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Sample records for minimal quantity lubrication

  1. Design and fundamental understanding of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) assisted grinding using advanced nanolubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalita, Parash

    Abrasive grinding is widely used across manufacturing industry for finishing parts and components requiring smooth superficial textures and precise dimensional tolerances and accuracy. Unlike any other machining operations, the complex thermo-mechanical processes during grinding produce excessive friction-induced energy consumption, heat, and intense contact seizures. Lubrication and cooling from grinding fluids is crucial in minimizing the deleterious effects of friction and heat to maximize the output part quality and process efficiency. The conventional flood grinding approach of an uneconomical application of large quantities of chemically active fluids has been found ineffective to provide sufficient lubrication and produces waste streams and pollutants that are hazardous to human health and environment. Application of Minimum Quantity Lubrication (MQL) that cuts the volumetric fluid consumption by 3-4 orders of magnitude have been extensively researched in grinding as a high-productivity and environmentally-sustainable alternative to the conventional flood method. However, the lubrication performance and productivity of MQL technique with current fluids has been critically challenged by the extreme thermo-mechanical conditions of abrasive grinding. In this research, an MQL system based on advanced nanolubricants has been proposed to address the current thermo-mechanical challenges of MQL grinding and improve its productivity. The nanolubricants were composed of inorganic Molybdenum Disulphide nanoparticles (≈ 200 nm) intercalated with organic macromolecules of EP/AW property, dispersed in straight (base) oils---mineral-based paraffin and vegetable-based soybean oil. After feasibility investigations into the grindability of cast iron using MQL with nanolubricants, this research focused on the fundamental understanding of tribological behavior and lubricating mechanisms of nanolubricants as a method to improve the productivity of MQL-assisted surface grinding

  2. Minimum quantity lubrication machining of aluminum and magnesium alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhowmick, Sukanta

    2011-12-01

    The use of minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) machining, i.e. drilling and tapping of aluminum and magnesium alloys using very low quantities of cutting fluids was studied and the MQL machining performance was compared to dry and conventional flooded conditions. An experimental drilling station with an MQL system was built to measure torque and thrust force responses. Uncoated and diamond-like carbon (DLC) coated HSS drills were tested against 319 Al and AZ91 alloys using 10--50 ml/h of distilled water (H 2O-MQL) and a fatty acid based MQL agent (FA-MQL). The results indicated that H2O-MQL used in conjunction with non-hydrogenated DLC (NH-DLC) coatings reduced the average torque and thrust-force compared to dry cutting and achieved a performance comparable with conventional flooded drilling. At least 103 holes could be drilled using NH-DLC in H2O-MQL and uncoated HSS in FA-MQL in drilling of both 319 Al and AZ91. MQL drilling and tapping provided a stable machining performance, which was evident from the uniform torque and force patterns and also resulted in desirable hole surface, thread quality and chip segments. The maximum temperature generated in the workpiece during MQL machining was lower than that observed in dry drilling and tapping, and comparable to flooded conditions. The mechanical properties of the material adjacent to drilled holes, as evaluated through plastic strain and hardness measurements, revealed a notable softening in case of dry drilling, with magnesium alloys exhibiting a recrystallized grain zone, but not for MQL drilling. Softened aluminum and magnesium promoted adhesion to the tools resulted built-up edge formation and consequently high torques and thrust-forces were generated. NH-DLC coatings' low COF in H 2O-MQL against 319 Al (0.10) and AZ91 (0.12) compared to uncoated HSS (0.63 and 0.65) limited the temperature increase during NH-DLC in H2 O-MQL drilling and hence both torques and thrust forces were effectively reduced.

  3. A study of minimum quantity lubricant of refined bleached deodorized palm stearin in plane strain extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridzuan, M. J. M.; Hafis, S. M.; Saifullah, K. N.; Syahrullail, S.

    2012-06-01

    Large quantities of lubricant are being widely used in the metal forming industry and this high consumption is negatively affecting the environment. Finding an alternative to this current situation is getting more serious and urgent in response to environmental and operational cost pressures. This paper deals with an experimental investigation to obtain the minimum quantity of lubricant (MQL) of RBD palm stearin, which is used as lubricant between the contact sliding surfaces of the taper die and billet via plane-strain-extrusion apparatus. The symmetrical workpieces are designed as combined billets made from pure aluminium A1100. The dies of the apparatus are made of SKD 11 steel. The extrusion ratio of the processes is 3 and the workpieces are extruded by hydraulic press machine. Four conditions of the quantity selected are 0.1 mg, 1 mg, 5 mg, and 20 mg. The analysis of the result shows that the conditions of the quantity are in the load reducing order from 0.1 mg, 1mg and 5 mg. The highest distribution of surface roughness is at 0.1 mg, whereby for others, the conditions are quite similar. However, the distribution of velocity and effective strain are lowest at 5 mg. The minimum quantity of lubricant (MQL) of the RBD palm stearin as lubricant on the contact sliding surfaces in planestrain-extrusion is determined based on the results of load, surface roughness, velocity and effective strain.

  4. 7 CFR 983.53 - Testing of minimal quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.53 Testing of minimal quantities. (a) Aflatoxin. Handlers who... following methods for testing for aflatoxin: (1) The handler may have an inspector sample and test his or her entire inventory of hulled and dried pistachios for the aflatoxin certification before...

  5. 7 CFR 983.53 - Testing of minimal quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.53 Testing of minimal quantities. (a) Aflatoxin. Handlers who... following methods for testing for aflatoxin: (1) The handler may have an inspector sample and test his or her entire inventory of hulled and dried pistachios for the aflatoxin certification before...

  6. Evaluation of minimum quantity lubrication grinding with nano-particles and recent related patents.

    PubMed

    Li, Changhe; Wang, Sheng; Zhang, Qiang; Jia, Dongzhou

    2013-06-01

    In recent years, a large number of patents have been devoted to developing minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) grinding techniques that can significantly improve both environmentally conscious and energy saving and costeffective sustainable grinding fluid alternatives. Among them, one patent is about a supply system for the grinding fluid in nano-particle jet MQL, which produced MQL lubricant by adding solid nano-particles in degradable grinding fluid. The MQL supply device turns the lubricant to the pulse drops with fixed pressure, unchanged pulse frequency and the same drop diameter. The drops will be produced and injected in the grinding zone in the form of jet flow under high pressure gas and air seal. As people become increasingly demanding on our environment, minimum quantity lubrication has been widely used in the grinding and processing. Yet, it presents the defect of insufficient cooling performance, which confines its development. To improve the heat transfer efficiency of MQL, nano-particles of a certain mass fraction can be added in the minimum quantity of lubricant oil, which concomitantly will improve the lubrication effects in the processing. In this study, the grinding experiment corroborated the effect of nano-particles in surface grinding. In addition, compared with other forms of lubrication, the results presented that the grinding force, the friction coefficient and specific grinding energy of MQL grinding have been significantly weakened, while G ratio greatly rose. These are attributed to the friction oil-film with excellent anti-friction and anti-wear performance, which is generated nano-particles at the wheel/workpiece interface. In this research, the cooling performance of nano-particle jet MQL was analyzed. Based on tests and experiments, the surface temperature was assayed from different methods, including flood lubricating oil, dry grinding, MQL grinding and nano-particle jet MQL grinding. Because of the outstanding heat transfer

  7. Using Isolated Mitochondria from Minimal Quantities of Mouse Skeletal Muscle for High throughput Microplate Respiratory Measurements

    PubMed Central

    Boutagy, Nabil E.; Rogers, George W.; Pyne, Emily S.; Ali, Mostafa M.; Hulver, Matthew W.; Frisard, Madlyn I.

    2015-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mitochondria play a specific role in many disease pathologies. As such, the measurement of oxygen consumption as an indicator of mitochondrial function in this tissue has become more prevalent. Although many technologies and assays exist that measure mitochondrial respiratory pathways in a variety of cells, tissue and species, there is currently a void in the literature in regards to the compilation of these assays using isolated mitochondria from mouse skeletal muscle for use in microplate based technologies. Importantly, the use of microplate based respirometric assays is growing among mitochondrial biologists as it allows for high throughput measurements using minimal quantities of isolated mitochondria. Therefore, a collection of microplate based respirometric assays were developed that are able to assess mechanistic changes/adaptations in oxygen consumption in a commonly used animal model. The methods presented herein provide step-by-step instructions to perform these assays with an optimal amount of mitochondrial protein and reagents, and high precision as evidenced by the minimal variance across the dynamic range of each assay. PMID:26555567

  8. Methods to improve lubricity of fuels and lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    2009-06-16

    A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

  9. Positive lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Dennis W.; Hooper, Fred L.

    1990-01-01

    As part of the development of an autonomous lubrication system for spin bearings, a system was developed to deliver oil to grease-lubricated bearings upon demand. This positive oil delivery system (PLUS) consists of a pressurized reservoir with a built-in solenoid valve that delivers a predictable quantity of oil to the spin bearing through a system of stainless steel tubes. Considerable testing was performed on the PLUS to characterize its performance and verify its effectiveness, along with qualifying it for flight. Additional development is underway that will lead to the fully autonomous active lubrication system.

  10. Joint lubrication.

    PubMed

    McCutchen, C W

    1983-01-01

    The fine-pored, easily compressed articular cartilage provides animal joints with self-pressurized hydrostatic (weeping) lubrication. The solid skeletons of the cartilages press against each other, but so lightly that their rubbing is lubricated successfully by synovial fluid--a boundary lubricant too weak to lubricate ordinary bearings. PMID:6317095

  11. Lubrication handbook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Thompson, M. B.

    1973-01-01

    Information on lubricants from government reports, military specifications, qualified parts lists, and suppliers of commercial lubricants has been consolidated in one source. Handbook includes data on chemical and physical properties of solid, bonded solid, and liquid lubricants; dispersions and composites; and greases, oils, and hydraulic fluids.

  12. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1993-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  13. Solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    The state of knowledge of solid lubricants is reviewed. The results of research on solid lubricants from the 1940's to the present are presented from a historical perspective. Emphasis is placed largely, but not exclusively, on work performed at NASA Lewis Research Center with a natural focus on aerospace applications. However, because of the generic nature of the research, the information presented in this review is applicable to most areas where solid lubricant technology is useful.

  14. Rapid and successful start-up of anammox process by immobilizing the minimal quantity of biomass in PVA-SA gel beads.

    PubMed

    Ali, Muhammad; Oshiki, Mamoru; Rathnayake, Lashitha; Ishii, Satoshi; Satoh, Hisashi; Okabe, Satoshi

    2015-08-01

    Rapid start-up of anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) process in up-flow column reactors was successfully achieved by immobilizing minimal quantity of biomass in polyvinyl alcohol (PVA)-sodium alginate (SA) gel beads. The changes in the reactor performance (i.e., nitrogen removal rate; NRR) were monitored with time. The results demonstrate that the reactor containing the immobilized biomass concentration of 0.33 g-VSS L(-1) achieved NRR of 10.8 kg-N m(-3) d(-1) after 35-day operation, whereas the reactor containing the granular biomass of 2.5 g-VSS L(-1) could achieve only NRR of 3.5 kg-N m(-3) d(-1). This indicates that the gel immobilization method requires much lower seeding biomass for start-up of anammox reactor. To explain the better performance of the immobilized biomass, the biological and physicochemical properties of the immobilized biomass were characterized and compared with the naturally aggregated granular biomass. Effective diffusion coefficient (De) in the immobilized biomass was directly determined by microelectrodes and found to be three times higher than one in the granular biomass. High anammox activity (i.e., NH4(+) and NO2(-) consumption rates) was evenly detected throughout the gel beads by microelectrodes due to faster and deeper substrate transport. In contrast, anammox activity was localized in the outer layers of the granular biomass, indicating that the inner biomass could not contribute to the nitrogen removal. This difference was in good agreement with the spatial distribution of microbes analysed by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Based on these results, PVA-SA gel immobilization is an efficient strategy to initiate anammox reactors with minimal quantity of anammox biomass. PMID:25980915

  15. Lubrication background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Surface topography, including the various physical methods of measuring surfaces, and the various lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, boundary, and mixed) are discussed. The historical development of elastohydrodynamic lubrication is outlined. The major accomplishments in four periods, the pre-1950's, the 1950's, the 1960's, and the 1970's are presented.

  16. New Vapor/Mist Phase Lubricant Formulated

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Handschuh, Robert F.

    1999-01-01

    To meet the increased thermal stresses of future advanced aircraft engines, new lubricants will have to be developed to replace the currently used ester-based liquid lubricants. If a suitable conventional replacement cannot be found, a different lubrication method will have to be used. The conventional method circulates bulk lubricant (stored in a sump) through a lubricating system containing cooling and filtering elements. Solid lubricants have been studied as a replacement for bulk liquid lubricants, and have been found to provide reasonable lubrication for lightly loaded systems. Solid lubricants, however, have proved inadequate for highly loaded, high-speed applications. Vapor/mist phase lubrication (VMPL), on the other hand, may be a viable alternative. VMPL has been used successfully to lubricate high-temperature bearings or gears. It can be used as an emergency backup system or as the primary source of lubrication. With VMPL, minimal weight is added to the system and minimal debris is formed. It works over a wide temperature range.

  17. Marine Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, B. H.; Green, D.

    Marine diesel engines are classified by speed, either large (medium speed) or very large (slow speed) with high efficiencies and burning low-quality fuel. Slow-speed engines, up to 200 rpm, are two-stroke with separate combustion chamber and sump connected by a crosshead, with trunk and system oil lubricants for each. Medium-speed diesels, 300-1500 rpm, are of conventional automotive design with one lubricant. Slow-speed engines use heavy fuel oil of much lower quality than conventional diesel with problems of deposit cleanliness, acidity production and oxidation. Lubricants are mainly SAE 30/40/50 monogrades using paraffinic basestocks. The main types of additives are detergents/dispersants, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, anti-wear/load-carrying/ep, pour-point depressants and anti-foam compounds. There are no simple systems for classifying marine lubricants, as for automotive, because of the wide range of engine design, ratings and service applications they serve. There are no standard tests; lubricant suppliers use their own tests or the Bolnes 3DNL, with final proof from field tests. Frequent lubricant analyses safeguard engines and require standard sampling procedures before determination of density, viscosity, flash point, insolubles, base number, water and wear metal content.

  18. Control Methods of Operational Properties of Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lysyannikova, N.; Kovalski, B.; Bezborodov, Yu; Lysyannikov, A.; Kravtsova, Ye; Shram, V.; Kovaleva, M.

    2016-06-01

    Some results of thermal-oxidation and temperature stability testing of motor oils are presented. The catalytic influence of metals on oxidizing processes in lubricants with use of steel 45 was determined. The parameters for identification of oils by groups of operational properties and quantity indicators of the influence of metals on oxidizing processes of lubricants are offered.

  19. USDOE Top-of-Rail Lubricant Project

    SciTech Connect

    Mohumad F. Alzoubi; George R. Fenske; Robert A. Erck; Amrit S. Boparai

    2002-02-01

    Lubrication of wheel/rail systems has been recognized for the last two decades as a very important issue for railroads. Energy savings and less friction and wear can be realized if a lubricant can be used at the wheel/rail interface. On the other hand, adverse influences are seen in operating and wear conditions if improper or excessive lubrication is used. Also, inefficiencies in lubrication need to be avoided for economic and environmental reasons. The top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant concept was developed by Texaco Corporation to lubricate wheels and rails effectively and efficiently. Tranergy Corporation has been developing its SENTRAEN 2000{trademark} lubrication system for the last ten years, and this revolutionary new high-tech on-board rail lubrication system promises to dramatically improve the energy efficiency, performance, safety, and track environment of railroads. The system is fully computer-controlled and ensures that all of the lubricant is consumed as the end of the train passes. Lubricant quantity dispensed is a function of grade, speed, curve, and axle load. Tranergy also has its LA4000{trademark} wheel and rail simulator, a lubrication and traction testing apparatus. The primary task of this project was collecting and analyzing the volatile and semivolatile compounds produced as the lubricant was used. The volatile organic compounds were collected by Carbotrap cartridges and analyzed by adsorption and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS). The semivolatile fraction was obtained by collecting liquid that dripped from the test wheel. The collected material was also analyzed by GC/MS. Both of these analyses were qualitative. The results indicated that in the volatile fraction, the only compounds on the Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Superfund List of Analytes detected were contaminants either in the room air or from other potential contamination sources in the laboratory. Similarly, in the semivolatile fraction none of the detected

  20. Advanced Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Three Sun Coast Chemicals (SCC) of Daytona, Inc. products were derived from NASA technology: Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. NASA contractor Lockheed Martin Space Operations contacted SCC about joining forces to develop an environmentally safe spray lubricant for the Shuttle Crawler. The formula was developed over an eight-month period resulting in new products which are cost effective and environmentally friendly. Meeting all Environmental Protection Agency requirements, the SCC products are used for applications from train tracks to bicycle chains.

  1. Lubrication Flows.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papanastasiou, Tasos C.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses fluid mechanics for undergraduates including the differential Navier-Stokes equations, dimensional analysis and simplified dimensionless numbers, control volume principles, the Reynolds lubrication equation for confined and free surface flows, capillary pressure, and simplified perturbation techniques. Provides a vertical dip coating…

  2. Bonded Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    Another spinoff to the food processing industry involves a dry lubricant developed by General Magnaplate Corp. of Linden, N.J. Used in such spacecraft as Apollo, Skylab and Viking, the lubricant is a coating bonded to metal surfaces providing permanent lubrication and corrosion resistance. The coating lengthens equipment life and permits machinery to be operated at greater speed, thus increasing productivity and reducing costs. Bonded lubricants are used in scores of commercia1 applications. They have proved particularly valuable to food processing firms because, while increasing production efficiency, they also help meet the stringent USDA sanitation codes for food-handling equipment. For example, a cookie manufacturer plagued production interruptions because sticky batter was clogging the cookie molds had the brass molds coated to solve the problem. Similarly, a pasta producer faced USDA action on a sanitation violation because dough was clinging to an automatic ravioli-forming machine; use of the anti-stick coating on the steel forming plates solved the dual problem of sanitation deficiency and production line downtime.

  3. Tethered Lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Archer, Lynden

    2010-09-15

    We have performed extensive experimental and theoretical studies of interfacial friction, relaxation dynamics, and thermodynamics of polymer chains tethered to points, planes, and particles. A key result from our tribology studies using lateral force microscopy (LFM) measurements of polydisperse brushes of linear and branched chains densely grafted to planar substrates is that there are exceedingly low friction coefficients for these systems. Specific project achievements include: (1) Synthesis of three-tiered lubricant films containing controlled amounts of free and pendent PDMS chains, and investigated the effect of their molecular weight and volume fraction on interfacial friction. (2.) Detailed studies of a family of hairy particles termed nanoscale organic hybrid materials (NOHMs) and demonstration of their use as lubricants.

  4. Aviation Lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lansdown, A. R.; Lee, S.

    Aviation lubricants must be extremely reliable, withstand high specific loadings and extreme environmental conditions within short times. Requirements are critical. Piston engines increasingly use multi-grade oils, single grades are still used extensively, with anti-wear and anti-corrosion additives for some classes of engines. The main gas turbine lubricant problem is transient heat exposure, the main base oils used are synthetic polyol esters which minimise thermal degradation. Aminic anti-oxidants are used together with anti-wear/load-carrying, corrosion inhibitor and anti-foam additives. The majority of formulation viscosities are 5 cSt at 100°C. Other considerations are seal compatibility and coking tendency.

  5. Liquid lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.; Khonsari, Michael M.

    1992-01-01

    Reviewed here is the state of the art of liquid lubrication for space applications. The areas discussed are types of liquid lubrication mechanisms, space environmental effects on lubrication, classification of lubricants, liquid lubricant additives, grease lubrication, mechanism materials, bearing anomalies and failures, lubricant supply techniques, and application types and lubricant needs for those applications.

  6. Liquid cryogenic lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietrich, M. W.; Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1970-01-01

    Fluorinated polyethers are suitable lubricants for rolling-element bearings in cryogenic systems. Lubrication effectiveness is comparable to that of super-refined mineral oil lubricants operating at room temperature.

  7. Top-of-Rail lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Alzoubi, M. F.; Fenske, G. R.; Erck, R. A.; Boparai, A. S.

    2000-07-14

    Analysis of the volatile and semivolatile fractions collected after use of the TOR lubricant indicated that other than contaminants in the collection laboratory, no compounds on the EPA's Target Compound Lists (Tables 2 and 5) were detected in these fractions. The data of these qualitative analyses, given in the various tables in the text, indicate only the relative amounts of the tentatively identified compounds. The authors recommend that quantitative analysis be performed on the volatile and semivolatile fractions to allow confirmation of the tentatively identified compounds and to obtain absolute amounts of the detected compounds. Additionally, the semivolatile fraction should be analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to identify compounds that are not chromatographable under the temperature program used for determination of semivolatile compounds. Introducing the top-of-rail (TOR) lubricant into the wheel/rail interface results in a reduction of almost 60% of lateral friction force over the forces encountered under dry conditions. This reveals good potential for energy savings, as well as wear reduction, for railroad companies. In TOR lubrication, an increase in the angle of attack and axle load results in increased lateral friction and rate of lubricant consumption. The most efficient TOR lubricant quantity to be used in the wheel/rail interface must be calculated precisely according to the number of cars, axle loads, train speed, and angle of attack.

  8. Engine Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    PS 212, a plasma-sprayed coating developed by NASA, is used to coat valves in a new rotorcam engine. The coating eliminates the need for a liquid lubricant in the rotorcam, which has no crankshaft, flywheel, distributor or water pump. Developed by Murray United Development Corporation, it is a rotary engine only 10 inches long with four cylinders radiating outward from a central axle. Company officials say the engine will be lighter, more compact and cheaper to manufacture than current engines and will feature cleaner exhaust emissions. A licensing arrangement with a manufacturer is under negotiation. Primary applications are for automobiles, but the engine may also be used in light aircraft.

  9. Lubrication with solids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.; Johnson, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Brief discussion of the historical background, variety range, chemistry, physics, and other properties of solid lubricants, and review of their current uses. The widespread use of solid lubricants did not occur until about 1947. At present, they are the object of such interest that a special international conference on their subject was held in 1971. They are used at temperatures beyond the useful range of conventional lubricating oils and greases. Their low volatility provides them with the capability of functioning effectively in vacuum and invites their use in space applications. Their high load carrying ability makes them useful with heavily loaded components. Solid lubricants, however, do lack some of the desirable properties of conventional lubricants. Unlike oils and greases, which have fluidity and can continuously be carried back into contact with lubricated surfaces, solid lubricants, because of their immobility, have finite lives. Also, oils and greases can carry away frictional heat from contacting surfaces, while solid lubricants cannot.

  10. Double angle seal forming lubricant film

    DOEpatents

    Ernst, William D.

    1984-01-01

    A lubricated piston rod seal which inhibits gas leaking from a high pressure chamber on one side of the seal to a low pressure chamber on the other side of the seal. A liquid is supplied to the surface of the piston rod on the low pressure side of the seal. This liquid acts as lubricant for the seal and provides cooling for the rod. The seal, which can be a plastic, elastomer or other material with low elastic modulus, is designed to positively pump lubricant through the piston rod/seal interface in both directions when the piston rod is reciprocating. The capacity of the seal to pump lubricant from the low pressure side to the high pressure side is less than its capacity to pump lubricant from the high pressure side to the low pressure side which ensures that there is zero net flow of lubricant to the high pressure side of the seal. The film of lubricant between the seal and the rod minimizes any sliding contact and prevents the leakage of gas. Under static conditions gas leakage is prevented by direct contact between the seal and the rod.

  11. Robust and Drain Resistant Lubricated Omniphobic Fabrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kido, Cassidee; Damle, Viraj; Sun, Xiaoda; Roopesh, Ajay; Doudrick, Kyle; Rykaczewski, Konrad

    2014-11-01

    The implications of omniphobic fabrics range from stainproof clothing to civilian and military protection from chemical weapons. The challenge comes in developing a product that remains effective in repelling droplets of liquids with a wide range of surface tensions even after being subjected to various stimuli imposed by human use. Omniphobic fabrics can be made by infusing hydrophobic nanoparticle coated fibers with a low surface energy lubricant. These types of lubricant impregnated surfaces can shed large deposited droplets as well as condensed microdroplets of variety of low surface tension liquids. However, here we show that lubricated omniphobic fabrics can easily lose their properties due to degradation of the nanostructure coating or drainage of the lubricant upon contact with a porous surface. We also demonstrate that this issue can be resolved with use of cross-linked polymer coated fibers that are swollen with the lubricant. Use of flexible polymers avoids structure degradation due to fabric deformation, while swelling of the polymer with lubricant minimizes lubricant drainage upon contact maintaining the omniphobic characteristics of the fabric. KR acknowledges startup funding from ASU and collaborative effort with Dr. Tim Burgin and James R. Lee from Naval Surface Warfare Center Dahlgren Division.

  12. Solid Lubricant For Alumina

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher; Pepper, Stephen V.; Honecy, Frank S.

    1993-01-01

    Outer layer of silver lubricates, while intermediate layer of titanium ensures adhesion. Lubricating outer films of silver deposited on thin intermediate films of titanium on alumina substrates found to reduce sliding friction and wear. Films provide effective lubrication for ceramic seals, bearings, and other hot sliding components in advanced high-temperature engines.

  13. Method to improve lubricity of low-sulfur diesel and gasoline fuels

    DOEpatents

    Erdemir, Ali

    2004-08-31

    A method for providing lubricity in fuels and lubricants includes adding a boron compound to a fuel or lubricant to provide a boron-containing fuel or lubricant. The fuel or lubricant may contain a boron compound at a concentration between about 30 ppm and about 3,000 ppm and a sulfur concentration of less than about 500 ppm. A method of powering an engine to minimize wear, by burning a fuel containing boron compounds. The boron compounds include compound that provide boric acid and/or BO.sub.3 ions or monomers to the fuel or lubricant.

  14. Lubricant rheology applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winer, W. O.; Sanborn, D. M.

    1977-01-01

    Viscosity measurements in a high pressure rheometer, elastohydrodynamic simulator studies (including the development of a temperature measuring technique), and analytical fluid modeling for elastohydrodynamic contacts are described. The more recent research which is described concerns infrared temperature measurements in elastohydrodynamic contacts and the exploration of the glassy state of lubricants. A correlation, of engineering significance, was made between transient surface temperature measurements and surface roughness profiles. Measurements of glass transitions of lubricants and the study of the effect of rate processes on materials lead to the conclusion that typical lubricants go into the glassy state as they pass through the contact region of typical elastohydrodynamic contacts.

  15. Lubrication of Nitinol 60

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.; DellaCorte, Christopher; Glennon, Glenn

    2010-01-01

    The mechanical properties of Nitinol 60, 60 wt% Ni, 40 wt% Ti (55 at.% Ni, 45 at.% Ti) are sufficiently attractive to warrant its consideration as a lubricated triboelement. Triboelements are always run lubricated. The ability to lubricate Nitinol 60 by the oils usually used on spacecraft mechanisms--Pennzane 2001A, Krytox 143AC and Castrol 815Z--was experimentally determined. These oils were run in the boundary lubrication regime for Nitinol 60 balls running against Nitinol 60 counterfaces in the vacuum spiral orbit tribometer. Test results consisting of the coefficient of friction versus time (friction traces) and relative degradation rates of the oils are presented. Contrary to the inability to successfully lubricate other metal alloys with high titanium content, it was found that Nitinol 60 is able to be lubricated by these oils. Overall, the results presented here indicate that Nitinol 60 is a credible candidate material for bearing applications.

  16. Boundary lubrication: Revisited

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1982-01-01

    A review of the various lubrication regimes, with particular, emphasis on boundary lubrication, is presented. The types of wear debris and extent of surface damage is illustrated for each regime. The role of boundary surface films along with their modes of formation and important physical properties are discussed. In addition, the effects of various operating parameters on friction and wear in the boundary lubrication regime are considered.

  17. Lubrication of Machine Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1984-01-01

    The understanding of hydrodynamic lubrication began with the classical experiments of Tower and Petrov. Reynolds used a reduced form of the Navier-Stokes equations and the continuity equation to generate a second order differential equation for the pressure in the narrow, converging gap of a bearing contact. Such a pressure enables a load to be transmitted between the surfaces with very low friction since the surfaces are completely separated by a film of fluid. In such a situation it is the physical properties of the lubricant, notably the dynamic viscosity, that dictate the behavior of the contact. The understanding of boundary lubrication is normally attributed to Hardy and Doubleday. In boundary lubrication it is the physical and chemical properties of thin films of molecular proportions and the surfaces to which they are attached that determine contact behavior. The lubricant viscosity is not an influential parameter. Research is devoted to a better understanding and more precise definition of other lubrication regimes between these extremes. One such regime, elastohydrodynamic lubrication, occurs in nonconformal contacts, where the pressures are high and the bearing surfaces deform elastically. In this situation the viscosity of the lubricant may raise considerably, and this further assists the formation of an effective fluid film. The science of these three lubrication regimes (hydrodynamic, elastohydrodynamic, and boundary) are described and the manner in which this science is used in the design of machine elements is examined.

  18. Fundamentals of fluid lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, Bernard J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim is to coordinate the topics of design, engineering dynamics, and fluid dynamics in order to aid researchers in the area of fluid film lubrication. The lubrication principles that are covered can serve as a basis for the engineering design of machine elements. The fundamentals of fluid film lubrication are presented clearly so that students that use the book will have confidence in their ability to apply these principles to a wide range of lubrication situations. Some guidance on applying these fundamentals to the solution of engineering problems is also provided.

  19. DIESEL FUEL LUBRICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun

    2012-01-01

    The diesel fuel injector and pump systems contain many sliding interfaces that rely for lubrication upon the fuels. The combination of the poor fuel lubricity and extremely tight geometric clearance between the plunger and bore makes the diesel fuel injector vulnerable to scuffing damage that severely limits the engine life. In order to meet the upcoming stricter diesel emission regulations and higher engine efficiency requirements, further fuel refinements that will result in even lower fuel lubricity due to the removal of essential lubricating compounds, more stringent operation conditions, and tighter geometric clearances are needed. These are expected to increase the scuffing and wear vulnerability of the diesel fuel injection and pump systems. In this chapter, two approaches are discussed to address this issue: (1) increasing fuel lubricity by introducing effective lubricity additives or alternative fuels, such as biodiesel, and (2) improving the fuel injector scuffing-resistance by using advanced materials and/or surface engineering processes. The developing status of the fuel modification approach is reviewed to cover topics including fuel lubricity origins, lubricity improvers, alternative fuels, and standard fuel lubricity tests. The discussion of the materials approach is focused on the methodology development for detection of the onset of scuffing and evaluation of the material scuffing characteristics.

  20. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    Information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on the availability of additional quantities of R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  1. Ocean Spray Lubricates Winds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Journal of College Science Teaching, 2005

    2005-01-01

    According to a new study by two University of California, Berkeley, mathematicians and their Russian colleague, the water droplets kicked up by rough seas serve to lubricate the swirling winds of hurricanes and cyclones, letting them build to speeds approaching 200 miles per hour. Without the lubricating effect of the spray, the mathematicians…

  2. Self-lubricating gear

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demorest, K. E.

    1969-01-01

    Self-lubricating gear, designed for long term operation in a vacuum at high, low, and ambient temperatures, is constructed of alternating layers of metal and a dry lubricant material, such as polytetrafluoroethylene, with a suitable reinforcing material bonded into a laminated composite unit, which is machined to form a standard gear.

  3. High temperature lubricating process

    DOEpatents

    Taylor, R.W.; Shell, T.E.

    1979-10-04

    It has been difficult to provide adequate lubrication for load bearing, engine components when such engines are operating in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The present invention is a process for providing a solid lubricant on a load bearing, solid surface, such as in an engine being operated at temperatures in excess of about 475/sup 0/C. The process comprises contacting and maintaining the following steps: a gas phase is provided which includes at least one component reactable in a temperature dependent reaction to form a solid lubricant; the gas phase is contacted with the load bearing surface; the load bearing surface is maintained at a temperature which causes reaction of the gas phase component and the formation of the solid lubricant; and the solid lubricant is formed directly on the load bearing surface. The method is particularly suitable for use with ceramic engines.

  4. Sporting Good Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Sun Coast Chemicals was originally contracted by Lockheed Martin Space Operations to formulate a spray lubricant free of environmental drawbacks for the Mobile Launch Platform used to haul the Space Shuttle from the Kennedy Space Center Vehicle Assembly Building to a launch pad. From this work, Sun Coast introduced Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lube, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid. Based on the original lubricant work, two more products have also been introduced. First, the X-1R Super Gun Cleaner and Lubricant protects guns from rust and corrosion caused by environmental conditions. Second, the X-1R Tackle Pack, endorsed by both fresh and saltwater guides and certain reel manufacturers, penetrates, cleans, reduces friction, lubricates, and provides extra protection against rust and corrosion.

  5. Vapor/Mist Used to Lubricate Gears After Loss of Primary Lubrication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert F.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2001-01-01

    Loss of lubrication in rotorcraft drive systems is a demanding requirement placed on drive system manufacturers. The drive system must operate for at least 30 minutes once the primary lubrication system has failed. This test is a military requirement that must be passed prior to certification of the aircraft. As new aircraft engines, operating at higher speeds, are fielded, the requirements for the drive system become increasingly more difficult. Also, the drive system must be lightweight, which minimizes the opportunity to use the gear bodies to absorb the tremendous amount of heating that takes place. In many cases, the amount of heat generated because of the high speed and load requires an emergency lubrication system that negatively impacts the aircraft's weight, complexity, and cost. A single mesh spur gear test rig is being used at the NASA Glenn Research Center to investigate possible emergency lubrication system improvements that will minimize the impact of having these systems onboard rotorcraft. A technique currently being investigated uses a vapor/mist system to lubricate the contacting surfaces after the primary lubrication system has been shut down. A number of tests were conducted in which the vapor/mist used the same lubricant as the primary system, but at a greatly reduced flow rate. Each test was initiated with the primary lubrication system operational and at steady-state conditions for a given speed and load. Then the primary lubrication system was shut down, and the vapor/mist lubrication system was initiated. An example of the tests conducted is shown in the figures. These preliminary tests have uncovered a mechanism that provides a lubricious, carbonaceous solid on the surface that actually reduces the surface temperature of the meshing gear teeth during operation. Surface analysis of the carbonaceous solid revealed it was graphitic. This mechanism is the synthetic lubricant "coking" on the active profile of the gears, which reduces the

  6. Electrophoretically-deposited solid film lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Panitz, J.K.J.; Vanecek, C.W.

    1995-04-01

    An aqueous-based process that uses electrophoresis to attract powdered lubricant in suspension to a charged target was developed. The deposition process yields coatings with low friction, complies with environmental safety regulations, requires minimal equipment, and has several advantages over processes involving organic binders or vacuum techniques. This work focuses on development of the deposition process, includes an analysis of the friction coefficient of the material in sliding contact with stainless steel under a range of conditions, and a functional evaluation of coating performance in a precision mechanical device application. Results show that solid lubricant films with friction coefficients as low as 0.03 can be produced. A 0.03 friction coefficient is superior to solid lubricants with binder systems and is comparable to friction coefficients generated with more costly vacuum techniques.

  7. Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ficken, W. H.; Schulien, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Dynamic-reservoir lubricating device supplies controlled amounts of lubricating oil to ball bearings during operation of the bearings. The dynamic reservoir lubricating device includes a rotating reservoir nut, a hollow cylinder filled with lubricating oil, flow restrictors and a ball bearing retainer.

  8. Dairy Equipment Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    Lake To Lake Dairy Cooperative, Manitowoc, Wisconsin, operates four plants in Wisconsin for processing milk, butter and cheese products from its 1,300 member farms. The large co-op was able to realize substantial savings by using NASA information for improved efficiency in plant maintenance. Under contract to Marshall Space Flight Center, Midwest Research Institute compiled a handbook consolidating information about commercially available lubricants. The handbook details chemical and physical properties, applications, specifications, test procedures and test data for liquid and solid lubricants. Lake To Lake's plant engineer used the handbook to effect savings in maintenance labor and materials costs by reducing the number of lubricants used on certain equipment. Strict U.S. Department of Agriculture and Food and Drug Administration regulations preclude lubrication changes n production equipment, but the co-op's maintenance chief was able to eliminate seven types of lubricants for ancillary equipment, such as compressors and high pressure pumps. Handbook data enabled him to select comparable but les expensive lubricants in the materials consolidation process, and simplified lubrication schedules and procedures. The handbook is in continuing use as a reference source when a new item of equipment is purchased.

  9. Environmentally friendly lubricating oil candidate.

    PubMed

    Ozgülsün, A; Karaosmanoğlu, F

    1999-01-01

    Synthetic lubricating oils based on renewable sources, excluding petroleum, have a great importance among all of the lubricating oil alternatives that are included in the research field about clean and environmentally friendly lubricating oil technologies. One of the environmentally friendly lubricating oils is a vegetable oil-based product. In this study, the esterification product of oleic acid with a fraction of molasses fusel oil as a lubricating oil candidate was determined according to the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standard tests. The results indicate that the ester product can be used as an environmental friendly lubricating oil or lubricating oil additive. PMID:10399269

  10. Liquid lubrication in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    The requirement for long-term, reliable operation of aerospace mechanisms has, with a few exceptions, pushed the state of the art in tribology. Space mission life requirements in the early 1960s were generally 6 months to a year. The proposed U.S. space station schedule to be launched in the 1990s must be continuously usable for 10 to 20 years. Liquid lubrication systems are generally used for mission life requirements longer than a year. Although most spacecraft or satellites have reached their required lifetimes without a lubrication-related failure, the application of liquid lubricants in the space environment presents unique challenges. The state of the art of liquid lubrication in space as well as the problems and their solutions are reviewed.

  11. Origins of hydration lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication.

  12. Origins of hydration lubrication.

    PubMed

    Ma, Liran; Gaisinskaya-Kipnis, Anastasia; Kampf, Nir; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Why is friction in healthy hips and knees so low? Hydration lubrication, according to which hydration shells surrounding charges act as lubricating elements in boundary layers (including those coating cartilage in joints), has been invoked to account for the extremely low sliding friction between surfaces in aqueous media, but not well understood. Here we report the direct determination of energy dissipation within such sheared hydration shells. By trapping hydrated ions in a 0.4-1 nm gap between atomically smooth charged surfaces as they slide past each other, we are able to separate the dissipation modes of the friction and, in particular, identify the viscous losses in the subnanometre hydration shells. Our results shed light on the origins of hydration lubrication, with potential implications both for aqueous boundary lubricants and for biolubrication. PMID:25585501

  13. Solid lubrication design methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aggarwal, B. B.; Yonushonis, T. M.; Bovenkerk, R. L.

    1984-01-01

    A single element traction rig was used to measure the traction forces at the contact of a ball against a flat disc at room temperature under combined rolling and sliding. The load and speed conditions were selected to match those anticipated for bearing applications in adiabatic diesel engines. The test program showed that the magnitude of traction forces were almost the same for all the lubricants tested; a lubricant should, therefore, be selected on the basis of its ability to prevent wear of the contact surfaces. Traction vs. slide/roll ratio curves were similar to those for liquid lubricants but the traction forces were an order of magnitude higher. The test data was used to derive equations to predict traction force as a function of contact stress and rolling speed. Qualitative design guidelines for solid lubricated concentrated contacts are proposed.

  14. Lubrication and cartilage.

    PubMed Central

    Wright, V; Dowson, D

    1976-01-01

    Mechanisms of lubrication of human synovial joints have been analysed in terms of the operating conditions of the joint, the synovial fluid and articular cartilage. In the hip and knee during a walking cycle the load may rise up to four times body weight. In the knee on dropping one metre the load may go up to 25 time body weight. The elastic modulus of cartilage is similar to that of the synthetic rubber of a car tyre. The cartilage surface is rough and in elderly specimens the centre line average is 2-75 mum. The friction force generated in reciprocating tests shows that both cartilage and synovial fluid are important in lubrication. The viscosity-shear rate relationships of normal synovial fluid show that it is non-Newtonian. Osteoarthrosic fluid is less so and rheumatoid fluid is more nearly Newtonian. Experiments with hip joints in a pendulum machine show that fluid film lubrication obtains at some phases of joint action. Boundary lubrication prevails under certain conditions and has been examined with a reciprocating friction machine. Digestion of hyaluronate does not alter the boundary lubrication, but trypsin digestion does. Surface active substances (lauryl sulphate and cetyl 3-ammonium bromide) give a lubricating ability similar to that of synovial fluid. The effectiveness of the two substances varies with pH. Images Fig. 10 PMID:3490

  15. Lubrication by glycoprotein brushes.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zappone, Bruno; Ruths, Marina; Greene, George W.; Israelachvili, Jacob

    2006-03-01

    Grafted polyelectrolyte brushes show excellent lubricating properties under water and have been proposed as a model to study boundary lubrication in biological system. Lubricin, a glycoprotein of the synovial fluid, is considered the major boundary lubricant of articular joints. Using the Surface Force Apparatus, we have measured normal and friction forces between model surfaces (negatively charged mica, positively charged poly-lysine and aminothiol, hydrophobic alkanethiol) bearing adsorbed layers of lubricin. Lubricin layers acts like a versatile anti-adhesive, adsorbing on all the surfaces considered and creating a repulsion similar to the force between end-grafted polymer brushes. Analogies with polymer brushes also appear from bridging experiment, where proteins molecules are end-adsorbed on two opposing surfaces at the same time. Lubricin `brushes' show good lubricating ability at low applied pressures (P<0.5MPa), especially on negatively charged surfaces like mica. At higher load, the adsorbed layers wears and fails lubricating the surfaces, while still protecting the underlying substrate from wearing. Lubricin might thus be a first example of biological polyelectrolytes providing `brush-like' lubrication and wear-protection.

  16. Solid Lubricants and Coatings for Extreme Environments: State-of-the-Art Survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2007-01-01

    An investigation was conducted to survey anticipated requirements for solid lubricants in lunar and Martian environments, as well as the effects of these environments on lubricants and their performance and durability. The success of habitats and vehicles on the Moon and Mars, and ultimately, of the human exploration of and permanent human presence on the Moon and Mars, are critically dependent on the correct and reliable operation of many moving mechanical assemblies and tribological components. The coefficient of friction and lifetime of any lubricant generally vary with the environment, and lubricants have very different characteristics under different conditions. It is essential, therefore, to select the right lubrication technique and lubricant for each mechanical and tribological application. Several environmental factors are hazardous to performance integrity on the Moon and Mars. Potential threats common to both the Moon and Mars are low ambient temperatures, wide daily temperature swings (thermal cycling), solar flux, cosmic radiation, and large quantities of dust. The surface of Mars has the additional challenges of dust storms, winds, and a carbon dioxide atmosphere. Solid lubricants and coatings are needed for lunar and Martian applications, where liquid lubricants are ineffective and undesirable, and these lubricants must perform well in the extreme environments of the Moon, Mars, and space, as well as on Earth, where they will be assembled and tested. No solid lubricants and coatings and their systems currently exist or have been validated that meet these requirements, so new solid lubricants must be designed and validated for these applications.

  17. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils.

    PubMed

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K R S

    2016-08-01

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid 'tribofilms', which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life. The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant's anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids. Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon. Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon-carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm. PMID:27488799

  18. Lubrication of Space Systems (c)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1995-01-01

    This article presents an overview of the current state-of-the-art tribology, some current and future perceived space lubrication problem areas, and some potential new lubrication technologies. It is the author's opinion that tribology technology, in general, has not significantly advanced over the last 20 to 30 years, even though some incremental improvements in the technology have occurred. There is a better understanding of elasto-hydrodynamic lubrication, some new lubricating and wear theories have been developed, and some new liquid and solid lubricants have been formulated. However, the important problems of being able to lubricate reliably at high temperatures or at cryogenic temperatures have not been adequately address.

  19. Power system with an integrated lubrication circuit

    SciTech Connect

    Hoff, Brian D.; Akasam, Sivaprasad; Algrain, Marcelo C.; Johnson, Kris W.; Lane, William H.

    2009-11-10

    A power system includes an engine having a first lubrication circuit and at least one auxiliary power unit having a second lubrication circuit. The first lubrication circuit is in fluid communication with the second lubrication circuit.

  20. Computational Chemistry and Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zehe, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    Members of NASA Lewis Research Center's Tribology and Surface Science Branch are applying high-level computational chemistry techniques to the development of new lubrication systems for space applications and for future advanced aircraft engines. The next generation of gas turbine engines will require a liquid lubricant to function at temperatures in excess of 350 C in oxidizing environments. Conventional hydrocarbon-based lubricants are incapable of operating in these extreme environments, but a class of compounds known as the perfluoropolyether (PFAE) liquids (see the preceding illustration) shows promise for such applications. These commercially available products are already being used as lubricants in conditions where low vapor pressure and chemical stability are crucial, such as in satellite bearings and composite disk platters. At higher temperatures, however, these compounds undergo a decomposition process that is assisted (catalyzed) by metal and metal oxide bearing surfaces. This decomposition process severely limits the applicability of PFAE's at higher temperatures. A great deal of laboratory experimentation has revealed that the extent of fluid degradation depends on the chemical properties of the bearing surface materials. Lubrication engineers would like to understand the chemical breakdown mechanism to design a less vulnerable PFAE or to develop a chemical additive to block this degradation.

  1. Fluid lubricated bearing assembly

    DOEpatents

    Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.; Menke, John R.

    1976-01-01

    1. A support for a loaded rotatable shaft comprising in combination on a housing having a fluid-tight cavity encasing an end portion of said shaft, a thrust bearing near the open end of said cavity for supporting the axial thrust of said shaft, said thrust bearing comprising a thrust plate mounted in said housing and a thrust collar mounted on said shaft, said thrust plate having a central opening the peripheral portion of which is hermetically sealed to said housing at the open end of said cavity, and means for supplying a fluid lubricant to said thrust bearing, said thrust bearing having a lubricant-conducting path connecting said lubricant supplying means with the space between said thrust plate and collar intermediate the peripheries thereof, the surfaces of said plate and collar being constructed and arranged to inhibit radial flow of lubricant and, on rotation of said thrust collar, to draw lubricant through said path between the bearing surfaces and to increase the pressure therebetween and in said cavity and thereby exert a supporting force on said end portion of said shaft.

  2. Space Station lubrication considerations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leger, Lubert J.; Dufrane, Keith

    1987-01-01

    Future activities in space will require the use of large structures and high power availability in order to fully exploit opportunities in Earth and stellar observations, space manufacturing and the development of optimum space transportation vehicles. Although these large systems will have increased capabilities, the associated development costs will be high, and will dictate long life with minimum maintenance. The Space Station provides a concrete example of such a system; it is approximately one hundred meters in major dimensions and has a life requirement of thirty years. Numerous mechanical components will be associated with these systems, a portion of which will be exposed to the space environment. If the long life and low maintenance goals are to be satisfied, lubricants and lubrication concepts will have to be carefully selected. Current lubrication practices are reviewed with the intent of determining acceptability for the long life requirements. The effects of exposure of lubricants and lubricant binders to the space environment are generally discussed. Potential interaction of MoS2 with atomic oxygen, a component of the low Earth orbit environment, appears to be significant.

  3. Assurance of lubricant supply in wet-lubricated space bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassow, F. A.

    1976-01-01

    Conventional lubrication techniques appear to be satisfactory, but rigorous proof of meeting a ten-year life requirement is lacking. One approach provides additional lubricant only when commanded from ground control, while the other passively augments lubrication at all times. Each technique has specific advantages, and selection should be related to the application to obtain optimum performance.

  4. Magnetically-controlled bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitaker, A. F.

    1977-01-01

    Proposed magnetic-lubricant ball-bearing assembly has permanently-magnetized bearing retainer fabricated of porous material. Pores of retainer are filled with ferrolubricant. Surface tension causes retainer to deliver sufficient lubricant to nonmagnetic ball bearings.

  5. High-temperature bearing lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Parker, R. J.; Zaretsky, E. V.

    1968-01-01

    Synthetic paraffinic oil lubricates ball bearings at temperatures in the 600 degrees F range. The lubricant contains antiwear and antifoam additives, is thermally stable in the high temperature range, but requires protection from oxygen.

  6. Fluid lubricated bearing construction

    DOEpatents

    Dunning, John R.; Boorse, Henry A.; Boeker, Gilbert F.

    1976-01-01

    1. A fluid lubricated thrust bearing assembly comprising, in combination, a first bearing member having a plain bearing surface, a second bearing member having a bearing surface confronting the bearing surface of said first bearing member and provided with at least one spiral groove extending inwardly from the periphery of said second bearing member, one of said bearing members having an axial fluid-tight well, a source of fluid lubricant adjacent to the periphery of said second bearing member, and means for relatively rotating said bearing members to cause said lubricant to be drawn through said groove and to flow between said bearing surfaces, whereby a sufficient pressure is built up between said bearing surfaces and in said well to tend to separate said bearing surfaces.

  7. High-Temperature Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    In the early 1980's, Lewis Research Center began a program to develop high-temperature lubricants for use on future aircraft flying at three or more times the speed of sound, which can result in vehicle skin temperatures as high as 1,600 degrees Fahrenheit. A material that emerged from this research is a plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating metal- glass-fluoride coating able to reduce oxidation at very high temperatures. Technology is now in commercial use under the trade name Surf-Kote C-800, marketed by Hohman Plating and Manufacturing Inc. and manufactured under a patent license from NASA. Among its uses are lubrication for sliding contact bearings, shaft seals for turbopumps, piston rings for high performance compressors and hot glass processing machinery; it is also widely used in missile and space applications.

  8. Basic lubrication equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    Lubricants, usually Newtonian fluids, are assumed to experience laminar flow. The basic equations used to describe the flow are the Navier-Stokes equation of motion. The study of hydrodynamic lubrication is, from a mathematical standpoint, the application of a reduced form of these Navier-Stokes equations in association with the continuity equation. The Reynolds equation can also be derived from first principles, provided of course that the same basic assumptions are adopted in each case. Both methods are used in deriving the Reynolds equation, and the assumptions inherent in reducing the Navier-Stokes equations are specified. Because the Reynolds equation contains viscosity and density terms and these properties depend on temperature and pressure, it is often necessary to couple the Reynolds with energy equation. The lubricant properties and the energy equation are presented. Film thickness, a parameter of the Reynolds equation, is a function of the elastic behavior of the bearing surface. The governing elasticity equation is therefore presented.

  9. A Systems Approach to the Solid Lubrication of Foil Air Bearings for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Zaldana, Antonio R.; Radil, Kevin C.

    2002-01-01

    Foil air bearings are self-acting hydrodynamic bearings which rely upon solid lubricants to reduce friction and minimize wear during sliding which occurs at start-up and shut-down when surface speeds are too low to allow the formation of a hydrodynamic air film. This solid lubrication is typically accomplished by coating the non-moving foil surface with a thin, soft polymeric film. The following paper introduces a systems approach in which the solid lubrication is provided by a combination of self lubricating shaft coatings coupled with various wear resistant and lubricating foil coatings. The use of multiple materials, each providing different functions is modeled after oil-lubricated hydrodynamic sleeve bearing technology which utilizes various coatings and surface treatments in conjunction with oil lubricants to achieve optimum performance. In this study, room temperature load capacity tests are performed on journal foil air bearings operating at 14,000 rpm. Different shaft and foil coating technologies such as plasma sprayed composites, ceramic, polymer and inorganic lubricant coatings are evaluated as foil bearing lubricants. The results indicate that bearing performance is improved through the individual use of the lubricants and treatments tested. Further, combining several solid lubricants together yielded synergistically better results than any material alone.

  10. Lubrication of rolling element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    This paper is a broad survey of the lubrication of rolling-element bearings. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through-the-race are discussed. The paper covers the historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling-element bearing lubrication.

  11. Inserts Automatically Lubricate Ball Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hager, J. A.

    1983-01-01

    Inserts on ball-separator ring of ball bearings provide continuous film of lubricant on ball surfaces. Inserts are machined or molded. Small inserts in ball pockets provide steady supply of lubricant. Technique is utilized on equipment for which maintenance is often poor and lubrication interval is uncertain, such as household appliances, automobiles, and marine engines.

  12. Environmental Capability of Liquid Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerbower, A.

    1973-01-01

    The methods available for predicting the properties of liquid lubricants from their structural formulas are discussed. The methods make it possible to design lubricants by forecasting the results of changing the structure and to determine the limits to which liquid lubricants can cope with environmental extremes. The methods are arranged in order of their thermodynamic properties through empirical physical properties to chemical properties.

  13. Self-lubricating gearset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binge, D. S.

    1981-01-01

    Gearset fabricated from molybdenum sulfide filled polyimide allows attention-free operation in vacuum and at extreme temperatures. Ring gear drives pinion gear on shaft in skewed-axis arrangement. Because loads are shared among multiple meshing teeth, self-lubricating material is strong enough to accomodate high gear ratio.

  14. Estolides: biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Estolides were originally developed as a cost effective derivative from vegetable oil sources to overcome the problems associated with standard vegetable oils as lubricants. Classic estolides are formed by the formation of a carbocation at the site of unsaturation that can undergo nucleophilic addi...

  15. A new solid lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Friction and wear life studies on burnished films of the compound graphite fluoride have demonstrated its potential as a solid lubricant material. It is effective in moist air, dry air, or in dry argon at temperatures up to approximately 400 degrees C.

  16. SURFACTANTS IN LUBRICATION

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surfactants are one of the most widely applied materials by consumers and industry. The application areas for surfactants span from everyday mundane tasks such as cleaning, to highly complex processes involving the formulation of pharmaceuticals, foods, pesticides, lubricants, etc. Even though sur...

  17. Natural oils as lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is currently an availability of vegetable oil lubricants, with the exception of engine oils. Vegetable oils are environmentally friendly, renewable, contribute to the reduction of our dependence on imported petroleum, and add value to the farmer. However, there are inherent weaknesses in veg...

  18. Biobased lubricant additives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Fully biobased lubricants are those formulated using all biobased ingredients, i.e. biobased base oils and biobased additives. Such formulations provide the maximum environmental, safety, and economic benefits expected from a biobased product. Currently, there are a number of biobased base oils that...

  19. Carbon-based tribofilms from lubricating oils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erdemir, Ali; Ramirez, Giovanni; Eryilmaz, Osman L.; Narayanan, Badri; Liao, Yifeng; Kamath, Ganesh; Sankaranarayanan, Subramanian K. R. S.

    2016-08-01

    Moving mechanical interfaces are commonly lubricated and separated by a combination of fluid films and solid ‘tribofilms’, which together ensure easy slippage and long wear life. The efficacy of the fluid film is governed by the viscosity of the base oil in the lubricant; the efficacy of the solid tribofilm, which is produced as a result of sliding contact between moving parts, relies upon the effectiveness of the lubricant’s anti-wear additive (typically zinc dialkyldithiophosphate). Minimizing friction and wear continues to be a challenge, and recent efforts have focused on enhancing the anti-friction and anti-wear properties of lubricants by incorporating inorganic nanoparticles and ionic liquids. Here, we describe the in operando formation of carbon-based tribofilms via dissociative extraction from base-oil molecules on catalytically active, sliding nanometre-scale crystalline surfaces, enabling base oils to provide not only the fluid but also the solid tribofilm. We study nanocrystalline catalytic coatings composed of nitrides of either molybdenum or vanadium, containing either copper or nickel catalysts, respectively. Structurally, the resulting tribofilms are similar to diamond-like carbon. Ball-on-disk tests at contact pressures of 1.3 gigapascals reveal that these tribofilms nearly eliminate wear, and provide lower friction than tribofilms formed with zinc dialkyldithiophosphate. Reactive and ab initio molecular-dynamics simulations show that the catalytic action of the coatings facilitates dehydrogenation of linear olefins in the lubricating oil and random scission of their carbon–carbon backbones; the products recombine to nucleate and grow a compact, amorphous lubricating tribofilm.

  20. Glass microsphere lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geiger, Michelle; Goode, Henry; Ohanlon, Sean; Pieloch, Stuart; Sorrells, Cindy; Willette, Chris

    1991-01-01

    The harsh lunar environment eliminated the consideration of most lubricants used on earth. Considering that the majority of the surface of the moon consists of sand, the elements that make up this mixture were analyzed. According to previous space missions, a large portion of the moon's surface is made up of fine grained crystalline rock, about 0.02 to 0.05 mm in size. These fine grained particles can be divided into four groups: lunar rock fragments, glasses, agglutinates (rock particles, crystals, or glasses), and fragments of meteorite material (rare). Analysis of the soil obtained from the missions has given chemical compositions of its materials. It is about 53 to 63 percent oxygen, 16 to 22 percent silicon, 10 to 16 percent sulfur, 5 to 9 percent aluminum, and has lesser amounts of magnesium, carbon, and sodium. To be self-supporting, the lubricant must utilize one or more of the above elements. Considering that the element must be easy to extract and readily manipulated, silicon or glass was the most logical choice. Being a ceramic, glass has a high strength and excellent resistance to temperature. The glass would also not contaminate the environment as it comes directly from it. If sand entered a bearing lubricated with grease, the lubricant would eventually fail and the shaft would bind, causing damage to the system. In a bearing lubricated with a solid glass lubricant, sand would be ground up and have little effect on the system. The next issue was what shape to form the glass in. Solid glass spheres was the only logical choice. The strength of the glass and its endurance would be optimal in this form. To behave as an effective lubricant, the diameter of the spheres would have to be very small, on the order of hundreds of microns or less. This would allow smaller clearances between the bearing and the shaft, and less material would be needed. The production of glass microspheres was divided into two parts, production and sorting. Production includes the

  1. Lubrication handbook for the space industry. Part A: Solid lubricants. Part B: Liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, E. L.

    1985-01-01

    This handbook is intended to provide a ready reference for many of the solid and liquid lubricants used in the space industry. Lubricants and lubricant properties are arranged systematically so that designers, engineers, and maintenance personnel can conveniently locate data needed for their work. This handbook is divided into two major parts (A and B). Part A is a compilation of solid lubricant suppliers information on chemical and physical property of data of more than 250 solid lubricants, bonded solid lubricants, dispersions, and composites. Part B is a compilation of chemical and physical porperty data of more then 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds, and fluids. The listed materials cover a broad spectrum from manufacturing and ground support to hardware applications of spacecraft.

  2. Lubricity of military jet fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Liberio, P.D.; Garver, J.M.

    1995-06-01

    In 1954, a corrosion inhibitor additive was required in JP-4, a wide cut gasoline type aviation turbine fuel, to alleviate corrosion carry-over from ground fuel systems to aircraft. The additive was blamed for fuel filtration problems and removed from the JP-4 specification in 1965. Almost immediately, the U.S. Air Force started experiencing lubricity problems with fuel pumps and controllers. Fuel controller tests showed that when a corrosion inhibitor was added to the fuel, the lubricity problem was alleviated. The effectiveness of the corrosion inhibitor additives as lubricity improvers was then studied. A variety of test methods evolved for use in evaluating the effectiveness of a corrosion inhibitor as a lubricity improver. In 1989, the ball-on-cylinder lubricity evaluator (BOCLE) test was added to MIL-I-25017, a military specification for fuel soluble corrosion inhibitor/lubricity improver, to determine lubricity effectiveness of the corrosion inhibitor additives. Since the revision of this specification, all corrosion inhibitor/lubricity improver additives on the qualified products list, QPL-25017, have been tested using the BOCLE. Due to aircraft engine redesign, MIL-T-25524, a thermally stable turbine fuel, recently required the addition of a lubricity additive. Concerns were raised to the effect that corrosion inhibitor/lubricity improver would have on the thermal stability of thermally stable turbine fuel. Recent jet fuel thermal oxidation tester and BOCLE evaluation of the additives in thermally stable turbine fuel addressed these concerns. 16 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  3. Analysis of a thioether lubricant by infrared Fourier microemission spectrophotometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Morales, W.; Lauer, J. L.

    1986-01-01

    An infrared Fourier microemission spectrophotometer is used to obtain spectra (wavenumber range, 630 to 1230 0.1 cm) from microgram quantities of thioether lubricant samples deposited on aluminum foil. Infrared bands in the spectra are reproducible and could be identified as originating from aromatic species (1,3-disubstituted benzenes). Spectra from all samples (neat and formulated, used and unused) are very similar. Additives (an acid and a phosphinate) present in low concentration (0.10 percent) in the formulated fluid are not detected. This instrument appears to be a viable tool in helping to identify lubricant components separated by liquid chromatography.

  4. Lubrication Handbook For The Space Industry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmurtrey, Ernest L.

    1988-01-01

    A 458-page handbook covers many of solid and liquid lubricants used in space industry. Also useful reference in industrial and military applications of lubricants. Part A of handbook compilation of data on chemical and physical properties of over 250 solid lubricants, including bonded solid lubricants, dispersions, and composites. Part B covers over 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds, and fluids.

  5. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    We have started to make a number of classes of new perfluoropolyethers both in the solid lubricant area and liquid lubricant area. We have prepared some chlorofluoroethers for testing as additives for normal petroleum and polyalphaolefin lubricants which are so widely used in the United States. Perfluoropolyethers are not soluble in hydrocarbons. On the other hand, these chlorofluoropolyethers are soluble in substantial amounts in simple hydrocarbons. These are uniquely capable of being additives that flow with the motor oil or the polyalphaolefin.

  6. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground...

  7. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground...

  8. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground...

  9. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground...

  10. 41 CFR 101-26.602-1 - Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. 101-26.602-1 Section 101-26.602-1 Public Contracts and...-26.602-1 Procurement of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants. (a) The Defense Fuel Supply Center will make annual procurements of lubricating oils, greases, and gear lubricants for ground...

  11. Lubrication of space systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1994-01-01

    NASA has many high-technology programs plannned for the future, such as the space station, Mission to Planet Earth (a series of Earth-observing satellites), space telescopes, and planetary orbiters. These missions will involve advanced mechanical moving components, space mechanisms that will need wear protection and lubrication. The tribology practices used in space today are primarily based on a technology that is more than 20 years old. The question is the following: Is this technology base good enough to meet the needs of these future long-duration NASA missions? This paper examines NASA's future space missions, how mechanisms are currently lubricated, some of the mechanism and tribology challenges that may be encountered in future missions, and some potential solutions to these future challenges.

  12. Shearing stability of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shiba, Y.; Gijyutsu, G.

    1984-01-01

    Shearing stabilities of lubricating oils containing a high mol. wt. polymer as a viscosity index improver were studied by use of ultrasound. The oils were degraded by cavitation and the degradation generally followed first order kinetics with the rate of degradation increasing with the intensity of the ultrasonic irradiation and the cumulative energy applied. The shear stability was mainly affected by the mol. wt. of the polymer additive and could be determined in a short time by mechanical shearing with ultrasound.

  13. Observations of Spacecraft Bearing Lubricant Redistribution Based on Thermal Conductance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Takeuchi, Yoshimi R.; Frantz, Peter P.; Hilton, Michael R.

    2014-01-01

    The performance and life of precision ball bearings are critically dependent on maintaining a quantity of oil at the ball/race interface that is sufficient to support a robust protective film. In space applications, where parched conditions are intentionally the norm, harsh operating conditions can displace the small reserves of oil, resulting in reduced film thickness and premature wear. In the past, these effects have proven difficult to model or to measure experimentally. This paper describes a study addressing this challenge, where bearing thermal conductance measurements are employed to infer changes in lubricant quantity at the critical rolling interfaces. In the first part of the paper, we explain how the lubricant's presence and its quantity impacts bearing thermal conductance measurements. For a stationary bearing, we show that conductance is directly related to the lubricant quantity in the ball/race contacts. Hence, aspects of bearing performance related to oil quantity can be understood and insights improved with thermal conductance data. For a moving bearing, a different mechanism of heat transfer dominates and is dependent on lubricant film thickness on the ball. In the second part of the report, we discuss lubricant quantity observations based on bearing thermal conductance measurements. Lubricant quantity, and thus bearing thermal conductance, depends on various initial and operating conditions and is impacted further by the run-in process. A significant effect of maximum run-in speed was also observed, with less oil remaining after obtaining higher speeds. Finally, we show that some of the lubricant that is displaced between the ball and race during run-in operation can be recovered during rest, and we measure the rate of recovery for one example.

  14. Fault lubrication during earthquakes.

    PubMed

    Di Toro, G; Han, R; Hirose, T; De Paola, N; Nielsen, S; Mizoguchi, K; Ferri, F; Cocco, M; Shimamoto, T

    2011-03-24

    The determination of rock friction at seismic slip rates (about 1 m s(-1)) is of paramount importance in earthquake mechanics, as fault friction controls the stress drop, the mechanical work and the frictional heat generated during slip. Given the difficulty in determining friction by seismological methods, elucidating constraints are derived from experimental studies. Here we review a large set of published and unpublished experiments (∼300) performed in rotary shear apparatus at slip rates of 0.1-2.6 m s(-1). The experiments indicate a significant decrease in friction (of up to one order of magnitude), which we term fault lubrication, both for cohesive (silicate-built, quartz-built and carbonate-built) rocks and non-cohesive rocks (clay-rich, anhydrite, gypsum and dolomite gouges) typical of crustal seismogenic sources. The available mechanical work and the associated temperature rise in the slipping zone trigger a number of physicochemical processes (gelification, decarbonation and dehydration reactions, melting and so on) whose products are responsible for fault lubrication. The similarity between (1) experimental and natural fault products and (2) mechanical work measures resulting from these laboratory experiments and seismological estimates suggests that it is reasonable to extrapolate experimental data to conditions typical of earthquake nucleation depths (7-15 km). It seems that faults are lubricated during earthquakes, irrespective of the fault rock composition and of the specific weakening mechanism involved. PMID:21430777

  15. Name Those Quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Strom, Daniel J.

    2004-03-22

    The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) has created a number of radiation protection quantities since its Publication 26 appeared in 1977. The ensuing years have brought chaos in the form of multiple definitions and symbols for the same and similar quantities, conflicting definitions, mathematical absurdities, and a proliferation of terms. Despite this, the most commonly used radiation protection quantities in the USA and in the International Atomic Energy Agency's Basic Safety Standards have not been named or clearly defined by the ICRP. This paper proposes the names "total effective dose" for the prospective quantity, and "total personal effective dose" for the quantity pertaining to an exposed individual.

  16. Making Self-Lubricating Parts By Powder Metallurgy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1990-01-01

    Compositions and parameters of powder-metallurgical fabrication processes determined for new class of low-friction, low-wear, self-lubricating materials. Used in oxidizing or reducing atmospheres in bearings and seals, at temperatures from below 25 degrees C to as high as 900 degrees C. Thick parts made with minimal waste.

  17. Mechanics and thermodynamics in lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cameron, A.; Gentle, C. R.

    1973-01-01

    The causes for breakdown in the lubricant film of mineral oils are discussed. It is stated that the critical point is caused by desorption of the naturally occurring surface active agent and can be described by thermodynamic analysis. The effect of different metals in lubrication is surveyed. The problem of breakdown in elastohydrodynamic lubrication is treated phenomenologically by studying traction. The topics considered are classical and non-Newtonian explanations, anomalous film thickness and viscosity effects, surface roughness contributions, and solidification of the lubricant. Reasons for the apparent granular traction characteristics are examined.

  18. Electrotunable Lubricity with Ionic Liquid Nanoscale Films

    PubMed Central

    Fajardo, O. Y.; Bresme, F.; Kornyshev, A. A.; Urbakh, M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the main challenges in tribology is finding the way for an in situ control of friction without changing the lubricant. One of the ways for such control is via the application of electric fields. In this respect a promising new class of lubricants is ionic liquids, which are solvent-free electrolytes, and their properties should be most strongly affected by applied voltage. Based on a minimal physical model, our study elucidates the connection between the voltage effect on the structure of the ionic liquid layers and their lubricating properties. It reveals two mechanisms of variation of the friction force with the surface charge density, consistent with recent AFM measurements, namely via the (i) charge effect on normal and in-plane ordering in the film and (ii) swapping between anion and cation layers at the surfaces. We formulate conditions that would warrant low friction coefficients and prevent wear by resisting “squeezing-out” of the liquid under compression. These results give a background for controllable variation of friction. PMID:25572127

  19. Lubrication handbook for use in the space industry. Part A: Solid lubricants. Part B: Liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Thompson, M. B.

    1972-01-01

    This handbook provides a ready reference for many of the solid and liquid lubricants used in the space industry. Lubricants and lubricant properties are arranged systematically so that designers, engineers, and maintenance personnel in the space industry can conveniently locate data needed for their work. The handbook is divided into two major parts. Part A is a compilation of chemical and physical property data of more than 250 solid lubricants, bonded solid lubricants, dispersions and composites. Part B is a compilation of chemical and physical property data of more than 250 liquid lubricants, greases, oils, compounds and fluids. The listed materials cover a broad spectrum, from manufacturing and ground support to hardware applications for missiles and spacecraft.

  20. Multiscale analysis of liquid lubrication trends from industrial machines to micro-electrical-mechanical systems.

    PubMed

    Brenner, Donald W; Irving, Douglas L; Kingon, Angus I; Krim, Jacqueline; Padgett, Clifford W

    2007-08-28

    An analytic multiscale expression is derived that yields conditions for effective liquid lubrication of oscillating contacts via surface flow over multiple time and length scales. The expression is a logistics function that depends on two quantities, the fraction of lubricant removed at each contact and a scaling parameter given by the logarithm of the ratio of the contact area to the product of the lubricant diffusion coefficient and the cycle time. For industrial machines the expression confirms the need for an oil mist. For magnetic disk drives, the expression predicts that existing lubricants are sufficient for next-generation data storage. For micro-electrical-mechanical systems, the expression predicts that a bound + mobile lubricant composed of tricresyl phosphate on an octadecyltrichlorosilane self-assembled monolayer will be effective only for temperatures greater than approximately 200 K and up to approximately MHz oscillation frequencies. PMID:17661501

  1. Treatment of Radioactive Metallic Waste from Operation of Nuclear Power Plants by Melting - The German Way for a Consistent Recycling to Minimize the Quantity of Radioactive Waste from Operation and Dismantling for Disposal - 12016

    SciTech Connect

    Wegener, Dirk; Kluth, Thomas

    2012-07-01

    During maintenance of nuclear power plants, and during their decommissioning period, a large quantity of radioactive metallic waste will accrue. On the other hand the capacity for final disposal of radioactive waste in Germany is limited as well as that in the US. That is why all procedures related to this topic should be handled with a maximum of efficiency. The German model of consistent recycling of the radioactive metal scrap within the nuclear industry therefore also offers high capabilities for facilities in the US. The paper gives a compact overview of the impressive results of melting treatment, the current potential and further developments. Thousands of cubic metres of final disposal capacity have been saved. The highest level of efficiency and safety by combining general surface decontamination by blasting and nuclide specific decontamination by melting associated with the typical effects of homogenization. An established process - nationally and internationally recognized. Excellent connection between economy and ecology. (authors)

  2. KSC lubricant testing program. [lubrication characteristics and corrosion resistance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, B. J.; Bryan, C. J.

    1973-01-01

    A program was conducted to evaluate the performance of various lubricants in use and considered for use at Kennedy Space Center (KSC). The overall objectives of the program were to: (1) determine the lubrication characteristics and relative corrosion resistance of lubricants in use and proposed for use at KSC; (2) identify materials which may be equivalent to or better than KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC greases; and (3) identify or develop an improved lubricating oil suitable for use in liquid oxygen (LOX) pumps at KSC. It was concluded that: (1) earth gel thickened greases are very poor corrosion preventive materials in the KSC environment; (2) Halocarbon 25-5S and Braycote 656 were suitable substiutes for KELF-90 and Krytox 240 AC respectively; and (3) none of the oils evaluated possessed the necessary inertness, lubricity, and corrosion prevention characteristics for the KSC LOX pumping systems in their present configuration.

  3. Process for preparing lubricating oil from used waste lubricating oil

    DOEpatents

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Reynolds, James W.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A re-refining process is described by which high-quality finished lubricating oils are prepared from used waste lubricating and crankcase oils. The used oils are stripped of water and low-boiling contaminants by vacuum distillation and then dissolved in a solvent of 1-butanol, 2-propanol and methylethyl ketone, which precipitates a sludge containing most of the solid and liquid contaminants, unspent additives, and oxidation products present in the used oil. After separating the purified oil-solvent mixture from the sludge and recovering the solvent for recycling, the purified oil is preferably fractional vacuum-distilled, forming lubricating oil distillate fractions which are then decolorized and deodorized to prepare blending stocks. The blending stocks are blended to obtain a lubricating oil base of appropriate viscosity before being mixed with an appropriate additive package to form the finished lubricating oil product.

  4. Extensive quantities in thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mannaerts, Sebastiaan H.

    2014-05-01

    A literature survey shows little consistency in the definitions of the term ‘extensive quantity’ (a.k.a. extensive property) as used in thermodynamics. A majority assumes that extensive quantities are those that are proportional to mass. Taking the mathematical meaning of proportional and taking the ‘mass’ to be that of the system or subsystem, it is shown that the proportionality assumption is only correct for a few extensive quantities under condition of constant composition. A large subset of extensive quantities are completely independent of mass; for most systems extensive quantities are not proportional to mass, but mass is the (extensive) constant of proportionality. The definition by IUPAC, based on the additivity of extensive quantities, is the preferred baseline for discussing this subject. It is noted however, that two types of additivity need to be distinguished and that a few intensive quantities are also additive. This paper leaves several interesting questions open to further scrutiny.

  5. Engine sealing and lubrication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zuk, J.

    1975-01-01

    Engine sealing programs are discussed which are directed toward the two major classes of engine seals: engine shaft seals and primary gas path seals. In addition, some concepts and results from fundamental lubrication research, as it pertains to the lubrication of bearings, are presented.

  6. Air-Lubricated Lead Screw

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perkins, G. S.

    1983-01-01

    Air lubricated lead screw and nut carefully machined to have closely matched closely fitting threads. Compressed air injected into two plenums encircle nut and flow through orifices to lubricate mating threads. Originally developed to position precisely interferometer retroreflector for airborne measurement of solar infrared radiation, device now has positioning accuracy of 0.25 micron.

  7. Evaluating Solid-Lubricant Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1988-01-01

    Report describes experimental techniques for measuring properties of solid-lubricant films. Discusses experimental parameters. Reviews basic pin-on-disk configurations and methods of preparing disks and applying solid lubricants. Techniques for constant-temperature testing, low-contact-stress testing, and temperature-versus-time testing presented. Suggests methods of measuring pin-wear volume and recommends ways of presenting data.

  8. Lubricant Coating Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    "Peen Plating," a NASA developed process for applying molybdenum disulfide, is the key element of Techniblast Co.'s SURFGUARD process for applying high strength solid lubricants. The process requires two machines -- one for cleaning and one for coating. The cleaning step allows the coating to be bonded directly to the substrate to provide a better "anchor." The coating machine applies a half a micron thick coating. Then, a blast gun, using various pressures to vary peening intensities for different applications, fires high velocity "media" -- peening hammers -- ranging from plastic pellets to steel shot. Techniblast was assisted by Rural Enterprises, Inc. Coating service can be performed at either Techniblast's or a customer's facility.

  9. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1982-01-01

    The isothermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) of a point contact was analyzed numerically by simultaneously solving the elasticity and Reynolds equations. In the elasticity analysis the contact zone was divided into equal rectangular areas, and it was assumed that a uniform pressure was applied over each area. In the numerical analysis of the Reynolds equation, a phi analysis (where phi is equal to the pressure times the film thickness to the 3/2 power) was used to help the relaxation process. The EHL point contact analysis is applicable for the entire range of elliptical parameters and is valid for any combination of rolling and sliding within the contact.

  10. Development and characterization of lubricants for use near nuclear reactors in space vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, G. L.; Akawie, R. I.; Gardos, M. N.; Krening, K. C.

    1972-01-01

    The synthesis and evaluation program was conducted to develop wide-temperature range lubricants suitable for use in space vehicles particularly in the vicinity of nuclear reactors. Synthetic approaches resulted in nonpolymeric, large molecular weight materials, all based on some combination of siloxane and aromatic groups. Evaluation of these materials indicated that certain tetramethyl and hexamethyl disiloxanes containing phenyl thiophenyl substituents are extremely promising with respect to radiation stability, wide temperature range, good lubricity, oxidation resistance and additive acceptance. The synthesis of fluids is discussed, and the equipment and methods used in evaluation are described, some of which were designed to evaluate micro-quantities of the synthesized lubricants.

  11. Succinimide lubricating oil dispersant

    SciTech Connect

    Wisotsky, M.J.; Bloch, R.; Brownwell, D.W.; Chen, F.J.; Gutierrez, A.

    1987-08-11

    A lubricating oil composition is described exhibiting improved dispersancy in both gasoline and diesel engines comprising a major amount of lubricating oil and 0.5 to 10 weight percent of a dispersant, the dispersant being prepared in a sequential process comprising the steps of: (a) in a first step reacting an oil-soluble polyolefin succinic anhydride, the olefin being a C/sub 3/ or C/sub 4/ olefin and an alkylene polyamine of the formula H/sub 2/N(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/(NH(CH/sub 2/)/sub n/)/sub m/sup -// NH/sub 2/ wherein n is 2 or 3 and m is 0 to 10, in a molar ratio of about 1.0 to 2.2 moles of polyolefin succinic anhydride per mole of polyamine, and (b) reacting the product of step (a) with dicarboxylic acid anhydride selected from the group consisting of maleic anhydride and succinic anhydride in sufficient molar proportions to provide a total mole ratio of about 2,3 to 3.0 moles of anhydride compounds per mole of polyamine.

  12. 7 CFR 2902.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 2902.46 Section 2902.46... Items § 2902.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication during... forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting or...

  13. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have...

  14. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.46 - Forming lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Forming lubricants. 3201.46 Section 3201.46... Designated Items § 3201.46 Forming lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication... preference for qualifying biobased forming lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have...

  16. Potentiometer, constant tension and lubrication device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, H. J.

    1972-01-01

    Wiper assembly is described for feedback potentiometers which provides self cleaning, self lubrication, and tension within controlled limits. Each end of the assembly contains loose fitting leather pad thoroughly soaked in wiper lubricating fluid. Cleaning and lubrication of potentiometer resulting from use of lubrication soaked leather accomplishes noise free operation.

  17. Automotive gear oil lubricant from soybean oil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The use of lubricants that are based on renewable materials is rapidly increasing. Vegetable oils have good lubricity, wear protection and low volatility which are desired properties for automotive gear lubricant applications. Soybean oil is used widely in the lubricant industry due to its properti...

  18. Interdisciplinary Approach to Liquid Lubricant Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ku, P. M. (Editor)

    1973-01-01

    The proceedings of a conference of liquid lubricant technology are presented. The subjects discussed are: (1) requirements and functions of liquid lubricants, (2) mineral oils, (3) greases, (4) theory of rheology, (5) mechanics and thermodynamics in lubrication, (6) environmental capability of liquid lubricants, and (7) wear corrosion and erosion.

  19. Lubricant Rheology in Concentrated Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.

    1984-01-01

    Lubricant behavior in highly stressed situtations shows that a Newtonian model for lubricant rheology is insufficient for explanation of traction behavior. The oil film build up is predicted by using a Newtonian lubricant model except at high slide to roll ratios and at very high loads, where the nonNewtonian behavior starts to be important already outside the Hertzian contact area. Static and dynamic experiments are reported. In static experiments the pressure is applied to the lubricant more than a million times longer than in an EHD contact. Depending on the pressure-temperature history of the experiment the lubricant will become a crystallized or amorphous solid at high pressures. In dynamic experiments, the oil is in an amorphous solid state. Depending on the viscosity, time scale, elasticity of the oil and the bearing surfaces, the oil film pressure, shear strain rate and the type of lubricant, different properties of the oil are important for prediction of shear stresses in the oil. The different proposed models for the lubricant, which describe it to a Newtonian liquid, an elastic liquid, a plastic liquid and an elastic-plastic solid.

  20. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2001-01-01

    Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications description of the adhesion, friction, abrasion, and wear behavior of solid film lubricants and related tribological materials, including diamond and diamond-like solid films. The book details the properties of solid surfaces, clean surfaces, and contaminated surfaces as well as discussing the structures and mechanical properties of natural and synthetic diamonds; chemical-vapor-deposited diamond film; surface design and engineering toward wear-resistant, self-lubricating diamond films and coatings. The author provides selection and design criteria as well as applications for synthetic and natural coatings in the commercial, industrial and aerospace industries..

  1. Automotive Lubricant Specification and Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, M. F.

    This chapter concerns commercial lubricant specification and testing, drawing together the many themes of previous chapters. Military lubricant standards were a very strong initial influence during World War II and led to the separate historical development of the North American and European specification systems. The wide range of functions that a successful lubricant must satisfy is discussed, together with issues of balancing special or universal applications, single or multiple engine tests, the philosophy of accelerated testing and the question of 'who sets the standards?' The role of engine tests and testing organisations is examined.

  2. Lubricant effects on bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1986-01-01

    Lubricant considerations for rolling-element bearings have within the last two decades taken on added importance in the design and operation of mechanical systems. The phenomenon which limits the useful life of bearings is rolling-element or surface pitting fatigue. The elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness which separates the ball or roller surface from those of the raceways of the bearing directly affects bearing life. Chemical additives added to the lubricant can also significantly affect bearings life and reliability. The interaction of these physical and chemical effects is important to the design engineer and user of these systems. Design methods and lubricant selection for rolling-element bearings are presented and discussed.

  3. Investigations of lubricant rheology as applied to elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carlson, S.; Turchina, V.; Jakobsen, J.; Sanborn, D. M.; Winer, W. O.

    1973-01-01

    The pressure viscometer was modified to permit the measurement of viscosity at elevated pressures and shear stresses up to 5 x 10 to the 6th power N/sq m (720 psi). This shear stress is within a factor of three of the shear stress occurring in a sliding ehd point contact such as occurs in the ehd simulator. Viscosity data were taken on five lubricant samples, and it was found that viscous heating effects on the viscosity were predominant and not non-Newtonian behavior at the high shear stresses. The development of the infrared temperature measuring technique for the ehd simulator was completed, and temperature data for a set of operating conditions and one lubricant are reported. The numerical analysis of the behavior of nonlinear lubricants in the lubrication of rollers is reported.

  4. Piezoviscosity In Lubrication Of Nonconformal Contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1988-01-01

    Developments in theory of lubrication. Analysis of piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication of two ellipsoidal contacts. Begins with Reynolds equation for point contact. Equation nondimensionalized using Roelands empirical formula and Dowson and Higginson formula. Equation solved numerically. Solutions obtained for full spectrum of conditions to find effects of dimensionless load, speed, parameters of lubricated and lubricating materials, and angle between direction of rolling and direction of entrainment of lubricant.

  5. Support of Oil Lubrication by Bonded Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holinski, R.

    1984-01-01

    A new generation of lubricating lacquers for treatment of metal surfaces has been developed. These coatings have proved to be oil-compatible and are used in oil-lubricated systems. The oil lubrication is supported thereby through reduction of friction and increase of load-carrying capacity during boundary conditions. For difficult tribological systems, the problem-solving lubricating concept has proved to be the beneficial combination of lubricating oil and bonded coatings. A number of practical applications are presented.

  6. Fullerene (C60) films for solid lubrication

    SciTech Connect

    Bhushan, B.; Gupta, B.K.; Van Cleef, G.W.; Capp, C.E.; Coe, J.V. )

    1993-10-01

    The advent of techniques for producing gram quantities of a new form of stable, pure, solid carbon, designated as fullerene, opens a profusion of possibilities to be explored in many disciplines including tribology. Fullerenes take the form of hollow geodesic domes, which are formed from a network of pentagons and hexagons with covalently bonded carbon atoms. The C60 molecule has the highest possible symmetry (icosahedral) and assumes the shape of a soccer ball. At room temperature, fullerene molecules pack in an fcc lattice bonded with weak van der Waals attractions. Fullerenes can be dissolved in solvents such as toluene and benzene and are easily sublimed. The low surface energy, high chemical stability, spherical shape, weak intermolecular bonding, and high load bearing capacity of C60 molecules offer potential for various mechanical and tribological applications. This paper describes the crystal structure and properties of fullerenes and proposes a mechanism for self-lubricating action. Sublimed films of C60 have been produced and friction and wear performance of these films in various operating environments are the subject of this paper. The results of this study indicate that C60, owing to its unique crystal structure and bonding, may be a promising solid lubricant. 31 refs.

  7. Frictional anisotropy under boundary lubrication: effect of surface texture.

    SciTech Connect

    Ajayi, O. O.; Erck, R. A.; Lorenzo-Martin, C.; Fenske, G. R.; Energy Systems

    2009-06-15

    The friction coefficient was measured under boundary lubrication with a ball-on-flat contact configuration in unidirectional sliding. The ball was smooth and hardened 52100 steel. Discs were made from case-carburized and hardened 4620, annealed 1080, and 1018 steels with directionally ground surfaces. A synthetic lubricant of stock polyalphaolefin was used for testing. During testing with each material, a frictional spike was observed whenever the ball slid parallel to the grinding ridge on the disc surface. The average friction coefficient for all tests was about 0.1, which is typical for the boundary lubrication regime. The magnitude of the frictional spikes, which reached as high as a friction coefficient of 0.25, and their persistence depended on the hardness of the disc surface. On the basis of elastohydrodynamic theory, coupled with the observation of severe plastic deformation on the ridges parallel to the sliding direction, the frictional spike could be due to localized plastic deformation on the disc surface at locations of minimal thickness for the lubricant fluid film. This hypothesis was further supported by lack of frictional spikes in tests using discs coated with a thin film of diamond-like carbon, in which plastic deformation is minimal.

  8. Enzyme catalysis with small ionic liquid quantities.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Fabian; Mutschler, Julien; Zufferey, Daniel

    2011-04-01

    Enzyme catalysis with minimal ionic liquid quantities improves reaction rates, stereoselectivity and enables solvent-free processing. In particular the widely used lipases combine well with many ionic liquids. Demonstrated applications are racemate separation, esterification and glycerolysis. Minimal solvent processing is also an alternative to sluggish solvent-free catalysis. The method allows simplified down-stream processing, as only traces of ionic liquids have to be removed. PMID:21107639

  9. Aviation-fuel lubricity evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-07-01

    Fuel-system components have experienced problems with the slipperiness or lubricity of the fuel back to the early 1960's. As a consequence of the level of refinement necessary for the PWA 523 fuel (now designated MIL-T-38219 grade JP-7) to obtain its high-temperature stability, many of the polar compounds contributing to lubricity had been removed, resulting in abnormal hydraulic fuel-pump wear. A lubricity-enhancing compound was developed (PWA 536) to eliminate the wear problem. High-pressure piston-type fuel pumps were one of the first parts of the engine fuel system to exhibit problems related to fuel properties. One early problem manifested itself as corrosion of silver-plated slipper pads and was related to carryover of residual-chlorides fuel. Fuel controls were another part of the engine fuel system susceptible to fuel properties. Lack of lubricity agents caused fuel control sliding servo valves to stick.

  10. Structural lubricity under ambient conditions

    PubMed Central

    Cihan, Ebru; İpek, Semran; Durgun, Engin; Baykara, Mehmet Z.

    2016-01-01

    Despite its fundamental importance, physical mechanisms that govern friction are poorly understood. While a state of ultra-low friction, termed structural lubricity, is expected for any clean, atomically flat interface consisting of two different materials with incommensurate structures, some associated predictions could only be quantitatively confirmed under ultra-high vacuum (UHV) conditions so far. Here, we report structurally lubric sliding under ambient conditions at mesoscopic (∼4,000–130,000 nm2) interfaces formed by gold islands on graphite. Ab initio calculations reveal that the gold–graphite interface is expected to remain largely free from contaminant molecules, leading to structurally lubric sliding. The experiments reported here demonstrate the potential for practical lubrication schemes for micro- and nano-electromechanical systems, which would mainly rely on an atomic-scale structural mismatch between the slider and substrate components, via the utilization of material systems featuring clean, atomically flat interfaces under ambient conditions. PMID:27350035

  11. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication of smooth surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.

    1983-01-01

    Fully flooded, elastohydrodynamically lubricated contacts are considered. Elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) analysis requires the simultaneous solution of the elastically, viscosity, density, and Reynolds equations. The most important practical aspect of elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory is the determination of the minimum film thickness within the conjunction. The maintenance of a fluid film of adequate magnitude is an essential feature of the correct operation of lubricated machine elements. The results show the influence of contact geometry on minimum film thickness as expressed by the ellipticity parameter and the dimensionless speed, load, and materials parameters. Film thickness equations are developed for materials of high elastic modulus, such as metal, and for materials of low elastic modulus, such as rubber.

  12. Method for lubricating contacting surfaces

    DOEpatents

    Dugger, Michael T.; Ohlhausen, James A.; Asay, David B.; Kim, Seong H.

    2011-12-06

    A method is provided for tribological lubrication of sliding contact surfaces, where two surfaces are in contact and in motion relative to each other, operating in a vapor-phase environment containing at least one alcohol compound at a concentration sufficiently high to provide one monolayer of coverage on at least one of the surfaces, where the alcohol compound continuously reacts at the surface to provide lubrication.

  13. Relative Lifetimes of Several Space Liquid Lubricants Using a Vacuum Spiral Orbit Tribometer (SOT)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansen, Mark J.; Jones, William R., Jr.; Predmore, Roamer E.; Loewenthal, Stuart L.

    2001-01-01

    A vacuum spiral orbit rolling contact tribometer (SOT) was used to determine the relative lifetimes of several unformulated space liquid lubricants. The lubricants tested included a synthetic hydrocarbon (Pennzane 2001 A), three perfluoropolyethers (Krytox 143AC, Fomblin Z25, and Brayco 815Z), three silahydrocarbons (a tri, a tetra, and a penta) and a polyalphaolefin (Nye PAO-100). The SOT simulates the ball motions in an angular contact bearing and tribochemically degrades microgram quantities of lubricant. Test failure is determined when a preset friction coefficient is exceeded. Relative lifetime (orbits/micro-g) is defined as the number of ball orbits to failure divided by the amount of lubricant on the ball. Conditions included 10 to 200 rpm rotational speed, approximately 50 micro-g lubricant, an initial vacuum < 1.3x10(exp -6) Pa, room temperature (approximately 23 C), a mean Hertzian stress of 1.5 GPa, and 440 C stainless steel specimens. Lubricated lifetimes from longest to shortest were Pennzane 2001 A, the silahydrocarbons and the PAO-100, 143AC, ZI-5, and then 815Z. Relative lifetimes compare favorably to full-scale vacuum gimbal bearing tests. The effect of varying the mean Hertzian stress on the lifetime of some of the lubricants was examined.

  14. Equations For Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication Of Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1993-01-01

    Equation for thickness of elastohydrodynamic (EHD) lubricant film in rolling-element bearing reduced to simplified form involving only inside and outside diameters of bearing, speed of rotation, parameter related to type of lubricant, and viscosity of lubricant at temperature of bearing. In addition, experimentally derived graph of EHD-film-thickness-reduction factor as function of contact-lubricant-flow number. Accounts for lubricant starvation within Hertzian contact. Graph relating ratio of minimum film thickness to composite roughness of bearing surfaces and to lubrication-life correction factor also provided. Life-correction factor used to determine resultant life of bearing.

  15. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications: Introduction and Background. Revision 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  16. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 1; Introduction and Background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1996-01-01

    This chapter presents an introduction and historical background to the field of tribology, especially solid lubrication and lubricants and sets them in the perspective of techniques and materials in lubrication. Also, solid and liquid lubrication films are defined and described.

  17. Tribological Behavior of Aqueous Copolymer Lubricant in Mixed Lubrication Regime.

    PubMed

    Ta, Thi D; Tieu, A Kiet; Zhu, Hongtao; Zhu, Qiang; Kosasih, Prabouno B; Zhang, Jie; Deng, Guanyu

    2016-03-01

    Although a number of experiments have been attempted to investigate the lubrication of aqueous copolymer lubricant, which is applied widely in metalworking operations, a comprehensive theoretical investigation at atomistic level is still lacking. This study addresses the influence of loading pressure and copolymer concentration on the structural properties and tribological performance of aqueous copolymer solution of poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide) (PPO-PEO-PPO) at mixed lubrication using a molecular dynamic (MD) simulation. An effective interfacial potential, which has been derived from density functional theory (DFT) calculations, was employed for the interactions between the fluid's molecules and iron surface. The simulation results have indicated that the triblock copolymer is physisorption on iron surface. Under confinement by iron surfaces, the copolymer molecules form lamellar structure in aqueous solution and behave differently from its bulk state. The lubrication performance of aqueous copolymer lubricant increases with concentration, but the friction reduction is insignificant at high loading pressure. Additionally, the plastic deformation of asperity is dependent on both copolymer concentration and loading pressure, and the wear behavior shows a linear dependence of friction force on the number of transferred atoms between contacting asperities. PMID:26828119

  18. Quantities, Units, and Symbols.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Royal Society, London (England).

    This booklet provides a reference to the quantities, units, and their symbols which are used in physical science. It is a revision of a 1969 report and takes account of the progress which has been made in obtaining international agreement on the definitions, names, and symbols for units and on the rules for the expression of relations involving…

  19. Engine lubrication circuit including two pumps

    DOEpatents

    Lane, William H.

    2006-10-03

    A lubrication pump coupled to the engine is sized such that the it can supply the engine with a predetermined flow volume as soon as the engine reaches a peak torque engine speed. In engines that operate predominately at speeds above the peak torque engine speed, the lubrication pump is often producing lubrication fluid in excess of the predetermined flow volume that is bypassed back to a lubrication fluid source. This arguably results in wasted power. In order to more efficiently lubricate an engine, a lubrication circuit includes a lubrication pump and a variable delivery pump. The lubrication pump is operably coupled to the engine, and the variable delivery pump is in communication with a pump output controller that is operable to vary a lubrication fluid output from the variable delivery pump as a function of at least one of engine speed and lubrication flow volume or system pressure. Thus, the lubrication pump can be sized to produce the predetermined flow volume at a speed range at which the engine predominately operates while the variable delivery pump can supplement lubrication fluid delivery from the lubrication pump at engine speeds below the predominant engine speed range.

  20. Spectroscopic Analysis of Perfluoropolyether Lubricant Degradation During Boundary Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Herrera-Fierro, Pilar; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jones, William R., Jr.

    1996-01-01

    The degradation of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE) under boundary lubrication conditions was studied using mu-FTIR and mu-Raman spectroscopies. Stainless steel (440C) discs coated with thin (600A), uniform films of the PFPE were tested in a ball-on-disc apparatus until various levels of friction coefficient were attained. Discs were then examined using the above techniques. When the friction coefficient surpassed the value obtained with an un-lubricated control, the lubricant film had either been physically displaced or partially transformed in to a 'friction polymer'. Infrared analysis of this 'friction polymer' indicated the presence of a polymeric fluorinated acid species (R(sub f)COOH). Raman spectroscopy indicated the presence of amorphous carbon in the wear track and in the friction polymer. Some reaction mechanisms are suggested to explain the results.

  1. Ionic Liquids as Novel Lubricants and /or Lubricant Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, J.; Viola, M. B.

    2013-10-31

    This ORNL-GM CRADA developed ionic liquids (ILs) as novel lubricants or oil additives for engine lubrication. A new group of oil-miscible ILs have been designed and synthesized with high thermal stability, non-corrosiveness, excellent wettability, and most importantly effective anti-scuffing/anti-wear and friction reduction characteristics. Mechanistic analysis attributes the superior lubricating performance of IL additives to their physical and chemical interactions with metallic surfaces. Working with a leading lubricant formulation company, the team has successfully developed a prototype low-viscosity engine oil using a phosphonium-phosphate IL as an anti-wear additive. Tribological bench tests of the IL-additized formulated oil showed 20-33% lower friction in mixed and elastohydrodynamic lubrication and 38-92% lower wear in boundary lubrication when compared with commercial Mobil 1 and Mobil Clean 5W-30 engine oils. High-temperature, high load (HTHL) full-size engine tests confirmed the excellent anti-wear performance for the IL-additized engine oil. Sequence VID engine dynamometer tests demonstrated an improved fuel economy by >2% for this IL-additized engine oil benchmarked against the Mobil 1 5W-30 oil. In addition, accelerated catalyst aging tests suggest that the IL additive may potentially have less adverse impact on three-way catalysts compared to the conventional ZDDP. Follow-on research is needed for further development and optimization of IL chemistry and oil formulation to fully meet ILSAC GF-5 specifications and further enhance the automotive engine efficiency and durability.

  2. Cost-Cutting Powdered Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Scientists at NASA's Glenn Research Center developed a high-temperature, solid lubricant coating material that is saving the manufacturing industry millions of dollars. The material came out of 3 decades of tribological research, work studying high-temperature friction, lubrication, and the wearing of interacting surfaces that are in relative motion. It was developed as a shaft coating deposited by thermal spraying to protect foil air bearings used in oil-free turbomachinery, like gas turbines, and is meant to be part of a larger project: an oil-free aircraft engine capable of operating at high temperatures with increased reliability, lowered weight, reduced maintenance requirements, and increased power. This advanced coating, PS300, is a self-lubricating bearing material containing chromium oxide, with additions of a low-temperature start up lubricant (silver) and a high-temperature lubricant, making it remarkably stable at high temperatures, and better suited than previously available materials for high-stress conditions. It improves efficiency, lowers friction, reduces emissions, and has been used by NASA in advanced aeropropulsion engines, refrigeration compressors, turbochargers, and hybrid electrical turbogenerators. PS300 is ideal in any application where lowered weight and reduced maintenance are desired, and high-temperature uses and heavy operating speeds are expected. It has notable uses for the Space Agency, but it has even further-reaching potential for the industrial realm.

  3. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere...

  4. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere...

  5. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere...

  6. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... operate. In wet sump engines, this requirement must be met when only one-half of the maximum lubricant... allow installing a means of cooling the lubricant. (c) The crankcase must be vented to the atmosphere...

  7. Method For Testing Properties Of Corrosive Lubricants

    DOEpatents

    Ohi, James; De La Cruz, Jose L.; Lacey, Paul I.

    2006-01-03

    A method of testing corrosive lubricating media using a wear testing apparatus without a mechanical seal. The wear testing apparatus and methods are effective for testing volatile corrosive lubricating media under pressure and at high temperatures.

  8. Metalworking corrosion inhibition/drawing lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Lipinski, H.F.; Wantling, S.J.

    1980-05-06

    A metalworking lubricant composition is disclosed which is effective as both a corrosion inhibitor and drawing lubricant and comprises a mineral oil and an additive combination of barium lanolate soap and barium sulfonate.

  9. Biodegradation of a synthetic lubricant by Micrococcus roseus

    SciTech Connect

    Wright, M.A.; Taylor, F.; Brown, D.E.; Higgins, I.J. ); Randles, S.J. )

    1993-04-01

    The loss of large quantities of lubricants, both synthetic and mineral oil based, is causing increasing concern because they are not only an unquantified hazard to the environment, but also a potential hazard to the long-term health of people. This study examines the metabolic pathways and eventual fate of synthetic lubricants in micoorganisms involved in biodegradation. The synthetic ester Emkarate 1550 (E1550), which includes a tertiary alcohol (TMP), and the bacterium, Micrococcus roseus were used in the experiments. The results indicate that M. roseus cleaves the E1550 ester by the action of esterases bound to the surface of the cell, with the products released into the surrounding medium. The organic acids, octaoate and decanoate, are taken up and metabolized, whereas the TMP (1,1,1-tri(hydroxymethyl)propane) component is not metabolized and accumulates in the medium. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Lubricants and Their Environmental Impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betton, C. I.

    Environmental considerations have increased in importance in the last two decades and lubricants are part of that. The REACH Regulations apply to the components of lubricants. About 50% of a lubricant can be reclaimed using refining processes ranging from acid/clay treatment through to distillation/hydrogenation to produce up to Gp. II quality re-refined base oils. The major possible contaminants are the PAHs, which are effectively removed by optimised distillation/hydrogenation, metals, remnants of VI improvers, water and untreated acids. Sulphur contents of these base oils must be viewed differently from those of virgin mineral base oils. Certain PAHs are recognised carcinogens and pose a health and safety risk and must be controlled. The use of re-refined base oils is driven by the concept of 'sustainability', to minimise pollution and maximise the use of resources.

  11. Tethered Lubricants for Small Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Lynden A. Archer

    2006-01-09

    The objective of this research project is two-fold. First, to fundamentally understand friction and relaxation dynamics of polymer chains near surfaces; and second, to develop novel self-lubricated substrates suitable for MEMS devices. During the three-year performance period of this study the PI and his students have shown using theory and experiments that systematic introduction of disorder into tethered lubricant coatings (e.g. by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) mixtures or SAMs with nonlinear, branched architectures) can be used to significantly reduce the friction coefficient of a surface. They have also developed a simple procedure based on dielectric spectroscopy for quantifying the effect of surface disorder on molecular relaxation in lubricant coatings. Details of research accomplishments in each area of the project are described in the body of the report.

  12. Engineering lubrication in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    McNary, Sean M; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A; Reddi, A Hari

    2012-04-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  13. Engineering Lubrication in Articular Cartilage

    PubMed Central

    McNary, Sean M.; Athanasiou, Kyriacos A.

    2012-01-01

    Despite continuous progress toward tissue engineering of functional articular cartilage, significant challenges still remain. Advances in morphogens, stem cells, and scaffolds have resulted in enhancement of the bulk mechanical properties of engineered constructs, but little attention has been paid to the surface mechanical properties. In the near future, engineered tissues will be able to withstand and support the physiological compressive and tensile forces in weight-bearing synovial joints such as the knee. However, there is an increasing realization that these tissue-engineered cartilage constructs will fail without the optimal frictional and wear properties present in native articular cartilage. These characteristics are critical to smooth, pain-free joint articulation and a long-lasting, durable cartilage surface. To achieve optimal tribological properties, engineered cartilage therapies will need to incorporate approaches and methods for functional lubrication. Steady progress in cartilage lubrication in native tissues has pushed the pendulum and warranted a shift in the articular cartilage tissue-engineering paradigm. Engineered tissues should be designed and developed to possess both tribological and mechanical properties mirroring natural cartilage. In this article, an overview of the biology and engineering of articular cartilage structure and cartilage lubrication will be presented. Salient progress in lubrication treatments such as tribosupplementation, pharmacological, and cell-based therapies will be covered. Finally, frictional assays such as the pin-on-disk tribometer will be addressed. Knowledge related to the elements of cartilage lubrication has progressed and, thus, an opportune moment is provided to leverage these advances at a critical step in the development of mechanically and tribologically robust, biomimetic tissue-engineered cartilage. This article is intended to serve as the first stepping stone toward future studies in functional

  14. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the...

  16. 7 CFR 3201.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 3201.38 Section 3201.38... Designated Items § 3201.38 Firearm lubricants. (a) Definition. Lubricants that are designed for use in firearms to reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the...

  17. Lubrication of rolling-element bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, R. J.

    1980-01-01

    The lubrication of rolling element bearings is surveyed. Emphasis is on the critical design aspects related to speed, temperature, and ambient pressure environment. Types of lubrication including grease, jets, mist, wick, and through the race are discussed. The historical development, present state of technology, and the future problems of rolling element bearing lubrication are discussed.

  18. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for...

  19. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for...

  20. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for...

  1. Research on liquid lubricants for space mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1998-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Lewis Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes, and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  2. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for...

  3. 21 CFR 880.6375 - Patient lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Patient lubricant. 880.6375 Section 880.6375 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL... § 880.6375 Patient lubricant. (a) Identification. A patient lubricant is a device intended for...

  4. Research on Liquid Lubricants for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, William R., Jr.; Shogrin, Bradley A.; Jansen, Mark J.

    1999-01-01

    Four research areas at the NASA Glenn Research Center involving the tribology of space mechanisms are highlighted. These areas include: soluble boundary lubrication additives for perfluoropolyether liquid lubricants, a Pennzane dewetting phenomenon, the effect of ODC-free bearing cleaning processes on bearing lifetimes and the development of a new class of liquid lubricants based on silahydrocarbons.

  5. 14 CFR 33.71 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lubrication system. 33.71 Section 33.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.71 Lubrication system. (a) General. Each lubrication...

  6. Gearing up for synthetic lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Shelley, S.

    1993-07-01

    Much of today's plant machinery operates at faster speeds, closer tolerances and higher temperatures than ever before. Without the help of lubricants to reduce wear, remove heat, and prevent corrosion, the chemical process industries would grind to a halt. Traditional, petroleum-derived products--called mineral oils-- have long starred in these roles. But today, synthetics, such as polyalphaolefins, carboxylic acid esters, phosphate esters and polyglycols are stealing the limelight, thanks to their inherent resistance to oxidation and hydrolysis and their extended range of service temperatures. The paper reviews the advantages of the synthetic lubricants.

  7. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, Richard J.

    1993-04-08

    In our second year of funding we began the testing phase of a number of new classes of lubricants. Three different testing collaborations have already begun and a fourth one is In the works with Dr. Stephen Hsu of the National Institute of Standards and Technology. Dr. Hsu also plans to test some of the same materials for us that Shell Development is studying. With Dr. Bill Jones of NASA, we are studying the effects of branching an high temperature lubricant properties in perfluoropolyethers, Initially Bill Jones is comparing the lubrication and physical properties of perfluorotetraglyme and the following two spherical perfluoropolyethers, Note that one contains a fluorocarbon chain and the other one contains a fluorocarbon ether chain. The synthesis of these was reported in the last progress report. With Professor Patricia Thiel of Iowa State University, we are working on studies of perfluoromethylene oxide ethers and have prepared a series of four of these polyethers to study in collaboration with her research group. These perfluoromethylene oxide ethers have the best low temperature properties of any known lubricants. Thiel's group is studying their interactions with metals under extreme conditions. Thirdly, we have also begun an Interaction with W. August Birke of Shell Development Company in Houston for whom we have already prepared samples of the chlorine-substituted fluorocarbon polyether lubricants whose structures appear on page 54 of our research proposal. Each of these four structures is thought to have potential as lubricant additives to motor oils. We also have underway syntheses of other fluorine-containing branched ether lubricants. These new materials which are also promising as antifriction additives for motor oils appear ahead of the perfluoro additives as Appendix I to the progress report. Additionally for Birke and Shell Development we have at their request prepared the novel compound perfluoro salicylic acid. This synthesis was suggested by the

  8. RF modal quantity gaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanleuven, K.

    1989-05-01

    The primary objective is to provide a concept of a radio frequency (RF) modal resonance technique which is being investigated as a method for gaging the quantities of subcritical cryogenic propellants in metallic tanks. Of special interest are the potential applications of the technique to microgravity propellant gaging situations. The results of concept testing using cryogenic oxygen, hydrogen, and nitrogen, as well as paraffin simulations of microgravity fluid orientations, are reported. These test results were positive and showed that the gaging concept was viable.

  9. High-Performing, Low-Temperature-Operating, Long-Lifetime Aerospace Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Prakash

    2015-01-01

    Long-duration space exploration will require spacecraft systems that can operate effectively over several years with minimal or no maintenance. Aerospace lubricants are key components of spacecraft systems. Physical Sciences Inc., has synthesized and characterized novel ionic liquids for use in aerospace lubricants that contribute to decreased viscosity, friction, and wear in aerospace systems. The resulting formulations offer low vapor pressure and outgassing properties and thermal stability up to 250 C. They are effective for use at temperatures as low as -70 C and provide long-term operational stability in aerospace systems. In Phase II, the company scaled several new ionic liquids and evaluated a novel formulation in a NASA testbed. The resulting lubricant compounds will offer lower volatility, decreased corrosion, and better tribological characteristics than standard liquid lubricants, particularly at lower temperatures.

  10. In Situ, On-Demand Lubrication System Developed for Space Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jansen, Mark J.; Predmore, Roamer E.

    2003-01-01

    Many moving mechanical assemblies (MMA) for space mechanisms rely on liquid lubricants to provide reliable, long-term performance. The proper performance of the MMA is critical in assuring a successful mission. Historically, mission lifetimes were short and MMA duty cycles were minimal. As mission lifetimes were extended, other components, such as batteries and computers, failed before lubricated systems. However, improvements in these ancillary systems over the last decade have left the tribological systems of the MMAs as the limiting factor in determining spacecraft reliability. Typically, MMAs are initially lubricated with a very small charge that is supposed to last the entire mission lifetime, often well in excess of 5 years. In many cases, the premature failure of a lubricated component can result in mission failure.

  11. Self lubrication of bitumen froth in pipelines

    SciTech Connect

    Joseph, D.D.

    1997-12-31

    In this paper I will review the main properties of water lubricated pipelines and explain some new features which have emerged from studies of self-lubrication of Syncrudes` bitumen froth. When heavy oils are lubricated with water, the water and oil are continuously injected into a pipeline and the water is stable when in a lubricating sheath around the oil core. In the case of bitumen froth obtained from the Alberta tar sands, the water is dispersed in the bitumen and it is liberated at the wall under shear; water injection is not necessary because the froth is self-lubricating.

  12. Thin Film Solid Lubricant Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benoy, Patricia A.

    1997-01-01

    Tribological coatings for high temperature sliding applications are addressed. A sputter-deposited bilayer coating of gold and chromium is investigated as a potential solid lubricant for protection of alumina substrates during sliding at high temperature. Evaluation of the tribological properties of alumina pins sliding against thin sputtered gold films on alumina substrates is presented.

  13. Lubricant Selection Manual, Phase 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Lowry, J. A.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1991-01-01

    Future spacecraft must be designated to operate for very long time periods in space. For example, a target goal for the Space Station is 30 years of operation. Although the actual life may be significantly less than this optimistic goal, the life will certainly be a critical issue in design. The bearings on primary components such as the alpha and beta joints must obviously be designed and lubricated with the objective of optimum performance life. In addition to these joints, there will be numerous other tribological (rubbing or rolling) interfaced that will be required to function for the life of the spacecraft. A major key to adequate performance of tribological interface is proper lubrication. Lubricants can be divided into two basic classes: solid films and liquids. Both types have been used extensively in space applications. Both have advantages and disadvantages that must be carefully considered in their selection. The purpose here is to summarize selection criteria for liquid and solid lubricants applied to long-life spacecraft.

  14. Automotive Cooling and Lubricating Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marine Corps Inst., Washington, DC.

    This correspondence course, originally developed for the Marine Corps, is designed to provide new mechanics with a source of study materials to assist them in becoming more proficient in their jobs. The course contains four study units covering automotive cooling system maintenance, cooling system repair, lubricating systems, and lubrication…

  15. Longevity Of Dry Film Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kannel, J. W.; Stockwell, R. D.

    1993-01-01

    Report describes evaluation of dry film lubricants candidate for use in rotary joints of proposed Space Station. Study included experiments and theoretical analyses focused on longevity of sputtered molybdenum disulfide films and ion-plated lead films under conditions partially simulating rolling contact.

  16. Tetrasulfide extreme pressure lubricant additives

    SciTech Connect

    Gast, L.E.; Kenney, H.E.; Schwab, A.W.

    1980-08-19

    A novel class of compounds has been prepared comprising the tetrasulfides of /sup 18/C hydrocarbons, /sup 18/C fatty acids, and /sup 18/C fatty and alkyl and triglyceride esters. These tetrasulfides are useful as extreme pressure lubricant additives and show potential as replacements for sulfurized sperm whale oil.

  17. Solid Lubricants for Oil-Free Turbomachinery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    Recent breakthroughs in gas foil bearing solid lubricants and computer based modeling has enabled the development of revolulionary Oil-Free turbomachinery systems. These innovative new and solid lubricants at low speeds (start-up and shut down). Foil bearings are hydrodynamic, self acting fluid film bearings made from thin, flexible sheet metal foils. These thin foils trap a hydrodynamic lubricating air film between their surfaces and moving shaft surface. For low temperature applications, like ainrafl air cycle machines (ACM's), polymer coatings provide important solid lubrication during start-up and shut down prior to the development of the lubricating fluid film. The successful development of Oil-Free gas turbine engines requires bearings which can operate at much higher temperatures (greater than 300 C). To address this extreme solid lubrication need, NASA has invented a new family of compostie solid lubricant coatings, NASA PS300.

  18. Methods of Measuring Vapor Pressures of Lubricants With Their Additives Using TGA and/or Microbalances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scialdone, John J.; Miller, Michael K.; Montoya, Alex F.

    1996-01-01

    The life of a space system may be critically dependent on the lubrication of some of its moving parts. The vapor pressure, the quantity of the available lubricant, the temperature and the exhaust venting conductance passage are important considerations in the selection and application of a lubricant. In addition, the oil additives employed to provide certain properties of low friction, surface tension, antioxidant and load bearing characteristics, are also very important and need to be known with regard to their amounts and vapor pressures. This paper reports on the measurements and analyses carried out to obtain those parameters for two often employed lubricants, the Apiezon(TM)-C and the Krytox(TM) AB. The measurements were made employing an electronic microbalance and a thermogravimetric analyzer (TGA) modified to operate in a vacuum. The results have been compared to other data on these oils when available. The identification of the mass fractions of the additives in the oil and their vapor pressures as a function of the temperature were carried out. These may be used to estimate the lubricant life given its quantity and the system vent exhaust conductance. It was found that the Apiezon(TM)-C has three main components with different rates of evaporation while the Krytox(TM) did not indicate any measurable additive.

  19. Development of the water-lubricated thrust bearing of the hydraulic turbine generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Inoue, K.; Deguchi, K.; Okude, K.; Fujimoto, R.

    2012-11-01

    In hydropower plant, a large quantities of turbine oil is used as machine control pressure oil and lubricating oil. If the oil leak out from hydropower plant, it flows into a river. And such oil spill has an adverse effect on natural environment because the oil does not degrade easily. Therefore the KANSAI and Hitachi Mitsubishi Hydro developed the water-lubricated thrust bearing for vertical type hydraulic turbine generator. The water-lubricated bearing has advantages in risk avoidance of river pollution because it does not need oil. For proceeding the development of the water-lubricated thrust bearing, we studied following items. The first is the examination of the trial products of water lubricating liquid. The second is the study of bearing structure which can satisfy bearing performance such as temperature characteristic and so on. The third is the mock-up testing for actual application in the future. As a result, it was found that the water-lubricated thrust bearing was technically applicable to actual equipments.

  20. Inertial Lubrication Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argentina, Mederic; Rojas, Nicolas; Cerda, Enrique; Tirapegui, Enrique

    2012-11-01

    Thin fluid films can have surprising behavior depending on the boundary conditions enforced, the energy input and the specific Reynolds number of the fluid motion. Here we study the equations of motion for a thin fluid film with a free boundary and its other interface in contact with a solid wall. Although shear dissipation increases for thinner layers and the motion can generally be described in the limit as viscous, inertial modes can always be excited for a sufficiently high input of energy. We derive the minimal set of equations containing inertial effects in this strongly dissipative regime.

  1. Self-sustained lift and low friction via soft lubrication.

    PubMed

    Saintyves, Baudouin; Jules, Theo; Salez, Thomas; Mahadevan, L

    2016-05-24

    Relative motion between soft wet solids arises in a number of applications in natural and artificial settings, and invariably couples elastic deformation fluid flow. We explore this in a minimal setting by considering a fluid-immersed negatively buoyant cylinder moving along a soft inclined wall. Our experiments show that there is an emergent robust steady-state sliding regime of the cylinder with an effective friction that is significantly reduced relative to that of rigid fluid-lubricated contacts. A simple scaling approach that couples the cylinder-induced flow to substrate deformation allows us to explain the elastohydrodynamic lift that underlies the self-sustained lubricated motion of the cylinder, consistent with recent theoretical predictions. Our results suggest an explanation for a range of effects such as reduced wear in animal joints and long-runout landslides, and can be couched as a design principle for low-friction interfaces. PMID:27162361

  2. Solid lubrication design methodology, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pallini, R. A.; Wedeven, L. D.; Ragen, M. A.; Aggarwal, B. B.

    1986-01-01

    The high temperature performance of solid lubricated rolling elements was conducted with a specially designed traction (friction) test apparatus. Graphite lubricants containing three additives (silver, phosphate glass, and zinc orthophosphate) were evaluated from room temperature to 540 C. Two hard coats were also evaluated. The evaluation of these lubricants, using a burnishing method of application, shows a reasonable transfer of lubricant and wear protection for short duration testing except in the 200 C temperature range. The graphite lubricants containing silver and zinc orthophosphate additives were more effective than the phosphate glass material over the test conditions examined. Traction coefficients ranged from a low of 0.07 to a high of 0.6. By curve fitting the traction data, empirical equations for slope and maximum traction coefficient as a function of contact pressure (P), rolling speed (U), and temperature (T) can be developed for each lubricant. A solid lubricant traction model was incorporated into an advanced bearing analysis code (SHABERTH). For comparison purposes, preliminary heat generation calculations were made for both oil and solid lubricated bearing operation. A preliminary analysis indicated a significantly higher heat generation for a solid lubricated ball bearing in a deep groove configuration. An analysis of a cylindrical roller bearing configuration showed a potential for a low friction solid lubricated bearing.

  3. 40 CFR 91.308 - Lubricating oil and test fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lubricating oil and test fuel. 91.308....308 Lubricating oil and test fuel. (a) Lubricating oil. (1) Use the engine lubricating oil which meets... specifications of the lubricating oil used for the test. (2) For two-stroke engines, the fuel/oil mixture...

  4. 40 CFR 91.308 - Lubricating oil and test fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lubricating oil and test fuel. 91.308....308 Lubricating oil and test fuel. (a) Lubricating oil. (1) Use the engine lubricating oil which meets... specifications of the lubricating oil used for the test. (2) For two-stroke engines, the fuel/oil mixture...

  5. Minimizing hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    DeClue, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    Hazardous waste minimization is a broad term often associated with pollution prevention, saving the environment or protecting Mother Earth. Some associate hazardous waste minimization with saving money. Thousands of hazardous materials are used in processes every day, but when these hazardous materials become hazardous wastes, dollars must be spent for disposal. When hazardous waste is reduced, an organization will spend less money on hazardous waste disposal. In 1993, Fort Bragg reduced its hazardous waste generation by over 100,000 pounds and spent nearly $90,000 less on hazardous waste disposal costs than in 1992. Fort Bragg generates a variety of wastes: Vehicle maintenance wastes such as antifreeze, oil, grease and solvents; helicopter maintenance wastes, including solvents, adhesives, lubricants and paints; communication operation wastes such as lithium, magnesium, mercury and nickel-cadmium batteries; chemical defense wastes detection, decontamination, and protective mask filters. The Hazardous Waste Office has the responsibility to properly identify, characterize, classify and dispose of these waste items in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations.

  6. Performance of two MOV lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, J.B.; Cline, T.

    1996-12-01

    Recent testing at Battelle has shown that a synthetic grease (Mobil 28) provides both improved friction coefficient and lower rate-of-loading (ROL) characteristics. Duke Power nuclear plants currently use an antiseize (N5000) as a motor operated valve (MOV) stem lubricant but they are considering changing to Mobil 28. However, it is not practical to completely remove all the residual antiseize from the steam threads when changing to a new lubricant. The testing performed during this study was to determine the friction coefficient and ROL effects for Mobil 28 when applied to a valve stem with residual N5000. This testing demonstrated how mixtures of Mobil 28 and N5000 perform under varying MOV conditions.

  7. Measurements, Physical Quantities, and Units.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Laurence E.

    1988-01-01

    Explains the significance of the mole as a unit of measure by showing the relationship between physical quantities and their mathematical representations. Offers a summary of the principles of metrology that make creation of physical quantities and units seem reasonable. A table of base physical quantities and units is included. (RT)

  8. Homegrown lubricants and plastics. [Brassica

    SciTech Connect

    Senft, D.

    1988-10-01

    A small bushy lesquerella plant of the mustard family growing wild in Arizona, New Mexico, Oklahoma and Texas produces seeds that may be used to make lubricants, plastics, protective coatings, surfactants, and pharmaceuticals. The plant thrives on poor soils that receive as little as 10 inches of rain a year. Studies to date indicate that target yields can be reached with a reasonable breeding effort coupled with agronomic research.

  9. Biofluid lubrication for artificial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pendleton, Alice Mae

    This research investigated biofluid lubrication related to artificial joints using tribological and rheological approaches. Biofluids studied here represent two categories of fluids, base fluids and nanostructured biofluids. Base fluids were studied through comparison of synthetic fluids (simulated body fluid and hyaluronic acid) as well as natural biofluids (from dogs, horses, and humans) in terms of viscosity and fluid shear stress. The nano-structured biofluids were formed using molecules having well-defined shapes. Understanding nano-structured biofluids leads to new ways of design and synthesis of biofluids that are beneficial for artificial joint performance. Experimental approaches were utilized in the present research. This includes basic analysis of biofluids' property, such as viscosity, fluid shear stress, and shear rate using rheological experiments. Tribological investigation and surface characterization were conducted in order to understand effects of molecular and nanostructures on fluid lubrication. Workpiece surface structure and wear mechanisms were investigated using a scanning electron microscope and a transmission electron microscope. The surface topography was examined using a profilometer. The results demonstrated that with the adding of solid additives, such as crown ether or fullerene acted as rough as the other solids in the 3-body wear systems. In addition, the fullerene supplied low friction and low wear, which designates the lubrication purpose of this particular particle system. This dissertation is constructed of six chapters. The first chapter is an introduction to body fluids, as mentioned earlier. After Chapter II, it examines the motivation and approach of the present research, Chapter III discusses the experimental approaches, including materials, experimental setup, and conditions. In Chapter IV, lubrication properties of various fluids are discussed. The tribological properties and performance nanostructured biofluids are

  10. Performance Of Perfluoropolyalkylether Lubricant System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paciorek, K.; Masuda, S.; Lin, Wen-Huey; Bierschenk, T.; Kawa, H.; Juhlke, T.; Lagow, R.

    1995-01-01

    Perfluoro-polyalkylethers (PFPAE) constitute class of fluids having characteristics of high thermal oxidative stability, good vicosity-temperature characteristics, good elastohydrodynamic film-forming capabilities, low volatility, and non-flammability. One unfortunate drawback PFPAE causes severe metal corrosion and fluid degradation when used in oxidizing atmosphere. Reports of interest deal with synthesis of PFPAE-type liquids and development of additive to reduce oxidizing atmosphere degradation. Properties and molecular structures reported in detail. Also lubricant performance over range of conditions.

  11. The PM-200 lubrication system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1991-01-01

    Plasma sprayed composite coating of metal-bonded chromium carbide with additions of silver and thermochemically stable fluorides were previously reported to be lubricative in pin on desk bench tests from room temperature to 900 C. An early coating formulation of this type, designated as PS-200, was successfully tested as a cylinder coating in a Stirling engine at a TRRT of 760 C in a hydrogen atmosphere, and as a backup lubricant for gas bearings to 650 C. A subsequent optimization program has shown that tribological properties are further improved by increasing the solid lubricant content. The improved coating is designated as PS-212. The same powder formulation was used to make free-standing powder metallurgy (PM-212) parts by sintering or hot isostatic pressing. The process is very attractive for making parts that cannot be readily plasma sprayed such as bushings and cylinders that have small bore diameters and/or high length to diameter ratios. The properties of coatings and free-standing parts fabricated from these powders are reviewed.

  12. Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, Ali

    1995-01-01

    Lubricating compositions including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

  13. Lubrication from mixture of boric acid with oils and greases

    SciTech Connect

    Erdemir, A.

    1995-07-11

    Lubricating compositions are disclosed including crystalline boric acid and a base lubricant selected from oils, greases and the like. The lubricity of conventional oils and greases can also be improved by adding concentrates of boric acid.

  14. Pyrolytic Carbon As A Lubricant In Hot Ceramic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lauer, J. L.; Davis, L. C.

    1996-01-01

    Pyrolytic carbon proves useful as solid lubricant in ceramic bearings in advanced gas-turbine engines, where high temperatures destroy liquid lubricants. Ethylene gas made to flow past bearings and pyrolized to replenish carbon lubricant particles.

  15. Testing and Lubrication for Single Race Bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1998-03-04

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for single race bearing applications and one hybrid-material single race bearings were evaluated and compared against single race bearings with trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon), which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Vydax has been used as a bearing lubricant in stronglink mechanisms since 1974. Hybrid bearings with silicon nitride balls and molded glass-nylon-Teflon retainers, bearings lubricated with titanium carbide (TiC) on the balls, bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on races and retainers, and bearings lubricated with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} were evaluated. The bearings were maintained in a preloaded state in bearing cartridges during cycling and vibration tests. Bearings with electrophoretically deposited MoS{sub 2} performed as well as bearings lubricated with Vydax and were the best performing candidate. All candidates were suitable for low preload applications. Bearings with TiC coated balls and bearings lubricated with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers performed well at high preloads, though not as well as bearings lubricated with electrophoretic deposition of MoS{sub 2}. Bearings with silicon nitride balls were not suitable for high preload applications.

  16. Physical and chemical properties of refrigeration lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Sunami, Motoshi

    1999-07-01

    The physical and chemical properties of refrigeration lubricants are discussed. Although much attention has been focused on the performance of candidate lubricants for use with hydrofluorocarbons (HFCs) in order to obtain satisfactory lubrication performance in compressors, the properties of the lubricants themselves have not been well discussed. In this paper, the properties of refrigeration lube base stocks and of lube-refrigerant mixtures are described, specifically the viscosity, density, and refrigerant solubility, the change in viscosity and density due to solution with HFCs, and the insulation properties of the base stocks and the refrigerant mixture.

  17. Liquid-Solid Self-Lubricated Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armada, S.; Schmid, R.; Equey, S.; Fagoaga, I.; Espallargas, N.

    2013-02-01

    Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Self-lubricated coatings obtained by thermal spray are exclusively based on solid lubricants (PTFE, h-BN, graphite, MoS2, etc.) embedded in the matrix. Production of thermal spray coatings containing liquid lubricants has not yet been achieved because of the complexity of keeping a liquid in a solid matrix during the spraying process. In the present article, the first liquid-solid self-lubricating thermal spray coatings are presented. The coatings are produced by inserting lubricant-filled capsules inside a polymeric matrix. The goal of the coating is to release lubricant to the system when needed. The first produced coatings consisted solely of capsules for confirming the feasibility of the process. For obtaining such a coating, the liquid-filled capsules were injected in the thermal spray flame without any other feedstock material. Once the concept and the idea were proven, a polymer was co-sprayed together with the capsules to obtain a coating containing the lubricant-filled capsules distributed in the solid polymeric matrix. The coatings and the self-lubricated properties have been investigated by means of optical microscopy, Scanning Electron Microscopy, and tribological tests.

  18. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1998-01-01

    This chapter describes powerful analytical techniques capable of sampling tribological surfaces and solid-film lubricants. Some of these techniques may also be used to determine the locus of failure in a bonded structure or coated substrate; such information is important when seeking improved adhesion between a solid-film lubricant and a substrate and when seeking improved performance and long life expectancy of solid lubricants. Many examples are given here and through-out the book on the nature and character of solid surfaces and their significance in lubrication, friction, and wear. The analytical techniques used include the late spectroscopic methods.

  19. Lubrication system with tolerance for reduced gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  20. Lubrication System with Tolerance for Reduced Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portlock, Lawrence E. (Inventor); McCune, Michael E. (Inventor); Dobek, Louis J. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A lubrication system includes an auxiliary lubricant tank 48, a supply conduit 58 extending from a source of lubricant 26 to the auxiliary lubricant tank. A reduced-G bypass line 108 branches from the conduit and enters the auxiliary tank at a first elevation E.sub.1. The system also includes an auxiliary tank discharge conduit 116, a portion of which resides within the tank. The resident portion has an opening 122 at least partially at a second elevation E.sub.2 higher than the first elevation.

  1. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers. Quarterly report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-10-01

    Information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on the availability of additional quantities of R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  2. Influence of liquid lubricant properties on their performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wedeven, V.

    1972-01-01

    The influence of lubricant properties on performance is considered in connection with various mechanisms of lubrication. The effects of temperature and pressure on viscosity, which is important in hydrodynamic and elastohydrodynamic lubrication, is presented using a correlation postulated by Roelands. Under elastohydrodynamic conditions it is important to distinguish between the influence of lubricant properties within the inlet region and the Hertz region since each performs different functions. The role of lubricant transport properties such as surface tension is considered in connection with lubricant starvation. Since the lubrication of practical surfaces usually involves boundary as well as hydrodynamic mechanisms, both the chemical and physical properties significantly influence the lubricant's performance.

  3. Self-lubricating polymer composites and polymer transfer film lubrication for space applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    The use of self-lubricating polymers and polymer composites in space is somewhat limited today. In general, they are only used when other methods are inadequate. There is potential, however, for these materials to make a significant impact on future space missions if properly utilized. Some of the different polymers and fillers used to make self-lubricating composites are surveyed. The mechanisms of composite lubrication and wear, the theory behind transfer film lubricating mechanisms, and some factors which affect polymer composite wear and transfer are examined. In addition, some of the current space tribology application areas for self-lubricating polymer composites and polymer transfer are mentioned.

  4. Economic incentives for hazardous-waste management: Deposit-refunded systems and used lubricating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Belzer, R.B.

    1989-01-01

    Economic incentives have been widely advocated for controlling environmental externalities. There has been increasing interest in devising such incentives to reduce the generation of hazardous waste. It is demonstrated that since firms comply with existing disposal rules, there is no efficiency basis for additional incentives. In contrast, incentives may be appropriate for firms that do not comply with existing rules. A range of regulatory instruments is compared, including taxes on inputs and waste generation, and subsidies for safe disposal and waste minimization. Each instrument has undesirable properties. Waste-end taxes encourage illegal disposal; safe-disposal subsides stimulate waste generation; and waste-minimization subsidies cannot be effectively targeted. The economic incentive instrument proposed is a combination of input taxes and safe-disposal subsidies, sometime manifest in the deposit-refund system. This instrument is efficiency-enhancing under plausible real-world conditions. The theoretical results are applied to the case of used lubricating oil, a large-volume waste stream that has vexed regulators for many years. An empirical model is developed that enables the simulation of prices, quantities, and net social benefits resulting from the establishment of a tax-subsidy or deposit-refund system. This model accounts for variations in: price-responsiveness; residual external damage from disposal; ex ante rates of regulatory compliance; and the level of transactions costs implied by the program. The instrument offers positive net social benefits, but only under a narrow range of conditions. The model is modified to apply to a generic hazardous waste problem that emphasizes illegal dumping. The existence of positive net social benefits depends on differences in risk across disposal options, the ex ante level of regulatory compliance, and the magnitude of unit transactions costs.

  5. LUBRICATED TRANSPORT OF VISCOUS FLUIDS

    SciTech Connect

    JOSEPH, DANIEL D

    2004-06-21

    We became the acknowledged world leaders in the science fundamentals of the technology of water lubricated pipelines focusing on stability, numerical and experimental studies. We completed the first direct numerical simulation of axisymmetric core flow. We showed that the pressure at the front of the wave is large (the fluid enters a converging region) and it pushes the interface in, steepening the wave at its front. At the backside of the wave, behind the crest, the pressure is low (diverging flow) and it pulls the interface to the wall, smoothing the backside of the wave. The steepening of the wave can be regarded as a shock up by inertia and it shows that dynamics works against the formation of long waves which are often assumed but not justified in the analysis of such problems. We showed that the steep wave persists even as the gap between the core and the wall decreases to zero. The wave length also decreases in proportion, so that the wave shape is preserved in this limit. This leads to the first mathematical solution giving rise sharkskin. The analysis also showed that there is a threshold Reynolds number below which the total force reckoned relative to a zero at the wave crest is negative, positive above, and we conjectured, therefore that inertia is required to center a density matched core and to levitate the core off the wall when the density is not matched. Other work relates to self-lubricated transport of bitumen froth and self-lubricated transport of bitumen froth.

  6. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    On-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces was studied. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  7. Positive commandable oiler for satellite bearing lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, G. E.

    1977-01-01

    The results of a feasibility study showed that on-orbit commandable lubrication of ball bearings can be accomplished by direct oil application to the moving ball surfaces. Test results for the lubricant applicator portion of the system are presented, in conjunction with a design approach for the reservoir and metering components.

  8. Lubricity studies with biodiesel and related compounds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biodiesel, the alkyl esters of vegetable oils or animal fats, possesses excellent lubricity. This feature has rendered biodiesel of special interest for blending with ultra-low sulfur diesel fuels with poor lubricity. However, some minor components, mainly free fatty acids and monoacylglycerols, of ...

  9. Progress in environmentally friendly lubricant development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Environmentally friendly lubricants comprise ingredients derived from natural raw materials such as those harvested from farms, forests, etc. There is a great deal of interest in such lubricants because of their potential economic, environmental, health, and safety benefits over petroleum-based prod...

  10. MODIFICATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR LUBRICANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils are recognized as rapidly biodegradable and are thus promising candidates as base fluids in environmental-friendly lubricants. Vegetable oils have excellent lubricity, but poor oxidation and low-temperature stability. This paper presents a series of structural modifications of veget...

  11. VOLATILIZED LUBRICANT EMISSIONS FROM STEEL ROLLING OPERATIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a study of the volatilization of lubricants used in steel rolling. Data from nine steel mills were used to: define the volatilized portion of lubricants used in rolling; and prepare total oil, grease, and hydraulic material balances for actual and typi...

  12. Glass molding process with mold lubrication

    DOEpatents

    Davey, Richard G.

    1978-06-27

    Improvements are provided in glass forming processes of the type wherein hot metal blank molds are employed by using the complementary action of a solid film lubricant layer, of graphite dispersed in a cured thermoset organopolysiloxane, along with an overspray of a lubricating oil.

  13. Biobased, environmentally friendly lubricants for processing plants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oil based lubricants have excellent lubricity, biodegradability, good viscosity temperature characteristics and low evaporation loss, but poor thermos-oxidative stability and cold flow properties. This paper presents a systematic approach to improve the oxidative and cold flow behavior of...

  14. Pressure-viscosity coefficient of biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Film thickness is an important tribological property that is dependent on the combined effect of lubricant properties, material property of friction surfaces, and the operating conditions of the tribological process. Pressure-viscosity coefficient (PVC) is one of the lubricant properties that influe...

  15. 7 CFR 3201.47 - Gear lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Gear lubricants. 3201.47 Section 3201.47 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.47 Gear lubricants....

  16. Advances in bio-lubricant development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bio-lubricants are those based on natural sources such as those harvested from farms. There is a great deal of interest in bio-lubricants because of their potential to provide a number of environmental, health, safety, and economic benefits over petroleum-based products. It is anticipated that wid...

  17. 14 CFR 33.71 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Lubrication system. 33.71 Section 33.71 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Turbine Aircraft Engines § 33.71 Lubrication system....

  18. 30 CFR 56.14204 - Machinery lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Machinery lubrication. 56.14204 Section 56... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-SURFACE METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 56.14204 Machinery lubrication. Machinery...

  19. 30 CFR 57.14204 - Machinery lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Machinery lubrication. 57.14204 Section 57... MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND METAL AND NONMETAL MINES Machinery and Equipment Safety Practices and Operational Procedures § 57.14204 Machinery lubrication. Machinery...

  20. Lubrication of rotary rock bits

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhail, J.; Gardner, H.

    1996-12-01

    The rotary rock bit is designed so that both the bearings and cutting structure work together as one unit. Should the bearings wear prematurely before the cutting structure is worn out, then the complete bit will rapidly deteriorate leading to a shortened bit life. The optimum bit run is when the bearings and cutting structure wear out simultaneously, having obtained a good footage and rate of penetration. This paper discusses reasons why users of rotary air blast hole bits encounter premature bit failure due to bearing failure. It also discusses a lubrication system designed for rotary rock bits to combat bearing failure.

  1. Transfer Lubrication For Cryogenic Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barber, S. A.; Kannel, J. W.; Dufrane, K. F.

    1988-01-01

    Report presents evaluation of bronze-filled polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE), known as Salox M, as cage material for ball bearings in high-pressure turbopumps for liquid oxygen. Material evaluated as potentially longer-lived replacement for glass-filled PTFE, known as Armalon. Cage transfers PTFE to balls to form solid lubricant film. However, glass fibers in glass-filled material tend to interfere with transfer. Two cage-design concepts developed; one involves metal-reinforced cage of bronze-filled PTFE; other calls for bronze-filled PTFE inserts in metal structure.

  2. Bearing, gearing, and lubrication technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results of selected NASA research programs on rolling-element and fluid-film bearings, gears, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication are reported. Advances in rolling-element bearing material technology, which have resulted in a significant improvement in fatigue life, and which make possible new applications for rolling bearings, are discussed. Research on whirl-resistant, fluid-film bearings, suitable for very high-speed applications, is discussed. An improved method for predicting gear pitting life is reported. An improved formula for calculating the thickness of elastohydrodynamic films (the existence of which help to define the operating regime of concentrated contact mechanisms such as bearings, gears, and cams) is described.

  3. A High Temperature Vapor Phase Lubrication Study Utilizing a Thioether Liquid Lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, Wilfredo; Graham, E. Earl; Galvin, Thomas

    1997-01-01

    Much of the experimental work on vapor phase lubrication has employed certain organo phosphorous compounds as the vapor phase lubricant. Graham and Klaus, for instance, used tricresyl phosphate (TCP) and tributyl phosphate to vapor phase lubricate a four-ball wear tester using M50 steel balls at 370 C. Makki and Graham were able to vapor phase lubricate a reciprocating pin on plate tribometer using 1018 steel at 280 C with TCP vapor. Although a few organo phosphorous compounds, such as TCP, have been successfully used as vapor phase lubricants in many laboratory experiments, many problems remain unsolved. Two areas of concern relate to the 'durability' of phosphate deposited films and to the ability of the lubricating system to "self-recover" when vapor phase lubricated with an organo phosphorous compound. Durability refers to the ability of the deposited film to provide effective lubrication, for a period of time, after the vapor flow to the lubricating surfaces has been interrupted. Vapor phase lubrication tests, conducted at Cleveland State University with their high temperature tribometer, revealed that when TCP vapor flow to the lubricating surfaces was interrupted the frictional coefficient of the system rapidly increased from a value less than 0.1 to a value of 0.3 which was selected as our failure point. Self-recovery means the ability of the vapor phase lubricant to reduce the frictional coefficient of the lubricating system back down to value less than 0.1 after startup of the interrupted vapor flow. Lubrication tests conducted at Cleveland State University revealed that the high temperature tribometer could not self-recover after startup of the interrupted TCP vapor flow.

  4. Vermiculite as a component of thread lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Kaminskii, S.E.; Shibryaev, S.B.; Lyubinin, I.A.; Nemets, V.L.

    1994-09-01

    Thread lubricants are used in threaded joints of piping and pump/compressor equipment of drilling units in order to protect the threads against wear and galling during the operations of making up and breaking the joints; the lubricants also serve as a seal against the pressure of liquid and gaseous media. Commercial thread lubricants contain fillers to provide the required level of antigalling, antiwear, and sealing properties. Powders of lead, copper, zinc, and their compounds are widely used as fillers; other materials that are used include finely dispersed molybdenum disulfide and polytetrafluoroethylene. The concentrations of these components in commercial thread lubricants may be as high as 60-70%,{sup *} so that the lubricants are quite expensive. Lead compounds have the further disadvantages of toxicity, requiring special protective measures in the production, storage, and application of the lubricants - i.e., these materials are ecologically hazardous. Production of specialized thread lubricants is limited by shortages of fillers, and hence general-purpose greases are almost universally used in threaded joints - greases that are inferior to thread lubricants in their set of tribotechnical properties. The end results are premature wear and leakage of the joints, losses of oil and gas, and environmental pollution. In this connection, it is of interest to use layered minerals, in particular vermiculite, in thread lubricant formulations. Heat-treated and milled vermiculite, which has a structure similar to graphite, is resistant to oxidation and to attack by corrosive media; it has a high upper temperature limit of serviceability as a lubricant, and it is readily available and inexpensive. Major reserves of vermiculite have been explored in the Kola Peninsula (Kovdor deposit), in the Urals (Potaninsk and Buldymsk deposits) and in Siberia (Sludyanka deposit).

  5. Minimal Reduplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchner, Jesse Saba

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces Minimal Reduplication, a new theory and framework within generative grammar for analyzing reduplication in human language. I argue that reduplication is an emergent property in multiple components of the grammar. In particular, reduplication occurs independently in the phonology and syntax components, and in both cases…

  6. Surface functionalization by fine ultraviolet-patterning of nanometer-thick liquid lubricant films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Renguo; Zhang, Hedong; Komada, Suguru; Mitsuya, Yasunaga; Fukuzawa, Kenji; Itoh, Shintaro

    2014-11-01

    For micro/nanoscale devices, surface functionalization is essential to achieve function and performance superior to those that originate from the inherent bulk material properties. As a method of surface functionalization, we dip-coated nanometer-thick liquid lubricant films onto solid surfaces and then patterned the lubricant films with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation through a photomask. Surface topography, adhesion, and friction measurements demonstrated that the patterned films feature a concave-convex thickness distribution with thicker lubricant in the irradiated regions and a functional distribution with lower adhesion and friction in the irradiated convex regions. The pattern linewidth ranged from 100 to as fine as 0.5 μm. The surface functionalization effect of UV-patterning was investigated by measuring the water contact angles, surface energies, friction forces, and depletion of the patterned, as-dipped, and full UV-irradiated lubricant films. The full UV-irradiated lubricant film was hydrophobic with a water contact angle of 102.1°, and had lower surface energy, friction, and depletion than the as-dipped film, which was hydrophilic with a water contact angle of 80.7°. This demonstrates that UV irradiation substantially improves the surface and tribological properties of the nanometer-thick liquid lubricant films. The UV-patterned lubricant films exhibited superior surface and tribological properties than the as-dipped film. The water contact angle increased and the surface energy, friction, and depletion decreased as the pattern linewidth decreased. In particular, the 0.5-μm patterned lubricant film even showed a larger water contact angle and lower friction and depletion than the full UV-irradiated film. These indicate that UV-patterning of nanometer-thick lubricant films with a minimized linewidth has a better surface functionalization effect than full UV irradiation. Enhancement of the surface functionalization effect may be attributed to a

  7. Research on bearing lubricants for use in a high vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Campbell, M. E.; Hass, H.

    1972-01-01

    Work, during the research program, was concentrated on lubricant development, gear lubrication and evaluation, providing coated test specimens, advising NASA contractors about solid lubrication specific applications, and investigation of new method of attaching lubricating solids to bearing surfaces by sputtering technique.

  8. 7 CFR 2902.43 - Chain and cable lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Chain and cable lubricants. 2902.43 Section 2902.43... Items § 2902.43 Chain and cable lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication in... and cable lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  9. 7 CFR 2902.43 - Chain and cable lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Chain and cable lubricants. 2902.43 Section 2902.43... Items § 2902.43 Chain and cable lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide lubrication in... and cable lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  10. Solid lubricant materials for high temperatures: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1985-01-01

    Solid lubricants that can be used above 300 C in air are discussed, including coatings and self-lubricating composite bearing materials. The lubricants considered are representative dichalcogenides, graphite, graphite fluoride, polyimides, soft oxides, oxidatively stable fluorides, and hard coating materials. A few general design considerations revelant to solid lubrication are interspersed.

  11. Taxonomic minimalism.

    PubMed

    Beattle, A J; Oliver, I

    1994-12-01

    Biological surveys are in increasing demand while taxonomic resources continue to decline. How much formal taxonomy is required to get the job done? The answer depends on the kind of job but it is possible that taxonomic minimalism, especially (1) the use of higher taxonomic ranks, (2) the use of morphospecies rather than species (as identified by Latin binomials), and (3) the involvement of taxonomic specialists only for training and verification, may offer advantages for biodiversity assessment, environmental monitoring and ecological research. As such, formal taxonomy remains central to the process of biological inventory and survey but resources may be allocated more efficiently. For example, if formal Identification is not required, resources may be concentrated on replication and increasing sample sizes. Taxonomic minimalism may also facilitate the inclusion in these activities of important but neglected groups, especially among the invertebrates, and perhaps even microorganisms. PMID:21236933

  12. Determining the Thermal Properties of Space Lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maldonado, Christina M.

    2004-01-01

    Many mechanisms used in spacecrafts, such as satellites or the space shuttle, employ ball bearings or gears that need to be lubricated. Normally this is not a problem, but in outer space the regular lubricants that are used on Earth will not function properly. Regular lubricants will quickly vaporize in the near vacuum of space. A unique liquid called a perfluoropolyalkylether (PFPE) has an extremely low vapor pressure, around l0(exp -10) torr at 20 C, and has been used in numerous satellites and is currently used in the space shuttle. Many people refer to the PFPEs as "liquid Teflon". PFPE lubricants however, have a number of problems with them. Lubricants need many soluble additives, especially boundary and anti-wear additives, in them to function properly. All the regular known boundary additives are insoluble in PFPEs and so PFPEs lubricate poorly under highly loaded conditions leading to many malfunctioning ball bearings and gears. JAXA, the Japanese Space Agency, is designing and building a centrifuge rotor to be installed in the International Space Station. The centrifuge rotor is part of a biology lab module. They have selected a PFPE lubricant to lubricate the rotor s ball bearings and NASA bearing experts feel this is not a wise choice. An assessment of the centrifuge rotor design is being conducted by NASA and part of the assessment entails knowing the physical and thermal properties of the PFPE lubricant. One important property, the thermal diffusivity, is not known. An experimental apparatus was set up in order to measure the thermal diffusivity of the PFPE. The apparatus consists of a constant temperature heat source, cylindrical Pyrex glassware, a thermal couple and digital thermometer. The apparatus was tested and calibrated using water since the thermal diffusivity of water is known.

  13. Interactive Cytokine Regulation of Synoviocyte Lubricant Secretion

    PubMed Central

    Blewis, Megan E.; Lao, Brian J.; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Bugbee, William D.; Firestein, Gary S.

    2010-01-01

    Cytokine regulation of synovial fluid (SF) lubricants, hyaluronan (HA), and proteoglycan 4 (PRG4) is important in health, injury, and disease of synovial joints, and may also provide powerful regulation of lubricant secretion in bioreactors for articulating tissues. This study assessed lubricant secretion rates by human synoviocytes and the molecular weight (MW) of secreted lubricants in response to interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-17, IL-32, transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1), and tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), applied individually and in all combinations. Lubricant secretion rates were assessed using ELISA and binding assays, and lubricant MW was assessed using gel electrophoresis and Western blotting. HA secretion rates were increased ∼40-fold by IL-1β, and increased synergistically to ∼80-fold by the combination of IL-1β + TGF-β1 or TNF-α + IL-17. PRG4 secretion rates were increased ∼80-fold by TGF-β1, and this effect was counterbalanced by IL-1β and TNF-α. HA MW was predominantly <1 MDa for controls and individual cytokine stimulation, but was concentrated at >3 MDa after stimulation by IL-1β + TGF-β1 + TNF-α to resemble the distribution in human SF. PRG4 MW was unaffected by cytokines and similar to that in human SF. These results contribute to an understanding of the relationship between SF cytokine and lubricant content in health, injury, and disease, and provide approaches for using cytokines to modulate lubricant secretion rates and MW to help achieve desired lubricant composition of fluid in bioreactors. PMID:19908966

  14. Torquing preload in a lubricated bolt

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seegmiller, H. L.

    1978-01-01

    The tension preload obtained by torquing a 7/8 in. diam UNC high strength bolt was determined for lubricated and dry conditions. Consistent preload with a variation of + or - 3% was obtained when the bolt head area was lubricated prior to each torque application. Preload tensions nearly 70% greater than the value predicted with the commonly used formula occurred with the lubricated bolt. A reduction to 39% of the initial preload was observed during 50 torque applications without relubrication. Little evidence of wear was noted after 203 cycles of tightening.

  15. Strategies for Estimating Discrete Quantities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crites, Terry W.

    1993-01-01

    Describes the benchmark and decomposition-recomposition estimation strategies and presents five techniques to develop students' estimation ability. Suggests situations involving quantities of candy and popcorn in which the teacher can model those strategies for the students. (MDH)

  16. Solvent dewaxing of lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Sequeira, A. Jr.

    1991-04-09

    This paper describes improvement in a process for producing a dewaxed lubricating oil from a wax-bearing mineral oil by the steps comprising; mixing the oil with a dewaxing solvent thereby forming an oil-solvent mixture, chilling the oil-solvent mixture to a dewaxing temperature thereby crystallizing the wax and forming an oil-solvent crystalline wax mixture, separating the oil-solvent-crystalline wax mixture to form a dewaxed oil-solvent mixture and crystalline wax, steam stripping the dewaxed oil-solvent mixture at a temperature of 300{degrees}F to 600{degrees}F and pressure of 1 atm to 3 atm, to yield a solvent free dewaxed oil.

  17. Coatings for wear and lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Recent advances in the tribological uses of rf-sputtered and ion plated films of solid film lubricants (laminar solids, soft metals, organic polymers) and wear resistant refractory compounds (carbides, nitrides, silicides) are reviewed. The sputtering and ion plating potentials and the corresponding coatings formed were evaluated relative to the friction coefficient, wear endurance life and mechanical properties. The tribological and mechanical properties for each kind of film are discussed in terms of film adherence, coherence, density, grain size, morphology, internal stresses, thickness, and substrate conditions such as temperature, topography, chemistry and dc-biasing. The ion plated metallic films in addition to improved tribological properties also have better mechanical properties such as tensile strength and fatigue life.

  18. Autoclaving of lubricated dental instruments.

    PubMed

    Hegna, I K; Kardel, K; Kardel, M

    1978-03-01

    Test organisms forced mechanically into lubricated, rotating dental instruments (handpieces) were all killed during autoclaving at 134 degrees C for 8 min, even when protected by serum and oil. The test organisms were: Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Candida albicans, and spores of Bacillus stearothermophilus. Also when testing the sterility of autoclaved simulated instrument surfaces (brass cylinders and pieces of a cotton fabric) which had been inoculated with bacteria and dried before they were sprayed with oil, there was no growth of the test organisms. In addition to the other test organisms, spores of Bacillus subtilis and Gram-positive, anaerobic bacteria isolated from used handpieces that had been exposed to several autoclavings were used. Some of the handpieces that had been left to dry after use in the dentist's office before they were autoclaved, were shown not to be sterile. Therefore, the authors suggest that autoclaving of the instruments should take place shortly after use and prescribed cleaning. PMID:274800

  19. Synthesis of new high performance lubricants and solid lubricants. Progress report, June 1991--March 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Lagow, R.J.

    1992-03-01

    We have started to make a number of classes of new perfluoropolyethers both in the solid lubricant area and liquid lubricant area. We have prepared some chlorofluoroethers for testing as additives for normal petroleum and polyalphaolefin lubricants which are so widely used in the United States. Perfluoropolyethers are not soluble in hydrocarbons. On the other hand, these chlorofluoropolyethers are soluble in substantial amounts in simple hydrocarbons. These are uniquely capable of being additives that flow with the motor oil or the polyalphaolefin.

  20. Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication with Polyolester Lubricants and HFC Refrigerants, Final Report, Volume 2

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsel, Selda; Pozebanchuk, Michael

    1999-04-01

    Lubrication properties of refrigeration lubricants were investigated in high pressure nonconforming contacts under different conditions of temperature, rolling speed, and refrigerant concentration. The program was based upon the recognition that the lubrication regime in refrigeration compressors is generally elastohydrodynamic or hydrodynamic, as determined by the operating conditions of the compressor and the properties of the lubricant. Depending on the compressor design, elastohydrodynamic lubrication conditions exist in many rolling and sliding elements of refrigeration compressors such as roller element bearings, gears, and rotors. The formation of an elastohydrodynamic film separating rubbing surfaces is important in preventing the wear and failure of compressor elements. It is, therefore, important to predict the elastohydrodynamic (EHD) performance of lubricants under realistic tribocontact renditions. This is, however, difficult as the lubricant properties that control film formation are critically dependent upon pressure and shear, and cannot be evaluated using conventional laboratory instruments. In this study, the elastohydrodynamic behavior of refrigeration lubricants with and without the presence of refrigerants was investigated using the ultrathin film EHD interferometry technique. This technique enables very thin films, down to less than 5 nm, to be measured accurately within an EHD contact under realistic conditions of temperature, shear, and pressure. The technique was adapted to the study of lubricant refrigerant mixtures. Film thickness measurements were obtained on refrigeration lubricants as a function of speed, temperature, and refrigerant concentration. The effects of lubricant viscosity, temperature, rolling speed, and refrigerant concentration on EHD film formation were investigated. From the film thickness measurements, effective pressure-viscosity coefficients were calculated. The lubricants studied in this project included two

  1. The basics of powder lubrication in high-temperature powder-lubricated dampers

    SciTech Connect

    Heshmat, H.; Walton, J.F. )

    1993-04-01

    The objective of this investigation is to develop a novel powder-lubricated rotor bearing system damper concept for use in high-temperature, high-speed rotating machinery such as advanced aircraft gas turbine engines. The approach discussed herein consists of replacing a conventional oil lubrication or frictional damper system with a powder lubrication system that uses the process particulates or externally fed powder lubricant. Unlike previous work in this field, this approach is based on the postulate of the quasi-hydrodynamic nature of powder lubrication. This postulate is deduced from past observation and present verification that there are a number of basic features of powder flow in narrow interfaces that have the characteristic behavior of fluid film lubrication. In addition to corroborating the basic mechanism of powder lubrication, the conceptual and experimental work performed in this program provides guidelines for selection of the proper geometries, materials, and powders suitable for this tribological process. The present investigation describes the fundamentals of quasi-hydrodynamic powder lubrication and defines the rationale underlying the design of the test facility. The performance and the results of the experimental program present conclusions reached regarding design requirements as well as the formulation of a proper model of quasi-hydrodynamic powder lubrication.

  2. Optimized Liquid-Liquid Extractive Rerefining of Spent Lubricants

    PubMed Central

    Kamal, Muhammad Ashraf; Khan, Fasihullah

    2014-01-01

    Central composite design methodology has been employed to model the sludge yield data obtained during liquid-liquid extractive rerefining of spent lubricants using an alcohol (1-butanol) and a ketone (methyl ethyl ketone) as prospective solvents. The study has resulted in two reasonably accurate multivariate process models that relate the sludge yield (R2 = 0.9065 and 0.9072 for alcohol and ketone, resp.) to process variables (settling time t, operating temperature T, and oil to solvent ratio r). Construction of such models has allowed the maximization of the sludge yield (more than 8% and 3% in case of alcohol and ketone, resp.) so that the extraction of useable oil components from spent lubricants can economically be performed under extremely mild conditions (t = 16.7 h, T = 10°C, and r = 2) and fairly moderate conditions (t = 26.6 h, T = 10°C, and r = 5) established for the alcohol and ketone correspondingly. Based on these performance parameters alcohol appears to be superior over ketone for this extraction process. Additionally extractive treatment results in oil stocks with lesser quantity of environmentally hazardous polyaromatic hydrocarbons that are largely left in the separated sludge. PMID:24688388

  3. Remote lubrication system for conveyor bearing

    SciTech Connect

    Bandy, C.L. Jr.

    1993-08-03

    In an assembly having a hard-to-reach rotary means supported by a bearing to be lubricated, a housing enclosing said bearing, and a fixed frame means for mounting said rotary means through said housing, a lubrication system is described comprising: access ports in said housing for communicating lubricant to said bearing; an elongated channel of predetermined length having at least two ends in said fixed frame means in fluid communication with at least one of said access ports located between said ends; means for sealing the ports not aligned with said channel; and stationary conduit means leading to a remote location in fluid communication with said channel; whereby lubricant is communicated through said conduit means, said channel, and at least one of said access ports for application to said bearing from a remote location.

  4. Dry lubricant films for aluminum forming.

    SciTech Connect

    Wei, J.; Erdemir, A.; Fenske, G. R.

    1999-03-30

    During metal forming process, lubricants are crucial to prevent direct contact, adhesion, transfer and scuffing of workpiece materials and tools. Boric acid films can be firmly adhered to the clean aluminum surfaces by spraying their methanol solutions and provide extremely low friction coefficient (about 0.04). The cohesion strengths of the bonded films vary with the types of aluminum alloys (6061, 6111 and 5754). The sheet metal forming tests indicate that boric acid films and the combined films of boric acid and mineral oil can create larger strains than the commercial liquid and solid lubricants, showing that they possess excellent lubricities for aluminum forming. SEM analyses indicate that boric acid dry films separate the workpiece and die materials, and prevent their direct contact and preserve their surface qualities. Since boric acid is non-toxic and easily removed by water, it can be expected that boric acid films are environmentally friendly, cost effective and very efficient lubricants for sheet aluminum cold forming.

  5. Burnishing technique improves lubrication of threaded fasteners

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gruper, J. L.

    1965-01-01

    Burnishing a molydisulfide coating into the thread surfaces of fasteners eliminates the need for binders and vehicles which ensure coverage and retention of the lubricant during fastening. The coating may be applied by any convenient method.

  6. Microfog lubrication for aircraft engine bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosenlieb, J. W.

    1976-01-01

    An analysis and system study was performed to provide design information regarding lubricant and coolant flow rates and flow paths for effective utilization of the lubricant and coolant in a once through bearing oil mist (microfog) and coolant air system. Both static and dynamic tests were performed. Static tests were executed to evaluate and calibrate the mist supply system. A total of thirteen dynamic step speed bearing tests were performed using four different lubricants and several different mist and air supply configurations. The most effective configuration consisted of supplying the mist and the major portion of the cooling air axially through the bearing. The results of these tests have shown the feasibility of using a once through oil mist and cooling air system to lubricate and cool a high speed, high temperature aircraft engine mainshaft bearing.

  7. High temperature rare earth solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1970-01-01

    Rare earth trifluorides have potential use as lubricating fillers for mechanical carbons and as coatings on metallic substrates. Friction experiments show that they are effective in reducing metallic wear.

  8. High-Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher; Edmonds, Brian J.

    2010-01-01

    NASA PS400 is a solid lubricant coating invented for high-temperature tribological applications. This plasma-sprayed coating is a variant of the previously patented PS304 coating, and has been formulated to provide higher density, smoother surface finish, and better dimensional stability. This innovation is a new composite material that provides a means to reduce friction and wear in mechanical components. PS400 is a blend of a nickel-molybdenum binder, chrome oxide hardener, silver lubricant, and barium fluoride/calcium fluoride eutectic lubricant that can either be sprayed or deposited by other means, such as powder metallurgy. The resulting composite material is then finished by grinding and polishing to produce a smooth, self-lubricating surface.

  9. Fundamental considerations for future solid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. L.; Sliney, H. E.

    1969-01-01

    Properties important to the performance of solid lubricants are discussed. Those properties include shear characteristics, coherence between particles, resistance to cold flow, adherence to the substrate, applicable chemical thermodynamics and kinetics of materials and environments, polymorphism, and rheology. The following generalizations are made: (1) chemical thermodynamics and kinetics are powerful tools for use in determining the useful environments and methods of application for solid film lubricants; (2) the primary requirement for a solid lubricant is low shear strength; (3) the rheology of solid film constituents and formulations is likely to be of vital importance to performance and life; and (4) adherence and mobility of surface films is another primary requirement for long lived solid lubricants.

  10. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, William R.; Fusaro, Robert L.

    1993-01-01

    An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.

  11. Overview of liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, W. R.

    1982-01-01

    An overall status report on liquid lubricants for use in high-performance turbojet engines is presented. Emphasis is placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is iven of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some nine candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Also, alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of of continuing work on improving high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of fluid base stocks is discussed.

  12. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1992-07-01

    Information contained in this reporters designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. Swell measurements have been made on approximately 50% of the proposed elastomers (94 total)in both the lubricant (7 total) and refrigerant (10 total) materials. Swell behavior in the these fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 hours and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  13. Lubrication and cooling for high speed gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.

    1985-01-01

    The problems and failures occurring with the operation of high speed gears are discussed. The gearing losses associated with high speed gearing such as tooth mesh friction, bearing friction, churning, and windage are discussed with various ways shown to help reduce these losses and thereby improve efficiency. Several different methods of oil jet lubrication for high speed gearing are given such as into mesh, out of mesh, and radial jet lubrication. The experiments and analytical results for the various methods of oil jet lubrication are shown with the strengths and weaknesses of each method discussed. The analytical and experimental results of gear lubrication and cooling at various test conditions are presented. These results show the very definite need of improved methods of gear cooling at high speed and high load conditions.

  14. Liquid lubricants for advanced aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loomis, William R.; Fusaro, Robert L.

    1992-01-01

    An overview of liquid lubricants for use in current and projected high performance turbojet engines is discussed. Chemical and physical properties are reviewed with special emphasis placed on the oxidation and thermal stability requirements imposed upon the lubrication system. A brief history is given of the development of turbine engine lubricants which led to the present day synthetic oils with their inherent modification advantages. The status and state of development of some eleven candidate classes of fluids for use in advanced turbine engines are discussed. Published examples of fundamental studies to obtain a better understanding of the chemistry involved in fluid degradation are reviewed. Alternatives to high temperature fluid development are described. The importance of continuing work on improving current high temperature lubricant candidates and encouraging development of new and improved fluid base stocks are discussed.

  15. Tribometer for Lubrication Studies in Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, Stephen V.

    1998-01-01

    The NASA Lewis Research Center has developed a new way to evaluate the liquid lubricants used in ball bearings in space mechanisms. For this evaluation, a liquid lubricant is exercised in the rolling contact vacuum tribometer shown in the photo. This tribometer, which is essentially a thrust bearing with three balls and flat races, has contact stresses similar to those in a typical preloaded, angular contact ball bearing. The rotating top plate drives the balls in an outward-winding spiral orbit instead of a circular path. Upon contact with the "guide plate," the balls are forced back to their initial smaller orbit radius; they then repeat this spiral orbit thousands of times. The orbit rate of the balls is low enough, 2 to 5 rpm, to allow the system to operate in the boundary lubrication regime that is most stressful to the liquid lubricant. This system can determine the friction coefficient, lubricant lifetime, and species evolved from the liquid lubricant by tribodegradation. The lifetime of the lubricant charge is only few micrograms, which is "used up" by degradation during rolling. The friction increases when the lubricant is exhausted. The species evolved by the degrading lubricant are determined by a quadrupole residual gas analyzer that directly views the rotating elements. The flat races (plates) and 0.5-in.-diameter balls are of a configuration and size that permit easy post-test examination by optical and electron microscopy and the full suite of modern surface and thin-film chemical analytical techniques, including infrared and Raman microspectroscopy and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. In addition, the simple sphere-on-a-flat-plate geometry allows an easy analysis of the contact stresses at all parts of the ball orbit and an understanding of the frictional energy losses to the lubricant. The analysis showed that when the ball contacts the guide plate, gross sliding occurs between the ball and rotating upper plate as the ball forced back to a smaller

  16. Viscous pour point of microquantities of fluid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gardos, M. N.

    1974-01-01

    A method is described involving the measurement of the viscous desolidification (pour) point of wax-free lubricant fluids. This method is especially useful for pour point testing of experimental quantities, since only six to sixteen drops of the oil are required for a single determination (automatically performed in duplicate) with nearly full recovery of the sample. The technique consists of: (1) rapidly freezing a small, predetermined amount of the oil on the side of a small test tube to form a frozen drop of given dimensions; (2) immersing duplicates of the charged and stoppered tubes into a cold bath; and (3) measuring the temperature when the drop front has moved a predetermined distance as the bath warms up.

  17. Polymer Lubricants For Use In Vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Report describes tests of lubricating properties of 10 polymer-based materials - in particular, polyimides - in vacuum. Commercially available materials, in forms of solid bodies and films on metals, were tested on pin-on-disk apparatus in vacuum. Best low-wear, low-friction material was 80 PMDA/20 BTDA solid-body polyimide. Friction and wear properties of most polyimides so good in vacuum that solid-lubricant additives not necessary.

  18. Advanced lubrication systems and materials. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, S.

    1998-05-07

    This report described the work conducted at the National Institute of Standards and Technology under an interagency agreement signed in September 1992 between DOE and NIST for 5 years. The interagency agreement envisions continual funding from DOE to support the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine technologies in terms of lubrication, friction, and wear control encountered in the development of advanced transportation technologies. However, in 1994, the DOE office of transportation technologies was reorganized and the tribology program was dissolved. The work at NIST therefore continued at a low level without further funding from DOE. The work continued to support transportation technologies in the development of fuel efficient, low emission engine development. Under this program, significant progress has been made in advancing the state of the art of lubrication technology for advanced engine research and development. Some of the highlights are: (1) developed an advanced high temperature liquid lubricant capable of sustaining high temperatures in a prototype heat engine; (2) developed a novel liquid lubricant which potentially could lower the emission of heavy duty diesel engines; (3) developed lubricant chemistries for ceramics used in the heat engines; (4) developed application maps for ceramic lubricant chemistry combinations for design purpose; and (5) developed novel test methods to screen lubricant chemistries for automotive air-conditioning compressors lubricated by R-134a (Freon substitute). Most of these findings have been reported to the DOE program office through Argonne National Laboratory who manages the overall program. A list of those reports and a copy of the report submitted to the Argonne National Laboratory is attached in Appendix A. Additional reports have also been submitted separately to DOE program managers. These are attached in Appendix B.

  19. New Lubricants Protect Machines and the Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    In 1994, NASA and Lockheed Martin Space Operations commissioned Sun Coast Chemicals of Daytona Inc to develop a new type of lubricant that would be safe for the environment and help "grease the wheels" of the shuttle-bearing launcher platform. Founded in 1989, Sun Coast Chemicals is known amongst the racing circuit for effective lubricants that help overcome engine and transmission problems related to heat and wear damage. In a matter of weeks, Sun Coast Chemical produced the biodegradable, high-performance X-1R Crawler Track Lube. In 1996, Sun Coast Chemical determined there was a market for this new development, and introduced three derivative products, Train Track Lubricant, Penetrating Spray Lubricant, and Biodegradable Hydraulic Fluid, and then quickly followed with a gun lubricant/cleaner and a fishing rod and reel lubricant. Just recently, Sun Coast introduced the X-1R Corporation, which folds the high-performance, environmentally safe benefits into a full line of standard automotive and specially formulated racing products. The entire X-1R automotive product line has stood up to rigorous testing by groups such as the American Society of Mechanical Engineers, the Swedish National Testing and Research Institute, the Department of Mechanical Engineering at Oakland University (Rochester, Michigan), and Morgan-McClure Motorsports (Abingdon, Virginia). The X-1R Corporation also markets "handy packs" for simple jobs around the house, consisting of a multi-purpose, multi-use lubricant and grease. In 2003, The X-1R Corporation teamed up with Philadelphia-based Penn Tackle Manufacturing Co., a leading manufacturer of fishing tackle since 1932, to jointly develop and market a line of advanced lubrication products for saltwater and freshwater anglers

  20. Tribology experiment. [journal bearings and liquid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wall, W. A.

    1981-01-01

    A two-dimensional concept for Spacelab rack 7 was developed to study the interaction of liquid lubricants and surfaces under static and dynamic conditions in a low-gravity environment fluid wetting and spreading experiments of a journal bearing experiments, and means to accurately measure and record the low-gravity environment during experimentation are planned. The wetting and spreading process of selected commercial lubricants on representative surface are to the observes in a near-zero gravity environment.

  1. Anti-friction additives for lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Karol, T.J.; Magaha, H.S.; Schlicht, R.C.

    1987-03-03

    A lubricating oil composition is described comprising (i) a major portion of lubricant oil; and (ii) from about 0.05 to about 10.0 wt.% of, as an additive, a product prepared by reacting a natural oil selected from the group consisting of coconut, babassu, palm, palm kernel, olive, castor, peanut, beef tallow and lard, with a (C/sub 2/-C/sub 10/) hydroxy acid and a polyamine.

  2. Investigation of lubricants under boundary friction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heidebroek, E; Pietsch, E

    1942-01-01

    Numerous observations of such lubrication processes within range of boundary friction on journal bearings and gear tooth profiles have strengthened the supposition that it should be possible to study the attendant phenomena with engineering methods and equipment. These considerations formed the basis of the present studies, which have led to the discovery of relations governing the suitability of bearing surfaces and the concept of "lubricating quality."

  3. Determination of microgram quantities of inorganic sulfate in atmospheric particulates

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfson, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    This method makes it possible for a minimally equipped analytical laboratory to measure the microgram quantities of water soluble inorganic sulfate in respirable-sized ambient air particulates. It is particularly appropriate for indoor and personal dosimeter samples which often contain cigarette smoke.

  4. Trigonometric functions of nonlinear quantities

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, D.W.

    1994-08-01

    Trigonometric functions of nonlinear quantities are introduced. Functions of the form {line_integral}(x{sup a}), {line_integral}(x{sup y}), and {line_integral}{sup n}(x{sup a}) are reported, where {line_integral} is a trigonometric function such as cos, sin, tan, cot, sec, or csc; x is a variable; a is a constant; y is a variable; and n is a constant. Sums, products and quotients of these functions are defined. Trigonometric functions of nonlinear quantities involving constants to variable powers also are mentioned. Possible applications to quantum mechanics, gravity, and a final theory of matter are discussed.

  5. Characteristic quantities and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimvall, Göran

    Phenomena in the physical sciences are described with quantities that have a numerical value and a dimension, i.e., a physical unit. Dimensional analysis is a powerful aspect of modeling and simulation. Characteristic quantities formed by a combination of model parameters can give new insights without detailed analytic or numerical calculations. Dimensional requirements lead to Buckingham's Π theorem - a general mathematical structure of all models in physics. These aspects are illustrated with many examples of modeling, e.g., an elastic beam on supports, wave propagation on a liquid surface, the Lennard-Jones potential for the interaction between atoms, the Lindemann melting rule, and saturation phenomena in electrical and thermal conduction.

  6. Krytox Lubrication Tape Study. [fluorinated lubricating oil for video tape recorders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, F.

    1978-01-01

    The use of Krytox, a fluorinated oil, as a tape surface lubricant was studied for a wideband video tape recorder. In spite of the 5 to 1 head wear reduction credited to the surface lubricant, the resultant head life fell short of the 1500 hour goal.

  7. Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants. Final report, Part 1

    SciTech Connect

    Cavestri, R.C.

    1997-07-01

    Part one of this research provides manufacturers of components of air-conditioning and refrigeration equipment with a useful list of lubricant additives, sources, functional properties and chemical species. The list in part one is comprised of domestic lubricant additive suppliers and the results of a literature search that was specifically targeted for additives reported to be useful in polyolester chemistry.

  8. Reduced Need of Lubricity Additives in Soybean Oil Blends Under Boundary Lubrication Conditions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Converging prices of vegetable oils and petroleum, along with increased focus on renewable resources, gave more momentum to vegetable oil lubricants. Boundary lubrication properties of four Extreme Pressure (EP) additive blends in conventional Soy Bean Oil (SBO) and Paraffinic Mineral Oil (PMO) of ...

  9. Surface roughness effects with solid lubricants dispersed in mineral oils

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cusano, C.; Goglia, P. R.; Sliney, H. E.

    1983-01-01

    The lubricating effectiveness of solid-lubricant dispersions are investigated in both point and line contacts using surfaces with both random and directional roughness characteristics. Friction and wear data obtained at relatively low speeds and at room temperature, indicate that the existence of solid lubricants such as graphite, MoS2, and PTFE in a plain mineral oil generally will not improve the effectiveness of the oil as a lubricant for such surfaces. Under boundary lubrication conditions, the friction force, as a function of time, initially depends upon the directional roughness properties of the contacting surfaces irrespective of whether the base oil or dispersions are used as lubricants.

  10. Mechanisms of lubrication and wear of a bonded solid lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    To obtain a better understanding of how bonded solid lubricant films lubricate and wear (in general), the tribological properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films were studied (in specific). A pin-on-disk type of testing apparatus was used; but in addition to sliding a hemispherically tipped rider, a rider with a 0.95 mm diameter flat area was slid against the film. This was done so that a lower, less variable contact stress could be achieved. Two stages of lubrication occurred. In the first, the film supported the load. The lubricating mechanism consisted of the shear of a thin surface layer (of the film) between the rider and the bulk of the film. The second occurred after the bonded film had worn to the substrate, and consisted of the shear of very thin lubricant films between the rider and flat plateaus generated on the metallic substrate asperities. The film wear mechanism was strongly dependent on contact stress.

  11. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-01-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to…

  12. Quantity Estimation Of The Interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Gorana, Agim; Malkaj, Partizan; Muda, Valbona

    2007-04-23

    In this paper we present some considerations about quantity estimations, regarding the range of interaction and the conservations laws in various types of interactions. Our estimations are done under classical and quantum point of view and have to do with the interaction's carriers, the radius, the influence range and the intensity of interactions.

  13. Experimental investigations of elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1983-01-01

    Various experimental studies of elastohydrodynamic lubrication have been reviewed. The various types of machines used in these investigations, such as the disc, two and four ball, crossed-cylinders, and crossed-axes rolling disc machine, are described. The measurement of the most important parameters, such as film shape, film thickness, pressure, temperature, and traction, is considered. Determination of the film thickness is generally the most important of these effects since it dictates the extent to which the asperities on opposing surfaces can come into contact and thus has a direct bearing on wear and fatigue failure of the contacting surfaces. Several different techniques for measuring film thickness have been described, including electrical resistance, capacitance, X-ray, optical interferometry, laser beam diffraction, strain gage, and spring dynamometer methods. An attempt has been made to describe the basic concepts and limitations of each of these techniques. These various methods have been used by individual researchers, but there is no universally acceptable technique for measuring elastohydrodynamic film thickness. Capacitance methods have provided most of the reliable data for nominal line or rectangular conjunctions, but optical interferometry has proved to be the most effective procedure for elliptical contacts. Optical interferometry has the great advantage that it reveals not only the film thickness, but also details of the film shape over the complete area of the conjunction.

  14. Coated carbide drill performance under soluble coconut oil lubricant and nanoparticle enhanced MQL in drilling AISI P20

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamil, N. A. M.; Azmi, A. I.; Fairuz, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    This research experimentally investigates the performance of a TiAlN coated carbide drill bit in drilling AISI P20 through two different kinds of lubricants, namely; soluble coconut oil (SCO) and nanoparticle-enhanced coconut oil (NECO) under minimum quantity lubrication system. The tool life and tool wear mechanism were studied using various cutting speeds of 50, 100 and 150 m/min with a constant feed of 0.01 mm/rev. Since the flank wear land was not regular along the cutting edge, the average flank wear (VB) was measured at several points using image analysis software. The drills were inspected using a scanning electron microscope to further elucidate the wear mechanism. The result indicates that drilling with the nanoparticle- enhanced lubricant was better in resisting the wear and improving the drill life to some extent

  15. Minimal cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Federico; Schücker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The minimal requirement for cosmography—a non-dynamical description of the universe—is a prescription for calculating null geodesics, and time-like geodesics as a function of their proper time. In this paper, we consider the most general linear connection compatible with homogeneity and isotropy, but not necessarily with a metric. A light-cone structure is assigned by choosing a set of geodesics representing light rays. This defines a "scale factor" and a local notion of distance, as that travelled by light in a given proper time interval. We find that the velocities and relativistic energies of free-falling bodies decrease in time as a consequence of cosmic expansion, but at a rate that can be different than that dictated by the usual metric framework. By extrapolating this behavior to photons' redshift, we find that the latter is in principle independent of the "scale factor". Interestingly, redshift-distance relations and other standard geometric observables are modified in this extended framework, in a way that could be experimentally tested. An extremely tight constraint on the model, however, is represented by the blackbody-ness of the cosmic microwave background. Finally, as a check, we also consider the effects of a non-metric connection in a different set-up, namely, that of a static, spherically symmetric spacetime.

  16. Density Estimation for Projected Exoplanet Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Robert A.

    2011-05-01

    Exoplanet searches using radial velocity (RV) and microlensing (ML) produce samples of "projected" mass and orbital radius, respectively. We present a new method for estimating the probability density distribution (density) of the unprojected quantity from such samples. For a sample of n data values, the method involves solving n simultaneous linear equations to determine the weights of delta functions for the raw, unsmoothed density of the unprojected quantity that cause the associated cumulative distribution function (CDF) of the projected quantity to exactly reproduce the empirical CDF of the sample at the locations of the n data values. We smooth the raw density using nonparametric kernel density estimation with a normal kernel of bandwidth σ. We calibrate the dependence of σ on n by Monte Carlo experiments performed on samples drawn from a theoretical density, in which the integrated square error is minimized. We scale this calibration to the ranges of real RV samples using the Normal Reference Rule. The resolution and amplitude accuracy of the estimated density improve with n. For typical RV and ML samples, we expect the fractional noise at the PDF peak to be approximately 80 n -log 2. For illustrations, we apply the new method to 67 RV values given a similar treatment by Jorissen et al. in 2001, and to the 308 RV values listed at exoplanets.org on 2010 October 20. In addition to analyzing observational results, our methods can be used to develop measurement requirements—particularly on the minimum sample size n—for future programs, such as the microlensing survey of Earth-like exoplanets recommended by the Astro 2010 committee.

  17. Enhancement of Perfluoropolyether Boundary Lubrication Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.; Ajayi, O. O.; Wedeven, L. D.

    1996-01-01

    A ball bearing simulator operating under starved conditions was used to perform screening tests to evaluate the boundary lubrication performance of a branched perfluoropolyether (PFPE), K-143 AB. Several approaches to enhance boundary lubrication were studied. These included: (1) soluble boundary additives, (2) bearing surface modifications, (3) 'run-in' surface films, and (4) ceramic bearing components. In addition, results were compared with two non-perfluorinated liquid lubricant formulations. Based on these tests, the following tentative conclusions can be made: (1) Substantial improvements in boundary lubrication performance were observed with a beta-diketone boundary additive and a tricresyl phosphate (TCP) liquid surface pretreatment, (2) the use of rough Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) = 40 micro-inch) also provided increases in test duration, but with concomitant abrasive wear, (3) moderate improvements were seen with two boundary additives (a phosphine and a phosphatriazine) and a neat (100%) fluid (a carboxylic acid terminated PFPE); and small improvements with surface pretreatments with synthetic hydrocarbons, a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) coating, and TiC coated 440 C and smooth Si3N4 balls (R(sub a) = 1 micro-inch), and (4) two non-PFPE lubricant formulations (a polyalphaolefin (PAO) and synthetic hydrocarbon) yielded substantial improvements.

  18. Additives for high temperature liquid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, C.; Yavrouian, A.H.

    1991-04-01

    The purpose of this task is to perform research for the Department of Energy (DOE) on the synthesis and characterization of additives for liquid lubricants which will lead to significant improvements in the major tribology task area of friction and wear reductions at high temperature. To this end JPL is surveying candidate precursor compounds which are soluble in liquid lubricants, synthesizing the most promising of these materials, characterizing them, and submitting these additives to NIST for evaluation. Calculations have been made to estimate the Hildebrand solubility parameters for candidate precursor compounds. The initial listing is confined to dinitrites which can form chelates with metals or their compounds. The goal is to find soluble additives that can react in situ with the bearing surface to form adherent lubricating film. Although none of the compounds listed match the solubility parameters of liquid lubricants, the lowest solubility parameters were calculated for dialkyl substituted compounds. In this case, there is probably sufficient solubility to provide adequate amounts of reactants on the metal surfaces. The conclusions are based on previous results where only 1/2 to 1% solubility was sufficient to give excellent lubrication.

  19. Solid Lubrication Fundamentals and Applications. Chapter 6

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    2000-01-01

    This chapter focuses attention on the friction and wear properties of selected solid lubricating films to aid users in choosing the best lubricant, deposition conditions, and operational variables. For simplicity, discussion of the tribological properties of concern is separated into two parts. The first part of the chapter discusses the different solid lubricating films selected for study including commercially developed solid film lubricants: (1) bonded molybdenum disulfide (MoS2), (2) magnetron-sputtered MoS2, (3) ion-plated silver, (4) ion-plated lead, (5) magnetron-sputtered diamondlike carbon (MS DLC), and (6) plasma-assisted, chemical-vapor-deposited diamondlike carbon (PACVD DEC) films. Marked differences in the friction and wear properties of the different films resulted from the different environmental conditions (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, and dry nitrogen) and the solid film lubricant materials. The second part of the chapter discusses the physical and chemical characteristics, friction behavior, and endurance life of the magnetron-sputtered MoS2 films. The role of interface species and the effects of applied load, film thickness, oxygen pressure, environment, and temperature on the friction and wear properties are considered.

  20. 7 CFR 985.12 - Salable quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.12 Salable quantity. Salable quantity means the total quantity of each class of oil which handlers may purchase...

  1. 7 CFR 985.12 - Salable quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.12 Salable quantity. Salable quantity means the total quantity of each class of oil which handlers may purchase...

  2. 7 CFR 985.12 - Salable quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.12 Salable quantity. Salable quantity means the total quantity of each class of oil which handlers may purchase...

  3. 7 CFR 985.12 - Salable quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.12 Salable quantity. Salable quantity means the total quantity of each class of oil which handlers may purchase...

  4. 7 CFR 985.12 - Salable quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... HANDLING OF SPEARMINT OIL PRODUCED IN THE FAR WEST Order Regulating Handling Definitions § 985.12 Salable quantity. Salable quantity means the total quantity of each class of oil which handlers may purchase...

  5. Evaluation of seals, lubricants, and adhesives used on LDEF

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, Harry; Keough, Bruce; Pippin, Gary

    1993-01-01

    A wide variety of seals, lubricants, and adhesives were used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). The results, to date, of the Systems Special Investigation Group (SIG) and the Materials SIG investigation into the effect of the long term low Earth orbit (LEO) exposure on these materials is discussed. Results of this investigation show that if the material was shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69 month exposure to LEO had minimal effect on the material. However, if the material was on LDEF's exterior surface, a variety of events occurred ranging from no material change, to changes in mechanical or physical properties, to complete disappearance of the material. The results are from the following sources: (1) visual examinations and/or testing of materials performed by various LDEF experimenters, (2) testing done at Boeing in support of the Materials or Systems SIG investigations, (3) testing done at Boeing on Boeing hardware flown on LDEF.

  6. Composites of porous metal and solid lubricants increase bearing life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1967-01-01

    Self-lubricating composites of porous nickel and nickel-chromium alloy impregnated with a barium fluoride-calcium fluoride eutectic, and a thin film of solid lubricant increase wear life of load bearing surfaces.

  7. Recognizing Prefixes in Scientific Quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sokolowski, Andrzej

    2015-09-01

    Although recognizing prefixes in physical quantities is inherent for practitioners, it might not be inherent for students, who do not use prefixes in their everyday life experiences. This deficiency surfaces in AP Physics exams. For example, readers of an AP Physics exam reported "a common mistake of incorrectly converting nanometers to meters." Similar students' mistakes were reported also by AP Chemistry readers "as in previous years, students still had difficulty converting kJ to J." While traditional teaching focuses on memorizing the symbols of prefixes, little attention is given to helping learners recognize a prefix in a given quantity. I noticed in my teaching practice that by making the processes of identifying prefixes more explicit, students make fewer mistakes on unit conversion. Thus, this paper presents an outline of a lesson that focuses on prefix recognition. It is designed for a first-year college physics class; however, its key points can be addressed to any group of physics students.

  8. Characteristic quantities and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimvall, Göran

    2008-04-01

    Phenomena in the physical sciences are described with quantities that have a numerical value and a dimension, i.e., a physical unit. Dimensional analysis is a powerful aspect of modeling and simulation. Characteristic quantities formed by a combination of model parameters can give new insights without detailed analytic or numerical calculations. Dimensional requirements lead to Buckingham’s Π theorem—a general mathematical structure of all models in physics. These aspects are illustrated with many examples of modeling, e.g., an elastic beam on supports, wave propagation on a liquid surface, the Lennard-Jones potential for the interaction between atoms, the Lindemann melting rule, and saturation phenomena in electrical and thermal conduction.

  9. Characteristic quantities and dimensional analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimvall, Göran

    Phenomena in the physical sciences are described with quantities that have a numerical value and a dimension, i.e., a physical unit. Dimensional analysis is a powerful aspect of modeling and simulation. Characteristic quantities formed by a combination of model parameters can give new insights without detailed analytic or numerical calculations. Dimensional requirements lead to Buckingham's Π theorem—a general mathematical structure of all models in physics. These aspects are illustrated with many examples of modeling, e.g., an elastic beam on supports, wave propagation on a liquid surface, the Lennard-Jones potential for the interaction between atoms, the Lindemann melting rule, and saturation phenomena in electrical and thermal conduction.

  10. Mechanics of a gaseous film barrier to lubricant wetting of elastohydrodynamically lubricated conjunctions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prahl, J. M.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1985-01-01

    Two analytical models, one based on simple hydrodynamic lubrication and the other on soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication, are presented and compared to delineate the dominant physical parameters that govern the mechanics of a gaseous film between a small droplet of lubricant and the outer race of a ball bearing. Both models are based on the balance of gravity forces, air drag forces, and air film lubrication forces and incorporate a drag coefficient C sub D and a lubrication coefficient C sub L to be determined from experiment. The soft elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) model considers the effects of droplet deformation and solid-surface geometry; the simpler hydrodynamic lubrication (HL) model assumes that the droplet remains essentially spherical. The droplet's angular position depended primarily on the ratio of gas inertia to droplet gravity forces and on the gas Reynolds number and weakly on the ratio of droplet gravity forces to surface tension forces (Bond number) and geometric ratios for the soft EHL. An experimental configuration in which an oil droplet is supported by an air film on the rotating outer race of a ball bearing within a pressure-controlled chamber produced measurements of droplet angular position as a function of outer-race velocity droplet size and type, and chamber pressure.

  11. Turbine engine lubricant foaming due to silicone basestock used in non-specification spline lubricant

    SciTech Connect

    Centers, P.W.

    1995-05-01

    Dependent upon molecular weight and distribution, concentration, temperature, air flow, and test details or field application, polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) may be neutral, profoamant or antifoamant in polyolesters. This understanding was critical in the solution of a turbine engine lubrication system foaming problem occurring at several military locations. Suspect turbine engine-accessory gearbox assembly materials gathered from several sites were evaluated. One non-specification PDMS-based spline lubricant caused copious foaming of the lubricant at less than ten parts-per-million concentration, while a specification polymethyl-phenylsiloxane (PMPS)-based lubricant required a concentration nearly 2000 times greater to generate equivalent foam. Use of the profoamant PDMS spline lubricant was then prohibited. Since prohibition, foaming of turbine engine lubricants used in the particular application has not been reported. PMPS impact on foaming of ester lubricants is similar to a much more viscous PDMS attributed to the reduced interaction of PMPS in esters due to pendant phenyl structure of PMPS absent in PDMS. These data provide significant additional insight and methodology to investigate foaming tendencies of partially miscible silicone-ester and other fluid systems. 7 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  12. On the Hojman conservation quantities in Cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paliathanasis, A.; Leach, P. G. L.; Capozziello, S.

    2016-04-01

    We discuss the application of the Hojman's Symmetry Approach for the determination of conservation laws in Cosmology, which has been recently applied by various authors in different cosmological models. We show that Hojman's method for regular Hamiltonian systems, where the Hamiltonian function is one of the involved equations of the system, is equivalent to the application of Noether's Theorem for generalized transformations. That means that for minimally-coupled scalar field cosmology or other modified theories which are conformally related with scalar-field cosmology, like f (R) gravity, the application of Hojman's method provide us with the same results with that of Noether's Theorem. Moreover we study the special Ansatz. ϕ (t) = ϕ (a (t)) , which has been introduced for a minimally-coupled scalar field, and we study the Lie and Noether point symmetries for the reduced equation. We show that under this Ansatz, the unknown function of the model cannot be constrained by the requirement of the existence of a conservation law and that the Hojman conservation quantity which arises for the reduced equation is nothing more than the functional form of Noetherian conservation laws for the free particle. On the other hand, for f (T) teleparallel gravity, it is not the existence of Hojman's conservation laws which provide us with the special function form of f (T) functions, but the requirement that the reduced second-order differential equation admits a Jacobi Last multiplier, while the new conservation law is nothing else that the Hamiltonian function of the reduced equation.

  13. A new look at lubrication of the ocular surface: fluid mechanics behind the blinking eyelids.

    PubMed

    Cher, Ivan

    2008-04-01

    The concept of the dacruon was presented by the author in this journal in July 2007. Dacruon, defined as "the body of unshed fluid, constantly occupying the ocular surface sac [OSS], comprising the mucoaqueous pool [MAP] and its covering lipid sealant," prompts a fresh consideration of OSS lubrication. The author notes scientific agreement that in the preocular, interpalpebral OSS (the menisco-optical domain), the mucous gel of the MAP adheres to subjacent bulbar epithelium. In the retropalpebral recesses (the "lubrication domain"), lid and globe epithelia are juxtaposed. The author proposes that microvilli and glycocalyx "grasp" the bases of dacruon mucous gels, enabling lid and globe to "drive" fluid movement. The adherent gels and associated low viscosity mucous modules mitigate friction. There is no substantive lipid layer. The modules abut, "mirror-image" fashion, forming an interface concentric with the eyeball surface about midway between the palpebral and bulbar mucosae. Here, kinetic energy originating from both lid and globe has been progressively dissipated by fluid friction, residual movement reduced to creeping flow. Shear stress is displaced from the rapidly moving epithelia, to occur between the more remote, slow-moving midzone fluids, minimizing frictional blink-related microtrauma. The midway interface serves as a "slip interface," crucial to the mucoaqueous lubrication of the OSS. Concomitantly, the OSS also forms the anterior lubricating compartment of the "ball and socket" ocular joint. PMID:18418505

  14. Accelerated aging of solid lubricants for the W76-1 TSL : effects of polymer outgassing.

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, Michael Thomas; Wallace, William O.; Huffman, Elizabeth M.

    2006-09-01

    The behavior of MoS{sub 2} lubricants intended for the W76-1 TSL was evaluated after 17 and 82 thermal cycles, each lasting seven days and including a low temperature of -35 C and a high temperature of 93 C, in a sealed container containing organic materials. The MoS{sub 2} was applied by tumbling with MoS{sub 2} powder and steel pins (harperized), or by spraying with a resin binder (AS Mix). Surface composition measurements indicated an uptake of carbon and silicon on the lubricant surfaces after aging. Oxidation of the MoS{sub 2} on harperized coupons, where enough MoS{sub 2} was present at the surface to result in significant Mo and S concentrations, was found to be minimal for the thermal cycles in an atmosphere of primarily nitrogen. Bare steel surfaces showed a reduction in friction for exposed coupons compared to control coupons stored in nitrogen, at least for the initial cycles of sliding until the adsorbed contaminants were worn away. Lubricated surfaces showed no more than a ten percent increase in steady-state friction coefficient after exposure. Initial coefficient of friction was up to 250 percent higher than steady-state for AS Mix films on H950 coupons after 82 thermal cycles. However, the friction coefficient exhibited by lubricated coupons was never greater than 0.25, and more often less than 0.15, even after the accelerated aging exposures.

  15. Practical Applications and Uses of Solid Lubricant Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stupp, B. C.

    1984-01-01

    Practical applications are illustrated with discussions covering the reasons for use of solid lubricants, required performance, lubricant selection, and results obtained for the various examples shown. The applications described cover a broad range of solid lubricants. Included are soft lamellar compounds, organic polymers, soft elemental metals, oxides and compounds for high temperature use. The illustrations selected cover a broad range of lubricant application techniques delineating the reasons for the different processing procedures which include bonded films, plasma spraying, sputtering, ion plating and electrodeposition.

  16. Correlation of rheological characteristics of lubricants with transmission efficiency measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jacobson, B. O.; Hamrock, B. J.; Hoeglund, E.

    1985-01-01

    The power efficiency of a helicopter transmission has been analyzed for 11 lubricants by looking at the Newtonian and non-Newtonian properties of the lubricants. A non-Newtonian property of the lubricants was the limiting shear strength proportionality constant. The tests were performed on a high-pressure, short-time shear strength analyzer. A power efficiency formula that was obtained by analyzing the Newtonian and non-Newtonian properties of the lubricants is presented in detail.

  17. High temperature solid lubricants: When and where to use them

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    The state of the art of solid lubrication for moderate to extremely high temperature lubrication (to 1600 F) is reviewed. Lubricating characteristics, stability in various environments, and relevant machine design considerations are discussed. Lubricating materials discussed include the layer lattice compounds: MoS2, WS2, graphite and graphite fluoride, the high temperature polyimide polymer, and calcium fluoride based coating and composites. The scope of the information includes results from wear testers, ball bearing, and journal bearings.

  18. High temperature solid lubricants - When and where to use them.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.

    1973-01-01

    This paper reviews the state of the art of solid lubrication for moderate to extremely high temperature lubrication (to 1600 F). Lubricating characteristics, stability in various environments, and relevant machine design considerations are discussed. Lubricating materials discussed include MoS2, WS2, graphite, graphite fluoride, the high temperature polymide polymer, and calcium fluoride based coatings and composites. The scope of the information includes results from wear testers, ball bearings, and journal bearings.

  19. Rheological effects on friction in elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trachman, E. G.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    An analytical and experimental investigation is presented of the friction in a rolling and sliding elastohydrodynamic lubricated contact. The rheological behavior of the lubricant is described in terms of two viscoelastic models. These models represent the separate effects of non-Newtonian behavior and the transient response of the fluid. A unified description of the non-Newtonian shear rate dependence of the viscosity is presented as a new hyperbolic liquid model. The transient response of viscosity, following the rapid pressure rise encountered in the contact, is described by a compressional viscoelastic model of the volume response of a liquid to an applied pressure step. The resulting momentum and energy equations are solved by an iterative numerical technique, and a friction coefficient is calculated. The experimental study was performed, with two synthetic paraffinic lubricants, to verify the friction predictions of the analysis. The values of friction coefficient from theory and experiment are in close agreement.

  20. Sputtering technology in solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Potential and present sputtering technology is discussed as it applies to the deposition of solid film lubricants particularly MoS2, WS2, and PTFE. Since the sputtered films are very thin, the selection of the sputtering parameters and substrate condition is very critical as reflected by the lubricating properties. It was shown with sputtered MoS2 films that the lubricating characteristics are directly affected by the selected sputtering parameters (power density, pressure, sputter etching, dc-biasing, etc.) and the substrate temperature, chemistry, topography and the environmental conditions during the friction tests. Electron microscopy and other surface sensitive analytical techniques illustrate the resulting changes in sputtered MoS2 film morphology and chemistry which directly influence the film adherence and frictional properties.

  1. Traction behavior of two traction lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Loewenthal, S. H.; Rohn, D. A.

    1983-01-01

    In the analysis of rolling-sliding concentrated contacts, such as gears, bearings and traction drives, the traction characteristics of the lubricant are of prime importance. The elastic shear modulus and limiting shear stress properties of the lubricant dictate the traction/slip characteristics and power loss associated with an EHD contact undergoing slip and/or spin. These properties can be deducted directly from the initial slope m and maximum traction coefficient micron of an experimental traction curve. In this investigation, correlation equations are presented to predict m and micron for two modern traction fluids based on the regression analysis of 334 separate traction disk machine experiments. The effects of contact pressure, temperature, surface velocity, ellipticity ratio are examined. Problems in deducing lubricant shear moduli from disk machine tests are discussed.

  2. NASA Lessons Learned from Space Lubricated Mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Predmore, Roamer E.

    2000-01-01

    This document reviews the lessons learned from short-life and long life lubricated space mechanisms. A short-life lubricated mechanisms complete their life test qualification requirements after a few cycles. The mechanisms include the hinges, motors and bearings for deployment, release mechanisms, latches, release springs and support shops. Performance testing can be difficult and expensive but must be accomplished. A long-life lubricated mechanisms requires up to 5 years of life testing, or 10 to 100 years of successful flight. The long-life mechanisms include reaction wheels, momentum wheels, antenna gimbals, solar array drives, gyros and despin mechanisms. Several instances of how a mechanisms failed either in test, or in space use, and the lessons learned from these failures are reviewed. The effect of the movement away from CFC-113 cleaning solvent to ODC (Ozone-Depleting Chemical) -free is reviewed, and some of the alternatives are discussed.

  3. Rheology and lubricity of hyaluronic acid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Jing; Krause, Wendy E.

    2007-03-01

    The polyelectrolyte hyaluronic acid (HA, hyaluronan) is an important component in synovial fluid (i.e., the fluid that lubricates our freely moving joints). Its presence results in highly viscoelastic solutions. In comparison to healthy synovial fluid, diseased fluid has a reduced viscosity and loss of lubricity. In osteoarthritis the reduction in viscosity results from a decline in both the molecular weight and concentration of HA. In our investigation, we attempt to correlate the rheological properties of HA solutions to changes in lubrication and wear. A nanoindenter will be used to evaluate the coefficient of friction and wear properties between the nanoindenter tip and ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene in both the presence and absence of a thin film of HA solution.

  4. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with elastomers

    SciTech Connect

    Hamed, G.R.; Seiple, R.H.

    1993-01-01

    The information contained in this report is designed to assist the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry in the selection of suitable elastomeric gasket and seal materials that will prove useful in various refrigerant and refrigeration lubricant environments. 97% of the swell measurements have been made to date. The other 3% of the measurements are contingent on availability of additional R-32. Swell behavior in the fluids have been determined using weight and in situ diameter measurements for the refrigerants and weight, diameter and thickness measurements for the lubricants. Weight and diameter measurements are repeated after 2 and 24 hours for samples removed from the refrigerant test fluids and 24 hours after removal from the lubricants.

  5. Wormgear geometry adopted for implementing hydrostatic lubrication and formulation of the lubrication problem

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, D. C.; Yuan, Qin

    1995-01-01

    The geometrical parameters for a wormgear intended to be used as the transmission in advanced helicopters are finalized. The resulting contact pattern of the meshing tooth surfaces is suitable for the implementation of hydrostatic lubrication Fluid film lubrication of the contact is formulated considering external pressurization as well as hydrodynamic wedge and squeeze actions. The lubrication analysis is aimed at obtaining the oil supply pressure needed to separate the worm and gear surfaces by a prescribed minimum film thickness. The procedure of solving the mathematical problem is outlined.

  6. 46 CFR 56.50-80 - Lubricating-oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Lubricating-oil systems. 56.50-80 Section 56.50-80 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-80 Lubricating-oil systems. (a) The lubricating oil system shall be...

  7. 46 CFR 56.50-80 - Lubricating-oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Lubricating-oil systems. 56.50-80 Section 56.50-80 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-80 Lubricating-oil systems. (a) The lubricating oil system shall be...

  8. 46 CFR 56.50-80 - Lubricating-oil systems.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Lubricating-oil systems. 56.50-80 Section 56.50-80 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Design Requirements Pertaining to Specific Systems § 56.50-80 Lubricating-oil systems. (a) The lubricating oil system shall be...

  9. FY2013 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-02-01

    Annual progress report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies. The Fuel & Lubricant Technologies Program supports fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle manufacturers and users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

  10. 7 CFR 3201.43 - Chain and cable lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Chain and cable lubricants. 3201.43 Section 3201.43... Designated Items § 3201.43 Chain and cable lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide... chain and cable lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  11. 7 CFR 3201.43 - Chain and cable lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Chain and cable lubricants. 3201.43 Section 3201.43... Designated Items § 3201.43 Chain and cable lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide... chain and cable lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  12. 7 CFR 3201.43 - Chain and cable lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Chain and cable lubricants. 3201.43 Section 3201.43... Designated Items § 3201.43 Chain and cable lubricants. (a) Definition. Products designed to provide... chain and cable lubricants. By that date, Federal agencies that have the responsibility for drafting...

  13. 21 CFR 884.5310 - Condom with spermicidal lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Condom with spermicidal lubricant. 884.5310... Devices § 884.5310 Condom with spermicidal lubricant. (a) Identification. A condom with spermicidal lubricant is a sheath which completely covers the penis with a closely fitting membrane with a...

  14. 21 CFR 884.5310 - Condom with spermicidal lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Condom with spermicidal lubricant. 884.5310... Devices § 884.5310 Condom with spermicidal lubricant. (a) Identification. A condom with spermicidal lubricant is a sheath which completely covers the penis with a closely fitting membrane with a...

  15. 21 CFR 884.5310 - Condom with spermicidal lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Condom with spermicidal lubricant. 884.5310... Devices § 884.5310 Condom with spermicidal lubricant. (a) Identification. A condom with spermicidal lubricant is a sheath which completely covers the penis with a closely fitting membrane with a...

  16. 21 CFR 884.5310 - Condom with spermicidal lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Condom with spermicidal lubricant. 884.5310... Devices § 884.5310 Condom with spermicidal lubricant. (a) Identification. A condom with spermicidal lubricant is a sheath which completely covers the penis with a closely fitting membrane with a...

  17. 21 CFR 884.5310 - Condom with spermicidal lubricant.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Condom with spermicidal lubricant. 884.5310... Devices § 884.5310 Condom with spermicidal lubricant. (a) Identification. A condom with spermicidal lubricant is a sheath which completely covers the penis with a closely fitting membrane with a...

  18. Tribological behavior of some candidate advanced space lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.K.; Snyder, C.E. Jr.; Gschwender, L.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Performance of a variety of space lubricants was compared under boundary and elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL). The types of fluids studied were naphthenic mineral oil, paraffinic mineral oil, polyalphaolefin, and silahydrocarbon. The silahydrocarbon and the polyalphaolefin lubricants exhibited lower traction under similar conditions. A specific additive package increased the traction of the polyalphaolefin. Volatility characteristics of some of these fluids were also studied. 10 refs.

  19. Bearings use dry self-lubricating cage materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, W. J.; Glenn, D. C.; Scribbe, H. W.

    1968-01-01

    Rolling element bearings in spacecraft mechanical systems use solid lubricant composites of polytetrafluoroethylene in the bearing cage which functions as the lubricant reservoir. The cage spaces the rolling elements equally and provides the lubricant at the bearing load-carrying surface.

  20. 40 CFR 90.308 - Lubricating oil and test fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., manufacturers may use the fuel specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, for gasoline-fueled engines. (2... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lubricating oil and test fuels. 90.308... Equipment Provisions § 90.308 Lubricating oil and test fuels. (a) Lubricating oil. Use the...

  1. 40 CFR 90.308 - Lubricating oil and test fuels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., manufacturers may use the fuel specified in 40 CFR part 1065, subpart H, for gasoline-fueled engines. (2... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lubricating oil and test fuels. 90.308... Equipment Provisions § 90.308 Lubricating oil and test fuels. (a) Lubricating oil. Use the...

  2. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A plurality of lubricating plugs are disposed in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are disposed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  3. Rotor self-lubricating axial stop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blount, Dale H.

    1988-01-01

    A series of lubricating plugs is located in the stationary backup face adjacent to the axial stop face of a rotating impeller mounted in a turbopump for pumping liquid oxygen or liquid hydrogen. The stop face and the backup face are those surfaces which engage when the axial load on the impeller exceeds the load balancing capability. The plugs have a truncated conical configuration so as to be trapped in the backup face, and are placed at varying radii on the face to provide complete surface lubrication. The plugs may be formed from Teflon, Kel-F or bronze filled Teflon.

  4. Ionic liquid lubrication at electrified interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Lingling; Huang, Wei; Wang, Xiaolei

    2016-06-01

    The lubrication performances of ionic liquids at electrified interfaces have been investigated by using a reciprocating sliding tribometer. Experimental results indicated that the lubricity of the confined ionic liquids was markedly affected by the application of external electric field and strong interface electric field strength could result in high friction. The influence was more pronounced for the ionic liquid with a shorter alkyl side chain in particular. The main reason of the friction increment might be ascribed to the electrically influenced surface adsorption where the charged ions were structured to form robust and ordered layers.

  5. Method for reclaiming waste lubricating oils

    DOEpatents

    Whisman, Marvin L.; Goetzinger, John W.; Cotton, Faye O.

    1978-01-01

    A method for purifying and reclaiming used lubricating oils containing additives such as detergents, antioxidants, corrosion inhibitors, extreme pressure agents and the like and other solid and liquid contaminants by preferably first vacuum distilling the used oil to remove water and low-boiling contaminants, and treating the dried oil with a solvent mixture of butanol, isopropanol and methylethyl ketone which causes the separation of a layer of sludge containing contaminants, unspent additives and oxidation products. After solvent recovery, the desludged oil is then subjected to conventional lubricating oil refining steps such as distillation followed by decolorization and deodorization.

  6. Sputtering technology in solid film lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Current and potential sputtering technology is reviewed as it applies primarily to the deposition of MoS2, though such lubricants as WS2 and PTFE are also considered. It is shown by electron microscopy and surface sensitive analytical techniques that the lubricating properties of sputtered MoS2 films are directly influenced by the sputtering parameters selected (i.e., power density, pressure, sputter etching, dc-biasing, etc.), substrate temperature, chemistry, topography, and environmental conditions during the friction test. Electron micrographs and diffractograms of sputtered MoS2 films clearly show the resultant changes in film morphology which affect film adherence and frictional properties.

  7. Lubricants or lubricant additives composed of ionic liquids containing ammonium cations

    DOEpatents

    Qu, Jun [Knoxville, TN; Truhan, Jr.,; John J. [Cookeville, TN; Dai, Sheng [Knoxville, TN; Luo, Huimin [Knoxville, TN; Blau, Peter J. [Knoxville, TN

    2010-07-13

    A lubricant or lubricant additive is an ionic liquid alkylammonium salt. The alkylammonium salt has the structure R.sub.xNH.sub.(4-x).sup.+,[F.sub.3C(CF.sub.2).sub.yS(O).sub.2].sub.2N.sup- .- where x is 1 to 3, R is independently C.sub.1 to C.sub.12 straight chain alkyl, branched chain alkyl, cycloalkyl, alkyl substituted cycloalkyl, cycloalkyl substituted alkyl, or, optionally, when x is greater than 1, two R groups comprise a cyclic structure including the nitrogen atom and 4 to 12 carbon atoms, and y is independently 0 to 11. The lubricant is effective for the lubrication of many surfaces including aluminum and ceramics surfaces.

  8. The use of screening tests in spacecraft lubricant evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kalogeras, Chris; Hilton, Mike; Carre, David; Didziulis, Stephen; Fleischauer, Paul

    1993-01-01

    A lubricant screening test fixture has been devised in order to satisfy the need to obtain lubricant performance data in a timely manner. This fixture has been used to perform short-term tests on potential lubricants for several spacecraft applications. The results of these tests have saved time by producing qualitative performance rankings of lubricant selections prior to life testing. To date, this test fixture has been used to test lubricants for 3 particular applications. The qualitative results from these tests have been verified by life test results and have provided insight into the function of various anti-wear additives.

  9. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bayart, E.; Svetlizky, I.; Fineberg, J.

    2016-05-01

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ . Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer.

  10. Slippery but Tough: The Rapid Fracture of Lubricated Frictional Interfaces.

    PubMed

    Bayart, E; Svetlizky, I; Fineberg, J

    2016-05-13

    We study the onset of friction for rough contacting blocks whose interface is coated with a thin lubrication layer. High speed measurements of the real contact area and stress fields near the interface reveal that propagating shear cracks mediate lubricated frictional motion. While lubricants reduce interface resistances, surprisingly they significantly increase the energy dissipated Γ during rupture. Moreover, lubricant viscosity affects the onset of friction but has no effect on Γ. Fracture mechanics provide a new way to view the otherwise hidden complex dynamics of the lubrication layer. PMID:27232023

  11. Simulation of lubricating behavior of a thioether liquid lubricant by an electrochemical method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morales, W.

    1984-01-01

    An electrochemical cell was constructed to explore the possible radical anion forming behavior of a thioether liquid lubricant. The electrochemical behavior of the thioether was compared with the electrochemical behavior of biphenyl, which is known to form radical anions. Under controlled conditions biphenyl undergoes a reversible reaction to a radical anion, whereas the thioether undergoes an irreversible reduction yielding several products. These results are discussed in relation to boundary lubrication.

  12. Elastohydrodynamic Lubrication with Polyolester Lubricants and HFC Refrigerants, Final Report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Gunsel, Selda; Pozebanchuk, Michael

    1999-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the film formation properties of refrigeration lubricants using the ultrathin film elastohydrodynamic (EHD) interferometry technique and to study the effects of refrigerants on film formation. Film thickness measurements were conducted as a function of lubricant viscosity, speed, temperature, and refrigerant concentration. Based on the EHD film thickness data, effective pressure-viscosity coefficients were calculated for the test fluids at different temperatures and the effects of refrigerants on pressure-viscosity properties were investigated.

  13. Current Trends in Biobased Lubricant Development

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobased lubricants are those comprising ingredients derived from natural raw materials such as those harvested from farms, forests, etc. Biolubricants provide a number of benefits over petroleum-based products including: biodegradability, renewability, and non-toxicity. As a result, manufacture ...

  14. 7 CFR 3201.14 - Penetrating lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    .... The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11. ... Designated Items § 3201.14 Penetrating lubricants. (a) Definition. Products formulated to provide light... the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product....

  15. Freon 21 bearing lubrication and coolant system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bodensieck, E. J.; Gustafson, M. J.

    1972-01-01

    Lubrication and cooling of turbopump rotor bearings by liquid Freon 21 is reported. Freon expands in rotor bearing and acts as heat sink by removing heat during warming and evaporation. Gaseous Freon is removed by vacuum pump controlling rotor chamber operation.

  16. Scuffing and Lubrication of Gears and Bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B.; Houpert, L.

    1986-01-01

    New Reynolds equation developed for elastohydrodynamic-lubrication analysis. Method developed to study macro- and micro-EHL, without restriction on load applied to contact. Macro-EHL refers to lubricantfilm thickness developed in inlet zone of EHL conjunction. Powerful tool used to study scuffing. Using new approach, researchers have analyzed stress concentrations near both bump and groove in bearing surface.

  17. 49 CFR 396.5 - Lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.5 Lubrication. Every motor carrier shall ensure that each motor vehicle subject to its control...

  18. 49 CFR 396.5 - Lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.5 Lubrication. Every motor carrier shall ensure that each motor vehicle subject to its control...

  19. 49 CFR 396.5 - Lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.5 Lubrication. Every motor carrier shall ensure that each motor vehicle subject to its control...

  20. 49 CFR 396.5 - Lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.5 Lubrication. Every motor carrier shall ensure that each motor vehicle subject to its control...

  1. 49 CFR 396.5 - Lubrication.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS INSPECTION, REPAIR, AND MAINTENANCE § 396.5 Lubrication. Every motor carrier shall ensure that each motor vehicle subject to its control...

  2. Considerations on the lubrication of spacecraft mechanisms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briscoe, M.; Todd, M. J.

    1983-01-01

    Space tribology and a number of precepts to guide designers in its application are discussed. Of the many techniques available all, without exception, have limitations in performance. Two processes are discussed in more detail and their limitations identified. Some performance results on a liquid space lubricant are given.

  3. New crop oils - Properties as potential lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    New crops oils such as lesquerella, field pennycress, meadowfoam and cuphea were investigated and compared to common commodity vegetable oils for their fatty acid profiles, low temperature and lubricating properties. The fatty acid profile investigation showed that lesquerella is high in hydroxy fat...

  4. 14 CFR 33.39 - Lubrication system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lubrication system. 33.39 Section 33.39 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT AIRWORTHINESS STANDARDS: AIRCRAFT ENGINES Design and Construction; Reciprocating Aircraft Engines § 33.39...

  5. Fuels and Lubricants. Selecting and Storing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parady, W. Harold; Colvin, Thomas S.

    The manual presents basic information for the person who plans to operate or service tractors, trucks, industrial engines, and automobiles. It tells how to select the proper fuels and lubricants and how to store them properly. Although there are no prerequisites to the study of the text, a general knowledge of engines and mobile-type vehicles is…

  6. Piezoviscous effects in nonconformal contacts lubricated hydrodynamically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Y. R.; Hamrock, B. J.; Brewe, D. E.

    1985-01-01

    The analysis is concerned with the piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication for the general case of elliptical contacts. In this regime several formulas of the lubricant film thickness have been proposed by Hamrock and Dowson, by Dowson et al., and more recently by Houpert. However, either they do not include the load parameter W, which has a strong effect on film thickness, or they overestimate the film thickness by using the Barus formula for pressure-viscosity characteristics. The Roelands formula was used for the pressure-viscosity relationship. The effects of the dimensionless load, speed, and materials parameters, the radius ratio, and the lubricant entrainment direction were investigated. The dimensionless load parameter was varied over a range of one order of magnitude. The dimensionless speed parameter was varied by 5.6 times the lowest value. Conditions corresponding to the use of solid materials of steel, bronze, and silicon nitride and lubricants of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oil were considered in obtaining the exponent in the dimensionless materials parameter. The radius ratio was varied from 0.2 to 64 (a configuration approaching a line contact). Forty-one cases were used in obtaining a minimum film thickness formula. Contour plots indicate in detail the pressure developed between the contacting solids.

  7. Piezoviscous effects in nonconformal contacts lubricated hydrodynamically

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeng, Yeau-Ren; Hamrock, Bernard J.; Brewe, David E.

    1987-01-01

    The analysis is concerned with the piezoviscous-rigid regime of lubrication for the general case of elliptical contacts. In this regime several formulas of the lubricant film thickness have been proposed by Hamrock and Dowson, by Dowson et al., and more recently by Houpert. However, either they do not include the load parameter W, which has a strong effect on film thickness, or they overestimate the film thickness by using the Barus formula for pressure-viscosity characteristics. The Roelands formula was used for the pressure-viscosity relationship. The effects of the dimensionless load, speed, and materials parameters, the radius ratio, and the lubricant entrainment direction were investigated. The dimensionless load parameter was varied over a range of one order of magnitude. The dimensionless speed parameter was varied by 5.6 times the lowest value. Conditions corresponding to the use of solid materials of steel, bronze, and silicon nitride and lubricants of paraffinic and naphthenic mineral oil were considered in obtaining the exponent in the dimensionless materials parameter. The radius ratio was varied from 0.2 to 64 (a configuration approaching a line contact). Forty-one cases were used in obtaining a minimum film thickness formula. Contour plots indicate in detail the pressure developed between the contacting solids.

  8. 7 CFR 2902.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 2902.38 Section 2902.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES... reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon clean...

  9. 7 CFR 2902.38 - Firearm lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Firearm lubricants. 2902.38 Section 2902.38 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF ENERGY POLICY AND NEW USES... reduce the friction and wear between the moving parts of a firearm, and to keep the weapon clean...

  10. 7 CFR 3201.14 - Penetrating lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    .... The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11. ... the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. (c... re-refined lubricating oil products. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of...

  11. 7 CFR 3201.57 - Multipurpose lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 15 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Multipurpose lubricants. 3201.57 Section 3201.57 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) OFFICE OF PROCUREMENT AND PROPERTY MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE GUIDELINES FOR DESIGNATING BIOBASED PRODUCTS FOR FEDERAL PROCUREMENT Designated Items § 3201.57...

  12. 7 CFR 3201.14 - Penetrating lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    .... The designation can be found in the Comprehensive Procurement Guideline, 40 CFR 247.11. ... the product as a percent of the weight (mass) of the total organic carbon in the finished product. (c... re-refined lubricating oil products. Under the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act of...

  13. Modified vegetable oils-based lubricant emulsions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lubricants made from vegetable oils represent only a small section of the market today. Recent legislation, however, in both the United States and Europe, could begin to brighten their prospects due to their eco-friendly and biodegradable character, unlike petroleum oil-based products. In order to u...

  14. 40 CFR 1065.740 - Lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lubricants. 1065.740 Section 1065.740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.740...

  15. 40 CFR 1065.740 - Lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Lubricants. 1065.740 Section 1065.740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.740...

  16. 40 CFR 1065.740 - Lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 34 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lubricants. 1065.740 Section 1065.740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.740...

  17. Auto Mechanics: Auto Mechanic Service Specialist (Lubrication).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoover, Virgil

    The unit of individualized learning activities is designed to provide training in the job skill, lubrication, for the prospective auto mechanic service specialist. The materials in the unit are divided into two sections. The developmental, or preliminary phase, for use by the instructor, includes brief descriptions of the job and of the student…

  18. 40 CFR 1065.740 - Lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lubricants. 1065.740 Section 1065.740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.740...

  19. 40 CFR 1065.740 - Lubricants.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 32 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lubricants. 1065.740 Section 1065.740 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR POLLUTION CONTROLS ENGINE-TESTING PROCEDURES Engine Fluids, Test Fuels, Analytical Gases and Other Calibration Standards § 1065.740...

  20. Lubricant effect of rate-of-loading

    SciTech Connect

    Gleeson, J.B.

    1995-11-01

    A series of tests were conducted to establish the performance of a motor operated valve (MOV) stem lubricant. Battelle has assembled a MOV test stand to provide a means to test valve actuators and stems with representative valve load profiles and to accurately measure the actuator performance. The facility duplicates an actual MOV except that the stem thrust loads are generated hydraulically and seating loads are generated by mechanical stops. These tests were conducted at a high torque switch setting on a Limitorque SMB-0. Stem-stemnut pairs with known rate-of-loading (ROL) effects ranging from approximately zero to 30% were tested. The stems were lubricated with Mobil 28; a nuclear-grade synthetic grease. A test with a slow, linearly increasing load profile with torque switch trip occurring prior to seating (ramp test), was used to establish the magnitude of the ROL effect for a particular stem-stemnut. Data from these experiments were compared with results of similar EPRI tests which used different stem lubricants. Results with Mobil 28 yielded unexpected, consistent reduced ROL effects. In addition, the thread pressure threshold for limiting ROL effects was significantly reduced. A model of the squeeze film phenomena was developed to explain the experimental results. The model shows that the basic rheological properties of the lubricant, the thread composite surface roughness, and the thread type all have a significant influence on the magnitude of ROL effects.

  1. Tribology: Friction, lubrication, and wear technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blau, Peter J.

    1993-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: introduction and definitions of terms; friction concepts; lubrication technology concepts; wear technology concepts; and tribological transitions. This document is designed for educators who seek to teach these concepts to their students.

  2. Environmentally friendly lubricant development programs at USDA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) carries out a wide range of programs to help in the development and commercialization of biobased lubricants. Widespread use of bioproducts will have wide ranging benefits to the environment, the rural economy, and the safety and well being of the A...

  3. Lubricant Properties of Modified Vegetable Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Lubricants made from vegetable oils represent a small section of the market today, but recent legislation in both the United States and Europe could begin to brighten their prospects due to their eco-friendly and biodegradable character unlike petroleum oil based products. In order to understand th...

  4. Parched elastohydrodynamic lubrication: Instrumentation and procedure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schritz, Bryan; Jones, William R., Jr.; Prahl, Joseph; Jansen, Ralph

    1991-01-01

    A counter rotating bearing rig was designed and constructed to study transient elastohydrodynamic lubrication phenomena. New instrumentation is described and test procedures are documented. Ball and race speed measurement systems and the capacitance (film thickness) measurement system were upgraded. Methods for measuring bearing torque and race temperatures were implemented.

  5. Biobased Lubricant Development - Problems and Opportunities

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biobased lubricants are those comprising ingredients derived from natural sources such as those harvested from farms, forests, etc. Biolubricants provide a number of economic, environmental and health benefits over petroleum-based products. Among these are: biodegradability, renewability and non-t...

  6. Friction, wear, and lubrication in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1971-01-01

    A review of studies and observations on the friction, wear, and lubrication behavior of materials in a vacuum environment is presented. The factors that determine and influence friction and wear are discussed. They include topographical, physical, mechanical, and the chemical nature of the surface. The effects of bulk properties such as deformation characteristics, fracture behavior, and structure are included.

  7. Self-lubricating fluorine shaft seal material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munk, W. R.

    1970-01-01

    Lubricating film is produced by a reaction of fluorine with a composite of aluminum oxide and nickel powder. The rate of nickel fluoride generation is proportional to the rate at which the fluoride is rubbed off the surface, allowing the seal to operate with the lowest possible heating.

  8. Exploring Low Emission Lubricants for Diesel Engines

    SciTech Connect

    Perez, J. M.

    2000-07-06

    A workshop to explore the technological issues involved with the removal of sulfur from lubricants and the development of low emission diesel engine oils was held in Scottsdale, Arizona, January 30 through February 1, 2000. It presented an overview of the current technology by means of panel discussions and technical presentations from industry, government, and academia.

  9. Improvement of lubricant materials using ruthenium isomerization

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Production of an effective industrial lubricant additive from vegetable oils is a high profile and difficult undertaking. One candidate is alkyl 9(10)-dibutylphosphonostearate, which has been made through a radical transformation of alkyl 9-cis-octadecanoate. It is effective, but still suffers from ...

  10. Space Station long term lubrication analysis. Phase 1 preliminary tribological survey

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dufrane, K. F.; Kannel, J. W.; Lowry, J. A.; Montgomery, E. E.

    1990-01-01

    Increases in the size, complexity, and life requirements of satellites and space vehicles have put increasing demands on the lubrication requirements for trouble-free service. Since the development costs of large systems are high, long lives with minimum maintenance are dictated. The Space Station represents the latest level of size and complexity in satellite development; it will be nearly 100 meters in major dimensions and will have a life requirement of thirty years. It will have numerous mechanisms critical to its success, some of which will be exposed to the space environment. Designing long-life lubrication systems and choosing appropriate lubricants for these systems will be necessary for their meeting the requirements and for avoiding failures with associated dependent mechanisms. The purpose of this program was to identify the various critical mechanisms and review their designs during the overall design and development stage so that problem areas could be avoided or minimized prior to the fabrication of hardware. The specific objectives were fourfold: (1) to perform a tribology survey of the Space Station for the purpose of documenting each wear point as to materials involved, environmental conditions, and operating characteristics; (2) to review each wear point (point of relative motion) as to the lubrication used and substrate materials selected in the context of its operating characteristics and the environmental conditions imposed; (3) to make recommendations for improvement in areas where the lubricant chosen and/or where the substrate (materials of the wear couple) are not considered optimum for the application; and (4) to make or recommend simulated or full scale tests in tribological areas where the state-of-the-art is being advanced, in areas where new designs are obviously being employed and a critical review would indicate that problems are a strong possibility, and/or where excessive wear, a malfunction, or excessive leakage would create fluid

  11. Investigating critical effects of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose tablets.

    PubMed

    Patadia, Riddhish; Vora, Chintan; Mittal, Karan; Mashru, Rajashree

    2016-01-01

    The research envisaged focuses on vital impacts of variegated lubricants, glidants and hydrophilic additives on lag time of press coated ethylcellulose (EC) tablets using prednisone as a model drug. Several lubricants and glidants such as magnesium stearate, colloidal SiO2, sodium stearyl fumarate, talc, stearic acid, polyethylene glycol (6000) and glyceryl behenate were investigated to understand their effects on lag time by changing their concentrations in outer coat. Further, the effects of hydrophilic additives on lag time were examined for hydroxypropylmethylcellulose (E5), hydroxypropylcellulose (EF and SSL), povidone (K30), copovidone, polyethylene glycol (4000), lactose and mannitol. In vitro drug release testing revealed that each selected lubricant/glidant, if present even at concentration of 0.25% w/w, significantly reduced the lag time of press coated tablets. Specifically, colloidal SiO2 and/or magnesium stearate were detrimental while other lubricants/glidants were relatively less injurious. Among hydrophilic additives, freely water soluble fillers had utmost influence in lag time, whereas, comparatively less impact was observed with polymeric binders. Concisely, glidant and lubricant should be chosen to have minimal impact on lag time and further judicious selection of hydrophilic additives should be exercised for modulating lag time of pulsatile release formulations. PMID:25566928

  12. Testing and evaluation of solid lubricants for gas bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Albrecht, P. R.; Fischer, W. H.

    1974-01-01

    The testing and results of testing solid film lubricants for gas lubricated bearing applications are reported. The tests simulated operational hazards of tilting pad gas bearings. The presence of a low coefficient of friction and the endurance of the solid film lubricant were the criteria for judging superior performance. All solid lubricants tested were applied to a plasma sprayed chrome oxide surface. Molybdenum disulfide and graphite fluoride were the solid lubricants tested; other test parameters included the method of application of the solid lubricant and the surface finish of the plasma sprayed coating. In general, the application of a solid film lubricant was found to significantly improve the coefficient of friction of the rubbing surfaces.

  13. Lubricant and additive effects on spur gear fatigue life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Scibbe, H. W.

    1985-01-01

    Spur gear endurance tests were conducted with six lubricants using a single lot of consumable-electrode vacuum melted (CVM) AISI 9310 spur gears. The sixth lubricant was divided into four batches each of which had a different additive content. Lubricants tested with a phosphorus-type load carrying additive showed a statistically significant improvement in life over lubricants without this type of additive. The presence of sulfur type antiwear additives in the lubricant did not appear to affect the surface fatigue life of the gears. No statistical difference in life was produced with those lubricants of different base stocks but with similar viscosity, pressure-viscosity coefficients and antiwear additives. Gears tested with a 0.1 wt % sulfur and 0.1 wt % phosphorus EP additives in the lubricant had reactive films that were 200 to 400 (0.8 to 1.6 microns) thick.

  14. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1990-01-01

    Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below 400 C. However, research at NASA's Lewis Research Center shows that silver and stable fluorides such as calcium and barium fluorides act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to about 900 C. This paper describes plasma-sprayed composite coatings that contain these solid lubricants in combination with a metal-bonded chromium carbide. The lubricants control friction, and the carbide matrix provides wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings as backup lubricants for compliant gas bearings in turbomachinery and as self-lubricating liners in a four-cylinder Stirling engine are discussed.

  15. AFM study of polymer lubricants on hard disk surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G. W.; Troemel, M.; Li, S. F. Y.

    Thin liquid films of PFPE (perfluoropolyether) lubricants dip-coated on hard disk surfaces were imaged with non-contact mode AFM. Demnum lubricants with phosphazene additives exhibited strong interactions with a silicon tip due to the formation of liquid bridges between the lubricants and the tip, as indicated by a remarkable hysteresis loop between approach and retraction curves in force vs. distance measurements. Features resulting from capillary forces due to tip tapping to the lubricants were revealed, which demonstrated that the capillary forces could be used to lock the non-contacting tip at a certain separation from the substrate surface to obtain AFM images. Force vs. distance curves for Fomblin Z-dol lubricants showed negligible hysteresis effects and features corresponding to lateral distortion of the tip by the lubricants only were observed. In both cases, only when the tip was positioned far above the surfaces could the natural distributions of the lubricants be imaged.

  16. Microfog lubricant application system for advanced turbine engine components, phase 3. [wetting characteristics and deposit forming tendencies of lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrucco, R. J.; Leonardi, S. J.

    1973-01-01

    The wetting characteristics and deposit forming tendencies of a series of lubricants were evaluated using a microfog jet delivery system to wet a flat heated rotating disc. The performances of the nine lubricants are discussed in terms of the various testing parameters which include temperature, disc speed and lubricant gas flow rates. Also discussed are the heat transfer characteristics of two of the lubricants on that same plane disc specimen. The wetting characteristics and heat transfer characteristics of one of the lubricants on a complex disc simulating bearing geometry are also discussed.

  17. A dynamic rheological model for thin-film lubrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiang-Jun; Huang, Ying; Guo, Yan-Bao; Tian, Yu; Meng, Yong-Gang

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the effects of the non-Newtonian rheological properties of the lubricant in a thin-film lubrication regime between smooth surfaces were investigated. The thin-film lubrication regime typically appears in Stribeck curves with a clearly observable minimum coefficient of friction (COF) and a low-COF region, which is desired for its lower energy dissipation. A dynamic rheology of the lubricant from the hydrodynamic lubrication regime to the thin-film lubrication regime was proposed based on the convected Maxwell constitutive equation. This rheology model includes the increased relaxation time and the yield stress of the confined lubricant thin film, as well as their dependences on the lubricant film thickness. The Deborah number (De number) was adopted to describe the liquid-solid transition of the confined lubricant thin film under shearing. Then a series of Stribeck curves were calculated based on Tichy's extended lubrication equations with a perturbation of the De number. The results show that the minimum COF points in the Stribeck curve correspond to a critical De number of 1.0, indicating a liquid-to-solid transition of the confined lubricant film. Furthermore, the two proposed parameters in the dynamic rheological model, namely negative slipping length b (indicating the lubricant interfacial effect) and the characteristic relaxation time λ0, were found to determine the minimum COF and the width of the low-COF region, both of which were required to optimize the shape of the Stribeck curve. The developed dynamic rheological model interprets the correlation between the rheological and interfacial properties of lubricant and its lubrication behavior in the thin-film regime.

  18. Balancing Teacher Quality and Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bond, Helen

    The world is facing a shortage of trained teachers. According to the 2010 Global Monitoring Report approximately 10.3 million teachers will be needed globally to staff classrooms from Bangkok to Canada. The situation is worse in Sub-Saharan Africa. Estimates suggest that approximately 1.2 million new teachers will be needed in Sub-Saharan Africa alone to achieve universal primary education goals by 2015. Increases in primary school enrollments, drought, and HIV-AIDS have exacerbated the need for well trained teachers. Despite the need, the focus is on balancing quality with quantity. An effective teacher is deemed a critical element, although not the only one, in a student's success in the classroom. This paper focuses on the dilemma of meeting universal primary education goals in Sub-Saharan Africa, while maintaining teacher quality in fragile contexts.

  19. Quantity Discrimination in Domestic Rats, Rattus norvegicus

    PubMed Central

    Cox, Laura; Montrose, V. Tamara

    2016-01-01

    Simple Summary Quantity discrimination involves distinguishing which of two quantities is greater. This discrimination between larger and smaller quantities has only been demonstrated in rats post extensive training. We tested whether domestic rats could perform quantity discrimination without explicit training. We found that rats could distinguish the greater amount in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. Rats could not distinguish between 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. We also found that as the ratio between quantities became finer the choice of the larger quantity decreased. We conclude that rats can perform quantity discrimination without extensive training and that their quantity discrimination ability is influenced by the ratio between quantities. Abstract Quantity discrimination is a basic form of numerical competence where an animal distinguishes which of two amounts is greater in size. Whilst quantity discrimination in rats has been investigated via training paradigms, rats’ natural quantity discrimination abilities without explicit training for a desired response have not been explored. This study investigated domestic rats’ ability to perform quantity discrimination. Domestic rats (n = 12) were examined for their ability to distinguish the larger amount under nine quantity comparisons. One-sample t-tests identified a significant preference for the larger quantity in comparisons of 1 vs. 2, 2 vs. 3, 3 vs. 5, 3 vs. 8, 4 vs. 6, and 4 vs. 8. No preference between quantities was found for comparisons of 3 vs. 4, 4 vs. 5 and 5 vs. 6. Overall, this study drew two key conclusions. Firstly, that domestic rats are capable of performing quantity discrimination without extensive training. Secondly, as subjects adhered to Weber’s law, it was concluded that the approximate number system underpins domestic rats’ ability to perform spontaneous quantity discrimination. PMID:27527223

  20. The effect of lubricant constituents on lubrication mechanisms in hip joint replacements.

    PubMed

    Nečas, David; Vrbka, Martin; Urban, Filip; Křupka, Ivan; Hartl, Martin

    2015-03-01

    The aim of the present paper is to provide a novel experimental approach enabling to assess the thickness of lubricant film within hip prostheses in meaning of the contribution of particular proteins. Thin film colorimetric interferometry was combined with fluorescent microscopy finding that a combination of optical methods can help to better understand the interfacial lubrication processes in hip replacements. The contact of metal femoral head against a glass disc was investigated under various operating conditions. As a test lubricant, the saline solution containing the albumin and γ-globulin in a concentration 2:1 was employed. Two different mean speeds were applied, 5.7 and 22mm/s, respectively. The measurements were carried out under pure rolling, partial negative and partial positive sliding conditions showing that kinematic conditions substantially affects the formation of protein film. Under pure rolling conditions, an increasing tendency of lubricant film independently on rolling speed was detected, while the total thickness of lubricant film can be attributed mainly to albumin. When the ball was faster than the disc (negative sliding), a very thin lubricant film was observed for lower speed with no significant effect of particular proteins. The increase in sliding speed led to the increase of film thickness mainly caused due to the presence of γ-globulin. On the contrary, when the disc was faster than the ball (positive sliding), the film formation was very complex and time dependent while both of the studied proteins have shown any qualitative change during the test, however the effect of albumin seems to be much more important. Since a very good agreement of the results was obtained, it can be concluded that the approach consisting of two optical methods can provide the fundamental information about the lubricant film formation in meaning of particular proteins while the simultaneous presence of other constituents in model synovial fluid. PMID

  1. An experimental assessment on the performance of different lubrication techniques in grinding of Inconel 751.

    PubMed

    Balan, A S S; Vijayaraghavan, L; Krishnamurthy, R; Kuppan, P; Oyyaravelu, R

    2016-09-01

    The application of emulsion for combined heat extraction and lubrication requires continuous monitoring of the quality of emulsion to sustain a desired grinding environment; this is applicable to other grinding fluids as well. Thus to sustain a controlled grinding environment, it is necessary to adopt an effectively lubricated wheel-work interface. The current study was undertaken to assess experimentally the ​ effects of different grinding environments such as dry, minimum quantity lubrication (MQL) and Cryo-MQL on performance, such as grinding force, temperature, surface roughness and chip morphology on Inconel 751, a higher heat resistance material posing thermal problems and wheel loading. The results show that grinding with the combination of both liquid nitrogen (LN2) and MQL lowers temperature, cutting forces, and surface roughness as compared with MQL and dry grinding. Specific cutting energy is widely used as an inverse measure of process efficiency in machining. It is found from the results that specific cutting energy of Cryo-MQL assisted grinding is 50-65% lower than conventional dry grinding. The grindability of Inconel 751 superalloy can be enhanced with Cryo-MQL condition. PMID:27621941

  2. 16 CFR 500.19 - Conversion of SI metric quantities to inch/pound quantities and inch/pound quantities to SI...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    .../pound quantities and inch/pound quantities to SI metric quantities. 500.19 Section 500.19 Commercial... LABELING ACT § 500.19 Conversion of SI metric quantities to inch/pound quantities and inch/pound quantities to SI metric quantities. (a) For calculating the conversion of SI metric quantities to...

  3. Use of Lubricants in the NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W; Biltoft, P

    2006-07-06

    There are two principal concerns that govern the use of lubricants in NIF: (1) Airborne molecular contaminants (AMCs)--AMCs are known to seriously degrade the performance of sol-gel coated optics. AMCs are produced by the slow outgassing of residues (non-volatile residues or ''NVRs'') of high molecular weight compounds left on surfaces. Lubricants, particularly hydrocarbon lubricants, are a primary source of such NVRs. (2) Particulates--Particulates that accumulate on optical surfaces can cause permanent physical damage when exposed to high energy density laser light. Lubricant residues exposed to high energy density light will pyrolyze or decompose and produce carbon particulates. The NIF Approved Materials Database lists several lubricants that have been tested for use in NIF environments. Many of these lubricants were tested according to MELs 99-006 (oven outgassing test) or 99-007 (vacuum outgassing test). In these tests, the change in percent transmission of light through a sol-gel coated optic placed next to the sample under evaluation is used as the diagnostic. Samples that cause less than 0.1% change in optical transmission are deemed suitable for use inside beam enclosures. This testing, however, addresses only the concern associated with AMCs. To assess the issue of particle generation, a flashlamp or ''aerosol'' test is used. In this test a sample with residues is subjected to intense light from the main amplifier flashlamps. The number density of particles per unit volume is measure after each flash. A measurement of an average of fewer than 1000 particles >0.5{micro}m in diameter produced per square foot of exposed surface per flash for each of the last ten flashes in a series of 60 flashes of light is deemed to be acceptable for polymers. A measurement of an average of fewer than 100 particles >0.5{micro}m in diameter produced per square foot of exposed surface per flash for each of the last ten flashes in a series of 60 flashes of light is deemed to

  4. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-11-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants.

  5. Water Lubrication of Stainless Steel using Reduced Graphene Oxide Coating

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hae-Jin; Kim, Dae-Eun

    2015-01-01

    Lubrication of mechanical systems using water instead of conventional oil lubricants is extremely attractive from the view of resource conservation and environmental protection. However, insufficient film thickness of water due to low viscosity and chemical reaction of water with metallic materials have been a great obstacle in utilization of water as an effective lubricant. Herein, the friction between a 440 C stainless steel (SS) ball and a 440 C stainless steel (SS) plate in water lubrication could be reduced by as much as 6-times by coating the ball with reduced graphene oxide (rGO). The friction coefficient with rGO coated ball in water lubrication was comparable to the value obtained with the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. Moreover, the wear rate of the SS plate slid against the rGO coated ball in water lubrication was 3-times lower than that of the SS plate slid against the uncoated ball in oil lubrication. These results clearly demonstrated that water can be effectively utilized as a lubricant instead of oil to lower the friction and wear of SS components by coating one side with rGO. Implementation of this technology in mechanical systems is expected to aid in significant reduction of environmental pollution caused by the extensive use of oil lubricants. PMID:26593645

  6. Ionic Liquids with Ammonium Cations as Lubricants or Additives

    SciTech Connect

    Qu, Jun; Blau, Peter Julian; Dai, Sheng; Luo, Huimin; Truhan, Jr., John J

    2006-01-01

    Friction and wear are estimated to cost 6% of the US gross national product, or around $700 billion annually. A new class of more effective lubricants could lead to huge energy savings. Limited recent literature has suggested potential for using room-temperature ionic liquids as lubricants, however only a few out of millions (or more) of species have been evaluated. Recent ORNL work discovered a new category of ionic liquids with ammonium cations that have demonstrated promising lubricating properties as net lubricants or lubricant additives, particularly in lubricating difficult-to-lubricate metals like aluminum. More than 30% friction reduction has been observed on ammonium-based ionic liquids compared to conventional hydrocarbon oils. The inherent polarity of ionic liquids is believed to provide strong adhesion to contact surfaces and form a boundary lubricating film leading to friction and wear reductions. Other advantages of ionic liquids include (1) negligible volatility, (2) high thermal stability, (3) non-flammability, and (4) better intrinsic properties that eliminate the necessity of many expensive lubricant additives. With very flexible molecular structures, this new class of lubricants, particularly ammonium-based ionic liquids, can be tailored to fit a big variety of applications including but not limited to bearings, combustion engines, MEMS, and metal forming.

  7. Quantity Cognition: Numbers, Numerosity, Zero and Mathematics.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Ben M

    2016-05-23

    Physical quantities differ from abstract numbers and mathematics, but recent results are revealing the neural representation of both: a new study demonstrates how an absence of quantity is transformed into a representation of zero as a number. PMID:27218850

  8. Properties of acoustic energy quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uosukainen, Seppo

    1989-09-01

    The sound power of a source is shown to depend on other sources and environment through the coherent and incoherent interaction and on the mounting conditions of the source. The conditions for a source to be a constant power source (being a rare exception amoung sound sources) are defined. A new quantity semianalytic intensity is defined. By its help the mean value, time-dependent, active and reactive intensity are defined in general time-dependent fields. In time harmonic fields the active part of the mean value intensity is rotational. The rotationality is proportional to the polarization vector of particle velocity, the polarization being elliptical in general. The changes of sound field are shown to generate rotationality in all intensity components. The negative pI-indicator is shown to be a possible indication of the rotationality of intensity. Fundamental intensity vortices are defined. The size of the lowest order vortices is of the order of 0.5 to 0.7 (Lambda). A modified J.M.C. method is developed for the basis of the vector and dyadic weighting, the former of which weights the sound pressure and particle velocity differently, and the latter also changes the polarization (or direction) of the particle velocity. Theoretical possibilities of general field modifications and acoustic sink optimization based on these new field reshapers are presented. A new field indicator for intensity measurements is defined. It can be used as a measure of the diffuseness and reactivity as a function of time and observation direction.

  9. Oxidation Effects on the Friction of Lubricants and Self-Lubricating Materials in the Enduring Stockpile

    SciTech Connect

    Dugger, M.T.; Peebles, D.E.; Ohlhausen, J.A.; Robinson, J.A.; Sorroche, E.H.; Fanska, J.

    1999-03-18

    Predictive models of solid lubricant performance are needed to determine the dynamic behavior of electromechanical devices after long periods of storage. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy has been used to determine the kinetics of oxidation and sulfate formation for solid lubricants and self-lubricating materials containing MoS{sub 2}, exposed to a variety of oxidation conditions. The frictional performance of the lubricant has then been determined as a fi.mction of its surface chemistry and the ambient environment in which sliding takes place. Results indicate that surface sulfate formation governs the initial or start-up friction coefficient of MoS{sub 2}-containing films, while the composition of the ambient gas determines the steady-state friction coefficient. The dependence of the steady-state friction coefficient on the environment in which sliding takes place has been examined, and the results show that dynamic oxidation of surfaces having exposed metal has a major impact on friction. Surface oxidation is also shown to influence the frictional behavior of a self-lubricating composite material containing MoS{sub 2}.

  10. 48 CFR 36.516 - Quantity surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Quantity surveys. 36.516... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.516 Quantity surveys. The contracting officer may insert the clause at 52.236-16, Quantity Surveys, in solicitations and contracts...

  11. 48 CFR 36.516 - Quantity surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Quantity surveys. 36.516... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.516 Quantity surveys. The contracting officer may insert the clause at 52.236-16, Quantity Surveys, in solicitations and contracts...

  12. 48 CFR 36.516 - Quantity surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Quantity surveys. 36.516... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.516 Quantity surveys. The contracting officer may insert the clause at 52.236-16, Quantity Surveys, in solicitations and contracts...

  13. 48 CFR 36.516 - Quantity surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Quantity surveys. 36.516... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.516 Quantity surveys. The contracting officer may insert the clause at 52.236-16, Quantity Surveys, in solicitations and contracts...

  14. 48 CFR 36.516 - Quantity surveys.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Quantity surveys. 36.516... CONTRACTING CONSTRUCTION AND ARCHITECT-ENGINEER CONTRACTS Contract Clauses 36.516 Quantity surveys. The contracting officer may insert the clause at 52.236-16, Quantity Surveys, in solicitations and contracts...

  15. 40 CFR 201.21 - Quantities measured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Quantities measured. 201.21 Section 201.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... § 201.21 Quantities measured. The quantities to be measured under the test conditions described...

  16. 40 CFR 201.21 - Quantities measured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Quantities measured. 201.21 Section 201.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... § 201.21 Quantities measured. The quantities to be measured under the test conditions described...

  17. 40 CFR 201.21 - Quantities measured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quantities measured. 201.21 Section 201.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... § 201.21 Quantities measured. The quantities to be measured under the test conditions described...

  18. 40 CFR 201.21 - Quantities measured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Quantities measured. 201.21 Section 201.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... § 201.21 Quantities measured. The quantities to be measured under the test conditions described...

  19. 40 CFR 201.21 - Quantities measured.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 26 2012-07-01 2011-07-01 true Quantities measured. 201.21 Section 201.21 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) NOISE ABATEMENT PROGRAMS... § 201.21 Quantities measured. The quantities to be measured under the test conditions described...

  20. 30 CFR 75.325 - Air quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Air quantity. 75.325 Section 75.325 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.325 Air quantity. (a)(1) In bituminous and lignite mines the quantity of air shall be at least 3,000 cubic feet per minute reaching each working...

  1. 30 CFR 75.325 - Air quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Air quantity. 75.325 Section 75.325 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.325 Air quantity. (a)(1) In bituminous and lignite mines the quantity of air shall be at least 3,000 cubic feet per minute reaching each working...

  2. 30 CFR 75.325 - Air quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Air quantity. 75.325 Section 75.325 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.325 Air quantity. (a)(1) In bituminous and lignite mines the quantity of air shall be at least 3,000 cubic feet per minute reaching each working...

  3. 30 CFR 75.325 - Air quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Air quantity. 75.325 Section 75.325 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.325 Air quantity. (a)(1) In bituminous and lignite mines the quantity of air shall be at least 3,000 cubic feet per minute reaching each working...

  4. 30 CFR 75.325 - Air quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Air quantity. 75.325 Section 75.325 Mineral... SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Ventilation § 75.325 Air quantity. (a)(1) In bituminous and lignite mines the quantity of air shall be at least 3,000 cubic feet per minute reaching each working...

  5. Modes of lubrication in human hip joints.

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, B J; Unsworth, A; Mian, N

    1982-01-01

    Cadaveric hip joints were tested in a hip function simulator which subjected the femoral head to a cycle of loading and oscillation similar to that experienced during walking and measured the frictional torque transmitted to the acetabulum. Silicone fluids with viscosities from 10-2 Pa s (pascal second) to 30 Pa s were used as lubricants and the transition from mixed to full fluid film lubrication was observed around 5 x 10(-2) Pa s. Sodium carboxymethylcellulose solutions were also tested at the lower viscosities. Hyaluronidase digestion of samples of synovial fluid caused a significant increase in friction over the control samples. Trypsin digestion had no significant effect. No correlation between compliance of the cartilage and the frictional values was observed. PMID:7092334

  6. Lubrication for high load duplex bearings

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.G.

    1997-08-01

    Three ES and H-compatible lubricants (Environment, Safety and Health) for high load duplex bearing applications were evaluated and compared against trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) deposition of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) bearing lubricant extracted from Vydax{trademark}. Vydax is a product manufactured by DuPont consisting of various molecular weights of PTFE suspended in trichlorotrifluoroethane (Freon) which is an ozone-depleting solvent. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE extracted from Vydax AR/IPA, bearings with titanium carbide coated balls, and bearings with diamond-like carbon races and retainers were evaluated. Bearings with Supercritical CO{sub 2} deposition of PTFE from Vydax AR/IPA performed as well as bearings with Freon deposition of PTFE from Freon-based Vydax.

  7. Geometry and starvation effects in hydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewe, D. E.; Hamrock, B. J.

    1982-01-01

    Numerical methods were used to determine the effects of lubricant starvation on the minimum film thickness under conditions of a hydrodynamic point contact. Starvation was effected by varying the fluid inlet level. The Reynolds boundary conditions were applied at the cavitation boundary and zero pressure was stipulated at the meniscus or inlet boundary. A minimum-film-thickness equation as a function of both the ratio of dimensionless load to dimensionless speed and inlet supply level was determined. By comparing the film generated under the starved inlet condition with the film generated from the fully flooded inlet, an expression for the film reduction factor was obtained. Based on this factor a starvation threshold was defined as well as a critically starved inlet. The changes in the inlet pressure buildup due to changing the available lubricant supply are presented in the form of three dimensional isometric plots and also in the form of contour plots.

  8. Thermal elastohydrodynamic lubrication of spur gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, K. L.; Cheng, H. S.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis and computer program called TELSGE were developed to predict the variations of dynamic load, surface temperature, and lubricant film thickness along the contacting path during the engagement of a pair of involute spur gears. The analysis of dynamic load includes the effect of gear inertia, the effect of load sharing of adjacent teeth, and the effect of variable tooth stiffness which are obtained by a finite-element method. Results obtained from TELSGE for the dynamic load distributions along the contacting path for various speeds of a pair of test gears show patterns similar to that observed experimentally. Effects of damping ratio, contact ratio, tip relief, and tooth error on the dynamic load were examined. In addition, two dimensionless charts are included for predicting the maximum equilibrium surface temperature, which can be used to estimate directly the lubricant film thickness based on well established EHD analysis.

  9. Graphene oxide film as solid lubricant.

    PubMed

    Liang, Hongyu; Bu, Yongfeng; Zhang, Junyan; Cao, Zhongyue; Liang, Aimin

    2013-07-10

    As a layered material, graphene oxide (GO) film is a good candidate for improving friction and antiwear performance of silicon-based MEMS devices. Via a green electrophoretic deposition (EPD) approach, GO films with tunable thickness in nanoscale are fabricated onto silicon wafer in a water solution. The morphology, microstructure, and mechanical properties as well as the friction coefficient and wear resistance of the films were investigated. The results indicated that the friction coefficient of silicon wafer was reduced to 1/6 its value, and the wear volume was reduced to 1/24 when using GO film as solid lubricant. These distinguished tribology performances suggest that GO films are expected to be good solid lubricants for silicon-based MEMS/NEMS devices. PMID:23786494

  10. Self-Lubricating Composite Containing Chromium Oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dellacorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A self lubricating. friction and wear reducing composite material useful over a wide temperature range of from cryogenic temperature up to about 900 C. contains 60 80 wt. % of particulate Cr2O3, dispersed in a metal binder of a metal alloy containing Cr and at least 50 wt. % of Ni, Cr or a mature of Ni and Cr. It also contains 5-20 wt. % of a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II or rare earth metal and. optionally, 5-20 wt. % of a low temperature lubricant metal, such as Ag. Au, Pt, Pd, Rh and Cu. This composite exhibits less oxidation instability and less abrasiveness than composites containing chromium carbide, is readily applied using plasma spray and can be ground and polished with a silicon carbide abrasive.

  11. New immiscible refrigeration lubricant for HFCs

    SciTech Connect

    Sunami, Motoshi; Takigawa, Katsuya; Suda, Satoshi; Sasaki, Umekichi

    1995-12-31

    This study examines the capability of a family of very low-viscosity alkylbenzenes (AB) used in high-side rotary compressors for HFCs. In the development of refrigeration lubricants for HFCs, miscibility is one of the most important problems to be solved. Therefore, PAG (polyalkylene glycols) and POE (polyol esters), which have good miscibility, have been applied in new HFC applications. However, it is difficult for these lubricants to maintain long-term durability in high-side rotary compressors. In friction tests under high HFC pressure, ABs with much lower viscosities than mineral oil maintained a much stronger oil film than the combination of mineral oil/R-12 or POE/HFCs. These results were also proven by compressor durability tests. From the study of the solubility of ABs and HFCs, it is suggested that the total amount of refrigerant can be reduced because HFCs are barely soluble with ABs inside the high-side shell.

  12. High temperature lubricant screening and systems studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, D. A.

    1973-01-01

    Four candidate lubricants for next generation aircraft gas turbine application were tested under open atmosphere conditions in a rig simulating an advanced engine 125 mm bore mainshaft thrust bearing position. Testing was conducted at speeds to 24,000 rpm (3,000,000 bearing DN), bearing ring temperature of 500 F, and with 1200 F air and 100 psi differential pressure across the seals installed in a dual tandem arrangement. Test bearing was a 125 mm bore split inner ring, outer race riding angular contact ball bearing under a 3280 lb. thrust load. One lubricant, a type 2 ester, performed extremely well. The mainshaft seal limited the performance. Numerous design improvements for this seal were indicated.

  13. Experience with synthetic fluorinated fluid lubricants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conley, Peter L.; Bohner, John J.

    1990-01-01

    Since the late 1970's, the wet lubricant of choice for space mechanisms has been one of the family of synthetic perfluoro polyalkylether (PFPE) compounds, namely Fomblin Z-25 (Bray-815Z) or DuPont's Krytox 143xx series. While offering the advantages of extremely low vapor pressures and wide temperature ranges, these oils and derived greases have a complex chemistry compared to the more familiar natural and synthetic hydrocarbons. Many aerospace companies have conducted test programs to characterize the behavior of these compounds in a space environment, resulting in a large body of hard knowledge as well as considerable space lore concerning the suitability of the lubricants for particular applications and techniques for successful application. The facts are summarized and a few myths about the compounds are dispelled, and some performance guidelines for the mechanism design engineer are provided.

  14. Thermohydrodynamic analysis for laminar lubricating films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elrod, H. G.; Brewe, D. E.

    1986-01-01

    A Galerkin-type analysis to include thermal effects in laminar lubricating films was performed. The lubricant properties were assumed constant except for a temperature-dependent Newtonian viscosity. The cross-film temperature profile is established by collocation at the film boundaries and two interior Lobatto points. The interior temperatures are determined by requiring that the zeroth and first moment of the energy equation be satisfied across the film. The fluidity is forced to conform to a third--degree polynomial appropriate to the Lobatto-point temperatures. Preliminary indications are that the use of just two such sampling points enables satisfactory prediction of bearing performance even in the presence of substantial viscosity variation.

  15. A New Type of Self-lubricated Thermal Spray Coatings: Liquid Lubricants Embedded in a Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Armada, S.

    2015-01-01

    Oils and greases are commonly used for lubricating, rotating and sliding systems such as bearings, gears, connectors, etc. The maintenance of such lubricated systems in some applications where access is difficult (e.g., offshore wind farms and subsea equipment) increases the operational costs. In some cases, it can be thought that the use of solid lubricants (MoS2, PTFE, graphite, etc.) embedded in coatings could be a solution for such applications; however, the mechanical and dynamic conditions of most of the systems are not appropriate for solid lubricants. Despite this, solid lubricants such as PTFE and MoS2 have been largely employed in different industries, especially in those applications where liquid lubricants cannot be used and when the dynamic conditions allow for it. Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Although the use of liquid lubricants is desirable whenever it is possible, limited research has been addressed toward the development of self-lubricated coatings containing liquid lubricants. One of the main reasons for this is due to the complexity of embedding liquid lubricant reservoirs inside the coating matrix. In the present work, a new type of liquid-solid self-lubricated coatings is presented, being the matrix a metal alloy. Three thermal spray techniques used were as follows: arc-spray, plasma spray, and HVOAF. The metal matrices were two stainless steel types and liquid lubricant-filled capsules with different liquid contents were used. No degradation of the capsules during spraying was observed and the coatings containing capsules were able to keep a low coefficient of friction. The optimal performance is found for the coatings obtained at the lowest spraying temperature and velocity.

  16. A New Type of Self-lubricated Thermal Spray Coatings: Liquid Lubricants Embedded in a Metal Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espallargas, N.; Armada, S.

    2014-09-01

    Oils and greases are commonly used for lubricating, rotating and sliding systems such as bearings, gears, connectors, etc. The maintenance of such lubricated systems in some applications where access is difficult (e.g., offshore wind farms and subsea equipment) increases the operational costs. In some cases, it can be thought that the use of solid lubricants (MoS2, PTFE, graphite, etc.) embedded in coatings could be a solution for such applications; however, the mechanical and dynamic conditions of most of the systems are not appropriate for solid lubricants. Despite this, solid lubricants such as PTFE and MoS2 have been largely employed in different industries, especially in those applications where liquid lubricants cannot be used and when the dynamic conditions allow for it. Self-lubricated coatings have been a major topic of interest in thermal spray in the last decades. Although the use of liquid lubricants is desirable whenever it is possible, limited research has been addressed toward the development of self-lubricated coatings containing liquid lubricants. One of the main reasons for this is due to the complexity of embedding liquid lubricant reservoirs inside the coating matrix. In the present work, a new type of liquid-solid self-lubricated coatings is presented, being the matrix a metal alloy. Three thermal spray techniques used were as follows: arc-spray, plasma spray, and HVOAF. The metal matrices were two stainless steel types and liquid lubricant-filled capsules with different liquid contents were used. No degradation of the capsules during spraying was observed and the coatings containing capsules were able to keep a low coefficient of friction. The optimal performance is found for the coatings obtained at the lowest spraying temperature and velocity.

  17. Lubrication free centrifugal compressor. Technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Gottschlich, J.M.; Scaringe, R.P.; Gui, F.

    1994-04-22

    This paper describes an effort to demonstrate the benefits of an innovative, lightweight, lubrication free centrifugal compressor that allows the use of environmentally sale alternate refrigerants with improved system efficiencies over current state-of-the-art technology. This effort couples the recently developed 3-D high efficiency centrifugal compressor and fabrication technologies with magnetic bearing technology and will then prove the performance, life and reliability of the compressor.

  18. Teflon lubrication of liquid oxygen turbopump bearings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naerheim, Y.; Stocker, P. J.

    1989-01-01

    Ball bearings with glass fiber reinforced Teflon ball retainers from hot-fired liquid oxygen turbopumps were analyzed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to determine the extent of Teflon transfer and/or chemical reaction at the bearing surface. No Teflon, but metal fluorides could be found on the metal surface. This indicates that Teflon decomposes and reacts with the bearing steel to form fluorides. Hence, Teflon does not appear to function directly as a lubricant under these operating conditions.

  19. Application of Thioether for Vapor Phase Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, E. Earl

    1997-01-01

    The objective of these studies was to identify the optimal conditions for vapor phase lubrication using Thioether for both sliding and rolling wear. The important variable include; (1) The component materials including M50 steel, monel and silicon nitride. (2) The vapor concentration and flow rate. (3) The temperature in the range of 600 F to 1500 F. (4) The loads and rolling and/or sliding speeds.

  20. Determination of thin hydrodynamic lubricating film thickness using dichromatic interferometry.

    PubMed

    Guo, L; Wong, P L; Guo, F; Liu, H C

    2014-09-10

    This paper introduces the application of dichromatic interferometry for the study of hydrodynamic lubrication. In conventional methods, two beams with different colors are projected consecutively on a static object. By contrast, the current method deals with hydrodynamic lubricated contacts under running conditions and two lasers with different colors are projected simultaneously to form interference images. Dichromatic interferometry incorporates the advantages of monochromatic and chromatic interferometry, which are widely used in lubrication research. This new approach was evaluated statically and dynamically by measuring the inclination of static wedge films and the thickness of the hydrodynamic lubricating film under running conditions, respectively. Results show that dichromatic interferometry can facilitate real-time determination of lubricating film thickness and is well suited for the study of transient or dynamic lubricating problems. PMID:25321689

  1. Evaluation of newly formulated Dow Corning 321 dry film lubricant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cook, M.

    1989-01-01

    An evaluation of the newly formulated Dow Corning 321 dry film lubricant was performed. The purpose of the evaluation was to compare lubricating characteristics of Dow Corning 321 (STW4-2955, SCN No. 3) to those of Molykote 321R (STW4-2955). Ten igniter bolts were installed and torqued on test plates using the old formulation thread lubricant (Molykote 321R), and 10 bolts were installed using the new formulation (Dow Corning 321). After bolt removal, no signs of galling were found on any of the bolts or test plates threaded holes. Average torque-load values for each formulation were very close. Test results showed there are no significant differences in lubrication abilities between Molykote 321R and Dow Corning 321. It is recommended that, once current supplies of Molykote 321R are depleted, Dow Corning 321 dry film lubricant be used in place of Molykote 321R as a thread lubricant on redesigned solid rocket motor assemblies.

  2. Characterization of Spray Lubricants for the Die Casting Process

    SciTech Connect

    Sabau, Adrian S

    2008-01-01

    During the die casting process, lubricants are sprayed in order to cool the dies and facilitate the ejection of the casting. The cooling effects of the die lubricant were investigated using Thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), heat flux sensors (HFS), and infrared imaging. The evolution of the heat flux and pictures taken using a high speed infrared camera revealed that lubricant application was a transient process. The short time response of the HFS allows the monitoring and data acquisition of the surface temperature and heat flux without additional data processing. A similar set of experiments was performed with deionized water in order to assess the lubricant effect. The high heat flux obtained at 300 C was attributed to the wetting and absorbant properties of the lubricant. Pictures of the spray cone and lubricant flow on the die were also used to explain the heat flux evolution.

  3. Historical perspective of lubricant deposit evaluations at Southwest Research Institute

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, J.N.; Lestz, S.J.

    1980-11-01

    This paper presents numerous bench tests investigated at Southwest Research Institute which were intended to evaluate the performance of automotive engine and gear oils, and aircraft turbine lubricants. In most cases the tests were designed to simulate certain aspects of the environment seen by the lubricant while performing its function, and lubricant degradation with subsequent deposit formation are the parameters measured. Although in many instances good correlation with specific engine tests were achieved, the final measure of acceptability of a finished lubricant for military applications remains the full engine tests for engine oils; automotive gear tests for gear oils, and full-scale turbine engine tests for the aircraft lubricants. The tests discussed here are excellent screening devices for new experimental lubricant formulations.

  4. Nanoscale lubricating film formation by linear polymer in aqueous solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Shuhai; Guo, Dan; Xie, Guoxin

    2012-11-01

    Film-forming properties of polymer in aqueous solution flowing through a nanogap have been investigated by using a thin film interferometry. The film properties of linear polymer in aqueous solution flowing through a confined nanogap depend on the ratio of water film thickness to averaged radius of polymer chains H0/RPolymer. It was found that the lubrication film thickness of linear polymer in aqueous solution decreases as the polymer molecular weight increasing when H0/RPolymer < 2 ˜ 3. A new lubrication map was proposed, which includes the lubrication regime of weak confinement influence, the lubrication regime of strong confinement influence (LRSCI), and the transition regime of confinement influence. It is very difficult to increase the lubrication film thickness using the higher molecule weight in the LRSCI regime. The lubrication mechanism inferred from our experimental results may help to better understand the dynamic film properties of linear polymer in aqueous solution flowing through a nanogap.

  5. Some new evidence on human joint lubrication.

    PubMed Central

    Unsworth, A; Dowson, D; Wright, V

    1975-01-01

    Theoretical consideration has been given to the use of pendulum machines which are used to examine the frictional properties of human joints by incorporating them as fulcra. As a result, a new type of pendulum machine has been built which incorporates the facility to apply sudden loads to the joint on starting the swinging motion, and also the ability to measure directly the frictional torque experienced by the joint. The results obtained from natural hip joints indicate the presence of squeeze film lubrication under conditions of sudden loading of a joint. In addition, a self-generated fluid film process was observed at low loads while at higher loads boundary lubrication appeared to be important. These results have been used to describe the lubrication regimens occurring in a normal activity such as walking. A single experiment carried out on a hip from a patient suffering from severe rheumatoid arthritis has also been reported and the frictional resistance was seen to be increased fifteenfold compared to a normal hip. Images PMID:1190847

  6. Optical microsystem for analyzing engine lubricants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scott, Andrew J.; Mabesa, Jose R., Jr.; Gorsich, David; Rathgeb, Brian; Said, Ali A.; Dugan, Mark; Haddock, Tom F.; Bado, Philippe W.

    2004-12-01

    It is possible to dramatically improve the performance, reliability, and maintainability of vehicles and other similarly complex equipment if improved sensing and diagnostics systems are available. Each year military and commercial maintenance personnel unnecessarily replace, at scheduled intervals, significant amounts of lubricant fluids in vehicles, weapon systems, and supporting equipment. Personnel draw samples of fluids and send them to test labs for analysis to determine if replacement is necessary. Systematic use of either on-board (embedded) lubricant quality analysis capabilities will save millions of dollars each year in avoided fluid changes, saved labor, prevented damage to mechanical components while providing associated environmental benefits. This paper discusses the design, the manufacturing, and the evaluation of robust optical sensors designed to monitor the condition of industrial fluids. The sensors reported are manufactured from bulk fused silica substrates. They incorporate three-dimensional micro fluidic circuitry side-by-side with three-dimensional wave guided optical networks. The manufacturing of the optical waveguides are completed using a direct-write process based on the use of femtosecond laser pulses to locally alter the structure of the glass substrate at the nano-level. The microfluidic circuitry is produced using the same femtosecond laser based process, followed by an anisotropic wet chemical etching step. Data will be presented regarding the use of these sensors to monitor the quality of engine oil and possibly some other vehicle lubricants such as hydraulic oil.

  7. Mechanisms of lubrication and wear of a bonded solid-lubricant film

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, R. L.

    1980-01-01

    The tribological properties of polyimide-bonded graphite fluoride films were investigated. A pin-on-disk type of testing apparatus was used; in addition to sliding a hemispherically tipped rider, a rider with a 0.95-mm-diameter flat area was slid against the film so that a lower, less variable contact stress could be achieved. Two stages of lubrication occurred: in the first, the film supported the load and the lubricating mechanism consisted of the shear of a thin surface layer between the rider and the bulk of the film. The second occurred after the bonded film had worn to the substrate, and consisted of the shear of very thin lubricant films between the rider and flat plateaus generated on the metallic substrate asperities. The film wear mechanism was strongly dependent on contact stress.

  8. Development of special lubricants for ball bearings operating in vacuum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    A ball bearing life test program was performed to obtain data on the efficiencies of various lubricated and self-lubricating ball retainer systems for instrument bearings in a vacuum environment. The program utilized light to moderate radial loads at relatively low speeds on a NASA-GSFC designed and supplied test rig. Several systems were found which gave acceptable bearing life under the test conditions used, but the most consistent low running torques after testing resulted from oil lubrication.

  9. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.; Waite, T. )

    1993-01-01

    Equipment manufacturers are challenged to replace CFC-based refrigerants and their lubricants with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Information on the compatibility of motor materials with these alternative refrigerants and lubricants is a basic requirement for reliable performance. This report presents compatibility data for 24 commercially used motor materials exposed to 17 refrigerant/lubricant combinations. This compatibility data will enable the phase out of CFC's to continue at its current fast pace and insure the continued reliable performance of refrigerant-based equipment.

  10. Operational quantities and new approach by ICRU.

    PubMed

    2016-06-01

    The protection quantities, equivalent dose in a tissue or organ and effective dose, were developed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) to allow quantification of the extent of exposure of the human body to ionising radiation. These quantities are used for the implementation of limitation and optimisation principles. Body-related protection quantities are not measurable in practice. Therefore, the International Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements (ICRU) developed a set of operational dose quantities for use in radiation measurements for external exposure that can assess the protection quantities. The current ICRU operational quantities were defined more than 30 years ago. ICRU Report Committee 26 examined the rationale for the operational quantities, taking account of changes in the definitions of the protection quantities in ICRP's 2007 Recommendations. The considerations included the range of types and energies of particles contributing to exposure of workers and members of the public. ICRU Report Committee 26 investigated a set of alternative definitions for the operational quantities. The major change to the currently favoured set of quantities is redefinition of the operational quantities, from being based on doses at specific points in the ICRU sphere and soft tissue, to being based on particle fluence and conversion coefficients for effective dose and absorbed dose to the lens of the eye and local skin. PMID:26980797

  11. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  12. MISCIBILITY, SOLUBILITY, AND VISCOSITY MEASUREMENTS FOR R-236EA WITH POTENTIAL LUBRICANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of miscibility, solubility, and viscosity measurements of refrigerant R-236ea with three potential lubricants. (NOTE: The data were needed to determine the suitability of refrigerant/lubricant combinations for use in refrigeration systems.) The lubricants...

  13. An analytical method for lubricant quality control by NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zamora, David; Blanco, Marcelo; Bautista, Manel; Mulero, Rufí; Mir, Miquel

    2012-01-30

    The excellent compatibility of polyol esters (POEs) with general fluids coolants such as CO(2) and non-chlorinated coolants (e.g. hydrofluorocarbons, HFCs) in terms of solubility, miscibility and chemical stability has fostered their use as lubricants by the refrigeration industry. The most widely used POEs bases consist of esters of polyalcohols - such as pentaerythritol, dipentaerythritol and neopentylglycol - with mixtures of carboxylic acids of 4-10 carbon atoms. Their thermophysical properties (viscosity mainly) are crucial with a view to producing efficient lubricants for specific applications. Usually, POE formulations, which usually contain several bases, are characterized in terms of global indices. In this work, we developed a methodology based on NIR spectroscopy for the characterization and analysis of lubricant formulations. The products, including lubricant bases and lubricant formulations, are characterized by reference to two spectral libraries that are used to identify as the starting lubricant bases as well as the lubricant formulations. It has been proposed to build libraries in cascade for the differentiation of lubricant formulations without and with low content in additives. Once the identification of the formulation is applied PLS multivariate models are used to determine the components of a lubricant formulation and its viscosity. PMID:22284520

  14. Lubricant base stock potential of chemically modified vegetable oils.

    PubMed

    Erhan, Sevim Z; Sharma, Brajendra K; Liu, Zengshe; Adhvaryu, Atanu

    2008-10-01

    The environment must be protected against pollution caused by lubricants based on petroleum oils. The pollution problem is so severe that approximately 50% of all lubricants sold worldwide end up in the environment via volatility, spills, or total loss applications. This threat to the environment can be avoided by either preventing undesirable losses, reclaiming and recycling mineral oil lubricants, or using environmentally friendly lubricants. Vegetable oils are recognized as rapidly biodegradable and are thus promising candidates as base fluids in environment friendly lubricants. Lubricants based on vegetable oils display excellent tribological properties, high viscosity indices, and flash points. To compete with mineral-oil-based lubricants, some of their inherent disadvantages, such as poor oxidation and low-temperature stability, must be corrected. One way to address these problems is chemical modification of vegetable oils at the sites of unsaturation. After a one-step chemical modification, the chemically modified soybean oil derivatives were studied for thermo-oxidative stability using pressurized differential scanning calorimetry and a thin-film micro-oxidation test, low-temperature fluid properties using pour-point measurements, and friction-wear properties using four-ball and ball-on-disk configurations. The lubricants formulated with chemically modified soybean oil derivatives exhibit superior low-temperature flow properties, improved thermo-oxidative stability, and better friction and wear properties. The chemically modified soybean oil derivatives having diester substitution at the sites of unsaturation have potential in the formulation of industrial lubricants. PMID:18783238

  15. Fluoride coatings make effective lubricants in molten sodium environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1966-01-01

    Coating bearing surfaces with calcium fluoride-barium fluoride film provides effective lubrication against sliding friction in molten sodium and other severe environments at high and low temperatures.

  16. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 13) to 10(exp 15) n per square centimeters. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 10(exp 15) to 10(exp 16) n per square centimeters with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  17. Constitutive modelling of lubricants in concentrated contacts at high slide to roll ratios

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tevaarwerk, J. L.

    1985-01-01

    A constitutive lubricant friction model for rolling/sliding concentrated contacts such as gears and cams was developed, based upon the Johnson and Tevaarwerk fluid rheology model developed earlier. The friction model reported herein differs from the earlier rheological models in that very large slide to roll ratios can now be accommodated by modifying the thermal response of the model. Also the elastic response of the fluid has been omitted from the model, thereby making it much simpler for use in the high slide to roll contacts. The effects of this simplification are very minimal on the outcome of the predicted friction losses (less than 1%). In essence then the lubricant friction model developed for the high slide to roll ratios treats the fluid in the concentrated contact as consisting of a nonlinear viscous element that is pressure, temperature, and strain rate dependent in its shear response. The fluid rheological constants required for the prediction of the friction losses at different contact conditions are obtained by traction measurements on several of the currently used gear lubricants. An example calculation, using this model and the fluid parameters obtained from the experiments, shows that it correctly predicts trends and magnitude of gear mesh losses measured elsewhere for the same fluids tested here.

  18. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-01

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  19. Post Irradiation Evaluation of Thermal Control Coatings and Solid Lubricants to Support Fission Surface Power Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bowman, Cheryl L.; Jaworske, Donald A.; Stanford, Malcolm K.; Persinger, Justin A.; Khorsandi, Behrooz; Blue, Thomas E.

    2007-01-30

    The development of a nuclear power system for space missions, such as the Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter or a lunar outpost, requires substantially more compact reactor design than conventional terrestrial systems. In order to minimize shielding requirements and hence system weight, the radiation tolerance of component materials within the power conversion and heat rejection systems must be defined. Two classes of coatings, thermal control paints and solid lubricants, were identified as material systems for which limited radiation hardness information was available. Screening studies were designed to explore candidate coatings under a predominately fast neutron spectrum. The Ohio State Research Reactor Facility staff performed irradiation in a well characterized, mixed energy spectrum and performed post irradiation analysis of representative coatings for thermal control and solid lubricant applications. Thermal control paints were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1013 to 1015 n/cm2. No optical degradation was noted although some adhesive degradation was found at higher fluence levels. Solid lubricant coatings were evaluated for 1 MeV equivalent fluences from 1015 to 1016 n/cm2 with coating adhesion and flexibility used for post irradiation evaluation screening. The exposures studied did not lead to obvious property degradation indicating the coatings would have survived the radiation environment for the previously proposed Jupiter mission. The results are also applicable to space power development programs such as fission surface power for future lunar and Mars missions.

  20. The effect of alternative fuels on the stability and lubricity of crankcase lubricants. Final report, September 1992--September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Klaus, E.E.; Duda, J.L.; Shah, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    The purpose of this research is to study the effect of alternative fuels on the functioning of crankcase lubricants with these three main goals: Develop simple, rapid test protocols to evaluate the influence of alternative fuels on the stability and lubricity of lubricants under conditions simulating engine operation. The objective is to have these test protocols serve industry as a precursor evaluation procedure before expensive engine tests are conducted. The reliability of these test procedures to predict the influence of additives on lubricant performance under actual operating conditions will be determined by comparison of these test results with available engine and fleet tests. Use the developed test procedures to evaluate commercially available lubricants for applications with alternative fuels and determine the influence of various bearing materials, including conventional steel as well as advanced ceramic materials. Use the test procedures to evaluate classes of lubricants and lubricant additives as well as fuel additives, and develop lubricants and additives for comparability with specific alternative fuels. Test procedures have been developed to produce lubricant fractions which can be caused by contact with alternative fuels in the crankcase and the area of the fuel injector. Associated test procedures have also been developed so that the oxidative stability and the wear characteristics of the lubricant fractions from the extraction protocol can be evaluated. Although these test procedures have been used to evaluate some lubricants, the significant impact of these tests on the development and evaluation of lubricants for alternatively fueled engines has only been initiated, and these tests should be the basis for extensive future studies.

  1. Evaluation of seals and lubricants used on the Long Duration Exposure Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dursch, H. W.; Keough, B. K.; Pippin, H. G.

    1994-01-01

    This report described results from testing and analysis of seals and lubricants subsequent to the 69-month low-earth-orbit (LEO) exposure on the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Results show that if the materials were shielded from exposure to LDEF's external environment, the 69-month exposure to LEO resulted in minimal changes to material properties. However, if the materials were exposed to LDEF's exterior environments (atomic oxygen, solar radiation, meteoroids, and/or space debris), a variety of events occurred, ranging from no material change, to changes in properties, to significant erosion of the material.

  2. Full Life Wind Turbine Gearbox Lubricating Fluids

    SciTech Connect

    Lutz, Glenn A.; Jungk, Manfred; Bryant, Jonathan J.; Lauer, Rebecca S.; Chobot, Anthony; Mayer, Tyler; Palmer, Shane; Kauffman, Robert E.

    2012-02-28

    Industrial gear box lubricants typically are hydrocarbon based mineral oils with considerable amounts of additives to overcome the lack of base fluid properties like wear protection, oxidation stability, load carrying capacity, low temperature solidification and drop of viscosity at higher temperatures. For today's wind turbine gearboxes, the requirements are more severe and synthetic hydrocarbon oils are used to improve on this, but all such hydrocarbon based lubricants require significant amounts of Extreme Pressure (EP) additives to meet performance requirements. Perfluoropolyether (PFPE) fluids provide load carrying capacity as an inherent property. During the course of the project with the main tasks of 'Establish a Benchmark', 'Lubricant Evaluation', 'Full Scale Gearbox Trial' and 'Economic Evaluation', the PAO Reference oil exhibited significant changes after laboratory gear testing, in service operation in the field and full scale gearbox trial. Four hydrocarbon base oils were selected for comparison in the benchmarking exercise and showed variation with respect to meeting the requirements for the laboratory micro-pitting tests, while the PFPE fluid exceeded the requirements even with the material taken after the full scale gear box trial. This is remarkable for a lubricant without EP additives. Laboratory bearing tests performed on the PFPE fluids before and after the full scale gear box trial showed the results met requirements for the industry standard. The PFPE fluid successfully completed the full scale gear box test program which included baseline and progressive staged load testing. The evaluation of gears showed no micro-pitting or objectionable wear. By the final stage, lubricant film thickness had been reduced to just 21% of its original value, this was by design and resulted in a lambda ratio of well below 1. This test design scenario of a low lambda ratio is a very undesirable lubrication condition for real world but creates the ability to test

  3. Quantities and units in radiation protection dosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jennings, W. A.

    1994-08-01

    A new report, entitled Quantities and Units in Radiation Protection Dosimetry, has recently been published by the international Commission on Radiation Units and Measurements. That report (No. 51) aims to provide a coherent system of quantities and units for purposes of measurement and calculation in the assessment of compliance with dose limitations. The present paper provides an extended summary of that report, including references to the operational quantities needed for area and individual monitoring of external radiations.

  4. Boundary friction in liquid and dry film biobased lubricants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farm-based raw materials such as fats, seed oils, starches, proteins, and gums can be subjected to various degrees of processing to make them suitable for use in lubrication. The resulting biobased ingredients are then blended with each other and/or with synthetic ingredients to formulate lubricant...

  5. The use of perfluoroether lubricants in unprotected space environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baxter, B. H.; Hall, B. P.

    1985-01-01

    A series of ball bearing tests in simulated space environment are described which determine durability of perfluoroether lubricants. The results of the examination of the test bearings for each stage are described and experimental techniques designed to overcome lubricant degradation are outlined.

  6. Extruded Self-Lubricating Solid For High-Temperature Use

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, H. E.; Waters, W. J.; Soltis, R. F.; Bemis, K.

    1996-01-01

    "EX-212" denotes high-density extruded form of composite solid material self-lubricating over wide range of temperatures. Properties equal or exceed those of powder-metallurgy version of this material. Developed for use in advanced engines at high temperatures at which ordinary lubricants destroyed.

  7. A review of liquid lubricant thermal/oxidative degradation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, W. R., Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The fundamental processes occurring during the thermal and oxidative degradation of hydrocarbons are reviewed. Particular emphasis is given to various classes of liquid lubricants such as mineral oils, esters, polyphenyl ethers, C-ethers, and fluorinated polyethers. Experimental techniques for determining thermal and oxidative stabilities of lubricants are discussed. The role of inhibitors and catalysis is also covered.

  8. MODIFICATION OF VEGETABLE OILS FOR USE AS INDUSTRIAL LUBRICANTS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There has been a lot of interest in using vegetable oils (particularly soybean oil) as renewable raw materials for new industrial products including lubricants. This emphasis on environmentally friendly lubricants is largely due to the rapid depletion of world fossil fuel reserves and increasing co...

  9. FY 2012 Progress Report for Fuel & Lubricant Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Stork, Kevin

    2013-06-28

    Annual progress report of the Fuel & Lubricant Technologies subprogram supporting fuels and lubricants research and development (R&D) to provide vehicle users with cost-competitive options that enable high fuel economy with low emissions, and contribute to petroleum displacement.

  10. Current problems: New similiquid lubricant for locomotive gears

    SciTech Connect

    Shibryaev, S.B.; Nesterov, A.V.; Seregina, I.E.

    1995-01-01

    The development of a formula for a new, domestically manufactured, semiliquid lubricant is described. The lubricant is for traction gears of locomotives and motorized cars of multiple-unit trains that will ensure year-round operation. Scientific principles have been used in selecting additives and in increasing the effectiveness of the additives by means of oxygen-containing synthetic oils.

  11. NOVEL VAPOR-DEPOSITED LUBRICANTS FOR METAL-FORMING PROCESSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report gives results of a preliminary laboratory study of the feasibility of using vapor-phase lubrication to lubricate industrial metal forging dies. (NOTE: the forging and shaping of metal parts is one of many metal fabricating processes that may generate volatile organic c...

  12. Seal/lubricant systems for geothermal drilling equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Hendrickson, R.R.; Winzenried, R.W.

    1980-07-01

    The development and testing of seals and lubricants for journal-type roller-cone rock bits for drilling into geothermal reservoirs at temperatures over 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) are described. The conditions experienced by seals and lubricants subjected to geothermal drilling are reviewed along with the basic design requirements for roller-cone bit seals and journal bearing lubricants. Two unique test facilities are described: a seal test machine which simulates pressures, temperatures, and mechanical eccentricities, and a lubricant tester capable of evaluating load-bearing ability at temperature and pressure. Three candidate elastomeric compounds demonstrated 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) capability and several others demonstrated 260/sup 0/C (500/sup 0/F) or greater capability. Successful elastomeric seal candidates were proprietary compounds based on EPDM, Kalrez, and/or Viton polymers. Three mechanical seals for reservoir temperatures over 288/sup 0/C (550/sup 0/F) are presented. Lubricant screening tests on more than 50 products are summarized, and several newly developed lubricants which meet both the compatibility and lubrication requirements are described. Several seal/lubricant systems are recommended for laboratory or field geothermal drilling tests in roller-cone drill bits. The future availability of drill bits for geothermal use is discussed, as well as the potential spinoffs of the program findings for nongeothermal roller-cone bits.

  13. Talc as a Substitute for Dry Lubricant (an Overview)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdulkareem, Suleiman; Orkuma, Gideon I.; Apasi, Adaokoma A.

    2011-01-01

    All metal surfaces, irrespective of their surface integrity, appear as a series of peaks and valleys under close examination. The objective of lubrication is to separate these peaks and valleys so that contact is avoided in metal to metal, hence greatly reduce or eliminate wear. A lubricant may be gas, liquid, semi-solid, or solid that permits free action of mechanical devices and prevents damage by abrasion and seizing of metal or other components through unequal expansion caused by heat. Among the solid (dry) lubricants includes: graphite, glass, boron nitride, polytetrafluoroethene (PTFE-Teflon), molybdenum disulfide, tungsten disulfide, lime, talc, etc. Solid (dry) lubricants differ significantly from liquid lubricants, in that liquid lubricants reduce friction due to their fluidity and viscosity. However, solid lubricants have neither of these properties but they are still capable of reducing friction and wear in metal. In this work, the study of the property characteristics of talc as a substitute for graphite in dry lubrication (an overview) was carried out and reported in this paper.

  14. High Temperature Solid Lubricant Coating for High Temperature Wear Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DellaCorte, Christopher (Inventor); Edmonds, Brian J (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    A self-lubricating, friction and wear reducing composite useful over a wide temperature range is described herein. The composite includes metal bonded chromium oxide dispersed in a metal binder having a substantial amount of nickel. The composite contains a fluoride of at least one Group I, Group II, or rare earth metal, and optionally a low temperature lubricant metal.

  15. Boron-containing compositions, and lubricants and fuels containing same

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, F.W.; Pialet, J.W.; Barrer, D.E.; Schroech, C.W.

    1988-05-03

    A method of preparing boron-containing compositions is described which comprises reacting at least one hydroxy-substituted ester, amide or imide with a boron compound. Such boron-containing compositions are useful in lubricating oils and provide the lubricating oils with anti-wear and/or friction-reducing properties. The boron-containing compositions also are useful in fuel compositions.

  16. Lubricant Basestock Potential of Chemically Modified Vegetable Oils

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The environment must be protected against pollution caused by lubricants based on petroleum oils. The pollution problem is so severe that approximately 50% of all lubricants sold worldwide end up in the environment via volatility, spills, and total loss applications. This threat to the environment...

  17. Soybean oil-based lubricants: a search for synergistic antioxidants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Vegetable oils can contribute towards the goal of energy independence and security due to their naturally renewable resource. They are promising candidates as base fluid for eco-friendly lubricants because of their excellent lubricity, biodegradability, superior viscosity-temperature characteristic...

  18. Adamantane dicarboxylic acid esters as possible additives to semisolid lubricants

    SciTech Connect

    Novikova, I.A.; Dolgopolova, T.N.; Apryatkin, A.D.

    1993-12-31

    The high efficiency of adamantane carboxylic acid esters as antiwear additives to lubricating compounds based on polysiloxane liquids has been demonstrated. Dibutyl and dihexyl esters of 5,7-dimethyl-1,3-adainantane dicarboxylic acid, increasing by several factors the efficiency of a semisolid lubricant based on liquid methyldichlorophenylsiloxane, have been synthesized and characterized.

  19. Pretreatment of lubricated surfaces with sputtered cadmium oxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Cadmium oxide is used with a dry solid lubricant on a surface to improve wear resistance. The surface topography is first altered by photochemical etching to a predetermined pattern. The cadmium oxide is then sputtered onto the altered surface to form an intermediate layer to more tightly hold the dry lubricant, such as graphite.

  20. CdO Pretreatment For Graphite Lubricant Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    Lubrication of rubbing steel surfaces with graphite improved by sputtering cadmium oxide onto surfaces, according to report. Lubricating films consisting of mixtures of cadmium oxide and graphite did not perform as well as films of graphite alone on surfaces pretreated with cadmium oxide. Primary beneficial effect obtained by sputtering pretreatment with cadmium oxide, which apparently improves bond between metallic substrate and graphite.

  1. Microfriction studies of model self-lubricating surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Blau, P.J.; Yust, C.S.

    1993-05-06

    Self-lubricating composites consist of at least one structural (matrix) phase and at least one phase to provide lubrication. Modeling the behavior of such composites involves ascertaining the frictional contributions of each constituent phase under varying conditions of lubricating films coverage. The ORNL friction microprobe (FMP), a specialized microcontact tribometer, was used to investigate the frictional behavior of both matrix and lubricant phases to support the development of self-lubricating, surfaces. Polished CVD-silicon carbide deposits and silicon wafers were used as substrates. The wafers were intended to simulate the thin silica films present on SiC surfaces at elevated temperature. Molybdenum disulfide, in both sputtered and burnished forms, was used as the model lubricant. The effects of CVD-SiC substrate surface roughness and method of lubricant film deposition on the substrate were studied for single passes of a spherical silicon nitride slider (NBD 200 material). In contrast to the smooth sliding exhibit by burnished, films, sputtered MoS{sub 2} surfaces exhibited marked stick-slip behavior, indicating that the frictional behavior of solid lubricating coatings can be quite erratic on a microscale, especially when asperity contacts are elastically compliant.

  2. 40 CFR 91.308 - Lubricating oil and test fuel.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Lubricating oil and test fuel. 91.308 Section 91.308 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) CONTROL OF EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Emission Test Equipment Provisions § 91.308 Lubricating oil and test fuel....

  3. Lubrication fluids from branched fatty acid methyl esters

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have invented a new method for the synthesis of lubrication fluids using natural vegetable oils. Ordinary vegetable oils are good lubricants, but in their native form, they lack the stability necessary for many applications. Materials made using this new technology display significantly increas...

  4. Compressor lubrication and noise reduction system

    SciTech Connect

    Bayyouk, J.A.; Waser, M.P.

    1988-06-14

    An oil lubrication and noise suppression system is described comprising: an oil sump: a crankshaft rotatable about an axis and defining a centrifugal oil pump: an oil pickup tube extending into the oil sump and secured to the crankshaft coaxial with the axis and rotatable with the crankshaft about the axis as a unit; and an impeller axially asymmetrically mounted on the pickup tube within the oil sump whereby upon rotation of the crankshaft, the oil pickup tube and the impeller as a unit causes the production of froth and the pumping of oil while preventing the formation of a stable vortex.

  5. Ice adhesion on lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces.

    PubMed

    Subramanyam, Srinivas Bengaluru; Rykaczewski, Konrad; Varanasi, Kripa K

    2013-11-01

    Ice accretion is an important problem and passive approaches for reducing ice-adhesion are of great interest in various systems such as aircrafts, power lines, wind turbines, and oil platforms. Here, we study the ice-adhesion properties of lubricant-impregnated textured surfaces. Force measurements show ice adhesion strength on textured surfaces impregnated with thermodynamically stable lubricant films to be higher than that on surfaces with excess lubricant. Systematic ice-adhesion measurements indicate that the ice-adhesion strength is dependent on texture and decreases with increasing texture density. Direct cryogenic SEM imaging of the fractured ice surface and the interface between ice and lubricant-impregnated textured surface reveal stress concentrators and crack initiation sites that can increase with texture density and result in lowering adhesion strength. Thus, lubricant-impregnated surfaces have to be optimized to outperform state-of-the-art icephobic treatments. PMID:24070257

  6. Lubricant Effects on Efficiency of a Helicopter Transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitchell, A. M.; Coy, J. J.

    1982-01-01

    Eleven different lubricants were used in efficiency tests conducted on the OH-58A helicopter main transmission using the NASA Lewis Research Center's 500 hp torque regenerative helicopter transmission test stand. Tests were run at oil-in temperatures of 355 K and 372 K. The efficiency was calculated from a heat balance on the water running through an oil to water heat exchanger which the transmission was heavily insulated. Results show an efficiency range from 98.3% to 98.8% which is a 50% variation relative to the losses associated with the maximum efficiency measured. For a given lubricant, the efficiency increased as temperature increased and viscosity decreased. There were two exceptions which could not be explained. Between lubricants, efficiency was not correlated with viscosity. There were relatively large variations in efficiency with the different lubricants whose viscosity generally fell in the 5 to 7 centistoke range. The lubricants had no significant effect on the vibration signature of the transmission.

  7. Study of ball bearing torque under elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, D. P.; Zaretsky, E. V.; Allen, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Spinning and rolling torques were measured in an angular-contact ball bearing with and without a cage under several lubrication regimes in a modified NASA spinning torque apparatus. Two lubricants were used - a di-2 ethylhexyl sebacate and a synthetic paraffinic oil, at shaft speeds of 1000, 2000, and 3000 rpm and bearing loads from 45 newtons (10 lb) to 403 newtons (90 lb). An analytical model was developed from previous spinning friction models to include rolling with spinning under lubrication regimes from thin film to flooded conditions. The bearing torque values have a wide variation, under any condition of speed and load, depending on the amount of lubricant present in the bearing. The analytical model compared favorably with experimental results under several lubrication regimes.

  8. Intrinsic adhesion force of lubricants to steel surface.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jonghwi

    2004-09-01

    The intrinsic adhesion forces of lubricants and other pharmaceutical materials to a steel surface were quantitatively compared using Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM). A steel sphere was attached to the tip of an AFM cantilever, and its adhesion forces to the substrate surfaces of magnesium stearate, sodium stearyl fumarate, lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen were measured. Surface roughness varied by an order of magnitude among the materials. However, the results clearly showed that the two lubricants had about half the intrinsic adhesion force as lactose, 4-acetamidophenol, and naproxen. Differences in the intrinsic adhesion forces of the two lubricants were insignificant. The lubricant molecules were unable to cover the steel surface during AFM measurements. Intrinsic adhesion force can slightly be modified by surface treatment and compaction, and its tip-to-tip variation was not greater than its difference between lubricants and other pharmaceutical particles. This study provides a quantitative fundamental basis for understanding adhesion related issues. PMID:15295791

  9. Bearing elastohydrodynamic lubrication: A complex calculation made simple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zaretsky, Erwin V.

    1990-01-01

    The lubricant elastohydrodynamic (EHD) film thickness formula is reduced to a simplified form whereby only the rolling-element bearing inside and outside diameters and speed (in revolutions per minute) and the lubricant type and viscosity (in centipoise) at temperature are required for its use. Additionally, a graph is provided for the first time that is based upon experimental data giving an EHD film reduction factor as a function of contact lubricant flow number. This reduction factor accounts for lubricant starvation within the Hertzian contact. A graph relating the ratio of minimum film thickness to composite surface roughness and a lubrication-life correction factor is also provided. The life correction factor is used to determine resultant bearing life.

  10. The effect of lubricant additives on fretting wear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Y.; Roylance, B. J.

    1992-10-01

    The effect of lubricant additives on fretting wear has been investigated using a ball-on-plate machine. The test results confirm that the antiwear additives, e.g. phospho-sulphurized terpene, sulphurized esters and sulphurized paraffins, are effective in reducing friction and wear. Examination of worn surfaces by optical and electron microscope inspection indicated the presence of thin films which had been deposited under fretting action when using oils containing these additives. Unlubricated fretting wear occurred in the scuffing region. In contrast, the lubricated fretting wear with the lubricating oils containing the antiwear additives took place in the mixed lubrication region. In lubricated fretting wear, the size of the wear particles was smaller than with dry fretting wear.

  11. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    PubMed Central

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration–lubrication mechanism. PMID:25754223

  12. High-pressure lubricity at the meso- and nanoscale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vanossi, A.; Benassi, A.; Varini, N.; Tosatti, E.

    2013-01-01

    The increase of sliding friction upon increasing load is a classic in the macroscopic world. Here we discuss the possibility that friction rise might sometimes turn into a drop when, at the mesoscale and nanoscale, a confined lubricant film separating crystalline sliders undergoes strong layering and solidification. Under pressure, transitions from N to N-1 layers may imply a change of lateral periodicity of the crystallized lubricant sufficient to alter the matching of crystal structures, influencing the ensuing friction jump. A pressure-induced friction drop may occur as the shear gradient maximum switches from the lubricant middle, marked by strong stick-slip with or without shear melting, to the crystalline slider-lubricant interface, characterized by smooth superlubric sliding. We present high-pressure sliding simulations to display examples of frictional drops, suggesting their possible relevance to the local behavior in boundary lubrication.

  13. Ball bearing lubrication: The elastohydrodynamics of elliptical contacts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hamrock, B. J.; Dowson, D.

    1981-01-01

    The history of ball bearings is examined, taking into account rollers and the wheel in the early civilizations, the development of early forms of rolling-element bearings in the classical civilizations, the Middle Ages, the Industrial Revolution, the emergence of the precision ball bearing, scientific studies of contact mechanics and rolling friction, and the past fifty years. An introduction to ball bearings is presented, and aspects of ball bearing mechanics are explored. Basic characteristics of lubrication are considered along with lubrication equations, the lubrication of rigid ellipsoidal solids, and elastohydrodynamic lubrication theory. Attention is given to the theoretical results for fully flooded elliptical hydrodynamic contacts, the theoretical results for starved elliptical contacts, experimental investigations, the elastohydrodynamics of elliptical contacts for materials of low elastic modulus, the film thickness for different regimes of fluid-film lubrication, and applications.

  14. Supramolecular synergy in the boundary lubrication of synovial joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seror, Jasmine; Zhu, Linyi; Goldberg, Ronit; Day, Anthony J.; Klein, Jacob

    2015-03-01

    Hyaluronan, lubricin and phospholipids, molecules ubiquitous in synovial joints, such as hips and knees, have separately been invoked as the lubricants responsible for the remarkable lubrication of articular cartilage; but alone, these molecules cannot explain the extremely low friction at the high pressures of such joints. We find that surface-anchored hyaluronan molecules complex synergistically with phosphatidylcholine lipids present in joints to form a boundary lubricating layer, which, with coefficient of friction μ≈0.001 at pressures to over 100 atm, has a frictional behaviour resembling that of articular cartilage in the major joints. Our findings point to a scenario where each of the molecules has a different role but must act together with the others: hyaluronan, anchored at the outer surface of articular cartilage by lubricin molecules, complexes with joint phosphatidylcholines to provide the extreme lubrication of synovial joints via the hydration-lubrication mechanism.

  15. Effects of lubricants on binary direct compression mixtures.

    PubMed

    Uğurlu, T; Halaçoğlu, M D; Türkoğlu, M

    2010-04-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of conventional lubricants including a new candidate lubricant on binary direct compression mixtures. Magnesium stearate (MGST), stearic acid (STAC), glyceryl behenate (COMP) and hexagonal boron nitride (HBN) were tested. The binary mixtures were 1:1 combinations of spray dried lactose (FlowLac 100), dicalcium phosphate dihydrate (Emcompress), and modified starch (Starch 1500) with microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH 102). Tablets were manufactured on a single-station instrumented tablet press with and without lubricants. In the case of unlubricated granules, the modified starch-microcrystalline cellulose mixture provided the highest percent compressibility value at 8.25%, spray dried lactose-microcrystalline cellulose mixture was 7.33%, and the dialcium phosphate dihydrate-microcrystalline cellulose mixture was 5.79%. Their corresponding tablet crushing strength values were: 104 N, 117 N, and 61 N, respectively. The lubricant concentrations studied were 0.5, 1, 2, and 4%. Effects of lubricant type and lubricant concentration on crushing strength were analyzed using a factorial ANOVA model. It was found that the Avicel PH 102-Starch 1500 mixture showed the highest lubricant sensitivity (110 N vs. 9 N), the least affected formulation was FlowLac-Avicel PH 102 mixture (118 N vs. 62 N). The crushing strength vs. concentration curve for MGST showed a typical biphasic profile, a fast drop up to 1% and a slower decline between 1 and 4%. The STAC, COMP, and HBN for all formulations showed a shallow linear decline of tablet crushing strength with increasing lubricant concentration. The HBN was as effective as MGST as a lubricant, and did not show a significant negative effect on the crushing strength of the tablets. The COMP and STAC also did not interfere with the crushing strength, however, they were not as effective lubricants as MGST or HBN. PMID:22491169

  16. 49 CFR 172.315 - Limited quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... SECURITY PLANS Marking § 172.315 Limited quantities. (a) Except for transportation by aircraft or as... transportation by aircraft, a limited quantity package conforming to Table 3 of § 173.27(f) of this subchapter... section. (d) Transitional exception. Except for transportation by aircraft, until December 31, 2013,...

  17. Rethinking Intensive Quantities via Guided Mediated Abduction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Abrahamson, Dor

    2012-01-01

    Some intensive quantities, such as slope, velocity, or likelihood, are perceptually privileged in the sense that they are experienced as holistic, irreducible sensations. However, the formal expression of these quantities uses "a/b" analytic metrics; for example, the slope of a line is the quotient of its rise and run. Thus, whereas students'…

  18. 36 CFR 223.220 - Quantity determination.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Quantity determination. 223.220 Section 223.220 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SALE AND DISPOSAL OF NATIONAL FOREST SYSTEM TIMBER Special Forest Products § 223.220 Quantity...

  19. Lubrication by Diamond and Diamondlike Carbon Coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miyoshi, Kazuhisa

    1997-01-01

    Regardless of environment (ultrahigh vacuum, humid air, dry nitrogen, or water), ion-beam-deposited diamondlike carbon (DLC) and nitrogen-ion-implanted, chemical-vapor-deposited (CVD) diamond films had low steady-state coefficients of friction (less than 0.1) and low wear rates (less than or equal to 10(exp -6)cu mm/N(dot)m). These films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings regardless of environment. On the other hand, as-deposited, fine-grain CVD diamond films; polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond films; and polished and then fluorinated, coarse-grain CVD diamond films can be used as effective wear-resistant, self-lubricating coatings in humid air, in dry nitrogen, and in water, but they had a high coefficient of friction and a high wear rate in ultrahigh vacuum. The polished, coarse-grain CVD diamond film revealed an extremely low wear rate, far less than 10(exp 10) cu mm/N(dot)m, in water.

  20. Effect of surface asperity on elastohydrodynamic lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, K.; Cheng, H. S.

    1973-01-01

    The important aspects of elastohydrodynamic lubrication, with a single, one-dimensional asperity, have been found by solving numerically the coupled transient Reynolds equation and the elasticity equation. Even though the assumption of a single asperity is highly ideal, this study sheds some light on the effect of surface roughness on elastohydrodynamic lubrication. The results show that the film pressure tends to increase more than the steady state pressure, and in particular, the increase in pressure reaches a maximum as the asperity approaches the inlet of the contact region. The asperity height and the pressure increase above the steady state pressure are closely related to each other; the higher the asperity height, the larger the pressure increase. In the pure rolling case, it has been found that a local pressure peak is not developed. However, in the cases of sliding and rolling, a small, local pressure peak is developed on the pressure profile when the asperity moves into the contact region. In general, the overall film thickness profile increases with increasing asperity height, but is not significantly affected by the asperity width. Moreover, the slope of the overall film thickness profile for the transient cases is much greater than the steady state profile, which is approximately constant across the contact width. The increase in the center film thickness also depends upon the width and height of the asperity.

  1. Fiber lubrication: A molecular dynamics simulation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongyi

    Molecular and mesoscopic level description of friction and lubrication remains a challenge because of difficulties in the phenomenological understanding of to the behaviors of solid-liquid interfaces during sliding. Fortunately, there is the computational simulation approach opens an opportunity to predict and analyze interfacial phenomena, which were studied with molecular dynamics (MD) and mesoscopic dynamics (MesoDyn) simulations. Polypropylene (PP) and cellulose are two of most common polymers in textile fibers. Confined amorphous surface layers of PP and cellulose were built successfully with xenon crystals which were used to compact the polymers. The physical and surface properties of the PP and cellulose surface layers were investigated by MD simulations, including the density, cohesive energy, volumetric thermal expansion, and contact angle with water. The topology method was employed to predict the properties of poly(alkylene glycol) (PAG) diblock copolymers and Pluronic triblock copolymers used as lubricants on surfaces. Density, zero shear viscosity, shear module, cohesive energy and solubility parameter were predicted with each block copolymer. Molecular dynamics simulations were used to study the interaction energy per unit contact area of block copolymer melts with PP and cellulose surfaces. The interaction energy is defined as the ratio of interfacial interaction energy to the contact area. Both poly(proplene oxide) (PPO) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) segments provided a lipophilic character to both PP and cellulose surfaces. The PPO/PEO ratio and the molecular weight were found to impact the interaction energy on both PP and cellulose surfaces. In aqueous solutions, the interaction energy is complicated due to the presence of water and the cross interactions between the multiple molecular components. The polymer-water-surface (PWS) calculation method was proposed to calculate such complex systems. In a contrast with a vacuum condition, the presence

  2. Minimal change disease

    MedlinePlus

    Minimal change nephrotic syndrome; Nil disease; Lipoid nephrosis; Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome of childhood ... which filter blood and produce urine. In minimal change disease, there is damage to the glomeruli. These ...

  3. Minimal change disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen under a very powerful microscope called an electron microscope. Minimal change disease is the most common ... biopsy and examination of the tissue with an electron microscope can show signs of minimal change disease.

  4. Ball Bearings Equipped for In Situ Lubrication on Demand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marchetti, Mario; Jones, William R., Jr.; Pepper, Stephen V.; Jansen, Mark; Predmore, Roamer

    2005-01-01

    In situ systems that provide fresh lubricants to ball/race contacts on demand have been developed to prolong the operational lives of ball bearings. These systems were originally intended to be incorporated into ball bearings in mechanisms that are required to operate in outer space for years, in conditions in which lubricants tend to deteriorate and/or evaporate. These systems may also be useful for similarly prolonging bearing lifetimes on Earth. Reservoirs have been among the means used previously to resupply lubricants. Lubricant- resupply reservoirs are bulky and add complexity to bearing assemblies. In addition, such a reservoir cannot be turned on or off as needed: it supplies lubricant continuously, often leading to an excess of lubricant in the bearing. A lubricator of the present type includes a porous ring cartridge attached to the inner or the outer ring of a ball bearing (see Figure 1). Oil is stored in the porous cartridge and is released by heating the cartridge: Because the thermal expansion of the oil exceeds that of the cartridge, heating causes the ejection of some oil. A metal film can be deposited on a face of the cartridge to serve as an electrical-resistance heater. The heater can be activated in response to a measured increase in torque that signals depletion of oil from the bearing/race contacts. Because the oil has low surface tension and readily wets the bearing-ring material, it spreads over the bearing ring and eventually reaches the ball/race contacts. The Marangoni effect (a surface-tension gradient associated with a temperature gradient) is utilized to enhance the desired transfer of lubricant to the ball/race contacts during heating. For a test, a ball bearing designed for use at low speed was assembled without lubricant and equipped with a porous-ring lubricator, the resistance heater of which consumed a power of less than 1 W when triggered on by a torque-measuring device. In the test, a load of 20 lb (.89 N) was applied and the

  5. Stationary Engineers Apprenticeship. Related Training Modules. 11.1-11.2 Lubrication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lane Community Coll., Eugene, OR.

    This learning module, one in a series of 20 related training modules for apprentice stationary engineers, deals with lubrication. Addressed in the individual instructional packages included in the module are the various types of lubricants, lubricant standards, and criteria for selecting lubricants. Each instructional package in the module…

  6. High-temperature lubricants and oils. (Latest citations from the NTIS data base). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the chemical composition and properties of high temperature lubricants, oils, and hydraulic fluids. The testing and uses of these lubricants are discussed. The performance of solid, liquid and dry lubricants are evaluated. Also discussed are self-lubricating materials used in bearings and coatings. (Contains 250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  7. A Viewpoint on the Quantity "Plane Angle"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eder, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Properties of the quantity "plane angle" are explored under the hypothesis that it is a dimensional quantity. The exploration proceeds especially with respect to the physical concept, its mathematical treatment, vector concepts, measurement theory, units of related quantities, engineering pragmatism, and SI. An attempt is made to bring these different relations into a rational, logical and consistent framework, and thus to justify the hypothesis. Various types of vectorial quantities are recognized, and their properties described with an outline of the necessary algebraic manipulations. The concept of plane angle is amplified, and its interdependence with the circular arc is explored. The resulting units of plane angle form a class of similar scales of measurement. Consequences of the confirmed hypothesis are developed for mathematical expressions involving trigonometric functions, rotational volumes and areas, mathematical limits, differentiation and series expansion. Consequences for mechanical rotational quantities are developed, with proposals for revisions to a number of expressions for derived units within SI. A revised definition for the quantity "plane angle" is stated to take account of the developed insights. There is a clear need to reconsider the status of plane angle and some other quantities within the international framework of SI.

  8. Waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-31

    The purpose of this plan is to document the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be employed to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. The intent of this plan is to respond to and comply with (DOE's) policy and guidelines concerning the need for pollution prevention. The Plan is composed of a LLNL Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan and, as attachments, Program- and Department-specific waste minimization plans. This format reflects the fact that waste minimization is considered a line management responsibility and is to be addressed by each of the Programs and Departments. 14 refs.

  9. Origins of extreme boundary lubrication by phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Sorkin, Raya; Kampf, Nir; Dror, Yael; Shimoni, Eyal; Klein, Jacob

    2013-07-01

    Phosphatidylcholine (PC) vesicles have been shown to have remarkable boundary lubricating properties under physiologically-high pressures. Here we carry out a systematic study, using a surface force balance, of the normal and shear (frictional) forces between two opposing surfaces bearing different PC vesicles across water, to elucidate the origin of these properties. Small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs, diameters < 100 nm) of the symmetric saturated diacyl PCs DMPC (C(14)), DPPC (C(16)) and DSPC (C(18)) attached to mica surfaces were studied in their solid-ordered (SO) phase on the surface. Overall liposome lubrication ability improves markedly with increasing acyl chain length, and correlates strongly with the liposomes' structural integrity on the substrate surface: DSPC-SUVs were stable on the surface, and provided extremely efficient lubrication (friction coefficient μ ≈ 10(-4)) at room temperature at pressures up to at least 18 MPa. DMPC-SUVs ruptured following adsorption, providing poor high-pressure lubrication, while DPPC-SUVs behavior was intermediate between the two. These results can be well understood in terms of the hydration-lubrication paradigm, but suggest that an earlier conjecture, that highly-efficient lubrication by PC-SUVs depended simply on their being in the SO rather than in the liquid-disordered phase, should be more nuanced. Our results indicate that the resistance of the SUVs to mechanical deformation and rupture is the dominant factor in determining their overall boundary lubrication efficiency in our system. PMID:23623226

  10. Phosphate Reactions as Mechanisms of High-Temperature Lubrication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nagarajan, Anitha; Garrido, Carolina; Gatica, Jorge E.; Morales, Wilfredo

    2006-01-01

    One of the major problems preventing the operation of advanced gas turbine engines at higher temperatures is the inability of currently used liquid lubricants to survive at these higher temperatures under friction and wear conditions. Current state-of-the-art organic liquid lubricants rapidly degrade at temperatures above 300 C; hence some other form of lubrication is necessary. Vapor-phase lubrication is a promising new technology for high-temperature lubrication. This lubrication method employs a liquid phosphate ester that is vaporized and delivered to bearings or gears; the vapor reacts with the metal surfaces, generating a solid lubricious film that has proven very stable at high temperatures. In this study, solid lubricious films were grown on cast-iron foils in order to obtain reaction and diffusion rate data to help characterize the growth mechanism. A phenomenological mathematical model of the film deposition process was derived incorporating transport and kinetic parameters that were coupled to the experimental data. This phenomenological model can now be reliably used as a predictive and scale-up tool for future vapor-phase lubrication studies.

  11. Soliton dynamics in a solid lubricant during sliding friction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigentini, Anna; Van Hattem, Barbara; Diato, Elena; Ponzellini, Paolo; Meledina, Tommaso; Vanossi, Andrea; Santoro, Giuseppe; Tosatti, Erio; Manini, Nicola

    2014-03-01

    Recent highly idealized model studies of lubricated nanofriction for two crystalline sliding surfaces with an interposed thin solid crystalline lubricant layer showed that the overall relative velocity of the lubricant vlub/vslider depends only on the ratio of the lattice spacings, and retains a strictly constant value even when system parameters are varied within a wide range. This peculiar "quantized" dynamical locking was understood as due to the sliding-induced motion of misfit dislocations, or soliton structures. So far the practical relevance of this concept to realistic sliding three-dimensional crystals has not been demonstrated. In this work, by means of classical molecular dynamics simulations and theoretical considerations, we realize a realistic three-dimensional crystal-lubricant-crystal geometry. Results show that the flux of lubricant particles associated with the advancing soliton lines gives rise here too to a quantized-velocity ratio. Moreover, depending on the interface lattice spacing mismatch, both forward and backward quantized motion of the lubricant is predicted. The persistence under realistic conditions of the dynamically pinned state and quantized sliding is further investigated by varying sliding speed, temperature, load, and lubricant film thickness. The possibilities of experimental observation of quantized sliding are also discussed.

  12. The usage of lubricants in a vacuum environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lewis, Don R.; Weilbach, August O.

    1989-10-01

    Lubrication systems which show substantially improved performance in a vacuum environment are the result of continuing development efforts. The availability of a variety of surface coatings and a better selection of high-tech ceramic and plastic materials with excellent wear and low friction qualities have permitted significant advances in the state of the art. The proper use of some wet lubricants, exhibiting very low vapor pressure, still can provide a viable vacuum lubrication system alternative. Hybrid bearings, consisting of metal races and ceramic balls, may provide the answer to extended life and extreme temperature problems. Bearing friction can further be reduced through the deposit of certain solid lubricants. Some of the materials and lubricant combinations will permit the use of plain sleeve bearings Combinations of a solid lubricant and a minimum amount of a wet lubricant have been chosen for a substantial number of spaceborne instrument actuators, rolling element and friction bearings. A continuing effort to essentially eliminate particulate and vapor contamination is essential for low friction mechanisms operating in a vacuum environment dedicated to the production of micro-circuitry. Examples of such efforts are described. The significance of surface hardness, surface finish and other characteristics of a selection of rolling and sliding element materials is discussed.

  13. Self-lubricating coatings for high-temperature applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliney, Harold E.

    1987-01-01

    Some present-day aeropropulsion systems impose severe demands on the thermal and oxidative stability of lubricant, bearing, and seal materials. These demands will be much more severe for operational systems around the turn of the century. Solid lubricants with maximum temperature capabilities of about 1100 C are known. Unfortunately, none of the solid lubricants with the highest temperature capabilities are effective below approximately 400 C. However, research shows that silver and stable fluorides, such as calcium and barium fluoride act synergistically to provide lubrication from below room temperature to approximately 900 C. Plasma-sprayed, self-lubricating composite coatings that were developed at Lewis are described. Background information is given on coatings, designed as PS100 and PS101, that contain the solid lubricants in a Nichrome matrix. These coatings have low friction coefficients over a wide temperature range, but they have inadequate wear resistance for some long-duration applications. Wear resistance was dramatically improved in a recently developed coating PS200, by replacing the Nichrome matrix material with metal-bonded chromium carbide containing dispersed silver and calcium fluoride/barium fluoride eutectic (CaF2/BaF2). The lubricants control friction and the carbide matrix provides excellent wear resistance. Successful tests of these coatings are discussed.

  14. Direct observation of drops on slippery lubricant-infused surfaces.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, Frank; Xie, Jing; Encinas, Noemí; Hardy, Alexandre; Klapper, Markus; Papadopoulos, Periklis; Butt, Hans-Jürgen; Vollmer, Doris

    2015-10-14

    For a liquid droplet to slide down a solid planar surface, the surface usually has to be tilted above a critical angle of approximately 10°. By contrast, droplets of nearly any liquid "slip" on lubricant-infused textured surfaces - so termed slippery surfaces - when tilted by only a few degrees. The mechanism of how the lubricant alters the static and dynamic properties of the drop remains elusive because the drop-lubricant interface is hidden. Here, we image the shape of drops on lubricant-infused surfaces by laser scanning confocal microscopy. The contact angle of the drop-lubricant interface with the substrate exceeds 140°, although macroscopic contour images suggest angles as low as 60°. Confocal microscopy of moving drops reveals fundamentally different processes at the front and rear. Drops recede via discrete depinning events from surface protrusions at a defined receding contact angle, whereas the advancing contact angle is 180°. Drops slide easily, as the apparent contact angles with the substrate are high and the drop-lubricant interfacial tension is typically lower than the drop-air interfacial tension. Slippery surfaces resemble superhydrophobic surfaces with two main differences: drops on a slippery surface are surrounded by a wetting ridge of adjustable height and the air underneath the drop in the case of a superhydrophobic surface is replaced by lubricant in the case of a slippery surface. PMID:26291621

  15. Lubricant replacement in rolling element bearings for weapon surety devices

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhoff, R.; Dugger, M.T.; Varga, K.S.

    1996-05-01

    Stronglink switches are a weapon surety device that is critical to the nuclear safety theme in modem nuclear weapons. These stronglink switches use rolling element bearings which contain a lubricant consisting of low molecular weight polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) fragments. Ozone-depleting solvents are used in both the manufacture and application of this lubricant. An alternate bearing lubrication for stronglink switches is needed that will provide long-term chemical stability, low migration and consistent performance. Candidates that were evaluated include bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers, bearings with TiC-coated balls, and bearings with Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} balls and steel races. These candidates were compared to the lubricants currently used which are bearings lubricated with PTFE fragments of low molecular weight in a fluorocarbon solvent. The candidates were also compared to bearings lubricated with a diester oil which is representative of bearing lubricants used in industrial applications. Evaluation consisted of cycling preloaded bearings and subjecting them to 23 gRMS random vibration. All of the candidates are viable substitutes for low load application where bearing preload is approximately 1 pound. For high load applications where the bearing preload is approximately 10 pounds, bearings with sputtered MoS{sub 2} on the races and retainers appear to be the best substitutes. Bearings with TiC-coated balls also appear to be a viable candidate but these bearings did not perform as well as the sputtered MoS{sub 2}.

  16. Through-Thickness Flow Profile Determination of Confined Lubricant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Janet; Ponjavic, Aleks

    2013-03-01

    The knowledge of the through-thickness flow profile of lubricants confined between two rubbing surfaces is necessary for the friction prediction of lubricated engineering systems. While it is crucial to materials selection and engineering design, little work on the direct measurement of lubricant flow has been performed in elastohydrodynamic lubrication (EHL) regime as the nanoscopic film thickness bars the use of conventional techniques. Photobleached-fluorescence imaging was applied to obtain the first experimental flow profile of a ~100 nm lubricant film within an EHL contact. Mapping of flow profiles was also carried out across the contact. The investigated lubricants show multiple flow phenomena. They do not follow the predicted Couette flow, often assumed in tribology theory. Two distinct flow conditions were observed: transition from Couette flow to a non-linear velocity profile; and shear banding, or dilation. Both conditions were shown to depend on position and normal stress experienced by the lubricant. Causes, such as pressure gradient and limiting shear stress, and the effect on traction, will be discussed. This work is supported by EPSRC Platform Grant (EP/G026114/1)

  17. Pipe flow of pumping wet shotcrete based on lubrication layer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lianjun; Liu, Guoming; Cheng, Weimin; Pan, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Wet shotcrete can reduce dust and improve supporting strength, however, safe and efficient pipage is a key technical part of wet shotcrete process. The paper studied the pipe flow law of wet shotcrete based on lubrication layer by build the experimental pumping circuit of wet shotcrete that can carry out a number of full-scale pumping tests. The experimental results show there was a linear relationship between pressure loss and flow rate. Combined with the Buckingham rheological equation, the computing equations of the yield shear stress and plastic viscosity were deduced through linear regression. A simple analytical method allowing for a rough estimation of the pumping pressure was proposed and used when considering the lubrication layer of wet shotcrete in pipes. In addition, two kinds of particulate distributive models were established along the time axial to analyze the formation of lubrication layer which is related with particles migration. By computational fluid dynamics simulation, the lubrication layer thickness of different mix proportions was estimated. A new method for measuring the thickness of lubrication layer was proposed to verify it by binarization processing. Finally, according to the comparative analysis of experiments, simulation and computed value, it can be seen that the lubrication layer plays a key role in the process of wet shotcrete flow and with the increase of lubrication layer thickness pipe pressure declines gradually. PMID:27386389

  18. Two-Higgs-doublet model in terms of observable quantities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ginzburg, I. F.; Kanishev, K. A.

    2015-07-01

    We found a minimal and a comprehensive set of directly measurable quantities defining the most general two-Higgs-doublet model (2HDM); we call these quantities observables. The potential parameters of the model are expressed explicitly via these observables (plus nonphysical parameters which are similar to gauge parameters). The model with arbitrary values of these observables can, in principle, be realized (up to general enough limitations). Our results open the door for the study of Higgs models in terms of measurable quantities only. The experimental limitations can be implemented here directly, without complex, often model-dependent, analysis of the Lagrangian coefficients. The principal opportunity to determine all parameters of the 2HDM from the (future) data meets strong practical limitation. It is the problem for a very long time. Apart from this construction per se, we also obtain some by-products. Among them are the following: a simple criterium for charge parity symmetry (C P ) conservation in the 2HDM, a new sum rules for Higgs couplings, a clear possibility of the coexistence of relatively light Higgses with the strong interaction in the Higgs sector, and a simple expression for the triple Higgs vertex g (hahaha) , useful for the analysis of future h h h coupling measurements.

  19. The minimal composite Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Contino, Roberto; Pomarol, Alex

    2005-07-01

    We study the idea of a composite Higgs in the framework of a five-dimensional AdS theory. We present the minimal model of the Higgs as a pseudo-Goldstone boson in which electroweak symmetry is broken dynamically via top loop effects, all flavour problems are solved, and contributions to electroweak precision observables are below experimental bounds. Since the 5D theory is weakly coupled, we are able to fully determine the Higgs potential and other physical quantities. The lightest resonances are expected to have a mass around 2 TeV and should be discovered at the LHC. The top sector is mostly composite and deviations from Standard Model couplings are expected.

  20. Polyetherurethane oligomers with aldehyde groups as additives for lubricating oils

    SciTech Connect

    Nikolaev, V.N.; Abramov, E.G.; Tenyushev, A.I.

    1995-01-01

    Polyetherurethane oligomers with aldehyde groups, which we synthesized from polyoxypropylene diols (molecular weight 500, 1000, 1500, 2000, or 3000) with toluene diisocyanate and salicylaldehyde, are of interest as additives for lubricating oils. The effects of these oligomers on the service properties and physicochemical characteristics of lubricating oils were investigated by methods prreviously described. As the lube base stocks we used castor oil, a polyoxypropylene diol and a polyethoxysiloxane. The oligomers are readily soluble in organic solvents and in the lube base stocks, and their solutions are stable during storage and use. We found that the optimal concentration of oligomers is 5%, providing the best lubricating properties, in particular the best antiwear properties.