Science.gov

Sample records for minimal surface contributions

  1. Periodic minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackay, Alan L.

    1985-04-01

    A minimal surface is one for which, like a soap film with the same pressure on each side, the mean curvature is zero and, thus, is one where the two principal curvatures are equal and opposite at every point. For every closed circuit in the surface, the area is a minimum. Schwarz1 and Neovius2 showed that elements of such surfaces could be put together to give surfaces periodic in three dimensions. These periodic minimal surfaces are geometrical invariants, as are the regular polyhedra, but the former are curved. Minimal surfaces are appropriate for the description of various structures where internal surfaces are prominent and seek to adopt a minimum area or a zero mean curvature subject to their topology; thus they merit more complete numerical characterization. There seem to be at least 18 such surfaces3, with various symmetries and topologies, related to the crystallographic space groups. Recently, glyceryl mono-oleate (GMO) was shown by Longley and McIntosh4 to take the shape of the F-surface. The structure postulated is shown here to be in good agreement with an analysis of the fundamental geometry of periodic minimal surfaces.

  2. TOWARD MINIMALLY ADHESIVE SURFACES UTILIZING SILOXANES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three types of siloxane-based network polymers have been investigated for their surface properties towards potential applications as minimally adhesive coatings. A filled poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) elastomer, RTV it, has been studied to determine surface weldability and stabil...

  3. Analysis of lipid flow on minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahmani, Fatemeh; Christenson, Joel; Rangamani, Padmini

    2016-03-01

    Interaction between the bilayer shape and surface flow is important for capturing the flow of lipids in many biological membranes. Recent microscopy evidence has shown that minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids) occur often in cellular membranes. In this study, we explore lipid flow in these geometries using a `stream function' formulation for viscoelastic lipid bilayers. Using this formulation, we derive two-dimensional lipid flow equations for the commonly occurring minimal surfaces in lipid bilayers. We show that for three minimal surfaces (planes, catenoids, and helicoids), the surface flow equations satisfy Stokes flow equations. In helicoids and catenoids, we show that the tangential velocity field is a Killing vector field. Thus, our analysis provides fundamental insight into the flow patterns of lipids on intracellular organelle membranes that are characterized by fixed shapes reminiscent of minimal surfaces.

  4. Minimal model for spoof acoustoelastic surface states

    SciTech Connect

    Christensen, J. Willatzen, M.; Liang, Z.

    2014-12-15

    Similar to textured perfect electric conductors for electromagnetic waves sustaining artificial or spoof surface plasmons we present an equivalent phenomena for the case of sound. Aided by a minimal model that is able to capture the complex wave interaction of elastic cavity modes and airborne sound radiation in perfect rigid panels, we construct designer acoustoelastic surface waves that are entirely controlled by the geometrical environment. Comparisons to results obtained by full-wave simulations confirm the feasibility of the model and we demonstrate illustrative examples such as resonant transmissions and waveguiding to show a few examples of many where spoof elastic surface waves are useful.

  5. Reflections concerning triply-periodic minimal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Schoen, Alan H.

    2012-01-01

    In recent decades, there has been an explosion in the number and variety of embedded triply-periodic minimal surfaces (TPMS) identified by mathematicians and materials scientists. Only the rare examples of low genus, however, are commonly invoked as shape templates in scientific applications. Exact analytic solutions are now known for many of the low genus examples. The more complex surfaces are readily defined with numerical tools such as Surface Evolver software or the Landau–Ginzburg model. Even though table-top versions of several TPMS have been placed within easy reach by rapid prototyping methods, the inherent complexity of many of these surfaces makes it challenging to grasp their structure. The problem of distinguishing TPMS, which is now acute because of the proliferation of examples, has been addressed by Lord & Mackay (Lord & Mackay 2003 Curr. Sci. 85, 346–362). PMID:24098851

  6. Minimizing vehicle noise and weight using panel acoustic contribution analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Gordon M.

    1998-05-01

    Panel acoustic contribution analysis (PACA) is an advanced engineering tool to improve noise, vibration, and harshness quality and minimize weight of vehicles. It is a technique to categorize areas of vehicle body panels as positive (sound level increases as vibration amplitude increases), negative or neutral according to their contribution to the total sound. PACA is a hybrid of computer aided engineering and experimental methods. Computer aided holometry, scanning laser velocimetry, or an accelerometer net is used to experimentally measure structure vibration complex velocities. These velocities are the boundary conditions for a boundary element model of the acoustic cavity. Boundary element analysis is then used to predict the vehicle interior sound and calculate panel acoustic contributions. Experimental results for a welded steel box (validation) and vehicle application are presented.

  7. Elliptic surface grid generation on minimal and parametrized surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spekreijse, S. P.; Nijhuis, G. H.; Boerstoel, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    An elliptic grid generation method, which generates boundary conforming grids in a two dimensional physical space, is presented. The method is based on the composition of an algebraic and elliptic transformation. The composite mapping obeys the Poisson grid generation system with control functions specified by the algebraic transformation. It is shown that the grid generation on a minimal surface in a three dimensional space is equivalent to the grid generation in a two dimensional domain in physical space. A second elliptic grid generation method, which generates boundary conforming grids on smooth surfaces, is presented. Concerning surface modeling, it is shown that bicubic Hermit interpolation is an excellent method to generate a smooth surface crossing a discrete set of control points.

  8. Minimal Φ-LAGRANGIAN Surfaces in almost Hermitian Manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khong Van, Le

    1990-02-01

    A general method of calibrations is developed for the study of minimal Φ-Lagrangian surfaces in almost-Hermitian manifolds. A criterion for minimality of Φ-Lagrangian surfaces is given, along with a lower bound for the second variation of the volume functional on minimal Φ-Lagrangian surfaces in Hermitian manifolds. The generalized Maslov index of these surfaces is shown to be trivial. Bibliography: 11 titles.

  9. Elliptic surface grid generation on minimal and parmetrized surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spekreijse, S. P.; Nijhuis, G. H.; Boerstoel, J. W.

    1995-01-01

    An elliptic grid generation method is presented which generates excellent boundary conforming grids in domains in 2D physical space. The method is based on the composition of an algebraic and elliptic transformation. The composite mapping obeys the familiar Poisson grid generation system with control functions specified by the algebraic transformation. New expressions are given for the control functions. Grid orthogonality at the boundary is achieved by modification of the algebraic transformation. It is shown that grid generation on a minimal surface in 3D physical space is in fact equivalent to grid generation in a domain in 2D physical space. A second elliptic grid generation method is presented which generates excellent boundary conforming grids on smooth surfaces. It is assumed that the surfaces are parametrized and that the grid only depends on the shape of the surface and is independent of the parametrization. Concerning surface modeling, it is shown that bicubic Hermite interpolation is an excellent method to generate a smooth surface which is passing through a given discrete set of control points. In contrast to bicubic spline interpolation, there is extra freedom to model the tangent and twist vectors such that spurious oscillations are prevented.

  10. Minimal adhesion surface area in tangentially loaded digital contacts.

    PubMed

    Terekhov, Alexander V; Hayward, Vincent

    2011-09-01

    The stick-to-slip transition of a fingertip in contact with a planar surface does not occur instantaneously. As the tangential load increases, portions of the skin adhere while others slip, giving rise to an evolution of the contact state, termed partial slip. We develop a quasi-static model that predicts that if the coefficient of kinetic friction is larger than the coefficient of static friction, then the stuck surface area diminishes as the tangential load increases until reaching a 'minimal adhesion surface area' where it vanishes abruptly. This phenomenon was observed in recently measured finger-slip image data (André et al., 2011) that were processed by an optic flow detection algorithm. We examined the results of 10 trials. Four of them exhibited the minimal adhesion surface area phenomenon, four of them did not, and two were inconclusive. PMID:21774936

  11. Minimal surfaces, incompressible flows and the geometric phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J. C.

    1995-02-01

    We show that the Berry phase may be associated with an incompressible flow issuing through a minimal surface. An example based on the linear Jahn-Teller effect is given and found to be related to a Clifford torus rather than the usual magnetic monopole in S 3.

  12. Minimizing Emissions From Soil Fumigation By Surface Seal Methods.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil fumigation is an important management practice for controlling soil pests in many high value crops. Reducing atmospheric emissions can minimize the impact of soil fumigation on the environment. Water seals (sprinkling water on the soil surface) to reduce fumigant emissions is more cost-effecti...

  13. Tensorial Minkowski functionals of triply periodic minimal surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Mickel, Walter; Schröder-Turk, Gerd E.; Mecke, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    A fundamental understanding of the formation and properties of a complex spatial structure relies on robust quantitative tools to characterize morphology. A systematic approach to the characterization of average properties of anisotropic complex interfacial geometries is provided by integral geometry which furnishes a family of morphological descriptors known as tensorial Minkowski functionals. These functionals are curvature-weighted integrals of tensor products of position vectors and surface normal vectors over the interfacial surface. We here demonstrate their use by application to non-cubic triply periodic minimal surface model geometries, whose Weierstrass parametrizations allow for accurate numerical computation of the Minkowski tensors. PMID:24098847

  14. Surface contributions to radiated sound power.

    PubMed

    Marburg, Steffen; Lösche, Eric; Peters, Herwig; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2013-06-01

    This paper presents a method to identify the surface areas of a vibrating structure that contribute to the radiated sound power. The surface contributions of the structure are based on the acoustic radiation modes and are computed for all boundaries of the acoustic domain. The surface contributions are compared to the acoustic intensity, which is a common measure for near-field acoustic energy. Sound intensity usually has positive and negative values that correspond to energy sources and sinks on the surface of the radiating structure. Sound from source and sink areas partially cancel each other and only a fraction of the near-field acoustic energy reaches the far-field. In contrast to the sound intensity, the surface contributions are always positive and no cancelation effects exist. The technique presented here provides a method to localize the relevant radiating surface areas on a vibrating structure. To illustrate the method, the radiated sound power from a baffled square plate is presented. PMID:23742325

  15. Delivery of minimally dispersed liquid interfaces for sequential surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, N; Bercovici, M; Kaigala, G V

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for sequential delivery of reagents to a reaction site with minimal dispersion of their interfaces. Using segmented flow to encapsulate the reagents as droplets, the dispersion between reagent plugs remains confined in a limited volume, while being transmitted to the reaction surface. In close proximity to the target surface, we use a passive array of microstructures for removal of the oil phase such that the original reagent sequence is reconstructed, and only the aqueous phase reaches the reaction surface. We provide a detailed analysis of the conditions under which the method can be applied and demonstrate maintaining a transition time of 560 ms between reagents transported to a reaction site over a distance of 60 cm. We implemented the method using a vertical microfluidic probe on an open surface, allowing contact-free interaction with biological samples, and demonstrated two examples of assays implemented using the method: measurements of receptor-ligand reaction kinetics and of the fluorescence response of immobilized GFP to local variations in pH. We believe that the method can be useful for studying the dynamic response of cells and proteins to various stimuli, as well as for highly automated multi-step assays. PMID:27354032

  16. Hot-rolling nanowire transparent electrodes for surface roughness minimization

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes are a promising alternative to transparent conductive oxides. However, their surface roughness presents a problem for their integration into devices with thin layers such as organic electronic devices. In this paper, hot rollers are used to soften plastic substrates with heat and mechanically press the nanowires into the substrate surface. By doing so, the root-mean-square surface roughness is reduced to 7 nm and the maximum peak-to-valley value is 30 nm, making the electrodes suitable for typical organic devices. This simple process requires no additional materials, which results in a higher transparency, and is compatible with roll-to-roll fabrication processes. In addition, the adhesion of the nanowires to the substrate significantly increases. PMID:24994963

  17. Hot-rolling nanowire transparent electrodes for surface roughness minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseinzadeh Khaligh, Hadi; Goldthorpe, Irene A.

    2014-06-01

    Silver nanowire transparent electrodes are a promising alternative to transparent conductive oxides. However, their surface roughness presents a problem for their integration into devices with thin layers such as organic electronic devices. In this paper, hot rollers are used to soften plastic substrates with heat and mechanically press the nanowires into the substrate surface. By doing so, the root-mean-square surface roughness is reduced to 7 nm and the maximum peak-to-valley value is 30 nm, making the electrodes suitable for typical organic devices. This simple process requires no additional materials, which results in a higher transparency, and is compatible with roll-to-roll fabrication processes. In addition, the adhesion of the nanowires to the substrate significantly increases.

  18. Surface Contour Radar (SCR) contributions to FASINEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walsh, E. J.

    1988-01-01

    The SCR was asked to participate in the Frontal Air-Sea Interaction Experiment (FASINEX) to provide directional wave spectra. The NASA P-3 carrying the SCR, the Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer, and the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar was one of five aircrafts and two ocean research ships participating in this coordinated study of the air sea interaction in the vicinity of a sea surface temperature front near 28 deg N, 70 deg W. Analysis of data from the February 1986 experiment is still ongoing, but results already submitted for publication strengthen the hypothesis that off-nadir radar backscatter is closely correlated to wind stress. The SCR provided valuable information on the directional wave spectrum and its spatial variation.

  19. Minimizing Cache Misses Using Minimum-Surface Bodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frumkin, Michael; VanderWijngaart, Rob; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    A number of known techniques for improving cache performance in scientific computations involve the reordering of the iteration space. Some of these reorderings can be considered as coverings of the iteration space with the sets having good surface-to-volume ratio. Use of such sets reduces the number of cache misses in computations of local operators having the iteration space as a domain. First, we derive lower bounds which any algorithm must suffer while computing a local operator on a grid. Then we explore coverings of iteration spaces represented by structured and unstructured grids which allow us to approach these lower bounds. For structured grids we introduce a covering by successive minima tiles of the interference lattice of the grid. We show that the covering has low surface-to-volume ratio and present a computer experiment showing actual reduction of the cache misses achieved by using these tiles. For planar unstructured grids we show existence of a covering which reduces the number of cache misses to the level of structured grids. On the other hand, we present a triangulation of a 3-dimensional cube such that any local operator on the corresponding grid has significantly larger number of cache misses than a similar operator on a structured grid.

  20. Minimization of deviations of gear real tooth surfaces determined by coordinate measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, F. L.; Kuan, C.; Wang, J.-C.; Handschuh, R. F.; Masseth, J.; Maruyama, N.

    1992-01-01

    The deviations of a gear's real tooth surface from the theoretical surface are determined by coordinate measurements at the grid of the surface. A method was developed to transform the deviations from Cartesian coordinates to those along the normal at the measurement locations. Equations are derived that relate the first order deviations with the adjustment to the manufacturing machine-tool settings. The deviations of the entire surface are minimized. The minimization is achieved by application of the least-square method for an overdetermined system of linear equations. The proposed method is illustrated with a numerical example for hypoid gear and pinion.

  1. Surface and bulk contribution to Cu(111) quantum efficiency

    SciTech Connect

    Pedersoli, Emanuele; Greaves, Corin Michael Ricardo; Wan, Weishi; Coleman-Smith, Christopher; Padmore, Howard A.; Pagliara, Stefania; Cartella, Andrea; Lamarca, Fabrizio; Ferrini, Gabriele; Galimberti, Gianluca; Montagnese, Matteo; dal Conte, Stefano; Parmigiani, Fulvio

    2008-11-04

    The quantum efficiency (QE) of Cu(111) is measured for different impinging light angles with photon energies just above the work function. We observe that the vectorial photoelectric effect, an enhancement of the QE due to illumination with light with an electric vector perpendicular to the sample surface, is stronger in the more surface sensitive regime. This can be explained by a contribution to photoemission due to the variation in the electromagnetic potential at the surface. The contributions of bulk and surface electrons can then be determined.

  2. Chemical Contribution to Surface-Enahanced Raman Scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Persson, Bo Nils J; Zhao, Ke; Zhang, Zhenyu

    2006-01-01

    We present a new mechanism for the chemical contribution to surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The theory considers the modulation of the polarizability of a metal nanocluster or a flat metal surface by the vibrational motion of an adsorbed molecule. The modulated polarization of the substrate coupled with the incident light will contribute to the Raman scattering enhancement. We show that for a metal cluster and for a flat metal surface this new chemical contribution may enhance the Raman scattering intensity by a factor of {approx} 10{sup 2} and {approx}10{sup 4}, respectively. The new SERS process is determined by the electric field parallel to the surface of the metal substrate at the molecular binding site.

  3. Determination of real machine-tool settings and minimization of real surface deviation by computerized inspection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litvin, Faydor L.; Kuan, Chihping; Zhang, YI

    1991-01-01

    A numerical method is developed for the minimization of deviations of real tooth surfaces from the theoretical ones. The deviations are caused by errors of manufacturing, errors of installment of machine-tool settings and distortion of surfaces by heat-treatment. The deviations are determined by coordinate measurements of gear tooth surfaces. The minimization of deviations is based on the proper correction of initially applied machine-tool settings. The contents of accomplished research project cover the following topics: (1) Descriptions of the principle of coordinate measurements of gear tooth surfaces; (2) Deviation of theoretical tooth surfaces (with examples of surfaces of hypoid gears and references for spiral bevel gears); (3) Determination of the reference point and the grid; (4) Determination of the deviations of real tooth surfaces at the points of the grid; and (5) Determination of required corrections of machine-tool settings for minimization of deviations. The procedure for minimization of deviations is based on numerical solution of an overdetermined system of n linear equations in m unknowns (m much less than n ), where n is the number of points of measurements and m is the number of parameters of applied machine-tool settings to be corrected. The developed approach is illustrated with numerical examples.

  4. Minimal intervention dentistry II: part 1. Contribution of the operating microscope to dentistry.

    PubMed

    Sitbon, Y; Attathom, T; St-Georges, A J

    2014-02-01

    The different aspects of treatment of periodontal disease and mucogingival defects all require an accurate diagnosis in addition to good control and precision during therapeutic procedures. Magnification aids and microsurgery, combined with minimally invasive techniques, can best meet these requirements. The suitability of treatment, the healing time, pain levels and postoperative scarring are all improved and the patient benefits. PMID:24504295

  5. Minimization of Surface Energies and Ripening Outcompete Template Effects in the Surface Growth of Metal-Organic Frameworks.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiu-Jun; Zhuang, Jin-Liang; Scherr, Julian; Abu-Husein, Tarek; Terfort, Andreas

    2016-07-11

    As well-oriented, surface-bound metal-organic frameworks become the centerpiece of many new applications, a profound understanding of their growth mode becomes necessary. This work shows that the currently favored model of surface templating is in fact a special case valid only for systems with a more or less cubic crystal shape, while in less symmetric systems crystal ripening and minimization of surface energies dominate the growth process. PMID:27258394

  6. The topological molecule: Its finite fluxes, exchange stability and minimal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, Gerald F.

    2016-03-01

    Molecules have at least one nontrivial topological property in common: their minimal surfaces of finite flux. This is why they are stable aggregates of atoms mutually engaged to varying degrees via Coulombic and exchange interactions in fealty to quantum mechanics on otherwise passive nuclear scaffolds. Isolated atoms do not have minimal surfaces but they do undergo exchange interactions. All surfaces implicitly defined by a molecule’s charge density are shown to have zero mean curvature and are consequently minimal surfaces. This finding extends to any potential of a molecule. The minimal surface is of importance in that it is indicative of a vanishing mean curvature whose measurement serves as a way of gauging the charge density or electrostatic potential’s local reliability, a quality assurance protocol absent in conventional crystallography but available to scanning force microscopy. The smaller the mean curvature of an atom, the more bonded is that atom in a molecule. The basis for this discovery is that implicit surfaces admit finite flux to cross them regardless of atomic affiliation, thus engendering exchange, correlation, and chemical bonding between the atoms in the underlying nuclear framework of a molecule. Finite flux in the charge density is a necessary condition for chemical bonding and the stability of molecules and is what makes the electron localization function (ELF) and the exchange-correlation functional (BLYP) useful.

  7. Minimal surfaces in q-deformed AdS5xS5

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kameyama, Takashi

    2016-01-01

    We study minimal surfaces in q-deformed AdS5×S5. For this purpose, it is convenient to introduce a coordinate system which describes the spacetime only inside the singularity surface and treat the singularity surface as the holographic screen. In particular, we consider minimal surfaces whose boundary shapes are 1) a straight line and 2) a circle. In the q → 1 limit, the solutions correspond to a 1/2 BPS straight line Wilson loop and a 1/2 BPS circular one, respectively. A remarkable point is that the classical Euclidean actions have no linear divergence unlike the original ones. This finiteness indicates that the q-deformation may be regarded as a UV regularization.

  8. Porin polypeptide contributes to surface charge of gonococci.

    PubMed Central

    Swanson, J; Dorward, D; Lubke, L; Kao, D

    1997-01-01

    Each strain of Neisseria gonorrhoeae elaborates a single porin polypeptide, with the porins expressed by different strains comprising two general classes, Por1A and Por1B. In the outer membrane, each porin molecule folds into 16 membrane-spanning beta-strands joined by top- and bottom-loop domains. Por1A and Por1B have similar membrane-spanning regions, but the eight surface-exposed top loops (I to VIII) differ in length and sequence. To determine whether porins, and especially their top loop domains, contribute to bacterial cell surface charge, strain MS11 gonococci that were identical except for expressing a recombinant Por1A, Por1B, or mosaic Por1A-1B polypeptide were compared by whole-cell electrophoresis. These porin variants displayed different electrophoretic mobilities that correlated with the net numbers of charged amino acids within surface-exposed loops of their respective porin polypeptides. The susceptibilities of porin variants to polyanionic sulfated polymers correlated roughly with gonococcal surface charge; those porin variants with diminished surface negativity showed increased sensitivity to the polyanionic sulfated compounds. These observations indicate that porin polypeptides in situ contribute to the surface charge of gonococci, and they suggest that the bacterium's interactions with large sulfated compounds are thereby affected. PMID:9171398

  9. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2010-01-01

    Physically-based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite observed brightness temperatures (TB) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are typically non-linear, such that inversions are ill-posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to better understand these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using brightness temperature weighting functions to quantify the percentage of the TB resulting from absorption/emission/reflection from the surface, absorption/emission/scattering by liquid and frozen hydrometeors in the cloud, the emission from atmospheric water vapor, and other contributors. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz and for several individual precipitation profiles as well as for three cloud resolving model simulations of falling snow. As expected, low frequency channels (<89 GHz) respond to liquid hydrometeors and the surface, while the higher frequency channels become increasingly sensitive to ice hydrometeors and the water vapor sounding channels react to water vapor in the atmosphere. Low emissivity surfaces (water and snow-covered land) permit energy downwelling from clouds to be reflected at the surface thereby increasing the percentage of the TB resulting from the hydrometeors. The slant path at a 53deg viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels and show sensitivity to surface polarization effects. The TB percentage information presented in this paper answers questions about the relative contributions to the brightness temperatures and provides a key piece of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  10. Iridescent flowers? Contribution of surface structures to optical signaling.

    PubMed

    van der Kooi, Casper J; Wilts, Bodo D; Leertouwer, Hein L; Staal, Marten; Elzenga, J Theo M; Stavenga, Doekele G

    2014-07-01

    The color of natural objects depends on how they are structured and pigmented. In flowers, both the surface structure of the petals and the pigments they contain determine coloration. The aim of the present study was to assess the contribution of structural coloration, including iridescence, to overall floral coloration. We studied the reflection characteristics of flower petals of various plant species with an imaging scatterometer, which allows direct visualization of the angle dependence of the reflected light in the hemisphere above the petal. To separate the light reflected by the flower surface from the light backscattered by the components inside (e.g. the vacuoles), we also investigated surface casts. A survey among angiosperms revealed three different types of floral surface structure, each with distinct reflections. Petals with a smooth and very flat surface had mirror-like reflections and petal surfaces with cones yielded diffuse reflections. Petals with striations yielded diffraction patterns when single cells were illuminated. The iridescent signal, however, vanished when illumination similar to that found in natural conditions was applied. Pigmentary rather than structural coloration determines the optical appearance of flowers. Therefore, the hypothesized signaling by flowers with striated surfaces to attract potential pollinators presently seems untenable. PMID:24713039

  11. Instability of a Möbius Strip Minimal Surface and a Link with Systolic Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pesci, Adriana I.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Alexander, Gareth P.; Moffatt, H. Keith

    2015-03-01

    We describe the first analytically tractable example of an instability of a nonorientable minimal surface under parametric variation of its boundary. A one-parameter family of incomplete Meeks Möbius surfaces is defined and shown to exhibit an instability threshold as the bounding curve is opened up from a double-covering of the circle. Numerical and analytical methods are used to determine the instability threshold by solution of the Jacobi equation on the double covering of the surface. The unstable eigenmode shows excellent qualitative agreement with that found experimentally for a closely related surface. A connection is proposed between systolic geometry and the instability by showing that the shortest noncontractable closed geodesic on the surface (the systolic curve) passes near the maximum of the unstable eigenmode.

  12. Euclidean Wilson loops and minimal area surfaces in lorentzian AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, Andrew; Kruczenski, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence relates Wilson loops in N=4 SYM theory to minimal area surfaces in AdS 5 × S 5 space. If the Wilson loop is Euclidean and confined to a plane ( t, x) then the dual surface is Euclidean and lives in Lorentzian AdS 3 ⊂ AdS 5. In this paper we study such minimal area surfaces generalizing previous results obtained in the Euclidean case. Since the surfaces we consider have the topology of a disk, the holonomy of the flat current vanishes which is equivalent to the condition that a certain boundary Schrödinger equation has all its solutions anti-periodic. If the potential for that Schrödinger equation is found then reconstructing the surface and finding the area become simpler. In particular we write a formula for the Area in terms of the Schwarzian derivative of the contour. Finally an infinite parameter family of analytical solutions using Riemann Theta functions is described. In this case, both the area and the shape of the surface are given analytically and used to check the previous results.

  13. Evaluating the contribution of shape attributes to recognition using the minimal transient discrete cue protocol

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Subjects were tested for their ability to identify objects that were represented by an array of dots that marked the major contours, usually only the outer boundary. Each dot was briefly flashed to make its position known, and a major variable was the time interval that was required to flash all the dots for a given shape. Recognition declined as the total time for display of the dot inventory was increased. Each shape was shown to a given subject only once and it was either recognized -- named – or not. Although the recorded response was binary, a large number of subjects was tested, which made it possible to derive regression functions and thus specify an intercept and slope for each shape. Shapes differed substantially in their slopes, which is likely due to the amount of redundant information provided by neighboring dots. Indices of shape attributes were also derived, specifically Attneave’s indices of complexity, mean curvature, inflection count, and symmetry. Three of the four shape attributes were significantly related to intercept and slope levels, but none made a substantial contribution. This suggests that these attributes are not essential properties that define shapes and allow for recognition. PMID:23146718

  14. Contribution of hyperammonemia and inflammatory factors to cognitive impairment in minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Felipo, Vicente; Urios, Amparo; Montesinos, Encarna; Molina, Inmaculada; Garcia-Torres, Maria L; Civera, Miguel; Olmo, Juan A Del; Ortega, Joaquin; Martinez-Valls, Jose; Serra, Miguel A; Cassinello, Norberto; Wassel, Abdallah; Jordá, Esperanza; Montoliu, Carmina

    2012-03-01

    To assess the contribution of hyperammonemia and inflammation to induction of mild cognitive impairment (or MHE). We analyzed the presence of mild cognitive impairment (CI) by using the PHES battery of psychometric tests and measured the levels of ammonia and of the inflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-18 in blood of patients with different types of liver or dermatological diseases resulting in different grades of hyperammonemia and/or inflammation. The study included patients with 1) liver cirrhosis, showing hyperammonemia and inflammation; 2) non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) showing inflammation but not hyperammonemia; 3) non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) showing inflammation and very mild hyperammonemia; 4) psoriasis, showing inflammation but not hyperammonemia; 5) keloids, showing both inflammation and hyperammonemia and 6) controls without inflammation or hyperammonemia. The data reported show that in patients with liver diseases, cognitive impairment may appear before progression to cirrhosis if hyperammonemia and inflammation are high enough. Five out of 11 patients with NASH, without liver cirrhosis, showed cognitive impairment associated with hyperammonemia and inflammation. Patients with keloids showed cognitive impairment associated with hyperammonemia and inflammation, in the absence of liver disease. Hyperammonemia or inflammation alone did not induce CI but the combination of certain levels of hyperammonemia and inflammation is enough to induce CI, even without liver disease. PMID:22072427

  15. Structural contribution to the roughness of supersmooth crystal surface

    SciTech Connect

    Butashin, A. V.; Muslimov, A. E. Kanevsky, V. M.; Deryabin, A. N.; Pavlov, V. A.; Asadchikov, V. E.

    2013-05-15

    Technological advances in processing crystals (Si, sapphire {alpha}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, SiC, GaN, LiNbO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3}, etc.) of substrate materials and X-ray optics elements make it possible to obtain supersmooth surfaces with a periodicity characteristic of the crystal structure. These periodic structures are formed by atomically smooth terraces and steps of nano- and subnanometer sizes, respectively. A model surface with such nanostructures is proposed, and the relations between its roughness parameters and the height of atomic steps are determined. The roughness parameters calculated from these relations almost coincide with the experimental atomic force microscopy (AFM) data obtained from 1 Multiplication-Sign 1 and 10 Multiplication-Sign 10 {mu}m areas on the surface of sapphire plates with steps. The minimum roughness parameters for vicinal crystal surfaces, which are due to the structural contribution, are calculated based on the approach proposed. A comparative analysis of the relief and roughness parameters of sapphire plate surfaces with different degrees of polishing is performed. A size effect is established: the relief height distribution changes from stochastic to regular with a decrease in the surface roughness.

  16. Quasi-minimal Lorentz surfaces with pointwise 1-type Gauss map in pseudo-Euclidean 4-space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milousheva, Velichka; Turgay, Nurettin Cenk

    2016-08-01

    A Lorentz surface in the four-dimensional pseudo-Euclidean space with neutral metric is called quasi-minimal if its mean curvature vector is lightlike at each point. In the present paper we obtain the complete classification of quasi-minimal Lorentz surfaces with pointwise 1-type Gauss map.

  17. Effect of Anti-Sticking Nanostructured Surface Coating on Minimally Invasive Electrosurgical Device in Brain.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Han-Yi; Ou, Keng-Liang; Chiang, Hsi-Jen; Lin, Li-Hsiang

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the extent of thermal injury in the brain after the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a nanostructured copper-doped diamond-like carbon (DLC-Cu) surface coating. To effectively utilize an electrosurgical device in clinical surgery, it is important to decrease the thermal injury to the adjacent tissues. The surface characteristics and morphology of DLC-Cu thin film was evaluated using a contact angle goniometer, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic force microscopy. Three-dimensional biomedical brain models were reconstructed using magnetic resonance images to simulate the electrosurgical procedure. Results indicated that the temperature was reduced significantly when a minimally invasive electrosurgical device with a DLC-Cu thin film coating (DLC-Cu-SS) was used. Temperatures decreased with the use of devices with increasing film thickness. Thermographic data revealed that surgical temperatures in an animal model were significantly lower with the DLC-Cu-SS electrosurgical device compared to an untreated device. Furthermore, the DLC-Cu-SS device created a relatively small region of injury and lateral thermal range. As described above, the biomedical nanostructured film reduced excessive thermal injury with the use of a minimally invasive electrosurgical device in the brain. PMID:25851468

  18. Contribution of Microchemical Surface Analysis of Archaeological Artefacts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousser, H.; Madani, A.; Amri, R.; Mousser, A.; Darchen, A.

    2009-11-01

    Museum CIRTA of the town of Constantine has a collection of more than 35000 coins and statuettes going back to Numide, Roman, Republican, Vandal and Byzantine times and is struck in the name of the cities, of the kingdoms and the empires. Surface analysis of these coins gives information about the chemical composition and leads to recommendations for restoration and preservations. This work is a contribution of microchemical surface study of coin with the effigy of the Numide King Massinissa (Constantine between 3rd and 2nd century before Jesus Christ). The photographic and scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry (SEM + EDS) and diffraction of X-ray (DRX) was used. The optic microscopy (OMP) and SEM pictures of coins showed heterogeneous surface. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive spectrometry identified three basic metals copper (46.06%), antimony (17.74%) and lead (12.06%), (Weight Percentage). The DRX identifies stages (copper and lead) and their crystalline oxides Bindheimite (Pb2Sb2O7) and Bystromite (MgSb2O6) on the coin's surface.

  19. Endothelialization of Rationally Microtextured Surfaces with Minimal Cell Seeding Under Flow.

    PubMed

    Stefopoulos, Georgios; Robotti, Francesco; Falk, Volkmar; Poulikakos, Dimos; Ferrari, Aldo

    2016-08-01

    The generation of a confluent and functional endothelium at the luminal surface of cardiovascular devices represents the ideal solution to avoid contact between blood and synthetic materials thus allowing the long-term body integration of the implants. Due to the foreseen paucity of source cells in cardiovascular patients, surface engineering strategies to achieve full endothelialization, while minimizing the amount of endothelial cells required to seed the surface leading to prompt and full coverage with an endothelium are necessary. A stable endothelialization is the result of the interplay between endothelial cells, the flow-generated walls shear stress and the substrate topography. Here a novel strategy is designed and validated based on the use of engineered surface textures combined with confined islands of seeded endothelial cells. Upon release of the confinement, the cell island populations are able to migrate on the texture and merge under physiological flow conditions to promptly generate a fully connected endothelium. The interaction between endothelial cells and surface textures supports the process of endothelialization through the stabilization of cell-to-substrate adhesions and cell-to-cell junctions. It is shown that with this approach, when ≈50% of a textured surface is initially covered with cell seeding, the time to full endothelialization compared to an untextured surface is almost halved, underpinning the viability and effectiveness of the method for the quick and stable coverage of cardiovascular implants. PMID:27346806

  20. Minimally Invasive Holographic Surface Scanning for Soft-Tissue Image Registration

    PubMed Central

    Hackworth, Douglas M.; Webster, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in registration have extended intra-surgical image guidance from its origins in bone-based procedures to new applications in soft tissues, thus enabling visualization of spatial relationships between surgical instruments and subsurface structures before incisions begin. Preoperative images are generally registered to soft tissues through aligning segmented volumetric image data with an intraoperatively sensed cloud of organ surface points. However, there is currently no viable noncontact minimally invasive scanning technology that can collect these points through a single laparoscopic port, which limits wider adoption of soft-tissue image guidance. In this paper, we describe a system based on conoscopic holography that is capable of minimally invasive surface scanning. We present the results of several validation experiments scanning ex vivo biological and phantom tissues with a system consisting of a tracked, off-the-shelf, relatively inexpensive conoscopic holography unit. These experiments indicate that conoscopic holography is suitable for use with biological tissues, and can provide surface scans of comparable quality to existing clinically used laser range scanning systems that require open surgery. We demonstrate experimentally that conoscopic holography can be used to guide a surgical needle to desired subsurface targets with an average tip error of less than 3 mm. PMID:20659823

  1. BV supersolutions to equations of 1-Laplace and minimal surface type

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheven, Christoph; Schmidt, Thomas

    2016-08-01

    We propose notions of BV supersolutions to (the Dirichlet problem for) the 1-Laplace equation, the minimal surface equation, and equations of similar type. We then establish some related compactness and consistency results. Our main technical tool is a generalized product of L∞ divergence-measure fields and gradient measures of BV functions. This product crucially depends on the choice of a representative of the BV function, and the proofs of its basic properties involve results on one-sided approximation and fine (semi)continuity in the BV context.

  2. Scattering Amplitudes, the AdS/CFT Correspondence, Minimal Surfaces, and Integrability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Alday, Luis F.

    2010-01-01

    We focus on the computation of scattering amplitudes of planar maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mill in four dimensions at strong coupling by means of the AdS/CFT correspondence and explain how the problem boils down to the computation of minimal surfaces in AdS in the first part of this paper. In the second part of this review we explain how integrability allows to give a solution to the problem in terms of a set of integral equations. The intention of the review is to give a pedagogical, rather than very detailed, exposition.

  3. Potential contribution of microbial degradation to natural attenuation of MTBE in surface water systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.; Landmeyer, J.E.

    2001-01-01

    The potential contribution of in situ biodegradation as a mechanism for natural attenuation of MTBE in surface water was studied. Surface water sediments from streams and lakes at 11 sites throughout the US. Microbial degradation of [U-14C] MTBE was observed in surface-water-sediment microcosms under anaerobic conditions, but the efficiency and products of anaerobic MTBE biodegradation were strongly dependent on the predominant terminal electron accepting conditions. In the presence of substantial methanogenic activity, MTBE biodegradation was nominal and involved reduction of MTBE to t-butanol (TBA). Under more oxidizing conditions, minimal accumulation of 14C-TBA and significant mineralization of [U-14C] MTBE to 14CO2 were observed. Microorganisms inhabiting the bed sediments of streams and lakes could degrade MTBE effectively under a range of anaerobic terminal electron accepting conditions. Thus, anaerobic bed sediment microbial processes also might contribute to natural attenuation of MTBE in surface water systems throughout the US. This is an abstract of a paper presented at the 222nd ACS National Meting (Chicago, IL 8/26-30/2001).

  4. Eddies contribute to striations in sea surface topography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2013-03-01

    Scientists recently observed striations in sea surface topography in all ocean basins. These striations appear as alternating mesoscale jet-like structures; they have speeds on the order of 1 centimeter per second and are typically separated by about 200 kilometers in the meridional direction. The cause of these striations has been debated. Contributing to this scientific discussion, Buckingham and Cornillon used a database of tracked eddies and a contour identification and eddy removal algorithm to show that eddies are a significant source of striations. The authors noted that a small portion of the energy was unaccounted for by propagating eddies, allowing for the existence of weak zonal flows. (Journal of Geophysical Research-Oceans, doi:10.1029/2012JC008231, 2013)

  5. Portable minimally invasive human glucose detection instrument by surface plasmon resonance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dachao; Wu, Peng; Zhang, Jingxin; Liang, Wenshuai; Xu, Kexin

    2010-08-01

    With the improvement of living standard, the incidence of diabetes increases year by year. Minimally invasive blood glucose monitoring is an effectively way to control diabetes, and it is achieved by measuring the glucose concentration of interstitial fluid in human body. This paper presents a portable minimally-invasive human glucose detection instrument which is based on a miniature integrated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensor. D-galactose/D-glucose Binding Protein (GGBP) which can specifically absorb glucose moleculars is used to modify the gold surface of SPR sensor for higher sensitivity and stability. The instrument includes an interstitial fluid extraction unit, a liquid flow unit, a SPR sensor unit and a circuit control unit. Interstitial fluid is extracted from human body using the interstitial fluid extraction unit, and it is then transported to the SPR sensor by the liquid flow unit, and the SPR sensor can detect the glucose concentration in the interstitial fluid. The acquisition and process of data is controlled by the circuit control unit, which controls the operation of the whole system as well. The glucose detection resolution could reach 6.25mg/L, and the experiment result has good linearity when the glucose concentration ranges from 6.25mg/L to 50mg/L.

  6. Contribution of BK channels to action potential repolarisation at minimal cytosolic Ca2+ concentration in chromaffin cells.

    PubMed

    Scott, Ricardo S; Bustillo, Diego; Olivos-Oré, Luis Alcides; Cuchillo-Ibañez, Inmaculada; Barahona, Maria Victoria; Carbone, Emilio; Artalejo, Antonio R

    2011-10-01

    BK channels modulate cell firing in excitable cells in a voltage-dependent manner regulated by fluctuations in free cytosolic Ca(2+) during action potentials. Indeed, Ca(2+)-independent BK channel activity has ordinarily been considered not relevant for the physiological behaviour of excitable cells. We employed the patch-clamp technique and selective BK channel blockers to record K(+) currents from bovine chromaffin cells at minimal intracellular (about 10 nM) and extracellular (free Ca(2+)) Ca(2+) concentrations. Despite their low open probability under these conditions (V(50) of +146.8 mV), BK channels were responsible for more than 25% of the total K(+) efflux during the first millisecond of a step depolarisation to +20 mV. Moreover, BK channels activated about 30% faster (τ = 0.55 ms) than the rest of available K(+) channels. The other main source of fast voltage-dependent K(+) efflux at such a low Ca(2+) was a transient K(+) (I(A)-type) current activating with V (50) = -14.2 mV. We also studied the activation of BK currents in response to action potential waveforms and their contribution to shaping action potentials both in the presence and the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). Our results show that BK channels activate during action potentials and accelerate cell repolarisation even at minimal Ca(2+) concentration, and suggest that they could do so also in the presence of extracellular Ca(2+), before Ca(2+) entering the cell facilitates their activity. PMID:21755285

  7. Multiple surface discrimination in three-dimensional FLASH laser radar while minimizing the effects of diffraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neff, Brian J.; Cain, Stephen C.

    2012-05-01

    The goal of this work is to develop an algorithm to enhance the utility of three-dimensional (3-D) FLASH laser radar sensors through accurate ranging to multiple surfaces per image pixel while minimizing the effects of diffraction. With this algorithm it will be possible to realize numerous enhancements over both traditional Gaussian mixture modeling and single-surface range estimation. While traditional Gaussian mixture modeling can effectively model the received pulse, we know that its shape is likely altered by optical aberrations from the imaging system and the medium through which it is imaging. Additionally, only identifying a single surface per pulse may result in the loss of valuable information about partially obscured surfaces. This algorithm enables multisurface ranging of an entire image with a single laser pulse. Ultimately, improvements realized through this new ranging algorithm when coupled with various other techniques may make 3-D FLASH LADAR more suitable for remote sensing applications. Simulation examples show that the multisurface ranging algorithm derived in this work improves range estimation over standard Gaussian mixture modeling and frame-by-frame deconvolution using the Richardson-Lucy algorithm by up to 91% and 70% respectively.

  8. Deposition of PEG onto PMMA microchannel surface to minimize nonspecific adsorption.

    PubMed

    Bi, Hongyan; Meng, Sheng; Li, Yan; Guo, Kai; Chen, Yupeng; Kong, Jilie; Yang, Pengyuan; Zhong, Wei; Liu, Baohong

    2006-06-01

    A protein-resistant surface has been constructed on the poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) microfluidic chips based on a one-step modification. The copolymer of butyl methacrylate (BMA) and poly(ethylene glycol) methyl ether methacrylate (PEGMA) is synthesized to introduce a dense PEG molecular brush-like coating on the PMMA microchannel surfaces via the anchoring effect of the hydrophobic BMA units. The PEGMA segments could produce hydrophilic domains formed on the interface so as to achieve stable electroosmotic flow, and less nonspecific adsorption toward biomolecules. The modification procedure and the properties of the poly(BMA-co-PEGMA)-coated surface have been characterized by FT-IR spectroscopy, confocal fluorescence microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. The water contact angle and electroosmotic flow of PEG-modified PMMA microchip are measured to be 36 degrees and 5.4 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1), while those of 73 degrees and 1.9 x 10(-4) cm(2) V(-1) s(-1) for native one, respectively. The PEG-modified microchip has been applied for the electrophoresis separation of proteins, corresponding to the theoretical efficiencies about 16 300 and 412 300 plates m(-1). In the interest of achieving efficient separation while minimizing biofoulings from the serum and plasma, the fabrication of PEG-coated microfluidic chips would provide a biocompatible platform for complex biological analysis. PMID:16738729

  9. Weight minimization of structures for fixed flutter speed via an optimality criterion. [algorithm for lifting surfaces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Segenreich, S. A.; Mcintosh, S. C., Jr.

    1975-01-01

    A rigorous optimality criterion is derived and a hybrid weight-reduction algorithm developed for the weight minimization of lifting surfaces with a constraint on flutter speed. The weight-reduction algorithm incorporates a simple recursion formula derived from the optimality criterion. Monotonic weight reduction is accomplished by dynamically adjusting a parameter in the recursion formula so as to achieve a predetermined weight decrease. The algorithm thus combines the simplicity of optimality-criterion methods with the convergence characteristics of mathematical-programming methods. The imposition of the flutter constraint is simplified by forcing to zero the imaginary part of the flutter eigenvalue, with the airspeed fixed. Four examples are discussed. The results suggest that significant improvements in efficiency are possible, in comparison with techniques based purely on mathematical programming.

  10. Visual contribution to human standing balance during support surface tilts

    PubMed Central

    Assländer, Lorenz; Hettich, Georg; Mergner, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Visual position and velocity cues improve human standing balance, reducing sway responses to external disturbances and sway variability. Previous work suggested that human balancing is based on sensory estimates of external disturbances and their compensation using feedback mechanisms (Disturbance Estimation and Compensation, DEC model). This study investigates the visual effects on sway responses to pseudo-random support surface tilts, assuming that improvements result from lowering the velocity threshold in a tilt estimate and the position threshold in an estimate of the gravity disturbance. Center of mass (COM) sway was measured with four different tilt amplitudes, separating the effect of visual cues across the conditions ‘Eyes closed’ (no visual cues), ‘4 Hz stroboscopic illumination’ (visual position cues), and ‘continuous illumination’ (visual position and velocity cues). In a model based approach, parameters of disturbance estimators were identified. The model reproduced experimental results and showed a specific reduction of the position and velocity threshold when adding visual position and velocity cues, respectively. Sway variability was analyzed to explore a hypothesized relation between estimator thresholds and internal noise. Results suggest that adding the visual cues reduces the contribution of vestibular noise, thereby reducing sway variability and allowing for lower thresholds, which improves the disturbance compensation. PMID:25816794

  11. Aqueous dispersions of oligomer-grafted carbon nanomaterials with controlled surface charge and minimal framework damage

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Sheng; Chen, Shu; Menzel, Robert; Goode, Angela D.; Ryan, Mary P.; Porter, Alexandra E.; Shaffer, Milo S. P.

    2015-01-01

    Functionalised carbon nanomaterials (CNMs), with an undamaged carbon framework and controlled physiochemical properties, are desirable for a wide range of scientific studies and commercial applications. The use of a thermochemical grafting approach provides a versatile means to functionalise both multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and carbon black (CB) nanoparticles without altering their inherent structure. The functionalisation process was investigated by employing various types of grafting monomers; to improve water solubility, reagents were chosen that introduced ionic character either intrinsically or after further chemical reaction. The degree of grafting for both MWCNTs and CB ranged from 3 to 27 wt%, as established by thermal gravimetric analysis (TGA). Raman spectroscopy confirmed that the structural framework of the MWNTs was unaffected by the thermochemical treatment. The effectiveness of the surface modification was demonstrated by significantly improved dispersibility and stability in water, and further quantified by zeta-potential analysis. The concentration of stable, individualised, grafted MWNTs in water ranged from 30 to 80 µg mL−1, whereas functionalised CB (CB) in water showed improved dispersibility up to ~460 µg mL−1 after centrifugation at 10, 000 g for 15 minutes. The successful preparation of structurally identical but differently functionalised nanoparticles panels, with high water compatibility and minimal framework damage, are useful for controlled experiments. For example, they can be used to explore the relationship between toxicological effects and specific physiochemical properties, such as surface charge and geometry. PMID:25254653

  12. Optimization of electroporation-enhanced intradermal delivery of DNA vaccine using a minimally invasive surface device.

    PubMed

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S; Broderick, Kate E; Sardesai, Niranjan Y

    2012-06-01

    In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10-100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10-100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular and humoral immune

  13. Optimization of Electroporation-Enhanced Intradermal Delivery of DNA Vaccine Using a Minimally Invasive Surface Device

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Feng; Shen, Xuefei; Kichaev, Gleb; Mendoza, Janess M.; Yang, Maria; Armendi, Philip; Yan, Jian; Kobinger, Gary P.; Bello, Alexander; Khan, Amir S.; Broderick, Kate E.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract In vivo electroporation (EP) is an efficient nonviral method for enhancing DNA vaccine delivery and immunogenicity in animals and humans. Intradermal delivery of DNA vaccines is an attractive strategy because of the immunocompetence of skin tissue. We have previously reported a minimally invasive surface intradermal EP (SEP) device for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines. Robust antibody responses were induced after vaccine delivery via surface EP in several tested animal models. Here we further investigated the optimal EP parameters for efficient delivery of DNA vaccines, with a specific emphasis on eliciting cellular immunity in addition to robust humoral responses. In a mouse model, using applied voltages of 10–100 V, transgene expression of green fluorescent protein and luciferase reporter genes increased significantly when voltages as low as 10 V were used as compared with DNA injection only. Tissue damage to skin was undetectable when voltages of 20 V and less were applied. However, inflammation and bruising became apparent at voltages above 40 V. Delivery of DNA vaccines encoding influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin (H5HA) and nucleoprotein (NP) of influenza H1N1 at applied voltages of 10–100 V elicited robust and sustained antibody responses. In addition, low-voltage (less than 20 V) EP elicited higher and more sustained cellular immune responses when compared with the higher voltage (above 20 V) EP groups after two immunizations. The data confirm that low-voltage EP, using the SEP device, is capable of efficient delivery of DNA vaccines into the skin, and establishes that these parameters are sufficient to elicit both robust and sustainable humoral as well as cellular immune responses without tissue damage. The SEP device, functioning within these parameters, may have important clinical applications for delivery of prophylactic DNA vaccines against diseases such as HIV infection, malaria, and tuberculosis that require both cellular

  14. Image-Based Topography Reconstruction by Minimizing the Reprojection-Error Over a Surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mor, S.; Filin, S.

    2012-07-01

    Image based three dimensional modelling of small scale scenes sees an increased demand in recent years due to algorithmic advances, and growing awareness of users to the value of scene documentation in three dimensions. Nonetheless, most of the reported image-based reconstruction methods are either point driven, relying on matching large set of automatically sampled points (e.g., SIFT, SURF), or integral approaches. The latter are commonly based on generating an entire map of matching. For many such stereo-correspondence methods, however, images which are acquired from a narrow baseline and similar orientations are usually needed, in order to ensure satisfying results. We present in this paper a reconstruction approach, assuming both visibility and Lambertian reflectance, which is intended to be less affected by image difference. The proposed method performs a surface evolution which is implemented by an iterative scheme, applying a gradient flow which minimizes a reprojection-error cost function. The algorithm is applied on scenes of complex topography and varied terrain. Our results show applicability of the method, along with its satisfactory performance for some difficult imagery configurations.

  15. Vessels as 4-D curves: global minimal 4-D paths to extract 3-D tubular surfaces and centerlines.

    PubMed

    Li, Hua; Yezzi, Anthony

    2007-09-01

    In this paper, we propose an innovative approach to the segmentation of tubular structures. This approach combines all of the benefits of minimal path techniques such as global minimizers, fast computation, and powerful incorporation of user input, while also having the capability to represent and detect vessel surfaces directly which so far has been a feature restricted to active contour and surface techniques. The key is to represent the trajectory of a tubular structure not as a 3-D curve but to go up a dimension and represent the entire structure as a 4-D curve. Then we are able to fully exploit minimal path techniques to obtain global minimizing trajectories between two user supplied endpoints in order to reconstruct tubular structures from noisy or low contrast 3-D data without the sensitivity to local minima inherent in most active surface techniques. In contrast to standard purely spatial 3-D minimal path techniques, however, we are able to represent a full tubular surface rather than just a curve which runs through its interior. Our representation also yields a natural notion of a tube's "central curve." We demonstrate and validate the utility of this approach on magnetic resonance (MR) angiography and computed tomography (CT) images of coronary arteries. PMID:17896594

  16. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  17. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Dongyeop X.; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-03-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 1010 tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called “natural way”, to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin’s natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature.

  18. Chiral nematic self-assembly of minimally surface damaged chitin nanofibrils and its load bearing functions.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dongyeop X; Cha, Yun Jeong; Nguyen, Hoang-Linh; Je, Hwa Heon; Jho, Yong Seok; Hwang, Dong Soo; Yoon, Dong Ki

    2016-01-01

    Chitin is one of the most abundant biomaterials in nature, with 10(10) tons produced annually as hierarchically organized nanofibril fillers to reinforce the exoskeletons of arthropods. This green and cheap biomaterial has attracted great attention due to its potential application to reinforce biomedical materials. Despite that, its practical use is limited since the extraction of chitin nanofibrils requires surface modification involving harsh chemical treatments, leading to difficulties in reproducing their natural prototypal hierarchical structure, i.e. chiral nematic phase. Here, we develop a chemical etching-free approach using calcium ions, called "natural way", to disintegrate the chitin nanofibrils while keeping the essential moiety for the self-assembly, ultimately resulting in the reproduction of chitin's natural chiral structure in a polymeric matrix. This chiral chitin nanostructure exceptionally toughens the composite. Our resultant chiral nematic phase of chitin materials can contribute to the understanding and use of the reinforcing strategy in nature. PMID:26988392

  19. Surface waves contribute to ice retreat in Beaufort Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendel, JoAnna

    2014-08-01

    Surface waves, created by blowing wind, play a role in energy and nutrient transport and also shape coasts through erosion. Because the Arctic Ocean is usually covered by ice year-round, surface waves of the central Arctic Ocean have not been studied extensively.

  20. Contribution of surface roughness to simulations of historical deforestation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ye; Wang, Zhaomin

    Surface roughness which partitions surface net radiation into energy fluxes is a key parameter for estimation of biosphere-atmosphere interactions and climate variability. An earth system model of intermediate complexity (EMIC), MPM-2, is used to derive the impact of surface roughness on climate from simulations of historical land cover change effects. The direct change in surface roughness leads to a global surface warming of 0.08 °C through altering the turbulence in the boundary layer. The regional temperature response to surface roughness associated deforestation is very strong at northern mid-latitudes with a most prominent warming of 0.72 °C around 50°N in the Eurasia continent during summer. They can be explained mainly as direct and indirect consequences of decreases in surface albedo and increases in precipitation in response to deforestation, although there are a few significant changes in precipitation. There is also a prominent warming of 0.25 °C around 40°N in the North American continent. This study indicates that land surface roughness plays a significant role which is comparable with the whole land conversion effect in climate change. Therefore, further investigation of roughness-climate relationship is needed to incorporate these aspects.

  1. Contribution of Surface Magnetic Recordings to Planetary Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menville, Michel; Kuhnke, Falko; Musman, Gunter; Tsurutani, Bruce; Karczewski, Jean Krans

    1996-01-01

    The transient variations of the magnetic field at the surface of a planet has a primary external source, the interaction between the environment of the planet and solar radiation, and a secondary source, the electric currents induced in the conductive planet. The continuous recording of the time variations of the magnetic fields at the surface of Mars by means of three component magnetometers installed onboard landers would therefor allow the study of both the internal structure of Mars and the dynamic of its ionized environment.

  2. Mechanical work makes important contributions to surface chemistry at steps

    PubMed Central

    Francis, M. F.; Curtin, W. A.

    2015-01-01

    The effect of mechanical strain on the binding energy of adsorbates to late transition metals is believed to be entirely controlled by electronic factors, with tensile stress inducing stronger binding. Here we show, via computation, that mechanical strain of late transition metals can modify binding at stepped surfaces opposite to well-established trends on flat surfaces. The mechanism driving the trend is mechanical, arising from the relaxation of stored mechanical energy. The mechanical energy change can be larger than, and of opposite sign than, the energy changes due to electronic effects and leads to a violation of trends predicted by the widely accepted electronic ‘d-band’ model. This trend has a direct impact on catalytic activity, which is demonstrated here for methanation, where biaxial tension is predicted to shift the activity of nickel significantly, reaching the peak of the volcano plot and comparable to cobalt and ruthenium. PMID:25677075

  3. Multispectral remote sensing contribution to land surface evaporation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choudhury, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    The global water cycle is perhaps the most important of all the biogeochemical cycles and evaporation, which is a significant component of the water cycle, is also linked with the energy and carbon cycles. Long-term evaporation over large areas has generally been computed as the difference of precipitation and river runoff. Analysis of short-term evaporation rate and its spatial pattern, however, is extremely complex, and multispectral remotely sensed data could aid in such analysis. Multispectral data considered here are visible and near-infrared reflectances, infrared surface temperature and the 37 GHz brightness temperatures. These observations are found to be not totally independent of each other. A few of their relationships are established and discussed considering physically-based models.

  4. Light scattering from human corneal grafts: Bulk and surface contribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latour, Gaël; Georges, Gaëlle; Lamoine, Laure Siozade; Deumié, Carole; Conrath, John; Hoffart, Louis

    2010-09-01

    The cornea is the only transparent tissue in the body. The transparency is the main characteristic of the corneal tissue, and depends not only on the transmission coefficient but also on the losses by scattering and absorption. The scattering properties of the cornea tissues become one of the most important parameters in the case of the corneal graft. These scattering properties are studied in this paper in the reflected half area, similar to the diagnosis configuration. We quantify the influence of the cornea thickness and of the epithelial layer on scattering level. The technique of ellipsometry on scattered field is also used to analyze the polarization properties in order to determine the origin of scattering (surface and/or bulk).

  5. Sea surface temperature contributes to marine crocodylomorph evolution.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jeremy E; Amiot, Romain; Lécuyer, Christophe; Benton, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    During the Mesozoic and Cenozoic, four distinct crocodylomorph lineages colonized the marine environment. They were conspicuously absent from high latitudes, which in the Mesozoic were occupied by warm-blooded ichthyosaurs and plesiosaurs. Despite a relatively well-constrained stratigraphic distribution, the varying diversities of marine crocodylomorphs are poorly understood, because their extinctions neither coincided with any major biological crises nor with the advent of potential competitors. Here we test the potential link between their evolutionary history in terms of taxic diversity and two abiotic factors, sea level variations and sea surface temperatures (SST). Excluding Metriorhynchoidea, which may have had a peculiar ecology, significant correlations obtained between generic diversity and estimated Tethyan SST suggest that water temperature was a driver of marine crocodylomorph diversity. Being most probably ectothermic reptiles, these lineages colonized the marine realm and diversified during warm periods, then declined or became extinct during cold intervals. PMID:25130564

  6. Minimal Contribution of APOBEC3-Induced G-to-A Hypermutation to HIV-1 Recombination and Genetic Variation

    PubMed Central

    Nikolaitchik, Olga A.; Burdick, Ryan C.; Gorelick, Robert J.; Keele, Brandon F.; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K.

    2016-01-01

    Although the predominant effect of host restriction APOBEC3 proteins on HIV-1 infection is to block viral replication, they might inadvertently increase retroviral genetic variation by inducing G-to-A hypermutation. Numerous studies have disagreed on the contribution of hypermutation to viral genetic diversity and evolution. Confounding factors contributing to the debate include the extent of lethal (stop codon) and sublethal hypermutation induced by different APOBEC3 proteins, the inability to distinguish between G-to-A mutations induced by APOBEC3 proteins and error-prone viral replication, the potential impact of hypermutation on the frequency of retroviral recombination, and the extent to which viral recombination occurs in vivo, which can reassort mutations in hypermutated genomes. Here, we determined the effects of hypermutation on the HIV-1 recombination rate and its contribution to genetic variation through recombination to generate progeny genomes containing portions of hypermutated genomes without lethal mutations. We found that hypermutation did not significantly affect the rate of recombination, and recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes only increased the viral mutation rate by 3.9 × 10−5 mutations/bp/replication cycle in heterozygous virions, which is similar to the HIV-1 mutation rate. Since copackaging of hypermutated and wild-type genomes occurs very rarely in vivo, recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes does not significantly contribute to the genetic variation of replicating HIV-1. We also analyzed previously reported hypermutated sequences from infected patients and determined that the frequency of sublethal mutagenesis for A3G and A3F is negligible (4 × 10−21 and1 × 10−11, respectively) and its contribution to viral mutations is far below mutations generated during error-prone reverse transcription. Taken together, we conclude that the contribution of APOBEC3-induced hypermutation to HIV-1 genetic

  7. Minimal Contribution of APOBEC3-Induced G-to-A Hypermutation to HIV-1 Recombination and Genetic Variation.

    PubMed

    Delviks-Frankenberry, Krista A; Nikolaitchik, Olga A; Burdick, Ryan C; Gorelick, Robert J; Keele, Brandon F; Hu, Wei-Shau; Pathak, Vinay K

    2016-05-01

    Although the predominant effect of host restriction APOBEC3 proteins on HIV-1 infection is to block viral replication, they might inadvertently increase retroviral genetic variation by inducing G-to-A hypermutation. Numerous studies have disagreed on the contribution of hypermutation to viral genetic diversity and evolution. Confounding factors contributing to the debate include the extent of lethal (stop codon) and sublethal hypermutation induced by different APOBEC3 proteins, the inability to distinguish between G-to-A mutations induced by APOBEC3 proteins and error-prone viral replication, the potential impact of hypermutation on the frequency of retroviral recombination, and the extent to which viral recombination occurs in vivo, which can reassort mutations in hypermutated genomes. Here, we determined the effects of hypermutation on the HIV-1 recombination rate and its contribution to genetic variation through recombination to generate progeny genomes containing portions of hypermutated genomes without lethal mutations. We found that hypermutation did not significantly affect the rate of recombination, and recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes only increased the viral mutation rate by 3.9 × 10-5 mutations/bp/replication cycle in heterozygous virions, which is similar to the HIV-1 mutation rate. Since copackaging of hypermutated and wild-type genomes occurs very rarely in vivo, recombination between hypermutated and wild-type genomes does not significantly contribute to the genetic variation of replicating HIV-1. We also analyzed previously reported hypermutated sequences from infected patients and determined that the frequency of sublethal mutagenesis for A3G and A3F is negligible (4 × 10-21 and1 × 10-11, respectively) and its contribution to viral mutations is far below mutations generated during error-prone reverse transcription. Taken together, we conclude that the contribution of APOBEC3-induced hypermutation to HIV-1 genetic

  8. A two-dimensional cascade solution using minimized surface singularity density distributions - with application to film cooled turbine blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcfarland, E.; Tabakoff, W.; Hamed, A.

    1977-01-01

    An investigation of the effects of coolant injection on the aerodynamic performance of cooled turbine blades is presented. The coolant injection is modeled in the inviscid irrotational adiabatic flow analysis through the cascade using the distributed singularities approach. The resulting integral equations are solved using a minimized surface singularity density criteria. The aerodynamic performance was evaluated using this solution in conjunction with an existing mixing theory analysis. The results of the present analysis are compared with experimental measurements in cold flow tests.

  9. Myosin-II controls cellular branching morphogenesis and migration in 3D by minimizing cell surface curvature

    PubMed Central

    Elliott, Hunter; Fischer, Robert A.; Myers, Kenneth A.; Desai, Ravi A.; Gao, Lin; Chen, Christopher S.; Adelstein, Robert; Waterman, Clare M.; Danuser, Gaudenz

    2014-01-01

    In many cases cell function is intimately linked to cell shape control. We utilized endothelial cell branching morphogenesis as a model to understand the role of myosin-II in shape control of invasive cells migrating in 3D collagen gels. We applied principles of differential geometry and mathematical morphology to 3D image sets to parameterize cell branch structure and local cell surface curvature. We find that Rho/ROCK-stimulated myosin-II contractility minimizes cell-scale branching by recognizing and minimizing local cell surface curvature. Utilizing micro-fabrication to constrain cell shape identifies a positive feedback mechanism in which low curvature stabilizes myosin-II cortical association, where it acts to maintain minimal curvature. The feedback between myosin-II regulation by and control of curvature drives cycles of localized cortical myosin-II assembly and disassembly. These cycles in turn mediate alternating phases of directionally biased branch initiation and retraction to guide 3D cell migration. PMID:25621949

  10. Optimal dispersion with minimized Poisson equations for non-hydrostatic free surface flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Haiyang; Pietrzak, J. D.; Stelling, G. S.

    2014-09-01

    A non-hydrostatic shallow-water model is proposed to simulate the wave propagation in situations where the ratio of the wave length to the water depth is small. It exploits the reduced-size stencil in the Poisson pressure solver to make the model less expensive in terms of memory and CPU time. We refer to this new technique as the minimized Poisson equations formulation. In the simplest case when the method applied to a two-layer model, the new model requires the same computational effort as depth-integrated non-hydrostatic models, but can provide a much better description of dispersive waves. To allow an easy implementation of the new method in depth-integrated models, the governing equations are transformed into a depth-integrated system, in which the velocity difference serves as an extra variable. The non-hydrostatic shallow-water model with minimized Poisson equations formulation produces good results in a series of numerical experiments, including a standing wave in a basin, a non-linear wave test, solitary wave propagation in a channel and a wave propagation over a submerged bar.

  11. Minimal contribution of severe hypertriglyceridemia in L-asparaginase-associated pancreatitis developed in a child with acute lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Goto, Yoshinori; Nishimura, Ryosei; Nohara, Atsushi; Mase, Shintaro; Fujiki, Toshihiro; Irabu, Hitoshi; Kuroda, Rie; Araki, Raita; Ikawa, Yasuhiro; Maeba, Hideaki; Yachie, Akihiro

    2016-08-01

    A 10-year-old girl developed L-asparaginase (ASP)-associated pancreatitis during chemotherapy for acute lymphocytic leukemia. Her symptoms showed alleviation with continuous regional arterial infusion of protease inhibitor and systemic somatostatin analog therapy. She had intermittent and marked hypertriglyceridemia, an initial trigger for pancreatitis, probably as a side effect of ASP and steroids. However, we considered the pancreatitis to have developed mainly because of factors other than hypertriglyceridemia as lipoprotein analysis confirmed chylomicron levels to be nearly undetectable. Extremely large chylomicrons contribute directly to the onset of pancreatitis by causing blockage of small vessels. Although it is necessary to examine patients for dyslipidemia developing as a side effect of ASP, therapeutic intervention for hypertriglyceridemia is not considered to prevent the onset of ASP-associated pancreatitis. PMID:27599414

  12. Application of radiometric surface temperature for surface energy balance estimation: John Monteith's contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 25 years ago, Huband and Monteith paper’s investigating the radiative surface temperature and the surface energy balance of a wheat canopy, highlighted the key issues in computing fluxes with radiometric surface temperature. These included the relationship between radiometric and aerodynamic s...

  13. 3D reconstruction of internal organ surfaces for minimal invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Hu, Mingxing; Penney, Graeme; Edwards, Philip; Figl, Michael; Hawkes, David

    2007-01-01

    While Minimally Invasive Surgery (MIS) offers great benefits to patients compared with open surgery surgeons suffer from a restricted field-of-view and obstruction from instruments. We present a novel method for 3D reconstruction of soft tissue, which can provide a wider field-of-view with 3D information for surgeons, including restoration of missing data. The paper focuses on the use of Structure from Motion (SFM) techniques to solve the missing data problem and application of competitive evolutionary agents to improve the robustness to missing data and outliers. The method has been evaluated with synthetic data, images from a phantom heart model, and in vivo MIS image sequences using the da Vinci telerobotic surgical system. PMID:18051045

  14. Elimination or Minimization of Oscillation Marks: A Path To Improved Cast Surface Quality

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Alan W. Cramb

    2007-12-17

    Oscillation marks are the most recognizable feature of continuous casting and can be related to the subsurface defects that can be found on product rolled from continuous cast slabs. The purpose of this work was to develop strategies that can be used on industrial continuous casters to reduce oscillation mark depth and, in particular, to minimize the formation of hook type defects that are prevalent on ultra low carbon grades. The major focus of the work was on developing a technique to allow heat transfer in the meniscus region of the continuous caster to be measured and the effect of mold slag chemistry and chrystallization to be documented. A new experimental technique was developed that allowed the effect of mold flux chemistry and chrystallization on the radiation heat transfer rate to be measured dynamically.

  15. Images as embedding maps and minimal surfaces: Movies, color, and volumetric medical images

    SciTech Connect

    Kimmel, R.; Malladi, R.; Sochen, N.

    1997-02-01

    A general geometrical framework for image processing is presented. The authors consider intensity images as surfaces in the (x,I) space. The image is thereby a two dimensional surface in three dimensional space for gray level images. The new formulation unifies many classical schemes, algorithms, and measures via choices of parameters in a {open_quote}master{close_quotes} geometrical measure. More important, it is a simple and efficient tool for the design of natural schemes for image enhancement, segmentation, and scale space. Here the authors give the basic motivation and apply the scheme to enhance images. They present the concept of an image as a surface in dimensions higher than the three dimensional intuitive space. This will help them handle movies, color, and volumetric medical images.

  16. Registration of liver images to minimally invasive intraoperative surface and subsurface data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Yifei; Rucker, D. C.; Conley, Rebekah H.; Pheiffer, Thomas S.; Simpson, Amber L.; Geevarghese, Sunil K.; Miga, Michael I.

    2014-03-01

    Laparoscopic liver resection is increasingly being performed with results comparable to open cases while incurring less trauma and reducing recovery time. The tradeoff is increased difficulty due to limited visibility and restricted freedom of movement. Image-guided surgical navigation systems have the potential to help localize anatomical features to improve procedural safety and achieve better surgical resection outcome. Previous research has demonstrated that intraoperative surface data can be used to drive a finite element tissue mechanics organ model such that high resolution preoperative scans are registered and visualized in the context of the current surgical pose. In this paper we present an investigation of using sparse data as imposed by laparoscopic limitations to drive a registration model. Non-contact laparoscopicallyacquired surface swabbing and mock-ultrasound subsurface data were used within the context of a nonrigid registration methodology to align mock deformed intraoperative surface data to the corresponding preoperative liver model as derived from pre-operative image segmentations. The mock testing setup to validate the potential of this approach used a tissue-mimicking liver phantom with a realistic abdomen-port patient configuration. Experimental results demonstrates a range of target registration errors (TRE) on the order of 5mm were achieving using only surface swab data, while use of only subsurface data yielded errors on the order of 6mm. Registrations using a combination of both datasets achieved TRE on the order of 2.5mm and represent a sizeable improvement over either dataset alone.

  17. Minimal thermal treatments for reducing bacterial population on cantaloupe rind surfaces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cantaloupe melon has been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness due to consumption of contaminated fresh-cut pieces. Surface structure and biochemical characteristics of bacteria play a major role on how and where bacteria may attach and also complicates decontamination treatments. Whole ca...

  18. Glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles: a surface ligand for minimizing serum protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Vinluan, Rodrigo D; Liu, Jinbin; Zhou, Chen; Yu, Mengxiao; Yang, Shengyang; Kumar, Amit; Sun, Shasha; Dean, Andrew; Sun, Xiankai; Zheng, Jie

    2014-08-13

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs' protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  19. Glutathione-Coated Luminescent Gold Nanoparticles: A Surface Ligand for Minimizing Serum Protein Adsorption

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasmall glutathione-coated luminescent gold nanoparticles (GS-AuNPs) are known for their high resistance to serum protein adsorption. Our studies show that these NPs can serve as surface ligands to significantly enhance the physiological stability and lower the serum protein adsorption of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs), in addition to rendering the NPs the luminescence property. After the incorporation of GS-AuNPs onto the surface of SPIONs to form the hybrid nanoparticles (HBNPs), these SPIONs’ protein adsorption was about 10-fold lower than those of the pure glutathione-coated SPIONs suggesting that GS-AuNPs are capable of providing a stealth effect against serum proteins. PMID:25029478

  20. Minimizing antibody surface density on liposomes while sustaining cytokine-activated EC targeting.

    PubMed

    Almeda, Dariela; Wang, Biran; Auguste, Debra T

    2015-02-01

    Liposomes may be engineered to target inflamed endothelium by mimicking ligand-receptor interactions between leukocytes and cytokine-activated endothelial cells (ECs). The upregulation and assembly of vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM1) and E-selectin on the cell membrane upon exposure to cytokines have shown potential for drug delivery vehicles to target sites of chronic endothelial inflammation, such as atherosclerosis and cancer. Herein, we characterized EC surfaces by measuring the E-selectin and VCAM1 surface densities and adhesion forces of aVCAM1 and aE-selectin to ECs. We quantified the antibody density, ratio, and diffusivity of liposomes to achieve significant binding and internalization. At 1 h, the 1:1 ratio of VCAM1:E-selectin antibodies was significantly higher than 1:0 and 0:1. Significant binding and uptake was achieved at aE-selectin densities as low as 400 molecules/μm(2). The highest levels of binding and uptake were achieved when using a 1:1 ratio of VCAM1:E-selectin antibodies at a density of 1000 molecules/μm(2); this density is 85% lower than previous reports. The binding and uptake of functionalized liposomes were reduced to levels comparable to IgG functionalized liposomes upon a 10-fold reduction in liposome membrane diffusivity. We conclude with a liposomal design that discriminates between healthy and inflamed endothelium while reducing antibody surface presentation. PMID:25522963

  1. A novel method for texture-mapping conoscopic surfaces for minimally invasive image-guided kidney surgery

    PubMed Central

    Ong, Rowena; Glisson, Courtenay L.; Burgner-Kahrs, Jessica; Simpson, Amber; Danilchenko, Andrei; Lathrop, Ray; Herrell, S. Duke; Webster, Robert J.; Miga, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Organ-level registration is critical to image-guided therapy in soft tissue. This is especially important in organs such as the kidney which can freely move. We have developed a method for registration that combines three-dimensional locations from a holographic conoscope with an endoscopically obtained textured surface. By combining these data sources clear decisions as to the tissue from which the points arise can be made. Methods By localizing the conoscope’s laser dot in the endoscopic space, we register the textured surface to the cloud of conoscopic points. This allows the cloud of points to be filtered for only those arising from the kidney surface. Once a valid cloud is obtained we can use standard surface registration techniques to perform the image-space to physical-space registration. Since our methods use two distinct data sources we test for spatial accuracy and characterize temporal effects in phantoms, ex vivo porcine and human kidneys. In addition we use an industrial robot to provide controlled motion and positioning for characterizing temporal effects. Results Our initial surface acquisitions are hand-held. This means that we take approximately 55 s to acquire a surface. At that rate we see no temporal effects due to acquisition synchronization or probe speed. Our surface registrations were able to find applied targets with submillimeter target registration errors. Conclusion The results showed that the textured surfaces could be reconstructed with submillimetric mean registration errors. While this paper focuses on kidney applications, this method could be applied to any anatomical structures where a line of sight can be created via open or minimally invasive surgical techniques. PMID:26758889

  2. One-step polymer surface modification for minimizing drug, protein, and DNA adsorption in microanalytical systems.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Esben Kjær Unmack; Larsen, Niels B

    2013-02-21

    The non-specific adsorption of dissolved analytes strongly reduces the sensitivity and reliability in polymer microanalytical systems. Here, a one-step aqueous phase procedure modifies polymer material surfaces to strongly reduce their non-specific adsorption of a broad range of organic analytes including hydrophobic and hydrophilic drugs (0.23 < ClogP < 8.95), small and large proteins (insulin, albumin, IgG), and DNA. The coating is shown to limit the adsorption of even highly hydrophobic drugs (ClogP > 8) in their pharmaceutically relevant concentration range ≤100 nM. The low adsorption is mediated by photochemical conjugation, where polyethylene glycol (PEG) polymers in aqueous solution are covalently bound to the surface by UV illumination of dissolved benzophenone and a functionalized PEG. The method can coat the interior of polymer systems made from a range of materials commonly used in microanalytical systems, including polystyrene (PS), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), liquid crystalline polymer (LCP), and polyimide (PI). PMID:23254780

  3. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss.

    PubMed

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  4. Reproducible Construction of Surface Tension-Mediated Honeycomb Concave Microwell Arrays for Engineering of 3D Microtissues with Minimal Cell Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lee, GeonHui; Lee, JaeSeo; Oh, HyunJik; Lee, SangHoon

    2016-01-01

    The creation of engineered 3D microtissues has attracted prodigious interest because of the fact that this microtissue structure is able to mimic in vivo environments. Such microtissues can be applied extensively in the fields of regenerative medicine and tissue engineering, as well as in drug and toxicity screening. Here, we develop a novel method of fabricating a large number of dense honeycomb concave microwells via surface tension-mediated self-construction. More specifically, in order to control the curvature and shape of the concavity in a precise and reproducible manner, a custom-made jig system was designed and fabricated. By applying a pre-set force using the jig system, the shape of the honeycomb concave well was precisely and uniformly controlled, despite the fact that wells were densely packed. The thin wall between the honeycomb wells enables the minimization of cell loss during the cell-seeding process. To evaluate the performance of the honeycomb microwell array, rat hepatocytes were seeded, and spheroids were successfully formed with uniform shape and size. Liver-specific functions such as albumin secretion and cytochrome P450 were subsequently analyzed. The proposed method of fabricating honeycomb concave wells is cost-effective, simple, and reproducible. The honeycomb well array can produce multiple spheroids with minimal cell loss, and can lead to significant contributions in tissue engineering and organ regeneration. PMID:27513567

  5. Additive manufacturing and mechanical characterization of graded porosity scaffolds designed based on triply periodic minimal surface architectures.

    PubMed

    Afshar, M; Anaraki, A Pourkamali; Montazerian, H; Kadkhodapour, J

    2016-09-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, triply periodic minimal surfaces have emerged as a novel tool for designing porous scaffolds. Whereas scaffolds are expected to provide multifunctional performance, spatially changing pore patterns have been a promising approach to integrate mechanical characteristics of different architectures into a unique scaffold. Smooth morphological variations are also frequently seen in nature particularly in bone and cartilage structures and can be inspiring for designing of artificial tissues. In this study, we carried out experimental and numerical procedures to uncover the mechanical properties and deformation mechanisms of linearly graded porosity scaffolds for two different mathematically defined pore structures. Among TPMS-based scaffolds, P and D surfaces were subjected to gradient modeling to explore the mechanical responses for stretching and bending dominated deformations, respectively. Moreover, the results were compared to their corresponding uniform porosity structures. Mechanical properties were found to be by far greater for the stretching dominated structure (P-Surface). For bending dominated architecture (D-Surface), although there was no global fracture for uniform structures, graded structure showed a brittle fracture at 0.08 strain. A layer by layer deformation mechanism for stretching dominated structure was observed. For bending dominated scaffolds, deformation was accompanied by development of 45° shearing bands. Finite element simulations were also performed and the results showed a good agreement with the experimental observations. PMID:27281165

  6. From surface to subsurface and back again: the contribution of subsurface particle motion to surface armoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferdowsi, B.; Jerolmack, D. J.; Ortiz, C. P.; Houssais, M.

    2015-12-01

    Armoring is the development of a coarse surface layer of sediments on a river bed, which overlies a smaller and typically more heterogeneous substrate. All existing models for this phenomenon are predicated on the idea that armoring develops due to size-selective transport and kinetic sieving at the surface of the granular bed. Here examine the development of armoring in the absence of size-selective surface transport, and demonstrate that subsurface particle movement can create an armored surface layer. We first conduct experiments in a laminar and annular flume, over a range of Shields stresses, with bimodal and refractive index-matched spherical sediments; this allows us to image the internal motion of the granular bed that is sheared from above by a viscous oil. Fluid-driven particle motion of the surface layer results in granular shear, that drives motion deep into the bed. This subsurface motion causes an upward migration of coarser particles, at a rate that is proportional to the granular shear rate. Comparison of experimental results to an existing continuum-granular flow model suggest that armoring in our bed-load exeriments is entirely consistent with shear-induced segregation in dry avalanches - but is slower. There is no size-selective transport at the surface in the experiments, as the annular flume is mass conserving and all particles move as bed load; this was confirmed by observation. To probe the granular physics of armor development further, we perform numerical simulations using a discrete element model (DEM) of granular flow, with and without damping. Simulations reproduce salient features of the experiments, and indicate that armoring is robust but that the rate of segregation is related to the degree of viscous damping. We posit that subsurface granular flow is an important and perhaps dominant contributor to surface armoring in rivers. More generally, this work shows how information is transferred from the surface to the subsurface and back

  7. The Relative Contributions of Facial Shape and Surface Information to Perceptions of Attractiveness and Dominance

    PubMed Central

    Torrance, Jaimie S.; Wincenciak, Joanna; Hahn, Amanda C.; DeBruine, Lisa M.; Jones, Benedict C.

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have investigated the facial characteristics that influence perceptions of others’ attractiveness and dominance, the majority of these studies have focused on either the effects of shape information or surface information alone. Consequently, the relative contributions of facial shape and surface characteristics to attractiveness and dominance perceptions are unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the relationships between ratings of original versions of faces and ratings of versions in which either surface information had been standardized (i.e., shape-only versions) or shape information had been standardized (i.e., surface-only versions). For attractiveness and dominance judgments of both male and female faces, ratings of shape-only and surface-only versions independently predicted ratings of the original versions of faces. The correlations between ratings of original and shape-only versions and between ratings of original and surface-only versions differed only in two instances. For male attractiveness, ratings of original versions were more strongly related to ratings of surface-only than shape-only versions, suggesting that surface information is particularly important for men’s facial attractiveness. The opposite was true for female physical dominance, suggesting that shape information is particularly important for women’s facial physical dominance. In summary, our results indicate that both facial shape and surface information contribute to judgments of others’ attractiveness and dominance, suggesting that it may be important to consider both sources of information in research on these topics. PMID:25349994

  8. The relative contributions of facial shape and surface information to perceptions of attractiveness and dominance.

    PubMed

    Torrance, Jaimie S; Wincenciak, Joanna; Hahn, Amanda C; DeBruine, Lisa M; Jones, Benedict C

    2014-01-01

    Although many studies have investigated the facial characteristics that influence perceptions of others' attractiveness and dominance, the majority of these studies have focused on either the effects of shape information or surface information alone. Consequently, the relative contributions of facial shape and surface characteristics to attractiveness and dominance perceptions are unclear. To address this issue, we investigated the relationships between ratings of original versions of faces and ratings of versions in which either surface information had been standardized (i.e., shape-only versions) or shape information had been standardized (i.e., surface-only versions). For attractiveness and dominance judgments of both male and female faces, ratings of shape-only and surface-only versions independently predicted ratings of the original versions of faces. The correlations between ratings of original and shape-only versions and between ratings of original and surface-only versions differed only in two instances. For male attractiveness, ratings of original versions were more strongly related to ratings of surface-only than shape-only versions, suggesting that surface information is particularly important for men's facial attractiveness. The opposite was true for female physical dominance, suggesting that shape information is particularly important for women's facial physical dominance. In summary, our results indicate that both facial shape and surface information contribute to judgments of others' attractiveness and dominance, suggesting that it may be important to consider both sources of information in research on these topics. PMID:25349994

  9. Cortical morphometry in attention deficit/hyperactivity disorder: Contribution of thickness and surface area to volume.

    PubMed

    Silk, Timothy J; Beare, Richard; Malpas, Charles; Adamson, Chris; Vilgis, Veronika; Vance, Alasdair; Bellgrove, Mark A

    2016-09-01

    Although lower brain volume is a consistent neuroimaging finding in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), we lack an understanding of whether this effect is driven by changes in cortical thickness or surface area, which are governed by distinct neurodevelopmental processes. This study examined ADHD-control differences in cortical thickness, surface area and volume, and tests whether thickness and surface area mediates any observed volume differences. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) data was collected from 35 males with ADHD-combined type and 35 typically developing control participants aged 9-17 years. Morphometric measures were examined for between group differences and the specific contribution of surface area and thickness to group differences in volume tested using mediation analysis. Individuals with ADHD had smaller total cortical volume (7.3%), surface area (4.3%), and mean cortical thickness (2.8%) compared to controls. Differences were pronounced in frontal and parietal lobes. Variance in volume as a function of ADHD diagnosis was accounted for at least in part by the relationship between diagnosis and each of cortical thickness and surface area, with regional variation in the relative contributions of these measures. The surface area of the precuneus was a major driver of volume differences, attesting to the potential relevance of this region for neurodevelopment in ADHD. Both surface area and cortical thickness play a significant mediating role in determining diagnostic differences in volume, with regional variation in the contribution of thickness and surface area to those volume differences, highlighting the importance of examining both cortical thickness and surface area in examining ADHD. PMID:27268101

  10. A structured light-based laparoscope with real-time organs' surface reconstruction for minimally invasive surgery.

    PubMed

    Maurice, Xavier; Albitar, Chadi; Doignon, Christophe; de Mathelin, Michel

    2012-01-01

    In this paper we present a new 3-D laparoscopic device based on structured light for minimally invasive surgery. Real-time reconstruction of internal organs' surfaces is very challenging as the numerous geometric and photometric variabilities and disturbances (bloody parts, specularities, smokes,...) often occur during the surgical operation, sometimes with manipulations by several assistants. We then conceived a structured light vision system to illuminate a coded pattern by means of an external video projector device or miniaturized diffractive optical elements and a laser source. Among the structured light techniques, the spatial neighbourhood scheme is the most relevant class of approaches to deal with moving and deformable surfaces, then to capture the depth map with only one shot. Each neighbourhood (a (3 × 3) window) is representing a codeword of length 9, and is unique in the whole pattern, even if there is a lack of information. To do so, a monochromatic subperfect map-based pattern is computed, driven by a desired minimal Hamming distance, H(min), between any couple of codewords. This provides patterns with high correction capabilities (H(min) > 1). For practical considerations, each numerical codeword symbol is associated to a unique visual feature embedding the local orientation of the pattern, which is helpful for the neighbourhood retrieval during the decoding process. Together with the endoscopic device, in vivo real-time reconstructions (in mini-invasive surgical conditions) are presented to assess both the efficiency of the proposed pattern design, the decoding process and the 3-D laparoscope setup realized in the lab. PMID:23367240

  11. Quantifying contributions of model processes to the surface temperature bias in FGOALS-g2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bo; Zhou, Tianjun; Lu, Jianhua

    2015-12-01

    To quantify the annual mean surface temperature bias due to various processes in Flexible Global Ocean-Atmosphere-Land-System model, Grid point version 2 (FGOALS-g2), the climate feedback-response analysis method (CFRAM) is used to isolate contributions from both radiative and nonradiative processes in the model by comparing the model simulation with ERA-Interim reanalysis. The observed surface temperature bias is decomposed into seven partial temperature biases associated with surface albedo, water vapor, cloud, both surface sensible and latent heat fluxes, land/ocean heat transport processes, and atmospheric transport processes. The global mean cold bias (-1.39 K) is mostly attributed to surface albedo and land/ocean heat transport processes while surface latent heat fluxes tend to weaken this bias. Cloud-induced bias is dominated by shortwave cloud radiative effect (SWCRE) over low-latitudes and longwave cloud radiative effect (LWCRE) over high latitudes. The mixed layer depth (MLD) bias is consistent with the bias due to ocean heat transport over North Pacific, North Atlantic, and the Southern Ocean. On global scale, contributions of radiative processes and nonradiative processes to the total observed cold bias are comparable, but tend to compensate each other over most regions except for the northern high latitudes. We suggest that the improvements in tropical clouds in the model may significantly decrease the global temperature bias through the interaction between clouds and circulation.

  12. Clay mineralogy of surface sediments as a tool for deciphering river contributions to the Cariaco Basin (Venezuela)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bout-Roumazeilles, V.; Riboulleau, A.; ChâTelet, E. Armynot; Lorenzoni, L.; Tribovillard, N.; Murray, R. W.; Müller-Karger, F.; Astor, Y. M.

    2013-02-01

    The mineralogical composition of 95 surface sediment samples from the Cariaco Basin continental shelf and Orinoco delta was investigated in order to constrain the clay-mineral main provenance and distribution within the Cariaco Basin. The spatial variability of the data set was studied using a geo-statistical approach that allows drawing representative clay-mineral distribution maps. These maps are used to identify present-day dominant sources for each clay-mineral species in agreement with the geological characteristics of the main river watersheds emptying into the basin. This approach allows (1) identifying the most distinctive clay-mineral species/ratios that determine particle provenance, (2) evaluating the respective contribution of local rivers, and (3) confirming the minimal present-day influence of the Orinoco plume on the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. The Tuy, Unare, and Neveri Rivers are the main sources of clay particles to the Cariaco Basin sedimentation. At present, the Tuy River is the main contributor of illite to the western part of the southern Cariaco Basin continental shelf. The Unare River plume, carrying smectite and kaolinite, has a wide westward propagation, whereas the Neveri River contribution is less extended, providing kaolinite and illite toward the eastern Cariaco Basin. The Manzanares, Araya, Tortuga, and Margarita areas are secondary sources of local influence. These insights shed light on the origin of present-day terrigenous sediments of the Cariaco Basin and help to propose alternative explanations for the temporal variability of clay mineralogy observed in previously published studies.

  13. Ultrafast magneto-photocurrents in GaAs: Separation of surface and bulk contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Schmidt, Christian B. Priyadarshi, Shekhar; Bieler, Mark; Tarasenko, Sergey A.

    2015-04-06

    We induce ultrafast magneto-photocurrents in a GaAs crystal employing interband excitation with femtosecond laser pulses at room temperature and non-invasively separate surface and bulk contributions to the overall current response. The separation between the different symmetry contributions is achieved by measuring the simultaneously emitted terahertz radiation for different sample orientations. Excitation intensity and photon energy dependences of the magneto-photocurrents for linearly and circularly polarized excitations reveal an involvement of different microscopic origins, one of which is the inverse spin Hall effect. Our experiments are important for a better understanding of the complex momentum-space carrier dynamics in magnetic fields.

  14. A survey of state-of-the-art surface chemistries to minimize fouling from human and animal biofluids.

    PubMed

    Blaszykowski, Christophe; Sheikh, Sonia; Thompson, Michael

    2015-10-15

    Upon contact with bodily fluids, synthetic materials spontaneously acquire a layer of various species (most notably proteins) on their surface. The concern with respect to biomedical equipment, implants or devices resides in the possibility for biological processes with potentially harmful effects to ensue. In biosensor technology, the issue with this natural fouling phenomenon is that of non-specific adsorption to sensing platforms, which generates an often overwhelming interference signal that prevents the detection, not to mention the quantification, of target analytes present at considerably lower concentration. To alleviate this ubiquitous, recurrent problem - this genuine biotechnological plague - considerable research efforts have been devoted over the last few decades to engineer antifouling coatings. Extensive literature now exists that describes stealth organic adlayers capable of reducing fouling surface coverage Γ down to a few ng cm(-2)- however from biotechnologically irrelevant buffered solutions free or nearly depleted of any potentially interfering species. Regrettably indeed, few coatings are known to display/retain such level of performance when exposed to otherwise more complex, real-life biosamples (even diluted). Herein, we comprehensively review the state-of-the-art surface chemistries developed to date (January 2015) to minimize fouling from 8 such uncomparatively more challenging biological media (blood plasma, blood serum, cell lysate, cerebrospinal fluid, egg, milk, saliva, and urine) - whether of human or animal origin. Literature search for another 25 biological milieux generated no (exploitable) hit. Also discussed in this Review are the identification of the species responsible for fouling, and the dependence of antifouling properties on biosample source variability. PMID:26215763

  15. Surface Alfven Wave Contribution to Coronal Heating in a Wave-Driven Solar Wind Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, Rebekah M.; Opher, M.; Oran, R.; Sokolov, I. V.

    2010-05-01

    We present results from the development of a solar wind model driven by Alfven waves with realistic damping mechanisms. We investigate the contribution of surface Alfven wave damping to the heating of the corona and acceleration of the solar wind. These waves are present and damp in regions of strong gradients in density or magnetic field (e.g., the border between open and closed magnetic fields). Recently Oran et al. (2009) implemented a first principle solar wind model driven by a spectrum of Alfven waves into the Space Weather Modeling Framework. The wave transport equation, including wave advection and dissipation, is coupled to the MHD equations for the wind. The waves contribute to the momentum and energy of the wind through the action of wave pressure. Here we extend this model to include surface Alfven wave damping as a dissipation mechanism, considering waves with frequencies lower than those damped in the chromosphere and on the order of those dominating the heliosphere (0.0001 to 100 Hz.) We demonstrate the influence of the damping by quantifying the differences between a solution that includes surface Alfven wave damping and one driven solely by Alfven wave pressure. We relate to possible observational signatures of heat transfer by surface Alfven wave damping. This work is the first to study surface Alfven waves self-consistently as an energy driven for the solar wind in a 4D (three in space and one in frequency) environment. This work is supported by the NSF CAREER Grant.

  16. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents.

    PubMed

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A K; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  17. Contribution of Cell Surface Hydrophobicity in the Resistance of Staphylococcus aureus against Antimicrobial Agents

    PubMed Central

    Lather, Puja; Mohanty, A. K.; Jha, Pankaj; Garsa, Anita Kumari

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is found in a wide variety of habitats, including human skin, where many strains are commensals that may be clinically significant or contaminants of food. To determine the physiological characteristics of resistant strain of Staphylococcus aureus against pediocin, a class IIa bacteriocin, a resistant strain was compared with wild type in order to investigate the contribution of hydrophobicity to this resistance. Additional clumping of resistant strain relative to wild type in light microscopy was considered as an elementary evidence of resistance attainment. A delay in log phase attainment was observed in resistant strain compared to the wild type strain. A significant increase in cell surface hydrophobicity was detected for resistant strain in both hexadecane and xylene indicating the contribution of cell surface hydrophobicity as adaptive reaction against antimicrobial agents. PMID:26966577

  18. Quantifying the contribution of inflow on surface ozone over California during summer 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pfister, Gabriele G.; Walters, Stacy; Emmons, Louisa K.; Edwards, David P.; Avise, Jeremy

    2013-11-01

    pollution has been recognized as making a potentially strong impact on air quality in the western U.S., but large uncertainties remain in quantifying its contribution. Assessing the role of pollution transport in relation to local emissions and meteorology is especially important in light of possibly lower ozone standards and projected increases in transpacific pollution transport. We apply the Weather Research and Forecasting with Chemistry model to analyze the role of upwind pollution ("inflow") to surface ozone over California during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites campaign in June-July 2008 over California. Comparisons of the model to surface and aircraft observations, ozonesondes, and satellite retrievals show an overall good agreement; a low bias (~5 ppb) in free tropospheric ozone is attributed to low ozone at the boundaries and likely places our estimated inflow contribution on the lower side. Most other studies applied sensitivity analyses, while we use a synthetic ozone tracer, which provides a quantitative estimate of the budget. We estimate that on average 10 ± 9 ppb of surface afternoon ozone over California is attributed to ozone and ozone precursors entering the region from outside. This contribution features a significant spatial and temporal variability. While in most high ozone events, transported pollution plays a small role compared to local influences, for some instances, the impact can be substantial. Omitting data impacted by wildfires, we estimate the 90th percentile of the relative contribution of O3INFLOW to 8 h ozone >75 ppb as 10%. Our results also indicate that inflow might have a stronger impact on surface ozone in less polluted compared to polluted areas.

  19. Daytime and nighttime groundwater contributions to soils with different surface conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xing, Xuguang; Ma, Xiaoyi; Shi, Wenjuan

    2015-12-01

    Contributions of groundwater to the soil-water balance play an important role in areas with shallow water tables. The characteristics of daytime and nighttime water flux using non-weighing lysimeters were studied from June to September 2012 and 2013 in the extremely arid Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in northwestern China. The study consisted of nine treatments: three surface conditions, bare soil and cotton plants, each with water tables at depths of 1.0, 1.5, and 2.0 m; and plastic mulch with a water table at 1.5 m but with three percentages of open areas (POAs) in the plastic. The groundwater supply coefficient (SC) and the groundwater contribution (GC) generally varied with surface conditions. Both SC and GC decreased in the bare-soil and cotton treatments with increasing depth of the groundwater. Both SC and GC increased in the plastic-mulch treatment with increasing POA. Average nighttime GCs in the bare-soil treatments in July and August (the midsummer months) were 50.8-60.8 and 53.2-65.3 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. Average nighttime GCs in the cotton treatments in July and August were 51.4-60.2 and 51.5-58.1 %, respectively, of the total daily contributions. The average GCs in June and September, however, were lower at night than during the daytime. Soil temperature may thus play a more important role than air temperature in the upflow of groundwater.

  20. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface.

    PubMed

    Toldin, Francesco Parisen; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate. PMID:25966039

  1. Line contribution to the critical Casimir force between a homogeneous and a chemically stepped surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parisen Toldin, Francesco; Tröndle, Matthias; Dietrich, S.

    2015-06-01

    Recent experimental realizations of the critical Casimir effect have been implemented by monitoring colloidal particles immersed in a binary liquid mixture near demixing and exposed to a chemically structured substrate. In particular, critical Casimir forces have been measured for surfaces consisting of stripes with periodically alternating adsorption preferences, forming chemical steps between them. Motivated by these experiments, we analyze the contribution of such chemical steps to the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and within the Ising universality class. By means of Monte Carlo simulations, mean-field theory and finite-size scaling analysis we determine the universal scaling function associated with the contribution to the critical Casimir force due to individual, isolated chemical steps facing a surface with homogeneous adsorption preference or with Dirichlet boundary condition. In line with previous findings, these results allow one to compute the critical Casimir force for the film geometry and in the presence of arbitrarily shaped, but wide stripes. In this latter limit the force decomposes into a sum of the contributions due to the two homogeneous parts of the surface and due to the chemical steps between the stripes. We assess this decomposition by comparing the resulting sum with actual simulation data for the critical Casimir force in the presence of a chemically striped substrate.

  2. Surface contribution to high-order aberrations using the Aldis therem and Andersen's algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz-Estardante, A.; Cornejo-Rodriguez, Alejandro

    1990-07-01

    Formulae and computer programs were developed for surface contributions to high order aberrations coefficients using the Aldis theorem and Andersen algor ithms for a symmetr ical optical system. 2. THEORY Using the algorithms developed by T. B. Andersent which allow to calculate the high order aberrations coefficients of an optical system. We were able to obtain a set of equations for the contributions of each surface of a centered optical system to such aberration coefficiets by using the equations of Andersen and the so called Aldis theorem 3. COMPUTER PROGRAMS AND EXAMPLES. The study for the case of an object at infinite has been completed and more recently the object to finite distance case has been also finished . The equations have been properly programed for the two above mentioned situations . Some typical designs of optical systems will be presented and some advantages and disadvantages of the developed formulae and method will be discussed. 4. CONCLUSIONS The algorithm developed by Anderson has a compact notation and structure which is suitable for computers. Using those results obtained by Anderson together with the Aldis theorem a set of equations were derived and programmed for the surface contributions of a centered optical system to high order aberrations. 5. REFERENCES 1. T . B. Andersen App 1. Opt. 3800 (1980) 2. A. Cox A system of Optical Design Focal Press 1964 18 / SPIE

  3. Surface and Atmospheric Contributions to Passive Microwave Brightness Temperatures for Falling Snow Events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Johnson, Benjamin T.

    2011-01-01

    Physically based passive microwave precipitation retrieval algorithms require a set of relationships between satellite -observed brightness temperatures (TBs) and the physical state of the underlying atmosphere and surface. These relationships are nonlinear, such that inversions are ill ]posed especially over variable land surfaces. In order to elucidate these relationships, this work presents a theoretical analysis using TB weighting functions to quantify the percentage influence of the TB resulting from absorption, emission, and/or reflection from the surface, as well as from frozen hydrometeors in clouds, from atmospheric water vapor, and from other contributors. The percentage analysis was also compared to Jacobians. The results are presented for frequencies from 10 to 874 GHz, for individual snow profiles, and for averages over three cloud-resolving model simulations of falling snow. The bulk structure (e.g., ice water path and cloud depth) of the underlying cloud scene was found to affect the resultant TB and percentages, producing different values for blizzard, lake effect, and synoptic snow events. The slant path at a 53 viewing angle increases the hydrometeor contributions relative to nadir viewing channels. Jacobians provide the magnitude and direction of change in the TB values due to a change in the underlying scene; however, the percentage analysis provides detailed information on how that change affected contributions to the TB from the surface, hydrometeors, and water vapor. The TB percentage information presented in this paper provides information about the relative contributions to the TB and supplies key pieces of information required to develop and improve precipitation retrievals over land surfaces.

  4. Contributions of gas-phase plasma chemistry to surface modifications and gas-surface interactions: investigations of fluorocarbon rf plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuddy, Michael F., II

    The fundamental aspects of inductively coupled fluorocarbon (FC) plasma chemistry were examined, with special emphasis on the contributions of gas-phase species to surface modifications. Characterization of the gas-phase constituents of single-source CF4-, C2F6-, C3F 8-, and C3F6-based plasmas was performed using spectroscopic and mass spectrometric techniques. The effects of varying plasma parameters, including applied rf power (P) and system pressure (p) were examined. Optical emission spectroscopy (OES) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy were employed to monitor the behavior of excited and ground CFx (x = 1,2) radicals, respectively. Mass spectrometric techniques, including ion energy analyses, elucidated behaviors of nascent ions in the FC plasmas. These gas-phase data were correlated with the net effect of substrate processing for Si and ZrO2 surfaces. Surface-specific analyses were performed for post-processed substrates via x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle goniometry. Generally, precursors with lower F/C ratios tended to deposit robust FC films of high surface energy. Precursors of higher F/C ratio, such as CF4, were associated with etching or removal of material from surfaces. Nonetheless, a net balance between deposition of FC moieties and etching of material exists for each plasma system. The imaging of radicals interacting with surfaces (IRIS) technique provided insight into the phenomena occurring at the interface of the plasma gas-phase and substrate of interest. IRIS results demonstrate that CFx radicals scatter copiously, with surface scatter coefficients, S, generally greater than unity under most experimental conditions. Such considerable S values imply surface-mediated production of the CFx radicals at FC-passivated sites. It is inferred that the primary route to surface production of CFx arises from energetic ion bombardment and ablation of surface FC films. Other factors which may influence the observed CFx

  5. Atmospheric and Surface Contributions to Planetary Albedo and their Relationship to the Total Meridional Energy Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donohoe, A.; Battisti, D. S.

    2010-12-01

    The meridional distribution of incident solar radiation and planetary albedo both contribute to the equator-to-pole gradient in absorbed solar radiation (ASR) in the observed climate system. While the former component is determined by the Earth-Sun geometry and composes 60% of the equator-to-pole gradient in ASR, the latter component makes a significant (40%) contribution to the ASR gradient and is potentially a function of climate state due to its dependence on both atmospheric and surface albedo. In turn, the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo is found to be primarily (86% -89%) dictated by atmospheric albedo with meridional gradients in surface albedo playing a much smaller role in forcing the climate system on the equator-to-pole scale. Simulations of the pre-industrial climate system using the CMIP3 coupled models show large differences in the equator-to-pole gradient in planetary albedo which are mainly due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution, with surface processes playing a much smaller role. The inter-model spread in total meridional heat transport is also primarily (85% of the inter-model spread) due to differences in the simulated cloud distribution. Further model simulations demonstrate that the surface albedo changes associated with moving from the present climate to an ice free climate have a small effect on the equator-to-pole gradient of ASR as compared to the uncertainty in simulated cloud distributions, and hence a small effect on the meridional heat transport.

  6. Contribution of material's surface layer on charge state distribution in laser ablation plasma.

    PubMed

    Kumaki, Masafumi; Steski, Dannie; Ikeda, Shunsuke; Kanesue, Takeshi; Okamura, Masahiro; Washio, Masakazu

    2016-02-01

    To generate laser ablation plasma, a pulse laser is focused onto a solid target making a crater on the surface. However, not all the evaporated material is efficiently converted to hot plasma. Some portion of the evaporated material could be turned to low temperature plasma or just vapor. To investigate the mechanism, we prepared an aluminum target coated by thin carbon layers. Then, we measured the ablation plasma properties with different carbon thicknesses on the aluminum plate. The results showed that C(6+) ions were generated only from the surface layer. The deep layers (over 250 nm from the surface) did not provide high charge state ions. On the other hand, low charge state ions were mainly produced by the deeper layers of the target. Atoms deeper than 1000 nm did not contribute to the ablation plasma formation. PMID:26931982

  7. Contribution to Surface Water Contamination Understanding by Pesticides and Pharmaceuticals, at a Watershed Scale

    PubMed Central

    Piel, Stéphanie; Baurès, Estelle; Thomas, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    This study aims at understanding the presence of regulated and emerging micropollutants, particularly pesticides and pharmaceuticals, in surface water, regarding spatial and temporal influences at a watershed scale. The study of relations between micropollutants and other water quality and hydroclimatic parameters was carried out from a statistical analysis on historical and experimental data of different sampling sites from the main watershed of Brittany, western France. The outcomes point out the influence of urban and rural areas of the watershed as well as the impact of seasons on contamination variations. This work contributes to health risk assessment related to surface water contamination by micropollutants. This approach is particularly interesting in the case of agricultural watersheds such as the one studied, where more than 80% of surface water is used to produce drinking water. PMID:23211608

  8. Contribution to surface water contamination understanding by pesticides and pharmaceuticals, at a watershed scale.

    PubMed

    Piel, Stéphanie; Baurès, Estelle; Thomas, Olivier

    2012-12-01

    This study aims at understanding the presence of regulated and emerging micropollutants, particularly pesticides and pharmaceuticals, in surface water, regarding spatial and temporal influences at a watershed scale. The study of relations between micropollutants and other water quality and hydroclimatic parameters was carried out from a statistical analysis on historical and experimental data of different sampling sites from the main watershed of Brittany, western France. The outcomes point out the influence of urban and rural areas of the watershed as well as the impact of seasons on contamination variations. This work contributes to health risk assessment related to surface water contamination by micropollutants. This approach is particularly interesting in the case of agricultural watersheds such as the one studied, where more than 80% of surface water is used to produce drinking water. PMID:23211608

  9. Can internal heat contribute to the high surface temperature of Venus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, D.

    1976-01-01

    It is shown that current observational data on conditions at the Venusian surface are adequate to exclude the possibility that thermal energy from a hot interior contributes to the high surface temperature of the planet. The maximum energy flux conducted from the interior is estimated by assigning a maximum thermal conductivity and a minimum thickness to the crust. It is found that the crust must be at least 10 km thick and that the maximum thermal flux for this thickness is about 6 millionths of a calorie per sq cm/sec. The relative importance of this internal energy source is assessed by comparing it with the amount of solar energy deposited at the surface. The result demonstrates that the absorbed solar energy is at least one and probably two orders of magnitude higher than the minimum flux conducted from the interior. It is concluded that a very efficient atmospheric trapping mechanism (the greenhouse effect) is operating on Venus.

  10. Surface contributions to scattered sound power using non-negative intensity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Daipei; Peters, Herwig; Marburg, Steffen; Kessissoglou, Nicole

    2016-08-01

    Non-negative intensity is used to identify the surface areas of a structure that contributes to the scattered sound power. In the acoustic near field, the scattered sound power is predicted using non-negative intensity, as well as the scattered acoustic intensity integrated directly over the scatterer's surface area. In the acoustic far field, the scattered acoustic intensity and the scattered sound power are evaluated for three different receiver surface areas, corresponding to a sphere representing a far-field area that fully circumscribes the scatterer, and two hemispherical surfaces that correspond to partial far-field areas that do not fully circumscribe the scatterer. Back-calculated non-negative intensity that defines the sound scattered from the full or partial far-field receiver surface areas is also calculated and compared to the non-negative intensity obtained directly from the surface of the scatterer. To illustrate the numerical technique, the scattered acoustic intensity and scattered sound power of a rigid sphere, a rigid cylinder, and a rigid hemispherical shell are examined. PMID:27586749

  11. Decoupling the contribution of dispersive and acid-base components of surface energy on the cohesion of pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Shah, Umang V; Olusanmi, Dolapo; Narang, Ajit S; Hussain, Munir A; Tobyn, Michael J; Heng, Jerry Y Y

    2014-11-20

    This study reports an experimental approach to determine the contribution from two different components of surface energy on cohesion. A method to tailor the surface chemistry of mefenamic acid via silanization is established and the role of surface energy on cohesion is investigated. Silanization was used as a method to functionalize mefenamic acid surfaces with four different functional end groups resulting in an ascending order of the dispersive component of surface energy. Furthermore, four haloalkane functional end groups were grafted on to the surface of mefenamic acid, resulting in varying levels of acid-base component of surface energy, while maintaining constant dispersive component of surface energy. A proportional increase in cohesion was observed with increases in both dispersive as well as acid-base components of surface energy. Contributions from dispersive and acid-base surface energy on cohesion were determined using an iterative approach. Due to the contribution from acid-base surface energy, cohesion was found to increase ∼11.7× compared to the contribution from dispersive surface energy. Here, we provide an approach to deconvolute the contribution from two different components of surface energy on cohesion, which has the potential of predicting powder flow behavior and ultimately controlling powder cohesion. PMID:25223493

  12. Contribution of Long Fibrils and Peptides to Surface and Foaming Behavior of Soy Protein Fibril System.

    PubMed

    Wan, Zhili; Yang, Xiaoquan; Sagis, Leonard M C

    2016-08-16

    When soy glycinin (11S) is heated for a prolonged time at pH 2 (20 h at 85 °C), a mixture is formed consisting of long semiflexible 11S fibrils and small peptides. The surface and foaming properties of this mixture were investigated at different pHs, and compared to the behavior of pure fibrils and pure peptides, to determine the individual contributions of these two factions to the behavior of the mixture. The adsorption of these three systems at air-water interfaces and the resulting surface rheological properties were studied by combining drop shape analysis tensiometry, ellipsometry, and surface large amplitude oscillatory dilatational (LAOD) rheology. Lissajous plots of surface pressure versus deformation were used to analyze the surface rheological response in terms of interfacial microstructure. Our results show that the adsorption kinetics, dilatational rheological properties, and the foaming behavior of the mixture were mainly dominated by the small peptides in the fibril system. Compared to pH 2, the fibril mixture at pH 5 and 7 provides much better foam stability and appears to be a very promising protein material to make stable foams, even at low protein concentration (0.1 wt %). The presence of fibril clusters and peptide aggregates at pH 5 and 7 contributed to foam stability of the mixture. In contrast, pure fibril formed an interface with a highly pH-responsive adsorption and rheological behavior, and the foamability and foam stability of the pure fibrils were very poor. PMID:27452662

  13. Percentage Contributions from Atmospheric and Surface Features to Computed Brightness Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick

    2006-01-01

    Over the past few years, there has become an increasing interest in the use of millimeter-wave (mm-wave) and sub-millimeter-wave (submm-wave) radiometer observations to investigate the properties of ice particles in clouds. Passive radiometric channels respond to both the integrated particle mass throughout the volume and field of view, and to the amount, location, and size distribution of the frozen (and liquid) particles with the sensitivity varying for different frequencies and hydrometeor types. One methodology used since the 1960's to discern the relationship between the physical state observed and the brightness temperature (TB) is through the temperature weighting function profile. In this research, the temperature weighting function concept is exploited to analyze the sensitivity of various characteristics of the cloud profile, such as relative humidity, ice water path, liquid water path, and surface emissivity. In our numerical analysis, we compute the contribution (in Kelvin) from each of these cloud and surface characteristics, so that the sum of these various parts equals the computed TB. Furthermore, the percentage contribution from each of these characteristics is assessed. There is some intermingling/contamination of the contributions from various components due to the integrated nature of passive observations and the absorption and scattering between the vertical layers, but all in all the knowledge gained is useful. This investigation probes the sensitivity over several cloud classifications, such as cirrus, blizzards, light snow, anvil clouds, and heavy rain. The focus is on mm-wave and submm-wave frequencies, however discussions of the effects of cloud variations to frequencies as low as 10 GHz and up to 874 GHz will also be presented. The results show that nearly 60% of the TB value at 89 GHz comes from the earth's surface for even the heaviest blizzard snow rates. On the other hand, a significant percentage of the TB value comes from the snow

  14. Disentangling bulk from surface contributions in the electronic structure of black phosphorus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Golias, E.; Krivenkov, M.; Sánchez-Barriga, J.

    2016-02-01

    Most recently, black phosphorus has come into focus as a promising material for future applications in nanoelectronic devices due to its unique electronic and transport properties. Here, we use angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy in conjunction with ab initio calculations within the framework of density-functional theory to disentangle surface from the bulk contributions in the electronic structure of black phosphorus. We find good agreement between our theoretical predictions for the intra- and interlayer energy-momentum dispersions and the experimentally obtained three-dimensional band structure of this material. Our results provide compelling evidence for the existence of surface-resonant states near the top of the valence band, which can play an important role in the performance of electronic devices based on black phosphorus.

  15. Contribution of the highly conserved EaeH surface protein to enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Alaullah; Luo, Qingwei; Roy, Koushik; Shabaan, Salwa; Kumar, Pardeep; Qadri, Firdausi; Fleckenstein, James M

    2014-09-01

    Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are among the most common causes of diarrheal illness worldwide. These pathogens disproportionately afflict children in developing countries, where they cause substantial morbidity and are responsible for hundreds of thousands of deaths each year. Although these organisms are important targets for enteric vaccines, most development efforts to date have centered on a subset of plasmid-encoded fimbrial adhesins known as colonization factors and heat-labile toxin (LT). Emerging data suggest that ETEC undergoes considerable changes in its surface architecture, sequentially deploying a number of putative adhesins during its interactions with the host. We demonstrate here that one putative highly conserved, chromosomally encoded adhesin, EaeH, engages the surfaces of intestinal epithelial cells and contributes to bacterial adhesion, LT delivery, and colonization of the small intestine. PMID:24935979

  16. Microthermal measurements of the surface layer and its contribution to the seeing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, Juan Carlos; Gonzalez, Manuel

    2006-06-01

    In order to obtain more knowledge of the atmospheric surface layer, an internet based remote monitoring system has been developed. The surface layer turbulence degrades the images to a degree that will depend on the terrain, vegetation, structures and earth thermal effects on the local site. To find the contribution of these micro-thermal fluctuations introduced by the surface layer to the image degradation a series of fast response temperature sensor are placed at different heights and a front-end electronic system is used to control the sensors and manage the Ethernet communication to a remote PC. From the instantaneous temperature differences between the micro thermocouple systems we can derive the temperature structure function coefficient C t2 which is related to the refractive index structure function coefficient C n2. Data from the micro thermocouples must be read at fairly high frequency and recorded in a fashion which may be synchronised. The long term surface layer turbulence measurements are stored in a remote PC.

  17. Factors Contributing to the Off-Target Transport of Pyrethroid Insecticides From Urban Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Jorgenson, Brant C.; Wissel-Tyson, Christopher; Young, Thomas M.

    2013-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides used in an urban and suburban context have been found in urban creek sediments and associated with toxicity in aquatic bioassays. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the main factors contributing to the off-target transport of pyrethroid insecticides from surfaces typical of residential landscapes. Controlled rainfall simulations over concrete, bare soil, and turf plots treated individually with pyrethroid insecticides in a suspension concentrate, an emulsifiable concentrate, or a granule formulation were conducted at different rainfall intensities and different product set-time intervals. Pyrethroid mass washoff varied by several orders of magnitude between experimental treatments. Suspension concentrate product application to concrete yielded significantly greater washoff than any other treatment; granule product application to turf yielded the least washoff. Fractional losses at 10 L of runoff ranged from 25.9% to 0.011% of pyrethroid mass applied and 10 L nominal mass losses ranged from 3,970 to 0.18 μg. Mass washoff depended principally on formulation and surface type combination and to a lesser degree set-time interval and rainfall intensity. Treatment effects were analyzed by ANOVA on main factors of formulation, surface type, and set time. Factor effects were not purely additive; a significant interaction between formulation and surface type was noted. PMID:22784034

  18. Organic matter on the early surface of Mars: An assessment of the contribution by interplanetary dust

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Flynn, G. J.

    1993-01-01

    Calculations by Anders and Chyba et al. have recently revived interest in the suggestion that organic compounds important to the development of life were delivered to the primitive surface of the Earth by comets, asteroids or the interplanetary dust derived from these two sources. Anders has shown that the major post-accretion contribution of extraterrestrial organic matter to the surface of the Earth is from interplanetary dust. Since Mars is a much more favorable site for the gentle deceleration of interplanetary dust particles than is Earth, model calculations show that biologically important organic compounds are likely to have been delivered to the early surface of Mars by the interplanetary dust in an order-of-magnitude higher surface density than onto the early Earth. Using the method described by Flynn and McKay, the size frequency distribution, and the atmospheric entry velocity distribution of IDP's at Mars were calculated. The entry velocity distribution, coupled with the atmospheric entry heating model developed by Whipple and extended by Fraundorf was used to calculate the fraction of the particles in each mass decade which survives atmospheric entry without melting (i.e., those not heated above 1600K). The incident mass and surviving mass in each mass decade are shown for both Earth and Mars.

  19. Ti-6Al-4V triply periodic minimal surface structures for bone implants fabricated via selective laser melting.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chunze; Hao, Liang; Hussein, Ahmed; Young, Philippe

    2015-11-01

    Triply periodic minimal surface (TPMS) structures have already been shown to be a versatile source of biomorphic scaffold designs. Therefore, in this work, Ti-6Al-4V Gyroid and Diamond TPMS lattices having an interconnected high porosity of 80-95% and pore sizes in the range of 560-1600 μm and 480-1450 μm respectively were manufactured by selective laser melting (SLM) for bone implants. The manufacturability, microstructure and mechanical properties of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices were evaluated. Comparison between 3D micro-CT reconstructed models and original CAD models of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices shows excellent reproduction of the designs. The as-built Ti-6Al-4V struts exhibit the microstructure of columnar grains filled with very fine and orthogonally oriented α' martensitic laths with the width of 100-300 nm and have the microhardness of 4.01 ± 0.34 GPa. After heat treatment at 680°C for 4h, the α' martensite was converted to a mixture of α and β, in which the α phase being the dominant fraction is present as fine laths with the width of 500-800 nm and separated by a small amount of narrow, interphase regions of dark β phase. Also, the microhardness is decreased to 3.71 ± 0.35 GPa due to the coarsening of the microstructure. The 80-95% porosity TPMS lattices exhibit a comparable porosity with trabecular bone, and the modulus is in the range of 0.12-1.25 GPa and thus can be adjusted to the modulus of trabecular bone. At the same range of porosity of 5-10%, the moduli of cortical bone and of the Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices are in a similar range. Therefore, the modulus and porosity of Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be tailored to the levels of human bones and thus reduce or avoid "stress shielding" and increase longevity of implants. Due to the biomorphic designs, and high interconnected porosity and stiffness comparable to human bones, SLM-made Ti-6Al-4V TPMS lattices can be a promising material for load bearing bone implants. PMID:26210549

  20. Complete hepatitis B virus prophylaxis withdrawal in hepatitis B surface antigen-positive liver transplant recipients after longterm minimal immunosuppression.

    PubMed

    Lenci, Ilaria; Baiocchi, Leonardo; Tariciotti, Laura; Di Paolo, Daniele; Milana, Martina; Santopaolo, Francesco; Manzia, Tommaso Maria; Toti, Luca; Svicher, Valentina; Tisone, Giuseppe; Perno, Carlo Federico; Angelico, Mario

    2016-09-01

    Tailored approaches have been attempted to prevent hepatitis B virus (HBV) reinfection in antibodies against hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg)-positive liver transplantation (LT) recipients in order to minimize the use of hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG) and nucleoside analogues (NAs). We report the results of complete HBV prophylaxis withdrawal after a follow-up of at least 6 years in LT recipients with undetectable serum HBV DNA and intrahepatic total HBV DNA and covalently closed circular DNA at LT. We included 30 HBsAg positive, hepatitis B e antigen-negative recipients, 6 with hepatitis C virus and 7 with hepatitis D virus coinfection, who had received HBIG plus NA for at least 5 years after LT. Stepwise HBIG and NA withdrawal was performed in two 6-month periods under strict monitoring of HBV virology. All patients underwent a clinical, biochemical, and virological follow-up at 3-6 month intervals. HBV recurrence (HBsAg seroreversion ± detectable HBV DNA) occurred in 6 patients: in 1 patient after HBIG interruption and in 5 after both HBIG and NA cessation. Only 3 patients required reinstitution of HBV prophylaxis because of persistent HBV replication, and all achieved optimal control of HBV infection and did not experience clinical events. The other who recurred showed only short-lasting HBsAg positivity, with undetectable HBV DNA, followed by spontaneous anti-HBs seroconversion. An additional 15 patients mounted an anti-HBs titer, without previous serum HBsAg detectability. At the end of follow-up, 90% of patients were still prophylaxis-free, 93.3% were HBsAg negative, and 100% were HBV DNA negative; 60% had anti-HBs titers >10 IU/L (median, 143; range, 13-1000). This small series shows that complete prophylaxis withdrawal is safe in patients transplanted for HBV-related disease at low risk of recurrence and is often followed by spontaneous anti-HBs seroconversion. Further studies are needed to confirm this finding. Liver Transplantation 22 1205

  1. Surface Gravity Data Contribution to the Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands Geoid Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, X.; Gerhards, C.; Holmes, S. A.; Saleh, J.; Shaw, B.

    2015-12-01

    The Gravity for the Redefinition of the American Vertical Datum (GRAV-D) project provides updated local gravity field information for the XGEOID15 models. In particular, its airborne gravity data in the area of Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands (PRVI) made substantial improvements (~60%) on the precision of the geoid models at the local GNSS/Leveling bench marks in the target area. Fortunately, PRVI is free of the huge systematic error in the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 (NAVD88). Thus, the airborne contribution was evaluated more realistically. In addition, the airborne data picked up more detailed gravity field information in the medium wavelength band (spherical harmonic degree 200 to 600) that are largely beyond the resolution of the current satellite missions, especially along the nearby ocean trench areas. Under this circumstance (significant airborne contributions in the medium band), local surface gravity data need to be examined more carefully than before during merging with the satellite and airborne information for local geoid improvement, especially considering the well-known systematic problems in the NGS historical gravity holdings (Saleh et al 2013 JoG). Initial tests showed that it is very important to maintain high consistency between the surface data sets and the airborne enhanced reference model. In addition, a new aggregation method (Gerhards 2014, Inverse Problems) will also be tested to optimally combine the local surface data with the reference model. The data cleaning and combining procedures in the target area will be summarized here as reference for future applications.

  2. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in Tokyo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-04-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  3. Contributions of regional and intercontinental transport to surface ozone in the Tokyo area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshitomi, M.; Wild, O.; Akimoto, H.

    2011-08-01

    Japan lies downwind of the Asian continent and for much of the year air quality is directly influenced by emissions of ozone precursors over these heavily-populated and rapidly-industrializing regions. This study examines the extent to which oxidant transport from regional and distant anthropogenic sources influences air quality in Japan in springtime, when these contributions are largest. We find that European and North American contributions to surface ozone over Japan in spring are persistent, averaging 3.5±1.1 ppb and 2.8±0.5 ppb respectively, and are greatest in cold continental outflow conditions following the passage of cold fronts. Contributions from China are larger, 4.0±2.8 ppb, and more variable, as expected for a closer source region, and are generally highest near cold fronts preceding the influence of more distant sources. The stratosphere provides a varying but ever-present background of ozone of about 11.2±2.5 ppb during spring. Local sources over Japan and Korea have a relatively small impact on mean ozone, 2.4±7.6 ppb, but this masks a strong diurnal signal, and local sources clearly dominate during episodes of high daytime ozone. By examining the meteorological mechanisms that favour transport from different source regions, we demonstrate that while maximum foreign influence generally does not occur at the same time as the greatest buildup of oxidants from local sources, it retains a significant influence under these conditions. It is thus clear that while meteorological boundaries provide some protection from foreign influence during oxidant outbreaks in Tokyo, these distant sources still make a substantial contribution to exceedance of the Japanese ozone air quality standard in springtime.

  4. Genes ycfR, sirA and yigG Contribute to the Surface Attachment of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Saintpaul to Fresh Produce

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Joelle K.; Deng, Kaiping; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Brandl, Maria T.; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a frequent contaminant of minimally-processed fresh produce linked to major foodborne disease outbreaks. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association of this enteric pathogen with fresh produce remain largely unexplored. In our recent study, we showed that the expression of a putative stress regulatory gene, ycfR, was significantly induced in S. enterica upon exposure to chlorine treatment, a common industrial practice for washing and decontaminating fresh produce during minimal processing. Two additional genes, sirA involved in S. enterica biofilm formation and yigG of unknown function, were also found to be differentially regulated under chlorine stress. To further characterize the roles of ycfR, sirA, and yigG in S. enterica attachment and survival on fresh produce, we constructed in-frame deletions of all three genes in two different S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium and Saintpaul, which have been implicated in previous disease outbreaks linked to fresh produce. Bacterial attachment to glass and polystyrene microtiter plates, cell aggregation and hydrophobicity, chlorine resistance, and surface attachment to intact spinach leaf and grape tomato were compared among wild-type strains, single-gene deletion mutants, and their respective complementation mutants. The results showed that deletions of ycfR, sirA, and yigG reduced bacterial attachment to glass and polystyrene as well as fresh produce surface with or without chlorine treatment in both Typhimurium and Saintpaul. Deletion of ycfR in Typhimurium significantly reduced bacterial chlorine resistance and the attachment to the plant surfaces after chlorinated water washes. Deletions of ycfR in Typhimurium and yigG in Saintpaul resulted in significant increase in cell aggregation. Our findings suggest that ycfR, sirA, and yigG collectively contribute to S. enterica surface attachment and survival during post-harvest minimal processing of fresh produce. PMID:23451197

  5. Genes ycfR, sirA and yigG contribute to the surface attachment of Salmonella enterica Typhimurium and Saintpaul to fresh produce.

    PubMed

    Salazar, Joelle K; Deng, Kaiping; Tortorello, Mary Lou; Brandl, Maria T; Wang, Hui; Zhang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Salmonella enterica is a frequent contaminant of minimally-processed fresh produce linked to major foodborne disease outbreaks. The molecular mechanisms underlying the association of this enteric pathogen with fresh produce remain largely unexplored. In our recent study, we showed that the expression of a putative stress regulatory gene, ycfR, was significantly induced in S. enterica upon exposure to chlorine treatment, a common industrial practice for washing and decontaminating fresh produce during minimal processing. Two additional genes, sirA involved in S. enterica biofilm formation and yigG of unknown function, were also found to be differentially regulated under chlorine stress. To further characterize the roles of ycfR, sirA, and yigG in S. enterica attachment and survival on fresh produce, we constructed in-frame deletions of all three genes in two different S. enterica serovars, Typhimurium and Saintpaul, which have been implicated in previous disease outbreaks linked to fresh produce. Bacterial attachment to glass and polystyrene microtiter plates, cell aggregation and hydrophobicity, chlorine resistance, and surface attachment to intact spinach leaf and grape tomato were compared among wild-type strains, single-gene deletion mutants, and their respective complementation mutants. The results showed that deletions of ycfR, sirA, and yigG reduced bacterial attachment to glass and polystyrene as well as fresh produce surface with or without chlorine treatment in both Typhimurium and Saintpaul. Deletion of ycfR in Typhimurium significantly reduced bacterial chlorine resistance and the attachment to the plant surfaces after chlorinated water washes. Deletions of ycfR in Typhimurium and yigG in Saintpaul resulted in significant increase in cell aggregation. Our findings suggest that ycfR, sirA, and yigG collectively contribute to S. enterica surface attachment and survival during post-harvest minimal processing of fresh produce. PMID:23451197

  6. High order surface aberration contributions from phase space analysis of differential rays.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bo; Herkommer, Alois M

    2016-03-21

    Phase space methods are very popular for illumination systems or paraxial system analysis. In this paper it will be shown that it is also a promising tool to visualize and quantify surface aberration contributions, including all orders. The method is based on the calculation and propagation of a differential ray pair. In order to validate the method we compare to Aldis calculus, an exact method to determine high order aberrations in rotational symmetric systems. A triplet lens is used as an example to visualize the results. The analysis indicates that the phase space method is a very good approximation to Aldis calculus and moreover it is not limited to any symmetry assumptions. PMID:27136789

  7. Regional Cortical Surface Area in Adolescents: A Preliminary MRI Twin Study of Genetic and Environmental Contributions.

    PubMed

    Ma, Xingshun; Eyler, Lisa T; Hu, Xiaomei; Hou, Xiao; Deng, Wei; Zhang, Xiaowei; Lin, Yin; Lei, Wei; Li, Mingli; Kang, Line; Huang, Yongfeng; Wang, Na; Qiu, Tian; Li, Xiao; He, Qian; Fu, Yixiao; Meng, Huaqing; Li, Tao

    2016-03-01

    Cortical surface area (CSA) has particular relevance for understanding development, behavior, and the connection between brain structure and function. Little is known about genetic and environmental determinants of CSA during development. We utilized bivariate twin methods to identify global and regionally specific genetic factors which influence CSA in a preliminary sample of typically-developing adolescents, with hypotheses based on findings in middle-aged adults. Similar to previous findings, we observed high heritability for total CSA. There was also significant evidence for genetic influences on regional CSA, particularly when these were not adjusted for total CSA, with highest heritability in frontal cortex and relatively fewer genetic contributions to medial temporal cortical structures. Adjustment for total CSA reduced regional CSA heritability dramatically, but a moderate influence of genetic factors remained in some regions. Both global and regionally-specific genetic factors influence regional CSA during adolescence. PMID:26519369

  8. Minimal surfaces of the {{AdS}}_{5}\\times {S}^{5} superstring and the symmetries of super Wilson loops at strong coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Münkler, Hagen; Pollok, Jonas

    2015-09-01

    Based on an extension of the holographic principle to superspace, we provide a strong-coupling description of smooth super Wilson loops in {N}=4 super Yang-Mills theory in terms of minimal surfaces of the {{AdS}}5× {S}5 superstring. We employ the classical integrability of the Green-Schwarz superstring on {{AdS}}5× {S}5 to derive the superconformal and Yangian Y[{psu}(2,2| 4)] Ward identities for the super Wilson loop, thus extending the strong coupling results obtained for the Maldacena-Wilson loop. In the course of the derivation, we determine the minimal surface solution up to third order in an expansion close to the conformal boundary.

  9. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Stacy D.; Chen, Guanqun; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Tomasi, Pernell; Jayawardhane, Kethmi; Dyer, John M.; Weselake, Randall J.

    2016-01-01

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis. GPATs 4–8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Recently, GPAT9 was reported to be essential for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in developing Arabidopsis seeds. The enzymatic properties and possible functions of GPAT9 in surface lipid, polar lipid and TAG biosynthesis in non-seed organs, however, have not been investigated. Here we show that Arabidopsis GPAT9 exhibits sn-1 acyltransferase activity with high specificity for acyl-coenzyme A, thus providing further evidence that this GPAT is involved in storage lipid biosynthesis. We also confirm a role for GPAT9 in seed oil biosynthesis and further demonstrate that GPAT9 contributes to the biosynthesis of both polar lipids and TAG in developing leaves, as well as lipid droplet production in developing pollen grains. Conversely, alteration of constitutive GPAT9 expression had no obvious effects on surface lipid biosynthesis. Taken together, these studies expand our understanding of GPAT9 function to include modulation of several different intracellular glycerolipid pools in plant cells. PMID:27325892

  10. Arabidopsis GPAT9 contributes to synthesis of intracellular glycerolipids but not surface lipids.

    PubMed

    Singer, Stacy D; Chen, Guanqun; Mietkiewska, Elzbieta; Tomasi, Pernell; Jayawardhane, Kethmi; Dyer, John M; Weselake, Randall J

    2016-08-01

    GLYCEROL-3-PHOSPHATE ACYLTRANSFERASE (GPAT) genes encode enzymes involved in glycerolipid biosynthesis in plants. Ten GPAT homologues have been identified in Arabidopsis. GPATs 4-8 have been shown to be involved in the production of extracellular lipid barrier polyesters. Recently, GPAT9 was reported to be essential for triacylglycerol (TAG) biosynthesis in developing Arabidopsis seeds. The enzymatic properties and possible functions of GPAT9 in surface lipid, polar lipid and TAG biosynthesis in non-seed organs, however, have not been investigated. Here we show that Arabidopsis GPAT9 exhibits sn-1 acyltransferase activity with high specificity for acyl-coenzyme A, thus providing further evidence that this GPAT is involved in storage lipid biosynthesis. We also confirm a role for GPAT9 in seed oil biosynthesis and further demonstrate that GPAT9 contributes to the biosynthesis of both polar lipids and TAG in developing leaves, as well as lipid droplet production in developing pollen grains. Conversely, alteration of constitutive GPAT9 expression had no obvious effects on surface lipid biosynthesis. Taken together, these studies expand our understanding of GPAT9 function to include modulation of several different intracellular glycerolipid pools in plant cells. PMID:27325892

  11. Cell surface heparan sulfate proteoglycans contribute to intracellular lipid accumulation in adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Wilsie, Larissa C; Chanchani, Shree; Navaratna, Deepti; Orlando, Robert A

    2005-01-01

    Background Transport of fatty acids within the cytosol of adipocytes and their subsequent assimilation into lipid droplets has been thoroughly investigated; however, the mechanism by which fatty acids are transported across the plasma membrane from the extracellular environment remains unclear. Since triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins represent an abundant source of fatty acids for adipocyte utilization, we have investigated the expression levels of cell surface lipoprotein receptors and their functional contributions toward intracellular lipid accumulation; these include very low density lipoprotein receptor (VLDL-R), low density lipoprotein receptor-related protein (LRP), and heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG). Results We found that expression of these three lipoprotein receptors increased 5-fold, 2-fold, and 2.5-fold, respectively, during adipocyte differentiation. The major proteoglycans expressed by mature adipocytes are of high molecular weight (>500 kD) and contain both heparan and chondroitin sulfate moieties. Using ligand binding antagonists, we observed that HSPG, rather than VLDL-R or LRP, play a primary role in the uptake of DiI-lableled apoE-VLDL by mature adipocytes. In addition, inhibitors of HSPG maturation resulted in a significant reduction (>85%) in intracellular lipid accumulation. Conclusions These results suggest that cell surface HSPG is required for fatty acid transport across the plasma membrane of adipocytes. PMID:15636641

  12. Individual surface-engineered microorganisms as robust Pickering interfacial biocatalysts for resistance-minimized phase-transfer bioconversion.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhaowei; Ji, Haiwei; Zhao, Chuanqi; Ju, Enguo; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-04-13

    A powerful strategy for long-term and diffusional-resistance-minimized whole-cell biocatalysis in biphasic systems is reported where individually encapsulated bacteria are employed as robust and recyclable Pickering interfacial biocatalysts. By individually immobilizing bacterial cells and optimizing the hydrophobic/hydrophilic balance of the encapsulating magnetic mineral shells, the encased bacteria became interfacially active and locate at the Pickering emulsion interfaces, leading to dramatically enhanced bioconversion performances by minimizing internal and external diffusional resistances. Moreover, in situ product separation and biocatalyst recovery was readily achieved using a remote magnetic field. Importantly, the mineral shell effectively protected the entire cell from long-term organic-solvent stress, as shown by the reusability of the biocatalysts for up to 30 cycles, while retaining high stereoselective catalytic activities, cell viabilities, and proliferative abilities. PMID:25706244

  13. A Streptococcus suis LysM domain surface protein contributes to bacterial virulence.

    PubMed

    Wu, Zongfu; Shao, Jing; Ren, Haiyan; Tang, Huanyu; Zhou, Mingyao; Dai, Jiao; Lai, Liying; Yao, Huochun; Fan, Hongjie; Chen, Dai; Zong, Jie; Lu, Chengping

    2016-05-01

    Streptococcus suis (SS) is a major swine pathogen, as well as a zoonotic agent for humans. Numerous factors contribute to SS virulence, but the pathogenesis of SS infection is poorly understood. Here, we show that a novel SS surface protein containing a LysM at the N-terminus (SS9-LysM) contributes to SS virulence. Homology analysis revealed that the amino acid sequence of SS9-LysM from the SS strain GZ0565 shares 99.8-68.7% identity with homologous proteins from other SS strains and 41.2% identity with Group B Streptococcal protective antigen Sip. Immunization experiments showed that 7 out of 30 mice immunized with recombinant SS9-LysM were protected against challenge with the virulent GZ0565 strain, while all of the control mice died within 48h following bacterial challenge. In mouse infection model, the virulence of the SS9-LysM deletion mutant (ΔSS9-LysM) was reduced compared with the wild-type (WT) strain GZ0565 and SS9-LysM complemented strain. In addition, ΔSS9-LysM was significantly more sensitive to killing by pig blood ex vivo and mouse blood in vivo compared with the WT strain and SS9-LysM complemented strain. In vivo transcriptome analysis in mouse blood showed that the WT strain reduced the expression of host genes related to iron-binding by SS9-LysM. Moreover, the total free iron concentration in blood from infected mice was significantly lower for the ΔSS9-LysM strain compared with the WT strain. Together, our data reveal that SS9-LysM facilitates SS survival within blood by releasing more free iron from the host. This represents a new mechanism of SS pathogenesis. PMID:27066710

  14. Surface heat flow and the mantle contribution on the margins of Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goutorbe, Bruno; Lucazeau, Francis; Bonneville, Alain

    2008-05-01

    We present thermal data from 473 oil exploration wells in Australia and New Zealand. Approximately 2300 bottom-hole temperatures are corrected to form a homogeneous set along with 86 temperatures from reservoir tests. Thermal conductivity profiles are estimated from a set of geophysical well logs using a recently developed neural network approach. Retaining wells in which temperature and thermal conductivity data overlap over an interval greater than 1000 m, we estimate 10 heat flow values in the Taranaki basin of New Zealand and 270 values in the northwestern, western, and southern margins and in the intracontinental Canning basin of Australia. The values are in the range 30-80 mW m-2. As a result of several differences in the data and methods, our heat flow values are 10-20 mW m-2 lower compared to previously published estimates for the same wells in New Zealand. For Australia, our values are consistent with previously measured values and trends in the continental and marine regions. On the northwestern and southeastern margins, we interpret the variations as reflecting changes in the nature of the underlying basement. Consistent with onshore data, it is inferred that the Archean crust is depleted in radiogenic elements compared to Proterozoic regions and that recent volcanism affects the eastern Paleozoic area. After removing from surface heat flow the sediment contributions, including a permanent radiogenic heat component and a transient sedimentation effect, a simple crustal model suggests that mantle heat flow on the continental margin bordering the Pilbara craton is higher than below the craton itself. Moreover, heat flow corrected for the sediment contributions is markedly lower in the Petrel intracontinental basin than in the adjacent margin, although the crust is thinner below this latter region. As both are underlaid by the same basement, this observation may indicate that the mantle contribution is also higher below that margin. Such a higher mantle

  15. Contribution of vision to postural behaviors during continuous support-surface translations

    PubMed Central

    Jilk, D. Joseph; Safavynia, Seyed A.; Ting, Lena H.

    2014-01-01

    During standing balance, kinematics of postural behaviors have been previously observed to change across visual conditions, perturbation amplitudes, or perturbation frequencies. However, experimental limitations only allowed for independent investigation of such parameters. Here, we adapted a pseudorandom ternary sequence (PRTS) perturbation previously used in rotational support-surface perturbations (Peterka 2002) to a translational paradigm, allowing us to concurrently examine the effects of vision, perturbation amplitude, and frequency on balance control. Additionally, the unpredictable PRTS perturbation eliminated effects of feedforward adaptations typical of responses to sinusoidal stimuli. The PRTS perturbation contained a wide spectral bandwidth (0.08-3.67 Hz) and was scaled to 4 different peak-to-peak amplitudes (3-24 cm). Root-mean-square (RMS) of hip displacement and velocity increased relative to RMS ankle displacement and velocity in the absence of vision across all subjects, especially at higher perturbation amplitudes. Gain and phase lag of CoM sway relative to the perturbation also increased with perturbation frequency; phase lag further increased when vision was absent. Together, our results suggest that visual input, perturbation amplitude, and perturbation frequency can concurrently and independently modulate postural strategies during standing balance. Moreover, each factor contributes to the difficulty of maintaining postural stability; increased difficulty evokes a greater reliance on hip motion. Finally, despite high degrees of joint angle variation across subjects, CoM measures were relatively similar across subjects, suggesting that the CoM is an important controlled variable for balance. PMID:24132526

  16. The contribution of Remote Sensing to the Indian Land Surface Processes Experiment (LASPEX)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, R.; Vijayan, D.; Prasad, T.

    During the conduct of the Indian Land Surface Processes (LSP) Experiment (LASPEX) in Sabarmati river basin, tower based measurements for wind, temperature and humidity fields were collected over 5 locations with primary and intensive ground based observations at Anand, Gujarat. Remote sensing component consisted of (a) ground based measurements of spectral radiances in 3 nm bandwidth (hyperspectral) in visible through near IR region; in blue, green, red and near IR bands of IRS LISS and LANDSAT TM; leaf area index (LAI); crop and air temperatures over Anand site; (b) crop distribution information in Anand -Kandha - Derol region to relate with satellite based measurements in 36,72,188 and 1100 m spatial resolutions. Fourth order polynomial fit was observed between LAI and spectral vegetation indices for wheat. By convolving respective filter functions with 3 nm bandwidth measurements, NDVI for bandwidths corresponding to TM and AVHRR were found to be correlated with r' in 0.96 - 0.99 range, and higher value observed for AVHRR NDVI was related to additional 725 - 760 nm bandwidth in AVHRR near IR band. Hyperspectral index defined by (R77 7-R747 )/R 673 , Rrefers to reflectance in wavelength centered at , was useful in discriminating low evapotranspiration (ET) chickpea and high ET wheat. Using hyperspectral data, 650-673 nm and 760-830 nm were found as optimum spectral region for computing NDVI; and relationships between LAI and various pigment indices and red-edge indices were studied. Using 1100 m resolution A VHRR data, the relationship between NDVI and roughness parameter (computed from tower based measurements) in direct as well as fractal based mode had been developed. The surface temperature over the region was obtained using split thermal window algorithm and NDVI as surrogate parameter to define relative contribution of emissivity for soil and crop components in the pixel. Sensible heat flux, computed using AVHRR data based roughness parameter and surface

  17. Relationships between deformation and microstructure evolution and minimizing surface roughness after BCP processing in RRR Nb cavitites

    SciTech Connect

    T.R. Bieler; D. Baars; K.T. Hartwig; C. Compton; T.L. Grimm

    2009-05-26

    Two strategies for improving the surface finish of niobium sheet used in superconducting radio frequency cavities were examined, using slices of single (or large-grain) material from an ingot, and equal channel angle extrusion (ECAE) preprocessing of ingot material to achieve a uniform and small grain size prior to subsequent rolling. The effect of these two processing paths on final microstructure, texture, and surface finish are discussed.

  18. The Contribution of Io-Raised Tides to Europa's Diurnally-Varying Surface Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoden, Alyssa Rose; Hurford, Terry A,; Manga, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Europa's icy surface records a rich history of geologic activity, Several features appear to be tectonic in origin and may have formed in response to Europa's daily-varying tidal stress [I]. Strike-slip faults and arcuate features called cycloids have both been linked to the patterns of stress change caused by eccentricity and obliquity [2J[3]. In fact, as Europa's obliquity has not been directly measured, observed tectonic patterns arc currently the best indicators of a theoretically supported [4] non-negligible obliquity. The diurnal tidal stress due to eccentricity is calculated by subtracting the average (or static) tidal shape of Europa generated by Jupiter's gravitational field from the instantaneous shape, which varies as Europa moves through its eccentric orbit [5]. In other words, it is the change of shape away from average that generates tidal stress. One might expect tidal contributions from the other large moons of Jupiter to be negligible given their size and the height of the tides they raise on Europa versus Jupiter's mass and the height of the tide it raises on Europa, However, what matters for tidally-induced stress is not how large the lo-raised bulge is compared to the Jupiter-raised bulge but rather the differences bet\\Veen the instantaneous and static bulges in each case. For example, when Europa is at apocenter, Jupiter raises a tide 30m lower than its static tide. At the same time, 10 raises a tide about 0.5m higher than its static tide. Hence, the change in Io's tidal distortion is about 2% of the change in the Jovian distortion when Europa is at apocenter

  19. Single bacterial strain capable of significant contribution to carbon cycling in the surface ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedler, Byron E.; Aluwihare, Lihini I.; Azam, Farooq

    2014-05-01

    Marine dissolved organic carbon (DOC) encompasses one of the largest reservoirs of carbon on Earth. Heterotrophic bacteria are the primary biotic force regulating the fate of this material, yet the capacity of individual strains to significantly contribute to carbon cycling is unknown. Here we quantified the ability of a single Alteromonas strain [Alteromonas sp. strain Scripps Institution of Oceanography (AltSIO)] to drawdown ambient DOC in a coastal ecosystem. In three experiments, AltSIO alone consumed the entire pool of labile DOC, defined here as the quantity consumed by the submicron size fraction of ambient microbial assemblages within 5 d. These findings demonstrate that complete removal of the labile DOC pool in coastal surface seawater can be achieved by a single taxon. During long-term incubations (>1 y) testing semilabile DOC consumption, AltSIO entered dormancy but remained viable, while the diverse assemblages continued to consume carbon. Given that AltSIO is a large bacterium and thus subject to increased grazing pressure, we sought to determine the ecological relevance of this phenotype. Growth dynamics in natural seawater revealed that AltSIO rapidly outgrew the native bacteria, and despite intense grazing pressure, was never eliminated from the population. A survey in the California Current Ecosystem revealed that large bacteria (≥40 fg Cṡcell-1) were persistent, accounting for up to 12% of total bacterial abundance and 24% of total bacterial biomass. We conclude that large, rapidly growing bacteria have the potential to disproportionately alter the fate of carbon in the mesotrophic ocean and play an important role in ecosystem function.

  20. Minimal thermal treatments for reducing bacterial population on cantaloupe rind surfaces and transfer to fresh-cut pieces

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cantaloupe melon has been associated with outbreaks of foodborne illness due to consumption of contaminated fresh-cut pieces. Surface structure and biochemical characteristics of bacteria play a major role on how and where bacteria may attach and also complicates decontamination treatments. Whole ca...

  1. Surface-roughness contributions to the electrical resistivity of polycrystalline metal films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacob, U.; Vancea, J.; Hoffmann, H.

    1990-06-01

    The influence of surface roughness on the electrical conductivity of polycrystalline metal films has to be considered at two different length scales. The large-scale surface roughness due to the granular arrangement of these films gives rise to a fluctuating film cross section. One-dimensional models of these fluctuations lead to roughness values consistent with scanning-tunneling-microscopy images of film surfaces. The microscopic surface roughness, mainly given by atomic steps on the crystallite surfaces, represents centers for surface scattering of conduction electrons. With this concept we were able to describe not only the thickness-dependent conductivity of films with natural (as-deposited) surface roughness, but also the increase in the resistance during subsequent coating with adatoms at 80 K owing to an artificial microscopic roughening of their surfaces.

  2. How and to what end may consciousness contribute to action? Attributing properties of consciousness to an embodied, minimally cognitive artificial neural network

    PubMed Central

    Cruse, Holk; Schilling, Malte

    2013-01-01

    An artificial neural network called reaCog is described which is based on a decentralized, reactive and embodied architecture developed to control non-trivial hexapod walking in an unpredictable environment (Walknet) while using insect-like navigation (Navinet). In reaCog, these basic networks are extended in such a way that the complete system, reaCog, adopts the capability of inventing new behaviors and – via internal simulation – of planning ahead. This cognitive expansion enables the reactive system to be enriched with additional procedures. Here, we focus on the question to what extent properties of phenomena to be characterized on a different level of description as for example consciousness can be found in this minimally cognitive system. Adopting a monist view, we argue that the phenomenal aspect of mental phenomena can be neglected when discussing the function of such a system. Under this condition, reaCog is discussed to be equipped with properties as are bottom-up and top-down attention, intentions, volition, and some aspects of Access Consciousness. These properties have not been explicitly implemented but emerge from the cooperation between the elements of the network. The aspects of Access Consciousness found in reaCog concern the above mentioned ability to plan ahead and to invent and guide (new) actions. Furthermore, global accessibility of memory elements, another aspect characterizing Access Consciousness is realized by this network. reaCog allows for both reactive/automatic control and (access-) conscious control of behavior. We discuss examples for interactions between both the reactive domain and the conscious domain. Metacognition or Reflexive Consciousness is not a property of reaCog. Possible expansions are discussed to allow for further properties of Access Consciousness, verbal report on internal states, and for Metacognition. In summary, we argue that already simple networks allow for properties of consciousness if leaving the

  3. Modeling multiple surface watersheds contributing to one aquifer using the SWATmf framework

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surface-subsurface integrated modeling is commonly limited by the extent of the surface domain. This limitation requires modelers to define the subsurface boundaries as a function of the surface domain resulting in inaccurate flow and transport simulation at the model boundary. In this study, the SW...

  4. A theoretical analysis of the thermodynamic contributions for the adsorption of individual protein residues on functionalized surfaces.

    PubMed

    Latour, Robert A; Hench, Larry L

    2002-12-01

    Although the denaturing of adsorbed proteins on biomaterials surfaces is believed to lead to adverse tissue reactions to implanted materials, very little is currently known of the actual mechanisms involved. These mechanisms must be understood if surfaces are to be proactively designed to control protein adsorption behavior. Concepts widely employed in rational drug design and in protein and RNA folding predictions provide a means to approach this problem. Accordingly, a theoretical analysis has been conducted to estimate the thermodynamic contributions (changes in enthalpy, entropy, and Gibbs free energy) for the adsorption of selected individual mid-chain protein residues to functionalized surfaces. Enthalpic contributions from residue-surface interactions were calculated using semi-empirical quantum mechanical-based computational chemistry methods in a simulated aqueous environment (MOPAC/COSMO), and enthalpic and entropic contributions due to water restructuring effects assumed to occur during adsorption were estimated from experimental data for functional group wetting and calculated changes in solvent accessible surface area as each protein residue approached each surface. When combined with intraprotein residue-residue interactions, the understanding of residue-surface adsorption energy relationships provides a means to begin to predict protein adsorption behavior as a function of biomaterials surface chemistry. It is recognized that several assumptions have been made in this approach that could be challenged, and that truncations necessary due to programming limitations have been applied that may neglect potentially important interactions. Therefore, it must be understood that the modeling predictions may not be directly applicable to biomaterials for surface design under actual physiologic conditions at this stage. However, this attempt at modeling fundamental components of protein adsorption is presented as an initial approach to understanding these

  5. An integrated groundwater and surface water approach to quantifying the contribution of hydrological pathways to streamflow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, R. J.; Deakin, J.; Misstear, B.; Gill, L.; Flynn, R. M.

    2012-12-01

    An appreciation of the quantity of streamflow derived from the main hydrological groundwater and surface water pathways transporting diffuse pollutants is critical when addressing a wide range of water resource management issues. The Pathways Project, funded by the Irish EPA, is developing a Catchment Management Tool (CMT) as an aid to water resource decision makers. The pollutants investigated by the CMT include phosphorus, nitrogen, sediments, pesticides and pathogens. An important first step in this process is to provide reliable estimates of the slower responding groundwater pathways in conjunction with the quicker overland and interflow pathways. Four watersheds are being investigated, with continuous rainfall, discharge, temperature and conductivity data being collected at gauging points within each of the watersheds. These datasets are being used to populate the semi-distributed, lumped flow model, NAM and also the distributed, finite difference model, MODFLOW. One of the main challenges is to achieve credible separations of the hydrograph into the main pathways in relatively small catchments (sometimes less than 5km2) with short response times. To assist the numerical modelling, physical separation techniques have been used to constrain the separations within probable limits. Physical techniques include: Master Recession Analysis; a modified Lyne and Hollick one-parameter digital separation; an approach developed in Ireland involving the application of recharge coefficients to hydrologically effective rainfall estimates; and finally using the NAM and MODFLOW models themselves as means of investigating separations. The contribution from each of the pathways, combined with an understanding of the attenuation of the contaminants along those pathways, will inform the CMT. This understanding will lay the foundation for linking the parameters of the NAM model to watershed descriptors such as slope, drainage density, watershed area, soil type, etc., in order to

  6. Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    SciTech Connect

    McClintock, Carlee; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L

    2013-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent hydroxyl radicals for these measurements; however, many of these approaches require use of radioactive sources or caustic oxidizing chemicals. The purpose of this research was to evaluate and optimize the use of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as a highly accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals as a means to induce a controllable level of oxidation on a range of intact proteins. These experiments utilize a relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber, along with a unique cell activation approach to improve control over the intact protein oxidation yield. Studies were conducted to evaluate the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface. This report demonstrates a robust protocol for the use of BDD electrochemistry and high performance LC-MS/MS as a high-throughput experimental pipeline for probing higher order protein structure, and illustrates how it is complementary to predictive computational modeling efforts.

  7. Improvement in the bias of laser based optical rotational sensor by minimizing the lock - in due to surface roughness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mahender Kumar; Rasheed, I. Abdul; Naidu, V. Atchaiah; Rao, A. Ramachander; Chhabra, Inder Mohan; Shankar, Sai

    2016-05-01

    Laser based optical rotational sensors are used for measuring the rotation of an object where it has been mounted. The coherent property of the laser is used in inertial navigation system for navigation purposes. This rotational sensor suffers from various errors out of which lock-in is one of the error which does not allow the sensor to detect a rotation below a specific lock-in threshold. The lock-in threshold is directly dependent upon the quality of the component i.e., prism or mirror. These components are being used for folding the laser to rotate it in a definite cavity. During the interaction with the prism or mirror the laser is scattered in forward and backward direction and the level of scattering is directly dependent on the surface roughness of mirror and prism. In this paper a concept of float polishing is demonstrated for developing pitch pad, similar to tin pad to produce a mirror and prism surface to a super smooth level i.e., Ra - 1.5 to 2.0 Å. With these prisms the lock - in threshold has been decreased to 300-400° / hr and thereby improved the performance of the laser based optical rotation sensor.

  8. Minimal Reduplication

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirchner, Jesse Saba

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation introduces Minimal Reduplication, a new theory and framework within generative grammar for analyzing reduplication in human language. I argue that reduplication is an emergent property in multiple components of the grammar. In particular, reduplication occurs independently in the phonology and syntax components, and in both cases…

  9. VARIABLE BOUND-SITE CHARGING CONTRIBUTIONS TO SURFACE COMPLEXATION MASS ACTION EXPRESSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    One and two pK models of surface complexation reactions between reactive surface sites (>SOH) and the proton (H+) use mass action expressions of the form: Ka={[>SOHn-1z-1]g>SOH(0-1)aH+EXP(-xeY/kT)}/{[>SOHnz]g>SOH(n)} where Ka=the acidity constant, [ ]=reactive species concentrati...

  10. Regulation of Type IV Pili Contributes to Surface Behaviors of Historical and Epidemic Strains of Clostridium difficile

    PubMed Central

    Purcell, Erin B.; McKee, Robert W.; Bordeleau, Eric; Burrus, Vincent

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The intestinal pathogen Clostridium difficile is an urgent public health threat that causes antibiotic-associated diarrhea and is a leading cause of fatal nosocomial infections in the United States. C. difficile rates of recurrence and mortality have increased in recent years due to the emergence of so-called “hypervirulent” epidemic strains. A great deal of the basic biology of C. difficile has not been characterized. Recent findings that flagellar motility, toxin synthesis, and type IV pilus (TFP) formation are regulated by cyclic diguanylate (c-di-GMP) reveal the importance of this second messenger for C. difficile gene regulation. However, the function(s) of TFP in C. difficile remains largely unknown. Here, we examine TFP-dependent phenotypes and the role of c-di-GMP in controlling TFP production in the historical 630 and epidemic R20291 strains of C. difficile. We demonstrate that TFP contribute to C. difficile biofilm formation in both strains, but with a more prominent role in R20291. Moreover, we report that R20291 is capable of TFP-dependent surface motility, which has not previously been described in C. difficile. The expression and regulation of the pilA1 pilin gene differs between R20291 and 630, which may underlie the observed differences in TFP-mediated phenotypes. The differences in pilA1 expression are attributable to greater promoter-driven transcription in R20291. In addition, R20291, but not 630, upregulates c-di-GMP levels during surface-associated growth, suggesting that the bacterium senses its substratum. The differential regulation of surface behaviors in historical and epidemic C. difficile strains may contribute to the different infection outcomes presented by these strains. IMPORTANCE How Clostridium difficile establishes and maintains colonization of the host bowel is poorly understood. Surface behaviors of C. difficile are likely relevant during infection, representing possible interactions between the bacterium and the

  11. Taxonomic minimalism.

    PubMed

    Beattle, A J; Oliver, I

    1994-12-01

    Biological surveys are in increasing demand while taxonomic resources continue to decline. How much formal taxonomy is required to get the job done? The answer depends on the kind of job but it is possible that taxonomic minimalism, especially (1) the use of higher taxonomic ranks, (2) the use of morphospecies rather than species (as identified by Latin binomials), and (3) the involvement of taxonomic specialists only for training and verification, may offer advantages for biodiversity assessment, environmental monitoring and ecological research. As such, formal taxonomy remains central to the process of biological inventory and survey but resources may be allocated more efficiently. For example, if formal Identification is not required, resources may be concentrated on replication and increasing sample sizes. Taxonomic minimalism may also facilitate the inclusion in these activities of important but neglected groups, especially among the invertebrates, and perhaps even microorganisms. PMID:21236933

  12. Land surface contribution to climate predictability: the long way from early evidence to improved forecast skill

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douville, Hervé

    2013-04-01

    Seasonal forecasts performance over most land areas remains relatively weak, particularly in the mid-latitudes where the interannual ocean variability has a lesser influence than in the tropics. Yet, many observational and numerical studies suggest that there is a fraction of predictability that is still untapped over land at the monthly to seasonal time scales, due to both local and remote land surface effects. Soil moisture and snow mass anomalies may have a strong signature in the land surface energy budget and thereby influence not only surface temperature, but also precipitation through changes in surface evaporation and/or moisture convergence. Land surface anomalies may also trigger planetary waves that can have remote effects on seasonal mean climate. This talk will first illustrate some potential land surface impacts on climate predictability using both statistical and numerical evidence. Then, the limitations of such studies and the practical difficulties for taking advantage of the land surface memory will be presented, as well as on-going efforts for adressing these issues at both European (i.e., SPECS) and international (i.e., GLACE) levels.

  13. Did mineral surface chemistry and toxicity contribute to evolution of microbial extracellular polymeric substances?

    PubMed

    Xu, Jie; Campbell, Jay M; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J; Sahai, Nita

    2012-08-01

    Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral-water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral-water-cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. PMID:22934560

  14. A new curvature technique calculation for surface tension contribution in PLIC-VOF method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, J.-M.; Chesneau, X.; Zeghmati, B.

    2006-01-01

    The volume of fluid (VOF) methods have been used for numerous numerical simulations. Among these techniques used to define the moving interface, the piecewise linear interface reconstruction (PLIC-VOF) is one of the most accurate. A study of the superficial tension impact on two-phase flow with free surface is presented. A new method based on direct staggered grid is developped to include surface tension in PLIC-VOF. The new numerical curvature calculation method doesn't need smoothed colour function and leads to less “spurious current”. This technique is applied to the calculus of surface tension force in the case of the rise of air bubble in viscous liquid and the fall of liquid drop in the same liquid on free surface. Droplets, thin layer and capillarity waves are observed after the free surface rupture for different Bond number. The influence of surface tension calculus is then obvioused and when the drop hit the free surface, wavelets propagate toward the virtual boundaries imposed.

  15. An Experimental Approach to Controllably Vary Protein Oxidation While Minimizing Electrode Adsorption for Boron-Doped Diamond Electrochemical Surface Mapping Applications

    PubMed Central

    McClintock, Carlee S; Hettich, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Oxidative protein surface mapping has become a powerful approach for measuring the solvent accessibility of folded protein structures. A variety of techniques exist for generating the key reagent – hydroxyl radicals – for these measurements; however, these approaches range significantly in their complexity and expense of operation. This research expands upon earlier work to enhance the controllability of boron-doped diamond (BDD) electrochemistry as an easily accessible tool for producing hydroxyl radicals in order to oxidize a range of intact proteins. Efforts to modulate oxidation level while minimizing the adsorption of protein to the electrode involved the use of relatively high flow rates to reduce protein residence time inside the electrochemical flow chamber. Additionally, a different cell activation approach using variable voltage to supply a controlled current allowed us to precisely tune the extent of oxidation in a protein-dependent manner. In order to gain perspective on the level of protein adsorption onto the electrode surface, studies were conducted to monitor protein concentration during electrolysis and gauge changes in the electrode surface between cell activation events. This report demonstrates the successful use of BDD electrochemistry for greater precision in generating a target number of oxidation events upon intact proteins. PMID:23210708

  16. Did Mineral Surface Chemistry and Toxicity Contribute to Evolution of Microbial Extracellular Polymeric Substances?

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Jay M.; Zhang, Nianli; Hickey, William J.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Modern ecological niches are teeming with an astonishing diversity of microbial life in biofilms closely associated with mineral surfaces, which highlights the remarkable success of microorganisms in conquering the challenges and capitalizing on the benefits presented by the mineral–water interface. Biofilm formation capability likely evolved on early Earth because biofilms provide crucial cell survival functions. The potential toxicity of mineral surfaces toward cells and the complexities of the mineral–water–cell interface in determining the toxicity mechanisms, however, have not been fully appreciated. Here, we report a previously unrecognized role for extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), which form biofilms in shielding cells against the toxicity of mineral surfaces. Using colony plating and LIVE/DEAD staining methods in oxide suspensions versus oxide-free controls, we found greater viability of wild-type, EPS-producing strains of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 compared to their isogenic knockout mutant with defective biofilm-producing capacity. Oxide toxicity was specific to its surface charge and particle size. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) images and assays for highly reactive oxygen species (hROS) on mineral surfaces suggested that EPS shield via both physical and chemical mechanisms. Intriguingly, qualitative as well as quantitative measures of EPS production showed that toxic minerals induced EPS production in bacteria. By determining the specific toxicity mechanisms, we provide insight into the potential impact of mineral surfaces in promoting increased complexity of cell surfaces, including EPS and biofilm formation, on early Earth. Key Words: Mineral toxicity—Bacteria—EPS evolution—Biofilms—Cytotoxicity—Silica—Anatase—Alumina. Astrobiology 12, 785–798. PMID:22934560

  17. Contribution of Head Position, Standing Surface, and Vision to Postural Control in Community-Dwelling Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Pociask, Fredrick D; DiZazzo-Miller, Rosanne; Goldberg, Allon; Adamo, Diane E

    2016-01-01

    Postural control requires the integration of sensorimotor information to maintain balance and to properly position and orient the body in response to external stimuli. Age-related declines in peripheral and central sensory and motor function contribute to postural instability and falls. This study investigated the contribution of head position, standing surface, and vision on postural sway in 26 community-dwelling older adults. Participants were asked to maintain a stable posture under conditions that varied standing surface, head position, and the availability of visual information. Significant main and interaction effects were found for all three factors. Findings from this study suggest that postural sway responses require the integration of available sources of sensory information. These results have important implications for fall risks in older adults and suggest that when standing with the head extended and eyes closed, older adults may place themselves at risk for postural disequilibrium and loss of balance. PMID:26709429

  18. 3d-shell contribution to the energy loss of protons during grazing scattering from Cu(111) surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gravielle, M. S.; Alducin, M.; Juaristi, J. I.; Silkin, V. M.

    2007-10-15

    Motivated by a recent experimental work [S. Lederer and H. Winter, Phys. Rev. A 73, 054901 (2006)] we study the contribution of the 3d shell electrons to the energy loss of 100 keV protons scattered off from the Cu(111) surface. To describe this process we use a multiple collision formalism, where the interaction of the projectile with 3d electrons is described by means of a sequence of single encounters with atoms belonging to the first atomic layer. In order to compare the theoretical energy loss with the experimental data, we add the contribution of valence electrons, which is evaluated in linear response theory using a response function that incorporates information on the surface band structure. For completeness, the energy lost by protons is also calculated within a jellium model that includes 3d and valence electrons with equal footing. Fair agreement between theory and experiment exists when the 3d shell is taken into account in the calculation.

  19. Pharmacological induction of cell surface GRP78 contributes to apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Raiter, Annat; Yerushalmi, Rinat; Hardy, Britta

    2014-11-30

    Breast cancer tumor with triple-negative receptors (estrogen, progesterone and Her 2, receptors) is the most aggressive and deadly subtype, with high rates of disease recurrence and poor survival. Here, we show that induction in cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin was associated with CHOP/GADD153 upregulation and increase in apoptosis in triple negative breast cancer tumor cells. GRP78 is a major regulator of the stress induced unfolded protein response pathway and CHOP/GADD153 is a pro-apoptotic transcription factor associated exclusively with stress induced apoptosis. The blocking of cell surface GRP78 by anti-GRP78 antibody prevented apoptosis, suggesting that induction of cell surface GRP78 by doxorubicin and tunicamycin is required for apoptosis. A better understanding of stress induction of apoptotic signaling in triple negative breast cancer cells may help to define new therapeutic strategies. PMID:25360516

  20. Decoupling Bulk and Surface Contributions in Water- Splitting Photocatalysts by In Situ Ultrafast Spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Appavoo, Kannatassen; Mingzhao, Liu; Black, Charles T.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.

    2015-05-10

    By performing ultrafast emission spectroscopy in an operating, bias-controlled photoelectrochemical cell, we distinguish between bulk (charge transport) and surface (chemical reaction) recombination processes in a nanostructured photocatalyst and correlate its electronic properties directly with its incident-photon-to-current efficiency.

  1. John Pendry: His Contributions to the Development of LEED Surface Crystallography

    SciTech Connect

    Somorjai, Gabor A.; Rous, P.J.

    2007-10-15

    In this paper we discuss the pivotal role played by Sir John Pendry in the development of Low Energy Electron Diffraction (LEED) during the past three decades; the earliest understanding on the physics of LEED to the development of sophisticated methods for the structural solution of complex surfaces.

  2. Contribution of oligomer/carbon dots hybrid semiconductor nanoribbon to surface-enhanced Raman scattering property

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guiyang; Hu, Lin; Zhu, Kerong; Yan, Manqing; Liu, Jian; Yang, Jiaxiang; Bi, Hong

    2016-02-01

    The hybrid Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots nanobelts (NBs) have been prepared by decorating Ag nanoparticles (NPs) on surface of the ultra-long, semiconducting (PS-PSS)/C-dots nanoribbons (NRs) via an electroless plating method. The as-prepared Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NB has been demonstrated to be an excellent substrate for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) with a detection limit of 10-14 M and an enhancement factor of 3.35 × 108 while using rhodamine 6G as probe molecules. Moreover, we have investigated the application of Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NBs as SERS substrate for detection of coumarins. Further, the Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NB could be used as a sacrificial template to form a novel kind of hollow porous Ag nanotubes (NTs) by simply removing the inner NR in tetrahydrofuran. However, the obtained Ag NTs show a weaker SERS effect compared to that of the Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NBs, which indicates that the inner organic/C-dots NR plays an essential role in SERS property of the Ag-(PS-PSS)/C-dots NBs. Here the organic (PS-PSS)/C-dots NR not only acts as a dielectric support for Ag NPs to reduce the surface plasmon damping at the Ag-NR interface due to the high electrical conductivity but also their large surface area are favorable for creating more "hot-spots". In addition, the embedded sp2-hybridized C-dots in NR can adsorb more aromatic R6G molecules via π-π interaction, which also drives R6G molecules approaching to the "hot-spots", thus enhancing the SERS signals. Based on our results, it is believed that the employment of semiconducting organic (PS-PSS)/C-dots ribbon-like structures to fabricate sensitive SERS substrates is an interesting new approach.

  3. The contribution of inflammasome components on macrophage response to surface nanotopography and chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Christo, Susan; Bachhuka, Akash; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-01-01

    Implantable devices have become an established part of medical practice. However, often a negative inflammatory host response can impede the integration and functionality of the device. In this paper, we interrogate the role of surface nanotopography and chemistry on the potential molecular role of the inflammasome in controlling macrophage responses. To achieve this goal we engineered model substrata having precisely controlled nanotopography of predetermined height and tailored outermost surface chemistry. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were harvested from genetically engineered mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2. These cells were then cultured on these nanoengineered substrata and assessed for their capacity to attach and express pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our data provide evidence that the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2 play a role in regulating macrophage adhesion and activation in response to surface nanotopography and chemistry. The findings of this paper are important for understanding the inflammatory consequences caused by biomaterials and pave the way to the rational design of future implantable devices having controlled and predictable inflammatory outcomes. PMID:27188492

  4. Oscillating line source in a shear flow with a free surface: critical layer-like contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellingsen, Simen Å.; Tyvand, Peder A.

    2016-07-01

    The linearized water-wave radiation problem for an oscillating submerged line source in an inviscid shear flow with a free surface is investigated analytically at finite, constant depth in the presence of a shear flow varying linearly with depth. The surface velocity is taken to be zero relative to the oscillating source, so that Doppler effects are absent. The radiated wave out from the source is calculated based on Euler's equation of motion with the appropriate boundary and radiation conditions, and differs substantially from the solution obtained by assuming potential flow. To wit, an additional wave is found in the downstream direction in addition to the previously known dispersive wave solutions; this wave is non-dispersive and we show how it is the surface manifestation of a critical layer-like flow generated by the combination of shear and mass flux at the source, passively advected with the flow. As seen from a system moving at the fluid velocity at the source's depth, streamlines form closed curves in a manner similar to Kelvin's cat's eye vortices. A resonant frequency exists at which the critical wave resonates with the downstream propagating wave, resulting in a downstream wave pattern diverging linearly in amplitude away from the source.

  5. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson's Disease.

    PubMed

    Gerrits, Niels J H M; van Loenhoud, Anita C; van den Berg, Stan F; Berendse, Henk W; Foncke, Elisabeth M J; Klein, Martin; Stoffers, Diederick; van der Werf, Ysbrand D; van den Heuvel, Odile A

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson's disease (PD) is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM) volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh) and surface area (SA), which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i) CTh, SA, and (sub)cortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii) the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i) CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii) SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii) volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i) CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii) VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes. PMID:26919667

  6. The contribution of inflammasome components on macrophage response to surface nanotopography and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Christo, Susan; Bachhuka, Akash; Diener, Kerrilyn R; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D

    2016-01-01

    Implantable devices have become an established part of medical practice. However, often a negative inflammatory host response can impede the integration and functionality of the device. In this paper, we interrogate the role of surface nanotopography and chemistry on the potential molecular role of the inflammasome in controlling macrophage responses. To achieve this goal we engineered model substrata having precisely controlled nanotopography of predetermined height and tailored outermost surface chemistry. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were harvested from genetically engineered mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2. These cells were then cultured on these nanoengineered substrata and assessed for their capacity to attach and express pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our data provide evidence that the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2 play a role in regulating macrophage adhesion and activation in response to surface nanotopography and chemistry. The findings of this paper are important for understanding the inflammatory consequences caused by biomaterials and pave the way to the rational design of future implantable devices having controlled and predictable inflammatory outcomes. PMID:27188492

  7. Contribution of Spores to the Ability of Clostridium difficile To Adhere to Surfaces

    PubMed Central

    Joshi, Lovleen Tina; Phillips, Daniel S.; Williams, Catrin F.; Alyousef, Abdullah

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium difficile is the commonest cause of hospital-acquired infection in the United Kingdom. We characterized the abilities of 21 clinical isolates to form spores; to adhere to inorganic and organic surfaces, including stainless steel and human adenocarcinoma cells; and to germinate. The composition of culture media had a significant effect on spore formation, as significantly more spores were produced in brain heart infusion broth (Student's t test; P = 0.018). The spore surface relative hydrophobicity (RH) varied markedly (14 to 77%) and was correlated with the ability to adhere to stainless steel. We observed no correlation between the ribotype and the ability to adhere to steel. When the binding of hydrophobic (DS1813; ribotype 027; RH, 77%) and hydrophilic (DS1748; ribotype 002; RH, 14%) spores to human gut epithelial cells at different stages of cell development was examined, DS1813 spores adhered more strongly, suggesting the presence of surface properties that aid attachment to human cells. Electron microscopy studies revealed the presence of an exosporium surrounding DS1813 spores that was absent from spores of DS1748. Finally, the ability of spores to germinate was found to be strain and medium dependent. While the significance of these findings to the disease process has yet to be determined, this study has highlighted the importance of analyzing multiple isolates when attempting to characterize the behavior of a bacterial species. PMID:22923404

  8. Contributions to understanding the high speed machining effects on aeronautic part surface integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jomaa, Walid

    To remain competitive, the aeronautic industry has increasing requirements for mechanical components and parts with high functional performance and longer in-service life. The improvement of the in-service life of components can be achieved by mastering and optimizing the surface integrity of the manufactured parts. Thus, the present study attempted to investigate, experimentally and theoretically, the tool/work material interactions on part surface integrity during the machining of aluminium alloys and hardened materials (low alloy steels) using orthogonal machining tests data. The studied materials are two aluminum alloys (6061-T6 and 7075-T651) and AISI 4340 steel. The AISI 4340 steel was machined after been induction heat treated to 58-60 HRC. These materials were selected in an attempt to provide a comprehensive study for the machining of metals with different behaviours (ductile and hard material). The proposed approach is built on three steps. First, we proposed a design of experiment (DOE) to analyse, experimentally, the chip formation and the resulting surface integrity during the high speed machining under dry condition. The orthogonal cutting mode, adopted in these experiments, allowed to explore, theoretically, the effects of technological (cutting speed and feed) and physical (cutting forces, temperature, shear angle, friction angle, and length Contact tool/chip) parameters on the chip formation mechanisms and the machined surface characteristics (residual stress, plastic deformation, phase transformation, etc.). The cutting conditions were chosen while maintaining a central composite design (CCD) with two factors (cutting speed and feed per revolution). For the aluminum 7075-T651, the results showed that the formation of BUE and the interaction between the tool edge and the iron-rich intermetallic particles are the main causes of the machined surface damage. The BUE formation increases with the cutting feed while the increase of the cutting speed

  9. The contribution of inflammasome components on macrophage response to surface nanotopography and chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christo, Susan; Bachhuka, Akash; Diener, Kerrilyn R.; Vasilev, Krasimir; Hayball, John D.

    2016-05-01

    Implantable devices have become an established part of medical practice. However, often a negative inflammatory host response can impede the integration and functionality of the device. In this paper, we interrogate the role of surface nanotopography and chemistry on the potential molecular role of the inflammasome in controlling macrophage responses. To achieve this goal we engineered model substrata having precisely controlled nanotopography of predetermined height and tailored outermost surface chemistry. Bone marrow derived macrophages (BMDM) were harvested from genetically engineered mice deficient in the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2. These cells were then cultured on these nanoengineered substrata and assessed for their capacity to attach and express pro-inflammatory cytokines. Our data provide evidence that the inflammasome components ASC, NLRP3 and AIM2 play a role in regulating macrophage adhesion and activation in response to surface nanotopography and chemistry. The findings of this paper are important for understanding the inflammatory consequences caused by biomaterials and pave the way to the rational design of future implantable devices having controlled and predictable inflammatory outcomes.

  10. Vulnerability of Drinking-Water Wells in La Crosse, Wisconsin, to Enteric-Virus Contamination from Surface Water Contributions

    PubMed Central

    Borchardt, Mark A.; Haas, Nathaniel L.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2004-01-01

    Human enteric viruses can contaminate municipal drinking-water wells, but few studies have examined the routes by which viruses enter these wells. In the present study, the objective was to monitor the municipal wells of La Crosse, Wisconsin, for enteric viruses and determine whether the amount of Mississippi River water infiltrating the wells was related to the frequency of virus detection. From March 2001 to February 2002, one river water site and four wells predicted by hydrogeological modeling to have variable degrees of surface water contributions were sampled monthly for enteric viruses, microbial indicators of sanitary quality, and oxygen and hydrogen isotopes. 18O/16O and 2H/1H ratios were used to determine the level of surface water contributions. All samples were collected prior to chlorination at the wellhead. By reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), 24 of 48 municipal well water samples (50%) were positive for enteric viruses, including enteroviruses, rotavirus, hepatitis A virus (HAV), and noroviruses. Of 12 river water samples, 10 (83%) were virus positive by RT-PCR. Viable enteroviruses were not detected by cell culture in the well samples, although three well samples were positive for culturable HAV. Enteroviruses detected in the wells by RT-PCR were identified as several serotypes of echoviruses and group A and group B coxsackieviruses. None of the well water samples was positive for indicators of sanitary quality, namely male-specific and somatic coliphages, total coliform bacteria, Escherichia coli, and fecal enterococci. Contrary to expectations, viruses were found in all wells regardless of the level of surface water contributions. This result suggests that there were other unidentified sources, in addition to surface water, responsible for the contamination. PMID:15466536

  11. Contribution of Surface Polishing and Sterilization Method to Backside Wear in Total Knee Arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Teeter, Matthew G; Lanting, Brent A; Shrestha, Kush R; Howard, James L; Vasarhelyi, Edward M

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the relative contributions of backside wear from polished and roughened tibial baseplates and different sterilization methods. Three groups of tibial inserts of the same design were matched: roughened gamma-air (RGA), polished gamma-air (PGA), and polished gas-plasma (PGP). Visual damage scoring and micro-CT deviation maps were used for evaluation. Total backside damage was higher (P=0.045) in RGA (13.8±3.4) compared to PGA (8.7±3.4) and PGP (8.2±4.8). Backside wear rates were greatest (P=0.02) in RGA (0.038 mm/year), followed by PGA (0.012 mm/year), and lowest in PGP (0.009 mm/year). Use of a roughened tibial baseplate had a greater effect on wear magnitude than sterilization method. PMID:26182981

  12. North American Ground Surface Temperature Histories: A Contribution to the PAGES2k North American Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mareschal, J. C.; Jaume Santero, F.; Beltrami, H.

    2015-12-01

    Within the framework of the PAGES NorthAmerica2k project, three hundred and seventy three (373) North American temperature-depth profiles from boreholes deeper than 300 meters were analyzed for recent climate. To facilitate comparisons and examine the same time period, the profiles were truncated at 300 m. The ground surface temperature (GST) histories for the last 500 years were inverted from the subsurface temperature anomalies using singular value decomposition for a model of 10 temperature changes along time-intervals of increasing duration. The inversion retains four singular values and accounts for the data acquisition time difference. The reference surface temperature and geothermal gradient were estimated by linear regression to the deepest 100 meters with a 95% confidence interval. Additionally, a Monte-Carlo method was used to find the range of solutions within a maximum subsurface anomaly error determined by the root mean square between the model and the data. The GST history results for North America, given by the mean and 95% confidence interval, reveal in most cases, a warming up to 1°C - 2.5°C during the last 100-150 years.

  13. Source Contribution Analysis of Surface Particulate Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbon Concentrations in Northeastern Asia by Source-receptor Relationships

    SciTech Connect

    Inomata, Yayoi; Kajino, Mizuo; Sato, Keiichi; Ohara, Toshimasa; Kurokawa, Jun-Ichi; Ueda, Hiromasa; Tang, Ning; Hayakawa, Kazuichi; Ohizumi, Tsuyoshi; Akimoto, Hajime

    2013-11-01

    We analyzed the sourceereceptor relationships for particulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) concentrations in northeastern Asia using an aerosol chemical transport model. The model successfully simulated the observed concentrations. In Beijing (China) benzo[a]pyren (BaP) concentrations are due to emissions from its own domain. In Noto, Oki and Tsushima (Japan), transboundary transport from northern China (>40°N, 40-60%) and central China (30-40°N, 10-40%) largely influences BaP concentrations from winter to spring, whereas the relative contribution from central China is dominant (90%) in Hedo. In the summer, the contribution from Japanese domestic sources increases (40-80%) at the 4 sites. Contributions from Japan and Russia are additional source of BaP over the northwestern Pacific Ocean in summer. The contribution rates for the concentrations from each domain are different among PAH species depending on their particulate phase oxidation rates. Reaction with O3 on particulate surfaces may be an important component of the PAH oxidation processes.

  14. Analysis of contributions of nonlinear material constants to temperature-induced velocity shifts of quartz surface acoustic wave resonators.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Haifeng; Kosinski, John A; Zuo, Lei

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we examine the significance of the various higher-order effects regarding calculating temperature behavior from a set of material constants and their temperature coefficients. Temperature-induced velocity shifts have been calculated for quartz surface acoustic wave (SAW) resonators and the contributions of different groups of nonlinear material constants (third-order elastic constants (TOE), third-order piezoelectric constants (TOP), third-order dielectric constants (TOD) and electrostrictive constants (EL)) to the temperature-induced velocity shifts have been analyzed. The analytical methodology has been verified through the comparison of experimental and analytical results for quartz resonators. In general, the third-order elastic constants were found to contribute most significantly to the temperature-induced shifts in the SAW velocity. The contributions from the third-order dielectric constants and electrostrictive constants were found to be negligible. For some specific cases, the third-order piezoelectric constants were found to make a significant contribution to the temperature-induced shifts. The significance of each third-order elastic constant as a contributor to the temperature-velocity effect was analyzed by applying a 10% variation to each of the third-order elastic constants separately. Additionally, we have considered the issues arising from the commonly used thermoelastic expansions that provide a good but not exact description of the temperature effects on frequency in piezoelectric resonators as these commonly used expansions do not include the effects of higher-order material constants. PMID:27392205

  15. Contributions of surface topography and cytotoxicity to the macrophage response to zinc oxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Zaveri, Toral D; Dolgova, Natalia V; Chu, Byung Hwan; Lee, Jiyeon; Wong, Joey; Lele, Tanmay P; Ren, Fan; Keselowsky, Benjamin G

    2010-04-01

    Macrophages associated with implanted biomaterials are primary mediators of chronic inflammation and foreign body reaction to the implant. Hence, various approaches have been investigated to modulate macrophage interactions with biomaterial surfaces to mitigate inflammatory responses. Nanostructured materials possess unique surface properties, and nanotopography has been reported to modulate cell adhesion and viability in a cell type-dependent manner. Zinc oxide (ZnO) has been investigated in a number of biomedical applications and surfaces presenting well-controlled nanorod structures of ZnO have recently been developed. In order to investigate the influence of nanotopography on macrophage adhesive response, we evaluated macrophage adhesion and viability on ZnO nanorods, compared to a relatively flat sputtered ZnO controls and using glass substrates for reference. We found that although macrophages are capable of initially adhering to and spreading on ZnO nanorod substrates, the number of adherent macrophages on ZnO nanorods was reduced compared to ZnO flat substrate and glass. Additionally adherent macrophage number on ZnO flat substrate was reduced as compared to glass. While these data suggest nanotopography may modulate macrophage adhesion, reduced cell viability on both sputtered and nanorod ZnO substrate indicates appreciable toxicity associated with ZnO. Cell death was apparently not apoptotic, given the lack of activated caspase-3 immunostaining. A decrease in viable macrophage numbers when ZnO substrates were present in the same media verified the role of ZnO substrate dissolution, and dissolved levels of Zn in culture media were quantified. In order to determine long-term physiological responses, ZnO nanorod-coated and sputtered ZnO-coated polyethylene terephthalate (PET) discs were implanted subcutaneously in mice for 14 d. Upon implantation, both ZnO-coated discs resulted in a discontinuous cellular fibrous capsule indicative of unresolved inflammation

  16. Minimal cosmography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piazza, Federico; Schücker, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    The minimal requirement for cosmography—a non-dynamical description of the universe—is a prescription for calculating null geodesics, and time-like geodesics as a function of their proper time. In this paper, we consider the most general linear connection compatible with homogeneity and isotropy, but not necessarily with a metric. A light-cone structure is assigned by choosing a set of geodesics representing light rays. This defines a "scale factor" and a local notion of distance, as that travelled by light in a given proper time interval. We find that the velocities and relativistic energies of free-falling bodies decrease in time as a consequence of cosmic expansion, but at a rate that can be different than that dictated by the usual metric framework. By extrapolating this behavior to photons' redshift, we find that the latter is in principle independent of the "scale factor". Interestingly, redshift-distance relations and other standard geometric observables are modified in this extended framework, in a way that could be experimentally tested. An extremely tight constraint on the model, however, is represented by the blackbody-ness of the cosmic microwave background. Finally, as a check, we also consider the effects of a non-metric connection in a different set-up, namely, that of a static, spherically symmetric spacetime.

  17. Gas phase versus surface contributions to photolytic laser chemical vapor deposition rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Braichotte, D.; van den Bergh, H.

    1988-04-01

    The rate of cw photolytic laser chemical vapor deposition (LCVD) of platinum is measured for λ≈350 nm as a function of the light intensity and the metalorganic vapor pressure. The growth of the metal films is studied in situ and in real time by monitoring their optical transmission. At low intensities the transmitted light decreases monotonically with time, and the LCVD process is photolytic with its rate limiting step in the surface adlayer. At higher intensities we observe two distinct time domains: Relatively slow initial photolytic deposition with its rate limiting step in the gas phase, which is followed by much faster pyrolytic LCVD. An improved method for distinguishing between adlayer and gas-phase limiting processes is demonstrated. These observations are confirmed by studying the photolytic deposition rates while varying the thickness of the adlayer.

  18. Stratospheric contribution to surface ozone in the desert Southwest during the 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langford, A. O.; Senff, C. J.; Alvarez, R. J. _II, II; Brioude, J. F.; Cooper, O. R.; Holloway, J. S.; Lin, M.; Marchbanks, R.; Pierce, R. B.; Reddy, P. J.; Sandberg, S.; Weickmann, A. M.; Williams, E. J.; Gustin, M. S.; Iraci, L. T.; Leblanc, T.; Yates, E. L.

    2014-12-01

    The 2013 Las Vegas Ozone Study (LVOS) was designed to investigate the potential impact of stratosphere-troposphere transport (STT) and long-range transport of pollution from Asia on surface O3 concentrations in Clark County, NV. This measurement campaign, which took place in May and June of 2013, was conducted at Angel Peak, NV, a high elevation site about 2.8 km above mean sea level and 45 km west of Las Vegas. The study was organized around the NOAA ESRL truck-based TOPAZ scanning ozone lidar with collocated in situ sampling of O3, CO, and meteorological parameters. These measurements were supported by the NOAA/NESDIS real time modelling system (RAQMS), FLEXPART particle dispersion model, and the NOAA GFDL AM3 model. In this talk, I will describe one of several STT events that occurred during the LVOS campaign. This intrusion, which was profiled by TOPAZ on the night of May 24-25, was also sampled by the NASA Alpha Jet, the Table Mountain ozone lidar, and by an ozonesonde flying above southern California. This event also led to significant ozone increases at surface monitors operated by Clark County, the California Air Resources Board, the U.S. National Park Service, and the Nevada Rural Ozone Initiative (NRVOI), and resulted in exceedances of the 2008 75 ppbv O3 NAAQS both in Clark County and in surrounding areas of Nevada and southern California. The potential implications of this and similar events for air quality compliance in the western U.S. will be discussed.

  19. Contribution of surface β-glucan polysaccharide to physicochemical and immunomodulatory properties of Propionibacterium freudenreichii.

    PubMed

    Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Parayre, Sandrine; Bouchoux, Antoine; Guyomarc'h, Fanny; Dewulf, Joëlle; Dols-Lafargue, Marguerite; Baglinière, François; Cousin, Fabien J; Falentin, Hélène; Jan, Gwénaël; Foligné, Benoît

    2012-03-01

    Propionibacterium freudenreichii is a bacterial species found in Swiss-type cheeses and is also considered for its health properties. The main claimed effect is the bifidogenic property. Some strains were shown recently to display other interesting probiotic potentialities such as anti-inflammatory properties. About 30% of strains were shown to produce a surface exopolysaccharide (EPS) composed of (1→3,1→2)-β-D-glucan due to a single gene named gtfF. We hypothesized that functional properties of P. freudenreichii strains, including their anti-inflammatory properties, could be linked to the presence of β-glucan. To evaluate this hypothesis, gtfF genes of three β-glucan-producing strains were disrupted. These knockout (KO) mutants were complemented with a plasmid harboring gtfF (KO-C mutants). The absence of β-glucan in KO mutants was verified by immunological detection and transmission electron microscopy. We observed by atomic force microscopy that the absence of β-glucan in the KO mutant dramatically changed the cell's topography. The capacity to adhere to polystyrene surface was increased for the KO mutants compared to wild-type (WT) strains. Anti-inflammatory properties of WT strains and mutants were analyzed by stimulation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). A significant increase of the anti-inflammatory interleukin-10 cytokine production by PBMCs was measured in the KO mutants compared to WT strains. For one strain, the role of β-glucan in mice gut persistence was assessed, and no significant difference was observed between the WT strain and its KO mutant. Thus, β-glucan appears to partly hide the anti-inflammatory properties of P. freudenreichii; which is an important result for the selection of probiotic strains. PMID:22247154

  20. Pilot Navigation Errors on the Airport Surface: Identifying Contributing Factors and Mitigating Solutions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hooey, Becky L.; Foyle, David C.

    2006-01-01

    A taxonomy of navigation errors (pilot deviations) during taxi operations was developed that defines 3 classes of errors: planning, decision, and execution errors. This taxonomy was applied to error data from 2 full-mission simulation studies that included trials that replicated current-day operations and trials with advanced cockpit technologies including datalink, electronic moving maps (EMM), and head-up displays (HUDs). Pilots committed navigation errors on 17% of current-day operations trials (in low-visibility and night), distributed roughly equally across the 3 error classes. Each error class was associated with a unique set of contributing factor s and mitigating solutions. Planning errors were mitigated by technologies that provided an unambiguous record of the clearance (datalink and the EMM, which possessed a text-based clearance). Decision errors were mitigated by technologies that provided both local and global awareness including information about the distance to and direction of the next turn, current township location, and a graphical depiction of the route (as provided by the EMM and HUD together). Execution errors were best mitigated by the HUD, which disambiguated the environment and depicted the clear ed taxi route. Implications for technology design and integration are provided.

  1. Dissimilarity of yellow-blue surfaces under neutral light sources differing in intensity: separate contributions of light intensity and chroma.

    PubMed

    Tokunaga, Rumi; Logvinenko, Alexander D; Maloney, Laurence T

    2008-01-01

    Observers viewed two side-by-side arrays each of which contained three yellow Munsell papers, three blue, and one neutral Munsell. Each array was illuminated uniformly and independently of the other. The neutral light source intensities were 1380, 125, or 20 lux. All six possible combinations of light intensities were set as illumination conditions. On each trial, observers were asked to rate the dissimilarity between each chip in one array and each chip in the other by using a 30-point scale. Each pair of surfaces in each illumination condition was judged five times. We analyzed this data using non-metric multi-dimensional scaling to determine how light intensity and surface chroma contributed to dissimilarity and how they interacted. Dissimilarities were captured by a three-dimensional configuration in which one dimension corresponded to differences in light intensity. PMID:18598408

  2. Use of isotopically labeled fertilizer to trace nitrogen fertilizer contributions to surface, soil, and ground water

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, D.H.; Blevins, D.W.; Silva, S.R.

    2000-01-01

    The fate and transport of a single N fertilizer application through plants, soil, runoff, and the unsaturated and saturated zones was determined for four years at a field site under continuous corn (Zea mays L.) management. Claypan soils, which underlie the site, were hypothesized to restrict the movement of agrichemicals from the soil surface to ground water. However, N fertilizer moved rapidly through preferential flow paths in the soil and into the underlying glacial till aquifer. Most N transport occurred during the fall and winter when crops were not available to use excess N. Forty months after application, 33 percent of the fertilizer had been removed by grain harvests, 30 percent had been transpired to the atmosphere, and 33 percent had migrated to ground water. Although runoff volumes were 50 percent greater than infiltration, less than 2 percent of the fertilizer was lost to runoff. Small measured denitrification rates and large measured dissolved oxygen concentrations in ground water favor the long-term stability of NO3-1 in ground water. Successive fertilizer applications, in areas that lack the ability to moderate N concentrations through consumptive N reactions, risk the potential of N-saturated ecosystems.

  3. Contributions of Johann jacob Huber to the surface anatomy of the spinal cord and meninges.

    PubMed

    Rengachary, Setti S; Pelle, Dominic; Guthikonda, Murali

    2008-06-01

    From prehistoric times, man has been aware that injury to the spine may result in paralysis of the limbs; this is reflected in bas-relief figures found at Nineweh in ancient Mesopotamia, in a hunting scene that depicts a lioness wounded by King Ashurbanipal. The Edwin Smith papyrus gives many case illustrations of spinal cord injury resulting in paralysis, yet early physicians were unaware of the anatomy of the spinal cord. Galen performed prospective studies in animals by sectioning the spinal cord at varying levels and observing the commensurate paralysis and sensory loss. Real advances in the understanding of spinal cord anatomy did not occur until human cadaveric dissections were undertaken; even then, the knowledge of the anatomy of the spinal cord lagged behind that of other body structures. Johann Jacob Huber appears to be the first anatomist to focus on the spinal cord almost exclusively. His descriptions, and especially his illustrations that depict spinal cord surface anatomy, are impressive with regard to their accuracy and their sense of photorealism. Indeed, his illustrations seem to compare well with the anatomic drawings in contemporary anatomic texts. Yet, we were unable to find a single article in the entire English-language literature depicting his illustrations. We conclude that the description and anatomic illustrations by Johann Jacob Huber remain a hidden gem in the history of human spinal anatomy. PMID:18825005

  4. The contribution and spatial distribution of Ob and Yenisei runoff on surface layer of the Kara Sea.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polukhin, A.; Makkaveev, P.

    2012-04-01

    On degree of influence of river runoff on water area of the Kara Sea in general it is possible to consider as uniform estuary of two largest Siberian rivers - Ob and Yenisei. The Kara Sea has 41 % of all river runoff from a land in Arctic ocean or 56 % of a river runoff of the rivers of the Siberian sector of Arctic regions. From them of 37 % belong to waters from The Obskaya Guba (the Ob, the Taz, the Pur) and 46 % to waters of Yenisei. Spatial distribution of a river flow and its interaction with sea waters is in many respects defines various and changeable hydrometeorological conditions of the Kara Sea. Hydrochemical researches of the Kara Sea were included into the works of complex expedition in 59th cruise of R/V "Academic Mstislav Keldysh" (on September, 11th - on October, 7th, 2011). This data supplements results of expeditions of Institute of oceanology RAS to the Kara Sea in the autumn 1993 and 2007. In these cruises were met and described lenses of fresh water contained Ob and Yenisei waters defined on hydrochemical parameters. Difference of the data of 2011 from last years is that sampling for researches of distribution of river flow (on silicon, and the general alkalinity) was spent in flowing system from horizon of 1-1,5 m on a course of a vessel with high frequency of sampling. Such technique of sampling allows to investigate a surface water area with high discretness which plays the main role in definition of the contribution of waters of Ob and Yenisei in surface water layer of the Kara Sea. The analysis of the data shows that the area of distribution and the relative contribution of waters of a different origin considerably changes from year to year. It is connected with considerable interannual variability of hydrometeorological conditions and in particular with the general circulation of waters of the Kara Sea. River flow distribution on the surface of the Kara Sea is difficult enough. Nevertheless, distinctions in a chemical compound of waters

  5. Dynamic contributions to the sea surface salinity variations along the equator and the coast of the Gulf of Guinea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, H.; Tréguier, A. M.; Perenne, N.

    2012-04-01

    Seasonal variations of the sea surface salinity in the Gulf of Guinea are linked to the important variations of fresh water from precipitations and coastal runoffs. However, as freshwater forcing terms are not sufficient to explain all observed variations, dynamical contribution must be analyzed. Here, we investigate the impact of the equatorial upwelling from May to August during the salinisation of the basin and the southward extension of the Congo plume along the coast between February and March. We use a tropical Atlantic (1/4°) configuration with a high horizontal (1/12°) and vertical resolution (100 levels) nested grid for the Gulf of Guinea based on the NEMO/AGRIF platform. Mixed layer trends are computed to allow a quantitative analysis of the contribution of each mechanism during the equatorial upwelling. At basin scale, it appears that evaporation and decreasing fresh water discharge cannot explain the intensity of the salinisation along the equator, especially during May and June. Surface temperature and salinity patterns show that regions where the salinisation is the most important correspond to upwelling regions and suggest that subsurface water are responsible for the dynamic part of the salinisation. However, mixed layer trends for salinity along the equator and the coast show that the main dynamical contribution come from horizontal advection. The horizontal contribution results from a transport of higher salinity water formed in regions where the E-P-R balance tends to increase the salinity before the upwelling takes place. The low salinity observed south of 10°S along the coast cannot be due to local fresh water forcing, which is weak in the area. During three weeks in between February and March, we show that an eastward and southward reversal of the surface circulation along the equator and the coasts of Gabon and Angola advects water from the Congo plume to the south. Along the southern coast, local wind forcing is not responsible for the

  6. The French contribution to the voluntary observing ships network of sea surface salinity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alory, G.; Delcroix, T.; Téchiné, P.; Diverrès, D.; Varillon, D.; Cravatte, S.; Gouriou, Y.; Grelet, J.; Jacquin, S.; Kestenare, E.; Maes, C.; Morrow, R.; Perrier, J.; Reverdin, G.; Roubaud, F.

    2015-11-01

    Sea Surface Salinity (SSS) is an essential climate variable that requires long term in situ observation. The French SSS Observation Service (SSS-OS) manages a network of Voluntary Observing Ships equipped with thermosalinographs (TSG). The network is global though more concentrated in the tropical Pacific and North Atlantic oceanic basins. The acquisition system is autonomous with real time transmission and is regularly serviced at harbor calls. There are distinct real time and delayed time processing chains. Real time processing includes automatic alerts to detect potential instrument problems, in case raw data are outside of climatic limits, and graphical monitoring tools. Delayed time processing relies on a dedicated software for attribution of data quality flags by visual inspection, and correction of TSG time series by comparison with daily water samples and collocated Argo data. A method for optimizing the automatic attribution of quality flags in real time, based on testing different thresholds for data deviation from climatology and retroactively comparing the resulting flags to delayed time flags, is presented. The SSS-OS real time data feed the Coriolis operational oceanography database, while the research-quality delayed time data can be extracted for selected time and geographical ranges through a graphical web interface. Delayed time data have been also combined with other SSS data sources to produce gridded files for the Pacific and Atlantic oceans. A short review of the research activities conducted with such data is given. It includes observation-based process-oriented and climate studies from regional to global scale as well as studies where in situ SSS is used for calibration/validation of models, coral proxies or satellite data.

  7. Multidomain, Surface Layer-associated Glycoside Hydrolases Contribute to Plant Polysaccharide Degradation by Caldicellulosiruptor Species.

    PubMed

    Conway, Jonathan M; Pierce, William S; Le, Jaycee H; Harper, George W; Wright, John H; Tucker, Allyson L; Zurawski, Jeffrey V; Lee, Laura L; Blumer-Schuette, Sara E; Kelly, Robert M

    2016-03-25

    The genome of the extremely thermophilic bacterium Caldicellulosiruptor kronotskyensisencodes 19 surface layer (S-layer) homology (SLH) domain-containing proteins, the most in any Caldicellulosiruptorspecies genome sequenced to date. These SLH proteins include five glycoside hydrolases (GHs) and one polysaccharide lyase, the genes for which were transcribed at high levels during growth on plant biomass. The largest GH identified so far in this genus, Calkro_0111 (2,435 amino acids), is completely unique toC. kronotskyensisand contains SLH domains. Calkro_0111 was produced recombinantly inEscherichia colias two pieces, containing the GH16 and GH55 domains, respectively, as well as putative binding and spacer domains. These displayed endo- and exoglucanase activity on the β-1,3-1,6-glucan laminarin. A series of additional truncation mutants of Calkro_0111 revealed the essential architectural features required for catalytic function. Calkro_0402, another of the SLH domain GHs inC. kronotskyensis, when produced inE. coli, was active on a variety of xylans and β-glucans. Unlike Calkro_0111, Calkro_0402 is highly conserved in the genus Caldicellulosiruptorand among other biomass-degrading Firmicutes but missing from Caldicellulosiruptor bescii As such, the gene encoding Calkro_0402 was inserted into the C. besciigenome, creating a mutant strain with its S-layer extensively decorated with Calkro_0402. This strain consequently degraded xylans more extensively than wild-typeC. bescii The results here provide new insights into the architecture and role of SLH domain GHs and demonstrate that hemicellulose degradation can be enhanced through non-native SLH domain GHs engineered into the genomes of Caldicellulosiruptorspecies. PMID:26814128

  8. Surface natures of conductive carbon materials and their contributions to charge/discharge performance of cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, H. B.; Huang, W. Z.; Rong, H. B.; Hu, J. N.; Mai, S. W.; Xing, L. D.; Xu, M. Q.; Li, X. P.; Li, W. S.

    2015-08-01

    The surface natures of five carbon materials, acetylene black, Super P, ECP600JD, KS-6 and CNTs, are compared in terms of morphology, specific surface area and activity towards electrolyte decomposition and anion insertion, and their contributions as conductive additives to cathode performance of lithium ion batteries are understood. With the characterizations from scanning electron microscopy, Brunauer-Emmett-Teller analysis and cyclic voltammetry, it's demonstrated that: (1) the morphology is granular for acetylene black, Super P and ECP600JD, flake-like for KS-6 and wire-like for CNTs; (2) ECP600JD exhibits the largest specific surface area but KS-6 has the smallest one; (3) the activity is the same for all the samples towards the electrolyte decomposition but different from each other towards anion insertion. Charge/discharge tests of LiMn2O4 and LiNi0.5Mn1.5O4 cathodes indicate that the surface natures of carbon materials play an important role in charge/discharge performance of cathodes for lithium ion batteries. ECP600JD with smallest particle size provides the largest site for electrolyte decomposition leading to the lowest coulombic efficiency, while KS-6 with a layered structure exhibits the highest activity towards anion insertion leading to the lowest charge and discharge capacity of cathode materials. These negative effects become more significant when high voltage cathode materials are used.

  9. 4-[(1-Benzyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)meth-oxy]benzene-1,2-dicarbo-nitrile: crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and energy-minimization calculations.

    PubMed

    Shamsudin, Norzianah; Tan, Ai Ling; Young, David J; Jotani, Mukesh M; Otero-de-la-Roza, A; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2016-04-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C18H13N5O, adopts a conformation whereby the phenyl ring and meth-oxy-benzene-1,2-dicarbo-nitrile residue (r.m.s. deviation of the 12 non-H atoms = 0.041 Å) lie to opposite sides of the central triazolyl ring, forming dihedral angles of 79.30 (13) and 64.59 (10)°, respectively; the dihedral angle between the outer rings is 14.88 (9)°. This conformation is nearly 7 kcal mol(-1) higher in energy than the energy-minimized structure which has a syn disposition of the outer rings, enabling intra-molecular π-π inter-actions. In the crystal, methyl-ene-C-H⋯N(triazol-yl) and carbo-nitrile-N⋯π(benzene) inter-actions lead to supra-molecular chains along the a axis. Supra-molecular layers in the ab plane arise as the chains are connected by benzene-C-H⋯N(carbo-nitrile) inter-actions; layers stack with no directional inter-actions between them. The specified inter-molecular contacts along with other, weaker contributions to the supra-molecular stabilization are analysed in a Hirshfeld surface analysis. PMID:27375890

  10. 4-[(1-Benzyl-1H-1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)meth­oxy]benzene-1,2-dicarbo­nitrile: crystal structure, Hirshfeld surface analysis and energy-minimization calculations

    PubMed Central

    Shamsudin, Norzianah; Tan, Ai Ling; Young, David J.; Jotani, Mukesh M.; Otero-de-la-Roza, A.; Tiekink, Edward R. T.

    2016-01-01

    In the solid state, the title compound, C18H13N5O, adopts a conformation whereby the phenyl ring and meth­oxy–benzene-1,2-dicarbo­nitrile residue (r.m.s. deviation of the 12 non-H atoms = 0.041 Å) lie to opposite sides of the central triazolyl ring, forming dihedral angles of 79.30 (13) and 64.59 (10)°, respectively; the dihedral angle between the outer rings is 14.88 (9)°. This conformation is nearly 7 kcal mol−1 higher in energy than the energy-minimized structure which has a syn disposition of the outer rings, enabling intra­molecular π–π inter­actions. In the crystal, methyl­ene-C—H⋯N(triazol­yl) and carbo­nitrile-N⋯π(benzene) inter­actions lead to supra­molecular chains along the a axis. Supra­molecular layers in the ab plane arise as the chains are connected by benzene-C—H⋯N(carbo­nitrile) inter­actions; layers stack with no directional inter­actions between them. The specified inter­molecular contacts along with other, weaker contributions to the supra­molecular stabilization are analysed in a Hirshfeld surface analysis. PMID:27375890

  11. Contribution of multiangular geometry conditions on the photometric characterization of granular surface samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daydou, Y.; Pinet, P.; Souchon, A.; Chevrel, S.

    2012-04-01

    the ISEP facility (Imaging Spectrogoniometer for Planetary Exploration) operating at the Midi-Pyrénées Observatory, Toulouse, France and documenting the optical and photometric properties of natural rocky surfaces and soils on their reflectance properties, when measured from the crystal to the macroscopic scale (200 x 200 mm).

  12. Surface vacuolar ATPase in ameloblastoma contributes to tumor invasion of the jaw bone.

    PubMed

    Yoshimoto, Shohei; Morita, Hiromitsu; Matsubara, Ryota; Mitsuyasu, Takeshi; Imai, Yuko; Kajioka, Shunichi; Yoneda, Masahiro; Ito, Yushi; Hirofuji, Takao; Nakamura, Seiji; Hirata, Masato

    2016-03-01

    Ameloblastoma is the most common benign odontogenic tumor in Japan. It is believed that it expands in the jaw bone through peritumoral activation of osteoclasts by receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) released from the ameloblastoma, as in bone metastases of cancer cells. However, the clinical features of ameloblastoma, including its growth rate and patterns of invasion, are quite different from those of bone metastasis of cancer cells, suggesting that different underlying mechanisms are involved. Therefore, in the present study, we examined the possible mechanisms underlying the invasive expansion of ameloblastoma in the jaw bone. Expression levels of RANKL assessed by western blotting were markedly lower in ameloblastoma (AM-1) cells than in highly metastatic oral squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells. Experiments coculturing mouse macrophages (RAW264.7) with AM-1 demonstrated low osteoclastogenic activity, as assessed by tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP)-positive multinuclear cell formation, probably because of low release of RANKL, whereas cocultures of RAW264.7 with HSC-3 cells exhibited very high osteoclastogenic activity. Thus, RANKL release from AM-1 appeared to be too low to generate osteoclasts. However, AM-1 cultured directly on calcium phosphate-coated plates formed resorption pits, and this was inhibited by application of bafilomycin A1. Furthermore, vacuolar-type H+-ATPase (V-ATPase) and H+/Cl- exchange transporter 7 (CLC-7) were detected on the surface of AM-1 cells by plasma membrane biotinylation and immunofluorescence analysis. Immunohistochemical analysis of clinical samples of ameloblastoma also showed plasma membrane-localized V-ATPase and CLC-7 in the epithelium of plexiform, follicular and basal cell types. The demineralization activity of AM-1 was only 1.7% of osteoclasts demineralization activity, and the growth rate was 20% of human normal skin keratinocytes and HSC-3 cells. These results suggest that the

  13. Contribution of coated humic acids calculated through their surface coverage on nano iron oxides for ofloxacin and norfloxacin sorption.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongbo; Liang, Ni; Li, Hao; Chen, Fangyuan; Zhang, Di; Pan, Bo; Xing, Baoshan

    2015-09-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants on organo-mineral complexes has been investigated extensively, but the sorption contribution of mineral particles was not properly addressed before calculating KOC, especially for ionic organic contaminants. We measured the surface coverage of a humic acid (HA) on nano iron oxides (n-Fe2O3) in a series of synthesized organo-mineral complexes. The contribution of the coated HA to ofloxacin (OFL) and norfloxacin (NOR) sorption in HA-n-Fe2O3 complexes was over 80% of the total sorption with the surface coverage of 36% and fOC of 1.6%. All the coated HA showed higher sorption to NOR and OFL in comparison to the original HA, suggesting HA fractionation and/or physical re-conformation during organo-mineral complex formation. The decreased KOC with multilayer coating may suggest the importance of site-specific interactions for OFL sorption, while the increased KOC with multilayer coating may suggest the importance of partitioning in hydrophobic region for NOR sorption. PMID:25978351

  14. Estimating the human contribution to groundwater depletion in the Middle East, from GRACE data, land surface models, and well observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joodaki, Gholamreza; Wahr, John; Swenson, Sean

    2014-03-01

    Data from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) satellite mission are used to estimate monthly changes in total water storage across the Middle East during February 2003 to December 2012. The results show a large negative trend in total water storage centered over western Iran and eastern Iraq. Subtracting contributions from the Caspian Sea and two large lakes, Tharthar and Urmiah, and using output from a version of the CLM4.5 land surface model to remove contributions from soil moisture, snow, canopy storage, and river storage, we conclude that most of the long-term water loss is due to a decline in groundwater storage. By dividing the region into seven mascons outlined along national boundaries and fitting them to the data, we find that the largest groundwater depletion is occurring in Iran, with a mass loss rate of 25 ± 3 Gt/yr during the study period. The conclusion of significant Iranian groundwater loss is further supported by in situ well data from across the country. Anthropogenic contributions to the groundwater loss are estimated by removing the natural variations in groundwater predicted by CLM4.5. These results indicate that over half of the groundwater loss in Iran (14 ± 3 Gt/yr) may be attributed to human withdrawals.

  15. A Surface Enolase Participates in Borrelia burgdorferi-Plasminogen Interaction and Contributes to Pathogen Survival within Feeding Ticks

    PubMed Central

    Nogueira, Sarah Veloso; Smith, Alexis A.; Qin, Jin-Hong

    2012-01-01

    Borrelia burgdorferi, a tick-borne bacterial pathogen, causes a disseminated infection involving multiple organs known as Lyme disease. Surface proteins can directly participate in microbial virulence by facilitating pathogen dissemination via interaction with host factors. We show here that a fraction of the B. burgdorferi chromosomal gene product BB0337, annotated as enolase or phosphopyruvate dehydratase, is associated with spirochete outer membrane and is surface exposed. B. burgdorferi enolase, either in a recombinant form or as a membrane-bound native antigen, displays enzymatic activities intrinsic to the glycolytic pathway. However, the protein also interacts with host plasminogen, potentially leading to its activation and resulting in B. burgdorferi-induced fibrinolysis. As expected, enolase displayed consistent expression in vivo, however, with a variable temporal and spatial expression during spirochete infection in mice and ticks. Despite an extracellular exposure of the antigen and a potential role in host-pathogen interaction, active immunization of mice with recombinant enolase failed to evoke protective immunity against subsequent B. burgdorferi infection. In contrast, enolase immunization of murine hosts significantly reduced the acquisition of spirochetes by feeding ticks, suggesting that the protein could have a stage-specific role in B. burgdorferi survival in the feeding vector. Strategies to interfere with the function of surface enolase could contribute to the development of novel preventive measures to interrupt the spirochete infection cycle and reduce the incidences of Lyme disease. PMID:22025510

  16. A New Model to Construct Ice Stream Surface Elevation Profiles and Calculate Contributions to Sea-Level Rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adachi, Yosuke

    Sea-level rise is a problem that affects regions worldwide - from the marshlands of the San Francisco Bay Area to the farmlands in coastal Bangladesh. Three-dimensional ice sheet models are the principle tools to evaluate mass loss from ice sheets that contribute to sea-level rise. We recognize that given the current limitations in representing the full extent of dynamical processes that affect ice sheet mass loss in 3-D ice sheet models, we cannot make reliable forecasts of sea-level rise from melting polar land ice. Thus, we take a completely different approach to gaining insight about the potential effects of climate change-induced perturbations on ice sheets. We build a flowline model that resolves the fast-flowing portions of ice sheets (i.e., ice streams). We express the dynamics along the flowline with (a) vertical shear deformation, (b) horizontal shear deformation, and (c) basal slip. Knowledge accumulated from prior force balance analyses performed on some polar ice streams allows us to form relations between (a) and ( c), and between (a) and (c) combined and (b). Based on these relationships, we numerically construct surface elevation profiles along flowlines centered on ten select ice streams in Greenland and Antarctica, by prescribing three climate change-induced perturbations: grounding line retreat, ice stream widening, and surface mass balance increase. Comparing these constructed profiles to the current observed ones allows us to quantify the effect of these perturbations on the various characteristics that these ten ice streams possess. Pine Island Glacier, which flows over a long overdeepening, will lose more than half of its stored ice volume that is contributable to sea-level rise before it reaches a possible steady state. Recovery Ice Stream, with its slippery base, long stretch of streaming-flow, and longest flowline among those we examined, loses the most mass (812 km3/km width). Jutulstraumen, which has little room to widen and a short

  17. Interparticle interactions and surface contribution to the effective anisotropy in biocompatible iron oxide nanoparticles used for contrast agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arelaro, A. D.; Brandl, A. L.; Lima, E.; Gamarra, L. F.; Brito, G. E. S.; Pontuschka, W. M.; Goya, G. F.

    2005-05-01

    We have investigated the dynamic magnetic properties of dextran-coated magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles in the form of (a) particles suspended in a carrier liquid and (b) concentrated powder obtained from lyophilization. The blocking temperature was found to increase from TB=42(2)to52(2)K (@μ0H=10mT) after lyophilization, showing the effects of dipolar interactions in samples with identical size distributions. The temperature dependence of the hyperfine field Bhyp(T) reveals the effects of collective magnetic excitations at low temperature, and allowed us to obtain the magnetic anisotropy energy Ea=3.6×10-21J for noninteracting particles. The obtained values can be understood assuming only magnetocrystalline anisotropy, without any additional contributions from surface, shape, or exchange origin. Moreover, a magnetocrystalline anisotropy constant value K1=10kJ/m3 was obtained by assuming the cubic phase with easy magnetic direction [111] of the bulk material above the Verwey transition, supporting the idea that the Verwey transition is absent in nanosized particles. Accordingly, no indication of magnetic transition at TV could be observed in our measurements. From the dynamical parameters of ac susceptibility χ(f ,T) curves, the contribution of the dipolar interactions to the total anisotropy energy barrier could be estimated to be Ω =4.5×10-21J, larger than the single-particle value.

  18. The Surface Brightness Contribution of II Peg: A Comparison of TiO Band Analysis and Doppler Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senavci, H. V.; O'Neal, D.; Hussain, G. A. J.; Barnes, J. R.

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the surface brightness contribution of the very well known active SB1 binary II Pegasi , to determine the star spot filling factor and the spot temperature parameters. In this context, we analyze 54 spectra of the system taken over 6 nights in September - October of 1996, using the 2.1m Otto Struve Telescope equipped with SES at the McDonald Observatory. We measure the spot temperatures and spot filling factors by fitting TiO molecular bands in this spectroscopic dataset, with model atmosphere approximation using ATLAS9 and with proxy stars obtained with the same instrument. The same dataset is then used to also produce surface spot maps using the Doppler imaging technique. We compare the spot filling factors obtained with the two independent techniques in order to better characterise the spot properties of the system and to better assess the limitations inherent to both techniques. The results obtained from both techniques show that the variation of spot filling factor as a function of phase agree well with each other, while the amount of TiO and DI spot

  19. Assessing the contributions of surface waves and complex rays to far-field Mie scattering by use of the Debye series

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hovenac, Edward A.; Lock, James A.

    1991-01-01

    The contributions of complex rays and the secondary radiation shed by surface waves to scattering by a dielectric sphere are calculated in the context of the Debye series expansion of the Mie scattering amplitudes. Also, the contributions of geometrical rays are reviewed and compared with the Debye series. Interference effects between surface waves, complex waves, and geometrical waves are calculated, and the possibility of observing these interference effects is discussed. Experimental data supporting the observation of a surface wave-geometrical pattern is presented.

  20. Shr is a broad-spectrum surface receptor that contributes to adherence and virulence in group A streptococcus.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Morly; Huang, Ya-Shu; Li, Xueru; McIver, Kevin S; Toukoki, Chadia; Eichenbaum, Zehava

    2008-11-01

    Group A streptococcus (GAS) is a common hemolytic pathogen that produces a range of suppurative infections and autoimmune sequelae in humans. Shr is an exported protein in GAS, which binds in vitro to hemoglobin, myoglobin, and the hemoglobin-haptoglobin complex. We previously reported that Shr is found in association with whole GAS cells and in culture supernatant. Here, we demonstrate that cell-associated Shr could not be released from the bacteria by the muralytic enzyme mutanolysin and was instead localized to the membrane. Shr was available, however, on the exterior of GAS, exposed to the extracellular environment. In vitro binding and competition assays demonstrated that in addition to hemoprotein binding, purified Shr specifically interacts with immobilized fibronectin and laminin. The absence of typical fibronectin-binding motifs indicates that a new protein pattern is involved in the binding of Shr to the extracellular matrix. Recombinant Lactococcus lactis cells expressing Shr on the bacterial surface gained the ability to bind to immobilized fibronectin, suggesting that Shr can function as an adhesin. The inactivation of shr resulted in a 40% reduction in the attachment to human epithelial cells in comparison to the parent strain. GAS infection elicited a high titer of Shr antibodies in sera from convalescent mice, demonstrating that Shr is expressed in vivo. The shr mutant was attenuated for virulence in an intramuscular zebrafish model system. In summary, this study identifies Shr as being a new microbial surface component recognizing adhesive matrix molecules in GAS that mediates attachment to epithelial cells and contributes to the infection process. PMID:18710861

  1. Contributions of natural arsenic sources to surface waters on a high grade arsenic-geochemical anomaly (French Massif Central).

    PubMed

    Bossy, A; Grosbois, C; Hendershot, W; Beauchemin, S; Crouzet, C; Bril, H

    2012-08-15

    The subwatershed studied drains a non-exploited area of the St-Yrieix-la-Perche gold mining district (French Massif Central) and it is located on an arsenic (As) geochemical anomaly. In this context, it is important to know the geochemical processes involved in the transfer of As from solid environmental compartments to the aquatic system. The stream showed a temporal variation of dissolved As (As(d)) content from 69.4 μg.L(-1) in the low flow period to 7.5 μg.L(-1) in the high flow period. Upstream, ground- and wetland waters had As(d) concentrations up to 215 and 169 μg.L(-1), respectively. The main representative As sources were determined at the subwatershed scale with in-situ monitoring of major and trace element contents in different waters and single extraction experiments. The As sources to stream water could be regrouped into two components: (i) one As-rich group (mainly in the low flow period) with groundwater, gallery exploration outlet waters and wetland waters, and (ii) one As-poor group (mainly in the high flow period) with rainwaters and soil solutions. In the soil profile, As(d) showed a significant decrease from 52.4 μg.L(-1) in the 0-5 cm superficial soil horizon to 14.4 μg.L(-1) in the 135-165 cm deep soil horizon. This decrease may be related to pedogenic processes and suggests an evolution of As-bearing phase stability through the soil profile. Quantification of As(d) fluxes at the subwatershed scale showed that groundwater was the major input (>80%) of As(d) to surface water. Moreover, natural weathering of the As-rich solid phases showed an impact on the As release, mainly from superficial soil horizons with runoff contributing about 5% to As input in surface water. PMID:22750171

  2. Basin and Crater Ejecta Contributions to the South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA) Regolith; Positive Implications for Robotic Surface Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petro, Noah E.; Jolliff, B. L.

    2011-01-01

    The ability of impacts of all sizes to laterally transport ejected material across the lunar surface is well-documented both in lunar samples [1-4] and in remote sensing data [5-7]. The need to quantify the amount of lateral transport has lead to several models to estimate the scale of this effect. Such models have been used to assess the origin of components at the Apollo sites [8-10] or to predict what might be sampled by robotic landers [11-13]. Here we continue to examine the regolith inside the South Pole-Aitken Basin (SPA) and specifically assess the contribution to the SPA regolith by smaller craters within the basin. Specifically we asses the effects of four larger craters within SPA, Bose, Bhabha, Stoney, and Bellinsgauzen all located within the mafic enhancement in the center of SPA (Figure 1). The region around these craters is of interest as it is a possible landing and sample return site for the proposed Moon-Rise mission [14-17]. Additionally, understanding the provenance of components in the SPA regolith is important for interpreting remotely sensed data of the basin interior [18-20].

  3. Age related increase in mTOR activity contributes to the pathological changes in ovarian surface epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Bajwa, Preety; Nagendra, Prathima B.; Nielsen, Sarah; Sahoo, Subhransu S.; Bielanowicz, Amanda; Lombard, Janine M.; Wilkinson, Erby J.; Miller, Richard A.; Tanwar, Pradeep S.

    2016-01-01

    Ovarian cancer is a disease of older women. However, the molecular mechanisms of ovarian aging and their contribution to the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer are currently unclear. mTOR signalling is a major regulator of aging as suppression of this pathway extends lifespan in model organisms. Overactive mTOR signalling is present in up to 80% of ovarian cancer samples and is associated with poor prognosis. This study examined the role of mTOR signalling in age-associated changes in ovarian surface epithelium (OSE). Histological examination of ovaries from both aged mice and women revealed OSE cell hyperplasia, papillary growth and inclusion cysts. These pathological lesions expressed bonafide markers of ovarian cancer precursor lesions, Pax8 and Stathmin 1, and were presented with elevated mTOR signalling. To understand whether overactive mTOR signalling is responsible for the development of these pathological changes, we analysed ovaries of the Pten trangenic mice and found significant reduction in OSE lesions compared to controls. Furthermore, pharmacological suppression of mTOR signalling significantly decreased OSE hyperplasia in aged mice. Treatment with mTOR inhibitors reduced human ovarian cancer cell viability, proliferation and colony forming ability. Collectively, we have established the role of mTOR signalling in age-related OSE pathologies and initiation of ovarian cancer. PMID:27036037

  4. Esophagectomy - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    Minimally invasive esophagectomy; Robotic esophagectomy; Removal of the esophagus - minimally invasive; Achalasia - esophagectomy; Barrett esophagus - esophagectomy; Esophageal cancer - esophagectomy - laparoscopic; Cancer of the ...

  5. Detection of Remarkably Low Isotopic Ratio of Iron in Anthropogenic Aerosols and Evaluation of its Contribution to the Surface Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurisu, M.; Iizuka, T.; Sakata, K.; Uematsu, M.; Takahashi, Y.

    2015-12-01

    It has been reported that phytoplankton growth in the High Nutrient-Low Chlorophyll (HNLC) regions is limited by dissolved iron (DFe) concentration (e.g., Martin and Fitzwater, 1988). Aerosol is known as one of the dominant sources of DFe to the ocean and classified into two origins such as anthropogenic and natural. A series of recent studies showed that Fe in anthropogenic aerosols is more soluble than that in natural aerosols (Takahashi et al., 2013) and has lower isotopic ratio (Mead et al., 2013). However, the difference between Fe isotopic ratio (δ56Fe: [(56Fe/54Fe)sample/(56Fe/54Fe)IRMM-14]-1) of two origins reported in Mead et al. (2013) is not so large compared with the standard deviation. Therefore, the aim of this study is to determine Fe species and δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosols more accurately and to evaluate its contribution to the ocean surface. Iron species were determined by X-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) analysis, while δ56Fe in size-fractionated aerosols were measured by MC-ICP-MS (NEPTUNE Plus) after chemical separation using anion exchange resin. Dominant Fe species in the samples were, ferrihydrite, hematite, and biotite. It was also revealed that coarse particles contained a larger amount of biotite and that fine particles contained a larger amount of hematite, which suggested that anthropogenic aerosols were emitted during combustion processes. In addition, results of Fe isotopic ratio analysis suggested that δ56Fe of coarse particles were around +0.25‰, whereas that of fine particles were -0.5 ˜ -2‰, which was lower than the δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosol by Mead et al. (2013). The size-fractionated sampling made it possible to determine the δ56Fe in anthropogenic aerosol. Soluble component in fine particles extracted by simulated rain water also showed much lower δ56Fe (δ56Fe = -3.9±0.12‰), suggesting that anthropogenic Fe has much lower isotopic ratio. The remarkably low δ56Fe may be caused by the

  6. Macrophytes may not contribute significantly to removal of nutrients, pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance in model surface constructed wetlands.

    PubMed

    Cardinal, Pascal; Anderson, Julie C; Carlson, Jules C; Low, Jennifer E; Challis, Jonathan K; Beattie, Sarah A; Bartel, Caitlin N; Elliott, Ashley D; Montero, Oscar F; Lokesh, Sheetal; Favreau, Alex; Kozlova, Tatiana A; Knapp, Charles W; Hanson, Mark L; Wong, Charles S

    2014-06-01

    Outdoor shallow wetland mesocosms, designed to simulate surface constructed wetlands to improve lagoon wastewater treatment, were used to assess the role of macrophytes in the dissipation of wastewater nutrients, selected pharmaceuticals, and antibiotic resistance genes (ARGs). Specifically, mesocosms were established with or without populations of Typha spp. (cattails), Myriophyllum sibiricum (northern water milfoil), and Utricularia vulgaris (bladderwort). Following macrophyte establishment, mesocosms were seeded with ARG-bearing organisms from a local wastewater lagoon, and treated with a single pulse of artificial municipal wastewater with or without carbamazepine, clofibric acid, fluoxetine, and naproxen (each at 7.6μg/L), as well as sulfamethoxazole and sulfapyridine (each at 150μg/L). Rates of pharmaceutical dissipation over 28d ranged from 0.073 to 3.0d(-1), corresponding to half-lives of 0.23 to 9.4d. Based on calculated rate constants, observed dissipation rates were consistent with photodegradation driving clofibric acid, naproxen, sulfamethoxazole, and sulfapyridine removal, and with sorption also contributing to carbamazepine and fluoxetine loss. Of the seven gene determinants assayed, only two genes for both beta-lactam resistance (blaCTX and blaTEM) and sulfonamide resistance (sulI and sulII) were found in sufficient quantity for monitoring. Genes disappeared relatively rapidly from the water column, with half-lives ranging from 2.1 to 99d. In contrast, detected gene levels did not change in the sediment, with the exception of sulI, which increased after 28d in pharmaceutical-treated systems. These shallow wetland mesocosms were able to dissipate wastewater contaminants rapidly. However, no significant enhancement in removal of nutrients or pharmaceuticals was observed in mesocosms with extensive aquatic plant communities. This was likely due to three factors: first, use of naïve systems with an unchallenged capacity for nutrient assimilation and

  7. Multi-scale modeling study of the source contributions to near-surface ozone and sulfur oxides levels over California during the ARCTAS-CARB period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Spak, S. N.; Adhikary, B.; Kulkarni, S.; Cheng, Y.; Wei, C.; Tang, Y.; D'Allura, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Huey, G. L.; Dibb, J. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Kaduwela, A.; Cai, C.; Wong, M.; Pierce, R. Bradley; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.

    2011-04-01

    Chronic high surface ozone (O3) levels and the increasing sulfur oxides (SOx = SO2+SO4) ambient concentrations over South Coast (SC) and other areas of California (CA) are affected by both local emissions and long-range transport. In this paper, multi-scale tracer, full-chemistry and adjoint simulations using the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are conducted to assess the contribution of local emission sourcesto SC O3 and to evaluate the impacts of transported sulfur and local emissions on the SC sulfur budgetduring the ARCTAS-CARB experiment period in 2008. Sensitivity simulations quantify contributions of biogenic and fire emissions to SC O3 levels. California biogenic and fire emissions contribute 3-4 ppb to near-surface O3 over SC, with larger contributions to other regions in CA. During a long-range transport event from Asia starting from 22 June, high SOx levels (up to ~0.7 ppb of SO2 and ~1.3 ppb of SO4) is observed above ~6 km, but they did not affect CA surface air quality. The elevated SOx observed at 1-4 km is estimated to enhance surface SOx over SC by ~0.25 ppb (upper limit) on ~24 June. The near-surface SOx levels over SC during the flight week are attributed mostly to local emissions. Two anthropogenic SOx emission inventories (EIs) from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are compared and applied in 60 km and 12 km chemical transport simulations, and the results are compared withobservations. The CARB EI shows improvements over the National Emission Inventory (NEI) by EPA, but generally underestimates surface SC SOx by about a factor of two. Adjoint sensitivity analysis indicated that SO2 levels at 00:00 UTC (17:00 local time) at six SC surface sites were influenced by previous day maritime emissions over the ocean, the terrestrial emissions over nearby urban areas, and by transported SO2 from the north through both terrestrial and maritime areas. Overall maritime emissions contribute 10-70% of

  8. Model and assessment of the contribution of dredged material disposal to sea-surface contamination in Puget Sound

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, J.T.; Cowan, C.E.

    1986-02-01

    Hydrophobic or floatable materials released to the water column during dredge disposal operations may accumulate in high concentrations on the water surface. If such surface accumulations occur, they could impact the reproduction of fish and shellfish with neustonic (floating) eggs or larvae. Also, floatable surface contaminants could deposit on nearby beaches. In order to examine the potential impacts of such processes, an interactive computer (IBM PC) model was developed. The FORTRAN model allows input of contaminant concentrations on the dredge material, the surface area of the disposal site, the floatable fraction of the contaminated material, and the baseline concentrations of contaminants present in the sea-surface microlayer. The model then computes the resultant concentrations of each contaminant in the microlayer and the potential impact on floating fish eggs. The utility of the model would be greatly improved by empirical data, not yeat available, on the vertical upward and lateral movement of contaminants during dredge material disposal.

  9. Fractional contributions by autotrophic and heterotrophic respiration to soil-surface CO2 efflux in Boreal forests.

    PubMed

    Högberg, Peter; Nordgren, Anders; Högberg, Mona N; Ottosson-Löfvenius, Mikaell; Bhupinderpal-Singh; Olsson, Per; Linder, Sune

    2005-01-01

    Soil-surface CO2 efflux ('soil respiration') accounts for roughly two-thirds of forest ecosystem respiration, and can be divided into heterotrophic and autotrophic components. Conventionally, the latter is defined as respiration by plant roots. In Boreal forests, however, fine roots of trees are invariably covered by ectomycorrhizal fungi, which by definition are heterotrophs, but like the roots, receive sugars derived from photosynthesis. There is also a significant leaching of labile carbon compounds from the ectomycorrhizal roots. It is, therefore, more meaningful in the context of carbon balance studies to include mycorrhizal fungi and other mycorrhizosphere organisms, dependent on the direct flux of labile carbon from photosynthesis, in the autotrophic component. Hence, heterotrophic activity becomes reserved for the decomposition of more complex organic molecules in litter and other forms of soil organic matter. In reality, the complex situation is perhaps best described as a continuum from strict autotrophy to strict heterotrophy. As a result of this, and associated methodological problems, estimates of the contribution of autotrophic respiration to total soil respiration have been highly variable. Based on recent stand-scale tree girdling experiments we have estimated that autotrophic respiration in boreal forest accounts for up to 50-65% of soil respiration during the snow-free part of the year. Girdling experiments and studies of the delta(13)C of the soil CO2 efflux show that there is a lag of a few days between the carbon uptake by photosynthesis and the release by autotrophic soil respiration of the assimilated carbon. In contrast, estimates of 'bomb 14C' and other approaches have suggested that it takes years to decades between carbon uptake via photosynthesis and the bulk of soil heterotrophic activity. Temperature is normally used as a driver in models of soil processes and it is often assumed that autotrophic soil activity is more sensitive to

  10. Minimal change disease

    MedlinePlus

    Minimal change nephrotic syndrome; Nil disease; Lipoid nephrosis; Idiopathic nephrotic syndrome of childhood ... which filter blood and produce urine. In minimal change disease, there is damage to the glomeruli. These ...

  11. Minimal change disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... seen under a very powerful microscope called an electron microscope. Minimal change disease is the most common ... biopsy and examination of the tissue with an electron microscope can show signs of minimal change disease.

  12. A method for apportionment of natural and anthropogenic contributions to heavy metal loadings in the surface soils across large-scale regions.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yuanan; Cheng, Hefa

    2016-07-01

    Quantification of the contributions from anthropogenic sources to soil heavy metal loadings on regional scales is challenging because of the heterogeneity of soil parent materials and high variability of anthropogenic inputs, especially for the species that are primarily of lithogenic origin. To this end, we developed a novel method for apportioning the contributions of natural and anthropogenic sources by combining sequential extraction and stochastic modeling, and applied it to investigate the heavy metal pollution in the surface soils of the Pearl River Delta (PRD) in southern China. On the average, 45-86% of Zn, Cu, Pb, and Cd were present in the acid soluble, reducible, and oxidizable fractions of the surface soils, while only 12-24% of Ni, Cr, and As were partitioned in these fractions. The anthropogenic contributions to the heavy metals in the non-residual fractions, even the ones dominated by natural sources, could be identified and quantified by conditional inference trees. Combination of sequential extraction, Kriging interpolation, and stochastic modeling reveals that approximately 10, 39, 6.2, 28, 7.1, 15, and 46% of the As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, respectively, in the surface soils of the PRD were contributed by anthropogenic sources. These results were in general agreements with those obtained through subtraction of regional soil metal background from total loadings, and the soil metal inputs through atmospheric deposition as well. In the non-residual fractions of the surface soils, the anthropogenic contributions to As, Cd, Cr, Cu, Ni, Pb, and Zn, were 48, 42, 50, 51, 49, 24, and 70%, respectively. PMID:27108044

  13. Effect of Hydrogen Peroxide in Combination with Minimal Thermal Treatment for Reducing Bacterial Populations on Cantaloupe Rind Surfaces and Transfer to Fresh-Cut Pieces.

    PubMed

    Ukuku, Dike O; Mukhopadhyay, Sudarsan; Geveke, David; Olanya, Modesto; Niemira, Brendan

    2016-08-01

    Surface structure and biochemical characteristics of bacteria and produce play a major role in how and where bacteria attach, complicating decontamination treatments. Whole cantaloupe rind surfaces were inoculated with Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes at 10(7) CFU/ml. Average population size of Salmonella, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and L. monocytogenes recovered after surface inoculation was 4.8 ± 0.12, 5.1 ± 0.14, and 3.6 ± 0.13 log CFU/cm(2), respectively. Inoculated melons were stored at 5 and 22°C for 7 days before washing treatment interventions. Intervention treatments used were (i) water (H2O) at 22°C, (ii) H2O at 80°C, (iii) 3% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) at 22°C, and (iv) a combination of 3% H2O2 and H2O at 80°C for 300 s. The strength of pathogen attachment (SR value) at days 0, 3, and 7 of storage was determined, and then the efficacy of the intervention treatments to detach, kill, and reduce transfer of bacteria to fresh-cut pieces during fresh-cut preparation was investigated. Populations of E. coli O157:H7 attached to the rind surface at significantly higher levels (P < 0.05) than Salmonella and L. monocytogenes, but Salmonella exhibited the strongest attachment (SR value) at all days tested. Washing with 3% H2O2 alone led to significant reduction (P < 0.05) of bacteria and caused some changes in bacterial cell morphology. A combination treatment with H2O and 3% H2O2 at 8°C led to an average 4-log reduction of bacterial pathogens, and no bacterial pathogens were detected in fresh-cut pieces prepared from this combination treatment, including enriched fresh-cut samples. The results of this study indicate that the microbial safety of fresh-cut pieces from treated cantaloupes was improved at day 6 of storage at 5°C and day 3 of storage at 10°C. PMID:27497118

  14. The Representation of Color across the Human Visual Cortex: Distinguishing Chromatic Signals Contributing to Object Form Versus Surface Color.

    PubMed

    Seymour, K J; Williams, M A; Rich, A N

    2016-05-01

    Many theories of visual object perception assume the visual system initially extracts borders between objects and their background and then "fills in" color to the resulting object surfaces. We investigated the transformation of chromatic signals across the human ventral visual stream, with particular interest in distinguishing representations of object surface color from representations of chromatic signals reflecting the retinal input. We used fMRI to measure brain activity while participants viewed figure-ground stimuli that differed either in the position or in the color contrast polarity of the foreground object (the figure). Multivariate pattern analysis revealed that classifiers were able to decode information about which color was presented at a particular retinal location from early visual areas, whereas regions further along the ventral stream exhibited biases for representing color as part of an object's surface, irrespective of its position on the retina. Additional analyses showed that although activity in V2 contained strong chromatic contrast information to support the early parsing of objects within a visual scene, activity in this area also signaled information about object surface color. These findings are consistent with the view that mechanisms underlying scene segmentation and the binding of color to object surfaces converge in V2. PMID:25681421

  15. Contributions of adhesive proteins to the cellular and bacterial response to surfaces treated with bioactive polymers: case of poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) grafted titanium surfaces.

    PubMed

    Felgueiras, Helena P; Aissa, Ines Ben; Evans, Margaret D M; Migonney, Véronique

    2015-11-01

    The research developed on functionalized model or prosthetic surfaces with bioactive polymers has raised the possibility to modulate and/or control the biological in vitro and in vivo responses to synthetic biomaterials. The mechanisms underlying the bioactivity exhibited by sulfonated groups on surfaces involves both selective adsorption and conformational changes of adsorbed proteins. Indeed, surfaces functionalized by grafting poly(sodium styrene sulfonate) [poly(NaSS)] modulate the cellular and bacterial response by inducing specific interactions with fibronectin (Fn). Once implanted, a biomaterial surface is exposed to a milieu of many proteins that compete for the surface which dictates the subsequent biological response. Once understood, this can be controlled by dictating exposure of active binding sites. In this in vitro study, we report the influence of binary mixtures of proteins [albumin (BSA), Fn and collagen type I (Col I)] adsorbed on poly(NaSS) grafted Ti6Al4V on the adhesion and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 osteoblast-like cells and the adhesion and proliferation of Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus). Outcomes showed that poly(NaSS) stimulated cell spreading, attachment strength, differentiation and mineralization, whatever the nature of protein provided at the interface compared with ungrafted Ti6Al4V (control). While in competition, Fn and Col I were capable of prevailing over BSA. Fn played an important role in the early interactions of the cells with the surface, while Col I was responsible for increased alkaline phosphatase, calcium and phosphate productions associated with differentiation. Poly(NaSS) grafted surfaces decreased the adhesion of S. aureus and the presence of Fn on these chemically altered surfaces increased bacterial resistance ≈70% compared to the ungrafted Ti6Al4V. Overall, our study showed that poly(NaSS) grafted Ti6Al4V selectively adsorbed proteins (particularly Fn) promoting the adhesion and differentiation of osteoblast

  16. The Influence of Surface Passivation on Dark Current Contributing Mechanisms of the InAs/GaSb Superlattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Ruiqin; Jiao, Shujie; Li, Hongtao; Gao, Shiyong; Yu, Qingjiang; Wang, Jinzhong; Wang, Dongbo; Zhao, Liancheng

    2016-01-01

    We report on the investigation of the dark current contributing mechanism by an effective SiO2 passivated layer deposited at low temperatures. In comparison with the unpassivated photodiodes, at 77 K, the dark current density is reduced by one order of magnitude and a maximum zero-bias resistance area product (R0A) of 567 Ω cm2 is achieved by introducing SiO2-passivated layer deposition technology at a lower temperature of 75°C. The temperature-dependence and bias-dependence of the dark current are studied experimentally and correlated to the theory, and then the fitting with experimental results shows good agreement between theory and experiment. The contribution of each dark current mechanism is also identified.

  17. BDNF contributes to both rapid and homeostatic alterations in AMPA receptor surface expression in nucleus accumbens medium spiny neurons

    PubMed Central

    Reimers, Jeremy M.; Loweth, Jessica A.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2015-01-01

    Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) plays a critical role in plasticity at glutamate synapses and the effects of repeated cocaine exposure. We recently showed that intracranial injection of BDNF into the rat nucleus accumbens (NAc), a key region for cocaine addiction, rapidly increases AMPA receptor (AMPAR) surface expression. To further characterize BDNF’s role in both rapid AMPAR trafficking and slower, homeostatic changes in AMPAR surface expression, we investigated the effects of acute (30 min) and long-term (24 h) treatment with BDNF on AMPAR distribution in NAc medium spiny neurons from postnatal rats co-cultured with mouse prefrontal cortex (PFC) neurons to restore excitatory inputs. Immunocytochemical studies showed that acute BDNF treatment increased cell surface GluA1 and GluA2 levels, as well as their co-localization, on NAc neurons. This effect of BDNF, confirmed using a protein crosslinking assay, was dependent on ERK but not AKT signaling. In contrast, long-term BDNF treatment decreased AMPAR surface expression on NAc neurons. Based on this latter result, we tested the hypothesis that BDNF plays a role in AMPAR “scaling down” in response to a prolonged increase in neuronal activity produced by bicuculline (24 h). Supporting this hypothesis, decreasing BDNF signaling with the extracellular BDNF scavenger TrkB-Fc prevented the scaling down of GluA1 and GluA2 surface levels in NAc neurons normally produced by bicuculline. In conclusion, BDNF exerts bidirectional effects on NAc AMPAR surface expression, depending on duration of exposure. Furthermore, BDNF’s involvement in synaptic scaling in the NAc differs from its previously described role in the visual cortex. PMID:24712995

  18. Plasminogen Binding Proteins and Plasmin Generation on the Surface of Leptospira spp.: The Contribution to the Bacteria-Host Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Monica L.; Atzingen, Marina V.; Oliveira, Rosane; Mendes, Renata S.; Domingos, Renan F.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Nascimento, Ana L. T. O.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is considered a neglected infectious disease of human and veterinary concern. Although extensive investigations on host-pathogen interactions have been pursued by several research groups, mechanisms of infection, invasion and persistence of pathogenic Leptospira spp. remain to be elucidated. We have reported the ability of leptospires to bind human plasminogen (PLG) and to generate enzimatically active plasmin (PLA) on the bacteria surface. PLA-coated Leptospira can degrade immobilized ECM molecules, an activity with implications in host tissue penetration. Moreover, we have identified and characterized several proteins that may act as PLG-binding receptors, each of them competent to generate active plasmin. The PLA activity associated to the outer surface of Leptospira could hamper the host immune attack by conferring the bacteria some benefit during infection. The PLA-coated leptospires obstruct complement C3b and IgG depositions on the bacterial surface, most probably through degradation. The decrease of leptospiral opsonization might be an important aspect of the immune evasion strategy. We believe that the presence of PLA on the leptospiral surface may (i) facilitate host tissue penetration, (ii) help the bacteria to evade the immune system and, as a consequence, (iii) permit Leptospira to reach secondary sites of infection. PMID:23118516

  19. Examining the Contributions of Image-Charge Forces to Charge Reversal: Discrete Versus Continuum Modeling of Surface Charges.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Ma, Zengwei

    2016-06-14

    The effects of both repulsive and attractive image-charge forces on the structure of electric double layers are addressed by Monte Carlo determination, based on a primitive model of electrolytes in contact with two types of identically charged surfaces: one with a homogeneously smeared-out charge density and the other with discrete interfacial groups. It is shown that the behavior of ions is closely related to surface charge distributions. Moreover, charge reversal in the absence of image charges witnesses an initial enhancement and then follows a fast suppression with increasing valence of the interfacial groups. The situation is quite similar to what are observed in the presence of repulsive image charges, which can significantly facilitate counterion condensation by overcoming the electrostatic barrier presented by the low dielectric substrate. With transition to attractive image-charge interactions, however, charge reversal remains widely unaffected in different surface charge representations, which even becomes much weaker when compared to the corresponding cases of both no images and repulsive images, provided that the interfacial groups have adequate valences. The overall scenario is found to be independent of the surface charge density values under study. These findings clearly illustrate the enormous improvement in our quantitative understanding of the electric double layer structure and the associated charge reversal phenomenon at the interface of various substrates. PMID:27198910

  20. A Paradigm Shift in the Application of Thermal Infrared Remote Sensing for Land Surface Modeling: John Norman's Critical Contributions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Over 10 years ago, John Norman and co-authors proposed a thermal-based land surface modeling strategy that treated the energy exchange and kinetic temperatures of the soil and vegetated components in a unique “two-source” approach addressing the key factors affecting the convective and radiative exc...

  1. An Sp1 binding site and the minimal promoter contribute to overexpression of the cytokeratin 18 gene in tumorigenic clones relative to that in nontumorigenic clones of a human carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed Central

    Gunther, M; Frebourg, T; Laithier, M; Fossar, N; Bouziane-Ouartini, M; Lavialle, C; Brison, O

    1995-01-01

    Clones of cells tumorigenic or nontumorigenic in nude mice have been previously isolated from the SW613-S human colon carcinoma cell line. We have already reported that tumorigenic cells overexpress the cytokeratin 18 (K18) gene in comparison with nontumorigenic cells and that this difference is mainly due to a transcriptional regulation. We now report that a 2,532-bp cloned human K18 gene promoter drives the differential expression of a reporter gene in a transient assay. A 62-bp minimal K18 promoter (TATA box and initiation site) has a low but differential activity. Analysis of deletion and substitution mutants as well as hybrid SV40-K18 promoters and reconstructed K18 promoters indicated that an important element for the activity of the K18 promoter is a high-affinity binding site for transcription factor Sp1 located just upstream of the TATA box. This Sp1 binding element, as well as the intron 1 enhancer element, stimulates the basal activity of the minimal promoter through mechanisms that maintain the differential activity. Gel shift assays and the use of an anti-Sp1 antibody have shown that both tumorigenic and nontumorigenic SW613-S cells contain three factors able to bind to the Sp1 binding element site and that one of them is Sp1. A hybrid GAL4-Sp1 protein transactivated to comparable extents in tumorigenic and nontumorigenic cells a reconstructed K18 promoter containing GAL4 binding sites and therefore without altering its differential behavior. These results indicate that the Sp1 transcription factor is involved in the overexpression of the K18 gene in tumorigenic SW613-S cells through its interaction with a component of the basal transcription machinery. PMID:7537848

  2. Multi-scale modeling study of the source contributions to near-surface ozone and sulfur oxides levels over California during the ARCTAS-CARB period

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, M.; Carmichael, G. R.; Spak, S. N.; Adhikary, B.; Kulkarni, S.; Cheng, Y. F.; Wei, C.; Tang, Y.; D'Allura, A.; Wennberg, P. O.; Huey, G. L.; Dibb, J. E.; Jimenez, J. L.; Cubison, M. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Kaduwela, A.; Cai, C.; Wong, M.; Pierce, R. B.; Al-Saadi, J. A.; Streets, D. G.; Zhang, Q.

    2010-11-01

    Chronic ozone (O3) problems and the increasing sulfur oxides (SOx=SO2+SO4) ambient concentrations over South Coast (SC) and other areas of California (CA) are affected by both local emissions and long-range transport. In this paper, multi-scale tracer and full-chemistry simulations with the STEM atmospheric chemistry model are used to assess the contribution of local emission sources to SC O3 and evaluate the impacts of transported sulfur and local emissions on the SC sulfur budget during the ARCTAS-CARB experiment period in 2008. Sensitivity simulations quantify contributions of biogenic and fire emissions to SC O3 levels. California biogenic and fire emissions contribute 3-4 ppb to near-surface O3 over SC, with larger contributions to other regions in CA. Long-range transport from Asia is estimated to enhance surface SO4 over SC by ~0.5 μg/sm3, and the higher SOx levels (up to ~0.7 ppb of SO2 and ~6 μg/sm3 of SO4) observed above ~6 km did not affect surface air quality in the study region. Enhanced near-surface SOx levels over SC during the flight week were attributed mostly to local emissions. Two anthropogenic SOx emission inventories (EIs) from the California Air Resources Board (CARB) and the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) are compared and applied in 60 km and 12 km chemical transport simulations, and the results are compared with observations. The CARB EI shows improvements over the National Emission Inventory (NEI) by EPA, but generally underestimates surface SC SOx by about a factor of two. Maritime (mostly shipping) emissions contribute to the high SO2 levels over the ocean and on-shore, and fine SO4 over the downwind areas is impacted by maritime sources. Maritime emissions also modify the NOx-VOC limitations over coastal areas. These suggest an important role for shipping emission controls in reducing fine particle and O3 concentrations in SC.

  3. Characterization and stability of gold nanoparticles depending on their surface chemistry: Contribution of capillary zone electrophoresis to a quality control.

    PubMed

    Pallotta, Arnaud; Boudier, Ariane; Leroy, Pierre; Clarot, Igor

    2016-08-26

    Four kinds of gold nanoparticles (AuNP) quite similar in terms of gold core size (ca. 5nm) and shape (spherical) but differing by their surface chemistry (either negatively, or positively charged, or neutral) were synthesized. They were analyzed using both the classical physicochemical approach (spectrophotometry, dynamic light scattering coupled or not to electrophoresis and transmission electron microscopy) and capillary zone electrophoresis equipped with photodiode array detection. The results obtained by both methodologies (related to Surface Plasmon Band-maximal absorbance wavelength-, and zeta potential and electrophoretic mobilities) were well correlated. Moreover, taking advantage of the separation method, the sample heterogeneity was evaluated and an impurity profile was extracted. This allowed setting some specifications which were then applied on the one hand to a batch-to-batch survey to declare NP as conform or not after production and on the other hand to a stability study. PMID:27435685

  4. Up-cycling waste glass to minimal water adsorption/absorption lightweight aggregate by rapid low temperature sintering: optimization by dual process-mixture response surface methodology.

    PubMed

    Velis, Costas A; Franco-Salinas, Claudia; O'Sullivan, Catherine; Najorka, Jens; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Cheeseman, Christopher R

    2014-07-01

    Mixed color waste glass extracted from municipal solid waste is either not recycled, in which case it is an environmental and financial liability, or it is used in relatively low value applications such as normal weight aggregate. Here, we report on converting it into a novel glass-ceramic lightweight aggregate (LWA), potentially suitable for high added value applications in structural concrete (upcycling). The artificial LWA particles were formed by rapidly sintering (<10 min) waste glass powder with clay mixes using sodium silicate as binder and borate salt as flux. Composition and processing were optimized using response surface methodology (RSM) modeling, and specifically (i) a combined process-mixture dual RSM, and (ii) multiobjective optimization functions. The optimization considered raw materials and energy costs. Mineralogical and physical transformations occur during sintering and a cellular vesicular glass-ceramic composite microstructure is formed, with strong correlations existing between bloating/shrinkage during sintering, density and water adsorption/absorption. The diametrical expansion could be effectively modeled via the RSM and controlled to meet a wide range of specifications; here we optimized for LWA structural concrete. The optimally designed LWA is sintered in comparatively low temperatures (825-835 °C), thus potentially saving costs and lowering emissions; it had exceptionally low water adsorption/absorption (6.1-7.2% w/wd; optimization target: 1.5-7.5% w/wd); while remaining substantially lightweight (density: 1.24-1.28 g.cm(-3); target: 0.9-1.3 g.cm(-3)). This is a considerable advancement for designing effective environmentally friendly lightweight concrete constructions, and boosting resource efficiency of waste glass flows. PMID:24871934

  5. [Contribution of Particle Size and Surface Coating of Silver Nanoparticles to Its Toxicity in Marine Diatom Skeletonema costatum].

    PubMed

    Huang, Jun; Yi, Jun; Qiang, Li-yuan; Cheng, Jin-ping

    2016-05-15

    Due to the unique antibacterial properties, silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have been widely used in commercial applications. In this study, the toxicity of three kinds of AgNPs with different sizes and surface coatings to marine diatom Skeletonema costatum (S. costatum) was studied, which was one of the dominant species in estuarine and coastal areas. All three kinds of tested AgNPs inhibited the growth of exposed S. costatum under acute exposure condition, and the order of toxicity was 10 nm-OA > 10 nm-PVP > 20 nm-PVP. Given the condition of similar particle size, oil amine surface coated AgNPs were more toxic than polyvinyl pyrrolidone (PVP) surface coated AgNPs in S. costatum in term of cytotoxicity. With the same surface coating, the toxicity of AgNPs in S. costatum was affected by its hydrodynamic diameter and exposure concentrations. When the concentration of AgNPs was less than 500 µg · L⁻¹, larger sized AgNPs showed greater toxicity; When the concentration was greater than or equal to 500 µg · L⁻¹, smaller AgNPs exhibited greater toxicity. At molecular level, 50 µg · L⁻¹ 10nm-PVP significantly upregulated expression level of 3HfcpA (P < 0.05) and significantly downregulated expression level of Dl (P < 0.05), and 500 µg · L⁻¹ 10nm-OA significantly upregulated 3HfcpA expression (P < 0.05), while 20 nm-PVP treatment group didn't show any significant change. Exposed diatom demonstrated sensitive photosynthesis response to small size and PVP coated silver nanoparticles at molecular level. This study suggested that the toxicity of AgNPs to marine microalgae was largely controlled by the particle size, surface coating, exposure medium, exposure concentration and other factors. The smaller the particle size, the greater the toxicity of AgNPs, and the particle size of AgNPs played an important role in the toxicity of AgNPs in marine diatom S. costatum. PMID:27506055

  6. Cortical Thickness, Surface Area and Subcortical Volume Differentially Contribute to Cognitive Heterogeneity in Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Stan F.; Berendse, Henk W.; Foncke, Elisabeth M. J.; Klein, Martin; Stoffers, Diederick; van der Werf, Ysbrand D.; van den Heuvel, Odile A.

    2016-01-01

    Parkinson’s disease (PD) is often associated with cognitive deficits, although their severity varies considerably between patients. Recently, we used voxel-based morphometry (VBM) to show that individual differences in gray matter (GM) volume relate to cognitive heterogeneity in PD. VBM does, however, not differentiate between cortical thickness (CTh) and surface area (SA), which might be independently affected in PD. We therefore re-analyzed our cohort using the surface-based method FreeSurfer, and investigated (i) CTh, SA, and (sub)cortical GM volume differences between 93 PD patients and 45 matched controls, and (ii) the relation between these structural measures and cognitive performance on six neuropsychological tasks within the PD group. We found cortical thinning in PD patients in the left pericalcarine gyrus, extending to cuneus, precuneus and lingual areas and left inferior parietal cortex, bilateral rostral middle frontal cortex, and right cuneus, and increased cortical surface area in the left pars triangularis. Within the PD group, we found negative correlations between (i) CTh of occipital areas and performance on a verbal memory task, (ii) SA and volume of the frontal cortex and visuospatial memory performance, and, (iii) volume of the right thalamus and scores on two verbal fluency tasks. Our primary findings illustrate that i) CTh and SA are differentially affected in PD, and ii) VBM and FreeSurfer yield non-overlapping results in an identical dataset. We argue that this discrepancy is due to technical differences and the subtlety of the PD-related structural changes. PMID:26919667

  7. The cloud and surface contributions to the net radiation balance during the 1982-83 El Nino

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sohn, Byung-Ju; Smith, Eric A.

    1989-01-01

    This paper investigates the interannual fluctuations in cloud and surface forcing associated with the unusually intense ENSO event of 1982-1983. The analysis was performed over a six-year period for which global radiation budget and cloudiness measurements from the Nimbus-7 experiments were available simultaneously. It is shown that major anomalies in cloudiness, due mostly to shifts of a major convective center in the Pacific Ocean associated with inactive or active ENSO phase, are most notable over the equatorial central Pacific, the maritime continent over the western Pacific, the South Pacific convergence zone, and the Indian Ocean.

  8. A Minimal Two-band Model for the Superconducting Fe-pnictides

    SciTech Connect

    Raghu, S.

    2010-03-25

    Following the discovery of the Fe-pnictide superconductors, LDA band structure calculations showed that the dominant contributions to the spectral weight near the Fermi energy came from the Fe 3d orbitals. The Fermi surface is characterized by two hole surfaces around the {Lambda} point and two electron surfaces around the M point of the 2 Fe/cell Brillouin zone. Here, we describe a 2-band model that reproduces the topology of the LDA Fermi surface and exhibits both ferromagnetic and q = ({pi}, 0) spin density wave (SDW) fluctuations. We argue that this minimal model contains the essential low energy physics of these materials.

  9. Minimal Doubling and Point Splitting

    SciTech Connect

    Creutz, M.

    2010-06-14

    Minimally-doubled chiral fermions have the unusual property of a single local field creating two fermionic species. Spreading the field over hypercubes allows construction of combinations that isolate specific modes. Combining these fields into bilinears produces meson fields of specific quantum numbers. Minimally-doubled fermion actions present the possibility of fast simulations while maintaining one exact chiral symmetry. They do, however, introduce some peculiar aspects. An explicit breaking of hyper-cubic symmetry allows additional counter-terms to appear in the renormalization. While a single field creates two different species, spreading this field over nearby sites allows isolation of specific states and the construction of physical meson operators. Finally, lattice artifacts break isospin and give two of the three pseudoscalar mesons an additional contribution to their mass. Depending on the sign of this mass splitting, one can either have a traditional Goldstone pseudoscalar meson or a parity breaking Aoki-like phase.

  10. Contribution of Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSI) to map surface displacement in the Travale - Radicondoli Geothermal area (Tuscany, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botteghi, S.; Del Ventisette, C.; Montanari, D.; Manzella, A.; Moretti, S.

    2012-12-01

    Synthetic Aperture Radar Interferometry (InSAR) has been successfully used to map the deformation of the earth surface. Multi-interferogram techniques, known as Persistent Scatterer Interferometry (PSInSAR), are a powerful tools to monitoring surface deformation connected with seismic and volcanic activity, landslides, and subsidence due to fluid extraction. The availability of many data acquired by space agencies, as well as European Space Agency (ESA), and the high spatial resolution of PSI methodology, allow to reconstruct the temporal evolution of the ground surface deformations, measuring relative displacements of individual points (Permanent Scatterers, or PS) and estimating the velocity of deformation recorded in the period covered by satellites acquisitions. The possibility to detect the continuous ground surface displacement can provide an important information about reservoir behavior during production, helping to improve the development of a geothermal field (e.g. Hole et al. 2007; JVGR). The present study aims to test PSInSAR techniques over Travale-Radicondoli area, in order to assess the surface deformation connected with the exploitation of this geothermal field. The Travale-Radicondoli area is located about 15 km E-SE of the well-known Larderello-geothermal filed - southwestern Tuscany, Italy-, extending at the south-western margin of the Anqua-Radicondoli Basin. In this area two different reservoir have been identified: a shallow steam dominated reservoir, consisting of carbonate and evaporitic units, and a deep superheated steam reservoir, within metamorphic basement units and thermometamorphic rocks. Industrial exploitation of geothermal resources in the Travale-Radicondoli area began in 1950 and concerned only a small zone on the southern margin of the area, known as the "old field", characterized by a water dominated system. Since 1973, an intensive exploitation started in a more productive area located north-east of the "old field", where the

  11. Atmospheric fluxes of organic matter to the Mediterranean Sea: contribution to the elemental C: N: P ratios of surface dissolved organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Djaoudi, Kahina; Barani, Aude; Hélias-Nunige, Sandra; Van Wambeke, France; Pulido-Villena, Elvira

    2016-04-01

    It has become increasingly apparent that atmospheric transport plays an important role in the supply of macro- and micro-nutrients to the surface ocean. This atmospheric input is especially important in oligotrophic regions where the vertical supply from the subsurface is low particularly during the stratification period. Compared to its inorganic counterpart, the organic fraction of atmospheric deposition and its impact on surface ocean biogeochemistry has been poorly explored. In the ocean, carbon export to depth (and therefore, its long term storage with presumed consequences on climate) occurs both through particle sedimentation and through the transfer of dissolved organic matter (DOM) via diffusion or convection. DOM export from the surface ocean represents up to 50% of total organic carbon flux to the deep ocean in oligotrophic regions such as the Mediterranean Sea. The efficiency of this C export pathway depends, among others, on the elemental C: N: P ratios of surface DOM which might be affected by the relative contribution of microbial processes and allochthonous sources. This work reports a one-year time-series (April 2015-April 2016) of simultaneous measurements of (1) total (dry + wet) atmospheric fluxes of organic carbon, organic nitrogen, and organic phosphorus and (2) concentration of dissolved organic carbon, dissolved organic nitrogen, and dissolved organic phosphate at the surface layer (0-200 m) in the NW Mediterranean Sea. Atmospheric and oceanic surveys were conducted at the Frioul and ANTARES sites, respectively, operated by the long-term observation network MOOSE (Mediterranean Oceanic Observation System for the Environment).

  12. Gaseous deposition contributes to the contamination of surface waters by pesticides close to treated fields. A process-based model study.

    PubMed

    Bedos, Carole; Loubet, Benjamin; Barriuso, Enrique

    2013-12-17

    The contribution of atmospheric pathways to surface waters contamination by pesticides has been demonstrated. At the local scale, modeling approaches as well as measurements show situations where the contribution of gaseous dry deposition is of the same order or even higher than the drift contribution. The approach presented here consists in estimating the gaseous emissions of pesticides applied in the field, their atmospheric dispersion, and finally their gaseous deposition into aquatic ecosystems at the local scale by running process-based models, that is, the one-dimensional model for pesticide volatilization following application on bare soil (Volt'Air) and the local-scale dispersion and deposition model (FIDES-2D), adapted for pesticides. A significant number of scenarios describes contrasted situations in terms of pedoclimatic conditions (covering 9 years of meteorological data), periods of pesticide application per year, physicochemical properties of the pesticides, and spatial configurations. The identification of the main factors governing gaseous deposition led to the definition of an effective emission factor which explains a large part of the deposition variability. Based on the model outputs, deposition curves are proposed, as a base for a new tool to assess the contribution of gaseous deposition to nontarget ecosystem contamination. PMID:24206530

  13. Development of an Advanced Technique to Correct Along-Track InSAR-Derived Surface Current Fields for Contributions of Wave Motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, C.; Romeiser, R.; Reniers, A.; MacMahan, J.

    2014-12-01

    The feasibility of surface current measurements by airborne and spaceborne along-track interferometric synthetic aperture radar (along-track InSAR) has been demonstrated on a number of occasions. Since the Doppler shifts detected by the radar include contributions of surface wave motions, a correction for these contributions has to be applied, which is often estimated as a mean correction for the entire current field on the basis of a simple theoretical model. In coastal areas and river estuaries with complex current and wave patterns, this approach is not adequate because one has to account for spatial variations in the wave field and in the corresponding corrections for the current field, which can be on the same order of magnitude as the actual surface currents of interest. Here we test the ability of a numerical near-shore hindcast model (Delft3D) to produce a wave field to be used for more appropriate computations of corrections for the along-track InSAR data. Our study was conducted at the mouth of the Columbia River on the West Coast of the U.S. during the spring of 2013. Over the course of the experiment, seven TerraSAR-X along-track InSAR images were acquired as well as a variety of in-situ data sets, such as trajectories of GPS-equipped Lagrangian drifters and velocity profiles from acoustic Doppler current profilers (ADCP). We use the in-situ data to validate our Delft3D model results, and we try to relate spatially varying differences between the measured and simulated surface currents and the TerraSAR-X derived Doppler velocities to the wave spectra obtained from Delft3D and to wave patterns observed in the SAR images. The long-term objective of this work is to derive the wave information and the corresponding velocity corrections from signatures contained in the along-track InSAR data set itself, such that a completely self-consistent correction of along-track InSAR-derived surface current fields for the contributions of spatially varying wave motions

  14. Contribution of the left anterior myocardium to the body surface potentials in case of apical ectopic beat.

    PubMed

    Väisänen, Juho; Requena-Carrión, Jesús; Alonso-Atienza, Felipe; Rojo-Alvarez, José Luis; Malmivuo, Jaakko; Hyttinen, Jari

    2007-01-01

    The present paper describes a study where effects of anterior myocardium on body surface potentials were investigated. The study combines numerical lead field analysis combined with cardiac automata model. Electric fields are calculated with finite difference method in a 3-D model of male thorax. The cardiac activation applied in the study is an ectopic beat originating in the apex. The correlations and mean differences between signal generated by anterior segments of left ventricle and signal generated by both ventricles were analysed for 117 leads. The results show that there are leads which have high correlation (>0.9) with low the relative mean difference (<0.2) between the signals generated by anterior segments and signals generated by whole ventricles. These electrode locations would be optimal to monitor the activation of anterior segments when ectopic beats originate in apex. PMID:18002110

  15. Protons migrate along interfacial water without significant contributions from jumps between ionizable groups on the membrane surface

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Andreas; Hagen, Volker; Cherepanov, Dmitry A.; Antonenko, Yuri N.; Pohl, Peter

    2011-01-01

    Proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as energy transduction. Commonly, it is treated as a succession of jumps between membrane-anchored proton-binding sites. Our experiments provide evidence for an alternative model. We released membrane-bound caged protons by UV flashes and monitored their arrival at distant sites by fluorescence measurements. The kinetics of the arrival is probed as a function of distance for different membranes and for different water isotopes. We found that proton diffusion along the membrane is fast even in the absence of ionizable groups in the membrane, and it decreases strongly in D2O as compared to H2O. We conclude that the fast proton transport along the membrane is dominated by diffusion via interfacial water, and not via ionizable lipid moieties. PMID:21859952

  16. Protons migrate along interfacial water without significant contributions from jumps between ionizable groups on the membrane surface.

    PubMed

    Springer, Andreas; Hagen, Volker; Cherepanov, Dmitry A; Antonenko, Yuri N; Pohl, Peter

    2011-08-30

    Proton diffusion along membrane surfaces is thought to be essential for many cellular processes such as energy transduction. Commonly, it is treated as a succession of jumps between membrane-anchored proton-binding sites. Our experiments provide evidence for an alternative model. We released membrane-bound caged protons by UV flashes and monitored their arrival at distant sites by fluorescence measurements. The kinetics of the arrival is probed as a function of distance for different membranes and for different water isotopes. We found that proton diffusion along the membrane is fast even in the absence of ionizable groups in the membrane, and it decreases strongly in D(2)O as compared to H(2)O. We conclude that the fast proton transport along the membrane is dominated by diffusion via interfacial water, and not via ionizable lipid moieties. PMID:21859952

  17. LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-02-14

    This document is the February 14, 1990 version of the LLNL Waste Minimization Program Plan (WMPP). The Waste Minimization Policy field has undergone continuous changes since its formal inception in the 1984 HSWA legislation. The first LLNL WMPP, Revision A, is dated March 1985. A series of informal revision were made on approximately a semi-annual basis. This Revision 2 is the third formal issuance of the WMPP document. EPA has issued a proposed new policy statement on source reduction and recycling. This policy reflects a preventative strategy to reduce or eliminate the generation of environmentally-harmful pollutants which may be released to the air, land surface, water, or ground water. In accordance with this new policy new guidance to hazardous waste generators on the elements of a Waste Minimization Program was issued. In response to these policies, DOE has revised and issued implementation guidance for DOE Order 5400.1, Waste Minimization Plan and Waste Reduction reporting of DOE Hazardous, Radioactive, and Radioactive Mixed Wastes, final draft January 1990. This WMPP is formatted to meet the current DOE guidance outlines. The current WMPP will be revised to reflect all of these proposed changes when guidelines are established. Updates, changes and revisions to the overall LLNL WMPP will be made as appropriate to reflect ever-changing regulatory requirements. 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. The metal-insulator transition in vanadium dioxide: A view at bulk and surface contributions for thin films and the effect of annealing

    SciTech Connect

    Yin, W.; West, K. G.; Lu, J. W.; Pei, Y.; Wolf, S. A.; Reinke, P.; Sun, Y.

    2009-06-01

    Vanadium dioxide is investigated as potential oxide barrier in spin switches, and in order to incorporate VO{sub 2} layers in complex multilayer devices, it is necessary to understand the relation between bulk and surface/interface properties. Highly oriented VO{sub 2} thin films were grown on (0001) sapphire single crystal substrates with reactive bias target ion beam deposition. In the analysis of the VO{sub 2} films, bulk-sensitive methods [x-ray diffraction (XRD) and transport measurements] and surface sensitive techniques [photoelectron spectroscopy (PES) and scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy] were employed. The samples were subjected to heating cycles with annealing temperatures of up to 425 and 525 K. Prior to annealing the VO{sub 2} films exhibit the transition from the monoclinic to the tetragonal phase with the concurrent change in conductivity by more than a factor of 10{sup 3} and their phase purity is confirmed by XRD. Annealing to 425 K and thus cycling across the metal-insulator transition (MIT) temperature has no impact on the bulk properties of the VO{sub 2} film but the surface undergoes irreversible electronic changes. The observation of the valence band with PES during the annealing illustrates that the surface adopts a partially metallic character, which is retained after cooling. Annealing to a higher temperature (525 K) triggers a modification of the bulk, which is evidenced by a considerable reduction in the MIT characteristics, and a degradation in crystallite morphology. The local measurement of the conductivity with scanning tunneling spectroscopy shows the transition of the surface from predominantly semiconducting surface prior to annealing to a surface with an overwhelming contribution from metallic sections afterward. The spatial distribution of metallic regions cannot be linked in a unique manner to the crystallite size or location within the crystallites. The onset of oxygen depletion at the surface is held responsible

  19. Analysis of the total solar irradiance composite and their contribution to global mean air surface temperature rise

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scafetta, N.

    2008-12-01

    Herein I discuss and propose updated satellite composites of the total solar irradiance covering the period 1978-2008. The composites are compiled from measurements made with the three ACRIM experiments. Measurements from the NIMBUS7/ERB, the ERBS/ERBE satellite experiments and a total solar irradiance proxy reconstruction are used to fill the gap from June 1989 to October 1991 between ACRIM1 and ACRIM2 experiments. The result of the analysis does suggests that the total solar irradiance did increase from 1980 to 2002. The climate implications of the alternative satellite composites are discussed by using a phenomenological climate model which depends on two characteristics time response at tau1 =0.4 year and tau2=8-12 years, as determined phenomenologically [Scafetta, JGR 2008]. Reconstructions of total solar irradiance signature on climate during the last four centuries are discussed. The solar variability appears to have significantly contributed to climate change during the last four centuries, including the last century. Indirectly, the model suggests that the preindustrial climate experienced a large variability which is incompatible with an Hockey Stick temperature graph.

  20. Minimally Invasive Valve Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Pope, Nicolas H.; Ailawadi, Gorav

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac valve surgery is life saving for many patients. The advent of minimally invasive surgical techniques has historically allowed for improvement in both post-operative convalescence and important clinical outcomes. The development of minimally invasive cardiac valve repair and replacement surgery over the past decade is poised to revolutionize the care of cardiac valve patients. Here, we present a review of the history and current trends in minimally invasive aortic and mitral valve repair and replacement, including the development of sutureless bioprosthetic valves. PMID:24797148

  1. Resonance Raman spectra of organic molecules absorbed on inorganic semiconducting surfaces: Contribution from both localized intramolecular excitation and intermolecular charge transfer excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Ye, ChuanXiang; Zhao, Yi E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn; Liang, WanZhen E-mail: liangwz@xmu.edu.cn

    2015-10-21

    The time-dependent correlation function approach for the calculations of absorption and resonance Raman spectra (RRS) of organic molecules absorbed on semiconductor surfaces [Y. Zhao and W. Z. Liang, J. Chem. Phys. 135, 044108 (2011)] is extended to include the contribution of the intermolecular charge transfer (CT) excitation from the absorbers to the semiconducting nanoparticles. The results demonstrate that the bidirectionally interfacial CT significantly modifies the spectral line shapes. Although the intermolecular CT excitation makes the absorption spectra red shift slightly, it essentially changes the relative intensities of mode-specific RRS and causes the oscillation behavior of surface enhanced Raman spectra with respect to interfacial electronic couplings. Furthermore, the constructive and destructive interferences of RRS from the localized molecular excitation and CT excitation are observed with respect to the electronic coupling and the bottom position of conductor band. The interferences are determined by both excitation pathways and bidirectionally interfacial CT.

  2. Prostate resection - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... are: Erection problems (impotence) No symptom improvement Passing semen back into your bladder instead of out through ... Whelan JP, Goeree L. Systematic review and meta-analysis of transurethral resection of the prostate versus minimally ...

  3. Minimizing Shortness of Breath

    MedlinePlus

    ... Top Doctors in the Nation Departments & Divisions Home Health Insights Stress & Relaxation Breathing and Relaxation Minimizing Shortness of Breath ... Management Assess Your Stress Coping Strategies Identifying ... & Programs Health Insights Doctors & Departments Research & Science Education & Training Make ...

  4. Minimally invasive hip replacement

    MedlinePlus

    ... Smits SA, Swinford RR, Bahamonde RE. A randomized, prospective study of 3 minimally invasive surgical approaches in total hip arthroplasty: comprehensive gait analysis. J Arthroplasty . 2008;23:68-73. PMID: 18722305 ...

  5. Minimal Orderings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    When minimum orderings proved too difficult to deal with, Rose, Tarjan, and Leuker instead studied minimal orderings and how to compute them (Algorithmic aspects of vertex elimination on graphs, SIAM J. Comput., 5:266-283, 1976). This paper introduces an algorithm that is capable of computing much better minimal orderings much more efficiently than the algorithm in Rose et al. The new insight is a way to use certain structures and concepts from modern sparse Cholesky solvers to re-express one of the basic results in Rose et al. The new algorithm begins with any initial ordering and then refines it until a minimal ordering is obtained. it is simple to obtain high-quality low-cost minimal orderings by using fill-reducing heuristic orderings as initial orderings for the algorithm. We examine several such initial orderings in some detail.

  6. Minimalism. Clip and Save.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hubbard, Guy

    2002-01-01

    Provides background information on the art movement called "Minimalism" discussing why it started and its characteristics. Includes learning activities and information on the artist, Donald Judd. Includes a reproduction of one of his art works and discusses its content. (CMK)

  7. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D.W.; Bennett, B.L.; Cockroft, N.J.

    1998-09-08

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal. 5 figs.

  8. Minimizing radiation damage in nonlinear optical crystals

    DOEpatents

    Cooke, D. Wayne; Bennett, Bryan L.; Cockroft, Nigel J.

    1998-01-01

    Methods are disclosed for minimizing laser induced damage to nonlinear crystals, such as KTP crystals, involving various means for electrically grounding the crystals in order to diffuse electrical discharges within the crystals caused by the incident laser beam. In certain embodiments, electrically conductive material is deposited onto or into surfaces of the nonlinear crystals and the electrically conductive surfaces are connected to an electrical ground. To minimize electrical discharges on crystal surfaces that are not covered by the grounded electrically conductive material, a vacuum may be created around the nonlinear crystal.

  9. Computer Simulation of Sputtering of Lunar Regolith by Solar Wind Protons: Contribution to Change of Surface Composition and to Hydrogen Flux at the Lunar Poles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starukhina, L. V.

    2003-01-01

    A computer simulation of the sputtering of lunar soil by solar wind protons was performed with the TRIM program. The rate of the sputtering-induced erosion of regolith particles was shown to be less than 0.2 Å per year. A preferential sputtering of Ca, Mg, and O was found along with a less intense sputtering of Fe, Si, and Ti. However, with no other selection mechanisms, surface concentrations of the atoms would differ from the volume ones by no more than 6 %. The enrichment of rims of regolith particles with iron occurs as a result of selective removal of lighter atoms from the lunar surface because of different energies of escape from the Moon's gravity. The energy distributions proved to be the same for all sorts of the sputtered atoms, except for implanted hydrogen; thus, a greater fraction of the atoms left on the lunar surface corresponds to heavier elements. According to simulation results, the concentration of reduced iron observed in the mature regolith could be attained during the time of regolith particle exposure to the present flux of solar wind (105 years). Thus, sputtering can provide the concentration of Fe0 observed in regolith. On periphery of a cloud of impact vapor the temperature is too low for an irreversible selective removal of evaporation products; thus, a meteoritic bombardment contributes to the formation of composition of the rims of regolith particles mainly through enrichment of the rims with elements from the bulk of the particles. The estimates of fluxes of backscattered solar wind protons and of sputtered protons, earlier implanted to the regolith, demonstrated that their contribution to the proton flux near the poles is only 104 cm-2 s-1. This is by two orders of magnitude smaller than the proton flux from the Earth's magnetosphere which is, therefore, the main source of protons for permanently shaded polar craters of the Moon.

  10. Minimally invasive procedures

    PubMed Central

    Baltayiannis, Nikolaos; Michail, Chandrinos; Lazaridis, George; Anagnostopoulos, Dimitrios; Baka, Sofia; Mpoukovinas, Ioannis; Karavasilis, Vasilis; Lampaki, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive procedures, which include laparoscopic surgery, use state-of-the-art technology to reduce the damage to human tissue when performing surgery. Minimally invasive procedures require small “ports” from which the surgeon inserts thin tubes called trocars. Carbon dioxide gas may be used to inflate the area, creating a space between the internal organs and the skin. Then a miniature camera (usually a laparoscope or endoscope) is placed through one of the trocars so the surgical team can view the procedure as a magnified image on video monitors in the operating room. Specialized equipment is inserted through the trocars based on the type of surgery. There are some advanced minimally invasive surgical procedures that can be performed almost exclusively through a single point of entry—meaning only one small incision, like the “uniport” video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS). Not only do these procedures usually provide equivalent outcomes to traditional “open” surgery (which sometimes require a large incision), but minimally invasive procedures (using small incisions) may offer significant benefits as well: (I) faster recovery; (II) the patient remains for less days hospitalized; (III) less scarring and (IV) less pain. In our current mini review we will present the minimally invasive procedures for thoracic surgery. PMID:25861610

  11. Risk Factors at Time of Primary ACL Reconstruction that Contribute to Significant Chondral Surface Change at Time of Revision ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Kaeding, Christopher C.; Group, Mars

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Articular cartilage health is an important issue following primary anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction (ACLR). It is not clear what risk factors at the time of primary reconstruction affect future articular cartilage health. The purpose of this study was to examine risk factors affecting chondral surface change in a cohort from the time of primary ACLR to revision ACLR. Methods: Subjects who had both primary and revision data contained in the MOON and MARS registries were included. Data included chondral surface status (grade and size) at time of primary and revision, meniscal status (no treatment/repair, ≤33% excision, >33% excision) at time of primary, time from primary to revision ACLR, and age, sex, BMI, Marx, KOOS, and IKDC at time of revision. Significant chondral surface change was defined as >25% deterioration between time of primary and revision in the femoral condyle, tibial plateau, patella, or trochlea. Logistic regression was used to test each variable’s contribution to significant chondral surface change in the medial compartment, lateral compartment, and patellofemoral compartment. Results: 134 subjects met our inclusion criteria. 34/134 (25.4%) had significant lateral compartment chondral surface change, 32/134 (23.9%) had significant medial compartment chondral surface change, and 31/134 (23.1%) had significant patellofemoral chondral surface change. Median age at time of revision was 19.5 years [IQ range 17-25] and median time from primary to revision was 462.5 days [IQ range 292-1049]. KOOS and IKDC at revision were not associated with significant chondral surface change in any compartment. Patients with >33% of their lateral meniscus excised had 13.5 times the odds of having significant lateral compartment surface change compared to subjects who either did not have lateral meniscal damage, had it repaired, or had an excision of ≤33% controlling for age (p<0.001). Patients with ≤33% excision of their medial meniscus had

  12. Minimally Invasive Radiofrequency Devices.

    PubMed

    Sadick, Neil; Rothaus, Kenneth O

    2016-07-01

    This article reviews minimally invasive radiofrequency options for skin tightening, focusing on describing their mechanism of action and clinical profile in terms of safety and efficacy and presenting peer-reviewed articles associated with the specific technologies. Treatments offered by minimally invasive radiofrequency devices (fractional, microneedling, temperature-controlled) are increasing in popularity due to the dramatic effects they can have without requiring skin excision, downtime, or even extreme financial burden from the patient's perspective. Clinical applications thus far have yielded impressive results in treating signs of the aging face and neck, either as stand-alone or as postoperative maintenance treatments. PMID:27363771

  13. Surface Defects on Plate-Shaped Silver Nanoparticles Contribute to Its Hazard Potential in a Fish Gill Cell Line and Zebrafish Embyos

    PubMed Central

    George, Saji; Lin, Sijie; Ji, Zhaoxia; Thomas, Courtney; Li, LinJiang; Mecklenburg, Mathew; Meng, Huan; Wang, Xiang; Zhang, Haiyuan; Xia, Tian; Lin, Shuo; Hohman, J. Nathan; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Weiss, Paul; Nel, André E.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated and compared nano-size Ag spheres, plates, and wires in a fish gill epithelial cell line (RT-W1) and in zebrafish embryos to understand the mechanism of toxicity of an engineered nanomaterial raising considerable environmental concern. While most of the Ag nanoparticles induced N-acetyl cysteine sensitive toxic oxidative stress effects in RT-W1, Ag nanoplates were considerably more toxic than other particle shapes. Interestingly, while Ag ion shedding and bioavailability failed to explain the high toxicity of the nanoplates, cellular injury required direct particle contact, resulting in cell membrane lysis in RT-W1 as well as red blood cells (RBC). Ag nanoplates were also considerably more toxic in zebrafish embryos in spite of their lesser ability to shed Ag into the exposure medium. In order to elucidate the “surface reactivity” of Ag nanoplates, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy was performed and demonstrated a high level of crystal defects (stacking faults and point defects) on the nanoplate surfaces. Surface coating with cysteine was used to passivate the surface defects and demonstrated a reduction of toxicity in RT-W1 cells, RBC, and zebrafish embryos. This study demonstrates the important role of crystal defects in contributing to Ag nanoparticle toxicity in addition to the established roles of Ag ion shed from spherical nanoparticles. The excellent correlation between the in vitro and in vivo toxicological assessment illustrates the utility of using a fish cell line in parallel with zebrafish embryos to perform a predictive environmental toxicological paradigm. PMID:22482460

  14. Relative contributions of sea surface salinity and temperature to density gradient and tropical instability waves: implications to eddy-mean flow interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasson, Audrey; Lee, Tong

    2015-04-01

    With their relatively uniform spatial and temporal sampling, satellite observations have revolutionized the estimates of the spatial derivative fields of various oceanic parameters that are not possible to derive from in-situ measurements on a global scale with sufficient spatial resolutions. For examples, the spatial gradients of sea surface height measurements from altimetry provide information about surface geostrophic currents; those of wind stress make possible the estimates of wind stress curl and divergence; those of sea surface temperature and salinity allow detections of thermal and haline fronts. These spatial derivatives fields are critical to the studies of ocean circulation and air-sea interaction. In particular, the spatial gradients of satellite-derived sea surface temperature and salinity (SST and SSS) have provided an unprecedented opportunity to study density gradient that is important to energy conversion between the background ocean state and the fluctuating flow field such as eddies and waves through baroclinic instability. In this study, we examine eddy-mean flow interaction in tropical oceans by studying the relations between background density gradient and tropical instability wave (TIW) variability using various satellite-derived SSS and SST products. In the equatorial Pacific and Atlantic Oceans, SSS is found to have equal or larger contribution to the background meridional density gradient. This has important consequence to the density variance associated with the TIWs (a proxy for the extraction of available potential energy from the background ocean state to the TIWs). Not accounting for salinity effect would under-estimate the TIW-related density variance by at least a factor of three.

  15. Individual contributions of the human metapneumovirus F, G, and SH surface glycoproteins to the induction of neutralizing antibodies and protective immunity

    SciTech Connect

    Skiadopoulos, Mario H. . E-mail: mskiadopoulos@niaid.nih.gov; Biacchesi, Stephane; Buchholz, Ursula J.; Amaro-Carambot, Emerito; Surman, Sonja R.; Collins, Peter L.; Murphy, Brian R.

    2006-02-20

    We evaluated the individual contributions of the three surface glycoproteins of human metapneumovirus (HMPV), namely the fusion F, attachment G, and small hydrophobic SH proteins, to the induction of serum HMPV-binding antibodies, serum HMPV-neutralizing antibodies, and protective immunity. Using reverse genetics, each HMPV protein was expressed individually from an added gene in recombinant human parainfluenza virus type 1 (rHPIV1) and used to infect hamsters once or twice by the intranasal route. The F protein was highly immunogenic and protective, whereas G and SH were only weakly or negligibly immunogenic and protective, respectively. Thus, in contrast to other paramyxoviruses, the HMPV attachment G protein is not a major neutralization or protective antigen. Also, although the SH protein of HMPV is a virion protein that is much larger than its counterparts in previously studied paramyxoviruses, it does not appear to be a significant neutralization or protective antigen.

  16. Ways To Minimize Bullying.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mueller, Mary Ellen; Parisi, Mary Joy

    This report delineates a series of interventions aimed at minimizing incidences of bullying in a suburban elementary school. The social services staff was scheduled to initiate an anti-bullying incentive in fall 2001 due to the increased occurrences of bullying during the prior year. The target population consisted of third- and fourth-grade…

  17. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery.

    PubMed

    Yiannakopoulou, E

    2015-12-01

    Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery is feasible and safe. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy should be widely adopted for benign lesions of the pancreas. Laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy, although technically demanding, in the setting of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma has a number of advantages including shorter hospital stay, faster recovery, allowing patients to recover in a timelier manner and pursue adjuvant treatment options. Furthermore, it seems that progression-free survival is longer in patients undergoing laparoscopic pancreaticoduodenectomy in comparison with those undergoing open pancreaticoduodenectomy. Minimally invasive middle pancreatectomy seems appropriate for benign or borderline tumors of the neck of the pancreas. Technological advances including intraoperative ultrasound and intraoperative fluorescence imaging systems are expected to facilitate the wide adoption of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. Although, the oncological outcome seems similar with that of open surgery, there are still concerns, as the majority of relevant evidence comes from retrospective studies. Large multicenter randomized studies comparing laparoscopic with open pancreatectomy as well as robotic assisted with both open and laparoscopic approaches are needed. Robotic approach could be possibly shown to be less invasive than conventional laparoscopic approach through the less traumatic intra-abdominal handling of tissues. In addition, robotic approach could enable the wide adoption of the technique by surgeon who is not that trained in advanced laparoscopic surgery. A putative clinical benefit of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery could be the attenuated surgical stress response leading to reduced morbidity and mortality as well as lack of the detrimental immunosuppressive effect especially for the oncological patients. PMID:26530291

  18. The Minimal Era

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Ness, Wilhelmina

    1974-01-01

    Described the development of Minimal Art, a composite name that has been applied to the scattering of bland, bleak, non-objective fine arts painting and sculpture forms that proliferated slightly mysteriously in the middle 1960's as Pop Art began to decline. (Author/RK)

  19. A Novel 2D Image Compression Algorithm Based on Two Levels DWT and DCT Transforms with Enhanced Minimize-Matrix-Size Algorithm for High Resolution Structured Light 3D Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddeq, M. M.; Rodrigues, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Image compression techniques are widely used on 2D image 2D video 3D images and 3D video. There are many types of compression techniques and among the most popular are JPEG and JPEG2000. In this research, we introduce a new compression method based on applying a two level discrete cosine transform (DCT) and a two level discrete wavelet transform (DWT) in connection with novel compression steps for high-resolution images. The proposed image compression algorithm consists of four steps. (1) Transform an image by a two level DWT followed by a DCT to produce two matrices: DC- and AC-Matrix, or low and high frequency matrix, respectively, (2) apply a second level DCT on the DC-Matrix to generate two arrays, namely nonzero-array and zero-array, (3) apply the Minimize-Matrix-Size algorithm to the AC-Matrix and to the other high-frequencies generated by the second level DWT, (4) apply arithmetic coding to the output of previous steps. A novel decompression algorithm, Fast-Match-Search algorithm (FMS), is used to reconstruct all high-frequency matrices. The FMS-algorithm computes all compressed data probabilities by using a table of data, and then using a binary search algorithm for finding decompressed data inside the table. Thereafter, all decoded DC-values with the decoded AC-coefficients are combined in one matrix followed by inverse two levels DCT with two levels DWT. The technique is tested by compression and reconstruction of 3D surface patches. Additionally, this technique is compared with JPEG and JPEG2000 algorithm through 2D and 3D root-mean-square-error following reconstruction. The results demonstrate that the proposed compression method has better visual properties than JPEG and JPEG2000 and is able to more accurately reconstruct surface patches in 3D.

  20. "Workshop to Promote and Coordinate U.S.A. Contributions to AMMA on Land Surface, Water Cycle, Aerosol and Radiation Budget Issues".

    SciTech Connect

    Lamb, Peter

    2008-05-05

    RIMS ID: ER64245-1028054-0012347 Consistent with the original proposal (dated February 28, 2006), the grant supported the participation in the above Workshop of a diverse group of West African, British, and American atmospheric scientists. All of these individuals contributed strongly to Workshop, with the result that ARM’s involvement in and contribution to AMMA was enhanced with respect to land surface, water cycle, aerosol, and radiation issues. Also, the Workshop gave these participants early exposure to ARM’s 2007 CLASIC Campaign over the U.S. Southern Great Plains, which is addressing parts of the same problem complex. The following eight individuals were fully funded (complete airfare, accommodations, registration, meals) to participate in the Workshop -- Dr. Aiguo Dai (NCAR, USA), Dr. Adamou Ousmane Manga (University of Niamey, Niger), Professor Abdelkrim Ben Mohamed (University of Niamey, Niger), Dr. Gary Robinson (University of Reading, UK), Dr. Amadou Gaye (University of Dakar, Senegal), Dr. Anne Jefferson (NOAA, USA), Dr. Aondover Tarhule (University of Oklahoma, USA), and Dr. Sally McFarlane (Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, USA). Partial funding also was provided for Professor Peter Lamb (University of Oklahoma, USA). To deepen the involvement of ARM in AMMA, the grant also paid for participation in the AMMA Special Observing Period in Niamey during August (Professor Peter J. Lamb) and in a follow-up Workshop at Méteo France (Toulouse) in November (Dr. Zeinabou Mindaodou Souley, University of Niamey, Niger; Professor Peter J. Lamb). When he was in Niamey for 11 days in August, Professor Lamb had considerable involvement with the ARM Mobile Facility there. I am confident that the participation of the above individuals in the two AMMA Workshops and the AMMA Special Observing Period strengthened the ARM Program’s contribution to AMMA, increased the associated international attention on ARM, and provided a bridge to the ARM CLASIC Campaign

  1. Challenging the minimal supersymmetric SU(5) model

    SciTech Connect

    Bajc, Borut; Lavignac, Stéphane; Mede, Timon

    2014-06-24

    We review the main constraints on the parameter space of the minimal renormalizable supersymmetric SU(5) grand unified theory. They consist of the Higgs mass, proton decay, electroweak symmetry breaking and fermion masses. Superpartner masses are constrained both from below and from above, giving hope for confirming or definitely ruling out the theory in the future. This contribution is based on Ref. [1].

  2. Urban and agricultural contribution of annual loads of glyphosate and AMPA towards surface waters at the Orge River catchment scale (France)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Botta, Fabrizio; Chevreuil, Marc; Blanchoud, Hélène

    2010-05-01

    exported amounts was carried out at the River scale. Different origins (agricultural zones, urban areas and wastewater treatment plants) were assessed to determine the contribution of each usage. These investigations showed the high impact of storm waters and wastewaters upon the Orge River contamination (90%), whereas the agricultural zone contributed to only 10 % of the glyphosate contamination of the River. Glyphosate contaminates the river by direct flow of rainfall sewers towards surface waters. AMPA in the Orge river originates from both degradation of glyphosate in agricultural soils (29%) and from urban sewers (79%). Glyphosate amount transferred via overflows between sewers is the main source (more than 95%) in wastewaters during application period and rainfall events, but represents only 50% of the annual load in wastewaters that reach treatment plants (WWTP). AMPA, always detected in wastewaters and WWTP, is partly related to domestic wastewaters (18 to 23% of the total load). A difference between glyphosate and AMPA load inputs in the Orge River and outputs load at the outlet was registered: Glyphosate load is decreasing downstream as AMPA is increasing, suggesting a degradation of glyphosate into the river. The rule of sediments could have a significant influence of the dynamic transport of glyphosate. The results of the budget calculation are supported by a strong and logical data collection, coupled with detailed spatial information and consciousness of estimation accuracy. Keywords: Catchment, glyphosate, AMPA, inputs, budget

  3. Instabilities and Solitons in Minimal Strips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P.; Goldstein, Raymond E.; Pesci, Adriana I.

    2016-07-01

    We show that highly twisted minimal strips can undergo a nonsingular transition, unlike the singular transitions seen in the Möbius strip and the catenoid. If the strip is nonorientable, this transition is topologically frustrated, and the resulting surface contains a helicoidal defect. Through a controlled analytic approximation, the system can be mapped onto a scalar ϕ4 theory on a nonorientable line bundle over the circle, where the defect becomes a topologically protected kink soliton or domain wall, thus establishing their existence in minimal surfaces. Demonstrations with soap films confirm these results and show how the position of the defect can be controlled through boundary deformation.

  4. Instabilities and Solitons in Minimal Strips.

    PubMed

    Machon, Thomas; Alexander, Gareth P; Goldstein, Raymond E; Pesci, Adriana I

    2016-07-01

    We show that highly twisted minimal strips can undergo a nonsingular transition, unlike the singular transitions seen in the Möbius strip and the catenoid. If the strip is nonorientable, this transition is topologically frustrated, and the resulting surface contains a helicoidal defect. Through a controlled analytic approximation, the system can be mapped onto a scalar ϕ^{4} theory on a nonorientable line bundle over the circle, where the defect becomes a topologically protected kink soliton or domain wall, thus establishing their existence in minimal surfaces. Demonstrations with soap films confirm these results and show how the position of the defect can be controlled through boundary deformation. PMID:27419593

  5. Minimizing the pain on burnout

    SciTech Connect

    Billings, A.

    1985-03-01

    An investment in an oil and gas shelter warrants an additional investment to fund tax liability on burnout. A relatively liquid and low-risk investment is preferable so as to assure timely satisfaction of tax liability when burnout occurs. If an investor decides to allow the shelter to die a timely death, the investment funds could be used to fund annual tax liability. In situations where a leak develops, the fund will once again be invaluable. When a leak or burnout occurs, investors may be able to do no more than minimize their maximum losses. Relief of debt on most dispositions will be deemed receipt of cash, thus triggering gains. Ordinary income will result by operation of Code Sections 1245, 1250, and 1254. Bankruptcy or a charitable contribution will grant limited reprieve from tax losses; however, economic losses will still result.

  6. The minimal composite Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agashe, Kaustubh; Contino, Roberto; Pomarol, Alex

    2005-07-01

    We study the idea of a composite Higgs in the framework of a five-dimensional AdS theory. We present the minimal model of the Higgs as a pseudo-Goldstone boson in which electroweak symmetry is broken dynamically via top loop effects, all flavour problems are solved, and contributions to electroweak precision observables are below experimental bounds. Since the 5D theory is weakly coupled, we are able to fully determine the Higgs potential and other physical quantities. The lightest resonances are expected to have a mass around 2 TeV and should be discovered at the LHC. The top sector is mostly composite and deviations from Standard Model couplings are expected.

  7. Waste Minimization Crosscut Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-05-13

    On November 27, 1991, the Secretary of Energy directed that a Department of Energy (DOE) crosscut plan for waste minimization (WMin) be prepared and submitted by March 1, 1992. This Waste Minimization Crosscut Plan responds to the Secretary`s direction and supports the National Energy Strategy (NES) goals of achieving greater energy security, increasing energy and economic efficiency, and enhancing environmental quality. It provides a DOE-wide planning framework for effective coordination of all DOE WMin activities. This Plan was jointly prepared by the following Program Secretarial Officer (PSO) organizations: Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (RW); Conservation and Renewable Energy (CE); Defense Programs (DP); Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), lead; Energy Research (ER); Fossil Energy (FE); Nuclear Energy (NE); and New Production Reactors (NP). Assistance and guidance was provided by the offices of Policy, Planning, and Analysis (PE) and Environment, Safety and Health (EH). Comprehensive application of waste minimization within the Department and in both the public and private sectors will provide significant benefits and support National Energy Strategy goals. These benefits include conservation of a substantial proportion of the energy now used by industry and Government, improved environmental quality, reduced health risks, improved production efficiencies, and longer useful life of disposal capacity. Taken together, these benefits will mean improved US global competitiveness, expanded job opportunities, and a better quality of life for all citizens.

  8. Minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Costello, D; Norman, J

    1999-07-01

    The last decade has been characterized by an emphasis on minimizing interventional techniques, hospital stays, and overall costs of patient care. It is clear that most patients with sporadic HPT do not require a complete neck exploration. We now know that a minimal approach is appropriate for this disease. Importantly, the MIRP technique can be applied to most patients with sporadic HPT and can be performed by surgeons with modest advanced training. The use of a gamma probe as a surgical tool converts the sestamibi to a functional and anatomical scan eliminating the need for any other preoperative localizing study. Quantification of the radioactivity within the removed gland eliminates the need for routine frozen section histologic examination and obviates the need for costly intraoperative parathyroid hormone measurements. This radioguided technique allows the benefit of local anesthesia, dramatically reduces operative times, eliminates postoperative blood tests, provides a smaller scar, requires minimal time spent in the hospital, and almost assures a rapid, near pain-free recovery. This combination is beneficial to the patient whereas helping achieve a reduction in overall costs. PMID:10448697

  9. How much have variations in the meridional overturning circulation contributed to sea surface temperature trends since 1850? A study with the EC-Earth global climate model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmith, Torben; Yang, Shuting; Gleeson, Emily; Semmler, Tido

    2014-05-01

    The surface of the worlds' oceans has been warming since the beginning of industrialisation mainly due to larger atmospheric greenhouse gas concentrations. In addition to that multidecadal SST variations of internal origin exist. Evidence points to the North Atlantic Ocean as exhibiting the strongest multidecadal SST variations and that these variations are connected to the overturning circulation. In this work we investigate the extent to which these internal multidecadal variations have contributed to enhancing or diminishing the trend induced by the external radiative forcing globally and in the North Atlantic. We do so in a model study where we combine the analysis of a long control simulation with constant forcing corresponding to preindustrial conditions and an ensemble of simulations with historical forcing from 1850 until 2005. First we note that global SST trends calculated from the different historical simulations are similar, while there is a large disagreement between the North Atlantic SST trends. Then we analyse the control simulation, where we identify a relationship between SST anomalies and anomalies in the Atlantic Meridional Overturning Circulation (AMOC) for multidecadal and longer time scales. This relationship enables us to extract the AMOC-related SST variability from each individual member of the ensemble of historical simulations and then to calculate the SST trends with the AMOC-related variability excluded. For the global SST trends this causes only a little difference while SST trends with AMOC related variability excluded for the North Atlantic show closer agreement than with the AMOC-related variability included. From this we conclude that AMOC variability contributed significantly to North Atlantic SST trends since the mid 19th century.

  10. Aerosol Direct, Indirect, Semidirect, and Surface Albedo Effects from Sector Contributions Based on the IPCC AR5 Emissions for Preindustrial and Present-day Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m(exp 2), with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m(exp 2)). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m(exp 2)) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m(exp 2)) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m(exp 2)), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each

  11. Aerosol direct, indirect, semidirect, and surface albedo effects from sector contributions based on the IPCC AR5 emissions for preindustrial and present-day conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi

    2012-01-01

    The anthropogenic increase in aerosol concentrations since preindustrial times and its net cooling effect on the atmosphere is thought to mask some of the greenhouse gas-induced warming. Although the overall effect of aerosols on solar radiation and clouds is most certainly negative, some individual forcing agents and feedbacks have positive forcing effects. Recent studies have tried to identify some of those positive forcing agents and their individual emission sectors, with the hope that mitigation policies could be developed to target those emitters. Understanding the net effect of multisource emitting sectors and the involved cloud feedbacks is very challenging, and this paper will clarify forcing and feedback effects by separating direct, indirect, semidirect and surface albedo effects due to aerosols. To this end, we apply the Goddard Institute for Space Studies climate model including detailed aerosol microphysics to examine aerosol impacts on climate by isolating single emission sector contributions as given by the Coupled Model Intercomparison Project Phase 5 (CMIP5) emission data sets developed for Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) AR5. For the modeled past 150 years, using the climate model and emissions from preindustrial times to present-day, the total global annual mean aerosol radiative forcing is -0.6 W/m2, with the largest contribution from the direct effect (-0.5 W/m2). Aerosol-induced changes on cloud cover often depends on cloud type and geographical region. The indirect (includes only the cloud albedo effect with -0.17 W/m2) and semidirect effects (-0.10 W/m2) can be isolated on a regional scale, and they often have opposing forcing effects, leading to overall small forcing effects on a global scale. Although the surface albedo effects from aerosols are small (0.016 W/m2), triggered feedbacks on top of the atmosphere (TOA) radiative forcing can be 10 times larger. Our results point out that each emission sector has varying

  12. Porous V2O5/RGO/CNT hierarchical architecture as a cathode material: Emphasis on the contribution of surface lithium storage

    PubMed Central

    Palanisamy, Kowsalya; Um, Ji Hyun; Jeong, Mihee; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2016-01-01

    A three dimensional vanadium pentoxide/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (3D V2O5/RGO/CNT) composite is synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The combination of 2D RGO and 1D CNT establishes continuous 3D conductive network, and most notably, the 1D CNT is designed to form hierarchically porous structure by penetrating into V2O5 microsphere assembly constituted of numerous V2O5 nanoparticles. The highly porous V2O5 microsphere enhances electrolyte contact and shortens Li+ diffusion path as a consequence of its developed surface area and mesoporosity. The successive phase transformations of 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT from α-phase to ε-, δ-, γ-, and ω-phase and its structural reversibility upon Li+ intercalation/de-intercalation are investigated by in situ XRD analysis, and the electronic and local structure reversibility around vanadium atom in 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT is observed by in situ XANES analysis. The 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT achieves a high capacity of 220 mAh g−1 at 1 C after 80 cycles and an excellent rate capability of 100 mAh g−1 even at a considerably high rate of 20 C. The porous 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT structure not only provides facile Li+ diffusion into bulk but contributes to surface Li+ storage as well, which enables the design of 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT composite to become a promising cathode architecture for high performance LIBs. PMID:27511434

  13. Porous V2O5/RGO/CNT hierarchical architecture as a cathode material: Emphasis on the contribution of surface lithium storage.

    PubMed

    Palanisamy, Kowsalya; Um, Ji Hyun; Jeong, Mihee; Yoon, Won-Sub

    2016-01-01

    A three dimensional vanadium pentoxide/reduced graphene oxide/carbon nanotube (3D V2O5/RGO/CNT) composite is synthesized by microwave-assisted hydrothermal method. The combination of 2D RGO and 1D CNT establishes continuous 3D conductive network, and most notably, the 1D CNT is designed to form hierarchically porous structure by penetrating into V2O5 microsphere assembly constituted of numerous V2O5 nanoparticles. The highly porous V2O5 microsphere enhances electrolyte contact and shortens Li(+) diffusion path as a consequence of its developed surface area and mesoporosity. The successive phase transformations of 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT from α-phase to ε-, δ-, γ-, and ω-phase and its structural reversibility upon Li(+) intercalation/de-intercalation are investigated by in situ XRD analysis, and the electronic and local structure reversibility around vanadium atom in 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT is observed by in situ XANES analysis. The 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT achieves a high capacity of 220 mAh g(-1) at 1 C after 80 cycles and an excellent rate capability of 100 mAh g(-1) even at a considerably high rate of 20 C. The porous 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT structure not only provides facile Li(+) diffusion into bulk but contributes to surface Li(+) storage as well, which enables the design of 3D V2O5/RGO/CNT composite to become a promising cathode architecture for high performance LIBs. PMID:27511434

  14. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery

    PubMed Central

    Melfi, Franca M. A.; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a “no-touch” technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally

  15. Minimally invasive mediastinal surgery.

    PubMed

    Melfi, Franca M A; Fanucchi, Olivia; Mussi, Alfredo

    2016-01-01

    In the past, mediastinal surgery was associated with the necessity of a maximum exposure, which was accomplished through various approaches. In the early 1990s, many surgical fields, including thoracic surgery, observed the development of minimally invasive techniques. These included video-assisted thoracic surgery (VATS), which confers clear advantages over an open approach, such as less trauma, short hospital stay, increased cosmetic results and preservation of lung function. However, VATS is associated with several disadvantages. For this reason, it is not routinely performed for resection of mediastinal mass lesions, especially those located in the anterior mediastinum, a tiny and remote space that contains vital structures at risk of injury. Robotic systems can overcome the limits of VATS, offering three-dimensional (3D) vision and wristed instrumentations, and are being increasingly used. With regards to thymectomy for myasthenia gravis (MG), unilateral and bilateral VATS approaches have demonstrated good long-term neurologic results with low complication rates. Nevertheless, some authors still advocate the necessity of maximum exposure, especially when considering the distribution of normal and ectopic thymic tissue. In recent studies, the robotic approach has shown to provide similar neurological outcomes when compared to transsternal and VATS approaches, and is associated with a low morbidity. Importantly, through a unilateral robotic technique, it is possible to dissect and remove at least the same amount of mediastinal fat tissue. Preliminary results on early-stage thymomatous disease indicated that minimally invasive approaches are safe and feasible, with a low rate of pleural recurrence, underlining the necessity of a "no-touch" technique. However, especially for thymomatous disease characterized by an indolent nature, further studies with long follow-up period are necessary in order to assess oncologic and neurologic results through minimally invasive

  16. Minimally refined biomass fuel

    DOEpatents

    Pearson, Richard K.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.

    1984-01-01

    A minimally refined fluid composition, suitable as a fuel mixture and derived from biomass material, is comprised of one or more water-soluble carbohydrates such as sucrose, one or more alcohols having less than four carbons, and water. The carbohydrate provides the fuel source; water solubilizes the carbohydrates; and the alcohol aids in the combustion of the carbohydrate and reduces the vicosity of the carbohydrate/water solution. Because less energy is required to obtain the carbohydrate from the raw biomass than alcohol, an overall energy savings is realized compared to fuels employing alcohol as the primary fuel.

  17. Wake Vortex Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A status report is presented on research directed at reducing the vortex disturbances of aircraft wakes. The objective of such a reduction is to minimize the hazard to smaller aircraft that might encounter these wakes. Inviscid modeling was used to study trailing vortices and viscous effects were investigated. Laser velocimeters were utilized in the measurement of aircraft wakes. Flight and wind tunnel tests were performed on scale and full model scale aircraft of various design. Parameters investigated included the effect of wing span, wing flaps, spoilers, splines and engine thrust on vortex attenuation. Results indicate that vortives may be alleviated through aerodynamic means.

  18. The ZOOM minimization package

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, Mark S.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  19. Minimally Invasive Parathyroidectomy

    PubMed Central

    Starker, Lee F.; Fonseca, Annabelle L.; Carling, Tobias; Udelsman, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) is an operative approach for the treatment of primary hyperparathyroidism (pHPT). Currently, routine use of improved preoperative localization studies, cervical block anesthesia in the conscious patient, and intraoperative parathyroid hormone analyses aid in guiding surgical therapy. MIP requires less surgical dissection causing decreased trauma to tissues, can be performed safely in the ambulatory setting, and is at least as effective as standard cervical exploration. This paper reviews advances in preoperative localization, anesthetic techniques, and intraoperative management of patients undergoing MIP for the treatment of pHPT. PMID:21747851

  20. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Takeshi; Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2016-02-01

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection. PMID:26644384

  1. The Surface Sensor NlpE of Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli Contributes to Regulation of the Type III Secretion System and Flagella by the Cpx Response to Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Ichimura, Kimitoshi; Noda, Masatoshi

    2015-01-01

    Although the adhesion of enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC) is central to the EHEC-host interaction during infection, it remains unclear how such adhesion regulates virulence factors. Adhesion to abiotic surfaces by E. coli has been reported to be an outer membrane lipoprotein NlpE-dependent activation cue of the Cpx pathway. Therefore, we investigated the role of NlpE in EHEC on the adhesion-mediated expression of virulence genes. NlpE in EHEC contributed to upregulation of the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) genes encoded type III secretion system and to downregulated expression of the flagellin gene by activation of the Cpx pathway during adherence to hydrophobic glass beads and undifferentiated Caco-2 cells. Moreover, LysR homologue A (LrhA) in EHEC was involved in regulating the expression of the LEE genes and flagellin gene in response to adhesion. Gel mobility shift analysis revealed that response regulator CpxR bound to the lrhA promoter region and thereby regulated expressions of the LEE genes and flagellin gene via the transcriptional regulator LrhA in EHEC. Therefore, these results suggest that the sensing of adhesion signals via NlpE is important for regulation of the expression of the type III secretion system and flagella in EHEC during infection. PMID:26644384

  2. Relative contributions of the Tibetan Plateau thermal forcing and the Indian Ocean Sea surface temperature basin mode to the interannual variability of the East Asian summer monsoon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jun; Duan, Anmin

    2015-11-01

    Investigating the relationships among different factors impacting the East Asian summer monsoon (EASM) is urgent for improving its predictability. In the present study, two factors, the Tibetan Plateau (TP) atmospheric thermal forcing and the Indian Ocean sea surface temperature basin mode (IOBM), are selected to compare their relative contributions to the interannual variability of the EASM. Both statistical methods and numerical experiments are used to separate and compare their respective influences under realistic circumstances. The results indicate that the IOBM mainly drives an anticyclonic anomaly over the northwestern Pacific in the lower troposphere, which is consistent with the dominant mode of the EASM circulation system. Meanwhile, influences from the TP thermal forcing are primarily on the anticyclonic anomaly over the TP in the upper troposphere, together with the enhanced southwesterly over southern China and a northerly anomaly over northern China in the lower troposphere. Moreover, the TP thermal forcing seems to play a more important role than the IOBM in affecting the main rainfall belt of the EASM, which extends from the middle and lower reaches of the Yangtze River to Japan. Such a rainfall pattern anomaly is directly related to the anomalous northerly over northern China and the resultant stronger moisture convergence over the main rainfall belt region when a strong TP thermal forcing occurs. In addition, the IOBM can increase the precipitation over the southeastern TP during its positive phase and hence enhance the in situ atmospheric heat source to a certain degree.

  3. Minimizing hazardous waste

    SciTech Connect

    DeClue, S.C.

    1996-06-01

    Hazardous waste minimization is a broad term often associated with pollution prevention, saving the environment or protecting Mother Earth. Some associate hazardous waste minimization with saving money. Thousands of hazardous materials are used in processes every day, but when these hazardous materials become hazardous wastes, dollars must be spent for disposal. When hazardous waste is reduced, an organization will spend less money on hazardous waste disposal. In 1993, Fort Bragg reduced its hazardous waste generation by over 100,000 pounds and spent nearly $90,000 less on hazardous waste disposal costs than in 1992. Fort Bragg generates a variety of wastes: Vehicle maintenance wastes such as antifreeze, oil, grease and solvents; helicopter maintenance wastes, including solvents, adhesives, lubricants and paints; communication operation wastes such as lithium, magnesium, mercury and nickel-cadmium batteries; chemical defense wastes detection, decontamination, and protective mask filters. The Hazardous Waste Office has the responsibility to properly identify, characterize, classify and dispose of these waste items in accordance with US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and US Department of Transportation (DOT) regulations.

  4. Minimal noise subsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaoting; Byrd, Mark; Jacobs, Kurt

    2016-03-01

    A system subjected to noise contains a decoherence-free subspace or subsystem (DFS) only if the noise possesses an exact symmetry. Here we consider noise models in which a perturbation breaks a symmetry of the noise, so that if S is a DFS under a given noise process it is no longer so under the new perturbed noise process. We ask whether there is a subspace or subsystem that is more robust to the perturbed noise than S . To answer this question we develop a numerical method that allows us to search for subspaces or subsystems that are maximally robust to arbitrary noise processes. We apply this method to a number of examples, and find that a subsystem that is a DFS is often not the subsystem that experiences minimal noise when the symmetry of the noise is broken by a perturbation. We discuss which classes of noise have this property.

  5. Minimal quiver standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Berenstein, David; Pinansky, Samuel

    2007-05-01

    This paper discusses the minimal quiver gauge theory embedding of the standard model that could arise from brane world type string theory constructions. It is based on the low energy effective field theory of D branes in the perturbative regime. The model differs from the standard model by the addition of one extra massive gauge boson, and contains only one additional parameter to the standard model: the mass of this new particle. The coupling of this new particle to the standard model is uniquely determined by input from the standard model and consistency conditions of perturbative string theory. We also study some aspects of the phenomenology of this model and bounds on its possible observation at the Large Hadron Collider.

  6. On Equilibria for ADM Minimization Games

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Epstein, Leah; Levin, Asaf

    In the ADM minimization problem, the input is a set of arcs along a directed ring. The input arcs need to be partitioned into non-overlapping chains and cycles so as to minimize the total number of endpoints, where a k-arc cycle contributes k endpoints and a k-arc chain contains k + 1 endpoints. We study ADM minimization problem both as a non-cooperative and a cooperative games. In these games, each arc corresponds to a player, and the players share the cost of the ADM switches. We consider two cost allocation models, a model which was considered by Flammini et al., and a new cost allocation model, which is inspired by congestion games. We compare the price of anarchy and price of stability in the two cost allocation models, as well as the strong price of anarchy and the strong price of stability.

  7. [Minimally invasive breast surgery].

    PubMed

    Mátrai, Zoltán; Gulyás, Gusztáv; Kunos, Csaba; Sávolt, Akos; Farkas, Emil; Szollár, András; Kásler, Miklós

    2014-02-01

    Due to the development in medical science and industrial technology, minimally invasive procedures have appeared in the surgery of benign and malignant breast diseases. In general , such interventions result in significantly reduced breast and chest wall scars, shorter hospitalization and less pain, but they require specific, expensive devices, longer surgical time compared to open surgery. Furthermore, indications or oncological safety have not been established yet. It is quite likely, that minimally invasive surgical procedures with high-tech devices - similar to other surgical subspecialties -, will gradually become popular and it may form part of routine breast surgery even. Vacuum-assisted core biopsy with a therapeutic indication is suitable for the removal of benign fibroadenomas leaving behind an almost invisible scar, while endoscopically assisted skin-sparing and nipple-sparing mastectomy, axillary staging and reconstruction with latissimus dorsi muscle flap are all feasible through the same short axillary incision. Endoscopic techniques are also suitable for the diagnostics and treatment of intracapsular complications of implant-based breast reconstructions (intracapsular fluid, implant rupture, capsular contracture) and for the biopsy of intracapsular lesions with uncertain pathology. Perception of the role of radiofrequency ablation of breast tumors requires further hands-on experience, but it is likely that it can serve as a replacement of surgical removal in a portion of primary tumors in the future due to the development in functional imaging and anticancer drugs. With the reduction of the price of ductoscopes routine examination of the ductal branch system, guided microdochectomy and targeted surgical removal of terminal ducto-lobular units or a "sick lobe" as an anatomical unit may become feasible. The paper presents the experience of the authors and provides a literature review, for the first time in Hungarian language on the subject. Orv. Hetil

  8. Minimally invasive parathyroid surgery

    PubMed Central

    Noureldine, Salem I.; Gooi, Zhen

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally, bilateral cervical exploration for localization of all four parathyroid glands and removal of any that are grossly enlarged has been the standard surgical treatment for primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT). With the advances in preoperative localization studies and greater public demand for less invasive procedures, novel targeted, minimally invasive techniques to the parathyroid glands have been described and practiced over the past 2 decades. Minimally invasive parathyroidectomy (MIP) can be done either through the standard Kocher incision, a smaller midline incision, with video assistance (purely endoscopic and video-assisted techniques), or through an ectopically placed, extracervical, incision. In current practice, once PHPT is diagnosed, preoperative evaluation using high-resolution radiographic imaging to localize the offending parathyroid gland is essential if MIP is to be considered. The imaging study results suggest where the surgeon should begin the focused procedure and serve as a road map to allow tailoring of an efficient, imaging-guided dissection while eliminating the unnecessary dissection of multiple glands or a bilateral exploration. Intraoperative parathyroid hormone (IOPTH) levels may be measured during the procedure, or a gamma probe used during radioguided parathyroidectomy, to ascertain that the correct gland has been excised and that no other hyperfunctional tissue is present. MIP has many advantages over the traditional bilateral, four-gland exploration. MIP can be performed using local anesthesia, requires less operative time, results in fewer complications, and offers an improved cosmetic result and greater patient satisfaction. Additional advantages of MIP are earlier hospital discharge and decreased overall associated costs. This article aims to address the considerations for accomplishing MIP, including the role of preoperative imaging studies, intraoperative adjuncts, and surgical techniques. PMID:26425454

  9. A slab tear between the Hellenic and Cyprus arcs : toward a better understanding of the contribution of mantle flow to regional surface dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salaun, G.; Paul, A.; Pedersen, H.; Karabulut, H.; Mutlu, A. K.; Simbaad Team

    2010-12-01

    of small scale mantle flow that would help establishing the contribution of mantle circulation to surface tectonics [see e.g. Faccenna & Becker, 2010] at the scale of the Eastern Mediterranean region.

  10. Surface expression of hippocampal NMDA GluN2B receptors regulated by fear conditioning determines its contribution to memory consolidation in adult rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yan-Yan; Cai, Wei; Yu, Jie; Liu, Shu-Su; Zhuo, Min; Li, Bao-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Han

    2016-01-01

    The number and subtype composition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) at synapses determines their functional properties and role in learning and memory. Genetically increased or decreased amount of GluN2B affects hippocampus-dependent memory in the adult brain. But in some experimental conditions (e.g., memory elicited by a single conditioning trial (1 CS-US)), GluN2B is not a necessary factor, which indicates that the precise role of GluN2B in memory formation requires further exploration. Here, we examined the role of GluN2B in the consolidation of fear memory using two training paradigms. We found that GluN2B was only required for the consolidation of memory elicited by five conditioning trials (5 CS-US), not by 1 CS-US. Strikingly, the expression of membrane GluN2B in CA1was training-strength-dependently increased after conditioning, and that the amount of membrane GluN2B determined its involvement in memory consolidation. Additionally, we demonstrated the increases in the activities of cAMP, ERK, and CREB in the CA1 after conditioning, as well as the enhanced intrinsic excitability and synaptic efficacy in CA1 neurons. Up-regulation of membrane GluN2B contributed to these enhancements. These studies uncover a novel mechanism for the involvement of GluN2B in memory consolidation by its accumulation at the cell surface in response to behavioral training. PMID:27487820

  11. In-duct removal of mercury from coal-fired power plant flue gas by activated carbon: assessment of entrained flow versus wall surface contributions

    SciTech Connect

    Scala, F.; Chirone, R.; Lancia, A.

    2008-12-15

    In-duct mercury capture efficiency by activated carbon from coal-combustion flue gas was investigated. To this end, elemental mercury capture experiments were conducted at 100 C in a purposely designed 65-mm ID labscale pyrex apparatus operated as an entrained flow reactor. Gas residence times were varied between 0.7 and 2.0 s. Commercial-powdered activated carbon was continuously injected in the reactor and both mercury concentration and carbon elutriation rate were followed at the outlet. Transient mercury concentration profiles at the outlet showed that steady-state conditions were reached in a time interval of 15-20 min, much longer than the gas residence time in the reactor. Results indicate that the influence of the walls is non-negligible in determining the residence time of fine carbon particles in the adsorption zone, because of surface deposition and/or the establishment of a fluid-dynamic boundary layer near the walls. Total mercury capture efficiencies of 20-50% were obtained with carbon injection rates in the range 0.07-0.25 g/min. However, only a fraction of this capture was attributable to free-flowing carbon particles, a significant contribution coming from activated carbon staying near the reactor walls. Entrained bed experiments at lab-scale conditions are probably not properly representative of full-scale conditions, where the influence of wall interactions is lower. Moreover, previously reported entrained flow lab-scale mercury capture data should be reconsidered by taking into account the influence of particle-wall interactions.

  12. Contributions of the Avian Influenza Virus HA, NA, and M2 Surface Proteins to the Induction of Neutralizing Antibodies and Protective Immunity▿

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Baibaswata; Kumar, Sachin; DiNapoli, Joshua M.; Paldurai, Anandan; Perez, Daniel R.; Collins, Peter L.; Samal, Siba K.

    2010-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza virus (HPAIV) subtype H5N1 causes severe disease and mortality in poultry. Increased transmission of H5N1 HPAIV from birds to humans is a serious threat to public health. We evaluated the individual contributions of each of the three HPAIV surface proteins, namely, the hemagglutinin (HA), the neuraminidase (NA), and the M2 proteins, to the induction of HPAIV-neutralizing serum antibodies and protective immunity in chickens. Using reverse genetics, three recombinant Newcastle disease viruses (rNDVs) were engineered, each expressing the HA, NA, or M2 protein of H5N1 HPAIV. Chickens were immunized with NDVs expressing a single antigen (HA, NA, and M2), two antigens (HA+NA, HA+M2, and NA+M2), or three antigens (HA+NA+M2). Immunization with HA or NA induced high titers of HPAIV-neutralizing serum antibodies, with the response to HA being greater, thus identifying HA and NA as independent neutralization antigens. M2 did not induce a detectable neutralizing serum antibody response, and inclusion of M2 with HA or NA reduced the magnitude of the response. Immunization with HA alone or in combination with NA induced complete protection against HPAIV challenge. Immunization with NA alone or in combination with M2 did not prevent death following challenge, but extended the time period before death. Immunization with M2 alone had no effect on morbidity or mortality. Thus, there was no indication that M2 is immunogenic or protective. Furthermore, inclusion of NA in addition to HA in a vaccine preparation for chickens may not enhance the high level of protection provided by HA. PMID:20032181

  13. Surface expression of hippocampal NMDA GluN2B receptors regulated by fear conditioning determines its contribution to memory consolidation in adult rats

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan-Yan; Cai, Wei; Yu, Jie; Liu, Shu-Su; Zhuo, Min; Li, Bao-Ming; Zhang, Xue-Han

    2016-01-01

    The number and subtype composition of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) at synapses determines their functional properties and role in learning and memory. Genetically increased or decreased amount of GluN2B affects hippocampus-dependent memory in the adult brain. But in some experimental conditions (e.g., memory elicited by a single conditioning trial (1 CS-US)), GluN2B is not a necessary factor, which indicates that the precise role of GluN2B in memory formation requires further exploration. Here, we examined the role of GluN2B in the consolidation of fear memory using two training paradigms. We found that GluN2B was only required for the consolidation of memory elicited by five conditioning trials (5 CS-US), not by 1 CS-US. Strikingly, the expression of membrane GluN2B in CA1was training-strength-dependently increased after conditioning, and that the amount of membrane GluN2B determined its involvement in memory consolidation. Additionally, we demonstrated the increases in the activities of cAMP, ERK, and CREB in the CA1 after conditioning, as well as the enhanced intrinsic excitability and synaptic efficacy in CA1 neurons. Up-regulation of membrane GluN2B contributed to these enhancements. These studies uncover a novel mechanism for the involvement of GluN2B in memory consolidation by its accumulation at the cell surface in response to behavioral training. PMID:27487820

  14. Minimal Marking: A Success Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McNeilly, Anne

    2014-01-01

    The minimal-marking project conducted in Ryerson's School of Journalism throughout 2012 and early 2013 resulted in significantly higher grammar scores in two first-year classes of minimally marked university students when compared to two traditionally marked classes. The "minimal-marking" concept (Haswell, 1983), which requires…

  15. Minimal distances between SCFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buican, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    We study lower bounds on the minimal distance in theory space between four-dimensional superconformal field theories (SCFTs) connected via broad classes of renormalization group (RG) flows preserving various amounts of supersymmetry (SUSY). For = 1 RG flows, the ultraviolet (UV) and infrared (IR) endpoints of the flow can be parametrically close. On the other hand, for RG flows emanating from a maximally supersymmetric SCFT, the distance to the IR theory cannot be arbitrarily small regardless of the amount of (non-trivial) SUSY preserved along the flow. The case of RG flows from =2 UV SCFTs is more subtle. We argue that for RG flows preserving the full =2 SUSY, there are various obstructions to finding examples with parametrically close UV and IR endpoints. Under reasonable assumptions, these obstructions include: unitarity, known bounds on the c central charge derived from associativity of the operator product expansion, and the central charge bounds of Hofman and Maldacena. On the other hand, for RG flows that break = 2 → = 1, it is possible to find IR fixed points that are parametrically close to the UV ones. In this case, we argue that if the UV SCFT possesses a single stress tensor, then such RG flows excite of order all the degrees of freedom of the UV theory. Furthermore, if the UV theory has some flavor symmetry, we argue that the UV central charges should not be too large relative to certain parameters in the theory.

  16. Swarm robotics and minimalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharkey, Amanda J. C.

    2007-09-01

    Swarm Robotics (SR) is closely related to Swarm Intelligence, and both were initially inspired by studies of social insects. Their guiding principles are based on their biological inspiration and take the form of an emphasis on decentralized local control and communication. Earlier studies went a step further in emphasizing the use of simple reactive robots that only communicate indirectly through the environment. More recently SR studies have moved beyond these constraints to explore the use of non-reactive robots that communicate directly, and that can learn and represent their environment. There is no clear agreement in the literature about how far such extensions of the original principles could go. Should there be any limitations on the individual abilities of the robots used in SR studies? Should knowledge of the capabilities of social insects lead to constraints on the capabilities of individual robots in SR studies? There is a lack of explicit discussion of such questions, and researchers have adopted a variety of constraints for a variety of reasons. A simple taxonomy of swarm robotics is presented here with the aim of addressing and clarifying these questions. The taxonomy distinguishes subareas of SR based on the emphases and justifications for minimalism and individual simplicity.

  17. CONTRIBUTION OF NUTRIENTS AND E. COLI TO SURFACE WATER CONDITION IN THE OZARKS I. USING PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES PREDICTIONS WHEN STANDARD REGRESSION ASSUMPTIONS ARE VIOLATED

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present here the application of PLS regression to predicting surface water total phosphorous, total ammonia and Escherichia coli from landscape metrics. The amount of variability in surface water constituents explained by each model reflects the composition of the contributi...

  18. Minimal Higgs inflation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamada, Yuta; Kawai, Hikaru; Oda, Kin-ya

    2014-02-01

    We consider a possibility that the Higgs field in the Standard Model (SM) serves as an inflaton when its value is around the Planck scale. We assume that the SM is valid up to an ultraviolet cutoff scale Λ , which is slightly below the Planck scale, and that the Higgs potential becomes almost flat above Λ . Contrary to the ordinary Higgs inflation scenario, we do not assume the huge non-minimal coupling, of O(10^4), of the Higgs field to the Ricci scalar. We find that Λ must be less than 5× 10^{17} {GeV} in order to explain the observed fluctuation of the cosmic microwave background, no matter how we extrapolate the Higgs potential above Λ . The scale 10^{17} {GeV} coincides with the perturbative string scale, which suggests that the SM is directly connected with string theory. For this to be true, the top quark mass is restricted to around 171 GeV, with which Λ can exceed 10^{17} {GeV}. As a concrete example of the potential above Λ , we propose a simple log-type potential. The predictions of this specific model for the e-foldings N_*=50-60 are consistent with the current observation, namely, the scalar spectral index is n_s=0.977hbox {-}0.983 and the tensor to scalar ratio 0

  19. Minimally Invasive Surgery for Inflammatory Bowel Disease

    PubMed Central

    Holder-Murray, Jennifer; Marsicovetere, Priscilla

    2015-01-01

    Abstract: Surgical management of inflammatory bowel disease is a challenging endeavor given infectious and inflammatory complications, such as fistula, and abscess, complex often postoperative anatomy, including adhesive disease from previous open operations. Patients with Crohn's disease and ulcerative colitis also bring to the table the burden of their chronic illness with anemia, malnutrition, and immunosuppression, all common and contributing independently as risk factors for increased surgical morbidity in this high-risk population. However, to reduce the physical trauma of surgery, technologic advances and worldwide experience with minimally invasive surgery have allowed laparoscopic management of patients to become standard of care, with significant short- and long-term patient benefits compared with the open approach. In this review, we will describe the current state-of the-art for minimally invasive surgery for inflammatory bowel disease and the caveats inherent with this practice in this complex patient population. Also, we will review the applicability of current and future trends in minimally invasive surgical technique, such as laparoscopic “incisionless,” single-incision laparoscopic surgery (SILS), robotic-assisted, and other techniques for the patient with inflammatory bowel disease. There can be no doubt that minimally invasive surgery has been proven to decrease the short- and long-term burden of surgery of these chronic illnesses and represents high-value care for both patient and society. PMID:25989341

  20. Surface Partitioning in Organic-Inorganic Mixtures Contributes to the Size-Dependence of the Phase-State of Atmospheric Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Werner, Josephina; Dalirian, Maryam; Walz, Marie-Madeleine; Ekholm, Victor; Wideqvist, Ulla; Lowe, Samuel J; Öhrwall, Gunnar; Persson, Ingmar; Riipinen, Ilona; Björneholm, Olle

    2016-07-19

    Atmospheric particulate matter is one of the main factors governing the Earth's radiative budget, but its exact effects on the global climate are still uncertain. Knowledge on the molecular-scale surface phenomena as well as interactions between atmospheric organic and inorganic compounds is necessary for understanding the role of airborne nanoparticles in the Earth system. In this work, surface composition of aqueous model systems containing succinic acid and sodium chloride or ammonium sulfate is determined using a novel approach combining X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, surface tension measurements and thermodynamic modeling. It is shown that succinic acid molecules are accumulated in the surface, yielding a 10-fold surface concentration as compared with the bulk for saturated succinic acid solutions. Inorganic salts further enhance this enrichment due to competition for hydration in the bulk. The surface compositions for various mixtures are parametrized to yield generalizable results and used to explain changes in surface tension. The enhanced surface partitioning implies an increased maximum solubility of organic compounds in atmospheric nanoparticles. The results can explain observations of size-dependent phase-state of atmospheric nanoparticles, suggesting that these particles can display drastically different behavior than predicted by bulk properties only. PMID:27326704

  1. Influenza SIRS with Minimal Pneumonitis

    PubMed Central

    Erramilli, Shruti; Mannam, Praveen; Manthous, Constantine A.

    2016-01-01

    Although systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a known complication of severe influenza pneumonia, it has been reported very rarely in patients with minimal parenchymal lung disease. We here report a case of severe SIRS, anasarca, and marked vascular phenomena with minimal or no pneumonitis. This case highlights that viruses, including influenza, may cause vascular dysregulation causing SIRS, even without substantial visceral organ involvement.

  2. Guidelines for mixed waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Owens, C.

    1992-02-01

    Currently, there is no commercial mixed waste disposal available in the United States. Storage and treatment for commercial mixed waste is limited. Host States and compacts region officials are encouraging their mixed waste generators to minimize their mixed wastes because of management limitations. This document provides a guide to mixed waste minimization.

  3. Waste minimization handbook, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Boing, L.E.; Coffey, M.J.

    1995-12-01

    This technical guide presents various methods used by industry to minimize low-level radioactive waste (LLW) generated during decommissioning and decontamination (D and D) activities. Such activities generate significant amounts of LLW during their operations. Waste minimization refers to any measure, procedure, or technique that reduces the amount of waste generated during a specific operation or project. Preventive waste minimization techniques implemented when a project is initiated can significantly reduce waste. Techniques implemented during decontamination activities reduce the cost of decommissioning. The application of waste minimization techniques is not limited to D and D activities; it is also useful during any phase of a facility`s life cycle. This compendium will be supplemented with a second volume of abstracts of hundreds of papers related to minimizing low-level nuclear waste. This second volume is expected to be released in late 1996.

  4. Surface Ozone Measured at GLOBE Schools in the Czech Republic: A Demonstration of the Importance of Student Contribution to the Larger Science Picture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, Margaret R.; Creilson, John K.; Henderson, Bryana L.; Ladd, Irene H.; Fishman, Jack; Votapkova, Dana; Krpcova, Ilona

    2008-01-01

    GLOBE (Global Learning and Observations to Benefit the Environment) is a worldwide hands-on, primary and secondary school-based education and science program, developed to give students a chance to perform real science by making measurements, analyzing data, and participating in research in collaboration with scientists. As part of the GLOBE Surface Ozone Protocol and with the assistance of the TEREZA Association in the Czech Republic, schools in the Czech Republic have been making and reporting daily measurements of surface ozone and surface meteorological data since 2001. Using a hand-held ozone monitor developed for GLOBE, students at several Czech schools have generated multiyear data records of surface ozone from 2001 to 2005. Analysis of the data shows surface ozone levels were anomalously high during the summer of 2003 relative to other summers. These findings are consistent with measurements by the European Environment Agency that highlights the summer of 2003 as having exceptionally long-lasting and spatially extensive episodes of high surface ozone, especially during the first half of August. Further analysis of the summer s prevailing meteorology shows not only that it was one of the hottest on record, a finding also seen in the student data, but the conditions for production of ozone were ideal. Findings such as these increase student, teacher, and scientist confidence in the utility of the GLOBE data for engaging budding scientists in the collection, analysis, and eventual interpretation of the data for inquiry-based education.

  5. Contribution of the Yellow Sea bottom cold water to the abnormal cooling of sea surface temperature in the summer of 2011

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Joon-ho; Pang, Ig-Chan; Moon, Jae-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Satellite-based sea surface temperature (SST) measurements revealed an abnormal cooling anomaly over the Yellow Sea (YS) in the summer of 2011. Using in situ hydrographic profiles, meteorological fields, and an ocean circulation model with a passive tracer experiment, we identified the cold SST anomaly and its connection with the YS Bottom Cold Water (YSBCW), which occupies the central part of the YS below the thermocline in the summer. The summer SST anomalies in the YS showed three cold peaks in 1993, 2003, and 2011 over the past 20 years, but the reasons for the cooling events were different, as one was due to weakened surface heating and the other was attributed to mixing with the YSBCW. In 1993 and 2003, relatively weak surface heating made the surface water cooler compared with that during the other years, whereas in 2011, a strong vertical mixing of water was induced by a typhoon that passed through the central YS, causing the surface water to cool by ˜8°C and the bottom water to warm up by ˜4°C. A tracer experiment further confirmed that the vertical heat transfers between the warm surface and the cold bottom water masses when the typhoon passed through the YS interior.

  6. Indirect nitrous oxide emissions from surface water bodies in a lowland arable catchment: a significant contribution to agricultural greenhouse gas budgets?

    PubMed

    Outram, Faye N; Hiscock, Kevin M

    2012-08-01

    In the UK agriculture is by far the largest source of nitrous oxide (N(2)O) emissions. Direct N(2)O emissions as a result of nitrogen (N) application to soils have been well documented in the UK, whereas indirect emissions produced in surface waters and groundwaters from leached N are much less understood with limited data to support IPCC emission factors. Indirect emissions were studied in surface waters in the Upper Thurne, a lowland drained arable catchment in eastern England. All surface waters were found to have dissolved N(2)O concentrations above that expected if in equilibrium with ambient concentrations, demonstrating all surface waters were acting as a source of N(2)O. The drainage channels represented 86% of the total indirect N(2)O flux, followed by wetland areas, 11%, and the river, 3%. The dense drainage network was found to have the highest dissolved N(2)O concentrations of all the water bodies studied with a combined N(2)O flux of 16 kg N(2)O-N per day in March 2007. Such indirect fluxes are comparable to direct fluxes per hectare and represent a significant proportion of the total N(2)O flux for this catchment. Separate emission factors were established for the three different surface water types within the same catchment, suggesting that the one emission factor used in the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) methodology for predicting all indirect N(2)O emissions is inappropriate. PMID:22789002

  7. Minimizing waste in environmental restoration

    SciTech Connect

    Moos, L.; Thuot, J.R.

    1996-07-01

    Environmental restoration, decontamination and decommissioning and facility dismantelment projects are not typically known for their waste minimization and pollution prevention efforts. Typical projects are driven by schedules and milestones with little attention given to cost or waste minimization. Conventional wisdom in these projects is that the waste already exists and cannot be reduced or minimized. In fact, however, there are three significant areas where waste and cost can be reduced. Waste reduction can occur in three ways: beneficial reuse or recycling; segregation of waste types; and reducing generation of secondary waste. This paper will discuss several examples of reuse, recycle, segregation, and secondary waste reduction at ANL restoration programs.

  8. Utilizing Resistivity Soundings and Forensic Geochemistry to Better Understand the Groundwater Contributions and the Interaction with Surface Water in a Streambed in the Texas Gulf Coast Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bighash, P.

    2012-12-01

    Water quality and quantity in a reservoir can be significantly affected by interactions between surface waters and adjacent aquifers. Environments that exhibit transient hydraulic conditions, such as changes in recharge and groundwater flow rates, are not well understood. The associated impacts to coastal water resources during elevated drought conditions can be better managed with a better understanding of the groundwater-surface water interaction and the transition zone. Proper characterization of the spatial and temporal extent of groundwater discharge is important for water resource management and contaminant migration pathways. The Texas coastal area has been experiencing exceptional drought conditions over the past few years which are expected to persist or intensify in the coming years. An investigation of how the hydrologic system is impacted by these conditions can be a valuable tool regarding water resource management, sustainability and conservation of the Gulf Coast region of South Texas. This study will be using resistivity soundings to vertically and laterally characterize groundwater-surface water interaction and provide a stratigraphic characterization of the transition zone in this area. Chemical and isotope tracers will be used to compliment the resistivity data in order to trace water sources in the surface water and transition zone. This information can aid in evaluating the extent of interaction and degree of mixing between the surface water and groundwater. The ultimate goal of this research is to provide new valuable information that could help professionals and researchers understand complex processes such as groundwater-surface water interaction using new methods that would improve the speed and accuracy of existing systems or techniques. This multidisciplinary approach can be useful in investigating land use impacts on groundwater inflow and in forecasting the availability of water resources in environmentally sensitive ecosystems such as

  9. Mitral valve surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... that does many of these procedures. Minimally invasive heart valve surgery has improved greatly in recent years. These ... WT, Mack MJ. Transcatheter cardiac valve interventions. Surg Clin North Am . 2009;89:951-66. ...

  10. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive

    MedlinePlus

    ... in 30-day outcomes in high-risk patients randomized to off-pump versus on-pump coronary bypass ... Thiele H, Neumann-Schniedewind P, Jacobs S, et al. Randomized comparison of minimally invasive direct coronary artery bypass ...

  11. Production of the Antimicrobial Secondary Metabolite Indigoidine Contributes to Competitive Surface Colonization by the Marine Roseobacter Phaeobacter sp. Strain Y4I

    PubMed Central

    Cude, W. Nathan; Mooney, Jason; Tavanaei, Arash A.; Hadden, Mary K.; Frank, Ashley M.; Gulvik, Christopher A.; May, Amanda L.

    2012-01-01

    Members of the Roseobacter lineage of marine bacteria are prolific surface colonizers in marine coastal environments, and antimicrobial secondary metabolite production has been hypothesized to provide a competitive advantage to colonizing roseobacters. Here, we report that the roseobacter Phaeobacter sp. strain Y4I produces the blue pigment indigoidine via a nonribosomal peptide synthase (NRPS)-based biosynthetic pathway encoded by a novel series of genetically linked genes: igiBCDFE. A Tn5-based random mutagenesis library of Y4I showed a perfect correlation between indigoidine production by the Phaeobacter strain and inhibition of Vibrio fischeri on agar plates, revealing a previously unrecognized bioactivity of this molecule. In addition, igiD null mutants (igiD encoding the indigoidine NRPS) were more resistant to hydrogen peroxide, less motile, and faster to colonize an artificial surface than the wild-type strain. Collectively, these data provide evidence for pleiotropic effects of indigoidine production in this strain. Gene expression assays support phenotypic observations and demonstrate that igiD gene expression is upregulated during growth on surfaces. Furthermore, competitive cocultures of V. fischeri and Y4I show that the production of indigoidine by Y4I significantly inhibits colonization of V. fischeri on surfaces. This study is the first to characterize a secondary metabolite produced by an NRPS in roseobacters. PMID:22582055

  12. Minimizing pollutants with multimedia strategies

    SciTech Connect

    Phillips, J.B.; Hindawi, M.A.

    1997-01-01

    A multimedia approach to pollution prevention that focuses on minimizing or eliminating production of pollutants is one of the most advantageous strategies to adopt in preparing an overall facility environmental plan. If processes are optimized to preclude or minimize the manufacture of streams containing pollutants, or to reduce the levels of pollutants in waste streams, then the task of multimedia pollution prevention becomes more manageable simply as a result of a smaller problem needing to be addressed. An orderly and systematic approach to waste minimization can result in a comprehensive strategy to reduce the production of waste streams and simultaneously improve the profitability of a process or industrial operation. There are a number of miscellaneous strategies for a waste minimization that attack the problem via process chemistry or engineering. Examples include installation of low-NO{sub x} burners, selection of valves that minimize fugitive emissions, high-level switches on storage tanks, the use of in-plant stills for recycling and reusing solvents and using water-based products instead of hydrocarbon-based products wherever possible. Other waste minimization countermeasures can focus on O and M issues.

  13. Key Amino Acid Residues within the Third Membrane Domains of NR1 and NR2 Subunits Contribute to the Regulation of the Surface Delivery of N-methyl-d-aspartate Receptors*

    PubMed Central

    Kaniakova, Martina; Krausova, Barbora; Vyklicky, Vojtech; Korinek, Miloslav; Lichnerova, Katarina; Vyklicky, Ladislav; Horak, Martin

    2012-01-01

    N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptors are glutamate ionotropic receptors that play critical roles in synaptic transmission, plasticity, and excitotoxicity. The functional NMDA receptors, heterotetramers composed mainly of two NR1 and two NR2 subunits, likely pass endoplasmic reticulum quality control before they are released from the endoplasmic reticulum and trafficked to the cell surface. However, the mechanism underlying this process is not clear. Using truncated and mutated NMDA receptor subunits expressed in heterologous cells, we found that the M3 domains of both NR1 and NR2 subunits contain key amino acid residues that contribute to the regulation of the number of surface functional NMDA receptors. These key residues are critical neither for the interaction between the NR1 and NR2 subunits nor for the formation of the functional receptors, but rather they regulate the early trafficking of the receptors. We also found that the identified key amino acid residues within both NR1 and NR2 M3 domains contribute to the regulation of the surface expression of unassembled NR1 and NR2 subunits. Thus, our data identify the unique role of the membrane domains in the regulation of the number of surface NMDA receptors. PMID:22711533

  14. Biochemical and physiological parameters on the skin surface of healthy test persons: a contribution towards the interpretation of the results obtained by a screening program.

    PubMed

    Gloor, M; Kionke, M; Friederich, H C

    1975-07-18

    Biochemical and physiological examinations were carried out on the skin surface of a total of 115 healthy persons ranging from the age of 7-79 years. In these investigations the following striking findings were made: 1. There is a significant correlation between the results obtained by the ferricyanide, the phenol sulfuric acid and the ninhydrin methods in the so called water solubles. 2. The relationship between the fraction of wax and cholesterol esters and the squalene fraction in the skin surface lipids influences the release of free fatty acids by bacterial lipases. 3. With regards to most parameters tested there are great differences between the 8-12 year age group and the older age groups. 4. There are significant differences in the 8-12 year age group between the male and female test persons. 5. With regards to the parameters tested there are also significant differences between the various test areas. PMID:1164042

  15. Organochlorines in surface soil at electronic-waste wire burning sites and metal contribution evaluated using quantitative X-ray speciation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujimori, Takashi; Takigami, Hidetaka; Takaoka, Masaki

    2013-04-01

    Heavy metals and toxic chlorinated aromatic compounds (aromatic-Cls) such as dioxins and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are found at high concentrations and persist in surface soil at wire burning sites (WBSs) in developing countries in which various wire cables are recycled to yield pure metals. Chlorine K-edge near-edge X-ray absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) is used to detect the specific chemical form of Cl and estimate its amount using a spectrum jump in the solid phase. Quantitative X-ray speciation of Cl was applied to study the mechanisms of aromatic-Cls formation in surface soil at WBSs in Southeast Asia. Relationships between aromatic-Cls and chlorides of heavy metals were evaluated because heavy metals are promoters of the thermochemical solid-phase formation of aromatic-Cls.

  16. Hydrogen isotopic substitution of solid methylamine through atomic surface reactions at low temperatures: A potential contribution to the D/H ratio of methylamine in molecular clouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oba, Yasuhiro; Chigai, Takeshi; Osamura, Yoshihiro; Watanabe, Naoki; Kouchi, Akira

    2014-01-01

    We experimentally studied hydrogen (H)-deuterium (D) substitution reactions of solid methylamine (CH3NH2) under astrophysically relevant conditions. We also calculated the potential energy surface for the H-D substitution reactions of methylamine isotopologues using quantum chemical methods. Despite the relatively large energy barrier of more than 18 kJ mol-1, CH3NH2 reacted with D atoms to yield deuterated methylamines at 10 K, suggesting that the H-D substitution reaction proceeds through quantum tunneling. Deuterated methylamines reacted with H atoms as well. On the basis of present results, we propose that methylamine has potential for D enrichment through atomic surface reactions on interstellar grains at very low temperatures in molecular clouds. D enrichment would occur in particular in the methyl group of methylamine.

  17. Advancements in medium and high resolution Earth observation for land-surface imaging: Evolutions, future trends and contributions to sustainable development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ouma, Yashon O.

    2016-01-01

    Technologies for imaging the surface of the Earth, through satellite based Earth observations (EO) have enormously evolved over the past 50 years. The trends are likely to evolve further as the user community increases and their awareness and demands for EO data also increases. In this review paper, a development trend on EO imaging systems is presented with the objective of deriving the evolving patterns for the EO user community. From the review and analysis of medium-to-high resolution EO-based land-surface sensor missions, it is observed that there is a predictive pattern in the EO evolution trends such that every 10-15 years, more sophisticated EO imaging systems with application specific capabilities are seen to emerge. Such new systems, as determined in this review, are likely to comprise of agile and small payload-mass EO land surface imaging satellites with the ability for high velocity data transmission and huge volumes of spatial, spectral, temporal and radiometric resolution data. This availability of data will magnify the phenomenon of "Big Data" in Earth observation. Because of the "Big Data" issue, new computing and processing platforms such as telegeoprocessing and grid-computing are expected to be incorporated in EO data processing and distribution networks. In general, it is observed that the demand for EO is growing exponentially as the application and cost-benefits are being recognized in support of resource management.

  18. Study of weathering processes developed on old piedmont surfaces in Western Spain: new contributions to the interpretation of the ``Raña'' profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina Ballesteros, E.; Cantano Martín, M.

    2002-01-01

    The Hercynian basement of the Iberian Peninsula was uplifted by the Alpine orogeny during the Tertiary. It gave rise to a set of block mountains and tectonic grabens, one of which is the Ciudad Rodrigo Basin. It is located in Western Spain and forms a westward extension of the great Tertiary Duero Basin. The sediments filling this graben are of continental origin, their ages ranging from Palaeogene to Quaternary. Morphologically, the southern part of this basin forms a set of piedmont surfaces (the "Raña" surfaces) appearing above the terrace system of the present rivers. This paper examines the weathering processes developed over these old piedmont surfaces using micromorphological, XR diffraction, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and microporosity techniques. The Raña sediments are rich in quartzite pebbles and gravel within a clayey matrix. Once deposited, these materials underwent important in situ weathering processes under somewhat hydromorphic conditions, of which hydrolysis, ferrolysis and xerolysis were the most important. All these processes gave rise to: (1) transformation of most of the clasts of shists and slates into a matrix causing the destruction of the original sedimentary structures and a relative concentration of the resistant lithologies (quartzites and quartz); (2) important changes in the clay fraction, leading to a predominance of kaolinite in the upper levels of the profiles, (3) release of elements from primary minerals, Fe being one of the most important, and (4) redistribution of matter, mainly clay and Fe oxyhydroxides, within the profiles. The coexistence of seasonal periods with pF higher than 4.2 repeated over a long time, together with poor internal and external drainage conditions, are the cause of the special features displayed by Raña deposits.

  19. Fermi surface versus Fermi sea contributions to intrinsic anomalous and spin Hall effects of multiorbital metals in the presence of Coulomb interaction and spin-Coulomb drag

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakawa, Naoya

    2016-06-01

    Anomalous Hall effect (AHE) and spin Hall effect (SHE) are fundamental phenomena, and their potential for application is great. However, we understand the interaction effects unsatisfactorily, and should have clarified issues about the roles of the Fermi sea term and Fermi surface term of the conductivity of the intrinsic AHE or SHE of an interacting multiorbital metal and about the effects of spin-Coulomb drag on the intrinsic SHE. Here, we resolve the first issue and provide the first step about the second issue by developing a general formalism in the linear response theory with appropriate approximations and using analytic arguments. The most striking result is that even without impurities, the Fermi surface term, a non-Berry-curvature term, plays dominant roles at high or slightly low temperatures. In particular, this Fermi surface term causes the temperature dependence of the dc anomalous Hall or spin Hall conductivity due to the interaction-induced quasiparticle damping and the correction of the dc spin Hall conductivity due to the spin-Coulomb drag. Those results revise our understanding of the intrinsic AHE and SHE. We also find that the differences between the dc anomalous Hall and longitudinal conductivities arise from the difference in the dominant multiband excitations. This not only explains why the Fermi sea term such as the Berry-curvature term becomes important in clean and low-temperature case only for interband transports, but also provides the useful principles on treating the electron-electron interaction in an interacting multiorbital metal for general formalism of transport coefficients. Several correspondences between our results and experiments are finally discussed.

  20. Structural elucidation, density functional calculations and contribution of intermolecular interactions in cholest-4-en-3-one crystals: Insights from X-ray and Hirshfeld surface analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khanam, Hena; Mashrai, Ashraf; Siddiqui, Nazish; Ahmad, Musheer; Alam, Mohammad Jane; Ahmad, Shabbir; Shamsuzzaman

    2015-03-01

    The foremost objective of the present work is systematic analysis of intermolecular interactions in crystal structure of cholest-4-en-3-one (2) molecule. It is accomplished by Hirshfeld surface analysis and fingerprint plot. Hirshfeld surface analysis has been used to visualize the fidelity of the crystal structure. This method permitted for the identification of individual types of intermolecular contacts and their impact on the complete packing. Molecules are linked by a combination of Cdbnd O---H, Csbnd H---H, and C---H contacts, which have clear signatures in the fingerprint plots. The theoretical study was attempted to predict the optimized geometry and computed spectra by the Density Functional Theory (DFT) using the B3LYP function with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set. Atomic charges, MEP mapping, HOMO-LUMO, various thermodynamic and molecular properties have been reported. In addition thermal stability, optical, morphological, and microstructral properties of the title compound (2) have also been explored.

  1. Minimally invasive video-assisted versus minimally invasive nonendoscopic thyroidectomy.

    PubMed

    Fík, Zdeněk; Astl, Jaromír; Zábrodský, Michal; Lukeš, Petr; Merunka, Ilja; Betka, Jan; Chovanec, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive video-assisted thyroidectomy (MIVAT) and minimally invasive nonendoscopic thyroidectomy (MINET) represent well accepted and reproducible techniques developed with the main goal to improve cosmetic outcome, accelerate healing, and increase patient's comfort following thyroid surgery. Between 2007 and 2011, a prospective nonrandomized study of patients undergoing minimally invasive thyroid surgery was performed to compare advantages and disadvantages of the two different techniques. There were no significant differences in the length of incision to perform surgical procedures. Mean duration of hemithyroidectomy was comparable in both groups, but it was more time consuming to perform total thyroidectomy by MIVAT. There were more patients undergoing MIVAT procedures without active drainage in the postoperative course and we also could see a trend for less pain in the same group. This was paralleled by statistically significant decreased administration of both opiates and nonopiate analgesics. We encountered two cases of recurrent laryngeal nerve palsies in the MIVAT group only. MIVAT and MINET represent safe and feasible alternative to conventional thyroid surgery in selected cases and this prospective study has shown minimal differences between these two techniques. PMID:24800227

  2. The New Minimal Standard Model

    SciTech Connect

    Davoudiasl, Hooman; Kitano, Ryuichiro; Li, Tianjun; Murayama, Hitoshi

    2005-01-13

    We construct the New Minimal Standard Model that incorporates the new discoveries of physics beyond the Minimal Standard Model (MSM): Dark Energy, non-baryonic Dark Matter, neutrino masses, as well as baryon asymmetry and cosmic inflation, adopting the principle of minimal particle content and the most general renormalizable Lagrangian. We base the model purely on empirical facts rather than aesthetics. We need only six new degrees of freedom beyond the MSM. It is free from excessive flavor-changing effects, CP violation, too-rapid proton decay, problems with electroweak precision data, and unwanted cosmological relics. Any model of physics beyond the MSM should be measured against the phenomenological success of this model.

  3. Eddy Current Minimizing Flow Plug for Use in Flow Conditioning and Flow Metering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    England, John Dwight (Inventor); Kelley, Anthony R. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An eddy-current-minimizing flow plug has an outer radial wall with open flow channels formed between the plug's inlet and outlet. The plug has a central region coupled to the inner surface of the outer radial wall. Each open flow channel includes (i) a first portion originating at the inlet and converging to a location in the plug where convergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and divergence of the central region, and (ii) a second portion originating in the plug and diverging to the outlet where divergence is contributed to by changes in thickness of the outer radial wall and convergence of the central region. For at least a portion of the open flow channels, a central axis passing through the first and second portions is non-parallel with respect to the given direction of the flow.

  4. Meteorological factors contributing to the interannual variability of midsummer surface ozone in Colorado, Utah, and other western U.S. states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, Patrick J.; Pfister, Gabriele G.

    2016-03-01

    We use daily maximum 8 h average surface O3 concentrations (MDA8) for July 1995-2013, meteorological variables from the National Center for Environmental Prediction/National Center for Atmospheric Research Reanalysis, the North American Regional Reanalysis, and output from regional chemistry-climate simulations to assess relationships between O3 and weather in the western U.S. We also explore relationships among July O3, satellite-derived NO2, and meteorology. A primary objective of this study is to identify an effective method for correcting the effects of meteorology on July MDA8. We find significant correlations between July MDA8 O3 and meteorological variables for sites in or near Denver, Colorado, and Salt Lake City, Utah. The highest correlations were for 500 hPa heights, surface temperatures, and 700 hPa temperatures and zonal winds. We conclude that increased 500 hPa heights lead to high July O3 in much of the western U.S., particularly in areas of elevated terrain near urban sources of NO2 and other O3 precursors. In addition to bringing warmer temperatures and fewer clouds, upper level ridges decrease winds and allow cyclic terrain-driven circulations to reduce transport away from sources. Because of strong, nearly linear responses of July MDA8 to 500 hPa heights, it is not reasonable to use uncorrected trends in peak O3 for assessments of the effectiveness of emissions controls for much of the western U.S. Robust linear regressions for July MDA8 and tropospheric NO2 with 500 hPa heights can be used to assess and correct trends in July MDA8 in the Intermountain West.

  5. Evaluating the importance of surface soil contributions to reservoir sediment in alpine environments: a combined modelling and fingerprinting approach in the Posets-Maladeta Natural Park

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palazón, L.; Gaspar, L.; Latorre, B.; Blake, W.; Navas, A.

    2014-05-01

    Soil in alpine environments plays a key role in the development of ecosystem. Identify, maintain and preserve its resources, as well as recognize processes that would affect them are important and of practical interest. Environmental concerns about these fragile systems which are threatened by the human pressure and climatic change have stressed the need to gather information in soil erosion processes. As most mountain alpine environment the Benasque catchment is characterized by temperatures below freezing that can last from November to April, strong rainfall events and rugged topography. Indirect studies, such as combined model approaches, could be an alternative to evaluate soil erosion on these areas. In this study the complementary tools of Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) and fingerprinting procedure were used to assess an initial approach on soil erosion processes which take place in the area of the Posets-Maladeta National Park (Central Spanish Pyrenees). Soil erosion rates and sediment contribution of potential sediment sources (Kastanozem/Phaeozem; Fluvisol; Cambisol and channel bed sediments) were assessed. SWAT model identified Cambisols as the main source of sediment of the Benasque catchment with the highest specific sediment yields and Phaeozems and Fluvisols were identified as the lowest sediment contributors. Spring and winter performed the highest and lowest specific sediment yield, respectively. Fingerprinting procedure identified channel bed sediment and Fluvisols as the main sediment sources indicating the main influence of connectivity. The combined approach enabled us to better understand soil erosion processes in the Benasque alpine catchment.

  6. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery.

    PubMed

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-09-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  7. WASTE MINIMIZATION OPPORTUNITY ASSESSMENT MANUAL

    EPA Science Inventory

    Waste minimization (WM) is a policy specifically mandated by the U.S. Congress in the 1984 Hazardous and Solid Wastes Amendments to the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). The RCRA regulations require that generators of hazardous waste have a program in place to reduce...

  8. Assembly of a minimal protocell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasmussen, Steen

    2007-03-01

    What is minimal life, how can we make it, and how can it be useful? We present experimental and computational results towards bridging nonliving and living matter, which results in life that is different and much simpler than contemporary life. A simple yet tightly coupled catalytic cooperation between genes, metabolism, and container forms the design underpinnings of our protocell, which is a minimal self-replicating molecular machine. Experimentally, we have recently demonstrated this coupling by having an informational molecule (8-oxoguanine) catalytically control the light driven metabolic (Ru-bpy based) production of container materials (fatty acids). This is a significant milestone towards assembling a minimal self-replicating molecular machine. Recent theoretical investigations indicate that coordinated exponential component growth should naturally emerge as a result from such a catalytic coupling between the main protocellular components. A 3-D dissipative particle simulation (DPD) study of the full protocell life-cycle exposes a number of anticipated systemic issues associated with the remaining experimental challenges for the implementation of the minimal protocell. Finally we outline how more general self-replicating materials could be useful.

  9. A Defense of Semantic Minimalism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Su

    2012-01-01

    Semantic Minimalism is a position about the semantic content of declarative sentences, i.e., the content that is determined entirely by syntax. It is defined by the following two points: "Point 1": The semantic content is a complete/truth-conditional proposition. "Point 2": The semantic content is useful to a theory of…

  10. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery

    PubMed Central

    Castrovinci, Sebastiano; Emmanuel, Sam; Moscarelli, Marco; Murana, Giacomo; Caccamo, Giuseppa; Bertolino, Emanuela Clara; Nasso, Giuseppe; Speziale, Giuseppe; Fattouch, Khalil

    2016-01-01

    Aortic valve disease is a prevalent disorder that affects approximately 2% of the general adult population. Surgical aortic valve replacement is the gold standard treatment for symptomatic patients. This treatment has demonstrably proven to be both safe and effective. Over the last few decades, in an attempt to reduce surgical trauma, different minimally invasive approaches for aortic valve replacement have been developed and are now being increasingly utilized. A narrative review of the literature was carried out to describe the surgical techniques for minimally invasive aortic valve surgery and report the results from different experienced centers. Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement is associated with low perioperative morbidity, mortality and a low conversion rate to full sternotomy. Long-term survival appears to be at least comparable to that reported for conventional full sternotomy. Minimally invasive aortic valve surgery, either with a partial upper sternotomy or a right anterior minithoracotomy provides early- and long-term benefits. Given these benefits, it may be considered the standard of care for isolated aortic valve disease. PMID:27582764

  11. Surface-expressed insulin receptors as well as IGF-I receptors both contribute to the mitogenic effects of human insulin and its analogues.

    PubMed

    Lundby, Anders; Bolvig, Pernille; Hegelund, Anne Charlotte; Hansen, Bo F; Worm, Jesper; Lützen, Anne; Billestrup, Nils; Bonnesen, Christine; Oleksiewicz, Martin B

    2015-07-01

    There is a medical need for new insulin analogues. Yet, molecular alterations to the insulin molecule can theoretically result in analogues with carcinogenic effects. Preclinical carcinogenicity risk assessment for insulin analogues rests to a large extent on mitogenicity assays in cell lines. We therefore optimized mitogenicity assay conditions for a panel of five cell lines. All cell lines expressed insulin receptors (IR), IGF-I receptors (IGF-IR) and hybrid receptors, and in all cell lines, insulin as well as the comparator compounds X10 and IGF-I caused phosphorylation of the IR as well as IGF-IR. Insulin exhibited mitogenicity EC(50) values in the single-digit nanomolar to picomolar range. We observed correlations across cell types between (i) mitogenic potency of insulin and IGF-IR/IR ratio, (ii) Akt phosphorylation and mitogenic potency and (iii) Akt phosphorylation and IR phosphorylation. Using siRNA-mediated knockdown of IR and IGF-IR, we observed that in HCT 116 cells the IR appeared dominant in driving the mitogenic response to insulin, whereas in MCF7 cells the IGF-IR appeared dominant in driving the mitogenic response to insulin. Together, our results show that the IR as well as IGF-IR may contribute to the mitogenic potency of insulin. While insulin was a more potent mitogen than IGF-I in cells expressing more IR than IGF-IR, the hyper-mitogenic insulin analogue X10 was a more potent mitogen than insulin across all cell types, supporting that the hyper-mitogenic effect of X10 involves the IR as well as the IGF-IR. These results are relevant for preclinical safety assessment of developmental insulin analogues. PMID:25413577

  12. Simple size control of TiO2 nanoparticles and their electrochemical performance: emphasizing the contribution of the surface area to lithium storage at high-rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Joohyun; Um, Ji Hyun; Lee, Kyung Jae; Yu, Seung-Ho; Kim, Young-Jae; Sung, Yung-Eun; Lee, Jin-Kyu

    2016-03-01

    The particle size effects of TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs), which are composed of small crystallites, on Li ion storage are a very fundamental and important subject. However, size control of TNPs under 200 nm using a sol-gel method has been limited due to the highly reactive precursor, titanium alkoxide. In this study, TNPs with various sizes even under 100 nm are obtained by controlling the reactant concentrations in a mixed solvent of ethanol and acetonitrile. Among them, three different sizes of TNPs are prepared to compare the Li ion storage capacity, and 60 nm TNPs are found to have the best reversible capacity of 182 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 1 C and a remarkable rate performance of 120 mA h g-1 at 10 C. Capacity increase upon cycling is observed in the size-controlled TNPs, and the explanation of this phenomenon is proposed to the lattice volume expansion of TiO2 upon intercalation for enabling further penetration of the electrolyte into the particles' interior. Moreover, the capacity at high rates is more closely related to the surface area from Hg porosimetry analysis than from typical N2 adsorption/desorption analysis.The particle size effects of TiO2 nanoparticles (TNPs), which are composed of small crystallites, on Li ion storage are a very fundamental and important subject. However, size control of TNPs under 200 nm using a sol-gel method has been limited due to the highly reactive precursor, titanium alkoxide. In this study, TNPs with various sizes even under 100 nm are obtained by controlling the reactant concentrations in a mixed solvent of ethanol and acetonitrile. Among them, three different sizes of TNPs are prepared to compare the Li ion storage capacity, and 60 nm TNPs are found to have the best reversible capacity of 182 mA h g-1 after 50 cycles at 1 C and a remarkable rate performance of 120 mA h g-1 at 10 C. Capacity increase upon cycling is observed in the size-controlled TNPs, and the explanation of this phenomenon is proposed to the lattice

  13. Experimental determination of the surface photometric contribution in the spectral reflectance deconvolution processes for a simulated martian crater-like regolithic target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cord, Aurélien M.; Pinet, Patrick C.; Daydou, Yves; Chevrel, Serge D.

    2005-05-01

    We produce bidirectional reflectance experimental measurements in the visible and near-infrared range of a macroscopic target simulating the case of a martian crater. Using Hapke's equation of radiative transfer, we compare the performance, in terms of mineralogical abundance determination, of different deconvolution processes on a multispectral image of the experimental target. In particular, we study the effects of the topography and the physical properties of natural rocky surfaces (e.g., local variations of incidence and emergence angles, grain size variations, mixtures of materials) on the data interpretation. For this purpose, we increase progressively the amount of quantitative knowledge available in terms of Hapke parameters description, textural properties and topography for the target. We estimate the accuracy of results in comparison with the known ground truth as a function of the level of knowledge we have of the target and carry out a critical assessment on the relative applicability of the different processes. This study shows that the more important parameters to take into account are (in decreasing order): (1) the textural roughness which is shown essential for the accurate determination of mineralogical abundances; (2) the disparity of Hapke parameters across the target (3) the topography (DEM) that has a limited influence on the results. These findings have obvious implications for interpreting planetary regolith reflectance properties in terms of photometry, spectroscopy and mineralogy, measured either from spaceborne (e.g., Io observations from Galileo, Mars from Mars-Express/HRSC and OMEGA) or in situ (Mars Pathfinder, MER) instruments.

  14. A Precision Nitrogen Management Approach to Minimize Impacts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nitrogen fertilizer is a crucial input for crop production but contributes to agriculture’s environmental footprint via CO2 emissions, N2O emissions, and eutrophication of coastal waters. The low-cost way to minimize this impact is to eliminate over-application of N. This is more difficult than it s...

  15. Minimally invasive three-dimensional site characterization system. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Steedman, D.; Seusy, F.E.; Gibbons, J.; Bratton, J.L.

    1993-09-01

    This paper presents an improved for hazardous site characterization. The major components of the systems are: (1) an enhanced cone penetrometer test, (2) surface geophysical surveys and (3) a field database and visualization code. The objective of the effort was to develop a method of combining geophysical data with cone penetrometer data in the field to produce a synergistic effect. Various aspects of the method were tested at three sites. The results from each site are discussed and the data compared. This method allows the data to be interpreted more fully with greater certainty, is faster, cheaper and leads to a more accurate site characterization. Utilizing the cone penetrometer test rather than the standard drilling, sampling and laboratory testing reduces the workers exposure to hazardous materials and minimizes the hazardous material disposal problems. The technologies employed in this effort are, for the most part, state-of-the-art procedures. The approach of using data from various measurement systems to develop a synergistic effect was a unique contribution to environmental site characterization. The use of the cone penetrometer for providing ``ground truth`` data and as a platform for subsurface sensors in environmental site characterization represents a significant advancement in environmental site characterization.

  16. Habitability and preservation from source to sink: Evidence for habitable surface environments in soils on early Mars and their possible contribution to fluvial deposits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horgan, B. H. N.

    2014-12-01

    One of the most widespread habitable environments on Earth lurks just under our feet. Soils, which are created by precipitation-induced chemical weathering of rocks and sediments, provide abundant geochemical sources of energy for microbes, and form even under water-limited or snow-dominated climates. The mineralogy of soils is directly related to climatic and environmental conditions. Typical neutral, well-drained soils are dominated by phyllosilicates produced through hydrolysis by carbonic acid, but the additional presence of sulfates, oxides, reduced iron, and carbonates can indicate other conditions, including variations in water saturation, redox state, and pH. The high clay content of soils enhances preservation, and reducing soils, like those formed in wetlands, can preserve high concentrations of organics in the form of coal precursors. On Mars, deposits with mineralogies consistent with paleosols are observed in several locations, but are best exemplified by clay-bearing deposits on the plateau surrounding Mawrth Vallis. Widespread smectites at Mawrth are consistent with regional paleosols formed under a temperate climate, and detections of leached Al-rich minerals, acid sulfates, and reduced iron-bearing phases are consistent with localized modification of these soils by fluctuating ground water tables. Together, this suggests a wetlands-like surface environment with diverse chemical gradients providing many energy pathways for life and locally high preservation potential. While sites like Mawrth could be excellent targets for organics and biosignatures on Mars, one limitation of such dispersed sites is that finding high concentrations of organics can be challenging. An alternative would be to utilize deltas and other fluvial deposits as a geological filter. Deltas concentrate the often organic-rich clay size fraction of detrital sediments in well-defined locations. On Earth, the majority of deltaic organics and clays are sourced from soils upstream, and

  17. Two surfaces of cytochrome b5 with major and minor contributions to CYP3A4-catalyzed steroid and nifedipine oxygenation chemistries

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Hwei-Ming; Auchus, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Conserved human cytochrome b5 (b5) residues D58 and D65 are critical for interactions with CYP2E1 and CYP2C19, whereas E48 and E49 are essential for stimulating the 17,20-lyase activity of CYP17A1. Here, we show that b5 mutations E48G, E49G, D58G, and D65G have reduced capacity to stimulate CYP3A4-catalyzed progesterone and testosterone 6β-hydroxylation or nifedipine oxidation. The b5 double mutation D58G/D65G fails to stimulate these reactions, similar to CYP2E1 and CYP2C19, whereas mutation E48G/E49G retains 23–42% of wild-type stimulation. Neither mutation impairs the activity stimulation of wild-type b5, nor does mutation D58G/D65G impair the partial stimulation of mutations E48G or E48G/E49G. For assays reconstituted with a single phospholipid, phosphatidyl serine afforded the highest testosterone 6β-hydroxylase activity with wild-type b5 but the poorest activity with b5 mutation E48G/E49G, and the activity stimulation of mutation E48G/E49G was lost at [NaCl] > 50 mM. Cross-linking of CYP3A4 and b5 decreased in the order wild-type > E48G/E49G > D58G/D65G and varied with phospholipid. We conclude that two b5 acidic surfaces, primarily the domain including residues D58-D65, participate in the stimulation of CYP3A4 activities. Our data suggest that a minor population of CYP3A4 molecules remains sensitive to b5 mutation E48G/E49G, consistent with phospholipid-dependent conformational heterogeneity of CYP3A4. PMID:24256945

  18. Two surfaces of cytochrome b5 with major and minor contributions to CYP3A4-catalyzed steroid and nifedipine oxygenation chemistries.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hwei-Ming; Auchus, Richard J

    2014-01-01

    Conserved human cytochrome b5 (b5) residues D58 and D65 are critical for interactions with CYP2E1 and CYP2C19, whereas E48 and E49 are essential for stimulating the 17,20-lyase activity of CYP17A1. Here, we show that b5 mutations E48G, E49G, D58G, and D65G have reduced capacity to stimulate CYP3A4-catalyzed progesterone and testosterone 6β-hydroxylation or nifedipine oxidation. The b5 double mutation D58G/D65G fails to stimulate these reactions, similar to CYP2E1 and CYP2C19, whereas mutation E48G/E49G retains 23-42% of wild-type stimulation. Neither mutation impairs the activity stimulation of wild-type b5, nor does mutation D58G/D65G impair the partial stimulation of mutations E48G or E48G/E49G. For assays reconstituted with a single phospholipid, phosphatidyl serine afforded the highest testosterone 6β-hydroxylase activity with wild-type b5 but the poorest activity with b5 mutation E48G/E49G, and the activity stimulation of mutation E48G/E49G was lost at [NaCl]>50mM. Cross-linking of CYP3A4 and b5 decreased in the order wild-type>E48G/E49G>D58G/D65G and varied with phospholipid. We conclude that two b5 acidic surfaces, primarily the domain including residues D58-D65, participate in the stimulation of CYP3A4 activities. Our data suggest that a minor population of CYP3A4 molecules remains sensitive to b5 mutation E48G/E49G, consistent with phospholipid-dependent conformational heterogeneity of CYP3A4. PMID:24256945

  19. Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-04-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) projections for present and future waste minimization and pollution prevention. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be used to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. It is intended to satisfy Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. This Plan provides an overview of projected activities from FY 1994 through FY 1999. The plans are broken into site-wide and problem-specific activities. All directorates at LLNL have had an opportunity to contribute input, to estimate budget, and to review the plan. In addition to the above, this plan records LLNL`s goals for pollution prevention, regulatory drivers for those activities, assumptions on which the cost estimates are based, analyses of the strengths of the projects, and the barriers to increasing pollution prevention activities.

  20. Toward a Minimal Artificial Axon.

    PubMed

    Ariyaratne, Amila; Zocchi, Giovanni

    2016-07-01

    The electrophysiology of action potentials is usually studied in neurons, through relatively demanding experiments which are difficult to scale up to a defined network. Here we pursue instead the minimal artificial system based on the essential biological components-ion channels and lipid bilayers-where action potentials can be generated, propagated, and eventually networked. The fundamental unit is the classic supported bilayer: a planar bilayer patch with embedded ion channels in a fluidic environment where an ionic gradient is imposed across the bilayer. Two such units electrically connected form the basic building block for a network. The system is minimal in that we demonstrate that one kind of ion channel and correspondingly a gradient of only one ionic species is sufficient to generate an excitable system which shows amplification and threshold behavior. PMID:27049652

  1. Anaesthesia for minimally invasive surgery

    PubMed Central

    Dec, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is rising in popularity. It offers well-known benefits to the patient. However, restricted access to the surgical site and gas insufflation into the body cavities may result in severe complications. From the anaesthetic point of view MIS poses unique challenges associated with creation of pneumoperitoneum, carbon dioxide absorption, specific positioning and monitoring a patient to whom the anaesthetist has often restricted access, in a poorly lit environment. Moreover, with refinement of surgical procedures and growing experience the anaesthetist is presented with patients from high-risk groups (obese, elderly, with advanced cardiac and respiratory disease) who once were deemed unsuitable for the laparoscopic technique. Anaesthetic management is aimed at getting the patient safely through the procedure, minimizing the specific risks arising from laparoscopy and the patient's coexisting medical problems, ensuring quick recovery and a relatively pain-free postoperative course with early return to normal function. PMID:26865885

  2. Minimal universal quantum heat machine.

    PubMed

    Gelbwaser-Klimovsky, D; Alicki, R; Kurizki, G

    2013-01-01

    In traditional thermodynamics the Carnot cycle yields the ideal performance bound of heat engines and refrigerators. We propose and analyze a minimal model of a heat machine that can play a similar role in quantum regimes. The minimal model consists of a single two-level system with periodically modulated energy splitting that is permanently, weakly, coupled to two spectrally separated heat baths at different temperatures. The equation of motion allows us to compute the stationary power and heat currents in the machine consistent with the second law of thermodynamics. This dual-purpose machine can act as either an engine or a refrigerator (heat pump) depending on the modulation rate. In both modes of operation, the maximal Carnot efficiency is reached at zero power. We study the conditions for finite-time optimal performance for several variants of the model. Possible realizations of the model are discussed. PMID:23410316

  3. Principle of minimal work fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality 〈e-βW〉=e-βΔF, a change in the fluctuations of e-βW may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-βW converges towards the theoretical value e-βΔF, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and ΔF is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-βW. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014)]. PMID:26382367

  4. Principle of minimal work fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Gaoyang; Gong, Jiangbin

    2015-08-01

    Understanding and manipulating work fluctuations in microscale and nanoscale systems are of both fundamental and practical interest. For example, in considering the Jarzynski equality =e-β Δ F , a change in the fluctuations of e-β W may impact how rapidly the statistical average of e-β W converges towards the theoretical value e-β Δ F, where W is the work, β is the inverse temperature, and Δ F is the free energy difference between two equilibrium states. Motivated by our previous study aiming at the suppression of work fluctuations, here we obtain a principle of minimal work fluctuations. In brief, adiabatic processes as treated in quantum and classical adiabatic theorems yield the minimal fluctuations in e-β W. In the quantum domain, if a system initially prepared at thermal equilibrium is subjected to a work protocol but isolated from a bath during the time evolution, then a quantum adiabatic process without energy level crossing (or an assisted adiabatic process reaching the same final states as in a conventional adiabatic process) yields the minimal fluctuations in e-β W, where W is the quantum work defined by two energy measurements at the beginning and at the end of the process. In the classical domain where the classical work protocol is realizable by an adiabatic process, then the classical adiabatic process also yields the minimal fluctuations in e-β W. Numerical experiments based on a Landau-Zener process confirm our theory in the quantum domain, and our theory in the classical domain explains our previous numerical findings regarding the suppression of classical work fluctuations [G. Y. Xiao and J. B. Gong, Phys. Rev. E 90, 052132 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevE.90.052132].

  5. Minimizing liability during internal investigations.

    PubMed

    Morris, Cole

    2010-01-01

    Today's security professional must appreciate the potential landmines in any investigative effort and work collaboratively with others to minimize liability risks, the author points out. In this article he examines six civil torts that commonly arise from unprofessionally planned or poorly executed internal investigations-defamation, false imprisonment. intentional infliction of emotional distress, assault and battery, invasion of privacy, and malicious prosecution and abuse of process. PMID:20873494

  6. Systems Biology Perspectives on Minimal and Simpler Cells

    PubMed Central

    Xavier, Joana C.; Patil, Kiran Raosaheb

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The concept of the minimal cell has fascinated scientists for a long time, from both fundamental and applied points of view. This broad concept encompasses extreme reductions of genomes, the last universal common ancestor (LUCA), the creation of semiartificial cells, and the design of protocells and chassis cells. Here we review these different areas of research and identify common and complementary aspects of each one. We focus on systems biology, a discipline that is greatly facilitating the classical top-down and bottom-up approaches toward minimal cells. In addition, we also review the so-called middle-out approach and its contributions to the field with mathematical and computational models. Owing to the advances in genomics technologies, much of the work in this area has been centered on minimal genomes, or rather minimal gene sets, required to sustain life. Nevertheless, a fundamental expansion has been taking place in the last few years wherein the minimal gene set is viewed as a backbone of a more complex system. Complementing genomics, progress is being made in understanding the system-wide properties at the levels of the transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome. Network modeling approaches are enabling the integration of these different omics data sets toward an understanding of the complex molecular pathways connecting genotype to phenotype. We review key concepts central to the mapping and modeling of this complexity, which is at the heart of research on minimal cells. Finally, we discuss the distinction between minimizing the number of cellular components and minimizing cellular complexity, toward an improved understanding and utilization of minimal and simpler cells. PMID:25184563

  7. Surface purity control during XMASS detector refurbishment

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Kazuyoshi

    2015-08-17

    The XMASS project aims at detecting dark matter, pp and {sup 7}Be solar neutrinos, and neutrino less double beta decay using large volume of pure liquid xenon. The first physics target of the XMASS project is to detect dark matter with 835 kg liquid xenon. After the commissioning runs, XMASS detector was refurbished to minimize the background contribution mainly from PMT sealing material and we restarted data taking in November 2013. We report how we control surface purity, especially how we prevent radon daughter accumulation on the detector copper surface, during XMASS detector refurbishment. The result and future plan of XMASS are also reported.

  8. Risk minimization through portfolio replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciliberti, S.; Mã©Zard, M.

    2007-05-01

    We use a replica approach to deal with portfolio optimization problems. A given risk measure is minimized using empirical estimates of asset values correlations. We study the phase transition which happens when the time series is too short with respect to the size of the portfolio. We also study the noise sensitivity of portfolio allocation when this transition is approached. We consider explicitely the cases where the absolute deviation and the conditional value-at-risk are chosen as a risk measure. We show how the replica method can study a wide range of risk measures, and deal with various types of time series correlations, including realistic ones with volatility clustering.

  9. Diagnosis of minimal hepatic encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Weissenborn, Karin

    2015-03-01

    Minimal hepatic encephalopathy (mHE) has significant impact upon a liver patient's daily living and health related quality of life. Therefore a majority of clinicians agree that mHE should be diagnosed and treated. The optimal means for diagnosing mHE, however, is controversial. This paper describes the currently most frequently used methods-EEG, critical flicker frequency, Continuous Reaction time Test, Inhibitory Control Test, computerized test batteries such as the Cognitive Drug Research test battery, the psychometric hepatic encephalopathy score (PHES) and the Repeatable Battery for the Assessment of Neuropsychological Status (RBANS)-and their pros and cons. PMID:26041959

  10. About the ZOOM minimization package

    SciTech Connect

    Fischler, M.; Sachs, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    A new object-oriented Minimization package is available for distribution in the same manner as CLHEP. This package, designed for use in HEP applications, has all the capabilities of Minuit, but is a re-write from scratch, adhering to modern C++ design principles. A primary goal of this package is extensibility in several directions, so that its capabilities can be kept fresh with as little maintenance effort as possible. This package is distinguished by the priority that was assigned to C++ design issues, and the focus on producing an extensible system that will resist becoming obsolete.

  11. Prepulse minimization in KALI-5000.

    PubMed

    Kumar, D Durga Praveen; Mitra, S; Senthil, K; Sharma, Vishnu K; Singh, S K; Roy, A; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K V; Chakravarthy, D P

    2009-07-01

    A pulse power system (1 MV, 50 kA, and 100 ns) based on Marx generator and Blumlein pulse forming line has been built for generating high power microwaves. The Blumlein configuration poses a prepulse problem and hence the diode gap had to be increased to match the diode impedance to the Blumlein impedance during the main pulse. A simple method to eliminate prepulse voltage using a vacuum sparkgap and a resistor is given. Another fundamental approach of increasing the inductance of Marx generator to minimize the prepulse voltage is also presented. Experimental results for both of these configurations are given. PMID:19655979

  12. Prepulse minimization in KALI-5000

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, D. Durga Praveen; Mitra, S.; Senthil, K.; Sharma, Vishnu K.; Singh, S. K.; Roy, A.; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2009-07-01

    A pulse power system (1 MV, 50 kA, and 100 ns) based on Marx generator and Blumlein pulse forming line has been built for generating high power microwaves. The Blumlein configuration poses a prepulse problem and hence the diode gap had to be increased to match the diode impedance to the Blumlein impedance during the main pulse. A simple method to eliminate prepulse voltage using a vacuum sparkgap and a resistor is given. Another fundamental approach of increasing the inductance of Marx generator to minimize the prepulse voltage is also presented. Experimental results for both of these configurations are given.

  13. Minimizing medical litigation, part 2.

    PubMed

    Harold, Tan Keng Boon

    2006-01-01

    Provider-patient disputes are inevitable in the healthcare sector. Healthcare providers and regulators should recognize this and plan opportunities to enforce alternative dispute resolution (ADR) a early as possible in the care delivery process. Negotiation is often the main dispute resolution method used by local healthcare providers, failing which litigation would usually follow. The role of mediation in resolving malpractice disputes has been minimal. Healthcare providers, administrators, and regulators should therefore look toward a post-event communication-cum-mediation framework as the key national strategy to resolving malpractice disputes. PMID:16711089

  14. The minimal scenario of leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchet, Steve; Di Bari, Pasquale

    2012-12-01

    We review the main features and results of thermal leptogenesis within the type I seesaw mechanism, the minimal extension of the Standard Model explaining neutrino masses and mixing. After presenting the simplest approach, the vanilla scenario, we discuss various important developments of recent years, such as the inclusion of lepton and heavy neutrino flavour effects, a description beyond a hierarchical heavy neutrino mass spectrum and an improved kinetic description within the density matrix and the closed-time-path formalisms. We also discuss how leptogenesis can ultimately represent an important phenomenological tool to test the seesaw mechanism and the underlying model of new physics.

  15. Minimally invasive surgery for thyroid eye disease

    PubMed Central

    Naik, Milind Neilkant; Nair, Akshay Gopinathan; Gupta, Adit; Kamal, Saurabh

    2015-01-01

    Thyroid eye disease (TED) can affect the eye in myriad ways: proptosis, strabismus, eyelid retraction, optic neuropathy, soft tissue changes around the eye and an unstable ocular surface. TED consists of two phases: active, and inactive. The active phase of TED is limited to a period of 12–18 months and is mainly managed medically with immunosuppression. The residual structural changes due to the resultant fibrosis are usually addressed with surgery, the mainstay of which is orbital decompression. These surgeries are performed during the inactive phase. The surgical rehabilitation of TED has evolved over the years: not only the surgical techniques, but also the concepts, and the surgical tools available. The indications for decompression surgery have also expanded in the recent past. This article discusses the technological and conceptual advances of minimally invasive surgery for TED that decrease complications and speed up recovery. Current surgical techniques offer predictable, consistent results with better esthetics. PMID:26669337

  16. Endoscopic navigation for minimally invasive suturing.

    PubMed

    Wengert, Christian; Bossard, Lukas; Häberling, Armin; Baur, Charles; Székely, Gábor; Cattin, Philippe C

    2007-01-01

    Manipulating small objects such as needles, screws or plates inside the human body during minimally invasive surgery can be very difficult for less experienced surgeons, due to the loss of 3D depth perception. This paper presents an approach for tracking a suturing needle using a standard endoscope. The resulting pose information of the needle is then used to generate artificial 3D cues on the 2D screen to optimally support surgeons during tissue suturing. Additionally, if an external tracking device is provided to report the endoscope's position, the suturing needle can be tracked in a hybrid fashion with sub-millimeter accuracy. Finally, a visual navigation aid can be incorporated, if a 3D surface is intraoperatively reconstructed from video or registered from preoperative imaging. PMID:18044620

  17. Perceiving environmental properties from motion information: Minimal conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Proffitt, Dennis R.; Kaiser, Mary K.

    1989-01-01

    The status of motion as a minimal information source for perceiving the environmental properties of surface segregation, three-dimensional (3-D) form, displacement, and dynamics is discussed. The selection of these particular properties was motivated by a desire to present research on perceiving properties that span the range of dimensional complexity.

  18. Minimal impact, waterless decontamination technologies for improving food safety

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogen contamination of produce, meats, poultry, shellfish, and other foods remains an ongoing concern. Chemical sanitizers are widely employed for foods and food contact surfaces. However, there is growing interest in the development of minimal impact, waterless decontamination processes that wil...

  19. Minimizing travel claims cost with minimal-spanning tree model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamalluddin, Mohd Helmi; Jaafar, Mohd Azrul; Amran, Mohd Iskandar; Ainul, Mohd Sharizal; Hamid, Aqmar; Mansor, Zafirah Mohd; Nopiah, Zulkifli Mohd

    2014-06-01

    Travel demand necessitates a big expenditure in spending, as has been proven by the National Audit Department (NAD). Every year the auditing process is carried out throughout the country involving official travel claims. This study focuses on the use of the Spanning Tree model to determine the shortest path to minimize the cost of the NAD's official travel claims. The objective is to study the possibility of running a network based in the Kluang District Health Office to eight Rural Clinics in Johor state using the Spanning Tree model applications for optimizing travelling distances and make recommendations to the senior management of the Audit Department to analyze travelling details before an audit is conducted. Result of this study reveals that there were claims of savings of up to 47.4% of the original claims, over the course of the travel distance.

  20. Remote sensing contribution to land surface hydrology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salomonson, V. V.; Choudhury, B. J.

    1990-01-01

    Progress that has been made over the past decade in developing technology for hydrological observations from operational aircraft is described. Particular attention is given to research on soil moisture, snow cover, and vegetation. Future missions such as the ESA ERS-1 and Canada's Radarsat mission are considered.

  1. Annual Waste Minimization Summary Report

    SciTech Connect

    Alfred J. Karns

    2007-01-01

    This report summarizes the waste minimization efforts undertaken by National Security Technologies, LLC (NSTec), for the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office (NNSA/NSO), during CY06. This report was developed in accordance with the requirements of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) Permit (No. NEV HW0021) and as clarified in a letter dated April 21, 1995, from Paul Liebendorfer of the Nevada Division of Environmental Protection to Donald Elle of the DOE, Nevada Operations Office. The NNSA/NSO Pollution Prevention (P2) Program establishes a process to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO and ensures that proposed methods of treatment, storage, and/or disposal of waste minimize potential threats to human health and the environment. The following information provides an overview of the P2 Program, major P2 accomplishments during the reporting year, a comparison of the current year waste generation to prior years, and a description of efforts undertaken during the year to reduce the volume and toxicity of waste generated by the NNSA/NSO.

  2. Less minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    de Gouvea, Andre; Friedland, Alexander; Murayama, Hitoshi

    1998-03-28

    Most of the phenomenological studies of supersymmetry have been carried out using the so-called minimal supergravity scenario, where one assumes a universal scalar mass, gaugino mass, and trilinear coupling at M{sub GUT}. Even though this is a useful simplifying assumption for phenomenological analyses, it is rather too restrictive to accommodate a large variety of phenomenological possibilities. It predicts, among other things, that the lightest supersymmetric particle (LSP) is an almost pure B-ino, and that the {mu}-parameter is larger than the masses of the SU(2){sub L} and U(1){sub Y} gauginos. We extend the minimal supergravity framework by introducing one extra parameter: the Fayet'Iliopoulos D-term for the hypercharge U(1), D{sub Y}. Allowing for this extra parameter, we find a much more diverse phenomenology, where the LSP is {tilde {nu}}{sub {tau}}, {tilde {tau}} or a neutralino with a large higgsino content. We discuss the relevance of the different possibilities to collider signatures. The same type of extension can be done to models with the gauge mediation of supersymmetry breaking. We argue that it is not wise to impose cosmological constraints on the parameter space.

  3. Symmetry breaking for drag minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roper, Marcus; Squires, Todd M.; Brenner, Michael P.

    2005-11-01

    For locomotion at high Reynolds numbers drag minimization favors fore-aft asymmetric slender shapes with blunt noses and sharp trailing edges. On the other hand, in an inertialess fluid the drag experienced by a body is independent of whether it travels forward or backward through the fluid, so there is no advantage to having a single preferred swimming direction. In fact numerically determined minimum drag shapes are known to exhibit almost no fore-aft asymmetry even at moderate Re. We show that asymmetry persists, albeit extremely weakly, down to vanishingly small Re, scaling asymptotically as Re^3. The need to minimize drag to maximize speed for a given propulsive capacity gives one possible mechanism for the increasing asymmetry in the body plans seen in nature, as organisms increase in size and swimming speed from bacteria like E-Coli up to pursuit predator fish such as tuna. If it is the dominant mechanism, then this signature scaling will be observed in the shapes of motile micro-organisms.

  4. Next-to-minimal SOFTSUSY

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allanach, B. C.; Athron, P.; Tunstall, Lewis C.; Voigt, A.; Williams, A. G.

    2014-09-01

    We describe an extension to the SOFTSUSY program that provides for the calculation of the sparticle spectrum in the Next-to-Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (NMSSM), where a chiral superfield that is a singlet of the Standard Model gauge group is added to the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) fields. Often, a Z3 symmetry is imposed upon the model. SOFTSUSY can calculate the spectrum in this case as well as the case where general Z3 violating (denoted as =) terms are added to the soft supersymmetry breaking terms and the superpotential. The user provides a theoretical boundary condition for the couplings and mass terms of the singlet. Radiative electroweak symmetry breaking data along with electroweak and CKM matrix data are used as weak-scale boundary conditions. The renormalisation group equations are solved numerically between the weak scale and a high energy scale using a nested iterative algorithm. This paper serves as a manual to the NMSSM mode of the program, detailing the approximations and conventions used. Catalogue identifier: ADPM_v4_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADPM_v4_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 154886 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 1870890 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: C++, fortran. Computer: Personal computer. Operating system: Tested on Linux 3.x. Word size: 64 bits Classification: 11.1, 11.6. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADPM_v3_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 183 (2012) 785 Nature of problem: Calculating supersymmetric particle spectrum and mixing parameters in the next-to-minimal supersymmetric standard model. The solution to the

  5. Update on designing and building minimal cells

    PubMed Central

    Jewett, Michael C.; Forster, Anthony C.

    2010-01-01

    Summary Minimal cells comprise only the genes and biomolecular machinery necessary for basic life. Synthesizing minimal and minimized cells will improve understanding of core biology, enhance development of biotechnology strains of bacteria, and enable evolutionary optimization of natural and unnatural biopolymers. Design and construction of minimal cells is proceeding in two different directions: “top-down” reduction of bacterial genomes in vivo and “bottom-up” integration of DNA/RNA/protein/membrane syntheses in vitro. Major progress in the last 5 years has occurred in synthetic genomics, minimization of the Escherichia coli genome, sequencing of minimal bacterial endosymbionts, identification of essential genes, and integration of biochemical systems. PMID:20638265

  6. Ab initio investigation of electronic and vibrational contributions to linear and nonlinear dielectric properties of ice

    SciTech Connect

    Casassa, S.; Baima, J.; Mahmoud, A.; Kirtman, B.

    2014-06-14

    Electronic and vibrational contributions to the static and dynamic (hyper)polarizability tensors of ice XI and model structures of ordinary hexagonal ice have been theoretically investigated. Calculations were carried out by the finite field nuclear relaxation method for periodic systems (FF-NR) recently implemented in the CRYSTAL code, using the coupled-perturbed Kohn-Sham approach (CPKS) for evaluating the required electronic properties. The effect of structure on the static electronic polarizabilities (dielectric constants) and second-hyperpolarizabilities is minimal. On the other hand, the vibrational contributions to the polarizabilities were found to be significant. A reliable evaluation of these (ionic) contributions allows one to discriminate amongst ice phases characterized by different degrees of proton-order, primarily through differences caused by librational motions. Transverse static and dynamic vibrational (hyper)polarizabilities were found by extrapolating calculations for slabs of increasing size, in order to eliminate substantial surface contributions.

  7. Design and Demonstration of Minimal Lunar Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche-Sauvan, L.; Foing, B. H.; Exohab Team

    2009-04-01

    Introduction: We propose a conceptual analysis of a first minimal lunar base, in focussing on the system aspects and coordinating every different part as part an evolving architecture [1-3]. We justify the case for a scientific outpost allowing experiments, sample analysis in laboratory (relevant to the origin and evolution of the Earth, geophysical and geochemical studies of the Moon, life sciences, observation from the Moon). Research: Research activities will be conducted with this first settlement in: - science (of, from and on the Moon) - exploration (robotic mobility, rover, drilling), - technology (communication, command, organisation, automatism). Life sciences. The life sciences aspects are considered through a life support for a crew of 4 (habitat) and a laboratory activity with biological experiments performed on Earth or LEO, but then without any magnetosphere protection and therefore with direct cosmic rays and solar particle effects. Moreover, the ability of studying the lunar environment in the field will be a big asset before settling a permanent base [3-5]. Lunar environment. The lunar environment adds constraints to instruments specifications (vacuum, extreme temperature, regolith, seism, micrometeorites). SMART-1 and other missions data will bring geometrical, chemical and physical details about the environment (soil material characteristics, on surface conditions …). Test bench. To assess planetary technologies and operations preparing for Mars human exploration. Lunar outpost predesign modular concept: To allow a human presence on the moon and to carry out these experiments, we will give a pre-design of a human minimal lunar base. Through a modular concept, this base will be possibly evolved into a long duration or permanent base. We will analyse the possibilities of settling such a minimal base by means of the current and near term propulsion technology, as a full Ariane 5 ME carrying 1.7 T of gross payload to the surface of the Moon

  8. Holographic entanglement entropy of anisotropic minimal surfaces in LLM geometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chanju; Kim, Kyung Kiu; Kwon, O.-Kab

    2016-08-01

    We calculate the holographic entanglement entropy (HEE) of the Zk orbifold of Lin-Lunin-Maldacena (LLM) geometries which are dual to the vacua of the mass-deformed ABJM theory with Chern-Simons level k. By solving the partial differential equations analytically, we obtain the HEEs for all LLM solutions with arbitrary M2 charge and k up to μ02 -order where μ0 is the mass parameter. The renormalized entanglement entropies are all monotonically decreasing near the UV fixed point in accordance with the F-theorem. Except the multiplication factor and to all orders in μ0, they are independent of the overall scaling of Young diagrams which characterize LLM geometries. Therefore we can classify the HEEs of LLM geometries with Zk orbifold in terms of the shape of Young diagrams modulo overall size. HEE of each family is a pure number independent of the 't Hooft coupling constant except the overall multiplication factor. We extend our analysis to obtain HEE analytically to μ04 -order for the symmetric droplet case.

  9. Simulation of Contributing Areas and Surface-Water Leakage to Potential Replacement Wells Near the Community of New Post, Sawyer County, Wisconsin, by Means of a Two-Dimensional Ground-Water-Flow Model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Juckem, Paul F.; Hunt, Randall J.

    2008-01-01

    A two-dimensional, steady-state ground-water-flow model of the shallow ground-water-flow system near the community of New Post, Sawyer County, Wis., was refined from an existing model of the area. Hydraulic-conductivity and recharge values were not changed from the existing model for the scenario simulations described in this report. Rather, the model was refined by adding detail along the Chippewa Flowage and then was used to simulate contributing areas for three potential replacement wells pumping 30,000 gallons per day. The model also was used to simulate potential surface-water leakage out of the Chippewa Flowage captured by replacement-well pumping. A range in resistance to vertical ground-water flow was simulated along the Chippewa Flowage for each potential replacement-well location to bound the potential effects of representing three-dimensional flow with a two-dimensional model. Results indicate that pumping from a replacement well sited about 130 feet from the Chippewa Flowage could capture as much as 39 percent of the total pumping from the flowage. Pumping from either of two potential replacement wells sited at least 400 feet from the Chippewa Flowage did not induce surface-water leakage out of the flowage regardless of the resistance applied along the flowage for simulations described in this report.

  10. [MINIMALLY INVASIVE AORTIC VALVE REPLACEMENT].

    PubMed

    Tabata, Minoru

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive aortic valve replacement (MIAVR) is defined as aortic valve replacement avoiding full sternotomy. Common approaches include a partial sternotomy right thoracotomy, and a parasternal approach. MIAVR has been shown to have advantages over conventional AVR such as shorter length of stay and smaller amount of blood transfusion and better cosmesis. However, it is also known to have disadvantages such as longer cardiopulmonary bypass and aortic cross-clamp times and potential complications related to peripheral cannulation. Appropriate patient selection is very important. Since the procedure is more complex than conventional AVR, more intensive teamwork in the operating room is essential. Additionally, a team approach during postoperative management is critical to maximize the benefits of MIAVR. PMID:27295772

  11. Non-minimal Inflationary Attractors

    SciTech Connect

    Kallosh, Renata; Linde, Andrei E-mail: alinde@stanford.edu

    2013-10-01

    Recently we identified a new class of (super)conformally invariant theories which allow inflation even if the scalar potential is very steep in terms of the original conformal variables. Observational predictions of a broad class of such theories are nearly model-independent. In this paper we consider generalized versions of these models where the inflaton has a non-minimal coupling to gravity with a negative parameter ξ different from its conformal value -1/6. We show that these models exhibit attractor behavior. With even a slight increase of |ξ| from |ξ| = 0, predictions of these models for n{sub s} and r rapidly converge to their universal model-independent values corresponding to conformal coupling ξ = −1/6. These values of n{sub s} and r practically coincide with the corresponding values in the limit ξ → −∞.

  12. Strategies to Minimize Antibiotic Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chang-Ro; Cho, Ill Hwan; Jeong, Byeong Chul; Lee, Sang Hee

    2013-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance can be reduced by using antibiotics prudently based on guidelines of antimicrobial stewardship programs (ASPs) and various data such as pharmacokinetic (PK) and pharmacodynamic (PD) properties of antibiotics, diagnostic testing, antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST), clinical response, and effects on the microbiota, as well as by new antibiotic developments. The controlled use of antibiotics in food animals is another cornerstone among efforts to reduce antibiotic resistance. All major resistance-control strategies recommend education for patients, children (e.g., through schools and day care), the public, and relevant healthcare professionals (e.g., primary-care physicians, pharmacists, and medical students) regarding unique features of bacterial infections and antibiotics, prudent antibiotic prescribing as a positive construct, and personal hygiene (e.g., handwashing). The problem of antibiotic resistance can be minimized only by concerted efforts of all members of society for ensuring the continued efficiency of antibiotics. PMID:24036486

  13. Minimal unitary (covariant) scattering theory

    SciTech Connect

    Lindesay, J.V.; Markevich, A.

    1983-06-01

    In the minimal three particle equations developed by Lindesay the two body input amplitude was an on shell relativistic generalization of the non-relativistic scattering model characterized by a single mass parameter ..mu.. which in the two body (m + m) system looks like an s-channel bound state (..mu.. < 2m) or virtual state (..mu.. > 2m). Using this driving term in covariant Faddeev equations generates a rich covariant and unitary three particle dynamics. However, the simplest way of writing the relativisitic generalization of the Faddeev equations can take the on shell Mandelstam parameter s = 4(q/sup 2/ + m/sup 2/), in terms of which the two particle input is expressed, to negative values in the range of integration required by the dynamics. This problem was met in the original treatment by multiplying the two particle input amplitude by THETA(s). This paper provides what we hope to be a more direct way of meeting the problem.

  14. Minimally packed phases in holography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donos, Aristomenis; Gauntlett, Jerome P.

    2016-03-01

    We numerically construct asymptotically AdS black brane solutions of D = 4 Einstein-Maxwell theory coupled to a pseudoscalar. The solutions are holographically dual to d = 3 CFTs at finite chemical potential and in a constant magnetic field, which spontaneously break translation invariance leading to the spontaneous formation of abelian and momentum magnetisation currents flowing around the plaquettes of a periodic Bravais lattice. We analyse the three-dimensional moduli space of lattice solutions, which are generically oblique, and show, for a specific value of the magnetic field, that the free energy is minimised by the triangular lattice, associated with minimal packing of circles in the plane. We show that the average stress tensor for the thermodynamically preferred phase is that of a perfect fluid and that this result applies more generally to spontaneously generated periodic phases. The triangular structure persists at low temperatures indicating the existence of novel crystalline ground states.

  15. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Trent J; Lubowitz, James H

    2013-01-01

    Autogenous hamstring harvesting for knee ligament reconstruction is a well-established standard. Minimally invasive posterior hamstring harvest is a simple, efficient, reproducible technique for harvest of the semitendinosus or gracilis tendon or both medial hamstring tendons. A 2- to 3-cm longitudinal incision from the popliteal crease proximally, in line with the semitendinosus tendon, is sufficient. The deep fascia is bluntly penetrated, and the tendon or tendons are identified. Adhesions are dissected. Then, an open tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons proximally; a closed, sharp tendon stripper is used to release the tendon or tendons from the pes. Layered, absorbable skin closure is performed, and the skin is covered with a skin sealant, bolster dressing, and plastic adhesive bandage for 2 weeks. PMID:24266003

  16. Minimally Invasive Spigelian Hernia Repair

    PubMed Central

    Baucom, Catherine; Nguyen, Quan D.; Hidalgo, Marco

    2009-01-01

    Introduction: Spigelian hernia is an uncommon ventral hernia characterized by a defect in the linea semilunaris. Repair of spigelian hernia has traditionally been accomplished via an open transverse incision and primary repair. The purpose of this article is to present 2 case reports of incarcerated spigelian hernia that were successfully repaired laparoscopically using Gortex mesh and to present a review of the literature regarding laparoscopic repair of spigelian hernias. Methods: Retrospective chart review and Medline literature search. Results: Two patients underwent laparoscopic mesh repair of incarcerated spigelian hernias. Both were started on a regular diet on postoperative day 1 and discharged on postoperative days 2 and 3. One patient developed a seroma that resolved without intervention. There was complete resolution of preoperative symptoms at the 12-month follow-up. Conclusion: Minimally invasive repair of spigelian hernias is an alternative to the traditional open surgical technique. Further studies are needed to directly compare the open and the laparoscopic repair. PMID:19660230

  17. A minimal little Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barceló, Roberto; Masip, Manuel

    2008-11-01

    We discuss a little Higgs scenario that introduces below the TeV scale just the two minimal ingredients of these models, a vectorlike T quark and a singlet component (implying anomalous couplings) in the Higgs field, together with a pseudoscalar singlet η. In the model, which is a variation of Schmaltz’s simplest little Higgs model, all the extra vector bosons are much heavier than the T quark. In the Yukawa sector the global symmetry is approximate, implying a single large coupling per flavor, whereas in the scalar sector it is only broken at the loop level. We obtain the one-loop effective potential and show that it provides acceptable masses for the Higgs h and for the singlet η with no need for an extra μ term. We find that mη can be larger than mh/2, which would forbid the (otherwise dominant) decay mode h→ηη.

  18. Natural supersymmetric minimal dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabbrichesi, Marco; Urbano, Alfredo

    2016-03-01

    We show how the Higgs boson mass is protected from the potentially large corrections due to the introduction of minimal dark matter if the new physics sector is made supersymmetric. The fermionic dark matter candidate (a 5-plet of S U (2 )L) is accompanied by a scalar state. The weak gauge sector is made supersymmetric, and the Higgs boson is embedded in a supersymmetric multiplet. The remaining standard model states are nonsupersymmetric. Nonvanishing corrections to the Higgs boson mass only appear at three-loop level, and the model is natural for dark matter masses up to 15 TeV—a value larger than the one required by the cosmological relic density. The construction presented stands as an example of a general approach to naturalness that solves the little hierarchy problem which arises when new physics is added beyond the standard model at an energy scale around 10 TeV.

  19. Chemical basis for minimal cognition.

    PubMed

    Hanczyc, Martin M; Ikegami, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    We have developed a simple chemical system capable of self-movement in order to study the physicochemical origins of movement. We propose how this system may be useful in the study of minimal perception and cognition. The system consists simply of an oil droplet in an aqueous environment. A chemical reaction within the oil droplet induces an instability, the symmetry of the oil droplet breaks, and the droplet begins to move through the aqueous phase. The complement of physical phenomena that is then generated indicates the presence of feedback cycles that, as will be argued, form the basis for self-regulation, homeostasis, and perhaps an extended form of autopoiesis. We discuss the result that simple chemical systems are capable of sensory-motor coupling and possess a homeodynamic state from which cognitive processes may emerge. PMID:20586578

  20. Minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP).

    PubMed

    Goldstein, R E; Martin, W H; Richards, K

    2003-06-01

    The technique of parathyroidectomy has traditionally involved a bilateral exploration of the neck with the intent of visualizing 4 parathyroid glands and resecting pathologically enlarged glands. Parathyroid scanning using technetium-99m sestamibi has evolved and can now localize 80% to 90% of parathyroid adenomas. The technique of minimally invasive radioguided parathyroidectomy (MIRP) is a surgical option for most patients with primary hyperparathyroidism and a positive preoperative parathyroid scan. The technique makes use of a hand-held gamma probe that is used intraoperatively to guide the dissection in a highly directed manner with the procedure often performed under local anesthesia. The technique results in excellent cure rates while allowing most patients to leave the hospital within a few hours after the completion of the procedure. Current data also suggest the procedure can decrease hospital charges by approximately 50%. This technique may significantly change the management of primary hyperparathyroidism. PMID:12955045

  1. Waste minimization in analytical methods

    SciTech Connect

    Green, D.W.; Smith, L.L.; Crain, J.S.; Boparai, A.S.; Kiely, J.T.; Yaeger, J.S. Schilling, J.B.

    1995-05-01

    The US Department of Energy (DOE) will require a large number of waste characterizations over a multi-year period to accomplish the Department`s goals in environmental restoration and waste management. Estimates vary, but two million analyses annually are expected. The waste generated by the analytical procedures used for characterizations is a significant source of new DOE waste. Success in reducing the volume of secondary waste and the costs of handling this waste would significantly decrease the overall cost of this DOE program. Selection of appropriate analytical methods depends on the intended use of the resultant data. It is not always necessary to use a high-powered analytical method, typically at higher cost, to obtain data needed to make decisions about waste management. Indeed, for samples taken from some heterogeneous systems, the meaning of high accuracy becomes clouded if the data generated are intended to measure a property of this system. Among the factors to be considered in selecting the analytical method are the lower limit of detection, accuracy, turnaround time, cost, reproducibility (precision), interferences, and simplicity. Occasionally, there must be tradeoffs among these factors to achieve the multiple goals of a characterization program. The purpose of the work described here is to add waste minimization to the list of characteristics to be considered. In this paper the authors present results of modifying analytical methods for waste characterization to reduce both the cost of analysis and volume of secondary wastes. Although tradeoffs may be required to minimize waste while still generating data of acceptable quality for the decision-making process, they have data demonstrating that wastes can be reduced in some cases without sacrificing accuracy or precision.

  2. Hydrophobic Surfaces of Spacecraft Components Enhance the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Higher Survival Rates on Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Kern, R. G.

    2003-01-01

    In order to minimize the forward contamination of Mars, spacecraft are assembled under clean-room conditions that often require several procedures to clean and sterilize components. Surface characteristics of spacecraft materials may contribute to microbial survival by protecting spores from sterilizing agents, including UV irradiation on the surface of Mars. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface characteristics of several spacecraft materials on the survival of Bacillus subtilis spores under simulated Martian conditions.

  3. Seasonal variability of iodine and selenium in surface and groundwater as a factor that may contribute to iodine isotope balance in the thyroid gland and its irradiation in case of radioiodine contamination during accidents at the NPP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobova, Elena; Kolmykova, Lyudmila; Ryzhenko, Boris; Berezkin, Viktor; Saraeva, Anastasia

    2016-04-01

    Radioiodine release to the environment during the accident at the Chernobyl NPP led to the increased risk of the thyroid cancer cases within the contaminated areas, the effect being aggravated in conditions of stable iodine and selenium deficiency in local food chains. Although the drinking water iodine is usually believed to contribute not more than 10% to local diet, our estimations accounting of water content in other products and several regional studies (e.g. India and Australia) proved its portion to be at least twice as much. As radioiodine isotopes are short-lived, their absorption depends greatly on stable iodine and selenium sufficiency in thyroid gland in the first few days of contamination and seasonal variation of stable iodine and selenium in local sources of drinking water may be significant as modifying the resulting thyroid irradiation in different seasons of the year. The main goal of the study was to evaluate seasonal variation of levels of iodine and selenium in natural waters of the Bryansk region as a possible factor affecting the radioiodine intake by thyroid gland of animals and humans in case of radioiodine contamination during the accident. Seasonal I and Se concentration was measured in the years of 2014 and 2015 at 14 test points characterizing surface (river and lake) and drinking groundwater. Obtained data proved considerable seasonal variation of I and Se concentration in natural waters (3,7-8,1 μg/l and 0,04-0,4 μg/l respectively) related to physico-chemical water parameters, such as pH, Eh and fluctuations in concentration of dissolved organic matter. The widest I and Se seasonal variability was observed in surface and well waters, maximum I level being found in autumn at the end of vegetation period characterized by active I leaching from the decomposed organic residues by long lasting precipitations. The content of selenium in the surface waters during summer-autumn (0,06-0,3 μg/l) was higher than in spring (0,04-0,05

  4. Minimal length uncertainty and accelerating universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farmany, A.; Mortazavi, S. S.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, minimal length uncertainty is used as a constraint to solve the Friedman equation. It is shown that, based on the minimal length uncertainty principle, the Hubble scale is decreasing which corresponds to an accelerating universe.

  5. Minimizing or eliminating refueling of nuclear reactor

    DOEpatents

    Doncals, Richard A.; Paik, Nam-Chin; Andre, Sandra V.; Porter, Charles A.; Rathbun, Roy W.; Schwallie, Ambrose L.; Petras, Diane S.

    1989-01-01

    Demand for refueling of a liquid metal fast nuclear reactor having a life of 30 years is eliminated or reduced to intervals of at least 10 years by operating the reactor at a low linear-power density, typically 2.5 kw/ft of fuel rod, rather than 7.5 or 15 kw/ft, which is the prior art practice. So that power of the same magnitude as for prior art reactors is produced, the volume of the core is increased. In addition, the height of the core and it diameter are dimensioned so that the ratio of the height to the diameter approximates 1 to the extent practicable considering the requirement of control and that the pressure drop in the coolant shall not be excessive. The surface area of a cylinder of given volume is a minimum if the ratio of the height to the diameter is 1. By minimizing the surface area, the leakage of neutrons is reduced. By reducing the linear-power density, increasing core volume, reducing fissile enrichment and optimizing core geometry, internal-core breeding of fissionable fuel is substantially enhanced. As a result, core operational life, limited by control worth requirements and fuel burnup capability, is extended up to 30 years of continuous power operation.

  6. Minimizing Glovebox Glove Breaches: PART II.

    SciTech Connect

    Cournoyer, M. E.; Andrade, R.M.; Taylor, D. J.; Stimmel, J. J.; Zaelke, R. L.; Balkey, J. J.

    2005-01-01

    As a matter of good business practices, a team of glovebox experts from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) has been assembled to proactively investigate processes and procedures that minimize unplanned breaches in the glovebox, e.g., glove failures. A major part of this effort involves the review of glovebox glove failures that have occurred at the Plutonium Facility and at the Chemical and Metallurgy Research Facility. Information dating back to 1993 has been compiled from formal records. This data has been combined with information obtained from a baseline inventory of about 9,000 glovebox gloves. The key attributes tracked include those related to location, the glovebox glove, type and location of breaches, the worker, and the consequences resulting from breaches. This glovebox glove failure analysis yielded results in the areas of the ease of collecting this type of data, the causes of most glove failures that have occurred, the effectiveness of current controls, and recommendations to improve hazard control systems. As expected, a significant number of breaches involve high-risk operations such as grinding, hammering, using sharps (especially screwdrivers), and assembling equipment. Surprisingly, tasks such as the movement of equipment and material between gloveboxes and the opening of cans are also major contributions of breaches. Almost half the gloves fail within a year of their install date. The greatest consequence for over 90% of glovebox glove failures is alpha contamination of protective clothing. Personnel self-monitoring at the gloveboxes continues to be the most effective way of detecting glovebox glove failures. Glove failures from these tasks can be reduced through changes in procedures and the design of remote-handling apparatus. The Nuclear Materials Technology Division management uses this information to improve hazard control systems to reduce the number of unplanned breaches in the glovebox further. As a result, excursions of contaminants

  7. Closed locally minimal nets on tetrahedra

    SciTech Connect

    Strelkova, Nataliya P

    2011-01-31

    Closed locally minimal networks are in a sense a generalization of closed geodesics. A complete classification is known of closed locally minimal networks on regular (and generally any equihedral) tetrahedra. In the present paper certain necessary and certain sufficient conditions are given for at least one closed locally minimal network to exist on a given non-equihedral tetrahedron. Bibliography: 6 titles.

  8. Mini-Med School Planning Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Institutes of Health, Office of Science Education, 2008

    2008-01-01

    Mini-Med Schools are public education programs now offered by more than 70 medical schools, universities, research institutions, and hospitals across the nation. There are even Mini-Med Schools in Ireland, Malta, and Canada! The program is typically a lecture series that meets once a week and provides "mini-med students" information on some of the…

  9. Minimal absent words in four human genome assemblies.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sara P; Pinho, Armando J

    2011-01-01

    Minimal absent words have been computed in genomes of organisms from all domains of life. Here, we aim to contribute to the catalogue of human genomic variation by investigating the variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species, using four human genome assemblies. We compare the reference human genome GRCh37 assembly, the HuRef assembly of the genome of Craig Venter, the NA12878 assembly from cell line GM12878, and the YH assembly of the genome of a Han Chinese individual. We find the variation in number and content of minimal absent words between assemblies more significant for large and very large minimal absent words, where the biases of sequencing and assembly methodologies become more pronounced. Moreover, we find generally greater similarity between the human genome assemblies sequenced with capillary-based technologies (GRCh37 and HuRef) than between the human genome assemblies sequenced with massively parallel technologies (NA12878 and YH). Finally, as expected, we find the overall variation in number and content of minimal absent words within a species to be generally smaller than the variation between species. PMID:22220210

  10. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry

    PubMed Central

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell’s criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein’s Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein’s remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation. PMID:26696908

  11. Differentially Private Empirical Risk Minimization

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhuri, Kamalika; Monteleoni, Claire; Sarwate, Anand D.

    2011-01-01

    Privacy-preserving machine learning algorithms are crucial for the increasingly common setting in which personal data, such as medical or financial records, are analyzed. We provide general techniques to produce privacy-preserving approximations of classifiers learned via (regularized) empirical risk minimization (ERM). These algorithms are private under the ε-differential privacy definition due to Dwork et al. (2006). First we apply the output perturbation ideas of Dwork et al. (2006), to ERM classification. Then we propose a new method, objective perturbation, for privacy-preserving machine learning algorithm design. This method entails perturbing the objective function before optimizing over classifiers. If the loss and regularizer satisfy certain convexity and differentiability criteria, we prove theoretical results showing that our algorithms preserve privacy, and provide generalization bounds for linear and nonlinear kernels. We further present a privacy-preserving technique for tuning the parameters in general machine learning algorithms, thereby providing end-to-end privacy guarantees for the training process. We apply these results to produce privacy-preserving analogues of regularized logistic regression and support vector machines. We obtain encouraging results from evaluating their performance on real demographic and benchmark data sets. Our results show that both theoretically and empirically, objective perturbation is superior to the previous state-of-the-art, output perturbation, in managing the inherent tradeoff between privacy and learning performance. PMID:21892342

  12. Against Explanatory Minimalism in Psychiatry.

    PubMed

    Thornton, Tim

    2015-01-01

    The idea that psychiatry contains, in principle, a series of levels of explanation has been criticized not only as empirically false but also, by Campbell, as unintelligible because it presupposes a discredited pre-Humean view of causation. Campbell's criticism is based on an interventionist-inspired denial that mechanisms and rational connections underpin physical and mental causation, respectively, and hence underpin levels of explanation. These claims echo some superficially similar remarks in Wittgenstein's Zettel. But attention to the context of Wittgenstein's remarks suggests a reason to reject explanatory minimalism in psychiatry and reinstate a Wittgensteinian notion of levels of explanation. Only in a context broader than the one provided by interventionism is that the ascription of propositional attitudes, even in the puzzling case of delusions, justified. Such a view, informed by Wittgenstein, can reconcile the idea that the ascription mental phenomena presupposes a particular level of explanation with the rejection of an a priori claim about its connection to a neurological level of explanation. PMID:26696908

  13. Minimalism through intraoperative functional mapping.

    PubMed

    Berger, M S

    1996-01-01

    Intraoperative stimulation mapping may be used to avoid unnecessary risk to functional regions subserving language and sensori-motor pathways. Based on the data presented here, language localization is variable in the entire population, with only certainty existing for the inferior frontal region responsible for motor speech. Anatomical landmarks such as the anterior temporal tip for temporal lobe language sites and the posterior aspect of the lateral sphenoid wing for the frontal lobe language zones are unreliable in avoiding postoperative aphasias. Thus, individual mapping to identify essential language sites has the greatest likelihood of avoiding permanent deficits in naming, reading, and motor speech. In a similar approach, motor and sensory pathways from the cortex and underlying white matter may be reliably stimulated and mapped in both awake and asleep patients. Although these techniques require an additional operative time and equipment nominally priced, the result is often gratifying, as postoperative morbidity has been greatly reduced in the process of incorporating these surgical strategies. The patients quality of life is improved in terms of seizure control, with or without antiepileptic drugs. This avoids having to perform a second costly operative procedure, which is routinely done when extraoperative stimulation and recording is done via subdural grids. In addition, an aggressive tumor resection at the initial operation lengthens the time to tumor recurrence and often obviates the need for a subsequent reoperation. Thus, intraoperative functional mapping may be best alluded to as a surgical technique that results in "minimalism in the long term". PMID:9247814

  14. Minimally invasive medial hip approach.

    PubMed

    Chiron, P; Murgier, J; Cavaignac, E; Pailhé, R; Reina, N

    2014-10-01

    The medial approach to the hip via the adductors, as described by Ludloff or Ferguson, provides restricted visualization and incurs a risk of neurovascular lesion. We describe a minimally invasive medial hip approach providing broader exposure of extra- and intra-articular elements in a space free of neurovascular structures. With the lower limb in a "frog-leg" position, the skin incision follows the adductor longus for 6cm and then the aponeurosis is incised. A slide plane between all the adductors and the aponeurosis is easily released by blunt dissection, with no interposed neurovascular elements. This gives access to the lesser trochanter, psoas tendon and inferior sides of the femoral neck and head, anterior wall of the acetabulum and labrum. We report a series of 56 cases, with no major complications: this approach allows treatment of iliopsoas muscle lesions and resection or filling of benign tumors of the cervical region and enables intra-articular surgery (arthrolysis, resection of osteophytes or foreign bodies, labral suture). PMID:25164350

  15. Minimal complexity control law synthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernstein, Dennis S.; Haddad, Wassim M.; Nett, Carl N.

    1989-01-01

    A paradigm for control law design for modern engineering systems is proposed: Minimize control law complexity subject to the achievement of a specified accuracy in the face of a specified level of uncertainty. Correspondingly, the overall goal is to make progress towards the development of a control law design methodology which supports this paradigm. Researchers achieve this goal by developing a general theory of optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback compensation, where here constrained-structure means that the dynamic-structure (e.g., dynamic order, pole locations, zero locations, etc.) of the output feedback compensation is constrained in some way. By applying this theory in an innovative fashion, where here the indicated iteration occurs over the choice of the compensator dynamic-structure, the paradigm stated above can, in principle, be realized. The optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problem is formulated in general terms. An elegant method for reducing optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problems to optimal static output feedback problems is then developed. This reduction procedure makes use of star products, linear fractional transformations, and linear fractional decompositions, and yields as a byproduct a complete characterization of the class of optimal constrained-structure dynamic output feedback problems which can be reduced to optimal static output feedback problems. Issues such as operational/physical constraints, operating-point variations, and processor throughput/memory limitations are considered, and it is shown how anti-windup/bumpless transfer, gain-scheduling, and digital processor implementation can be facilitated by constraining the controller dynamic-structure in an appropriate fashion.

  16. On Modelling Minimal Disease Activity

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Christopher H.; Su, Li; Gladman, Dafna D.

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore methods for statistical modelling of minimal disease activity (MDA) based on data from intermittent clinic visits. Methods The analysis was based on a 2‐state model. Comparisons were made between analyses based on “complete case” data from visits at which MDA status was known, and the use of hidden model methodology that incorporated information from visits at which only some MDA defining criteria could be established. Analyses were based on an observational psoriatic arthritis cohort. Results With data from 856 patients and 7,024 clinic visits, analysis was based on virtually all visits, although only 62.6% provided enough information to determine MDA status. Estimated mean times for an episode of MDA varied from 4.18 years to 3.10 years, with smaller estimates derived from the hidden 2‐state model analysis. Over a 10‐year period, the estimated expected times spent in MDA episodes of longer than 1 year was 3.90 to 4.22, and the probability of having such an MDA episode was estimated to be 0.85 to 0.91, with longer times and greater probabilities seen with the hidden 2‐state model analysis. Conclusion A 2‐state model provides a useful framework for the analysis of MDA. Use of data from visits at which MDA status can not be determined provide more precision, and notable differences are seen in estimated quantities related to MDA episodes based on complete case and hidden 2‐state model analyses. The possibility of bias, as well as loss of precision, should be recognized when complete case analyses are used. PMID:26315478

  17. Flow cytometric determination of leukemia-associated marker combinations for the study of minimal residual disease.

    PubMed

    Babusíková, O; Glasová, M; Kusenda, J; Koníková, E; Mésárosová, A

    1994-01-01

    To study the minimal residual disease in acute leukemia patients we used some marker combinations related either to the simultaneous surface membrane and cytoplasmic marker expression, or to the expression of atypical marker combinations, that are absent or extremely rare in normal hematopoietic cells. We investigated to which extent flow cytometric analysis of leukemia-associated marker combination may contribute to sensitive follow-up in patients with acute leukemia. For this purpose dilution experiments were performed, in which artificial mixtures of normal peripheral blood lymphocytes and leukemia cells from a patient with leukemia-associated phenotype were prepared and analyzed for double positive cells. Our results showed that the sensitivity of double color immunofluorescence assay was 3 in 10(4) cells. Sequential studies of residual disease were evaluated in five acute leukemia patients with leukemia-associated markers combinations at diagnosis. In three of them morphologic relapse was preceded by the immunologic detection of small amounts of leukemia cells, while in two other cases, in which no double positive cells for leukemia-associated markers were found, patients are still in hematologic remission. This approach to the study of minimal residual disease could be valuable in monitoring the efficiency of chemotherapy, as well as in evaluating the quality control of bone marrow before autografting. Furthermore, flow cytometric approach can efficiently complete other methods, which are used for more exact definition of remission in acute leukemia patients. PMID:7870213

  18. Minimal modeling of the extratropical general circulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Brien, Enda; Branscome, Lee E.

    1989-01-01

    The ability of low-order, two-layer models to reproduce basic features of the mid-latitude general circulation is investigated. Changes in model behavior with increased spectral resolution are examined in detail. Qualitatively correct time-mean heat and momentum balances are achieved in a beta-plane channel model which includes the first and third meridional modes. This minimal resolution also reproduces qualitatively realistic surface and upper-level winds and mean meridional circulations. Higher meridional resolution does not result in substantial changes in the latitudinal structure of the circulation. A qualitatively correct kinetic energy spectrum is produced when the resolution is high enough to include several linearly stable modes. A model with three zonal waves and the first three meridional modes has a reasonable energy spectrum and energy conversion cycle, while also satisfying heat and momentum budget requirements. This truncation reproduces the basic mechanisms and zonal circulation features that are obtained at higher resolution. The model performance improves gradually with higher resolution and is smoothly dependent on changes in external parameters.

  19. Transdermal Photopolymerization for Minimally Invasive Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elisseeff, J.; Anseth, K.; Sims, D.; McIntosh, W.; Randolph, M.; Langer, R.

    1999-03-01

    Photopolymerizations are widely used in medicine to create polymer networks for use in applications such as bone restorations and coatings for artificial implants. These photopolymerizations occur by directly exposing materials to light in "open" environments such as the oral cavity or during invasive procedures such as surgery. We hypothesized that light, which penetrates tissue including skin, could cause a photopolymerization indirectly. Liquid materials then could be injected s.c. and solidified by exposing the exterior surface of the skin to light. To test this hypothesis, the penetration of UVA and visible light through skin was studied. Modeling predicted the feasibility of transdermal polymerization with only 2 min of light exposure required to photopolymerize an implant underneath human skin. To establish the validity of these modeling studies, transdermal photopolymerization first was applied to tissue engineering by using "injectable" cartilage as a model system. Polymer/chondrocyte constructs were injected s.c. and transdermally photopolymerized. Implants harvested at 2, 4, and 7 weeks demonstrated collagen and proteoglycan production and histology with tissue structure comparable to native neocartilage. To further examine this phenomenon and test the applicability of transdermal photopolymerization for drug release devices, albumin, a model protein, was released for 1 week from photopolymerized hydrogels. With further study, transdermal photpolymerization potentially could be used to create a variety of new, minimally invasive surgical procedures in applications ranging from plastic and orthopedic surgery to tissue engineering and drug delivery.

  20. Bacterial Stressors in Minimally Processed Food

    PubMed Central

    Capozzi, Vittorio; Fiocco, Daniela; Amodio, Maria Luisa; Gallone, Anna; Spano, Giuseppe

    2009-01-01

    Stress responses are of particular importance to microorganisms, because their habitats are subjected to continual changes in temperature, osmotic pressure, and nutrients availability. Stressors (and stress factors), may be of chemical, physical, or biological nature. While stress to microorganisms is frequently caused by the surrounding environment, the growth of microbial cells on its own may also result in induction of some kinds of stress such as starvation and acidity. During production of fresh-cut produce, cumulative mild processing steps are employed, to control the growth of microorganisms. Pathogens on plant surfaces are already stressed and stress may be increased during the multiple mild processing steps, potentially leading to very hardy bacteria geared towards enhanced survival. Cross-protection can occur because the overlapping stress responses enable bacteria exposed to one stress to become resistant to another stress. A number of stresses have been shown to induce cross protection, including heat, cold, acid and osmotic stress. Among other factors, adaptation to heat stress appears to provide bacterial cells with more pronounced cross protection against several other stresses. Understanding how pathogens sense and respond to mild stresses is essential in order to design safe and effective minimal processing regimes. PMID:19742126

  1. Disk Acceleration Experiment Utilizing Minimal Material (DAXUMM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biss, Matthew; Lorenz, Thomas; Sutherland, Gerrit

    2015-06-01

    A venture between the US Army Research Laboratory (ARL) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is currently underway in an effort to characterize novel energetic material performance properties using a single, high-precision, gram-range charge. A nearly all-inclusive characterization experiment is proposed by combing LLNL's disk acceleration experiment (DAX) with the ARL explosive evaluation utilizing minimal material (AXEUMM) experiment. Spherical-cap charges fitted with a flat circular metal disk are centrally initiated using an exploding bridgewire detonator while photonic doppler velocimetry is used to probe the metal disk surface velocity and measure its temporal history. The metal disk's jump-off-velocity measurement is combined with conservation equations, material Hugoniots, and select empirical relationships to determine performance properties of the detonation wave (i.e., velocity, pressure, particle velocity, and density). Using the temporal velocity history with the numerical hydrocode CTH, a determination of the energetic material's equation of state and material expansion energy is possible. Initial experimental and computational results for the plastic-bonded energetic formulation PBXN-5 are presented.

  2. Radon induced surface contaminations in low background experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Pattavina, L.

    2013-08-08

    In neutrinoless double-beta decay and dark matter searches, one of the main issues is to increase the experimental sensitivity through careful material selection and production, minimizing the background contributions. In order to achieve the required, extremely low, counting rates, very stringent requirements must be fulfilled in terms of bulk material radiopurity. As the experimental sensitivity increases, the bulk impurities in the detector components decrease, and surface contaminations start to play an increasingly significant role In fully active detectors, like cryogenic particle detectors, surface contaminations are a critical issue (as shown by the CUORICINO experiment). {sup 222}Rn is by far the most intense source of airborne radioactivity, and if a radio-pure material is exposed to environment where the Radon concentration is not minimized, {sup 210}Pb and {sup 210}Po contaminations can occur. The mechanisms and the dynamics of Radon-induced surface contaminations are reviewed, and specific solutions to prevent and to reject the induced background are presented.

  3. Electroweak contributions to squark pair production at the LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Germer, Jan; Hollik, Wolfgang; Mirabella, Edoardo; Trenkel, Maike

    2010-02-10

    We present the tree-level and next-to-leading order (NLO) electroweak (EW) contributions to squark - squark production at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) within the framework of the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM).

  4. Heart bypass surgery - minimally invasive - discharge

    MedlinePlus

    ... Thrombosis, 9th ed: American College of Chest Physicians Evidence-Based Clinical Practice Guidelines. Chest . ... bypass surgery - minimally invasive Heart failure - overview High blood cholesterol ...

  5. Hydrophobic Surfaces of Spacecraft Components Enhance the Aggregation of Microorganisms and May Lead to Higher Survival Rates of Bacteria on Mars Landers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuerger, Andrew C.; Kern, Roger G.

    2004-01-01

    In order to minimize the forward contamination of Mars, spacecraft are assembled under cleanroom conditions that require several procedures to clean and sterilize components. Surface characteristics of spacecraft materials may contribute to microbial survival on the surface of Mars by protecting spores from sterilizing agents, including UV irradiation. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of surface characteristics of several spacecraft materials on the survival of Bacillus subtilis spores under simulated Martian conditions.

  6. The use of ion beam cleaning to obtain high quality cold welds with minimal deformation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sater, B. L.; Moore, T. J.

    1978-01-01

    A variation of cold welding is described which utilizes an ion beam to clean mating surfaces prior to joining in a vacuum environment. High quality solid state welds were produced with minimal deformation.

  7. Design and Demonstration of Minimal Lunar Base

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boche-Sauvan, L.; Foing, B. H.; Exohab Team

    2009-04-01

    Introduction: We propose a conceptual analysis of a first minimal lunar base, in focussing on the system aspects and coordinating every different part as part an evolving architecture [1-3]. We justify the case for a scientific outpost allowing experiments, sample analysis in laboratory (relevant to the origin and evolution of the Earth, geophysical and geochemical studies of the Moon, life sciences, observation from the Moon). Research: Research activities will be conducted with this first settlement in: - science (of, from and on the Moon) - exploration (robotic mobility, rover, drilling), - technology (communication, command, organisation, automatism). Life sciences. The life sciences aspects are considered through a life support for a crew of 4 (habitat) and a laboratory activity with biological experiments performed on Earth or LEO, but then without any magnetosphere protection and therefore with direct cosmic rays and solar particle effects. Moreover, the ability of studying the lunar environment in the field will be a big asset before settling a permanent base [3-5]. Lunar environment. The lunar environment adds constraints to instruments specifications (vacuum, extreme temperature, regolith, seism, micrometeorites). SMART-1 and other missions data will bring geometrical, chemical and physical details about the environment (soil material characteristics, on surface conditions …). Test bench. To assess planetary technologies and operations preparing for Mars human exploration. Lunar outpost predesign modular concept: To allow a human presence on the moon and to carry out these experiments, we will give a pre-design of a human minimal lunar base. Through a modular concept, this base will be possibly evolved into a long duration or permanent base. We will analyse the possibilities of settling such a minimal base by means of the current and near term propulsion technology, as a full Ariane 5 ME carrying 1.7 T of gross payload to the surface of the Moon

  8. Minimizing distortion and internal forces in truss structures by simulated annealing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kincaid, Rex K.; Padula, Sharon L.

    1990-01-01

    Inaccuracies in the length of members and the diameters of joints of large space structures may produce unacceptable levels of surface distortion and internal forces. Here, two discrete optimization problems are formulated, one to minimize surface distortion (DSQRMS) and the other to minimize internal forces (FSQRMS). Both of these problems are based on the influence matrices generated by a small-deformation linear analysis. Good solutions are obtained for DSQRMS and FSQRMS through the use of a simulated annealing heuristic.

  9. Reduced chemical warfare agent sorption in polyurethane-painted surfaces via plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition of perfluoroalkanes.

    PubMed

    Gordon, Wesley O; Peterson, Gregory W; Durke, Erin M

    2015-04-01

    Perfluoralkalation via plasma chemical vapor deposition has been used to improve hydrophobicity of surfaces. We have investigated this technique to improve the resistance of commercial polyurethane coatings to chemicals, such as chemical warfare agents. The reported results indicate the surface treatment minimizes the spread of agent droplets and the sorption of agent into the coating. The improvement in resistance is likely due to reduction of the coating's surface free energy via fluorine incorporation, but may also have contributing effects from surface morphology changes. The data indicates that plasma-based surface modifications may have utility in improving chemical resistance of commercial coatings. PMID:25775244

  10. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A DAIRY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small- and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. n an effort to assist these manufacturers, Waste Minimization Assessment Ce...

  11. Is goal ascription possible in minimal mindreading?

    PubMed

    Butterfill, Stephen A; Apperly, Ian A

    2016-03-01

    In this response to the commentary by Michael and Christensen, we first explain how minimal mindreading is compatible with the development of increasingly sophisticated mindreading behaviors that involve both executive functions and general knowledge and then sketch 1 approach to a minimal account of goal ascription. PMID:26901746

  12. WASTE MINIMIZATION ASSESSMENT FOR A BOURBON DISTILLERY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S.Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has funded a pilot project to assist small and medium-size manufacturers who want to minimize their generation of waste but who lack the expertise to do so. Waste Minimization Assessment Centers (WMACs) were established at selected un...

  13. Making the Most of Minimalism in Music.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Geiersbach, Frederick J.

    1998-01-01

    Describes the minimalist movement in music. Discusses generations of minimalist musicians and, in general, the minimalist approach. Considers various ways that minimalist strategies can be integrated into the music classroom focusing on (1) minimalism and (2) student-centered composition and principles of minimalism for use with elementary band…

  14. Minimizing electrode contamination in an electrochemical cell

    DOEpatents

    Kim, Yu Seung; Zelenay, Piotr; Johnston, Christina

    2014-12-09

    An electrochemical cell assembly that is expected to prevent or at least minimize electrode contamination includes one or more getters that trap a component or components leached from a first electrode and prevents or at least minimizes them from contaminating a second electrode.

  15. Waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness plan. Revision 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1994-07-01

    The purpose of this plan is to document Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) projections for present and future waste minimization and pollution prevention. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be used to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. It is intended to satisfy Department of Energy (DOE) requirements. This Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Plan provides an overview of projected activities from FY 1994 through FY 1999. The plans are broken into site-wide and problem-specific activities. All directorates at LLNL have had an opportunity to contribute input, estimate budgets, and review the plan. In addition to the above, this plan records LLNL`s goals for pollution prevention, regulatory drivers for those activities, assumptions on which the cost estimates are based, analyses of the strengths of the projects, and the barriers to increasing pollution prevention activities.

  16. Minimally invasive surgery in orthopaedics. Small is beautiful?

    PubMed

    Yeung, S H

    2008-08-01

    With the blooming of minimally invasive procedures in surgical specialties, many orthopaedic subspecialties have been evolving along such lines. Despite the apparent paradox that many orthopaedic implants are quite bulky to start off with, different methods have been adopted to insert them safely with the least possible trauma. Altering time-honoured incisions and surgical techniques has often been helpful. The industry is also very keen to re-design implants for this purpose and has contributed substantial momentum in this direction. Coupled with the use of operating microscopes, endoscopes, and imaging modalities, operations can be performed with greater precision and lesser trauma. The advent of computer-assisted technology is another step forward. It is through constant attention to minimising tissue trauma and a combination of different methods available, that surgeons can achieve the ultimate goals of minimally invasive surgery. PMID:18685164

  17. Electric dipole moment constraints on minimal electroweak baryogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Huber, Stephan J.; Pospelov, Maxim; Ritz, Adam

    2007-02-01

    We study the simplest generic extension of the standard model which allows for conventional electroweak baryogenesis, through the addition of dimension-six operators in the Higgs sector. At least one such operator is required to be CP-odd, and we study the constraints on such a minimal setup, and related scenarios with minimal flavor violation, from the null results of searches for electric dipole moments (EDMs), utilizing the full set of two-loop contributions to the EDMs. The results indicate that the current bounds are stringent, particularly that of the recently updated neutron EDM, but fall short of ruling out these scenarios. The next generation of EDM experiments should be sufficiently sensitive to provide a conclusive test.

  18. Probing minimal flavor violation at the CERN LHC

    SciTech Connect

    Grossman, Yuval; Nir, Yosef; Volansky, Tomer; Thaler, Jesse; Zupan, Jure

    2007-11-01

    If the LHC experiments discover new particles that couple to the standard model fermions, then measurements by ATLAS and CMS can contribute to our understanding of the flavor puzzles. We demonstrate this statement by investigating a scenario where extra SU(2)-singlet down-type quarks are within the LHC reach. By measuring masses, production cross sections, and relative decay rates, minimal flavor violation (MFV) can in principle be excluded. Conversely, these measurements can probe the way in which MFV applies to the new degrees of freedom. Many of our conclusions are valid in a much more general context than this specific extension of the standard model.

  19. Heavy-lepton production in the minimal supersymmetric standard model

    SciTech Connect

    Cieza Montalvo, J.E. ); Eboli, O.J.P.; Novaes, S.F. )

    1992-07-01

    We study the production of a charged-heavy-lepton pair considering the minimal supersymmetric standard model. We show that the cross section for the process {ital pp}{r arrow}{ital gg}{r arrow}{ital l}{sup +}{ital l{minus}} is enhanced for large values of the ratio between the two-Higgs-doublet vacuum expectation values, in comparison with the standard model result. The gluon fusion mechansim is the most important contribution to the lepton pair production for {ital M}{sub {ital l}}{gt}50 GeV.

  20. Minimally Invasive Cardiovascular Surgery: Incisions and Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Langer, Nathaniel B.; Argenziano, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Throughout the modern era of cardiac surgery, most operations have been performed via median sternotomy with cardiopulmonary bypass. This paradigm is changing, however, as cardiovascular surgery is increasingly adopting minimally invasive techniques. Advances in patient evaluation, instrumentation, and operative technique have allowed surgeons to perform a wide variety of complex operations through smaller incisions and, in some cases, without cardiopulmonary bypass. With patients desiring less invasive operations and the literature supporting decreased blood loss, shorter hospital length of stay, improved postoperative pain, and better cosmesis, minimally invasive cardiac surgery should be widely practiced. Here, we review the incisions and approaches currently used in minimally invasive cardiovascular surgery. PMID:27127555

  1. Technology applications for radioactive waste minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Devgun, J.S.

    1994-07-01

    The nuclear power industry has achieved one of the most successful examples of waste minimization. The annual volume of low-level radioactive waste shipped for disposal per reactor has decreased to approximately one-fifth the volume about a decade ago. In addition, the curie content of the total waste shipped for disposal has decreased. This paper will discuss the regulatory drivers and economic factors for waste minimization and describe the application of technologies for achieving waste minimization for low-level radioactive waste with examples from the nuclear power industry.

  2. Imaging and minimally invasive aortic valve replacement

    PubMed Central

    Loor, Gabriel

    2015-01-01

    Cardiovascular imaging has been the most important tool allowing for innovation in cardiac surgery. There are now a variety of approaches available for treating aortic valve disease, including standard sternotomy, minimally invasive surgery, and percutaneous valve replacement. Minimally invasive cardiac surgery relies on maximizing exposure within a limited field of view. The complexity of this approach is increased as the relationship between the great vessels and the bony thorax varies between individuals. Ultimately, the success of minimally invasive surgery depends on appropriate choices regarding the type and location of the incision, cannulation approach, and cardioprotection strategy. These decisions are facilitated by preoperative imaging, which forms the focus of this review. PMID:25694979

  3. Minimal representations, geometric quantization, and unitarity.

    PubMed Central

    Brylinski, R; Kostant, B

    1994-01-01

    In the framework of geometric quantization we explicitly construct, in a uniform fashion, a unitary minimal representation pio of every simply-connected real Lie group Go such that the maximal compact subgroup of Go has finite center and Go admits some minimal representation. We obtain algebraic and analytic results about pio. We give several results on the algebraic and symplectic geometry of the minimal nilpotent orbits and then "quantize" these results to obtain the corresponding representations. We assume (Lie Go)C is simple. PMID:11607478

  4. Level set based structural topology optimization for minimizing frequency response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shu, Lei; Wang, Michael Yu; Fang, Zongde; Ma, Zhengdong; Wei, Peng

    2011-11-01

    For the purpose of structure vibration reduction, a structural topology optimization for minimizing frequency response is proposed based on the level set method. The objective of the present study is to minimize the frequency response at the specified points or surfaces on the structure with an excitation frequency or a frequency range, subject to the given amount of the material over the admissible design domain. The sensitivity analysis with respect to the structural boundaries is carried out, while the Extended finite element method (X-FEM) is employed for solving the state equation and the adjoint equation. The optimal structure with smooth boundaries is obtained by the level set evolution with advection velocity, derived from the sensitivity analysis and the optimization algorithm. A number of numerical examples, in the frameworks of two-dimension (2D) and three-dimension (3D), are presented to demonstrate the feasibility and effectiveness of the proposed approach.

  5. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    PubMed Central

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of ‘minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  6. Genetic algorithms for minimal source reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C.

    1993-12-01

    Under-determined linear inverse problems arise in applications in which signals must be estimated from insufficient data. In these problems the number of potentially active sources is greater than the number of observations. In many situations, it is desirable to find a minimal source solution. This can be accomplished by minimizing a cost function that accounts from both the compatibility of the solution with the observations and for its ``sparseness``. Minimizing functions of this form can be a difficult optimization problem. Genetic algorithms are a relatively new and robust approach to the solution of difficult optimization problems, providing a global framework that is not dependent on local continuity or on explicit starting values. In this paper, the authors describe the use of genetic algorithms to find minimal source solutions, using as an example a simulation inspired by the reconstruction of neural currents in the human brain from magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements.

  7. Minimally Invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR)

    MedlinePlus Videos and Cool Tools

    Watch a Broward Health surgeon perform a minimally invasive Transcatheter Aortic Valve Replacement (TAVR) Click Here to view the BroadcastMed, Inc. Privacy Policy and Legal Notice © 2016 BroadcastMed, Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Assembling Precise Truss Structures With Minimal Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sword, Lee F.

    1996-01-01

    Improved method of assembling precise truss structures involves use of simple devices. Tapered pins that fit in tapered holes indicate deviations from prescribed lengths. Method both helps to ensure precision of finished structures and minimizes residual stresses within structures.

  9. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  10. Waste minimization and pollution prevention awareness plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-05-31

    The purpose of this plan is to document the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program. The plan specifies those activities and methods that are or will be employed to reduce the quantity and toxicity of wastes generated at the site. The intent of this plan is to respond to and comply with (DOE's) policy and guidelines concerning the need for pollution prevention. The Plan is composed of a LLNL Waste Minimization and Pollution Prevention Awareness Program Plan and, as attachments, Program- and Department-specific waste minimization plans. This format reflects the fact that waste minimization is considered a line management responsibility and is to be addressed by each of the Programs and Departments. 14 refs.

  11. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of `minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions.

  12. Degreasing of titanium to minimize stress corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carpenter, S. R.

    1967-01-01

    Stress corrosion of titanium and its alloys at elevated temperatures is minimized by replacing trichloroethylene with methanol or methyl ethyl ketone as a degreasing agent. Wearing cotton gloves reduces stress corrosion from perspiration before the metal components are processed.

  13. Waste minimization in electroplating industries: a review.

    PubMed

    Babu, B Ramesh; Bhanu, S Udaya; Meera, K Seeni

    2009-07-01

    Wastewater, spent solvent, spent process solutions, and sludge are the major waste streams generated in large volumes daily in electroplating industries. These waste streams can be significantly minimized through process modification and operational improvement. Waste minimization methods have been implemented in some of the electroplating industries. Suggestions such as practicing source reduction approaches, reduction in drag out and waste, process modification and environmental benefits, have also been adopted. In this endeavor, extensive knowledge covering various disciplines has been studied, which makes problem solving extremely easy. Moreover, available process data pertaining to waste minimization (WM) is usually imprecise, incomplete, and uncertain due to the lack of sensors, the difficulty of measurement, and process variations. In this article waste minimization techniques and its advantages on the improvement of working atmosphere and reduction in operating cost have been discussed. PMID:19657919

  14. Controlling molecular transport in minimal emulsions.

    PubMed

    Gruner, Philipp; Riechers, Birte; Semin, Benoît; Lim, Jiseok; Johnston, Abigail; Short, Kathleen; Baret, Jean-Christophe

    2016-01-01

    Emulsions are metastable dispersions in which molecular transport is a major mechanism driving the system towards its state of minimal energy. Determining the underlying mechanisms of molecular transport between droplets is challenging due to the complexity of a typical emulsion system. Here we introduce the concept of 'minimal emulsions', which are controlled emulsions produced using microfluidic tools, simplifying an emulsion down to its minimal set of relevant parameters. We use these minimal emulsions to unravel the fundamentals of transport of small organic molecules in water-in-fluorinated-oil emulsions, a system of great interest for biotechnological applications. Our results are of practical relevance to guarantee a sustainable compartmentalization of compounds in droplet microreactors and to design new strategies for the dynamic control of droplet compositions. PMID:26797564

  15. Minimally Invasive Osteotomies of the Calcaneus.

    PubMed

    Guyton, Gregory P

    2016-09-01

    Osteotomies of the calcaneus are powerful surgical tools, representing a critical component of the surgical reconstruction of pes planus and pes cavus deformity. Modern minimally invasive calcaneal osteotomies can be performed safely with a burr through a lateral incision. Although greater kerf is generated with the burr, the effect is modest, can be minimized, and is compatible with many fixation techniques. A hinged jig renders the procedure more reproducible and accessible. PMID:27524705

  16. PWM control techniques for rectifier filter minimization

    SciTech Connect

    Ziogas, P.D.; Kang, Y-G; Stefanovic, V.R.

    1985-09-01

    Minimization of input/output filters is an essential step towards manufacturing compact low-cost static power supplies. Three PWM control techniques that yield substantial filter size reduction for three-phase (self-commutated) rectifiers are presented and analyzed. Filters required by typical line-commutated rectifiers are used as the basis for comparison. Moreover, it is shown that in addition to filter minimization two of the proposed three control techniques improve substantially the rectifier total input power factor.

  17. Minimally Invasive Forefoot Surgery in France.

    PubMed

    Meusnier, Tristan; Mukish, Prikesht

    2016-06-01

    Study groups have been formed in France to advance the use of minimally invasive surgery. These techniques are becoming more frequently used and the technique nuances are continuing to evolve. The objective of this article was to advance the awareness of the current trends in minimally invasive surgery for common diseases of the forefoot. The percutaneous surgery at the forefoot is less developed at this time, but also will be discussed. PMID:27261810

  18. Mesonic spectroscopy of minimal walking technicolor

    SciTech Connect

    Del Debbio, Luigi; Lucini, Biagio; Patella, Agostino; Pica, Claudio; Rago, Antonio

    2010-07-01

    We investigate the structure and the novel emerging features of the mesonic nonsinglet spectrum of the minimal walking technicolor theory. Precision measurements in the nonsinglet pseudoscalar and vector channels are compared to the expectations for an IR-conformal field theory and a QCD-like theory. Our results favor a scenario in which minimal walking technicolor is (almost) conformal in the infrared, while spontaneous chiral symmetry breaking seems less plausible.

  19. Alternating minimization and Boltzmann machine learning.

    PubMed

    Byrne, W

    1992-01-01

    Training a Boltzmann machine with hidden units is appropriately treated in information geometry using the information divergence and the technique of alternating minimization. The resulting algorithm is shown to be closely related to gradient descent Boltzmann machine learning rules, and the close relationship of both to the EM algorithm is described. An iterative proportional fitting procedure for training machines without hidden units is described and incorporated into the alternating minimization algorithm. PMID:18276461

  20. Future of Minimally Invasive Colorectal Surgery.

    PubMed

    Whealon, Matthew; Vinci, Alessio; Pigazzi, Alessio

    2016-09-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is slowly taking over as the preferred operative approach for colorectal diseases. However, many of the procedures remain technically difficult. This article will give an overview of the state of minimally invasive surgery and the many advances that have been made over the last two decades. Specifically, we discuss the introduction of the robotic platform and some of its benefits and limitations. We also describe some newer techniques related to robotics. PMID:27582647

  1. Multifunction minimization for programmable logic arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Campbell, J.A.

    1984-01-01

    The problem of minimizing two-level AND/OR Boolean algebraic functions of n inputs and m outputs for implementation on programmable logic arrays (PLA) is examined. The theory of multiple-output functions as well as the historically alternative approaches to reckoning the cost of an equation implementation are reviewed. The PLA is shown to be a realization of the least product gate equation cost criterion. The multi-function minimization is dealt with in the context of a directed tree search algorithm developed in previous research. The PLA oriented minimization is shown to alter the nature of each of the basic tenets of multiple-output minimization used in earlier work. The concept of a non-prime but selectable implicant is introduced. A new cost criterion, the quantum cost, is discussed, and an approximation algorithm utilizing this criterion is developed. A timing analysis of a cyclic resolution algorithm for PLA based functions is presented. Lastly, the question of efficiency in automated minimization algorithms is examined. The application of the PLA cost criterion is shown to exhibit intrinsic increases in computational efficiency. A minterm classification algorithm is suggested and a PLA minimization algorithm is implemented in the FORTRAN language.

  2. Economic impact of minimally invasive lumbar surgery

    PubMed Central

    Hofstetter, Christoph P; Hofer, Anna S; Wang, Michael Y

    2015-01-01

    Cost effectiveness has been demonstrated for traditional lumbar discectomy, lumbar laminectomy as well as for instrumented and noninstrumented arthrodesis. While emerging evidence suggests that minimally invasive spine surgery reduces morbidity, duration of hospitalization, and accelerates return to activites of daily living, data regarding cost effectiveness of these novel techniques is limited. The current study analyzes all available data on minimally invasive techniques for lumbar discectomy, decompression, short-segment fusion and deformity surgery. In general, minimally invasive spine procedures appear to hold promise in quicker patient recovery times and earlier return to work. Thus, minimally invasive lumbar spine surgery appears to have the potential to be a cost-effective intervention. Moreover, novel less invasive procedures are less destabilizing and may therefore be utilized in certain indications that traditionally required arthrodesis procedures. However, there is a lack of studies analyzing the economic impact of minimally invasive spine surgery. Future studies are necessary to confirm the durability and further define indications for minimally invasive lumbar spine procedures. PMID:25793159

  3. Minimally Invasive Surgery in Gynecologic Oncology

    PubMed Central

    Mori, Kristina M.; Neubauer, Nikki L.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive surgery has been utilized in the field of obstetrics and gynecology as far back as the 1940s when culdoscopy was first introduced as a visualization tool. Gynecologists then began to employ minimally invasive surgery for adhesiolysis and obtaining biopsies but then expanded its use to include procedures such as tubal sterilization (Clyman (1963), L. E. Smale and M. L. Smale (1973), Thompson and Wheeless (1971), Peterson and Behrman (1971)). With advances in instrumentation, the first laparoscopic hysterectomy was successfully performed in 1989 by Reich et al. At the same time, minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology was being developed alongside its benign counterpart. In the 1975s, Rosenoff et al. reported using peritoneoscopy for pretreatment evaluation in ovarian cancer, and Spinelli et al. reported on using laparoscopy for the staging of ovarian cancer. In 1993, Nichols used operative laparoscopy to perform pelvic lymphadenectomy in cervical cancer patients. The initial goals of minimally invasive surgery, not dissimilar to those of modern medicine, were to decrease the morbidity and mortality associated with surgery and therefore improve patient outcomes and patient satisfaction. This review will summarize the history and use of minimally invasive surgery in gynecologic oncology and also highlight new minimally invasive surgical approaches currently in development. PMID:23997959

  4. Department of Energy's waste minimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-09-01

    Waste minimization, as mandated by the Congress, requires, the elimination or reduction of the generation of waste as its source, that is, before it can become waste. This audit was made to determine the adequacy of DOE's efforts to minimize the generation of waste. The audit emphasized radioactive and other hazardous waste generation at DOE's nuclear weapons production plants and design laboratories. We included waste minimization activities and actions that can be taken now, in contrast to the long-range weapons complex modernization effort. We reviewed waste minimization activities within the Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM), the Office of the Assistant Secretary for Defense Programs (DP), the Hazardous Waste Remedial Action Program Office, and the Waste Minimization Management Group (WMMG) in the Albuquerque Field Office. Waste minimization programs were examined in detail at the three largest nuclear weapons production facilities -- the Rocky Flats plant, which manufactures plutonium parts; the Y-12 facility, which produces uranium components; and the Savannah River site, which manufactures and loads tritium -- and two of DOE's weapons design laboratories, Los Alamos and Sandia.

  5. [Minimally invasive hemodynamic monitoring with esophageal echoDoppler].

    PubMed

    Monge, M I; Estella, A; Díaz, J C; Gil, A

    2008-01-01

    Hemodynamic monitoring is a key element in the care of the critical patients, providing an unquestionable aid in the attendance to diagnosis and the choice of the adequate treatment. Minimally invasive devices have been emerging over the past few years as an effective alternative to classic monitoring tools. The esophageal echoDoppler is among these. It makes it possible to obtain continuous and minimally invasive monitoring of the cardiac output in addition to other useful parameters by measuring the blood flow rate and the diameter of the thoracic descending aorta, which provides a sufficiently extensive view of the hemodynamic state of the patient and facilitates early detection of the changes produced by a sudden clinical derangement. Although several studies have demonstrated the usefulness of the esophageal Doppler in the surgical scene, there is scarce and dispersed evidence in the literature on its benefits in critical patients. Nevertheless, its advantages make it an attractive element to take into account within the diagnostic arsenal in the intensive care. The purpose of the following article is to describe how it works, its degree of validation with other monitoring methods and the role of esophageal echoDoppler as a minimally invasive monitoring tool for measuring cardiac output in the daily clinical practice, contributing with our own experience in the critical patient. PMID:18221711

  6. Surface Emissivity Effects on Thermodynamic Retrieval of IR Spectral Radiance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhou, Daniel K.; Larar, Allen M.; Smith, William L.; Liu, Xu

    2006-01-01

    The surface emissivity effect on the thermodynamic parameters (e.g., the surface skin temperature, atmospheric temperature, and moisture) retrieved from satellite infrared (IR) spectral radiance is studied. Simulation analysis demonstrates that surface emissivity plays an important role in retrieval of surface skin temperature and terrestrial boundary layer (TBL) moisture. NAST-I ultraspectral data collected during the CLAMS field campaign are used to retrieve thermodynamic properties of the atmosphere and surface. The retrievals are then validated by coincident in-situ measurements, such as sea surface temperature, radiosonde temperature and moisture profiles. Retrieved surface emissivity is also validated by that computed from the observed radiance and calculated emissions based on the retrievals of surface temperature and atmospheric profiles. In addition, retrieved surface skin temperature and emissivity are validated together by radiance comparison between the observation and retrieval-based calculation in the window region where atmospheric contribution is minimized. Both simulation and validation results have lead to the conclusion that variable surface emissivity in the inversion process is needed to obtain accurate retrievals from satellite IR spectral radiance measurements. Retrieval examples are presented to reveal that surface emissivity plays a significant role in retrieving accurate surface skin temperature and TBL thermodynamic parameters.

  7. MINIMIZATION OF CARBON LOSS IN COAL REBURNING

    SciTech Connect

    Vladimir Zamansky; Vitali Lissianski; Pete Maly; Richard Koppang

    2002-09-10

    This project develops Fuel-Flexible Reburning (FFR) technology that is an improved version of conventional reburning. In FFR solid fuel is partially gasified before injection into the reburning zone of a boiler. Partial gasification of the solid fuel improves efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction and decreases LOI by increasing fuel reactivity. Objectives of this project were to develop engineering and scientific information and know-how needed to improve the cost of reburning via increased efficiency and minimized LOI and move the FFR technology to the demonstration and commercialization stage. All project objectives and technical performance goals have been met, and competitive advantages of FFR have been demonstrated. The work included a combination of experimental and modeling studies designed to identify optimum process conditions, confirm the process mechanism and to estimate cost effectiveness of the FFR technology. Experimental results demonstrated that partial gasification of a solid fuel prior to injection into the reburning zone improved the efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction and decreased LOI. Several coals with different volatiles content were tested. Testing suggested that incremental increase in the efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction due to coal gasification was more significant for coals with low volatiles content. Up to 14% increase in the efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction in comparison with basic reburning was achieved with coal gasification. Tests also demonstrated that FFR improved efficiency of NO{sub x} reduction for renewable fuels with high fuel-N content. Modeling efforts focused on the development of the model describing reburning with gaseous gasification products. Modeling predicted that the composition of coal gasification products depended on temperature. Comparison of experimental results and modeling predictions suggested that the heterogeneous NO{sub x} reduction on the surface of char played important role. Economic analysis confirmed

  8. Production of minimally disturbed synchronous cultures of hematopoietic cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thornton, Maureen; Eward, Kathryn Leigh; Helmstetter, Charles E.; Edward, K. L. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    A method is describedforproducing sizable quantities of synchronously dividing, minimally disturbed mammalian cells. Cultures were grown immobilized on surfaces such that cell division within the population resulted in the continuous release of synchronous newborn cells. As judged by the quality and duration of synchronous growth, cell size distributions, and DNA compositions, newborn mouse L1210 cells grew with a very high level of synchrony without overt evidence of growth disturbances. The technology should be applicable to a variety of hematopoietic cells, as evidenced by similar results with human MOLT-4 and U937 cell lines.

  9. Minimally invasive procedures on the lumbar spine.

    PubMed

    Skovrlj, Branko; Gilligan, Jeffrey; Cutler, Holt S; Qureshi, Sheeraz A

    2015-01-16

    Degenerative disease of the lumbar spine is a common and increasingly prevalent condition that is often implicated as the primary reason for chronic low back pain and the leading cause of disability in the western world. Surgical management of lumbar degenerative disease has historically been approached by way of open surgical procedures aimed at decompressing and/or stabilizing the lumbar spine. Advances in technology and surgical instrumentation have led to minimally invasive surgical techniques being developed and increasingly used in the treatment of lumbar degenerative disease. Compared to the traditional open spine surgery, minimally invasive techniques require smaller incisions and decrease approach-related morbidity by avoiding muscle crush injury by self-retaining retractors, preventing the disruption of tendon attachment sites of important muscles at the spinous processes, using known anatomic neurovascular and muscle planes, and minimizing collateral soft-tissue injury by limiting the width of the surgical corridor. The theoretical benefits of minimally invasive surgery over traditional open surgery include reduced blood loss, decreased postoperative pain and narcotics use, shorter hospital length of stay, faster recover and quicker return to work and normal activity. This paper describes the different minimally invasive techniques that are currently available for the treatment of degenerative disease of the lumbar spine. PMID:25610845

  10. Minimal control power of the controlled teleportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kabgyun; Kim, Jaewan; Lee, Soojoon

    2016-03-01

    We generalize the control power of a perfect controlled teleportation of an entangled three-qubit pure state, suggested by Li and Ghose [Phys. Rev. A 90, 052305 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevA.90.052305], to the control power of a general controlled teleportation of a multiqubit pure state. Thus, we define the minimal control power, and calculate the values of the minimal control power for a class of general three-qubit Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states and the three-qubit W class whose states have zero three-tangles. Moreover, we show that the standard three-qubit GHZ state and the standard three-qubit W state have the maximal values of the minimal control power for the two classes, respectively. This means that the minimal control power can be interpreted as not only an operational quantity of a three-qubit quantum communication but also a degree of three-qubit entanglement. In addition, we calculate the values of the minimal control power for general n -qubit GHZ states and the n -qubit W -type states.

  11. Energy minimization in medical image analysis: Methodologies and applications.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Feng; Xie, Xianghua

    2016-02-01

    Energy minimization is of particular interest in medical image analysis. In the past two decades, a variety of optimization schemes have been developed. In this paper, we present a comprehensive survey of the state-of-the-art optimization approaches. These algorithms are mainly classified into two categories: continuous method and discrete method. The former includes Newton-Raphson method, gradient descent method, conjugate gradient method, proximal gradient method, coordinate descent method, and genetic algorithm-based method, while the latter covers graph cuts method, belief propagation method, tree-reweighted message passing method, linear programming method, maximum margin learning method, simulated annealing method, and iterated conditional modes method. We also discuss the minimal surface method, primal-dual method, and the multi-objective optimization method. In addition, we review several comparative studies that evaluate the performance of different minimization techniques in terms of accuracy, efficiency, or complexity. These optimization techniques are widely used in many medical applications, for example, image segmentation, registration, reconstruction, motion tracking, and compressed sensing. We thus give an overview on those applications as well. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:26186171

  12. Advanced pyrochemical technologies for minimizing nuclear waste

    SciTech Connect

    Bronson, M.C.; Dodson, K.E.; Riley, D.C.

    1994-06-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE) is seeking to reduce the size of the current nuclear weapons complex and consequently minimize operating costs. To meet this DOE objective, the national laboratories have been asked to develop advanced technologies that take uranium and plutonium, from retired weapons and prepare it for new weapons, long-term storage, and/or final disposition. Current pyrochemical processes generate residue salts and ceramic wastes that require aqueous processing to remove and recover the actinides. However, the aqueous treatment of these residues generates an estimated 100 liters of acidic transuranic (TRU) waste per kilogram of plutonium in the residue. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) is developing pyrochemical techniques to eliminate, minimize, or more efficiently treat these residue streams. This paper will present technologies being developed at LLNL on advanced materials for actinide containment, reactors that minimize residues, and pyrochemical processes that remove actinides from waste salts.

  13. Genetic Research on Biospecimens Poses Minimal Risk

    PubMed Central

    Wendler, David S.; Rid, Annette

    2014-01-01

    Genetic research on human biospecimens is increasingly common. Yet, debate continues over the level of risk that this research poses to sample donors. Some argue that genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk; others argue that it poses greater than minimal risk and therefore needs additional requirements and limitations. This debate raises concern that some donors are not receiving appropriate protection or, conversely, that valuable research is being subject to unnecessary requirements and limitations. The present paper attempts to address this concern using the widely-endorsed ‘risks of daily life’ standard. The three extant versions of this standard all suggest that, with proper measures in place to protect donor confidentiality, most genetic research on human biospecimens poses minimal risk to donors. PMID:25530152

  14. One-dimensional Gromov minimal filling problem

    SciTech Connect

    Ivanov, Alexandr O; Tuzhilin, Alexey A

    2012-05-31

    The paper is devoted to a new branch in the theory of one-dimensional variational problems with branching extremals, the investigation of one-dimensional minimal fillings introduced by the authors. On the one hand, this problem is a one-dimensional version of a generalization of Gromov's minimal fillings problem to the case of stratified manifolds. On the other hand, this problem is interesting in itself and also can be considered as a generalization of another classical problem, the Steiner problem on the construction of a shortest network connecting a given set of terminals. Besides the statement of the problem, we discuss several properties of the minimal fillings and state several conjectures. Bibliography: 38 titles.

  15. Responsible gambling: general principles and minimal requirements.

    PubMed

    Blaszczynski, Alex; Collins, Peter; Fong, Davis; Ladouceur, Robert; Nower, Lia; Shaffer, Howard J; Tavares, Hermano; Venisse, Jean-Luc

    2011-12-01

    Many international jurisdictions have introduced responsible gambling programs. These programs intend to minimize negative consequences of excessive gambling, but vary considerably in their aims, focus, and content. Many responsible gambling programs lack a conceptual framework and, in the absence of empirical data, their components are based only on general considerations and impressions. This paper outlines the consensus viewpoint of an international group of researchers suggesting fundamental responsible gambling principles, roles of key stakeholders, and minimal requirements that stakeholders can use to frame and inform responsible gambling programs across jurisdictions. Such a framework does not purport to offer value statements regarding the legal status of gambling or its expansion. Rather, it proposes gambling-related initiatives aimed at government, industry, and individuals to promote responsible gambling and consumer protection. This paper argues that there is a set of basic principles and minimal requirements that should form the basis for every responsible gambling program. PMID:21359586

  16. [EVOLUTION OF MINIMALLY INVASIVE CARDIAC SURGERY].

    PubMed

    Fujita, Tomoyuki; Kobayashi, Junjiro

    2016-03-01

    Minimally invasive surgery is an attractive choice for patients undergoing major cardiac surgery. We review the history of minimally invasive valve surgery in this article. Due to many innovations in surgical tools, cardiopulmonary bypass systems, visualization systems, and robotic systems as well as surgical techniques, minimally invasive cardiac surgery has become standard care for valve lesion repair. In particular, aortic cross-clamp techniques and methods for cardioplegia using the Chitwood clamp and root cannula or endoballoon catheter in combination with femoro-femoral bypass systems have made such procedures safer and more practical. On the other hand, robotically assisted surgery has not become standard due to the cost and slow learning curve. However, along with the development of robotics, this less-invasive technique may provide another choice for patients in the near future. PMID:27295770

  17. Minimal invasive treatments for liver malignancies.

    PubMed

    Orsi, Franco; Varano, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    Minimal invasive therapies have proved useful in the management of primary and secondary hepatic malignancies. The most relevant aspects of all these therapies are their minimal toxicity profiles and highly effective tumor responses without affecting the normal hepatic parenchyma. These unique characteristics coupled with their minimally invasive nature provide an attractive therapeutic option for patients who previously may have had few alternatives. Combination of these therapies might extend indications to bring curative treatment to a wider selected population. The results of various ongoing combination trials of intraarterial therapies with targeted therapies are awaited to further improve survival in this patient group. This review focuses on the application of ablative and intra-arterial therapies in the management of hepatocellular carcinoma and hepatic colorectal metastasis. PMID:26050603

  18. Genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk.

    PubMed

    Wendler, David S; Rid, Annette

    2015-01-01

    Genetic research on human biospecimens is increasingly common. However, debate continues over the level of risk that this research poses to sample donors. Some argue that genetic research on biospecimens poses minimal risk; others argue that it poses greater than minimal risk and therefore needs additional requirements and limitations. This debate raises concern that some donors are not receiving appropriate protection or, conversely, that valuable research is being subject to unnecessary requirements and limitations. The present paper attempts to resolve this debate using the widely-endorsed 'risks of daily life' standard. The three extant versions of this standard all suggest that, with proper measures in place to protect confidentiality, most genetic research on human biospecimens poses minimal risk to donors. PMID:25530152

  19. Approximate error conjugation gradient minimization methods

    DOEpatents

    Kallman, Jeffrey S

    2013-05-21

    In one embodiment, a method includes selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In another embodiment, a system includes a processor for executing logic, logic for selecting a subset of rays from a set of all rays to use in an error calculation for a constrained conjugate gradient minimization problem, logic for calculating an approximate error using the subset of rays, and logic for calculating a minimum in a conjugate gradient direction based on the approximate error. In other embodiments, computer program products, methods, and systems are described capable of using approximate error in constrained conjugate gradient minimization problems.

  20. Inverse Modeling Via Linearized Functional Minimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barajas-Solano, D. A.; Wohlberg, B.; Vesselinov, V. V.; Tartakovsky, D. M.

    2014-12-01

    We present a novel parameter estimation methodology for transient models of geophysical systems with uncertain, spatially distributed, heterogeneous and piece-wise continuous parameters.The methodology employs a bayesian approach to propose an inverse modeling problem for the spatial configuration of the model parameters.The likelihood of the configuration is formulated using sparse measurements of both model parameters and transient states.We propose using total variation regularization (TV) as the prior reflecting the heterogeneous, piece-wise continuity assumption on the parameter distribution.The maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimator of the parameter configuration is then computed by minimizing the negative bayesian log-posterior using a linearized functional minimization approach. The computation of the MAP estimator is a large-dimensional nonlinear minimization problem with two sources of nonlinearity: (1) the TV operator, and (2) the nonlinear relation between states and parameters provided by the model's governing equations.We propose a a hybrid linearized functional minimization (LFM) algorithm in two stages to efficiently treat both sources of nonlinearity.The relation between states and parameters is linearized, resulting in a linear minimization sub-problem equipped with the TV operator; this sub-problem is then minimized using the Alternating Direction Method of Multipliers (ADMM). The methodology is illustrated with a transient saturated groundwater flow application in a synthetic domain, stimulated by external point-wise loadings representing aquifer pumping, together with an array of discrete measurements of hydraulic conductivity and transient measurements of hydraulic head.We show that our inversion strategy is able to recover the overall large-scale features of the parameter configuration, and that the reconstruction is improved by the addition of transient information of the state variable.

  1. Minimal mass design of tensegrity structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagase, Kenji; Skelton, R. E.

    2014-03-01

    This paper provides a unified framework for minimal mass design of tensegrity systems. For any given configuration and any given set of external forces, we design force density (member force divided by length) and cross-section area to minimize the structural mass subject to an equilibrium condition and a maximum stress constraint. The answer is provided by a linear program. Stability is assured by a positive definite stiffness matrix. This condition is described by a linear matrix inequality. Numerical examples are shown to illustrate the proposed method.

  2. Navigated minimally invasive unicompartmental knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Jean-Yves; Müller, Peter E; Weyer, R; John, Michael; Weber, Patrick; Ciobanu, Eugène; Schmitz, Andreas; Bacher, Thomas; Neumann, Wolfram; Jansson, Volkmar

    2006-10-01

    Unicompartmental knee arthroplasty (UKA) is an alternative procedure to high tibial osteotomy. This study assessed the procedure using computer navigation to improve implantation accuracy and presents early radiological results of a group of patients implanted with the univation UKA (B. Braun Aesculap, Tuttlingen, Germany) with navigation instrumentation and a minimally invasive approach. The authors concluded that navigated implantation of a UKA using a nonimage-based system improved radiologic accuracy implantation without significant inconvenience and minimal change in the conventional operating technique. PMID:17407935

  3. Minimally invasive surgical training: challenges and solutions.

    PubMed

    Pierorazio, Phillip M; Allaf, Mohamad E

    2009-01-01

    Treatment options for urological malignancies continue to increase and include endoscopic, laparoscopic, robotic, and image-guided percutaneous techniques. This ever expanding array of technically demanding management options coupled with a static training paradigm introduces challenges to training the urological oncologist of the future. Minimally invasive learning opportunities continue to evolve, and include an intensive experience during residency, postgraduate short courses or mini-apprenticeships, and full time fellowship programs. Incorporation of large animal surgery and surgical simulators may help shorten the necessary learning curve. Ultimately, programs must provide an intense hands-on experience to trainees in all minimally invasive surgical aspects for optimal training. PMID:19285236

  4. The Parisi Formula has a Unique Minimizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auffinger, Antonio; Chen, Wei-Kuo

    2015-05-01

    In 1979, Parisi (Phys Rev Lett 43:1754-1756, 1979) predicted a variational formula for the thermodynamic limit of the free energy in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick model, and described the role played by its minimizer. This formula was verified in the seminal work of Talagrand (Ann Math 163(1):221-263, 2006) and later generalized to the mixed p-spin models by Panchenko (Ann Probab 42(3):946-958, 2014). In this paper, we prove that the minimizer in Parisi's formula is unique at any temperature and external field by establishing the strict convexity of the Parisi functional.

  5. Pattern Search Methods for Linearly Constrained Minimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lewis, Robert Michael; Torczon, Virginia

    1998-01-01

    We extend pattern search methods to linearly constrained minimization. We develop a general class of feasible point pattern search algorithms and prove global convergence to a Karush-Kuhn-Tucker point. As in the case of unconstrained minimization, pattern search methods for linearly constrained problems accomplish this without explicit recourse to the gradient or the directional derivative. Key to the analysis of the algorithms is the way in which the local search patterns conform to the geometry of the boundary of the feasible region.

  6. Minimally invasive transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng-Yuan; Wang, Michael Y

    2016-07-01

    In minimally invasive spinal fusion surgery, transforaminal lumbar (sacral) interbody fusion (TLIF) is one of the most common procedures that provides both anterior and posterior column support without retraction or violation to the neural structure. Direct and indirect decompression can be done through this single approach. Preoperative plain radiographs and MR scan should be carefully evaluated. This video demonstrates a standard approach for how to perform a minimally invasive transforaminal lumbosacral interbody fusion. The video can be found here: https://youtu.be/bhEeafKJ370 . PMID:27364426

  7. From Jack polynomials to minimal model spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ridout, David; Wood, Simon

    2015-01-01

    In this note, a deep connection between free field realizations of conformal field theories and symmetric polynomials is presented. We give a brief introduction into the necessary prerequisites of both free field realizations and symmetric polynomials, in particular Jack symmetric polynomials. Then we combine these two fields to classify the irreducible representations of the minimal model vertex operator algebras as an illuminating example of the power of these methods. While these results on the representation theory of the minimal models are all known, this note exploits the full power of Jack polynomials to present significant simplifications of the original proofs in the literature.

  8. Non-minimal inflation and SUSY GUTs

    SciTech Connect

    Okada, Nobuchika

    2012-07-27

    The Standard Model Higgs boson with the nonminimal coupling to the gravitational curvature can drive cosmological inflation. We study this type of inflationary scenario in the context of supergravity. We first point out that it is naturally implemented in the minimal supersymmetric SU(5) model, and hence virtually in any GUT models. Next we propose another scenario based on the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model supplemented by the right-handed neutrinos. These models can be tested by new observational data from the Planck satellite experiments within a few years.

  9. Minimally invasive approach to familial multiple lipomatosis.

    PubMed

    Ronan, S J; Broderick, T

    2000-09-01

    Thirty-five abdominal wall lipomas were removed from a patient with familial multiple lipomatosis using a minimally invasive approach in a cost-effective, reliable, and cosmetically pleasing manner. The surgical technique used is described in this case report. Clinical findings and prior excisions provided the preoperative diagnosis. The abdominal wall was dissected through two small, vertical midline incisions in the suprafascial plane with the aid of a lighted breast retractor. A complete excision of all palpable lipomas was achieved with this approach. The patient had excellent cosmetic results with minimal postoperative scarring. PMID:11007403

  10. A Reconsideration of the b{yields}s{gamma} Decay in the Minimal Flavor Violating MSSM

    SciTech Connect

    Wick, Michael; Altmannshofer, Wolfgang

    2008-11-23

    We present a MSSM study of the b{yields}s{gamma} decay in a Minimal Flavor Violating (MFV) framework, where the form of the soft SUSY breaking terms is determined by the Standard Model Yukawa couplings. In particular, we address the role of gluino contributions, which are set to zero in most studies of the MFV MSSM.Gluino contributions can play an important role in the MFV MSSM whenever {mu}xtan{beta} is large. In fact, similarly to chargino contributions, gluino contributions are tan{beta} enhanced and can easily dominate charged Higgs contributions for large values of tan{beta}. Even though each of the separate contributions to b{yields}s{gamma} can be sizeable by itself, surprisingly no absolute lower bound can be placed on any of the relevant SUSY masses, since patterns of partial cancellations among the three competing contributions (Higgs, chargino and gluino) can occur throughout the MSSM parameter space.

  11. Minimal Synthetic Cells to Study Integrin-Mediated Adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Frohnmayer, Johannes P; Brüggemann, Dorothea; Eberhard, Christian; Neubauer, Stefanie; Mollenhauer, Christine; Boehm, Heike; Kessler, Horst; Geiger, Benjamin; Spatz, Joachim P

    2015-01-01

    To shed light on cell-adhesion-related molecular pathways, synthetic cells offer the unique advantage of a well-controlled model system with reduced molecular complexity. Herein, we show that liposomes with the reconstituted platelet integrin αIIbβ3 as the adhesion-mediating transmembrane protein are a functional minimal cell model for studying cellular adhesion mechanisms in a defined environment. The interaction of these synthetic cells with various extracellular matrix proteins was analyzed using a quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring. The data indicated that integrin was functionally incorporated into the lipid vesicles, thus enabling integrin-specific adhesion of the engineered liposomes to fibrinogen- and fibronectin-functionalized surfaces. Then, we were able to initiate the detachment of integrin liposomes from these surfaces in the presence of the peptide GRGDSP, a process that is even faster with our newly synthesized peptide mimetic SN529, which specifically inhibits the integrin αIIbβ3. PMID:26257266

  12. DUPONT CHAMBERS WORKS WASTE MINIMIZATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a joint U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DuPont waste minimization project, fifteen waste streams were-selected for assessment. The intent was to develop assessments diverse in terms of process type, mode of operation, waste type, disposal needed, and relative s...

  13. Practice Enables Successful Learning under Minimal Guidance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brunstein, Angela; Betts, Shawn; Anderson, John R.

    2009-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted, contrasting a minimally guided discovery condition with a variety of instructional conditions. College students interacted with a computer-based tutor that presented algebra-like problems in a novel graphical representation. Although the tutor provided no instruction in a discovery condition, it constrained the…

  14. Minimally invasive pancreatic surgery – a review

    PubMed Central

    Damoli, Isacco; Ramera, Marco; Paiella, Salvatore; Marchegiani, Giovanni; Bassi, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    During the past 20 years the application of a minimally invasive approach to pancreatic surgery has progressively increased. Distal pancreatectomy is the most frequently performed procedure, because of the absence of a reconstructive phase. However, middle pancreatectomy and pancreatoduodenectomy have been demonstrated to be safe and feasible as well. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is recognized as the gold standard treatment for small tumors of the pancreatic body-tail, with several advantages over the traditional open approach in terms of patient recovery. The surgical treatment of lesions of the pancreatic head via a minimally invasive approach is still limited to a few highly experienced surgeons, due to the very challenging resection and complex anastomoses. Middle pancreatectomy and enucleation are indicated for small and benign tumors and offer the maximum preservation of the parenchyma. The introduction of a robotic platform more than ten years ago increased the interest of many surgeons in minimally invasive treatment of pancreatic diseases. This new technology overcomes all the limitations of laparoscopic surgery, but actual benefits for the patients are still under investigation. The increased costs associated with robotic surgery are under debate too. This article presents the state of the art of minimally invasive pancreatic surgery. PMID:26240612

  15. Minimal Interventions in the Teaching of Mathematics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foster, Colin

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses ways in which mathematics pedagogy can benefit from insights gleaned from counselling. Person-centred counselling stresses the value of genuineness, warm empathetic listening and minimal intervention to support people in solving their own problems and developing increased autonomy. Such an approach contrasts starkly with the…

  16. Minimization search method for data inversion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fymat, A. L.

    1975-01-01

    Technique has been developed for determining values of selected subsets of independent variables in mathematical formulations. Required computation time increases with first power of the number of variables. This is in contrast with classical minimization methods for which computational time increases with third power of the number of variables.

  17. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-01-01

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27621576

  18. Inflation with non-minimally derivative coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Nan; Gao, Qing; Gong, Yungui

    2015-10-01

    We derive the second order correction to the scalar and tensor spectral tilts for the inflationary models with non-minimally derivative coupling. In the high friction limit, the quartic power law potential is consistent with the observational constraint at 95% CL because the amplitude of the primordial gravitational waves is smaller, and the inflaton excursion is sub-Planckian.

  19. Minimal Mimicry: Mere Effector Matching Induces Preference

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sparenberg, Peggy; Topolinski, Sascha; Springer, Anne; Prinz, Wolfgang

    2012-01-01

    Both mimicking and being mimicked induces preference for a target. The present experiments investigate the minimal sufficient conditions for this mimicry-preference link to occur. We argue that mere effector matching between one's own and the other person's movement is sufficient to induce preference, independent of which movement is actually…

  20. MULTIOBJECTIVE PARALLEL GENETIC ALGORITHM FOR WASTE MINIMIZATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    In this research we have developed an efficient multiobjective parallel genetic algorithm (MOPGA) for waste minimization problems. This MOPGA integrates PGAPack (Levine, 1996) and NSGA-II (Deb, 2000) with novel modifications. PGAPack is a master-slave parallel implementation of a...

  1. Using Rewards to Minimize Overdue Book Rates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, W. Bede; Smith, Fred W.

    2005-01-01

    For as long as libraries have charged fines for books returned after their due dates, this familiar practice has excited comment and controversy. Fines are thought by many to deter patrons from keeping materials too long. However, others believe there is little persuasive evidence that fines are more effective at minimizing overdues than are…

  2. Pancreatic cancer: Open or minimally invasive surgery?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yu-Hua; Zhang, Cheng-Wu; Hu, Zhi-Ming; Hong, De-Fei

    2016-08-28

    Pancreatic duct adenocarcinoma is one of the most fatal malignancies, with R0 resection remaining the most important part of treatment of this malignancy. However, pancreatectomy is believed to be one of the most challenging procedures and R0 resection remains the only chance for patients with pancreatic cancer to have a good prognosis. Some surgeons have tried minimally invasive pancreatic surgery, but the short- and long-term outcomes of pancreatic malignancy remain controversial between open and minimally invasive procedures. We collected comparative data about minimally invasive and open pancreatic surgery. The available evidence suggests that minimally invasive pancreaticoduodenectomy (MIPD) is as safe and feasible as open PD (OPD), and shows some benefit, such as less intraoperative blood loss and shorter postoperative hospital stay. Despite the limited evidence for MIPD in pancreatic cancer, most of the available data show that the short-term oncological adequacy is similar between MIPD and OPD. Some surgical techniques, including superior mesenteric artery-first approach and laparoscopic pancreatoduodenectomy with major vein resection, are believed to improve the rate of R0 resection. Laparoscopic distal pancreatectomy is less technically demanding and is accepted in more pancreatic centers. It is technically safe and feasible and has similar short-term oncological prognosis compared with open distal pancreatectomy. PMID:27621576

  3. Minimization of Salmonella Contamination on Raw Poultry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Many reviews have discussed Salmonella in poultry and suggested best practices to minimize this organism on raw poultry meat. Despite years of research and conscientious control efforts by industry and regulatory agencies, human salmonellosis rates have declined only modestly and Salmonella is stil...

  4. Minimal Competency Measurement Conference: Summary Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1976

    On March 11 and 12, 1976, the National Assessment of Educational Progress (NAEP), a project of the Education Commission of the States (ECS), and the Clearinghouse for Applied Performance Testing (CAPT), a project of the Northwest Regional Educational Laboratory (NWREL), cohosted a Minimal Competency Measurement Conference in Denver, Colorado.…

  5. Minimal Guidelines for Authors of Web Pages.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    ADE Bulletin, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Presents guidelines that recommend the minimal reference information that should be provided on Web pages intended for use by students, teachers, and scholars in the modern languages. Suggests the inclusion of information about responsible parties, copyright declaration, privacy statements, and site information. Makes a note on Web page style. (SG)

  6. DUPONT CHAMBERS WORKS WASTE MINIMIZATION PROJECT

    EPA Science Inventory

    In a joint U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and DuPont waste minimization project, fifteen waste streams were-selected for assessment. he intent was to develop assessments diverse in terms of process type, mode of operation, waste type, disposal needed, and relative suc...

  7. The Minimal Preprocessing Pipelines for the Human Connectome Project

    PubMed Central

    Glasser, Matthew F.; Sotiropoulos, Stamatios N; Wilson, J Anthony; Coalson, Timothy S; Fischl, Bruce; Andersson, Jesper L; Xu, Junqian; Jbabdi, Saad; Webster, Matthew; Polimeni, Jonathan R; Van Essen, David C; Jenkinson, Mark

    2013-01-01

    The Human Connectome Project (HCP) faces the challenging task of bringing multiple magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) modalities together in a common automated preprocessing framework across a large cohort of subjects. The MRI data acquired by the HCP differ in many ways from data acquired on conventional 3 Tesla scanners and often require newly developed preprocessing methods. We describe the minimal preprocessing pipelines for structural, functional, and diffusion MRI that were developed by the HCP to accomplish many low level tasks, including spatial artifact/distortion removal, surface generation, cross-modal registration, and alignment to standard space. These pipelines are specially designed to capitalize on the high quality data offered by the HCP. The final standard space makes use of a recently introduced CIFTI file format and the associated grayordinates spatial coordinate system. This allows for combined cortical surface and subcortical volume analyses while reducing the storage and processing requirements for high spatial and temporal resolution data. Here, we provide the minimum image acquisition requirements for the HCP minimal preprocessing pipelines and additional advice for investigators interested in replicating the HCP’s acquisition protocols or using these pipelines. Finally, we discuss some potential future improvements for the pipelines. PMID:23668970

  8. Multiview stereo and silhouette fusion via minimizing generalized reprojection error☆

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhaoxin; Wang, Kuanquan; Jia, Wenyan; Chen, Hsin-Chen; Zuo, Wangmeng; Meng, Deyu; Sun, Mingui

    2014-01-01

    Accurate reconstruction of 3D geometrical shape from a set of calibrated 2D multiview images is an active yet challenging task in computer vision. The existing multiview stereo methods usually perform poorly in recovering deeply concave and thinly protruding structures, and suffer from several common problems like slow convergence, sensitivity to initial conditions, and high memory requirements. To address these issues, we propose a two-phase optimization method for generalized reprojection error minimization (TwGREM), where a generalized framework of reprojection error is proposed to integrate stereo and silhouette cues into a unified energy function. For the minimization of the function, we first introduce a convex relaxation on 3D volumetric grids which can be efficiently solved using variable splitting and Chambolle projection. Then, the resulting surface is parameterized as a triangle mesh and refined using surface evolution to obtain a high-quality 3D reconstruction. Our comparative experiments with several state-of-the-art methods show that the performance of TwGREM based 3D reconstruction is among the highest with respect to accuracy and efficiency, especially for data with smooth texture and sparsely sampled viewpoints. PMID:25558120

  9. Resummation of Goldstone boson contributions to the MSSM effective potential

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Nilanjana; Martin, Stephen P.

    2016-07-01

    We discuss the resummation of the Goldstone boson contributions to the effective potential of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model. This eliminates the formal problems of spurious imaginary parts and logarithmic singularities in the minimization conditions when the tree-level Goldstone boson squared masses are negative or approach zero. The numerical impact of the resummation is shown to be almost always very small. We also show how to write the two-loop minimization conditions so that Goldstone boson squared masses do not appear at all, and so that they can be solved without iteration.

  10. A comparison of four receptor models used to quantify the boreal wildfire smoke contribution to surface PM2.5 in Halifax, Nova Scotia during the BORTAS-B experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, M. D.; Haelssig, J.; Pierce, J. R.; Parrington, M.; Franklin, J. E.; Hopper, J. T.; Li, Z.; Ward, T. J.

    2014-09-01

    This paper presents a quantitative comparison of the four most commonly used receptor models, namely Absolute Principal Component Scores (APCS), Pragmatic Mass Closure (PMC), Chemical Mass Balance (CMB), and Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF). The models were used to predict the contributions of a wide variety of sources to PM2.5 mass in Halifax, Nova Scotia during the Quantifying the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS) experiment. However, particular emphasis was placed on the capacity of the models to predict the boreal wild fire smoke contributions during the BORTAS experiment. Using PMF, a new woodsmoke enrichment factor of 52 was estimated for use in the PMC receptor model. The results indicate that the APCS and PMC receptor models were not able to accurately resolve total PM2.5 mass concentrations below 2.0 μg m-3. CMB was better able to resolve these low PM2.5 concentrations, but it could not be run on 9 of the 45 days of PM2.5 samples. PMF was found to be the most robust of the four models since it was able to resolve PM2.5 mass below 2.0 μg m-3, predict PM2.5 mass on all 45 days, and utilized an unambiguous woodsmoke chemical marker. The median woodsmoke relative contribution to PM2.5 estimated using PMC, APCS, CMB and PMF were found to be 0.08, 0.09, 3.59 and 0.14 μg m-3, respectively. The contribution predicted by the CMB model seems to be clearly too high based on other observations. The use of levoglucosan as a tracer for woodsmoke was found to be vital for identifying this source.

  11. One-loop Einstein-Hilbert term in minimally supersymmetric type IIB orientifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haack, Michael; Kang, Jin U.

    2016-02-01

    We evaluate string one-loop contributions to the Einstein-Hilbert term in toroidal minimally supersymmetric type IIB orientifolds with D-branes. These have potential applications to the determination of quantum corrections to the moduli Kähler metric in these models.

  12. Differential surface expression of CD18 and CD44 by neutrophils in bone marrow and spleen contributed to the neutrophilia in thalidomide-treated female B6C3F1 mice

    SciTech Connect

    Auttachoat, Wimolnut; Zheng Jianfeng; Chi, Rui P.; Meng, Andrew; Guo, Tai L. . E-mail: tlguo@vcu.edu

    2007-02-01

    Previously, we have reported that thalidomide (Thd) can enhance neutrophil function in female B6C3F1 mice. The present study was intended to evaluate the mechanisms underlying the enhanced neutrophil responses following Thd treatment intraperitoneally (100 mg/kg) for 14 or 28 days. Treatment with Thd increased the numbers of neutrophils in the spleen, peripheral blood, bone marrow, peritoneal cavity and lungs of female B6C3F1 mice when compared to the vehicle control mice. Thd treatment for 14 days increased the percentage and the number of neutrophils in the spleen in the first 8 h (peaking at 2 h) after the last Thd treatment, and it returned to the baseline after 24 h. However, Thd treatment for 28 days increased the percentage and number of neutrophils in the spleen even at the 24-h time point after the last Thd treatment. These neutrophils were demonstrated to be functional by the myeloperoxidase activity assay. Further studies have ruled out the possibility of an increased bone marrow granulopoiesis following Thd treatment. Flow cytometric analysis of the surface expression of adhesion molecules suggested that Thd treatment for either 14 or 28 days decreased the surface expression of either CD18 or CD44 by bone marrow neutrophils. On the other hand, the surface expression of both CD18 and CD44 by splenic neutrophils was increased following Thd treatment for 28 days but not for 14 days. No effect was produced for other cell surface molecules such as CD62L and CD11a. It was possible that decreased surface expressions of CD18 and CD44 facilitated neutrophils' release from the bone marrow; increased surface expressions of CD44 and CD18 by splenic neutrophils after 28 days of Thd treatment increased their ability to remain in the periphery. Taken together, Thd treatment increased neutrophils in female B6C3F1 mice, at least partially, through differentially modulating the surface expression of CD18 and CD44 by the neutrophils in the bone marrow and spleen00.

  13. Minimization and management of wastes from biomedical research.

    PubMed Central

    Rau, E H; Alaimo, R J; Ashbrook, P C; Austin, S M; Borenstein, N; Evans, M R; French, H M; Gilpin, R W; Hughes, J; Hummel, S J; Jacobsohn, A P; Lee, C Y; Merkle, S; Radzinski, T; Sloane, R; Wagner, K D; Weaner, L E

    2000-01-01

    Several committees were established by the National Association of Physicians for the Environment to investigate and report on various topics at the National Leadership Conference on Biomedical Research and the Environment held at the 1--2 November 1999 at the National Institutes of Health in Bethesda, Maryland. This is the report of the Committee on Minimization and Management of Wastes from Biomedical Research. Biomedical research facilities contribute a small fraction of the total amount of wastes generated in the United States, and the rate of generation appears to be decreasing. Significant reductions in generation of hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes have recently been reported, even at facilities with rapidly expanding research programs. Changes in the focus of research, improvements in laboratory techniques, and greater emphasis on waste minimization (volume and toxicity reduction) explain the declining trend in generation. The potential for uncontrolled releases of wastes from biomedical research facilities and adverse impacts on the general environment from these wastes appears to be low. Wastes are subject to numerous regulatory requirements and are contained and managed in a manner protective of the environment. Most biohazardous agents, chemicals, and radionuclides that find significant use in research are not likely to be persistent, bioaccumulative, or toxic if they are released. Today, the primary motivations for the ongoing efforts by facilities to improve minimization and management of wastes are regulatory compliance and avoidance of the high disposal costs and liabilities associated with generation of regulated wastes. The committee concluded that there was no evidence suggesting that the anticipated increases in biomedical research will significantly increase generation of hazardous wastes or have adverse impacts on the general environment. This conclusion assumes the positive, countervailing trends of enhanced pollution prevention

  14. Criteria for minimal model of driven polymer translocation.

    PubMed

    Suhonen, P M; Kaski, K; Linna, R P

    2014-10-01

    While the characteristics of the driven translocation for asymptotically long polymers are well understood, this is not the case for finite-sized polymers, which are relevant for real-world experiments and simulation studies. Most notably, the behavior of the exponent α, which describes the scaling of the translocation time with polymer length, when the driving force fp in the pore is changed, is under debate. By Langevin dynamics simulations of regular and modified translocation models using the freely jointed-chain polymer model we find that a previously reported incomplete model, where the trans side and fluctuations were excluded, gives rise to characteristics that are in stark contradiction with those of the complete model, for which α increases with fp. Our results suggest that contribution due to fluctuations is important. We construct a minimal model where dynamics is completely excluded to show that close alignment with a full translocation model can be achieved. Our findings set very stringent requirements for a minimal model that is supposed to describe the driven polymer translocation correctly. PMID:25375518

  15. Mesopic luminance assessed with minimally distinct border perception.

    PubMed

    Raphael, Sabine; MacLeod, Donald I A

    2015-01-01

    In photopic vision, the border between two fields is minimally distinct when the two fields are isoluminant; that is, when the achromatic luminance of the two fields is equal. The distinctness of a border between extrafoveal reference and comparison fields was used here as an isoluminance criterion under a variety of adaptation conditions ranging from photopic to scotopic. The adjustment was done by trading off the amount of blue against the amount of red in the comparison field. Results show that isoluminant border settings are linear under all constant adaptation conditions, though varying with state of adaptation. The relative contribution of rods and cones to luminance was modeled such that the linear sum of the suitably weighted scotopic and photopic luminance is constant for the mesopic isoluminant conditions. The relative weights change with adapting intensity in a sigmoid fashion and also depend strongly on the position of the border in the visual field. PMID:26223024

  16. Minimal supergravity radiative effects on the tribimaximal neutrino mixing pattern

    SciTech Connect

    Hirsch, M.; Valle, J. W. F.; Villanova Moral, A. del; Romao, J. C.

    2007-03-01

    We study the stability of the Harrison-Perkins-Scott (HPS) mixing pattern, assumed to hold at some high energy scale, against supersymmetric radiative corrections. We work in the framework of a reference minimal supergravity model (mSUGRA) where supersymmetry breaking is universal and flavor-blind at unification. The radiative corrections considered include both RGE running as well as threshold effects. We find that in this case the solar mixing angle can only increase with respect to the HPS reference value, while the atmospheric and reactor mixing angles remain essentially stable. Deviations from the solar angle HPS prediction towards lower values would signal novel contributions from physics beyond the simplest mSUGRA model.

  17. Mesopic luminance assessed with minimally distinct border perception

    PubMed Central

    Raphael, Sabine; MacLeod, Donald I. A.

    2015-01-01

    In photopic vision, the border between two fields is minimally distinct when the two fields are isoluminant; that is, when the achromatic luminance of the two fields is equal. The distinctness of a border between extrafoveal reference and comparison fields was used here as an isoluminance criterion under a variety of adaptation conditions ranging from photopic to scotopic. The adjustment was done by trading off the amount of blue against the amount of red in the comparison field. Results show that isoluminant border settings are linear under all constant adaptation conditions, though varying with state of adaptation. The relative contribution of rods and cones to luminance was modeled such that the linear sum of the suitably weighted scotopic and photopic luminance is constant for the mesopic isoluminant conditions. The relative weights change with adapting intensity in a sigmoid fashion and also depend strongly on the position of the border in the visual field. PMID:26223024

  18. Minimal 3-3-1 model with a spectator sextet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Conto, G.; Machado, A. C. B.; Pleitez, V.

    2015-10-01

    We consider the minimal 3-3-1 model with a heavy scalar sextet and realize, at the tree level, an effective dimension-five interaction that contributes to the mass of the charged leptons. In this case the charged leptons masses arise from a sort of type-II seesawlike mechanism while the neutrino masses are generated by a type-I mechanism. We also show that the parameters giving the correct lepton masses also accommodate the Pontecorvo-Maki-Nakawaga-Sakata matrix. We give the scalar mass spectra of the model and analyze under which conditions the fields in the scalar sextet are heavy even with small or zero vacuum expectation values. We also show the conditions under which it is possible to have a stable (bounded from below) potential and also a global minimum.

  19. CernVM: Minimal maintenance approach to virtualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buncic, Predrag; Aguado-Sanchez, Carlos; Blomer, Jakob; Harutyunyan, Artem

    2011-12-01

    CernVM is a virtual software appliance designed to support the development cycle and provide a runtime environment for the LHC experiments. It consists of three key components that differentiate it from more traditional virtual machines: a minimal Linux Operating System (OS), a specially tuned file system designed to deliver application software on demand, and contextualization tools that provide a means to easily customize and configure CernVM instances for different tasks and user communities. In this contribution we briefly describe the most important use cases for virtualization in High Energy Physics (HEP), CernVM key components and discuss how end-to-end systems corresponding to these use cases can be realized using CernVM.

  20. A comparison of four receptor models used to quantify the boreal wildfire smoke contribution to surface PM2.5 in Halifax, Nova Scotia during the BORTAS-B experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, M. D.; Haelssig, J.; Pierce, J. R.; Parrington, M.; Franklin, J. E.; Hopper, J. T.; Li, Z.; Ward, T. J.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a quantitative comparison of the four most commonly used receptor models, namely absolute principal component scores (APCS), pragmatic mass closure (PMC), chemical mass balance (CMB) and positive matrix factorization (PMF). The models were used to predict the contributions of a wide variety of sources to PM2.5 mass in Halifax, Nova Scotia during the experiment to quantify the impact of BOReal forest fires on Tropospheric oxidants over the Atlantic using Aircraft and Satellites (BORTAS). However, particular emphasis was placed on the capacity of the models to predict the boreal wildfire smoke contributions during the BORTAS experiment. The performance of the four receptor models was assessed on their ability to predict the observed PM2.5 with an R2 close to 1, an intercept close to zero, a low bias and low RSME. Using PMF, a new woodsmoke enrichment factor of 52 was estimated for use in the PMC receptor model. The results indicate that the APCS and PMC receptor models were not able to accurately resolve total PM2.5 mass concentrations below 2 μg m-3. CMB was better able to resolve these low PM2.5 concentrations, but it could not be run on 9 of the 45 days of PM2.5 samples. PMF was found to be the most robust of the four models since it was able to resolve PM2.5 mass below 2 μg m-3, predict PM2.5 mass on all 45 days and utilise an unambiguous woodsmoke chemical tracer. The median woodsmoke relative contributions to PM2.5 estimated using PMC, APCS, CMB and PMF were found to be 0.08, 0.09, 3.59 and 0.14 μg m-3 respectively. The contribution predicted by the CMB model seemed to be clearly too high based on other observations. The use of levoglucosan as a tracer for woodsmoke was found to be vital for identifying this source.