown that the ratio of non-protein coding genes rises to 98.5% in humans, suggesting that current knowledge on genetic information processing might be largely incomplete. It implies that protein-coding sequences only represent a small fraction of cellular transcriptional information. Here, we examine the community structure of the network defined by functional interactions between non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and proteins related bio-macromolecules (PRMs) using a two-fold approach: modularity in bipartite network and k-clique community detection. First, the high modularity scores as well as the distribution of community sizes showing a scaling-law revealed manifestly non-random features. Second, the k-clique sub-graphs and overlaps show that the identified communities of the ncRNA molecules of H. sapiens can potentially be associated with certain functions. These findings highlight the complex modular structure of ncRNA interactions and its possible regulatory roles in the cell. PMID:23545211

  17. CANTATAdb: A Collection of Plant Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Szcześniak, Michał W.; Rosikiewicz, Wojciech; Makałowska, Izabela

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a class of potent regulators of gene expression that are found in a wide array of eukaryotes; however, our knowledge about these molecules in plants is still very limited. In particular, a number of model plant species still lack comprehensive data sets of lncRNAs and their annotations, and very little is known about their biological roles. To meet these shortcomings, we created an online database of lncRNAs in 10 model plant species. The lncRNAs were identified computationally using dozens of publicly available RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) libraries. Expression values, coding potential, sequence alignments as well as other types of data provide annotation for the identified lncRNAs. In order to better characterize them, we investigated their potential roles in splicing modulation and deregulation of microRNA functions. The data are freely available for searching, browsing and downloading from an online database called CANTATAdb (http://cantata.amu.edu.pl, http://yeti.amu.edu.pl/CANTATA/). PMID:26657895

  18. Non-coding RNA in Ovarian Development and Disease.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, J Browning; George, Jitu; Christenson, Lane K

    2016-01-01

    The ovary's primary function is to produce the mature female gamete, the oocyte that, following fertilization, can develop into an embryo, implant within the uterus and ultimately allow the mother's genetic material to be passed along to subsequent generations. In addition to supporting the generation of the oocyte, the ovary and specific ephemeral tissues within it, follicles and corpora lutea, produce steroids that regulate all aspects of the reproductive system, including the hypothalamic/pituitary axis, the reproductive tract (uterus, oviduct, cervix), secondary sex characteristics all of which are also essential for pregnancy and subsequent nurturing of the offspring. To accomplish these critical roles, ovarian development and function are tightly regulated by a number of exogenous (hypothalamic/pituitary) and endogenous (intraovarian) hormones. Within ovarian cells, intricate signalling cascades and transcriptional and post-transcriptional gene regulatory networks respond to these hormonal influences to provide the exquisite control over all of the temporal and spatial events that must be synchronized to allow this organ to successfully complete its function. This book chapter will focus specifically on the role of non-coding RNAs, their identification and described functional roles within the ovary with respect to normal function and their possible involvement in diseases, which involve the ovary. PMID:26659488

  19. Long non-coding RNA expression in primary human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Mirsafian, Hoda; Manda, Srinivas Srikanth; Mitchell, Christopher J; Sreenivasamurthy, Sreelakshmi; Ripen, Adiratna Mat; Mohamad, Saharuddin Bin; Merican, Amir Feisal; Pandey, Akhilesh

    2016-07-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to possess a wide range of functions in both cellular and developmental processes including cancers. Although some of the lncRNAs have been implicated in the regulation of the immune response, the exact function of the large majority of lncRNAs still remains unknown. In this study, we characterized the lncRNAs in human primary monocytes, an essential component of the innate immune system. We performed RNA sequencing of monocytes from four individuals and combined our data with eleven other publicly available datasets. Our analysis led to identification of ~8000 lncRNAs of which >1000 have not been previously reported in monocytes. PCR-based validation of a subset of the identified novel long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs) revealed distinct expression patterns. Our study provides a landscape of lncRNAs in monocytes, which could facilitate future experimental studies to characterize the functions of these molecules in the innate immune system. PMID:26778813

  20. Non-coding RNAs, the cutting edge of histone messages

    PubMed Central

    Köhn, Marcel; Hüttelmaier, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT In metazoan the 3′-end processing of histone mRNAs is a conserved process involving the concerted action of many protein factors and the non-coding U7 snRNA. Recently, we identified that the processing of histone pre-mRNAs is promoted by an additional ncRNA, the Y3-derived Y3** RNA. U7 modulates the association of the U7 snRNP whereas Y3** promotes recruitment of CPSF (cleavage and polyadenylation specific factor) proteins to nascent histone transcripts at histone locus bodies (HLBs) in mammals. This enhances the 3′-end cleavage of nascent histone pre-mRNAs and modulates HLB assembly. Here we discuss new insights in the role of ncRNAs in the spatiotemporal control of histone synthesis. We propose that ncRNAs scaffold the formation of functional protein-RNA complexes and their sequential deposition on nascent histone pre-mRNAs at HLBs. These findings add to the multiple roles of ncRNAs in controlling gene expression and may provide new avenues for targeting histone synthesis in cancer. PMID:26909464

  1. Identification and function of long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, Carl; Morton, Cynthia C.

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding (lnc) RNAs are defined as non-protein coding RNAs distinct from housekeeping RNAs such as tRNAs, rRNAs, and snRNAs, and independent from small RNAs with specific molecular processing machinery such as micro- or piwi-RNAs. Recent studies of lncRNAs across different species have revealed a diverse population of RNA molecules of differing size and function. RNA sequencing studies suggest transcription throughout the genome, so there is a need to understand how sequence relates to functional and structural relationships amongst RNA molecules. Our synthesis of recent studies suggests that neither size, presence of a poly-A tail, splicing, direction of transcription, nor strand specificity are of importance to lncRNA function. Rather, relative genomic position in relation to a target is fundamentally important. In this review, we describe issues of key importance in functional assessment of lncRNA and how this might apply to lncRNAs important in neurodevelopment. PMID:24106460

  2. Melanoma addiction to the long non-coding RNA SAMMSON.

    PubMed

    Leucci, Eleonora; Vendramin, Roberto; Spinazzi, Marco; Laurette, Patrick; Fiers, Mark; Wouters, Jasper; Radaelli, Enrico; Eyckerman, Sven; Leonelli, Carina; Vanderheyden, Katrien; Rogiers, Aljosja; Hermans, Els; Baatsen, Pieter; Aerts, Stein; Amant, Frederic; Van Aelst, Stefan; van den Oord, Joost; de Strooper, Bart; Davidson, Irwin; Lafontaine, Denis L J; Gevaert, Kris; Vandesompele, Jo; Mestdagh, Pieter; Marine, Jean-Christophe

    2016-03-24

    Focal amplifications of chromosome 3p13-3p14 occur in about 10% of melanomas and are associated with a poor prognosis. The melanoma-specific oncogene MITF resides at the epicentre of this amplicon. However, whether other loci present in this amplicon also contribute to melanomagenesis is unknown. Here we show that the recently annotated long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) gene SAMMSON is consistently co-gained with MITF. In addition, SAMMSON is a target of the lineage-specific transcription factor SOX10 and its expression is detectable in more than 90% of human melanomas. Whereas exogenous SAMMSON increases the clonogenic potential in trans, SAMMSON knockdown drastically decreases the viability of melanoma cells irrespective of their transcriptional cell state and BRAF, NRAS or TP53 mutational status. Moreover, SAMMSON targeting sensitizes melanoma to MAPK-targeting therapeutics both in vitro and in patient-derived xenograft models. Mechanistically, SAMMSON interacts with p32, a master regulator of mitochondrial homeostasis and metabolism, to increase its mitochondrial targeting and pro-oncogenic function. Our results indicate that silencing of the lineage addiction oncogene SAMMSON disrupts vital mitochondrial functions in a cancer-cell-specific manner; this silencing is therefore expected to deliver highly effective and tissue-restricted anti-melanoma therapeutic responses. PMID:27008969

  3. Long non-coding RNAs in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xia; Tang, Bo; Xiao, Yu-Feng; Xie, Rui; Li, Bo-Sheng; Dong, Hui; Zhou, Jian-Yun; Yang, Shi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the leading causes of cancer-related death worldwide. Despite substantial progress in understanding the molecular mechanisms and treatment of CRC in recent years, the overall survival rate of CRC patients has not improved dramatically. The development of CRC is multifactor and multistep processes, in which abnormal gene expression may play an important role. With the advance of human tumor molecular biology, a series of studies have highlighted the role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the development of CRC. CRC-related lncRNAs have been demonstrated to regulate the genes by various mechanisms, including epigenetic modifications, lncRNA-miRNA and lncRNA-protein interactions, and by their actions as miRNA precursors or pseudogenes. Since some lncRNAs can be detected in human body fluid and have good specificity and accessibility, they have been suggested to be used as novel potential biomarkers for CRC diagnosis and prognosis as well as in the prediction of the response to therapy. Therefore, in this review, we will focus on lncRNAs in CRC development, the mechanisms and biomarkers of lncRNAs in CRC. PMID:26637808

  4. Associating schizophrenia, long non-coding RNAs and neurostructural dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Merelo, Veronica; Durand, Dante; Lescallette, Adam R.; Vrana, Kent E.; Hong, L. Elliot; Faghihi, Mohammad Ali; Bellon, Alfredo

    2015-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that schizophrenia has a strong genetic component. But the exact nature and functional role of this genetic component in the pathophysiology of this mental illness remains a mystery. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a recently discovered family of molecules that regulate gene transcription through a variety of means. Consequently, lncRNAs could help us bring together apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia; namely, genomic deficiencies on one side and neuroimaging, as well as postmortem results on the other. In fact, the most consistent finding in schizophrenia is decreased brain size together with enlarged ventricles. This anomaly appears to originate from shorter and less ramified dendrites and axons. But a decrease in neuronal arborizations cannot explain the complex pathophysiology of this psychotic disorder; however, dynamic changes in neuronal structure present throughout life could. It is well recognized that the structure of developing neurons is extremely plastic. This structural plasticity was thought to stop with brain development. However, breakthrough discoveries have shown that neuronal structure retains some degree of plasticity throughout life. What the neuroscientific field is still trying to understand is how these dynamic changes are regulated and lncRNAs represent promising candidates to fill this knowledge gap. Here, we present evidence that associates specific lncRNAs with schizophrenia. We then discuss the potential role of lncRNAs in neurostructural dynamics. Finally, we explain how dynamic neurostructural modifications present throughout life could, in theory, reconcile apparent unrelated findings in schizophrenia. PMID:26483630

  5. Neighboring Gene Regulation by Antisense Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Victoria E.; Zaphiropoulos, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Antisense transcription, considered until recently as transcriptional noise, is a very common phenomenon in human and eukaryotic transcriptomes, operating in two ways based on whether the antisense RNA acts in cis or in trans. This process can generate long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), one of the most diverse classes of cellular transcripts, which have demonstrated multifunctional roles in fundamental biological processes, including embryonic pluripotency, differentiation and development. Antisense lncRNAs have been shown to control nearly every level of gene regulation—pretranscriptional, transcriptional and posttranscriptional—through DNA–RNA, RNA–RNA or protein–RNA interactions. This review is centered on functional studies of antisense lncRNA-mediated regulation of neighboring gene expression. Specifically, it addresses how these transcripts interact with other biological molecules, nucleic acids and proteins, to regulate gene expression through chromatin remodeling at the pretranscriptional level and modulation of transcriptional and post-transcriptional processes by altering the sense mRNA structure or the cellular compartmental distribution, either in the nucleus or the cytoplasm. PMID:25654223

  6. Sequence and Structural Analyses for Functional Non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakakibara, Yasubumi; Sato, Kengo

    Analysis and detection of functional RNAs are currently important topics in both molecular biology and bioinformatics research. Several computational methods based on stochastic context-free grammars (SCFGs) have been developed for modeling and analysing functional RNA sequences. These grammatical methods have succeeded in modeling typical secondary structures of RNAs and are used for structural alignments of RNA sequences. Such stochastic models, however, are not sufficient to discriminate member sequences of an RNA family from non-members, and hence to detect non-coding RNA regions from genome sequences. Recently, the support vector machine (SVM) and kernel function techniques have been actively studied and proposed as a solution to various problems in bioinformatics. SVMs are trained from positive and negative samples and have strong, accurate discrimination abilities, and hence are more appropriate for the discrimination tasks. A few kernel functions that extend the string kernel to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences from the viewpoint of secondary structures have been proposed. In this article, we give an overview of recent progress in SCFG-based methods for RNA sequence analysis and novel kernel functions tailored to measure the similarity of two RNA sequences and developed for use with support vector machines (SVM) in discriminating members of an RNA family from non-members.

  7. Environmental Health and Long Non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Oskar; Baccarelli, Andrea A

    2016-09-01

    An individual's risk of developing a common disease typically depends on an interaction of genetic and environmental factors. Epigenetic research is uncovering novel ways through which environmental factors such as diet, air pollution, and chemical exposure can affect our genes. DNA methylation and histone modifications are the most commonly studied epigenetic mechanisms. The role of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in epigenetic processes has been more recently highlighted. LncRNAs are defined as transcribed RNA molecules greater than 200 nucleotides in length with little or no protein-coding capability. While few functional lncRNAs have been well characterized to date, they have been demonstrated to control gene regulation at every level, including transcriptional gene silencing via regulation of the chromatin structure and DNA methylation. This review aims to provide a general overview of lncRNA function with a focus on their role as key regulators of health and disease and as biomarkers of environmental exposure. PMID:27234044

  8. The most frequent short sequences in non-coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Subirana, Juan A; Messeguer, Xavier

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this work is to determine the most frequent short sequences in non-coding DNA. They may play a role in maintaining the structure and function of eukaryotic chromosomes. We present a simple method for the detection and analysis of such sequences in several genomes, including Arabidopsis thaliana, Caenorhabditis elegans, Drosophila melanogaster and Homo sapiens. We also study two chromosomes of man and mouse with a length similar to the whole genomes of the other species. We provide a list of the most common sequences of 9-14 bases in each genome. As expected, they are present in human Alu sequences. Our programs may also give a graph and a list of their position in the genome. Detection of clusters is also possible. In most cases, these sequences contain few alternating regions. Their intrinsic structure and their influence on nucleosome formation are not known. In particular, we have found new features of short sequences in C. elegans, which are distributed in heterogeneous clusters. They appear as punctuation marks in the chromosomes. Such clusters are not found in either A. thaliana or D. melanogaster. We discuss the possibility that they play a role in centromere function and homolog recognition in meiosis. PMID:19966278

  9. Biocomputational prediction of small non-coding RNAs in Streptomyces

    PubMed Central

    Pánek, Josef; Bobek, Jan; Mikulík, Karel; Basler, Marek; Vohradský, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Background The first systematic study of small non-coding RNAs (sRNA, ncRNA) in Streptomyces is presented. Except for a few exceptions, the Streptomyces sRNAs, as well as the sRNAs in other genera of the Actinomyces group, have remained unstudied. This study was based on sequence conservation in intergenic regions of Streptomyces, localization of transcription termination factors, and genomic arrangement of genes flanking the predicted sRNAs. Results Thirty-two potential sRNAs in Streptomyces were predicted. Of these, expression of 20 was detected by microarrays and RT-PCR. The prediction was validated by a structure based computational approach. Two predicted sRNAs were found to be terminated by transcription termination factors different from the Rho-independent terminators. One predicted sRNA was identified computationally with high probability as a Streptomyces 6S RNA. Out of the 32 predicted sRNAs, 24 were found to be structurally dissimilar from known sRNAs. Conclusion Streptomyces is the largest genus of Actinomyces, whose sRNAs have not been studied. The Actinomyces is a group of bacterial species with unique genomes and phenotypes. Therefore, in Actinomyces, new unique bacterial sRNAs may be identified. The sequence and structural dissimilarity of the predicted Streptomyces sRNAs demonstrated by this study serve as the first evidence of the uniqueness of Actinomyces sRNAs. PMID:18477385

  10. Perspectives of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Reis, Eduardo M.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio

    2012-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) transcribed from intergenic and intronic regions of the human genome constitute a broad class of cellular transcripts that are under intensive investigation. While only a handful of lncRNAs have been characterized, their involvement in fundamental cellular processes that control gene expression highlights a central role in cell homeostasis. Not surprisingly, aberrant expression of regulatory lncRNAs has been increasingly documented in different types of cancer, where they can mediate both oncogenic or tumor suppressor effects. Interaction with chromatin remodeling complexes that promote silencing of specific genes or modulation of splicing factor proteins seem to be two general modes of lncRNA regulation, but it is conceivable that additional mechanisms of action are yet to be unveiled. LncRNAs show greater tissue specificity compared to protein-coding mRNAs making them attractive in the search of novel diagnostics/prognostics cancer biomarkers in body fluid samples. In fact, lncRNA prostate cancer antigen 3 can be detected in urine samples and has been shown to improve diagnosis of prostate cancer. We suggest that an unbiased screening of the presence of RNAs in easily accessible body fluids such as serum and urine might reveal novel circulating lncRNAs as potential biomarkers in many types of cancer. Annotation and functional characterization of the lncRNA complement of the cancer transcriptome will conceivably provide new venues for early diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:22408643

  11. Long Non-Coding RNAs: Critical Players in Hepatocellular Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jin; Bie, Beibei; Zhang, Shu; Yang, Jun; Li, Zongfang

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a complex disease with multiple underlying pathogenic mechanisms caused by a variety of etiologic factors. Emerging evidence showed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), with size larger than 200 nucleotides (nt), play important roles in various types of cancer development and progression. In recent years, some dysregulated lncRNAs in HCC have been revealed and roles for several of them in HCC have been characterized. All these findings point to the potential of lncRNAs as prospective novel therapeutic targets in HCC. In this review, we summarize known dysregulated lncRNAs in HCC, and review potential biological roles and underlying molecular mechanisms of lncRNAs in HCC. Additionally, we discussed prospects of lncRNAs as potential biomarker and therapeutic target for HCC. In conclusion, this paper will help us gain better understanding of molecular mechanisms by which lncRNAs perform their function in HCC and also provide general strategies and directions for future research. PMID:25387074

  12. Non-coding RNAs and complex distributed genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-08-01

    In eukaryotic cells, the mRNA-protein interplay can be dramatically influenced by non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Although this new paradigm is now widely accepted, an understanding of the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks is lacking. To clarify what may happen in this case, we propose a mean-field kinetic model describing the influence of ncRNA on a complex genetic network with a distributed architecture including mutual protein-mediated regulation of many genes transcribed into mRNAs. ncRNA is considered to associate with mRNAs and inhibit their translation and/or facilitate degradation. Our results are indicative of the richness of the kinetics under consideration. The main complex features are found to be bistability and oscillations. One could expect to find kinetic chaos as well. The latter feature has however not been observed in our calculations. In addition, we illustrate the difference in the regulation of distributed networks by mRNA and ncRNA.

  13. Non-coding recurrent mutations in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia.

    PubMed

    Puente, Xose S; Beà, Silvia; Valdés-Mas, Rafael; Villamor, Neus; Gutiérrez-Abril, Jesús; Martín-Subero, José I; Munar, Marta; Rubio-Pérez, Carlota; Jares, Pedro; Aymerich, Marta; Baumann, Tycho; Beekman, Renée; Belver, Laura; Carrio, Anna; Castellano, Giancarlo; Clot, Guillem; Colado, Enrique; Colomer, Dolors; Costa, Dolors; Delgado, Julio; Enjuanes, Anna; Estivill, Xavier; Ferrando, Adolfo A; Gelpí, Josep L; González, Blanca; González, Santiago; González, Marcos; Gut, Marta; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús M; López-Guerra, Mónica; Martín-García, David; Navarro, Alba; Nicolás, Pilar; Orozco, Modesto; Payer, Ángel R; Pinyol, Magda; Pisano, David G; Puente, Diana A; Queirós, Ana C; Quesada, Víctor; Romeo-Casabona, Carlos M; Royo, Cristina; Royo, Romina; Rozman, María; Russiñol, Nuria; Salaverría, Itziar; Stamatopoulos, Kostas; Stunnenberg, Hendrik G; Tamborero, David; Terol, María J; Valencia, Alfonso; López-Bigas, Nuria; Torrents, David; Gut, Ivo; López-Guillermo, Armando; López-Otín, Carlos; Campo, Elías

    2015-10-22

    Chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) is a frequent disease in which the genetic alterations determining the clinicobiological behaviour are not fully understood. Here we describe a comprehensive evaluation of the genomic landscape of 452 CLL cases and 54 patients with monoclonal B-lymphocytosis, a precursor disorder. We extend the number of CLL driver alterations, including changes in ZNF292, ZMYM3, ARID1A and PTPN11. We also identify novel recurrent mutations in non-coding regions, including the 3' region of NOTCH1, which cause aberrant splicing events, increase NOTCH1 activity and result in a more aggressive disease. In addition, mutations in an enhancer located on chromosome 9p13 result in reduced expression of the B-cell-specific transcription factor PAX5. The accumulative number of driver alterations (0 to ≥4) discriminated between patients with differences in clinical behaviour. This study provides an integrated portrait of the CLL genomic landscape, identifies new recurrent driver mutations of the disease, and suggests clinical interventions that may improve the management of this neoplasia. PMID:26200345

  14. Long Non-Coding RNAs in Endometrial Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Maria A.; Bullock, Marc D.; Ling, Hui; Pichler, Martin; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial carcinoma (EC), the second most common form of gynaecological malignancy, can be divided into two distinct sub-types: Type I tumours arise from hyperplastic endometrium and typically effect women around the time of menopause, whereas type II tumours arise in postmenopausal women from atrophic endometrium. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of non-protein coding molecules that have recently been implicated in the pathogenesis of many types of cancer including gynaecological tumours. Although they play critical physiological roles in cellular metabolism, their expression and function are deregulated in EC compared with paired normal tissue, indicating that they may also participate in tumour initiation and progression. For instance, the lncRNA MALAT-1 is down-regulated in EC samples compared to normal or hyperplastic endometrium, whereas the lncRNA OVAL is down-regulated in type II disease but up-regulated in type I disease. Other notatble lncRNAs such as HOTAIR, H19 and SRA become up-regulated with increasing EC tumour grade and other features associated with poor prognosis. In the current review, we will examine the growing body of evidence linking deregulated lncRNAs with specific biological functions of tumour cells in EC, we will highlight associations between lncRNAs and the molecular pathways implicated in EC tumourigenesis and we will identify critical knowledge gaps that remain to be addressed. PMID:26556343

  15. Non-coding Y RNAs as tethers and gates

    PubMed Central

    Wolin, Sandra L; Belair, Cedric; Boccitto, Marco; Chen, Xinguo; Sim, Soyeong; Taylor, David W; Wang, Hong-Wei

    2013-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) called Y RNAs are abundant components of both animal cells and a variety of bacteria. In all species examined, these ~100 nt RNAs are bound to the Ro 60 kDa (Ro60) autoantigen, a ring-shaped protein that also binds misfolded ncRNAs in some vertebrate nuclei. Although the function of Ro60 RNPs has been mysterious, we recently reported that a bacterial Y RNA tethers Ro60 to the 3′ to 5′ exoribonuclease polynucleotide phosphorylase (PNPase) to form RYPER (Ro60/Y RNA/PNPase Exoribonuclease RNP), a new RNA degradation machine. PNPase is a homotrimeric ring that degrades single-stranded RNA, and Y RNA-mediated tethering of Ro60 increases the effectiveness of PNPase in degrading structured RNAs. Single particle electron microscopy of RYPER suggests that RNA threads through the Ro60 ring into the PNPase cavity. Further studies indicate that Y RNAs may also act as gates to regulate entry of RNA substrates into the Ro60 channel. These findings reveal novel functions for Y RNAs and raise questions about how the bacterial findings relate to the roles of these ncRNAs in animal cells. Here we review the literature on Y RNAs, highlighting their close relationship with Ro60 proteins and the hypothesis that these ncRNAs function generally to tether Ro60 rings to diverse RNA-binding proteins. PMID:24036917

  16. Non-coding RNA: a new frontier in regulatory biology

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Xiang-Dong

    2015-01-01

    A striking finding in the past decade is the production of numerous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) from mammalian genomes. While it is entirely possible that many of those ncRNAs are transcription noises or by-products of RNA processing, increasing evidence suggests that a large fraction of them are functional and provide various regulatory activities in the cell. Thus, functional genomics and proteomics are incomplete without understanding functional ribonomics. As has been long suggested by the ‘RNA world’ hypothesis, many ncRNAs have the capacity to act like proteins in diverse biochemical processes. The enormous amount of information residing in the primary sequences and secondary structures of ncRNAs makes them particularly suited to function as scaffolds for molecular interactions. In addition, their functions appear to be stringently controlled by default via abundant nucleases when not engaged in specific interactions. This review focuses on the functional properties of regulatory ncRNAs in comparison with proteins and emphasizes both the opportunities and challenges in future ncRNA research. PMID:25821635

  17. Non-coding RNAs and disease: the classical ncRNAs make a comeback.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Rogerio Alves; Fraczek, Marcin G; Parker, Steven; Delneri, Daniela; O'Keefe, Raymond T

    2016-08-15

    Many human diseases have been attributed to mutation in the protein coding regions of the human genome. The protein coding portion of the human genome, however, is very small compared with the non-coding portion of the genome. As such, there are a disproportionate number of diseases attributed to the coding compared with the non-coding portion of the genome. It is now clear that the non-coding portion of the genome produces many functional non-coding RNAs and these RNAs are slowly being linked to human diseases. Here we discuss examples where mutation in classical non-coding RNAs have been attributed to human disease and identify the future potential for the non-coding portion of the genome in disease biology. PMID:27528754

  18. [Role of non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids in chronic inflammatory diseases].

    PubMed

    Heinz, G A; Mashreghi, M-F

    2016-05-01

    Non-coding regulatory ribonucleic acids (RNA), including microRNA, long non-coding RNA and circular RNA, can influence the expression of genes mediating inflammatory processes and therefore affect the course and progression of chronic inflammatory diseases. Recent studies using antisense oligonucleotides suggest that such non-coding regulatory RNAs are suitable as novel therapeutic target molecules for the treatment of inflammatory rheumatic diseases. PMID:27115697

  19. Small and Long Non-Coding RNAs: Novel Targets in Perspective Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Han Li, Chi; Chen, Yangchao

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNA refers to a large group of endogenous RNA molecules that have no protein coding capacity, while having specialized cellular and molecular functions. They possess wide range of functions such as the regulation of gene transcription and translation, post-transcriptional modification, epigenetic landscape establishment, protein scaffolding and cofactors recruitments. They are further divided into small non-coding RNAs with size < 200nt (e.g. miRNA, piRNA) and long non-coding RNAs with size >= 200nt (e.g. lincRNA, NAT). Increasing evidences suggest that both non-coding RNAs groups play important roles in cancer development, progression and pathology. Clinically, non-coding RNAs aberrations show high diagnostic and prognostic values. With improved understanding of the nature and roles of non-coding RNAs, it is believed that we can develop therapeutic treatment against cancer via the modulation of these RNA molecules. Advances in nucleic acid drug technology and computational simulation prompt the development of agents to intervene the malignant effects of non-coding RNAs. In this review, we will discuss the role of non-coding RNAs in cancer, and evaluate the potential of non-coding RNA-based cancer therapies. PMID:27047252

  20. Systematic classification of non-coding RNAs by epigenomic similarity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Even though only 1.5% of the human genome is translated into proteins, recent reports indicate that most of it is transcribed into non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), which are becoming the subject of increased scientific interest. We hypothesized that examining how different classes of ncRNAs co-localized with annotated epigenomic elements could help understand the functions, regulatory mechanisms, and relationships among ncRNA families. Results We examined 15 different ncRNA classes for statistically significant genomic co-localizations with cell type-specific chromatin segmentation states, transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs), and histone modification marks using GenomeRunner (http://www.genomerunner.org). P-values were obtained using a Chi-square test and corrected for multiple testing using the Benjamini-Hochberg procedure. We clustered and visualized the ncRNA classes by the strength of their statistical enrichments and depletions. We found piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs) to be depleted in regions containing activating histone modification marks, such as H3K4 mono-, di- and trimethylation, H3K27 acetylation, as well as certain TFBSs. piRNAs were further depleted in active promoters, weak transcription, and transcription elongation regions, and enriched in repressed and heterochromatic regions. Conversely, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) were depleted in heterochromatin regions and strongly enriched in regions containing activating H3K4 di- and trimethylation marks, H2az histone variant, and a variety of TFBSs. Interestingly, regions containing CTCF insulator protein binding sites were associated with tRNAs. tRNAs were also enriched in the active, weak and poised promoters and, surprisingly, in regions with repetitive/copy number variations. Conclusions Searching for statistically significant associations between ncRNA classes and epigenomic elements permits detection of potential functional and/or regulatory relationships among ncRNA classes, and suggests cell

  1. Kinetic models of gene expression including non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir P.

    2011-03-01

    In cells, genes are transcribed into mRNAs, and the latter are translated into proteins. Due to the feedbacks between these processes, the kinetics of gene expression may be complex even in the simplest genetic networks. The corresponding models have already been reviewed in the literature. A new avenue in this field is related to the recognition that the conventional scenario of gene expression is fully applicable only to prokaryotes whose genomes consist of tightly packed protein-coding sequences. In eukaryotic cells, in contrast, such sequences are relatively rare, and the rest of the genome includes numerous transcript units representing non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). During the past decade, it has become clear that such RNAs play a crucial role in gene expression and accordingly influence a multitude of cellular processes both in the normal state and during diseases. The numerous biological functions of ncRNAs are based primarily on their abilities to silence genes via pairing with a target mRNA and subsequently preventing its translation or facilitating degradation of the mRNA-ncRNA complex. Many other abilities of ncRNAs have been discovered as well. Our review is focused on the available kinetic models describing the mRNA, ncRNA and protein interplay. In particular, we systematically present the simplest models without kinetic feedbacks, models containing feedbacks and predicting bistability and oscillations in simple genetic networks, and models describing the effect of ncRNAs on complex genetic networks. Mathematically, the presentation is based primarily on temporal mean-field kinetic equations. The stochastic and spatio-temporal effects are also briefly discussed.

  2. Effective knockdown of Drosophila long non-coding RNAs by CRISPR interference.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Tibbit, Charlotte; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-05-19

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as regulators of gene expression across metazoa. Interestingly, some lncRNAs function independently of their transcripts - the transcription of the lncRNA locus itself affects target genes. However, current methods of loss-of-function analysis are insufficient to address the role of lncRNA transcription from the transcript which has impeded analysis of their function. Using the minimal CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system, we show that coexpression of the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) and guide RNAs targeting the endogenous roX locus in the Drosophila cells results in a robust and specific knockdown of roX1 and roX2 RNAs, thus eliminating the need for recruiting chromatin modifying proteins for effective gene silencing. Additionally, we find that the human and Drosophila codon optimized dCas9 genes are functional and show similar transcription repressive activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the minimal CRISPRi system suppresses roX transcription efficiently in vivo resulting in loss-of-function phenotype, thus validating the method for the first time in a multicelluar organism. Our analysis expands the genetic toolkit available for interrogating lncRNA function in situ and is adaptable for targeting multiple genes across model organisms. PMID:26850642

  3. Effective knockdown of Drosophila long non-coding RNAs by CRISPR interference

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Sanjay; Tibbit, Charlotte; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as regulators of gene expression across metazoa. Interestingly, some lncRNAs function independently of their transcripts – the transcription of the lncRNA locus itself affects target genes. However, current methods of loss-of-function analysis are insufficient to address the role of lncRNA transcription from the transcript which has impeded analysis of their function. Using the minimal CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) system, we show that coexpression of the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) and guide RNAs targeting the endogenous roX locus in the Drosophila cells results in a robust and specific knockdown of roX1 and roX2 RNAs, thus eliminating the need for recruiting chromatin modifying proteins for effective gene silencing. Additionally, we find that the human and Drosophila codon optimized dCas9 genes are functional and show similar transcription repressive activity. Finally, we demonstrate that the minimal CRISPRi system suppresses roX transcription efficiently in vivo resulting in loss-of-function phenotype, thus validating the method for the first time in a multicelluar organism. Our analysis expands the genetic toolkit available for interrogating lncRNA function in situ and is adaptable for targeting multiple genes across model organisms. PMID:26850642

  4. Non-coding RNAs in Development and Disease: Background, Mechanisms, and Therapeutic Approaches.

    PubMed

    Beermann, Julia; Piccoli, Maria-Teresa; Viereck, Janika; Thum, Thomas

    2016-10-01

    Advances in RNA-sequencing techniques have led to the discovery of thousands of non-coding transcripts with unknown function. There are several types of non-coding linear RNAs such as microRNAs (miRNA) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), as well as circular RNAs (circRNA) consisting of a closed continuous loop. This review guides the reader through important aspects of non-coding RNA biology. This includes their biogenesis, mode of actions, physiological function, as well as their role in the disease context (such as in cancer or the cardiovascular system). We specifically focus on non-coding RNAs as potential therapeutic targets and diagnostic biomarkers. PMID:27535639

  5. Bistability in self-activating genes regulated by non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miro-Bueno, Jesus

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNA molecules are able to regulate gene expression and play an essential role in cells. On the other hand, bistability is an important behaviour of genetic networks. Here, we propose and study an ODE model in order to show how non-coding RNA can produce bistability in a simple way. The model comprises a single gene with positive feedback that is repressed by non-coding RNA molecules. We show how the values of all the reaction rates involved in the model are able to control the transitions between the high and low states. This new model can be interesting to clarify the role of non-coding RNA molecules in genetic networks. As well, these results can be interesting in synthetic biology for developing new genetic memories and biomolecular devices based on non-coding RNAs.

  6. Long non-coding RNAs as emerging regulators of differentiation, development, and disease

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Bijan K; Mueller, Adam C; Dutta, Anindya

    2014-01-01

    A significant portion of the mammalian genome encodes numerous transcripts that are not translated into proteins, termed long non-coding RNAs. Initial studies identifying long non-coding RNAs inferred these RNA sequences were a consequence of transcriptional noise or promiscuous RNA polymerase II activity. However, the last decade has seen a revolution in the understanding of regulation and function of long non-coding RNAs. Now it has become apparent that long non-coding RNAs play critical roles in a wide variety of biological processes. In this review, we describe the current understanding of long non-coding RNA-mediated regulation of cellular processes: differentiation, development, and disease. PMID:25483404

  7. Identification and analysis of mouse non-coding RNA using transcriptome data.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yuhui; Liu, Wanfei; Zeng, Jingyao; Liu, Shoucheng; Tan, Xinyu; Aljohi, Hasanawad; Hu, Songnian

    2016-06-01

    Transcripts are expressed spatially and temporally and they are very complicated, precise and specific; however, most studies are focused on protein-coding related genes. Recently, massively parallel cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has emerged to be a new and promising tool for transcriptome research, and numbers of non-coding RNAs, especially lincRNAs, have been widely identified and well characterized as important regulators of diverse biological processes. In this study, we used ultra-deep RNA-seq data from 15 mouse tissues to study the diversity and dynamic of non-coding RNAs in mouse. Using our own criteria, we identified totally 16,249 non-coding genes (21,569 non-coding RNAs) in mouse. We annotated these non-coding RNAs by diverse properties and found non-coding RNAs are generally shorter, have fewer exons, express in lower level and are more strikingly tissue-specific compared with protein-coding genes. Moreover, these non-coding RNAs show significant enrichment with transcriptional initiation and elongation signals including histone modifications (H3K4me3, H3K27me3 and H3K36me3), RNAPII binding sites and CAGE tags. The gene set enrichment analysis (GSEA) result revealed several sets of lincRNAs associated with diverse biological processes such as immune effector process, muscle development and sexual reproduction. Taken together, this study provides a more comprehensive annotation of mouse non-coding RNAs and gives an opportunity for future functional and evolutionary study of mouse non-coding RNAs. PMID:26944582

  8. Water/carbonate stripping for CO.sub.2 capture adsorber regeneration and CO.sub.2 delivery to photoautotrophs

    DOEpatents

    Chance, Ronald; Koros, William J.; McCool, Benjamin; Noel, James

    2015-08-11

    The invention provides systems and methods for the delivery of carbon to photoautotrophs. The invention utilizes low energy regeneration of adsorbent for CO.sub.2 capture and provides for effective CO.sub.2 loading into liquids useful for photoautotroph growth and/or production of photosynthetic products, such as biofuels, via photoautotrophic culture media. The inventive system comprises a fluid/membrane/fluid contactor that provides selective transfer of molecular CO.sub.2 via a dense (non-porous) membrane from a carbonate-based CO.sub.2 snipping solution to a culture medium where the CO.sub.2 is consumed by a photoautotroph for the production of biofuels, biofuel precursors or other commercial products.

  9. CncRNAs: RNAs with both coding and non-coding roles in development.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Karuna; Ephrussi, Anne

    2016-04-15

    RNAs are known to regulate diverse biological processes, either as protein-encoding molecules or as non-coding RNAs. However, a third class that comprises RNAs endowed with both protein coding and non-coding functions has recently emerged. Such bi-functional 'coding and non-coding RNAs' (cncRNAs) have been shown to play important roles in distinct developmental processes in plants and animals. Here, we discuss key examples of cncRNAs and review their roles, regulation and mechanisms of action during development. PMID:27095489

  10. [Role of long non-coding RNA in diabetes mellitus and its complications].

    PubMed

    Li, Ailing; Zhang, Zheng

    2016-03-01

    Long non-coding RNA was initially identified as "noises" of gene transcriptions. However, with the developing researches of ENCODE, it was found that the long non-coding RNAs can regulate the genomic expressions in the form of RNAs in epigenetic, transcription, and post transcriptional levels, which is involved in the regulation of diverse cellular processes and has significant influences on occurrence and precaution of human diseases. This paper introduces functions and features of the long non-coding RNAs, and sums up the internal relation between long non-coding RNAs, diabetes and diabetic complications on the basis of existing researches. These advances can provide the basis for the further understanding of molecular medicine on occurrence and evolution of diabetes. PMID:27349111

  11. The Clinical Relevance of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Andreia; Bullock, Marc; Calin, George

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs have long been associated with cancer development and progression, and since their earliest discovery, their clinical potential in identifying and characterizing the disease has been pursued. Long non-coding (lncRNAs), a diverse class of RNA transcripts >200 nucleotides in length with limited protein coding potential, has been only modestly studied relative to other categories of non-coding RNAs. However, recent data suggests they too may be important players in cancer. In this article, we consider the value of lncRNAs in the clinical setting, and in particular their potential roles as diagnostic and prognostic markers in cancer. Furthermore, we summarize the most significant studies linking lncRNA expression in human biological samples to cancer outcomes. The diagnostic sensitivity, specificity and validity of these non-coding RNA transcripts is compared in the various biological compartments in which they have been detected including tumor tissue, whole body fluids and exosomes. PMID:26516918

  12. Utilizing sequence intrinsic composition to classify protein-coding and long non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Sun, Liang; Luo, Haitao; Bu, Dechao; Zhao, Guoguang; Yu, Kuntao; Zhang, Changhai; Liu, Yuanning; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2013-09-01

    It is a challenge to classify protein-coding or non-coding transcripts, especially those re-constructed from high-throughput sequencing data of poorly annotated species. This study developed and evaluated a powerful signature tool, Coding-Non-Coding Index (CNCI), by profiling adjoining nucleotide triplets to effectively distinguish protein-coding and non-coding sequences independent of known annotations. CNCI is effective for classifying incomplete transcripts and sense-antisense pairs. The implementation of CNCI offered highly accurate classification of transcripts assembled from whole-transcriptome sequencing data in a cross-species manner, that demonstrated gene evolutionary divergence between vertebrates, and invertebrates, or between plants, and provided a long non-coding RNA catalog of orangutan. CNCI software is available at http://www.bioinfo.org/software/cnci. PMID:23892401

  13. Non-Coding RNAs as Therapeutic Targets in Hepatocellular Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2014-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that affects a large number of patients worldwide, with an increasing incidence in the United States and Europe. The therapies that are currently available for patients with inoperable HCC have limited benefits. Although molecular targeted therapies against selected cell signaling pathways have shown some promising results, their impact has been minimal. There is a need to identify and explore other targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Several non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNA) have recently been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. These ncRNA genes represent promising targets for cancer. However, therapeutic targeting of ncRNA genes has not been employed for HCC. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and viral vector delivery approaches has been shown to be feasible approaches to modulate ncRNA expression. HCC is an optimal cancer to evaluate novel RNA based therapeutic approaches because of the potential of effective delivery and uptake of therapeutic agents to the liver. In this review, we discuss selected ncRNA that could function as potential targets in HCC treatment and outline approaches to target ncRNA expression. Future challenges include the need to achieve site-specific targeting with acceptable safety and efficacy. PMID:22873215

  14. Non-coding RNAs as therapeutic targets in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Braconi, Chiara; Patel, Tushar

    2012-11-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) is a common malignancy that affects a large number of patients worldwide, with an increasing incidence in the United States and Europe. The therapies that are currently available for patients with inoperable HCC have limited benefits. Although molecular targeted therapies against selected cell signaling pathways have shown some promising results, their impact has been minimal. There is a need to identify and explore other targets for the development of novel therapeutics. Several non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNA) have recently been implicated in hepatocarcinogenesis and tumor progression. These ncRNA genes represent promising targets for cancer. However, therapeutic targeting of ncRNA genes has not been employed for HCC. The use of antisense oligonucleotides and viral vector delivery approaches have been shown to be feasible approaches to modulate ncRNA expression. HCC is an optimal cancer to evaluate novel RNA based therapeutic approaches because of the potential of effective delivery and uptake of therapeutic agents to the liver. In this review, we discuss selected ncRNA that could function as potential targets in HCC treatment and outline approaches to target ncRNA expression. Future challenges include the need to achieve site-specific targeting with acceptable safety and efficacy. PMID:22873215

  15. Impact of Nutrition on Non-Coding RNA Epigenetics in Breast and Gynecological Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Krakowsky, Rosanna H. E.; Tollefsbol, Trygve O.

    2015-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in females. According to the American Cancer Society, there are 327,660 new cases in breast and gynecological cancers estimated in 2014, placing emphasis on the need for cancer prevention and new cancer treatment strategies. One important approach to cancer prevention involves phytochemicals, biologically active compounds derived from plants. A variety of studies on the impact of dietary compounds found in cruciferous vegetables, green tea, and spices like curry and black pepper have revealed epigenetic changes in female cancers. Thus, an important emerging topic comprises epigenetic changes due to the modulation of non-coding RNA levels. Since it has been shown that non-coding RNAs such as microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs are aberrantly expressed in cancer, and furthermore are linked to distinct cancer phenotypes, understanding the effects of dietary compounds and supplements on the epigenetic modulator non-coding RNA is of great interest. This article reviews the current findings on nutrition-induced changes in breast and gynecological cancers at the non-coding RNA level. PMID:26075205

  16. Non-coding RNAs as emerging molecular targets of gallbladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Tekcham, Dinesh Singh; Tiwari, Pramod Kumar

    2016-08-15

    Gallbladder cancer is one of the most common cancers of biliary tract with aggressive pathophysiology, now emerging as a global health issue. Although minority of gallbladder cancer patients could receive such curative resection due to late diagnosis, this increases the survival rate. Lack of potential target molecule (s) for early diagnosis, better prognosis and effective therapy of gallbladder cancer has triggered investigators to look for novel technological or high throughput approaches to identify potential biomarker for gallbladder cancer. Intervention of non-coding RNAs in gallbladder cancer has been revealed recently. Non-coding RNAs are now widely implicated in cancer. Recent reports have revealed association of non-coding RNAs (microRNAs or miRNAs and long non-coding RNAs or lncRNAs) with gallbladder cancer. Here, we present an updated overview on the biogenesis, mechanism of action, role of non-coding RNAs, the identified cellular functions in gallbladder tumorigenesis, their prognostic & therapeutic potentials (efficacies) and future significance in developing effective biomarker(s), in future, for gallbladder. PMID:27131889

  17. A Micropeptide Encoded by a Putative Long Non-coding RNA Regulates Muscle Performance

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Douglas M.; Anderson, Kelly M.; Chang, Chi-Lun; Makarewich, Catherine A.; Nelson, Benjamin R.; McAnally, John R.; Kasaragod, Prasad; Shelton, John M.; Liou, Jen; Bassel-Duby, Rhonda; Olson, Eric N.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Functional micropeptides can be concealed within RNAs that appear to be non-coding. We discovered a conserved micropeptide, that we named myoregulin (MLN), encoded by a skeletal muscle-specific RNA annotated as a putative long non-coding RNA. MLN shares structural and functional similarity with phospholamban (PLN) and sarcolipin (SLN), which inhibit SERCA, the membrane pump that controls muscle relaxation by regulating Ca2+ uptake into the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). MLN interacts directly with SERCA and impedes Ca2+ uptake into the SR. In contrast to PLN and SLN, which are expressed in cardiac and slow skeletal muscle in mice, MLN is robustly expressed in all skeletal muscle. Genetic deletion of MLN in mice enhances Ca2+ handling in skeletal muscle and improves exercise performance. These findings identify MLN as an important regulator of skeletal muscle physiology and highlight the possibility that additional micropeptides are encoded in the many RNAs currently annotated as non-coding. PMID:25640239

  18. Structure based approaches for targeting non-coding RNAs with small molecules

    PubMed Central

    Shortridge, Matthew D.; Varani, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    The increasing appreciation of the central role of non-coding RNAs (miRNAs and long non coding RNAs) in chronic and degenerative human disease makes them attractive therapeutic targets. This would not be unprecedented: the bacterial ribosomal RNA is a mainstay for antibacterial treatment, while the conservation and functional importance of viral RNA regulatory elements has long suggested they would constitute attractive targets for new antivirals. Oligonucleotide-based chemistry has obvious appeals but also considerable pharmacological limitations that are yet to be addressed satisfactorily. Recent studies identifying small molecules targeting non-coding RNAs may provide an alternative approach to oligonucleotide methods. Here we review recent work investigating new structural and chemical principles for targeting RNA with small molecules. PMID:25687935

  19. The decalog of long non-coding RNA involvement in cancer diagnosis and monitoring.

    PubMed

    Kunej, Tanja; Obsteter, Jana; Pogacar, Ziva; Horvat, Simon; Calin, George Adrian

    2014-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding capacity; initially regarded as "transcriptional noise", lately they have emerged as essential factors in both cell biology and mechanisms of disease. In this article, we present basic knowledge of lncRNA molecular mechanisms, associated physiological processes and cancer association, as well as their diagnostic and therapeutic value in the form of a decalog: (1) Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding capacity divided by size (short and long ncRNAs), function (housekeeping RNA and regulatory RNA) and direction of transcription (sense/antisense, bidirectional, intronic and intergenic), containing a broad range of molecules with diverse properties and functions, such as messenger RNA, transfer RNA, microRNA and long non-coding RNAs. (2) Long non-coding RNAs are implicated in many molecular mechanisms, such as transcriptional regulation, post-transcriptional regulation and processing of other short ncRNAs. (3) Long non-coding RNAs play an important role in many physiological processes such as X-chromosome inactivation, cell differentiation, immune response and apoptosis. (4) Long non-coding RNAs have been linked to hallmarks of cancer: (a) sustaining proliferative signaling; (b) evading growth suppressors; (c) enabling replicative immortality; (d) activating invasion and metastasis; (e) inducing angiogenesis; (f) resisting cell death; and (g) reprogramming energy metabolism. (5) Regarding their impact on cancer cells, lncRNAs are divided into two groups: oncogenic and tumor-suppressor lncRNAs. (6) Studies of lncRNA involvement in cancer usually analyze deregulated expression patterns at the RNA level as well as the effects of single nucleotide polymorphisms and copy number variations at the DNA level. (7) Long non-coding RNAs have potential as novel biomarkers due to tissue-specific expression patterns, efficient detection in body fluids and high stability. (8) LncRNAs serve

  20. The role of long non-coding RNAs in genome formatting and expression

    PubMed Central

    Angrand, Pierre-Olivier; Vennin, Constance; Le Bourhis, Xuefen; Adriaenssens, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcripts without protein-coding potential but having a pivotal role in numerous biological functions. Long non-coding RNAs act as regulators at different levels of gene expression including chromatin organization, transcriptional regulation, and post-transcriptional control. Misregulation of lncRNAs expression has been found to be associated to cancer and other human disorders. Here, we review the different types of lncRNAs, their mechanisms of action on genome formatting and expression and emphasized on the multifaceted action of the H19 lncRNA. PMID:25972893

  1. Light Stress and Oxidative Cell Damage in Photoautotrophic Cell Suspension of Euphorbia characias L.

    PubMed Central

    Bladier, C.; Carrier, P.; Chagvardieff, P.

    1994-01-01

    A photoautotrophic cell-suspension culture of Euphorbia characias L. grown at 70 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1 was very sensitive to light stress: the gross photosynthesis measured by using a mass spectrometric 16O2/18O2 isotope technique showed a fast decrease at a rather low light intensity of 100 [mu]mol photons m-2 s-1, far below the photosynthetic saturation level. The contribution of activated oxygen species on photosystem II photoinhibition was examined for a given light intensity. A protective effect on gross photosynthesis was observed with 1% oxygen. When light stress was applied to a methyl viologen-adapted cell suspension, photoinhibition was reduced. When 50 [mu]mol L-1 methyl viologen was added, photoinhibition was slightly enhanced. These responses suggested an involvement of superoxide radicals in the photoinhibition process of E. characias photoautotrophic cells. The long-term (16 h) effects of photoinhibition were then studied. Aldehyde (malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxyalcenals) production resulting from lipid peroxidation was stimulated in long-term stressed cells. When 50 [mu]mol L-1 methyl viologen were added, increased aldehyde production was measured. Under 1% oxygen, the aldehyde production was comparable to that of nonstressed cells. The relationship among lipid peroxidation, light intensity, and net photosynthesis suggests that aldehyde production may result from cell death provoked by a prolonged energy deficit due to the inhibition of photosynthesis. PMID:12232375

  2. RNA-Seq analysis provides insights for understanding photoautotrophic polyhydroxyalkanoate production in recombinant Synechocystis Sp.

    PubMed

    Lau, Nyok-Sean; Foong, Choon Pin; Kurihara, Yukio; Sudesh, Kumar; Matsui, Minami

    2014-01-01

    The photosynthetic cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. strain 6803, is a potential platform for the production of various chemicals and biofuels. In this study, direct photosynthetic production of a biopolymer, polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA), in genetically engineered Synechocystis sp. achieved as high as 14 wt%. This is the highest production reported in Synechocystis sp. under photoautotrophic cultivation conditions without the addition of a carbon source. The addition of acetate increased PHA accumulation to 41 wt%, and this value is comparable to the highest production obtained with cyanobacteria. Transcriptome analysis by RNA-seq coupled with real-time PCR was performed to understand the global changes in transcript levels of cells subjected to conditions suitable for photoautotrophic PHA biosynthesis. There was lower expression of most PHA synthesis-related genes in recombinant Synechocystis sp. with higher PHA accumulation suggesting that the concentration of these enzymes is not the limiting factor to achieving high PHA accumulation. In order to cope with the higher PHA production, cells may utilize enhanced photosynthesis to drive the product formation. Results from this study suggest that the total flux of carbon is the possible driving force for the biosynthesis of PHA and the polymerizing enzyme, PHA synthase, is not the only critical factor affecting PHA-synthesis. Knowledge of the regulation or control points of the biopolymer production pathways will facilitate the further use of cyanobacteria for biotechnological applications. PMID:24466058

  3. cncRNAs: Bi-functional RNAs with protein coding and non-coding functions

    PubMed Central

    Kumari, Pooja; Sampath, Karuna

    2015-01-01

    For many decades, the major function of mRNA was thought to be to provide protein-coding information embedded in the genome. The advent of high-throughput sequencing has led to the discovery of pervasive transcription of eukaryotic genomes and opened the world of RNA-mediated gene regulation. Many regulatory RNAs have been found to be incapable of protein coding and are hence termed as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). However, studies in recent years have shown that several previously annotated non-coding RNAs have the potential to encode proteins, and conversely, some coding RNAs have regulatory functions independent of the protein they encode. Such bi-functional RNAs, with both protein coding and non-coding functions, which we term as ‘cncRNAs’, have emerged as new players in cellular systems. Here, we describe the functions of some cncRNAs identified from bacteria to humans. Because the functions of many RNAs across genomes remains unclear, we propose that RNAs be classified as coding, non-coding or both only after careful analysis of their functions. PMID:26498036

  4. [Support vector data description for finding non-coding RNA gene].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yingjie; Wang, Zhengzhi

    2010-08-01

    In the field of computational molecule biology, there is still a challenging question of how to detect non-coding RNA gene in lots of unlabeled sequences. Generally, the methods of machine learning and classification are employed to answer this question. However, only a limited number of positive training samples and unlabeled samples are available. The negative samples are difficult to define appropriately, yet they are necessary for usual learning-then-classification method. The common way for most of the existing non-coding RNA gene finding methods is to produce a number of random sequences as negative samples, which may hold some characteristic of positive sample sequences. Consequently, the contrived uncertain factor was introduced and the performance of methods was not good enough. In this paper, Support Vector Data Description (SVDD) is in use for to learning and classification as well as for detecting non-coding RNA gene in lots of unlabeled sequences, and the k-means clustering algorithm is employed before SVDD training to deal with the high flase positive fault in the result of SVDD. The training samples (target samples) are non-coding RNA genes validated by experiment. Moreover, appropriate features were constructed by Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The effectiveness and performance of the method are demonstrated by testing the cases in NONCODE databases and E. coli genome. PMID:20842844

  5. Detecting and Comparing Non-Coding RNAs in the High-Throughput Era

    PubMed Central

    Bussotti, Giovanni; Notredame, Cedric; Enright, Anton J.

    2013-01-01

    In recent years there has been a growing interest in the field of non-coding RNA. This surge is a direct consequence of the discovery of a huge number of new non-coding genes and of the finding that many of these transcripts are involved in key cellular functions. In this context, accurately detecting and comparing RNA sequences has become important. Aligning nucleotide sequences is a key requisite when searching for homologous genes. Accurate alignments reveal evolutionary relationships, conserved regions and more generally any biologically relevant pattern. Comparing RNA molecules is, however, a challenging task. The nucleotide alphabet is simpler and therefore less informative than that of amino-acids. Moreover for many non-coding RNAs, evolution is likely to be mostly constrained at the structural level and not at the sequence level. This results in very poor sequence conservation impeding comparison of these molecules. These difficulties define a context where new methods are urgently needed in order to exploit experimental results to their full potential. This review focuses on the comparative genomics of non-coding RNAs in the context of new sequencing technologies and especially dealing with two extremely important and timely research aspects: the development of new methods to align RNAs and the analysis of high-throughput data. PMID:23887659

  6. Identification and characterization of long non-coding RNAs in rainbow trout eggs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are in general considered as a diverse class of transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that structurally resemble mRNAs but do not encode proteins. Recent advances in RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq) and bioinformatics methods have provided an opportunity to indentify and ana...

  7. Conservation and dissipation of light energy in desiccation-tolerant photoautotrophs, two sides of the same coin.

    PubMed

    Heber, Ulrich

    2012-09-01

    Conservation of light energy in photosynthesis is possible only in hydrated photoautotrophs. It requires complex biochemistry and is limited in capacity. Charge separation in reaction centres of photosystem II initiates energy conservation but opens also the path to photooxidative damage. A main mechanism of photoprotection active in hydrated photoautotrophs is controlled by light. This is achieved by coupling light flux to the protonation of a special thylakoid protein which activates thermal energy dissipation. This mechanism facilitates the simultaneous occurrence of energy conservation and energy dissipation but cannot completely prevent damage by light. Continuous metabolic repair is required to compensate damage. More efficient photoprotection is needed by desiccation-tolerant photoautotrophs. Loss of water during desiccation activates ultra-fast energy dissipation in mosses and lichens. Desiccation-induced energy dissipation neither requires a protonation reaction nor light but photoprotection often increases when light is present during desiccation. Two different mechanisms contribute to photoprotection of desiccated photoautotrophs. One facilitates energy dissipation in the antenna of photosystem II which is faster than energy capture by functional reaction centres. When this is insufficient for full photoprotection, the other one permits energy dissipation in the reaction centres themselves. PMID:22527974

  8. Live Cell Chemical Profiling of Temporal Redox Dynamics in a Photoautotrophic Cyanobacterium

    SciTech Connect

    Sadler, Natalie C.; Melnicki, Matthew R.; Serres, Margrethe H.; Merkley, Eric D.; Chrisler, William B.; Hill, Eric A.; Romine, Margaret F.; Kim, Sangtae; Zink, Erika M.; Datta, Suchitra; Smith, Richard D.; Beliaev, Alex S.; Konopka, Allan; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-01-01

    Protein reduction-oxidation (redox) modification is an important mechanism that allows microorganisms to sense environmental changes and initiate cellular responses. We have developed a quantitative chemical probe approach for live cell labeling of proteins that are sensitive to redox modifications. We utilize this in vivo strategy to identify 176 proteins undergoing ~5-10 fold dynamic redox change in response to nutrient limitation and subsequent replenishment in the photoautotrophic cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002. We detect redox changes in as little as 30 seconds after nutrient perturbation, and oscillations in reduction and oxidation for 60 minutes following the perturbation. Many of the proteins undergoing dynamic redox transformations participate in the major components for the production (photosystems and electron transport chains) or consumption (Calvin-Benson cycle and protein synthesis) of reductant and/or energy in photosynthetic organisms. Thus, our in vivo approach reveals new redox-susceptible proteins, in addition to validating those previously identified in vitro.

  9. Improving a Synechocystis-based photoautotrophic chassis through systematic genome mapping and validation of neutral sites

    PubMed Central

    Pinto, Filipe; Pacheco, Catarina C.; Oliveira, Paulo; Montagud, Arnau; Landels, Andrew; Couto, Narciso; Wright, Phillip C.; Urchueguía, Javier F.; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-01-01

    The use of microorganisms as cell factories frequently requires extensive molecular manipulation. Therefore, the identification of genomic neutral sites for the stable integration of ectopic DNA is required to ensure a successful outcome. Here we describe the genome mapping and validation of five neutral sites in the chromosome of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, foreseeing the use of this cyanobacterium as a photoautotrophic chassis. To evaluate the neutrality of these loci, insertion/deletion mutants were produced, and to assess their functionality, a synthetic green fluorescent reporter module was introduced. The constructed integrative vectors include a BioBrick-compatible multiple cloning site insulated by transcription terminators, constituting robust cloning interfaces for synthetic biology approaches. Moreover, Synechocystis mutants (chassis) ready to receive purpose-built synthetic modules/circuits are also available. This work presents a systematic approach to map and validate chromosomal neutral sites in cyanobacteria, and that can be extended to other organisms. PMID:26490728

  10. Improving a Synechocystis-based photoautotrophic chassis through systematic genome mapping and validation of neutral sites.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Filipe; Pacheco, Catarina C; Oliveira, Paulo; Montagud, Arnau; Landels, Andrew; Couto, Narciso; Wright, Phillip C; Urchueguía, Javier F; Tamagnini, Paula

    2015-12-01

    The use of microorganisms as cell factories frequently requires extensive molecular manipulation. Therefore, the identification of genomic neutral sites for the stable integration of ectopic DNA is required to ensure a successful outcome. Here we describe the genome mapping and validation of five neutral sites in the chromosome of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, foreseeing the use of this cyanobacterium as a photoautotrophic chassis. To evaluate the neutrality of these loci, insertion/deletion mutants were produced, and to assess their functionality, a synthetic green fluorescent reporter module was introduced. The constructed integrative vectors include a BioBrick-compatible multiple cloning site insulated by transcription terminators, constituting robust cloning interfaces for synthetic biology approaches. Moreover, Synechocystis mutants (chassis) ready to receive purpose-built synthetic modules/circuits are also available. This work presents a systematic approach to map and validate chromosomal neutral sites in cyanobacteria, and that can be extended to other organisms. PMID:26490728

  11. Screening and characterization of oleaginous Chlorella strains and exploration of photoautotrophic Chlorella protothecoides for oil production.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zheng; Zhou, Zhi-gang; Gerken, Henri; Chen, Feng; Liu, Jin

    2015-05-01

    The growth and oil production of nine Chlorella strains were comparatively assessed and Chlorellaprotothecoides CS-41 demonstrated the greatest lipid production potential. The effects of different nitrogen forms and concentrations, phosphorus concentrations and light intensities on growth and oil production were studied in laboratory columns. C. protothecoides CS-41 accumulated lipids up to 55% of dry weight, with triacylglycerol and oleic acid being 71% of total lipids and 59% of total fatty acids, respectively. High biomass and lipid productivities were achieved in outdoor panel PBRs, up to 1.25 and 0.59 g L(-1) day(-1), or 44. 1 and 16.1 g m(-2) day(-1), respectively. A two-stage cultivation strategy was proposed to enhance the algal biomass and lipid production. This is the first comprehensive investigation of both indoor and outdoor photoautotrophic C. protothecoides cultures for oil production, and C. protothecoides CS-41 represents a promising biofuel feedstock worthy of further exploration. PMID:25266686

  12. Enhanced lipid accumulation of photoautotrophic microalgae by high-dose CO2 mimics a heterotrophic characterization.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhilan; Dou, Xiao; Wu, Jun; He, Bing; Wang, Yuancong; Chen, Yi-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Microalgae possess higher photosynthetic efficiency and accumulate more neutral lipids when supplied with high-dose CO2. However, the nature of lipid accumulation under conditions of elevated CO2 has not been fully elucidated so far. We now revealed that the enhanced lipid accumulation of Chlorella in high-dose CO2 was as efficient as under heterotrophic conditions and this may be attributed to the driving of enlarged carbon source. Both photoautotrophic and heterotrophic cultures were established by using Chlorella sorokiniana CS-1. A series of changes in the carbon fixation, lipid accumulation, energy conversion, and carbon-lipid conversion under high-dose CO2 (1-10%) treatment were characterized subsequently. The daily carbon fixation rate of C. sorokiniana LS-2 in 10% CO2 aeration was significantly increased compared with air CO2. Correspondingly, double oil content (28%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, close to 32.3% produced under heterotrophic conditions. In addition, with 10% CO2 aeration, the overall energy yield (Ψ) in Chlorella reached 12.4 from 7.3% (with air aeration) because of the enhanced daily carbon fixation rates. This treatment also improved the energetic lipid yield (Ylipid/Es) with 4.7-fold, tending to the heterotrophic parameters. More significantly, 2.2 times of carbon-lipid conversion efficiency (ηClipid/Ctotal, 42.4%) was observed in 10% CO2 aeration, towards to 53.7% in heterotrophic cultures, suggesting that more fixed carbon might flow into lipid synthesis under both 10% CO2 aeration and heterotrophic conditions. Taken together, all our evidence showed that 10% CO2 may push photoautotrophic Chlorella to display heterotrophic-like efficiency at least in lipid production. It might bring us an efficient model of lipid production based on microalgal cells with high-dose CO2, which is essential to sustain biodiesel production at large scales. PMID:26712624

  13. Long non-coding RNA regulation of gene expression during differentiation.

    PubMed

    Lopez-Pajares, Vanessa

    2016-06-01

    Transcriptome analysis of mammalian genomes has revealed widespread transcription, much of which does not encode protein. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a subset of the non-coding transcriptome that are emerging as critical regulators of various cellular processes. Differentiation of stem and progenitor cells requires a careful execution of specific genetic programs, and recent studies have revealed that lncRNA expression contributes to specification of cell identity. LncRNAs participate in regulating differentiation at multiple levels of gene expression through various mechanisms of action. In this review, functional roles of lncRNAs in regulating cellular differentiation of blood, muscle, skin, cardiomyocytes, adipocytes, and neurons are discussed. PMID:26996975

  14. The emerging role of pseudogene expressed non-coding RNAs in cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Groen, Jessica N.; Capraro, David; Morris, Kevin V.

    2014-01-01

    A paradigm shift is sweeping modern day molecular biology following the realisation that large amounts of “junk” DNA”, thought initially to be evolutionary remnants, may actually be functional. Several recent studies support a functional role for pseudogene-expressed non-coding RNAs in regulating their protein-coding counterparts. Several hundreds of pseudogenes have been reported as transcribed into RNA in a large variety of tissues and tumours. Most studies have focused on pseudogenes expressed in the sense direction, but some reports suggest that pseudogenes can also be transcribed as antisense RNAs (asRNAs). A few examples of key regulatory genes, such as PTEN and OCT4, have in fact been reported to be under the regulation of pseudogene-expressed asRNAs. Here, we review what are known about pseudogene expressed non-coding RNA mediated gene regulation and their roles in the control of epigenetic states. PMID:24842102

  15. Non-coding chloroplast DNA for plant molecular systematics at the infrageneric level.

    PubMed

    Böhle, U R; Hilger, H; Cerff, R; Martin, W F

    1994-01-01

    With primers constructed against highly conserved regions of tRNA genes (trnTUGU, trnLUAA and trnFGAA) in chloroplast DNA, we have amplified two different non-coding spacers and one intron from four species within the genus Echium L. (Boraginaceae) and from two confamilial outgroups. The trnTUGU-trnLUAA intergenic spacer contains a greater number of polymorphic sites than the trnLUAA intron or the trnLUAA-trnFGAA intergenic spacer. We analyzed a total of 11 kb of sequence data from this non-coding DNA. Total nucleotide divergence between Echium species is on the order of 1% for these regions, all of which possess infrageneric length polymorphisms. The latter two regions contain indels which occur only in the 14 Macaronesian Island endemic species of Echium studied and suggest that these may form a monophyletic group. PMID:7994117

  16. Regulatory networks of non-coding RNAs in brown/beige adipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Shaohai; Chen, Peng; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    BAT (brown adipose tissue) is specialized to burn fatty acids for heat generation and energy expenditure to defend against cold and obesity. Accumulating studies have demonstrated that manipulation of BAT activity through various strategies can regulate metabolic homoeostasis and lead to a healthy phenotype. Two classes of ncRNA (non-coding RNA), miRNA and lncRNA (long non-coding RNA), play crucial roles in gene regulation during tissue development and remodelling. In the present review, we summarize recent findings on regulatory role of distinct ncRNAs in brown/beige adipocytes, and discuss how these ncRNA regulatory networks contribute to brown/beige fat development, differentiation and function. We suggest that targeting ncRNAs could be an attractive approach to enhance BAT activity for protecting the body against obesity and its pathological consequences. PMID:26283634

  17. Estimation of correlations between copy-number variants in non-coding DNA.

    PubMed

    Stamoulis, Catherine

    2011-01-01

    Allelic DNA aberrations across our genome have been associated with normal human genetic heterogeneity as well as with a number of diseases and disorders. When copy-number variations (CNVs) occur in gene-coding regions, known relationships between genes may help us understand correlations between CNVs. However, a large number of these aberrations occur in non-coding, extragenic regions and their correlations may be characterized only quantitatively, e.g., probabilistically, but not functionally. Using a signal processing approach to CNV detection, we identified distributed CNVs in short, non-coding regions across chromosomes and investigated their potential correlations. We estimated predominantly local correlations between CNVs within the same chromosome, and a small number of apparently random long-distance correlations. PMID:22255599

  18. Elements and machinery of non-coding RNAs: toward their taxonomy

    PubMed Central

    Hirose, Tetsuro; Mishima, Yuichiro; Tomari, Yukihide

    2014-01-01

    Although recent transcriptome analyses have uncovered numerous non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), their functions remain largely unknown. ncRNAs assemble with proteins and operate as ribonucleoprotein (RNP) machineries, formation of which is thought to be determined by specific fundamental elements embedded in the primary RNA transcripts. Knowledge about the relationships between RNA elements, RNP machinery, and molecular and physiological functions is critical for understanding the diverse roles of ncRNAs and may eventually allow their systematic classification or “taxonomy.” In this review, we catalog and discuss representative small and long non-coding RNA classes, focusing on their currently known (and unknown) RNA elements and RNP machineries. PMID:24731943

  19. MicroRNAs and other non-coding RNAs as targets for anticancer drug development

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Fabbri, Muller; Calin, George A.

    2015-01-01

    With the first cancer-targeted microRNA drug, MRX34, a liposome-based miR-34 mimic, entering phase I clinical trial in patients with advanced hepatocellular carcinoma in April 2013, miRNA therapeutics are attracting special attention from both academia and biotechnology companies. Although to date the most studied non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are miRNAs, the importance of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) is increasingly being recognized. Here we summarize the roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs in cancer, with a focus on the recently identified novel mechanisms of action, and discuss the current strategies in designing ncRNA-targeting therapeutics, as well as the associated challenges. PMID:24172333

  20. Long non-coding RNA-mediated regulation of glucose homeostasis and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xinghui; Wong, Danny

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent an important class of non-coding RNAs that plays key roles in regulating the expression of genes in health and disease. Accumulating genetic, experimental, and epidemiological studies highlight a growing list of lncRNAs that control glucose homeostasis and diabetic pathologies and complications. Through interactions with chromatin, RNA, and protein, lncRNAs modulate chromatin modification, mRNA stability, microRNA activity, and the function of proteins such as transcription factors. This review highlights emerging concepts in lncRNA-mediated control of glucose homeostasis as well as some of the challenges and therapeutic opportunities in the pathogenesis of diabetes and its complications. PMID:27335687

  1. Barcelona conference on epigenetics and cancer 2015: Coding and non-coding functions of the genome.

    PubMed

    Corujo, David; Mas, Gloria; Malinverni, Roberto; Di Croce, Luciano; Buschbeck, Marcus

    2016-01-01

    The Barcelona Conference on Epigenetics and Cancer (BCEC) entitled "Coding and Non-Coding functions of the Genome" took place October 29-30, 2015 in Barcelona. The 2015 BCEC was the third edition of a series of annual conferences jointly organized by 5 leading research centers in Barcelona together with B-Debate, an initiative of BioCat. Luciano Di Croce from the Center for Genomic Regulation and Marcus Buschbeck from the Josep Carreras Leukemia Research Institute put together the scientific program with a particular focus on the role of non-coding RNAs in enhancer regulation, epigenetic control by Polycomb complexes, histone variants, and nuclear organization. In one and a half days, 22 talks and 56 posters were presented to an audience of 215 participants. PMID:26996885

  2. An expanding universe of the non-coding genome in cancer biology

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Bin; He, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Neoplastic transformation is caused by accumulation of genetic and epigenetic alterations that ultimately convert normal cells into tumor cells with uncontrolled proliferation and survival, unlimited replicative potential and invasive growth [Hanahan,D. et al. (2011) Hallmarks of cancer: the next generation. Cell, 144, 646–674]. Although the majority of the cancer studies have focused on the functions of protein-coding genes, emerging evidence has started to reveal the importance of the vast non-coding genome, which constitutes more than 98% of the human genome. A number of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) derived from the ‘dark matter’ of the human genome exhibit cancer-specific differential expression and/or genomic alterations, and it is increasingly clear that ncRNAs, including small ncRNAs and long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), play an important role in cancer development by regulating protein-coding gene expression through diverse mechanisms. In addition to ncRNAs, nearly half of the mammalian genomes consist of transposable elements, particularly retrotransposons. Once depicted as selfish genomic parasites that propagate at the expense of host fitness, retrotransposon elements could also confer regulatory complexity to the host genomes during development and disease. Reactivation of retrotransposons in cancer, while capable of causing insertional mutagenesis and genome rearrangements to promote oncogenesis, could also alter host gene expression networks to favor tumor development. Taken together, the functional significance of non-coding genome in tumorigenesis has been previously underestimated, and diverse transcripts derived from the non-coding genome could act as integral functional components of the oncogene and tumor suppressor network. PMID:24747961

  3. New Neurons in Aging Brains: Molecular Control by Small Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Schouten, Marijn; Buijink, M. Renate; Lucassen, Paul J.; Fitzsimons, Carlos P.

    2012-01-01

    Adult neurogenesis generates functional neurons from neural stem cells present in specific brain regions. It is largely confined to two main regions: the subventricular zone of the lateral ventricle, and the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus (DG), in the hippocampus. With age, the function of the hippocampus and particularly the DG is impaired. For instance, adult neurogenesis is decreased with aging, in both proliferating and differentiation of newborn cells, while in parallel an age-associated decline in cognitive performance is often seen. Surprisingly, the synaptogenic potential of adult-born neurons is only marginally influenced by aging. Therefore, although proliferation, differentiation, and synaptogenesis of adult-born new neurons in the DG are closely related to each other, they are differentially affected by aging. In this review we discuss the crucial roles of a novel class of recently discovered modulators of gene expression, the small non-coding RNAs, in the regulation of adult neurogenesis. Multiple small non-coding RNAs are differentially expressed in the hippocampus. In particular a subgroup of the small non-coding RNAs, the microRNAs, fine-tune the progression of adult neurogenesis. This makes small non-coding RNAs appealing candidates to orchestrate the functional alterations in adult neurogenesis and cognition associated with aging. Finally, we summarize observations that link changes in circulating levels of steroid hormones with alterations in adult neurogenesis, cognitive decline, and vulnerability to psychopathology in advanced age, and discuss a potential interplay between steroid hormone receptors and microRNAs in cognitive decline in aging individuals. PMID:22363255

  4. Variation in conserved non-coding sequences on chromosome 5q andsusceptibility to asthma and atopy

    SciTech Connect

    Donfack, Joseph; Schneider, Daniel H.; Tan, Zheng; Kurz,Thorsten; Dubchak, Inna; Frazer, Kelly A.; Ober, Carole

    2005-09-10

    Background: Evolutionarily conserved sequences likely havebiological function. Methods: To determine whether variation in conservedsequences in non-coding DNA contributes to risk for human disease, westudied six conserved non-coding elements in the Th2 cytokine cluster onhuman chromosome 5q31 in a large Hutterite pedigree and in samples ofoutbred European American and African American asthma cases and controls.Results: Among six conserved non-coding elements (>100 bp,>70percent identity; human-mouse comparison), we identified one singlenucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in each of two conserved elements and sixSNPs in the flanking regions of three conserved elements. We genotypedour samples for four of these SNPs and an additional three SNPs each inthe IL13 and IL4 genes. While there was only modest evidence forassociation with single SNPs in the Hutterite and European Americansamples (P<0.05), there were highly significant associations inEuropean Americans between asthma and haplotypes comprised of SNPs in theIL4 gene (P<0.001), including a SNP in a conserved non-codingelement. Furthermore, variation in the IL13 gene was strongly associatedwith total IgE (P = 0.00022) and allergic sensitization to mold allergens(P = 0.00076) in the Hutterites, and more modestly associated withsensitization to molds in the European Americans and African Americans (P<0.01). Conclusion: These results indicate that there is overalllittle variation in the conserved non-coding elements on 5q31, butvariation in IL4 and IL13, including possibly one SNP in a conservedelement, influence asthma and atopic phenotypes in diversepopulations.

  5. Distinct Expression of Long Non-Coding RNAs in an Alzheimer's Disease Model.

    PubMed

    Lee, Doo Young; Moon, Jangsup; Lee, Soon-Tae; Jung, Keun-Hwa; Park, Dong-Kyu; Yoo, Jung-Seok; Sunwoo, Jun-Sang; Byun, Jung-Ick; Shin, Jung-Won; Jeon, Daejong; Jung, Ki-Young; Kim, Manho; Lee, Sang Kun; Chu, Kon

    2015-01-01

    With the recent advancement in transcriptome-wide profiling approach, numerous non-coding transcripts previously unknown have been identified. Among the non-coding transcripts, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have received increasing attention for their capacity to modulate transcriptional regulation. Although alterations in the expressions of non-coding RNAs have been studied in Alzheimer's disease (AD), most research focused on the involvement of microRNAs, and comprehensive expression profiling of lncRNAs in AD has been lacking. In this study, microarray analysis was performed to procure the expression profile of lncRNAs dysregulated in a triple transgenic model of AD (3xTg-AD). A total of 4,622 lncRNAs were analyzed: 205 lncRNAs were significantly dysregulated in 3xTg-AD compared with control mice, and 230 lncRNAs were significantly dysregulated within 3xTg-AD in an age-dependent manner (≥2.0-fold, p < 0.05). Among these, 27 and 15 lncRNAs, respectively, had adjacent protein-coding genes whose expressions were also significantly dysregulated. A majority of these lncRNAs and their adjacent genes shared the same direction of dysregulation. For these pairs of lncRNAs and adjacent genes, significant Gene Ontology terms were DNA-dependent regulation of transcription, transcription regulator activity, and embryonic organ morphogenesis. One of the most highly upregulated lncRNAs had a 395 bp core sequence that overlapped with multiple chromosomal regions. This is the first study that comprehensively identified dysregulated lncRNAs in 3xTg-AD mice and will likely facilitate the development of therapeutics targeting lncRNAs in AD. PMID:25624420

  6. Sequence analysis of the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Hamlyn, P H; Gillam, S; Smith, M; Milstein, C

    1977-01-01

    Using an oligonucleotide d(pT10-C-A) as primer, cDNA has been transcribed from the 3' non-coding region of mouse immunoglobulin light chain mRNA and sequenced by a modification1 of the 'plus-minus' gel method2. The sequence obtained has partially corrected and extended a previously obtained sequence3. The new data contains an unusual sequence in which a trinucleotide is repeated seven times. Images PMID:405661

  7. Functional annotation of the vlinc class of non-coding RNAs using systems biology approach

    PubMed Central

    Laurent, Georges St.; Vyatkin, Yuri; Antonets, Denis; Ri, Maxim; Qi, Yao; Saik, Olga; Shtokalo, Dmitry; de Hoon, Michiel J.L.; Kawaji, Hideya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R.R.; Nicolas, Estelle; McCaffrey, Timothy A.; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2016-01-01

    Functionality of the non-coding transcripts encoded by the human genome is the coveted goal of the modern genomics research. While commonly relied on the classical methods of forward genetics, integration of different genomics datasets in a global Systems Biology fashion presents a more productive avenue of achieving this very complex aim. Here we report application of a Systems Biology-based approach to dissect functionality of a newly identified vast class of very long intergenic non-coding (vlinc) RNAs. Using highly quantitative FANTOM5 CAGE dataset, we show that these RNAs could be grouped into 1542 novel human genes based on analysis of insulators that we show here indeed function as genomic barrier elements. We show that vlincRNAs genes likely function in cis to activate nearby genes. This effect while most pronounced in closely spaced vlincRNA–gene pairs can be detected over relatively large genomic distances. Furthermore, we identified 101 vlincRNA genes likely involved in early embryogenesis based on patterns of their expression and regulation. We also found another 109 such genes potentially involved in cellular functions also happening at early stages of development such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Overall, we show that Systems Biology-based methods have great promise for functional annotation of non-coding RNAs. PMID:27001520

  8. Long and Short Non-Coding RNAs as Regulators of Hematopoietic Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Morceau, Franck; Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Gaigneaux, Anthoula; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Genomic analyses estimated that the proportion of the genome encoding proteins corresponds to approximately 1.5%, while at least 66% are transcribed, suggesting that many non-coding DNA-regions generate non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The relevance of these ncRNAs in biological, physiological as well as in pathological processes increased over the last two decades with the understanding of their implication in complex regulatory networks. This review particularly focuses on the involvement of two large families of ncRNAs, namely microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the regulation of hematopoiesis. To date, miRNAs have been widely studied, leading to a wealth of data about processing, regulation and mechanisms of action and more specifically, their involvement in hematopoietic differentiation. Notably, the interaction of miRNAs with the regulatory network of transcription factors is well documented whereas roles, regulation and mechanisms of lncRNAs remain largely unexplored in hematopoiesis; this review gathers current data about lncRNAs as well as both potential and confirmed roles in normal and pathological hematopoiesis. PMID:23860209

  9. Long and short non-coding RNAs as regulators of hematopoietic differentiation.

    PubMed

    Morceau, Franck; Chateauvieux, Sébastien; Gaigneaux, Anthoula; Dicato, Mario; Diederich, Marc

    2013-01-01

    Genomic analyses estimated that the proportion of the genome encoding proteins corresponds to approximately 1.5%, while at least 66% are transcribed, suggesting that many non-coding DNA-regions generate non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). The relevance of these ncRNAs in biological, physiological as well as in pathological processes increased over the last two decades with the understanding of their implication in complex regulatory networks. This review particularly focuses on the involvement of two large families of ncRNAs, namely microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in the regulation of hematopoiesis. To date, miRNAs have been widely studied, leading to a wealth of data about processing, regulation and mechanisms of action and more specifically, their involvement in hematopoietic differentiation. Notably, the interaction of miRNAs with the regulatory network of transcription factors is well documented whereas roles, regulation and mechanisms of lncRNAs remain largely unexplored in hematopoiesis; this review gathers current data about lncRNAs as well as both potential and confirmed roles in normal and pathological hematopoiesis. PMID:23860209

  10. In silico prediction of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bakhtiarizadeh, Mohammad Reza; Hosseinpour, Batool; Arefnezhad, Babak; Shamabadi, Narges; Salami, Seyed Alireza

    2016-04-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are transcribed RNA molecules >200 nucleotides in length that do not encode proteins and serve as key regulators of diverse biological processes. Recently, thousands of long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs), a type of lncRNAs, have been identified in mammalians using massive parallel large sequencing technologies. The availability of the genome sequence of sheep (Ovis aries) has allowed us genomic prediction of non-coding RNAs. This is the first study to identify lincRNAs using RNA-seq data of eight different tissues of sheep, including brain, heart, kidney, liver, lung, ovary, skin, and white adipose. A computational pipeline was employed to characterize 325 putative lincRNAs with high confidence from eight important tissues of sheep using different criteria such as GC content, exon number, gene length, co-expression analysis, stability, and tissue-specific scores. Sixty-four putative lincRNAs displayed tissues-specific expression. The highest number of tissues-specific lincRNAs was found in skin and brain. All novel lincRNAs that aligned to the human and mouse lincRNAs had conserved synteny. These closest protein-coding genes were enriched in 11 significant GO terms such as limb development, appendage development, striated muscle tissue development, and multicellular organismal development. The findings reported here have important implications for the study of sheep genome. PMID:27002388

  11. Genome-Wide Discovery of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout

    PubMed Central

    Al-Tobasei, Rafet; Paneru, Bam; Salem, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1–2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200nt. Emerging evidence indicates that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cellular processes including regulation of gene expression. LncRNAs show low levels of gene expression and sequence conservation, which make their computational identification in genomes difficult. In this study, more than two billion Illumina sequence reads were mapped to the genome reference using the TopHat and Cufflinks software. Transcripts shorter than 200nt, with more than 83–100 amino acids ORF, or with significant homologies to the NCBI nr-protein database were removed. In addition, a computational pipeline was used to filter the remaining transcripts based on a protein-coding-score test. Depending on the filtering stringency conditions, between 31,195 and 54,503 lncRNAs were identified, with only 421 matching known lncRNAs in other species. A digital gene expression atlas revealed 2,935 tissue-specific and 3,269 ubiquitously-expressed lncRNAs. This study annotates the lncRNA rainbow trout genome and provides a valuable resource for functional genomics research in salmonids. PMID:26895175

  12. Post-GWAS methodologies for localisation of functional non-coding variants: ANGPTL3

    PubMed Central

    Oldoni, Federico; Palmen, Jutta; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Howard, Philip; Drenos, Fotios; Plagnol, Vincent; Humphries, Steve E.; Talmud, Philippa J.; Smith, Andrew J.P.

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies have confirmed the involvement of non-coding angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) gene variants with coronary artery disease, levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides and ANGPTL3 mRNA transcript. Extensive linkage disequilibrium at the locus, however, has hindered efforts to identify the potential functional variants. Using regulatory annotations from ENCODE, combined with functional in vivo assays such as allele-specific formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements, statistical approaches including eQTL/lipid colocalisation, and traditional in vitro methodologies including electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assays, variants affecting the ANGPTL3 regulome were examined. From 253 variants associated with ANGPTL3 mRNA expression, and/or lipid traits, 46 were located within liver regulatory elements and potentially functional. One variant, rs10889352, demonstrated allele-specific effects on DNA-protein interactions, reporter gene expression and chromatin accessibility, in line with effects on LDL-C levels and expression of ANGPTL3 mRNA. The ANGPTL3 gene lies within DOCK7, although the variant is within non-coding regions outside of ANGPTL3, within DOCK7, suggesting complex long-range regulatory effects on gene expression. This study illustrates the power of combining multiple genome-wide datasets with laboratory data to localise functional non-coding variation and provides a model for analysis of regulatory variants from GWAS. PMID:26800306

  13. Post-GWAS methodologies for localisation of functional non-coding variants: ANGPTL3.

    PubMed

    Oldoni, Federico; Palmen, Jutta; Giambartolomei, Claudia; Howard, Philip; Drenos, Fotios; Plagnol, Vincent; Humphries, Steve E; Talmud, Philippa J; Smith, Andrew J P

    2016-03-01

    Genome-wide association studies have confirmed the involvement of non-coding angiopoietin-like 3 (ANGPTL3) gene variants with coronary artery disease, levels of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C), triglycerides and ANGPTL3 mRNA transcript. Extensive linkage disequilibrium at the locus, however, has hindered efforts to identify the potential functional variants. Using regulatory annotations from ENCODE, combined with functional in vivo assays such as allele-specific formaldehyde-assisted isolation of regulatory elements, statistical approaches including eQTL/lipid colocalisation, and traditional in vitro methodologies including electrophoretic mobility shift assay and luciferase reporter assays, variants affecting the ANGPTL3 regulome were examined. From 253 variants associated with ANGPTL3 mRNA expression, and/or lipid traits, 46 were located within liver regulatory elements and potentially functional. One variant, rs10889352, demonstrated allele-specific effects on DNA-protein interactions, reporter gene expression and chromatin accessibility, in line with effects on LDL-C levels and expression of ANGPTL3 mRNA. The ANGPTL3 gene lies within DOCK7, although the variant is within non-coding regions outside of ANGPTL3, within DOCK7, suggesting complex long-range regulatory effects on gene expression. This study illustrates the power of combining multiple genome-wide datasets with laboratory data to localise functional non-coding variation and provides a model for analysis of regulatory variants from GWAS. PMID:26800306

  14. Non-coding CK19 RNA in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Oloomi, Mana; Yardehnavi, Najmeh; Bouzari, Saeid; Moazzezy, Neda

    2013-01-01

    Breast carcinoma is the major cause of cancer-related death in women. The incidence of this carcinoma is rising and there are many attempts to decrease this problem. The aim of this study was detection of full-length cytokeratin 19 (CK19) mRNA, in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients in early stage of cancer. In this study, RT-PCR (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) technique was used for detection of CK19 mRNA in peripheral blood and tissue of breast cancer patients. Primers were established to amplify the CK19 as a tumor marker. Moreover, CYFRA 21-1 subunit of CK19 protein was measured in the serum of patients. CK19 mRNA was detected and sequenced. It is shown that the most released CK19 mRNAs in blood and tissue of cancer patients are non-coding RNA. The mutated forms of mRNA are the incomplete transcripts of protein-coding gene as a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) that could regulate gene expression. Moreover, small non-coding RNA (ncRNA) as fragments of CK19 is mostly observed in this experiment. They may play a role in tumorogenesis and their biologic exact function in breast cancer should be further elucidated. PMID:23585313

  15. Profiling Caenorhabditis elegans non-coding RNA expression with a combined microarray.

    PubMed

    He, Housheng; Cai, Lun; Skogerbø, Geir; Deng, Wei; Liu, Tao; Zhu, Xiaopeng; Wang, Yudong; Jia, Dong; Zhang, Zhihua; Tao, Yong; Zeng, Haipan; Aftab, Muhammad Nauman; Cui, Yan; Liu, Guozhen; Chen, Runsheng

    2006-01-01

    Small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are encoded by genes that function at the RNA level, and several hundred ncRNAs have been identified in various organisms. Here we describe an analysis of the small non-coding transcriptome of Caenorhabditis elegans, microRNAs excepted. As a substantial fraction of the ncRNAs is located in introns of protein-coding genes in C.elegans, we also analysed the relationship between ncRNA and host gene expression. To this end, we designed a combined microarray, which included probes against ncRNA as well as host gene mRNA transcripts. The microarray revealed pronounced differences in expression profiles, even among ncRNAs with housekeeping functions (e.g. snRNAs and snoRNAs), indicating distinct developmental regulation and stage-specific functions of a number of novel transcripts. Analysis of ncRNA-host mRNA relations showed that the expression of intronic ncRNA loci with conserved upstream motifs was not correlated to (and much higher than) expression levels of their host genes. Even promoter-less intronic ncRNA loci, though showing a clear correlation to host gene expression, appeared to have a surprising amount of 'expressional freedom', depending on host gene function. Taken together, our microarray analysis presents a more complete and detailed picture of a non-coding transcriptome than hitherto has been presented for any other multicellular organism. PMID:16738136

  16. Prospective and therapeutic screening value of non-coding RNA as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Busch, Albert; Eken, Suzanne M.

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) is a class of genetic, epigenetic and translational regulators, containing short and long transcripts with intriguing abilities for use as biomarkers due to their superordinate role in disease development. In the past five years many of these have been investigated in cardiovascular diseases (CVD), mainly myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. To extend this view, we summarize the existing data about ncRNA as biomarker in the whole entity of CVDs by literature-based review and comparison of the identified candidates. The myomirs miRNA-1, -133a/b, -208a, -499 with well-defined cellular functions have proven equal to classic protein biomarkers for disease detection in MI. Other microRNAs (miRNAs) were reproducibly found to correlate with disease, disease severity and outcome in heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease (CAD) and aortic aneurysm. An additional utilization has been discovered for therapeutic monitoring. The function of long non-coding transcripts is only about to be unraveled, yet shows great potential for outcome prediction. ncRNA biomarkers have a distinct role if no alternative test is available or has is performing poorly. With increasing mechanistic understanding, circulating miRNA and long non-coding transcripts will provide useful disease information with high predictive power. PMID:27429962

  17. Long Non-Coding RNAs as Master Regulators in Cardiovascular Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Archer, Krystal; Broskova, Zuzana; Bayoumi, Ahmed S.; Teoh, Jian-peng; Davila, Alec; Tang, Yaoliang; Su, Huabo; Kim, Il-man

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death in the United States, accounting for nearly one in every seven deaths. Over the last decade, various targeted therapeutics have been introduced, but there has been no corresponding improvement in patient survival. Since the mortality rate of cardiovascular disease has not been significantly decreased, efforts have been made to understand the link between heart disease and novel therapeutic targets such as non-coding RNAs. Among multiple non-coding RNAs, long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has emerged as a novel therapeutic in cardiovascular medicine. LncRNAs are endogenous RNAs that contain over 200 nucleotides and regulate gene expression. Recent studies suggest critical roles of lncRNAs in modulating the initiation and progression of cardiovascular diseases. For example, aberrant lncRNA expression has been associated with the pathogenesis of ischemic heart failure. In this article, we present a synopsis of recent discoveries that link the roles and molecular interactions of lncRNAs to cardiovascular diseases. Moreover, we describe the prevalence of circulating lncRNAs and assess their potential utilities as biomarkers for diagnosis and prognosis of heart disease. PMID:26445043

  18. Exploiting the hypoxia sensitive non-coding genome for organ-specific physiologic reprogramming.

    PubMed

    Bischof, Corinne; Krishnan, Jaya

    2016-07-01

    In this review we highlight the role of non-coding RNAs in the development and progression of cardiac pathology and explore the possibility of disease-associated RNAs serving as targets for cardiac-directed therapeutics. Contextually, we focus on the role of stress-induced hypoxia as a driver of disease development and progression through activation of hypoxia inducible factor 1α (HIF1α) and explore mechanisms underlying HIFα function as an enforcer of cardiac pathology through direct transcriptional coupling with the non-coding transcriptome. In the interest of clarity, we will confine our analysis to cardiac pathology and focus on three defining features of the diseased state, namely metabolic, growth and functional reprogramming. It is the aim of this review to explore possible mechanisms through which HIF1α regulation of the non-coding transcriptome connects to spatiotemporal control of gene expression to drive establishment of the diseased state, and to propose strategies for the exploitation of these unique RNAs as targets for clinical therapy. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Cardiomyocyte Biology: Integration of Developmental and Environmental Cues in the Heart edited by Marcus Schaub and Hughes Abriel. PMID:26851074

  19. Long non-coding RNAs-towards precision medicine in diabetic kidney disease?

    PubMed

    Panchapakesan, Usha; Pollock, Carol

    2016-09-01

    Diabetic kidney disease (DKD) is escalating and is the major cause of end stage kidney failure. There is increasing evidence to support the role of epigenetic factors and metabolic memory in linking the environmental and genetic causes of this disease. Although our understanding of this disease has improved, there has been no significant efficacious therapeutic translation in the last decade. Current sequencing technology has allowed interrogation of the human transcriptome. It is evident that although approximately 80% of the genome is transcribed, only 1-2% is read and coded into protein. The remaining non-coding RNA, historically assumed to be 'junk', is now known to have key roles in regulating gene function and orchestrate how and when coding genes are expressed. This largest subset of non-coding RNAs called long non-coding RNAs (LNCRNAs) drives epigenetic changes and has functional relevance best characterized in cancers and cardiovascular disease. This understanding, coupled with the availability and affordability of RNA sequencing, has shifted our therapeutic strategies towards genomic therapy in DKD. The role of LNCRNAs with respect to DKD is only just emerging. In this review we summarize the role of LNCRNAs in DKD and the existing antisense oligonucleotide therapy that may provide precise and targeted medicine to treat DKD in this postgenomic era. PMID:27503944

  20. Characters, functions and clinical perspectives of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Wu, Ruifang; Su, Yuwen; Wu, Haijing; Dai, Yong; Zhao, Ming; Lu, Qianjin

    2016-06-01

    It is well established that most of the human genome and those of other mammals and plants are transcribed into RNA without protein-coding capacity, which we define as non-coding RNA. From siRNA to microRNA, whose functions and features have been well characterized, non-coding RNAs have been a popular topic in life science research over the last decade. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), however, as a novel class of transcripts, are distinguished from these other small RNAs. Recent studies have revealed a diverse population of lncRNAs with different sizes and functions across different species. These populations are expressed dynamically and act as important regulators in a variety of biological processes, especially in gene expression. Nevertheless, the functions and mechanisms of most lncRNAs remain unclear. In this review, we present recent progress in the identification of lncRNAs, their functions and molecular mechanisms, their roles in human diseases, their potential diagnostic and therapeutic applications as well as newer technologies for identifying deregulated lncRNAs in disease tissues. PMID:26885843

  1. A two-dimensional mutate-and-map strategy for non-coding RNA structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kladwang, Wipapat; Vanlang, Christopher C.; Cordero, Pablo; Das, Rhiju

    2011-12-01

    Non-coding RNAs fold into precise base-pairing patterns to carry out critical roles in genetic regulation and protein synthesis, but determining RNA structure remains difficult. Here, we show that coupling systematic mutagenesis with high-throughput chemical mapping enables accurate base-pair inference of domains from ribosomal RNA, ribozymes and riboswitches. For a six-RNA benchmark that has challenged previous chemical/computational methods, this ‘mutate-and-map’ strategy gives secondary structures that are in agreement with crystallography (helix error rates, 2%), including a blind test on a double-glycine riboswitch. Through modelling of partially ordered states, the method enables the first test of an interdomain helix-swap hypothesis for ligand-binding cooperativity in a glycine riboswitch. Finally, the data report on tertiary contacts within non-coding RNAs, and coupling to the Rosetta/FARFAR algorithm gives nucleotide-resolution three-dimensional models (helix root-mean-squared deviation, 5.7 Å) of an adenine riboswitch. These results establish a promising two-dimensional chemical strategy for inferring the secondary and tertiary structures that underlie non-coding RNA behaviour.

  2. Non-coding RNAs: Functions and applications in endocrine-related cancer.

    PubMed

    Venkatesh, Thejaswini; Suresh, Padmanaban S; Tsutsumi, Rie

    2015-11-15

    A significant fraction of the human genome is transcribed as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). This non-coding transcriptome has challenged the notion of the central dogma and its involvement in transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression is well established. Interestingly, several ncRNAs are dysregulated in cancer and current non-coding transcriptome research aims to use our increasing knowledge of these ncRNAs for the development of cancer biomarkers and anti-cancer drugs. In endocrine-related cancers, for which survival rates can be relatively low, there is a need for such advancements. In this review, we aimed to summarize the roles and clinical implications of recently discovered ncRNAs, including long ncRNAs, PIWI-interacting RNAs, tRNA- and Y RNA-derived ncRNAs, and small nucleolar RNAs, in endocrine-related cancers affecting both sexes. We focus on recent studies highlighting discoveries in ncRNA biology and expression in cancer, and conclude with a discussion on the challenges and future directions, including clinical application. ncRNAs show great promise as diagnostic tools and therapeutic targets, but further work is necessary to realize the potential of these unconventional transcripts. PMID:26360585

  3. NCAD, a database integrating the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-coded amino acids

    PubMed Central

    Revilla-López, Guillem; Torras, Juan; Curcó, David; Casanovas, Jordi; Calaza, M. Isabel; Zanuy, David; Jiménez, Ana I.; Cativiela, Carlos; Nussinov, Ruth; Grodzinski, Piotr; Alemán, Carlos

    2010-01-01

    Peptides and proteins find an ever-increasing number of applications in the biomedical and materials engineering fields. The use of non-proteinogenic amino acids endowed with diverse physicochemical and structural features opens the possibility to design proteins and peptides with novel properties and functions. Moreover, non-proteinogenic residues are particularly useful to control the three-dimensional arrangement of peptidic chains, which is a crucial issue for most applications. However, information regarding such amino acids –also called non-coded, non-canonical or non-standard– is usually scattered among publications specialized in quite diverse fields as well as in patents. Making all these data useful to the scientific community requires new tools and a framework for their assembly and coherent organization. We have successfully compiled, organized and built a database (NCAD, Non-Coded Amino acids Database) containing information about the intrinsic conformational preferences of non-proteinogenic residues determined by quantum mechanical calculations, as well as bibliographic information about their synthesis, physical and spectroscopic characterization, conformational propensities established experimentally, and applications. The architecture of the database is presented in this work together with the first family of non-coded residues included, namely, α-tetrasubstituted α-amino acids. Furthermore, the NCAD usefulness is demonstrated through a test-case application example. PMID:20455555

  4. Prospective and therapeutic screening value of non-coding RNA as biomarkers in cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Busch, Albert; Eken, Suzanne M; Maegdefessel, Lars

    2016-06-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) is a class of genetic, epigenetic and translational regulators, containing short and long transcripts with intriguing abilities for use as biomarkers due to their superordinate role in disease development. In the past five years many of these have been investigated in cardiovascular diseases (CVD), mainly myocardial infarction (MI) and heart failure. To extend this view, we summarize the existing data about ncRNA as biomarker in the whole entity of CVDs by literature-based review and comparison of the identified candidates. The myomirs miRNA-1, -133a/b, -208a, -499 with well-defined cellular functions have proven equal to classic protein biomarkers for disease detection in MI. Other microRNAs (miRNAs) were reproducibly found to correlate with disease, disease severity and outcome in heart failure, stroke, coronary artery disease (CAD) and aortic aneurysm. An additional utilization has been discovered for therapeutic monitoring. The function of long non-coding transcripts is only about to be unraveled, yet shows great potential for outcome prediction. ncRNA biomarkers have a distinct role if no alternative test is available or has is performing poorly. With increasing mechanistic understanding, circulating miRNA and long non-coding transcripts will provide useful disease information with high predictive power. PMID:27429962

  5. Synthetic long non-coding RNAs [SINEUPs] rescue defective gene expression in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Indrieri, Alessia; Grimaldi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Silvia; Tammaro, Roberta; Gustincich, Stefano; Franco, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs provide additional regulatory layers to gene expression as well as the potential to being exploited as therapeutic tools. Non-coding RNA-based therapeutic approaches have been attempted in dominant diseases, however their use for treatment of genetic diseases caused by insufficient gene dosage is currently more challenging. SINEUPs are long antisense non-coding RNAs that up-regulate translation in mammalian cells in a gene-specific manner, although, so far evidence of SINEUP efficacy has only been demonstrated in in vitro systems. We now show that synthetic SINEUPs effectively and specifically increase protein levels of a gene of interest in vivo. We demonstrated that SINEUPs rescue haploinsufficient gene dosage in a medakafish model of a human disorder leading to amelioration of the disease phenotype. Our results demonstrate that SINEUPs act through mechanisms conserved among vertebrates and that SINEUP technology can be successfully applied in vivo as a new research and therapeutic tool for gene-specific up-regulation of endogenous functional proteins. PMID:27265476

  6. Synthetic long non-coding RNAs [SINEUPs] rescue defective gene expression in vivo.

    PubMed

    Indrieri, Alessia; Grimaldi, Claudia; Zucchelli, Silvia; Tammaro, Roberta; Gustincich, Stefano; Franco, Brunella

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs provide additional regulatory layers to gene expression as well as the potential to being exploited as therapeutic tools. Non-coding RNA-based therapeutic approaches have been attempted in dominant diseases, however their use for treatment of genetic diseases caused by insufficient gene dosage is currently more challenging. SINEUPs are long antisense non-coding RNAs that up-regulate translation in mammalian cells in a gene-specific manner, although, so far evidence of SINEUP efficacy has only been demonstrated in in vitro systems. We now show that synthetic SINEUPs effectively and specifically increase protein levels of a gene of interest in vivo. We demonstrated that SINEUPs rescue haploinsufficient gene dosage in a medakafish model of a human disorder leading to amelioration of the disease phenotype. Our results demonstrate that SINEUPs act through mechanisms conserved among vertebrates and that SINEUP technology can be successfully applied in vivo as a new research and therapeutic tool for gene-specific up-regulation of endogenous functional proteins. PMID:27265476

  7. Non-coding RNAs as Emerging Regulators of Neural Injury Responses and Regeneration.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Songlin; Ding, Fei; Gu, Xiaosong

    2016-06-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a large cluster of RNAs that do not encode proteins, but have multiple functions in diverse cellular processes. Mounting evidence indicates the involvement of ncRNAs in the physiology and pathophysiology of the central and peripheral nervous systems. It has been shown that numerous ncRNAs, especially microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, are differentially expressed after insults such as acquired brain injury, spinal cord injury, and peripheral nerve injury. These ncRNAs affect neuronal survival, neurite regrowth, and glial phenotype primarily by targeting specific mRNAs, resulting in translation repression or degradation of the mRNAs. An increasing number of studies have investigated the regulatory roles of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs in neural injury and regeneration, and thus a new research field is emerging. In this review, we highlight current progress in the field in an attempt to provide further insight into post-transcriptional changes occurring after neural injury, and to facilitate the potential use of ncRNAs for improving neural regeneration. We also suggest potential directions for future studies. PMID:27037691

  8. Current Status of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Human Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Cerk, Stefanie; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Adiprasito, Jan Basri; Stotz, Michael; Hutterer, Georg C; Gerger, Armin; Ling, Hui; Calin, George Adrian; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer represents a major health burden in Europe and North America, as recently published data report breast cancer as the second leading cause of cancer related death in women worldwide. Breast cancer is regarded as a highly heterogeneous disease in terms of clinical course and biological behavior and can be divided into several molecular subtypes, with different prognosis and treatment responses. The discovery of numerous non-coding RNAs has dramatically changed our understanding of cell biology, especially the pathophysiology of cancer. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts >200 nucleotides in length. Several studies have demonstrated their role as key regulators of gene expression, cell biology and carcinogenesis. Deregulated expression levels of lncRNAs have been observed in various types of cancers including breast cancer. lncRNAs are involved in cancer initiation, progression, and metastases. In this review, we summarize the recent literature to highlight the current status of this class of long non-coding lncRNAs in breast cancer. PMID:27608009

  9. Deciphering the function of non-coding RNAs in prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Ramalho-Carvalho, João; Fromm, Bastian; Henrique, Rui; Jerónimo, Carmen

    2016-06-01

    The advent of next-generation sequencing methods is fuelling the discovery of multiple non-coding RNA transcripts with direct implication in cell biology and homeostasis. This new layer of biological regulation seems to be of particular importance in human pathogenesis, including cancer. The aberrant expression of ncRNAs is a feature of prostate cancer, as they promote tumor-suppressive or oncogenic activities, controlling multicellular events leading to carcinogenesis and tumor progression. From the small RNAs involved in the RNAi pathway to the long non-coding RNAs controlling chromatin remodeling, alternative splicing, and DNA repair, the non-coding transcriptome represents the significant majority of transcriptional output. As such, ncRNAs appear as exciting new diagnostic, prognostic, and therapeutic tools. However, additional work is required to characterize the RNA species, their functions, and their applicability to clinical practice in oncology. In this review, we summarize the most important features of ncRNA biology, emphasizing its relevance in prostate carcinogenesis and its potential for clinical applications. PMID:27221068

  10. Functional annotation of the vlinc class of non-coding RNAs using systems biology approach.

    PubMed

    Laurent, Georges St; Vyatkin, Yuri; Antonets, Denis; Ri, Maxim; Qi, Yao; Saik, Olga; Shtokalo, Dmitry; de Hoon, Michiel J L; Kawaji, Hideya; Itoh, Masayoshi; Lassmann, Timo; Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R R; Nicolas, Estelle; McCaffrey, Timothy A; Carninci, Piero; Hayashizaki, Yoshihide; Wahlestedt, Claes; Kapranov, Philipp

    2016-04-20

    Functionality of the non-coding transcripts encoded by the human genome is the coveted goal of the modern genomics research. While commonly relied on the classical methods of forward genetics, integration of different genomics datasets in a global Systems Biology fashion presents a more productive avenue of achieving this very complex aim. Here we report application of a Systems Biology-based approach to dissect functionality of a newly identified vast class of very long intergenic non-coding (vlinc) RNAs. Using highly quantitative FANTOM5 CAGE dataset, we show that these RNAs could be grouped into 1542 novel human genes based on analysis of insulators that we show here indeed function as genomic barrier elements. We show that vlincRNAs genes likely function incisto activate nearby genes. This effect while most pronounced in closely spaced vlincRNA-gene pairs can be detected over relatively large genomic distances. Furthermore, we identified 101 vlincRNA genes likely involved in early embryogenesis based on patterns of their expression and regulation. We also found another 109 such genes potentially involved in cellular functions also happening at early stages of development such as proliferation, migration and apoptosis. Overall, we show that Systems Biology-based methods have great promise for functional annotation of non-coding RNAs. PMID:27001520

  11. Photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid in an engineered cyanobacterium

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The world faces the challenge to develop sustainable technologies to replace thousands of products that have been generated from fossil fuels. Microbial cell factories serve as promising alternatives for the production of diverse commodity chemicals and biofuels from renewable resources. For example, polylactic acid (PLA) with its biodegradable properties is a sustainable, environmentally friendly alternative to polyethylene. At present, PLA microbial production is mainly dependent on food crops such as corn and sugarcane. Moreover, optically pure isomers of lactic acid are required for the production of PLA, where D-lactic acid controls the thermochemical and physical properties of PLA. Henceforth, production of D-lactic acid through a more sustainable source (CO2) is desirable. Results We have performed metabolic engineering on Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 for the phototrophic synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid from CO2. Synthesis of optically pure D-lactic acid was achieved by utilizing a recently discovered enzyme (i.e., a mutated glycerol dehydrogenase, GlyDH*). Significant improvements in D-lactic acid synthesis were achieved through codon optimization and by balancing the cofactor (NADH) availability through the heterologous expression of a soluble transhydrogenase. We have also discovered that addition of acetate to the cultures improved lactic acid production. More interestingly, 13C-pathway analysis revealed that acetate was not used for the synthesis of lactic acid, but was mainly used for synthesis of certain biomass building blocks (such as leucine and glutamate). Finally, the optimal strain was able to accumulate 1.14 g/L (photoautotrophic condition) and 2.17 g/L (phototrophic condition with acetate) of D-lactate in 24 days. Conclusions We have demonstrated the photoautotrophic production of D-lactic acid by engineering a cyanobacterium Synechocystis 6803. The engineered strain shows an excellent D-lactic acid productivity from CO2. In

  12. NONCODEv4: exploring the world of long non-coding RNA genes

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Chaoyong; Yuan, Jiao; Li, Hui; Li, Ming; Zhao, Guoguang; Bu, Dechao; Zhu, Weimin; Wu, Wei; Chen, Runsheng; Zhao, Yi

    2014-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an integrated knowledge database dedicated to non-coding RNAs (excluding tRNAs and rRNAs). Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have been implied in diseases and identified to play important roles in various biological processes. Since NONCODE version 3.0 was released 2 years ago, discovery of novel ncRNAs has been promoted by high-throughput RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). In this update of NONCODE, we expand the ncRNA data set by collection of newly identified ncRNAs from literature published in the last 2 years and integration of the latest version of RefSeq and Ensembl. Particularly, the number of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) has increased sharply from 73 327 to 210 831. Owing to similar alternative splicing pattern to mRNAs, the concept of lncRNA genes was put forward to help systematic understanding of lncRNAs. The 56 018 and 46 475 lncRNA genes were generated from 95 135 and 67 628 lncRNAs for human and mouse, respectively. Additionally, we present expression profile of lncRNA genes by graphs based on public RNA-seq data for human and mouse, as well as predict functions of these lncRNA genes. The improvements brought to the database also include an incorporation of an ID conversion tool from RefSeq or Ensembl ID to NONCODE ID and a service of lncRNA identification. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:24285305

  13. Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs: Novel Drivers of Human Lymphocyte Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Panzeri, Ilaria; Rossetti, Grazisa; Abrignani, Sergio; Pagani, Massimiliano

    2015-01-01

    Upon recognition of a foreign antigen, CD4+ naïve T lymphocytes proliferate and differentiate into subsets with distinct functions. This process is fundamental for the effective immune system function, as CD4+ T cells orchestrate both the innate and adaptive immune response. Traditionally, this differentiation event has been regarded as the acquisition of an irreversible cell fate so that memory and effector CD4+ T subsets were considered terminally differentiated cells or lineages. Consequently, these lineages are conventionally defined thanks to their prototypical set of cytokines and transcription factors. However, recent findings suggest that CD4+ T lymphocytes possess a remarkable phenotypic plasticity, as they can often re-direct their functional program depending on the milieu they encounter. Therefore, new questions are now compelling such as which are the molecular determinants underlying plasticity and stability and how the balance between these two opposite forces drives the cell fate. As already mentioned, in some cases, the mere expression of cytokines and master regulators could not fully explain lymphocytes plasticity. We should consider other layers of regulation, including epigenetic factors such as the modulation of chromatin state or the transcription of non-coding RNAs, whose high cell-specificity give a hint on their involvement in cell fate determination. In this review, we will focus on the recent advances in understanding CD4+ T lymphocytes subsets specification from an epigenetic point of view. In particular, we will emphasize the emerging importance of non-coding RNAs as key players in these differentiation events. We will also present here new data from our laboratory highlighting the contribution of long non-coding RNAs in driving human CD4+ T lymphocytes differentiation. PMID:25926836

  14. Mechanistic and Kinetic Differences between Reverse Transcriptases of Vpx Coding and Non-coding Lentiviruses*

    PubMed Central

    Lenzi, Gina M.; Domaoal, Robert A.; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F.; Kim, Baek

    2015-01-01

    Among lentiviruses, HIV Type 2 (HIV-2) and many simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains replicate rapidly in non-dividing macrophages, whereas HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) replication in this cell type is kinetically delayed. The efficient replication capability of HIV-2/SIV in non-dividing cells is induced by a unique, virally encoded accessory protein, Vpx, which proteasomally degrades the host antiviral restriction factor, SAM domain- and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). SAMHD1 is a dNTPase and kinetically suppresses the reverse transcription step of HIV-1 in macrophages by hydrolyzing and depleting cellular dNTPs. In contrast, Vpx, which is encoded by HIV-2/SIV, kinetically accelerates reverse transcription by counteracting SAMHD1 and then elevating cellular dNTP concentration in non-dividing cells. Here, we conducted the pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from two Vpx non-coding and two Vpx coding lentiviruses. At all three sites of the template tested, the two RTs of the Vpx non-coding viruses (HIV-1) displayed higher kpol values than the RTs of the Vpx coding HIV-2/SIV, whereas there was no significant difference in the Kd values of these two groups of RTs. When we employed viral RNA templates that induce RT pausing by their secondary structures, the HIV-1 RTs showed more efficient DNA synthesis through pause sites than the HIV-2/SIV RTs, particularly at low dNTP concentrations found in macrophages. This kinetic study suggests that RTs of the Vpx non-coding HIV-1 may have evolved to execute a faster kpol step, which includes the conformational changes and incorporation chemistry, to counteract the limited dNTP concentration found in non-dividing cells and still promote efficient viral reverse transcription. PMID:26483545

  15. Mechanistic and Kinetic Differences between Reverse Transcriptases of Vpx Coding and Non-coding Lentiviruses.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, Gina M; Domaoal, Robert A; Kim, Dong-Hyun; Schinazi, Raymond F; Kim, Baek

    2015-12-11

    Among lentiviruses, HIV Type 2 (HIV-2) and many simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) strains replicate rapidly in non-dividing macrophages, whereas HIV Type 1 (HIV-1) replication in this cell type is kinetically delayed. The efficient replication capability of HIV-2/SIV in non-dividing cells is induced by a unique, virally encoded accessory protein, Vpx, which proteasomally degrades the host antiviral restriction factor, SAM domain- and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). SAMHD1 is a dNTPase and kinetically suppresses the reverse transcription step of HIV-1 in macrophages by hydrolyzing and depleting cellular dNTPs. In contrast, Vpx, which is encoded by HIV-2/SIV, kinetically accelerates reverse transcription by counteracting SAMHD1 and then elevating cellular dNTP concentration in non-dividing cells. Here, we conducted the pre-steady-state kinetic analysis of reverse transcriptases (RTs) from two Vpx non-coding and two Vpx coding lentiviruses. At all three sites of the template tested, the two RTs of the Vpx non-coding viruses (HIV-1) displayed higher kpol values than the RTs of the Vpx coding HIV-2/SIV, whereas there was no significant difference in the Kd values of these two groups of RTs. When we employed viral RNA templates that induce RT pausing by their secondary structures, the HIV-1 RTs showed more efficient DNA synthesis through pause sites than the HIV-2/SIV RTs, particularly at low dNTP concentrations found in macrophages. This kinetic study suggests that RTs of the Vpx non-coding HIV-1 may have evolved to execute a faster kpol step, which includes the conformational changes and incorporation chemistry, to counteract the limited dNTP concentration found in non-dividing cells and still promote efficient viral reverse transcription. PMID:26483545

  16. Myelin basic protein synthesis is regulated by small non-coding RNA 715.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nina M; Moos, Christina; van Horssen, Jack; Witte, Maarten; van der Valk, Paul; Altenhein, Benjamin; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2012-09-01

    Oligodendroglial Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) synthesis is essential for myelin formation in the central nervous system. During oligodendrocyte differentiation, MBP mRNA is kept in a translationally silenced state while intracellularly transported, until neuron-derived signals initiate localized MBP translation. Here we identify the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as an inhibitor of MBP translation. SncRNA715 localizes to cytoplasmic granular structures and associates with MBP mRNA transport granule components. We also detect increased levels of sncRNA715 in demyelinated chronic human multiple sclerosis lesions, which contain MBP mRNA but lack MBP protein. PMID:22744314

  17. RNA in unexpected places: long non-coding RNA functions in diverse cellular contexts

    PubMed Central

    Geisler, Sarah; Coller, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    The increased application of transcriptome-wide profiling approaches has led to an explosion in the number of documented long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). While these new and enigmatic players in the complex transcriptional milieu are encoded by a significant proportion of the genome, their functions are mostly unknown. Early discoveries support a paradigm in which lncRNAs regulate transcription via chromatin modulation, but new functions are steadily emerging. Given the biochemical versatility of RNA, lncRNAs may be used for various tasks, including post-transcriptional regulation, organization of protein complexes, cell-cell signalling and allosteric regulation of proteins. PMID:24105322

  18. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs) . Volume 2; Appendices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This document contains the appendices to the main report.

  19. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements

    PubMed Central

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K.

    2015-01-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  20. TFIIS-Dependent Non-coding Transcription Regulates Developmental Genome Rearrangements.

    PubMed

    Maliszewska-Olejniczak, Kamila; Gruchota, Julita; Gromadka, Robert; Denby Wilkes, Cyril; Arnaiz, Olivier; Mathy, Nathalie; Duharcourt, Sandra; Bétermier, Mireille; Nowak, Jacek K

    2015-07-01

    Because of their nuclear dimorphism, ciliates provide a unique opportunity to study the role of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in the communication between germline and somatic lineages. In these unicellular eukaryotes, a new somatic nucleus develops at each sexual cycle from a copy of the zygotic (germline) nucleus, while the old somatic nucleus degenerates. In the ciliate Paramecium tetraurelia, the genome is massively rearranged during this process through the reproducible elimination of repeated sequences and the precise excision of over 45,000 short, single-copy Internal Eliminated Sequences (IESs). Different types of ncRNAs resulting from genome-wide transcription were shown to be involved in the epigenetic regulation of genome rearrangements. To understand how ncRNAs are produced from the entire genome, we have focused on a homolog of the TFIIS elongation factor, which regulates RNA polymerase II transcriptional pausing. Six TFIIS-paralogs, representing four distinct families, can be found in P. tetraurelia genome. Using RNA interference, we showed that TFIIS4, which encodes a development-specific TFIIS protein, is essential for the formation of a functional somatic genome. Molecular analyses and high-throughput DNA sequencing upon TFIIS4 RNAi demonstrated that TFIIS4 is involved in all kinds of genome rearrangements, including excision of ~48% of IESs. Localization of a GFP-TFIIS4 fusion revealed that TFIIS4 appears specifically in the new somatic nucleus at an early developmental stage, before IES excision. RT-PCR experiments showed that TFIIS4 is necessary for the synthesis of IES-containing non-coding transcripts. We propose that these IES+ transcripts originate from the developing somatic nucleus and serve as pairing substrates for germline-specific short RNAs that target elimination of their homologous sequences. Our study, therefore, connects the onset of zygotic non coding transcription to the control of genome plasticity in Paramecium, and establishes for

  1. Roles, Functions, and Mechanisms of Long Non-coding RNAs in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Yiwen; Fullwood, Melissa J.

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play important roles in cancer. They are involved in chromatin remodeling, as well as transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation, through a variety of chromatin-based mechanisms and via cross-talk with other RNA species. lncRNAs can function as decoys, scaffolds, and enhancer RNAs. This review summarizes the characteristics of lncRNAs, including their roles, functions, and working mechanisms, describes methods for identifying and annotating lncRNAs, and discusses future opportunities for lncRNA-based therapies using antisense oligonucleotides. PMID:26883671

  2. Non-coding functions of alternative pre-mRNA splicing in development

    PubMed Central

    Mockenhaupt, Stefan; Makeyev, Eugene V.

    2015-01-01

    A majority of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) in the higher eukaryotes undergo alternative splicing to generate more than one mature product. By targeting the open reading frame region this process increases diversity of protein isoforms beyond the nominal coding capacity of the genome. However, alternative splicing also frequently controls output levels and spatiotemporal features of cellular and organismal gene expression programs. Here we discuss how these non-coding functions of alternative splicing contribute to development through regulation of mRNA stability, translational efficiency and cellular localization. PMID:26493705

  3. Multisubunit RNA Polymerases IV and V: Purveyors of Non-Coding RNA for Plant Gene Silencing

    SciTech Connect

    Haag, Jeremy R.; Pikaard, Craig S.

    2011-08-01

    In all eukaryotes, nuclear DNA-dependent RNA polymerases I, II and III synthesize the myriad RNAs that are essential for life. Remarkably, plants have evolved two additional multisubunit RNA polymerases, RNA polymerases IV and V, which orchestrate non-coding RNA-mediated gene silencing processes affecting development, transposon taming, antiviral defence and allelic crosstalk. Biochemical details concerning the templates and products of RNA polymerases IV and V are lacking. However, their subunit compositions reveal that they evolved as specialized forms of RNA polymerase II, which provides the unique opportunity to study the functional diversification of a eukaryotic RNA polymerase family.

  4. Myelin Basic Protein synthesis is regulated by small non-coding RNA 715

    PubMed Central

    Bauer, Nina M; Moos, Christina; van Horssen, Jack; Witte, Maarten; van der Valk, Paul; Altenhein, Benjamin; Luhmann, Heiko J; White, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Oligodendroglial Myelin Basic Protein (MBP) synthesis is essential for myelin formation in the central nervous system. During oligodendrocyte differentiation, MBP mRNA is kept in a translationally silenced state while intracellularly transported, until neuron-derived signals initiate localized MBP translation. Here we identify the small non-coding RNA 715 (sncRNA715) as an inhibitor of MBP translation. SncRNA715 localizes to cytoplasmic granular structures and associates with MBP mRNA transport granule components. We also detect increased levels of sncRNA715 in demyelinated chronic human multiple sclerosis lesions, which contain MBP mRNA but lack MBP protein. PMID:22744314

  5. Emerging roles of non-coding RNAs in brain evolution, development, plasticity and disease

    PubMed Central

    Qureshi, Irfan A.; Mehler, Mark F.

    2012-01-01

    Novel classes of small and long non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are being characterized at a rapid pace, driven by recent paradigm shifts in our understanding of genomic architecture, regulation and transcriptional output, as well as by innovations in sequencing technologies and computational and systems biology. These ncRNAs can interact with DNA, RNA and protein molecules; engage in diverse structural, functional and regulatory activities; and have roles in nuclear organization and transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic processes. This expanding inventory of ncRNAs is implicated in mediating a broad spectrum of processes including brain evolution, development, synaptic plasticity and disease pathogenesis. PMID:22814587

  6. The Beginning of the Road for Non-Coding RNAs in Normal Hematopoiesis and Hematologic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Heuston, Elisabeth F.; Lemon, Kenya T.; Arceci, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    The field of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) encompasses a wide array of RNA classes that are indispensible for the regulation of cellular activities. However, de-regulation of these ncRNAs can also play key roles in malignant transformation and cancer cell behavior. In this article we survey a select group of microRNAs and long ncRNAs that appear to contribute in keys ways to the development of acute and chronic leukemias, as well as contribute to their diagnosis, prognosis, and potentially, their treatment. PMID:22303388

  7. Stochastic bursts in the kinetics of gene expression with regulation by long non-coding RNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, V. P.

    2010-09-01

    One of the main recent breakthroughs in cellular biology is a discovery of numerous non-coding RNAs (ncR-NAs). We outline abilities of long ncRNAs and articulate that the corresponding kinetics may frequently exhibit stochastic bursts. For example, we scrutinize one of the generic cases when the gene transcription is regulated by competitive attachment of ncRNA and protein to a regulatory site. Our Monte Carlo simulations show that in this case one can observe huge long transcriptional bursts consisting of short bursts.

  8. Non-coding RNAs as the bridge between epigenetic mechanisms, lineages and domains of life

    PubMed Central

    Sela, Mor; Kloog, Yoel; Rechavi, Oded

    2014-01-01

    Many cases of heritable environmental responses have been documented but the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Recently, inherited RNA interference has been shown to act as a multigenerational genome surveillance apparatus. We suggest that inheritance of regulatory RNAs is at the root of many other epigenetic phenomena, the trigger that induces other epigenetic mechanisms, such as the depositing of histone modifications and DNA methylation. In addition, we explore the possibility that interacting organisms influence each other's transcriptomes by exchanging heterologous non-coding RNAs. PMID:24882818

  9. Functional diversity of long non-coding RNAs in immune regulation

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Hua; Tan, Xiao-Di

    2016-01-01

    Precise and dynamic regulation of gene expression is a key feature of immunity. In recent years, rapid advances in transcriptome profiling analysis have led to recognize long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as an additional layer of gene regulation context. In the immune system, lncRNAs are found to be widely expressed in immune cells including monocytes, macrophages, dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, T cells and B cells during their development, differentiation and activation. However, the functional importance of immune-related lncRNAs is just emerging to be characterized. In this review, we discuss the up-to-date knowledge of lncRNAs in immune regulation.

  10. Epigenetic modifications and long non-coding RNAs influence pancreas development and function

    PubMed Central

    Arnes, Luis; Sussel, Lori

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing β-cells within the pancreatic islet of Langerhans are responsible for maintaining glucose homeostasis; the loss or malfunction of β-cells results in diabetes mellitus. Recent advances in cell purification strategies and sequencing technologies as well as novel molecular tools have revealed that epigenetic modifications and long non-coding RNAs represent an integral part of the transcriptional mechanisms regulating pancreas development and β-cell function. Importantly, these findings have uncovered a new layer of gene regulation in the pancreas that can be exploited to enhance the restoration and/or repair of β-cells to treat diabetes. PMID:25812926

  11. An altered Q sub B polypeptide as the basis for atrazine resistance in photoautotrophic potato cells

    SciTech Connect

    Smeda, R.J.; Hasegawa, P.M.; Weller, S.C. )

    1990-05-01

    A photoautotrophic potato cell line (variant) was isolated and is capable of sustained growth in media containing the herbicide atrazine at concentrations up to 100-fold greater than the lethal concentration (1.0 {mu}M) for the unselected (wild type) cell line. The basis for atrazine resistance could not be identified by differential uptake or metabolism. Photosynthetic electron transport rates for both intact cell and isolated thylakoid membranes from chloroplasts were unaffected in variant cells at atrazine concentrations up to 100-fold greater than for wild type cells. Photoaffinity labeling of isolated thylakoid membranes from both cell lines with {sup 14}C-azidoatrazine revealed an altered Q{sub B} polypeptide in variant cells resulting in low or no affinity for atrazine. A portion of the chloroplast psbA gene, encoding the Q{sub B} polypeptide, was sequenced for both cell lines. The basis for atrazine resistance in variant cells was identified as a single base change resulting in the alteration of serine to threonine at position 264 of the Q{sub B} polypeptide. In addition to atrazine resistance, variant cells exhibit enhanced tolerance to the herbicides DCMU and metribuzin, but greater sensitivity to bentazon. No reductions in variant cell growth and photosynthetic efficiency in the absence of atrazine were observed.

  12. Direct membrane-carbonation photobioreactor producing photoautotrophic biomass via carbon dioxide transfer and nutrient removal.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Woo; Cheng, Jing; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2016-03-01

    An advanced-material photobioreactor, the direct membrane-carbonation photobioreactor (DMCPBR), was tested to investigate the impact of directly submerging a membrane carbonation (MC) module of hollow-fiber membranes inside the photobioreactor. Results demonstrate that the DMCPBR utilized over 90% of the supplied CO2 by matching the CO2 flux to the C demand of photoautotrophic biomass growth. The surface area of the submerged MC module was the key to control CO2 delivery and biomass productivity. Tracking the fate of supplied CO2 explained how the DMCPBR reduced loss of gaseous CO2 while matching the inorganic carbon (IC) demand to its supply. Accurate fate analysis required that the biomass-associated C include soluble microbial products as a sink for captured CO2. With the CO2 supply matched to the photosynthetic demand, light attenuation limited the rate microalgal photosynthesis. The DMCPBR presents an opportunity to improve CO2-deliver efficiency and make microalgae a more effective strategy for C-neutral resource recovery. PMID:26771923

  13. High-Level Accumulation of Triacylglycerol and Starch in Photoautotrophically Grown Chlamydomonas debaryana NIES-2212.

    PubMed

    Toyoshima, Masakazu; Sato, Naoki

    2015-12-01

    Microalgae have the potential to produce triacylglycerol (TAG) and starch, which provide alternative sources of biofuel. A problem in using Chlamydomonas reinhardtii as a model for TAG production has been that this alga lacks phosphatidylcholine (PC), which is thought to be important for TAG synthesis in plants. We found that C. debaryana is one of the rare species of Chlamydomonas having PC. Here we show that this strain, grown under complete photoautotrophic conditions, accumulated TAG and starch up to 20 and 250 pg per cell, respectively, during the stationary phase without nutrient deprivation. Addition of nutrients in this state did not cause loss of TAG, which was found in dilution with fresh medium. The photosynthetically produced TAG contained a high level of monounsaturated fatty acids, which is a preferred property as a material for biodiesel. The oil bodies were present in the cytoplasm, either between the cytoplasmic membrane and the chloroplast or between the chloroplast and the nucleus, whereas the starch granules were present within the chloroplast. Oil bodies were also deposited as a broad layer in the peripheral space of the cytoplasm outside the chloroplast, and might be easily released from the cells by genetic, chemical or mechanical manipulation. These results suggest that C. debaryana is a promising seed organism for developing a good biofuel producer. PMID:26542110

  14. Role of long non-coding RNAs in the determination of β-cell identity.

    PubMed

    Motterle, A; Sanchez-Parra, C; Regazzi, R

    2016-09-01

    Pancreatic β-cells are highly specialized cells committed to secrete insulin in response to changes in the level of nutrients, hormones and neurotransmitters. Chronic exposure to elevated concentrations of glucose, fatty acids or inflammatory mediators can result in modifications in β-cell gene expression that alter their functional properties. This can lead to the release of insufficient amount of insulin to cover the organism's needs, and thus to the development of diabetes mellitus. Although most of the studies carried out in the last decades to elucidate the causes of β-cell dysfunction under disease conditions have focused on protein-coding genes, we now know that insulin-secreting cells also contain thousands of molecules of RNA that do not encode polypeptides but play key roles in the acquisition and maintenance of a highly differentiated state. In this review, we will highlight the involvement of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a particular class of non-coding transcripts, in the differentiation of β-cells and in the regulation of their specialized tasks. We will also discuss the crosstalk between the activities of lncRNAs and microRNAs and present the emerging evidence of a potential contribution of particular lncRNAs to the development of both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27615130

  15. Estradiol-Induced Transcriptional Regulation of Long Non-Coding RNA, HOTAIR.

    PubMed

    Bhan, Arunoday; Mandal, Subhrangsu S

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR (HOX antisense intergenic RNA) is a 2.2 kb long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), transcribed from the antisense strand of homeobox C (HOXC) gene locus in chromosome 12. HOTAIR acts as a scaffolding lncRNA. It interacts and guides various chromatin-modifying complexes such as PRC2 (polycomb-repressive complex 2) and LSD1 (lysine-specific demethylase 1) to the target gene promoters leading to their gene silencing. Various studies have demonstrated that HOTAIR overexpression is associated with breast cancer. Recent studies from our laboratory demonstrate that HOTAIR is required for viability of breast cancer cells and is transcriptionally regulated by estradiol (E2) in vitro and in vivo. This chapter describes protocols for analysis of the HOTAIR promoter, cloning, transfection and dual luciferase assays, knockdown of protein synthesis by antisense oligonucleotides, and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assay. These protocols are useful for studying the estrogen-mediated transcriptional regulation of lncRNA HOTAIR, as well as other protein coding genes and non-coding RNAs. PMID:26585152

  16. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Hui; Vincent, Kimberly; Pichler, Martin; Fodde, Riccardo; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Slack, Frank J.; Calin, George A

    2015-01-01

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted much attention due to their large number and biological significance. Many lncRNAs have been identified as mapping to regulatory elements including gene promoters and enhancers, ultraconserved regions, and intergenic regions of protein-coding genes. Yet, the biological function and molecular mechanisms of lncRNA in human diseases in general and cancer in particular remain largely unknown. Data from the literature suggest that lncRNA, often via interaction with proteins, functions in specific genomic loci or use their own transcription loci for regulatory activity. In this review, we summarize recent findings supporting the importance of DNA loci in lncRNA function, and the underlying molecular mechanisms via cis or trans regulation, and discuss their implications in cancer. In addition, we use the 8q24 genomic locus, a region containing interactive SNPs, DNA regulatory elements and lncRNAs, as an example to illustrate how single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within lncRNAs may be functionally associated with the individual’s susceptibility to cancer. PMID:25619839

  17. Functional non-coding RNAs derived from the flavivirus 3' untranslated region.

    PubMed

    Clarke, B D; Roby, J A; Slonchak, A; Khromykh, A A

    2015-08-01

    Flaviviruses are single-stranded positive sense RNA enveloped viruses. The flavivirus genus includes important human pathogens such as dengue virus (DENV), West Nile virus (WNV), yellow fever virus (YFV), Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), tick-borne encephalitis virus (TBEV), and Murray Valley encephalitis virus (MVEV). In addition to the viral proteins and viral genomic RNA, flaviviruses produce at least two functional non-coding RNAs derived from the 3' untranslated region (3'UTR), the subgenomic flavivirus RNA (sfRNA) and a putative WNV miRNA (KUN-miR-1). In this review we summarize published data from studies with WNV, YFV, DENV, JEV, and MVEV on sfRNA production following incomplete degradation of the viral genomic RNA by the cellular 5'-3' exoribonuclease 1 (XRN1), RNA structural elements involved in stalling XRN1 to generate sfRNA, and functions of sfRNA in modulating cellular mRNA decay and RNAi pathways as well as in modulating anti-viral type I interferon response. In addition, we also summarize data on the mechanisms of biogenesis of 3'UTR-derived KUN-miR-1 and its function in WNV replication in mosquito host, along with recent findings on a discovery of a second potential flaviviral miRNA vsRNA5, derived from the 3'UTR of DENV. This review thus summarizes the known mechanisms of generation and the functions of flaviviral 3'UTR-derived non-coding RNAs. PMID:25660582

  18. An integrative approach to predicting the functional effects of non-coding and coding sequence variation

    PubMed Central

    Shihab, Hashem A.; Rogers, Mark F.; Gough, Julian; Mort, Matthew; Cooper, David N.; Day, Ian N. M.; Gaunt, Tom R.; Campbell, Colin

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: Technological advances have enabled the identification of an increasingly large spectrum of single nucleotide variants within the human genome, many of which may be associated with monogenic disease or complex traits. Here, we propose an integrative approach, named FATHMM-MKL, to predict the functional consequences of both coding and non-coding sequence variants. Our method utilizes various genomic annotations, which have recently become available, and learns to weight the significance of each component annotation source. Results: We show that our method outperforms current state-of-the-art algorithms, CADD and GWAVA, when predicting the functional consequences of non-coding variants. In addition, FATHMM-MKL is comparable to the best of these algorithms when predicting the impact of coding variants. The method includes a confidence measure to rank order predictions. Availability and implementation: The FATHMM-MKL webserver is available at: http://fathmm.biocompute.org.uk Contact: H.Shihab@bristol.ac.uk or Mark.Rogers@bristol.ac.uk or C.Campbell@bristol.ac.uk Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25583119

  19. Non-coding RNA and Antisense RNA. Nature's Trash or Treasure?

    PubMed Central

    Knowling, Stuart; Morris, Kevin V.

    2011-01-01

    Although control of cellular function has classically been considered the responsibility of proteins, research over the last decade has elucidated many roles for RNA in regulation of not only the proteins that control cellular functions but also for the cellular functions themselves. In parallel to this advancement in knowledge about the regulatory roles of RNA there has been an explosion of knowledge about the role that epigenetics plays in controlling not only long-term cellular fate but also the short-term regulatory control of genes. Of particular interest is the crossover between these two worlds, a world where RNA can act out its part and subsequently elicit chromatin modifications that alter cellular function. Two main categories of RNA are examined here, non-coding RNA and antisense RNA both of which perform vital functions in controlling numerous genes, proteins and RNA itself. As the activities of non-coding and antisense RNA in both normal and aberrant cellular function are elucidated, so does the number of possible targets for pharmacopeic intervention. PMID:21843589

  20. The Role of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soudyab, Mohammad; Iranpour, Mostafa; Ghafouri-Fard, Soudeh

    2016-07-01

    Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) genes are an important population of non-coding RNAs with defined key roles in normal development as well as tumorigenesis process. Evidences suggest that they can be classified as tumor suppressor genes or oncogenes according to their functions and expression pattern in tumoral tissues. They have been shown to regulate the plasticity of cancer stem cells. Their important roles in the regulation of cancer-related pathways in addition to deregulation of their expression in a number of cancers have suggested that they can be used as markers for cancer detection and prognosis, as well as targets for cancer treatment. Deregulation of a number of lncRNAs, such as HOTAIR, XIST, MALAT, and H19 has been detected in breast cancer samples and cell lines. In addition, the association between lncRNAs signature and breast cancer patients' survival has been assessed in various studies. Here, the expression patterns of lncRNAs in breast cancer, as well as their significance in prognosis and patient treatment are discussed. PMID:27362246

  1. Non-coding RNAs and heme oxygenase-1 in vaccinia virus infection

    SciTech Connect

    Meseda, Clement A.; Srinivasan, Kumar; Wise, Jasen; Catalano, Jennifer; Yamada, Kenneth M.; Dhawan, Subhash

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) induction inhibited vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. • Reduced infectivity inversely correlated with increased expression of non-coding RNAs. • The regulation of HO-1 and ncRNAs suggests a novel host defense response against vaccinia virus infection. - Abstract: Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are <200 nucleotide non-coding uridylate-rich RNAs. Although the functions of many snRNAs remain undetermined, a population of snRNAs is produced during the early phase of infection of cells by vaccinia virus. In the present study, we demonstrate a direct correlation between expression of the cytoprotective enzyme heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), suppression of selective snRNA expression, and inhibition of vaccinia virus infection of macrophages. Hemin induced HO-1 expression, completely reversed virus-induced host snRNA expression, and suppressed vaccinia virus infection. This involvement of specific virus-induced snRNAs and associated gene clusters suggests a novel HO-1-dependent host-defense pathway in poxvirus infection.

  2. Long Non-coding RNA ANRIL and Polycomb in Human Cancers and Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Aguilo, Francesca; Cecilia, Serena Di; Walsh, Martin J.

    2015-01-01

    The long non-coding RNA CDKN2B-AS1, commonly referred to as the Antisense Non-coding RNA in the INK4 Locus (ANRIL), is a 3.8-kb-long RNA transcribed from the short arm of human chromosome 9 on p21.3 that overlaps a critical region encompassing three major tumor suppressor loci juxtaposed to the INK4b-ARF-INK4a gene cluster and the methyl-thioadenosine phosphorylase (MTAP) gene. Genome-wide association studies have identified this region with a remarkable and growing number of disease-associated DNA alterations and single nucleotide polymorphisms, which corresponds to increased susceptibility to human disease. Recent attention has been devoted on whether these alterations in the ANRIL sequence affect its expression levels and/or its splicing transcript variation, and in consequence, global cellular homeostasis. Moreover, recent evidence postulates that ANRIL not only can regulate their immediate genomic neighbors in cis, but also has the capacity to regulate additional loci in trans. This action would further increase the complexity for mechanisms imposed through ANRIL and furthering the scope of this lncRNA in disease pathogenesis. In this chapter, we summarize the most recent findings on the investigation of ANRIL and provide a perspective on the biological and clinical significance of ANRIL as a putative biomarker, specifically, its potential role in directing cellular fates leading to cancer and cardiovascular disease. PMID:26220772

  3. Non-coding RNA: what is functional and what is junk?

    PubMed Central

    Palazzo, Alexander F.; Lee, Eliza S.

    2015-01-01

    The genomes of large multicellular eukaryotes are mostly comprised of non-protein coding DNA. Although there has been much agreement that a small fraction of these genomes has important biological functions, there has been much debate as to whether the rest contributes to development and/or homeostasis. Much of the speculation has centered on the genomic regions that are transcribed into RNA at some low level. Unfortunately these RNAs have been arbitrarily assigned various names, such as “intergenic RNA,” “long non-coding RNAs” etc., which have led to some confusion in the field. Many researchers believe that these transcripts represent a vast, unchartered world of functional non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), simply because they exist. However, there are reasons to question this Panglossian view because it ignores our current understanding of how evolution shapes eukaryotic genomes and how the gene expression machinery works in eukaryotic cells. Although there are undoubtedly many more functional ncRNAs yet to be discovered and characterized, it is also likely that many of these transcripts are simply junk. Here, we discuss how to determine whether any given ncRNA has a function. Importantly, we advocate that in the absence of any such data, the appropriate null hypothesis is that the RNA in question is junk. PMID:25674102

  4. Prognostic and predictive values of long non-coding RNA LINC00472 in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yi; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Loo, Lenora W M; Hernandez, Brenda Y; Chong, Clayton; Canuto, Emilie Marion; Biglia, Nicoletta; Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Harvey; Chu, Wen-Ming; Yu, Herbert

    2015-04-20

    LINC00472 is a novel long intergenic non-coding RNA. We evaluated LINC00472 expression in breast tumor samples using RT-qPCR, performed a meta-analysis of over 20 microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, and investigated the effect of LINC00472 expression on cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells transfected with a LINC00472-expressing vector. Our qPCR results showed that high LINC00472 expression was associated with less aggressive breast tumors and more favorable disease outcomes. Patients with high expression of LINC00472 had significantly reduced risk of relapse and death compared to those with low expression. Patients with high LINC00472 expression also had better responses to adjuvant chemo- or hormonal therapy than did patients with low expression. Results of meta-analysis on multiple studies from the GEO database were in agreement with the findings of our study. High LINC00472 was also associated with favorable molecular subtypes, Luminal A or normal-like tumors. Cell culture experiments showed that up-regulation of LINC00472 expression could suppress breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. Collectively, our clinical and in vitro studies suggest that LINC00472 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Evaluating this long non-coding RNA in breast tumors may have prognostic and predictive value in the clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:25865225

  5. Regulatory non-coding RNA: new instruments in the orchestration of cell death.

    PubMed

    Su, Ye; Wu, Haijiang; Pavlosky, Alexander; Zou, Ling-Lin; Deng, Xinna; Zhang, Zhu-Xu; Jevnikar, Anthony M

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNA (ncRNA) comprises a substantial portion of primary transcripts that are generated by genomic transcription, but are not translated into protein. The possible functions of these once considered 'junk' molecules have incited considerable interest and new insights have emerged. The two major members of ncRNAs, namely micro RNA (miRNA) and long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), have important regulatory roles in gene expression and many important physiological processes, which has recently been extended to programmed cell death. The previous paradigm of programmed cell death only by apoptosis has recently expanded to include modalities of regulated necrosis (RN), and particularly necroptosis. However, most research efforts in this field have been on protein regulators, leaving the role of ncRNAs largely unexplored. In this review, we discuss important findings concerning miRNAs and lncRNAs that modulate apoptosis and RN pathways, as well as the miRNA-lncRNA interactions that affect cell death regulation. PMID:27512954

  6. Targeting long non-coding RNAs in cancers: progress and prospects.

    PubMed

    Li, Chi Han; Chen, Yangchao

    2013-08-01

    Pervasive transcription occurs in the human genome to generate thousands of RNA transcripts, and accumulating evidence suggested that the RNA molecules, without protein coding ability, have important roles in diverse biological functions. Long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), with size larger than 200 nt, is a new class of the non-coding RNA that contributes to cancer development and progression. Roles for several lncRNAs in cancers have been characterized and strategies targeting them have inhibitory effects to malignant cells in vitro and in vivo. These findings point to the potential of lncRNAs as prospective novel therapeutic targets in cancers. Recent advance in biological drugs, led by nucleic acid drugs (i.e. siRNAs, antisense oligonucleotides), suggest directions for the development of cancer therapies targeting lncRNAs. Here, we discuss the characteristics of lncRNAs regarding their synthesis, stability and functional role in cells, and emphasize their unique properties that determine their molecular functions. We then discuss the association of lncRNAs with cancers, and illustrate the anticancer effects induced upon modulating the level and function of lncRNAs. We also revisit established methods for targeting RNA molecules and discuss new agents and strategies to attenuate lncRNAs in cancer. PMID:23748105

  7. Prognostic and predictive values of long non-coding RNA LINC00472 in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Yi; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Loo, Lenora W. M.; Hernandez, Brenda Y.; Chong, Clayton; Canuto, Emilie Marion; Biglia, Nicoletta; Lu, Lingeng; Risch, Harvey; Chu, Wen-Ming; Yu, Herbert

    2015-01-01

    LINC00472 is a novel long intergenic non-coding RNA. We evaluated LINC00472 expression in breast tumor samples using RT-qPCR, performed a meta-analysis of over 20 microarray datasets from the Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database, and investigated the effect of LINC00472 expression on cell proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells transfected with a LINC00472-expressing vector. Our qPCR results showed that high LINC00472 expression was associated with less aggressive breast tumors and more favorable disease outcomes. Patients with high expression of LINC00472 had significantly reduced risk of relapse and death compared to those with low expression. Patients with high LINC00472 expression also had better responses to adjuvant chemo- or hormonal therapy than did patients with low expression. Results of meta-analysis on multiple studies from the GEO database were in agreement with the findings of our study. High LINC00472 was also associated with favorable molecular subtypes, Luminal A or normal-like tumors. Cell culture experiments showed that up-regulation of LINC00472 expression could suppress breast cancer cell proliferation and migration. Collectively, our clinical and in vitro studies suggest that LINC00472 is a tumor suppressor in breast cancer. Evaluating this long non-coding RNA in breast tumors may have prognostic and predictive value in the clinical management of breast cancer. PMID:25865225

  8. Junk DNA and the long non-coding RNA twist in cancer genetics.

    PubMed

    Ling, H; Vincent, K; Pichler, M; Fodde, R; Berindan-Neagoe, I; Slack, F J; Calin, G A

    2015-09-24

    The central dogma of molecular biology states that the flow of genetic information moves from DNA to RNA to protein. However, in the last decade this dogma has been challenged by new findings on non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) such as microRNAs (miRNAs). More recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have attracted much attention due to their large number and biological significance. Many lncRNAs have been identified as mapping to regulatory elements including gene promoters and enhancers, ultraconserved regions and intergenic regions of protein-coding genes. Yet, the biological function and molecular mechanisms of lncRNA in human diseases in general and cancer in particular remain largely unknown. Data from the literature suggest that lncRNA, often via interaction with proteins, functions in specific genomic loci or use their own transcription loci for regulatory activity. In this review, we summarize recent findings supporting the importance of DNA loci in lncRNA function and the underlying molecular mechanisms via cis or trans regulation, and discuss their implications in cancer. In addition, we use the 8q24 genomic locus, a region containing interactive SNPs, DNA regulatory elements and lncRNAs, as an example to illustrate how single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) located within lncRNAs may be functionally associated with the individual's susceptibility to cancer. PMID:25619839

  9. Structural architecture of the human long non-coding RNA, steroid receptor RNA activator.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Irina V; Hennelly, Scott P; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2012-06-01

    While functional roles of several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been determined, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we report the first experimentally derived secondary structure of a human lncRNA, the steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), 0.87 kB in size. The SRA RNA is a non-coding RNA that coactivates several human sex hormone receptors and is strongly associated with breast cancer. Coding isoforms of SRA are also expressed to produce proteins, making the SRA gene a unique bifunctional system. Our experimental findings (SHAPE, in-line, DMS and RNase V1 probing) reveal that this lncRNA has a complex structural organization, consisting of four domains, with a variety of secondary structure elements. We examine the coevolution of the SRA gene at the RNA structure and protein structure levels using comparative sequence analysis across vertebrates. Rapid evolutionary stabilization of RNA structure, combined with frame-disrupting mutations in conserved regions, suggests that evolutionary pressure preserves the RNA structural core rather than its translational product. We perform similar experiments on alternatively spliced SRA isoforms to assess their structural features. PMID:22362738

  10. Structural architecture of the human long non-coding RNA, steroid receptor RNA activator

    PubMed Central

    Novikova, Irina V.; Hennelly, Scott P.; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y.

    2012-01-01

    While functional roles of several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been determined, the molecular mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we report the first experimentally derived secondary structure of a human lncRNA, the steroid receptor RNA activator (SRA), 0.87 kB in size. The SRA RNA is a non-coding RNA that coactivates several human sex hormone receptors and is strongly associated with breast cancer. Coding isoforms of SRA are also expressed to produce proteins, making the SRA gene a unique bifunctional system. Our experimental findings (SHAPE, in-line, DMS and RNase V1 probing) reveal that this lncRNA has a complex structural organization, consisting of four domains, with a variety of secondary structure elements. We examine the coevolution of the SRA gene at the RNA structure and protein structure levels using comparative sequence analysis across vertebrates. Rapid evolutionary stabilization of RNA structure, combined with frame-disrupting mutations in conserved regions, suggests that evolutionary pressure preserves the RNA structural core rather than its translational product. We perform similar experiments on alternatively spliced SRA isoforms to assess their structural features. PMID:22362738

  11. The interplay of long non-coding RNAs and MYC in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hamilton, Michael J.; Young, Matthew D.; Sauer, Silvia; Martinez, Ernest

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of RNA molecules that are changing how researchers view eukaryotic gene regulation. Once considered to be non-functional products of low-level aberrant transcription from non-coding regions of the genome, lncRNAs are now viewed as important epigenetic regulators and several lncRNAs have now been demonstrated to be critical players in the development and/or maintenance of cancer. Similarly, the emerging variety of interactions between lncRNAs and MYC, a well-known oncogenic transcription factor linked to most types of cancer, have caught the attention of many biomedical researchers. Investigations exploring the dynamic interactions between lncRNAs and MYC, referred to as the lncRNA-MYC network, have proven to be especially complex. Genome-wide studies have shown that MYC transcriptionally regulates many lncRNA genes. Conversely, recent reports identified lncRNAs that regulate MYC expression both at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels. These findings are of particular interest because they suggest roles of lncRNAs as regulators of MYC oncogenic functions and the possibility that targeting lncRNAs could represent a novel avenue to cancer treatment. Here, we briefly review the current understanding of how lncRNAs regulate chromatin structure and gene transcription, and then focus on the new developments in the emerging field exploring the lncRNA-MYC network in cancer. PMID:27077133

  12. Evaluation of temporary non-code repairs in safety class 3 piping systems

    SciTech Connect

    Godha, P.C.; Kupinski, M.; Azevedo, N.F.

    1996-12-01

    Temporary non-ASME Code repairs in safety class 3 pipe and piping components are permissible during plant operation in accordance with Nuclear Regulatory Commission Generic Letter 90-05. However, regulatory acceptance of such repairs requires the licensee to undertake several timely actions. Consistent with the requirements of GL 90-05, this paper presents an overview of the detailed evaluation and relief request process. The technical criteria encompasses both ductile and brittle piping materials. It also lists appropriate evaluation methods that a utility engineer can select to perform a structural integrity assessment for design basis loading conditions to support the use of temporary non-Code repair for degraded piping components. Most use of temporary non-code repairs at a nuclear generating station is in the service water system which is an essential safety related system providing the ultimate heat sink for various plant systems. Depending on the plant siting, the service water system may use fresh water or salt water as the cooling medium. Various degradation mechanisms including general corrosion, erosion/corrosion, pitting, microbiological corrosion, galvanic corrosion, under-deposit corrosion or a combination thereof continually challenge the pressure boundary structural integrity. A good source for description of corrosion degradation in cooling water systems is provided in a cited reference.

  13. Long Non-coding RNA in Neurons: New Players in Early Response to BDNF Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Aliperti, Vincenza; Donizetti, Aldo

    2016-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is a neurotrophin family member that is highly expressed and widely distributed in the brain. BDNF is critical for neural survival and plasticity both during development and in adulthood, and dysfunction in its signaling may contribute to a number of neurodegenerative disorders. Deep understanding of the BDNF-activated molecular cascade may thus help to find new biomarkers and therapeutic targets. One interesting direction is related to the early phase of BDNF-dependent gene expression regulation, which is responsible for the activation of selective gene programs that lead to stable functional and structural remodeling of neurons. Immediate-early coding genes activated by BDNF are under investigation, but the involvement of the non-coding RNAs is largely unexplored, especially the long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). lncRNAs are emerging as key regulators that can orchestrate different aspects of nervous system development, homeostasis, and plasticity, making them attractive candidate markers and therapeutic targets for brain diseases. We used microarray technology to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs in the immediate response phase of BDNF stimulation in a neuronal cell model. Our observations on the putative functional role of lncRNAs provide clues to their involvement as master regulators of gene expression cascade triggered by BDNF. PMID:26973456

  14. Circular non-coding RNA ANRIL modulates ribosomal RNA maturation and atherosclerosis in humans.

    PubMed

    Holdt, Lesca M; Stahringer, Anika; Sass, Kristina; Pichler, Garwin; Kulak, Nils A; Wilfert, Wolfgang; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Herbst, Andreas; Northoff, Bernd H; Nicolaou, Alexandros; Gäbel, Gabor; Beutner, Frank; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Musunuru, Kiran; Krohn, Knut; Mann, Matthias; Teupser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are broadly expressed in eukaryotic cells, but their molecular mechanism in human disease remains obscure. Here we show that circular antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (circANRIL), which is transcribed at a locus of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease on chromosome 9p21, confers atheroprotection by controlling ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation and modulating pathways of atherogenesis. CircANRIL binds to pescadillo homologue 1 (PES1), an essential 60S-preribosomal assembly factor, thereby impairing exonuclease-mediated pre-rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages. As a consequence, circANRIL induces nucleolar stress and p53 activation, resulting in the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, which are key cell functions in atherosclerosis. Collectively, these findings identify circANRIL as a prototype of a circRNA regulating ribosome biogenesis and conferring atheroprotection, thereby showing that circularization of long non-coding RNAs may alter RNA function and protect from human disease. PMID:27539542

  15. Comprehensive Reconstruction and Visualization of Non-Coding Regulatory Networks in Human

    PubMed Central

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    Research attention has been powered to understand the functional roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Many studies have demonstrated their deregulation in cancer and other human disorders. ncRNAs are also present in extracellular human body fluids such as serum and plasma, giving them a great potential as non-invasive biomarkers. However, non-coding RNAs have been relatively recently discovered and a comprehensive database including all of them is still missing. Reconstructing and visualizing the network of ncRNAs interactions are important steps to understand their regulatory mechanism in complex systems. This work presents ncRNA-DB, a NoSQL database that integrates ncRNAs data interactions from a large number of well established on-line repositories. The interactions involve RNA, DNA, proteins, and diseases. ncRNA-DB is available at http://ncrnadb.scienze.univr.it/ncrnadb/. It is equipped with three interfaces: web based, command-line, and a Cytoscape app called ncINetView. By accessing only one resource, users can search for ncRNAs and their interactions, build a network annotated with all known ncRNAs and associated diseases, and use all visual and mining features available in Cytoscape. PMID:25540777

  16. Comprehensive reconstruction and visualization of non-coding regulatory networks in human.

    PubMed

    Bonnici, Vincenzo; Russo, Francesco; Bombieri, Nicola; Pulvirenti, Alfredo; Giugno, Rosalba

    2014-01-01

    Research attention has been powered to understand the functional roles of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Many studies have demonstrated their deregulation in cancer and other human disorders. ncRNAs are also present in extracellular human body fluids such as serum and plasma, giving them a great potential as non-invasive biomarkers. However, non-coding RNAs have been relatively recently discovered and a comprehensive database including all of them is still missing. Reconstructing and visualizing the network of ncRNAs interactions are important steps to understand their regulatory mechanism in complex systems. This work presents ncRNA-DB, a NoSQL database that integrates ncRNAs data interactions from a large number of well established on-line repositories. The interactions involve RNA, DNA, proteins, and diseases. ncRNA-DB is available at http://ncrnadb.scienze.univr.it/ncrnadb/. It is equipped with three interfaces: web based, command-line, and a Cytoscape app called ncINetView. By accessing only one resource, users can search for ncRNAs and their interactions, build a network annotated with all known ncRNAs and associated diseases, and use all visual and mining features available in Cytoscape. PMID:25540777

  17. Circular non-coding RNA ANRIL modulates ribosomal RNA maturation and atherosclerosis in humans

    PubMed Central

    Holdt, Lesca M.; Stahringer, Anika; Sass, Kristina; Pichler, Garwin; Kulak, Nils A.; Wilfert, Wolfgang; Kohlmaier, Alexander; Herbst, Andreas; Northoff, Bernd H.; Nicolaou, Alexandros; Gäbel, Gabor; Beutner, Frank; Scholz, Markus; Thiery, Joachim; Musunuru, Kiran; Krohn, Knut; Mann, Matthias; Teupser, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Circular RNAs (circRNAs) are broadly expressed in eukaryotic cells, but their molecular mechanism in human disease remains obscure. Here we show that circular antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus (circANRIL), which is transcribed at a locus of atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease on chromosome 9p21, confers atheroprotection by controlling ribosomal RNA (rRNA) maturation and modulating pathways of atherogenesis. CircANRIL binds to pescadillo homologue 1 (PES1), an essential 60S-preribosomal assembly factor, thereby impairing exonuclease-mediated pre-rRNA processing and ribosome biogenesis in vascular smooth muscle cells and macrophages. As a consequence, circANRIL induces nucleolar stress and p53 activation, resulting in the induction of apoptosis and inhibition of proliferation, which are key cell functions in atherosclerosis. Collectively, these findings identify circANRIL as a prototype of a circRNA regulating ribosome biogenesis and conferring atheroprotection, thereby showing that circularization of long non-coding RNAs may alter RNA function and protect from human disease. PMID:27539542

  18. Long Non-Coding RNAs As Potential Novel Prognostic Biomarkers in Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Saus, Ester; Brunet-Vega, Anna; Iraola-Guzmán, Susana; Pegueroles, Cinta; Gabaldón, Toni; Pericay, Carles

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is the fourth most common cause of death worldwide. Surgery is usually the first line of treatment for patients with CRC but many tumors with similar histopathological features show significantly different clinical outcomes. The discovery of robust prognostic biomarkers in patients with CRC is imperative to achieve more effective treatment strategies and improve patient's care. Recent progress in next generation sequencing methods and transcriptome analysis has revealed that a much larger part of the genome is transcribed into RNA than previously assumed. Collectively referred to as non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), some of these RNA molecules such as microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be altered and to play critical roles in tumor biology. This discovery leads to exciting possibilities for personalized cancer diagnosis, and therapy. Many lncRNAs are tissue and cancer-type specific and have already revealed to be useful as prognostic markers. In this review, we focus on recent findings concerning aberrant expression of lncRNAs in CRC tumors and emphasize their prognostic potential in CRC. Further studies focused on the mechanisms of action of lncRNAs will contribute to the development of novel biomarkers for diagnosis and disease progression. PMID:27148353

  19. Long non-coding RNA MINCR promotes gallbladder cancer progression through stimulating EZH2 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shou-Hua; Yang, Yong; Wu, Xiao-Cai; Zhang, Ming-Di; Weng, Ming-Zhe; Zhou, Di; Wang, Jian-Dong; Quan, Zhi-Wei

    2016-09-28

    The regulation of MYC-regulated long non-coding RNAs has been reported to contribute to certain types of cancers. However, the role of MYC-induced long non-coding RNA (MINCR) in the tumorigenesis of gallbladder cancer (GBC) is still largely unknown. In this study, we discovered that MINCR was markedly upregulated in GBC tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. High MINCR expression levels in GBC were positively associated with tumor volume and lymph node metastasis and were negatively correlated with overall survival (OS). Upregulation of MINCR and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2) in GBC coincided with the downregulation of miR-26a-5p in GBC. Mechanistically, MINCR/miR-26a-5p/EZH2 axis was found to be involved in cell proliferation, cell invasive and apoptosis in GBC cells. Moreover, knockdown of MINCR suppressed cell proliferation, decreased S-phase cell numbers, increased cell apoptosis, and inhibited cell invasion by inhibiting the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) phenomenon in GBC cells. In vivo, tumor volumes were significantly decreased in the MINCR silencing group compared with those in the control group. These results demonstrated that MINCR could potentially be a therapeutic target as well as a prognostic marker in GBC. PMID:27345740

  20. Non-coding RNAs deregulation in oral squamous cell carcinoma: advances and challenges.

    PubMed

    Yu, T; Li, C; Wang, Z; Liu, K; Xu, C; Yang, Q; Tang, Y; Wu, Y

    2016-05-01

    Oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common cause of cancer death. Despite decades of improvements in exploring new treatments and considerable advance in multimodality treatment, satisfactory curative rates have not yet been reached. The difficulty of early diagnosis and the high prevalence of metastasis associated with OSCC contribute to its dismal prognosis. In the last few decades the emerging data from both tumor biology and clinical trials led to growing interest in the research for predictive biomarkers. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are promising biomarkers. Among numerous kinds of ncRNAs, short ncRNAs, such as microRNAs (miRNAs), have been extensively investigated with regard to their biogenesis, function, and importance in carcinogenesis. In contrast to miRNAs, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are much less known concerning their functions in human cancers especially in OSCC. The present review highlighted the roles of miRNAs and newly discovered lncRNAs in oral tumorigenesis, metastasis, and their clinical implication. PMID:26370423

  1. The Emerging Role of Non-Coding RNAs in Drug Addiction

    PubMed Central

    Sartor, Gregory C.; St. Laurent, Georges; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2012-01-01

    Prolonged drug use causes long-lasting neuroadaptations in reward-related brain areas that contribute to addiction. Despite significant amount of research dedicated to understanding the underlying mechanisms of addiction, the molecular underpinnings remain unclear. At the same time, much of the pervasive transcription that encompasses the human genome occurs in the nervous system and contributes to its heterogeneity and complexity. Recent evidence suggests that non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play an important and dynamic role in transcriptional regulation, epigenetic signaling, stress response, and plasticity in the nervous system. Dysregulation of ncRNAs are thought to contribute to many, and perhaps all, neurological disorders, including addiction. Here, we review recent insights in the functional relevance of ncRNAs, including both microRNAs (miRNAs), and long non-coding RNAs, and then illustrate specific examples of ncRNA regulation in the context of drug addiction. We conclude that ncRNAs are importantly involved in the persistent neuroadaptations associated with addiction-related behaviors, and that therapies that target specific ncRNAs may represent new avenues for the treatment of drug addiction. PMID:22737160

  2. Role of non-coding RNAs in pancreatic cancer: The bane of the microworld

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Yi-Ting; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Xiao-Dong; Hao, Jun; Cao, Han; Zhu, Wei; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Cao, Jian-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of the mechanisms underlying the development of pancreatic cancer has been greatly advanced. However, the molecular events involved in the initiation and development of pancreatic cancer remain inscrutable. None of the present medical technologies have been proven to be effective in significantly improving early detection or reducing the mortality/morbidity of this disease. Thus, a better understanding of the molecular basis of pancreatic cancer is required for the identification of more effective diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), generally including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, have recently been found to be deregulated in many human cancers, which provides new opportunities for identifying both functional drivers and specific biomarkers of pancreatic cancer. In this article, we review the existing literature in the field documenting the significance of aberrantly expressed and functional ncRNAs in human pancreatic cancer, and discuss how oncogenic ncRNAs may be involved in the genetic and epigenetic networks regulating functional pathways that are deregulated in this malignancy, particularly of the ncRNAs’ role in drug resistance and epithelial-mesenchymal transition biological phenotype, with the aim of analyzing the feasibility of clinical application of ncRNAs in the diagnosis and treatment of pancreatic cancer. PMID:25071335

  3. NONCODE 2016: an informative and valuable data source of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yi; Li, Hui; Fang, Shuangsang; Kang, Yue; wu, Wei; Hao, Yajing; Li, Ziyang; Bu, Dechao; Sun, Ninghui; Zhang, Michael Q.; Chen, Runsheng

    2016-01-01

    NONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/noncode/) is an interactive database that aims to present the most complete collection and annotation of non-coding RNAs, especially long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). The recently reduced cost of RNA sequencing has produced an explosion of newly identified data. Revolutionary third-generation sequencing methods have also contributed to more accurate annotations. Accumulative experimental data also provides more comprehensive knowledge of lncRNA functions. In this update, NONCODE has added six new species, bringing the total to 16 species altogether. The lncRNAs in NONCODE have increased from 210 831 to 527,336. For human and mouse, the lncRNA numbers are 167,150 and 130,558, respectively. NONCODE 2016 has also introduced three important new features: (i) conservation annotation; (ii) the relationships between lncRNAs and diseases; and (iii) an interface to choose high-quality datasets through predicted scores, literature support and long-read sequencing method support. NONCODE is also accessible through http://www.noncode.org/. PMID:26586799

  4. Bioactivity of Benthic and Picoplanktonic Estuarine Cyanobacteria on Growth of Photoautotrophs: Inhibition versus Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Lopes, Viviana R.; Vasconcelos, Vitor M.

    2011-01-01

    Understanding potential biochemical interactions and effects among cyanobacteria and other organisms is one of the main keys to a better knowledge of microbial population structuring and dynamics. In this study, the effects of cyanobacteria from benthos and plankton of estuaries on other cyanobacteria and green algae growth were evaluated. To understand how the estuarine cyanobacteria might influence the dynamics of phytoplankton, experiments were carried out with the freshwater species Microcystis aeruginosa and Chlorella sp., and the marine Synechocystis salina and Nannochloropsis sp. exposed to aqueous and organic (70% methanol) crude extracts of cyanobacteria for 96 h. The most pronounced effect observed was the growth stimulation. Growth inhibition was also observed for S. salina and M. aeruginosa target-species at the highest and lowest concentrations of cyanobacterial extracts. The methanolic crude extract of Phormidium cf. chalybeum LEGE06078 was effective against S. salina growth in a concentration-dependent manner after 96 h-exposure. All of the cyanobacterial isolates showed some bioactivity on the target-species growth, i.e., inhibitory or stimulating effects. These results indicate that the analyzed cyanobacterial isolates can potentially contribute to blooms’ proliferation of other cyanobacteria and to the abnormal growth of green algae disturbing the dynamic of estuarine phytoplankton communities. Since estuaries are transitional ecosystems, the benthic and picoplanktonic estuarine cyanobacteria can change both freshwater and marine phytoplankton succession, competition and bloom formation. Furthermore, a potential biotechnological application of these isolates as a tool to control cyanobacteria and microalgae proliferation can be feasible. This work is the first on the subject of growth responses of photoautotrophs to cyanobacteria from Atlantic estuarine environments. PMID:21673889

  5. Evaluation of Agency Non-Code Layered Pressure Vessels (LPVs). Corrected Copy, Aug. 25, 2014

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prosser, William H.

    2014-01-01

    In coordination with the Office of Safety and Mission Assurance and the respective Center Pressure System Managers (PSMs), the NASA Engineering and Safety Center (NESC) was requested to formulate a consensus draft proposal for the development of additional testing and analysis methods to establish the technical validity, and any limitation thereof, for the continued safe operation of facility non-code layered pressure vessels. The PSMs from each NASA Center were asked to participate as part of the assessment team by providing, collecting, and reviewing data regarding current operations of these vessels. This report contains the outcome of the assessment and the findings, observations, and NESC recommendations to the Agency and individual NASA Centers.

  6. Long non-coding RNAs and cancer: a new frontier of translational research?

    PubMed Central

    Spizzo, R; Almeida, MI; Colombatti, A; Calin, GA

    2012-01-01

    Tiling array and novel sequencing technologies have made available the transcription profile of the entire human genome. However, the extent of transcription and the function of genetic elements that occur outside of protein-coding genes, particularly those involved in disease, are still a matter of debate. In this review, we focus on long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that are involved in cancer. We define lncRNAs and present a cancer-oriented list of lncRNAs, list some tools (for example, public databases) that classify lncRNAs or that scan genome spans of interest to find whether known lncRNAs reside there, and describe some of the functions of lncRNAs and the possible genetic mechanisms that underlie lncRNA expression changes in cancer, as well as current and potential future applications of lncRNA research in the treatment of cancer. PMID:22266873

  7. The role of non-coding RNAs in male sex determination and differentiation.

    PubMed

    Rastetter, Raphael H; Smith, Craig A; Wilhelm, Dagmar

    2015-09-01

    A complex network of gene regulation and interaction drives male sex determination and differentiation. While many important protein-coding genes that are necessary for proper male development have been identified, many disorders in human sex development are still unexplained at the molecular level. This suggests that key factors and regulatory mechanisms are still unknown. In recent years, extensive data have shown that different classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play a role in almost all developmental and physiological pathways. Here we review what is known about their role in male sex determination and differentiation not only in mammals, but also other species. While for some processes a key role for ncRNA has been identified, we are still far from having a complete picture. PMID:25995439

  8. Multifunctional non-coding Epstein-Barr virus encoded RNAs (EBERs) contribute to viral pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Iwakiri, Dai

    2016-01-01

    Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) is known as an oncogenic herpesvirus implicated in the pathogenesis of various malignancies. It has been reported that EBV non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) including EBV-encoded small RNAs (EBERs) and EBV-miRNAs contribute to viral pathogenesis. EBERs that are expressed abundantly in latently EBV-infected cells have been reported to play significant roles in tumorigenesis by EBV. Furthermore, it was demonstrated that the modulation of host innate immune signals by EBERs contributes to EBV-mediated pathogenesis including oncogenesis. Recently it was demonstrated that EBERs are secreted via exosomes by EBV-infected cells. It was also demonstrated that exosomes contain a number of EBV-encoded miRNAs. Various mRNAs have been identified as targets for regulation by EBV-miRNAs in host cells, therefore, EBERs and EBV-miRNAs might function through the transfer of exosomes. PMID:26292159

  9. A-to-I editing of coding and non-coding RNAs by ADARs

    PubMed Central

    Nishikura, Kazuko

    2016-01-01

    Adenosine deaminases acting on RNA (ADARs) convert adenosine to inosine in double-stranded RNA. This A-to-I editing occurs not only in protein-coding regions of mRNAs, but also frequently in non-coding regions that contain inverted Alu repeats. Editing of coding sequences can result in the expression of functionally altered proteins that are not encoded in the genome, whereas the significance of Alu editing remains largely unknown. Certain microRNA (miRNA) precursors are also edited, leading to reduced expression or altered function of mature miRNAs. Conversely, recent studies indicate that ADAR1 forms a complex with Dicer to promote miRNA processing, revealing a new function of ADAR1 in the regulation of RNA interference. PMID:26648264

  10. Long non-coding RNAs as novel therapeutic targets in cancer.

    PubMed

    Lavorgna, Giovanni; Vago, Riccardo; Sarmini, Mohamad; Montorsi, Francesco; Salonia, Andrea; Bellone, Matteo

    2016-08-01

    Thanks to impressive technology advancements, pervasive expression of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has been recently identified in the genome of numerous cancers. Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) belong to a new class of ncRNAs including tens of thousands different species. A fraction of these molecules shows a striking cancer-enriched expression pattern, suggesting an essential role in tumor cells and, possibly, a utility in therapeutic terms. This review aims at summarizing current knowledge for the identification and validation of lncRNAs as therapeutics targets in tumors. Both in-silico and wet-biology resources are presented in relation to the many challenges that the scientific community still needs to address in terms of lncRNA identification, stratification, patient personalization, drug delivery and toxicity. PMID:27210721

  11. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs in Renal Cell Carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Seles, Maximilian; Hutterer, Georg C; Kiesslich, Tobias; Pummer, Karl; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Perakis, Samantha; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Stotz, Michael; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a deadly disease with rising mortality despite intensive therapeutic efforts. It comprises several subtypes in terms of distinct histopathological features and different clinical presentations. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts in the genome which vary in expression levels and length and perform diverse functions. They are involved in the inititation, evolution and progression of primary cancer, as well as in the development and spread of metastases. Recently, several lncRNAs were described in RCC. This review emphasises the rising importance of lncRNAs in RCC. Moreover, it provides an outlook on their therapeutic potential in the future. PMID:27092491

  12. The functional role of long non-coding RNAs and epigenetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides. The post-transcriptional regulation is influenced by these lncRNAs by interfering with the microRNA pathways, involving in diverse cellular processes. The regulation of gene expression by lncRNAs at the epigenetic level, transcriptional and post-transcriptional level have been well known and widely studied. Recent recognition that lncRNAs make effects in many biological and pathological processes such as stem cell pluripotency, neurogenesis, oncogenesis and etc. This review will focus on the functional roles of lncRNAs in epigenetics and related research progress will be summarized. PMID:25276098

  13. Current Insights into Long Non-Coding RNAs in Renal Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Seles, Maximilian; Hutterer, Georg C.; Kiesslich, Tobias; Pummer, Karl; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Perakis, Samantha; Schwarzenbacher, Daniela; Stotz, Michael; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) represents a deadly disease with rising mortality despite intensive therapeutic efforts. It comprises several subtypes in terms of distinct histopathological features and different clinical presentations. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are non-protein-coding transcripts in the genome which vary in expression levels and length and perform diverse functions. They are involved in the inititation, evolution and progression of primary cancer, as well as in the development and spread of metastases. Recently, several lncRNAs were described in RCC. This review emphasises the rising importance of lncRNAs in RCC. Moreover, it provides an outlook on their therapeutic potential in the future. PMID:27092491

  14. Regulation of neuronal-glial fate specification by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; Liu, Yan; Sun, Shaiqi; Lu, Ming; Xia, Ying

    2016-07-01

    Neural stem cell transplantation is becoming a promising and attractive cell-based treatment modality for repairing the damaged central nervous system. One of the limitations of this approach is that the proportion of functional cells differentiated from stem cells still remains at a low level. In recent years, novel long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are being discovered at a growing pace, suggesting that this class of molecules may act as novel regulators in neuronal-glial fate specification. In this review, we first describe the general features of lncRNAs that are more likely to be relevant to reveal their function. By this, we aim to point out the specific roles of a number of lncRNAs whose function has been described during neuronal and glial cell differentiation. There is no doubt that investigation of the lncRNAs will open a new window in studying neuronal-glial fate specification. PMID:26943605

  15. Role of Non-Coding RNAs in the Transgenerational Epigenetic Transmission of the Effects of Reprotoxicants

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, Eduardo; del Mazo, Jesús

    2016-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are regulatory elements of gene expression and chromatin structure. Both long and small ncRNAs can also act as inductors and targets of epigenetic programs. Epigenetic patterns can be transmitted from one cell to the daughter cell, but, importantly, also through generations. Diversity of ncRNAs is emerging with new and surprising roles. Functional interactions among ncRNAs and between specific ncRNAs and structural elements of the chromatin are drawing a complex landscape. In this scenario, epigenetic changes induced by environmental stressors, including reprotoxicants, can explain some transgenerationally-transmitted phenotypes in non-Mendelian ways. In this review, we analyze mechanisms of action of reprotoxicants upon different types of ncRNAs and epigenetic modifications causing transgenerationally transmitted characters through germ cells but affecting germ cells and reproductive systems. A functional model of epigenetic mechanisms of transgenerational transmission ncRNAs-mediated is also proposed. PMID:27023531

  16. Rise of the RNA machines: exploring the structure of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Irina V; Hennelly, Scott P; Tung, Chang-Shung; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-10-01

    Novel, profound and unexpected roles of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging in critical aspects of gene regulation. Thousands of lncRNAs have been recently discovered in a wide range of mammalian systems, related to development, epigenetics, cancer, brain function and hereditary disease. The structural biology of these lncRNAs presents a brave new RNA world, which may contain a diverse zoo of new architectures and mechanisms. While structural studies of lncRNAs are in their infancy, we describe existing structural data for lncRNAs, as well as crystallographic studies of other RNA machines and their implications for lncRNAs. We also discuss the importance of dynamics in RNA machine mechanism. Determining commonalities between lncRNA systems will help elucidate the evolution and mechanistic role of lncRNAs in disease, creating a structural framework necessary to pursue lncRNA-based therapeutics. PMID:23467124

  17. Long non-coding RNAs in heart failure: an obvious lnc

    PubMed Central

    El Azzouzi, Hamid; Doevendans, Pieter Adrianus

    2016-01-01

    Heart failure is a life-threatening and costly ailment characterized by structural and functional impairment of the heart. Despite major advances in understanding protein-mediated transcriptional control and signaling pathways that underlie the cellular and interstitial alterations of heart failure, significant therapeutical breakthroughs for innovative treatments of this disease are still missing. The recent extensive profiling of the mammalian transcriptome has revealed a large number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that play a diversity of important regulatory roles in gene expression. In here, we focus on a recent work by Ounzain and colleagues comprising genome-wide profiling of the cardiac transcriptome after myocardial infarction with an emphasis on the identification of novel heart-specific lncRNAs. PMID:27275495

  18. Non-coding RNAs: novel players in chromatin-regulation during viral latency.

    PubMed

    Eilebrecht, Sebastian; Schwartz, Christian; Rohr, Olivier

    2013-08-01

    Chromatin structure plays an essential role during gene expression regulation not only in the case of the host cellular genome, but also during the viral life cycle. Epigenetic chromatin marks thereby define, whether a gene promoter is accessible for the transcription machinery or whether a repressive heterochromatin state is established. The heterochromatin-mediated repression of lytic viral genes results in viral latency, enabling the virus to persist dormant without being recognized by the host immune system, but keeping the potential for reactivation. Arising new systems biology approaches are starting to uncover an unexpected multiplicity and variety of non-coding (nc)RNAs playing important roles during chromatin structure control, likely constituting a novel layer in epigenetic regulation. In this review we give an overview of chromatin-regulatory viral and host cellular ncRNAs and their links to viral latency. PMID:23660570

  19. Non-coding RNAs as direct and indirect modulators of epigenetic regulation

    PubMed Central

    Peschansky, Veronica J; Wahlestedt, Claes

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is an increasingly well-understood concept that explains much of the contribution of an organism’s environment and experience to its biology. However, discussion persists as to which mechanisms can be classified as epigenetic. Ongoing research continues to uncover novel pathways, including the important role of non-protein coding RNA transcripts in epigenetic gene regulation. We know that the majority of human and other mammalian transcripts are not translated but that many of these are nonetheless functional. These non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) can be short (< 200 nt) or long (< 200 nt) and are further classified by genomic origin and mechanism of action. We discuss examples of ncRNAs that interact with histone modifying complexes or DNA methyltransferases to regulate gene expression, others that are targets of these epigenetic mechanisms, and propose a model in which such transcripts feed back into an epigenetic regulatory network. PMID:24739571

  20. An Improved Canine Genome and a Comprehensive Catalogue of Coding Genes and Non-Coding Transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Hoeppner, Marc P.; Lundquist, Andrew; Pirun, Mono; Meadows, Jennifer R. S.; Zamani, Neda; Johnson, Jeremy; Sundström, Görel; Cook, April; FitzGerald, Michael G.; Swofford, Ross; Mauceli, Evan; Moghadam, Behrooz Torabi; Greka, Anna; Alföldi, Jessica; Abouelleil, Amr; Aftuck, Lynne; Bessette, Daniel; Berlin, Aaron; Brown, Adam; Gearin, Gary; Lui, Annie; Macdonald, J. Pendexter; Priest, Margaret; Shea, Terrance; Turner-Maier, Jason; Zimmer, Andrew; Lander, Eric S.; di Palma, Federica

    2014-01-01

    The domestic dog, Canis familiaris, is a well-established model system for mapping trait and disease loci. While the original draft sequence was of good quality, gaps were abundant particularly in promoter regions of the genome, negatively impacting the annotation and study of candidate genes. Here, we present an improved genome build, canFam3.1, which includes 85 MB of novel sequence and now covers 99.8% of the euchromatic portion of the genome. We also present multiple RNA-Sequencing data sets from 10 different canine tissues to catalog ∼175,000 expressed loci. While about 90% of the coding genes previously annotated by EnsEMBL have measurable expression in at least one sample, the number of transcript isoforms detected by our data expands the EnsEMBL annotations by a factor of four. Syntenic comparison with the human genome revealed an additional ∼3,000 loci that are characterized as protein coding in human and were also expressed in the dog, suggesting that those were previously not annotated in the EnsEMBL canine gene set. In addition to ∼20,700 high-confidence protein coding loci, we found ∼4,600 antisense transcripts overlapping exons of protein coding genes, ∼7,200 intergenic multi-exon transcripts without coding potential, likely candidates for long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) and ∼11,000 transcripts were reported by two different library construction methods but did not fit any of the above categories. Of the lincRNAs, about 6,000 have no annotated orthologs in human or mouse. Functional analysis of two novel transcripts with shRNA in a mouse kidney cell line altered cell morphology and motility. All in all, we provide a much-improved annotation of the canine genome and suggest regulatory functions for several of the novel non-coding transcripts. PMID:24625832

  1. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts

    PubMed Central

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D.; Vlachos, Ioannis S.; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G.

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. PMID:26612864

  2. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Zuccaro, Antonio; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool), QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation’s enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein—protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA) by ab initio methods) helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is freely

  3. CVD-associated non-coding RNA, ANRIL, modulates expression of atherogenic pathways in VSMC

    SciTech Connect

    Congrains, Ada; Kamide, Kei; Katsuya, Tomohiro; Yasuda, Osamu; Oguro, Ryousuke; Yamamoto, Koichi; Ohishi, Mitsuru; Rakugi, Hiromi

    2012-03-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL maps in the strongest susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Silencing of ANRIL leads to altered expression of tissue remodeling-related genes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The effects of ANRIL on gene expression are splicing variant specific. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ANRIL affects progression of cardiovascular disease by regulating proliferation and apoptosis pathways. -- Abstract: ANRIL is a newly discovered non-coding RNA lying on the strongest genetic susceptibility locus for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in the chromosome 9p21 region. Genome-wide association studies have been linking polymorphisms in this locus with CVD and several other major diseases such as diabetes and cancer. The role of this non-coding RNA in atherosclerosis progression is still poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the implication of ANRIL in the modulation of gene sets directly involved in atherosclerosis. We designed and tested siRNA sequences to selectively target two exons (exon 1 and exon 19) of the transcript and successfully knocked down expression of ANRIL in human aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (HuAoVSMC). We used a pathway-focused RT-PCR array to profile gene expression changes caused by ANRIL knock down. Notably, the genes affected by each of the siRNAs were different, suggesting that different splicing variants of ANRIL might have distinct roles in cell physiology. Our results suggest that ANRIL splicing variants play a role in coordinating tissue remodeling, by modulating the expression of genes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, extra-cellular matrix remodeling and inflammatory response to finally impact in the risk of cardiovascular disease and other pathologies.

  4. An Interactive network of long non-coding RNAs facilitates the Drosophila sex determination decision

    PubMed Central

    Mulvey, Brett B.; Olcese, Ursula; Cabrera, Janel R.; Horabin, Jamila I.

    2014-01-01

    Genome analysis in several eukaryotes shows a surprising number of transcripts which do not encode conventional messenger RNAs. Once considered noise, these non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) appear capable of controlling gene expression by various means. We find Drosophila sex determination, specifically the master-switch gene Sex-lethal (Sxl), is regulated by long ncRNAs (>200 nt). The lncRNAs influence the dose sensitive establishment promoter of Sxl, SxlPe, which must be activated to specify female sex. They are primarily from two regions, R1 and R2, upstream of SxlPeand show a dynamic developmental profile. Of the four lncRNA strands only one, R2 antisense, has its peak coincident with SxlPe transcription, suggesting it may promote activation. Indeed, its expression is regulated by the X chromosome counting genes, whose dose determines whether SxlPe is transcribed. Transgenic lines which ectopically express each of the lncRNAs show they can act in trans, impacting the process of sex determination but also altering the levels of the other lncRNAs. Generally, expression of R1 is negative whereas R2 is positive to females. This ectopic expression also results in a change in the local chromatin marks, affecting the timing and strength of SxlPe transcription. The chromatin marks are those deposited by the Polycomb and Trithorax groups of chromatin modifying proteins, which we find bind to the lncRNAs. We suggest the increasing numbers of non-coding transcripts being identified are a harbinger of interacting networks similar to the one we describe. PMID:24954180

  5. Non-coding RNAs: Epigenetic regulators of bone development and homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Mohammad Q; Tye, Coralee E; Stein, Gary S; Lian, Jane B

    2015-12-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have evolved in eukaryotes as epigenetic regulators of gene expression. The most abundant regulatory ncRNAs are the 20-24 nt small microRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs, <200 nt). Each class of ncRNAs operates through distinct mechanisms, but their pathways to regulating gene expression are interrelated in ways that are just being recognized. While the importance of lncRNAs in epigenetic control of transcription, developmental processes and human traits is emerging, the identity of lncRNAs in skeletal biology is scarcely known. However, since the first profiling studies of miRNA at stages during osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, over 1100 publications related to bone biology and pathologies can be found, as well as many recent comprehensive reviews summarizing miRNA in skeletal cells. Delineating the activities and targets of specific miRNAs regulating differentiation of osteogenic and resorptive bone cells, coupled with in vivo gain- and loss-of-function studies, discovered unique mechanisms that support bone development and bone homeostasis in adults. We present here "guiding principles" for addressing biological control of bone tissue formation by ncRNAs. This review emphasizes recent advances in understanding regulation of the process of miRNA biogenesis that impact on osteogenic lineage commitment, transcription factors and signaling pathways. Also discussed are the approaches to be pursued for an understanding of the role of lncRNAs in bone and the challenges in addressing their multiple and complex functions. Based on new knowledge of epigenetic control of gene expression to be gained for ncRNA regulation of the skeleton, new directions for translating the miRNAs and lncRNAs into therapeutic targets for skeletal disorders are possible. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Epigenetics and Bone. PMID:26039869

  6. Non-coding RNAs Enabling Prognostic Stratification and Prediction of Therapeutic Response in Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Perakis, Samantha O; Thomas, Joseph E; Pichler, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a heterogeneous disease and current treatment options for patients are associated with a wide range of outcomes and tumor responses. Although the traditional TNM staging system continues to serve as a crucial tool for estimating CRC prognosis and for stratification of treatment choices and long-term survival, it remains limited as it relies on macroscopic features and cases of surgical resection, fails to incorporate new molecular data and information, and cannot perfectly predict the variety of outcomes and responses to treatment associated with tumors of the same stage. Although additional histopathologic features have recently been applied in order to better classify individual tumors, the future might incorporate the use of novel molecular and genetic markers in order to maximize therapeutic outcome and to provide accurate prognosis. Such novel biomarkers, in addition to individual patient tumor phenotyping and other validated genetic markers, could facilitate the prediction of risk of progression in CRC patients and help assess overall survival. Recent findings point to the emerging role of non-protein-coding regions of the genome in their contribution to the progression of cancer and tumor formation. Two major subclasses of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs, are often dysregulated in CRC and have demonstrated their diagnostic and prognostic potential as biomarkers. These ncRNAs are promising molecular classifiers and could assist in the stratification of patients into appropriate risk groups to guide therapeutic decisions and their expression patterns could help determine prognosis and predict therapeutic options in CRC. PMID:27573901

  7. DIANA-LncBase v2: indexing microRNA targets on non-coding transcripts.

    PubMed

    Paraskevopoulou, Maria D; Vlachos, Ioannis S; Karagkouni, Dimitra; Georgakilas, Georgios; Kanellos, Ilias; Vergoulis, Thanasis; Zagganas, Konstantinos; Tsanakas, Panayiotis; Floros, Evangelos; Dalamagas, Theodore; Hatzigeorgiou, Artemis G

    2016-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that act as post-transcriptional regulators of coding gene expression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently reported to interact with miRNAs. The sponge-like function of lncRNAs introduces an extra layer of complexity in the miRNA interactome. DIANA-LncBase v1 provided a database of experimentally supported and in silico predicted miRNA Recognition Elements (MREs) on lncRNAs. The second version of LncBase (www.microrna.gr/LncBase) presents an extensive collection of miRNA:lncRNA interactions. The significantly enhanced database includes more than 70 000 low and high-throughput, (in)direct miRNA:lncRNA experimentally supported interactions, derived from manually curated publications and the analysis of 153 AGO CLIP-Seq libraries. The new experimental module presents a 14-fold increase compared to the previous release. LncBase v2 hosts in silico predicted miRNA targets on lncRNAs, identified with the DIANA-microT algorithm. The relevant module provides millions of predicted miRNA binding sites, accompanied with detailed metadata and MRE conservation metrics. LncBase v2 caters information regarding cell type specific miRNA:lncRNA regulation and enables users to easily identify interactions in 66 different cell types, spanning 36 tissues for human and mouse. Database entries are also supported by accurate lncRNA expression information, derived from the analysis of more than 6 billion RNA-Seq reads. PMID:26612864

  8. A global profile of glucose-sensitive endothelial-expressed long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Singh, Krishna K; Mantella, Laura-Eve; Pan, Yi; Quan, Adrian; Sabongui, Sandra; Sandhu, Paul; Teoh, Hwee; Al-Omran, Mohammed; Verma, Subodh

    2016-09-01

    Hyperglycemia-related endothelial dysfunction is believed to be the crux of diabetes-associated micro- and macro-vascular complications. We conducted a systematic transcriptional survey to screen for human endothelial long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulated by elevated glucose levels. lncRNAs and protein-coding transcripts from human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) cultured under high (25 mmol/L) or normal (5 mmol/L) glucose conditions for 24 h were profiled with the Arraystar Human LncRNA Expression Microarray V3.0. Of the 30 586 lncRNAs screened, 100 were significantly upregulated and 186 appreciably downregulated (P < 0.05) in response to high-glucose exposure. In the same HUVEC samples, 133 of the 26 109 mRNAs screened were upregulated and 166 downregulated. Of these 299 differentially expressed mRNAs, 26 were significantly associated with 28 differentially expressed long intergenic non-coding RNAs (P < 0.05). Bioinformatics analyses indicated that the mRNAs most upregulated are primarily enriched in axon guidance signaling pathways; those most downregulated are notably involved in pathways targeting vascular smooth muscle cell contraction, dopaminergic signaling, ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis, and adrenergic signaling. This is the first lncRNA and mRNA transcriptome profile of high-glucose-mediated changes in human endothelial cells. These observations may prove novel insights into novel regulatory molecules and pathways of hyperglycemia-related endothelial dysfunction and, accordingly, diabetes-associated vascular disease. PMID:27434139

  9. Transcriptator: An Automated Computational Pipeline to Annotate Assembled Reads and Identify Non Coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Kumar Parijat; Evangelista, Daniela; Zuccaro, Antonio; Guarracino, Mario Rosario

    2015-01-01

    RNA-seq is a new tool to measure RNA transcript counts, using high-throughput sequencing at an extraordinary accuracy. It provides quantitative means to explore the transcriptome of an organism of interest. However, interpreting this extremely large data into biological knowledge is a problem, and biologist-friendly tools are lacking. In our lab, we developed Transcriptator, a web application based on a computational Python pipeline with a user-friendly Java interface. This pipeline uses the web services available for BLAST (Basis Local Search Alignment Tool), QuickGO and DAVID (Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery) tools. It offers a report on statistical analysis of functional and Gene Ontology (GO) annotation's enrichment. It helps users to identify enriched biological themes, particularly GO terms, pathways, domains, gene/proteins features and protein-protein interactions related informations. It clusters the transcripts based on functional annotations and generates a tabular report for functional and gene ontology annotations for each submitted transcript to the web server. The implementation of QuickGo web-services in our pipeline enable the users to carry out GO-Slim analysis, whereas the integration of PORTRAIT (Prediction of transcriptomic non coding RNA (ncRNA) by ab initio methods) helps to identify the non coding RNAs and their regulatory role in transcriptome. In summary, Transcriptator is a useful software for both NGS and array data. It helps the users to characterize the de-novo assembled reads, obtained from NGS experiments for non-referenced organisms, while it also performs the functional enrichment analysis of differentially expressed transcripts/genes for both RNA-seq and micro-array experiments. It generates easy to read tables and interactive charts for better understanding of the data. The pipeline is modular in nature, and provides an opportunity to add new plugins in the future. Web application is freely

  10. A comprehensive catalogue of the coding and non-coding transcripts of the human inner ear.

    PubMed

    Schrauwen, Isabelle; Hasin-Brumshtein, Yehudit; Corneveaux, Jason J; Ohmen, Jeffrey; White, Cory; Allen, April N; Lusis, Aldons J; Van Camp, Guy; Huentelman, Matthew J; Friedman, Rick A

    2016-03-01

    The mammalian inner ear consists of the cochlea and the vestibular labyrinth (utricle, saccule, and semicircular canals), which participate in both hearing and balance. Proper development and life-long function of these structures involves a highly complex coordinated system of spatial and temporal gene expression. The characterization of the inner ear transcriptome is likely important for the functional study of auditory and vestibular components, yet, primarily due to tissue unavailability, detailed expression catalogues of the human inner ear remain largely incomplete. We report here, for the first time, comprehensive transcriptome characterization of the adult human cochlea, ampulla, saccule and utricle of the vestibule obtained from patients without hearing abnormalities. Using RNA-Seq, we measured the expression of >50,000 predicted genes corresponding to approximately 200,000 transcripts, in the adult inner ear and compared it to 32 other human tissues. First, we identified genes preferentially expressed in the inner ear, and unique either to the vestibule or cochlea. Next, we examined expression levels of specific groups of potentially interesting RNAs, such as genes implicated in hearing loss, long non-coding RNAs, pseudogenes and transcripts subject to nonsense mediated decay (NMD). We uncover the spatial specificity of expression of these RNAs in the hearing/balance system, and reveal evidence of tissue specific NMD. Lastly, we investigated the non-syndromic deafness loci to which no gene has been mapped, and narrow the list of potential candidates for each locus. These data represent the first high-resolution transcriptome catalogue of the adult human inner ear. A comprehensive identification of coding and non-coding RNAs in the inner ear will enable pathways of auditory and vestibular function to be further defined in the study of hearing and balance. Expression data are freely accessible at https://www.tgen.org/home/research

  11. A Dual Model for Prioritizing Cancer Mutations in the Non-coding Genome Based on Germline and Somatic Events

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jia; Poursat, Marie-Anne; Drubay, Damien; Motz, Arnaud; Saci, Zohra; Morillon, Antonin; Michiels, Stefan; Gautheret, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    We address here the issue of prioritizing non-coding mutations in the tumoral genome. To this aim, we created two independent computational models. The first (germline) model estimates purifying selection based on population SNP data. The second (somatic) model estimates tumor mutation density based on whole genome tumor sequencing. We show that each model reflects a different set of constraints acting either on the normal or tumor genome, and we identify the specific genome features that most contribute to these constraints. Importantly, we show that the somatic mutation model carries independent functional information that can be used to narrow down the non-coding regions that may be relevant to cancer progression. On this basis, we identify positions in non-coding RNAs and the non-coding parts of mRNAs that are both under purifying selection in the germline and protected from mutation in tumors, thus introducing a new strategy for future detection of cancer driver elements in the expressed non-coding genome. PMID:26588488

  12. Low-cost production of green microalga Botryococcus braunii biomass with high lipid content through mixotrophic and photoautotrophic cultivation.

    PubMed

    Yeesang, Chittra; Cheirsilp, Benjamas

    2014-09-01

    Botryococcus braunii is a microalga that is regarded as a potential source of renewable fuel because of its ability to produce large amounts of lipid that can be converted into biodiesel. Agro-industrial by-products and wastes are of great interest as cultivation medium for microorganisms because of their low cost, renewable nature, and abundance. In this study, two strategies for low-cost production of B. braunii biomass with high lipid content were performed: (i) the mixotrophic cultivation using molasses, a cheap by-product from the sugar cane plant as a carbon source, and (ii) the photoautotrophic cultivation using nitrate-rich wastewater supplemented with CO2 as a carbon source. The mixotrophic cultivation added with 15 g L(-1) molasses produced a high amount of biomass of 3.05 g L(-1) with a high lipid content of 36.9 %. The photoautotrophic cultivation in nitrate-rich wastewater supplemented with 2.0 % CO2 produced a biomass of 2.26 g L(-1) and a lipid content of 30.3 %. The benefits of this photoautotrophic cultivation are that this cultivation would help to reduce accumulation of atmospheric carbon dioxide and more than 90 % of the nitrate could be removed from the wastewater. When this cultivation was scaled up in a stirred tank photobioreactor and run with semi-continuous cultivation regime, the highest microalgal biomass of 5.16 g L(-1) with a comparable lipid content of 32.2 % was achieved. These two strategies could be promising ways for producing cheap lipid-rich microalgal biomass that can be used as biofuel feedstocks and animal feeds. PMID:24989454

  13. Supporting data for characterization of non-coding RNAs associated with the Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Prameet; Tan, Jun Rong; Karolina, Dwi Setyowati; Sepramaniam, Sugunavathi; Armugam, Arunmozhiarasi; Peter Wong, Tsun-Hon; Jeyaseelan, Kandiah

    2016-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs and microRNAs control gene expression to determine central nervous system development and function. Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) is a cell adhesion molecule that plays an important role in neurite outgrowth during neuronal development and its precise expression is crucial for correct brain development. The data described here is related to the research article titled "A long non-coding RNA, BC048612 and a microRNA, miR-203 coordinate the gene expression of Neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) adhesion protein" [1]. This data article contains detailed bioinformatics analysis of genetic signatures at the Negr1 gene locus retrieved from the UCSC genome browser. This approach could be adopted to identify putative regulatory non-coding RNAs in other tissues and diseases. PMID:26977442

  14. The fusion of two worlds: non-coding RNAs and extracellular vesicles--diagnostic and therapeutic implications (Review).

    PubMed

    Sato-Kuwabara, Yukie; Melo, Sonia A; Soares, Fernando A; Calin, George A

    2015-01-01

    The role of the extracellular non-coding RNAs, particularly microRNAs present in tumor-derived extravesicles, has been intensively exploited in human cancer as a promising tool for diagnostic and prognostic purposes. Current knowledge on exosomes shows an important role not only as vehicles in the intercellular communication, but the transfer of their content can specifically modulate the surrounding microenvironment, leading to tumor development and progression and affecting therapy response. Based on this, much effort has focused on understanding the mechanisms behind the biology of exosomes and their closely interaction with non-coding RNAs as an efficient tool in tumor diagnostic and therapy. Here we summarize the current knowledge on extracellular and exosomes-enclosed non-coding RNAs, and their importance as potential biomarkers and mediators of intercellular communication in tumor biology. PMID:25338714

  15. Multifractal detrended cross-correlation analysis of coding and non-coding DNA sequences through chaos-game representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Mayukha; Satish, B.; Srinivas, K.; Rao, P. Madhusudana; Manimaran, P.

    2015-10-01

    We propose a new approach combining the chaos game representation and the two dimensional multifractal detrended cross correlation analysis methods to examine multifractal behavior in power law cross correlation between any pair of nucleotide sequences of unequal lengths. In this work, we analyzed the characteristic behavior of coding and non-coding DNA sequences of eight prokaryotes. The results show the presence of strong multifractal nature between coding and non-coding sequences of all data sets. We found that this integrative approach helps us to consider complete DNA sequences for characterization, and further it may be useful for classification, clustering, identification of class affiliation of nucleotide sequences etc. with high precision.

  16. Non-coding yet non-trivial: a review on the computational genomics of lincRNAs.

    PubMed

    Ching, Travers; Masaki, Jayson; Weirather, Jason; Garmire, Lana X

    2015-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) represent one of the most mysterious RNA species encoded by the human genome. Thanks to next generation sequencing (NGS) technology and its applications, we have recently witnessed a surge in non-coding RNA research, including lincRNA research. Here, we summarize the recent advancement in genomics studies of lincRNAs. We review the emerging characteristics of lincRNAs, the experimental and computational approaches to identify lincRNAs, their known mechanisms of regulation, the computational methods and resources for lincRNA functional predictions, and discuss the challenges to understanding lincRNA comprehensively. PMID:26697116

  17. OncodriveFML: a general framework to identify coding and non-coding regions with cancer driver mutations.

    PubMed

    Mularoni, Loris; Sabarinathan, Radhakrishnan; Deu-Pons, Jordi; Gonzalez-Perez, Abel; López-Bigas, Núria

    2016-01-01

    Distinguishing the driver mutations from somatic mutations in a tumor genome is one of the major challenges of cancer research. This challenge is more acute and far from solved for non-coding mutations. Here we present OncodriveFML, a method designed to analyze the pattern of somatic mutations across tumors in both coding and non-coding genomic regions to identify signals of positive selection, and therefore, their involvement in tumorigenesis. We describe the method and illustrate its usefulness to identify protein-coding genes, promoters, untranslated regions, intronic splice regions, and lncRNAs-containing driver mutations in several malignancies. PMID:27311963

  18. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Michele; Ferro, Matteo; Terreri, Sara; Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando; Calin, George A; Cimmino, Amelia

    2016-04-12

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  19. Integrative Analysis of Normal Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNAs in Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Bawa, Pushpinder; Zackaria, Sajna; Verma, Mohit; Gupta, Saurabh; Srivatsan, R; Chaudhary, Bibha; Srinivasan, Subhashini

    2015-01-01

    Recently, large numbers of normal human tissues have been profiled for non-coding RNAs and more than fourteen thousand long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) are found expressed in normal human tissues. The functional roles of these normal lincRNAs (nlincRNAs) in the regulation of protein coding genes in normal and disease biology are yet to be established. Here, we have profiled two RNA-seq datasets including cancer and matched non-neoplastic tissues from 12 individuals from diverse demography for both coding genes and nlincRNAs. We find 130 nlincRNAs significantly regulated in cancer, with 127 regulated in the same direction in the two datasets. Interestingly, according to Illumina Body Map, significant numbers of these nlincRNAs display baseline null expression in normal prostate tissues but are specific to other tissues such as thyroid, kidney, liver and testis. A number of the regulated nlincRNAs share loci with coding genes, which are either co-regulated or oppositely regulated in all cancer samples studied here. For example, in all cancer samples i) the nlincRNA, TCONS_00029157, and a neighboring tumor suppressor factor, SIK1, are both down regulated; ii) several thyroid-specific nlincRNAs in the neighborhood of the thyroid-specific gene TPO, are both up-regulated; and iii) the TCONS_00010581, an isoform of HEIH, is down-regulated while the neighboring EZH2 gene is up-regulated in cancer. Several nlincRNAs from a prostate cancer associated chromosomal locus, 8q24, are up-regulated in cancer along with other known prostate cancer associated genes including PCAT-1, PVT1, and PCAT-92. We observe that there is significant bias towards up-regulation of nlincRNAs with as high as 118 out of 127 up-regulated in cancer, even though regulation of coding genes is skewed towards down-regulation. Considering that all reported cancer associated lincRNAs (clincRNAs) are biased towards up-regulation, we conclude that this bias may be functionally relevant. PMID:25933431

  20. Long non-coding RNA containing ultraconserved genomic region 8 promotes bladder cancer tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Durso, Montano; Romanelli, Alessandra; Avitabile, Concetta; De Cobelli, Ottavio; Messere, Anna; Bruzzese, Dario; Vannini, Ivan; Marinelli, Luciana; Novellino, Ettore; Zhang, Wei; Incoronato, Mariarosaria; Ilardi, Gennaro; Staibano, Stefania; Marra, Laura; Franco, Renato; Perdonà, Sisto; Terracciano, Daniela; Czerniak, Bogdan; Liguori, Giovanna L.; Colonna, Vincenza; Fabbri, Muller; Febbraio, Ferdinando

    2016-01-01

    Ultraconserved regions (UCRs) have been shown to originate non-coding RNA transcripts (T-UCRs) that have different expression profiles and play functional roles in the pathophysiology of multiple cancers. The relevance of these functions to the pathogenesis of bladder cancer (BlCa) is speculative. To elucidate this relevance, we first used genome-wide profiling to evaluate the expression of T-UCRs in BlCa tissues. Analysis of two datasets comprising normal bladder tissues and BlCa specimens with a custom T-UCR microarray identified ultraconserved RNA (uc.) 8+ as the most upregulated T-UCR in BlCa tissues, although its expression was lower than in pericancerous bladder tissues. These results were confirmed on BlCa tissues by real-time PCR and by in situ hybridization. Although uc.8+ is located within intron 1 of CASZ1, a zinc-finger transcription factor, the transcribed non-coding RNA encoding uc.8+ is expressed independently of CASZ1. In vitro experiments evaluating the effects of uc.8+ silencing, showed significantly decreased capacities for cancer cell invasion, migration, and proliferation. From this, we proposed and validated a model of interaction in which uc.8+ shuttles from the nucleus to the cytoplasm of BlCa cells, interacts with microRNA (miR)-596, and cooperates in the promotion and development of BlCa. Using computational analysis, we investigated the miR-binding domain accessibility, as determined by base-pairing interactions within the uc.8+ predicted secondary structure, RNA binding affinity, and RNA species abundance in bladder tissues and showed that uc.8+ is a natural decoy for miR-596. Thus uc.8+ upregulation results in increased expression of MMP9, increasing the invasive potential of BlCa cells. These interactions between evolutionarily conserved regions of DNA suggest that natural selection has preserved this potentially regulatory layer that uses RNA to modulate miR levels, opening up the possibility for development of useful markers for

  1. Identification of a Novel Small Non-Coding RNA Modulating the Intracellular Survival of Brucella melitensis.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yufei; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ligui; Wang, Tongkun; Liang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Chunli; Yuan, Jiuyun; Zhuang, Yubin; An, Chang; Lei, Shuangshuang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Li, Wenna; Yuan, Xitong; Huang, Liuyu; Yang, Xiaoli; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are gene expression modulators respond to environmental changes, stressful conditions, and pathogenesis. In this study, by using a combined bioinformatic and experimental approach, eight novel sRNA genes were identified in intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis. BSR0602, one sRNA that was highly induced in stationary phase, was further examined and found to modulate the intracellular survival of B. melitensis. BSR0602 was present at very high levels in vitro under stresses similar to those encountered during infection in host macrophages. Furthermore, BSR0602 was found to be highly expressed in the spleens of infected mice, suggesting its potential role in the control of pathogenesis. BSR0602 targets the mRNAs coding for gntR, a global transcriptional regulator, which is required for B. melitensis virulence. Overexpression of BSR0602 results in distinct reduction in the gntR mRNA level. B. melitensis with high level of BSR0602 is defective in bacteria intracellular survival in macrophages and defective in growth in the spleens of infected mice. Therefore, BSR0602 may directly inhibit the expression of gntR, which then impairs Brucellae intracellular survival and contributes to Brucella infection. Our findings suggest that BSR0602 is responsible for bacterial adaptation to stress conditions and thus modulate B. melitensis intracellular survival. PMID:25852653

  2. Expression of a novel non-coding mitochondrial RNA in human proliferating cells

    PubMed Central

    Villegas, Jaime; Burzio, Veronica; Villota, Claudio; Landerer, Eduardo; Martinez, Ronny; Santander, Marcela; Martinez, Rodrigo; Pinto, Rodrigo; Vera, María I.; Boccardo, Enrique; Villa, Luisa L.; Burzio, Luis O.

    2007-01-01

    Previously, we reported the presence in mouse cells of a mitochondrial RNA which contains an inverted repeat (IR) of 121 nucleotides (nt) covalently linked to the 5′ end of the mitochondrial 16S RNA (16S mtrRNA). Here, we report the structure of an equivalent transcript of 2374 nt which is over-expressed in human proliferating cells but not in resting cells. The transcript contains a hairpin structure comprising an IR of 815 nt linked to the 5′ end of the 16S mtrRNA and forming a long double-stranded structure or stem and a loop of 40 nt. The stem is resistant to RNase A and can be detected and isolated after digestion with the enzyme. This novel transcript is a non-coding RNA (ncRNA) and several evidences suggest that the transcript is synthesized in mitochondria. The expression of this transcript can be induced in resting lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin (PHA). Moreover, aphidicolin treatment of DU145 cells reversibly blocks proliferation and expression of the transcript. If the drug is removed, the cells re-assume proliferation and over-express the ncmtRNA. These results suggest that the expression of the ncmtRNA correlates with the replicative state of the cell and it may play a role in cell proliferation. PMID:17962305

  3. Expression of a non-coding RNA in ectromelia virus is required for normal plaque formation.

    PubMed

    Esteban, David J; Upton, Chris; Bartow-McKenney, Casey; Buller, R Mark L; Chen, Nanhai G; Schriewer, Jill; Lefkowitz, Elliot J; Wang, Chunlin

    2014-02-01

    Poxviruses are dsDNA viruses with large genomes. Many genes in the genome remain uncharacterized, and recent studies have demonstrated that the poxvirus transcriptome includes numerous so-called anomalous transcripts not associated with open reading frames. Here, we characterize the expression and role of an apparently non-coding RNA in orthopoxviruses, which we call viral hairpin RNA (vhRNA). Using a bioinformatics approach, we predicted expression of a transcript not associated with an open reading frame that is likely to form a stem-loop structure due to the presence of a 21 nt palindromic sequence. Expression of the transcript as early as 2 h post-infection was confirmed by northern blot and analysis of publicly available vaccinia virus infected cell transcriptomes. The transcription start site was determined by RACE PCE and transcriptome analysis, and early and late promoter sequences were identified. Finally, to test the function of the transcript we generated an ectromelia virus knockout, which failed to form plaques in cell culture. The important role of the transcript in viral replication was further demonstrated using siRNA. Although the function of the transcript remains unknown, our work contributes to evidence of an increasingly complex poxvirus transcriptome, suggesting that transcripts such as vhRNA not associated with an annotated open reading frame can play an important role in viral replication. PMID:24078045

  4. Small non-coding RNAs and their associated proteins in spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ling-Feng; Hou, Cong-Cong; Yang, Wan-Xi

    2016-03-10

    The importance of the gene regulation roles of small non-coding RNAs and their protein partners is of increasing focus. In this paper, we reviewed three main small RNA species which appear to affect spermatogenesis. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are single stand RNAs derived from transcripts containing stem-loops and hairpins which target corresponding mRNAs and affect their stability or translation. Many miRNA species have been found to be related to normal male germ cell development. The biogenesis of piRNAs is still largely unknown but several models have been proposed. Some piRNAs and PIWIs target transposable elements and it is these that may be active in regulating translation or stem cell maintenance. endo-siRNAs may also participate in sperm development. Some possible interactions between different kinds of small RNAs have even been suggested. We also show that male germ granules are seen to have a close relationship with a considerable number of mRNAs and small RNAs. Those special structures may also participate in sperm development. PMID:26692146

  5. LncRNAWiki: harnessing community knowledge in collaborative curation of human long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lina; Li, Ang; Zou, Dong; Xu, Xingjian; Xia, Lin; Yu, Jun; Bajic, Vladimir B; Zhang, Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) perform a diversity of functions in numerous important biological processes and are implicated in many human diseases. In this report we present lncRNAWiki (http://lncrna.big.ac.cn), a wiki-based platform that is open-content and publicly editable and aimed at community-based curation and collection of information on human lncRNAs. Current related databases are dependent primarily on curation by experts, making it laborious to annotate the exponentially accumulated information on lncRNAs, which inevitably requires collective efforts in community-based curation of lncRNAs. Unlike existing databases, lncRNAWiki features comprehensive integration of information on human lncRNAs obtained from multiple different resources and allows not only existing lncRNAs to be edited, updated and curated by different users but also the addition of newly identified lncRNAs by any user. It harnesses community collective knowledge in collecting, editing and annotating human lncRNAs and rewards community-curated efforts by providing explicit authorship based on quantified contributions. LncRNAWiki relies on the underling knowledge of scientific community for collective and collaborative curation of human lncRNAs and thus has the potential to serve as an up-to-date and comprehensive knowledgebase for human lncRNAs. PMID:25399417

  6. Transcriptomic profiling of long non-coding RNAs in dermatomyositis by microarray analysis

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Qing-Lin; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Yang, Han-Bo; Shu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Xin; Wang, Guo-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalently transcribed in the genome and have been found to be of functional importance. However, the potential roles of lncRNAs in dermatomyositis (DM) remain unknown. In this study, a lncRNA + mRNA microarray analysis was performed to profile lncRNAs and mRNAs from 15 treatment-naive DM patients and 5 healthy controls. We revealed a total of 1198 lncRNAs (322 up-regulated and 876 down-regulated) and 1213 mRNAs (665 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated) were significantly differentially expressed in DM patients compared with the healthy controls (fold change>2, P < 0.05). Subgrouping DM patients according to the presence of interstitial lung disease and anti-Jo-1 antibody revealed different expression patterns of the lncRNAs. Pathway and gene ontology analysis for the differentially expressed mRNAs confirmed that type 1 interferon signaling was the most significantly dysregulated pathway in all DM subgroups. In addition, distinct pathways that uniquely associated with DM subgroup were also identified. Bioinformatics prediction suggested that linc-DGCR6-1 may be a lncRNA that regulates type 1 interferon-inducible gene USP18, which was found highly expressed in the perifascicular areas of the muscle fibers of DM patients. Our findings provide an overview of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in DM muscle and further broaden the understanding of DM pathogenesis. PMID:27605457

  7. A pathophysiological view of the long non-coding RNA world

    PubMed Central

    Di Gesualdo, Federico; Capaccioli, Sergio; Lulli, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Because cells are constantly exposed to micro-environmental changes, they require the ability to adapt to maintain a dynamic equilibrium. Proteins are considered critical for the regulation of gene expression, which is a fundamental process in determining the cellular responses to stimuli. Recently, revolutionary findings in RNA research and the advent of high-throughput genomic technologies have revealed a pervasive transcription of the human genome, which generates many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) whose roles are largely undefined. However, there is evidence that lncRNAs are involved in several cellular physiological processes such as adaptation to stresses, cell differentiation, maintenance of pluripotency and apoptosis. The correct balance of lncRNA levels is crucial for the maintenance of cellular equilibrium, and the dysregulation of lncRNA expression is linked to many disorders; certain transcripts are useful prognostic markers for some of these pathologies. This review revisits the classic concept of cellular homeostasis from the perspective of lncRNAs specifically to understand how this novel class of molecules contributes to cellular balance and how its dysregulated expression can lead to the onset of pathologies such as cancer. PMID:25428918

  8. Differential expression of long non-coding RNAs in hyperoxia-induced bronchopulmonary dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Bao, Tian-Ping; Wu, Rong; Cheng, Huai-Ping; Cui, Xian-Wei; Tian, Zhao-Fang

    2016-07-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is a common complication of premature birth that seriously affects the survival rate and quality of life among preterm neonates. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in many human diseases. However, the role of lncRNAs in the pathogenesis of BPD remains poorly understood. Here, we exposed neonatal C57BL/6J mice to 95% concentrations of ambient oxygen and established a mouse lung injury model that mimicked human BPD. Next, we compared lncRNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) expression profiles between BPD and normal lung tissues using a high-throughput mouse lncRNA + mRNA array system. Compared with the control group, 882 lncRNAs were upregulated, and 887 lncRNAs were downregulated in BPD lung tissues. We validated some candidate BPD-associated lncRNAs by real-time quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis in eight pairs of BPD and normal lung tissues. Gene ontology, pathway and bioinformatics analyses revealed that a downregulated lncRNA, namely AK033210, associated with tenascin C may be involved in the pathogenesis of BPD. To the best of our knowledge, our study is the first to reveal differential lncRNA expression in BPD, which provides a foundation for further understanding of the molecular mechanism of BPD development. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27137150

  9. Long Non-Coding RNA-ROR Mediates the Reprogramming in Cardiac Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Feng; Zhou, Xiangyu; Huang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    Background Cardiac hypertrophy associated with various cardiovascular diseases results in heart failure and sudden death. A clear understanding of the mechanisms of hypertrophy will benefit the development of novel therapies. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to play essential roles in many biological process, however, whether lncRNA-ROR plays functional roles in the reprogramming of cardiomyocyte remains unclear. Methodology/Principal Findings Here we show that lncRNA-ROR plays important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiac hypertrophy. In hypertrophic heart and cardiomyocytes, the expression of lncRNA-ROR is dramatically increased, downregulation of which attenuates the hypertrophic responses. Furthermore, the expression of lncRNA-ROR negatively correlates with miR-133, whose expression is increased when lncRNA-ROR is knocked down. In line with this, overexpression of miR-133 prevents the elevation of lncRNA-ROR and re-expression of ANP and BNP in cardiomyocytes subject to phenylephrine treatment. Conclusions/Significance Taken together, our study demonstrates that lncRNA-ROR promotes cardiac hypertrophy via interacting with miR-133, indicating that lncRNA-ROR could be targeted for developing novel antihypertrophic therapeutics. PMID:27082978

  10. Multidrug-Resistance Related Long Non-Coding RNA Expression Profile Analysis of Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Wu, Kaichun; Yang, Zhiping; Zhao, Qingchuan; Fan, Dongmei; Xu, Po; Nie, Yongzhan; Fan, Daiming

    2015-01-01

    The effect of chemotherapy of gastric cancer (GC) remains very poor because of multidrug resistance (MDR). However, the mechanisms underlying MDR of GC remains far from fully understood. The aim of this study is to illustrate the potential mechanisms of the MDR of GC at mainly the long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) level. In this study, GC cell line, SGC7901, and two MDR sublines, SGC7901/VCR and SGC7901/ADR were subjected to an lncRNA microarray analysis. Bioinformatics and verification experiments were performed to investigate the potential lncRNAs involved in the development of MDR. Pathway analysis indicated that 15 pathways corresponded to down-regulated transcripts and that 20 pathways corresponded to up-regulated transcripts (p-value cut-off is 0.05). GO analysis showed that the highest enriched GOs targeted by up-regulated transcripts were “system development” and the highest esenriched GOs targeted by the down-regulated transcripts were “sterol biosynthetic process”. Our study is the first to interrogate differentially expressed lncRNAs in human GC cell line and MDR sublines and indicates that lncRNAs are worthwhile for further study to be the novel candidate biomarkers for the clinical diagnosis of MDR and potential targets for further therapy. PMID:26291830

  11. Retrotransposon-associated long non-coding RNAs in mice and men.

    PubMed

    Ganesh, Sravya; Svoboda, Petr

    2016-06-01

    Over a half of mammalian genomes is occupied by repetitive elements whose ability to provide functional sequences, move into new locations, and recombine underlies the so-called genome plasticity. At the same time, mobile elements exemplify selfish DNA, which is expanding in the genome at the expense of the host. The selfish generosity of mobile genetic elements is in the center of research interest as it offers insights into mechanisms underlying evolution and emergence of new genes. In terms of numbers, with over 20,000 in count, protein-coding genes make an outstanding >2 % minority. This number is exceeded by an ever-growing list of genes producing long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), which do not encode for proteins. LncRNAs are a dynamically evolving population of genes. While it is not yet clear what fraction of lncRNAs represents functionally important ones, their features imply that many lncRNAs emerge at random as new non-functional elements whose functionality is acquired through natural selection. Here, we explore the intersection of worlds of mobile genetic elements (particularly retrotransposons) and lncRNAs. In addition to summarizing essential features of mobile elements and lncRNAs, we focus on how retrotransposons contribute to lncRNA evolution, structure, and function in mammals. PMID:27044413

  12. Negative regulation of the interferon response by an interferon-induced long non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Kambara, Hiroto; Niazi, Farshad; Kostadinova, Lenche; Moonka, Dilip K; Siegel, Christopher T; Post, Anthony B; Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Fortes, Puri; Anthony, Donald D; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes; however, their involvement in many critical aspects of the immune response including the interferon (IFN) response remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we compared the global gene expression pattern of primary human hepatocytes before and at three time points after treatment with IFN-α. Among ∼ 200 IFN-induced lncRNAs, one transcript showed ∼ 100-fold induction. This RNA, which we named lncRNA-CMPK2, was a spliced, polyadenylated nuclear transcript that was induced by IFN in diverse cell types from human and mouse. Similar to protein-coding IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), its induction was dependent on JAK-STAT signaling. Intriguingly, knockdown of lncRNA-CMPK2 resulted in a marked reduction in HCV replication in IFN-stimulated hepatocytes, suggesting that it could affect the antiviral role of IFN. We could show that lncRNA-CMPK2 knockdown resulted in upregulation of several protein-coding antiviral ISGs. The observed upregulation was caused by an increase in both basal and IFN-stimulated transcription, consistent with loss of transcriptional inhibition in knockdown cells. These results indicate that the IFN response involves a lncRNA-mediated negative regulatory mechanism. lncRNA-CMPK2 was strongly upregulated in a subset of HCV-infected human livers, suggesting a role in modulation of the IFN response in vivo. PMID:25122750

  13. Negative regulation of the interferon response by an interferon-induced long non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Kambara, Hiroto; Niazi, Farshad; Kostadinova, Lenche; Moonka, Dilip K.; Siegel, Christopher T.; Post, Anthony B.; Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Fortes, Puri; Anthony, Donald D.; Valadkhan, Saba

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play critical roles in diverse cellular processes; however, their involvement in many critical aspects of the immune response including the interferon (IFN) response remains poorly understood. To address this gap, we compared the global gene expression pattern of primary human hepatocytes before and at three time points after treatment with IFN-α. Among ∼200 IFN-induced lncRNAs, one transcript showed ∼100-fold induction. This RNA, which we named lncRNA-CMPK2, was a spliced, polyadenylated nuclear transcript that was induced by IFN in diverse cell types from human and mouse. Similar to protein-coding IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs), its induction was dependent on JAK-STAT signaling. Intriguingly, knockdown of lncRNA-CMPK2 resulted in a marked reduction in HCV replication in IFN-stimulated hepatocytes, suggesting that it could affect the antiviral role of IFN. We could show that lncRNA-CMPK2 knockdown resulted in upregulation of several protein-coding antiviral ISGs. The observed upregulation was caused by an increase in both basal and IFN-stimulated transcription, consistent with loss of transcriptional inhibition in knockdown cells. These results indicate that the IFN response involves a lncRNA-mediated negative regulatory mechanism. lncRNA-CMPK2 was strongly upregulated in a subset of HCV-infected human livers, suggesting a role in modulation of the IFN response in vivo. PMID:25122750

  14. The RNA-centred view of the synapse: non-coding RNAs and synaptic plasticity

    PubMed Central

    Smalheiser, Neil R.

    2014-01-01

    If mRNAs were the only RNAs made by a neuron, there would be a simple mapping of mRNAs to proteins. However, microRNAs and other non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs; endo-siRNAs, piRNAs, BC1, BC200, antisense and long ncRNAs, repeat-related transcripts, etc.) regulate mRNAs via effects on protein translation as well as transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms. Not only are genes ON or OFF, but their ability to be translated can be turned ON or OFF at the level of synapses, supporting an enormous increase in information capacity. Here, I review evidence that ncRNAs are expressed pervasively within dendrites in mammalian brain; that some are activity-dependent and highly enriched near synapses; and that synaptic ncRNAs participate in plasticity responses including learning and memory. Ultimately, ncRNAs can be viewed as the post-it notes of the neuron. They have no literal meaning of their own, but derive their functions from where (and to what) they are stuck. This may explain, in part, why ncRNAs differ so dramatically from protein-coding genes, both in terms of the usual indicators of functionality and in terms of evolutionary constraints. ncRNAs do not appear to be direct mediators of synaptic transmission in the manner of neurotransmitters or receptors, yet they orchestrate synaptic plasticity—and may drive species-specific changes in cognition. PMID:25135965

  15. RNA exosome regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity

    PubMed Central

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N.; Bradner, James E.; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-01-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem (ES) cells by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3’ regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPRCas9 mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3’regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers, by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  16. Transposable Element Insertions in Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Kannan, Sivakumar; Chernikova, Diana; Rogozin, Igor B.; Poliakov, Eugenia; Managadze, David; Koonin, Eugene V.; Milanesi, Luciano

    2015-01-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) are abundant in mammalian genomes and appear to have contributed to the evolution of their hosts by providing novel regulatory or coding sequences. We analyzed different regions of long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes in human and mouse genomes to systematically assess the potential contribution of TEs to the evolution of the structure and regulation of expression of lincRNA genes. Introns of lincRNA genes contain the highest percentage of TE-derived sequences (TES), followed by exons and then promoter regions although the density of TEs is not significantly different between exons and promoters. Higher frequencies of ancient TEs in promoters and exons compared to introns implies that many lincRNA genes emerged before the split of primates and rodents. The content of TES in lincRNA genes is substantially higher than that in protein-coding genes, especially in exons and promoter regions. A significant positive correlation was detected between the content of TEs and evolutionary rate of lincRNAs indicating that inserted TEs are preferentially fixed in fast-evolving lincRNA genes. These results are consistent with the repeat insertion domains of LncRNAs hypothesis under which TEs have substantially contributed to the origin, evolution, and, in particular, fast functional diversification, of lincRNA genes. PMID:26106594

  17. Noncoder: a web interface for exon array-based detection of long non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Gellert, Pascal; Ponomareva, Yuliya; Braun, Thomas; Uchida, Shizuka

    2013-01-01

    Due to recent technical developments, a high number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in mammals. Although it has been shown that lncRNAs are regulated differently among tissues and disease statuses, functions of these transcripts are still unknown in most cases. GeneChip Exon 1.0 ST Arrays (exon arrays) from Affymetrix, Inc. have been used widely to profile genome-wide expression changes and alternative splicing of protein-coding genes. Here, we demonstrate that re-annotation of exon array probes can be used to profile expressions of tens of thousands of lncRNAs. With this annotation, a detailed inspection of lncRNAs and their isoforms is possible. To allow for a general usage to the research community, we developed a user-friendly web interface called ‘noncoder’. By uploading CEL files from exon arrays and with a few mouse clicks and parameter settings, exon array data will be normalized and analysed to identify differentially expressed lncRNAs. Noncoder provides the detailed annotation information of lncRNAs and is equipped with unique features to allow for an efficient search for interesting lncRNAs to be studied further. The web interface is available at http://noncoder.mpi-bn.mpg.de. PMID:23012263

  18. Long non-coding RNA Loc554202 regulates proliferation and migration in breast cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Yongguo; Lu, Jianwei; Zhou, Jing; Tan, Xueming; He, Ye; Ding, Jie; Tian, Yun; Wang, Li; Wang, Keming

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • First, we have shown that upregulated of the Loc554202 in breast cancer tissues. • Second, we demonstrated the function of Loc554202 in breast cancer cell. • Finally, we demonstrated that LOC554202 knockdown could inhibit tumor growth in vivo. - Abstract: Data derived from massive cloning and traditional sequencing methods have revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) play important roles in the development and progression of cancer. Although many studies suggest that the lncRNAs have different cellular functions, many of them are not yet to be identified and characterized for the mechanism of their functions. To address this question, we assay the expression level of lncRNAs–Loc554202 in breast cancer tissues and find that Loc554202 is significantly increased compared with normal control, and associated with advanced pathologic stage and tumor size. Moreover, knockdown of Loc554202 decreased breast cancer cell proliferation, induced apoptosis and inhibits migration/invasion in vitro and impeded tumorigenesis in vivo. These data suggest an important role of Loc554202 in breast tumorigenesis.

  19. Insights into the Regulatory Role of Non-coding RNAs in Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy O; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents a complex disease originated from alterations in several genes leading to disturbances in important signaling pathways in tumor biology, favoring heterogeneity that promotes adaptability and pharmacological resistance of tumor cells. Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as an important hallmark of cancer characterized by the presence of aerobic glycolysis, increased glutaminolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as an altered mitochondrial energy production. The metabolic switches that support energetic requirements of cancer cells are closely related to either activation of oncogenes or down-modulation of tumor-suppressor genes, finally leading to dysregulation of cell proliferation, metastasis and drug resistance signals. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as one important kind of molecules that can regulate altered genes contributing, to the establishment of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, diverse metabolic signals can regulate ncRNA expression and activity at genetic, transcriptional, or epigenetic levels. The regulatory landscape of ncRNAs may provide a new approach for understanding and treatment of different types of malignancies. In this review we discuss the regulatory role exerted by ncRNAs on metabolic enzymes and pathways involved in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. We also review how metabolic stress conditions and tumoral microenvironment influence ncRNA expression and activity. Furthermore, we comment on the therapeutic potential of metabolism-related ncRNAs in cancer. PMID:27551267

  20. Genome-wide analyses of small non-coding RNAs in streptococci

    PubMed Central

    Patenge, Nadja; Pappesch, Roberto; Khani, Afsaneh; Kreikemeyer, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Streptococci represent a diverse group of Gram-positive bacteria, which colonize a wide range of hosts among animals and humans. Streptococcal species occur as commensal as well as pathogenic organisms. Many of the pathogenic species can cause severe, invasive infections in their hosts leading to a high morbidity and mortality. The consequence is a tremendous suffering on the part of men and livestock besides the significant financial burden in the agricultural and healthcare sectors. An environmentally stimulated and tightly controlled expression of virulence factor genes is of fundamental importance for streptococcal pathogenicity. Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) modulate the expression of genes involved in stress response, sugar metabolism, surface composition, and other properties that are related to bacterial virulence. Even though the regulatory character is shared by this class of RNAs, variation on the molecular level results in a high diversity of functional mechanisms. The knowledge about the role of sRNAs in streptococci is still limited, but in recent years, genome-wide screens for sRNAs have been conducted in an increasing number of species. Bioinformatics prediction approaches have been employed as well as expression analyses by classical array techniques or next generation sequencing. This review will give an overview of whole genome screens for sRNAs in streptococci with a focus on describing the different methods and comparing their outcome considering sRNA conservation among species, functional similarities, and relevance for streptococcal infection. PMID:26042151

  1. Non-coding RNA regulation in pathogenic bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Álvaro D.; Quereda, Juan J.; Pucciarelli, M. Graciela; García-del Portillo, Francisco

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have evolved distinct lifestyles inside eukaryotic cells. Some pathogens coexist with the infected cell in an obligate intracellular state, whereas others transit between the extracellular and intracellular environment. Adaptation to these intracellular lifestyles is regulated in both space and time. Non-coding small RNAs (sRNAs) are post-transcriptional regulatory molecules that fine-tune important processes in bacterial physiology including cell envelope architecture, intermediate metabolism, bacterial communication, biofilm formation, and virulence. Recent studies have shown production of defined sRNA species by intracellular bacteria located inside eukaryotic cells. The molecules targeted by these sRNAs and their expression dynamics along the intracellular infection cycle remain, however, poorly characterized. Technical difficulties linked to the isolation of “intact” intracellular bacteria from infected host cells might explain why sRNA regulation in these specialized pathogens is still a largely unexplored field. Transition from the extracellular to the intracellular lifestyle provides an ideal scenario in which regulatory sRNAs are intended to participate; so much work must be done in this direction. This review focuses on sRNAs expressed by intracellular bacterial pathogens during the infection of eukaryotic cells, strategies used with these pathogens to identify sRNAs required for virulence, and the experimental technical challenges associated to this type of studies. We also discuss varied techniques for their potential application to study RNA regulation in intracellular bacterial infections. PMID:25429360

  2. Classification of non-coding RNA using graph representations ofsecondary structure

    SciTech Connect

    Karklin, Yan; Meraz, Richard F.; Holbrook, Stephen R.

    2004-06-07

    Some genes produce transcripts that function directly in regulatory, catalytic, or structural roles in the cell. These non-coding RNAs are prevalent in all living organisms, and methods that aid the understanding of their functional roles are essential. RNA secondary structure, the pattern of base-pairing, contains the critical information for determining the three dimensional structure and function of the molecule. In this work we examine whether the basic geometric and topological properties of secondary structure are sufficient to distinguish between RNA families in a learning framework. First, we develop a labeled dual graph representation of RNA secondary structure by adding biologically meaningful labels to the dual graphs proposed by Gan et al [1]. Next, we define a similarity measure directly on the labeled dual graphs using the recently developed marginalized kernels [2]. Using this similarity measure, we were able to train Support Vector Machine classifiers to distinguish RNAs of known families from random RNAs with similar statistics. For 22 of the 25 families tested, the classifier achieved better than 70% accuracy, with much higher accuracy rates for some families. Training a set of classifiers to automatically assign family labels to RNAs using a one vs. all multi-class scheme also yielded encouraging results. From these initial learning experiments, we suggest that the labeled dual graph representation, together with kernel machine methods, has potential for use in automated analysis and classification of uncharacterized RNA molecules or efficient genome-wide screens for RNA molecules from existing families.

  3. Regulation of Non-coding RNAs in Heat Stress Responses of Plants

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jianguo; He, Qingsong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Li; Jin, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is an important factor limiting plant growth, development, and productivity; thus, plants have evolved special adaptive mechanisms to cope with high-temperature stress. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of regulatory RNAs that play an important role in many biological processes. Recently developed advanced technologies, such as genome-wide transcriptomic analysis, have revealed that abundant ncRNAs are expressed under heat stress. Although this area of research is still in its infancy, an increasing number of several classes of regulatory ncRNA (i.e., miRNA, siRNA, and lncRNA) related to heat stress responses have been reported. In this mini-review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of ncRNAs in heat stress responses in plants, especially miRNAs, siRNAs, and their targets. For example, the miR398-CSD/CCS-HSF, miR396-WRKY6, miR159-GAMYB, and TAS1-HTT-HSF pathways regulate plant heat tolerance. We highlight the hormone/development-related miRNAs involved in heat stress, and discuss the regulatory networks of miRNA-targets. We also note that DNA methylation and alternative splicing could affect miRNA expression under heat stress, and some lncRNAs could respond to heat stress. Finally, we briefly discuss future prospects concerning the ncRNA-related mechanisms of heat stress responses in plants. PMID:27588021

  4. Conservation and Losses of Non-Coding RNAs in Avian Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Paul P.; Fasold, Mario; Burge, Sarah W.; Ninova, Maria; Hertel, Jana; Kehr, Stephanie; Steeves, Tammy E.; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Stadler, Peter F.

    2015-01-01

    Here we present the results of a large-scale bioinformatics annotation of non-coding RNA loci in 48 avian genomes. Our approach uses probabilistic models of hand-curated families from the Rfam database to infer conserved RNA families within each avian genome. We supplement these annotations with predictions from the tRNA annotation tool, tRNAscan-SE and microRNAs from miRBase. We identify 34 lncRNA-associated loci that are conserved between birds and mammals and validate 12 of these in chicken. We report several intriguing cases where a reported mammalian lncRNA, but not its function, is conserved. We also demonstrate extensive conservation of classical ncRNAs (e.g., tRNAs) and more recently discovered ncRNAs (e.g., snoRNAs and miRNAs) in birds. Furthermore, we describe numerous “losses” of several RNA families, and attribute these to either genuine loss, divergence or missing data. In particular, we show that many of these losses are due to the challenges associated with assembling avian microchromosomes. These combined results illustrate the utility of applying homology-based methods for annotating novel vertebrate genomes. PMID:25822729

  5. Regulation of spermatogenesis by small non-coding RNAs: role of the Germ Granule

    PubMed Central

    de Mateo, Sara; Sassone-Corsi, Paolo

    2015-01-01

    The spermatogenic process relays in highly regulated gene expression mechanisms at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels to generate the male gamete that is needed for the perpetuation of the species. Small non-coding RNA pathways have been determined to participate in the post-transcriptional regulatory processes of germ cells. The most important sncRNA molecules that are critically involved in spermatogenesis belong to the miRNA and piRNAs pathways as illustrated by animal models where ablation of specific protein components displays male infertility. Several elements of these regulatory pathways have been found in the nuage or germ granule, a non-membranous cytoplasmatic structure that can be seen in spermatocytes and spermatids. This notion suggests that germ granules may act as organizer centers for silencing pathways in the germline. In general, miRNAs regulate spermatogenesis through targeting and down-regulation of specific transcripts to eventually promote sperm development. However, piRNAs are powerful repressors of transposon elements expression in the spermatogenic process. Here we describe the suggested functions that miRNA and piRNAs pathways execute in the regulation of spermatogenesis and include some recent studies in the field. Despite major strides on the detailed molecular mechanisms of sncRNAs in relation to spermatogenesis, there is plenty to discover on this fascinating regulatory program. PMID:24755166

  6. Understanding the Functions of Long Non-Coding RNAs through Their Higher-Order Structures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Rui; Zhu, Hongliang; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-01-01

    Although thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in eukaryotes, very few molecular mechanisms have been characterized due to an insufficient understanding of lncRNA structure. Therefore, investigations of lncRNA structure and subsequent elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms are urgently needed. However, since lncRNA are high molecular weight molecules, which makes their crystallization difficult, obtaining information about their structure is extremely challenging, and the structures of only several lncRNAs have been determined so far. Here, we review the structure–function relationships of the widely studied lncRNAs found in the animal and plant kingdoms, focusing on the principles and applications of both in vitro and in vivo technologies for the study of RNA structures, including dimethyl sulfate-sequencing (DMS-seq), selective 2′-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension-sequencing (SHAPE-seq), parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS), and fragmentation sequencing (FragSeq). The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of lncRNA biological functions by studying them at the structural level. PMID:27196897

  7. CAUSEL: An epigenome and genome editing pipeline for establishing function of non-coding GWAS variants

    PubMed Central

    Spisak, Sandor; Lawrenson, Kate; Fu, Yanfang; Csabai, Istvan; Cottman, Rebecca T.; Haiman, Christopher; Han, Ying; Seo, Ji-Heui; Lenci, Romina; Li, Qiyuan; Tisza, Viktoria; Szallasi, Zoltan; Herbert, Zachery T.; Chabot, Matthew; Pomerantz, Mark; Solymosi, Norbert; Gayther, Simon; Joung, J. Keith; Freedman, Matthew L.

    2016-01-01

    The vast majority of disease-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) mapped by genome-wide association studies (GWAS) are located in the non-protein coding genome, but establishing the functional and mechanistic roles of these sequence variants has proven challenging. Here, we describe a general pipeline in which candidate functional SNPs are first evaluated by fine-mapping, epigenomic profiling, and epigenome editing and then interrogated for causal function by using genome editing to create isogenic cell lines. To validate this approach, we analyzed the 6q22.1 prostate cancer risk locus and identified rs339331 as the top scoring SNP. Epigenome editing confirmed that rs339331 possessed regulatory potential. Using transcription activator-like effector nuclease (TALEN)-mediated genome-editing, we created a panel of isogenic 22Rv1 prostate cancer cell lines representing all three genotypes (TT, TC, CC) at rs339331. Introduction of the “T” risk allele increased transcription of the RFX6 gene, increased HOXB13 binding at the rs339331 region, and increased deposition of the enhancer-associated H3K4me2 histone mark at the rs339331 region. The cell lines also differed in cellular morphology and adhesion, and pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes suggested an influence of androgens. In summary, we have developed and validated a widely accessible approach to establish functional causality for non-coding sequence variants identified by GWAS. PMID:26398868

  8. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast

    PubMed Central

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G.; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F.; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A.

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  9. Small Non-coding RNAs Associated with Viral Infectious Diseases of Veterinary Importance: Potential Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Samir, Mohamed; Pessler, Frank

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) represent a class of small non-coding RNA (sncRNA) molecules that can regulate mRNAs by inducing their degradation or by blocking translation. Considering that miRNAs are ubiquitous, stable, and conserved across animal species, it seems feasible to exploit them for clinical applications. Unlike in human viral diseases, where some miRNA-based molecules have progressed to clinical application, in veterinary medicine, this concept is just starting to come into view. Clinically, miRNAs could represent powerful diagnostic tools to pinpoint animal viral diseases and/or prognostic tools to follow up disease progression or remission. Additionally, the possible consequences of miRNA dysregulation make them potential therapeutic targets and open the possibilities to use them as tools to generate viral disease-resistant livestock. This review presents an update of preclinical studies on using sncRNAs to combat viral diseases that affect pet and farm animals. Moreover, we discuss the possibilities and challenges of bringing these bench-based discoveries to the veterinary clinic. PMID:27092305

  10. Insights into the Regulatory Role of Non-coding RNAs in Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Beltrán-Anaya, Fredy O.; Cedro-Tanda, Alberto; Hidalgo-Miranda, Alfredo; Romero-Cordoba, Sandra L.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer represents a complex disease originated from alterations in several genes leading to disturbances in important signaling pathways in tumor biology, favoring heterogeneity that promotes adaptability and pharmacological resistance of tumor cells. Metabolic reprogramming has emerged as an important hallmark of cancer characterized by the presence of aerobic glycolysis, increased glutaminolysis and fatty acid biosynthesis, as well as an altered mitochondrial energy production. The metabolic switches that support energetic requirements of cancer cells are closely related to either activation of oncogenes or down-modulation of tumor-suppressor genes, finally leading to dysregulation of cell proliferation, metastasis and drug resistance signals. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as one important kind of molecules that can regulate altered genes contributing, to the establishment of metabolic reprogramming. Moreover, diverse metabolic signals can regulate ncRNA expression and activity at genetic, transcriptional, or epigenetic levels. The regulatory landscape of ncRNAs may provide a new approach for understanding and treatment of different types of malignancies. In this review we discuss the regulatory role exerted by ncRNAs on metabolic enzymes and pathways involved in glucose, lipid, and amino acid metabolism. We also review how metabolic stress conditions and tumoral microenvironment influence ncRNA expression and activity. Furthermore, we comment on the therapeutic potential of metabolism-related ncRNAs in cancer. PMID:27551267

  11. Comparative analysis of non-coding RNAs in the antibiotic-producing Streptomyces bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are key regulatory elements that control a wide range of cellular processes in all bacteria in which they have been studied. Taking advantage of recent technological innovations, we set out to fully explore the ncRNA potential of the multicellular, antibiotic-producing Streptomyces bacteria. Results Using a comparative RNA sequencing analysis of three divergent model streptomycetes (S. coelicolor, S. avermitilis and S. venezuelae), we discovered hundreds of novel cis-antisense RNAs and intergenic small RNAs (sRNAs). We identified a ubiquitous antisense RNA species that arose from the overlapping transcription of convergently-oriented genes; we termed these RNA species ‘cutoRNAs’, for convergent untranslated overlapping RNAs. Conservation between different classes of ncRNAs varied greatly, with sRNAs being more conserved than antisense RNAs. Many species-specific ncRNAs, including many distinct cutoRNA pairs, were located within antibiotic biosynthetic clusters, including the actinorhodin, undecylprodigiosin, and coelimycin clusters of S. coelicolor, the chloramphenicol cluster of S. venezuelae, and the avermectin cluster of S. avermitilis. Conclusions These findings indicate that ncRNAs, including a novel class of antisense RNA, may exert a previously unrecognized level of regulatory control over antibiotic production in these bacteria. Collectively, this work has dramatically expanded the ncRNA repertoire of three Streptomyces species and has established a critical foundation from which to investigate ncRNA function in this medically and industrially important bacterial genus. PMID:23947565

  12. Functional implications of long non-coding RNAs in the pancreatic islets of Langerhans

    PubMed Central

    Esguerra, Jonathan L. S.; Eliasson, Lena

    2014-01-01

    Type-2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex disease characterized by insulin resistance in target tissues and impaired insulin release from pancreatic beta cells. As central tissue of glucose homeostasis, the pancreatic islet continues to be an important focus of research to understand the pathophysiology of the disease. The increased access to human pancreatic islets has resulted in improved knowledge of islet function, and together with advances in RNA sequencing and related technologies, revealed the transcriptional and epigenetic landscape of human islet cells. The discovery of thousands of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts highly enriched in the pancreatic islet and/or specifically expressed in the beta-cells, points to yet another layer of gene regulation of many hitherto unknown mechanistic principles governing islet cell functions. Here we review fundamental islet physiology and propose functional implications of the lncRNAs in islet development and endocrine cell functions. We also take into account important differences between rodent and human islets in terms of morphology and function, and suggest how species-specific lncRNAs may partly influence gene regulation to define the unique phenotypic identity of an organism and the functions of its constituent cells. The implication of primate-specific lncRNAs will be far-reaching in all aspects of diabetes research, but most importantly in the identification and development of novel targets to improve pancreatic islet cell functions as a therapeutic approach to treat T2D. PMID:25071836

  13. Long non-coding RNAs as regulators of the endocrine system

    PubMed Central

    Knoll, Marko; Lodish, Harvey F.; Sun, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse group of RNAs that are often lineage-specific and that regulate multiple biological functions. Many are nuclear and are essential parts of ribonucleoprotein complexes that modify chromatin segments and establish active or repressive chromatin states; others are cytosolic and regulate the stability of mRNA or act as microRNA sponges. This Review summarizes the current knowledge of lncRNAs as regulators of the endocrine system, with a focus on the identification and mode of action of several endocrine-important lncRNAs. We highlight lncRNAs that have a role in the development and function of pancreatic β cells, white and brown adipose tissue, and other endocrine organs, and discuss the involvement of these molecules in endocrine dysfunction (for example, diabetes mellitus). We also address the associations of lncRNAs with nuclear receptors involved in major hormonal signalling pathways, such as estrogen and androgen receptors, and the relevance of these associations in certain endocrine cancers. PMID:25560704

  14. The non-coding RNA TERRA is a natural ligand and direct inhibitor of human telomerase

    PubMed Central

    Redon, Sophie; Reichenbach, Patrick; Lingner, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Telomeres, the physical ends of eukaryotes chromosomes are transcribed into telomeric repeat containing RNA (TERRA), a large non-coding RNA of unknown function, which forms an integral part of telomeric heterochromatin. TERRA molecules resemble in sequence the telomeric DNA substrate as they contain 5′-UUAGGG-3′ repeats near their 3′-end which are complementary to the template sequence of telomerase RNA. Here we demonstrate that endogenous TERRA is bound to human telomerase in cell extracts. Using in vitro reconstituted telomerase and synthetic TERRA molecules we demonstrate that the 5′-UUAGGG-3′ repeats of TERRA base pair with the RNA template of the telomerase RNA moiety (TR). In addition TERRA contacts the telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT) protein subunit independently of hTR. In vitro studies further demonstrate that TERRA is not used as a telomerase substrate. Instead, TERRA acts as a potent competitive inhibitor for telomeric DNA in addition to exerting an uncompetitive mode of inhibition. Our data identify TERRA as a telomerase ligand and natural direct inhibitor of human telomerase. Telomerase regulation by the telomere substrate may be mediated via its transcription. PMID:20460456

  15. Long non-coding RNA-dependent transcriptional regulation in neuronal development and disease

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Brian S.; Blackshaw, Seth

    2014-01-01

    Comprehensive analysis of the mammalian transcriptome has revealed that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may make up a large fraction of cellular transcripts. Recent years have seen a surge of studies aimed at functionally characterizing the role of lncRNAs in development and disease. In this review, we discuss new findings implicating lncRNAs in controlling development of the central nervous system (CNS). The evolution of the higher vertebrate brain has been accompanied by an increase in the levels and complexities of lncRNAs expressed within the developing nervous system. Although a limited number of CNS-expressed lncRNAs are now known to modulate the activity of proteins important for neuronal differentiation, the function of the vast majority of neuronal-expressed lncRNAs is still unknown. Topics of intense current interest include the mechanism by which CNS-expressed lncRNAs might function in epigenetic and transcriptional regulation during neuronal development, and how gain and loss of function of individual lncRNAs contribute to neurological diseases. PMID:24936207

  16. An unusually long non-coding region in rat lens alpha-crystallin messenger RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Moormann, R J; van der Velden, H M; Dodemont, H J; Andreoli, P M; Bloemendal, H; Schoenmakers, J G

    1981-01-01

    Most of the mRNA sequence coding for the alpha A2 chain of the ocular lens protein alpha-crystallin from rat, has been determined by sequencing cloned DNA copies of this mRNA. The 892-base pair cDNA sequence encompasses all but 52 N-terminal amino acids of the alpha A2 chain. It lacks the sequence characteristic for the 22 extra amino acids inserted in the alpha A2 -like chain, named alpha AIns. A stretch of 583 nuceotides, representing more than 50% of the entire mRNA sequence, is located 3' wards of the alpha A2 coding sequence. It contains the characteristic AAUAAA signal involved in poly(A) -addition and represents an unexpectedly long non-coding region. Examination of the total cytoplasmic poly(A) RNA of rat lens by filter-hybridization and subsequent translation of the electrophoretically separated mRNA fractions shows that the alpha A2 chain is encoded by mRNA species which are distinct from the alpha AIns encoding mRNA. No evidence is obtained for an extensive size heterogeneity in the 3' untranslated regions of these two different rat lens mRNAs. Images PMID:6171772

  17. Non-coding RNAs and a layered architecture of genetic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhdanov, Vladimir

    2010-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, protein-coding sequences constitute a relatively small part of the genome. The rest of the genome is transcribed to non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Such RNAs form the cornerstone of a regulatory network that operates in parallel with the protein network. Their biological functions are based primarily on the ability to pair with and deactivate target messenger RNAs (mRNAs). To clarify the likely role of ncRNAs in complex genetic networks, we present and comprehensively analyze a kinetic model of one of the key counterparts of the network architectures. Specifically, the genes transcribed to ncRNAs are considered to interplay with a hierarchical two-layer set of genes transcribed to mRNAs. The genes forming the bottom layer are regulated from the top and negatively self-regulated. If the former regulation is positive, the dependence of the RNA populations on the governing parameters is found to be often non-monotonous. Specifically, the model predicts bistability. If the regulation is negative, the dependence of the RNA populations on the governing parameters is monotonous. In particular, the population of the mRNAs, corresponding to the genes forming the bottom layer, is nearly constant.

  18. Exploration of Deregulated Long Non-Coding RNAs in Association with Hepatocarcinogenesis and Survival

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jing; Siegel, Abby B.; Remotti, Helen; Wang, Qiao; Shen, Yueyue; Santella, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are larger than 200 nucleotides in length and pervasively expressed across the genome. An increasing number of studies indicate that lncRNA transcripts play integral regulatory roles in cellular growth, division, differentiation and apoptosis. Deregulated lncRNAs have been observed in a variety of human cancers, including hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). We determined the expression profiles of 90 lncRNAs for 65 paired HCC tumor and adjacent non-tumor tissues, and 55 lncRNAs were expressed in over 90% of samples. Eight lncRNAs were significantly down-regulated in HCC tumor compared to non-tumor tissues (p < 0.05), but no lncRNA achieved statistical significance after Bonferroni correction for multiple comparisons. Within tumor tissues, carrying more aberrant lncRNAs (6–7) was associated with a borderline significant reduction in survival (HR = 8.5, 95% CI: 1.0–72.5). The predictive accuracy depicted by the AUC was 0.93 for HCC survival when using seven deregulated lncRNAs (likelihood ratio test p = 0.001), which was similar to that combining the seven lncRNAs with tumor size and treatment (AUC = 0.96, sensitivity = 87%, specificity = 87%). These data suggest the potential association of deregulated lncRNAs with hepatocarcinogenesis and HCC survival. PMID:26378581

  19. Comparison of small molecules and oligonucleotides that target a toxic, non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Costales, Matthew G; Rzuczek, Suzanne G; Disney, Matthew D

    2016-06-01

    Potential RNA targets for chemical probes and therapeutic modalities are pervasive in the transcriptome. Oligonucleotide-based therapeutics are commonly used to target RNA sequence. Small molecules are emerging as a modality to target RNA structures selectively, but their development is still in its infancy. In this work, we compare the activity of oligonucleotides and several classes of small molecules that target the non-coding r(CCUG) repeat expansion (r(CCUG)(exp)) that causes myotonic dystrophy type 2 (DM2), an incurable disease that is the second-most common cause of adult onset muscular dystrophy. Small molecule types investigated include monomers, dimers, and multivalent compounds synthesized on-site by using RNA-templated click chemistry. Oligonucleotides investigated include phosphorothioates that cleave their target and vivo-morpholinos that modulate target RNA activity via binding. We show that compounds assembled on-site that recognize structure have the highest potencies amongst small molecules and are similar in potency to a vivo-morpholino modified oligonucleotide that targets sequence. These studies are likely to impact the design of therapeutic modalities targeting other repeats expansions that cause fragile X syndrome and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, for example. PMID:27117425

  20. Non-Coding RNAs in Saliva: Emerging Biomarkers for Molecular Diagnostics

    PubMed Central

    Majem, Blanca; Rigau, Marina; Reventós, Jaume; Wong, David T.

    2015-01-01

    Saliva is a complex body fluid that comprises secretions from the major and minor salivary glands, which are extensively supplied by blood. Therefore, molecules such as proteins, DNA, RNA, etc., present in plasma could be also present in saliva. Many studies have reported that saliva body fluid can be useful for discriminating several oral diseases, but also systemic diseases including cancer. Most of these studies revealed messenger RNA (mRNA) and proteomic biomarker signatures rather than specific non-coding RNA (ncRNA) profiles. NcRNAs are emerging as new regulators of diverse biological functions, playing an important role in oncogenesis and tumor progression. Indeed, the small size of these molecules makes them very stable in different body fluids and not as susceptible as mRNAs to degradation by ribonucleases (RNases). Therefore, the development of a non-invasive salivary test, based on ncRNAs profiles, could have a significant applicability to clinical practice, not only by reducing the cost of the health system, but also by benefitting the patient. Here, we summarize the current status and clinical implications of the ncRNAs present in human saliva as a source of biological information. PMID:25898412

  1. Non-Coding RNA: Sequence-Specific Guide for Chromatin Modification and DNA Damage Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Francia, Sofia

    2015-01-01

    Chromatin conformation shapes the environment in which our genome is transcribed into RNA. Transcription is a source of DNA damage, thus it often occurs concomitantly to DNA damage signaling. Growing amounts of evidence suggest that different types of RNAs can, independently from their protein-coding properties, directly affect chromatin conformation, transcription and splicing, as well as promote the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR) and DNA repair. Therefore, transcription paradoxically functions to both threaten and safeguard genome integrity. On the other hand, DNA damage signaling is known to modulate chromatin to suppress transcription of the surrounding genetic unit. It is thus intriguing to understand how transcription can modulate DDR signaling while, in turn, DDR signaling represses transcription of chromatin around the DNA lesion. An unexpected player in this field is the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery, which play roles in transcription, splicing and chromatin modulation in several organisms. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and several protein factors involved in the RNAi pathway are well known master regulators of chromatin while only recent reports show their involvement in DDR. Here, we discuss the experimental evidence supporting the idea that ncRNAs act at the genomic loci from which they are transcribed to modulate chromatin, DDR signaling and DNA repair. PMID:26617633

  2. CoRAL: predicting non-coding RNAs from small RNA-sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Leung, Yuk Yee; Ryvkin, Paul; Ungar, Lyle H; Gregory, Brian D; Wang, Li-San

    2013-08-01

    The surprising observation that virtually the entire human genome is transcribed means we know little about the function of many emerging classes of RNAs, except their astounding diversities. Traditional RNA function prediction methods rely on sequence or alignment information, which are limited in their abilities to classify the various collections of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). To address this, we developed Classification of RNAs by Analysis of Length (CoRAL), a machine learning-based approach for classification of RNA molecules. CoRAL uses biologically interpretable features including fragment length and cleavage specificity to distinguish between different ncRNA populations. We evaluated CoRAL using genome-wide small RNA sequencing data sets from four human tissue types and were able to classify six different types of RNAs with ∼80% cross-validation accuracy. Analysis by CoRAL revealed that microRNAs, small nucleolar and transposon-derived RNAs are highly discernible and consistent across all human tissue types assessed, whereas long intergenic ncRNAs, small cytoplasmic RNAs and small nuclear RNAs show less consistent patterns. The ability to reliably annotate loci across tissue types demonstrates the potential of CoRAL to characterize ncRNAs using small RNA sequencing data in less well-characterized organisms. PMID:23700308

  3. The Sm Complex Is Required for the Processing of Non-Coding RNAs by the Exosome

    PubMed Central

    Coy, Sarah; Volanakis, Adam; Shah, Sneha; Vasiljeva, Lidia

    2013-01-01

    A key question in the field of RNA regulation is how some exosome substrates, such as spliceosomal snRNAs and telomerase RNA, evade degradation and are processed into stable, functional RNA molecules. Typical feature of these non-coding RNAs is presence of the Sm complex at the 3′end of the mature RNA molecule. Here, we report that in Saccharomyces cerevisiae presence of intact Sm binding site is required for the exosome-mediated processing of telomerase RNA from a polyadenylated precursor into its mature form and is essential for its function in elongating telomeres. Additionally, we demonstrate that the same pathway is involved in the maturation of snRNAs. Furthermore, the insertion of an Sm binding site into an unstable RNA that is normally completely destroyed by the exosome, leads to its partial stabilization. We also show that telomerase RNA accumulates in Schizosaccharomyces pombe exosome mutants, suggesting a conserved role for the exosome in processing and degradation of telomerase RNA. In summary, our data provide important mechanistic insight into the regulation of exosome dependent RNA processing as well as telomerase RNA biogenesis. PMID:23755256

  4. Two Lamprey Hedgehog Genes Share Non-Coding Regulatory Sequences and Expression Patterns with Gnathostome Hedgehogs

    PubMed Central

    Ekker, Marc; Hadzhiev, Yavor; Müller, Ferenc; Casane, Didier; Magdelenat, Ghislaine; Rétaux, Sylvie

    2010-01-01

    Hedgehog (Hh) genes play major roles in animal development and studies of their evolution, expression and function point to major differences among chordates. Here we focused on Hh genes in lampreys in order to characterize the evolution of Hh signalling at the emergence of vertebrates. Screening of a cosmid library of the river lamprey Lampetra fluviatilis and searching the preliminary genome assembly of the sea lamprey Petromyzon marinus indicate that lampreys have two Hh genes, named Hha and Hhb. Phylogenetic analyses suggest that Hha and Hhb are lamprey-specific paralogs closely related to Sonic/Indian Hh genes. Expression analysis indicates that Hha and Hhb are expressed in a Sonic Hh-like pattern. The two transcripts are expressed in largely overlapping but not identical domains in the lamprey embryonic brain, including a newly-described expression domain in the nasohypophyseal placode. Global alignments of genomic sequences and local alignment with known gnathostome regulatory motifs show that lamprey Hhs share conserved non-coding elements (CNE) with gnathostome Hhs albeit with sequences that have significantly diverged and dispersed. Functional assays using zebrafish embryos demonstrate gnathostome-like midline enhancer activity for CNEs contained in intron2. We conclude that lamprey Hh genes are gnathostome Shh-like in terms of expression and regulation. In addition, they show some lamprey-specific features, including duplication and structural (but not functional) changes in the intronic/regulatory sequences. PMID:20967201

  5. Regulation of Non-coding RNAs in Heat Stress Responses of Plants.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianguo; He, Qingsong; Chen, Gang; Wang, Li; Jin, Biao

    2016-01-01

    Heat stress is an important factor limiting plant growth, development, and productivity; thus, plants have evolved special adaptive mechanisms to cope with high-temperature stress. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are a class of regulatory RNAs that play an important role in many biological processes. Recently developed advanced technologies, such as genome-wide transcriptomic analysis, have revealed that abundant ncRNAs are expressed under heat stress. Although this area of research is still in its infancy, an increasing number of several classes of regulatory ncRNA (i.e., miRNA, siRNA, and lncRNA) related to heat stress responses have been reported. In this mini-review, we discuss our current understanding of the role of ncRNAs in heat stress responses in plants, especially miRNAs, siRNAs, and their targets. For example, the miR398-CSD/CCS-HSF, miR396-WRKY6, miR159-GAMYB, and TAS1-HTT-HSF pathways regulate plant heat tolerance. We highlight the hormone/development-related miRNAs involved in heat stress, and discuss the regulatory networks of miRNA-targets. We also note that DNA methylation and alternative splicing could affect miRNA expression under heat stress, and some lncRNAs could respond to heat stress. Finally, we briefly discuss future prospects concerning the ncRNA-related mechanisms of heat stress responses in plants. PMID:27588021

  6. Identification of novel long non-coding RNAs in triple-negative breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Wenjie; Wang, Wenmin; Xu, Dong; Yan, Xinqiang; Chen, Beibei; Yu, Longyao; Li, Jicheng; Chen, Xiaobing; Ding, Kan; Cao, Feilin

    2015-01-01

    Triple-negative breast carcinomas (TNBC) are characterized by particularly poor outcomes, and there are no established markers significantly associated with prognosis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are subclass of noncoding RNAs that have been recently shown to play critical roles in cancer biology. However, little is known about their mechanistic role in TNBC pathogenesis. In this report, we investigated the expression patterns of lncRNAs from TNBC tissues and matched normal tissues with Agilent Human lncRNA array. We identified 1,758 lncRNAs and 1,254 mRNAs that were differentially expressed (≥ 2-fold change), indicating that many lncRNAs are significantly upregulated or downregulated in TNBC. Among these, XR_250621.1 and NONHSAT125629 were the most upregulated and downregulated lncRNAs respectively. qRT-PCR was employed to validate the microarray analysis findings, and results were consistent with the data from the microarrays. GO and KEGG pathway analysis were applied to explore the potential lncRNAs functions, some pathways including microtubule motor activity and DNA replication were identified in TNBC pathogenesis. Our study revealed that a set of lncRNAs were differentially expressed in TNBC tissues, suggesting that they may play role in TNBC. These results shed light on lncRNAs’ biological functions and provide useful information for exploring potential therapeutic targets for breast cancer. PMID:26078338

  7. Genetic evidence for conserved non-coding element function across species–the ears have it

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Eric E.; Cox, Timothy C.

    2014-01-01

    Comparison of genomic sequences from diverse vertebrate species has revealed numerous highly conserved regions that do not appear to encode proteins or functional RNAs. Often these “conserved non-coding elements,” or CNEs, can direct gene expression to specific tissues in transgenic models, demonstrating they have regulatory function. CNEs are frequently found near “developmental” genes, particularly transcription factors, implying that these elements have essential regulatory roles in development. However, actual examples demonstrating CNE regulatory functions across species have been few, and recent loss-of-function studies of several CNEs in mice have shown relatively minor effects. In this Perspectives article, we discuss new findings in “fancy” rats and Highland cattle demonstrating that function of a CNE near the Hmx1 gene is crucial for normal external ear development and when disrupted can mimic loss-of function Hmx1 coding mutations in mice and humans. These findings provide important support for conserved developmental roles of CNEs in divergent species, and reinforce the concept that CNEs should be examined systematically in the ongoing search for genetic causes of human developmental disorders in the era of genome-scale sequencing. PMID:24478720

  8. Evolutionary divergence and limits of conserved non-coding sequence detection in plant genomes

    PubMed Central

    Reineke, Anna R.; Bornberg-Bauer, Erich; Gu, Jenny

    2011-01-01

    The discovery of regulatory motifs embedded in upstream regions of plants is a particularly challenging bioinformatics task. Previous studies have shown that motifs in plants are short compared with those found in vertebrates. Furthermore, plant genomes have undergone several diversification mechanisms such as genome duplication events which impact the evolution of regulatory motifs. In this article, a systematic phylogenomic comparison of upstream regions is conducted to further identify features of the plant regulatory genomes, the component of genomes regulating gene expression, to enable future de novo discoveries. The findings highlight differences in upstream region properties between major plant groups and the effects of divergence times and duplication events. First, clear differences in upstream region evolution can be detected between monocots and dicots, thus suggesting that a separation of these groups should be made when searching for novel regulatory motifs, particularly since universal motifs such as the TATA box are rare. Second, investigating the decay rate of significantly aligned regions suggests that a divergence time of ∼100 mya sets a limit for reliable conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) detection. Insights presented here will set a framework to help identify embedded motifs of functional relevance by understanding the limits of bioinformatics detection for CNSs. PMID:21470961

  9. Conserved Non-Coding Sequences are Associated with Rates of mRNA Decay in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Spangler, Jacob B.; Feltus, Frank Alex

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state mRNA levels are tightly regulated through a combination of transcriptional and post-transcriptional control mechanisms. The discovery of cis-acting DNA elements that encode these control mechanisms is of high importance. We have investigated the influence of conserved non-coding sequences (CNSs), DNA patterns retained after an ancient whole genome duplication event, on the breadth of gene expression and the rates of mRNA decay in Arabidopsis thaliana. The absence of CNSs near α duplicate genes was associated with a decrease in breadth of gene expression and slower mRNA decay rates while the presence CNSs near α duplicates was associated with an increase in breadth of gene expression and faster mRNA decay rates. The observed difference in mRNA decay rate was fastest in genes with CNSs in both non-transcribed and transcribed regions, albeit through an unknown mechanism. This study supports the notion that some Arabidopsis CNSs regulate the steady-state mRNA levels through post-transcriptional control mechanisms and that CNSs also play a role in controlling the breadth of gene expression. PMID:23675377

  10. 3S: shotgun secondary structure determination of long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Novikova, Irina V; Dharap, Ashutosh; Hennelly, Scott P; Sanbonmatsu, Karissa Y

    2013-09-15

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as an important class of RNAs playing key roles in development, disease and epigenetics. Knowledge of lncRNA structure may be critical in understanding function for many lncRNA systems. Due to the enormous number of possible folds for these sequences, secondary structure determination presents a significant challenge, both experimentally and computationally. Here, we present a new strategy capable of determining the RNA secondary structure in the wet lab without significant reliance on computational predictions. First, we chemically probe the entire lncRNA. Next, using a shotgun approach, we divide the RNA into overlapping fragments and probe these fragments. We then compare probing profiles of fragments with the profiles of the full RNA and identify similarities. Sequence regions with profiles that are similar in the fragment and full-length transcript possess only base pairing partners within the fragment. Thus, by experimentally folding smaller and smaller fragments of the full RNA and probing these chemically, we are able to isolate modular sub-domains, dramatically reducing the number of possible folds. The method also eliminates the possibility of pseudoknots within a modular sub-domain. The 3S technique is ideally suited for lncRNAs because it is designed for long RNA sequences. The 3S-determined secondary structure of a specific lncRNA in one species (e.g., human) enables searches for instances of the same lncRNA in other species. PMID:23927838

  11. Quantitative Profiling of Peptides from RNAs classified as non-coding

    PubMed Central

    Prabakaran, Sudhakaran; Hemberg, Martin; Chauhan, Ruchi; Winter, Dominic; Tweedie-Cullen, Ry Y.; Dittrich, Christian; Hong, Elizabeth; Gunawardena, Jeremy; Steen, Hanno; Kreiman, Gabriel; Steen, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Only a small fraction of the mammalian genome codes for messenger RNAs destined to be translated into proteins, and it is generally assumed that a large portion of transcribed sequences - including introns and several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) do not give rise to peptide products. A systematic examination of translation and physiological regulation of ncRNAs has not been conducted. Here, we use computational methods to identify the products of non-canonical translation in mouse neurons by analyzing unannotated transcripts in combination with proteomic data. This study supports the existence of non-canonical translation products from both intragenic and extragenic genomic regions, including peptides derived from anti-sense transcripts and introns. Moreover, the studied novel translation products exhibit temporal regulation similar to that of proteins known to be involved in neuronal activity processes. These observations highlight a potentially large and complex set of biologically regulated translational events from transcripts formerly thought to lack coding potential. PMID:25403355

  12. RNA exosome-regulated long non-coding RNA transcription controls super-enhancer activity.

    PubMed

    Pefanis, Evangelos; Wang, Jiguang; Rothschild, Gerson; Lim, Junghyun; Kazadi, David; Sun, Jianbo; Federation, Alexander; Chao, Jaime; Elliott, Oliver; Liu, Zhi-Ping; Economides, Aris N; Bradner, James E; Rabadan, Raul; Basu, Uttiya

    2015-05-01

    We have ablated the cellular RNA degradation machinery in differentiated B cells and pluripotent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) by conditional mutagenesis of core (Exosc3) and nuclear RNase (Exosc10) components of RNA exosome and identified a vast number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) and enhancer RNAs (eRNAs) with emergent functionality. Unexpectedly, eRNA-expressing regions accumulate R-loop structures upon RNA exosome ablation, thus demonstrating the role of RNA exosome in resolving deleterious DNA/RNA hybrids arising from active enhancers. We have uncovered a distal divergent eRNA-expressing element (lncRNA-CSR) engaged in long-range DNA interactions and regulating IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer function. CRISPR-Cas9-mediated ablation of lncRNA-CSR transcription decreases its chromosomal looping-mediated association with the IgH 3' regulatory region super-enhancer and leads to decreased class switch recombination efficiency. We propose that the RNA exosome protects divergently transcribed lncRNA expressing enhancers by resolving deleterious transcription-coupled secondary DNA structures, while also regulating long-range super-enhancer chromosomal interactions important for cellular function. PMID:25957685

  13. Structural insights into Transcriptional Repression by non-coding RNAs that bind to Human Pol II

    PubMed Central

    Kassube, Susanne A.; Fang, Jie; Grob, Patricia; Yakovchuk, Petro; Goodrich, James A.; Nogales, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Gene transcription is regulated in response to environmental changes as well as developmental cues. In mammalian cells subjected to stress conditions such as heat shock, transcription of most protein-coding genes decreases, while the transcription of heat shock protein genes increases. Repression involves direct binding to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) of certain non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) that are upregulated upon heat shock. Another class of ncRNAs is also upregulated and binds to Pol II, but does not inhibit transcription. Incorporation of repressive ncRNAs into pre-initiation complexes prevents transcription initiation, while non-repressive ncRNAs are displaced from Pol II by TFIIF. Here, we present cryo-EM reconstructions of human Pol II in complex with six different ncRNAs from mouse and human. Our structures show that both repressive and non-repressive ncRNAs bind to a conserved binding site within the cleft of Pol II. The site, also shared with a previously characterized yeast aptamer, is close to the active center and thus in an ideal position to regulate transcription. Importantly, additional RNA elements extend flexibly beyond the docking site. We propose that the differences concerning the repressive activity of the ncRNA analyzed must be due to the distinct character of these more unstructured, flexible segments of the RNA that emanate from the cleft. PMID:22954660

  14. TUG1: a pivotal oncogenic long non-coding RNA of human cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2016-08-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a group greater than 200 nucleotides in length. An increasing number of studies has shown that lncRNAs play important roles in diverse cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, invasion and chromatin remodelling. In this regard, deregulation of lncRNAs has been documented in human cancers. TUG1 is a recently identified oncogenic lncRNA whose aberrant upregulation has been detected in different types of cancer, including B-cell malignancies, oesophageal squamous cell carcinoma, bladder cancer, hepatocellular carcinoma and osteosarcoma. In these malignancies, knock-down of TUG1 has been shown to suppress cell proliferation, invasion and/or colony formation. Interestingly, TUG1 has been found to be downregulated in non-small cell lung carcinoma, indicative of its tissue-specific function in tumourigenesis. Pertinent to clinical practice, TUG1 may act as a prognostic biomarker for tumours. In this review, we summarize current knowledge concerning the role of TUG1 in tumour progression and discuss mechanisms associated with it. PMID:27339553

  15. Regulation of influenza virus infection by long non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Landeras-Bueno, Sara; Ortín, Juan

    2016-01-01

    Influenza A viruses generate annual epidemics and occasional pandemics of respiratory disease with important consequences for human health and economy. To establish a productive infection, influenza viruses interact with cellular factors to favour their own replication and to suppress antiviral cell responses. Although most virus-host interaction studies have been centred on cell protein factors, most of the human transcriptome comprises non-coding RNAs, as miRNAs and lncRNAs. The latter are key cellular regulators in many cellular processes, including transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation. Influenza virus infection induces the differential expression of hundreds of potential lncRNAs, some of which are related to the antiviral pathways activated by the cell while others may be deregulated by the infection to allow efficient virus multiplication. Although our knowledge on the role of cellular lncRNAs for influenza virus replication and pathogenesis is still at its infancy, several lncRNAs have been described to influence the cell innate response to the virus by altering the histone modification at specific sites, by interaction with specific transcription factors or directly stimulating in cis the expression of specific IFN-induced genes. In addition, at least one lncRNA appears to be required for virus multiplication in an IFN-independent way. PMID:26321158

  16. Identification of a Novel Small Non-Coding RNA Modulating the Intracellular Survival of Brucella melitensis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yufei; Ke, Yuehua; Xu, Jie; Wang, Ligui; Wang, Tongkun; Liang, Hui; Zhang, Wei; Gong, Chunli; Yuan, Jiuyun; Zhuang, Yubin; An, Chang; Lei, Shuangshuang; Du, Xinying; Wang, Zhoujia; Li, Wenna; Yuan, Xitong; Huang, Liuyu; Yang, Xiaoli; Chen, Zeliang

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are gene expression modulators respond to environmental changes, stressful conditions, and pathogenesis. In this study, by using a combined bioinformatic and experimental approach, eight novel sRNA genes were identified in intracellular pathogen Brucella melitensis. BSR0602, one sRNA that was highly induced in stationary phase, was further examined and found to modulate the intracellular survival of B. melitensis. BSR0602 was present at very high levels in vitro under stresses similar to those encountered during infection in host macrophages. Furthermore, BSR0602 was found to be highly expressed in the spleens of infected mice, suggesting its potential role in the control of pathogenesis. BSR0602 targets the mRNAs coding for gntR, a global transcriptional regulator, which is required for B. melitensis virulence. Overexpression of BSR0602 results in distinct reduction in the gntR mRNA level. B. melitensis with high level of BSR0602 is defective in bacteria intracellular survival in macrophages and defective in growth in the spleens of infected mice. Therefore, BSR0602 may directly inhibit the expression of gntR, which then impairs Brucellae intracellular survival and contributes to Brucella infection. Our findings suggest that BSR0602 is responsible for bacterial adaptation to stress conditions and thus modulate B. melitensis intracellular survival. PMID:25852653

  17. Identification of long non-coding RNAs involved in neuronal development and intellectual disability.

    PubMed

    D'haene, Eva; Jacobs, Eva Z; Volders, Pieter-Jan; De Meyer, Tim; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, exome sequencing led to the identification of causal mutations in 16-31% of patients with intellectual disability (ID), leaving the underlying cause for many patients unidentified. In this context, the noncoding part of the human genome remains largely unexplored. For many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) a crucial role in neurodevelopment and hence the human brain is anticipated. Here we aimed at identifying lncRNAs associated with neuronal development and ID. Therefore, we applied an integrated genomics approach, harnessing several public epigenetic datasets. We found that the presence of neuron-specific H3K4me3 confers the highest specificity for genes involved in neurodevelopment and ID. Based on the presence of this feature and GWAS hits for CNS disorders, we identified 53 candidate lncRNA genes. Extensive expression profiling on human brain samples and other tissues, followed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis indicates that at least 24 of these lncRNAs are indeed implicated in processes such as synaptic transmission, nervous system development and neurogenesis. The bidirectional or antisense overlapping orientation relative to multiple coding genes involved in neuronal processes supports these results. In conclusion, we identified several lncRNA genes putatively involved in neurodevelopment and CNS disorders, providing a resource for functional studies. PMID:27319317

  18. Long non-coding RNA MALAT1 regulates retinal neurodegeneration through CREB signaling.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jin; Wang, Xiao-Qun; Li, Yu-Jie; Shan, Kun; Yang, Hong; Wang, Yang-Ning-Zhi; Yao, Mu-Di; Liu, Chang; Li, Xiu-Miao; Shen, Yi; Liu, Jing-Yu; Cheng, Hong; Yuan, Jun; Zhang, Yang-Yang; Jiang, Qin; Yan, Biao

    2016-01-01

    The nervous and vascular systems, although functionally different, share many common regulators of function maintenance. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important players in many biological processes and human disorders. We previously identified a role of MALAT1 in microvascular dysfunction. However, its role in neurodegeneration is still unknown. Here, we used the eye as the model to investigate the role of MALAT1 in retinal neurodegeneration. We show that MALAT1 expression is significantly up-regulated in the retinas, Müller cells, and primary retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) upon stress. MALAT1 knockdown reduces reactive gliosis, Müller cell activation, and RGC survival in vivo and in vitro MALAT1-CREB binding maintains CREB phosphorylation by inhibiting PP2A-mediated dephosphorylation, which leads to continuous CREB signaling activation. Clinical and animal experimentation suggests that MALAT1 dysfunction is implicated in neurodegenerative processes and several human disorders. Collectively, this study reveals that MALAT1 might regulate the development of retinal neurodegeneration through CREB signaling. PMID:26964565

  19. Understanding the Functions of Long Non-Coding RNAs through Their Higher-Order Structures.

    PubMed

    Li, Rui; Zhu, Hongliang; Luo, Yunbo

    2016-01-01

    Although thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in eukaryotes, very few molecular mechanisms have been characterized due to an insufficient understanding of lncRNA structure. Therefore, investigations of lncRNA structure and subsequent elucidation of the regulatory mechanisms are urgently needed. However, since lncRNA are high molecular weight molecules, which makes their crystallization difficult, obtaining information about their structure is extremely challenging, and the structures of only several lncRNAs have been determined so far. Here, we review the structure-function relationships of the widely studied lncRNAs found in the animal and plant kingdoms, focusing on the principles and applications of both in vitro and in vivo technologies for the study of RNA structures, including dimethyl sulfate-sequencing (DMS-seq), selective 2'-hydroxyl acylation analyzed by primer extension-sequencing (SHAPE-seq), parallel analysis of RNA structure (PARS), and fragmentation sequencing (FragSeq). The aim of this review is to provide a better understanding of lncRNA biological functions by studying them at the structural level. PMID:27196897

  20. New complete mitochondrial genome of the Perccottus glenii (Perciformes, Odontobutidae): additional non-coding region.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiaohui; Shi, Yangbai; Zhong, Liqiang; Wang, Minghua; Sun, Lihui; Yang, Guoliang

    2016-05-01

    Perccottus glenii is a species of freshwater sleeper native to the Russian Far East, north-eastern China, and the northern part of the Korean Penninsula with introduced populations in other regions of Eurasia. In this study, a new complete mitochondrial genome of Perccottus glenii was reported. The circular genome is 16,510 bp in length and consists of 13 protein-coding genes, 22 tRNA genes, 2 ribosomal RNA genes, and 1 control region. Except the origin of the light strand replication (OL), an additional non-coding region was present between ND6 and tRNA-Glu in the Light strand. The overall nucleotide composition was 30.5% A, 29.2% T, 24.4% C and 15.9% G, with an A + T bias of 59.7%. The gene composition and the structural arrangement of the P. glenii complete mtDNA were identical to most of the other vertebrates. The molecular data here we presented could play a useful role to study the evolutionary relationships and population genetics of Odontobutidae fish. PMID:25329281

  1. Experimental identification and analysis of macronuclear non-coding RNAs from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kasper L.; Nielsen, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    The ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila is an important eukaryotic model organism that has been used in pioneering studies of general phenomena, such as ribozymes, telomeres, chromatin structure and genome reorganization. Recent work has shown that Tetrahymena has many classes of small RNA molecules expressed during vegetative growth or sexual reorganization. In order to get an overview of medium-sized (40–500 nt) RNAs expressed from the Tetrahymena genome, we created a size-fractionated cDNA library from macronuclear RNA and analyzed 80 RNAs, most of which were previously unknown. The most abundant class was small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), many of which are formed by an unusual maturation pathway. The modifications guided by the snoRNAs were analyzed bioinformatically and experimentally and many Tetrahymena-specific modifications were found, including several in an essential, but not conserved domain of ribosomal RNA. Of particular interest, we detected two methylations in the 5′-end of U6 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) that has an unusual structure in Tetrahymena. Further, we found a candidate for the first U8 outside metazoans, and an unusual U14 candidate. In addition, a number of candidates for new non-coding RNAs were characterized by expression analysis at different growth conditions. PMID:21967850

  2. Natural variation in non-coding regions underlying phenotypic diversity in budding yeast.

    PubMed

    Salinas, Francisco; de Boer, Carl G; Abarca, Valentina; García, Verónica; Cuevas, Mara; Araos, Sebastian; Larrondo, Luis F; Martínez, Claudio; Cubillos, Francisco A

    2016-01-01

    Linkage mapping studies in model organisms have typically focused their efforts in polymorphisms within coding regions, ignoring those within regulatory regions that may contribute to gene expression variation. In this context, differences in transcript abundance are frequently proposed as a source of phenotypic diversity between individuals, however, until now, little molecular evidence has been provided. Here, we examined Allele Specific Expression (ASE) in six F1 hybrids from Saccharomyces cerevisiae derived from crosses between representative strains of the four main lineages described in yeast. ASE varied between crosses with levels ranging between 28% and 60%. Part of the variation in expression levels could be explained by differences in transcription factors binding to polymorphic cis-regulations and to differences in trans-activation depending on the allelic form of the TF. Analysis on highly expressed alleles on each background suggested ASN1 as a candidate transcript underlying nitrogen consumption differences between two strains. Further promoter allele swap analysis under fermentation conditions confirmed that coding and non-coding regions explained aspartic and glutamic acid consumption differences, likely due to a polymorphism affecting Uga3 binding. Together, we provide a new catalogue of variants to bridge the gap between genotype and phenotype. PMID:26898953

  3. Role of long non-coding RNA-RNCR3 in atherosclerosis-related vascular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Shan, K; Jiang, Q; Wang, X-Q; Wang, Y-N-Z; Yang, H; Yao, M-D; Liu, C; Li, X-M; Yao, J; Liu, B; Zhang, Y-Y; J, Yong; Yan, B

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is one of the most common vascular disorders. Endothelial cell (EC) dysfunction and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation contributes to the development of atherosclerosis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been implicated in several biological processes and human diseases. Here we show that lncRNA-RNCR3 is expressed in ECs and VSMCs. RNCR3 expression is significantly upregulated in mouse and human aortic atherosclerotic lesions, and cultured ECs and VSMCs upon ox-LDL treatment in vitro. RNCR3 knockdown accelerates the development of atherosclerosis, aggravates hypercholesterolemia and inflammatory factor releases, and decreases EC and VSMC proliferation in vivo. RNCR3 knockdown also reduces the proliferation and migration, and accelerates apoptosis development of EC and VSMC in vitro. RNCR3 acts as a ceRNA, and forms a feedback loop with Kruppel-like factor 2 and miR-185-5p to regulate cell function. This study reveals that RNCR3 has an atheroprotective role in atherosclerosis, and its intervention is a promising strategy for treating atherosclerosis-related vascular dysfunction. PMID:27253412

  4. CCAT1: a pivotal oncogenic long non-coding RNA in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Xin, Yu; Li, Zheng; Shen, Jianxiong; Chan, Matthew T V; Wu, William Ka Kei

    2016-06-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) compose a group of non-protein-coding RNAs - more than 200 nucleotides in length. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs play important roles in different cellular processes, including proliferation, differentiation, migration and invasion. Deregulation of lncRNAs has been widely reported in human tumours, in which they are able to function as either oncogenes (on the one hand) or tumour suppressor genes (on the other). Deregulation of CCAT1 (colon cancer-associated transcript-1), an oncogenic lncRNA, has been documented in different types of malignancy, such as gastric cancer, colorectal cancer and hepatocellular carcinoma. In this regard, enforced expression of CCAT1 exerts potent tumorigenic effects by promoting cell proliferation, invasion and migration. Recent evidence has also shown that CCAT1 may serve as a prognostic cancer biomarker. In this review, we provide an overview of current evidence relating to the role and biological function of CCAT1 in tumour development. PMID:27134049

  5. Non-coding RNA as mediators in microenvironment-breast cancer cell communication.

    PubMed

    Patel, Jimmy S; Hu, Madeleine; Sinha, Garima; Walker, Nykia D; Sherman, Lauren S; Gallagher, Ashley; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2016-09-28

    The tumor microenvironment has a critical role in the survival and decision of the cancer cells. These include support by enhanced angiogenesis, and metastasis or adaptation of dormancy. This article discusses methods by which the microenvironment sustains the tumor. This process is important as it will identify avenues of drug targets. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are evolving as key mediators in the interaction between the cancer cells and the microenvironment. Thus, the question is how to develop methods to effectively block the effects of the ncRNA and/or to introduce them to prevent metastasis, dormancy or to reverse dormancy. We focused on the advantages of using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for RNA delivery. MSCs can be available as "off-the-shelf" cells. Thus far, MSCs are shown to be safe when transplanted across allogeneic barriers. We discussed the various methods by which MSCs can interact with cancer cells to deliver ncRNA or antagomirs. We also include the advances and possible confounds of using these methods. Overall, this review article provides a potential method by which MSCs can be used for effective delivery of nucleic acid to treat cancer. PMID:26582656

  6. Identification of long non-coding RNAs involved in neuronal development and intellectual disability

    PubMed Central

    D’haene, Eva; Jacobs, Eva Z.; Volders, Pieter-Jan; De Meyer, Tim; Menten, Björn; Vergult, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Recently, exome sequencing led to the identification of causal mutations in 16–31% of patients with intellectual disability (ID), leaving the underlying cause for many patients unidentified. In this context, the noncoding part of the human genome remains largely unexplored. For many long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) a crucial role in neurodevelopment and hence the human brain is anticipated. Here we aimed at identifying lncRNAs associated with neuronal development and ID. Therefore, we applied an integrated genomics approach, harnessing several public epigenetic datasets. We found that the presence of neuron-specific H3K4me3 confers the highest specificity for genes involved in neurodevelopment and ID. Based on the presence of this feature and GWAS hits for CNS disorders, we identified 53 candidate lncRNA genes. Extensive expression profiling on human brain samples and other tissues, followed by Gene Set Enrichment Analysis indicates that at least 24 of these lncRNAs are indeed implicated in processes such as synaptic transmission, nervous system development and neurogenesis. The bidirectional or antisense overlapping orientation relative to multiple coding genes involved in neuronal processes supports these results. In conclusion, we identified several lncRNA genes putatively involved in neurodevelopment and CNS disorders, providing a resource for functional studies. PMID:27319317

  7. How Many Non-coding RNAs Does It Take to Compensate Male/Female Genetic Imbalance?

    PubMed

    Ouimette, Jean-François; Rougeulle, Claire

    2016-01-01

    Genetic sex determination in mammals relies on dimorphic sex chromosomes that confer phenotypic/physiologic differences between males and females. In this heterogametic system, X and Y chromosomes diverged from an ancestral pair of autosomes, creating a genetic disequilibrium between XX females and XY males. Dosage compensation mechanisms alleviate intrinsic gene dosage imbalance, leading to equal expression levels of most X-linked genes in the two sexes. In therian mammals, this is achieved through inactivation of one of the two X chromosomes in females. Failure to undergo X-chromosome inactivation (XCI) results in developmental arrest and death. Although fundamental for survival, a surprising loose conservation in the mechanisms to achieve XCI during development in therian lineage has been, and continues, to be uncovered. XCI involves the concerted action of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), including the well-known Xist RNA, and has thus become a classical paradigm to study the mode of action of this particular class of transcripts. In this chapter, we will describe the processes coping with sex chromosome genetic imbalance and how ncRNAs underlie dosage compensation mechanisms and influence male-female differences in mammals. Moreover, we will discuss how ncRNAs have been tinkered with during therian evolution to adapt XCI mechanistic to species-specific constraints. PMID:26659486

  8. Molecular Evolution of the Non-Coding Eosinophil Granule Ontogeny Transcript

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Dominic; Stadler, Peter F.

    2011-01-01

    Eukaryotic genomes are pervasively transcribed. A large fraction of the transcriptional output consists of long, mRNA-like, non-protein-coding transcripts (mlncRNAs). The evolutionary history of mlncRNAs is still largely uncharted territory. In this contribution, we explore in detail the evolutionary traces of the eosinophil granule ontogeny transcript (EGOT), an experimentally confirmed representative of an abundant class of totally intronic non-coding transcripts (TINs). EGOT is located antisense to an intron of the ITPR1 gene. We computationally identify putative EGOT orthologs in the genomes of 32 different amniotes, including orthologs from primates, rodents, ungulates, carnivores, afrotherians, and xenarthrans, as well as putative candidates from basal amniotes, such as opossum or platypus. We investigate the EGOT gene phylogeny, analyze patterns of sequence conservation, and the evolutionary conservation of the EGOT gene structure. We show that EGO-B, the spliced isoform, may be present throughout the placental mammals, but most likely dates back even further. We demonstrate here for the first time that the whole EGOT locus is highly structured, containing several evolutionary conserved, and thermodynamic stable secondary structures. Our analyses allow us to postulate novel functional roles of a hitherto poorly understood region at the intron of EGO-B which is highly conserved at the sequence level. The region contains a novel ITPR1 exon and also conserved RNA secondary structures together with a conserved TATA-like element, which putatively acts as a promoter of an independent regulatory element. PMID:22303364

  9. The H19 Non-Coding RNA Is Essential for Human Tumor Growth

    PubMed Central

    Matouk, Imad J.; DeGroot, Nathan; Mezan, Shaul; Ayesh, Suhail; Abu-lail, Rasha; Hochberg, Abraham; Galun, Eithan

    2007-01-01

    Background Mutations and epigenetic aberrant signaling of growth factors pathways contribute to carcinogenesis. Recent studies reveal that non-coding RNAs are controllers of gene expression. H19 is an imprinted gene that demonstrates maternal monoallelic expression without a protein product; although its expression is shut off in most tissues postnatally, it is re-activated during adult tissue regeneration and tumorigenesis. Moreover, H19 is highly expressed in liver metastasis derived from a range of carcinomas. The objective of this study is to explore the role of H19 in carcinogenesis, and to determine its identification as an anti-tumor target. Methodology/ Principle Findings By controlling oxygen pressure during tumor cell growth and H19 expression levels, we investigated the role of H19 expression in vitro and in vivo in hepatocellular (HCC) and bladder carcinoma. Hypoxia upregulates the level of H19 RNA. Ablations of tumorigenicity of HCC and bladder carcinomas in vivo are seen by H19 knockdown which also significantly abrogates anchorage-independent growth after hypoxia recovery, while ectopic H19 expression enhances tumorigenic potential of carcinoma cells in vivo. Knocking-down H19 message in hypoxic stress severely diminishes p57kip2 induction. We identified a number of potential downstream targets of H19 RNA, including angiogenin and FGF18. Conclusions H19 RNA harbors pro-tumorigenic properties, thus the H19 gene behaves as an oncogene and may serve as a potential new target for anti-tumor therapy. PMID:17786216

  10. Transcriptomic profiling of long non-coding RNAs in dermatomyositis by microarray analysis.

    PubMed

    Peng, Qing-Lin; Zhang, Ya-Mei; Yang, Han-Bo; Shu, Xiao-Ming; Lu, Xin; Wang, Guo-Chun

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are prevalently transcribed in the genome and have been found to be of functional importance. However, the potential roles of lncRNAs in dermatomyositis (DM) remain unknown. In this study, a lncRNA + mRNA microarray analysis was performed to profile lncRNAs and mRNAs from 15 treatment-naive DM patients and 5 healthy controls. We revealed a total of 1198 lncRNAs (322 up-regulated and 876 down-regulated) and 1213 mRNAs (665 up-regulated and 548 down-regulated) were significantly differentially expressed in DM patients compared with the healthy controls (fold change>2, P < 0.05). Subgrouping DM patients according to the presence of interstitial lung disease and anti-Jo-1 antibody revealed different expression patterns of the lncRNAs. Pathway and gene ontology analysis for the differentially expressed mRNAs confirmed that type 1 interferon signaling was the most significantly dysregulated pathway in all DM subgroups. In addition, distinct pathways that uniquely associated with DM subgroup were also identified. Bioinformatics prediction suggested that linc-DGCR6-1 may be a lncRNA that regulates type 1 interferon-inducible gene USP18, which was found highly expressed in the perifascicular areas of the muscle fibers of DM patients. Our findings provide an overview of aberrantly expressed lncRNAs in DM muscle and further broaden the understanding of DM pathogenesis. PMID:27605457

  11. Non-Coding RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling and Cancer Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Jing-Wen; Wang, Ling-Yu; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer frequently relapses from therapy and inevitably progresses to a bone-metastatic status with no cure. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to androgen deprivation therapy has the potential to lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for type of prostate cancer with poor prognosis. Progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is characterized by aberrant androgen receptor (AR) expression and persistent AR signaling activity. Alterations in metabolic activity regulated by oncogenic pathways, such as c-Myc, were found to promote prostate cancer growth during the development of CRPC. Non-coding RNAs represent a diverse family of regulatory transcripts that drive tumorigenesis of prostate cancer and various other cancers by their hyperactivity or diminished function. A number of studies have examined differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in each stage of prostate cancer. Herein, we highlight the emerging impacts of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs linked to reactivation of the AR signaling axis and reprogramming of the cellular metabolism in prostate cancer. The translational implications of non-coding RNA research for developing new biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for CRPC are also discussed. PMID:26690121

  12. Molecular evolution of coding and non-coding sequences of the growth hormone receptor (GHR) gene in the family Bovidae.

    PubMed

    Maj, Andrzej; Zwierzchowski, Lech

    2006-01-01

    The GHR gene exon 1A and exon 4 with fragments of its flanking introns were sequenced in twelve Bovidae species and the obtained sequences were aligned and analysed by the ClustalW method. In coding exon 4 only three interspecies differences were found, one of which had an effect on the amino-acid sequence--leucine 152 proline. The average mutation frequency in non-coding exon 1A was 10.5 per 100 bp, and was 4.6-fold higher than that in coding exon 4 (2.3 per 100 bp). The mutation frequency in intron sequences was similar to that in non-coding exon 1A (8.9 vs 10.5/100 bp). For non-coding exon 1A, the mutation levels were lower within than between the subfamilies Bovinae and Caprinae. Exon 4 was 100% identical within the genera Ovis, Capra, Bison, and Bos and 97.7% identical for Ovis moschatus, Ammotragus lervia and Bovinae species. The identity level of non-coding exon 1A of the GHR gene was 93.8% between species belonging to Bovinae and Caprinae. The average mutation rate was 0.2222/100 bp/MY and 0.0513/100 bp/MY for the Bovidae GHR gene exons 1A and 4, respectively. Thus, the GHR gene is well conserved in the Bovidae family. Also, in this study some novel intraspecies polymorphisms were found for cattle and sheep. PMID:17044257

  13. Sequence Variability in Viral Genome Non-coding Regions Likely Contribute to Observed Differences in Viral Replication Amongst MARV Strains

    PubMed Central

    ALONSO, JESUS A.; PATTERSON, JEAN L.

    2013-01-01

    The Marburg viruses Musoke (MARV-Mus) and Angola (MARV-Ang) have highly similar genomic sequences. Analysis of viral replication using various assays consistently identified MARV-Ang as the faster replicating virus. Non-coding genomic regions of negative sense RNA viruses are known to play a role in viral gene expression. A comparison of the six non-coding regions using bicistronic minigenomes revealed that the first two non-coding regions (NP / VP35 and VP35 / VP40) differed significantly in their transcriptional regulation. Deletion mutation analysis of the MARV-Mus NP / VP35 region further revealed that the MARV polymerase (L) is able to initiate production of the downstream gene without the presence of highly conserved regulatory signals. Bicistronic minigenome assays also identified the VP30 mRNA 5′ untranslated region as an rZAP-targeted RNA motif. Overall, our studies indicate that the high variation of MARV non-coding regions may play a significant role in observed differences in transcription and/or replication. PMID:23510675

  14. Non-Coding RNAs in Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer: Regulation of Androgen Receptor Signaling and Cancer Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Shih, Jing-Wen; Wang, Ling-Yu; Hung, Chiu-Lien; Kung, Hsing-Jien; Hsieh, Chia-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Hormone-refractory prostate cancer frequently relapses from therapy and inevitably progresses to a bone-metastatic status with no cure. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to androgen deprivation therapy has the potential to lead to the discovery of novel therapeutic targets for type of prostate cancer with poor prognosis. Progression to castration-resistant prostate cancer (CRPC) is characterized by aberrant androgen receptor (AR) expression and persistent AR signaling activity. Alterations in metabolic activity regulated by oncogenic pathways, such as c-Myc, were found to promote prostate cancer growth during the development of CRPC. Non-coding RNAs represent a diverse family of regulatory transcripts that drive tumorigenesis of prostate cancer and various other cancers by their hyperactivity or diminished function. A number of studies have examined differentially expressed non-coding RNAs in each stage of prostate cancer. Herein, we highlight the emerging impacts of microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs linked to reactivation of the AR signaling axis and reprogramming of the cellular metabolism in prostate cancer. The translational implications of non-coding RNA research for developing new biomarkers and therapeutic strategies for CRPC are also discussed. PMID:26690121

  15. Gene Expression of Protein-Coding and Non-Coding RNAs Related to Polyembryogenesis in the Parasitic Wasp, Copidosoma floridanum

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Hiroki; Yoshimura, Jin; Iwabuchi, Kikuo

    2014-01-01

    Polyembryony is a unique form of development in which many embryos are clonally produced from a single egg. Polyembryony is known to occur in many animals, but the underlying genetic mechanism responsible is unknown. In a parasitic wasp, Copidosoma floridanum, polyembryogenesis is initiated during the formation and division of the morula. In the present study, cDNA libraries were constructed from embryos at the cleavage and subsequent primary morula stages, times when polyembryogenesis is likely to be controlled genetically. Of 182 and 263 cDNA clones isolated from these embryos, 38% and 70%, respectively, were very similar to protein-coding genes obtained from BLAST analysis and 55 and 65 clones, respectively, were stage-specific. In our libraries we also detected a high frequency of long non-coding RNA. Some of these showed stage-specific expression patterns in reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR) analysis. The stage-specificity of expression implies that these protein-coding and non-coding genes are related to polyembryogenesis in C. floridanum. The non-coding genes are not similar to any known non-coding RNAs and so are good candidates as regulators of polyembryogenesis. PMID:25469914

  16. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition: focus on metastatic cascade, alternative splicing, non-coding RNAs and modulating compounds

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a key process in embryonic development and metastases formation during malignant progression. This review focuses on transcriptional regulation, non-coding RNAs, alternative splicing events and cell adhesion molecules regulation during EMT. Additionally, we summarize the knowledge with regard to the small potentially druggable molecules capable of modulating EMT for cancer therapy. PMID:24053443

  17. Long non-coding RNAs as prognostic markers in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Hairong; Li, Juan; Koirala, Pratirodh; Ding, Xianfeng; Chen, Binghai; Wang, Yiheng; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Chuanxin; Zhang, Xu; Mo, Yin-Yuan

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently shown to play an important role in gene regulation and normal cellular functions, and disease processes. However, despite the overwhelming number of lncRNAs identified to date, little is known about their role in cancer for vast majority of them. The present study aims to determine whether lncRNAs can serve as prognostic markers in human breast cancer. We interrogated the breast invasive carcinoma dataset of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) at the cBioPortal consisting of ~ 1,000 cases. Among 2,730 lncRNAs analyzed, 577 lncRNAs had alterations ranging from 1% to 32% frequency, which include mutations, alterations of copy number and RNA expression. We found that deregulation of 11 lncRNAs, primarily due to copy number alteration, is associated with poor overall survival. At RNA expression level, upregulation of 4 lncRNAs (LINC00657, LINC00346, LINC00654 and HCG11) was associated with poor overall survival. A third signature consists of 9 lncRNAs (LINC00705, LINC00310, LINC00704, LINC00574, FAM74A3, UMODL1-AS1, ARRDC1-AS1, HAR1A, and LINC00323) and their upregulation can predict recurrence. Finally, we selected LINC00657 to determine their role in breast cancer, and found that LINC00657 knockout significantly suppresses tumor cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that it plays an oncogenic role. Together, these results highlight the clinical significance of lncRNAs, and thus, these lncRNAs may serve as prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:26942882

  18. Evolutionary annotation of conserved long non-coding RNAs in major mammalian species.

    PubMed

    Bu, DeChao; Luo, HaiTao; Jiao, Fei; Fang, ShuangSang; Tan, ChengFu; Liu, ZhiYong; Zhao, Yi

    2015-08-01

    Mammalian genomes contain tens of thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) that have been implicated in diverse biological processes. However, the lncRNA transcriptomes of most mammalian species have not been established, limiting the evolutionary annotation of these novel transcripts. Based on RNA sequencing data from six tissues of nine species, we built comprehensive lncRNA catalogs (4,142-42,558 lncRNAs) covering the major mammalian species. Compared to protein- coding RNAs, expression of lncRNAs exhibits striking lineage specificity. Notably, although 30%-99% human lncRNAs are conserved across different species on DNA locus level, only 20%-27% of these conserved lncRNA loci are detected to transcription, which represents a stark contrast to the proportion of conserved protein-coding genes (48%-80%). This finding provides a valuable resource for experimental scientists to study the mechanisms of lncRNAs. Moreover, we constructed lncRNA expression phylogenetic trees across nine mammals and demonstrated that lncRNA expression profiles can reliably determine phylogenic placement in a manner similar to their coding counterparts. Our data also reveal that the evolutionary rate of lncRNA expression varies among tissues and is significantly higher than those for protein-coding genes. To streamline the processes of browsing lncRNAs and detecting their evolutionary statuses, we integrate all the data produced in this study into a database named PhyloNONCODE (http://www.bioinfo.org/phyloNoncode). Our work starts to place mammalian lncRNAs in an evolutionary context and represent a rich resource for comparative and functional analyses of this critical layer of genome. PMID:26117828

  19. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR promotes carcinogenesis and invasion of gastric adenocarcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Na Keum; Lee, Jung Hwa; Park, Chan Hyuk; Yu, Dayeon; Lee, Yong Chan; Cheong, Jae-Ho; Noh, Sung Hoon; Lee, Sang Kil

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • HOTAIR expression was tested in fifty patients with gastric cancer. • Cell proliferation was measured after HOTAIR silencing in gastric cancer cell line. • siRNA–HOTAIR suppresses cell invasiveness and capacity of migration. • Knock down of HOTAR leads to decreased expression of EMT markers. • Inhibition of HOTAIR induces apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. - Abstract: Gastric cancer is one of the major causes of cancer death worldwide; however, the mechanism of carcinogenesis is complex and poorly understood. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) recently emerged as a promoter of metastasis in various cancers including gastric cancer. Here we investigated the impact of HOTAIR on apoptosis, cell proliferation and cell cycle to dissect the carcinogenesis of gastric cancer. We examined the mechanism of invasion and metastasis and analyzed the clinical significance of HOTAIR. Downregulation of HOTAIR was confirmed by two different siRNAs. The expression of HOTAIR was significantly elevated in various gastric cancer cell lines and tissues compared to normal control. si-HOTAIR significantly reduced viability in MKN 28, MKN 74, and KATO III cells but not in AGS cells. si-HOTAIR induced apoptosis in KATO III cells. Lymphovascular invasion and lymph node metastasis were more common in the high level of HOTAIR group. si-HOTAIR significantly decreased invasiveness and migration. si-HOTAIR led to differential expression of epithelial to mesenchymal transition markers. We found that HOTAIR was involved in inhibition of apoptosis and promoted invasiveness, supporting a role for HOTAIR in carcinogenesis and progression of gastric cancer.

  20. Identification of Differentially Expressed Long Non-coding RNAs in Polarized Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zikun; Luo, Qing; Yao, Fangyi; Qing, Cheng; Ye, Jianqing; Deng, Yating; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages display remarkable plasticity, with the ability to undergo dynamic transition between classically and alternatively activated phenotypes. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are more than 200 nucleotides in length and play roles in various biological pathways. However, the role of lncRNAs in regulating macrophage polarization has yet to be explored. In this study, lncRNAs expression profiles were determined in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M(IFN-γ + LPS) or M(IL-4) phenotypes. Compared with primary MDMs, 9343 lncRNAs and 5903 mRNAs were deregulated in M(IFN-γ + LPS) group (fold change ≥2.0, P < 0.05), 4592 lncRNAs and 3122 mRNAs were deregulated in M(IL-4) group. RT-qPCR results were generally consistent with the microarray data. Furthermore, we found that TCONS_00019715 is expressed at a higher level in M(IFN-γ + LPS) macrophages than in M(IL-4) macrophages. TCONS_00019715 expression was decreased when M(IFN-γ + LPS) converted to M(IL-4) whereas increased when M(IL-4) converted to M(IFN-γ + LPS). Knockdown of TCONS_00019715 following the activation of THP-1 cellls using IFN-γ and LPS diminished the expression of M(IFN-γ + LPS) markers, and elevated the expression of M(IL-4) markers. These data show a significantly altered lncRNA and mRNA expression profile in macrophages exposure to different activating conditions. Dysregulation of some of these lncRNAs may play important roles in regulating macrophage polarization. PMID:26796525

  1. Long non-coding RNAs as prognostic markers in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hairong; Li, Juan; Koirala, Pratirodh; Ding, Xianfeng; Chen, Binghai; Wang, Yiheng; Wang, Zheng; Wang, Chuanxin; Zhang, Xu; Mo, Yin-Yuan

    2016-04-12

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been recently shown to play an important role in gene regulation and normal cellular functions, and disease processes. However, despite the overwhelming number of lncRNAs identified to date, little is known about their role in cancer for vast majority of them. The present study aims to determine whether lncRNAs can serve as prognostic markers in human breast cancer. We interrogated the breast invasive carcinoma dataset of the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) at the cBioPortal consisting of ~ 1,000 cases. Among 2,730 lncRNAs analyzed, 577 lncRNAs had alterations ranging from 1% to 32% frequency, which include mutations, alterations of copy number and RNA expression. We found that deregulation of 11 lncRNAs, primarily due to copy number alteration, is associated with poor overall survival. At RNA expression level, upregulation of 4 lncRNAs (LINC00657, LINC00346, LINC00654 and HCG11) was associated with poor overall survival. A third signature consists of 9 lncRNAs (LINC00705, LINC00310, LINC00704, LINC00574, FAM74A3, UMODL1-AS1, ARRDC1-AS1, HAR1A, and LINC00323) and their upregulation can predict recurrence. Finally, we selected LINC00657 to determine their role in breast cancer, and found that LINC00657 knockout significantly suppresses tumor cell growth and proliferation, suggesting that it plays an oncogenic role. Together, these results highlight the clinical significance of lncRNAs, and thus, these lncRNAs may serve as prognostic markers for breast cancer. PMID:26942882

  2. Natural Antisense Transcripts and Long Non-Coding RNA in Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Arthanari, Yamini; Heintzen, Christian; Griffiths-Jones, Sam; Crosthwaite, Susan K.

    2014-01-01

    The prevalence of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) and natural antisense transcripts (NATs) has been reported in a variety of organisms. While a consensus has yet to be reached on their global importance, an increasing number of examples have been shown to be functional, regulating gene expression at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from the ABI SOLiD platform to identify lncRNA and NATs obtained from samples of the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa grown under different light and temperature conditions. We identify 939 novel lncRNAs, of which 477 are antisense to annotated genes. Across the whole dataset, the extent of overlap between sense and antisense transcripts is large: 371 sense/antisense transcripts are complementary over 500 nts or more and 236 overlap by more than 1000 nts. Most prevalent are 3′ end overlaps between convergently transcribed sense/antisense pairs, but examples of divergently transcribed pairs and nested transcripts are also present. We confirm the expression of a subset of sense/antisense transcript pairs by qPCR. We examine the size, types of overlap and expression levels under the different environmental stimuli of light and temperature, and identify 11 lncRNAs that are up-regulated in response to light. We also find differences in transcript length and the position of introns between protein-coding transcripts that have antisense expression and transcripts with no antisense expression. These results demonstrate the ability of N. crassa lncRNAs and NATs to be regulated by different environmental stimuli and provide the scope for further investigation into the function of NATs. PMID:24621812

  3. Analysis of dysregulated long non-coding RNA expressions in glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Balci, Tugce; Yilmaz Susluer, Sunde; Kayabasi, Cagla; Ozmen Yelken, Besra; Biray Avci, Cigir; Gunduz, Cumhur

    2016-09-15

    Long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are associated with various biological roles such as embryogenesis, stem cell biology, cellular development and present specific tissue expression profiles. Aberrant expression of lncRNAs are thought to play a critical role in the progression and development of various cancer types, including gliomas. Glioblastomas (GBM) are common and malignant primary brain tumours. Brain cancer stem cells (BCSC) are isolated from both low and high-grade tumours in adults and children, by cell fraction which express neuronal stem cell surface marker CD133. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression profiles of lncRNAs in brain tumour cells and determine its potential biological function. For this purpose, U118MG-U87MG; GBM stem cell series were used. Human parental brain cancer cells were included as the control group; the expressions of disease related human lncRNA profiles were studied by LightCycler 480 real-time PCR. Expression profiles of 83 lncRNA genes were analyzed for a significant dysregulation, compared to the control cells. Among lncRNAs, 51 lncRNA genes down-regulated, while 8 lncRNA genes were up-regulated. PCAT-1 (-2.36), MEG3 (-5.34), HOTAIR (-2.48) lncRNAs showed low expression in glioblastoma compared to the human (parental) brain cancer stem cells, indicating their role as tumour suppressor genes on gliomas. As a result, significant changes for anti-cancer gene expressions were detected with disease-related human lncRNA array plates. Identification of novel target genes may lead to promising developments in human brain cancer treatment. PMID:27306825

  4. Control of somatic tissue differentiation by the long non-coding RNA TINCR

    PubMed Central

    Kretz, Markus; Siprashvili, Zurab; Chu, Ci; Webster, Dan E.; Zehnder, Ashley; Qu, Kun; Lee, Carolyn S.; Flockhart, Ross J.; Groff, Abigail F.; Chow, Jennifer; Johnston, Danielle; Kim, Grace E.; Spitale, Robert C.; Flynn, Ryan A.; Zheng, Grace X. Y.; Aiyer, Subhadra; Raj, Arjun; Rinn, John L.; Chang, Howard Y.; Khavari, Paul A.

    2013-01-01

    Several of the thousands of human long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been functionally characterized1–4; however, potential roles for lncRNAs in somatic tissue differentiation remain poorly understood. Here we show that a 3.7-kilobase lncRNA, terminal differentiation-induced ncRNA (TINCR), controls human epidermal differentiation by a post-transcriptional mechanism. TINCR is required for high messenger RNA abundance of key differentiation genes, many of which are mutated in human skin diseases, including FLG, LOR, ALOXE3, ALOX12B, ABCA12, CASP14 and ELOVL3. TINCR-deficient epidermis lacked terminal differentiation ultrastructure, including keratohyalin granules and intact lamellar bodies. Genome-scale RNA interactome analysis revealed that TINCR interacts with a range of differentiation mRNAs. TINCR–mRNA interaction occurs through a 25-nucleotide ‘TINCR box’ motif that is strongly enriched in interacting mRNAs and required for TINCR binding. A high-throughput screen to analyse TINCR binding capacity to approximately 9,400 human recombinant proteins revealed direct binding of TINCR RNA to the staufen1 (STAU1) protein. STAU1-deficient tissue recapitulated the impaired differentiation seen with TINCR depletion. Loss of UPF1 and UPF2, both of which are required for STAU1-mediated RNA decay, however, did not have differentiation effects. Instead, the TINCR–STAU1 complex seems to mediate stabilization of differentiation mRNAs, such as KRT80. These data identify TINCR as a key lncRNA required for somatic tissue differentiation, which occurs through lncRNA binding to differentiation mRNAs to ensure their expression. PMID:23201690

  5. Microarray expression profile analysis of aberrant long non-coding RNAs in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yao, Juan; Huang, Jun-Xing; Lin, Mei; Wu, Zheng-Dong; Yu, Hong; Wang, Peng-Cheng; Ye, Jun; Chen, Ping; Wu, Jing; Zhao, Guo-Jun

    2016-06-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) plays an important role in tumorigenesis. However, the function and regulatory mechanism of lncRNAs are still unclear in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC). To address this challenge, we screened lncRNAs expression profiles in 3 pairs of ESCC and matched non-cancerous tissues by microarray assay and identified the relationship between lncRNAs expression in ESCC tissue and clinicopathological characteristics and prognosis of patients with ESCC. We found 182 lncRNAs that were significantly differently expressed in ESCC tissues versus the matched non-cancerous tissues. Gene ontology and pathway analysis results suggested that the primary biological processes of these genes were involved in extracellular matrix, immune responses, cell differentiation and cell proliferation. Through cis and trans analyzing, we found 4 lncRNAs (ENST00000480669, NONHSAT104436, NONHSAT126998 and NONHSAT112918) may play important roles in tumorigenesis of ESCC. The four lncRNAs were checked in 73 patients with ESCC. The results showed that they mainly related to tumor metastasis. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that high expression of NONHSAT104436, NONHSAT126998 and low expression of ENST00000480669 were related to poor 3-year overall survival (P=0.003, 0.032 and 0.040, respectively). Multivariate analysis showed that NONHSAT104436 was an independent prognostic factor (P=0.017). Thus we concluded that, lncRNAs showed differently expression patterns in ESCC versus matched non-cancerous tissues, and aberrantly expressed lncRNA may play important roles in ESCC development and progression. Interestingly, the overexpression of NONHSAT104436 was tightly correlated with distant metastasis and, poor survival rate, which might indicate that NONHSAT104436 might play a very important part in ESCC tumor progression. PMID:27035335

  6. Motility modulation by the small non-coding RNA SroC in Salmonella Typhimurium.

    PubMed

    Fuentes, Danitza N; Calderón, Paulina F; Acuña, Lillian G; Rodas, Paula I; Paredes-Sabja, Daniel; Fuentes, Juan A; Gil, Fernando; Calderón, Iván L

    2015-09-01

    Bacterial regulatory networks of gene expression include the interaction of diverse types of molecules such as the small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) and their cognate messenger RNAs (mRNAs). In this study, we demonstrated that the Salmonella Typhimurium sRNA SroC is significantly expressed between the late-exponential and stationary phase of growth in an rpoS-dependent manner. The expression of flagellar genes predicted as targets of this sRNA was quantitatively analyzed in both a ΔsroC mutant and a SroC-overexpressing (pSroC) strain. Deletion of sroC increased flagellar gene expression (i.e. flhBAE and fliE). Conversely, overexpression of SroC reduced flhBAE and fliE expression. These observations correlated with phenotypic evaluation of motility, where sroC deletion slightly increased motility, which in turn, was drastically reduced upon overexpression of SroC. The effects of deletion and overexpression of sroC in biofilm formation were also examined, where the ΔsroC and pSroC strains exhibited a reduced and increased ability to form biofilm, respectively. Furthermore, electron microscopy revealed that the wild-type strain overexpressing SroC had a non-flagellated phenotype. Taken together, our results showed that S. Typhimurium sRNA SroC modulates the flagellar synthesis by down-regulating the expression of flhBAE and fliE genes. PMID:26293911

  7. zflncRNApedia: A Comprehensive Online Resource for Zebrafish Long Non-Coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Dhiman, Heena; Kapoor, Shruti; Sivadas, Ambily; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod

    2015-01-01

    Recent transcriptome annotation using deep sequencing approaches have annotated a large number of long non-coding RNAs in zebrafish, a popular model organism for human diseases. These studies characterized lncRNAs in critical developmental stages as well as adult tissues. Each of the studies has uncovered a distinct set of lncRNAs, with minor overlaps. The availability of the raw RNA-Seq datasets in public domain encompassing critical developmental time-points and adult tissues provides us with a unique opportunity to understand the spatiotemporal expression patterns of lncRNAs. In the present report, we created a catalog of lncRNAs in zebrafish, derived largely from the three annotation sets, as well as manual curation of literature to compile a total of 2,267 lncRNA transcripts in zebrafish. The lncRNAs were further classified based on the genomic context and relationship with protein coding gene neighbors into 4 categories. Analysis revealed a total of 86 intronic, 309 promoter associated, 485 overlapping and 1,386 lincRNAs. We created a comprehensive resource which houses the annotation of lncRNAs as well as associated information including expression levels, promoter epigenetic marks, genomic variants and retroviral insertion mutants. The resource also hosts a genome browser where the datasets could be browsed in the genome context. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first comprehensive resource providing a unified catalog of lncRNAs in zebrafish. The resource is freely available at URL: http://genome.igib.res.in/zflncRNApedia. PMID:26065909

  8. Intrinsic noise in post-transcriptional gene regulation by small non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Jia, Ya; Liu, Wangheng; Li, Anbang; Yang, Lijian; Zhan, Xuan

    2009-07-01

    Small non-coding RNA (sRNA) plays very important role in the post transcriptional regulation in various organisms. In complex regulatory networks, highly significant relative fluctuations in RNAs copy numbers can not be neglected due to very small copy number of individual RNA molecules. Here we consider two simple regulation schemes, where one is single target gene regulated by a sRNA and the other is two target mRNAs (mRNA(R) and mRNA(T)) regulated by one sRNA. The Fano factor (a measure of the relative size of the internal fluctuations) formulae of RNA molecules in the post transcriptional regulation are theoretically derived by using of the Langevin theory. For single target gene regulated by a sRNA, it is shown that the intrinsic noise of both mRNA and sRNA approaches the bare Poissonian limit in the regimen of both target RNA silencing and surviving. However, the strong anti-correlation between the fluctuations of two components result in a large intrinsic fluctuations in the level of RNA molecules in the regimen of crossover. For two target mRNAs regulated by one sRNA, in the regimen of crossover, it is found that, with the increasing of transcription rate of target mRNA(T), the maximal intrinsic fluctuation of RNA molecules is shifted from sRNA to target mRNA(R), and then to target mRNA(T). The intrinsic noise intensity of target mRNA(R) is determined by both the transcriptional rate of itself and that of sRNA, and independent of the transcriptional rate of the other target mRNA(T). PMID:19403234

  9. Identification of Differentially Expressed Long Non-coding RNAs in Polarized Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zikun; Luo, Qing; Yao, Fangyi; Qing, Cheng; Ye, Jianqing; Deng, Yating; Li, Junming

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages display remarkable plasticity, with the ability to undergo dynamic transition between classically and alternatively activated phenotypes. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are more than 200 nucleotides in length and play roles in various biological pathways. However, the role of lncRNAs in regulating macrophage polarization has yet to be explored. In this study, lncRNAs expression profiles were determined in human monocyte-derived macrophages (MDMs) incubated in conditions causing activation toward M(IFN-γ + LPS) or M(IL-4) phenotypes. Compared with primary MDMs, 9343 lncRNAs and 5903 mRNAs were deregulated in M(IFN-γ + LPS) group (fold change ≥ 2.0, P < 0.05), 4592 lncRNAs and 3122 mRNAs were deregulated in M(IL-4) group. RT-qPCR results were generally consistent with the microarray data. Furthermore, we found that TCONS_00019715 is expressed at a higher level in M(IFN-γ + LPS) macrophages than in M(IL-4) macrophages. TCONS_00019715 expression was decreased when M(IFN-γ + LPS) converted to M(IL-4) whereas increased when M(IL-4) converted to M(IFN-γ + LPS). Knockdown of TCONS_00019715 following the activation of THP-1 cellls using IFN-γ and LPS diminished the expression of M(IFN-γ + LPS) markers, and elevated the expression of M(IL-4) markers. These data show a significantly altered lncRNA and mRNA expression profile in macrophages exposure to different activating conditions. Dysregulation of some of these lncRNAs may play important roles in regulating macrophage polarization. PMID:26796525

  10. Population genomic analysis of gibberellin-responsive long non-coding RNAs in Populus.

    PubMed

    Tian, Jiaxing; Song, Yuepeng; Du, Qingzhang; Yang, Xiaohui; Ci, Dong; Chen, Jinhui; Xie, Jianbo; Li, Bailian; Zhang, Deqiang

    2016-04-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) participate in a wide range of biological processes, but lncRNAs in plants remain largely unknown; in particular, we lack a systematic identification of plant lncRNAs involved in hormone responses. Moreover, allelic variation in lncRNAs remains poorly characterized at a large scale. Here, we conducted high-throughput RNA-sequencing of leaves from control and gibberellin (GA)-treated Populus tomentosa and identified 7655 reliably expressed lncRNAs. Among the 7655 lncRNAs, the levels of 410 lncRNAs changed in response to GA. Seven GA-responsive lncRNAs were predicted to be putative targets of 18 miRNAs, and one GA-responsive lncRNA (TCONS_00264314) was predicted to be a target mimic of ptc-miR6459b. Computational analysis predicted 939 potential cis-regulated target genes and 965 potential trans-regulated target genes for GA-responsive lncRNAs. Functional annotation of these potential target genes showed that they participate in many different biological processes, including auxin signal transduction and synthesis of cellulose and pectin, indicating that GA-responsive lncRNAs may influence growth and wood properties. Finally, single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP)-based association analysis showed that 112 SNPs from 52 GA-responsive lncRNAs and 1014 SNPs from 296 potential target genes were significantly associated with growth and wood properties. Epistasis analysis also provided evidence for interactions between lncRNAs and their potential target genes. Our study provides a comprehensive view of P. tomentosa lncRNAs and offers insights into the potential functions and regulatory interactions of GA-responsive lncRNAs, thus forming the foundation for future functional analysis of GA-responsive lncRNAs in P. tomentosa. PMID:26912799

  11. Characterization of human pseudogene-derived non-coding RNAs for functional potential.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xingyi; Lin, Mingyan; Rockowitz, Shira; Lachman, Herbert M; Zheng, Deyou

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of pseudogenes exist in the human genome and many are transcribed, but their functional potential remains elusive and understudied. To explore these issues systematically, we first developed a computational pipeline to identify transcribed pseudogenes from RNA-Seq data. Applying the pipeline to datasets from 16 distinct normal human tissues identified ∼ 3,000 pseudogenes that could produce non-coding RNAs in a manner of low abundance but high tissue specificity under normal physiological conditions. Cross-tissue comparison revealed that the transcriptional profiles of pseudogenes and their parent genes showed mostly positive correlations, suggesting that pseudogene transcription could have a positive effect on the expression of their parent genes, perhaps by functioning as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs), as previously suggested and demonstrated with the PTEN pseudogene, PTENP1. Our analysis of the ENCODE project data also found many transcriptionally active pseudogenes in the GM12878 and K562 cell lines; moreover, it showed that many human pseudogenes produced small RNAs (sRNAs) and some pseudogene-derived sRNAs, especially those from antisense strands, exhibited evidence of interfering with gene expression. Further integrated analysis of transcriptomics and epigenomics data, however, demonstrated that trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3), a posttranslational modification typically associated with gene repression and heterochromatin, was enriched at many transcribed pseudogenes in a transcription-level dependent manner in the two cell lines. The H3K9me3 enrichment was more prominent in pseudogenes that produced sRNAs at pseudogene loci and their adjacent regions, an observation further supported by the co-enrichment of SETDB1 (a H3K9 methyltransferase), suggesting that pseudogene sRNAs may have a role in regional chromatin repression. Taken together, our comprehensive and systematic characterization of pseudogene transcription uncovers

  12. Long non-coding RNAs expression profiles in hepatocytes of mice after hematopoietic stem cell transplantation.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Jianlin; Yao, Haina; Xia, Yuan; Chu, Peipei; Li, Mingfeng; Wu, Yulu; Li, Wen; Ding, Lan; Qi, Kunming; Li, Depeng; Xu, Kailin; Zeng, Lingyu

    2016-03-01

    Hepatic veno-occlusive disease (HVOD), one serious complication following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), is mainly initiated by the damage to sinusoidal endothelial cells and hepatocytes. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play an important role in the proliferation of hepatocytes and liver regeneration. lncRNAs profile in hepatocytes post-HSCT remains unclear. The aim of this study is to evaluate the profile of lncRNAs in hepatocytes of mice after HSCT. Mice HSCT model was established through infusion of 5 × 10(6) bone marrow mononuclear cells. On day 7, 14 and 33 after HSCT, mice were sacrificed for analysis of liver pathology, function and index. Total RNA was extracted from hepatocytes of mice on day 14 for microarray analysis of the expression profiles of lncRNAs by Arraystar Mouse lncRNA Microarray v2.0. Obvious edema and spotty necrosis of hepatocytes with inflammatory cells infiltration were observed post-HSCT. Meanwhile, increased levels of alkaline phosphatase, aspartate transaminase, and total bilirubin, as well as elevated liver index were also found. 2,918 up-regulated and 1,911 down-regulated lncRNAs in hepatocytes were identified. Some of differentially expressed mRNAs had adjacent lncRNAs that were also significantly dysregulated, with the same dysregulation direction. T-cell receptor (up-regulation) and VEGF signaling pathway (down-regulation) were identified as one of the most enriched pathways. Dysregulated lncRNAs might be involved in hepatocytes damage after HSCT, suggesting targeting them might be a novel approach in amelioration of hepatocytes damage. PMID:26805554

  13. Expression Profile of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Serum of Patients with Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Santoro, Massimo; Nociti, Viviana; Lucchini, Matteo; De Fino, Chiara; Losavio, Francesco Antonio; Mirabella, Massimiliano

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a chronic progressive inflammatory disease of the central nervous system (CNS) that leads to severe neurological disability. There is an interest in potential biomarkers that could provide information predicting disease activity and progression. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been reported to be involved in the pathogenesis of various human disorders, such as oncologic, cardiovascular, and neurodegenerative diseases. No studies have so far explored a potential link between lncRNAs and MS pathology. We screened 84 lncRNAs, involved in autoimmunity and human inflammatory response, in the serum of relapsing-remitting MS (RR-MS) patients (n = 12), age-matched controls (n = 12), and in patients with idiopathic inflammatory myopathy (IIM) (n = 12). We used the following criteria for lncRNAs analysis: fold change >2 and p < 0.05. According to these criteria, by real-time PCR, we identified three lncRNAs up-regulated in RR-MS patients respectively to controls: nuclear paraspeckle assembly transcript 1 (NEAT1), taurine up-regulated 1 (TUG1), and 7SK small nuclear (RN7SK RNA). Literature data showed that NEAT1, TUG1, and RN7SK RNA play an important role in neurodegenerative processes. Our results indicate that these lncRNAs may be involved in MS pathogenesis. Additional experimental data are needed to clarify the molecular mechanisms through which lncRNAs up-regulation may have a role in MS. PMID:27034068

  14. Characterization of Human Pseudogene-Derived Non-Coding RNAs for Functional Potential

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Xingyi; Lin, Mingyan; Rockowitz, Shira; Lachman, Herbert M.; Zheng, Deyou

    2014-01-01

    Thousands of pseudogenes exist in the human genome and many are transcribed, but their functional potential remains elusive and understudied. To explore these issues systematically, we first developed a computational pipeline to identify transcribed pseudogenes from RNA-Seq data. Applying the pipeline to datasets from 16 distinct normal human tissues identified ∼3,000 pseudogenes that could produce non-coding RNAs in a manner of low abundance but high tissue specificity under normal physiological conditions. Cross-tissue comparison revealed that the transcriptional profiles of pseudogenes and their parent genes showed mostly positive correlations, suggesting that pseudogene transcription could have a positive effect on the expression of their parent genes, perhaps by functioning as competing endogenous RNAs (ceRNAs), as previously suggested and demonstrated with the PTEN pseudogene, PTENP1. Our analysis of the ENCODE project data also found many transcriptionally active pseudogenes in the GM12878 and K562 cell lines; moreover, it showed that many human pseudogenes produced small RNAs (sRNAs) and some pseudogene-derived sRNAs, especially those from antisense strands, exhibited evidence of interfering with gene expression. Further integrated analysis of transcriptomics and epigenomics data, however, demonstrated that trimethylation of histone 3 at lysine 9 (H3K9me3), a posttranslational modification typically associated with gene repression and heterochromatin, was enriched at many transcribed pseudogenes in a transcription-level dependent manner in the two cell lines. The H3K9me3 enrichment was more prominent in pseudogenes that produced sRNAs at pseudogene loci and their adjacent regions, an observation further supported by the co-enrichment of SETDB1 (a H3K9 methyltransferase), suggesting that pseudogene sRNAs may have a role in regional chromatin repression. Taken together, our comprehensive and systematic characterization of pseudogene transcription uncovers a

  15. Hydrogen production by photoautotrophic sulfur-deprived Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pre-grown and incubated under high light.

    PubMed

    Tolstygina, Irina V; Antal, Taras K; Kosourov, Sergey N; Krendeleva, Tatyana E; Rubin, Andrey B; Tsygankov, Anatoly A

    2009-03-01

    We have previously demonstrated that Chlamydomonas reinhardtii can produce hydrogen under strictly photoautotrophic conditions during sulfur deprivation [Tsygankov et al. (2006); Int J Hydrogen Energy 3:1574-1584]. The maximum hydrogen photoproduction was achieved by photoautotrophic cultures pre-grown under a low light regime (25 microE m(-2) s(-1)). We failed to establish sustained hydrogen production from cultures pre-grown under high light (100 microE m(-2) s(-1)). A new approach for sustained hydrogen production by these cultures is presented here. Assuming that stable and reproducible transition to anerobiosis as well as high starch accumulation are important for hydrogen production, the influence of light intensity and dissolved oxygen concentration during the oxygen evolving stage of sulfur deprivation were investigated in cultures pre-grown under high light. Results showed that light higher than 175 microE m(-2) s(-1) during sulfur deprivation induced reproducible transition to anerobiosis, although the total amount of starch accumulation and hydrogen production were insignificant. The potential PSII activity measured in the presence of an artificial electron acceptor (DCBQ) and an inhibitor of electron transport (DBMIB) did not change in cultures pre-grown under 20 microE m(-2) s(-1) and incubated under 150 microE m(-2) s(-1) during sulfur deprivation. In contrast, the potential PSII activity decreased in cultures pre-grown under 100 microE m(-2) s(-1) and incubated under 420 microE m(-2) s(-1). This indicates that cultures grown under higher light experience irreversible inhibition of PSII in addition to reversible down regulation. High dissolved O(2) content during the oxygen evolving stage of sulfur deprivation has a negative regulatory role on PSII activity. To increase hydrogen production by C. reinhardtii pre-grown under 100 microE m(-2) s(-1), cultures were incubated under elevated PFD and decreased oxygen pressure during the oxygen evolving stage

  16. 2,3 Butanediol production in an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium in dark conditions via diverse sugar consumption.

    PubMed

    McEwen, Jordan T; Kanno, Masahiro; Atsumi, Shota

    2016-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are under investigation as a means to utilize light energy to directly recycle CO2 into chemical compounds currently derived from petroleum. Any large-scale photosynthetic production scheme must rely on natural sunlight for energy, thereby limiting production time to only lighted hours during the day. Here, an obligate photoautotrophic cyanobacterium was engineered for enhanced production of 2,3-butanediol (23BD) in continuous light, 12h:12h light-dark diurnal, and continuous dark conditions via supplementation with glucose or xylose. This study achieved 23BD production under diurnal conditions comparable to production under continuous light conditions. The maximum 23BD titer was 3.0gL(-1) in 10d. Also achieving chemical production under dark conditions, this work enhances the feasibility of using cyanobacteria as industrial chemical-producing microbes. PMID:26979472

  17. Control of competence by related non-coding csRNAs in Streptococcus pneumoniae R6

    PubMed Central

    Laux, Anke; Sexauer, Anne; Sivaselvarajah, Dineshan; Kaysen, Anne; Brückner, Reinhold

    2015-01-01

    The two-component regulatory system CiaRH of Streptococcus pneumoniae is involved in β-lactam resistance, maintenance of cell integrity, bacteriocin production, host colonization, virulence, and competence. The response regulator CiaR controls, among other genes, expression of five highly similar small non-coding RNAs, designated csRNAs. These csRNAs control competence development by targeting comC, encoding the precursor of the competence stimulating peptide, which is essential to initiate the regulatory cascade leading to competence. In addition, another gene product of the CiaR regulon, the serine protease HtrA, is also involved in competence control. In the absence of HtrA, five csRNAs could suppress competence, but one csRNA alone was not effective. To determine if all csRNAs are needed, reporter gene fusions to competence genes were used to monitor competence gene expression in the presence of different csRNAs. These experiments showed that two csRNAs were not enough to prevent competence, but combinations of three csRNAs, csRNA1,2,3, or csRNA1,2,4 were sufficient. In S. pneumoniae strains expressing only csRNA5, a surprising positive effect was detected on the level of early competence gene expression. Hence, the role of the csRNAs in competence regulation is more complex than anticipated. Mutations in comC (comC8) partially disrupting predicted complementarity to the csRNAs led to competence even in the presence of all csRNAs. Reconstitution of csRNA complementarity to comC8 restored competence suppression. Again, more than one csRNA was needed. In this case, even two mutated csRNAs complementary to comC8, csRNA1–8 and csRNA2–8, were suppressive. In conclusion, competence in S. pneumoniae is additively controlled by the csRNAs via post-transcriptional regulation of comC. PMID:26257773

  18. Non-coding RNA interact to regulate neuronal development and function

    PubMed Central

    Iyengar, Bharat R.; Choudhary, Ashwani; Sarangdhar, Mayuresh A.; Venkatesh, K. V.; Gadgil, Chetan J.; Pillai, Beena

    2014-01-01

    The human brain is one of the most complex biological systems, and the cognitive abilities have greatly expanded compared to invertebrates without much expansion in the number of protein coding genes. This suggests that gene regulation plays a very important role in the development and function of nervous system, by acting at multiple levels such as transcription and translation. In this article we discuss the regulatory roles of three classes of non-protein coding RNAs (ncRNAs)—microRNAs (miRNAs), piwi-interacting RNA (piRNAs) and long-non-coding RNA (lncRNA), in the process of neurogenesis and nervous function including control of synaptic plasticity and potential roles in neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are involved in diverse processes including neurogenesis where they channelize the cellular physiology toward neuronal differentiation. miRNAs can also indirectly influence neurogenesis by regulating the proliferation and self renewal of neural stem cells and are dysregulated in several neurodegenerative diseases. miRNAs are also known to regulate synaptic plasticity and are usually found to be co-expressed with their targets. The dynamics of gene regulation is thus dependent on the local architecture of the gene regulatory network (GRN) around the miRNA and its targets. piRNAs had been classically known to regulate transposons in the germ cells. However, piRNAs have been, recently, found to be expressed in the brain and possibly function by imparting epigenetic changes by DNA methylation. piRNAs are known to be maternally inherited and we assume that they may play a role in early development. We also explore the possible function of piRNAs in regulating the expansion of transposons in the brain. Brain is known to express several lncRNA but functional roles in brain development are attributed to a few lncRNA while functions of most of the them remain unknown. We review the roles of some known lncRNA and explore the other possible functions of lnc

  19. Long Non-Coding RNA and Alternative Splicing Modulations in Parkinson's Leukocytes Identified by RNA Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Soreq, Lilach; Guffanti, Alessandro; Salomonis, Nathan; Simchovitz, Alon; Israel, Zvi; Bergman, Hagai; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    The continuously prolonged human lifespan is accompanied by increase in neurodegenerative diseases incidence, calling for the development of inexpensive blood-based diagnostics. Analyzing blood cell transcripts by RNA-Seq is a robust means to identify novel biomarkers that rapidly becomes a commonplace. However, there is lack of tools to discover novel exons, junctions and splicing events and to precisely and sensitively assess differential splicing through RNA-Seq data analysis and across RNA-Seq platforms. Here, we present a new and comprehensive computational workflow for whole-transcriptome RNA-Seq analysis, using an updated version of the software AltAnalyze, to identify both known and novel high-confidence alternative splicing events, and to integrate them with both protein-domains and microRNA binding annotations. We applied the novel workflow on RNA-Seq data from Parkinson's disease (PD) patients' leukocytes pre- and post- Deep Brain Stimulation (DBS) treatment and compared to healthy controls. Disease-mediated changes included decreased usage of alternative promoters and N-termini, 5′-end variations and mutually-exclusive exons. The PD regulated FUS and HNRNP A/B included prion-like domains regulated regions. We also present here a workflow to identify and analyze long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) via RNA-Seq data. We identified reduced lncRNA expression and selective PD-induced changes in 13 of over 6,000 detected leukocyte lncRNAs, four of which were inversely altered post-DBS. These included the U1 spliceosomal lncRNA and RP11-462G22.1, each entailing sequence complementarity to numerous microRNAs. Analysis of RNA-Seq from PD and unaffected controls brains revealed over 7,000 brain-expressed lncRNAs, of which 3,495 were co-expressed in the leukocytes including U1, which showed both leukocyte and brain increases. Furthermore, qRT-PCR validations confirmed these co-increases in PD leukocytes and two brain regions, the amygdala and substantia

  20. Prediction and characterization of small non-coding RNAs related to secondary metabolites in Saccharopolyspora erythraea.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei-Bing; Shi, Yang; Yao, Li-Li; Zhou, Ying; Ye, Bang-Ce

    2013-01-01

    Saccharopolyspora erythraea produces a large number of secondary metabolites with biological activities, including erythromycin. Elucidation of the mechanisms through which the production of these secondary metabolites is regulated may help to identify new strategies for improved biosynthesis of erythromycin. In this paper, we describe the systematic prediction and analysis of small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) in S. erythraea, with the aim to elucidate sRNA-mediated regulation of secondary metabolite biosynthesis. In silico and deep-sequencing technologies were applied to predict sRNAs in S. erythraea. Six hundred and forty-seven potential sRNA loci were identified, of which 382 cis-encoded antisense RNA are complementary to protein-coding regions and 265 predicted transcripts are located in intergenic regions. Six candidate sRNAs (sernc292, sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, sernc361, and sernc389) belong to four gene clusters (tpc3, pke, pks6, and nrps5) that are involved in secondary metabolite biosynthesis. Deep-sequencing data showed that the expression of all sRNAs in the strain HL3168 E3 (E3) was higher than that in NRRL23338 (M), except for sernc292 and sernc361 expression. The relative expression of six sRNAs in strain M and E3 were validated by qRT-PCR at three different time points (24, 48, and 72 h). The results showed that, at each time point, the transcription levels of sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 were higher in E3 than in M, with the largest difference observed at 72 h, whereas no signals for sernc292 and sernc361 were detected. sernc293, sernc350, sernc351, and sernc389 probably regulate iron transport, terpene metabolism, geosmin synthesis, and polyketide biosynthesis, respectively. The major significance of this study is the successful prediction and identification of sRNAs in genomic regions close to the secondary metabolism-related genes in S. erythraea. A better understanding of the sRNA-target interaction would help to elucidate the

  1. Type I Interferon Regulates the Expression of Long Non-Coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Carnero, Elena; Barriocanal, Marina; Segura, Victor; Guruceaga, Elizabeth; Prior, Celia; Börner, Kathleen; Grimm, Dirk; Fortes, Puri

    2014-01-01

    Interferons (IFNs) are key players in the antiviral response. IFN sensing by the cell activates transcription of IFN-stimulated genes (ISGs) able to induce an antiviral state by affecting viral replication and release. IFN also induces the expression of ISGs that function as negative regulators to limit the strength and duration of IFN response. The ISGs identified so far belong to coding genes. However, only a small proportion of the transcriptome corresponds to coding transcripts and it has been estimated that there could be as many coding as long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). To address whether IFN can also regulate the expression of lncRNAs, we analyzed the transcriptome of HuH7 cells treated or not with IFNα2 by expression arrays. Analysis of the arrays showed increased levels of several well-characterized coding genes that respond to IFN both at early or late times. Furthermore, we identified several IFN-stimulated or -downregulated lncRNAs (ISRs and IDRs). Further validation showed that ISR2, 8, and 12 expression mimics that of their neighboring genes GBP1, IRF1, and IL6, respectively, all related to the IFN response. These genes are induced in response to different doses of IFNα2 in different cell lines at early (ISR2 or 8) or later (ISR12) time points. IFNβ also induced the expression of these lncRNAs. ISR2 and 8 were also induced by an influenza virus unable to block the IFN response but not by other wild-type lytic viruses tested. Surprisingly, both ISR2 and 8 were significantly upregulated in cultured cells and livers from patients infected with HCV. Increased levels of ISR2 were also detected in patients chronically infected with HIV. This is relevant as genome-wide guilt-by-association studies predict that ISR2, 8, and 12 may function in viral processes, in the IFN pathway and the antiviral response. Therefore, we propose that these lncRNAs could be induced by IFN to function as positive or negative regulators of the antiviral response. PMID:25414701

  2. Genome-wide discovery of long non-coding RNAs in Rainbow Trout and their potential roles in muscle growth and quality

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The ENCODE project revealed that ~70% of the human genome is transcribed. While only 1-2% of the RNAs encode for proteins, the rest are non-coding RNAs. LncRNAs form a diverse class of non-coding RNAs that are longer than 200nt. Evidences are emerging that lncRNAs play critical roles in various cel...

  3. [Comparison study on the methods for finding borders between coding and non-coding DNA regions in rice].

    PubMed

    Sun, Yi-Gang; Gao, Lei; Zhang, Zhong-Hua; Xue, Qing-Zhong

    2005-07-01

    Entropy-based divergence measures have provided an impelling tool in evaluating sequence complexity, predicting CpG island, and detecting borders between coding and non-coding DNA regions etc. In this paper, two new divergence measures: the alpha-KL divergence and the alpha-Jensen-Shannon divergence were defined and a coarse-graining vector of amino acids- corresponding codons was proposed according to codons GC-content, in order to improve the computational approach to finding borders between coding and non-coding in rice. A comparison of the accuracies gained by different vectors (the Jensen-Shannon divergence, the Jensen-Renyi divergence, the alpha-KL divergence and the alpha-Jensen -Shannon divergence) showed that recognition efficiency based on the new information measures with the vector coarse-graining increase by 4-5 times than that of Bernaola's method in the 'stop codon' of coding regions in rice. PMID:16120591

  4. Sequence-Based Analysis Uncovers an Abundance of Non-Coding RNA in the Total Transcriptome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Arnvig, Kristine B.; Comas, Iñaki; Thomson, Nicholas R.; Houghton, Joanna; Boshoff, Helena I.; Croucher, Nicholas J.; Rose, Graham; Perkins, Timothy T.; Parkhill, Julian; Dougan, Gordon; Young, Douglas B.

    2011-01-01

    RNA sequencing provides a new perspective on the genome of Mycobacterium tuberculosis by revealing an extensive presence of non-coding RNA, including long 5’ and 3’ untranslated regions, antisense transcripts, and intergenic small RNA (sRNA) molecules. More than a quarter of all sequence reads mapping outside of ribosomal RNA genes represent non-coding RNA, and the density of reads mapping to intergenic regions was more than two-fold higher than that mapping to annotated coding sequences. Selected sRNAs were found at increased abundance in stationary phase cultures and accumulated to remarkably high levels in the lungs of chronically infected mice, indicating a potential contribution to pathogenesis. The ability of tubercle bacilli to adapt to changing environments within the host is critical to their ability to cause disease and to persist during drug treatment; it is likely that novel post-transcriptional regulatory networks will play an important role in these adaptive responses. PMID:22072964

  5. Inducing cell growth arrest and apoptosis by silencing long non-coding RNA PCAT-1 in human bladder cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Li; Liu, Yuchen; Zhuang, Chengle; Xu, Wen; Fu, Xing; Lv, Zhaojie; Wu, Hanwei; Mou, Lisha; Zhao, Guoping; Cai, Zhiming; Huang, Weiren

    2015-09-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a class of non-coding RNAs that play important roles in cancer development and progression. Prostate cancer-associated transcript 1 (PCAT-1) is a novel lncRNA that promotes cell proliferation in prostate cancer. We hypothesized that PCAT-1 also have roles in bladder cancer. In this study, we found that PCAT-1 was up-regulated in bladder cancer compared to paired normal urothelium. Cell proliferation inhibition and apoptosis induction were also observed in PCAT-1 small hairpin RNA (shRNA)-transfected bladder cancer T24 and 5637 cells. Our data suggest that PCAT-1 plays oncogenic roles and can be used as a therapeutic target for treating human bladder cancer. PMID:25934337

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms with cis-regulatory effects on long non-coding transcripts in human primary monocytes.

    PubMed

    Almlöf, Jonas Carlsson; Lundmark, Per; Lundmark, Anders; Ge, Bing; Pastinen, Tomi; Goodall, Alison H; Cambien, François; Deloukas, Panos; Ouwehand, Willem H; Syvänen, Ann-Christine

    2014-01-01

    We applied genome-wide allele-specific expression analysis of monocytes from 188 samples. Monocytes were purified from white blood cells of healthy blood donors to detect cis-acting genetic variation that regulates the expression of long non-coding RNAs. We analysed 8929 regions harboring genes for potential long non-coding RNA that were retrieved from data from the ENCODE project. Of these regions, 60% were annotated as intergenic, which implies that they do not overlap with protein-coding genes. Focusing on the intergenic regions, and using stringent analysis of the allele-specific expression data, we detected robust cis-regulatory SNPs in 258 out of 489 informative intergenic regions included in the analysis. The cis-regulatory SNPs that were significantly associated with allele-specific expression of long non-coding RNAs were enriched to enhancer regions marked for active or bivalent, poised chromatin by histone modifications. Out of the lncRNA regions regulated by cis-acting regulatory SNPs, 20% (n = 52) were co-regulated with the closest protein coding gene. We compared the identified cis-regulatory SNPs with those in the catalog of SNPs identified by genome-wide association studies of human diseases and traits. This comparison identified 32 SNPs in loci from genome-wide association studies that displayed a strong association signal with allele-specific expression of non-coding RNAs in monocytes, with p-values ranging from 6.7×10(-7) to 9.5×10(-89). The identified cis-regulatory SNPs are associated with diseases of the immune system, like multiple sclerosis and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:25025429

  7. Overexpression of KLC2 due to a homozygous deletion in the non-coding region causes SPOAN syndrome.

    PubMed

    Melo, Uirá S; Macedo-Souza, Lucia I; Figueiredo, Thalita; Muotri, Alysson R; Gleeson, Joseph G; Coux, Gabriela; Armas, Pablo; Calcaterra, Nora B; Kitajima, João P; Amorim, Simone; Olávio, Thiago R; Griesi-Oliveira, Karina; Coatti, Giuliana C; Rocha, Clarissa R R; Martins-Pinheiro, Marinalva; Menck, Carlos F M; Zaki, Maha S; Kok, Fernando; Zatz, Mayana; Santos, Silvana

    2015-12-15

    SPOAN syndrome is a neurodegenerative disorder mainly characterized by spastic paraplegia, optic atrophy and neuropathy (SPOAN). Affected patients are wheelchair bound after 15 years old, with progressive joint contractures and spine deformities. SPOAN patients also have sub normal vision secondary to apparently non-progressive congenital optic atrophy. A potential causative gene was mapped at 11q13 ten years ago. Here we performed next-generation sequencing in SPOAN-derived samples. While whole-exome sequencing failed to identify the causative mutation, whole-genome sequencing allowed to detect a homozygous 216-bp deletion (chr11.hg19:g.66,024,557_66,024,773del) located at the non-coding upstream region of the KLC2 gene. Expression assays performed with patient's fibroblasts and motor neurons derived from SPOAN patients showed KLC2 overexpression. Luciferase assay in constructs with 216-bp deletion confirmed the overexpression of gene reporter, varying from 48 to 74%, as compared with wild-type. Knockdown and overexpression of klc2 in Danio rerio revealed mild to severe curly-tail phenotype, which is suggestive of a neuromuscular disorder. Overexpression of a gene caused by a small deletion in the non-coding region is a novel mechanism, which to the best of our knowledge, was never reported before in a recessive condition. Although the molecular mechanism of KLC2 up-regulation still remains to be uncovered, such example adds to the importance of non-coding regions in human pathology. PMID:26385635

  8. Refined mapping of autoimmune disease associated genetic variants with gene expression suggests an important role for non-coding RNAs.

    PubMed

    Ricaño-Ponce, Isis; Zhernakova, Daria V; Deelen, Patrick; Luo, Oscar; Li, Xingwang; Isaacs, Aaron; Karjalainen, Juha; Di Tommaso, Jennifer; Borek, Zuzanna Agnieszka; Zorro, Maria M; Gutierrez-Achury, Javier; Uitterlinden, Andre G; Hofman, Albert; van Meurs, Joyce; Netea, Mihai G; Jonkers, Iris H; Withoff, Sebo; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Li, Yang; Ruan, Yijun; Franke, Lude; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kumar, Vinod

    2016-04-01

    Genome-wide association and fine-mapping studies in 14 autoimmune diseases (AID) have implicated more than 250 loci in one or more of these diseases. As more than 90% of AID-associated SNPs are intergenic or intronic, pinpointing the causal genes is challenging. We performed a systematic analysis to link 460 SNPs that are associated with 14 AID to causal genes using transcriptomic data from 629 blood samples. We were able to link 71 (39%) of the AID-SNPs to two or more nearby genes, providing evidence that for part of the AID loci multiple causal genes exist. While 54 of the AID loci are shared by one or more AID, 17% of them do not share candidate causal genes. In addition to finding novel genes such as ULK3, we also implicate novel disease mechanisms and pathways like autophagy in celiac disease pathogenesis. Furthermore, 42 of the AID SNPs specifically affected the expression of 53 non-coding RNA genes. To further understand how the non-coding genome contributes to AID, the SNPs were linked to functional regulatory elements, which suggest a model where AID genes are regulated by network of chromatin looping/non-coding RNAs interactions. The looping model also explains how a causal candidate gene is not necessarily the gene closest to the AID SNP, which was the case in nearly 50% of cases. PMID:26898941

  9. The 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus RNAs – non-coding is not non-functional

    PubMed Central

    Hyde, Jennifer L.; Chen, Rubing; Trobaugh, Derek W.; Diamond, Michael S.; Weaver, Scott C.; Klimstra, William B.; Wilusz, Jeffrey

    2015-01-01

    The non-coding regions found at the 5' and 3' ends of alphavirus genomes regulate viral gene expression, replication, translation and virus-host interactions, which have significant implications for viral evolution, host range, and pathogenesis. The functions of these non-coding regions are mediated by a combination of linear sequence and structural elements. The capped 5' untranslated region (UTR) contains promoter elements, translational regulatory sequences that modulate dependence on cellular translation factors, and structures that help to avoid innate immune defenses. The polyadenylated 3' UTR contains highly conserved sequence elements for viral replication, binding sites for cellular miRNAs that determine cell tropism, host range, and pathogenesis, and conserved binding regions for a cellular protein that influences viral RNA stability. Nonetheless, there are additional conserved elements in non-coding regions of the virus (e.g., the repeated sequence elements in the 3' UTR) whose function remains obscure. Thus, key questions remain as to the function of these short yet influential untranslated segments of alphavirus RNAs. PMID:25630058

  10. Automated conserved non-coding sequence (CNS) discovery reveals differences in gene content and promoter evolution among grasses

    PubMed Central

    Turco, Gina; Schnable, James C.; Pedersen, Brent; Freeling, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Conserved non-coding sequences (CNS) are islands of non-coding sequence that, like protein coding exons, show less divergence in sequence between related species than functionless DNA. Several CNSs have been demonstrated experimentally to function as cis-regulatory regions. However, the specific functions of most CNSs remain unknown. Previous searches for CNS in plants have either anchored on exons and only identified nearby sequences or required years of painstaking manual annotation. Here we present an open source tool that can accurately identify CNSs between any two related species with sequenced genomes, including both those immediately adjacent to exons and distal sequences separated by >12 kb of non-coding sequence. We have used this tool to characterize new motifs, associate CNSs with additional functions, and identify previously undetected genes encoding RNA and protein in the genomes of five grass species. We provide a list of 15,363 orthologous CNSs conserved across all grasses tested. We were also able to identify regulatory sequences present in the common ancestor of grasses that have been lost in one or more extant grass lineages. Lists of orthologous gene pairs and associated CNSs are provided for reference inbred lines of arabidopsis, Japonica rice, foxtail millet, sorghum, brachypodium, and maize. PMID:23874343

  11. Nuclear transcriptome profiling of induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells identify non-coding loci resistant to reprogramming

    PubMed Central

    Fort, Alexandre; Yamada, Daisuke; Hashimoto, Kosuke; Koseki, Haruhiko; Carninci, Piero

    2015-01-01

    Identification of functionally relevant differences between induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) and reference embryonic stem cells (ESC) remains a central question for therapeutic applications. Differences in gene expression between iPSC and ESC have been examined by microarray and more recently with RNA-SEQ technologies. We here report an in depth analyses of nuclear and cytoplasmic transcriptomes, using the CAGE (cap analysis of gene expression) technology, for 5 iPSC clones derived from mouse lymphocytes B and 3 ESC lines. This approach reveals nuclear transcriptomes significantly more complex in ESC than in iPSC. Hundreds of yet not annotated putative non-coding RNAs and enhancer-associated transcripts specifically transcribed in ESC have been detected and supported with epigenetic and chromatin-chromatin interactions data. We identified super-enhancers transcriptionally active specifically in ESC and associated with genes implicated in the maintenance of pluripotency. Similarly, we detected non-coding transcripts of yet unknown function being regulated by ESC specific super-enhancers. Taken together, these results demonstrate that current protocols of iPSC reprogramming do not trigger activation of numerous cis-regulatory regions. It thus reinforces the need for already suggested deeper monitoring of the non-coding transcriptome when characterizing iPSC clones. Such differences in regulatory transcript expression may indeed impact their potential for clinical applications. PMID:25664506

  12. Non-coding RNAs and HIV: viral manipulation of host dark matter to shape the cellular environment.

    PubMed

    Barichievy, Samantha; Naidoo, Jerolen; Mhlanga, Musa M

    2015-01-01

    On October 28th 1943 Winston Churchill said "we shape our buildings, and afterward our buildings shape us" (Humes, 1994). Churchill was pondering how and when to rebuild the British House of Commons, which had been destroyed by enemy bombs on May 10th 1941. The old House had been small and insufficient to hold all its members, but was restored to its original form in 1950 in order to recapture the "convenience and dignity" that the building had shaped into its parliamentary members. The circular loop whereby buildings or dwellings are shaped and go on to shape those that reside in them is also true of pathogens and their hosts. As obligate parasites, pathogens need to alter their cellular host environments to ensure survival. Typically pathogens modify cellular transcription profiles and in doing so, the pathogen in turn is affected, thereby closing the loop. As key orchestrators of gene expression, non-coding RNAs provide a vast and extremely precise set of tools for pathogens to target in order to shape the cellular environment. This review will focus on host non-coding RNAs that are manipulated by the infamous intracellular pathogen, the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). We will briefly describe both short and long host non-coding RNAs and discuss how HIV gains control of these factors to ensure widespread dissemination throughout the host as well as the establishment of lifelong, chronic infection. PMID:25859257

  13. The non-coding B2 RNA binds to the DNA cleft and active-site region of RNA polymerase II.

    PubMed

    Ponicsan, Steven L; Houel, Stephane; Old, William M; Ahn, Natalie G; Goodrich, James A; Kugel, Jennifer F

    2013-10-01

    The B2 family of short interspersed elements is transcribed into non-coding RNA by RNA polymerase III. The ~180-nt B2 RNA has been shown to potently repress mRNA transcription by binding tightly to RNA polymerase II (Pol II) and assembling with it into complexes on promoter DNA, where it keeps the polymerase from properly engaging the promoter DNA. Mammalian Pol II is an ~500-kDa complex that contains 12 different protein subunits, providing many possible surfaces for interaction with B2 RNA. We found that the carboxy-terminal domain of the largest Pol II subunit was not required for B2 RNA to bind Pol II and repress transcription in vitro. To identify the surface on Pol II to which the minimal functional region of B2 RNA binds, we coupled multi-step affinity purification, reversible formaldehyde cross-linking, peptide sequencing by mass spectrometry, and analysis of peptide enrichment. The Pol II peptides most highly recovered after cross-linking to B2 RNA mapped to the DNA binding cleft and active-site region of Pol II. These studies determine the location of a defined nucleic acid binding site on a large, native, multi-subunit complex and provide insight into the mechanism of transcriptional repression by B2 RNA. PMID:23416138

  14. Overexpression of two stress-responsive, small, non-coding RNAs, 6S and tmRNA, imparts butanol tolerance in Clostridium acetobutylicum.

    PubMed

    Jones, Alexander J; Venkataramanan, Keerthi P; Papoutsakis, Terry

    2016-04-01

    While extensively studied in several model organisms, the role of small, non-coding RNAs in the stress response remains largely unexplored in Clostridium organisms. About 100 years after the first industrial Acetone-Butanol-Ethanol fermentation process, based on the Weizmann Clostridium acetobutylicum strain, strain tolerance to butanol remains a crucial factor limiting the economics of the process. Several studies have examined the response of this organism to metabolite stress, and several genes have been engaged to impart enhanced tolerance, but no sRNAs have yet been directly engaged in this task. We show that the two stress-responsive sRNAs, 6S and tmRNA, upon overexpression impart tolerance to butanol as assessed by viability assays under process-relevant conditions. 6S overexpression enhances cell densities as well as butanol titres. We discuss the likely mechanisms that these two sRNAs might engage in this tolerance phenotype. Our data support the continued exploration of sRNAs as a basis for engineering enhanced tolerance and enhanced solvent production, especially because sRNA-based strategies impose a minimal metabolic burden on the cells. PMID:26989157

  15. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA NR_036575.1 contributes to the proliferation and migration of papillary thyroid cancer.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Lan, Xiabin; Wang, Zhihong; Dong, Wenwu; He, Liang; Zhang, Ting; Zhang, Hao

    2016-09-01

    Current evidence suggests that the human genome produces a large number of non-coding RNAs, including microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs). Generally, lncRNAs are defined as RNA transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that are not transcribed into proteins. In recent years, lncRNAs have been reported to play oncogenic roles in tumourigenesis. However, minimal research has been performed on the expression and clinicopathological significance of lncRNAs in papillary thyroid cancer (PTC). In the present study, we investigated not only the expression and clinicopathological significance of a novel lncRNA, NR_036575.1, in PTC tissues and adjacent non-cancerous tissues but also its potential function in TPC1 cells. The expression levels of the lncRNA NR_036575.1 in 83 pairs of PTC tissues and adjacent non-cancerous tissues were detected via quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. The relationships between the expression levels and clinicopathological characteristics of the lncRNA NR_036575.1 were analysed. In addition, we established two receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves to assess the diagnostic value of NR_036575.1 expression. Cell Counting Kit-8 and transwell assays were used to assess cell proliferation and migration, respectively. The expression levels of the lncRNA NR_036575.1 were significantly higher in PTC tissues than in adjacent non-cancerous tissues. High NR_036575.1 expression was associated with extrathyroidal extension (ETE) (P = 0.011) and tumour size (P = 0.006). The ROC curves indicated that NR_036575.1 could potentially serve as a biomarker for identifying PTC and related, non-cancerous diseases (sensitivity, 80.7 %; specificity, 88 %), as well as for differentiating between PTC with or without ETE (sensitivity, 57.8 %; specificity, 86.7 %). NR_036575.1 knock-down significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of TPC1 cells. Our findings are the first to describe lncRNA NR_036575.1 overexpression in PTC

  16. Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs Related to Mouse Embryonic Brain Development from Available Transcriptomic Data

    PubMed Central

    He, Hongjuan; Xiu, Youcheng; Guo, Jing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Qi; Zeng, Tiebo; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Yan; Wu, Qiong

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as a key group of non-coding RNAs have gained widely attention. Though lncRNAs have been functionally annotated and systematic explored in higher mammals, few are under systematical identification and annotation. Owing to the expression specificity, known lncRNAs expressed in embryonic brain tissues remain still limited. Considering a large number of lncRNAs are only transcribed in brain tissues, studies of lncRNAs in developmental brain are therefore of special interest. Here, publicly available RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) data in embryonic brain are integrated to identify thousands of embryonic brain lncRNAs by a customized pipeline. A significant proportion of novel transcripts have not been annotated by available genomic resources. The putative embryonic brain lncRNAs are shorter in length, less spliced and show less conservation than known genes. The expression of putative lncRNAs is in one tenth on average of known coding genes, while comparable with known lncRNAs. From chromatin data, putative embryonic brain lncRNAs are associated with active chromatin marks, comparable with known lncRNAs. Embryonic brain expressed lncRNAs are also indicated to have expression though not evident in adult brain. Gene Ontology analysis of putative embryonic brain lncRNAs suggests that they are associated with brain development. The putative lncRNAs are shown to be related to possible cis-regulatory roles in imprinting even themselves are deemed to be imprinted lncRNAs. Re-analysis of one knockdown data suggests that four regulators are associated with lncRNAs. Taken together, the identification and systematic analysis of putative lncRNAs would provide novel insights into uncharacterized mouse non-coding regions and the relationships with mammalian embryonic brain development. PMID:23967161

  17. Global Intersection of Long Non-Coding RNAs with Processed and Unprocessed Pseudogenes in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Milligan, Michael J.; Harvey, Erin; Yu, Albert; Morgan, Ashleigh L.; Smith, Daniela L.; Zhang, Eden; Berengut, Jonathan; Sivananthan, Jothini; Subramaniam, Radhini; Skoric, Aleksandra; Collins, Scott; Damski, Caio; Morris, Kevin V.; Lipovich, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogenes are abundant in the human genome and had long been thought of purely as nonfunctional gene fossils. Recent observations point to a role for pseudogenes in regulating genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally in human cells. To computationally interrogate the network space of integrated pseudogene and long non-coding RNA regulation in the human transcriptome, we developed and implemented an algorithm to identify all long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts that overlap the genomic spans, and specifically the exons, of any human pseudogenes in either sense or antisense orientation. As inputs to our algorithm, we imported three public repositories of pseudogenes: GENCODE v17 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 72); Retroposed Pseudogenes V5 (processed only), and Yale Pseudo60 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 60); two public lncRNA catalogs: Broad Institute, GENCODE v17; NCBI annotated piRNAs; and NHGRI clinical variants. The data sets were retrieved from the UCSC Genome Database using the UCSC Table Browser. We identified 2277 loci containing exon-to-exon overlaps between pseudogenes, both processed and unprocessed, and long non-coding RNA genes. Of these loci we identified 1167 with Genbank EST and full-length cDNA support providing direct evidence of transcription on one or both strands with exon-to-exon overlaps. The analysis converged on 313 pseudogene-lncRNA exon-to-exon overlaps that were bidirectionally supported by both full-length cDNAs and ESTs. In the process of identifying transcribed pseudogenes, we generated a comprehensive, positionally non-redundant encyclopedia of human pseudogenes, drawing upon multiple, and formerly disparate public pseudogene repositories. Collectively, these observations suggest that pseudogenes are pervasively transcribed on both strands and are common drivers of gene regulation. PMID:27047535

  18. Global Intersection of Long Non-Coding RNAs with Processed and Unprocessed Pseudogenes in the Human Genome.

    PubMed

    Milligan, Michael J; Harvey, Erin; Yu, Albert; Morgan, Ashleigh L; Smith, Daniela L; Zhang, Eden; Berengut, Jonathan; Sivananthan, Jothini; Subramaniam, Radhini; Skoric, Aleksandra; Collins, Scott; Damski, Caio; Morris, Kevin V; Lipovich, Leonard

    2016-01-01

    Pseudogenes are abundant in the human genome and had long been thought of purely as nonfunctional gene fossils. Recent observations point to a role for pseudogenes in regulating genes transcriptionally and post-transcriptionally in human cells. To computationally interrogate the network space of integrated pseudogene and long non-coding RNA regulation in the human transcriptome, we developed and implemented an algorithm to identify all long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) transcripts that overlap the genomic spans, and specifically the exons, of any human pseudogenes in either sense or antisense orientation. As inputs to our algorithm, we imported three public repositories of pseudogenes: GENCODE v17 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 72); Retroposed Pseudogenes V5 (processed only), and Yale Pseudo60 (processed and unprocessed, Ensembl 60); two public lncRNA catalogs: Broad Institute, GENCODE v17; NCBI annotated piRNAs; and NHGRI clinical variants. The data sets were retrieved from the UCSC Genome Database using the UCSC Table Browser. We identified 2277 loci containing exon-to-exon overlaps between pseudogenes, both processed and unprocessed, and long non-coding RNA genes. Of these loci we identified 1167 with Genbank EST and full-length cDNA support providing direct evidence of transcription on one or both strands with exon-to-exon overlaps. The analysis converged on 313 pseudogene-lncRNA exon-to-exon overlaps that were bidirectionally supported by both full-length cDNAs and ESTs. In the process of identifying transcribed pseudogenes, we generated a comprehensive, positionally non-redundant encyclopedia of human pseudogenes, drawing upon multiple, and formerly disparate public pseudogene repositories. Collectively, these observations suggest that pseudogenes are pervasively transcribed on both strands and are common drivers of gene regulation. PMID:27047535

  19. Long non-coding RNA regulation of liver cancer stem cell self-renewal offers new therapeutic targeting opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Parasramka, Mansi A.

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are critical regulators of gene expression, and can reprogram the transcriptome to modulate cellular processes involved in cellular growth and differentiation, and thereby contribute to tumorigenesis. In addition to effects on tumor cell growth, survival and cell signaling, lncRNA can modulate cancer stem cell (CSC) behavior, including the expression of pluripotency factors. The identification of lncRNA that are mechanistically linked to cancer stem cell self-renewal and differentiation, or aberrant signaling pathways associated with tumor growth or progression, offer new opportunities for therapeutic intervention.

  20. Non-coding RNAs including miRNAs, piRNAs, and tRNAs in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Heyns, Mieke; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Over 98% of our genes code for RNA transcripts that will never become translated into protein. Numerous non-coding RNA (ncRNA) transcripts are structurally and functionally diverse. In particular, micro RNAs (miRNAs), piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs), and, more recently, transfer RNAs (tRNAs) are implicated as regulators of key genes and processes that are involved in various human diseases, including cancer. Here, we summarize the recent findings and perspectives in the small RNA and cancer research. PMID:26405161

  1. Current Status of Long Non-Coding RNAs in Human Cancer with Specific Focus on Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smolle, Maria; Uranitsch, Stefan; Gerger, Armin; Pichler, Martin; Haybaeck, Johannes

    2014-01-01

    The latest investigations of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have revealed their important role in human cancers. LncRNAs are larger than 200 nucleotides in length and fulfill their cellular purpose without being translated into proteins. Though the molecular functions of some lncRNAs have been elucidated, there is still a high number of lncRNAs with unknown or controversial functions. In this review, we provide an overview of different lncRNAs and their role in human cancers. In particular, we emphasize their importance in tumorigenesis of colorectal cancer, the third most common cancer worldwide. PMID:25119862

  2. Comparison of the effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids of heterotrophic and photoautotrophic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Heinzelmann, Sandra M; Chivall, David; M'Boule, Daniela; Sinke-Schoen, Danielle; Villanueva, Laura; Damsté, Jaap S Sinninghe; Schouten, Stefan; van der Meer, Marcel T J

    2015-05-01

    The core metabolism of microorganisms has a major influence on the hydrogen isotopic composition of their fatty acids. Heterotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids with a deuterium to hydrogen (D/H) ratio either slightly depleted or enriched in D compared to the growth water, while photo- and chemoautotrophic microorganisms produce fatty acids which are heavily depleted in D. However, besides metabolism other biochemical and environmental factors (i.e. biosynthetic pathways, growth phase and temperature) have been shown to affect the D/H ratio of fatty acids, and it is necessary to evaluate the magnitude of these effects compared to that of metabolism. Here, we show that the effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids depends on the core metabolism of the microorganism. While fatty acids of the photoautotroph Isochrysis galbana become more enriched in D with increasing salinity (enrichment of 30-40‰ over a range of 25 salinity units), no effect of salinity on the D/H ratio of fatty acids of the heterotrophic Pseudomonas str. LFY10 was observed ((ε)lipid/water of the C16:0 fatty acid of ~120‰ over a range of 10 salinity units). This can likely be explained by the relative contributions of different H and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate sources during fatty acid biosynthesis. PMID:25883110

  3. Dispensability of a sulfolipid for photoautotrophic cell growth and photosynthesis in a marine cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002.

    PubMed

    Sato, Norihiro; Kamimura, Ryohei; Tsuzuki, Mikio

    2016-09-01

    Sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol, which mainly comprises thylakoid membranes in oxygenic photosynthetic organisms, plays species-dependent roles in freshwater microbes. In this study, a sulfoquinovosyl-diacylglycerol deficient mutant was generated in a cyanobacterium, Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, for the first time among marine microbes to gain more insight into its physiological significance. The mutation had little deleterious impact on photoautotrophic cell growth, and functional and structural properties of the photosystem II complex. These findings were similar to previous observations for a freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, but were distinct from those for another freshwater cyanobacterium, Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803, and a green alga, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii, both of which require sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol for cell growth and/or photosystem II. Therefore, the functionality of PSII to dispense with sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol in Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, similar to that in Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942, seemed to have been excluded from the evolution of the PSII complex from cyanobacteria to green algal chloroplasts. Meanwhile, sulfoquinovosyl diacylglycerol was found to contribute to photoheterotrophic growth of Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, which revealed a novel species-dependent strategy for utilizing SQDG in physiological processes. PMID:27372425

  4. A hetero-photoautotrophic two-stage cultivation process to improve wastewater nutrient removal and enhance algal lipid accumulation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Wenguang; Min, Min; Li, Yecong; Hu, Bing; Ma, Xiaochen; Cheng, Yanling; Liu, Yuhuan; Chen, Paul; Ruan, Roger

    2012-04-01

    A hetero-photoautotrophic algal growth model was studied for improved wastewater treatment and low cost algal biofuel feedstock production. The microalga, Auxenochlorella protothecoides UMN280, was grown heterotrophically on concentrated municipal wastewater and then autotrophically with CO(2) supplementation (air, 1% and 5%, respectively). Strain UMN280 was harvested by self-sedimentation after the heterotrophic stage and the supernatant was aerated with different levels of CO(2) to facilitate autotrophic growth in the second stage. The maximal biomass concentration and lipid content at the first and second stages reached 1.12g/L and 28.90%, and 1.16g/L and 33.22%, respectively. The nutrient removal efficiencies for total phosphorus, ammonia, nitrogen and chemical oxygen demand at the end of the two-stage cultivation were 98.48%, 100%, 90.60% and 79.10%, respectively. The above process can be used to treat organic-rich wastewaters (e.g. industrial and animal manure wastewaters) to achieve the dual purpose of low-cost wastewater treatment and biofuel feedstock production. PMID:22326332

  5. Photoautotrophic symbiont and geography are major factors affecting highly structured and diverse bacterial communities in the lichen microbiome

    SciTech Connect

    Hodkinson, Brendan P; Gottel, Neil R; Schadt, Christopher Warren; Lutzoni, Francois

    2011-01-01

    Although common knowledge dictates that the lichen thallus is formed solely by a fungus (mycobiont) that develops a symbiotic relationship with an alga and/or cyanobacterium (photobiont), the non-photoautotrophic bacteria found in lichen microbiomes are increasingly regarded as integral components of lichen thalli. For this study, comparative analyses were conducted on lichen-associated bacterial communities to test for effects of photobiont-types (i.e. green algal vs. cyanobacterial), mycobiont-types and large-scale spatial distances (from tropical to arctic latitudes). Amplicons of the 16S (SSU) rRNA gene were examined using both Sanger sequencing of cloned fragments and barcoded pyrosequencing. Rhizobiales is typically the most abundant and taxonomically diverse order in lichen microbiomes; however, overall bacterial diversity in lichens is shown to be much higher than previously reported. Members of Acidobacteriaceae, Acetobacteraceae, Brucellaceae and sequence group LAR1 are the most commonly found groups across the phylogenetically and geographically broad array of lichens examined here. Major bacterial community trends are significantly correlated with differences in large-scale geography, photobiont-type and mycobiont-type. The lichen as a microcosm represents a structured, unique microbial habitat with greater ecological complexity and bacterial diversity than previously appreciated and can serve as a model system for studying larger ecological and evolutionary principles.

  6. Identification of differentially expressed small non-coding RNAs in the legume endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti by comparative genomics.

    PubMed

    del Val, Coral; Rivas, Elena; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I

    2007-12-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are being recognized as novel widespread regulators of gene expression in response to environmental signals. Here, we present the first search for sRNA-encoding genes in the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, performed by a genome-wide computational analysis of its intergenic regions. Comparative sequence data from eight related alpha-proteobacteria were obtained, and the interspecies pairwise alignments were scored with the programs eQRNA and RNAz as complementary predictive tools to identify conserved and stable secondary structures corresponding to putative non-coding RNAs. Northern experiments confirmed that eight of the predicted loci, selected among the original 32 candidates as most probable sRNA genes, expressed small transcripts. This result supports the combined use of eQRNA and RNAz as a robust strategy to identify novel sRNAs in bacteria. Furthermore, seven of the transcripts accumulated differentially in free-living and symbiotic conditions. Experimental mapping of the 5'-ends of the detected transcripts revealed that their encoding genes are organized in autonomous transcription units with recognizable promoter and, in most cases, termination signatures. These findings suggest novel regulatory functions for sRNAs related to the interactions of alpha-proteobacteria with their eukaryotic hosts. PMID:17971083

  7. Identification of differentially expressed small non-coding RNAs in the legume endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti by comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    del Val, Coral; Rivas, Elena; Torres-Quesada, Omar; Toro, Nicolás; Jiménez-Zurdo, José I

    2007-01-01

    Bacterial small non-coding RNAs (sRNAs) are being recognized as novel widespread regulators of gene expression in response to environmental signals. Here, we present the first search for sRNA-encoding genes in the nitrogen-fixing endosymbiont Sinorhizobium meliloti, performed by a genome-wide computational analysis of its intergenic regions. Comparative sequence data from eight related α-proteobacteria were obtained, and the interspecies pairwise alignments were scored with the programs eQRNA and RNAz as complementary predictive tools to identify conserved and stable secondary structures corresponding to putative non-coding RNAs. Northern experiments confirmed that eight of the predicted loci, selected among the original 32 candidates as most probable sRNA genes, expressed small transcripts. This result supports the combined use of eQRNA and RNAz as a robust strategy to identify novel sRNAs in bacteria. Furthermore, seven of the transcripts accumulated differentially in free-living and symbiotic conditions. Experimental mapping of the 5′-ends of the detected transcripts revealed that their encoding genes are organized in autonomous transcription units with recognizable promoter and, in most cases, termination signatures. These findings suggest novel regulatory functions for sRNAs related to the interactions of α-proteobacteria with their eukaryotic hosts. PMID:17971083

  8. Long non-coding RNAs and enhancer RNAs regulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human monocytes

    PubMed Central

    IIott, Nicholas E.; Heward, James A.; Roux, Benoit; Tsitsiou, Eleni; Fenwick, Peter S.; Lenzi, Luca; Goodhead, Ian; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Heger, Andreas; Hall, Neil; Donnelly, Louise E.; Sims, David; Lindsay, Mark A.

    2014-01-01

    Early reports indicate that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel regulators of biological responses. However, their role in the human innate immune response, which provides the initial defence against infection, is largely unexplored. To address this issue, here we characterize the long non-coding RNA transcriptome in primary human monocytes using RNA sequencing. We identify 76 enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), 40 canonical lncRNAs, 65 antisense lncRNAs and 35 regions of bidirectional transcription (RBT) that are differentially expressed in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Crucially, we demonstrate that knockdown of nuclear-localized, NF-κB-regulated, eRNAs (IL1β-eRNA) and RBT (IL1β-RBT46) surrounding the IL1β locus, attenuates LPS-induced messenger RNA transcription and release of the proinflammatory mediators, IL1β and CXCL8. We predict that lncRNAs can be important regulators of the human innate immune response. PMID:24909122

  9. Non-coding RNAs’ partitioning in the evolution of photosynthetic organisms via energy transduction and redox signaling

    PubMed Central

    Kotakis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Ars longa, vita brevis —HippocratesChloroplasts and mitochondria are genetically semi-autonomous organelles inside the plant cell. These constructions formed after endosymbiosis and keep evolving throughout the history of life. Experimental evidence is provided for active non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) in these prokaryote-like structures, and a possible functional imprinting on cellular electrophysiology by those RNA entities is described. Furthermore, updated knowledge on RNA metabolism of organellar genomes uncovers novel inter-communication bridges with the nucleus. This class of RNA molecules is considered as a unique ontogeny which transforms their biological role as a genetic rheostat into a synchronous biochemical one that can affect the energetic charge and redox homeostasis inside cells. A hypothesis is proposed where such modulation by non-coding RNAs is integrated with genetic signals regulating gene transfer. The implications of this working hypothesis are discussed, with particular reference to ncRNAs involvement in the organellar and nuclear genomes evolution since their integrity is functionally coupled with redox signals in photosynthetic organisms. PMID:25826417

  10. Non-coding small (micro) RNAs of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from clinical isolates from adult patients with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Rao, J R; Nelson, D; Moore, J E; Millar, B C; Goldsmith, C E; Rendall, J; Elborn, J S

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs are a class of small non-coding RNAs widely reported in eukaryotic multicellular organisms. In this study, a number of small non-coding micro (mi)RNA species in clinical isolates of prokaryote Pseudomonas aeruginosa were obtained from the sputum of adult patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) utilising a DynaExpress miRNA cloning kit, and five miRNAs of 16-47 nucleotides that were smaller than those encountered or described (80-100 nucleotides) previously in bacterial systems were described. This report presents data on these unknown cellular miRNAs cloned from P. aeruginosa isolates from CF patients. Adapting a computational miRNA prediction model that takes advantage of the highly conserved known miRNA hair pin stems regions, the results revealed that the fold structure of the microRNAs had a high homology to the recently reported human bacterial infection response (BiR)-related microRNA, mi-146, associated with the Toll-like receptor (TLR) family, which is the primary evolutionarily conserved sensors of pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs), and known to trigger host inflammatory and immune responses. PMID:20973407

  11. Long non-coding RNAs and enhancer RNAs regulate the lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammatory response in human monocytes.

    PubMed

    IIott, Nicholas E; Heward, James A; Roux, Benoit; Tsitsiou, Eleni; Fenwick, Peter S; Lenzi, Luca; Goodhead, Ian; Hertz-Fowler, Christiane; Heger, Andreas; Hall, Neil; Donnelly, Louise E; Sims, David; Lindsay, Mark A

    2014-01-01

    Early reports indicate that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel regulators of biological responses. However, their role in the human innate immune response, which provides the initial defence against infection, is largely unexplored. To address this issue, here we characterize the long non-coding RNA transcriptome in primary human monocytes using RNA sequencing. We identify 76 enhancer RNAs (eRNAs), 40 canonical lncRNAs, 65 antisense lncRNAs and 35 regions of bidirectional transcription (RBT) that are differentially expressed in response to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Crucially, we demonstrate that knockdown of nuclear-localized, NF-κB-regulated, eRNAs (IL1β-eRNA) and RBT (IL1β-RBT46) surrounding the IL1β locus, attenuates LPS-induced messenger RNA transcription and release of the proinflammatory mediators, IL1β and CXCL8. We predict that lncRNAs can be important regulators of the human innate immune response. PMID:24909122

  12. Knockdown of long non-coding RNA HOTAIR inhibits proliferation and invasiveness and improves radiosensitivity in colorectal cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao-Dong; Xu, Hong-Tao; Xu, Xiao-Hui; Ru, Gan; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Jun-Jia; Wu, Yong-You; Zhao, Kui; Wu, Yong; Xing, Chun-Gen; Zhang, Shu-Yu; Cao, Jian-Ping; Li, Ming

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is still one of the most important neoplasias causing human death. Multidisciplinary therapy has won consensus in the management of CRC, of which, radiotherapy occupies an important position. However, radioresistance is still a major obstacle in local control of CRC. Overexpression of long non-coding RNA HOTAIR has been found to correlate with tumorigenesis and poor prognosis in several types of cancer. In the present study, we analyzed HOTAIR expression levels of 53 CRC patients in tumor and adjacent normal tissue by real-time quantitative PCR. Knockdown of HOTAIR by RNA interference was performed to explore its roles in cell proliferation, migration, invasion, apoptosis and radiosensitivity. Results showed that CRC patients had higher HOTAIR expression in tumor tissues compared with adjacent normal tissues. In vitro, downregulation of HOTAIR reduced proliferation, migration and invasiveness while enhanced apoptosis and radio-sensitivity of CRC cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that long non-coding RNA HOTAIR expression is closely associated with tumor invasion and radiosensitivity, indicating the potential role in diagnostics and therapeutics of CRC. PMID:26549670

  13. Profiling of conserved non-coding elements upstream of SHOX and functional characterisation of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape

    PubMed Central

    Verdin, Hannah; Fernández-Miñán, Ana; Benito-Sanz, Sara; Janssens, Sandra; Callewaert, Bert; Waele, Kathleen De; Schepper, Jean De; François, Inge; Menten, Björn; Heath, Karen E.; Gómez-Skarmeta, José Luis; Baere, Elfride De

    2015-01-01

    Genetic defects such as copy number variations (CNVs) in non-coding regions containing conserved non-coding elements (CNEs) outside the transcription unit of their target gene, can underlie genetic disease. An example of this is the short stature homeobox (SHOX) gene, regulated by seven CNEs located downstream and upstream of SHOX, with proven enhancer capacity in chicken limbs. CNVs of the downstream CNEs have been reported in many idiopathic short stature (ISS) cases, however, only recently have a few CNVs of the upstream enhancers been identified. Here, we set out to provide insight into: (i) the cis-regulatory role of these upstream CNEs in human cells, (ii) the prevalence of upstream CNVs in ISS, and (iii) the chromatin architecture of the SHOX cis-regulatory landscape in chicken and human cells. Firstly, luciferase assays in human U2OS cells, and 4C-seq both in chicken limb buds and human U2OS cells, demonstrated cis-regulatory enhancer capacities of the upstream CNEs. Secondly, CNVs of these upstream CNEs were found in three of 501 ISS patients. Finally, our 4C-seq interaction map of the SHOX region reveals a cis-regulatory domain spanning more than 1 Mb and harbouring putative new cis-regulatory elements. PMID:26631348

  14. A long non-coding RNA interacts with Gfra1 and maintains survival of mouse spermatogonial stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, L; Wang, M; Wang, M; Wu, X; Geng, L; Xue, Y; Wei, X; Jia, Y; Wu, X

    2016-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) are unique male germline stem cells that support spermatogenesis and male fertility. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have been identified as key regulators of stem cell fate; however, their role in SSCs has not been explored. Here, we report that a novel spermatogonia-specific lncRNA (lncRNA033862) is essential for the survival of murine SSCs. LncRNA033862 is expressed in early spermatogonia including SSC and was among 805 lncRNAs identified by global expression profiling as responsive to glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), a growth factor required for SSC self-renewal and survival. LncRNA033862 is an antisense transcript of the GDNF receptor alpha1 (Gfra1) that lacks protein coding potential and regulates Gfra1 expression levels by interacting with Gfra1 chromatin. Importantly, lncRNA033862 knockdown severely impairs SSC survival and their capacity to repopulate recipient testes in a transplantation assay. Collectively, our data provide the first evidence that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) regulate SSC fate. PMID:26962690

  15. Crosstalk between transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway and long non-coding RNAs in cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbo; Shao, Na; Ding, Xiaowen; Tan, Bingxu; Song, Qingxu; Wang, Nana; Jia, Yibin; Ling, Hongbo; Cheng, Yufeng

    2016-01-28

    The transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathway plays an important role in tumorigenesis by exerting either a tumor-suppressing or tumor-promoting effect. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a newly discovered class of non-coding RNAs, have been widely studied in recent years and identified as crucial regulators of various biological processes, including cell cycle progression, chromatin remodeling, gene transcription, and posttranscriptional processing. Recent evidence, addressing the crosstalk between the TGF-β signaling pathway and lncRNAs in cancer, found that several members of the TGF-β pathway are targeted by lncRNAs, and the production of hundreds of lncRNAs is induced by TGF-β treatment. This review will summarize the latest progress on the investigation of TGF-β pathway and lncRNA network in regulating cancer development. Further study on the network would provide a better understanding of carcinogenesis and have potentials for the prevention and treatment of malignant diseases. PMID:26577807

  16. Integration of Expressed Sequence Tag Data Flanking Predicted RNA Secondary Structures Facilitates Novel Non-Coding RNA Discovery

    PubMed Central

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M.; Price, Feodor D.; Muro, Enrique M.; Rudnicki, Michael A.; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A.

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  17. The CASC15 long intergenic non-coding RNA locus is involved in melanoma progression and phenotype-switching

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Laurent; Liu, Michelle; Marzese, Diego M.; Wang, Hongwei; Chong, Kelly; Kawas, Neal; Donovan, Nicholas C; Kiyohara, Eiji; Hsu, Sandy; Nelson, Nellie; Izraely, Sivan; Sagi-Assif, Orit; Witz, Isaac P; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Luo, Yuling; Hoon, Dave SB

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, considerable advances have been made in the characterization of protein-coding alterations involved in the pathogenesis of melanoma. However, despite their growing implication in cancer, little is known about the role of long non-coding RNAs in melanoma progression. We hypothesized that copy number alterations of intergenic non-protein coding domains could help identify long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) associated with metastatic cutaneous melanoma. Among several candidates, our approach uncovered the chromosome 6p22.3 CASC15 lincRNA locus as a frequently gained genomic segment in metastatic melanoma tumors and cell lines. The locus was actively transcribed in metastatic melanoma cells, and up-regulation of CASC15 expression was associated with metastatic progression to brain metastasis in a mouse xenograft model. In clinical specimens, CASC15 levels increased during melanoma progression and were independent predictors of disease recurrence in a cohort of 141 patients with AJCC stage III lymph node metastasis. Moreover, siRNA knockdown experiments revealed that CASC15 regulates melanoma cell phenotype switching between proliferative and invasive states. Accordingly, CASC15 levels correlated with known gene signatures corresponding to melanoma proliferative and invasive phenotypes. These findings support a key role for CASC15 in metastatic melanoma. PMID:26016895

  18. Feedback modulation of cholesterol metabolism by the lipid-responsive non-coding RNA LeXis.

    PubMed

    Sallam, Tamer; Jones, Marius C; Gilliland, Thomas; Zhang, Li; Wu, Xiaohui; Eskin, Ascia; Sandhu, Jaspreet; Casero, David; Vallim, Thomas Q de Aguiar; Hong, Cynthia; Katz, Melanie; Lee, Richard; Whitelegge, Julian; Tontonoz, Peter

    2016-06-01

    Liver X receptors (LXRs) are transcriptional regulators of cellular and systemic cholesterol homeostasis. Under conditions of excess cholesterol, LXR activation induces the expression of several genes involved in cholesterol efflux, facilitates cholesterol esterification by promoting fatty acid synthesis, and inhibits cholesterol uptake by the low-density lipoprotein receptor. The fact that sterol content is maintained in a narrow range in most cell types and in the organism as a whole suggests that extensive crosstalk between regulatory pathways must exist. However, the molecular mechanisms that integrate LXRs with other lipid metabolic pathways are incompletely understood. Here we show that ligand activation of LXRs in mouse liver not only promotes cholesterol efflux, but also simultaneously inhibits cholesterol biosynthesis. We further identify the long non-coding RNA LeXis as a mediator of this effect. Hepatic LeXis expression is robustly induced in response to a Western diet (high in fat and cholesterol) or to pharmacological LXR activation. Raising or lowering LeXis levels in the liver affects the expression of genes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis and alters the cholesterol levels in the liver and plasma. LeXis interacts with and affects the DNA interactions of RALY, a heterogeneous ribonucleoprotein that acts as a transcriptional cofactor for cholesterol biosynthetic genes in the mouse liver. These findings outline a regulatory role for a non-coding RNA in lipid metabolism and advance our understanding of the mechanisms that coordinate sterol homeostasis. PMID:27251289

  19. Non-coding stem-bulge RNAs are required for cell proliferation and embryonic development in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Kowalski, Madzia P.; Baylis, Howard A.; Krude, Torsten

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Stem bulge RNAs (sbRNAs) are a family of small non-coding stem-loop RNAs present in Caenorhabditis elegans and other nematodes, the function of which is unknown. Here, we report the first functional characterisation of nematode sbRNAs. We demonstrate that sbRNAs from a range of nematode species are able to reconstitute the initiation of chromosomal DNA replication in the presence of replication proteins in vitro, and that conserved nucleotide sequence motifs are essential for this function. By functionally inactivating sbRNAs with antisense morpholino oligonucleotides, we show that sbRNAs are required for S phase progression, early embryonic development and the viability of C. elegans in vivo. Thus, we demonstrate a new and essential role for sbRNAs during the early development of C. elegans. sbRNAs show limited nucleotide sequence similarity to vertebrate Y RNAs, which are also essential for the initiation of DNA replication. Our results therefore establish that the essential function of small non-coding stem-loop RNAs during DNA replication extends beyond vertebrates. PMID:25908866

  20. Up-regulation of Long Non-coding RNA TUG1 in Hibernating Thirteen-lined Ground Squirrels.

    PubMed

    Frigault, Jacques J; Lang-Ouellette, Daneck; Morin, Pier

    2016-04-01

    Mammalian hibernation is associated with multiple physiological, biochemical, and molecular changes that allow animals to endure colder temperatures. We hypothesize that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a group of non-coding transcripts with diverse functions, are differentially expressed during hibernation. In this study, expression levels of lncRNAsH19 and TUG1 were assessed via qRT-PCR in liver, heart, and skeletal muscle tissues of the hibernating thirteen-lined ground squirrels (Ictidomys tridecemlineatus). TUG1 transcript levels were significantly elevated 1.94-fold in skeletal muscle of hibernating animals when compared with euthermic animals. Furthermore, transcript levels of HSF2 also increased 2.44-fold in the skeletal muscle in hibernating animals. HSF2 encodes a transcription factor that can be negatively regulated by TUG1 levels and that influences heat shock protein expression. Thus, these observations support the differential expression of the TUG1-HSF2 axis during hibernation. To our knowledge, this study provides the first evidence for differential expression of lncRNAs in torpid ground squirrels, adding lncRNAs as another group of transcripts modulated in this mammalian species during hibernation. PMID:27132145

  1. Integration of expressed sequence tag data flanking predicted RNA secondary structures facilitates novel non-coding RNA discovery.

    PubMed

    Krzyzanowski, Paul M; Price, Feodor D; Muro, Enrique M; Rudnicki, Michael A; Andrade-Navarro, Miguel A

    2011-01-01

    Many computational methods have been used to predict novel non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), but none, to our knowledge, have explicitly investigated the impact of integrating existing cDNA-based Expressed Sequence Tag (EST) data that flank structural RNA predictions. To determine whether flanking EST data can assist in microRNA (miRNA) prediction, we identified genomic sites encoding putative miRNAs by combining functional RNA predictions with flanking ESTs data in a model consistent with miRNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. In both human and mouse genomes, we observed that the inclusion of flanking ESTs adjacent to and not overlapping predicted miRNAs significantly improved the performance of various methods of miRNA prediction, including direct high-throughput sequencing of small RNA libraries. We analyzed the expression of hundreds of miRNAs predicted to be expressed during myogenic differentiation using a customized microarray and identified several known and predicted myogenic miRNA hairpins. Our results indicate that integrating ESTs flanking structural RNA predictions improves the quality of cleaved miRNA predictions and suggest that this strategy can be used to predict other non-coding RNAs undergoing cleavage during maturation. PMID:21698286

  2. Strong conservation of non-coding sequences during vertebrates evolution: potential involvement in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Duret, L; Dorkeld, F; Gautier, C

    1993-01-01

    Comparison of nucleotide sequences from different classes of vertebrates that diverged more than 300 million years ago, revealed the existence of highly conserved regions (HCRs) with more than 70% similarity over 100 to 1450 nt in non-coding parts of genes. Such a conservation is unexpected because it is much longer and stronger than what is necessary for specifying the binding of a regulatory protein. HCRs are relatively frequent, particularly in genes that are essential to cell life. In multigene families, conserved regions are specific of each isotype and are probably involved in the control of their specific pattern of expression. Studying HCRs distribution within genes showed that functional constraints are generally much stronger in 3'-non-coding regions than in promoters or introns. The 3'-HCRs are particularly A + T-rich and are always located in the transcribed untranslated regions of genes, which suggests that they are involved in post-transcriptional processes. However, current knowledge of mechanisms that regulate mRNA export, localisation, translation, or degradation is not sufficient to explain the strong functional constraints that we have characterised. PMID:8506129

  3. Natural genetic variation impacts expression levels of coding, non-coding, and antisense transcripts in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Clément-Ziza, Mathieu; Marsellach, Francesc X; Codlin, Sandra; Papadakis, Manos A; Reinhardt, Susanne; Rodríguez-López, María; Martin, Stuart; Marguerat, Samuel; Schmidt, Alexander; Lee, Eunhye; Workman, Christopher T; Bähler, Jürg; Beyer, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    Our current understanding of how natural genetic variation affects gene expression beyond well-annotated coding genes is still limited. The use of deep sequencing technologies for the study of expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) has the potential to close this gap. Here, we generated the first recombinant strain library for fission yeast and conducted an RNA-seq-based QTL study of the coding, non-coding, and antisense transcriptomes. We show that the frequency of distal effects (trans-eQTLs) greatly exceeds the number of local effects (cis-eQTLs) and that non-coding RNAs are as likely to be affected by eQTLs as protein-coding RNAs. We identified a genetic variation of swc5 that modifies the levels of 871 RNAs, with effects on both sense and antisense transcription, and show that this effect most likely goes through a compromised deposition of the histone variant H2A.Z. The strains, methods, and datasets generated here provide a rich resource for future studies. PMID:25432776

  4. Clinical genetics of functionally mild non-coding GTP cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) polymorphisms modulating pain and cardiovascular risk.

    PubMed

    Doehring, Alexandra; Antoniades, Charalambos; Channon, Keith M; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2008-01-01

    Guanosine triphosphate cyclohydrolase 1 (GCH1) is the first enzyme in the tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) biosynthesis, an important co-factor for the formation of nitric oxide, biogenic amines and serotonin. Hereditary diseases such as DOPA-responsive dystonia and atypical phenylketonuria are known to be caused by coding or splice-site mutations in the GCH1 gene, leading mostly to a dominant negative enzyme. However, recent evidence suggests a clinical genetics of GCH1 beyond these hereditary loss-of-function diseases. That is, a non-coding GCH1 haplotype has been associated with reduced pain hypersensitivity and with altered vascular endothelial function. Moreover, the presence of the non-coding c.*243C>T variant in the 3'-untranslated region (3'-UTR) of the GCH1 gene has been associated with mildly increased heart rate and blood pressure. Here, we show that carriers of the pain-protective GCH1 haplotype also carry the c.*243C>T variant and vice versa. We thus demonstrate that apart from the coding or splice-site variants causing DOPA-responsive dystonia and atypical phenylketonuria, there is a common clinically relevant GCH1 genetics that is so far known to be related to unfavorable changes of endothelial function and a reduced risk for chronic pain. PMID:18515178

  5. RNA-seq analysis of small RNPs in Trypanosoma brucei reveals a rich repertoire of non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Michaeli, Shulamit; Doniger, Tirza; Gupta, Sachin Kumar; Wurtzel, Omri; Romano, Mali; Visnovezky, Damian; Sorek, Rotem; Unger, Ron; Ullu, Elisabetta

    2012-01-01

    The discovery of a plethora of small non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has fundamentally changed our understanding of how genes are regulated. In this study, we employed the power of deep sequencing of RNA (RNA-seq) to examine the repertoire of ncRNAs present in small ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) of Trypanosoma brucei, an important protozoan parasite. We identified new C/D and H/ACA small nucleolar RNAs (snoRNAs), as well as tens of putative novel non-coding RNAs; several of these are processed from trans-spliced and polyadenylated transcripts. The RNA-seq analysis provided information on the relative abundance of the RNAs, and their 5′- and 3′-termini. The study demonstrated that three highly abundant snoRNAs are involved in rRNA processing and highlight the unique trypanosome-specific repertoire of these RNAs. Novel RNAs were studied using in situ hybridization, association in RNP complexes, and ‘RNA walk’ to detect interaction with their target RNAs. Finally, we showed that the abundance of certain ncRNAs varies between the two stages of the parasite, suggesting that ncRNAs may contribute to gene regulation during the complex parasite’s life cycle. This is the first study to provide a whole-genome analysis of the large repertoire of small RNPs in trypanosomes. PMID:21976736

  6. Emergence of Photoautotrophic Minimal Protocell-Like Supramolecular Assemblies, "Jeewanu" Synthesied Photo Chemically in an Irradiated Sterilised Aqueous Mixture of Some Inorganic and Organic Substances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Sunlight exposed sterilised aqueous mixture of ammonium molybdate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, biological minerals and formaldehyde showed photochemical formation of self-sustaining biomimetic protocell-like supramolecular assemblies "Jeewanu" (Bahadur and Ranganayaki J Brit Interplanet Soc 23:813-829 1970). The structural and functional characteristics of Jeewanu suggests that in possible prebiotic atmosphere photosy nergistic collaboration of non-linear processes at mesoscopic level established autocatalytic pathways on mineral surfaces by selforganisation and self recognition and led to emergence of similar earliest energy transducing supramolecular assemblies which might have given rise to common universal ancestor on the earth or elsewhere.

  7. Emergence of photoautotrophic minimal protocell-like supramolecular assemblies, "Jeewanu" synthesied photo chemically in an irradiated sterilised aqueous mixture of some inorganic and organic substances.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vinod Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Sunlight exposed sterilised aqueous mixture of ammonium molybdate, diammonium hydrogen phosphate, biological minerals and formaldehyde showed photochemical formation of self-sustaining biomimetic protocell-like supramolecular assemblies "Jeewanu" (Bahadur and Ranganayaki J Brit Interplanet Soc 23:813-829 1970). The structural and functional characteristics of Jeewanu suggests that in possible prebiotic atmosphere photosy nergistic collaboration of non-linear processes at mesoscopic level established autocatalytic pathways on mineral surfaces by selforganisation and self recognition and led to emergence of similar earliest energy transducing supramolecular assemblies which might have given rise to common universal ancestor on the earth or elsewhere. PMID:25567741

  8. Minimal Reduplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchner, Jesse Saba

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces Minimal Reduplication, a new theory and framework within generative grammar for analyzing reduplication in human language. I argue that reduplication is an emergent property in multiple components of the grammar. In particular, reduplication occurs independently in the phonology and syntax components, and in both cases…

  9. Complex organisation and structure of the ghrelin antisense strand gene GHRLOS, a candidate non-coding RNA gene

    PubMed Central

    Seim, Inge; Carter, Shea L; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2008-01-01

    Background The peptide hormone ghrelin has many important physiological and pathophysiological roles, including the stimulation of growth hormone (GH) release, appetite regulation, gut motility and proliferation of cancer cells. We previously identified a gene on the opposite strand of the ghrelin gene, ghrelinOS (GHRLOS), which spans the promoter and untranslated regions of the ghrelin gene (GHRL). Here we further characterise GHRLOS. Results We have described GHRLOS mRNA isoforms that extend over 1.4 kb of the promoter region and 106 nucleotides of exon 4 of the ghrelin gene, GHRL. These GHRLOS transcripts initiate 4.8 kb downstream of the terminal exon 4 of GHRL and are present in the 3' untranslated exon of the adjacent gene TATDN2 (TatD DNase domain containing 2). Interestingly, we have also identified a putative non-coding TATDN2-GHRLOS chimaeric transcript, indicating that GHRLOS RNA biogenesis is extremely complex. Moreover, we have discovered that the 3' region of GHRLOS is also antisense, in a tail-to-tail fashion to a novel terminal exon of the neighbouring SEC13 gene, which is important in protein transport. Sequence analyses revealed that GHRLOS is riddled with stop codons, and that there is little nucleotide and amino-acid sequence conservation of the GHRLOS gene between vertebrates. The gene spans 44 kb on 3p25.3, is extensively spliced and harbours multiple variable exons. We have also investigated the expression of GHRLOS and found evidence of differential tissue expression. It is highly expressed in tissues which are emerging as major sites of non-coding RNA expression (the thymus, brain, and testis), as well as in the ovary and uterus. In contrast, very low levels were found in the stomach where sense, GHRL derived RNAs are highly expressed. Conclusion GHRLOS RNA transcripts display several distinctive features of non-coding (ncRNA) genes, including 5' capping, polyadenylation, extensive splicing and short open reading frames. The gene is also

  10. Photoautotrophic Polyhydroxybutyrate Granule Formation Is Regulated by Cyanobacterial Phasin PhaP in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Hauf, Waldemar; Watzer, Björn; Roos, Nora; Klotz, Alexander; Forchhammer, Karl

    2015-07-01

    Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic microorganisms which fix atmospheric carbon dioxide via the Calvin-Benson cycle to produce carbon backbones for primary metabolism. Fixed carbon can also be stored as intracellular glycogen, and in some cyanobacterial species like Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulates when major nutrients like phosphorus or nitrogen are absent. So far only three enzymes which participate in PHB metabolism have been identified in this organism, namely, PhaA, PhaB, and the heterodimeric PHB synthase PhaEC. In this work, we describe the cyanobacterial PHA surface-coating protein (phasin), which we term PhaP, encoded by ssl2501. Translational fusion of Ssl2501 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) showed a clear colocalization to PHB granules. A deletion of ssl2501 reduced the number of PHB granules per cell, whereas the mean PHB granule size increased as expected for a typical phasin. Although deletion of ssl2501 had almost no effect on the amount of PHB, the biosynthetic activity of PHB synthase was negatively affected. Secondary-structure prediction and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of PhaP revealed that the protein consists of two α-helices, both of them associating with PHB granules. Purified PhaP forms oligomeric structures in solution, and both α-helices of PhaP contribute to oligomerization. Together, these results support the idea that Ssl2501 encodes a cyanobacterial phasin, PhaP, which regulates the surface-to-volume ratio of PHB granules. PMID:25911471

  11. Assessment of herbicidal toxicity based on non-destructive measurement of local chlorophyll content in photoautotrophic hairy roots.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Oogami, Yoshihiro; Kino-Oka, Masahiro; Taya, Masahito

    2003-01-01

    Changes in local chlorophyll (Chl) content in photoautotrophic hairy roots of pak-bung (Ipomoea aquatica) were evaluated at incident light intensities of I=11 and 22 W/m2 by non-destructive measurement of the pigment based on color image analysis. Upon addition of 3-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-1,1-dimethylurea (DCMU), 1-1'-dimethyl-4,4'-bipyridylium dichloride (paraquat) and 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) to the medium at the median effective concentrations (0.40, 0.37 and 0.45 micromol/dm3 for DCMU, paraquat and 2,4-D, respectively), the roots showed different Chl pigmentation responses when the Chl content was measured at longitudinal lengths of l0=2.5 mm (Chl accumulation position) and l(0)=35 mm (Chl saturation position) under light irradiation. Chl accumulation index (beta) and Chl degradation index (gamma) were determined from the changes in Chl content at l0=2.5 and 35 mm, respectively, during the cultures for 96 h: beta=0% (DCMU), 93.6% (paraquat) and 93.8% (2,4-D), and gamma=98.4% (DCMU), 282% (paraquat) and 86.5% (2,4-D) at I=22 W/m2. Moreover, the bioassay system with the hairy roots was applied to the evaluation of a model sample of field water. The values of beta and gamma for the field water were determined, respectively, to be 105% and 217% at I=22 W/m2, from which the field water tested was judged to be a "paraquat-like" toxicant against the roots. PMID:16233403

  12. Photoautotrophic Polyhydroxybutyrate Granule Formation Is Regulated by Cyanobacterial Phasin PhaP in Synechocystis sp. Strain PCC 6803

    PubMed Central

    Hauf, Waldemar; Watzer, Björn; Roos, Nora; Klotz, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are photoautotrophic microorganisms which fix atmospheric carbon dioxide via the Calvin-Benson cycle to produce carbon backbones for primary metabolism. Fixed carbon can also be stored as intracellular glycogen, and in some cyanobacterial species like Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, polyhydroxybutyrate (PHB) accumulates when major nutrients like phosphorus or nitrogen are absent. So far only three enzymes which participate in PHB metabolism have been identified in this organism, namely, PhaA, PhaB, and the heterodimeric PHB synthase PhaEC. In this work, we describe the cyanobacterial PHA surface-coating protein (phasin), which we term PhaP, encoded by ssl2501. Translational fusion of Ssl2501 with enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) showed a clear colocalization to PHB granules. A deletion of ssl2501 reduced the number of PHB granules per cell, whereas the mean PHB granule size increased as expected for a typical phasin. Although deletion of ssl2501 had almost no effect on the amount of PHB, the biosynthetic activity of PHB synthase was negatively affected. Secondary-structure prediction and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy of PhaP revealed that the protein consists of two α-helices, both of them associating with PHB granules. Purified PhaP forms oligomeric structures in solution, and both α-helices of PhaP contribute to oligomerization. Together, these results support the idea that Ssl2501 encodes a cyanobacterial phasin, PhaP, which regulates the surface-to-volume ratio of PHB granules. PMID:25911471

  13. Taxonomic minimalism.

    PubMed

    Beattle, A J; Oliver, I

    1994-12-01

    Biological surveys are in increasing demand while taxonomic resources continue to decline. How much formal taxonomy is required to get the job done? The answer depends on the kind of job but it is possible that taxonomic minimalism, especially (1) the use of higher taxonomic ranks, (2) the use of morphospecies rather than species (as identified by Latin binomials), and (3) the involvement of taxonomic specialists only for training and verification, may offer advantages for biodiversity assessment, environmental monitoring and ecological research. As such, formal taxonomy remains central to the process of biological inventory and survey but resources may be allocated more efficiently. For example, if formal Identification is not required, resources may be concentrated on replication and increasing sample sizes. Taxonomic minimalism may also facilitate the inclusion in these activities of important but neglected groups, especially among the invertebrates, and perhaps even microorganisms. PMID:21236933

  14. The regulation of mammalian mRNA transcription by long non-coding RNAs: Recent discoveries and current concepts

    PubMed Central

    Kugel, Jennifer F.; Goodrich, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Transcription by RNA polymerase II (Pol II) is a tightly controlled process critical to normal cellular metabolism. Understanding how transcriptional regulation is orchestrated has mainly involved identifying and characterizing proteins that function as transcription factors. During the past decade, however, an increasing number of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified as transcriptional regulators. This revelation has spurred new discoveries, novel techniques, and paradigm shifts, which together are redefining our understanding of transcriptional control and broadening our view of RNA function. Here we summarize recent discoveries concerning the role of lncRNAs as regulators of mammalian mRNA transcription, with a focus on key concepts that are guiding current research in the field. PMID:23414324

  15. Emerging roles of long non-coding RNA in root developmental plasticity and regulation of phosphate homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bazin, Jeremie; Bailey-Serres, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of gene expression in a variety of biological process and in multiple species. In plants, they are transcribed by different RNA polymerases and show diverse structural features. With the aid of next-generation sequencing technologies, a large number of lncRNA have been identified in model plants as well as in crops. This review focuses on the demonstration that lncRNAs control root system architecture, notably in response to phosphate availability, through regulation of transcription, alternative splicing, microRNA activity, messenger RNA stability and translation, illustrating remarkable diversity in their roles in regulating developmental plasticity. PMID:26106399

  16. All’s Well That Transcribes Well: Non-coding RNAs and Post-Stroke Brain Damage

    PubMed Central

    Vemuganti, Raghu

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian genome is replete with various classes of non-coding (nc) RNA genes. Many of them actively transcribe, and their relevance to CNS diseases is just beginning to be understood. CNS is one of the organs in the body that shows very high ncRNAs activity. Recent studies demonstrated that cerebral ischemia rapidly changes the expression profiles of different classes of ncRNAs: including microRNA, long noncoding RNA and piwi-interacting RNA. Several studies further showed that post-ischemic neuronal death and/or plasticity/regeneration can be altered by modulating specific microRNAs. These studies are of interest for therapeutic development as they may contribute to identifying new ncRNA targets that can be modulated to prevent secondary brain damage after stroke. PMID:23954844

  17. Transcriptional regulation of Oct4 by a long non-coding RNA antisense to Oct4-pseudogene 5.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Peter G; Morris, Kevin V

    2010-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to epigenetically regulate certain genes in human cells. Here we report evidence for the involvement of an antisense lncRNA in the transcriptional regulation of the pluripotency-associated factor Oct4. When an lncRNA antisense to Oct4-pseudogene 5 was suppressed, transcription of Oct4 and Oct4 pseudogenes 4 and 5 was observed to increase. This increase correlated with a loss of silent state epigenetic marks and the histone methyltransferase Ezh2 at the Oct4 promoter. We observed this lncRNA to interact with nucleolin and PURA, a 35 kD single-stranded DNA and RNA binding protein, and found that these proteins may act to negatively regulate this antisense transcript. PMID:21151833

  18. Non-coding transcription by RNA polymerase II in yeast: Hasard or nécessité?

    PubMed

    Tudek, Agnieszka; Candelli, Tito; Libri, Domenico

    2015-10-01

    Recent developments of microarrays and deep sequencing techniques have unveiled an unexpected complexity of the eukaryotic transcriptome, demonstrating that virtualy the entire genome is transcribed by RNA polymerase II (RNAPII). Transcription occurring outside of annotated regions is generally referred to as pervasive transcription and leads to the production of several classes of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). In this review we will discuss the metabolism and functional significance of these ncRNAs in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We will discuss the mechanisms that the cell has adopted to prevent potentially disruptive interference between pervasive transcription and the expression of canonical genes. We will explore the possible reasons that justify the evolutionary conserved maintenance of extensive genomic transcription. PMID:25956976

  19. Unveiling the hidden function of long non-coding RNA by identifying its major partner-protein.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yongfang; Wen, Liwei; Zhu, Hongliang

    2015-01-01

    Tens of thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered in eukarya, but their functions are largely unknown. Fortunately, lncRNA-protein interactions may offer details of how lncRNAs play important roles in various biological processes, thus identifying proteins associated with lncRNA is critical. Here we review progress of molecular archetypes that lncRNAs execute as guides, scaffolds, or decoys for protein, focusing on advantages, shortcomings and applications of various conventional and emerging technologies to probe lncRNAs and protein interactions, including protein-centric biochemistry approaches such as nRIP and CLIP, and RNA-centric biochemistry approaches such as ChIRP, CHART and RAP. Overall, this review provides strategies for probing interactions between lncRNAs and protein. PMID:26500759

  20. Identification and expression patterns of novel long non-coding RNAs in neural progenitors of the developing mammalian cortex

    PubMed Central

    Aprea, Julieta; Lesche, Mathias; Massalini, Simone; Prenninger, Silvia; Alexopoulou, Dimitra; Dahl, Andreas; Hiller, Michael; Calegari, Federico

    2015-01-01

    Long non-coding (lnc)RNAs play key roles in many biological processes. Elucidating the function of lncRNAs in cell type specification during organ development requires knowledge about their expression in individual progenitor types rather than in whole tissues. To achieve this during cortical development, we used a dual-reporter mouse line to isolate coexisting proliferating neural stem cells, differentiating neurogenic progenitors and newborn neurons and assessed the expression of lncRNAs by paired-end, high-throughput sequencing. We identified 379 genomic loci encoding novel lncRNAs and performed a comprehensive assessment of cell-specific expression patterns for all, annotated and novel, lncRNAs described to date. Our study provides a powerful new resource for studying these elusive transcripts during stem cell commitment and neurogenesis.

  1. Conservation of the Exon-Intron Structure of Long Intergenic Non-Coding RNA Genes in Eutherian Mammals.

    PubMed

    Chernikova, Diana; Managadze, David; Glazko, Galina V; Makalowski, Wojciech; Rogozin, Igor B

    2016-01-01

    The abundance of mammalian long intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) genes is high, yet their functions remain largely unknown. One possible way to study this important question is to use large-scale comparisons of various characteristics of lincRNA with those of protein-coding genes for which a large body of functional information is available. A prominent feature of mammalian protein-coding genes is the high evolutionary conservation of the exon-intron structure. Comparative analysis of putative intron positions in lincRNA genes from various mammalian genomes suggests that some lincRNA introns have been conserved for over 100 million years, thus the primary and/or secondary structure of these molecules is likely to be functionally important. PMID:27429005

  2. Long non-coding RNAs: An emerging powerhouse in the battle between life and death of tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Xing-Dong; Ren, Xingcong; Cai, Meng-Yun; Yang, Jay W; Liu, Xinguang; Yang, Jin-Ming

    2016-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent a class of non-protein coding transcripts longer than 200 nucleotides that have aptitude for regulating gene expression at the transcriptional, post-transcriptional or epigenetic levels. In recent years, lncRNAs, which are believed to be the largest transcript class in the transcriptomes, have emerged as important players in a variety of biological processes. Notably, the identification and characterization of numerous lncRNAs in the past decade has revealed a role for these molecules in the regulation of cancer cell survival and death. It is likely that this class of non-coding RNA constitutes a critical contributor to the assorted known or/and unknown mechanisms of intrinsic or acquired drug resistance. Moreover, the expression of lncRNAs is altered in various patho-physiological conditions, including cancer. Therefore, lncRNAs represent potentially important targets in predicting or altering the sensitivity or resistance of cancer cells to various therapies. Here, we provide an overview on the molecular functions of lncRNAs, and discuss their impact and importance in cancer development, progression, and therapeutic outcome. We also provide a perspective on how lncRNAs may alter the efficacy of cancer therapy and the promise of lncRNAs as novel therapeutic targets for overcoming chemoresistance. A better understanding of the functional roles of lncRNA in cancer can ultimately translate to the development of novel, lncRNA-based intervention strategies for the treatment or prevention of drug-resistant cancer. PMID:27180308

  3. Targeting Non-Coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas Technology is a Challenge yet Worth Accepting.

    PubMed

    Basak, Jolly; Nithin, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18-24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize, and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field. PMID:26635829

  4. On the phylogeny of Mustelidae subfamilies: analysis of seventeen nuclear non-coding loci and mitochondrial complete genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Mustelidae, as the largest and most-diverse family of order Carnivora, comprises eight subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationships among these Mustelidae subfamilies remain argumentative subjects in recent years. One of the main reasons is that the mustelids represent a typical example of rapid evolutionary radiation and recent speciation event. Prior investigation has been concentrated on the application of different mitochondrial (mt) sequence and nuclear protein-coding data, herein we employ 17 nuclear non-coding loci (>15 kb), in conjunction with mt complete genome data (>16 kb), to clarify these enigmatic problems. Results The combined nuclear intron and mt genome analyses both robustly support that Taxidiinae diverged first, followed by Melinae. Lutrinae and Mustelinae are grouped together in all analyses with strong supports. The position of Helictidinae, however, is enigmatic because the mt genome analysis places it to the clade uniting Lutrinae and Mustelinae, whereas the nuclear intron analysis favores a novel view supporting a closer relationship of Helictidinae to Martinae. This finding emphasizes a need to add more data and include more taxa to resolve this problem. In addition, the molecular dating provides insights into the time scale of the origin and diversification of the Mustelidae subfamilies. Finally, the phylogenetic performances and limits of nuclear introns and mt genes are discussed in the context of Mustelidae phylogeny. Conclusion Our study not only brings new perspectives on the previously obscured phylogenetic relationships among Mustelidae subfamilies, but also provides another example demonstrating the effectiveness of nuclear non-coding loci for reconstructing evolutionary histories in a group that has undergone rapid bursts of speciation. PMID:21477367

  5. Circulating microRNAs and long non-coding RNAs in gastric cancer diagnosis: An update and review

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Kai; Yu, Jian-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Gastric cancer (GC) is the fourth most common cancer and the third leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) and long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are the most popular non-coding RNAs in cancer research. To date, the roles of miRNAs and lncRNAs have been extensively studied in GC, suggesting that miRNAs and lncRNAs represent a vital component of tumor biology. Furthermore, circulating miRNAs and lncRNAs are found to be dysregulated in patients with GC compared with healthy individuals. Circulating miRNAs and lncRNAs may function as promising biomarkers to improve the early detection of GC. Multiple possibilities for miRNA secretion have been elucidated, including active secretion by microvesicles, exosomes, apoptotic bodies, high-density lipoproteins and protein complexes as well as passive leakage from cells. However, the mechanism underlying lncRNA secretion and the functions of circulating miRNAs and lncRNAs have not been fully illuminated. Concurrently, to standardize results of global investigations of circulating miRNAs and lncRNAs biomarker studies, several recommendations for pre-analytic considerations are put forward. In this review, we summarize the known circulating miRNAs and lncRNAs for GC diagnosis. The possible mechanism of miRNA and lncRNA secretion as well as methodologies for identification of circulating miRNAs and lncRNAs are also discussed. The topics covered here highlight new insights into GC diagnosis and screening. PMID:26379393

  6. LincSNP: a database of linking disease-associated SNPs to human large intergenic non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have successfully identified a large number of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) that are associated with a wide range of human diseases. However, many of these disease-associated SNPs are located in non-coding regions and have remained largely unexplained. Recent findings indicate that disease-associated SNPs in human large intergenic non-coding RNA (lincRNA) may lead to susceptibility to diseases through their effects on lincRNA expression. There is, therefore, a need to specifically record these SNPs and annotate them as potential candidates for disease. Description We have built LincSNP, an integrated database, to identify and annotate disease-associated SNPs in human lincRNAs. The current release of LincSNP contains approximately 140,000 disease-associated SNPs (or linkage disequilibrium SNPs), which can be mapped to around 5,000 human lincRNAs, together with their comprehensive functional annotations. The database also contains annotated, experimentally supported SNP-lincRNA-disease associations and disease-associated lincRNAs. It provides flexible search options for data extraction and searches can be performed by disease/phenotype name, SNP ID, lincRNA name and chromosome region. In addition, we provide users with a link to download all the data from LincSNP and have developed a web interface for the submission of novel identified SNP-lincRNA-disease associations. Conclusions The LincSNP database aims to integrate disease-associated SNPs and human lincRNAs, which will be an important resource for the investigation of the functions and mechanisms of lincRNAs in human disease. The database is available at http://bioinfo.hrbmu.edu.cn/LincSNP. PMID:24885522

  7. Expression Quantitative Trait Loci Information Improves Predictive Modeling of Disease Relevance of Non-Coding Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Raj, Towfique; McGeachie, Michael J.; Qiu, Weiliang; Ziniti, John P.; Stubbs, Benjamin J.; Liang, Liming; Martinez, Fernando D.; Strunk, Robert C.; Lemanske, Robert F.; Liu, Andrew H.; Stranger, Barbara E.; Carey, Vincent J.; Raby, Benjamin A.

    2015-01-01

    Disease-associated loci identified through genome-wide association studies (GWAS) frequently localize to non-coding sequence. We and others have demonstrated strong enrichment of such single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) for expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs), supporting an important role for regulatory genetic variation in complex disease pathogenesis. Herein we describe our initial efforts to develop a predictive model of disease-associated variants leveraging eQTL information. We first catalogued cis-acting eQTLs (SNPs within 100kb of target gene transcripts) by meta-analyzing four studies of three blood-derived tissues (n = 586). At a false discovery rate < 5%, we mapped eQTLs for 6,535 genes; these were enriched for disease-associated genes (P < 10−04), particularly those related to immune diseases and metabolic traits. Based on eQTL information and other variant annotations (distance from target gene transcript, minor allele frequency, and chromatin state), we created multivariate logistic regression models to predict SNP membership in reported GWAS. The complete model revealed independent contributions of specific annotations as strong predictors, including evidence for an eQTL (odds ratio (OR) = 1.2–2.0, P < 10−11) and the chromatin states of active promoters, different classes of strong or weak enhancers, or transcriptionally active regions (OR = 1.5–2.3, P < 10−11). This complete prediction model including eQTL association information ultimately allowed for better discrimination of SNPs with higher probabilities of GWAS membership (6.3–10.0%, compared to 3.5% for a random SNP) than the other two models excluding eQTL information. This eQTL-based prediction model of disease relevance can help systematically prioritize non-coding GWAS SNPs for further functional characterization. PMID:26474488

  8. Differential DNA methylation profiles of coding and non-coding genes define hippocampal sclerosis in human temporal lobe epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Miller-Delaney, Suzanne F.C.; Bryan, Kenneth; Das, Sudipto; McKiernan, Ross C.; Bray, Isabella M.; Reynolds, James P.; Gwinn, Ryder; Stallings, Raymond L.

    2015-01-01

    Temporal lobe epilepsy is associated with large-scale, wide-ranging changes in gene expression in the hippocampus. Epigenetic changes to DNA are attractive mechanisms to explain the sustained hyperexcitability of chronic epilepsy. Here, through methylation analysis of all annotated C-phosphate-G islands and promoter regions in the human genome, we report a pilot study of the methylation profiles of temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis. Furthermore, by comparative analysis of expression and promoter methylation, we identify methylation sensitive non-coding RNA in human temporal lobe epilepsy. A total of 146 protein-coding genes exhibited altered DNA methylation in temporal lobe epilepsy hippocampus (n = 9) when compared to control (n = 5), with 81.5% of the promoters of these genes displaying hypermethylation. Unique methylation profiles were evident in temporal lobe epilepsy with or without hippocampal sclerosis, in addition to a common methylation profile regardless of pathology grade. Gene ontology terms associated with development, neuron remodelling and neuron maturation were over-represented in the methylation profile of Watson Grade 1 samples (mild hippocampal sclerosis). In addition to genes associated with neuronal, neurotransmitter/synaptic transmission and cell death functions, differential hypermethylation of genes associated with transcriptional regulation was evident in temporal lobe epilepsy, but overall few genes previously associated with epilepsy were among the differentially methylated. Finally, a panel of 13, methylation-sensitive microRNA were identified in temporal lobe epilepsy including MIR27A, miR-193a-5p (MIR193A) and miR-876-3p (MIR876), and the differential methylation of long non-coding RNA documented for the first time. The present study therefore reports select, genome-wide DNA methylation changes in human temporal lobe epilepsy that may contribute to the molecular architecture of the epileptic brain. PMID

  9. Targeting Non-Coding RNAs in Plants with the CRISPR-Cas Technology is a Challenge yet Worth Accepting

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Jolly; Nithin, Chandran

    2015-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have emerged as versatile master regulator of biological functions in recent years. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small endogenous ncRNAs of 18–24 nucleotides in length that originates from long self-complementary precursors. Besides their direct involvement in developmental processes, plant miRNAs play key roles in gene regulatory networks and varied biological processes. Alternatively, long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) are a large and diverse class of transcribed ncRNAs whose length exceed that of 200 nucleotides. Plant lncRNAs are transcribed by different RNA polymerases, showing diverse structural features. Plant lncRNAs also are important regulators of gene expression in diverse biological processes. There has been a breakthrough in the technology of genome editing, the CRISPR-Cas9 (clustered regulatory interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated protein 9) technology, in the last decade. CRISPR loci are transcribed into ncRNA and eventually form a functional complex with Cas9 and further guide the complex to cleave complementary invading DNA. The CRISPR-Cas technology has been successfully applied in model plants such as Arabidopsis and tobacco and important crops like wheat, maize, and rice. However, all these studies are focused on protein coding genes. Information about targeting non-coding genes is scarce. Hitherto, the CRISPR-Cas technology has been exclusively used in vertebrate systems to engineer miRNA/lncRNAs, but it is still relatively unexplored in plants. While briefing miRNAs, lncRNAs and applications of the CRISPR-Cas technology in human and animals, this review essentially elaborates several strategies to overcome the challenges of applying the CRISPR-Cas technology in editing ncRNAs in plants and the future perspective of this field. PMID:26635829

  10. Long Non-Coding RNA LSINCT5 Predicts Negative Prognosis and Exhibits Oncogenic Activity in Gastric Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Mi-Die; Qi, Peng; Weng, Wei-Wei; Shen, Xiao-Han; Ni, Shu-Juan; Dong, Lei; Huang, Dan; Tan, Cong; Sheng, Wei-Qi; Zhou, Xiao-Yan; Du, Xiang

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are recently discovered RNA transcripts that are aberrantly expressed in many tumor types. Numerous studies have suggested that lncRNAs can be utilized for cancer diagnosis and prognosis. LSINCT5 (long stress-induced non-coding transcript 5) is dramatically upregulated in breast and ovarian cancer and affects cellular proliferation. However, the expression pattern of LSINCT5 in gastrointestinal cancer and the association between aberrant expression of LSINCT5 in gastrointestinal cancer and malignancy, metastasis, or prognosis remain unknown. LSINCT5 expression was detected in gastrointestinal cancer and paired adjacent normal tissue samples or cell lines using reverse transcription quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR). We also investigated the potential relationship between tumor LSINCT5 levels and clinicopathological features of gastrointestinal cancer. Finally, we assessed whether LSINCT5 influences in vitro cell proliferation. The expression of LSINCT5 is significantly upregulated in gastrointestinal cancer tissues and cell lines relative to their normal counterparts. In addition, increased LSINCT5 expression was correlated with a larger tumor size, deeper tumor depth, and advanced clinical stage. Kaplan–Meier analysis indicated that gastric cancer (GC) and colorectal cancer (CRC) patients with higher LSINCT5 expression levels have worse disease-free survival (DFS) and disease-specific survival (DSS) rates. Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed that increased expression of LSINCT5 is an independent predictor of DFS and DSS rates in GC patients. The ectopic expression of LSINCT5 in gastrointestinal cancer cell lines resulted in an increase in cellular proliferation; conversely, knock down of LSINCT5 significantly inhibited proliferation. These results suggest that LSINCT5 may represent a novel prognostic indicator and a target for gene therapy in gastrointestinal cancer. PMID:25526476

  11. Silencing of long non-coding RNA ANRIL inhibits the development of multidrug resistance in gastric cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lan, Wei-Guang; Xu, Dian-Hong; Xu, Chen; Ding, Chang-Ling; Ning, Fang-Ling; Zhou, Yan-Li; Ma, Long-Bo; Liu, Chang-Min; Han, Xia

    2016-07-01

    The development of multidrug resistance (MDR) is a crucial cause of therapy failure in gastric cancer, which results in disease recurrence and metastasis. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been proven to be critical in carcinogenesis and metastasis of gastric cancer. However, little is known about the roles of ANRIL (antisense non-coding RNA in the INK4 locus) in gastric cancer MDR. The aim of our study is to identify the biological function of ANRIL in gastric cancer MDR. In our results, ANRIL was highly expressed in gastric cancer tissues of cisplatin-resistant and 5-fluorouracil (5-FU)-resistant patients, and the same upregulation trends were observed in cisplatin-resistant cells (BGC823/DDP) and 5-FU-resistant cells (BGC823/5-FU). In addition, BGC823/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells transfected with ANRIL siRNA and treated with cisplatin or 5-FU, respectively, exhibited significant lower survival rate, decreased invasion capability, and high percentage of apoptotic tumor cells. The influence of ANRIL knockdown on MDR was assessed by measuring IC50 of BGC823/DDP and BGC823/5-FU cells to cisplatin and 5-FU, the result showed that silencing ANRIL decreased the IC50 values in gastric cancer cells. Moreover, qRT-PCR and western blotting revealed that ANRIL knockdown decreased the expression of MDR1 and MRP1, both of which are MDR related genes; regression analysis showed that the expression of ANRIL positively correlated with the expression of MDR1 and MRP1, resprectively In summary, knockdown of lncRNA ANRIL in gastric cancer cells inhibits the development of MDR, suggesting an efficacious target for reversing MDR in gastric cancer therapy. PMID:27121324

  12. Non-coding roX RNAs prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatic regions.

    PubMed

    Figueiredo, Margarida L A; Kim, Maria; Philip, Philge; Allgardsson, Anders; Stenberg, Per; Larsson, Jan

    2014-12-01

    Long non-coding RNAs contribute to dosage compensation in both mammals and Drosophila by inducing changes in the chromatin structure of the X-chromosome. In Drosophila melanogaster, roX1 and roX2 are long non-coding RNAs that together with proteins form the male-specific lethal (MSL) complex, which coats the entire male X-chromosome and mediates dosage compensation by increasing its transcriptional output. Studies on polytene chromosomes have demonstrated that when both roX1 and roX2 are absent, the MSL-complex becomes less abundant on the male X-chromosome and is relocated to the chromocenter and the 4th chromosome. Here we address the role of roX RNAs in MSL-complex targeting and the evolution of dosage compensation in Drosophila. We performed ChIP-seq experiments which showed that MSL-complex recruitment to high affinity sites (HAS) on the X-chromosome is independent of roX and that the HAS sequence motif is conserved in D. simulans. Additionally, a complete and enzymatically active MSL-complex is recruited to six specific genes on the 4th chromosome. Interestingly, our sequence analysis showed that in the absence of roX RNAs, the MSL-complex has an affinity for regions enriched in Hoppel transposable elements and repeats in general. We hypothesize that roX mutants reveal the ancient targeting of the MSL-complex and propose that the role of roX RNAs is to prevent the binding of the MSL-complex to heterochromatin. PMID:25501352

  13. DNA sequence variation in a non-coding region of low recombination on the human X chromosome.

    PubMed

    Kaessmann, H; Heissig, F; von Haeseler, A; Pääbo, S

    1999-05-01

    DNA sequence variation has become a major source of insight regarding the origin and history of our species as well as an important tool for the identification of allelic variants associated with disease. Comparative sequencing of DNA has to date focused mainly on mitochondrial (mt) DNA, which due to its apparent lack of recombination and high evolutionary rate lends itself well to the study of human evolution. These advantages also entail limitations. For example, the high mutation rate of mtDNA results in multiple substitutions that make phylogenetic analysis difficult and, because mtDNA is maternally inherited, it reflects only the history of females. For the history of males, the non-recombining part of the paternally inherited Y chromosome can be studied. The extent of variation on the Y chromosome is so low that variation at particular sites known to be polymorphic rather than entire sequences are typically determined. It is currently unclear how some forms of analysis (such as the coalescent) should be applied to such data. Furthermore, the lack of recombination means that selection at any locus affects all 59 Mb of DNA. To gauge the extent and pattern of point substitutional variation in non-coding parts of the human genome, we have sequenced 10 kb of non-coding DNA in a region of low recombination at Xq13.3. Analysis of this sequence in 69 individuals representing all major linguistic groups reveals the highest overall diversity in Africa, whereas deep divergences also exist in Asia. The time elapsed since the most recent common ancestor (MRCA) is 535,000+/-119,000 years. We expect this type of nuclear locus to provide more answers about the genetic origin and history of humans. PMID:10319866

  14. microRNA-29 can regulate expression of the long non-coding RNA gene MEG3 in hepatocellular cancer

    PubMed Central

    Braconi, C; Kogure, T; Valeri, N; Huang, N; Nuovo, G; Costinean, S; Negrini, M; Miotto, E; Croce, CM; Patel, T

    2015-01-01

    The human genome is replete with long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), many of which are transcribed and likely to have a functional role. Microarray analysis of > 23 000 lncRNAs revealed downregulation of 712 (~3%) lncRNA in malignant hepatocytes, among which maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) was downregulated by 210-fold relative to expression in non-malignant hepatocytes. MEG3 expression was markedly reduced in four human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) cell lines compared with normal hepatocytes by real-time PCR. RNA in situ hybridization showed intense cytoplasmic expression of MEG3 in non-neoplastic liver with absent or very weak expression in HCC tissues. Enforced expression of MEG3 in HCC cells significantly decreased both anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth, and induced apoptosis. MEG3 promoter hypermethylation was identified by methylation-specific PCR and MEG3 expression was increased with inhibition of methylation with either 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine, or siRNA to DNA Methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b in HCC cells. MiRNA-dependent regulation of MEG3 expression was studied by evaluating the involvement of miR-29, which can modulate DNMT 1 and 3. Overexpression of mir-29a increased expression of MEG3. GTL2, the murine homolog of MEG3, was reduced in liver tissues from hepatocyte-specific miR-29a/b1 knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls. These data show that methylation-dependent tissue-specific regulation of the lncRNA MEG3 by miR-29a may contribute to HCC growth and highlight the inter-relationship between two classes of non-coding RNA, miRNAs and lncRNAs, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:21625215

  15. microRNA-29 can regulate expression of the long non-coding RNA gene MEG3 in hepatocellular cancer.

    PubMed

    Braconi, C; Kogure, T; Valeri, N; Huang, N; Nuovo, G; Costinean, S; Negrini, M; Miotto, E; Croce, C M; Patel, T

    2011-11-24

    The human genome is replete with long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA), many of which are transcribed and likely to have a functional role. Microarray analysis of >23,000 lncRNAs revealed downregulation of 712 (~3%) lncRNA in malignant hepatocytes, among which maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3) was downregulated by 210-fold relative to expression in non-malignant hepatocytes. MEG3 expression was markedly reduced in four human hepatocellular cancer (HCC) cell lines compared with normal hepatocytes by real-time PCR. RNA in situ hybridization showed intense cytoplasmic expression of MEG3 in non-neoplastic liver with absent or very weak expression in HCC tissues. Enforced expression of MEG3 in HCC cells significantly decreased both anchorage-dependent and -independent cell growth, and induced apoptosis. MEG3 promoter hypermethylation was identified by methylation-specific PCR and MEG3 expression was increased with inhibition of methylation with either 5-Aza-2-Deoxycytidine, or siRNA to DNA Methyltransferase (DNMT) 1 and 3b in HCC cells. MiRNA-dependent regulation of MEG3 expression was studied by evaluating the involvement of miR-29, which can modulate DNMT 1 and 3. Overexpression of mir-29a increased expression of MEG3. GTL2, the murine homolog of MEG3, was reduced in liver tissues from hepatocyte-specific miR-29a/b1 knock-out mice compared with wild-type controls. These data show that methylation-dependent tissue-specific regulation of the lncRNA MEG3 by miR-29a may contribute to HCC growth and highlight the inter-relationship between two classes of non-coding RNA, miRNAs and lncRNAs, and epigenetic regulation of gene expression. PMID:21625215

  16. Downregulation of a putative plastid PDC E1α subunit impairs photosynthetic activity and triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii

    PubMed Central

    Shtaida, Nastassia; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Solovchenko, Alexei; Chekanov, Konstantin; Didi-Cohen, Shoshana; Leu, Stefan; Cohen, Zvi; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    The chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-CoA, an immediate primer for the initial reactions of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Little is known about the source of acetyl-CoA in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microalgae, which are capable of producing high amounts of the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) under conditions of nutrient stresses. We generated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-1618 mutants with decreased expression of the PDC2_E1α gene, encoding the putative chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E1α, using artificial microRNA. A comparative study on the effects of PDC2_E1α silencing on FAs and TAG production in C. reinhardtii, grown photoautotrophically and mixotrophically, with and without a nitrogen source in the nutrient medium, was carried out. Reduced expression of PDC2 _E1α led to a severely hampered photoautotrophic growth phenotype with drastic impairment in TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation. In the presence of acetate, downregulation of PDC2_E1α exerted little to no effect on TAG production and photosynthetic activity. In contrast, under photoautotrophic conditions, especially in the absence of a nitrogen source, a dramatic decline in photosynthetic oxygen evolution and photosystem II quantum yield against a background of the apparent over-reduction of the photosynthetic electron chain was recorded. Our results suggest an essential role of cpPDC in the supply of carbon precursors for de novo FA synthesis in microalgae under conditions of photoautotrophy. A shortage of this supply is detrimental to the nitrogen-starvation-induced synthesis of storage TAG, an important carbon and energy sink in stressed Chlamydomonas cells, thereby impairing the acclimation ability of the microalga. PMID:25210079

  17. Downregulation of a putative plastid PDC E1α subunit impairs photosynthetic activity and triacylglycerol accumulation in nitrogen-starved photoautotrophic Chlamydomonas reinhardtii.

    PubMed

    Shtaida, Nastassia; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Solovchenko, Alexei; Chekanov, Konstantin; Didi-Cohen, Shoshana; Leu, Stefan; Cohen, Zvi; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-12-01

    The chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase complex (cpPDC) catalyses the oxidative decarboxylation of pyruvate forming acetyl-CoA, an immediate primer for the initial reactions of de novo fatty acid (FA) synthesis. Little is known about the source of acetyl-CoA in the chloroplasts of photosynthetic microalgae, which are capable of producing high amounts of the storage lipid triacylglycerol (TAG) under conditions of nutrient stresses. We generated Chlamydomonas reinhardtii CC-1618 mutants with decreased expression of the PDC2_E1α gene, encoding the putative chloroplast pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit E1α, using artificial microRNA. A comparative study on the effects of PDC2_E1α silencing on FAs and TAG production in C. reinhardtii, grown photoautotrophically and mixotrophically, with and without a nitrogen source in the nutrient medium, was carried out. Reduced expression of PDC2 _E1α led to a severely hampered photoautotrophic growth phenotype with drastic impairment in TAG accumulation under nitrogen deprivation. In the presence of acetate, downregulation of PDC2_E1α exerted little to no effect on TAG production and photosynthetic activity. In contrast, under photoautotrophic conditions, especially in the absence of a nitrogen source, a dramatic decline in photosynthetic oxygen evolution and photosystem II quantum yield against a background of the apparent over-reduction of the photosynthetic electron chain was recorded. Our results suggest an essential role of cpPDC in the supply of carbon precursors for de novo FA synthesis in microalgae under conditions of photoautotrophy. A shortage of this supply is detrimental to the nitrogen-starvation-induced synthesis of storage TAG, an important carbon and energy sink in stressed Chlamydomonas cells, thereby impairing the acclimation ability of the microalga. PMID:25210079

  18. SHARAKU: an algorithm for aligning and clustering read mapping profiles of deep sequencing in non-coding RNA processing

    PubMed Central

    Tsuchiya, Mariko; Amano, Kojiro; Abe, Masaya; Seki, Misato; Hase, Sumitaka; Sato, Kengo; Sakakibara, Yasubumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Deep sequencing of the transcripts of regulatory non-coding RNA generates footprints of post-transcriptional processes. After obtaining sequence reads, the short reads are mapped to a reference genome, and specific mapping patterns can be detected called read mapping profiles, which are distinct from random non-functional degradation patterns. These patterns reflect the maturation processes that lead to the production of shorter RNA sequences. Recent next-generation sequencing studies have revealed not only the typical maturation process of miRNAs but also the various processing mechanisms of small RNAs derived from tRNAs and snoRNAs. Results: We developed an algorithm termed SHARAKU to align two read mapping profiles of next-generation sequencing outputs for non-coding RNAs. In contrast with previous work, SHARAKU incorporates the primary and secondary sequence structures into an alignment of read mapping profiles to allow for the detection of common processing patterns. Using a benchmark simulated dataset, SHARAKU exhibited superior performance to previous methods for correctly clustering the read mapping profiles with respect to 5′-end processing and 3′-end processing from degradation patterns and in detecting similar processing patterns in deriving the shorter RNAs. Further, using experimental data of small RNA sequencing for the common marmoset brain, SHARAKU succeeded in identifying the significant clusters of read mapping profiles for similar processing patterns of small derived RNA families expressed in the brain. Availability and Implementation: The source code of our program SHARAKU is available at http://www.dna.bio.keio.ac.jp/sharaku/, and the simulated dataset used in this work is available at the same link. Accession code: The sequence data from the whole RNA transcripts in the hippocampus of the left brain used in this work is available from the DNA DataBank of Japan (DDBJ) Sequence Read Archive (DRA) under the accession number DRA

  19. The future of genetics in psychology and psychiatry: Microarrays, genome-wide association, and non-coding RNA

    PubMed Central

    Plomin, Robert; Davis, Oliver S. P.

    2010-01-01

    Background Much of what we thought we knew about genetics needs to be modified in light of recent discoveries. What are the implications of these advances for identifying genes responsible for the high heritability of many behavioural disorders and dimensions in childhood? Methods Although quantitative genetics such as twin studies will continue to yield important findings, nothing will advance the field as much as identifying the specific genes responsible for heritability. Advances in molecular genetics have been driven by technology, especially DNA microarrays the size of a postage stamp that can genotype a million DNA markers simultaneously. DNA microarrays have led to a dramatic shift in research towards genome-wide association (GWA) studies. The ultimate goal of GWA is to sequence each individual’s entire genome, which has begun to happen. Results GWA studies suggest that for most complex traits and common disorders genetic effects are much smaller than previously considered: The largest effects account for only 1% of the variance of quantitative traits. This finding implies that hundreds of genes are responsible for the heritability of behavioural problems in childhood, and that it will be difficult to identify reliably these genes of small effect. Another discovery with far-reaching implications for future genetic research is the importance of non-coding RNA (DNA transcribed into RNA but not translated into amino acid sequences) which redefines what the word gene means. Non-coding RNA underlines the need for a genome-wide approach that is not limited to the 2% of DNA responsible for traditional genes that are translated into amino acid sequences. Conclusions The only safe prediction is that the fast pace of genetic discoveries will continue and will increasingly affect research in child psychology and psychiatry. DNA microarrays will make it possible to use hundreds of genes to predict genetic risk and to use these sets of genes in top-down behavioural

  20. Emerging bioinformatics approaches for analysis of NGS-derived coding and non-coding RNAs in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Guffanti, Alessandro; Simchovitz, Alon; Soreq, Hermona

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases in general and specifically late-onset Alzheimer’s disease (LOAD) involve a genetically complex and largely obscure ensemble of causative and risk factors accompanied by complex feedback responses. The advent of “high-throughput” transcriptome investigation technologies such as microarray and deep sequencing is increasingly being combined with sophisticated statistical and bioinformatics analysis methods complemented by knowledge-based approaches such as Bayesian Networks or network and graph analyses. Together, such “integrative” studies are beginning to identify co-regulated gene networks linked with biological pathways and potentially modulating disease predisposition, outcome, and progression. Specifically, bioinformatics analyses of integrated microarray and genotyping data in cases and controls reveal changes in gene expression of both protein-coding and small and long regulatory RNAs; highlight relevant quantitative transcriptional differences between LOAD and non-demented control brains and demonstrate reconfiguration of functionally meaningful molecular interaction structures in LOAD. These may be measured as changes in connectivity in “hub nodes” of relevant gene networks (Zhang etal., 2013). We illustrate here the open analytical questions in the transcriptome investigation of neurodegenerative disease studies, proposing “ad hoc” strategies for the evaluation of differential gene expression and hints for a simple analysis of the non-coding RNA (ncRNA) part of such datasets. We then survey the emerging role of long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) in the healthy and diseased brain transcriptome and describe the main current methods for computational modeling of gene networks. We propose accessible modular and pathway-oriented methods and guidelines for bioinformatics investigations of whole transcriptome next generation sequencing datasets. We finally present methods and databases for functional interpretations of lncRNAs and

  1. Variation of photoautotrophic fatty acid production from a highly CO2 tolerant alga, Chlorococcum littorale, with inorganic carbon over narrow ranges of pH.

    PubMed

    Ota, Masaki; Takenaka, Motohiro; Sato, Yoshiyuki; Smith, Richard L; Inomata, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Photoautotrophic fatty acid production of a highly CO2 -tolerant green alga Chlorococcum littorale in the presence of inorganic carbon at 295 K and light intensity of 170 µmol-photon m(-2) s(-1) was investigated. CO2 concentration in the bubbling gas was adjusted by mixing pure gas components of CO2 and N2 to avoid photorespiration and β-oxidation of fatty acids under O2 surrounding conditions. Maximum content of total fatty acid showed pH-dependence after nitrate depletion of the culture media and increased with the corresponding inorganic carbon ratio. Namely, [HCO3 (-) ]/([CO2 ]+n[ CO32-]) ratio in the culture media was found to be a controlling factor for photoautotrophic fatty acid production after the nitrate limitation. At a CO2 concentration of 5% (vol/vol) and a pH of 6.7, the fatty acid content was 47.8 wt % (dry basis) at its maximum that is comparable with land plant seed oils. PMID:25919350

  2. Algal-bacterial process for the simultaneous detoxification of thiocyanate-containing wastewater and maximized lipid production under photoautotrophic/photoheterotrophic conditions.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Byung-Gon; Kim, Jungmin; Farooq, Wasif; Han, Jong-In; Yang, Ji-Won; Kim, Woong

    2014-06-01

    In this work, a cooperative algal-bacterial system that efficiently degrades thiocyanate (SCN(-)), a toxic contaminant, and exhibits high lipid productivity, was developed. A consortium of mixed bacteria (activated sludge) and microalgae was sequentially cultivated under photoautotrophic and photoheterotrophic modes. The hydrolysis of SCN(-) to ammonium (NH4(+))-nitrogen and subsequent nitrification steps were performed by the initial activated sludge under lithoautotrophic conditions. The NH4(+) and oxidized forms of nitrogen, nitrite (NO2(-)) and nitrate (NO3(-)), were then assimilated and removed by the microalgal cells when light was supplied. After the degradation of SCN(-), the cultivation mode was changed to photoheterotrophic conditions in a sequential manner. Algal-bacterial cultures containing Chlorella protothecoides and Ettlia sp. yielded significantly increased lipid productivity under photoheterotrophic conditions compared to photoautotrophic conditions (28.7- and 17.3-fold higher, respectively). Statistical methodologies were also used to investigate the effects of volatile fatty acids and yeast extract on biomass and lipid production. PMID:24747384

  3. Long non-coding RNAs harboring miRNA seed regions are enriched in prostate cancer exosomes

    PubMed Central

    Ahadi, Alireza; Brennan, Samuel; Kennedy, Paul J.; Hutvagner, Gyorgy; Tran, Nham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest transcript class in the human transcriptome. These lncRNA are expressed not only in the cells, but they are also present in the cell-derived extracellular vesicles such as exosomes. The function of these lncRNAs in cancer biology is not entirely clear, but they appear to be modulators of gene expression. In this study, we characterize the expression of lncRNAs in several prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines. We show that certain lncRNAs are enriched in cancer exosomes with the overall expression signatures varying across cell lines. These exosomal lncRNAs are themselves enriched for miRNA seeds with a preference for let-7 family members as well as miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-93 and miR-106b. The enrichment of miRNA seed regions in exosomal lncRNAs is matched with a concomitant high expression of the same miRNA. In addition, the exosomal lncRNAs also showed an over representation of RNA binding protein binding motifs. The two most common motifs belonged to ELAVL1 and RBMX. Given the enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites on exosomal lncRNAs, their interplay may suggest a possible function in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27102850

  4. Distinct BK polyomavirus non-coding control region (NCCR) variants in oral fluids of HIV- associated Salivary Gland Disease patients.

    PubMed

    Burger-Calderon, Raquel; Ramsey, Kathy J; Dolittle-Hall, Janet M; Seaman, William T; Jeffers-Francis, Liesl K; Tesfu, Daniel; Nickeleit, Volker; Webster-Cyriaque, Jennifer

    2016-06-01

    HIV-associated Salivary Gland Disease (HIVSGD) is among the most common salivary gland-associated complications in HIV positive individuals and was associated with the small DNA tumorvirus BK polyomavirus (BKPyV). The BKPyV non-coding control region (NCCR) is the main determinant of viral replication and rearranges readily. This study analyzed the BKPyV NCCR architecture and viral loads of 35 immunosuppressed individuals. Throatwash samples from subjects diagnosed with HIVSGD and urine samples from transplant patients were BKPyV positive and yielded BKPyV NCCR sequences. 94.7% of the BKPyV HIVSGD NCCRs carried a rearranged OPQPQQS block arrangement, suggesting a distinct architecture among this sample set. BKPyV from HIV positive individuals without HIVSGD harbored NCCR block sequences that were distinct from OPQPQQS. Cloned HIVSGD BKPyV isolates displayed active promoters and efficient replication capability in human salivary gland cells. The unique HIVSGD NCCR architecture may represent a potentially significant oral-tropic BKPyV substrain. PMID:27085139

  5. Characterization of MicA interactions suggests a potential novel means of gene regulation by small non-coding RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Henderson, Charlotte A.; Vincent, Helen A.; Stone, Carlanne M.; Phillips, Jack O.; Cary, Peter D.; Gowers, Darren M.; Callaghan, Anastasia J.

    2013-01-01

    MicA is a small non-coding RNA that regulates ompA mRNA translation in Escherichia coli. MicA has an inhibitory function, base pairing to the translation initiation region of target mRNAs through short sequences of complementarity, blocking their ribosome-binding sites. The MicA structure contains two stem loops, which impede its interaction with target mRNAs, and it is thought that the RNA chaperone protein Hfq, known to be involved in MicA regulation of ompA, may structurally remodel MicA to reveal the ompA-binding site for cognate pairing. To further characterize these interactions, we undertook biochemical and biophysical studies using native MicA and a ‘stabilized’ version, modified to mimic the conformational state of MicA where the ompA-binding site is exposed. Our data corroborate two proposed roles for Hfq: first, to bring both MicA and ompA into close proximity, and second, to restructure MicA to allow exposure of the ompA-binding site for pairing, thereby demonstrating the RNA chaperone function of Hfq. Additionally, at accumulated MicA levels, we identified a Mg2+-dependent self-association that occludes the ompA-recognition region. We discuss the potential contribution of an Mg2+-mediated conformational switch of MicA for the regulation of MicA function. PMID:23361466

  6. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs from Mulberry (Morus notabilis) RNA-seq Data.

    PubMed

    Song, Xiaobo; Sun, Liang; Luo, Haitao; Ma, Qingguo; Zhao, Yi; Pei, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Numerous sources of evidence suggest that most of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed into protein-coding mRNAs and also into a large number of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), a group consisting of ncRNAs longer than 200 nucleotides, have been found to play critical roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic gene regulation across all kingdoms of life. However, lncRNAs and their regulatory roles remain poorly characterized in plants, especially in woody plants. In this paper, we used a computational approach to identify novel lncRNAs from a published RNA-seq data set and analyzed their sequences and expression patterns. In total, 1133 novel lncRNAs were identified in mulberry, and 106 of these lncRNAs displayed a predominant tissue-specific expression in the five major tissues investigated. Additionally, functional predictions revealed that tissue-specific lncRNAs adjacent to protein-coding genes might play important regulatory roles in the development of floral organ and root in mulberry. The pipeline used in this study would be useful for the identification of lncRNAs obtained from other deep sequencing data. Furthermore, the predicted lncRNAs would be beneficial towards an understanding of the variations in gene expression in plants. PMID:26938562

  7. Identification of a long non-coding RNA-associated RNP complex regulating metastasis at the translational step

    PubMed Central

    Gumireddy, Kiranmai; Li, Anping; Yan, Jinchun; Setoyama, Tetsuro; Johannes, Gregg J; Ørom, Ulf A; Tchou, Julia; Liu, Qin; Zhang, Lin; Speicher, David W; Calin, George A; Huang, Qihong

    2013-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are a novel class of regulatory genes that play critical roles in various processes ranging from normal development to human diseases such as cancer progression. Recent studies have shown that lncRNAs regulate the gene expression by chromatin remodelling, transcription, splicing and RNA decay control, enhancer function, and epigenetic regulation. However, little is known about translation regulation by lncRNAs. We identified a translational regulatory lncRNA (treRNA) through genome-wide computational analysis. We found that treRNA is upregulated in paired clinical breast cancer primary and lymph-node metastasis samples, and that its expression stimulates tumour invasion in vitro and metastasis in vivo. Interestingly, we found that treRNA downregulates the expression of the epithelial marker E-cadherin by suppressing the translation of its mRNA. We identified a novel ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, consisting of RNA-binding proteins (hnRNP K, FXR1, and FXR2), PUF60 and SF3B3, that is required for this treRNA functions. Translational suppression by treRNA is dependent on the 3′UTR of the E-cadherin mRNA. Taken together, our study indicates a novel mechanism of gene regulation by lncRNAs in cancer progression. PMID:23974796

  8. Genome-Wide Identification and Characterization of Long Non-Coding RNAs from Mulberry (Morus notabilis) RNA-seq Data

    PubMed Central

    Song, Xiaobo; Sun, Liang; Luo, Haitao; Ma, Qingguo; Zhao, Yi; Pei, Dong

    2016-01-01

    Numerous sources of evidence suggest that most of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed into protein-coding mRNAs and also into a large number of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). Long ncRNAs (lncRNAs), a group consisting of ncRNAs longer than 200 nucleotides, have been found to play critical roles in transcriptional, post-transcriptional, and epigenetic gene regulation across all kingdoms of life. However, lncRNAs and their regulatory roles remain poorly characterized in plants, especially in woody plants. In this paper, we used a computational approach to identify novel lncRNAs from a published RNA-seq data set and analyzed their sequences and expression patterns. In total, 1133 novel lncRNAs were identified in mulberry, and 106 of these lncRNAs displayed a predominant tissue-specific expression in the five major tissues investigated. Additionally, functional predictions revealed that tissue-specific lncRNAs adjacent to protein-coding genes might play important regulatory roles in the development of floral organ and root in mulberry. The pipeline used in this study would be useful for the identification of lncRNAs obtained from other deep sequencing data. Furthermore, the predicted lncRNAs would be beneficial towards an understanding of the variations in gene expression in plants. PMID:26938562

  9. Long non-coding RNA FEZF1-AS1 facilitates cell proliferation and migration in colorectal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Qiong; Yang, Minhui; Wang, Dan; Peng, Man; Ding, Yanqing; Wang, Shuang; Zhou, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) have been shown to play important roles in the development and progression of cancer. Here, we discovered a novel long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) FEZF1 antisense RNA1 (FEZF1-AS1) is markedly upregulated in human primary colorectal carcinoma (CRC) and associated with CRC metastasis and poor prognosis. Moreover, the downregulation of FEZF1-AS1 expression significantly inhibited the CRC cells proliferation, migration and invasiveness, suppressed S-phase entry in vitro, and repressed tumor growth and metastasis in vivo. In contrast, overexpression of FEZF1-AS1 could promote the aggressive behaviors of CRC cells. We further discovered that the downregulation of FEZF1-AS1 reduced its sense-cognate gene FEZF1 mRNA and protein expression in CRC cells. There was a positive correlation between FEZF1-AS1 and FEZF1 expression in CRC. Moreover, FEZF1 knockdown also significantly suppressed CRC cell proliferation, migration, and invasion. Our findings indicate that the dysregulation of FEZF1-AS1 participates in colorectal tumorigenesis and progression, which might be achieved, at least in part, through FEZF1 induction. PMID:26848625

  10. Association of Long Non-Coding RNA HOTAIR Polymorphisms with Cervical Cancer Risk in a Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Liangsheng; Lu, Xueguan; Zheng, Lijun; Liu, Xianying; Hu, Min

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), HOTAIR has been reported to be upregulated in cervical cancer development and progression. However, SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphisms) in the lncRNAs and their associations with cervical cancer susceptibility have not been reported. In the current study, we hypothesized that SNPs within the lncRNA HOTAIR may influence the risk of cervical cancer. We performed a case-control study including 510 cervical cancer patients (cases) and 713 cancer-free individuals (controls) to investigate the association between three haplotype-tagging SNPs (rs920778, rs1899663 and rs4759314) in the lncRNA HOTAIR and the risk of cervical cancer. We found a strong association between the SNP rs920778 in the intronic enhancer of the HOTAIR and cervical cancer (P<10−4). Moreover, the cervical cancer patients with homozygous TT genotype were significantly associated with tumor-node-metastasis (TNM) stage. In vitro assays with allele-specific reporter constructs indicated that the reporter constructs bearing rs920778T allele conferred elevated reporter gene transcriptional activity when compared to the reporter constructs containing rs920778C allele. Furthermore, HOTAIR expression was higher in cervical cancer tissues than that in corresponding normal tissues, and the high expression was associated with the risk-associated allele T. In summary, our studies provide strong functional evidence that functional SNP rs920778 regulates HOTAIR expression, and may ultimately influence the predisposition for cervical cancer. PMID:27467165

  11. A Dynamic 3D Graphical Representation for RNA Structure Analysis and Its Application in Non-Coding RNA Classification

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiaoqing; Fang, Yiliang; Wang, Kejing; Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Tao

    2016-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in transcriptome and epigenetics, RNAs have been identified to play more and more important roles in life processes. Consequently, various methods have been proposed to assess the biological functions of RNAs and thus classify them functionally, among which comparative study of RNA structures is perhaps the most important one. To measure the structural similarity of RNAs and classify them, we propose a novel three dimensional (3D) graphical representation of RNA secondary structure, in which an RNA secondary structure is first transformed into a characteristic sequence based on chemical property of nucleic acids; a dynamic 3D graph is then constructed for the characteristic sequence; and lastly a numerical characterization of the 3D graph is used to represent the RNA secondary structure. We tested our algorithm on three datasets: (1) Dataset I consisting of nine RNA secondary structures of viruses, (2) Dataset II consisting of complex RNA secondary structures including pseudo-knots, and (3) Dataset III consisting of 18 non-coding RNA families. We also compare our method with other nine existing methods using Dataset II and III. The results demonstrate that our method is better than other methods in similarity measurement and classification of RNA secondary structures. PMID:27213271

  12. Macrophage infiltration promotes invasiveness of breast cancer cells via activating long non-coding RNA UCA1.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuzheng; Shao, Chuxiao; Xu, Min; Ji, Jiansong; Xie, Yanru; Lei, Yongliang; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2015-01-01

    There is now considerable evidence supporting the view that macrophage infiltration is playing a critical role in the proliferation and progression of breast cancer but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. To this end, using long non-coding RNA (lncRNA) expression profiling, we examined changes in lncRNA expression in breast cancer cells treated with conditioned medium (CM) from cultured human THP-1 macrophages. We found that treatment with macrophage CM induced the expression of numerous lncRNAs, including urothelial cancer associated 1 (UCA1). Knockdown of UCA1 using shRNA inhibited AKT phosphorylation and abolished invasiveness of tumor cells induced by macrophage CM. Consistent with these results; we further showed that UCA1 level was significantly enhanced in human primary breast tumors and correlated with advanced clinical stage, supporting its role in promoting carcinogenesis and progression of breast cancer. Together, these results suggest that macrophage could promote invasiveness of breast cancer cells by enhancing expression of lncRNA UCA1. PMID:26464647

  13. Regulatory consequences of neuronal ELAV-like protein binding to coding and non-coding RNAs in human brain.

    PubMed

    Scheckel, Claudia; Drapeau, Elodie; Frias, Maria A; Park, Christopher Y; Fak, John; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Kou, Yan; Haroutunian, Vahram; Ma'ayan, Avi; Buxbaum, Joseph D; Darnell, Robert B

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal ELAV-like (nELAVL) RNA binding proteins have been linked to numerous neurological disorders. We performed crosslinking-immunoprecipitation and RNAseq on human brain, and identified nELAVL binding sites on 8681 transcripts. Using knockout mice and RNAi in human neuroblastoma cells, we showed that nELAVL intronic and 3' UTR binding regulates human RNA splicing and abundance. We validated hundreds of nELAVL targets among which were important neuronal and disease-associated transcripts, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcripts. We therefore investigated RNA regulation in AD brain, and observed differential splicing of 150 transcripts, which in some cases correlated with differential nELAVL binding. Unexpectedly, the most significant change of nELAVL binding was evident on non-coding Y RNAs. nELAVL/Y RNA complexes were specifically remodeled in AD and after acute UV stress in neuroblastoma cells. We propose that the increased nELAVL/Y RNA association during stress may lead to nELAVL sequestration, redistribution of nELAVL target binding, and altered neuronal RNA splicing. PMID:26894958

  14. lncRScan-SVM: A Tool for Predicting Long Non-Coding RNAs Using Support Vector Machine

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Lei; Liu, Hui; Zhang, Lin; Meng, Jia

    2015-01-01

    Functional long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been bringing novel insight into biological study, however it is still not trivial to accurately distinguish the lncRNA transcripts (LNCTs) from the protein coding ones (PCTs). As various information and data about lncRNAs are preserved by previous studies, it is appealing to develop novel methods to identify the lncRNAs more accurately. Our method lncRScan-SVM aims at classifying PCTs and LNCTs using support vector machine (SVM). The gold-standard datasets for lncRScan-SVM model training, lncRNA prediction and method comparison were constructed according to the GENCODE gene annotations of human and mouse respectively. By integrating features derived from gene structure, transcript sequence, potential codon sequence and conservation, lncRScan-SVM outperforms other approaches, which is evaluated by several criteria such as sensitivity, specificity, accuracy, Matthews correlation coefficient (MCC) and area under curve (AUC). In addition, several known human lncRNA datasets were assessed using lncRScan-SVM. LncRScan-SVM is an efficient tool for predicting the lncRNAs, and it is quite useful for current lncRNA study. PMID:26437338

  15. An Abundant Class of Non-coding DNA Can Prevent Stochastic Gene Silencing in the C. elegans Germline.

    PubMed

    Frøkjær-Jensen, Christian; Jain, Nimit; Hansen, Loren; Davis, M Wayne; Li, Yongbin; Zhao, Di; Rebora, Karine; Millet, Jonathan R M; Liu, Xiao; Kim, Stuart K; Dupuy, Denis; Jorgensen, Erik M; Fire, Andrew Z

    2016-07-14

    Cells benefit from silencing foreign genetic elements but must simultaneously avoid inactivating endogenous genes. Although chromatin modifications and RNAs contribute to maintenance of silenced states, the establishment of silenced regions will inevitably reflect underlying DNA sequence and/or structure. Here, we demonstrate that a pervasive non-coding DNA feature in Caenorhabditis elegans, characterized by 10-base pair periodic An/Tn-clusters (PATCs), can license transgenes for germline expression within repressive chromatin domains. Transgenes containing natural or synthetic PATCs are resistant to position effect variegation and stochastic silencing in the germline. Among endogenous genes, intron length and PATC-character undergo dramatic changes as orthologs move from active to repressive chromatin over evolutionary time, indicating a dynamic character to the An/Tn periodicity. We propose that PATCs form the basis of a cellular immune system, identifying certain endogenous genes in heterochromatic contexts as privileged while foreign DNA can be suppressed with no requirement for a cellular memory of prior exposure. PMID:27374334

  16. Mechanism of Wnt signaling induced down regulation of mrhl long non-coding RNA in mouse spermatogonial cells

    PubMed Central

    Akhade, Vijay Suresh; Dighe, Shrinivas Nivrutti; Kataruka, Shubhangini; Rao, Manchanahalli R. Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of various biological processes. LncRNAs also behave as response elements or targets of signaling pathway(s) mediating cellular function. Wnt signaling is important in regulating mammalian spermatogenesis. Mrhl RNA negatively regulates canonical Wnt pathway and gets down regulated upon Wnt signaling activation in mouse spermatogonial cells. Also, mrhl RNA regulates expression of genes pertaining to Wnt pathway and spermatogenesis by binding to chromatin. In the present study, we delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of Wnt signaling induced mrhl RNA down regulation in mouse spermatogonial cells. Mrhl RNA has an independent transcription unit and our various experiments like Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (in cell line as well as mouse testis) and shRNA mediated down regulation convincingly show that β-catenin and TCF4, which are the key effector proteins of the Wnt signaling pathway are required for down regulation of mrhl RNA. We have identified Ctbp1 as the co-repressor and its occupancy on mrhl RNA promoter depends on both β-catenin and TCF4. Upon Wnt signaling activation, Ctbp1 mediated histone repression marks increase at the mrhl RNA promoter. We also demonstrate that Wnt signaling induced mrhl RNA down regulation results in an up regulation of various meiotic differentiation marker genes. PMID:26446991

  17. A novel long non-coding RNA FGF14-AS2 is correlated with progression and prognosis in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yang, Fan; Liu, Ye-huan; Dong, Si-yang; Ma, Rui-ming; Bhandari, Adheesh; Zhang, Xiao-hua; Wang, Ou-chen

    2016-02-12

    Breast cancer is diverse in their natural history and in their responsiveness to treatments. It is urgent to generate candidate biomarkers for the stratification of patients and personalization of therapy to avoid overtreatment or inadequate treatment. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been found to be pervasively transcribed in the genome and played critical roles in cancer progression. A lot of lncRNAs have been reported as potential prognostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets in multiple cancers. In this study, we demonstrated that FGF14 antisense RNA 2 (FGF14-AS2), a novel long non-coding RNA, was significantly down-regulated in breast cancer tissue compared with adjacent normal tissue both in validated cohort and TCGA cohort. Reduced expression of FGF14-AS2 was correlated with larger tumor size, more lymph node metastasis and advanced clinical stage in both cohorts. Kaplan-Meier analysis indicated that patients with lower FGF14-AS2 expression had a worse overall survival. Moreover, multivariate analysis revealed that decreased expression of FGF14-AS2 was an independent predictor of overall survival. Together, these results suggested that FGF14-AS2 involved in the progress of breast cancer and might act as a tumor suppressor gene. To the best of our knowledge, it was firstly reported that FGF14-AS2 was involved in cancer. This study provided a potential new marker and a target for gene therapy in breast cancer treatment. PMID:26820525

  18. Regulatory consequences of neuronal ELAV-like protein binding to coding and non-coding RNAs in human brain

    PubMed Central

    Scheckel, Claudia; Drapeau, Elodie; Frias, Maria A; Park, Christopher Y; Fak, John; Zucker-Scharff, Ilana; Kou, Yan; Haroutunian, Vahram; Ma'ayan, Avi

    2016-01-01

    Neuronal ELAV-like (nELAVL) RNA binding proteins have been linked to numerous neurological disorders. We performed crosslinking-immunoprecipitation and RNAseq on human brain, and identified nELAVL binding sites on 8681 transcripts. Using knockout mice and RNAi in human neuroblastoma cells, we showed that nELAVL intronic and 3' UTR binding regulates human RNA splicing and abundance. We validated hundreds of nELAVL targets among which were important neuronal and disease-associated transcripts, including Alzheimer's disease (AD) transcripts. We therefore investigated RNA regulation in AD brain, and observed differential splicing of 150 transcripts, which in some cases correlated with differential nELAVL binding. Unexpectedly, the most significant change of nELAVL binding was evident on non-coding Y RNAs. nELAVL/Y RNA complexes were specifically remodeled in AD and after acute UV stress in neuroblastoma cells. We propose that the increased nELAVL/Y RNA association during stress may lead to nELAVL sequestration, redistribution of nELAVL target binding, and altered neuronal RNA splicing. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.10421.001 PMID:26894958

  19. GermlncRNA: a unique catalogue of long non-coding RNAs and associated regulations in male germ cell development.

    PubMed

    Luk, Alfred Chun-Shui; Gao, Huayan; Xiao, Sizhe; Liao, Jinyue; Wang, Daxi; Tu, Jiajie; Rennert, Owen M; Chan, Wai-Yee; Lee, Tin-Lap

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenic failure is a major cause of male infertility, which affects millions of couples worldwide. Recent discovery of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as critical regulators in normal and disease development provides new clues for delineating the molecular regulation in male germ cell development. However, few functional lncRNAs have been characterized to date. A major limitation in studying lncRNA in male germ cell development is the absence of germ cell-specific lncRNA annotation. Current lncRNA annotations are assembled by transcriptome data from heterogeneous tissue sources; specific germ cell transcript information of various developmental stages is therefore under-represented, which may lead to biased prediction or fail to identity important germ cell-specific lncRNAs. GermlncRNA provides the first comprehensive web-based and open-access lncRNA catalogue for three key male germ cell stages, including type A spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. This information has been developed by integrating male germ transcriptome resources derived from RNA-Seq, tiling microarray and GermSAGE. Characterizations on lncRNA-associated regulatory features, potential coding gene and microRNA targets are also provided. Search results from GermlncRNA can be exported to Galaxy for downstream analysis or downloaded locally. Taken together, GermlncRNA offers a new avenue to better understand the role of lncRNAs and associated targets during spermatogenesis. Database URL: http://germlncrna.cbiit.cuhk.edu.hk/ PMID:25982314

  20. GermlncRNA: a unique catalogue of long non-coding RNAs and associated regulations in male germ cell development

    PubMed Central

    Luk, Alfred Chun-Shui; Gao, Huayan; Xiao, Sizhe; Liao, Jinyue; Wang, Daxi; Tu, Jiajie; Rennert, Owen M.; Chan, Wai-Yee; Lee, Tin-Lap

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogenic failure is a major cause of male infertility, which affects millions of couples worldwide. Recent discovery of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as critical regulators in normal and disease development provides new clues for delineating the molecular regulation in male germ cell development. However, few functional lncRNAs have been characterized to date. A major limitation in studying lncRNA in male germ cell development is the absence of germ cell-specific lncRNA annotation. Current lncRNA annotations are assembled by transcriptome data from heterogeneous tissue sources; specific germ cell transcript information of various developmental stages is therefore under-represented, which may lead to biased prediction or fail to identity important germ cell-specific lncRNAs. GermlncRNA provides the first comprehensive web-based and open-access lncRNA catalogue for three key male germ cell stages, including type A spermatogonia, pachytene spermatocytes and round spermatids. This information has been developed by integrating male germ transcriptome resources derived from RNA-Seq, tiling microarray and GermSAGE. Characterizations on lncRNA-associated regulatory features, potential coding gene and microRNA targets are also provided. Search results from GermlncRNA can be exported to Galaxy for downstream analysis or downloaded locally. Taken together, GermlncRNA offers a new avenue to better understand the role of lncRNAs and associated targets during spermatogenesis. Database URL: http://germlncrna.cbiit.cuhk.edu.hk/ PMID:25982314

  1. Epstein-Barr virus-encoded small non-coding RNAs induce cancer cell chemoresistance and migration.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Aditi Sengupta; Pal, Anindita Deb; Banerjee, Subrata

    2013-09-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) encoded small, non-coding, non-polyadenylated RNAs, known as EBERs are the most abundantly expressed viral transcripts in latently EBV infected cells. We found the specific role of EBERs in cell cycle progression, resistance against chemotherapeutic drug and cellular invasion in gastric cancer cells in vitro. Ectopic expression of EBERs upregulates the expression of IL-6 and activate its downstream STAT3, which is significantly involved in downregulating the expression of cell cycle inhibitor genes p21 and p27. Stable expression of EBERs regulates the activation of pFAK and pPAK1 and the expression of anti-metastatic genes RhoGDI and KAI-1 in gastric cancer cells. In addition, administration of neu-IL-6 antibody and dominant negative STAT3β reduces chemoresistance and inhibits invasion of EBERs-expressing gastric cancer cells. Our results thus revealed a novel role of EBERs in the coordination of IL-6-STAT3 signaling pathway to chemoresistance and cellular migration. PMID:23791019

  2. Fast turnover of genome transcription across evolutionary time exposes entire non-coding DNA to de novo gene emergence

    PubMed Central

    Neme, Rafik; Tautz, Diethard

    2016-01-01

    Deep sequencing analyses have shown that a large fraction of genomes is transcribed, but the significance of this transcription is much debated. Here, we characterize the phylogenetic turnover of poly-adenylated transcripts in a comprehensive sampling of taxa of the mouse (genus Mus), spanning a phylogenetic distance of 10 Myr. Using deep RNA sequencing we find that at a given sequencing depth transcriptome coverage becomes saturated within a taxon, but keeps extending when compared between taxa, even at this very shallow phylogenetic level. Our data show a high turnover of transcriptional states between taxa and that no major transcript-free islands exist across evolutionary time. This suggests that the entire genome can be transcribed into poly-adenylated RNA when viewed at an evolutionary time scale. We conclude that any part of the non-coding genome can potentially become subject to evolutionary functionalization via de novo gene evolution within relatively short evolutionary time spans. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.09977.001 PMID:26836309

  3. A long non-coding RNA is required for targeting centromeric protein A to the human centromere

    PubMed Central

    Quénet, Delphine; Dalal, Yamini

    2014-01-01

    The centromere is a specialized chromatin region marked by the histone H3 variant CENP-A. Although active centromeric transcription has been documented for over a decade, the role of centromeric transcription or transcripts has been elusive. Here, we report that centromeric α-satellite transcription is dependent on RNA Polymerase II and occurs at late mitosis into early G1, concurrent with the timing of new CENP-A assembly. Inhibition of RNA Polymerase II-dependent transcription abrogates the recruitment of CENP-A and its chaperone HJURP to native human centromeres. Biochemical characterization of CENP-A associated RNAs reveals a 1.3 kb molecule that originates from centromeres, which physically interacts with the soluble pre-assembly HJURP/CENP-A complex in vivo, and whose down-regulation leads to the loss of CENP-A and HJURP at centromeres. This study describes a novel function for human centromeric long non-coding RNAs in the recruitment of HJURP and CENP-A, implicating RNA-based chaperone targeting in histone variant assembly. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.03254.001 PMID:25117489

  4. Heterogeneity in Genetic Diversity among Non-Coding Loci Fails to Fit Neutral Coalescent Models of Population History

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Jeffrey L.; Roberts, Trina E.; Winker, Kevin; McCracken, Kevin G.

    2012-01-01

    Inferring aspects of the population histories of species using coalescent analyses of non-coding nuclear DNA has grown in popularity. These inferences, such as divergence, gene flow, and changes in population size, assume that genetic data reflect simple population histories and neutral evolutionary processes. However, violating model assumptions can result in a poor fit between empirical data and the models. We sampled 22 nuclear intron sequences from at least 19 different chromosomes (a genomic transect) to test for deviations from selective neutrality in the gadwall (Anas strepera), a Holarctic duck. Nucleotide diversity among these loci varied by nearly two orders of magnitude (from 0.0004 to 0.029), and this heterogeneity could not be explained by differences in substitution rates alone. Using two different coalescent methods to infer models of population history and then simulating neutral genetic diversity under these models, we found that the observed among-locus heterogeneity in nucleotide diversity was significantly higher than expected for these simple models. Defining more complex models of population history demonstrated that a pre-divergence bottleneck was also unlikely to explain this heterogeneity. However, both selection and interspecific hybridization could account for the heterogeneity observed among loci. Regardless of the cause of the deviation, our results illustrate that violating key assumptions of coalescent models can mislead inferences of population history. PMID:22384117

  5. PredcircRNA: computational classification of circular RNA from other long non-coding RNA using hybrid features.

    PubMed

    Pan, Xiaoyong; Xiong, Kai

    2015-08-01

    Recently circular RNA (circularRNA) has been discovered as an increasingly important type of long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), playing an important role in gene regulation, such as functioning as miRNA sponges. So it is very promising to identify circularRNA transcripts from de novo assembled transcripts obtained by high-throughput sequencing, such as RNA-seq data. In this study, we presented a machine learning approach, named as PredcircRNA, focused on distinguishing circularRNA from other lncRNAs using multiple kernel learning. Firstly we extracted different sources of discriminative features, including graph features, conservation information and sequence compositions, ALU and tandem repeats, SNP densities and open reading frames (ORFs) from transcripts. Secondly, to better integrate features from different sources, we proposed a computational approach based on a multiple kernel learning framework to fuse those heterogeneous features. Our preliminary 5-fold cross-validation result showed that our proposed method can classify circularRNA from other types of lncRNAs with an accuracy of 0.778, sensitivity of 0.781, specificity of 0.770, precision of 0.784 and MCC of 0.554 in our constructed gold-standard dataset, respectively. Our feature importance analysis based on Random Forest illustrated some discriminative features, such as conservation features and a GTAG sequence motif. Our PredcircRNA tool is available for download at . PMID:26028480

  6. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity. PMID:26472689

  7. Identification and characterization of the gene expression profiles for protein coding and non-coding RNAs of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Gutiérrez, María Laura; Corchete, Luis; Teodosio, Cristina; Sarasquete, María Eugenia; Abad, María del Mar; Iglesias, Manuel; Esteban, Carmen

    2015-01-01

    Significant advances have been achieved in recent years in the identification of the genetic and the molecular alterations of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Despite this, at present the understanding of the precise mechanisms involved in the development and malignant transformation of PDAC remain relatively limited. Here, we evaluated for the first time, the molecular heterogeneity of PDAC tumors, through simultaneous assessment of the gene expression profile (GEP) for both coding and non-coding genes of tumor samples from 27 consecutive PDAC patients. Overall, we identified a common GEP for all PDAC tumors, characterized by an increased expression of genes involved in PDAC cell proliferation, local invasion and metastatic capacity, together with a significant alteration of the early steps of the cellular immune response. At the same time, we confirm and extend on previous observations about the genetic complexity of PDAC tumors as revealed by the demonstration of two clearly distinct and unique GEPs (e.g. epithelial-like vs. mesenchymal-like) reflecting the alteration of different signaling pathways involved in the oncogenesis and progression of these tumors. Our results also highlight the potential role of the immune system microenvironment in these tumors, with potential diagnostic and therapeutic implications. PMID:26053098

  8. Identification of long non-coding RNAs as novel biomarker and potential therapeutic target for atrial fibrillation in old adults

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yingjia; Huang, Ritai; Gu, Jianing; Jiang, Weifeng

    2016-01-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) is a highly prevalent cardiac arrhythmia disease, which widely leads to exacerbate heart failure and ischemic stroke in elder world. Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a subclass of noncoding RNAs, have been reported to play critical roles in pathophysiology of cardiac heart. However, little is known of their role in cardiac arrhythmia. In the present study, we investigated the expression levels of lncRNAs of AF patients and healthy people with Agilent Human lncRNA array for the first time. 177 lncRNAs of 78243 and 153 mRNAs of 30215 tested were identified to be differentially expressed (≥ 2-fold change), indicating that the expression of many lncRNAs are upregulated or downregulated in AF. Among these, NONHSAT040387 and NONHSAT098586 were the most upregulated and downregulated lncRNAs. Real time quantitative PCR were employed to validate the microarray analysis findings, and the results confirmed the consistence. GO and KEGG pathway analysis were applied to explore the potential lncRNAs functions, some pathways including oxygen transporter activity and protein heterodimerization activity were speculated to be involved in AF pathogenesis. These results shed some light on lncRNAs' physiologic functions and provide useful information for exploring potential therapeutic treatments for heart rhythm disease. PMID:26908457

  9. Identification of a long non-coding RNA NR_026689 associated with lung carcinogenesis induced by NNK

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiqin; Yang, Ti; Yang, Qiaoyuan; Yang, Chengfeng; Jiang, Yiguo

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNA) are thought to be important epigenetic regulators involved in the development of a variety of cancers. Alterations in lncRNA expression are associated with exposure to chemical carcinogens. However, it is still unclear whether lncRNA expression during lung carcinogenesis is induced by chemical carcinogens. In this study, using NNK-induced rat lung cancer model established by our previous study, we determined the lncRNA expression profiles, and an alteration in lncRNA expression was observed in lung cancer tissues and blood in the NNK treatment group. Using quantitative reverse-transcription PCR (qRT-PCR), five differentially expressed lncRNAs were further detected and validated. We identified a novel lncRNA, NR_026689, which showed increased expression in lung cancer tissues induced by NNK and the alteration of lncRNA NR_026689 was specifically observed in lung tissue. The level of NR_026689 was determined and significantly increased in rat whole blood at the 10th and 20th week after NNK treatment to evaluate it as a potential early marker for lung cancer. Together, these findings suggest that lncRNA NR_026689 may be a potential early biomarker for lung cancer and is associated with lung carcinogenesis induced by NNK. PMID:26908441

  10. Mechanism of Wnt signaling induced down regulation of mrhl long non-coding RNA in mouse spermatogonial cells.

    PubMed

    Akhade, Vijay Suresh; Dighe, Shrinivas Nivrutti; Kataruka, Shubhangini; Rao, Manchanahalli R Satyanarayana

    2016-01-01

    Long non coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have emerged as important regulators of various biological processes. LncRNAs also behave as response elements or targets of signaling pathway(s) mediating cellular function. Wnt signaling is important in regulating mammalian spermatogenesis. Mrhl RNA negatively regulates canonical Wnt pathway and gets down regulated upon Wnt signaling activation in mouse spermatogonial cells. Also, mrhl RNA regulates expression of genes pertaining to Wnt pathway and spermatogenesis by binding to chromatin. In the present study, we delineate the detailed molecular mechanism of Wnt signaling induced mrhl RNA down regulation in mouse spermatogonial cells. Mrhl RNA has an independent transcription unit and our various experiments like Chromatin Immunoprecipitation (in cell line as well as mouse testis) and shRNA mediated down regulation convincingly show that β-catenin and TCF4, which are the key effector proteins of the Wnt signaling pathway are required for down regulation of mrhl RNA. We have identified Ctbp1 as the co-repressor and its occupancy on mrhl RNA promoter depends on both β-catenin and TCF4. Upon Wnt signaling activation, Ctbp1 mediated histone repression marks increase at the mrhl RNA promoter. We also demonstrate that Wnt signaling induced mrhl RNA down regulation results in an up regulation of various meiotic differentiation marker genes. PMID:26446991

  11. A pathogenic non-coding RNA induces changes in dynamic DNA methylation of ribosomal RNA genes in host plants.

    PubMed

    Martinez, German; Castellano, Mayte; Tortosa, Maria; Pallas, Vicente; Gomez, Gustavo

    2014-02-01

    Viroids are plant-pathogenic non-coding RNAs able to interfere with as yet poorly known host-regulatory pathways and to cause alterations recognized as diseases. The way in which these RNAs coerce the host to express symptoms remains to be totally deciphered. In recent years, diverse studies have proposed a close interplay between viroid-induced pathogenesis and RNA silencing, supporting the belief that viroid-derived small RNAs mediate the post-transcriptional cleavage of endogenous mRNAs by acting as elicitors of symptoms expression. Although the evidence supporting the role of viroid-derived small RNAs in pathogenesis is robust, the possibility that this phenomenon can be a more complex process, also involving viroid-induced alterations in plant gene expression at transcriptional levels, has been considered. Here we show that plants infected with the 'Hop stunt viroid' accumulate high levels of sRNAs derived from ribosomal transcripts. This effect was correlated with an increase in the transcription of ribosomal RNA (rRNA) precursors during infection. We observed that the transcriptional reactivation of rRNA genes correlates with a modification of DNA methylation in their promoter region and revealed that some rRNA genes are demethylated and transcriptionally reactivated during infection. This study reports a previously unknown mechanism associated with viroid (or any other pathogenic RNA) infection in plants providing new insights into aspects of host alterations induced by the viroid infectious cycle. PMID:24178032

  12. Downregulation of the long non-coding RNA TUSC7 promotes NSCLC cell proliferation and correlates with poor prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhongwei; Jin, Yingying; Ren, Hongtao; Ma, Xiulong; Wang, Baofeng; Wang, Yali

    2016-01-01

    Background: Emerging evidence indicated that dysregulated long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) was implicated in the tumorigenesis and progression. LncRNA TUSC7 was involved in various malignancies. However, the role of TUSC7 in human non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unclear. Methods: Expression of TUSC7 was analyzed in 112 cases of NSCLC tissues and six lung cancer cell lines by quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR). Then the correlation of TUSC7 expression with clinicopathological features and prognosis was aslo studied. Furthermore, overexpression of TUSC7 was performed and its role in tumor progression was explored. Results: The expression level of TUSC7 was lower in NSCLC tissues and lung cancer cells compared with their normal counterparts. Lower expression of TUSC7 in NSCLC tissues was associated with larger tumor size and higher TNM stage. Patients with lower TUSC7 expression had worse overall survival compared with the high expression cases. Univariate and multivariate analyses suggested that low expression of TUSC7 was an independent poor prognostic indicator for NSCLC patients. Moreover, upregulation of TUSC7 expression could inhibit proliferation of lung cancer cell in vitro. Conclusions: Our results suggested that TUSC7 was a potential biomarker for NSCLC prognosis, and the dysregulation of TUSC7 may play an important role in the NSCLC progression. PMID:27158360

  13. Associations between polymorphisms of long non-coding RNA MEG3 and risk of colorectal cancer in Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Xi, Lei; Deng, Lichun; Sheng, Huaming; Shen, Weisheng

    2016-01-01

    Maternally expressed gene 3 (MEG3), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), is involved in cancer development and metastasis. The objective of the present study was to evaluate whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in MEG3 could be related with colorectal cancer risk in Chinese. We genotyped six tagSNPs of MEG3 in a colorectal cancer case-control study including 518 cases and 527 control subjects. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was applied to calculate adjusted odds ratios (ORs). We found that MEG3 rs7158663 AA genotype, but not GA genotype, had significant increased colorectal cancer risk, compared with GG genotype (OR = 1.96 and P = 0.006 for AA versus GG, and OR = 1.20 and P = 0.171 for GA versus GG). Further stratified analysis indicated that the increased risk was significantly correlated with individuals with age ≤ 60 and family history of cancer. However, there was no significant association between rs7158663 and colorectal tumor site and stage (P = 0.842 for tumor site, and P = 0.601 for tumor stage). These results demonstrate that genetic variants in MEG3 may contribute to the development and risk of colorectal cancer. Further studies are required to confirm these findings. PMID:26934323

  14. A Bipartite Network-based Method for Prediction of Long Non-coding RNA–protein Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Ge, Mengqu; Li, Ao; Wang, Minghui

    2016-01-01

    As one large class of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs), long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) have gained considerable attention in recent years. Mutations and dysfunction of lncRNAs have been implicated in human disorders. Many lncRNAs exert their effects through interactions with the corresponding RNA-binding proteins. Several computational approaches have been developed, but only few are able to perform the prediction of these interactions from a network-based point of view. Here, we introduce a computational method named lncRNA–protein bipartite network inference (LPBNI). LPBNI aims to identify potential lncRNA–interacting proteins, by making full use of the known lncRNA–protein interactions. Leave-one-out cross validation (LOOCV) test shows that LPBNI significantly outperforms other network-based methods, including random walk (RWR) and protein-based collaborative filtering (ProCF). Furthermore, a case study was performed to demonstrate the performance of LPBNI using real data in predicting potential lncRNA–interacting proteins. PMID:26917505

  15. Biological function of Foot-and-mouth disease virus non-structural proteins and non-coding elements.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yuan; Sun, Shi-Qi; Guo, Hui-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) represses host translation machinery, blocks protein secretion, and cleaves cellular proteins associated with signal transduction and the innate immune response to infection. Non-structural proteins (NSPs) and non-coding elements (NCEs) of FMDV play a critical role in these biological processes. The FMDV virion consists of capsid and nucleic acid. The virus genome is a positive single stranded RNA and encodes a single long open reading frame (ORF) flanked by a long structured 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) and a short 3'-UTR. The ORF is translated into a polypeptide chain and processed into four structural proteins (VP1, VP2, VP3, and VP4), 10 NSPs (L(pro), 2A, 2B, 2C, 3A, 3B1-3, 3C(pro), and 3D(pol)), and some cleavage intermediates. In the past decade, an increasing number of studies have begun to focus on the molecular pathogenesis of FMDV NSPs and NCEs. This review collected recent research progress on the biological functions of these NSPs and NCEs on the replication and host cellular regulation of FMDV to understand the molecular mechanism of host-FMDV interactions and provide perspectives for antiviral strategy and development of novel vaccines. PMID:27334704

  16. DNA methylation patterns of protein-coding genes and long non-coding RNAs in males with schizophrenia

    PubMed Central

    LIAO, QI; WANG, YUNLIANG; CHENG, JIA; DAI, DONGJUN; ZHOU, XINGYU; ZHANG, YUZHENG; LI, JINFENG; YIN, HONGLEI; GAO, SHUGUI; DUAN, SHIWEI

    2015-01-01

    Schizophrenia (SCZ) is one of the most complex mental illnesses affecting ~1% of the population worldwide. SCZ pathogenesis is considered to be a result of genetic as well as epigenetic alterations. Previous studies have aimed to identify the causative genes of SCZ. However, DNA methylation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) involved in SCZ has not been fully elucidated. In the present study, a comprehensive genome-wide analysis of DNA methylation was conducted using samples from two male patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, respectively. Methyl-CpG binding domain protein-enriched genome sequencing was used. In the two patients with paranoid and undifferentiated SCZ, 1,397 and 1,437 peaks were identified, respectively. Bioinformatic analysis demonstrated that peaks were enriched in protein-coding genes, which exhibited nervous system and brain functions. A number of these peaks in gene promoter regions may affect gene expression and, therefore, influence SCZ-associated pathways. Furthermore, 7 and 20 lncRNAs, respectively, in the Refseq database were hypermethylated. According to the lncRNA dataset in the NONCODE database, ~30% of intergenic peaks overlapped with novel lncRNA loci. The results of the present study demonstrated that aberrant hypermethylation of lncRNA genes may be an important epigenetic factor associated with SCZ. However, further studies using larger sample sizes are required. PMID:26503909

  17. Long non-coding RNA MALAT-1 overexpression predicts tumor recurrence of hepatocellular carcinoma after liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Lai, Ming-chun; Yang, Zhe; Zhou, Lin; Zhu, Qian-qian; Xie, Hai-yang; Zhang, Feng; Wu, Li-ming; Chen, Lei-ming; Zheng, Shu-sen

    2012-09-01

    Metastasis-associated lung adenocarcinoma transcript 1(MALAT1), a long non-coding RNA (lncRNA), is up-regulated in many solid tumors and associated with cancer metastasis and recurrence. However, its role in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains poorly understood. In the present study, we evaluated the expression of MALAT1 by quantitative real-time PCR in 9 liver cancer cell lines and 112 HCC cases including 60 cases who received liver transplantation (LT) with complete follow-up data. Moreover, small interfering RNA (siRNA) was used to inhibit MALAT1 expression to investigate its biological role in tumor progression. We found that MALAT1 was up-regulated in both cell lines and clinical tissue samples. Patients with high expression level of MALAT1 had a significantly increased risk of tumor recurrence after LT, particularly in patients who exceeded the Milan criteria. On multivariate analysis, MALAT1 was an independent prognostic factor for predicting HCC recurrence (hazard ratio, 3.280, P = 0.003).In addition, inhibition of MALAT1 in HepG2 cells could effectively reduce cell viability, motility, invasiveness, and increase the sensitivity to apoptosis. Our data suggest that lncRNA MALAT1 play an important role in tumor progression and could be a novel biomarker for predicting tumor recurrence after LT and serve as a promising therapeutic target. PMID:21678027

  18. Long non-coding RNA SOX2OT: expression signature, splicing patterns, and emerging roles in pluripotency and tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Shahryari, Alireza; Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Samaei, Nader M.; Mowla, Seyed J.

    2015-01-01

    SOX2 overlapping transcript (SOX2OT) is a long non-coding RNA which harbors one of the major regulators of pluripotency, SOX2 gene, in its intronic region. SOX2OT gene is mapped to human chromosome 3q26.3 (Chr3q26.3) locus and is extended in a high conserved region of over 700 kb. Little is known about the exact role of SOX2OT; however, recent studies have demonstrated a positive role for it in transcription regulation of SOX2 gene. Similar to SOX2, SOX2OT is highly expressed in embryonic stem cells and down-regulated upon the induction of differentiation. SOX2OT is dynamically regulated during the embryogenesis of vertebrates, and delimited to the brain in adult mice and human. Recently, the disregulation of SOX2OT expression and its concomitant expression with SOX2 have become highlighted in some somatic cancers including esophageal squamous cell carcinoma, lung squamous cell carcinoma, and breast cancer. Interestingly, SOX2OT is differentially spliced into multiple mRNA-like transcripts in stem and cancer cells. In this review, we are describing the structural and functional features of SOX2OT, with an emphasis on its expression signature, its splicing patterns and its critical function in the regulation of SOX2 expression during development and tumorigenesis. PMID:26136768

  19. A novel non-coding RNA lncRNA-JADE connects DNA damage signalling to histone H4 acetylation

    PubMed Central

    Wan, Guohui; Hu, Xiaoxiao; Liu, Yunhua; Han, Cecil; Sood, Anil K; Calin, George A; Zhang, Xinna; Lu, Xiongbin

    2013-01-01

    A prompt and efficient DNA damage response (DDR) eliminates the detrimental effects of DNA lesions in eukaryotic cells. Basic and preclinical studies suggest that the DDR is one of the primary anti-cancer barriers during tumorigenesis. The DDR involves a complex network of processes that detect and repair DNA damage, in which long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs), a new class of regulatory RNAs, may play an important role. In the current study, we identified a novel lncRNA, lncRNA-JADE, that is induced after DNA damage in an ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM)-dependent manner. LncRNA-JADE transcriptionally activates Jade1, a key component in the HBO1 (human acetylase binding to ORC1) histone acetylation complex. Consequently, lncRNA-JADE induces histone H4 acetylation in the DDR. Markedly higher levels of lncRNA-JADE were observed in human breast tumours in comparison with normal breast tissues. Knockdown of lncRNA-JADE significantly inhibited breast tumour growth in vivo. On the basis of these results, we propose that lncRNA-JADE is a key functional link that connects the DDR to histone H4 acetylation, and that dysregulation of lncRNA-JADE may contribute to breast tumorigenesis. PMID:24097061

  20. The long non-coding RNA expression profile of Coxsackievirus A16 infected RD cells identified by RNA-seq.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yingying; Tu, Huilin; Chen, Xiong; Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Liujun; Liu, Zhongchun; Sheng, Jiqun; Han, Song; Yin, Jun; Peng, Biwen; He, Xiaohua; Liu, Wanhong

    2016-04-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CVA16) is one of major pathogens of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) in children. Long non-coding RNAs (IncRNAs) have been implicated in various biological processes, but they have not been associated with CVA16 infection. In this study, we comprehensively characterized the landscape of IncRNAs of normal and CVA16 infected rhabdomyosarcoma (RD) cells using RNA-Seq to investigate the functional relevance of IncRNAs. We showed that a total of 760 IncRNAs were upregulated and 1210 IncRNAs were downregulated. Out of these dysregulated IncRNAs, 43.64% were intergenic, 22.31% were sense, 15.89% were intronic, 8.67% were bidirectional, 5.59% were antisense, 3.85% were sRNA host IncRNAs and 0.05% were enhancer. Six dysregulated IncRNAs were validated by quantitative PCR assays and the secondary structures of these IncRNAs were projected. Moreover, we conducted a bioinformatics analysis of an IncRNAs (ENST00000602478) to elucidate the diversity of modification and functions of IncRNAs. In summary, the current study compared the dysregulated IncRNAs profile upon CVA16 challenge and illustrated the intricate relationship between coding and IncRNAs transcripts. These results may not only provide a complete picture of transcription in CVA16 infected cells but also provide novel molecular targets for treatments of HFMD. PMID:27060091

  1. RNAe: an effective method for targeted protein translation enhancement by artificial non-coding RNA with SINEB2 repeat

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yi; Jin, Shouhong; Long, Haizhou; Yu, Yingting; Zhang, Zhenming; Cheng, Ge; Xu, Chengwei; Ding, Yan; Guan, Qian; Li, Ning; Fu, Suneng; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Hanshuo; Tong, Pei; Tan, Yue; Yu, Yang; Fu, Shushu; Li, Juan; He, Guang-Jun; Wu, Qiong

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a universal protein expression enhancement RNA tool, termed RNAe, was developed by modifying a recently discovered natural long non-coding RNA. At the moment, RNAe is the only technology for gene expression enhancement, as opposed to silencing, at the post-transcriptional level. With this technology, an expression enhancement of 50–1000% is achievable, with more than 200% enhancement achieved in most cases. This work identified the sufficient and necessary element for RNAe function, which was found to be merely 300 nucleotides long and was named minRNAe. It contains a 72-nt 5' pairing sequence which determines the specificity, a 167-nt short non-pairing interspersed nuclear element (SINE) B2 sequence which enhances ribosome recruitment to the target mRNA, and a poly(A) tail, provided together on a plasmid bearing the appropriate sequences. Cellular delivery of RNAe was achieved using routine transfection. The RNAe platform was validated in several widely-used mammalian cell lines. It was proven to be efficient and flexible in specifically enhancing the expression of various endogenous and exogenous proteins of diverse functions in a dose-dependent manner. Compared to the expression-inhibitory tool RNAi, the RNAe tool has a comparable effect size, with an enhancing as opposed to inhibitory effect. One may predict that this brand new technology for enhancing the production of proteins will find wide applications in both research and biopharmaceutical production. PMID:25722369

  2. BlockClust: efficient clustering and classification of non-coding RNAs from short read RNA-seq profiles

    PubMed Central

    Videm, Pavankumar; Rose, Dominic; Costa, Fabrizio; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Summary: Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) play a vital role in many cellular processes such as RNA splicing, translation, gene regulation. However the vast majority of ncRNAs still have no functional annotation. One prominent approach for putative function assignment is clustering of transcripts according to sequence and secondary structure. However sequence information is changed by post-transcriptional modifications, and secondary structure is only a proxy for the true 3D conformation of the RNA polymer. A different type of information that does not suffer from these issues and that can be used for the detection of RNA classes, is the pattern of processing and its traces in small RNA-seq reads data. Here we introduce BlockClust, an efficient approach to detect transcripts with similar processing patterns. We propose a novel way to encode expression profiles in compact discrete structures, which can then be processed using fast graph-kernel techniques. We perform both unsupervised clustering and develop family specific discriminative models; finally we show how the proposed approach is scalable, accurate and robust across different organisms, tissues and cell lines. Availability: The whole BlockClust galaxy workflow including all tool dependencies is available at http://toolshed.g2.bx.psu.edu/view/rnateam/blockclust_workflow. Contact: backofen@informatik.uni-freiburg.de; costa@informatik.uni-freiburg.de Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24931994

  3. Upregulation of long non coding RNA PCAT-1 contributes to cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis in hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jifeng; Xu, Jun; Sun, Qifeng; Xing, Chengliang; Yin, Wenzhe

    2016-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) exert regulatory functions on various biological processes in cancer cells, including proliferation, apoptosis and mobility. Prostate cancer-associated transcript 1 (PCAT-1) is a novel lncRNA that promotes cell proliferation in prostate cancer, however, the effect of PCAT‑1 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remains to be elucidated. The present study hypothesized that PCAT‑1 also exerts an important effect in HCC. The current study investigated PCAT-1 expression levels in HCC tissue samples and HepG2 and Bel‑7402 cell lines using the reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The results demonstrated that PCAT-1 was upregulated in HCC tissue samples and cell lines compared with adjacent non‑cancerous tissues and the L02 normal liver epithelial cell line. PCAT‑1 suppression using PCAT‑1 small hairpin RNA in HepG2 and Bel‑7402 cells inhibited cell proliferation and migration, and induced apoptosis. Overexpression of PCAT‑1 induced synthetic plasmid vectors was demonstrated to increase cell proliferation and migration, and inhibit apoptosis. Results from the present study suggest that PCAT‑1 exerts an oncogenic effect in HCC and silencing PCAT-1 may be a potential novel therapeutic strategy for HCC. PMID:27035680

  4. The long non-coding RNA PCAT-1 promotes prostate cancer cell proliferation through cMyc.

    PubMed

    Prensner, John R; Chen, Wei; Han, Sumin; Iyer, Matthew K; Cao, Qi; Kothari, Vishal; Evans, Joseph R; Knudsen, Karen E; Paulsen, Michelle T; Ljungman, Mats; Lawrence, Theodore S; Chinnaiyan, Arul M; Feng, Felix Y

    2014-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) represent an emerging layer of cancer biology, contributing to tumor proliferation, invasion, and metastasis. Here, we describe a role for the oncogenic lncRNA PCAT-1 in prostate cancer proliferation through cMyc. We find that PCAT-1-mediated proliferation is dependent on cMyc protein stabilization, and using expression profiling, we observed that cMyc is required for a subset of PCAT-1-induced expression changes. The PCAT-1-cMyc relationship is mediated through the post-transcriptional activity of the MYC 3' untranslated region, and we characterize a role for PCAT-1 in the disruption of MYC-targeting microRNAs. To further elucidate a role for post-transcriptional regulation, we demonstrate that targeting PCAT-1 with miR-3667-3p, which does not target MYC, is able to reverse the stabilization of cMyc by PCAT-1. This work establishes a basis for the oncogenic role of PCAT-1 in cancer cell proliferation and is the first study to implicate lncRNAs in the regulation of cMyc in prostate cancer. PMID:25425964

  5. A Non-Coding RNA Promotes Bacterial Persistence and Decreases Virulence by Regulating a Regulator in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Tomasini, Arnaud; Caldelari, Isabelle; Benito, Yvonne; Hammann, Philippe; Geissmann, Thomas; Boisset, Sandrine; Romby, Pascale; Vandenesch, François

    2014-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus produces a high number of RNAs for which the functions are poorly understood. Several non-coding RNAs carry a C-rich sequence suggesting that they regulate mRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. We demonstrate that the Sigma B-dependent RsaA RNA represses the synthesis of the global transcriptional regulator MgrA by forming an imperfect duplex with the Shine and Dalgarno sequence and a loop-loop interaction within the coding region of the target mRNA. These two recognition sites are required for translation repression. Consequently, RsaA causes enhanced production of biofilm and a decreased synthesis of capsule formation in several strain backgrounds. These phenotypes led to a decreased protection of S. aureus against opsonophagocytic killing by polymorphonuclear leukocytes compared to the mutant strains lacking RsaA. Mice animal models showed that RsaA attenuates the severity of acute systemic infections and enhances chronic catheter infection. RsaA takes part in a regulatory network that contributes to the complex interactions of S. aureus with the host immune system to moderate invasiveness and favour chronic infections. It is the first example of a conserved small RNA in S. aureus functioning as a virulence suppressor of acute infections. Because S. aureus is essentially a human commensal, we propose that RsaA has been positively selected through evolution to support commensalism and saprophytic interactions with the host. PMID:24651379

  6. Correlation of long non-coding RNA expression with metastasis, drug resistance and clinical outcome in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Malek, Ehsan; Jagannathan, Sajjeev; Driscoll, James J.

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic response and clinical outcome of patients diagnosed with the same cancer type and that receive identical treatment is highly variable to reflect the genetic heterogeneity within tumor cells. Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) are recently discovered molecules that regulate eukaryotic gene expression and represent a significant advance towards a better understanding of the mechanisms that govern cellular growth. NcRNAs are essential for the proper regulation of cell proliferation and survival under physiologic conditions and are deregulated in many pathologies, e.g., human cancers. NcRNAs have been associated with cancer diagnosis, staging, treatment response, metastasis and survival and include distinct subtypes, e.g., long ncRNAs (lncRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs). LncRNAs have been linked to essential growth-promoting activities and their deregulation contributes to tumor cell survival. A prominent example is the Hox transcript antisense intergenic lncRNA, HOTAIR, that cooperates with the polycomb repressive complex to reprogram chromatin organization. HOTAIR expression is deregulated in a spectrum of cancers and HOTAIR expression correlates with patient survival. Here, we highlight emerging evidence that supports a role for lncRNAs in cancer with implications for the development of novel diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:25275300

  7. Long non-coding RNA HOTAIR regulates cyclin J via inhibition of microRNA-205 expression in bladder cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X; Du, P; Yuan, W; Du, Z; Yu, M; Yu, X; Hu, T

    2015-01-01

    The level of microRNA-205 (miR-205) is commonly deregulated in a number of cancers. Through the screening of the microRNA expression profile in bladder cancer tissue and cell lines, we found that expression of miR-205 was significantly suppressed. In addition, the levels of miR-205 expression had a negative correlation with the degree of bladder cancer malignancy. However, the biological functions of miR-205 remained unclear. In this study, we have demonstrated that miR-205 had a role in the inhibition of proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells. Moreover, we have identified cyclin J (CCNJ) gene, which is involved in cell cycle regulation, as a novel target for miR-205. Furthermore, a long non-coding RNA HOTAIR (HOX transcript antisense RNA) was observed to participate in the silencing of miR-205 in bladder cancer cells by breaking the balance of histone modification between H3K4me3 (histone H3 at lysine 4 methylation) and H3K27me3 on miR-205 promoter. This study elucidates an important role that miR-205 had in the regulation of proliferation, migration and invasion of bladder cancer cells, suggesting a potential therapeutic target for combating bladder cancer. PMID:26469956

  8. Long non-coding RNAs as novel expression signatures modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium toxicology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhiheng; Liu, Haibai; Wang, Caixia; Lu, Qian; Huang, Qinhai; Zheng, Chanjiao; Lei, Yixiong

    2015-10-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are involved in a variety of physiological and pathophysiological processes. Our study was to investigate whether lncRNAs as novel expression signatures are able to modulate DNA damage and repair in cadmium(Cd) toxicity. There were aberrant expression profiles of lncRNAs in 35th Cd-induced cells as compared to untreated 16HBE cells. siRNA-mediated knockdown of ENST00000414355 inhibited the growth of DNA-damaged cells and decreased the expressions of DNA-damage related genes (ATM, ATR and ATRIP), while increased the expressions of DNA-repair related genes (DDB1, DDB2, OGG1, ERCC1, MSH2, RAD50, XRCC1 and BARD1). Cadmium increased ENST00000414355 expression in the lung of Cd-exposed rats in a dose-dependent manner. A significant positive correlation was observed between blood ENST00000414355 expression and urinary/blood Cd concentrations, and there were significant correlations of lncRNA-ENST00000414355 expression with the expressions of target genes in the lung of Cd-exposed rats and the blood of Cd exposed workers. These results indicate that some lncRNAs are aberrantly expressed in Cd-treated 16HBE cells. lncRNA-ENST00000414355 may serve as a signature for DNA damage and repair related to the epigenetic mechanisms underlying the cadmium toxicity and become a novel biomarker of cadmium toxicity.

  9. Disentangling the Effects of Colocalizing Genomic Annotations to Functionally Prioritize Non-coding Variants within Complex-Trait Loci

    PubMed Central

    Trynka, Gosia; Westra, Harm-Jan; Slowikowski, Kamil; Hu, Xinli; Xu, Han; Stranger, Barbara E.; Klein, Robert J.; Han, Buhm; Raychaudhuri, Soumya

    2015-01-01

    Identifying genomic annotations that differentiate causal from trait-associated variants is essential to fine mapping disease loci. Although many studies have identified non-coding functional annotations that overlap disease-associated variants, these annotations often colocalize, complicating the ability to use these annotations for fine mapping causal variation. We developed a statistical approach (Genomic Annotation Shifter [GoShifter]) to assess whether enriched annotations are able to prioritize causal variation. GoShifter defines the null distribution of an annotation overlapping an allele by locally shifting annotations; this approach is less sensitive to biases arising from local genomic structure than commonly used enrichment methods that depend on SNP matching. Local shifting also allows GoShifter to identify independent causal effects from colocalizing annotations. Using GoShifter, we confirmed that variants in expression quantitative trail loci drive gene-expression changes though DNase-I hypersensitive sites (DHSs) near transcription start sites and independently through 3′ UTR regulation. We also showed that (1) 15%–36% of trait-associated loci map to DHSs independently of other annotations; (2) loci associated with breast cancer and rheumatoid arthritis harbor potentially causal variants near the summits of histone marks rather than full peak bodies; (3) variants associated with height are highly enriched in embryonic stem cell DHSs; and (4) we can effectively prioritize causal variation at specific loci. PMID:26140449

  10. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast

    PubMed Central

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C.

    2014-01-01

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1+). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1+ promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1+ without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1+ is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1+ expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1+ even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1+ expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast. PMID:25428589

  11. Long non-coding RNA CCAT2 functions as an oncogene in hepatocellular carcinoma, regulating cellular proliferation, migration and apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    ZHOU, NING; SI, ZHONGZHOU; LI, TING; CHEN, GUANGSHUN; ZHANG, ZHONGQIANG; QI, HAIZHI

    2016-01-01

    An increasing number of studies have demonstrated that the dysregulation of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) may serve an important role in tumor progression. Previous studies have reported that the lncRNA, colon cancer associated transcript 2 (CCAT2), was highly expressed in various tumors. However, the function of CCAT2 in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) has not yet been elucidated. The aim of the present study was to identify novel oncogene lncRNAs and investigate their physiological function and mechanism in HCC. Using reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction, it was observed that CCAT2 was upregulated in HCC tissues and human HCC cell lines. Furthermore, the impacts of CCAT2 on cell proliferation, migration and apoptosis were analyzed using cell migration, 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay analysis respectively. The overexpression of CCAT2 using a synthesized vector significantly promoted cell migration and proliferation, and inhibited apoptosis of HCC cells in vitro. The suppression of CCAT2 expression resulted in opposing effects. To the best of our knowledge, the present study is the first to demonstrate that CCAT2 functions as a oncogene in HCC. Further investigation is required to clarify the molecular mechanisms of this lncRNA in HCC development.

  12. A liver-enriched long non-coding RNA, lncLSTR, regulates systemic lipid metabolism in mice

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ping; Ruan, Xiangbo; Yang, Ling; Kiesewetter, Kurtis; Zhao, Yi; Luo, Haitao; Chen, Yong; Gucek, Marjan; Zhu, Jun; Cao, Haiming

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) constitute a significant portion of mammalian genome, yet the physiological importance of lncRNAs is largely unknown. Here, we identify a liver-enriched lncRNA in mouse we term liver-specific triglyceride regulator (lncLSTR). Mice with a liver-specific depletion of lncLSTR exhibit a marked reduction in plasma triglyceride levels. We show that lncLSTR depletion enhances apoC2 expression, leading to robust lipoprotein lipase activation and increased plasma triglyceride clearance. We further demonstrate that the regulation of apoC2 expression occurs through an FXR-mediated pathway. LncLSTR forms a molecular complex with TDP-43 to regulate expression of Cyp8b1, a key enzyme in the bile acid synthesis pathway, and engenders an in vivo bile pool that induces apoC2 expression through FXR. Finally, we demonstrate that lncLSTR depletion can reduce triglyceride levels in a hyperlipidemia mouse model. Taken together, these data support a model where lncLSTR regulates a TDP-43/FXR/apoC2 dependent pathway to maintain systemic lipid homeostasis. PMID:25738460

  13. A long non-coding RNA, APOA4-AS, regulates APOA4 expression depending on HuR in mice.

    PubMed

    Qin, Wangshu; Li, Xinzhi; Xie, Liwei; Li, Sha; Liu, Jianan; Jia, Linna; Dong, Xue; Ren, Xiaomeng; Xiao, Junjie; Yang, Changqing; Zhou, Yifa; Chen, Zheng

    2016-07-27

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been shown to be critical biomarkers or therapeutic targets for human diseases. However, only a small number of lncRNAs were screened and characterized. Here, we identified 15 lncRNAs, which are associated with fatty liver disease. Among them, APOA4-AS is shown to be a concordant regulator of Apolipoprotein A-IV (APOA4) expression. APOA4-AS has a similar expression pattern with APOA4 gene. The expressions of APOA4-AS and APOA4 are both abnormally elevated in the liver of ob/ob mice and patients with fatty liver disease. Knockdown of APOA4-AS reduces APOA4 expression both in vitro and in vivo and leads to decreased levels of plasma triglyceride and total cholesterol in ob/ob mice. Mechanistically, APOA4-AS directly interacts with mRNA stabilizing protein HuR and stabilizes APOA4 mRNA. Deletion of HuR dramatically reduces both APOA4-AS and APOA4 transcripts. This study uncovers an anti-sense lncRNA (APOA4-AS), which is co-expressed with APOA4, and concordantly and specifically regulates APOA4 expression both in vitro and in vivo with the involvement of HuR. PMID:27131369

  14. BRAF-activated long non-coding RNA contributes to cell proliferation and activates autophagy in papillary thyroid carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, YONG; GUO, QINHAO; ZHAO, YAN; CHEN, JIEJING; WANG, SHUWEI; HU, JUN; SUN, YUEMING

    2014-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are novel regulators in cancer biology. BRAF-activated lncRNA (BANCR) is overexpressed in melanoma and has a potential functional role in melanoma cell migration. However, little is known about the role of BANCR in the development of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC). In the present study, BANCR expression was examined in six pairs of PTC and matched adjacent normal tissues. The results revealed that BANCR levels were significantly higher in the PTC tissues and PTC IHH-4 cells compared with the normal controls. Knockdown of BANCR in the IHH-4 cells inhibited proliferation and increased apoptosis of the cells in vitro. Further investigation of the underlying mechanisms revealed that BANCR markedly activated autophagy. Overexpression of BANCR inhibited apoptosis in the IHH-4 cells, whereas inhibition of autophagy stimulated apoptosis in the BANCR-overexpressed cells. BANCR overexpression also increased cell proliferation and the inhibition of autophagy abrogated BANCR overexpression-induced cell proliferation. In addition, the overexpression of BANCR resulted in an increase in the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I, a marker for autophagy, while the knockdown of BANCR decreased the ratio of LC3-II/LC3-I. These results revealed that BANCR expression levels are upregulated in PTC. Additionally, BANCR increases PTC cell proliferation, which could activate autophagy. PMID:25289082

  15. Cellular localization of long non-coding RNAs affects silencing by RNAi more than by antisense oligonucleotides.

    PubMed

    Lennox, Kim A; Behlke, Mark A

    2016-01-29

    Thousands of long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been identified in mammalian cells. Some have important functions and their dysregulation can contribute to a variety of disease states. However, most lncRNAs have not been functionally characterized. Complicating their study, lncRNAs have widely varying subcellular distributions: some reside predominantly in the nucleus, the cytoplasm or in both compartments. One method to query function is to suppress expression and examine the resulting phenotype. Methods to suppress expression of mRNAs include antisense oligonucleotides (ASOs) and RNA interference (RNAi). Antisense and RNAi-based gene-knockdown methods vary in efficacy between different cellular compartments. It is not known if this affects their ability to suppress lncRNAs. To address whether localization of the lncRNA influences susceptibility to degradation by either ASOs or RNAi, nuclear lncRNAs (MALAT1 and NEAT1), cytoplasmic lncRNAs (DANCR and OIP5-AS1) and dual-localized lncRNAs (TUG1, CasC7 and HOTAIR) were compared for knockdown efficiency. We found that nuclear lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using ASOs, cytoplasmic lncRNAs were more effectively suppressed using RNAi and dual-localized lncRNAs were suppressed using both methods. A mixed-modality approach combining ASOs and RNAi reagents improved knockdown efficacy, particularly for those lncRNAs that localize to both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. PMID:26578588

  16. Long non-coding RNA expression profiles of hepatitis C virus-related dysplasia and hepatocellular carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming; Wu, Liangcai; Yang, Xiaobo; Wan, Xueshuai; Wang, Anqiang; Zhang, Michael Q.; Sang, Xinting; Zhao, Haitao

    2015-01-01

    Recently, long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) were found to be implicated in cancer progression. However, the contributions of lncRNAs to Hepatitis C virus-related hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized lncRNA expression in 73 tissue samples from several different developmental stages of HCV-related hepatocarcinogenesis by repurposing microarray data sets. We found that the expression of 7 lncRNAs in preneoplastic lesions and HCC was significantly different. Among these significantly differently expressed lncRNAs, the lncRNA LINC01419 transcripts were expressed at higher levels in early stage HCC compared to dysplasia and as compared with early stage HCC, lncRNA AK021443 level increase in advanced stage HCC while lncRNA AF070632 level decrease in advanced stage HCC. Using quantitative real-time reverse-transcription PCR, we validated that LINC01419 was significantly overexpressed in HBV-related and HCV-related HCC when compared with matched non-tumor liver tissues. Moreover, functional predictions suggested that LINC01419 and AK021443 regulate cell cycle genes, whereas AF070632 is associated with cofactor binding, oxidation-reduction and carboxylic acid catabolic process. These findings provide the first large-scale survey of lncRNAs associated with the development of hepatocarcinogenesis and may offer new diagnostic biomarkers and therapeutic targets for HCV-related HCC. PMID:26540467

  17. The structure of the genotype-phenotype map strongly constrains the evolution of non-coding RNA.

    PubMed

    Dingle, Kamaludin; Schaper, Steffen; Louis, Ard A

    2015-12-01

    The prevalence of neutral mutations implies that biological systems typically have many more genotypes than phenotypes. But, can the way that genotypes are distributed over phenotypes determine evolutionary outcomes? Answering such questions is difficult, in part because the number of genotypes can be hyper-astronomically large. By solving the genotype-phenotype (GP) map for RNA secondary structure (SS) for systems up to length L = 126 nucleotides (where the set of all possible RNA strands would weigh more than the mass of the visible universe), we show that the GP map strongly constrains the evolution of non-coding RNA (ncRNA). Simple random sampling over genotypes predicts the distribution of properties such as the mutational robustness or the number of stems per SS found in naturally occurring ncRNA with surprising accuracy. Because we ignore natural selection, this strikingly close correspondence with the mapping suggests that structures allowing for functionality are easily discovered, despite the enormous size of the genetic spaces. The mapping is extremely biased: the majority of genotypes map to an exponentially small portion of the morphospace of all biophysically possible structures. Such strong constraints provide a non-adaptive explanation for the convergent evolution of structures such as the hammerhead ribozyme. These results present a particularly clear example of bias in the arrival of variation strongly shaping evolutionary outcomes and may be relevant to Mayr's distinction between proximate and ultimate causes in evolutionary biology. PMID:26640651

  18. SINEUPs: A new class of natural and synthetic antisense long non-coding RNAs that activate translation

    PubMed Central

    Zucchelli, S; Cotella, D; Takahashi, H; Carrieri, C; Cimatti, L; Fasolo, F; Jones, MH; Sblattero, D; Sanges, R; Santoro, C; Persichetti, F; Carninci, P; Gustincich, S

    2015-01-01

    Over the past 10 years, it has emerged that pervasive transcription in mammalian genomes has a tremendous impact on several biological functions. Most of transcribed RNAs are lncRNAs and repetitive elements. In this review, we will detail the discovery of a new functional class of natural and synthetic antisense lncRNAs that stimulate translation of sense mRNAs. These molecules have been named SINEUPs since their function requires the activity of an embedded inverted SINEB2 sequence to UP-regulate translation. Natural SINEUPs suggest that embedded Transposable Elements may represent functional domains in long non-coding RNAs. Synthetic SINEUPs may be designed by targeting the antisense sequence to the mRNA of choice representing the first scalable tool to increase protein synthesis of potentially any gene of interest. We will discuss potential applications of SINEUP technology in the field of molecular biology experiments, in protein manufacturing as well as in therapy of haploinsufficiencies. PMID:26259533

  19. Long non-coding RNA GAS5 inhibited hepatitis C virus replication by binding viral NS3 protein.

    PubMed

    Qian, Xijing; Xu, Chen; Zhao, Ping; Qi, Zhongtian

    2016-05-01

    HCV infection has a complex and dynamic process which involves a large number of viral and host factors. Long non-coding RNA GAS5 inhibits liver fibrosis and liver tumor migration and invasion. However, the contribution of GAS5 on HCV infection remains unknown. In this study, GAS5 was gradually upregulated during HCV infection in Huh7 cells. In addition, GAS5 attenuated virus replication with its 5' end sequences, as confirmed by different GAS5 truncations. Moreover, this 5' end sequences showed RNA-protein interaction with HCV NS3 protein that could act as a decoy to inhibit its functions, which contributed to the suppression of HCV replication. Finally, the innate immune responses remained low in HCV infected Huh7 cells, ruling out the possibility of GAS5 to modulate innate immunity. Thus, HCV stimulated endogenous GAS5 can suppress HCV infection by acting as HCV NS3 protein decoy, providing a potential role of GAS5 as a diagnostic or therapeutic target. PMID:26945984

  20. Functional analysis of long intergenic non-coding RNAs in phosphate-starved rice using competing endogenous RNA network

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Xi-Wen; Zhou, Xiong-Hui; Wang, Rui-Ru; Peng, Wen-Lei; An, Yue; Chen, Ling-Ling

    2016-01-01

    Long intergenic non-coding RNAs (lincRNAs) may play widespread roles in gene regulation and other biological processes, however, a systematic examination of the functions of lincRNAs in the biological responses of rice to phosphate (Pi) starvation has not been performed. Here, we used a computational method to predict the functions of lincRNAs in Pi-starved rice. Overall, 3,170 lincRNA loci were identified using RNA sequencing data from the roots and shoots of control and Pi-starved rice. A competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA) network was constructed for each tissue by considering the competing relationships between lincRNAs and genes, and the correlations between the expression levels of RNAs in ceRNA pairs. Enrichment analyses showed that most of the communities in the networks were related to the biological processes of Pi starvation. The lincRNAs in the two tissues were individually functionally annotated based on the ceRNA networks, and the differentially expressed lincRNAs were biologically meaningful. For example, XLOC_026030 was upregulated from 3 days after Pi starvation, and its functional annotation was ‘cellular response to Pi starvation’. In conclusion, we systematically annotated lincRNAs in rice and identified those involved in the biological response to Pi starvation. PMID:26860696

  1. Exosomes in human semen carry a distinctive repertoire of small non-coding RNAs with potential regulatory functions

    PubMed Central

    Vojtech, Lucia; Woo, Sangsoon; Hughes, Sean; Levy, Claire; Ballweber, Lamar; Sauteraud, Renan P.; Strobl, Johanna; Westerberg, Katharine; Gottardo, Raphael; Tewari, Muneesh; Hladik, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Semen contains relatively ill-defined regulatory components that likely aid fertilization, but which could also interfere with defense against infection. Each ejaculate contains trillions of exosomes, membrane-enclosed subcellular microvesicles, which have immunosuppressive effects on cells important in the genital mucosa. Exosomes in general are believed to mediate inter-cellular communication, possibly by transferring small RNA molecules. We found that seminal exosome (SE) preparations contain a substantial amount of RNA from 20 to 100 nucleotides (nts) in length. We sequenced 20–40 and 40–100 nt fractions of SE RNA separately from six semen donors. We found various classes of small non-coding RNA, including microRNA (21.7% of the RNA in the 20–40 nt fraction) as well as abundant Y RNAs and tRNAs present in both fractions. Specific RNAs were consistently present in all donors. For example, 10 (of ∼2600 known) microRNAs constituted over 40% of mature microRNA in SE. Additionally, tRNA fragments were strongly enriched for 5’-ends of 18–19 or 30–34 nts in length; such tRNA fragments repress translation. Thus, SE could potentially deliver regulatory signals to the recipient mucosa via transfer of small RNA molecules. PMID:24838567

  2. Response of the bacteriophage T4 replisome to non-coding lesions and regression of a stalled replication fork

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Scott W.; Benkovic, Stephen J.

    2010-01-01

    DNA is constantly damaged by endogenous and exogenous agents. The resulting DNA lesions have the potential to halt the progression of the replisome, possibly leading to replication fork collapse. Here, we examine the effect of a non-coding DNA lesion in either the leading or lagging strand template on the bacteriophage T4 replisome. A damaged base in the lagging strand template does not affect the progression of the replication fork. Instead, the stalled lagging strand polymerase recycles from the lesion and initiates synthesis of the new Okazaki fragment upstream from the damaged base. In contrast, when the replisome encounters a blocking lesion in the leading strand template, the replication fork only travels approximately 1 kb beyond the point of the DNA lesion before complete replication fork collapse. The primosome and lagging strand polymerase remain active during this period and an Okazaki fragment is synthesized beyond the point of the leading strand lesion. There is no evidence for a new priming event on the leading strand template. Instead, the DNA structure that is produced by the stalled replication fork is a substrate for the DNA repair helicase, UvsW. UvsW catalyzes the regression of a stalled replication fork into a “chicken foot” structure that has been postulated to be an intermediate in an error-free lesion bypass pathway. PMID:20600127

  3. A Dynamic 3D Graphical Representation for RNA Structure Analysis and Its Application in Non-Coding RNA Classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Huang, Haiyun; Dong, Xiaoqing; Fang, Yiliang; Wang, Kejing; Zhu, Lijuan; Wang, Ke; Huang, Tao; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    With the development of new technologies in transcriptome and epigenetics, RNAs have been identified to play more and more important roles in life processes. Consequently, various methods have been proposed to assess the biological functions of RNAs and thus classify them functionally, among which comparative study of RNA structures is perhaps the most important one. To measure the structural similarity of RNAs and classify them, we propose a novel three dimensional (3D) graphical representation of RNA secondary structure, in which an RNA secondary structure is first transformed into a characteristic sequence based on chemical property of nucleic acids; a dynamic 3D graph is then constructed for the characteristic sequence; and lastly a numerical characterization of the 3D graph is used to represent the RNA secondary structure. We tested our algorithm on three datasets: (1) Dataset I consisting of nine RNA secondary structures of viruses, (2) Dataset II consisting of complex RNA secondary structures including pseudo-knots, and (3) Dataset III consisting of 18 non-coding RNA families. We also compare our method with other nine existing methods using Dataset II and III. The results demonstrate that our method is better than other methods in similarity measurement and classification of RNA secondary structures. PMID:27213271

  4. Long non-coding RNAs harboring miRNA seed regions are enriched in prostate cancer exosomes.

    PubMed

    Ahadi, Alireza; Brennan, Samuel; Kennedy, Paul J; Hutvagner, Gyorgy; Tran, Nham

    2016-01-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) form the largest transcript class in the human transcriptome. These lncRNA are expressed not only in the cells, but they are also present in the cell-derived extracellular vesicles such as exosomes. The function of these lncRNAs in cancer biology is not entirely clear, but they appear to be modulators of gene expression. In this study, we characterize the expression of lncRNAs in several prostate cancer exosomes and their parental cell lines. We show that certain lncRNAs are enriched in cancer exosomes with the overall expression signatures varying across cell lines. These exosomal lncRNAs are themselves enriched for miRNA seeds with a preference for let-7 family members as well as miR-17, miR-18a, miR-20a, miR-93 and miR-106b. The enrichment of miRNA seed regions in exosomal lncRNAs is matched with a concomitant high expression of the same miRNA. In addition, the exosomal lncRNAs also showed an over representation of RNA binding protein binding motifs. The two most common motifs belonged to ELAVL1 and RBMX. Given the enrichment of miRNA and RBP sites on exosomal lncRNAs, their interplay may suggest a possible function in prostate cancer carcinogenesis. PMID:27102850

  5. A Non-Coding Genomic Duplication at the HMX1 Locus Is Associated with Crop Ears in Highland Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Caroline Tina; Bruggmann, Rémy; Tetens, Jens; Drögemüller, Cord

    2013-01-01

    Highland cattle with congenital crop ears have notches of variable size on the tips of both ears. In some cases, cartilage deformation can be seen and occasionally the external ears are shortened. We collected 40 cases and 80 controls across Switzerland. Pedigree data analysis confirmed a monogenic autosomal dominant mode of inheritance with variable expressivity. All affected animals could be traced back to a single common ancestor. A genome-wide association study was performed and the causative mutation was mapped to a 4 Mb interval on bovine chromosome 6. The H6 family homeobox 1 (HMX1) gene was selected as a positional and functional candidate gene. By whole genome re-sequencing of an affected Highland cattle, we detected 6 non-synonymous coding sequence variants and two variants in an ultra-conserved element at the HMX1 locus with respect to the reference genome. Of these 8 variants, only a non-coding 76 bp genomic duplication (g.106720058_106720133dup) located in the conserved region was perfectly associated with crop ears. The identified copy number variation probably results in HMX1 misregulation and possible gain-of-function. Our findings confirm the role of HMX1 during the development of the external ear. As it is sometimes difficult to phenotypically diagnose Highland cattle with slight ear notches, genetic testing can now be used to improve selection against this undesired trait. PMID:24194898

  6. Polymorphisms in Non-coding RNA Genes and Their Targets Sites as Risk Factors of Sporadic Colorectal Cancer.

    PubMed

    Vodicka, Pavel; Pardini, Barbara; Vymetalkova, Veronika; Naccarati, Alessio

    2016-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) is a complex disease that develops as a consequence of both genetic and environmental risk factors in interplay with epigenetic mechanisms, such as microRNAs (miRNAs). CRC cases are predominantly sporadic in which the disease develops with no apparent hereditary syndrome. The last decade has seen the progress of genome-wide association studies (GWAS) that allowed the discovery of several genetic regions and variants associated with weak effects on sporadic CRC. Collectively these variants may enable a more accurate prediction of an individual's risk to the disease and its prognosis. However, the number of variants contributing to CRC is still not fully explored.SNPs in genes encoding the miRNA sequence or in 3'UTR regions of the corresponding binding sites may affect miRNA transcription, miRNA processing, and/or the fidelity of the miRNA-mRNA interaction. These variants could plausibly impact miRNA expression and target mRNA translation into proteins critical for cellular integrity, differentiation, and proliferation.In the present chapter, we describe the different aspects of variations related to miRNAs and other non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) and evidence from studies investigating these candidate genetic alterations in support to their role in CRC development and progression. PMID:27573898

  7. Minimal cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Federico; Schücker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The minimal requirement for cosmography—a non-dynamical description of the universe—is a prescription for calculating null geodesics, and time-like geodesics as a function of their proper time. In this paper, we consider the most general linear connection compatible with homogeneity and isotropy, but not necessarily with a metric. A light-cone structure is assigned by choosing a set of geodesics representing light rays. This defines a "scale factor" and a local notion of distance, as that travelled by light in a given proper time interval. We find that the velocities and relativistic energies of free-falling bodies decrease in time as a consequence of cosmic expansion, but at a rate that can be different than that dictated by the usual metric framework. By extrapolating this behavior to photons' redshift, we find that the latter is in principle independent of the "scale factor". Interestingly, redshift-distance relations and other standard geometric observables are modified in this extended framework, in a way that could be experimentally tested. An extremely tight constraint on the model, however, is represented by the blackbody-ness of the cosmic microwave background. Finally, as a check, we also consider the effects of a non-metric connection in a different set-up, namely, that of a static, spherically symmetric spacetime.

  8. Functional Investigation of a Non-coding Variant Associated with Adolescent Idiopathic Scoliosis in Zebrafish: Elevated Expression of the Ladybird Homeobox Gene Causes Body Axis Deformation

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Long; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Kou, Ikuyo; Takimoto, Aki; Meguro-Horike, Makiko; Horike, Shin-ichi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Miura, Shigenori; Adachi, Taiji; Yamamoto, Takashi; Ikegawa, Shiro; Hiraki, Yuji; Shukunami, Chisa

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified an adolescent idiopathic scoliosis susceptibility locus near human ladybird homeobox 1 (LBX1) and FLJ41350 by a genome-wide association study. Here, we characterized the associated non-coding variant and investigated the function of these genes. A chromosome conformation capture assay revealed that the genome region with the most significantly associated single nucleotide polymorphism (rs11190870) physically interacted with the promoter region of LBX1-FLJ41350. The promoter in the direction of LBX1, combined with a 590-bp region including rs11190870, had higher transcriptional activity with the risk allele than that with the non-risk allele in HEK 293T cells. The ubiquitous overexpression of human LBX1 or either of the zebrafish lbx genes (lbx1a, lbx1b, and lbx2), but not FLJ41350, in zebrafish embryos caused body curvature followed by death prior to vertebral column formation. Such body axis deformation was not observed in transcription activator-like effector nucleases mediated knockout zebrafish of lbx1b or lbx2. Mosaic expression of lbx1b driven by the GATA2 minimal promoter and the lbx1b enhancer in zebrafish significantly alleviated the embryonic lethal phenotype to allow observation of the later onset of the spinal curvature with or without vertebral malformation. Deformation of the embryonic body axis by lbx1b overexpression was associated with defects in convergent extension, which is a component of the main axis-elongation machinery in gastrulating embryos. In embryos overexpressing lbx1b, wnt5b, a ligand of the non-canonical Wnt/planar cell polarity (PCP) pathway, was significantly downregulated. Injection of mRNA for wnt5b or RhoA, a key downstream effector of Wnt/PCP signaling, rescued the defective convergent extension phenotype and attenuated the lbx1b-induced curvature of the body axis. Thus, our study presents a novel pathological feature of LBX1 and its zebrafish homologs in body axis deformation at various stages of

  9. Psiscan: a computational approach to identify H/ACA-like and AGA-like non-coding RNA in trypanosomatid genomes

    PubMed Central

    Myslyuk, Inna; Doniger, Tirza; Horesh, Yair; Hury, Avraham; Hoffer, Ran; Ziporen, Yaara; Michaeli, Shulamit; Unger, Ron

    2008-01-01

    Background Detection of non coding RNA (ncRNA) molecules is a major bioinformatics challenge. This challenge is particularly difficult when attempting to detect H/ACA molecules which are involved in converting uridine to pseudouridine on rRNA in trypanosomes, because these organisms have unique H/ACA molecules (termed H/ACA-like) that lack several of the features that characterize H/ACA molecules in most other organisms. Results We present here a computational tool called Psiscan, which was designed to detect H/ACA-like molecules in trypanosomes. We started by analyzing known H/ACA-like molecules and characterized their crucial elements both computationally and experimentally. Next, we set up constraints based on this analysis and additional phylogenic and functional data to rapidly scan three trypanosome genomes (T. brucei, T. cruzi and L. major) for sequences that observe these constraints and are conserved among the species. In the next step, we used minimal energy calculation to select the molecules that are predicted to fold into a lowest energy structure that is consistent with the constraints. In the final computational step, we used a Support Vector Machine that was trained on known H/ACA-like molecules as positive examples and on negative examples of molecules that were identified by the computational analyses but were shown experimentally not to be H/ACA-like molecules. The leading candidate molecules predicted by the SVM model were then subjected to experimental validation. Conclusion The experimental validation showed 11 molecules to be expressed (4 out of 25 in the intermediate stage and 7 out of 19 in the final validation after the machine learning stage). Five of these 11 molecules were further shown to be bona fide H/ACA-like molecules. As snoRNA in trypanosomes are organized in clusters, the new H/ACA-like molecules could be used as starting points to manually search for additional molecules in their neighbourhood. All together this study increased

  10. Identification of a long non-coding RNA gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor opposite strand, which stimulates cell migration in non-small cell lung cancer cell lines.

    PubMed

    Whiteside, Eliza J; Seim, Inge; Pauli, Jana P; O'Keeffe, Angela J; Thomas, Patrick B; Carter, Shea L; Walpole, Carina M; Fung, Jenny N T; Josh, Peter; Herington, Adrian C; Chopin, Lisa K

    2013-08-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in non‑small cell lung cancer tumourigenesis are largely unknown; however, recent studies have suggested that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are likely to play a role. In this study, we used public databases to identify an mRNA-like, candidate long non-coding RNA, GHSROS (GHSR opposite strand), transcribed from the antisense strand of the ghrelin receptor gene, growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR). Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed higher expression of GHSROS in lung cancer tissue compared to adjacent, non-tumour lung tissue. In common with many long non-coding RNAs, GHSROS is 5' capped and 3' polyadenylated (mRNA-like), lacks an extensive open reading frame and harbours a transposable element. Engineered overexpression of GHSROS stimulated cell migration in the A549 and NCI-H1299 non-small cell lung cancer cell lines, but suppressed cell migration in the Beas-2B normal lung-derived bronchoepithelial cell line. This suggests that GHSROS function may be dependent on the oncogenic context. The identification of GHSROS, which is expressed in lung cancer and stimulates cell migration in lung cancer cell lines, contributes to the growing number of non-coding RNAs that play a role in the regulation of tumourigenesis and metastatic cancer progression. PMID:23722988

  11. The 5' non-coding region of the BCR/ABL oncogene augments its ability to stimulate the growth of immature lymphoid cells.

    PubMed

    Gishizky, M L; McLaughlin, J; Pendergast, A M; Witte, O N

    1991-08-01

    The Philadelphia chromosome (Ph1, t9:22;34:q11) is a reciprocal translocation between chromosome 22 and chromosome 9 which results in the formation of the chimeric BCR/ABL oncogene. Alternative forms of BCR/ABL are produced by splicing different sets of exons of the BCR gene to a common set of c-ABL sequences. This results in the formation of an 8.7 kilobase mRNA that encodes the P210 BCR/ABL gene product or a 7.0 kilobase mRNA that encodes the P185 BCR/ABL gene product. Both BCR/ABL transcripts derive their 5' non-coding sequences from the BCR gene locus. This 5' region is over 500 nucleotides in length, has a GC content greater than 75% and has a short open reading frame. To determine if this unusual 5' non-coding region plays a role in BCR/ABL transformation, we prepared retroviral vectors containing identical BCR/ABL coding regions but differing in the length of the BCR 5' non-coding region. Matched viral stocks were evaluated for their ability to transform bone marrow in vitro and for their ability to cause tumors when inoculated into 3- to 4-week-old mice. In this report we present the unexpected finding that the BCR/ABL 5' non-coding region augments the transforming activity of both P210 and P185 BCR/ABL in vitro. In vivo, BCR/ABL is a weak tumorigenic agent and its potency is enhanced by the presence of the 5' non-coding region. PMID:1886706

  12. Short non-coding RNAs as bacteria species identifiers detected by surface plasmon resonance enhanced common path interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greef, Charles; Petropavlovskikh, Viatcheslav; Nilsen, Oyvind; Khattatov, Boris; Plam, Mikhail; Gardner, Patrick; Hall, John

    2008-04-01

    Small non-coding RNA sequences have recently been discovered as unique identifiers of certain bacterial species, raising the possibility that they can be used as highly specific Biowarfare Agent detection markers in automated field deployable integrated detection systems. Because they are present in high abundance they could allow genomic based bacterial species identification without the need for pre-assay amplification. Further, a direct detection method would obviate the need for chemical labeling, enabling a rapid, efficient, high sensitivity mechanism for bacterial detection. Surface Plasmon Resonance enhanced Common Path Interferometry (SPR-CPI) is a potentially market disruptive, high sensitivity dual technology that allows real-time direct multiplex measurement of biomolecule interactions, including small molecules, nucleic acids, proteins, and microbes. SPR-CPI measures differences in phase shift of reflected S and P polarized light under Total Internal Reflection (TIR) conditions at a surface, caused by changes in refractive index induced by biomolecular interactions within the evanescent field at the TIR interface. The measurement is performed on a microarray of discrete 2-dimensional areas functionalized with biomolecule capture reagents, allowing simultaneous measurement of up to 100 separate analytes. The optical beam encompasses the entire microarray, allowing a solid state detector system with no scanning requirement. Output consists of simultaneous voltage measurements proportional to the phase differences resulting from the refractive index changes from each microarray feature, and is automatically processed and displayed graphically or delivered to a decision making algorithm, enabling a fully automatic detection system capable of rapid detection and quantification of small nucleic acids at extremely sensitive levels. Proof-of-concept experiments on model systems and cell culture samples have demonstrated utility of the system, and efforts are in

  13. Characterization of long non-coding RNA expression profiles in lymph node metastasis of early-stage cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Shang, Chunliang; Zhu, Wenhui; Liu, Tianyu; Wang, Wei; Huang, Guangxin; Huang, Jiaming; Zhao, Peizhen; Zhao, Yunhe; Yao, Shuzhong

    2016-06-01

    Pelvic lymph node metastasis (PLNM) is an independent prognostic parameter and determines the treatment strategies of cervical cancer. Increasing evidence indicates that long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) play a crucial role in the process of tumor biological functions. This study aimed to mine lymph node metastasis-associated lncRNAs and investigate their potential pathophysiological mechanism in cervical cancer lymph node metastasis. We applied the lncRNA-mining approach to identify lncRNA transcripts represented on Affymetrix human genome U133 plus 2.0 microarrays from Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and then by validation in clinical specimens. The biological role and molecular mechanism of these lncRNAs were predicted by bioinformatic analysis. Subsequently, a receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve and survival curve were conducted to evaluate the diagnostic and prognostic value of candidate lncRNAs. In total, 234 differentially expressed lncRNAs were identified to significantly associate with pelvic lymph node metastasis in early-stage cervical cancer. Our qRT-PCR results were consistent with the mining analysis (P<0.05). The functional enrichment analysis suggested that these lncRNAs may be involved in the biological process of lymph node metastasis. The ROC curves demonstrated satisfactory discrimination power of MIR100HG and AC024560.2 with areas under the curve of 0.801 and 0.837, respectively. Survival curve also indicated that patients with high MIR100HG expression had a tendency of poor prognosis. This is the first study to successfully mine the lncRNA expression patterns in PLNM of early-stage cervical cancer. MIR100HG and AC024560.2 may be a potential biomarkers of PLNM and these lncRNAs may provide broader perspective for combating cervical cancer metastasis. PMID:27035672

  14. Iron Deprivation in Synechocystis: Inference of Pathways, Non-coding RNAs, and Regulatory Elements from Comprehensive Expression Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Prieto, Miguel A.; Schön, Verena; Georg, Jens; Barreira, Luísa; Varela, João; Hess, Wolfgang R.; Futschik, Matthias E.

    2012-01-01

    Iron is an essential cofactor in many metabolic reactions. Mechanisms controlling iron homeostasis need to respond rapidly to changes in extracellular conditions, but they must also keep the concentration of intracellular iron under strict control to avoid the generation of damaging reactive oxygen species. Due to its role as a redox carrier in photosynthesis, the iron quota in cyanobacteria is about 10 times higher than in model enterobacteria. The molecular details of how such a high quota is regulated are obscure. Here we present experiments that shed light on the iron regulatory system in cyanobacteria. We measured time-resolved changes in gene expression after iron depletion in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 using a comprehensive microarray platform, monitoring both protein-coding and non-coding transcripts. In total, less than a fifth of all protein-coding genes were differentially expressed during the first 72 hr. Many of these proteins are associated with iron transport, photosynthesis, or ATP synthesis. Comparing our data with three previous studies, we identified a core set of 28 genes involved in iron stress response. Among them were genes important for assimilation of inorganic carbon, suggesting a link between the carbon and iron regulatory networks. Nine of the 28 genes have unknown functions and constitute key targets for further functional analysis. Statistical and clustering analyses identified 10 small RNAs, 62 antisense RNAs, four 5′UTRs, and seven intragenic elements as potential novel components of the iron regulatory network in Synechocystis. Hence, our genome-wide expression profiling indicates an unprecedented complexity in the iron regulatory network of cyanobacteria. PMID:23275872

  15. BRAF activated non-coding RNA (BANCR) promoting gastric cancer cells proliferation via regulation of NF-κB1

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Zhi-Xin; Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Biao; Lu, Xin-Yang; Ning, Xiao-Fei; Yuan, Chuan-Tao; Wang, Ai-Liang

    2015-09-18

    Background and objective: Long non-coding RNA, BANCR, has been demonstrated to contribute to the proliferation and migration of tumors. However, its molecular mechanism underlying gastric cancer is still unknown. In present study, we investigated whether BANCR was involved in the development of gastric cancer cells via regulation of NF-κB1. Methods: Human gastric cancer tissues were isolated as well as human gastric cell lines MGC803 and BGC823 were cultured to investigate the role of BANCR in gastric cancer. Results: BANCR expression was significantly up-regulated in gastric tumor tissues and gastric cell lines. Down-regulation of BANCR inhibited gastric cancer cell growth and promoted cell apoptosis, and it also contributed to a significant decrease of NF-κB1 (P50/105) expression and 3′UTR of NF-κB1 activity. Overexpression of NF-κB1 reversed the effect of BANCR on cancer cell growth and apoptosis. MiroRNA-9 (miR-9) targeted NF-κB1, and miR-9 inhibitor also reversed the effects of BANCR on gastric cancer cell growth and apoptosis. Conclusion: BANCR was highly expressed both in gastric tumor tissues and in cancer cells. NF-κB1 and miR-9 were involved in the role of BANCR in gastric cancer cell growth and apoptosis. - Highlights: • BANCR up-regulated in gastric cancer (GC) tissues and cell lines MGC803 and BGC823. • Down-regulation of BANCR inhibited GC cell growth and promoted cell apoptosis. • Down-regulation of BANCR contributed to decreased 3′UTR of NF-κB1 and its expression. • Overexpressed NF-κB1 reversed the effect of BANCR on GC cell growth. • miR-9 inhibitor reversed the effect of BANCR on cancer GC cell growth.

  16. Protein and small non-coding RNA-enriched extracellular vesicles are released by the pathogenic blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Nowacki, Fanny C.; Swain, Martin T.; Klychnikov, Oleg I.; Niazi, Umar; Ivens, Alasdair; Quintana, Juan F.; Hensbergen, Paul J.; Hokke, Cornelis H.; Buck, Amy H.; Hoffmann, Karl F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Penetration of skin, migration through tissues and establishment of long-lived intravascular partners require Schistosoma parasites to successfully manipulate definitive host defences. While previous studies of larval schistosomula have postulated a function for excreted/secreted (E/S) products in initiating these host-modulatory events, the role of extracellular vesicles (EVs) has yet to be considered. Here, using preparatory ultracentrifugation as well as methodologies to globally analyse both proteins and small non-coding RNAs (sncRNAs), we conducted the first characterization of Schistosoma mansoni schistosomula EVs and their potential host-regulatory cargos. Results Transmission electron microscopy analysis of EVs isolated from schistosomula in vitro cultures revealed the presence of numerous, 30–100 nm sized exosome-like vesicles. Proteomic analysis of these vesicles revealed a core set of 109 proteins, including homologs to those previously found enriched in other eukaryotic EVs, as well as hypothetical proteins of high abundance and currently unknown function. Characterization of E/S sncRNAs found within and outside of schistosomula EVs additionally identified the presence of potential gene-regulatory miRNAs (35 known and 170 potentially novel miRNAs) and tRNA-derived small RNAs (tsRNAs; nineteen 5′ tsRNAs and fourteen 3′ tsRNAs). Conclusions The identification of S. mansoni EVs and the combinatorial protein/sncRNA characterization of their cargo signifies that an important new participant in the complex biology underpinning schistosome/host interactions has now been discovered. Further work defining the role of these schistosomula EVs and the function/stability of intra- and extra-vesicular sncRNA components presents tremendous opportunities for developing novel schistosomiasis diagnostics or interventions. PMID:26443722

  17. Virtual screening of gene expression regulatory sites in non-coding regions of the infectious salmon anemia virus

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Members of the Orthomyxoviridae family, which contains an important fish pathogen called the infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV), have a genome consisting of eight segments of single-stranded RNA that encode different viral proteins. Each of these segments is flanked by non-coding regions (NCRs). In other Orthomyxoviruses, sequences have been shown within these NCRs that regulate gene expression and virulence; however, only the sequences of these regions are known in ISAV, and a biological role has not yet been attributed to these regions. This study aims to determine possible functions of the NCRs of ISAV. Results The results suggested an association between the molecular architecture of NCR regions and their role in the viral life cycle. The available NCR sequences from ISAV isolates were compiled, alignments were performed to obtain a consensus sequence, and conserved regions were identified in this consensus sequence. To determine the molecular structure adopted by these NCRs, various bioinformatics tools, including RNAfold, RNAstructure, Sfold, and Mfold, were used. This hypothetical structure, together with a comparison with influenza, yielded reliable secondary structure models that lead to the identification of conserved nucleotide positions on an intergenus level. These models determined which nucleotide positions are involved in the recognition of the vRNA/cRNA by RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) or mRNA by the ribosome. Conclusions The information obtained in this work allowed the proposal of previously unknown sites that are involved in the regulation of different stages of the viral cycle, leading to the identification of new viral targets that may assist future antiviral strategies. PMID:25069483

  18. Long non-coding RNA HOTTIP is correlated with progression and prognosis in tongue squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Ying-Xue; Xi, Mian; Liu, Shi-Liang; Luo, Li-Ling

    2015-11-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been demonstrated to be a critical role in cancer progression and prognosis. However, little is known about the pathological role of lncRNA HOXA transcript at the distal tip (HOTTIP) in tongue squamous cell carcinoma (TSCC) patients. The aim of this study is to measure the expression of lncRNA HOTTIP in TSCC patients and to explore the clinical significance of the lncRNA HOTTIP. The expression of lncRNA HOTTIP was measured in 86 TSCC tissues and 14 adjacent non-malignant tissues using qRT-PCR. In our study, results indicated that lncRNA HOTTIP was highly expressed in TSCC compared with adjacent non-malignant tissues (P < 0.001) and positively correlated with T stage (T1-2 vs. T3-4, P = 0.023), clinical stage (I-II stages vs. III-IV stages, P = 0.018), and distant metastasis (absent vs. present, P = 0.031) in TSCC patients. Furthermore, we also found that lncRNA HOTTIP overexpression was an unfavorable prognostic factor in TSCC patients (P < 0.001), regardless of T stage, distant metastasis, and clinical stage. Finally, overexpression of lncRNA HOTTIP was supposed to be an independent poor prognostic factor for TSCC patients through multivariate analysis (P = 0.023). In conclusion, increased lncRNA HOTTIP expression may be serve as an unfavorable prognosis predictor for TSCC patients. Nevertheless, further investigation with a larger sample size is needed to support our results. PMID:26058875

  19. Reciprocal Changes of Circulating Long Non-Coding RNAs ZFAS1 and CDR1AS Predict Acute Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Sun, Lihua; Xuan, Lina; Pan, Zhenwei; Li, Kang; Liu, Shuangshuang; Huang, Yuechao; Zhao, Xuyun; Huang, Lihua; Wang, Zhiguo; Hou, Yan; Li, Junnan; Tian, Ye; Yu, Jiahui; Han, Hui; Liu, Yanhong; Gao, Fei; Zhang, Yong; Wang, Shu; Du, Zhimin; Lu, Yanjie; Yang, Baofeng

    2016-01-01

    This study sought to evaluate the potential of circulating long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) as biomarkers for acute myocardial infarction (AMI). We measured the circulating levels of 15 individual lncRNAs, known to be relevant to cardiovascular disease, using the whole blood samples collected from 103 AMI patients, 149 non-AMI subjects, and 95 healthy volunteers. We found that only two of them, Zinc finger antisense 1 (ZFAS1) and Cdr1 antisense (CDR1AS), showed significant differential expression between AMI patients and control subjects. Circulating level of ZFAS1 was significantly lower in AMI (0.74 ± 0.07) than in non-AMI subjects (1.0 ± 0.05, P < 0.0001), whereas CDR1AS showed the opposite changes with its blood level markedly higher in AMI (2.18 ± 0.24) than in non-AMI subjects (1.0 ± 0.05, P < 0.0001). When comparison was made between AMI and non-AMI, the area under ROC curve was 0.664 for ZFAS1 alone or 0.671 for CDR1AS alone, and 0.691 for ZFAS1 and CDR1AS combination. Univariate and multivariate analyses identified these two lncRNAs as independent predictors for AMI. Similar changes of circulating ZFAS1 and CDR1AS were consistently observed in an AMI mouse model. Reciprocal changes of circulating ZFAS1 and CDR1AS independently predict AMI and may be considered novel biomarkers of AMI. PMID:26928231

  20. Significant association between long non-coding RNA HOTAIR polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility: a meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Liu, Xu; You, Liang-Hao; Zhou, Rui-Zhi

    2016-01-01

    HOTAIR, a well-known long non-coding RNA, is involved in carcinogenesis and progression of multiple cancers. Molecular epidemiological studies suggest that HOTAIR polymorphisms may be associated with cancer susceptibility, but the results remain controversial. To derive a more precise evaluation, we performed a meta-analysis focused on the associations between HOTAIR polymorphisms and cancer risk for the first time. PubMed, Embase, China National Knowledge Infrastructure, and Wanfang databases were searched. Odds ratios (ORs) with 95% confidence interval (CI) were applied to assess the association between HOTAIR rs920778 C>T, rs4759314 A>G, rs7958904 G>C, and rs1899663 G>T polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility. Analyses were conducted to detect heterogeneity, sensitivity, and publication bias in order to measure the robustness of our findings. Overall, 13 related studies involving 7,151 patients and 8,740 control samples were analyzed. Significant associations between the HOTAIR rs920778 polymorphism and cancer risk were observed (T vs C: OR =1.33, 95% CI =1.17–1.53; TT vs TC + CC: OR =1.55, 95% CI =1.21–2.00; TC + TT vs CC: OR =1.33, 95% CI =1.11–1.59; TT vs CC: OR =2.02, 95% CI =1.31–3.10) in the total population, as well as in subgroup analyses. For rs4759314 A>G polymorphism, a similarly increased risk was found in the gastric cancer group. However, significant decreases in cancer risk were observed both in the overall population and colorectal cancer group for rs7958904 G>C polymorphism. In addition, no significant association was detected between rs1899663 G>T polymorphism and cancer susceptibility. In conclusion, our meta-analyses suggest that HOTAIR polymorphisms may be associated with the risk of cancer development. PMID:27330313