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Sample records for minimum inhibitory concentrations

  1. Minimum inhibitory concentration distribution in environmental Legionella spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Sandalakis, Vassilios; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2014-12-01

    In Greece standard tests are performed in the watering and cooling systems of hotels' units either as part of the surveillance scheme or following human infection. The purpose of this study was to establish the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of environmental Legionella isolates for six antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of Legionella infections, by MIC-test methodology. Water samples were collected from 2004 to 2011 from 124 hotels from the four prefectures of Crete (Greece). Sixty-eight (68) Legionella isolates, comprising L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, 13, 15, L. anisa, L. rubrilucens, L. maceachernii, L. quinlivanii, L. oakridgensis, and L. taurinensis, were included in the study. MIC-tests were performed on buffered charcoal yeast extract with ?-ketoglutarate, L-cysteine, and ferric pyrophosphate. The MICs were read after 2 days of incubation at 36 ± 1 °C at 2.5% CO2. A large distribution in MICs was recorded for each species and each antibiotic tested. Rifampicin proved to be the most potent antibiotic regardless of the Legionella spp.; tetracycline appeared to have the least activity on our environmental isolates. The MIC-test approach is an easy, although not so cost-effective, way to determine MICs in Legionella spp. These data should be kept in mind especially since these Legionella species may cause human disease. PMID:25473976

  2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of medicinal plants used in Northern Peru as antibacterial remedies

    PubMed Central

    Malca-García, G.; Glenn, A.; Sharon, D.; Chait, G.; Díaz, D.; Pourmand, K.; Jonat, B.; Somogy, S.; Guardado, G.; Aguirre, C.; Chan, R.; Meyer, K.; Kuhlman, A.; Townesmith, A.; Effio-Carbajal, J.; Frías-Fernandez, F.; Benito, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim The plant species reported here are traditionally used in Northern Peru to treat bacterial infections, often addressed by the local healers as “inflammation”. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of their antibacterial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and methods The antimicrobial activity of ethanolic and water extracts of 141 plant species was determined using a deep-well broth microdilution method on commercially available bacterial strains. Results The ethanolic extracts of 51 species inhibited Escherichia coli, and 114 ethanolic extracts inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, only 30 aqueous extracts showed activity against E. coli and 38 extracts against S. aureus. The MIC concentrations were mostly very high and ranged from 0.008 to 256mg/ml, with only 36 species showing inhibitory concentrations of <4mg/ml. The ethanolic extracts exhibited stronger activity and a much broader spectrum of action than the aqueous extracts. Hypericum laricifolium, Hura crepitans, Caesalpinia paipai, Cassia fistula, Hyptis sidifolia, Salvia sp., Banisteriopsis caapi, Miconia salicifolia and Polygonum hydropiperoides showed the lowest MIC values and would be interesting candidates for future research. Conclusions The presence of antibacterial activity could be confirmed in most species used in traditional medicine in Peru which were assayed in this study. However, the MIC for the species employed showed a very large range, and were mostly very high. Nevertheless, traditional knowledge might provide some leads to elucidate potential candidates for future development of new antibiotic agents. PMID:20678568

  3. Medium effects on minimum inhibitory concentrations of nylon-3 polymers against E. coli.

    PubMed

    Choi, Heejun; Chakraborty, Saswata; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H; Weisshaar, James C

    2014-01-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against E. coli were measured for three nylon-3 polymers using Luria-Bertani broth (LB), brain-heart infusion broth (BHI), and a chemically defined complete medium (EZRDM). The polymers differ in the ratio of hydrophobic to cationic subunits. The cationic homopolymer is inert against E. coli in BHI and LB, but becomes highly potent in EZRDM. A mixed hydrophobic/cationic polymer with a hydrophobic t-butylbenzoyl group at its N-terminus is effective in BHI, but becomes more effective in EZRDM. Supplementation of EZRDM with the tryptic digest of casein (often found in LB) recapitulates the LB and BHI behavior. Additional evidence suggests that polyanionic peptides present in LB and BHI may form electrostatic complexes with cationic polymers, decreasing activity by diminishing binding to the anionic lipopolysaccharide layer of E. coli. In contrast, two natural antimicrobial peptides show no medium effects. Thus, the use of a chemically defined medium helps to reveal factors that influence antimicrobial potency of cationic polymers and functional differences between these polymers and evolved antimicrobial peptides. PMID:25153714

  4. Epidemiology and Prognosis of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Endocarditis: Impact of Vancomycin Minimum Inhibitory Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Ximena; Armero, Yolanda; Soy, Dolors; Almela, Manel; Ninot, Salvador; Falces, Carlos; Mestres, Carlos A.; Gatell, Jose M.; Moreno, Asuncion; Marco, Francesc; Miró, José M.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes coagulase-negative staphylococcal (CoNS) infective endocarditis (IE) epidemiology at our institution, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, and the influence of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on patient outcomes. One hundred and three adults with definite IE admitted to an 850-bed tertiary care hospital in Barcelona from 1995-2008 were prospectively included in the cohort. We observed that CoNS IE was an important cause of community-acquired and healthcare-associated IE; one-third of patients involved native valves. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequent species, methicillin-resistant in 52% of patients. CoNS frozen isolates were available in 88 patients. Vancomycin MICs of 2.0 ?g/mL were common; almost all cases were found among S. epidermidis isolates and did not increase over time. Eighty-five patients were treated either with cloxacillin or vancomycin: 38 patients (Group 1) were treated with cloxacillin, and 47 received vancomycin; of these 47, 27 had CoNS isolates with a vancomycin MIC <2.0 ?g/mL (Group 2), 20 had isolates with a vancomycin MIC ?2.0 ?g/mL (Group 3). One-year mortality was 21%, 48%, and 65% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P=0.003). After adjusting for confounders and taking Group 2 as a reference, methicillin-susceptibility was associated with lower 1-year mortality (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.02-0.55), and vancomycin MIC ?2.0 ?g/mL showed a trend to higher 1-year mortality (OR 3.7, 95% CI 0.9-15.2; P=0.069). Other independent variables associated with 1-year mortality were heart failure (OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5-25.2) and pacemaker lead IE (OR 0.1, 95%CI 0.02-0.51). In conclusion, methicillin-resistant S.epidermidis was the leading cause of CoNS IE, and patients receiving vancomycin had higher mortality rates than those receiving cloxacillin; mortality was higher among patients having isolates with vancomycin MICs ?2.0 ?g/mL. PMID:25961578

  5. The effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin concentrations on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Trevino-Dopatka, Sonia; Maggart, Michael J; Boisen, Nadia; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  6. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Allison, David Post

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhoea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  7. Influence of different susceptibility testing methods and media on determination of the relevant fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentrations for heavy trailing Candida isolates with low-high phenotype.

    PubMed

    Alp, Sehnaz; Sancak, Banu; Hascelik, Gulsen; Arikan, Sevtap

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the incidence of trailing growth with fluconazole in 101 clinical Candida isolates (49 C. albicans and 52 C. tropicalis) and tried to establish the convenient susceptibility testing method and medium for fluconazole minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) determination. MICs were determined by CLSI M27-A2 broth microdilution (BMD) and Etest methods on RPMI-1640 agar supplemented with 2% glucose (RPG) and on Mueller-Hinton agar supplemented with 2% glucose and 0.5 ?g ml(-1) methylene blue (GMB). BMD and Etest MICs were read at 24 and 48 h, and susceptibility categories were compared. All isolates were determined as susceptible with BMD, Etest-RPG and Etest-GMB at 24 h. While all isolates were interpreted as susceptible at 48 h on Etest-RPG and Etest-GMB, one C. albicans isolate was interpreted as susceptible-dose dependent (S-DD) and two C. tropicalis isolates were interpreted as resistant with BMD. On Etest-RPG, trailing growth caused widespread microcolonies within the inhibition zone and resulted in confusion in MIC determination. On Etest-GMB, because of the nearly absence of microcolonies within the zone of inhibition, MICs were evaluated more easily. We conclude that, for the determination of fluconazole MICs of trailing Candida isolates, the Etest method has an advantage over BMD and can be used along with this reference method. Moreover, GMB appears more beneficial than RPG for the fluconazole Etest. PMID:19563491

  8. The impact of serum vancomycin levels and minimum inhibitory concentrations of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus on mortality in patients with nosocomial pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Machado, Denise Pires; Goldani, Luciano Z; Paiva, Rodrigo Minuto; Aquino, Valério Rodrigues; de-Paris, Fernanda; Lisboa, Thiago; Jung, Bruno; dos Santos, Rodrigo Pires

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Vancomycin is the treatment of choice for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections; however, treatment failure is not uncommon, even when the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the MRSA strain is within the susceptible range for vancomycin. OBJECTIVE: To describe the relationship between molecular markers such as the mecA and agrII genes, serum vancomycin levels and vancomycin MICs, and the 30-day mortality rate of patients with nosocomial MRSA pneumonia in an intensive care unit (ICU). METHODS: The present study was a prospective cohort study including all patients with MRSA hospital-acquired pneumonia or ventilator-associated pneumonia who were admitted to the ICU of a tertiary care hospital between June 2009 and December 2011. The MIC for vancomycin was determined using the E-test and broth microdilution methods. Variables analyzed included age, sex, comorbid conditions, serum vancomycin trough concentration, the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE) score and the presence of the agrII gene. The primary outcome was mortality at 30 days. RESULTS: Thirty-six (42.4%) patients died within 30 days of the index MRSA culture. A multiple regression analysis that included the variables of MIC (determined using the E-test or broth microdilution methods), APACHE II score, serum vancomycin level and the presence of agrII revealed that only the APACHE II score was related to the 30-day mortality rate (P=0.03). Seven patients (9.0%) with isolates exhibiting an MIC ?1.5 ?g/mL according to the E-test method died, and nine patients (11.6%) survived (P=0.76). Of the patients for whom MICs were determined using the broth microdilution method, 11 (14.1%) patients with MICs of 1.0 ?g/mL died, and 16 (20.5%) survived (P=0.92). The median APACHE II score of survivors was 22.5, and the median score of nonsurvivors was 25.0 (P=0.03). The presence of the agrII gene was not related to the 30-day mortality rate. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with severe hospital-acquired pneumonia presented with MRSA isolates with low to intermediate vancomycin MICs in the ICU setting. At the Hospital de Clínicas de Porto Alegre (Porto Alegre, Brazil), the 30-day mortality rate was high, and was similar among patients with severe hospital-acquired pneumonia infected with MRSA isolates that exhibited MICs of ?1.5 ?g/mL determined using the E-test method and ?1.0 ?g/mL determined using the broth microdilution method in those who achieved optimal serum vancomycin levels. The APACHE II scores which provides an overall estimate of ICU mortality were independently associated with mortality in the present study, regardless of the MICs determined. Molecular markers, such as the agrII gene, were not associated with higher mortality in the present study. PMID:24421835

  9. Vancomycin versus daptomycin for the treatment of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia due to isolates with high vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations: study protocol for a phase IIB randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin is the standard first-line treatment for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteremia. However, recent consensus guidelines recommend that clinicians consider using alternative agents such as daptomycin when the vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration is greater than 1 ug/ml. To date however, there have been no head-to-head randomized trials comparing the safety and efficacy of daptomycin and vancomycin in the treatment of such infections. The primary aim of our study is to compare the efficacy of daptomycin versus vancomycin in the treatment of bloodstream infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with high vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations (greater than or equal to 1.5 ug/ml) in terms of reducing all-cause 60-day mortality. Methods/Design The study is designed as a multicenter prospective open label phase IIB pilot randomized controlled trial. Eligible participants will be inpatients over 21-years-old with a positive blood culture for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus with vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration of greater than or equal to 1.5ug/ml. Randomization into intervention or active control arms will be performed with a 1:1 allocation ratio. We aim to recruit 50 participants over a period of two years. Participants randomized to the active control arm will receive vancomycin dose-while those randomized to the intervention arm will receive daptomycin. Participants will receive a minimum of 14 days study treatment. The primary analysis will be conducted on the intention-to-treat principle. The Fisher’s exact test will be used to compare the 60-day mortality rate from index blood cultures (primary endpoint) between the two treatment arms, and the exact two-sided 95% confidence interval will be calculated using the Clopper and Pearson method. Primary analysis will be conducted using a two sided alpha of 0.05. Discussion If results from this pilot study suggest that daptomycin shows significant efficacy in the treatment of bloodstream infections due to methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus isolates with high vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentrations, we aim to proceed with a larger scale confirmatory study. This would help guide clinicians and inform practice guidelines on the optimal treatment for such infections. Trial registration The trial is listed on clinicaltrials.gov (NCT01975662, date of registration: 29 October 2013). PMID:24943129

  10. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine ?-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine ?-naphthylamide (PA?N). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PA?N reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing nosocomial infections. PMID:26568800

  11. Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R.; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K.

    1999-05-01

    A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

  12. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum concentration by security issue. 27.204 Section 27.204 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Chemical Facility Security Program § 27.204 Minimum concentration by security issue. (a) Release...

  13. Minimal inhibitory concentration drift of glycopeptides and linezolid against S. Aureus at a Chinese children's center, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chun-Mei; Xie, Wei; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Cai

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the drift in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of glycopeptides and linezolid against 793 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 4696 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from Chinese children. For vancomycin and teicoplanin, no significant change occurred in different years for MIC values ? 2 ?g/mL, either in MRSA or MSSA. For linezolid, there was an MIC drift in MRSA and in MSSA. PMID:25741804

  14. Spacecraft Minimum Allowable Concentrations: Determination, Application, and Contingency Situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is an outline of a presentation about the determination of minimum allowable concentrations in spacecraft. The presentation reviews the type of toxins and mechanisms to determine the acceptable concentrations of these toxic substances. The considerations for the unique situation that spaceflight entails including zero gravity, and the intense scrutiny are reviewed. The current measurement hardware is reviewed. The spacecraft atmospheres on the Shuttle, airflow, the Space Station and the EMU in respect to airflow, pressure, constituents are also summarized. Contingency situations and potential hazards are also discussed.

  15. Determination of MICING: a new assay for assessing minimal inhibitory concentration for invasive growth.

    PubMed

    Zupan, J; Tomi?i?, Z; Raspor, P

    2015-05-01

    Our work was focused on a new assay for characterising clinically important yeast. This assay was developed due to the need for new diagnostic methods for recognising potentially virulent strains of increasingly important non-albicans yeast pathogens, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida glabrata. With the great diversity among strains for virulence and virulence factors, identification to the species level is not sufficient; therefore, testing for specific virulent traits remains the best option. We show here that the proposed assay uncovers the relationships between the three most important yeast virulence traits in a single test: the ability of a strain to invade solid medium, while resisting the presence of an antimycotic and high temperature (37 °C). We combined the quantitative agar invasion assay with classical antimycotic susceptibility testing into a single assay. Similarly to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value, we defined the MICING (minimal inhibitory concentration of antimycotic for invasive growth) as the concentration of an antimycotic above which the yeast invasive growth is significantly repressed. In this study, we tested three of the most common antimycotics: fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B. The response of yeast strains invasion was characteristic of each antimycotic, indicating their mechanisms of action. In addition to MICING, the assay provides quantitative information about the superficial and invasive growth, and also about the relative invasion, which helps in identifying clinically important yeast, such as azole-resistant and/or invasive strains of S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. PMID:25620781

  16. Production Responses of Channel Catfish to Minimum Daily Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations in Earthen Ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the minimum daily dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on production parameters of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus in earthen ponds. Fifteen one-acre ponds (5 ponds per treatment) were managed as High Oxygen (minimum DO concentrations aver...

  17. Effect of (Minimum) D.O. Concentration on Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have long known that increased aeration allows them feed more and grow more fish. However, since we still do not know how specific D.O. concentrations affect various production parameters, every farm has its own oxygen management plan, most based largely on keeping the fish alive over night....

  18. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefotaxime enhances the systemic colonization of Salmonella Typhimurium in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Silva, Cecilia A; Molina, Cristian F; Leiva, Lorenzo E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2015-10-01

    It has been proposed that sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics play a role in virulence modulation. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (hereafter S. Typhimurium) to colonize systemically BALB/c mice after exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of cefotaxime (CTX). In vivo competition assays showed a fivefold increase in systemic colonization of CTX-exposed bacteria when compared to untreated bacteria. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, we carried out a high-throughput genetic screen. A transposon library of S. Typhimurium mutants was subjected to negative selection in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX and genes related to anaerobic metabolism, biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids and other metabolites were identified as needed to survive in this condition. In addition, an impaired ability for oxygen consumption was observed when bacteria were cultured in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX. Altogether, our data indicate that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of CTX increases the systemic colonization of S. Typhimurium in BALB/c mice in part by the establishment of a fitness alteration conducive to anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26468132

  19. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefotaxime enhances the systemic colonization of Salmonella Typhimurium in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C.; Silva, Cecilia A.; Molina, Cristian F.; Leiva, Lorenzo E.; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics play a role in virulence modulation. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (hereafter S. Typhimurium) to colonize systemically BALB/c mice after exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of cefotaxime (CTX). In vivo competition assays showed a fivefold increase in systemic colonization of CTX-exposed bacteria when compared to untreated bacteria. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, we carried out a high-throughput genetic screen. A transposon library of S. Typhimurium mutants was subjected to negative selection in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX and genes related to anaerobic metabolism, biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids and other metabolites were identified as needed to survive in this condition. In addition, an impaired ability for oxygen consumption was observed when bacteria were cultured in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX. Altogether, our data indicate that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of CTX increases the systemic colonization of S. Typhimurium in BALB/c mice in part by the establishment of a fitness alteration conducive to anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26468132

  20. Predicting the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for Antimicrobial Peptides with Rana-Box Domain.

    PubMed

    Kozi?, Mara; Vuki?evi?, Damir; Simuni?, Juraj; Ron?evi?, Tomislav; Antcheva, Nikolinka; Tossi, Alessandro; Jureti?, Davor

    2015-10-26

    The global spreading of multidrug resistance has motivated the search for new antibiotic classes including different types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Computational methods for predicting activity in terms of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMPs can facilitate "in silico" design and reduce the cost of synthesis and testing. We have used an original method for separating training and test data sets, both of which contain the sequences and measured MIC values of non-homologous anuran peptides having the Rana-box disulfide motif at their C-terminus. Using a more flexible profiling methodology (sideways asymmetry moment, SAM) than the standard hydrophobic moment, we have developed a two-descriptor model to predict the bacteriostatic activity of Rana-box peptides against Gram-negative bacteria-the first multilinear quantitative structure-activity relationship model capable of predicting MIC values for AMPs of widely different lengths and low identity using such a small number of descriptors. Maximal values for SAMs, as defined and calculated in our method, furthermore offer new structural insight into how different segments of a peptide contribute to its bacteriostatic activity, and this work lays the foundations for the design of active artificial AMPs with this type of disulfide bridge. PMID:26332863

  1. Effect of cigarette smoke on human serum trypsin inhibitory capacity and antitrypsin concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Bone, R.C.; Louria, D.B.; Rayford, P.L.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of the effect of cigarette smoke on the serum trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) and antitrypsin content in 89 smokers compared with 37 nonsmokers revealed that cigarette smoking is associated with a significantly lower level of TIC. No alteration in serum antitrypsin content was found because of cigarette smoking. Further analysis of the data indicated a correlation between the magnitude of smoking and the reduction in serum TIC. The reduction of TIC in cigarette smokers is consistent with the recent findings of decreased alpha 1-antitrypsin activity in rat lung and the reduced elastase inhibitory capacity per mg of alpha 1-antitrypsin found in the serum of smokers. The decrease in TIC in the serum of smokers, in addition to the reported decrease in elastolytic activity, may be useful in explaining the pathogenesis of emphysema frequently found in smokers.

  2. Estimation of Serum-Free 50-Percent Inhibitory Concentrations for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Inhibitors Lopinavir and Ritonavir

    PubMed Central

    Hickman, Dean; Vasavanonda, Sudthida; Nequist, George; Colletti, Lynn; Kati, Warren M.; Bertz, Richard; Hsu, Ann; Kempf, Dale J.

    2004-01-01

    Using measured free fraction and 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) values for the human immunodeficiency virus protease inhibitors lopinavir (LPV) and ritonavir (RTV) in tissue culture media with various protein concentrations ranging from 5 to 50%, we estimated serum-free IC50 values for each drug. The range of serum-free IC50 values (0.64 to 0.77 ng/ml for LPV and 3.0 to 5.0 ng/ml for RTV) did not exhibit a trend with increasing protein concentrations, despite a 10-fold difference in the free fraction value (0.006 to 0.063) for LPV and a 5-fold difference in the free fraction value (0.013 to 0.057) for RTV. The mean serum-free IC50 by the MTT-MT4 assay (0.69 ng/ml for LPV and 4.0 ng/ml for RTV) may be the most accurate parameter for the estimation of the inhibitory quotient (IQ), a relative measure of in vivo potency defined as the ratio of the minimal free drug concentration in plasma (Ctrough,free) for a specific patient population and the serum-free IC50. Using this approach, we calculated the average IQs for protease inhibitor-naïve patients for LPV and RTV to be 67 and 5.6, respectively. PMID:15273100

  3. Evaluation of the minimum iodine concentration for contrast-enhanced subtraction mammography.

    PubMed

    Baldelli, P; Bravin, A; Di Maggio, C; Gennaro, G; Sarnelli, A; Taibi, A; Gambaccini, M

    2006-09-01

    Early manifestation of breast cancer is often very subtle and is displayed in a complex and variable pattern of normal anatomy that may obscure the disease. The use of dual-energy techniques, that can remove the structural noise, and contrast media, that enhance the region surrounding the tumour, could help us to improve the detectability of the lesions. The aim of this work is to investigate the use of an iodine-based contrast medium in mammography with two different double exposure techniques: K-edge subtraction mammography and temporal subtraction mammography. Both techniques have been investigated by using an ideal source, like monochromatic beams produced at a synchrotron radiation facility and a clinical digital mammography system. A dedicated three-component phantom containing cavities filled with different iodine concentrations has been developed and used for measurements. For each technique, information about the minimum iodine concentration, which provides a significant enhancement of the detectability of the pathology by minimizing the risk due to high dose and high concentration of contrast medium, has been obtained. In particular, for cavities of 5 and 8 mm in diameter filled with iodine solutions, the minimum concentration needed to obtain a contrast-to-noise ratio of 5 with a mean glandular dose of 2 mGy has been calculated. The minimum concentrations estimated with monochromatic beams and K-edge subtraction mammography are 0.9 mg ml(-1) and 1.34 mg ml(-1) for the biggest and smallest details, respectively, while for temporal subtraction mammography they are 0.84 mg ml(-1) and 1.31 mg ml(-1). With the conventional clinical system the minimum concentrations for the K-edge subtraction mammography are 4.13 mg ml(-1) (8 mm diameter) and 5.75 mg ml(-1) (5 mm diameter), while for the temporal subtraction mammography they are 1.01 mg ml(-1) (8 mm diameter) and 1.57 mg ml(-1) (5 mm diameter). PMID:16912379

  4. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Li-Wu; Wu, Qiangen; Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg; Shi, Leming; LoSurdo, Jessica; Deng, Helen; Bauer, Steven; Fang, Jia-Long; Ning, Baitang

    2012-07-15

    Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (? 5.0 ?M TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (? 2.5 ?M TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 ?M range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ? TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ? 5.0 ?M. ? TCS at concentrations ? 2.5 ?M is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ? TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ? TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ? TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

  5. Antioxidant capacity and angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Carillon, Julie; Del Rio, Daniele; Teissèdre, Pierre-Louis; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacan, Dominique; Rouanet, Jean-Max

    2012-12-01

    Antioxidant capacity and angiotensin 1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase (SOD-MC) were investigated in vitro. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured by the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay (TEAC), the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay, and the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). The ability of the extract to scavenge three specific reactive oxygen species (superoxide radical anion (O(2)(-)), hydroxyl radical (HO()) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))) was also investigated in order to better evaluate its antioxidant properties. Even if the measures of TAC were relatively low, results clearly established an antioxidant potential of SOD-MC that exhibited the highest radical-scavenging activity towards O(2)(-), with a IC(50) 12-fold lower than that of H(2)O(2) or HO(). This lets hypothesis that the antioxidant potential of SOD-MC could be mainly due to its high level of SOD. Moreover, for the first time, an ACE inhibitory activity of SOD-MC (IC(50)=2.4±0.1mg/mL) was demonstrated, showing that its use as a functional food ingredient with potential preventive benefits in the context of hypertension may have important public health implications and should be carefully considered. PMID:22953857

  6. Inadequate vancomycin therapy in term and preterm neonates: a retrospective analysis of trough serum concentrations in relation to minimal inhibitory concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin is effective against gram-positive bacteria and the first-line antibiotic for treatment of proven coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections. The aim of this study is bipartite: first, to assess the percentage of therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations and second, to evaluate the adequacy of the therapeutic range in interrelationship with the observed MIC-values in neonates. Methods In this study, preterm and term neonates admitted at a tertiary NICU in the Netherlands from January 2009 to December 2012 and treated with vancomycin for a proven gram-positive infection were included. Trough serum concentrations were measured prior to administration of the 5th dose. Trough concentrations in the range of 10 to 15 mg/L were considered therapeutic. Staphylococcal species minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC’s) were determined using the E-test method. Species identification was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry. Results Of the 112 neonates, 53 neonates (47%) had sub-therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations of vancomycin, whereas 22% had supra-therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations. In all patients doses were adjusted on basis of the initial trough concentration. In 40% (23/57) of the neonates the second trough concentration remained sub-therapeutic. MIC’s were determined for 30 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates obtained from 19 patients. Only 4 out of 19 subjects had a trough concentration greater than tenfold the MIC. Conclusions Forty-seven percent of the neonates had sub-therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations of vancomycin. The MIC-data indicate that the percentages of underdosed patients may be greater. It may be advisable to increase the lower limit of the therapeutic range for European neonates. PMID:25066951

  7. Optogenetic evidence for inhibitory signalling from orexin to melanin-concentrating-hormone neurons via local microcircuits

    E-print Network

    Apergis-Schoute, John; Iordanidou, Panagiota; Faure, Cedric; Jego, Sonia; Schöne, Cornelia; Aitta-Aho, Teemu; Adamantidis, Antoine; Burdakov, Denis

    2015-04-08

    The lateral hypothalamus (LH) is a key regulator of multiple vital behaviors. The firing of brain-wide-projecting LH neurons releases neuropeptides promoting wakefulness (orexin/hypocretin; OH), or sleep (melanin-concentrating hormone; MCH). OH...

  8. Calculation of Minimum-Detectable-Concentration Levels of Radioxenon Isotopes Using the PNNL ARSA System

    SciTech Connect

    McIntyre, Justin I.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Reeder, Paul L.

    2006-03-11

    Measurement of xenon fission product isotopes is a key element in the global network being established to monitor the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. The automated Radio-xenon Analyzer/Sampler (ARSA), built by Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, can detect 131mXe, 133mXe, 133Xe, and 135Xe via a beta-gamma counting system. Due to the variable background and sources of these four radio-xenon isotopes, it is important to have as sensitive a detection system as possible and to quantify the Minimum-Detectable-Concentrations (MDC) that such a system will be able to detect to preclude false negative and false positive results. From data obtained from IAR in Germany MDC values for 133Xe were well below the 1 mBq/SCMA as required by the PTS for the Comprehensive Test BAn Treaty [WGB TL-11,1999].

  9. Evaluation of minimal inhibitory concentration of two new materials using tube dilution method: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Geeta S.; Kulkarni, Raghavendra D.; Naik, Balaram D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of two new materials MTA Plus and Biodentine with ProRoot MTA using tube dilution method. Materials and Methods: The materials used were ProRoot MTA (Dentsply), MTA Plus (compounded by Prevest Denpro, Jammu, India for Avalon Biomed Inc, USA) and a calcium silicate based material Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses, France). Doubling dilutions of the material were prepared in Sabouraud's dextrose broth (SDB) and Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth for Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis, respectively. The minimal concentration at which inhibition of microorganism occurred was measured and noted as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the material. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the materials against C. albicans. Biodentine was statistically significant than MTA Plus against E. faecalis (P-value-0.022). ProRoot MTA was statistically significant at different time intervals against E. faecalis (P-value-0.001). Conclusion: ProRoot MTA and Biodentine proved to have antimicrobial property. MTA Plusproved as a good antifungal agent. PMID:25829698

  10. Role of PBPD1 in Stimulation of Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation by Subminimal Inhibitory ?-Lactam Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Uyen T.; Harvey, Hanjeong; Hogan, Andrew J.; Afonso, Alexandria C. F.; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Disinfectant-tolerant Listeria monocytogenes biofilms can colonize surfaces that come into contact with food, leading to contamination and, potentially, food-borne illnesses. To better understand the process of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation and dispersal, we screened 1,120 off-patent FDA-approved drugs and identified several that modulate Listeria biofilm development. Among the hits were more than 30 ?-lactam antibiotics, with effects ranging from inhibiting (?50%) to stimulating (?200%) biofilm formation compared to control. Most ?-lactams also dispersed a substantial proportion of established biofilms. This phenotype did not necessarily involve killing, as >50% dispersal could be achieved with concentrations as low as 1/20 of the MIC of some cephalosporins. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) profiling using a fluorescent penicillin analogue showed similar inhibition patterns for most ?-lactams, except that biofilm-stimulatory drugs did not bind PBPD1, a low-molecular-weight d,d-carboxypeptidase. Compared to the wild type, a pbpD1 mutant had an attenuated biofilm response to stimulatory ?-lactams. The cephalosporin-responsive CesRK two-component regulatory system, whose regulon includes PBPs, was not required for the response. The requirement for PBPD1 activity for ?-lactam stimulation of L. monocytogenes biofilms shows that the specific set of PBPs that are inactivated by a particular drug dictates whether a protective biofilm response is provoked. PMID:25136010

  11. Aspirin Half Maximal Inhibitory Concentration Value on Platelet Cyclooxygenase1 in Severe Type-2 Diabetes Mellitus is not Significantly Different from that of Healthy Individuals.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Yukio; Takano, Katsuhiro; Satoh, Kaneo; Aida, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Tetsuro; Ozaki, Yukio

    2014-09-01

    It is implicated that diabetic patients are more resistant to aspirin therapy than patients with other diseases or healthy individuals. We evaluated the inhibitory effects of aspirin on aggregation and the cyclooxygenase activity of platelets of 10 patients with severe type-2 diabetes mellitis (DM) and compared the results with those of healthy individuals. Although platelet aggregation had a tendency to be more resistant to aspirin with the DM group, there was no significant difference in half maximal inhibitory concentration 50 values of aspirin on the cyclooxygenase activity between the patients with DM and healthy individuals. Thus, the residual platelet aggregability uninhibited by aspirin appears to be independent of the cyclooxygenase activity. Since adenosine diphosphate (ADP) receptor blocking almost completely inhibited the residual platelet aggregability, it is suggested that hyperreactivity to ADP is more prevalent in patients with DM. PMID:23677911

  12. Assessment of Antioxidant and Phenolic Compound Concentrations as well as Xanthine Oxidase and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Properties of Different Extracts of Pleurotus citrinopileatus Fruiting Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nuhu; Yoon, Ki Nam; Lee, Kyung Rim; Kim, Hye Young; Shin, Pyung Gyun; Cheong, Jong Chun; Yoo, Young Bok; Shim, Mi Ja; Lee, Min Woong

    2011-01-01

    Cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases, thus establishing a significant role for antioxidants in maintaining human health. Acetone, methanol, and hot water extracts of Pleurotus citrinopileatus were evaluated for their antioxidant activities against ?-carotene-linoleic acid and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, reducing power, ferrous ion-chelating abilities, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. In addition, the tyrosinase inhibitory effects and phenolic compound contents of the extracts were also analyzed. Methanol and acetone extracts of P. citrinopileatus showed stronger inhibition of ?-carotene-linoleic acid compared to the hot water extract. Methanol extract (8 mg/mL) showed a significantly high reducing power of 2.92 compared to the other extracts. The hot water extract was more effective than the acetone and methanole extracts for scavenging DPPH radicals. The strongest chelating effect (92.72%) was obtained with 1.0 mg/mL of acetone extract. High performance liquid chromatography analysis detected eight phenolic compounds, including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, naringenin, hesperetin, formononetin, and biochanin-A, in an acetonitrile and hydrochloric acid (5 : 1) solvent extract. Xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of the acetone, methanol, and hot water extracts increased with increasing concentration. This study suggests that fruiting bodies of P. citrinopileatus can potentially be used as a readily accessible source of natural antioxidants. PMID:22783067

  13. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 ?g/ml of tobramycin and 25 ?g/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed. PMID:25841054

  14. The physiological concentration of ferrous iron (II) alters the inhibitory effect of hydrogen peroxide on CD45, LAR and PTP1B phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Gorska, Magdalena; Jaremko, Lukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wozniak, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important regulator of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity via reversible oxidation. However, the role of iron in this reaction has not been yet elucidated. Here we compare the influence of hydrogen peroxide and the ferrous iron (reagent for Fenton reaction) on the enzymatic activity of recombinant CD45, LAR, PTP1B phosphatases and cellular CD45 in Jurkat cells. The obtained results show that ferrous iron (II) is potent inhibitor of CD45, LAR and PTP1B, but the inhibitory effect is concentration dependent. We found that the higher concentrations of ferrous iron (II) increase the inactivation of CD45, LAR and PTP1B phosphatase caused by hydrogen peroxide, but the addition of the physiological concentration (500 nM) of ferrous iron (II) has even a slightly preventive effect on the phosphatase activity against hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26407665

  15. A New Freeze Concentration Process for Minimum Effluent Process in Bleached Pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Ru-Ying; Botsaris, Gregory D.

    2001-03-06

    This project researches freeze concentration as a primary volume reduction technology for bleaching plant effluents from paper-pulp mills before they are treated by expensive technologies, such as incineration, for the destruction of the adsorbable organic halogens. Previous laboratory studies show that freeze concentration has a greater than 99.5% purification efficiency for volatile, semivolatile, and nonprocess elements, or any other solute, thus producing pure ice that can be reused in the mill as water. The first section evaluates the anticipated regulatory and public pressures associated with implementing the technology; the remaining sections deal with the experimental results from a scaled-up freeze concentration process in a 100-liter pilot-plant at Tufts University. The results of laboratory scale experiments confirmed that the freeze concentration technology could be an efficient volume reduction technology for the above elements and for removing adsorbable organic hologens and or nonprocess elements from recycled water. They also provide the necessary data for designing and operating a larger pilot plant, and identify the technical problems encountered in the scale-up and the way they could be addressed in the larger scale plants. This project was originally planned to include the operation of a large pilot plant in the facilities of Swenson Process Equipment Inc., and a field test at a pulp mill, but the paper company withdrew its financial support for the field test. In place of a final economic evaluation after the field test, a preliminary evaluation based on the small pilot plant data predicts an economically reasonable freeze concentration process in the case of reduction of the bleaching-effluent flow to less than 5 m3/kkg pulp, a target anticipated in the near future.

  16. Inhibitory effect of high NH4(+)-N concentration on anaerobic biotreatment of fresh leachate from a municipal solid waste incineration plant.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhao; Dang, Yan; Li, Caihua; Sun, Dezhi

    2015-09-01

    Fresh leachate from municipal solid waste (MSW) incineration plants generally contains extremely high NH4(+)-N concentration which could inhibit the bioactivity of microorganisms. The inhibitory effect of high NH4(+)-N concentration on anaerobic biotreatment of fresh leachate from a MSW incineration plant in China has been investigated in this study. The inhibition processes was studied by both static tests and a laboratory-scale expanded granular sludge bed (EGSB) reactor. The specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of the microorganisms in anaerobic granular sludge was inhibited with the NH4(+)-N concentration increasing to 1000mg/L in static tests. As well the chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal efficiency and the methane yield decreased in the EGSB reactor, while the volatile fatty acids (VFAs) accumulated and extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) of the anaerobic granular sludge increased with NH4(+)-N concentration rising to 1000mg/L, without any rebounding during 30days of operation. Decreasing NH4(+)-N concentration to 500mg/L in influent, the COD removal efficiency recovered to about 85% after 26days. 1000mg/L of NH4(+)-N in leachate was suggested to be the inhibition threshold in EGSB reactor. High-throughput sequencing results showed little changes in microbial communities of the sludge for a high NH4(+)-N concentration, indicating that the survival of most microorganisms was not affected under such a condition. It inhibited the bioactivity of the microorganisms, resulting in decrease of the COD removal efficiency. PMID:26139135

  17. A growth inhibitory model with SO(x) influenced effective growth rate for estimation of algal biomass concentration under flue gas atmosphere.

    PubMed

    Ronda, Srinivasa Reddy; Kethineni, Chandrika; Parupudi, Lakshmi Chandrika Pavani; Thunuguntla, Venkata Bala Sai Chaitanya; Vemula, Sandeep; Settaluri, Vijaya Saradhi; Allu, Prasada Rao; Grande, Suresh Kumar; Sharma, Suraj; Kandala, Chari Venkatakrishna

    2014-01-01

    A theoretical model for the prediction of biomass concentration under rice husk flue gas emission has been developed. The growth inhibitory model (GIM) considers the CO2 mass transfer rate, the critical SOx concentration and its role in pH-based inter-conversion of bicarbonate. The calibration and subsequent validation of the growth profile of Nannochloropsis limnetica at 2% and 10% (v/v) CO2 showed that the predicted values were consistent with the measured values, with r(2) being 0.96 and 0.98, respectively, and p<0.001 in both cases. The constants used in the GIM for the prediction of biomass have been justified using sensitivity analysis. GIM applicability was defined as ±30% of the calibrated flow rate (3.0 L min(-1)). This growth model can be applied to predict algal growth in photo-bioreactors treated with flue gas in the generation of biomass feed stock for biofuel production. PMID:24300846

  18. Evaluation of AQUI-S(TM) (efficacy and minimum toxic concentration) as a fish anaesthetic/sedative for public aquaculture in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of efficacy and minimum toxic concentration of AQUI-S(TM), a fish anaesthetic/sedative, was determined in two size classes of six species of fish important to US public aquaculture (bluegill, channel catfish, lake trout, rainbow trout, walleye and yellow perch). In addition, efficacy and minimum toxic concentration were determined in juvenile-young adult (fish aged 1 year or older) rainbow trout acclimated to water at 7 ??C, 12 ??C and 17 ??C. Testing concentrations were based on determinations made with range-finding studies for both efficacy and minimum toxic concentration. Most of the tested juvenile-young adult fish species were induced in 3 min or less at a nominal AQUI-S(TM) concentration of 20 mg L-1. In juvenile-young adult fish, the minimum toxic concentration was at least 2.5 times the selected efficacious concentration. Three out of five species of fry-fingerlings (1.25-12.5 cm in length and < 1 year old) were induced in ??? 4.1 min at a nominal concentration of 20 mg L-1 AQUI-S(TM), with the other two species requiring nominal concentrations of 25 and 35 mg L-1 for similar times of induction. Recovery times were ??? 7.3 rain for all species in the two size classes. In fry-fingerlings, the minimum toxic concentration was at least 1.4 times the selected efficacious concentration. There appeared to be little relationship between size of fish and concentrations or times to induction, recovery times and minimum toxic concentration. The times required for induction and for recovery were increased in rainbow trout as the acclimation temperature was reduced.

  19. Impact of Synaptic Neurotransmitter Concentration Time Course on the Kinetics and Pharmacological Modulation of Inhibitory Synaptic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Barberis, Andrea; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2011-01-01

    The time course of synaptic currents is a crucial determinant of rapid signaling between neurons. Traditionally, the mechanisms underlying the shape of synaptic signals are classified as pre- and post-synaptic. Over the last two decades, an extensive body of evidence indicated that synaptic signals are critically shaped by the neurotransmitter time course which encompasses several phenomena including pre- and post-synaptic ones. The agonist transient depends on neurotransmitter release mechanisms, diffusion within the synaptic cleft, spill-over to the extra-synaptic space, uptake, and binding to post-synaptic receptors. Most estimates indicate that the neurotransmitter transient is very brief, lasting between one hundred up to several hundreds of microseconds, implying that post-synaptic activation is characterized by a high degree of non-equilibrium. Moreover, pharmacological studies provide evidence that the kinetics of agonist transient plays a crucial role in setting the susceptibility of synaptic currents to modulation by a variety of compounds of physiological or clinical relevance. More recently, the role of the neurotransmitter time course has been emphasized by studies carried out on brain slice models that revealed a striking, cell-dependent variability of synaptic agonist waveforms ranging from rapid pulses to slow volume transmission. In the present paper we review the advances on studies addressing the impact of synaptic neurotransmitter transient on kinetics and pharmacological modulation of synaptic currents at inhibitory synapses. PMID:21734864

  20. Nonlinear concentration gradients regulated by the width of channels for observation of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuta; Kamiya, Koki; Osaki, Toshihisa; Sasaki, Hirotaka; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-08-21

    This paper describes a simple microfluidic device that can generate nonlinear concentration gradients. We changed the "width" of channels that can drastically shorten the total microfluidic channel length and simplify the microfluidic network design rather than the "length" of channels. The logarithmic concentration gradients generated by the device were in good agreement with those obtained by simulation. Using this device, we evaluated a probable IC50 value of the ABC transporter proteins by the competitive transport assays at five different logarithmic concentrations. This probable IC50 value was in good agreement with an IC50 value (0.92 ?M) obtained at the diluted concentrations of seven points. PMID:26153566

  1. Optimization of Crystals of an Inhibitory Antibody of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) with Hydrogen Peroxide and Low Protein Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongdong; Shi, Xiaoli; Parry, Graham; Chen, Liqing; Callahan, Jennifer A.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-07-19

    Optimization of protein crystal formation is often a necessary step leading to diffraction-quality crystals to enable collection of a full X-ray data set. Typical protein crystal optimization involves screening different components, e.g., pH, precipitants, and additives of the precipitant solution. Here we present an example using an inhibitory antibody of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) where such procedures did not yield diffracting crystals. In contrast, it was the treatment of the protein with hydrogen peroxide incubation and the protein concentration reduction that were found to be key factors in obtaining diffracting crystals. Final crystals diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom}, and belong to orthorhombic P212121 space group with unit cell parameters a = 37.162 {angstrom}, b = 84.474 {angstrom}, c = 134.030 {angstrom}, and contain one molecule of Fab fragment of anti-uro kinase receptor antibody in the asymmetric unit.

  2. Spectroscopic Characterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens: Suppression using Sub-Inhibitory Concentrations of Bismuth Thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Badireddy, Appala R.; Korpol, Bhoom Reddy; Chellam, Shankararaman; Gassman, Paul L.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2008-10-21

    Free and capsular EPS produced by Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens were characterized in detail using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Total EPS production decreased upon treatment with sub-inhibitory concentrations of lipophilic bismuth thiols (bismuth dimercaptopropanol, BisBAL; bismuth ethanedithiol, BisEDT; and bismuth pyrithione, BisPYR), BisBAL being most effective. Bismuth thiols also influenced acetylation and carboxylation of polysaccharides in EPS from S. marcescens. Extensive homology between EPS samples in the presence and absence of bismuth was observed with proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids varying predominantly only in the total amount expressed. Second derivative analysis of the amide I region of FTIR spectra revealed decreases in protein secondary structures in the presence of bismuth thiols. Hence, anti-fouling properties of bismuth thiols appear to originate in their ability to suppress O-acetylation and protein secondary structures in addition to total EPS secretion.

  3. The anesthetic interaction of propofol and sevoflurane on the minimum alveolar concentration preventing motor movement (MACNM) in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Singsank-Coats, Jill; Seddighi, Reza; Rohrbach, Barton W.; Cox, Sherry K.; Egger, Christine M.; Doherty, Thomas J.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of propofol on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane needed to prevent motor movement (MACNM) in dogs subjected to a noxious stimulus using randomized crossover design. Six, healthy, adult beagles (9.2 ± 1.3 kg) were used. Dogs were anesthetized with sevoflurane on 3 occasions, at weekly intervals, and baseline MACNM (MACNM-B) was determined on each occasion. Propofol treatments were administered as loading dose (LD) and constant rate infusion (CRI) as follows: Treatment 1 (T1) was 2 mg/kg body weight (BW) and 4.5 mg/kg BW per hour; T2 was 4 mg/kg BW and 9 mg/kg BW per hour; T3 was 8 mg/kg BW and 18 mg/kg BW per hour, respectively. Treatment MACNM (MACNM-T) determination was initiated 60 min after the start of the CRI. Two venous blood samples were collected and combined at each MACNM-T determination for measurement of blood propofol concentration using high-performance liquid chromatography method (HPLC). Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA and are presented as least square means (LSM) ± standard error of means (SEM). Propofol infusions in the range of 4.5 to 18 mg/kg BW per hour resulted in mean blood concentrations between 1.3 and 4.4 ?g/mL, and decreased (P < 0.05) sevoflurane MACNM in a concentration-dependent manner. The percentage decrease in MACNM was 20.5%, 43.0%, and 68.3%, with corresponding blood propofol concentrations of 1.3 ± 0.3 ?g/mL, 2.5 ± 0.3 ?g/mL, and 4.4 ± 0.3 ?g/mL, for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. Venous blood propofol concentrations were strongly correlated (r = 0.855, P < 0.0001) with the decrease in MACNM. In dogs, propofol decreased the sevoflurane MACNM in a concentration-dependent manner. PMID:25852224

  4. Effects on indicators of tissue perfusion in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane at two multiples of the minimum alveolar concentration.

    PubMed

    Floriano, Beatriz P; Wagatsuma, Juliana T; Ferreira, Joana Z; Abimussi, Caio J X; Menegheti, Thais M; Santos, Paulo S P; Oliva, Valéria N L S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia administered at 2 multiples of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) on tissue perfusion in dogs. ANIMALS 8 healthy young adult Beagles. PROCEDURES A randomized crossover design was used. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane at 1.5 or 2.0 times the MAC for 2 hours, a 7-day washout period was provided, and dogs were reanesthetized with the alternate treatment. Various physiologic variables were monitored before anesthesia (baseline), at 20-minute intervals during anesthesia, and after anesthetic recovery. Variable values were compared between MAC multiples by means of repeated-measures ANOVA, with the Tukey test used for multiple comparisons. RESULTS During anesthesia, mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and mixed venous oxygen saturation were significantly greater when isoflurane was administered at 1.5 versus 2.0 times the MAC. Cardiac output gradually increased during anesthesia at 1.5 times but not at 2.0 times the MAC. Arterial blood lactate concentration did not differ between MAC multiples at any point; however, this concentration decreased with increasing anesthetic duration at both MAC multiples. Oxygen delivery differed between MAC multiples, and oxygen consumption differed from baseline during anesthesia at 2.0 times the MAC. Oxygen extraction was higher at 2.0 versus 1.5 times the MAC. Heart rate differed between MAC multiples only after anesthetic recovery. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Isoflurane anesthesia impaired tissue perfusion in dogs, but these changes would not be clinically relevant with oxygen delivery at 100%. Peripheral tissue perfusion was maintained or improved with time. PMID:26709933

  5. Lack of Sex Difference in Minimum Local Analgesic Concentration of Ropivacaine for Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Qingqing; Yang, Yanqing; Liu, Qin; Peng, Zhiyou; Feng, Zhiying

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex differences, which may be an important variable for determining anesthetic requirements, have not been well investigated in the aspect of local anesthetic. This investigation aimed to compare the minimum local analgesic concentration (MLAC) of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCB) between men and women. Material/Method Patients aged 18–45 years undergoing elective forearm, wrist, or hand surgeries under US-SCB were divided into 2 groups according to sex. The initial concentration was 0.375% ropivacaine 20 mL and the concentration for the next patient was determined by the up-down technique at 0.025% intervals. Success was defined as the absence of any pain in response to a pinprick in the region of all 4 terminal nerves and the skin incision within 45 min. The primary outcome was the MLAC of ropivacaine, which was estimated by the Dixon and Massey method. The analgesia duration, which was defined as the time from the end of the US-SCB injection to the time of feeling discomfort and need for additional analgesics, was observed for each patient. Results The MLAC of ropivacaine 20 mL for US-SCB was 0.2675% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.2512–0.2838%) in men and 0.2675% (95% CI, 0.2524–0.2826%) in women. There was no significant difference in MLAC or the analgesia duration between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions We found no significant sex-related differences in MLAC or analgesia duration of ropivacaine for US-SCB. PMID:26556653

  6. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, José A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muñoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% ± 0.04%, 0.99% ± 0.009%, 0.97% ± 0.02%, and 0.99% ± 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  7. Dissolved Trace Metal Concentrations over the Peru Shelf and in the Subsurface Oxygen Minimum Zone Off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C.; Bruland, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Peru coast is the site of one of the largest fisheries in the world, and home to some of the highest f-ratios ever recorded. As a result of this highly productive surface water, an intense subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) persists. Despite the import of the effect of OMZs due to their predicted increase with global warming, there is very little trace metal data from this region. Here we present dissolved trace metal data from the U.S. GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect over the Peru shelf and through the OMZ. Results suggest a sink of Pb, Cd, Sc, Cu and Ga in the suboxic region of the shelf, and a shelf source of Co and Fe. Trace metal concentrations within the OMZ will also be discussed. As many of these metals have not been analyzed in this region previously, this work can serve as a baseline for future comparison and adds to the understanding of global trace metal distributions.

  8. Proteomic analysis using an unfinished bacterial genome: the effects of subminimum inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics on Mannheimia haemolytica virulence factor expression.

    PubMed

    Nanduri, Bindu; Lawrence, Mark L; Vanguri, Sucharith; Pechan, Tibor; Burgess, Shane C

    2005-12-01

    Here we identify, using nonelectrophoretic proteomics, effects of subminimum inhibitory concentrations (subMIC) of two antibiotic preparations, chlortetracycline (CTC), and chlortetracycline-sulfamethazine (CTC + SMZ), on protein expression in the bovine respiratory pathogen Mannheimia haemolytica. The M. haemolytica genome is currently in draft form, and annotation is incomplete. Relying on the principle of gene sequence conservation across species, we used annotated genomes from closely related species to identify, confirm, and functionally annotate 495 M. haemolytica proteins. To conduct quantitative comparative proteomics, we developed a protein quantitation method based on the cross correlation function of the SEQUEST algorithm. When M. haemolytica was cultivated in the presence of 1/4 MIC of CTC and CTC + SMZ, expression of proteins involved in energy production, nucleotide metabolism, translation, and the bacterial stress response (chaperones) were affected. The most notable subMIC effect was a significant decrease in the expression of leukotoxin A, which is an important M. haemolytica virulence factor. Reduction in leukotoxin expression could be one of the molecular mechanisms responsible for the efficacy of these antibiotics against bovine respiratory disease. PMID:16247735

  9. A rapid real-time quantitative PCR assay to determine the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration of antibiotics against an intracellular Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Shifman, Ohad; Lazar, Shlomi; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular bacterium. The lack of a safe and efficient vaccine makes antibiotics the preferred treatment. F. tularensis antibiotic susceptibility tests are based on the in vitro standard CLSI-approved microdilution method for determining the MIC. However, limited data are available regarding the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration (MIEC) needed to eradicate intracellular bacteria. Here, we evaluated the MIEC values of various WHO-recommended antibiotics and compared the MIEC values to the established MICs. We describe a rapid 3-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) intracellular antibiogram assay, which yields comparable MIEC values to those obtained by the classical 72-h cfu assay. This rapid qPCR assay is highly advantageous in light of the slow growth rates of F. tularensis. Our results showed that the MIECs obtained for doxycycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin were indicative of intracellular activity. Gentamicin was not effective against intracellular bacteria for at least 32 h post treatment, raising the question of whether slow-penetrating gentamicin should be used for certain stages of the disease. We suggest that the qPCR intracellular antibiogram assay may be used to screen for potentially active antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis as well as to detect strains with acquired resistance to recommended antibiotics. PMID:26579112

  10. Inhibitory Effects of Cytosolic Ca2+ Concentration by Ginsenoside Ro Are Dependent on Phosphorylation of IP3RI and Dephosphorylation of ERK in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Shin, Jung-Hae; Lee, Dong-Ha; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is platelet aggregation-inducing molecule and is involved in activation of aggregation associated molecules. This study was carried out to understand the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of ginsenoside Ro (G-Ro), an oleanane-type saponin in Panax ginseng. G-Ro, without affecting leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, dose-dependently inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration was approximately 155??M. G-Ro inhibited strongly thrombin-elevated [Ca2+]i, which was strongly increased by A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS compared to G-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cGMPS. G-Ro increased the level of cAMP and subsequently elevated the phosphorylation of inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor I (IP3RI) (Ser1756) to inhibit [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Phosphorylation of IP3RI (Ser1756) by G-Ro was decreased by PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. In addition, G-Ro inhibited thrombin-induced phosphorylation of ERK 2 (42?kDa), indicating inhibition of Ca2+ influx across plasma membrane. We demonstrate that G-Ro upregulates cAMP-dependent IP3RI (Ser1756) phosphorylation and downregulates phosphorylation of ERK 2 (42?kDa) to decrease thrombin-elevated [Ca2+]i, which contributes to inhibition of ATP and serotonin release, and p-selectin expression. These results indicate that G-Ro in Panax ginseng is a beneficial novel Ca2+-antagonistic compound and may prevent platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease. PMID:26355658

  11. Inhibitory Effect of Dried Pomegranate Concentration Powder on Melanogenesis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells; Involvement of p38 and PKA Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Song, Chang Hyun; Lee, Young Joon; Ku, Sae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Plants rich in antioxidant substances may be useful for preventing skin aging. Pomegranates, containing flavonoids and other polyphenolic compounds, are widely consumed due to their beneficial properties. We examined the underlying mechanisms of dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. The antioxidant effects of PCP were determined by measuring free radical scavenging capacity and transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes. To explore the inhibitory effects of PCP on melanin synthesis, we measured tyrosinase activity and melanin content in ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone (?-MSH)-stimulated B16F10 cells. In addition, the levels of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, tyrosinase, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression were determined by Western blotting. Changes in the phosphorylation status of protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), serine/threonine kinase Akt, and glycogen kinase 3? (GSK3?) were also examined. The free radical scavenging activity of PCP increased in a dose-dependent manner. In PCP-treated B16F10 cells, transcript levels of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) were increased compared with ?-MSH-stimulated cells. In addition, PCP led to the down-regulation of phospho-p38, phospho-PKA, phospho-CREB, phospho-GSK3?, MITF, and TRP-1 compared with ?-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. We believe this effect may be associated with PCP activity, which leads to the inhibition of melanin production and tyrosinase activity. These results suggest that PCP decreases tyrosinase activity and melanin production via inactivation of the p38 and PKA signaling pathways, and subsequently decreases phosphorylation of CREB, MITF, and melanogenic enzymes. These observations provided new insights on the molecular mechanisms of the skin-whitening property of PCP. PMID:26473849

  12. Inhibitory Effect of Dried Pomegranate Concentration Powder on Melanogenesis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells; Involvement of p38 and PKA Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Song, Chang Hyun; Lee, Young Joon; Ku, Sae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Plants rich in antioxidant substances may be useful for preventing skin aging. Pomegranates, containing flavonoids and other polyphenolic compounds, are widely consumed due to their beneficial properties. We examined the underlying mechanisms of dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. The antioxidant effects of PCP were determined by measuring free radical scavenging capacity and transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes. To explore the inhibitory effects of PCP on melanin synthesis, we measured tyrosinase activity and melanin content in ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone (?-MSH)-stimulated B16F10 cells. In addition, the levels of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, tyrosinase, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression were determined by Western blotting. Changes in the phosphorylation status of protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), serine/threonine kinase Akt, and glycogen kinase 3? (GSK3?) were also examined. The free radical scavenging activity of PCP increased in a dose-dependent manner. In PCP-treated B16F10 cells, transcript levels of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) were increased compared with ?-MSH-stimulated cells. In addition, PCP led to the down-regulation of phospho-p38, phospho-PKA, phospho-CREB, phospho-GSK3?, MITF, and TRP-1 compared with ?-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. We believe this effect may be associated with PCP activity, which leads to the inhibition of melanin production and tyrosinase activity. These results suggest that PCP decreases tyrosinase activity and melanin production via inactivation of the p38 and PKA signaling pathways, and subsequently decreases phosphorylation of CREB, MITF, and melanogenic enzymes. These observations provided new insights on the molecular mechanisms of the skin-whitening property of PCP. PMID:26473849

  13. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  14. On the mimimum length of leader channel and the minimum volume of space charge concentration necessary to initiate lightning flashes in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    2015-12-01

    Minimum length to which a leader channel has to grow before it can propagate continuously as a stable leader as a function of the background electric field inside a thundercloud is estimated. For electric field magnitudes comparable to the values measured inside thunderclouds, the minimum length of the leader channel that is required for it to propagate continuously is about 3-5 m. In other words, a leader discharge that originated inside a thundercloud has to grow to a length of 3-5 m before it can culminate in a stable and continuously propagating leader discharge that can give rise to a lightning flash. The minimum size of charge concentrations that can make this event possible have radii in the range of 2-4 m and should carry about 300-900 ?C of electric charge, respectively. This in turn shows that the high field regions inside the cloud where electrical discharges that can culminate in stable leader discharges, and hence in lightning discharges, may be confined to volumes which are no larger than a few meters in radius.

  15. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  16. The interaction of nitrous oxide and fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane blocking motor movement (MACNM) in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J.; Kukanich, Butch; Egger, Christine M.; Henn, Melissa A.; Long, Whitney M.; Rohrbach, Barton W.

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and fentanyl on the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane necessary to prevent movement (MACNM) in response to noxious stimulation in dogs. Six healthy, adult, intact male, mixed-breed dogs were used on 3 occasions in a randomized crossover design. After induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, each of the following treatments was randomly administered: fentanyl loading dose (Ld) of 15 ?g/kg and infusion of 6 ?g/kg per hour [treatment 1 (T1)], 70% N2O (T2), or fentanyl (Ld of 15 ?g/kg and infusion of 6 ?g/kg per hour) combined with 70% N2O (T3). Each dog received each of the 3 treatments once during the 3-week period. Determination of MACNM was initiated 90 min after the start of each treatment. The values were compared using the baseline MACNM, which had been determined in a previous study on the same group of dogs. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer tests, and expressed as least squares mean ± SEM. The baseline MACNM decreased by 36.6 ± 4.0%, 15.0 ± 4.0%, and 46.0 ± 4.0% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P < 0.05), and differed (P < 0.05) among treatments. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations did not differ (P ? 0.05) between T1 (3.70 ± 0.56 ng/mL) and T3 (3.50 ± 0.56 ng/mL). The combination of fentanyl and N2O resulted in a greater sevoflurane MACNM sparing effect than either treatment alone. PMID:24982551

  17. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells.

    PubMed

    Flaskos, J; Nikolaidis, E; Harris, W; Sachana, M; Hargreaves, A J

    2011-11-01

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 ?M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 ?M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH. PMID:21704052

  18. Elevated Serum Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor (MIF) Concentrations in Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) Are Associated with Markers of Oxidative Stress and Endothelial Activation

    PubMed Central

    Bruchfeld, Annette; Carrero, Juan J; Qureshi, Abdul R; Lindholm, Bengt; Barany, Peter; Heimburger, Olof; Hu, Maowen; Lin, Xinchun; Stenvinkel, Peter; Miller, Edmund J

    2009-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease (CKD) carries an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD). Macrophage migration inhibiting factor (MIF) is a proinflammatory cytokine implicated in the pathogenesis of sepsis, autoimmune disease, atherogenesis, and plaque instability, and is a known cardiac depressant. This post-hoc, cross-sectional study examined whether MIF serum concentrations are elevated in CKD patients. Our study included CKD 3–5 patients with moderate to severe renal dysfunction (n = 257) (mean age SD; 55 ± 12 years) and 53 controls (60 ± 12 years). Serum MIF concentrations, measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were studied in relation to glomerular filtration rate (GFR), presence of CVD, outcome and inflammatory and oxidative stress markers. MIF was significantly elevated in CKD patients compared with controls (CKD: median 676 [range 118–8275 pg/mL] controls: 433 [142–4707] pg/mL; P = 0.008). MIF was also associated with 8-hydroxy-2-deoxyguanosine (8-OH-dG) levels (rho = 0.26; P = 0.001), a marker of oxidative stress, and ICAM-1 levels (rho = 0.14; P = 0.02), a marker of endothelial activation. However, the elevated MIF concentrations were neither correlated with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) nor inflammatory markers such as CRP, IL-6, and TNF. When combining MIF and IL-6 as a marker of inflammation, a significant increase in risk for CVD was found, but when analyzing all-cause mortality, this did not differ significantly with regard to mortality from inflamed patients with low MIF levels. The data suggest that increased serum MIF levels found in CKD is not caused primarily by poor renal function, but is associated with markers of oxidative stress and endothelial activation and may play a role in vascular disease associated with CKD. PMID:19081768

  19. Comparison of equi-minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane on bispectral index values during both wash in and wash out phases: A prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Shri, Iti; Sakia, Prashant; Govil, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: At equal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), volatile agents may produce different bispectral index (BIS) values especially at low BIS levels when the effect is volatile agent specific. The present study was performed to compare the BIS values produced by sevoflurane and isoflurane at equal MAC and thereby assessing which is a better hypnotic agent. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologists I and II patients undergoing elective mastoidectomy were divided into groups receiving either isoflurane or sevoflurane, and at equi-MAC. BIS value was measured during both wash in and wash out phase, keeping other parameters same. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman two-way analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BIS value was significantly lower with sevoflurane at all MAC values as compared to isoflurane, except in the beginning and at MAC awake. However, both the drugs proved to be cardiostable. Conclusion: At equi-MAC sevoflurane produces lower BIS values during wash in as well as wash out phase as compared to isoflurane, reflecting probably an agent specific effect and a deficiency in BIS algorithm for certain agents and their interplay. PMID:25788739

  20. Anesthesia with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): Minimum Anesthetic Concentration, Physiological Effects, Hematocrit, Plasma Chemistry and Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, Fang-Tse; CHANG, Geng-Ruei; WANG, Hsien-Chi; HSU, Tien-Huan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 ± 0.30 and 2.03 ± 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO2 and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  1. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flaskos, J.; Nikolaidis, E.; Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-lethal levels of chlorpyrifos oxon inhibit neurite outgrowth in N2a cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylcholinesterase exhibits sustained inhibition throughout exposure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The levels of neurofilament heavy chain and GAP-43 protein are reduced Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurofilament heavy chain forms aggregates in cell bodies Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus at least two axon-associated cytoskeletal proteins are disrupted by this agent.

  2. Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) Concentration Modulates Embryonic

    E-print Network

    Zandstra, Peter W.

    - neering, cellular therapies or cell-mediated gene transfer, cell-based therapeutics have the potential transplantation (Emerson, 1996). Similarly, genetic manipulation of HSC may form the basis of treatment for a variety of diseases caused by single-gene defects (Zanjani and Anderson, 1999). Con- versely

  3. Antifungal properties and inhibitory effects upon aflatoxin production of Thymus vulgaris L. by Aspergillus flavus Link.

    PubMed

    Kohiyama, Cássia Yumie; Yamamoto Ribeiro, Milene Mayumi; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Bando, Erika; Bomfim, Natália da Silva; Nerilo, Samuel Botião; Rocha, Gustavo Henrique Oliveira; Grespan, Renata; Mikcha, Jane Martha Graton; Machinski, Miguel

    2015-04-15

    The antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic properties of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) were evaluated upon Aspergillus flavus "in vitro". Suspension containing 10(6) of A. flavus were cultivated with TEO in concentrations ranging from 50 to 500 ?g/mL. TEO reached minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) at 250 ?g/mL. Inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was detected at a concentration of 100 ?g/mL of TEO. Morphological evaluation performed by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that antifungal activity of TEO could be detected starting at a concentration of 50 ?g/mL and the fungicide effect at a concentration of 250 ?g/mL. TEO completely inhibited production of both B1 and B2 aflatoxins (AFB1 and AFB2) at a concentration of 150 ?g/mL. This way, fungal biomass development and aflatoxin production were dependent on TEO concentration. Therefore, TEO was capable of controlling the growth of A. flavus and its production of aflatoxins. PMID:25466118

  4. Nootropic dipeptide noopept enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Povarov, I S; Kondratenko, R V; Derevyagin, V I; Ostrovskaya, R U; Skrebitskii, V G

    2015-01-01

    Application of nootropic agent Noopept on hippocampal slices from Wistar rats enhanced the inhibitory component of total current induced by stimulation of Shaffer collaterals in CA1 pyramidal neurons, but did not affect the excitatory component. A direct correlation between the increase in the amplitude of inhibitory current and agent concentration was found. The substance did not affect the release of inhibitory transmitters from terminals in the pyramidal neurons, which indicated changes in GABAergic interneurons. PMID:25573367

  5. The inhibitory effect of Zingiber corallinum Hance essential oil on drug-resistant bacteria and evaluation of its acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ce; Zhou, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hai-Yan; Huang, Su-Na; Liu, Qing; Hu, Shi-Lin; Li, Ting-Rong; Chen, Yan-Bing; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The excessive and irregular use of antibiotics could result in the generation and diffusion of drug-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Zingiber corallinum Hance essential oil (ZCHO) on drug-resistant bacteria, especially on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Material/Methods Susceptibility testing was used to evaluate the effect of ZCHO on growth inhibition of drug-resistant bacteria by paper disk method. Mice orally administered with ZCHO were used to observe acute toxicity and to determine median lethal dose (LD50) of ZCHO. Broth dilution method was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ZCHO on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Results ZCHO exhibited an obvious inhibitory effect not only on gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter baumannii, but also on gram-positive drug-resistant bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The ZCHO containing 79% terpinen-4-ol revealed better bacteriostatic effect than ZCHO with 34% terpinen-4-ol. The LD50 of ZCHO was 1790.427 mg/kg. The MIC and MBC of ZCHO on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were 1457.81 mg/L. Conclusions ZCHO has obvious bacteriostasis and bactericidal effects, especially against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Therefore, ZCHO is a promising natural bioactive component with antibacterial effect and satisfactory safety due to its low toxicity. PMID:21525802

  6. Inhibitory Receptor of Platelets

    Cancer.gov

    The National Cancer Institute's Molecular Targets Laboratory is seeking statements of capability or interest from parties interested in collaborative research on a novel, inhibitory platelet surface protein known as TREM like Transcript (TLT-1). The collaborative research would be pre-clinical development of a potential therapeutic target for thrombosis and other platelet-associated disorders, as well as immune disorders.

  7. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  8. Marine-Derived Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activities Enhance the Antibacterial Efficacy of Tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Busetti, Alessandro; Shaw, George; Megaw, Julianne; Gorman, Sean P.; Maggs, Christine A.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs). Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (?63%) and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (?33%). KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (?89%) and a 2-log reduction (?99%) in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL). Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL) of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments. PMID:25546516

  9. Repulsive and inhibitory signals.

    PubMed

    Keynes, R J; Cook, G M

    1995-02-01

    Repulsive or inhibitory interactions between growth cones and their environment are now widely implicated in neural development and regeneration. Over the past year, descriptive studies of the various neuronal systems in which repulsion may participate have clarified its biology. Molecular and genetic studies have also provided the necessary entry point for further experimental manipulations, and are beginning to yield important clues regarding the function of repulsion in vivo. Although candidate second messengers underlying the growth cone response have been identified, they have yet to be incorporated into a comprehensive mechanism. PMID:7539649

  10. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  11. Inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle via inhibition of growth and histidine decarboxylase activity of Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Koth Bong Woo Ri; Cho, Ji Young; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2014-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle. First, antimicrobial activities of brown algae extracts against Morganella morganii were investigated using a disk diffusion method. An ethanol extract of Ecklonia cava (ECEE) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ECEE was 2 mg/ml. Furthermore, the brown algae extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit crude histidine decarboxylase (HDC) of M. morganii. The ethanol extract of Eisenia bicyclis (EBEE) and ECEE exhibited significant inhibitory activities (19.82% and 33.79%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. To obtain the phlorotannin dieckol, ECEE and EBEE were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel column chromatography, and HPLC. Dieckol exhibited substantial inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.61 mg/ml, and exhibited competitive inhibition. These extracts were also tested on mackerel muscle. The viable cell counts and histamine production in mackerel muscle inoculated with M. morganii treated with ?2.5 MIC of ECEE (weight basis) were highly inhibited compared with the untreated sample. Furthermore, treatment of crude HDC-inoculated mackerel muscle with 0.5% ECEE and 0.5% EBEE (weight basis), which exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against crude HDC, reduced the overall histamine production by 46.29% and 56.89%, respectively, compared with the untreated sample. Thus, these inhibitory effects of ECEE and EBEE should be helpful in enhancing the safety of mackerel by suppressing histamine production in this fish species. PMID:24394193

  12. Competition Through Selective Inhibitory Synchrony

    E-print Network

    Rutishauser, Ueli

    Models of cortical neuronal circuits commonly depend on inhibitory feedback to control gain, provide signal normalization, and selectively amplify signals using winner-take-all (WTA) dynamics. Such models generally assume ...

  13. Quinic acid esters from Pluchea indica with collagenase, MMP-2 and MMP-9 inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Ohtsuki, Takashi; Yokosawa, Emiko; Koyano, Takashi; Preeprame, Srisomporn; Kowithayakorn, Thaworn; Sakai, Shinobu; Toida, Toshihiko; Ishibashi, Masami

    2008-02-01

    Investigation of collagenase inhibitory natural components afforded two quinic acid esters (1 and 2) and quercetin (3) from the leaves of Pluchea indica (Compositae). Of these, compounds 1 and 2 exhibited collagenase inhibitory activity (IC(50)) at a concentration of less than 10 microm, and 1 showed matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and -9 inhibitory activity (IC(50)) at 2.5 and 6.4 microm, respectively. PMID:17726735

  14. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  15. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30…

  16. Inhibitory effects of ginseng seed on melanin biosynthesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Yeonmi; Kim, Kyoung-Tack; Kim, Sung Soo; Hur, Jinyoung; Ha, Sang Keun; Cho, Chang-Won; Choi, Sang Yoon

    2014-01-01

    Background: Ginseng root has been traditionally used for the treatment of many diseases in Korea. However, so far ginseng seed has been mostly unused and discarded. As part of our ongoing research on the ginseng seeds, the inhibitory effect of ginseng seeds on melanin production was verified to assess their potential as a skin depigmenting substance. Materials and Methods: The present study measured the inhibitory effect of ginseng seeds on melanin production through the tyrosinase inhibitory effect and analyzed their effects on melanin production in melan-a-cells. Results: Ethanol extract of ginseng seed was applied to melan-a-cells at a concentration of 100 ppm and melanin production was reduced by 35.1% without cytotoxicity. In addition, the ethanol extract of ginseng seed was shown to reduce tyrosinase activity. Conclusion: Because the results showed excellent melanin inhibitory activity compared with that obtained by arbutin, ethanol extracts of ginseng leaf and ginseng root at the same concentration, it can be concluded that ginseng seeds show great potential as a skin depigmenting substance. PMID:24991102

  17. The inhibitory activity of linalool against the filamentous growth and biofilm formation in Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Chih-Chieh; Lai, Wen-Lin; Chuang, Kuei-Chin; Lee, Meng-Hwan; Tsai, Ying-Chieh

    2013-07-01

    Candida spp. are part of the natural human microbiota, but they also represent important opportunistic human pathogens. Biofilm-associated Candida albicans infections are clinically relevant due to their high levels of resistance to traditional antifungal agents. In this study, we investigated the ability of linalool to inhibit the formation of C. albicans biofilms and reduce existing C. albicans biofilms. Linalool exhibited antifungal activity against C. albicans ATCC 14053, with a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 8 mM. Sub-MIC concentrations of linalool also inhibited the formation of germ tubes and biofilms in that strain. The defective architecture composition of C. albicans biofilms exposed to linalool was characterized by scanning electron microscopy. The expression levels of the adhesin genes HWP1 and ALS3 were downregulated by linalool, as assessed by real-time RT-PCR. The expression levels of CYR1 and CPH1, which encode components of the cAMP-PKA and MAPK hyphal formation regulatory pathways, respectively, were also suppressed by linalool, as was the gene encoding their upstream regulator, Ras1. The expression levels of long-term hyphae maintenance associated genes, including UME6, HGC1, and EED1, were all suppressed by linalool. These results indicate that linalool may have therapeutic potential in the treatment of candidiasis associated with medical devices because it interferes with the morphological switch and biofilm formation of C. albicans. PMID:23210679

  18. Inhibitory effect of linalool-rich essential oil from Lippia alba on the peptidase and keratinase activities of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Danielle Cristina Machado; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Almeida, Catia Amancio; de Souza Dias, Edilma Paraguai; Cedrola, Sabrina Martins Lage; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Fátima; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Alviano, Daniela Sales

    2014-02-01

    Abstract Lippia alba (Miller) N.E. Brown is an aromatic plant known locally as "Erva-cidreira-do-campo" that has great importance in Brazilian folk medicine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the antidermatophytic potential of linalool-rich essential oil (EO) from L. alba and analyze the ability of this EO to inhibit peptidase and keratinase activities, which are important virulence factors in dermatophytes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of L. alba EO were 39, 156 and 312 µg/mL against Trichophyton rubrum, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum gypseum, respectively. To evaluate the influence of L. alba EO on the proteolytic and keratinolytic activities of these dermatophytes, specific inhibitory assays were performed. The results indicated that linalool-rich EO from L. alba inhibited the activity of proteases and keratinases secreted from dermatophytes, and this inhibition could be a possible mechanism of action against dermatophytes. Due to the effective antidermatophytic activity of L. alba EO, further experiments should be performed to explore the potential of this linalool-rich EO as an alternative antifungal therapy. PMID:23323991

  19. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paula M; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a "kick start effect" over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the protocol. These results demonstrate a dynamical behavioral inhibition capacity in humans, as illustrated by the reward magnitude modulation and initial reward history effects. PMID:24860469

  20. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Paula M.; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristán A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a “kick start effect” over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the protocol. These results demonstrate a dynamical behavioral inhibition capacity in humans, as illustrated by the reward magnitude modulation and initial reward history effects. PMID:24860469

  1. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013 - Duration: 32 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  2. Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential of Crude Acetone Extracts of Combretum molle (Combretaceae) on Drug-resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori

    PubMed Central

    Njume, Collise; Afolayan, Anthony J.; Samie, Amidou

    2011-01-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with a number of gastroduodenal pathologies. Antimicrobial resistance to commonly-used drugs has generated a considerable interest in the search for novel therapeutic compounds from medicinal plants. As an ongoing effort of this search, the susceptibility of 32 clinical strains of H. pylori and a reference strain—NCTC 11638—was evaluated against five solvent extracts of Combretum molle, a plant widely used for the treatment of gastric ulcers and other stomach-related morbidities in South Africa. The extracts were screened for activity by the agar-well diffusion method, and the most active one of them was tested against the same strains by micro-broth dilution and time kill assays. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. The solvent extracts all demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm. The most potent anti-H. pylori activity was demonstrated by the acetone extract, to which 87.5% of the clinical strains were susceptible. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) values for this extract ranged from 1.25 to 5.0 mg/mL while those for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.94 mg/mL and from 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extract was highly bactericidal at a concentration of 2.5 and 5.0 mg/mL, with complete elimination of the test organisms in 24 hours. Its inhibitory activity was better than that of metronidazole (p<0.05) as opposed to amoxicillin (p<0.05). The results demonstrate that C. molle may contain therapeutically-useful compounds against H. pylori, which are mostly concentrated in the acetone extract. PMID:22106749

  3. Inhibitory and bactericidal potential of crude acetone extracts of Combretum molle (Combretaceae) on drug-resistant strains of Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Njume, Collise; Afolayan, Anthony J; Samie, Amidou; Ndip, Roland N

    2011-10-01

    Infection with Helicobacter pylori is strongly associated with a number of gastroduodenal pathologies. Antimicrobial resistance to commonly-used drugs has generated a considerable interest in the search for novel therapeutic compounds from medicinal plants. As an ongoing effort of this search, the susceptibility of 32 clinical strains of H. pylori and a reference strain-NCTC 11,638-was evaluated against five solvent extracts of Combretum molle, a plant widely used for the treatment of gastric ulcers and other stomach-related morbidities in South Africa. The extracts were screened for activity by the agar-well diffusion method, and the most active one of them was tested against the same strains by micro-broth dilution and time kill assays. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. The solvent extracts all demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm. The most potent anti-H. pylori activity was demonstrated by the acetone extract, to which 87.5% of the clinical strains were susceptible. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC90) values for this extract ranged from 1.25 to 5.0 mg/mL while those for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.94 mg/mL and from 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extract was highly bactericidal at a concentration of 2.5 and 5.0 mg/mL, with complete elimination of the test organisms in 24 hours. Its inhibitory activity was better than that of metronidazole (p<0.05) as opposed to amoxicillin (p<0.05). The results demonstrate that C. molle may contain therapeutically-useful compounds against H. pylori, which are mostly concentrated in the acetone extract. PMID:22106749

  4. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of ethanol GRAS plant and supercritical CO? hop extracts on planktonic cultures of oral pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pilna, J; Vlkova, E; Krofta, K; Nesvadba, V; Rada, V; Kokoska, L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional chemical antiseptics used for treatment of oral infections often produce side-effects, which restrict their long-term use. Plants are considered as perspective sources of novel natural antiseptics. However, little is still known about their inhibitory properties against oral pathogens. The objective of this study was to test in vitro antimicrobial activities of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) species against planktonic cultures of cariogenic, periodontal and candidal microorganisms and identify active compounds of the most active extracts. Growth-inhibitory effects of ethanol extracts from 109 GRAS plant species, six Humulus lupulus cultivars and two hop supercritical CO2 extracts were evaluated using broth microdilution method. The chemical analysis was done through high-performance liquid chromatography. Best results were obtained for supercritical CO2 and ethanol extracts of H. lupulus with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ?8 ?g/mL and ?16 ?g/mL, respectively. The chemical analysis of supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts revealed that ?- and ?-acids were their main constituents. Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens showed antibacterial effect against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus salivarius (MIC=64-128 ?g/mL). These strains were further inhibited by Zanthoxylum clava-herculis (MIC=64-128 ?g/mL) and Myristica fragrans (both MIC?128 ?g/mL). The latter also exhibited antimicrobial activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC=64 ?g/mL). Punica granatum possessed inhibitory effects against Candida albicans (MIC=128 ?g/mL) and F. nucleatum (MIC=64 ?g/mL). The results indicate that supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts together with ethanol extracts of C. annuum, C. frutescens, M. fragrans, P. granatum and Z. clava-herculis are promising materials for further investigation on new antiseptic agents of oral care products. PMID:26232134

  5. The Minimum Price Contract 

    E-print Network

    Waller, Mark L.; Amosson, Stephen H.; Welch, Mark; Dhuyvetter, Kevin C.

    2008-10-17

    A minimum price contract is one of many tools a marketer may use to better manage price and production risk while trying to achieve financial goals and objectives. This publication discusses the advantages and disadvantages involved...

  6. Inhibitory effects of emodin, baicalin, schizandrin and berberine on hefA gene: Treatment of Helicobacter pylori-induced multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Qiang; Huang, Gan-Rong; Wu, Ming-Hui; Tang, Hua-Ying; Huang, Zan-Song; Zhou, Xi-Han; Yu, Wen-Qiang; Su, Jian-Wei; Mo, Xiao-Qiang; Chen, Bing-Pu; Zhao, Li-Juan; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Wei, Hong-Yu; Wei, Lian-Deng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of emodin, baicalin, etc. on the hefA gene of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: The double dilution method was used to screen MDR H. pylori strains and determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of emodin, baicalin, schizandrin, berberine, clarithromycin, metronidazole, tetracycline, amoxicillin and levofloxacin against H. pylori strains. After the screened MDR stains were treated with emodin, baicalin, schizandrin or berberine at a 1/2 MIC concentration for 48 h, changes in MICs of amoxicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, metronidazole and clarithromycin were determined. MDR strains with reduced MICs of amoxicillin were selected to detect the hefA mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR. RESULTS: A total of four MDR H. pylori strains were screened. Treatment with emodin, baicalin, schizandrin and berberine significantly decreased the MICs of amoxicillin and tetracycline against some strains, decreased by 1 to 2 times, but did not significantly change the MICs of clarithromycin, levofloxacin, and metronidazole against MDR strains. In the majority of strains with reduced MICs of amoxicillin, hefA mRNA expression was decreased; one-way ANOVA (SPSS 12.0) used for comparative analysis, P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Emodin, baicalin, schizandrin and berberine significantly decreased the MICs of amoxicillin and tetracycline against some H. pylori strains, possibly by mechanisms associated with decreasing hefA mRNA expression. PMID:25892872

  7. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Trichosporon ovoides causing Piedra Hair Infection.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Seema; Uniyal, Veena; Bhatt, R P

    2012-10-01

    Piedra, is an asymptomatic fungal infection of the hair shaft, resulting in the formation of nodules of different hardness on the infected hair. The infection also known as Trichomycosis nodularis is a superficial fungal infection arising from the pathogen being restricted to the stratum corneum with little or no tissue reaction. The nodules are a concretion of hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus. Two varieties of Piedra may be seen, Black Piedra and White Piedra. The fungus Trichosporon ovoides is involved in the occurrence of both types of Piedras. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth of the fungus and to determine whether the antifungal effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. Two screening methods viz. Agar well diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration were adopted for the study. MIC and MFC were determined by tube dilution method. Essential oils from Eucalyptus, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon winterians, Trachyspermum ammi, Zingiber officinalis, Citrus limon, Cinnamomon zeylanicum, Salvia sclarea, Citrus aurantifolia, Melaleuca alternifolia, Citrus aurantium, Citrus bergamia, Pogostemon pathchouli, Cedrus atlantica, Jasminum officinale, Juniperus communis, Abelmoschus moschatus, Cyperus scariosus, Palargonium graveolens, Boswellia carterii, Rosa damascene, Veteveria zizanoides and Commiphora myrrha were evaluated. The essential oils of Cymbopogon winterians, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were proved to be most effective against the fungus Trichosporon ovoides. PMID:24031963

  8. Inhibitory effect of Allium sativum and Zingiber officinale extracts on clinically important drug resistant pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Herbs and spices are very important and useful as therapeutic agent against many pathological infections. Increasing multidrug resistance of pathogens forces to find alternative compounds for treatment of infectious diseases. Methods In the present study the antimicrobial potency of garlic and ginger has been investigated against eight local clinical bacterial isolates. Three types of extracts of each garlic and ginger including aqueous extract, methanol extract and ethanol extract had been assayed separately against drug resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcusepidermidis and Salmonella typhi. The antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion method. Results All tested bacterial strains were most susceptible to the garlic aqueous extract and showed poor susceptibility to the ginger aqueous extract. The (minimum inhibitory concentration) MIC of different bacterial species varied from 0.05?mg/ml to 1.0?mg/ml. Conclusion In the light of several socioeconomic factors of Pakistan mainly poverty and poor hygienic condition, present study encourages the use of spices as alternative or supplementary medicine to reduce the burden of high cost, side effects and progressively increasing drug resistance of pathogens. PMID:22540232

  9. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ? 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:24294222

  10. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ? 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:24294222

  11. [Quality evaluation of artificial musk based on its inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase-2].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Jin, Cheng; Zhou, Jian; Wen, Rui-qing; Li, Xing-feng; Li, Rui-sheng; Yang, Ming; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2011-04-01

    The inhibitory ratio (1%) of artificial musk on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The dose-effect relationship between concentrations of artificial musk and 1% was established. It was found that artificial musk had obvious inhibitory action on COX-2. The concentration for 50% of maximum inhibitory effect (IC50) was about 2.26 mg x mL(-1). There was a good relationship between the logarithm concentrations of artificial musk and 1% when the concentrations of artificial musk ranged from 0.31-20.0 mg x mL(-1). The results indicated that this EIA method could be applied to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of artificial musk quickly, conveniently, sensitively and exactly. This paper provided a novel method and foundational research for the bioassay of artificial musk. PMID:21751497

  12. Assessment of inhibitory potency of antibiotics by MRI: apparent T2 as a marker of cell growth.

    PubMed

    Hoerr, Verena; Hoffmann, Kerstin; Schollmayer, Curd; Holzgrabe, Ulrike; Haase, Axel; Jakob, Peter; Faber, Cornelius

    2006-11-01

    A new method to assess the antibiotic potency by MRI has been developed. Correlating 1H NMR spectra of bacterial cultures with the extracellular parameters T2, OD600, and pH, a relationship between cell growth and T2 variations was established. T2 is influenced by chemical exchange that depends on pH, composition, and concentration of the medium. Changes in the medium from bacterial metabolism are reflected in alternating T2 values. At 17.6 T, growth curves based on T2 values were measured simultaneously of several cultures of Streptococcus vestibularis. From T2 growth curves in the presence of varying concentrations of vancomycin, the minimum inhibitory concentration of the antibiotic could be determined to be 0.33+/-0.08 microM. This value was in good agreement with the result obtained by the conventional broth microdilution. In principle, T2 growth curves can be determined on a large number of cultures simultaneously and may potentially be used as a novel tool in high through-put screening of novel anti-infective substances. PMID:17096123

  13. Plasticity of Cortical Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior. PMID:25897875

  14. Probing inhibitory effects of nanocrystalline cellulose: inhibition versus surface charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Keith B.; Leung, Alfred C. W.; Montes, Johnny; Kamen, Amine; Luong, John H. T.

    2012-02-01

    NCC derived from different biomass sources was probed for its plausible cytotoxicity by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Two different cell lines, Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells and Chinese hamster lung fibroblast V79, were exposed to NCC and their spreading and viability were monitored and quantified by ECIS. Based on the 50%-inhibition concentration (ECIS50), none of the NCC produced was judged to have any significant cytotoxicity on these two cell lines. However, NCC derived from flax exhibited the most pronounced inhibition on Sf9 compared to hemp and cellulose powder. NCCs from flax and hemp pre-treated with pectate lyase were also less inhibitory than NCCs prepared from untreated flax and hemp. Results also suggested a correlation between the inhibitory effect and the carboxylic acid contents on the NCC.

  15. Lipoxygenase inhibitory activity of anacardic acids.

    PubMed

    Ha, Tae Joung; Kubo, Isao

    2005-06-01

    6[8'(Z)-pentadecenyl]salicylic acid, otherwise known as anacardic acid (C15:1), inhibited the linoleic acid peroxidation catalyzed by soybean lipoxygenase-1 (EC 1.13.11.12, type 1) with an IC50 of 6.8 microM. The inhibition of the enzyme by anacardic acid (C15:1) is a slow and reversible reaction without residual activity. The inhibition kinetics analyzed by Dixon plots indicates that anacardic acid (C15:1) is a competitive inhibitor and the inhibition constant, KI, was obtained as 2.8 microM. Although anacardic acid (C15:1) inhibited the linoleic acid peroxidation without being oxidized, 6[8'(Z),11'(Z)-pentadecadienyl]salicylic acid, otherwise known as anacardic acid (C15:2), was dioxygenated at low concentrations as a substrate. In addition, anacardic acid (C15:2) was also found to exhibit time-dependent inhibition of lipoxygenase-1. The alk(en)yl side chain of anacardic acids is essential to elicit the inhibitory activity. However, the hydrophobic interaction alone is not enough because cardanol (C15:1), which possesses the same side chain as anacardic acid (C15:1), acted neither as a substrate nor as an inhibitor. PMID:15913294

  16. Studies of the in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of selected Thai medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional folk medicinal plants have recently become popular and are widely used for primary health care. Since Thailand has a great diversity of indigenous (medicinal) plant species, this research investigated 52 traditionally used species of Thai medicinal plants for their in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities. Methods The 55 dried samples, derived from the medicinally used parts of the 52 plant species were sequentially extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol and water. These 220 extracts were then screened for in vitro (i) cytotoxicity against four cell lines, derived from human lung (A549), breast (MDA-MB-231), cervical (KB3-1) and colon (SW480) cancers, using the MTT cytotoxicity assay; (ii) antioxidant activity, analyzed by measuring the scavenging activity of DPPH radicals; (iii) lipase inhibitory activity, determined from the hydrolytic reaction of p-nitrophenyllaurate with pancreatic lipase; and (iv) antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria species plus one strain of yeast using the disc-diffusion method and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration by the broth micro-dilution assay. Results The crude dichloromethane and/or ethanol extracts from four plant species showed an effective in vitro cytotoxic activity against the human cancer cell lines that was broadly similar to that of the specific chemotherapy drugs (etoposide, doxorubicin, vinblastine and oxaliplatin). In particular, this is the first report of the strong in vitro cytotoxic activity of Bauhinia strychnifolia vines. The tested tissue parts of only six plant species (Allium sativum, Cocoloba uvifera, Dolichandrone spathacea, Lumnitzera littorea, Sonneratia alba and Sonneratia caseolaris) showed promising potential antioxidant activity, whereas lipase inhibitory activity was only found in the ethanol extract from Coscinum fenestratum and this was weak at 17-fold lower than Orlistat, a known lipase inhibitor. The highest antimicrobial activity was observed in the extracts from S. alba and S. caseolaris against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, respectively. Conclusion The Thai medicinal plant B. strychnifolia is first reported to exert strong in vitro cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines and warrants further enrichment and characterization. The broad spectrum of the biological activities from the studied plant extracts can be applied as the guideline for the selection of Thai medicinal plant species for further pharmacological and phytochemical investigations. PMID:23145786

  17. Endogenous cannabinoid signaling at inhibitory interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Younts, Thomas J.; Castillo, Pablo E.

    2014-01-01

    Significant progress has been made in our understanding of how endogenous cannabinoids (eCBs) signal at excitatory and inhibitory synapses in the central nervous system (CNS). This review discusses how eCBs regulate inhibitory interneurons, their synapses, and the networks in which they are embedded. eCB signaling plays a pivotal role in brain physiology by means of their synaptic signal transduction, spatiotemporal signaling profile, routing of information through inhibitory microcircuits, and experience-dependent plasticity. Understanding the normal processes underlying eCB signaling is beginning to shed light on how their dysregulation contributes to disease. PMID:24650503

  18. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  19. Inhibitory effects of nisin and potassium sorbate alone or in combination on vegetative cells growth and spore germination of Bacillus sporothermodurans in milk.

    PubMed

    Aouadhi, Chedia; Mejri, Slah; Maaroufi, Abderrazak

    2015-04-01

    The inhibitory activities of nisin or/and potassium sorbate on spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus sporothermodurans LTIS27, which are known to be a contaminant of dairy products and to be extremely heat-resistant, were investigated. First, the tested concentrations of nisin or potassium sorbate inhibited vegetative cell growth; with the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 × 10(3) IU/ml and 2% (w/v), respectively. Then, the behaviour of vegetative cells and spores in presence of sub-lethal concentrations of nisin (50 UI/ml) or/and potassium sorbate (0.2%), in milk at 37 °C for 5 days, were evaluated. In the absence of inhibitors, strain grew and sporulated at the end of the exponential phase. Nisin (50 UI/ml) was able to inhibit spore outgrowth but didn't affect their germination. It induced an immediate and transitory reduction (1.6log(10) after 1 h and 2.8log(10) after 6 h of incubation) of vegetative cell growth which reappeared between 10 h and 24 h. Potassium sorbate (0.2%) had a durable bacteriostatic effect (1.1log(10) after 6 h), on vegetative cells, followed by a slower regrowth. It was able to inhibit both germination and outgrowth of spores. Association of nisin and potassium sorbate, at sub-lethal concentrations, showed a synergistic effect and resulted in a total inhibition of cells growth after 5 days. The results illustrate the efficacy of nisin and potassium sorbate in combination, and the commercial potential of applying such treatment to decontaminate any product that has a problem with persistence of bacterial spores. PMID:25475264

  20. Prenylated flavonoids from the stems and leaves of Desmodium caudatum and evaluation of their inhibitory activity against the film-forming growth of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii F51.

    PubMed

    Sasaki, Hisako; Shibata, Hirofumi; Imabayashi, Kiyoshi; Takaishi, Yoshihisa; Kashiwada, Yoshiki

    2014-07-01

    In order to provide scientific evidence for the relationship between the traditional usage, stems and leaves of Desmodium caudatum being used for protecting miso from spoilage, and its Japanese name (miso-naoshi), phytochemical study on the stems and leaves of this plant was carried out. Seven new prenylated flavonoids (1-3, 15-18), together with 19 known compounds (4-14, 19-26), were isolated, and the structures of new compounds were elucidated by extensive spectroscopic analyses. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of 28 flavonoids, including 17 compounds (1, 2, 4, 5, 7-14, 20-22, 24, 25) isolated in this study and 11 flavonoids (27-37) previously isolated from the roots of this plant, against the film-forming yeast of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii F51 were determined. Fifteen compounds (2, 4, 5, 11, 12, 14, 21, 22, 25, 27, 28, 32-35) inhibited the film-forming growth of Z. rouxii F51 (MIC values, 7.8-62.5 ?g/mL), among which 2",2"-dimethylpyran-(5",6":7,8)-5,2'-dihydroxy-4'-methoxy-(2R,3R)-dihydroflavonol (11) demonstrated potent inhibitory activity with an MIC value of 7.8 ?g/mL. PMID:24956381

  1. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca²? release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca²? content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function. PMID:25623539

  2. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Ma?gorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  3. Stability and cytotoxicity of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from bovine casein*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Pan-pan; Zhang, Feng-yang; Che, Hong-xia; Jiang, Zhan-mei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of heat treatment combined with acid and alkali on the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of peptides derived from bovine casein. The free amino group content, color, and cytotoxicity of the peptides were measured under different conditions. When heated at 100 °C in the pH range from 9.0 to 12.0, ACE inhibitory activity was reduced and the appearance of the peptides was significantly darkened. After thermal treatment in the presence of acid and alkali, the free amino group content of ACE inhibitory peptides decreased markedly. High temperature and prolonged heating also resulted in the loss of ACE inhibitory activity, the loss of free amino groups, and the darker coloration of bovine casein-derived peptides. However, ACE inhibitory peptides, within a concentration range of from 0.01 to 0.2 mg/ml, showed no cytotoxicity to Caco-2 and ECV-304 cell lines after heat treatment. This indicated that high temperature and alkaline heat treatment impaired the stability of bovine casein-derived ACE inhibitory peptides. PMID:24510707

  4. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries.

    PubMed

    Seeram, N P; Momin, R A; Nair, M G; Bourquin, L D

    2001-09-01

    Anthocyanins from tart cherries, Prunus cerasus L. (Rosaceae) cv. Balaton and Montmorency; sweet cherries, Prunus avium L. (Rosaceae); bilberries, Vaccinum myrtillus L. (Ericaceae); blackberries, Rubus sp. (Rosaceae); blueberries var. Jersey, Vaccinium corymbosum L. (Ericaceae); cranberries var. Early Black, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae); elderberries, Sambucus canadensis (Caprifoliaceae); raspberries, Rubus idaeus (Rosaceae); and strawberries var. Honeoye, Fragaria x ananassa Duch. (Rosaceae), were investigated for cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant activities. The presence and levels of cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside 1 and cyanidin-3-rutinoside 2 were determined in the fruits using HPLC. The antioxidant activity of anthocyanins from cherries was comparable to the commercial antioxidants, tert-butylhydroquinone, butylated hydroxytoluene and butylated hydroxyanisole, and superior to vitamin E, at a test concentration of 125 microg/ml. Anthocyanins from raspberries and sweet cherries demonstrated 45% and 47% cyclooxygenase-I and cyclooxygenase-II inhibitory activities, respectively, when assayed at 125 microg/ml. The cyclooxygenase inhibitory activities of anthocyanins from these fruits were comparable to those of ibuprofen and naproxen at 10 microM concentrations. Anthocyanins 1 and 2 are present in both cherries and raspberry. The yields of pure anthocyanins 1 and 2 in 100 g Balaton and Montmorency tart cherries, sweet cherries and raspberries were 21, 16.5; 11, 5; 4.95, 21; and 4.65, 13.5 mg, respectively. Fresh blackberries and strawberries contained only anthocyanin 2 in yields of 24 and 22.5 mg/100 g, respectively. Anthocyanins 1 and 2 were not found in bilberries, blueberries, cranberries or elderberries. PMID:11695879

  5. Whats Inside: Minimum Wage Bill

    E-print Network

    concerning which retirement plan would be of most value, or is best suit- ed to an individual based on individual circumstances. MINIMUM WAGE BILL PASSED The Fair Minimum Wage Act of 2007 amend- ing the Fair

  6. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T

    2015-08-11

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties. PMID:26216985

  7. Amends General Minimum Wage Order

    E-print Network

    Dahlquist, Kam D.

    Amends General Minimum Wage Order and IWC Industry and Occupation Orders Please Post Next to Your IWC Industry or Occupation Order OFFICIAL NOTICE California Minimum Wage MW-2014 Minimum Wage - Every and representatives of persons working in industries and occupations in the State of California: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS

  8. Amends General Minimum Wage Order

    E-print Network

    Amends General Minimum Wage Order and IWC Industry and Occupation Orders Please Post Next to Your IWC Industry or Occupation Order OFFICIAL NOTICE California Minimum Wage MW-2007 Minimum Wage - Every in industries and occupations in the State of California: SUMMARY OF ACTIONS TAKE NOTICE that on September 12

  9. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-25

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article. PMID:26704013

  10. Potent ?-amylase inhibitory activity of Indian Ayurvedic medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Indian medicinal plants used in the Ayurvedic traditional system to treat diabetes are a valuable source of novel anti-diabetic agents. Pancreatic ?-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post-prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. In this study, seventeen Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for ?-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on PPA (porcine pancreatic ?-amylase). Preliminary phytochemical analysis of the lead extracts was performed in order to determine the probable constituents. Methods Analysis of the 126 extracts, obtained from 17 plants (Aloe vera (L.) Burm.f., Adansonia digitata L., Allium sativum L., Casia fistula L., Catharanthus roseus (L.) G. Don., Cinnamomum verum Persl., Coccinia grandis (L.) Voigt., Linum usitatisumum L., Mangifera indica L., Morus alba L., Nerium oleander L., Ocimum tenuiflorum L., Piper nigrum L., Terminalia chebula Retz., Tinospora cordifolia (Willd.) Miers., Trigonella foenum-graceum L., Zingiber officinale Rosc.) for PPA inhibition was initially performed qualitatively by starch-iodine colour assay. The lead extracts were further quantified with respect to PPA inhibition using the chromogenic DNSA (3, 5-dinitrosalicylic acid) method. Phytochemical constituents of the extracts exhibiting? 50% inhibition were analysed qualitatively as well as by GC-MS (Gas chromatography-Mass spectrometry). Results Of the 126 extracts obtained from 17 plants, 17 extracts exhibited PPA inhibitory potential to varying degrees (10%-60.5%) while 4 extracts showed low inhibition (< 10%). However, strong porcine pancreatic amylase inhibitory activity (> 50%) was obtained with 3 isopropanol extracts. All these 3 extracts exhibited concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, viz., seeds of Linum usitatisumum (540 ?gml-1), leaves of Morus alba (1440 ?gml-1) and Ocimum tenuiflorum (8.9 ?gml-1). Acarbose as the standard inhibitor exhibited an IC50 (half maximal inhibitory concentration)value of 10.2 ?gml-1. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids with the major phytoconstituents being identified by GC-MS. Conclusions This study endorses the use of these plants for further studies to determine their potential for type 2 diabetes management. Results suggests that extracts of Linum usitatisumum, Morus alba and Ocimum tenuiflorum act effectively as PPA inhibitors leading to a reduction in starch hydrolysis and hence eventually to lowered glucose levels. PMID:21251279

  11. The inhibitory effect of Mesembryanthemum edule (L.) bolus essential oil on some pathogenic fungal isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesembryanthemum edule is a medicinal plant which has been indicated by Xhosa traditional healers in the treatment HIV associated diseases such as tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetic mellitus, laryngitis, mouth infections, ringworm eczema and vaginal infections. The investigation of the essential oil of this plant could help to verify the rationale behind the use of the plant as a cure for these illnesses. Methods The essential oil from M. edule was analysed by GC/MS. Concentration ranging from 0.005 - 5 mg/ml of the hydro-distilled essential oil was tested against some fungal strains, using micro-dilution method. The plant minimum inhibitory activity on the fungal strains was determined. Result GC/MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 28 compounds representing 99.99% of the total essential oil. A total amount of 10.6 and 36.61% constituents were obtained as monoterpenes and oxygenated monoterpenes. The amount of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.58%) was low compared to the oxygenated sesquiterpenes with pick area of 9.28%. Total oil content of diterpenes and oxygenated diterpenes detected from the essential oil were 1.43% and 19.24%. The fatty acids and their methyl esters content present in the essential oil extract were found to be 19.25%. Antifungal activity of the essential oil extract tested against the pathogenic fungal, inhibited C. albican, C. krusei, C. rugosa, C. glabrata and C. neoformans with MICs range of 0.02-0.31 mg/ml. the activity of the essential oil was found competing with nystatin and amphotericin B used as control. Conclusion Having accounted the profile chemical constituent found in M. edule oil and its important antifungal properties, we consider that its essential oil might be useful in pharmaceutical and food industry as natural antibiotic and food preservative. PMID:24885234

  12. Ascorbyl palmitate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles: characteristic and polyphenol oxidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Ji-Soo; Kim, Kwang Yup; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to produce ascorbyl palmitate (AP)-loaded nanoparticles in order to inhibit polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in bananas. AP-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using acetic acid and citric acid (denoted as CS/AA and CS/CA nanoparticles, respectively). As the initial AP concentration increases, the particle size significantly decreases, and the zeta potential, entrapment and loading efficiency significantly increases. The PPO inhibitory activity of AP was effectively improved when AP was nano-encapsulated by chitosan compared to no encapsulation. These results suggest that chitosan nano-encapsulation can be used to enhance the PPO inhibitory activity of AP. PMID:23247266

  13. Bilingualism Influences Inhibitory Control in Auditory Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Marian, Viorica

    2011-01-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among…

  14. Variation in the inhibitory potency of terbinafine among genetic variants of CYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takeshi; Ishiuchi, Miho; Imaoka, Ayuko; Ohtani, Hisakazu

    2015-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a highly polymorphic enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of many drugs. Terbinafine (TER) is a CYP2D6 inhibitor and causes persistent drug interactions in the clinical setting; however, its inhibitory mechanism and the differences in its inhibitory potency among genetic variants of CYP2D6 remain to be investigated. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of TER and the differences in its inhibitory potency among three CYP2D6 variants, CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10. In a competitive inhibition study, the metabolic activity of the CYP2D6 was assessed based on their demethylation of dextromethorphan in the presence or absence of TER, and the time-dependency of the inhibitory effects were examined by preincubating the enzymes with TER. TER had weaker inhibitory effects on CYP2D6.2 and CYP2D6.10 than on CYP2D6.1; i.e., TER exhibited Ki values (the concentration of inhibitor that results in half-maximal inhibition) of 0.0525, 0.355, and 1.85 ?M for CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10, respectively. The inhibitory effects of TER were not time-dependent. Since TER's Ki value for CYP2D6.10 was 35.2-fold higher than its Ki value for CYP2D6.1, the CYP2D6 genotype of subjects should be taken into account when estimating the severity of drug interactions involving TER. PMID:26195224

  15. Biomimetic biosensor to distinguish between inhibitory and non-inhibitory factor VIII antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kocot, Carmen; Schindler, Aline R; Le Blanc, Alexander; Schmalenberg, Michael; Miesbach, Wolfgang; Spannagl, Michael; Luppa, Peter B

    2015-07-01

    Patients with hereditary or acquired haemophilia A may develop inhibitory factor VIII (FVIII) antibodies. These disrupt FVIII activity predominantly by preventing the formation of the tenase complex, leading to a serious bleeding disorder. Antibodies without inhibiting activity, however, can also be found when screening patients with haemophilia A under FVIII supplementation. Therefore, the detection of only these allo- or autoantibodies from plasma is not sufficient. Rather, the characterization of the antibody-induced effects on the coagulation cascade should be considered due to its great diagnostic importance. Currently, inhibitory activities are detected by the functional Bethesda assay, which directly measures the delay in clotting time by the patient plasma. However, this assay does not provide information on the cause of the inhibition. Here, we report the development of a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor that has the potential to integrate both quantitative and functional information on patient antibody characteristics in one measurement. Recombinant FVIII protein was immobilized on the sensor surface to detect antibodies from patient plasma. The interaction of the FIX- and FXa-clotting proteins with the formed anti-FVIII/FVIII complex could be detected subsequently within the same SPR measurement cycle. Inhibitory antibodies led to the prevention of these interactions. Thus, discrimination between the clinically relevant inhibitory and non-inhibitory antibodies was enabled. In a group of 16 patients with inhibitory antibodies (both ELISA- and Bethesda-positive), 5 patients with non-inhibitory antibodies (ELISA-positive but Bethesda-negative) and 12 healthy controls, diagnostic sensitivity and specificity data of 100% for the FIX interaction were achieved using this biomimetic biosensor approach. The new method allows for detection and quantification, as well as for evaluation of inhibitory activity of allo- and autoantibodies, using small sample volume and short analysis time. PMID:25957847

  16. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  17. The ?-Glucosidase and ?-Amylase Enzyme Inhibitory of Hydroxytyrosol and Oleuropein.

    PubMed

    Hadrich, Fatma; Bouallagui, Zouhaier; Junkyu, Han; Isoda, Hiroko; Sayadi, Sami

    2015-01-01

    To date, numerous studies have reported on the antidiabetic properties of various plant extracts through inhibition of carbohydrate-hydrolysing enzymes. The objective of this research was to evaluate the inhibitory effect of the hydroxytyrosol and the oleuropein against ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase. The hydroxytyrosol was purified from olive leaves. The result shows that the hydroxytyrosol had the strongest ?-glucosidase inhibitory effect with IC50 values of 150 ?M with mild inhibition against ?-amylase. The enzyme kinetic studies, using Lineweaver-Burk indicated that, in the presence of the hydroxytyrosol, the Michaelis-Menton constant (Km) remained constant but the maximal velocity (Vmax) decreased, revealing a non-competitive type of inhibition with inhibition constants; Ki for the formation of the inhibitor-enzyme complex and Kis for the formation of the inhibitor-enzyme-substrate complex of 104.3 and 150.1 ?M, respectively. On the other hand, oleuropein showedan uncompetitive inhibition. The concentrations used in this work were below cytotoxic levels observed at 400 ?M. However, at 600 ?M, the hydroxytyrosol significantly decreased viability of the Caco-2 cells (p < 0.05) and in the case of the oleuropein, there's an increase in cell number compared to control (p < 0.05). These results suggest that the hydroxytyrosol and oleuropein are two potential effective ?-glucosidase inhibitors for management of postprandial hyperglycemia. PMID:26235001

  18. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  19. Inhibitory effect of nitrite on coagulation processes demonstrated by thrombelastography

    PubMed Central

    Park, J. W.; Piknova, B.; Nghiem, K.; Lozier, J. N.; Schechter, A. N.

    2014-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) can be generated by two-step reduction pathway in which nitrate is converted first into nitrite and then into NO via several mechanisms, as well as from arginine by endogenous nitric oxide synthase (NOS). We have recently shown that nitrite ions in the presence of erythrocytes inhibit platelet aggregation and activation, as measured by aggregometry and flow cytometric analysis of P-selectin, through its reduction to NO under partially deoxygenated conditions. In the current study, we investigated how nitrite may affect overall clotting processes via modulating platelet function using thrombelastography (TEG). We measured three major TEG parameters, reaction time (R, time to initial fibrin formation), ? angle (velocity of clot growth) and maximum amplitude (MA, maximum clot strength) using blood from healthy volunteers. An NO donor (DEANONOate) showed inhibitory effects on all TEG parameters in platelet rich plasma (PRP) and whole blood, resulting in delayed R, decreased angle, and reduced MA in a dose dependent manner. Nitrite ions also exhibited inhibitory effects in whole blood at 20% hematocrit, and this was greatly enhanced under hypoxic conditions, being demonstrable at 0.1 ?M concentration. Neither compound changed any TEG parameters in plasma. Our results suggest that nitrite affects overall blood clotting and that TEG may be used to follow this process. Further the physiological effects of factors which determine NO bioavailability, such as endogenous levels of blood and tissue nitrite, may be useful as biomarkers for predicting hemostatic potential. PMID:24858214

  20. Inhibitory effect of DNA topoisomerase inhibitor isoliquiritigenin on the growth of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shupeng; Chang, Haigang; Ma, Pengju; Gao, Guojun; Jin, Cailing; Zhao, Xinli; Zhou, Wenke; Jin, Baozhe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of isoliquiritigenin on the activity of DNA topoisomerase (TOP I) and its inhibitory effect on the growth of U87 glioma cells. Methods: This study investigated the inhibitory effect of isoliquiritigenin on the growth of U87 glioma cells and its cytotoxicity by MTT method and determined the effect of isoliquiritigenin on TOP I activity by agarose gel electrophoresis. On this basis, we studied the interaction between isoliquiritigenin and TOP I and DNA. Finally, we further discussed the effect of isoliquiritigenin on the activity of Caspase 3, the apoptosis protein of U87 glioma cells. Results: Isoliquiritigenin could inhibit the growth of U87 glioma cells (half inhibitory concentration IC50: 0.221 mM) and is of low cytotoxicity to normal cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that isoliquiritigenin had significant inhibitory effect on TOP I activity. Molecular simulation results indicated that isoliquiritigenin took priority of binding to the active center of TOP I, and formed hydrogen bonds with the catalytic site Try723. Finally, Caspase 3 activity detection results suggested that isoliquiritigenin could significantly increase the activity of Caspase 3 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Isoliquiritigenin had a reversible inhibitory effect on TOP I activity, reduced the rate of single strand DNA unwinding in tumor cells, and thus played an important role in inducing the apoptosis of U87 glioma cells. PMID:26722447

  1. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest, a facility shall count...mixture toward the STQ. (3) Theft/Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP)...

  2. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest, a facility shall count...mixture toward the STQ. (3) Theft/Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP)...

  3. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flammability hazard rating of 4...National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flammability hazard rating of 1, 2...flammability hazard ratings are defined in NFPA 704: Standard System for the...

  4. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flammability hazard rating of 4...National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flammability hazard rating of 1, 2...flammability hazard ratings are defined in NFPA 704: Standard System for the...

  5. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flammability hazard rating of 4...National Fire Protection Association (NFPA) flammability hazard rating of 1, 2...flammability hazard ratings are defined in NFPA 704: Standard System for the...

  6. Predictors of Longitudinal Growth in Inhibitory Control in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moilanen, Kristin L.; Shaw, Daniel S.; Dishion, Thomas J.; Gardner, Frances; Wilson, Melvin

    2010-01-01

    In the current study, we examined latent growth in 731 young children's inhibitory control from the ages of two to four years, and whether demographic characteristics or parenting behaviors were related to initial levels and growth in inhibitory control. As part of an ongoing longitudinal evaluation of the family check-up, children's inhibitory

  7. Inhibitory Control and Emotion Regulation in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Stephanie M.; Wang, Tiffany S.

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the relation between individual differences in inhibitory control and emotion regulation. Preschool children (N=53) ages 4-6 (M=5; 0) were assessed on brief batteries of inhibitory control of prepotent responses and emotion regulation. Individual differences in inhibitory control were significantly correlated with…

  8. Hu man minimum redundancy coding

    E-print Network

    Jones, Geraint

    14 Hu#11;man minimum redundancy coding It has become usual to store data and transmit messages a particular coded text. In a classic paper, published in 1952, David Hu#11;man described an algorithm to #12;nd the set of codes that would minimize the expected length 175 #12; 176 Hu#11;man minimum redundancy

  9. Proton pump inhibitory therapy: then and now.

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, W.

    1996-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been established as the new "gold standard" for traditional acid-inhibitory treatment of the so called "peptic" diseases. Due to the high antisecretory and ulcer-healing potency of omeprazole, no major improvements of the efficacy in ulcer healing and pain relief can be expected. Pantoprazole, as a further development in PPIs, is characterized by improved pharmacokinetic behavior as well as by higher tissue selectivity and binding specificity and by a very low potential to interact with the cytochrome P450 enzyme system. These characteristics may provide the basis for a low potential for side effects and for a more favorable interaction profile, although the clinical relevance of these potential advantages remains to be proven. Reflux esophagitis will also remain a domain for the traditional use of PPIs in the future. However, in the treatment of gastroduodenal ulcers, the acid inhibitory potential of PPIs will be used mainly to facilitate the eradication of H. pylori. PMID:9112749

  10. Minimum uncertainty filters for pulses

    SciTech Connect

    Trantham, E.C. )

    1993-06-01

    The objective of this paper is to calculate filters with a minimum uncertainty, the product of filter length and bandwidth. The method is applicable to producing minimum uncertainly filters with time or frequency domain constraints on the filter. The calculus of variations is used to derive the conditions that minimize a filter's uncertainly. The general solution is a linear combination of Hermite functions, where the Hermite functions are summed from low to high order until the filter's constraints are met. Filters constrained to have zero amplitude at zero hertz have an uncertainty at least three times greater than expected from the uncertainty principle, and the minimum uncertainty filter is a first derivative Gaussian. For the previous filter, the minimum uncertainty high cut filter is a Gaussian function of frequency, but the minimum uncertainty low cut filter is a linear function of frequency.

  11. Concentrator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Heredia, Ignacio; Luque, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * The early development of CPV * Concentrator solar cells * Optics for photovoltaic concentrators * Photovoltaic concentration modules * Tracking systems for photovoltaic concentration * High-concentration systems * Rating and performance * Cost considerations * Conclusions * References

  12. Comparative mutant prevention concentration and antibacterial activity of fluoroquinolones against Escherichia coli in diarrheic buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Beri, Supriya; Sidhu, Pritam K; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Rampal, Satyavan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to emerging threat of antimicrobial resistance, mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is considered as an important parameter to evaluate the antimicrobials for their capacity to restrict/allow the emergence of resistant mutants. Therefore, MPCs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin were determined against Escherichia coli isolates of diarrheic buffalo calves. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were also established. The MICs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and norfloxacin were 0·009, 0·022, 0·024, 0·028, and 0·036 ?g/ml, respectively. The MBCs obtained were very close to the MICs of respective drugs that suggested a bactericidal mode of action of antimicrobials. The MPCs (?g/ml) of ciprofloxacin (4·2×MIC), moxifloxacin (4·8×MIC), and norfloxacin (5·1×MIC) were approximately equal but slightly lower than enrofloxacin (7·6×MIC) and levofloxacin (8·5×MIC) against clinical isolates of E. coli. The MPC data suggested that enrofloxacin has the potential for restricting the selection of E. coli mutants during treatment at appropriate dosing. PMID:24575977

  13. Urease inhibitory activities of ?-boswellic acid derivatives

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Boswellia carterii have been used in traditional medicine for many years for management different gastrointestinal disorders. In this study, we wish to report urease inhibitory activity of four isolated compound of boswellic acid derivative. Methods 4 pentacyclic triterpenoid acids were isolated from Boswellia carterii and identified by NMR and Mass spectroscopic analysis (compounds 1, 3-O-acetyl-9,11-dehydro-?-boswellic acid; 2, 3-O-acetyl-11-hydroxy-?-boswellic acid; 3. 3-O- acetyl-11-keto-?-boswellic acid and 4, 11-keto-?-boswellic acid. Their inhibitory activity on Jack bean urease were evaluated. Docking and pharmacophore analysis using AutoDock 4.2 and Ligandscout 3.03 programs were also performed to explain possible mechanism of interaction between isolated compounds and urease enzyme. Results It was found that compound 1 has the strongest inhibitory activity against Jack bean urease (IC50?=?6.27?±?0.03 ?M), compared with thiourea as a standard inhibitor (IC50?=?21.1?±?0.3 ?M). Conclusion The inhibition potency is probably due to the formation of appropriate hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic interactions between the investigated compounds and urease enzyme active site and confirms its traditional usage. PMID:23351363

  14. Sleep, epilepsy and thalamic reticular inhibitory neurons.

    PubMed

    Steriade, Mircea

    2005-06-01

    Thalamic reticular neurons release the potent inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and their main targets are thalamocortical neurons in the dorsal thalamus. This article focuses on two topics: (i) the role of thalamic reticular neurons in the initiation of spindles, a hallmark oscillation during early sleep stages; and (ii) the reticular-induced inhibition of thalamocortical neurons during cortically generated spike-wave seizures. Although hotly debated during the past decade, the idea of spindle generation by a network of GABAergic reticular neurons was recently supported by in vivo and in computo studies demonstrating interactions between inhibitory reticular neurons that lead to spindle sequences. During spike-wave seizures and electrical paroxysms of the Lennox-Gastaut type, which arise in the neocortex, reticular neurons are powerfully excited through corticofugal projections and they produce prolonged inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in thalamocortical neurons. Thus, GABAergic reticular neurons are crucial in the generation of some sleep rhythms, which produce synaptic plasticity, and in inhibiting external signals through thalamocortical neurons, which leads to unconsciousness during absence epilepsy. PMID:15927688

  15. Context specificity of inhibitory control in dogs

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Evan L.; Hare, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Across three experiments, we explored whether a dog's capacity for inhibitory control is stable or variable across decision-making contexts. In the social task, dogs were first exposed to the reputations of a stingy experimenter that never shared food and a generous experimenter who always shared food. In subsequent test trials, dogs were required to avoid approaching the stingy experimenter when this individual offered (but withheld) a higher-value reward than the generous experimenter did. In the A-not-B task, dogs were required to inhibit searching for food in a previously rewarded location after witnessing the food being moved from this location to a novel hiding place. In the cylinder task, dogs were required to resist approaching visible food directly (because it was behind a transparent barrier), in favor of a detour reaching response. Overall, dogs exhibited inhibitory control in all three tasks. However, individual scores were not correlated between tasks, suggesting that context has a large effect on dogs' behavior. This result mirrors studies of humans, which have highlighted intra-individual variation in inhibitory control as a function of the decision-making context. Lastly, we observed a correlation between a subject's age and performance on the cylinder task, corroborating previous observations of age-related decline in dogs' executive function. PMID:23584618

  16. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some Turkish medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I; Sener, B; Choudhary, M I; Khalid, A

    2004-03-01

    The chloroform:medianol (1:1) extracts of a number of the plant species belonging to eight families, namely Corydalis solida (L.) Swartz subsp. solida and Glaucium corniculatum (L.) J. H. Rudolph (Papaveraceae), Rhododendron ponticum L. subsp. ponticum and Rhododendron luteum Sweet. (Ericaceae), Buxus sempervirens L. (Buxaceae), Vicia faba L. (Fabaceae), Robinia pseudoacacia L. (Caeselpiniaceae), Tribulus terrestris L. and Zygophyllum fabago L. (Zygophyllaceae), Lycopodium clavatum L. (Lycopodiaceae), Fumaria vaillantii Lois., Fumaria capreolata L., Fumaria kralikii Jordan, Fumaria asepala Boiss., Fumaria densiflora DC., Fumaria flabellata L., Fumaria petteri Reichb. subsp. thuretii (Boiss.) Pugsley, Fumaria macrocarpa Boiss. ex Hausskn., Fumaria cilicica Hauskkn., Fumaria parviflora Lam. and Fumaria judaica Boiss. (Fumariaceae) were screened for their anticholinesterase activity on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) enzymes by in vitro Ellman method at 10 microg/ml and 1 mg/ml concentrations. The extracts did not show any noticeable inhibitory activity against both of the enzymes at 10 microg/ml. The extracts of Rhododendron ponticum subsp. ponticum, Rhododendron luteum, Corydalis solida subsp. solida, Glaucium corniculatum, and Buxus sempervirens showed remarkable inhibitory activity above 50% inhibition rate on AChE at 1 mg/ml. Among them, Rhododendron ponticum subsp. ponticum, Corydalis solida subsp. solida and Buxus sempervirens were the most active extracts against BChE having 95.46 +/- 1.03%, 93.08 +/- 0.97%, and 93.45 +/- 0.88% inhibition rates, respectively. Among the extracts screened, all of the Fumaria extracts displayed highly potent inhibition against both of the enzymes at 1 mg/ml concentration compared to the standard. PMID:15036468

  17. In vitro ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase inhibitory effects and cytotoxic activity of Albizia antunesiana extracts

    PubMed Central

    Chipiti, Talent; Ibrahim, Mohammed Auwal; Singh, Moganavelli; Islam, Md. Shahidul

    2015-01-01

    Context: Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease, and its incidence is tremendously increasing globally. Decreasing postprandial hyperglycemia by retarding glucose absorption through inhibiting carbohydrates digesting enzymes (?-amylase and ?-glucosidase) is one of many approaches used for the management of this disease. Objectives: The leaf and root aqueous and ethanol extracts of Albizia antunesiana were investigated for ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase inhibitory and cytotoxic activity in vitro. Materials and Methods: The ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase activities were measured in the presence of aqueous and ethanol extracts of the plant parts using starch and p-nitrophenyl-D-glucopyranoside as substrates respectively. Furthermore, cytotoxic effects of the extracts were investigated on HEK (human embryonic kidney) 293 cell lines using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) (MTT) assay. Results: The results showed that ethanolic root extract of A. antunesiana had mild ?-amylase and strong ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity with half-maximal inhibitory concentration values of 30.68 and 4.35 µg/mL, respectively. The aqueous root extract showed mild ?-glucosidase but no ?-amylase inhibitory activity. Cytotoxicity studies on the extracts using the MTT assay revealed that the ethanolic (leaf and root) extracts were relatively nontoxic at tested concentrations on the HEK 293 cell lines. However, the aqueous extracts (leaf and root) were cytotoxic at concentrations above 50 µg/mL. Conclusion: Data from this study suggest that the ethanolic root extract of A. antunesiana possess in vitro ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase inhibitory activities and are not cytotoxic at least in an in vitro condition.

  18. STATISTICAL PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINATION AND VERIFICATION OF MINIMUM REPORTING LEVELS FOR DRINKING WATER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) has developed a single-laboratory quantitation procedure: the lowest concentration minimum reporting level (LCMRL). The LCMRL is the lowest true concentration for which fu...

  19. Prenatal stress and inhibitory neuron systems: implications for neuropsychiatric disorders

    PubMed Central

    Fine, Rebecca; Zhang, Jie; Stevens, Hanna E.

    2014-01-01

    Prenatal stress is a risk factor for several psychiatric disorders in which inhibitory neuron pathology is implicated. A growing body of research demonstrates that inhibitory circuitry in the brain is directly and persistently affected by prenatal stress. This review synthesizes research that elucidates how this early, developmental risk factor impacts inhibitory neurons and how these findings intersect with research on risk factors and inhibitory neuron pathophysiology in schizophrenia, anxiety, autism and Tourette syndrome. The specific impact of prenatal stress on inhibitory neurons, particularly developmental mechanisms, may elucidate further the pathophysiology of these disorders. PMID:24751963

  20. Screening of tea extract and theaflavins for inhibitory effects on the biological activity and production of staphylococcal enterotoxin A.

    PubMed

    Shimamura, Yuko; Aoki, Natsumi; Sugiyama, Yuka; Nakayama, Tsutomu; Masuda, Shuichi

    2014-11-01

    This study aimed to develop a novel method with tea extracts and its components, to reduce the risk of foodborne illnesses caused by the bacterial toxin staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA). The potential effect of tea extracts, theaflavins, and epitheaflagallin on staphylococcal growth was studied. A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration of these samples against an SEA-producing strain, Staphylococcus aureus C-29. The following assays were performed to evaluate various effects on concentrations of no effect on staphylococcal growth. The interactions of theaflavin-rich green tea extracts (TGE), theaflavins, and epitheaflagallin to cultured S. aureus C-29 were determined using Western blot analysis. As a result, all samples suppressed the binding affinity of the anti-SEA antibody to SEA. Since these samples could react directly with SEA, we examined whether they could bind to SEA. Our results demonstrated that binding of the anti-SEA antibody to 4 theaflavins-treated SEA was inhibited in a dose-dependent manner. On the other hand, the production of SEA was significantly decreased by treatment with TGE and epitheaflagallin. Based on the finding that TGE and epitheaflagallin inhibit the production of SEA, we further examined the relative expression levels of sea toxin-encoding genes after treatment with TGE and epitheaflagallin with real-time RT-PCR. TGE and epitheaflagallin significantly supressed the gene transcription of SEA in S. aureus C-29. We then tested whether the samples block the biological activity of SEA in murine spleen cells. TGE, theaflavins, and epitheaflagallin became inactivated the biological activity of SEA. These results suggest that edible and safe compounds in tea can be used to inactivate both pathogens and toxins. PMID:25307624

  1. Alcohol and single-cell protein production by Kluyveromyces in concentrated whey permeates with reduced ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, M.M.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five Kluyveromyces yeasts were grown in concentrated whey permeates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce single-cell protein and ethanol. K. fragilis NRRL Y2415 produced the highest yield of alcohol, 9.1%, and K. bulgaricus ATCC 1605 gave the highest yield of biomass, 13.5 mg/mL. High ash, apparently through Na and K effects, inhibited production of biomass and alcohol. A 0.77% ash was optimum. Lactose utilization was more rapid under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and urea supplementation were without effect on yeast growth or were slightly inhibitory. A 1% peptone inclusion gave the highest biomass yield with minimum alcohol production.

  2. Differential expression of efflux pump genes of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in response to varied subinhibitory concentrations of antituberculosis agents.

    PubMed

    Garima, Kushal; Pathak, Rakesh; Tandon, Rashmi; Rathor, Nisha; Sinha, Rajesh; Bose, Mridula; Varma-Basil, Mandira

    2015-03-01

    Several reports have elaborated on the role of efflux pumps in drug resistance in Mycobacterium tuberculosis by analysing the mRNA expression profiles. However, there is no uniformity in the subinhibitory concentrations of drugs chosen in these studies. Some investigators studied the expression of efflux pumps under a drug concentration of 1/2 minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), while others used 1/3, 1/4 or 1/8MIC. The present study was planned to understand the effect of different concentrations of antituberculosis drugs on the expression of efflux pump genes. Log phase culture of the laboratory strain M. tuberculosis H37Rv was exposed to rifampicin (RIF), isoniazid (INH), streptomycin (SM) and ethambutol (EMB) at different drug concentrations (1/2MIC, 1/3MIC and 1/4MIC). The expression of 10 putative efflux pump genes was studied using quantitative Real Time-Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). We observed an optimal expression of efflux pumps at higher concentrations of INH; and at lower concentrations of RIF and EMB. However, in the presence of SM, a decreased expression of efflux genes with increasing concentrations of the drug was confounded by a significant reduction in Colony Forming Units (CFU). PMID:25680943

  3. Polyphenols with indirect proprotein convertase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingjing; Van de Ven, Wim; Vermorken, Alphons

    2013-09-01

    Polyphenols, a class of natural products, have been shown to exhibit cancer protective properties. Proprotein convertases form a family of mammalian subtilisin-like serine endoproteases. Increased expression of these enzymes has been associated with numerous pathologies including cancer. It has been suggested that the cancer protective effect of polyphenols might be related to their proprotein convertase inhibitory effects. Furin, the most studied proprotein convertase, was shown to be inhibited by polyphenols in an in vitro fluorescence peptide-based assay. Protein substrates or the presence of protein prevented this inhibition by prototype members of various classes of polyphenolic compounds. Inhibition appeared to be related to the reactivity of polyphenol auto-oxidation products to proteins. While direct inhibition by polyphenols of furin has, therefore, not been observed in cells, the existence of indirect mechanisms cannot be excluded. In the present investigation, 26 polyphenols and 5 control compounds were screened for indirect inhibition of furin in a cellular environment. Five polyphenols showed moderate inhibitory activity and three of these: octyl gallate, dodecyl gallate and nordihydroguariaretic acid were further studied. The processing in cells of several genuine furin substrates, including pro-IGF-1R, appeared to be inhibited by these polyphenols. The inhibition was not specific for furin but also affected other proprotein convertases. The three polyphenols inhibited the maturation of the furin zymogen, thereby limiting the formation of the active enzyme. The three polyphenols inhibited focus formation of HepG2 liver carcinoma cells suggesting reversal of the malignant phenotype. Anchorage-independent growth of these cells, a hallmark feature of tumor cells, was also inhibited. Since, dependent of the molecular subclass of hepatocellular carcinoma, overexpression of furin can have either favourable or detrimental effects, it seems advisable to take indirect proprotein convertase inhibitory activity into account when polyphenols are considered for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23835774

  4. Interaction of some limbic structures which exert inhibitory effect on corticosterone secretion.

    PubMed

    Suárez, M; Perassi, N I

    1990-12-01

    The interaction between limbic structures which exert inhibitory influence on corticosterone secretion was investigated in the rat. The following experiments were performed: 1) electrical stimulation at mammillary medial nucleus (MMN) in rats with lesioned anterodrosal thalami nucleus (ADTN) or intermediate tegmental area; 2) electrical stimulation at ADTN in rats with lesioned retrosplenial cortex (RC). Bilateral stimulation at MMN in ADTN or RC-lesioned rats produces an increase in plasma corticosterone concentration. In animals with lesioned RC, values of plasma corticosterone after stimulation at ADTN were higher than before stimulation. Taking into consideration that electrical stimulation of MMN or ADTN in intact rats produces a decrease in plasma corticosterone concentration, these studies demonstrate that MMN and ADTN exert inhibitory influence on corticoadrenal activity only when their projection areas remain intact. PMID:1705770

  5. Pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of taraxacum officinale in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Mi-Eun; Song, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Young-Min

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide health problem. Orlistat, an inhibitor of pancreatic lipase, is currently approved as an anti-obesity drug. However, gastrointestinal side effects caused by Orlistat may limit its use. In this study the inhibitory activities of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) against pancreatic lipase in vitro and in vivo were measured to determine its possible use as a natural anti-obesity agent. The inhibitory activities of the 95% ethanol extract of T. officinale and Orlistat were measured using 4-methylumbelliferyl oleate (4-MU oleate) as a substrate at concentrations of 250, 125, 100, 25, 12.5 and 4 µg/ml. To determine pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity in vivo, mice (n=16) were orally administered with corn oil emulsion (5 ml/kg) alone or with the 95% ethanol extract of T. officinale (400 mg/kg) following an overnight fast. Plasma triglyceride levels were measured at 0, 90, 180, and 240 min after treatment and incremental areas under the response curves (AUC) were calculated. The 95% ethanol extract of T. officinale and Orlistat, inhibited, porcine pancreatic lipase activity by 86.3% and 95.7% at a concentration of 250 µg/ml, respectively. T. officinale extract showed dose-dependent inhibition with the IC50 of 78.2 µg/ml. A single oral dose of the extract significantly inhibited increases in plasma triglyceride levels at 90 and 180 min and reduced AUC of plasma triglyceride response curve (p<0.05). The results indicate that T. officinale exhibits inhibitory activities against pancreatic lipase in vitro and in vivo. Further studies to elucidate anti-obesity effects of chronic consumption of T. officinale and to identify the active components responsible for inhibitory activity against pancreatic lipase are necessary. PMID:20016719

  6. Thalamic Post-Inhibitory Bursting Occurs in Patients with Organic Dystonia more often than Controls

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, K.; Liu, C.C.; Jensen, A.L.; Vitek, J.L.; Mari, Z.; Lenz, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    We now test the hypothesis that post-inhibitory bursting in the human pallidal receiving nucleus of the thalamus (ventral oral) mediates inhibitory pallido-thalamic transmission during dystonia. We have compared thalamic single neuron activity in nine patients with organic dystonia to that in a patient with psychogenic dystonia (Psyd) and in healthy waking monkeys. In organic dystonia, EMG power is commonly concentrated at the lowest frequency of the smoothed autopower spectrum (0.39Hz). Therefore, segments of spike trains with a signal-to-noise ratio ? 2 at 0.39 Hz were termed dystonia frequency (DF) segments, which occurred more commonly during dystonia related to movement. Those with a SNR < 2 were termed non-dystonia frequency (nDF) segments, which are associated with spontaneous dystonia. We concentrated on nDF activity since neuronal activity in our controls was measured at rest. Neuronal spike trains were categorized into those with post-inhibitory bursts (G, grouped), with single spikes (NG, non-grouped), or with both single spikes and bursts (I, intermediate). nDF spike trains in ventral oral had more G category firing in dystonia than in controls. The burst rate and the pre-burst silent period in nDF firing of organic dystonia were consistently greater than those of both the monkeys and the patient with Psyd. The distribution of the pre-burst silent period was bimodal with a longer mode of approximately GABAb (gamma amino butyric acid receptor - type b) duration. These results demonstrate distinct differences of post-inhibitory bursting in organic dystonia versus controls. The presence of inhibitory events consistent with GABAb duration suggests interventions for treatment of dystonia. PMID:24125808

  7. Maximizing Exposure Therapy: An Inhibitory Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Craske, Michelle G.; Treanor, Michael; Conway, Chris; Zbozinek, Tomislav; Vervliet, Bram

    2014-01-01

    Exposure therapy is an effective approach for treating anxiety disorders, although a substantial number of individuals fail to benefit or experience a return of fear after treatment. Research suggests that anxious individuals show deficits in the mechanisms believed to underlie exposure therapy, such as inhibitory learning. Targeting these processes may help improve the efficacy of exposure-based procedures. Although evidence supports an inhibitory learning model of extinction, there has been little discussion of how to implement this model in clinical practice. The primary aim of this paper is to provide examples to clinicians for how to apply this model to optimize exposure therapy with anxious clients, in ways that distinguish it from a ‘fear habituation’ approach and ‘belief disconfirmation’ approach within standard cognitive-behavior therapy. Exposure optimization strategies include 1) expectancy violation, 2) deepened extinction, 3) occasional reinforced extinction, 4) removal of safety signals, 5) variability, 6) retrieval cues, 7) multiple contexts, and 8) affect labeling. Case studies illustrate methods of applying these techniques with a variety of anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and panic disorder. PMID:24864005

  8. Social inhibitory control in five lemur species.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Rachna B; MacLean, Evan L; Sandel, Aaron A; Hare, Brian

    2015-07-01

    We tested five lemur species-ring-tailed lemurs, ruffed lemurs, mongoose lemurs, black lemurs, and Coquerel's sifakas-(N = 52) in an experiment that evaluated skills for inhibitory control in a social context. First, two human experimenters presented identical food rewards; the "generous" experimenter allowed the subject to eat from her hand, whereas the "competitive" experimenter always withheld the reward. Lemurs quickly learned to approach the generous experimenter and avoid the competitive one. In the inhibition test phase, we endowed the competitive experimenter with a more valuable food reward but the competitive experimenter continued to withhold food from the subject. Thus, lemurs were required to inhibit approaching the more desirable reward in favor of the lesser but obtainable reward presented by the generous experimenter. In test trials, lemurs' tendency to approach the competitive experimenter increased from the reputation phase, demonstrating sensitivity to the experimental manipulation. However, subjects approached the larger reward less frequently in test trials compared with pretest food-preference trials, evidencing some capacity for inhibitory control in this context. Despite differences in sociality and ecology, the five lemur species did not differ in this ability. Although the study did not uncover species differences, this experimental task may provide a useful measure of social inhibition in broader comparative studies. PMID:25822664

  9. Bilingualism influences inhibitory control in auditory comprehension.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K; Marian, Viorica

    2011-02-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among four pictures while their eye-movements were tracked. Each target picture (e.g., hamper) appeared together with a similar-sounding within-language competitor picture (e.g., hammer) and two neutral pictures. Following each eye-tracking trial, priming probe trials indexed residual activation of target words, and residual inhibition of competitor words. Eye-tracking showed similar within-language competition across groups; priming showed stronger competitor inhibition in monolinguals than in bilinguals, suggesting differences in how inhibitory control was used to resolve within-language competition. Notably, correlation analyses revealed that inhibition performance on a nonlinguistic Stroop task was related to linguistic competition resolution in bilinguals but not in monolinguals. Together, monolingual-bilingual comparisons suggest that cognitive control mechanisms can be shaped by linguistic experience. PMID:21159332

  10. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  11. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  12. ACSB: A minimum performance assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Lloyd Thomas; Kissick, William A.

    1988-01-01

    Amplitude companded sideband (ACSB) is a new modulation technique which uses a much smaller channel width than does conventional frequency modulation (FM). Among the requirements of a mobile communications system is adequate speech intelligibility. This paper explores this aspect of minimum required performance. First, the basic principles of ACSB are described, with emphasis on those features that affect speech quality. Second, the appropriate performance measures for ACSB are reviewed. Third, a subjective voice quality scoring method is used to determine the values of the performance measures that equate to the minimum level of intelligibility. It is assumed that the intelligibility of an FM system operating at 12 dB SINAD represents that minimum. It was determined that ACSB operating at 12 dB SINAD with an audio-to-pilot ratio of 10 dB provides approximately the same intelligibility as FM operating at 12 dB SINAD.

  13. The Maunder minimum: a revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, Nadezhda; Ponyavin, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    One of the most enigmatic features of the solar history in the past was the Maunder minimum (1645-1715). We estimated the daily nominal sunspot counts of each observer individually from 1610 to 1720. Simultaneous comparison of textual reports, tables, and sunspot drawings reveals a significant difference between them. Some observers (among whom were Jean Picard and Giovanni Domenico Cassini, both from the Royal Observatory in Paris) systematically made gaps in reports when others noticed sunspots. Philippe de La Hire announced only fewer sunspot groups compared with the other observers. We argue that different points of view of observers of the seventeenth-century on the origin of sunspots resulted in strong underestimation of sunspot groups. Our findings suggest that the Maunder minimum was an ordinary secular minimum with reduced but non-stopped solar cyclicity.

  14. Effects of temperature and medium composition on inhibitory activities of gossypol-related compounds against aflatoxigenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of temperature and medium composition on growth/aflatoxin inhibitory activities of gossypol, gossypolone and apogossypolone against Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus were investigated. The compounds were tested in a Czapek agar medium at 25 C, 31 C and 37 C at a concentration of 100 µg ...

  15. A Lectin with Highly Potent Inhibitory Activity toward Breast Cancer Cells from Edible Tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. Nagaimo

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-01-01

    A 70-kDa galactose-specific lectin was purified from the tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo. The purification involved three chromatographic steps: anion exchange chromatography on a Q-Sepharose column, FPLC-anion exchange chromatography on a Mono Q column, and FPLC-gel filtration on a Superdex 75 column. The purified nagaimo lectin presented as a single 35-kDa band in reducing SDS-PAGE while it exhibited a 70-kDa single band in non-reducing SDS-PAGE suggesting its dimeric nature. Nagaimo lectin displayed moderate thermostability, retaining full hemagglutinating activity after heating up to 62°C for 30 minutes. It also manifested stability over a wide pH range from pH 2 to 13. Nagaimo lectin was a galactose-specific lectin, as evidenced by binding with galactose and galactose-containing sugars such as lactose and raffinose. The minimum concentration of galactose, lactose and raffinose required to exert an inhibitory effect on hemagglutinating activity of nagaimo lectin was 20 mM, 5 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Nagaimo lectin inhibited the growth of some cancer cell lines including breast cancer MCF7 cells, hepatoma HepG2 cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells, with IC50 values of 3.71 µM, 7.12 µM and 19.79 µM, respectively, after 24 hour treatment with nagaimo lectin. The induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization indicated that nagaimo lectin evoked apoptosis in MCF7 cells. However, the anti-proliferative activity of nagaimo lectin was not blocked by application of galactose, signifying that the activity was not related to the carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin. PMID:23349827

  16. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tristan, I. Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-15

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  17. The inhibitory effect of selenium nanoparticles on protein glycation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaoxuan; Zhang, Wentao; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Wenxin; Guo, Ruochen; Wang, Yashan; Zhang, Daohong; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-04-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) possess well-known excellent biological activities and low toxicity, and have been employed for numerous applications except as inhibitors to protein glycation. Herein, the present study is carried out to investigate the inhibitory effect of Se NPs on protein glycation in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose system. By measuring the amount of glucose covalently bound onto BSA, the formation of fructosamine and fluorescent products, it is found that Se NPs can hinder the development of protein glycation in a dose-dependent but time-independent manner under the selected reaction conditions (55 °C, 40 h). And after comparing the increase of inhibitory rate in different stages, it is observed that Se NPs show the greatest inhibitory effect in the early stage, then in the advanced stage, but no effect in the intermediate stage. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy characterization of Se NPs collected after glycation and determination of ·OH influence and glyoxal formation show that the mechanism for the inhibitory efficacy of Se NPs is related to their strong competitive activity against available amino groups in proteins, their great scavenging activity on reactive oxygen species and their inhibitory effect on ?-dicarbonyl compounds’ formation. In addition, it is proved that Se NPs protect proteins from structural modifications in the system and they do not exhibit significant cytotoxicity towards BV-2 and BRL-3A cells at low concentrations (10 and 50 ?g mL-1). Consequently, Se NPs may be suitable for further in vivo studies as novel anti-glycation agents.

  18. 76 FR 11668 - Minimum Capital

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ... Enterprises' future, FHFA is monitoring the activities of the Enterprises to: (a) Limit their risk and... 12 U.S.C. 4612(d). The 60-day comment period closed on April 9, 2010. See Federal Register 75 FR 6151... amended. See 74 FR 5597 (January 30, 2009). As a result, the definition of ``minimum capital level''...

  19. 75 FR 6151 - Minimum Capital

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ...The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is issuing and seeking comment on a proposed rule to effect a provision of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act that provides for a temporary increase in the minimum capital level for entities regulated by FHFA--Federal National Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation or the Federal Home Loan Banks.......

  20. Designing Minimum Cost Nonblocking Communication

    E-print Network

    Turner, Jonathan S.

    Cost Nonblocking Communication Networks Figure 1: Alternative Campus Network Designs to multirateDesigning Minimum Cost Nonblocking Communication Networks J. Andrew Fingerhut Subhash Suri Jonathan of topological design of ATM (and similar) com- munication networks. We formulate the problem from a worst

  1. On the Minimum Vocabulary Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekharan, N.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of a directed graph model as a tool for finding desirable minimum vocabularies to be used in indexing and information retrieval. The basic algorithm is outlined, possible enhancements to the model are discussed, and further research questions are suggested. (Author/CLB)

  2. General Requirements and Minimum Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2003

    This publication provides the General Requirements and Minimum Standards developed by the National Court Reporters Association's Council on Approved Student Education (CASE). They are the same for all court reporter education programs, whether an institution is applying for approval for the first time or for a new grant of approval. The first…

  3. Approximating the Minimum Weight Triangulation

    E-print Network

    Eppstein, David

    Approximating the Minimum Weight Triangulation David Eppstein Department of Information be approximated within a constant factor by a triangulation algorithm based on quadtrees. In O(n log n) time we can compute a triangulation with O(n) new points, and no ob- tuse triangles, that approximates

  4. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school…

  5. A Novel Lectin with Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Dried Fruiting Bodies of the Monkey Head Mushroom Hericium erinaceum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanrui; Zhang, Guoqing; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wang, Hexiang

    2010-01-01

    A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA) was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51?kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5?mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9–12.1 and at temperatures up to 70°C, but was inhibited by Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF7) cells with an IC50 of 56.1??M and 76.5??M, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 31.7??M. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity. PMID:20625408

  6. Aqueous and Organic Solvent-Extracts of Selected South African Medicinal Plants Possess Antimicrobial Activity against Drug-Resistant Strains of Helicobacter pylori: Inhibitory and Bactericidal Potential

    PubMed Central

    Njume, Collise; Jide, Afolayan A.; Ndip, Roland N.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify sources of cheap starting materials for the synthesis of new drugs against Helicobacter pylori. Solvent-extracts of selected medicinal plants; Combretum molle, Sclerocarya birrea, Garcinia kola, Alepidea amatymbica and a single Strychnos species were investigated against 30 clinical strains of H. pylori alongside a reference control strain (NCTC 11638) using standard microbiological techniques. Metronidazole and amoxicillin were included in these experiments as positive control antibiotics. All the plants demonstrated anti-H. pylori activity with zone diameters of inhibition between 0 and 38 mm and 50% minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC50) values ranging from 0.06 to 5.0 mg/mL. MIC50 values for amoxicillin and metronidazole ranged from 0.001 to 0.63 mg/mL and 0.004 to 5.0 mg/mL respectively. The acetone extracts of C. molle and S. birrea exhibited a remarkable bactericidal activity against H. pylori killing more than 50% of the strains within 18 h at 4× MIC and complete elimination of the organisms within 24 h. Their antimicrobial activity was comparable to the control antibiotics. However, the activity of the ethanol extract of G. kola was lower than amoxicillin (P < 0.05) as opposed to metronidazole (P > 0.05). These results demonstrate that S. birrea, C. molle and G. kola may represent good sources of compounds with anti-H. pylori activity. PMID:22016616

  7. Ultrasonic extraction of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica and their antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Yang, Xiaoman; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Sun, Huili; Chen, Deke; Pan, Jianyu

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, ultrasonic extraction technique (UET) is used to improve the yield of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica (LJPs). And their antioxidative as well as glycosidase inhibitory activities are investigated. Box-Behnken design (BBD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) is applied to optimize ultrasonic extraction for polysaccharides. The optimized conditions are obtained as extraction time at 54 min, ultrasonic power at 1050 W, extraction temperature at 80°C and ratio of material to solvent at 1:50 (g mL-1). Under these optimal ultrasonic extraction conditions, an actual experimental yield (5.75% ± 0.3%) is close to the predicted result (5.67%) with no significant difference ( P > 0.05). Vitro antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities tests indicate that the crude polysaccharides (LJP) and two major ethanol precipitated fractions (LJP1 and LJP2) are in a concentration-dependent manner. LJP2 (30%-60% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) possesses the strongest ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity and moderate scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (66.09% ± 2.19%, 3.0 mg mL-1). Also, the inhibitory activity against ?-glucosidase (59.08% ± 3.79%, 5.0 mg mL-1) is close to that of acarbose (63.99% ± 3.27%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP1 (30% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) exhibits the strongest scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (99.80% ± 0.00%, 3.0 mg mL-1) and moderate ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity (47.76% ± 1.92%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP shows the most remarkable DPPH scavenging activity (66.20% ± 0.11%, 5.0 mg mL-1) but weakest ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity (37.77% ± 1.30%, 5.0 mg mL-1). However, all these LJPs exert weak inhibitory effects against ?-amylase. These results show that UET is an effective method for extracting bioactive polysaccharides from seaweed materials. LJP1 and LJP2 can be developed as a potential ingredient in hypoglycemic agents or functional food for the management of diabetes. This study provides scientific evidence and advances in the preparation technology and a hypoglycemic activities evaluation method for seaweed polysaccharides, especially glycosidase inhibition in combination with an antioxidative activity evaluation method.

  8. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  9. Morphological, Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Twelve Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria and Their Response to Various Zinc Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Dadook, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Sedigheh; Salehi, Mitra; Irian, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Zinc is an essential micronutrient used in the form of zinc sulfate in fertilizers in the agriculture production system. Nitrogen-fixing microorganisms are also of considerable value in promoting soil fertility. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the degree of sensitivity to varying concentrations of zinc, in the form of ZnSO4, in different strains of Azotobacter chroococcum in a laboratory environment. Materials and Methods: To isolate A. chroococcum strains, soil samples were collected from wheat, corn and asparagus rhizospheres and cultured in media lacking nitrogen at 30?C for 48 hours. Strains were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. The presence of the nitrogenase enzyme system was confirmed by testing for the presence of the nifH gene using PCR analysis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and optimal zinc concentration for the growth of each strain was determined. Results: A total of 12 bacterial strains were isolated from six different soil samples. A. chroococcum strains were morphologically and biochemically characterized. The presence of the nifH gene was confirmed in all the strains. MIC and the optimal zinc concentration for bacterial growth were 50 ppm and 20 ppm, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that increasing the concentration of zinc in the agricultural soil is harmful to beneficial microorganisms and reduces the soil fertility. A 20-ppm zinc concentration in soil is suggested to be optimal. PMID:25147702

  10. Screening of traditional European herbal medicines for acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Wszelaki, Natalia; Kuciun, Agnieszka; Kiss, Anna Karolina

    2010-03-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to enhance central cholinergic transmission. On the other hand, butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitors were reported to produce a significant increase in brain extracellular AChE without triggering severe peripheral or central side effects. In the present study, we selected twelve plants used in traditional European medicine to treat different central nervous system (CNS) disorders or to improve memory. Methanolic and hexane extracts of these plants were tested for the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's colorimetric method. The most potent AChE and BuChE inhibition was observed in the hexane extracts of the flowers of Arnica chamissonis Less. subs. foliosa and Ruta graveolens L. herb at a concentration of 400 microg mL(-1). However, methanolic extracts of the flowers of Arnica chamissonis Less. subs. foliosa and the Hypericum perforatum L. herb demonstrated at the same concentration, selective inhibition only against AChE but not against BuChE. The other extracts did not show any significant AChE or BuChE inhibitory activity. Our results show that further investigations of the extracts of arnica, rue and St. John's Wort are needed to identity the compounds responsible for the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activity. PMID:20228046

  11. Experimental studies on glycolytic enzyme inhibitory and antiglycation potential of Triphala

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Jain, Shubhangi; Agarwal, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Imbalance in cellular metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids is observed in diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic ?-amylase and ?-glucosidases are responsible for the conversion of polysaccharides into glucose that enters in the blood stream. Triphala has shown antidiabetic effects (type 2) in human subjects. However, its effects on glycolytic enzymes and protein glycation have not been studied. Aim: To evaluate glycolytic enzyme inhibitory and antiglycation potential of Triphala. Materials and Methods: Triphala Churna was extracted with cold water and subjected to phytochemical analysis. Studies on ? amylase and ? glucosidase inhibition were performed, and its antiglycation potential was determined. Results: Triphala extract showed prominent ?-amylase inhibitory potential (48.66% at concentration 250 ?g/ml). Percent ?-glucosidase inhibition increased with increasing concentration of the extract (6.32–40.64%). Extract showed remarkable results for antiglycation potential. Triphala extract showed glycation inhibition by inhibiting fructosamine; fructosamine inhibition was found to be 37.74%, protein carbonyls were inhibited up to 15.23% whereas protein thiols were inhibited up to 84.81%. Conclusion: Triphala showed glycolytic enzyme inhibitory and antiglycation potential. Hence, it can be effectively used in the diabetes management. PMID:26730147

  12. Inhibitory Control Predicts Language Switching Performance in Trilingual Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linck, Jared A.; Schwieter, John W.; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of domain-general inhibitory control in trilingual speech production. Taking an individual differences approach, we examined the relationship between performance on a non-linguistic measure of inhibitory control (the Simon task) and a multilingual language switching task for a group of fifty-six native English (L1)…

  13. Sustained Attention and Age Predict Inhibitory Control during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reck, Sarah G.; Hund, Alycia M.

    2011-01-01

    Executive functioning skills develop rapidly during early childhood. Recent research has focused on specifying this development, particularly predictors of executive functioning skills. Here we focus on sustained attention as a predictor of inhibitory control, one key executive functioning component. Although sustained attention and inhibitory

  14. Inhibitory circuits in sensory maps develop through Naoum P. Issa

    E-print Network

    Issa, Naoum

    Inhibitory circuits in sensory maps develop through excitation Naoum P. Issa Department studied, little is known about how inhibitory circuits develop. In a recent study, Gunsoo Kim and Karl Kandler have shown that, as in the devel- opment of excitatory circuits, synapse elimination

  15. Residential Mobility, Inhibitory Control, and Academic Achievement in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Sara A.; Finders, Jennifer K.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct effects of residential mobility on children's inhibitory control and academic achievement during the preschool year. It also explored fall inhibitory control and academic skills as mediators linking residential mobility and spring achievement. Participants included 359 preschool children (49% female)…

  16. Residential Mobility, Inhibitory Control, and Academic Achievement in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Sara A.; Finders, Jennifer K.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study investigated the direct effects of residential mobility on children's inhibitory control and academic achievement during the preschool year. It also explored fall inhibitory control and academic skills as mediators linking residential mobility and spring achievement. Participants included 359 preschool…

  17. An anti-steroidogenic inhibitory primer pheromone in male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus).

    PubMed

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Wang, Huiyong; Bryan, Mara B; Wu, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas S; Li, Weiming

    2013-08-01

    Reproductive functions can be modulated by both stimulatory and inhibitory primer pheromones released by conspecifics. Many stimulatory primer pheromones have been documented, but relatively few inhibitory primer pheromones have been reported in vertebrates. The sea lamprey male sex pheromone system presents an advantageous model to explore the stimulatory and inhibitory primer pheromone functions in vertebrates since several pheromone components have been identified. We hypothesized that a candidate sex pheromone component, 7?, 12?-dihydroxy-5?-cholan-3-one-24-oic acid (3 keto-allocholic acid or 3kACA), exerts priming effects through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To test this hypothesis, we measured the peptide concentrations and gene expressions of lamprey gonadotropin releasing hormones (lGnRH) and the HPG output in immature male sea lamprey exposed to waterborne 3kACA. Exposure to waterborne 3kACA altered neuronal activation markers such as jun and jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and lGnRH mRNA levels in the brain. Waterborne 3kACA also increased lGnRH-III, but not lGnRH-I or -II, in the forebrain. In the plasma, 3kACA exposure decreased all three lGnRH peptide concentrations after 1h exposure. After 2h exposure, 3kACA increased lGnRH-I and -III, but decreased lGnRH-II peptide concentrations in the plasma. Plasma lGnRH peptide concentrations showed differential phasic patterns. Group housing condition appeared to increase the averaged plasma lGnRH levels in male sea lamprey compared to isolated males. Interestingly, 15?-hydroxyprogesterone (15?-P) concentrations decreased after prolonged 3kACA exposure (at least 24h). To our knowledge, this is the only known synthetic vertebrate pheromone component that inhibits steroidogenesis in males. PMID:23644156

  18. An anti-steroidogenic inhibitory primer pheromone in male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Wang, Huiyong; Bryan, Mara B.; Wu, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive functions can be modulated by both stimulatory and inhibitory primer pheromones released by conspecifics. Many stimulatory primer pheromones have been documented, but relatively few inhibitory primer pheromones have been reported in vertebrates. The sea lamprey male sex pheromone system presents an advantageous model to explore the stimulatory and inhibitory primer pheromone functions in vertebrates since several pheromone components have been identified. We hypothesized that a candidate sex pheromone component, 7?, 12?-dihydroxy-5?-cholan-3-one-24-oic acid (3 keto-allocholic acid or 3kACA), exerts priming effects through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To test this hypothesis, we measured the peptide concentrations and gene expressions of lamprey gonadotropin releasing hormones (lGnRH) and the HPG output in immature male sea lamprey exposed to waterborne 3kACA. Exposure to waterborne 3kACA altered neuronal activation markers such as jun and jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and lGnRH mRNA levels in the brain. Waterborne 3kACA also increased lGnRH-III, but not lGnRH-I or -II, in the forebrain. In the plasma, 3kACA exposure decreased all three lGnRH peptide concentrations after 1 h exposure. After 2 h exposure, 3kACA increased lGnRHI and -III, but decreased lGnRH-II peptide concentrations in the plasma. Plasma lGnRH peptide concentrations showed differential phasic patterns. Group housing condition appeared to increase the averaged plasma lGnRH levels in male sea lamprey compared to isolated males. Interestingly, 15?-hydroxyprogesterone (15?-P) concentrations decreased after prolonged 3kACA exposure (at least 24 h). To our knowledge, this is the only known synthetic vertebrate pheromone component that inhibits steroidogenesis in males.

  19. Inhibitory processes in visual perception: a bilingual advantage.

    PubMed

    Wimmer, Marina C; Marx, Christina

    2014-10-01

    Bilingual inhibitory control advantages are well established. An open question is whether inhibitory superiority also extends to visual perceptual phenomena that involve inhibitory processes. This research used ambiguous figures to assess inhibitory bilingual superiority in 3-, 4-, and 5-year-old mono- and bilingual children (N=141). Findings show that bilinguals across all ages are superior in inhibiting a prevalent interpretation of an ambiguous figure to perceive the alternative interpretation. In contrast, mono- and bilinguals revealed no differences in understanding that an ambiguous figure can have two distinct referents. Together, these results suggest that early bilingual inhibitory control superiority is also evident in visual perception. Bilinguals' conceptual understanding of figure ambiguity is comparable to that of their monolingual peers. PMID:24878102

  20. Solar Effects on Climate and the Maunder Minimum: Minimum Certainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    2003-01-01

    The current state of our understanding of solar effects on climate is reviewed. As an example of the relevant issues, the climate during the Maunder Minimum is compared with current conditions in GCM simulations that include a full stratosphere and parameterized ozone response to solar spectral irradiance variability and trace gas changes. The GISS Global Climate/Middle Atmosphere Model coupled to a q-flux/mixed layer model is used for the simulations, which begin in 1500 and extend to the present. Experiments were made to investigate the effect of total versus spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes; spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes on the stratospheric ozone/climate response with both pre-industrial and present trace gases; and the impact on climate and stratospheric ozone of the preindustrial trace gases and aerosols by themselves. The results showed that: (1) the Maunder Minimum cooling relative to today was primarily associated with reduced anthropogenic radiative forcing, although the solar reduction added 40% to the overall cooling. There is no obvious distinguishing surface climate pattern between the two forcings. (2)The global and tropical response was greater than 1 C, in a model with a sensitivity of 1.2 C per W m-2. To reproduce recent low-end estimates would require a sensitivity 1/4 as large. (3) The global surface temperature change was similar when using the total and spectral irradiance prescriptions, although the tropical response was somewhat greater with the former, and the stratospheric response greater with the latter. (4) Most experiments produce a relative negative phase of the NAO/AO during the Maunder Minimum, with both solar and anthropogenic forcing equally capable, associated with the tropical cooling and relative poleward EP flux refraction. (5) A full stratosphere appeared to be necessary for the negative AO/NAO phase, as was the case with this model for global warming experiments, unless the cooling was very large, while the ozone response played a minor role and did not influence surface temperature significantly. (6) Stratospheric ozone was most affected by the difference between present day and preindustrial atmospheric composition and chemistry, with increases in the upper and lower stratosphere during the Maunder Minimum. While the estimated UV reduction led to ozone decreases, this was generally less important than the anthropogenic effect except in the upper middle stratosphere, as judged by two different ozone photochemistry schemes. (7) The effect of the reduced solar irradiance on stratospheric ozone and on climate was similar in Maunder Minimum and current atmospheric conditions.

  1. Inhibitory activity of isoniazid and ethionamide against Cryptococcus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Serpa, Rosana; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; de Melo, Charlline Vládia Silva; Evangelista, Antonio José de Jesus; Mota, Valquíria Ferreira; Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the search for drugs to treat systemic and opportunistic mycoses has attracted great interest from the scientific community. This study evaluated the in vitro inhibitory effect of the antituberculosis drugs isoniazid and ethionamide alone and combined with itraconazole and fluconazole against biofilms of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. Antimicrobials were tested at defined concentrations after susceptibility assays with Cryptococcus planktonic cells. In addition, we investigated the synergistic interaction of antituberculosis drugs and azole derivatives against Cryptococcus planktonic cells, as well as the influence of isoniazid and ethionamide on ergosterol content and cell membrane permeability. Isoniazid and ethionamide inhibited both biofilm formation and viability of mature biofilms. Combinations formed by antituberculosis drugs and azoles proved synergic against both planktonic and sessile cells, showing an ability to reduce Cryptococcus biofilms by approximately 50%. Furthermore, isoniazid and ethionamide reduced the content of ergosterol in Cryptococcus spp. planktonic cells and destabilized or permeabilized the fungal cell membrane, leading to leakage of macromolecules. Owing to the paucity of drugs able to inhibit Cryptococcus biofilms, we believe that the results presented here might be of interest in the designing of new antifungal compounds. PMID:26362025

  2. Screening of Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Kumar, Venkatesan; Houghton, Peter J

    2007-12-01

    The cholinergic hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided the rationale for the current pharmaco-therapy of this disease, in an attempt to reduce the cognitive decline caused by cholinergic deficits. Nevertheless, the search for potent and long-acting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that exert minimal side effects in AD patients is still ongoing. AChE inhibitors are currently the only approved therapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease; only a limited number of drugs are commercially available. Hydroalcohol extracts of six herbs, Andrographis paniculata, Centella asiatica, Evalvulus alsinoides, Nardostachys jatamansi, Nelumbo nucifera, Myristica fragrans used in Indian systems of medicine, were tested for in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity based on Ellman's method in 96-well microplates using AChE obtained from bovine erythrocytes. The results showed that the hydroalcohol extract from Centella asiatica, Nardostachys jatamansi, Myristica fragrans, Evalvulus alsinoides inhibited 50% of AChE activity at concentrations of 100-150 microg/mL. Andrographis paniculata and Nelumbo nucifera extracts showed a weak inhibition of acetylcholinesterase with IC(50) values of 222.41 +/- 19.87 microg/mL and 185.55 +/- 21.24 microg/mL, respectively. Physostigmine was used as a standard and showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase with an IC(50) value of 0.076 +/- 0.0042 microg/mL. PMID:17639556

  3. Design of rat renin inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Hui, K Y; Holtzman, E J; Quinones, M A; Hollenberg, N K; Haber, E

    1988-09-01

    Because several well-studied strains of rats manifest spontaneous hypertension, we set out to design a renin inhibitor suitable for use in this species. On the basis of the sequence of the renin substrate, a series of substrate analogue inhibitory peptides were synthesized by systematically modifying the P5, P3, P2, P1P1', P2', P3', and P4' positions. In assays against rat plasma renin, we found that modifications at the C-terminal segment have a marked influence on potency, and that a secondary butyl side chain at the P2' position is important for obtaining optimal activity. The structure at the P3' position, however, could vary considerably without significant effect. The steric effect of the P2 position was important; there an isopropyl side chain provided optimal binding between the inhibitor and the enzyme. At the P3 and P5 positions, potency appeared to depend on aromatic side chains. The effects at the P1P1' position of the transition-state residue (3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy -6-methylheptanoic acid (statine) and its congeners (3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-5-phenylpentanoic acid (AHPPA) and (3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-5-cyclohexylpentanoic acid (ACHPA) were found to depend on the sequence of the C-terminal segment. For peptides with an unfavorable C-terminal segment (-Ile-Phe-NH2), AHPPA and ACHPA resulted in a surprising retention of potency. For peptides with a favorable C-terminal segment (-Leu-Phe-NH2), the effect of AHPPA was mild, even though ACHPA still significantly enhanced potency. The hypotensive and plasma renin inhibitory effects of three of the analogues were then studied in anesthetized sodium-depleted rats. One of the compounds, acetyl-His-Pro-Phe-Val-Statine-Leu-Phe-NH2 (IC50 against rat plasma renin of 30 nM at pH 7.4), proved to be a potent hypotensive agent and a potentially useful probe for the study of the renin-angiotensin system in rats. PMID:3045320

  4. MICE LACKING THE TRANSCRIPTIONAL COACTIVATOR PGC-1? EXHIBIT ALTERATIONS IN INHIBITORY SYNAPTIC TRANSMISSION IN THE MOTOR CORTEX

    PubMed Central

    DOUGHERTY, S.E.; BARTLEY, A.F.; LUCAS, E.K.; HABLITZ, J.J.; DOBRUNZ, L.E.; COWELL, R. M.

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator activated receptor ? coactivator 1? (PGC-1?) is a transcriptional coactivator known to regulate gene programs in a cell-specific manner in energy-demanding tissues, and its dysfunction has been implicated in numerous neurological and psychiatric disorders. Previous work from the Cowell laboratory indicates that PGC-1? is concentrated in inhibitory interneurons and required for the expression of the calcium buffer parvalbumin (PV) in the cortex; however, the impact of PGC-1? deficiency on inhibitory neurotransmission in the motor cortex is not known. Here, we show that mice lacking PGC-1? exhibit increased amplitudes and decreased frequency of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents in layer V pyramidal neurons. Upon repetitive train stimulation at the gamma frequency, decreased GABA release is observed. Furthermore, PV-positive interneurons in PGC-1? ?/? mice display reductions in intrinsic excitability and excitatory input without changes in gross interneuron morphology. Taken together, these data show that PGC-1? is required for normal inhibitory neurotransmission and cortical PV-positive interneuron function. Given the pronounced motor dysfunction in PGC-1? ?/? mice and the essential role of PV-positive interneurons in maintenance of cortical excitatory:inhibitory balance, it is possible that deficiencies in PGC-1? expression could contribute to cortical hyperexcitability and motor abnormalities in multiple neurological disorders. PMID:24769433

  5. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  6. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... Administrative Forms Standard Forms Skip Navigation Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H1 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... / Topics / ... Chart / Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Z7_0Q0619C0JGR010IFST1G5B10H3 Web Content Viewer (JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Z7_ ...

  7. Minimum impulse orbital evasive maneuvers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burk, Roger C.; Widhalm, Joseph W.

    1989-02-01

    The defeat of an attack on a satellite by a threat sphere moving in a Keplerian orbit is presently achieved by changing the satellite's orbital velocity at a specified time, thereby avoiding the penetration of the threat sphere. An algorithm employing a method of differential corrections was developed to ascertain the minimum-impulse evasive maneuver. The sensitivity of this solution to intercept parameter variations was also studied; maneuver time was the most important parameter, followed by threat sphere radius.

  8. Organic carbon, and not copper, controls denitrification in oxygen minimum zones of the ocean

    E-print Network

    Ward, Bess

    conditions and ambient oxygen concentrations were used to investigate the response of microbial assemblagesOrganic carbon, and not copper, controls denitrification in oxygen minimum zones of the ocean Bess Oxygen minimum zone Carbon limitation a b s t r a c t Incubation experiments under trace metal clean

  9. Action Potential Initiation in Neocortical Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Li, Tun; Tian, Cuiping; Scalmani, Paolo; Frassoni, Carolina; Mantegazza, Massimo; Wang, Yonghong; Yang, Mingpo; Wu, Si; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-01-01

    Action potential (AP) generation in inhibitory interneurons is critical for cortical excitation-inhibition balance and information processing. However, it remains unclear what determines AP initiation in different interneurons. We focused on two predominant interneuron types in neocortex: parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SST)-expressing neurons. Patch-clamp recording from mouse prefrontal cortical slices showed that axonal but not somatic Na+ channels exhibit different voltage-dependent properties. The minimal activation voltage of axonal channels in SST was substantially higher (?7 mV) than in PV cells, consistent with differences in AP thresholds. A more mixed distribution of high- and low-threshold channel subtypes at the axon initial segment (AIS) of SST cells may lead to these differences. Surprisingly, NaV1.2 was found accumulated at AIS of SST but not PV cells; reducing NaV1.2-mediated currents in interneurons promoted recurrent network activity. Together, our results reveal the molecular identity of axonal Na+ channels in interneurons and their contribution to AP generation and regulation of network activity. PMID:25203314

  10. Action potential initiation in neocortical inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Tun; Tian, Cuiping; Scalmani, Paolo; Frassoni, Carolina; Mantegazza, Massimo; Wang, Yonghong; Yang, Mingpo; Wu, Si; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-09-01

    Action potential (AP) generation in inhibitory interneurons is critical for cortical excitation-inhibition balance and information processing. However, it remains unclear what determines AP initiation in different interneurons. We focused on two predominant interneuron types in neocortex: parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SST)-expressing neurons. Patch-clamp recording from mouse prefrontal cortical slices showed that axonal but not somatic Na+ channels exhibit different voltage-dependent properties. The minimal activation voltage of axonal channels in SST was substantially higher (?7 mV) than in PV cells, consistent with differences in AP thresholds. A more mixed distribution of high- and low-threshold channel subtypes at the axon initial segment (AIS) of SST cells may lead to these differences. Surprisingly, NaV1.2 was found accumulated at AIS of SST but not PV cells; reducing NaV1.2-mediated currents in interneurons promoted recurrent network activity. Together, our results reveal the molecular identity of axonal Na+ channels in interneurons and their contribution to AP generation and regulation of network activity. PMID:25203314

  11. Identification of benzoquinones in pretreated lignocellulosic feedstocks and inhibitory effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Stagge, Stefan; Cavka, Adnan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-12-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass under acidic conditions gives rise to by-products that inhibit fermenting microorganisms. An analytical procedure for identification of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone (DMBQ) in pretreated biomass was developed, and the inhibitory effects of BQ and DMBQ on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were assessed. The benzoquinones were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Pretreatment liquids examined with regard to the presence of BQ and DMBQ originated from six different lignocellulosic feedstocks covering agricultural residues, hardwood, and softwood, and were produced through impregnation with sulfuric acid or sulfur dioxide at varying pretreatment temperature (165-204 °C) and residence time (6-20 min). BQ was detected in all six pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 6 mg/l, while DMBQ was detected in four pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 0.5 mg/l. The result indicates that benzoquinones are ubiquitous as by-products of acid pretreatment of lignocellulose, regardless of feedstock and pretreatment conditions. Fermentation experiments with BQ and DMBQ covered the concentration ranges 2 mg/l to 1 g/l and 20 mg/l to 1 g/l, respectively. Even the lowest BQ concentration tested (2 mg/l) was strongly inhibitory to yeast, while 20 mg/l DMBQ gave a slight negative effect on ethanol formation. This work shows that benzoquinones should be regarded as potent and widespread inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, and that they warrant attention besides more well-studied inhibitory substances, such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, phenols, and furan aldehydes. PMID:26384342

  12. Antioxidant Activities and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Effects of Different Extracts from Pleurotus ostreatus Fruiting Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nuhu; Yoon, Ki Nam; Lee, Kyung Rim; Shin, Pyung Gyun; Cheong, Jong Chun; Yoo, Young Bok; Shim, Ja Mi; Lee, Min Woong; Lee, U Youn

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the antioxidant activity and tyrosinase inhibitory effects of Pleurotus ostreatus fruiting bodies extracted with acetone, methanol, and hot water. The antioxidant activities were tested against ?-carotene-linoleic acid, reducing power, 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl free radical scavenging activity, and ferrous chelating ability. Furthermore, phenolic acid and flavonoid contents were also analyzed. The methanol extract showed the strongest ?-carotene-linoleic acid inhibition as compared to the other exracts. The acetone extract (8 mg/mL) showed a significantly high reducing power of 1.54 than the other extracts. The acetone extract was more effective than other extracts for scavenging on 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl radicals. The strongest chelating effect (85.66%) was obtained from the acetone extract at 1.0 mg/mL. The antioxidant activities of the extracts from the P. ostreatus fruiting bodies increased with increasing concentration. A high performance liquid chromatography analysis detected seven phenolic compounds, including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, naringenin, hesperetin, formononetin, and biochanin-A in an acetonitrile and 0.1 N hydrochloric acid (5 : 1) solvent extract. The total phenolic compound concentration was 188 µg/g. Tyrosinase inhibition of the acetone, methanol, and hot water P. ostreatus extracts increased with increasing concentration. The results revealed that the methanol extract had good tyrosinase inhibitory ability, whereas the acetone and hot water extracts showed moderate activity at the concentrations tested. The results suggested that P. ostreatus may have potential as a natural antioxidant. PMID:23956669

  13. [Inhibitory effects of liquor cultured with Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea tetragona on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Hou, Wen-hua

    2007-10-01

    The inhibitory effects of liquor cultured with Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea tetragona on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa have been investigated by measuring the cell number and the chlorophyll a content of Microcystis aeruginosa of culture in the laboratory. The results showed that the inhibitory effects on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa with different concentration of the liquor cultured with Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea tetragona were dissimilar, and an evident phenomenon appeared that low concentrations could promote the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa. However, the inhibitory effects on the growth of Microcystis aeruginosa with continuous liquor cultured with Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea tetragona were obvious, which made the algal cell almost lose the capability of photosynthesis, and the inhibitory effects of liquor cultured with Nymphaea tetragona were better than those of Nelumbo nucifera. The scale-up experiment demonstrated that the algal cell received menace and damage by measuring the activities of peroxidase (SOD) and the accumulated contents of malondialdehyde (MDA) of Microcystis aeruginosa in the co-culture. Sterilization methods influenced the algal growth inhibition experiment so that high temperature couldn't replace micropore filter, which explained that the matter excreted by Nelumbo nucifera and Nymphaea tetragona may contain thermally-instabe matter. PMID:18268975

  14. Inhibitory Receptors Beyond T Cell Exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Neubert, Natalie J.; Verdeil, Grégory; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory receptors (iRs) are frequently associated with “T cell exhaustion”. However, the expression of iRs is also dependent on T cell differentiation and activation. Therapeutic blockade of various iRs, also referred to as “checkpoint blockade”, is showing ­unprecedented results in the treatment of cancer patients. Consequently, the clinical potential in this field is broad, calling for increased research efforts and rapid refinements in the understanding of iR function. In this review, we provide an overview on the significance of iR expression for the interpretation of T cell functionality. We summarize how iRs have been strongly associated with “T cell exhaustion” and illustrate the parallel evidence on the importance of T cell differentiation and activation for the expression of iRs. The differentiation subsets of CD8 T cells (naïve, effector, and memory cells) show broad and inherent differences in iR expression, while activation leads to strong upregulation of iRs. Therefore, changes in iR expression during an immune response are often concomitant with T cell differentiation and activation. Sustained expression of iRs in chronic infection and in the tumor microenvironment likely reflects a specialized T cell differentiation. In these situations of prolonged antigen exposure and chronic inflammation, T cells are “downtuned” in order to limit tissue damage. Furthermore, we review the novel “checkpoint blockade” treatments and the potential of iRs as biomarkers. Finally, we provide recommendations for the immune monitoring of patients to interpret iR expression data combined with parameters of activation and differentiation of T cells. PMID:26167163

  15. Age-related differences in inhibitory control in the early school years.

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Jacqui A; Beauchamp, Miriam H; Crigan, Judith A; Anderson, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    The transition to school is associated with a greater requirement to inhibit irrelevant or inappropriate thought and behavior in order to concentrate on effective learning and to interact successfully with peers. Current knowledge of inhibitory control development in the early school years is limited due to a lack of normative data from age-appropriate, sensitive measures. In this study, three pictorial versions of the Stroop task were administered to investigate inhibitory control development in early school-aged children. Age-related trajectories of inhibition and effects of gender were examined in 80 children (42 boys) aged 5 to 8 years. All children were assessed with the Cognitive Assessment System Expressive Attention subtest (Big-Small Stroop), Fruit Stroop, and Boy-Girl Stroop. The Big-Small Stroop revealed substantial age-related improvement in inhibition from 5 to 7 years with a levelling of performance at 8 years of age, while the Fruit Stroop and Boy-Girl Stroop demonstrated clear but nonsignificant age trends. In particular, older children committed fewer errors and corrected their errors more frequently than younger children. Performance on all Stroop tasks correlated significantly, providing evidence that they tap similar cognitive abilities. Some gender differences were found. This study indicates that inhibitory skills develop rapidly in the early school years and suggests that error awareness may be a useful indicator of the development of cognitive inhibition for this age group. PMID:23909718

  16. Interaction of macrophage migration inhibitory factor with ceruloplasmin: role of labile copper ions.

    PubMed

    Kostevich, Valeria A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Grudinina, Natalia A; Zakharova, Elena T; Samygina, Valeria R; Vasilyev, Vadim B

    2015-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is a target for pharmacological treatment of sepsis and malignant tumors. Inhibition of tautomerase activity of MIF in reaction with p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) was observed in the presence of ceruloplasmin (CP), a copper-containing plasma protein. Binding labile copper ions to CP (CP+Cu(II)) is a prerequisite for MIF inhibiting. CP+Cu(II) is shown to be an uncompetitive inhibitor of MIF (Ki ~ 37 nM), which suggests formation of a complex 'MIF-HPP-CP-Cu(II)'. Filtration of CP+Cu(II) on a column with Chelex-100, otherwise the presence of high concentrations of histidine, cysteine or methionine abrogated the inhibitory effect of CP. Adding salts of Co(II) and Ni(II) that replace copper ions in the labile sites prevented the inhibitory effect of CP+Cu(II). Limited proteolysis of CP by thrombin diminished its oxidase activity in reaction with p-phenylenediamine, but endowed it with the capacity of inhibiting MIF. Covalent modification of MIF by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) resulted in binding of MIF-PMSF to CP immobilized on CM5 chip, the dissociation constant being 4.2 ?M. In D-galactosamine-sensitized mice CP+Cu(II) increased the LPS-induced lethality from 54 to 100%, while administration of antibodies against MIF prevented the lethal effect. The enhancement by CP+Cu(II) of the pro-inflammatory signal of MIF is discussed. PMID:26091949

  17. Melanogenesis-inhibitory activity and cancer chemopreventive effect of glucosylcucurbic acid from shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kurita, Masahiro; Ebina, Kodai; Ukiya, Motohiko; Tokuda, Harukuni; Yasukawa, Ken; Masters, Eliot T; Shimizu, Naoto; Akihisa, Momoko; Feng, Feng; Akihisa, Toshihiro

    2015-04-01

    Two jasmonate derivatives, glucosylcucurbic acid (1) and methyl glucosylcucurbate (2), were isolated from the MeOH extract of defatted shea (Vitellaria paradoxa; Sapotaceae) kernels. These and their deglucosylated derivatives, cucurbic acid (3) and methyl cucurbate (4), were evaluated for their melanogenesis-inhibitory and cancer chemopreventive potencies. Compounds 1, 3, and 4 exhibited potent melanogenesis-inhibitory activities in ?-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (?-MSH)-stimulated B16 melanoma cells. Western-blot analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 3 reduced the protein levels of MITF (=microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), tyrosinase, TRP-1 (=tyrosine-related protein 1), and TRP-2 mostly in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, compound 1 exhibited inhibitory effects against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells, against TPA-induced inflammation in mice, and against skin tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis test based on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) as initiator, and with TPA as promoter. PMID:25879500

  18. Evaluation of 5?-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful as antiandrogens.

    PubMed

    Nahata, A; Dixit, V K

    2014-08-01

    This study demonstrates 5?-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful in the management of androgenic disorders. Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst (GL), Urtica dioica Linn. (UD), Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming. (CB), Tribulus terrestris Linn. (TT), Pedalium murex Linn. (PM), Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (SI), Cuscuta reflexa Roxb. (CR), Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. (CC), Benincasa hispida Cogn. (BH), Phyllanthus niruri Linn. (PN) and Echinops echinatus Linn. (EE) were included in the study. Petroleum ether, ethanol and aqueous extracts of these herbs were tested for their 5?-reductase inhibitory activity against the standard 5?-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. A biochemical method to determine the activity of 5?-reductase was used to evaluate the inhibition of different extracts to the enzyme. The optical density (OD) value of each sample was measured continuously with ultraviolet spectrophotometer for the reason that the substrate NADPH has a specific absorbance at 340 nm. As the enzyme 5?-reductase uses NADPH as a substrate, so in the presence of 5?-reductase inhibitor, the NADPH concentration will increase with the function of time. This method thus implicates the activity of 5?-reductase. The method proved to be extremely useful to screen the herbs for their 5?-reductase inhibitory potential. GL, UD, BH, SI and CR came out to be promising candidates for further exploring their antiandrogenic properties. PMID:23710567

  19. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of florfenicol on morphology, growth, and viability of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Blickwede, M; Valentin-Weigand, P; Rohde, M; Schwarz, S

    2004-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strain Newman was investigated for changes in its growth pattern, its morphology and its viability when grown in the presence of 3 microg/ml florfenicol (Ff). This concentration corresponds to the 0.75-fold strain-specific minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Under these conditions, S. aureus Newman showed a distinct retardation in its growth pattern and 20% dead cells were detected in a fluorescence microscopic viability assay. However, bactericidal activity - defined as a 3-log drop in the staphylococcal population - was not recorded at this Ff concentration. Further analysis of the cell wall revealed a significant increase in cell wall thickness of S. aureus Newman when grown in the presence of 3 microg/ml Ff. This might result in a compression of the protoplast with subsequent disruption of single staphylococcal cells. Accordingly, 20% of the staphylococcal cells analysed by electron microscopy proved to be disrupted. These observations suggest that Ff can cause a thickening of the cell wall accompanied by impaired viability of the staphylococcal cells. PMID:15458493

  20. Intracellular activity of clinical concentrations of phenothiazines including thioridiazine against phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Amaral, Leonard

    2002-07-01

    The effect of thioridazine (TZ) was studied on the killing activity of human peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages (HPBMDM) and of human macrophage cell line THP-1 at extracellular concentrations below those achievable clinically. These macrophages have nominal killing activity against bacteria and therefore, would not influence any activity that the compounds may have against intracellular localised Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicated that whereas TZ has an in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the strains of S. aureus of 18, 0.1 mg/l of TZ in the medium completely inhibits the growth of S. aureus that has been phagocytosed by macrophages. The latter concentration was non-toxic to macrophages, did not cause cellular expression of activation marker CD69 nor induction of CD3+ T cell production of IFN-gamma, but blocked cellular proliferation and down-regulated the production of T cell-derived cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-5). These results suggest that TZ induces intracellular bactericidal activities independent of the capacity to generate Type 1 responses against S. aureus. PMID:12127709

  1. Effect of gamma radiation and oregano essential oil on murein and ATP concentration of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Caillet, Stéphane; Ursachi, Laura; Shareck, François; Lacroix, Monique

    2009-01-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of gamma-irradiation alone or in combination with oregano essential oil on murein composition of Staphylococcus aureus and on the intracellular and extracellular concentration of ATP. The bacterial strain was treated with 3 irradiation doses: 1.2 kGy to induce cell damage, 2.9 kGy to obtain a viable but nonculturable state, and 3.5 kGy to cause cell death. Oregano essential oil was used at 0.010% and 0.013% (w/v), which is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All treatments had a significant effect (P < or = 0.05) on the murein composition, although some muropeptides did not seem to be affected by the treatment. Each treatment influenced differently the relative percentage and number of muropeptides. There was a significant (P < or = 0.05) correlation between the reduction of intracellular ATP and increase in extracellular ATP following treatment of the cells with oregano oil. The reduction of intracellular ATP was even more important when essential oil was combined with irradiation. Also, irradiation alone of S. aureus induced a significant decrease (P < or = 0.05) of the internal ATP and a significant increase (P < or = 0.05) of the external ATP. However, no significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed in ATP concentrations between different radiation doses. Transmission electron microscopic observation revealed that oregano oil and irradiation have an effect on cell wall structure. PMID:20492121

  2. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  3. ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Functional MRI of inhibitory processing in abstinent

    E-print Network

    California at San Diego, University of

    ORIGINAL INVESTIGATION Functional MRI of inhibitory processing in abstinent adolescent marijuana-Verlag 2007 Abstract Background Marijuana intoxication appears to impair re- sponse inhibition abnormalities in adolescent marijuana users after 28 days of abstinence. Methods Adolescents with (n=16

  4. INHIBITORY CONTROL OF SOMATODENDRITIC INTERACTIONS UNDERLYING ACTION POTENTIALS IN

    E-print Network

    Destexhe, Alain

    INHIBITORY CONTROL OF SOMATODENDRITIC INTERACTIONS UNDERLYING ACTION POTENTIALS IN NEOCORTICAL­­The effect of synaptic inputs on somatodendritic interactions during action potentials was investigated synaptic inputs to different somatodendritic regions. Relative to action potentials evoked by current

  5. Inhibitory Processing of Sad Facial Expressions and Depression Vulnerability

    E-print Network

    Bistricky, Steven L.

    2010-05-17

    be examined through behavioral and psychophysiological indicators, including the N200, P300a, and P300b ERP components. The present study examined whether groups traditionally at risk of depression would show inhibitory deficits for depressive facial...

  6. Shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks with chaotic external inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmet, M. U.; Fen, M. O.

    2013-06-01

    Taking advantage of external inputs, it is shown that shunting inhibitory cellular neural networks behave chaotically. The analysis is based on the Li-Yorke definition of chaos. Appropriate illustrations which support the theoretical results are depicted.

  7. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  8. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  9. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum...

  10. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid § 3923.10 Minimum bid....

  11. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  12. Inflammatory markers are associated with inhibitory avoidance memory deficit induced by sleep deprivation in rats.

    PubMed

    Esumi, L A; Palma, B D; Gomes, V L; Tufik, S; Hipólide, D C

    2011-08-01

    Sleep deprivation (SD) causes detrimental effects to the body, such as memory impairment and weight loss. SD also changes the concentration of inflammatory mediators such as cytokines, which, in turn, can affect cognitive functioning. Thus, the objective of this study was to investigate the involvement of these inflammatory mediators in inhibitory avoidance memory deficit in sleep-deprived rats. Male Wistar rats were deprived of sleep by the modified multiple platform method for 96 h, while their respective controls remained in their housing cages. To assess memory after SD, all animals underwent training, followed by the inhibitory avoidance task test 24h later. Also, the weight of each animal was recorded daily. In the first experiment, animals received an acute administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 or 75 ?g/kg i.p.) 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training. In the experiment 2, the animals received acute or chronic administration of anti-IL-6 antibody (Ab, 2 ?g/kg i.p.). The acute administration was performed 3h before the inhibitory avoidance training, while the chronic treatment administrations were performed daily during the SD period. The 75 ?g/kg dose of LPS, but not the 50 ?g/kg dose, caused a significant attenuation of memory impairment in the sleep-deprived animals. Although the treatments with the anti-IL-6 Ab did not produce any significant changes in cognitive performance, the Ab attenuated weight loss in sleep-deprived animals. Taken together, these results suggest the involvement of inflammatory mediators in the modulation of memory deficit and weight loss that are observed in sleep-deprived rats. PMID:21356250

  13. Isolation, Purification and Molecular Mechanism of a Peanut Protein-Derived ACE-Inhibitory Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Aimin; Liu, Hongzhi; Liu, Li; Hu, Hui; Wang, Qiang; Adhikari, Benu

    2014-01-01

    Although a number of bioactive peptides are capable of angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory effects, little is known regarding the mechanism of peanut peptides using molecular simulation. The aim of this study was to obtain ACE inhibiting peptide from peanut protein and provide insight on the molecular mechanism of its ACE inhibiting action. Peanut peptides having ACE inhibitory activity were isolated through enzymatic hydrolysis and ultrafiltration. Further chromatographic fractionation was conducted to isolate a more potent peanut peptide and its antihypertensive activity was analyzed through in vitro ACE inhibitory tests and in vivo animal experiments. MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS was used to identify its amino acid sequence. Mechanism of ACE inhibition of P8 was analyzed using molecular docking and molecular dynamics simulation. A peanut peptide (P8) having Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence was obtained which had the highest ACE inhibiting activity of 85.77% (half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50): 0.0052 mg/ml). This peanut peptide is a competitive inhibitor and show significant short term (12 h) and long term (28 days) antihypertensive activity. Dynamic tests illustrated that P8 can be successfully docked into the active pocket of ACE and can be combined with several amino acid residues. Hydrogen bond, electrostatic bond and Pi-bond were found to be the three main interaction contributing to the structural stability of ACE-peptide complex. In addition, zinc atom could form metal-carboxylic coordination bond with Tyr, Met residues of P8, resulting into its high ACE inhibiting activity. Our finding indicated that the peanut peptide (P8) having a Lys-Leu-Tyr-Met-Arg-Pro amino acid sequence can be a promising candidate for functional foods and prescription drug aimed at control of hypertension. PMID:25347076

  14. Dominant inhibitory Ras mutants selectively inhibit the activity of either cellular or oncogenic Ras.

    PubMed Central

    Stacey, D W; Feig, L A; Gibbs, J B

    1991-01-01

    Two dominant inhibitory Ras mutant proteins were analyzed by microinjection. One, [Asn-17]Ras, had a substitution in the putative Mg(2+)-binding site of Ha-Ras. The other, RAST, had a mutation in a yeast RAS protein that impaired its GTPase activity and increased its affinity for GAP. RAST also had a mutation that blocked its localization to the plasma membrane. In NIH 3T3 cells [Asn-17]Ras inhibited the function of normal Ras much more efficiently than that of oncogenic Ras. In contrast, RAST interfered with the transforming activity of oncogenic Ras more efficiently than that of normal Ras. These conclusions were based on two separate types of analysis. The inhibitory Ras mutant proteins were first microinjected into cells stably transformed either by oncogenic Ras or by high levels of expression of cellular Ras. Results obtained in stably transformed cells were then verified by coinjection of the inhibitory Ras mutant proteins together with transforming concentrations of either oncogenic or normal Ras protein. Whereas RAST was active in soluble form. [Asn-17]Ras required membrane localization for activity. Furthermore, mutations in the GAP/effector-binding domain reduced or eliminated the inhibitory activity of RAST but had no detectable effect on [Asn-17]Ras. These results are consistent with the possibility that [Asn-17]Ras functions by blocking the activation of endogenous Ras proteins, while RAST functions by blocking the ability of activated Ras to stimulate a downstream target within the cells. The properties of RAST suggest that interference with the GAP/effector-binding function of RAS represents a strategy for the preferential inactivation of oncogenic Ras in cells. Images PMID:2072908

  15. Inhibitory effect of sodium hypochlorite and chlorhexidine digluconate in clinical isolates of Sporothrix schenckii.

    PubMed

    Madrid, Isabel Martins; Mattei, Antonella Souza; Santin, Rosema; dos Reis Gomes, Angelita; Cleff, Marlete Brum; Meireles, Mário Carlos Araújo

    2012-05-01

    The susceptibility of Sporothrix schenckii isolates from clinical cases of canine, feline and human sporotrichosis, and from the environment, was evaluated with 4% sodium hypochlorite and 6.6% chlorhexidine digluconate using the broth microdilution, agar diffusion and direct exposure techniques. The minimal inhibitory concentration was smaller than 0.8% for chlorhexidine digluconate and between 8% and 4% for sodium hypochlorite. Inhibition zones were not found in agar diffusion for sodium hypochlorite, and zones averaging 1.9 mm were found for chlorhexidine digluconate. In the direct exposure test, sodium hypochlorite demonstrated best performance at 20 min of contact, as chlorhexidine digluconate presented little antimicrobial activity. PMID:21902724

  16. Inhibitory effects of arabitol on caries-associated microbiologic parameters of oral Streptococci and Lactobacilli.

    PubMed

    Loman, Abdullah Al; Ju, Lu-Kwang

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to compare arabitol with its better studied isomer xylitol for their inhibitory effects on cell growth and acid production of oral bacteria. Streptococcus mutans, Streptococcus salivarius and Streptococcus sobrinus were used as representatives of oral streptococci and Lactobacillus acidophilus and Lactobacillus fermentum were used for oral lactobacilli. Growth was followed by measuring the absorbance at 660nm, acid production by pH change. Sensitivity of these oral bacteria to arabitol and xylitol was first compared at 1% (65mM) additive concentration with glucose as sugar substrate. For all bacteria tested, the inhibitory effects of the two polyols were comparable; both were significantly stronger on streptococci (with 20-60% inhibition) than on lactobacilli (with 5-10% inhibition). Effects of arabitol and xylitol were also compared for S. mutans and S. salivarius in media with 1% of different sugar substrates: glucose (55mM), fructose (55mM), galactose (55mM) and sucrose (30mM). Inhibition occurred for all sugars: stronger on glucose and galactose (60-65%) than on fructose and sucrose (40-45%). Inhibition dependency on the arabitol/xylitol concentration from 0.01% (0.65mM) to 2% (130mM) was further determined for S. mutans and S. salivarius. Regardless of the concentration, sugar substrate and bacterial species tested, arabitol showed very similar inhibition effects to its isomer xylitol. PMID:26433188

  17. A chiral ligand exchange CE system for monitoring inhibitory effect of kojic acid on tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bing-bing; Qi, Li; Mu, Xiao-yu; Qiao, Juan; Wang, Ming-lin

    2013-11-15

    A facile chiral ligand exchange capillary electrophoresis (CLE-CE) system with Zn(II)-L-alanine as the chiral selector in the presence of ?-cyclodextrin has been developed for enantioseparation of dansyl amino acids. The influence of the key factors, such as buffer pH, the ratio of Zn (II) to ligand, the concentration of ?-cyclodextrin and the concentration of the complex, were investigated in detail when D, L-Tyr and D, L-Thr were selected as the model analytes. The proposed method showed favorable quantitative analysis property of dansyl D, L-tyrosine with good linearity (r(2)?0.999) and reproducibility (RSD?3.8%), then, it was applied in studying the activity of tyrosinase through the determination of L-tyrosine concentration variation after being incubated with the enzyme. Further, the inhibitory efficiency of kojic acid and soy sauce on the tyrosinase was investigated. The IC50 of kojic acid obtained from the sigmoidal inhibitory curve was 21.35 ?M. The results imply that the proposed CLE-CE system has the potential in exploring the activity of enzyme and screening the inhibitors of enzyme. PMID:24148524

  18. Nanocapsular dispersion of cinnamaldehyde for enhanced inhibitory activity against aflatoxin production by Aspergillus flavus.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongbo; Shen, Qingshan; Zhou, Wei; Mo, Haizhen; Pan, Daodong; Hu, Liangbin

    2015-01-01

    Cinnamaldehyde (CA) is marginally soluble in water, making it challenging to evenly disperse it in foods, and resulting in lowered anti-A. flavus efficacy. In the present study, nano-dispersed CA (nano-CA) was prepared to increase its aqueous solubility. Free and nano-dispersed CA were compared in terms of their inhibitory activity against fungal growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus both in Sabouraud Dextrose (SD) culture and in peanut butter. Our results indicated that free CA inhibited the mycelia growth and aflatoxin production of A. flavus with a minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value of 1.0 mM, but promoted the aflatoxin production at some concentrations lower than the MIC. Nano-CA had a lower MIC value of 0.8 mM against A. flavus, and also showed improved activity against aflatoxin production without the promotion at lower dose. The solidity of peanut butter had an adverse impact on the antifungal activity of free CA, whereas nano-dispersed CA showed more than 2-fold improved activity against the growth of A. flavus. Free CA still promoted AFB1 production at the concentration of 0.25 mM, whereas nano-CA showed more efficient inhibition of AFB1 production in the butter. PMID:25853318

  19. Minimum distance classification in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of minimum distance classification methods in remote sensing problems, such as crop species identification, is considered. Literature concerning both minimum distance classification problems and distance measures is reviewed. Experimental results are presented for several examples. The objective of these examples is to: (a) compare the sample classification accuracy of a minimum distance classifier, with the vector classification accuracy of a maximum likelihood classifier, and (b) compare the accuracy of a parametric minimum distance classifier with that of a nonparametric one. Results show the minimum distance classifier performance is 5% to 10% better than that of the maximum likelihood classifier. The nonparametric classifier is only slightly better than the parametric version.

  20. Decorrelation of Neural-Network Activity by Inhibitory Feedback

    PubMed Central

    Einevoll, Gaute T.; Diesmann, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Correlations in spike-train ensembles can seriously impair the encoding of information by their spatio-temporal structure. An inevitable source of correlation in finite neural networks is common presynaptic input to pairs of neurons. Recent studies demonstrate that spike correlations in recurrent neural networks are considerably smaller than expected based on the amount of shared presynaptic input. Here, we explain this observation by means of a linear network model and simulations of networks of leaky integrate-and-fire neurons. We show that inhibitory feedback efficiently suppresses pairwise correlations and, hence, population-rate fluctuations, thereby assigning inhibitory neurons the new role of active decorrelation. We quantify this decorrelation by comparing the responses of the intact recurrent network (feedback system) and systems where the statistics of the feedback channel is perturbed (feedforward system). Manipulations of the feedback statistics can lead to a significant increase in the power and coherence of the population response. In particular, neglecting correlations within the ensemble of feedback channels or between the external stimulus and the feedback amplifies population-rate fluctuations by orders of magnitude. The fluctuation suppression in homogeneous inhibitory networks is explained by a negative feedback loop in the one-dimensional dynamics of the compound activity. Similarly, a change of coordinates exposes an effective negative feedback loop in the compound dynamics of stable excitatory-inhibitory networks. The suppression of input correlations in finite networks is explained by the population averaged correlations in the linear network model: In purely inhibitory networks, shared-input correlations are canceled by negative spike-train correlations. In excitatory-inhibitory networks, spike-train correlations are typically positive. Here, the suppression of input correlations is not a result of the mere existence of correlations between excitatory (E) and inhibitory (I) neurons, but a consequence of a particular structure of correlations among the three possible pairings (EE, EI, II). PMID:23133368

  1. Evidence for facilitatory and inhibitory muscarinic receptors on postganglionic sympathetic nerves in mouse isolated atria.

    PubMed Central

    Cost, M.; Majewski, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. McNeil A 343 (10 microM-30 microM) enhanced the fractional stimulation-induced (S-I) outflow of radioactivity from mouse isolated atria which had been incubated with [3H]-noradrenaline. The enhancing effect of McNeil A 343 was not altered by hexamethonium (300 microM) suggesting that it was not due to an action at nicotinic receptors. It is also unlikely that McNeil A 343 enhanced the S-I outflow of radioactivity in mouse atria by blocking neuronal reuptake of noradrenaline since the effect persisted in the presence of cocaine (30 microM). 2. The facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 on the S-I outflow of radioactivity was attenuated by atropine (0.3 microM), pirenzepine (0.2 microM or 1.0 microM), dicyclomine (1.0 microM) and methoctramine (1.0 microM) and was thus due to activation of muscarinic receptors. 3. In contrast to the effect of McNeil A 343, another muscarinic receptor agonist, carbachol (3.0 microM) significantly decreased the S-I outflow of radioactivity. The receptors through which McNeil A 343 acts to enhance the S-I outflow of radioactivity appear to be distinct from inhibitory prejunctional muscarinic receptors. The relatively M 1-selective antagonist, pirenzepine (0.2 microM), attenuated the facilitatory effect of McNeil A 343 whereas a higher concentration (1.0 microM) was required to block the inhibitory effect of carbachol. Conversely, the relatively M2-selective antagonist, methoctramine (0.1 microM), blocked the inhibitory effect of carbachol but a higher concentration of methoctramine (1.0 microM) was required to block the facilitatory effects of McNeil A 343.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:1713109

  2. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  3. In vitro inhibitory effect of tetrahydrocurcuminoids on Fusarium proliferatum growth and fumonisin B? biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Coma, Véronique; Portes, Elise; Gardrat, Christian; Richard-Forget, Florence; Castellan, Alain

    2011-02-01

    Many plant pathogens produce toxic metabolites when growing on food and feed. Some antioxidative components seem to prevent fungal growth and mycotoxin formation. Recently, we synthesized a new class of powerful antioxidative compounds, i.e. tetrahydrocurcuminoids, and its structure/antioxidant activity relationships have been established. The South West of France produces large amounts of corn, which can be infected by Fusarium species, particularly F. proliferatum. In this context, the efficiency of tetrahydrocurcuminoids, which can be obtained from natural curcuminoids, was investigated to control in vitro the growth of F. proliferatum and the production of its associated mycotoxin, fumonisin B?. The relation between structure and antifungal activity was studied. Tetrahydrocurcumin (THC1), with two guaiacyl phenolic subunits, showed the highest inhibitory activity (measured as radial growth on agar medium) against the F. proliferatum development (67% inhibition at a concentration of 13.6 µmol ml?¹). The efficiencies of THC2 (36% at a concentration of 11.5 µmol ml?¹), which contains syringyl phenolic units, and THC3 (30% at a concentration of 13.6 µmol ml?¹), which does not have any substituent on the aromatic rings, were relatively close. These results indicate that the simultaneous presence of guaiacyl phenols and the enolic function of the ?-diketone moiety play an important role in the inhibition mechanisms. The importance of this combination was confirmed using n-propylguaiacol and acetylacetone as molecular models. Under the same conditions, ferulic acid and eugenol, other natural phenolic antioxidants, were less efficient in inhibiting fungal growth. THC1 also reduced fumonisin B? production in liquid medium by approximately 35, 50 and 75% at concentrations of 0.8, 1.3, and 1.9 µmol ml?¹, respectively. These very low inhibitory concentrations show that tetrahydrocurcuminoids could be one of the most promising biobased molecules for the control of mycotoxinogen fungal strains. PMID:21240822

  4. Mapping Inhibitory Neuronal Circuits by Laser Scanning Photostimulation

    PubMed Central

    Ikrar, Taruna; Olivas, Nicholas D.; Shi, Yulin; Xu, Xiangmin

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitory neurons are crucial to cortical function. They comprise about 20% of the entire cortical neuronal population and can be further subdivided into diverse subtypes based on their immunochemical, morphological, and physiological properties1-4. Although previous research has revealed much about intrinsic properties of individual types of inhibitory neurons, knowledge about their local circuit connections is still relatively limited3,5,6. Given that each individual neuron's function is shaped by its excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input within cortical circuits, we have been using laser scanning photostimulation (LSPS) to map local circuit connections to specific inhibitory cell types. Compared to conventional electrical stimulation or glutamate puff stimulation, LSPS has unique advantages allowing for extensive mapping and quantitative analysis of local functional inputs to individually recorded neurons3,7-9. Laser photostimulation via glutamate uncaging selectively activates neurons perisomatically, without activating axons of passage or distal dendrites, which ensures a sub-laminar mapping resolution. The sensitivity and efficiency of LSPS for mapping inputs from many stimulation sites over a large region are well suited for cortical circuit analysis. Here we introduce the technique of LSPS combined with whole-cell patch clamping for local inhibitory circuit mapping. Targeted recordings of specific inhibitory cell types are facilitated by use of transgenic mice expressing green fluorescent proteins (GFP) in limited inhibitory neuron populations in the cortex3,10, which enables consistent sampling of the targeted cell types and unambiguous identification of the cell types recorded. As for LSPS mapping, we outline the system instrumentation, describe the experimental procedure and data acquisition, and present examples of circuit mapping in mouse primary somatosensory cortex. As illustrated in our experiments, caged glutamate is activated in a spatially restricted region of the brain slice by UV laser photolysis; simultaneous voltage-clamp recordings allow detection of photostimulation-evoked synaptic responses. Maps of either excitatory or inhibitory synaptic input to the targeted neuron are generated by scanning the laser beam to stimulate hundreds of potential presynaptic sites. Thus, LSPS enables the construction of detailed maps of synaptic inputs impinging onto specific types of inhibitory neurons through repeated experiments. Taken together, the photostimulation-based technique offers neuroscientists a powerful tool for determining the functional organization of local cortical circuits. PMID:22006064

  5. Characterization of Melanogenesis Inhibitory Constituents of Morus alba Leaves and Optimization of Extraction Conditions Using Response Surface Methodology.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Ji Yeon; Liu, Qing; Kim, Seon Beom; Jo, Yang Hee; Mo, Eun Jin; Yang, Hyo Hee; Song, Dae Hye; Hwang, Bang Yeon; Lee, Mi Kyeong

    2015-01-01

    Melanin is a natural pigment that plays an important role in the protection of skin, however, hyperpigmentation cause by excessive levels of melatonin is associated with several problems. Therefore, melanogenesis inhibitory natural products have been developed by the cosmetic industry as skin medications. The leaves of Morus alba (Moraceae) have been reported to inhibit melanogenesis, therefore, characterization of the melanogenesis inhibitory constituents of M. alba leaves was attempted in this study. Twenty compounds including eight benzofurans, 10 flavonoids, one stilbenoid and one chalcone were isolated from M. alba leaves and these phenolic constituents were shown to significantly inhibit tyrosinase activity and melanin content in B6F10 melanoma cells. To maximize the melanogenesis inhibitory activity and active phenolic contents, optimized M. alba leave extraction conditions were predicted using response surface methodology as a methanol concentration of 85.2%; an extraction temperature of 53.2 °C and an extraction time of 2 h. The tyrosinase inhibition and total phenolic content under optimal conditions were found to be 74.8% inhibition and 24.8 ?g GAE/mg extract, which were well-matched with the predicted values of 75.0% inhibition and 23.8 ?g GAE/mg extract. These results shall provide useful information about melanogenesis inhibitory constituents and optimized extracts from M. alba leaves as cosmetic therapeutics to reduce skin hyperpigmentation. PMID:26007176

  6. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates.

    PubMed

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  7. Angiotensin-I Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory and Anti-Oxidant Activities of Sea Cucumber (Actinopyga lecanora) Hydrolysates

    PubMed Central

    Ghanbari, Raheleh; Zarei, Mohammad; Ebrahimpour, Afshin; Abdul-Hamid, Azizah; Ismail, Amin; Saari, Nazamid

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, food protein-derived hydrolysates have received considerable attention because of their numerous health benefits. Amongst the hydrolysates, those with anti-hypertensive and anti-oxidative activities are receiving special attention as both activities can play significant roles in preventing cardiovascular diseases. The present study investigated the angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities of Actinopyga lecanora (A. lecanora) hydrolysates, which had been prepared by alcalase, papain, bromelain, flavourzyme, pepsin, and trypsin under their optimum conditions. The alcalase hydrolysate showed the highest ACE inhibitory activity (69.8%) after 8 h of hydrolysis while the highest anti-oxidative activities measured by 2,2-diphenyl 1-1-picrylhydrazyl radical scavenging (DPPH) (56.00%) and ferrous ion-chelating (FIC) (59.00%) methods were exhibited after 24 h and 8 h of hydrolysis, respectively. The ACE-inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities displayed dose-dependent trends, and increased with increasing protein hydrolysate concentrations. Moreover, strong positive correlations between angiotensin-I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and anti-oxidative activities were also observed. This study indicates that A. lecanora hydrolysate can be exploited as a source of functional food owing to its anti-oxidant as well as anti-hypertension functions. PMID:26690117

  8. Chronic exercise keeps working memory and inhibitory capacities fit

    PubMed Central

    Padilla, Concepción; Pérez, Laura; Andrés, Pilar

    2014-01-01

    Padilla et al. (2013) recently showed that chronic aerobic exercise in young adults is associated with better inhibitory control as measured by the strategic Stop Signal Task (SST). The aim of the current study was to explore whether better inhibitory abilities, associated with high levels of physical fitness, were also associated with higher working memory capacity (WMC) in young healthy adults. Participants aged between 18 and 30 years and showing different levels of fitness confirmed by the Rockport 1-mile walking fitness test took part in this study. Active and passive participants were administered the SST to measure inhibitory control, and the Automatic Operation Span (AOSPAN) to measure verbal WMC. We first replicated Padilla et al.'s results showing that exercise specifically modulates strategic inhibitory processes. Our results also showed that active participants presented with better WMC than sedentary ones, showing a better capacity to manage simultaneously two verbal tasks and to inhibit interference. The results point to an association between chronic exercise, inhibitory abilities, and WMC. The theoretical relationship between these variables will be discussed. PMID:24653684

  9. Parallel language activation and inhibitory control in bimodal bilinguals.

    PubMed

    Giezen, Marcel R; Blumenfeld, Henrike K; Shook, Anthony; Marian, Viorica; Emmorey, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Findings from recent studies suggest that spoken-language bilinguals engage nonlinguistic inhibitory control mechanisms to resolve cross-linguistic competition during auditory word recognition. Bilingual advantages in inhibitory control might stem from the need to resolve perceptual competition between similar-sounding words both within and between their two languages. If so, these advantages should be lessened or eliminated when there is no perceptual competition between two languages. The present study investigated the extent of inhibitory control recruitment during bilingual language comprehension by examining associations between language co-activation and nonlinguistic inhibitory control abilities in bimodal bilinguals, whose two languages do not perceptually compete. Cross-linguistic distractor activation was identified in the visual world paradigm, and correlated significantly with performance on a nonlinguistic spatial Stroop task within a group of 27 hearing ASL-English bilinguals. Smaller Stroop effects (indexing more efficient inhibition) were associated with reduced co-activation of ASL signs during the early stages of auditory word recognition. These results suggest that inhibitory control in auditory word recognition is not limited to resolving perceptual linguistic competition in phonological input, but is also used to moderate competition that originates at the lexico-semantic level. PMID:25912892

  10. Cross-language lexical processes and inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Linck, Jared A; Hoshino, Noriko; Kroll, Judith F

    2008-01-01

    Many recent studies demonstrate that both languages are active when bilinguals and second language (L2) learners are reading, listening, or speaking one language only. The parallel activity of the two languages has been hypothesized to create competition that must be resolved. Models of bilingual lexical access have proposed an inhibitory control mechanism to effectively limit attention to the intended language (e.g., Green, 1998). Critically, other recent research suggests that a lifetime of experience as a bilingual negotiating the competition across the two languages confers a set of benefits to cognitive control processes more generally (e.g., Bialystok, Craik, Klein, & Viswanathan, 2004). However, few studies have examined the consequences of individual differences in inhibitory control for performance on language processing tasks. The goal of the present work was to determine whether there is a relation between enhanced executive function and performance for L2 learners and bilinguals on lexical comprehension and production tasks. Data were analyzed from two studies involving a range of language processing tasks, a working memory measure, and also the Simon task, a nonlinguistic measure of inhibitory control. The results demonstrate that greater working memory resources and enhanced inhibitory control are related to a reduction in cross-language activation in a sentence context word naming task and a picture naming task, respectively. Other factors that may be related to inhibitory control are identified. The implications of these results for models of bilingual lexical comprehension and production are discussed. PMID:19907674

  11. Modeling Inhibitory Interneurons in Efficient Sensory Coding Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Mengchen; Rozell, Christopher J.

    2015-01-01

    There is still much unknown regarding the computational role of inhibitory cells in the sensory cortex. While modeling studies could potentially shed light on the critical role played by inhibition in cortical computation, there is a gap between the simplicity of many models of sensory coding and the biological complexity of the inhibitory subpopulation. In particular, many models do not respect that inhibition must be implemented in a separate subpopulation, with those inhibitory interneurons having a diversity of tuning properties and characteristic E/I cell ratios. In this study we demonstrate a computational framework for implementing inhibition in dynamical systems models that better respects these biophysical observations about inhibitory interneurons. The main approach leverages recent work related to decomposing matrices into low-rank and sparse components via convex optimization, and explicitly exploits the fact that models and input statistics often have low-dimensional structure that can be exploited for efficient implementations. While this approach is applicable to a wide range of sensory coding models (including a family of models based on Bayesian inference in a linear generative model), for concreteness we demonstrate the approach on a network implementing sparse coding. We show that the resulting implementation stays faithful to the original coding goals while using inhibitory interneurons that are much more biophysically plausible. PMID:26172289

  12. Antimicrobial activity of glycosidase inhibitory protein isolated from Cyphomandra betacea Sendt. fruit.

    PubMed

    Ordóñez, Roxana M; Ordóñez, Adriana A L; Sayago, Jorge E; Nieva Moreno, María I; Isla, María I

    2006-06-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of an invertase inhibitory protein (IIP) isolated from Cyphomandra betacea ripe fruits is documented. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined by agar macrodilution and broth microdilution assays. This IIP inhibited the growth of xylophagous and phytopatogenic fungi (Ganoderma applanatum, Schizophyllum commune, Lenzites elegans, Pycnoporus sanguineous, Penicillium notatum, Aspergillus niger, Phomopsis sojae and Fusarium mango) and phytopathogenic bacteria (Xanthomonas campestris pvar vesicatoria CECT 792, Pseudomonas solanacearum CECT 125, Pseudomonas corrugata CECT 124, Pseudomonas syringae pv. syringae and Erwinia carotovora var carotovora). The IIP concentration required to completely inhibit the growth of all studied fungi ranged from 7.8 to 62.5 microg/ml. Phytopatogenic bacteria were the most sensitive, with MIC values between 7.8 and 31.25 microg/ml. Antifungal and antibacterial activities can be associated with their ability to inhibit hydrolytic enzymes. Our results indicate the possible participation of IIP in the plant defense mechanism and its potential application as a biocontrol agent against phytopathogenic fungi and bacteria. PMID:16406143

  13. Flavonoids from Machilus japonica stems and their inhibitory effects on LDL oxidation.

    PubMed

    Joo, Se-Jin; Park, Hee-Jung; Park, Ji-Hae; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Kang, Hee Cheol; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Hack-Soo; Byun, Sang-Yo; Baek, Nam-In

    2014-01-01

    Stems of Machilus japonica were extracted with 80% aqueous methanol (MeOH) and the concentrated extract was successively extracted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc), normal butanol (n-BuOH), and water. Six flavonoids were isolated from the EtOAc fraction: (+)-taxifolin, afzelin, (-)-epicatechin, 5,3'-di-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin, 5,7,3'-tri-O-methyl-(-)-epicatechin, and 5,7-di-O-methyl-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavan-3-ol. The chemical structures were identified using spectroscopic data including NMR, mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. This is the first report of isolation of these six compounds from M. japonica. The compounds were evaluated for their diphenyl picryl hydrazinyl scavenging activity and inhibitory effects on low-density lipoprotein oxidation. Compounds 1 and 3-6 exhibited DPPH antioxidant activity equivalent with that of ascorbic acid, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.16, 0.21, 0.17, 0.15 and 0.07 mM, respectively. The activity of compound 1 was similar to the positive control butylated hydroxytoluene, which had an IC50 value of 1.9 µM, while compounds 3 and 5 showed little activity. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 exhibited LDL antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 2.8, 7.1, and 4.6 µM, respectively. PMID:25229822

  14. Flavonoids from Machilus japonica Stems and Their Inhibitory Effects on LDL Oxidation

    PubMed Central

    Joo, Se-Jin; Park, Hee-Jung; Park, Ji-Hae; Cho, Jin-Gyeong; Kang, Ji-Hyun; Jeong, Tae-Sook; Kang, Hee Cheol; Lee, Dae-Young; Kim, Hack-Soo; Byun, Sang-Yo; Baek, Nam-In

    2014-01-01

    Stems of Machilus japonica were extracted with 80% aqueous methanol (MeOH) and the concentrated extract was successively extracted with ethyl acetate (EtOAc), normal butanol (n-BuOH), and water. Six flavonoids were isolated from the EtOAc fraction: (+)-taxifolin, afzelin, (?)-epicatechin, 5,3'-di-O-methyl-(?)-epicatechin, 5,7,3'-tri-O-methyl-(?)-epicatechin, and 5,7-di-O-methyl-3',4'-methylenedioxyflavan-3-ol. The chemical structures were identified using spectroscopic data including NMR, mass spectrometry and infrared spectroscopy. This is the first report of isolation of these six compounds from M. japonica. The compounds were evaluated for their diphenyl picryl hydrazinyl scavenging activity and inhibitory effects on low-density lipoprotein oxidation. Compounds 1 and 3–6 exhibited DPPH antioxidant activity equivalent with that of ascorbic acid, with half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) values of 0.16, 0.21, 0.17, 0.15 and 0.07 mM, respectively. The activity of compound 1 was similar to the positive control butylated hydroxytoluene, which had an IC50 value of 1.9 µM, while compounds 3 and 5 showed little activity. Compounds 1, 3, and 5 exhibited LDL antioxidant activity with IC50 values of 2.8, 7.1, and 4.6 µM, respectively. PMID:25229822

  15. Relationship between Tetracyclines' Structure and Minimal Inhibitory Concentration of Streptococcus spp.

    PubMed

    Marczak, M; Grabowski, T; Feder, M

    2015-08-01

    During the past years, a growing number of bacterial strains have become resistant to tetracyclines. The problem of increasing resistance and lack of susceptibility to tetracyclines applies to strains isolated from both: animals and humans. Basic tools to design new drugs and determining the direction of the search for new molecules is the analysis of the relationship between the chemical structure and the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic parameters. Purpose of this study is to determine the relationship between physicochemical parameters of tetracyclines and MIC50 and MIC90 values determined for Streptococcus spp. Analysis of physicochemical parameters of selected drugs was made using MarvinSketch 5.11.5 (ChemAxon Ltd.) and QuickProp 3.1 software from Schrödinger package v 31207. MIC50 and MIC90 values were correlated with 51 calculated physicochemical parameters and arithmetic expressions. Internal and external model validation was performed using leave-one out method. 4 arithmetic expressions fulfilled all validation criteria, but only in relation to MIC50. A new method to optimize the tetracyclines' structure in relation to Streptococcus spp. was presented. It was also shown that the relations of structure: antimicrobial activity type can have different nature depending on MIC50 or MIC90 of specific bacterial strain. PMID:25153336

  16. Role of PBPD1 in Stimulation of Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation by Subminimal Inhibitory -Lactam Concentrations

    E-print Network

    Burrows, Lori

    cephalosporins. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) profiling using a fluorescent penicillin analogue showed similar, specifically penicillins (e.g., ampi- cillin), which target the penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) that play key roles in peptidoglycan (PG) biosynthesis and remodeling (15). Penicillins are sometimes used

  17. Mutant prevention concentration, pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic integration, and modeling of enrofloxacin data established in diseased buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, B; Sidhu, P K; Kaur, G; Venkatachalam, D; Rampal, S

    2015-12-01

    The pharmacokinetic-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) modeling of enrofloxacin data using mutant prevention concentration (MPC) of enrofloxacin was conducted in febrile buffalo calves to optimize dosage regimen and to prevent the emergence of antimicrobial resistance. The serum peak concentration (Cmax ), terminal half-life (t1/2 K10) , apparent volume of distribution (Vd(area) /F), and mean residence time (MRT) of enrofloxacin were 1.40 ± 0.27 ?g/mL, 7.96 ± 0.86 h, 7.74 ± 1.26 L/kg, and 11.57 ± 1.01 h, respectively, following drug administration at dosage 12 mg/kg by intramuscular route. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), minimum bactericidal concentration, and MPC of enrofloxacin against Pasteurella multocida were 0.055, 0.060, and 1.45 ?g/mL, respectively. Modeling of ex vivo growth inhibition data to the sigmoid Emax equation provided AUC24 h /MIC values to produce effects of bacteriostatic (33 h), bactericidal (39 h), and bacterial eradication (41 h). The estimated daily dosage of enrofloxacin in febrile buffalo calves was 3.5 and 8.4 mg/kg against P. multocida/pathogens having MIC90 ?0.125 and 0.30 ?g/mL, respectively, based on the determined AUC24 h /MIC values by modeling PK/PD data. The lipopolysaccharide-induced fever had no direct effect on the antibacterial activity of the enrofloxacin and alterations in PK of the drug, and its metabolite will be beneficial for its use to treat infectious diseases caused by sensitive pathogens in buffalo species. In addition, in vitro MPC data in conjunction with in vivo PK data indicated that clinically it would be easier to eradicate less susceptible strains of P. multocida in diseased calves. PMID:25776301

  18. Pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of phlorotannins isolated from Eisenia bicyclis.

    PubMed

    Eom, Sung-Hwan; Lee, Myung-Suk; Lee, Eun-Woo; Kim, Young-Mog; Kim, Tae Hoon

    2013-01-01

    Pancreatic lipase is a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of diet-induced obesity in humans. In an ongoing search for new pancreatic lipase inhibitors from natural sources, a methanolic extract of marine brown algae, Eisenia bicyclis, showed a significant inhibitory effect against pancreatic lipase. Bioassay-guided isolation of this methanolic extract using a pancreatic lipase inhibitory assay led to the isolation and identification of six known phlorotannins: eckol (1), fucofuroeckol A (2), 7-phloroeckol (3), dioxindehydroeckol (4), phlorofucofuroeckol A (5), and dieckol (6). The structures were established on the basis of nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry spectroscopic data interpretation. Among the isolated phloroglucinol polymers, compounds 2 and 3 showed potent inhibitory effects on pancreatic lipase with IC?? values ranging from 37.2?±?2.3 to 12.7?±?1.0??M, respectively. PMID:22473750

  19. Adaptive Proactive Inhibitory Control for Embedded Real-Time Applications

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Shufan; McGinnity, T. Martin; Wong-Lin, KongFatt

    2012-01-01

    Psychologists have studied the inhibitory control of voluntary movement for many years. In particular, the countermanding of an impending action has been extensively studied. In this work, we propose a neural mechanism for adaptive inhibitory control in a firing-rate type model based on current findings in animal electrophysiological and human psychophysical experiments. We then implement this model on a field-programmable gate array (FPGA) prototyping system, using dedicated real-time hardware circuitry. Our results show that the FPGA-based implementation can run in real-time while achieving behavioral performance qualitatively suggestive of the animal experiments. Implementing such biological inhibitory control in an embedded device can lead to the development of control systems that may be used in more realistic cognitive robotics or in neural prosthetic systems aiding human movement control. PMID:22701420

  20. Optimal percentage of inhibitory synapses in multi-task learning

    PubMed Central

    Capano, Vittorio; Herrmann, Hans J.; de Arcangelis, Lucilla

    2015-01-01

    Performing more tasks in parallel is a typical feature of complex brains. These are characterized by the coexistence of excitatory and inhibitory synapses, whose percentage in mammals is measured to have a typical value of 20-30%. Here we investigate parallel learning of more Boolean rules in neuronal networks. We find that multi-task learning results from the alternation of learning and forgetting of the individual rules. Interestingly, a fraction of 30% inhibitory synapses optimizes the overall performance, carving a complex backbone supporting information transmission with a minimal shortest path length. We show that 30% inhibitory synapses is the percentage maximizing the learning performance since it guarantees, at the same time, the network excitability necessary to express the response and the variability required to confine the employment of resources. PMID:25898781

  1. Modifying Yeast Tolerance to Inhibitory Conditions of Ethanol Production Processes

    PubMed Central

    Caspeta, Luis; Castillo, Tania; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains having a broad range of substrate utilization, rapid substrate consumption, and conversion to ethanol, as well as good tolerance to inhibitory conditions are ideal for cost-competitive ethanol production from lignocellulose. A major drawback to directly design S. cerevisiae tolerance to inhibitory conditions of lignocellulosic ethanol production processes is the lack of knowledge about basic aspects of its cellular signaling network in response to stress. Here, we highlight the inhibitory conditions found in ethanol production processes, the targeted cellular functions, the key contributions of integrated -omics analysis to reveal cellular stress responses according to these inhibitors, and current status on design-based engineering of tolerant and efficient S. cerevisiae strains for ethanol production from lignocellulose. PMID:26618154

  2. The minimum rank of universal adjacency matrices

    E-print Network

    Ahmadi, Bahman; Fallat, Shaun M; Fan, Yi-Zheng; Meagher, Karen; Nasserasr, Shahla

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we introduce a new parameter for a graph called the {\\it minimum universal rank}. This parameter is similar to the minimum rank of a graph. For a graph $G$ the minimum universal rank of $G$ is the minimum rank over all matrices of the form \\[ U(\\alpha, \\beta, \\gamma, \\delta) = \\alpha A + \\beta I + \\gamma J + \\delta D \\] where $A$ is the adjacency matrix of $G$, $J$ is the all ones matrix and $D$ is the matrix with the degrees of the vertices in the main diagonal, and $\\alpha\

  3. 12 CFR 1750.4 - Minimum capital requirement computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital requirement computation. 1750.4 Section...Minimum Capital § 1750.4 Minimum capital requirement computation. (a) The minimum capital requirement for each Enterprise shall be...

  4. 12 CFR 1750.4 - Minimum capital requirement computation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 2011-01-01 false Minimum capital requirement computation. 1750.4 Section...Minimum Capital § 1750.4 Minimum capital requirement computation. (a) The minimum capital requirement for each Enterprise shall be...

  5. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83 Section 648.83 Wildlife...Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for...

  6. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83 Section 648.83 Wildlife...Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for...

  7. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83 Section 648.83 Wildlife...Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for...

  8. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83 Section 648.83 Wildlife...Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for...

  9. Inhibitory effects of insulin on GABAA currents modulated by the GABAA alpha subunit.

    PubMed

    Williams, Daniel B

    2015-12-01

    Insulin, when co-applied with GABA, can cause an inhibition of the induced current at GABAA receptors. This study investigated that inhibitory effect of insulin at a variety of receptor isoforms, concentrating on ?1, ?2 and ?4 containing receptors. Various isoforms were expressed in Xenopus oocytes and currents determined using two-electrode voltage clamp. Submaximal GABA currents at all isoforms studied were inhibited by nanomolar concentrations of insulin. At ?2 and ?4 containing forms, insulin could inhibit maximal GABA currents. The ability to inhibit maximal currents, and the general potency and effects at submaximal currents paralleled the number of potential MAPK sites on the ? subunits. The differences in insulin inhibition of GABA currents at different ? containing GABAA receptors could be important in autocrine and paracrine control of hormone secretion in the pancreas, and in control of reward and food intake circuits of the brain. PMID:25224408

  10. Xanthone glycosides from Swertia bimaculata with ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Yue, Yao-Dong; Zhang, Yu-Tang; Liu, Zhao-Xia; Min, Qiu-Xia; Wan, Luo-Sheng; Wang, Yong-Long; Xiao, Zuo-Qi; Chen, Jia-Chun

    2014-04-01

    Seven new xanthone glycosides (1-7) were isolated from the n-butanol extract of Swertia bimaculata, together with six known compounds (8-13). Their structures were elucidated on the basis of extensive spectroscopic analyses (1D- and 2D-NMR, HRESIMS, UV, and IR) and comparison with data reported in the literature. All the compounds were evaluated for their ?-glucosidase inhibitory activities in vitro, and compounds 3, 4, and 7 exhibited significant activities to inhibit ?-glucosidase. Meanwhile the effects of different substitutions on the ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity of xanthone glycosides from S. bimaculata are also discussed. PMID:24687743

  11. Dissecting inhibitory brain circuits with genetically-targeted technologies

    PubMed Central

    Murphey, Dona K.; Herman, Alexander M.; Arenkiel, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of genetically targeted tools has begun to allow us to dissect anatomically and functionally heterogeneous interneurons, and to probe circuit function from synapses to behavior. Over the last decade, these tools have been used widely to visualize neurons in a cell type-specific manner, and engage them to activate and inactivate with exquisite precision. In this process, we have expanded our understanding of interneuron diversity, their functional connectivity, and how selective inhibitory circuits contribute to behavior. Here we discuss the relative assets of genetically encoded fluorescent proteins (FPs), viral tracing methods, optogenetics, chemical genetics, and biosensors in the study of inhibitory interneurons and their respective circuits. PMID:25368555

  12. Inhibitory processes in toddlers: a latent-variable approach

    PubMed Central

    Gandolfi, Elena; Viterbori, Paola; Traverso, Laura; Usai, M. Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the nature of inhibitory processes in early childhood. A confirmatory factor analysis was used to examine the latent structure of inhibitory processes in day-care center children aged 24–32 months and in preschool children aged 36–48 months. The best fit to the data for the younger sample was a single undifferentiated inhibition factor model; in older children, a two-factor model was differently identified in which response inhibition and interference suppression were distinguished. PMID:24817858

  13. Comparative inhibitory effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil against Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes and mesophilic starter co-culture in cheese-mimicking models.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Rayssa Julliane; de Souza, Geanny Targino; Honório, Vanessa Gonçalves; de Sousa, Jossana Pereira; da Conceição, Maria Lúcia; Maganani, Marciane; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, we assessed the effects of Thymus vulgaris L. essential oil (TVEO) on Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes, pathogenic bacteria frequently associated with fresh or low-ripened cheeses (e.g., Brazilian coalho cheese), and on a starter co-culture comprising Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis and L. lactis subsp. cremoris, which are commonly used for the production of different cheeses. To measure these effects, we determined the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and assessed bacterial cell viability over time in (coalho) cheese-based broth and in a semi-solid (coalho) cheese model at 10 °C. The MIC for TVEO was 2.5 ?L/mL against S. aureus and L. monocytogenes, while the MIC was 1.25 ?L/mL against the starter co-culture. The TVEO (5 and 2.5 ?L/mL) sharply reduced the viable counts of all assayed bacteria in cheese broth over 24 h; although, at 5 ?L/mL, TVEO more severely affected the viability of the starter co-culture compared with pathogenic bacteria. The addition of 1.25 ?L/g of TVEO in the semi-solid cheese model did not reduce the viable counts of all assayed bacteria. At 2.5 ?L/g, TVEO slightly decreased the viable counts of S. aureus, L. monocytogenes and Lactococcus spp. in the semi-solid cheese model over 72 h. The final counts of Lactococcus spp. in a semi-solid cheese model containing 2.5 ?L/mL TVEO were lower than those of pathogenic bacteria under the same conditions. These results suggest that the doses of TVEO used to control pathogenic bacteria in fermented dairy products, especially in low-ripened cheeses, should be cautiously considered for potential negative effects on the growth and survival of starter cultures. PMID:26338117

  14. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF SURFACE MINING RECLAMATION AND ENFORCEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR Natural Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the...

  15. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  16. 30 CFR 202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.352 Section 202.352 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual...

  17. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  18. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark, Wascher); and "Wage Mobility of MW Workers" (Smith,…

  19. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (a) The minimum size for black sea bass is 11 inches (27...for, possess, land or retain black sea bass in or from U.S. waters of the western Atlantic Ocean...b) The minimum fish size for black sea bass is 12.5...

  20. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  1. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of the methanolic extracts of selected Jordanian medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    Hudaib, Mohammad M.; Tawaha, Khaled A.; Mohammad, Mohammad K.; Assaf, Areej M.; Issa, Ala Y.; Alali, Feras Q.; Aburjai, Talal A.; Bustanji, Yasser K.

    2011-01-01

    Background: The search for novel xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitors with a higher therapeutic activity and fewer side effects are desired not only to treat gout but also to combat various other diseases associated with the XO activity. At present, the potential of developing successful natural products for the management of XO-related diseases is still largely unexplored. In the present study, we have screened the methanolic extracts of various Jordanian medicinal plants for their XO inhibitory activities using an optimized protocol. Materials and Methods: The methanolic extracts of 23 medicinal plants, belonging to 12 families, were tested in vitro, at 200 ?g/ml concentrations, for their XO inhibitory potential. The dose-dependent inhibition profiles of the most active plants were further evaluated by estimating the IC50 values of their corresponding extracts. Results: Six plants were found most active (% inhibition more than 39%). These plants are Salvia spinosa L. (IC50 = 53.7 ?g/ml), Anthemis palestina Boiss. (168.0 ?g/ml), Chrysanthemum coronarium L. (199.5 ?g/ml), Achillea biebersteinii Afansiev (360.0 ?g/ml), Rosmarinus officinalis L. (650.0 ?g/ml), and Ginkgo biloba L. (595.8 ?g/ml). Moreover, four more plants, namely Lavandula angustifolia Mill. (28.7% inhibition), Helianthemum ledifolium (L.) Mill. (28.4%), Majorana syriaca (L.) Kostel. (25.1%), and Mentha spicata L. (22.5%) showed a XO inhibitory activity in the range of 22–30%. Conclusion: The study showed that many of the tested plant species are potential sources of natural XO inhibitors that can be developed, upon further investigation, into successful herbal drugs for treatment of gout and other XO-related disorders. PMID:22262935

  2. Sodium salicylate reduces inhibitory postsynaptic currents in neurons of rat auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hai-Tao; Luo, Bin; Zhou, Ke-Qing; Xu, Tian-Le; Chen, Lin

    2006-05-01

    Sodium salicylate (SS) is a medicine for anti-inflammation and for chronic pain relief with a side effect of tinnitus. To understand the cellular mechanisms of tinnitus induced by SS in the central auditory system, we examined effects of SS on evoked and miniature inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs and mIPSCs) recorded from layer II/III pyramidal neurons of rat auditory cortex in a brain slice preparation with whole-cell patch-clamp techniques. Both eIPSCs and mIPSCs recorded from the auditory cortex could be completely blocked by bicuculline, a selective GABA(A) receptor antagonist. SS did not change the input resistance of neurons but was found to reversibly depress eIPSCs in a concentration-dependent manner. SS reduced eIPSCs to 82.3% of the control level at 0.5 mM (n=7) and to 60.9% at 1.4 mM (n=12). In addition, SS at 1.4 mM significantly reduced the amplitude of mIPSCs from 24.12+/-1.44 pA to 19.92+/-1.31 pA and reduced the frequency of mIPSCs from 1.34+/-0.23 Hz to 0.89+/-0.13 Hz (n=6). Our results demonstrate that SS attenuates inhibitory postsynaptic currents in the auditory cortex, suggesting that the alteration of inhibitory neural circuits may be one of the cellular mechanisms for tinnitus induced by SS in the central auditory region. PMID:16632286

  3. Inhibitory factors associated with anaphase-promoting complex/cylosome in mitotic checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Braunstein, Ilana; Miniowitz, Shirly; Moshe, Yakir; Hershko, Avram

    2007-01-01

    The mitotic (or spindle assembly) checkpoint system ensures accurate chromosome segregation by preventing anaphase initiation until all chromosomes are correctly attached to the mitotic spindle. It affects the activity of the anaphase-promoting complex/cyclosome (APC/C), a ubiquitin ligase that targets inhibitors of anaphase initiation for degradation. The mechanisms by which this system regulates APC/C remain obscure. Some models propose that the system promotes sequestration of the APC/C activator Cdc20 by binding to the checkpoint proteins Mad2 and BubR1. A different model suggests that a mitotic checkpoint complex (MCC) composed of BubR1, Bub3, Cdc20, and Mad2 inhibits APC/C in mitotic checkpoint [Sudakin V, Chan GKT, Yen TJ (2001) J Cell Biol 154:925–936]. We examined this problem by using extracts from nocodazole-arrested cells that reproduce some downstream events of the mitotic checkpoint system, such as lag kinetics of the degradation of APC/C substrate. Incubation of extracts with adenosine-5?-(?-thio)triphosphate (ATP[?S]) stabilized the checkpoint-arrested state, apparently by stable thiophosphorylation of some proteins. By immunoprecipitation of APC/C from stably checkpoint-arrested extracts, followed by elution with increased salt concentration, we isolated inhibitory factors associated with APC/C. A part of the inhibitory material consists of Cdc20 associated with BubR1 and Mad2, and is thus similar to MCC. Contrary to the original MCC hypothesis, we find that MCC disassembles upon exit from the mitotic checkpoint. Thus, the requirement of the mitotic checkpoint system for the binding of Mad2 and BubR1 to Cdc20 may be for the assembly of the inhibitory complex rather than for Cdc20 sequestration. PMID:17360335

  4. Antioxidant/lipoxygenase inhibitory activities and chemical compositions of selected essential oils.

    PubMed

    Wei, Alfreda; Shibamoto, Takayuki

    2010-06-23

    Twenty-five essential oils were tested for antioxidant activities using a conjugated diene assay, the aldehyde/carboxylic acid assay, the DPPH free radical scavenging assay, and the malonaldehyde/gas chromatography (MA/GC) assay. They were also tested for lipoxygenase inhibitory activities using the lipoxygenase inhibitor-screening assay. Thyme oil exhibited the greatest antioxidant effect in all assays (80-100%) except in the DPPH assay (60%). Clove leaf oil showed activities comparable to those of thyme oil (53-100%). Cinnamon leaf oil showed strong activities in the aldehyde/carboxylic acid assay (100%) and DPPH assay (84%), but only moderate activities in the conjugated diene assay (24%) and MA/GC assay (48%). Basil oil exhibited a strong effect in the DPPH assay (86%) and moderate activities in the MA/GC assay (35%). Bergamot oil exhibited 100% antioxidant activity in the aldehyde/carboxylic acid assay. Eucalyptus and chamomile oils showed appreciable activities only in the conjugated diene assay. Bitter orange oil exhibited moderate antioxidant activity (53%) only in the MA/GC assay. Aloe vera oil exhibited the greatest lipoxygenase inhibitory activity (96%), followed by thyme oil (86%) and bergamot oil (85%) at a concentration of 0.5 microg/mL. Chamomile oil showed slight lipoxygenase inhibitory activity at 0.5 microg/mL but strong lipoxygenase inducing activity at 5 microg/mL (-123%). Thyme and clove leaf oils contained high levels of thymol (23%) and eugenol (77%), respectively, as a principal of the antioxidant activity. The results obtained in the present study suggest that some essential oils possess strong medicinal activities, which can be utilized for treatment of certain diseases. PMID:20499917

  5. The Role of Inhibitory Control in Behavioral and Physiological Expressions of Toddler Executive Function

    PubMed Central

    Morasch, Katherine C.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2010-01-01

    Eighty-one toddlers (ranging from 24 to 27 months) participated in a biobehavioral investigation of inhibitory control. Maternal-report measures of inhibitory control were related to laboratory tasks assessing inhibitory abilities under conditions of conflict, delay, and compliance challenge as well as toddler verbal ability. Additionally, unique variance in inhibitory control was explained by task-related changes in brain electrical activity at lateral frontal scalp sites as well as concurrent inhibitory task performance. Implications regarding neural correlates of executive function in early development and a central, organizing role of inhibitory processing in toddlerhood are discussed. PMID:20719337

  6. Conflict Inhibitory Control Facilitates Pretense Quality in Young Preschoolers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Reet, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    The present research explores the role of inhibitory control (IC) in young preschoolers' pretense ability using an ego depletion paradigm. In Experiment 1 (N = 56), children's pretense ability was assessed either before or after participating in conflict IC or control tasks, and in Experiment 2 (N = 36), pretense ability was measured after…

  7. The Effect of Social Observation on Children's Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moriguchi, Yusuke

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of social observation on young children's performance during an inhibitory control task. In Experiment 1, children were randomly assigned to either a neutral, facilitation, or interference condition. In the neutral condition, children were presented with a standard black/white task. In the facilitation and…

  8. Inhibitory Control during Emotional Distraction across Adolescence and Early Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cohen-Gilbert, Julia E.; Thomas, Kathleen M.

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the changing relation between emotion and inhibitory control during adolescence. One hundred participants between 11 and 25 years of age performed a go-nogo task in which task-relevant stimuli (letters) were presented at the center of large task-irrelevant images depicting negative, positive, or neutral scenes selected from…

  9. Inhibitory Control of Proactive Interference in Adults with ADHD

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Holly A.

    2007-01-01

    Objective: Attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is associated with poor inhibition of prepotent responses and deficits in distractor inhibition, but relatively few studies have addressed inhibitory control of proactive interference (PI) in individuals with ADHD. Thus, the goal of the present study was to evaluate resistance to spatial…

  10. Characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The present study is the first characterization of Neospora caninum macrophage migration inhibitory factor (NcMIF). BLAST-N analysis of NcMIF revealed high similarity (87%) to the Toxoplasma gondii MIF. NcMIF was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli in three forms, NcMIF (mature protein), NcMI...

  11. FAST EMERGENT OSCILLATIONS IN A MUTUALLY INHIBITORY NETWORK RAMANA DODLA*

    E-print Network

    Dodla, Ramana

    FAST EMERGENT OSCILLATIONS IN A MUTUALLY INHIBITORY NETWORK RAMANA DODLA* & JOHN RINZEL Sciences, New York University, New York, NY 10012 We study a network of mutually alltoall inhibiting AND PAIRWISE CROSS CORRELATIONS In the absence of mutual coupling, the ISI histogram shows a peak

  12. Sleep: The hebbian reinforcement of the local inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Touzet, Claude

    2015-09-01

    Sleep is ubiquitous among the animal realm, and represents about 30% of our lives. Despite numerous efforts, the reason behind our need for sleep is still unknown. The Theory of neuronal Cognition (TnC) proposes that sleep is the period of time during which the local inhibitory synapses (in particular the cortical ones) are replenished. Indeed, as long as the active brain stays awake, hebbian learning guarantees that efficient inhibitory synapses lose their efficiency – just because they are efficient at avoiding the activation of the targeted neurons. Since hebbian learning is the only known mechanism of synapse modification, it follows that to replenish the inhibitory synapses' efficiency, source and targeted neurons must be activated together. This is achieved by a local depolarization that may travel (wave). The period of time during which such slow waves are experienced has been named the "slow-wave sleep" (SWS). It is cut into several pieces by shorter periods of paradoxical sleep (REM) which activity resembles that of the awake state. Indeed, SWS – because it only allows local neural activation – decreases the excitatory long distance connections strength. To avoid losing the associations built during the awake state, these long distance activations are played again during the REM sleep. REM and SWS sleeps act together to guarantee that when the subject awakes again, his inhibitory synaptic efficiency is restored and his (excitatory) long distance associations are still there. PMID:26138624

  13. NEED RECURRENT GATED DIPOLE TO EXPLAIN SECONDARY INHIBITORY CONDITIONING

    E-print Network

    Grossberg, Stephen

    2 + + SG © 2005 READ (I) CIRCUIT REcurrent Associative Diople Grossberg & Schmajuk (1987) LTM GATES forgetting CS Read-out ON OFF LTM (ON) Aquisition Extinction CS US CS NO US #12;3 SG © 2005 PRIMARY INHIBITORY CONDITIONING CS becomes a "conditioned inhibitor" US ON OFF LTM (ON) CS Read-out Aquisition

  14. The Role of Inhibitory Control in False Belief Understanding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flynn, Emma

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study was to establish the nature of the relations between inhibitory control (IC) and false belief understanding (FBU). Twenty-eight children, participating in an experimental condition, were tested on a battery of FBU and IC tasks every four weeks for six phases of testing. A control group of 14 children completed the battery…

  15. Synergic study of ?-glucosidase inhibitory action of aloin and its antioxidant activity with and without camel ?-casein and its peptides.

    PubMed

    Ghamari, F; Ghaffari, S M; Salami, M; Moosavi-Movahedi, F; Farivar, F; Johari, A; Saboury, A A; Chobert, J M; Haertlé, T; Moosavi-Movahedi, A A

    2013-05-01

    Regular consumption of natural antioxidants reduces the risk of developing diseases. Aloin is one of the main active phenolic components of Aloe vera. The main disadvantage of aloin is its concentration limit of use that causes cell damage. One of the aims of this study was to investigate the antioxidant activity of aloin in the presence and absence of camel ?-casein ( ?-CN) and its peptide fractions. The mixture of aloin, ?-CN and peptides showed a very high antioxidant activity in a synergistic manner as compared to each component alone. The alpha ( ?)-glucosidase inhibitory activity of aloin was also investigated in the presence and absence of ?-CN and its peptides. Aloin alone is a potent inhibitor of ?-glucosidase. The ?-glucosidase inhibitory activity of aloin is reduced in the presence of ?-CN or its peptides. The combination of aloin and ?-CN or its peptides makes a high antioxidant functional ingredient. PMID:23116059

  16. Fermentation characteristics and angiotensin I-converting enzyme-inhibitory activity of Lactobacillus helveticus isolate H9 in cow milk, soy milk, and mare milk.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jicheng; Li, Changkun; Xue, Jiangang; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Qing; Zhang, Heping; Chen, Yongfu

    2015-06-01

    Lactobacillus helveticus isolate H9 demonstrated high angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity in previous research. Here, we evaluated the fermentation characteristics (pH, titratable acidity, free amino nitrogen, and viable bacterial counts), ACE-inhibitory activity, and contents of Val-Pro-Pro (VPP) and Ile-Pro-Pro (IPP) peptides of stored yogurt (4°C for 28 d) fermented by L. helveticus isolate H9 (initially inoculated at 4 concentrations), from cow, mare, and soy milks. During storage, the pH and titratable acidity remained stable in yogurts produced from all milk types and all inoculation concentrations. The viable bacterial counts in all stored yogurts ranged between 10(6.72) and 10(8.59) cfu/g. The highest ACE-inhibitory activity (70.9-74.5%) was achieved at inoculation concentrations of 5×10(6) cfu/mL. The ACE-inhibitory tripeptides VPP and IPP as determined by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry were not produced in yogurt made from soy milk or mare milk. These evaluations indicate that L. helveticus H9 has good probiotic properties and would be a promising candidate for production of fermented food with probiotic properties. PMID:25892687

  17. Subinhibitory Concentrations of Perilla Oil Affect the Expression of Secreted Virulence Factor Genes in Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Mingjing; Li, Hongen; Dong, Jing; Wang, Jianfeng; Leng, Bingfeng; Wang, Xiaoliang; Feng, Haihua; Ren, Wenzhi; Deng, Xuming

    2011-01-01

    Background The pathogenicity of staphylococcus aureus is dependent largely upon its ability to secrete a number of virulence factors, therefore, anti-virulence strategy to combat S. aureus-mediated infections is now gaining great interest. It is widely recognized that some plant essential oils could affect the production of staphylococcal exotoxins when used at subinhibitory concentrations. Perilla [Perilla frutescens (L.) Britton], a natural medicine found in eastern Asia, is primarily used as both a medicinal and culinary herb. Its essential oil (perilla oil) has been previously demonstrated to be active against S. aureus. However, there are no data on the influence of perilla oil on the production of S. aureus exotoxins. Methodology/Principal Findings A broth microdilution method was used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of perilla oil against S. aureus strains. Hemolysis, tumour necrosis factor (TNF) release, Western blot, and real-time RT-PCR assays were performed to evaluate the effects of subinhibitory concentrations of perilla oil on exotoxins production in S. aureus. The data presented here show that perilla oil dose-dependently decreased the production of ?-toxin, enterotoxins A and B (the major staphylococcal enterotoxins), and toxic shock syndrome toxin 1 (TSST-1) in both methicillin-sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA). Conclusions/Significance The production of ?-toxin, SEA, SEB, and TSST-1 in S. aureus was decreased by perilla oil. These data suggest that perilla oil may be useful for the treatment of S. aureus infections when used in combination with ?-lactam antibiotics, which can increase exotoxins production by S. aureus at subinhibitory concentrations. Furthermore, perilla oil could be rationally applied in food systems as a novel food preservative both to inhibit the growth of S. aureus and to repress the production of exotoxins, particularly staphylococcal enterotoxins. PMID:21283822

  18. In vitro inhibitory effect of piperlonguminine isolated from Piper longum on human cytochrome P450 1A2.

    PubMed

    Song, Min; Hwang, Jae Yun; Lee, Min Young; Jee, Jun-Goo; Lee, You Mie; Bae, Jong-Sup; Kim, Jeong Ah; Lee, Seung Ho; Lee, Sangkyu

    2014-08-01

    Piperlonguminine (PL), a major alkaloid isolated from Piper longum fruits, shows several biological activities including anti-tumor, anti-hyperlipidemic and anti-inflammatory effects. Although there have been studies of the biological effects of PL, the potential drug-interaction effect of PL following evaluation of inhibitory effects of cytochrome P450 (CYP) activities was not investigated. Here, to investigate the inhibitory effects of PL on the activities of CYP isoforms, CYP inhibition assays were conducted using a cocktail of probe substrates in pooled human liver microsome (HLMs) and human recombinant cDNA-expressed CYP. PL strongly inhibited CYP1A2-mediated phenacetin O-deethylation with an IC50 value of 8.8 ?M, as NADPH-independent inhibition, while other CYPs were not significantly inhibited. A Lineweaver-Burk plot resulted in the inhibition mechanism of PL being divided into two different modes, reversible competitive inhibition in a low concentration range of 0-16 ?M with a Ki value of 1.39 ?M and uncompetitive inhibitory behavior at a high concentration range of 16-40 ?M. In addition, PL only decreased CYP 1A2-catalyzed phenacetin O-deethylase activity with IC50 values of 10.0 ?M in human recombinant cDNA-expressed 1A2, not 1A1. Overall, this is the first investigation of potential herb-drug interactions associated with PL conducted by identifying the competitive inhibitory effects of PL on CYP1A2 in HLMs. PMID:24194261

  19. Structure-activity relationships of 44 halogenated compounds for iodotyrosine deiodinase-inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Ryo; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Uramaru, Naoto; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Ohta, Shigeru; Kitamura, Shigeyuki; Sugihara, Kazumi

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the possible influence of halogenated compounds on thyroid hormone metabolism via inhibition of iodotyrosine deiodinase (IYD) activity. The structure-activity relationships of 44 halogenated compounds for IYD-inhibitory activity were examined in vitro using microsomes of HEK-293 T cells expressing recombinant human IYD. The compounds examined were 17 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 15 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), two agrichemicals, five antiparasitics, two pharmaceuticals and three food colorants. Among them, 25 halogenated phenolic compounds inhibited IYD activity at the concentration of 1×10(-4)M or 6×10(-4)M. Rose bengal was the most potent inhibitor, followed by erythrosine B, phloxine B, benzbromarone, 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4-tribromodiphenyl ether, 4-hydroxy-2,3',3,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether, 4-hydroxy-2',3,4',5,6'-pentachlorobiphenyl, 4'-hydroxy-2,2',4,5'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether, triclosan, and 4-hydroxy-2,2',3,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether. However, among PCBs and PBDEs without a hydroxyl group, including their methoxylated metabolites, none inhibited IYD activity. These results suggest that halogenated compounds may disturb thyroid hormone homeostasis via inhibition of IYD, and that the structural requirements for IYD-inhibitory activity include halogen atom and hydroxyl group substitution on a phenyl ring. PMID:24012475

  20. Inhibitory effects of sea buckthorn procyanidins on fatty acid synthase and MDA-MB-231 cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Nie, Fangyuan; Ouyang, Jian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Ma, Xiaofeng

    2014-10-01

    Fatty acid synthase (FAS) is overexpressed in many human cancers including breast cancer and is considered to be a promising target for therapy. Sea buckthorn has long been used to treat a variety of maladies. Here, we investigated the inhibitory effect of sea buckthorn procyanidins (SBPs) isolated from the seeds of sea buckthorn on FAS and FAS overexpressed human breast cancer MDA-MB-231 cells. The FAS activity and FAS inhibition were measured by a spectrophotometer at 340 nm of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) absorption. We found that SBP potently inhibited the activity of FAS with a half-inhibitory concentration (IC50) value of 0.087 ?g/ml. 3-4,5-Dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,3-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was used to test the cell viability. SBP reduced MDA-MB-231 cell viability with an IC50 value of 37.5 ?g/ml. Hoechst 33258/propidium iodide dual staining and flow cytometric analysis showed that SBP induced MDA-MB-231 cell apoptosis. SBP inhibited intracellular FAS activity with a dose-dependent manner. In addition, sodium palmitate could rescue the cell apoptosis induced by SBP. These results showed that SBP was a promising FAS inhibitor which could induce the apoptosis of MDA-MB-231 cells via inhibiting FAS. These findings suggested that SBP might be useful for preventing or treating breast cancer. PMID:24957042

  1. Inhibitory Effect of Arctigenin from Fructus Arctii Extract on Melanin Synthesis via Repression of Tyrosinase Expression

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hwayong; Song, Kwang Hoon; Jung, Pil Mun; Kim, Ji-Eun; Kim, Mi Yoon; Ma, Jin Yeul

    2013-01-01

    To identify the active compound arctigenin in Fructus Arctii (dried seed of medicinal plant Arctium lappa) and to elucidate the inhibitory mechanism in melanogenesis, we analyzed melanin content and tyrosinase activity on B16BL6 murine melanoma and melan-A cell cultures. Water extracts of Fructus Arctii were shown to inhibit tyrosinase activity in vitro and melanin content in ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone-stimulated cells to similar levels as the well-known kojic acid and arbutin, respectively. The active compound arctigenin of Fructus Arctii displayed little or no cytotoxicity at all concentrations examined and decreased the relative melanin content and tyrosinase activity in a dose-dependent manner. Melanogenic inhibitory activity was also identified in vivo with zebrafish embryo. To determine the mechanism of inhibition, the effects of arctigenin on tyrosinase gene expression and tyrosinase promoter activity were examined. Also in addition, in the signaling cascade, arctigenin dose dependently decreased the cAMP level and promoted the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase. This result suggests that arctigenin downregulates cAMP and the tyrosinase enzyme through its gene promoter and subsequently upregulates extracellular signal-regulated kinase activity by increasing phosphorylation in the melanogenesis signaling pathway, which leads to a lower melanin content. PMID:23781272

  2. Hypocholesterolemic Effect and In Vitro Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Activity of an Opuntia ficus-indica Extract

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Fernandez-Flores, Ofelia; Gutierrez-Mercado, Yanet; Carmona-de la Luz, Joel; Sandoval-Salas, Fabiola; Mendez-Carreto, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol control is fundamental for prevention of cardiovascular disorders. In this work, the hypocholesterolemic activity of an aqueous Opuntia ficus-indica extract (AOE) was tested in triton-induced mice. The inhibitory activity on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated in vitro by the same extract. Furthermore, polyphenol content of the extract was evaluated. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in three groups of mice by intraperitoneal administration of Triton WR-1339. After induction of hypercholesterolemia, the groups were treated with an AOE (500?mg/kg) and saline solution and the positive control group with orlistat, respectively. Cholesterol levels were measured 24?h later in peripheral blood. The levels of blood cholesterol after administration of AOE significantly decreased compared to negative control. The inhibitory activity of AOE on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated at concentrations from 60 to 1000??g/mL. The AOE inhibited the pancreatic lipase with an IC50 = 588.5??g/mL. The AOE had a high content of polyphenolic compounds. These results show that AOE is able to prevent hypercholesterolemia by pancreatic lipase inhibition, in part due to its polyphenolic compounds. PMID:26078966

  3. Inhibitory phlorotannins from the edible brown alga Ecklonia stolonifera on total reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hye Sook; Chung, Hae Young; Kim, Ji Young; Son, Byeng Wha; Jung, Hyun Ah; Choi, Jae Sue

    2004-02-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play an important role in the pathogenesis of many human degenerative diseases such as cancer, aging, arteriosclerosis, and rheumatism. Much attention has been focused on the development of safe and effective antioxidants. To discover sources of antioxidative activity in marine algae, extracts from 17 kinds of seaweed were screened for their inhibitory effect on total ROS generation in kidney homogenate using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA). ROS inhibition was seen in three species: Ulva pertusa, Symphyocladia latiuscula, and Ecklonia stolonifera. At a final concentration of 25 microg/mL, U. pertusa inhibited 85.65+/-20.28% of total ROS generation, S. latiscula caused 50.63+/-0.09% inhibitory, and the Ecklonia species was 44.30+/-7.33% inhibition. E. stolonifera Okamura (Laminariaceae), which belongs to the brown algae, has been further investigated because it is commonly used as a foodstuff in Korea. Five compounds, phloroglucinol (1), eckstolonol (2), eckol (3), phlorofucofuroeckol A (4), and dieckol (5), isolated from the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of the methanolic extract of E. stolonifera inhibited total ROS generation. PMID:15022722

  4. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity and hypouricemic effect of aspalathin from unfermented rooibos.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Makoto; Hirano, Yoshiaki; Nishio, Masahiro; Furuya, Yutaka; Nakamura, Hiromichi; Watanabe, Tsuyoshi

    2013-12-01

    Rooibos is rich in flavonoids such as aspalathin, which is a unique C-glycosyl dihydrochalcone, that is used as a traditional herbal tea. This study was designed to evaluate the in vitro xanthine oxidase (XOD) inhibitory activity of the aspalathin-rich fraction (ARF) and purified aspalathin from rooibos. The hypouricemic effects of the ARF and aspalathin on hyperuricemic mice were also assessed. The ARF was prepared from aqueous extract of unfermented rooibos leaves and stems, and it was collected by column chromatography; the aspalathin content in this fraction was 21.4%. The ARF and aspalathin inhibited XOD in a dose-dependent manner. The concentrations of the ARF and aspalathin required to inhibit XOD at 50% (IC50 ) were 20.4 ?g/mL (4.4 ?g/mL aspalathin equivalents) and 4.5 ?g/mL, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plot analysis indicated that aspalathin was a competitive inhibitor of XOD, and the inhibition constant (Ki) was 3.1 ?M. In hyperuricemic mice induced by inosine-5'-monophosphate, treatment with the ARF and aspalathin significantly suppressed the increased plasma uric acid level in a dose-dependent manner. The suppressed plasma uric acid level in mice could be attributed to the XOD inhibitory activity of the ARF and aspalathin. Further study is required to determine the effect of aspalathin or its metabolites on XOD activity in vivo. PMID:24261664

  5. Inhibitory effect of gold nanoparticles on the D-ribose glycation of bovine serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Weixi; Cohenford, Menashi A; Frost, Leslie; Seneviratne, Champika; Dain, Joel A

    2014-01-01

    Formation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) by nonenzymatic glycation of proteins is a major contributory factor to the pathophysiology of diabetic conditions including senile dementia and atherosclerosis. This study describes the inhibitory effect of gold nanoparticles (GNPs) on the D-ribose glycation of bovine serum albumin (BSA). A combination of analytical methods including ultraviolet–visible spectrometry, high performance liquid chromatography, circular dichroism, and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometry were used to determine the extent of BSA glycation in the presence of citrate reduced spherical GNPs of various sizes and concentrations. GNPs of particle diameters ranging from 2 nm to 20 nm inhibited BSA’s AGE formation. The extent of inhibition correlated with the total surface area of the nanoparticles. GNPs of highest total surface area yielded the most inhibition whereas those with the lowest total surface area inhibited the formation of AGEs the least. Additionally, when GNPs’ total surface areas were set the same, their antiglycation activities were similar. This inhibitory effect of GNPs on BSA’s glycation by D-ribose suggests that colloidal particles may have a therapeutic application for the treatment of diabetes and conditions that promote hyperglycemia. PMID:25473284

  6. Memory-enhancing treatments reverse the impairment of inhibitory avoidance retention in sepsis-surviving rats

    PubMed Central

    Tuon, Lisiane; Comim, Clarissa M; Petronilho, Fabrícia; Barichello, Tatiana; Izquierdo, Ivan; Quevedo, João; Dal-Pizzol, Felipe

    2008-01-01

    Introduction Survivors from sepsis have presented with long-term cognitive impairment, including alterations in memory, attention, concentration, and global loss of cognitive function. Thus, we evaluated the effects of memory enhancers in sepsis-surviving rats. Methods The rats underwent cecal ligation and perforation (CLP) (sepsis group) with 'basic support' (saline at 50 mL/kg immediately and 12 hours after CLP plus ceftriaxone at 30 mg/kg and clindamycin at 25 mg/kg 6, 12, and 18 hours after CLP) or sham-operated (control group). After 10 or 30 days, rats were submitted to an inhibitory avoidance task. After task training, animals received injections of saline, epinephrine, naloxone, dexamethasone, or glucose. Twenty-four hours afterwards, animals were submitted to the inhibitory avoidance test. Results We demonstrated that memory enhancers reversed impairment in the sepsis group 10 and 30 days after sepsis induction. This effect was of lower magnitude when compared with sham animals 10 days, but not 30 days, after sepsis. Conclusions Using different pharmacologic approaches, we conclude that the adrenergic memory formation pathways are responsive in sepsis-surviving animals. PMID:18957125

  7. Inhibitory effects of antibiotic combinations on syntrophic bacteria, homoacetogens and methanogens.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Sevcan; Cetecioglu, Zeynep; Arikan, Osman; Ince, Bahar; Ozbayram, E Gozde; Ince, Orhan

    2015-02-01

    Antibiotics have the potential to adversely affect the microbial community that is present in biological wastewater treatment processes. The antibiotics that exist in waste streams directly inhibit substrate degradation and also have an influence on the composition of the microbial community. The aim of this study was to evaluate the short-term inhibition impact that various antibiotic combinations had on the syntrophic bacteria, homoacetogenic and methanogenic activities of a microbial community that had been fed with propionate and butyrate as the sole carbon source and VFA mixture (acetate, propionate and butyrate). Acute tests were constructed using on a two way-factorial design, where one factor was the composition of antibiotic mixture and another was the concentration of antibiotics added. In addition, the inhibitory effect of antibiotics was evaluated by monitoring biogas production and the accumulation of individual volatile fatty acids. Specific methanogenic activity batch tests showed a significant (p<0.05) decrease in the maximum methane production rate in the presence of 1 mg L(-1) of antibiotics for the substrate in a VFA mixture and propionate; 1 mg L(-1) of ETS, 25 mg L(-1) of ET, 10 mg L(-1) of ST and ES combination for substrates butyrate. The addition of antibiotics to the batch tests affected the utilization of acetate, propionate and butyrate. This study indicated that antibiotic mixtures have an effect on homoacetogenic bacteria and methanogens, which may exert inhibitory effects on propionate and butyrate-oxidizing syntrophic bacteria, resulting in unfavorable effects on methanogenesis. PMID:25290357

  8. Inhibitory actions of opioid compounds on calcium fluxes and neurotransmitter release from mammalian cerebral cortical slices.

    PubMed Central

    Bradford, H. F.; Crowder, J. M.; White, E. J.

    1986-01-01

    The effects of opioid agonists on veratrine-stimulated Ca2+ influx and amino acid neurotransmitter release in rat cerebrocortical brain slices were studied. Inhibitory effects were seen on both of these parameters with all of the opioid agonists used. None of the drugs used affected basal 45Ca2+ uptake, basal K+ content or basal amino acid release from the slices. At high concentrations (100 microM) fentanyl, tifluadom, U50,488H, butorphanol and bremazocine greatly inhibited the depolarization of the slices by veratrine as determined by the reduced release of K+. The opioid receptor subtypes at which the drugs were acting were characterized by the antagonistic effects of naloxone and WIN44441-3. The opioid-induced inhibition of stimulated Ca2+ uptake and amino acid release were not antagonized by WIN44441-2, the inactive enantiomer of WIN44441-3. It is concluded that opioid agonists acting through mu- and kappa-receptors and probably through delta- and sigma-receptors, have an inhibitory effect on Ca2+ uptake into cerebrocortical brain slices and the subsequent release of aspartate, glutamate and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA). PMID:2871885

  9. Glutathione peroxidase inhibitory assay for electrophilic pollutants in diesel exhaust and tobacco smoke

    PubMed Central

    Staimer, Norbert; Nguyen, Tran B.; Nizkorodov, Sergey A.; Delfino, Ralph J.

    2012-01-01

    We developed a rapid kinetic bioassay demonstrating the inhibition of glutathione peroxidase 1 (GPx-1) by organic electrophilic pollutants such as acrolein, crotonaldehyde, and p-benzoquinone that are frequently found as components of tobacco smoke, diesel exhaust, and other combustion sources. In a complementary approach, we applied a high-resolution proton-transfer reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometer (PTR-ToF-MS) to monitor in real-time the generation of electrophilic volatile carbonyls in cigarette smoke. The new bioassay uses the important antioxidant selenoenzyme GPx-1, immobilized to 96-well microtiter plates, as a probe. The selenocysteine bearing subunits of the enzyme's catalytic site are viewed as cysteine analogues and are vulnerable to electrophilic attack by compounds with conjugated carbonyl systems. The immobilization of GPx-1 to microtiter plate wells enabled facile removal of excess reactive inhibitory compounds after incubation with electrophilic chemicals or aqueous extracts of air samples derived from different sources. The inhibitory response of cigarette smoke and diesel exhaust particle extracts were compared to chemical standards of a group of electrophilic carbonyls and the arylating p-benzoquinone. GPx-1 activity was directly inactivated by millimolar concentrations of highly reactive electrophilic chemicals (including acrolein, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, and p-benzoquinone) and extracts of diesel and cigarette smoke. We conclude that the potential of air pollutant components to generate oxidative stress may be, in part, a result of electrophile-derived covalent modifications of enzymes involved in the cytosolic antioxidant defense. PMID:22349402

  10. Hypocholesterolemic Effect and In Vitro Pancreatic Lipase Inhibitory Activity of an Opuntia ficus-indica Extract.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Camberos, Eduardo; Flores-Fernandez, Jose Miguel; Fernandez-Flores, Ofelia; Gutierrez-Mercado, Yanet; Carmona-de la Luz, Joel; Sandoval-Salas, Fabiola; Mendez-Carreto, Carlos; Allen, Kirk

    2015-01-01

    Cholesterol control is fundamental for prevention of cardiovascular disorders. In this work, the hypocholesterolemic activity of an aqueous Opuntia ficus-indica extract (AOE) was tested in triton-induced mice. The inhibitory activity on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated in vitro by the same extract. Furthermore, polyphenol content of the extract was evaluated. Hypercholesterolemia was induced in three groups of mice by intraperitoneal administration of Triton WR-1339. After induction of hypercholesterolemia, the groups were treated with an AOE (500?mg/kg) and saline solution and the positive control group with orlistat, respectively. Cholesterol levels were measured 24?h later in peripheral blood. The levels of blood cholesterol after administration of AOE significantly decreased compared to negative control. The inhibitory activity of AOE on pancreatic lipase enzyme was evaluated at concentrations from 60 to 1000??g/mL. The AOE inhibited the pancreatic lipase with an IC50 = 588.5??g/mL. The AOE had a high content of polyphenolic compounds. These results show that AOE is able to prevent hypercholesterolemia by pancreatic lipase inhibition, in part due to its polyphenolic compounds. PMID:26078966

  11. Inhibitory effect of tocotrienol on eukaryotic DNA polymerase {lambda} and angiogenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mizushina, Yoshiyuki . E-mail: mizushin@nutr.kobegakuin.ac.jp; Nakagawa, Kiyotaka; Shibata, Akira; Awata, Yasutoshi; Kuriyama, Isoko; Shimazaki, Noriko; Koiwai, Osamu; Uchiyama, Yukinobu; Sakaguchi, Kengo; Miyazawa, Teruo; Yoshida, Hiromi

    2006-01-20

    Tocotrienols, vitamin E compounds that have an unsaturated side chain with three double bonds, selectively inhibited the activity of mammalian DNA polymerase {lambda} (pol {lambda}) in vitro. These compounds did not influence the activities of replicative pols such as {alpha}, {delta}, and {epsilon}, or even the activity of pol {beta} which is thought to have a very similar three-dimensional structure to the pol {beta}-like region of pol {lambda}. Since {delta}-tocotrienol had the strongest inhibitory effect among the four ({alpha}- to {delta}-) tocotrienols, the isomer's structure might be an important factor in the inhibition of pol {lambda}. The inhibitory effect of {delta}-tocotrienol on both intact pol {lambda} (residues 1-575) and a truncated pol {lambda} lacking the N-terminal BRCA1 C-terminus (BRCT) domain (residues 133-575, del-1 pol {lambda}) was dose-dependent, with 50% inhibition observed at a concentration of 18.4 and 90.1 {mu}M, respectively. However, del-2 pol {lambda} (residues 245-575) containing the C-terminal pol {beta}-like region was unaffected. Tocotrienols also inhibited the proliferation of and formation of tubes by bovine aortic endothelial cells, with {delta}-tocotrienol having the greatest effect. These results indicated that tocotrienols targeted both pol {lambda} and angiogenesis as anti-cancer agents. The relationship between the inhibition of pol {lambda} and anti-angiogenesis by {delta}-tocotrienol was discussed.

  12. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  13. The role of inhibitory control in behavioral and physiological expressions of toddler executive function

    E-print Network

    Inhibitory control EEG Executive function Temperament Verbal ability a b s t r a c t A total of 81 toddlers, can be found in the temperament literature. Rothbart's definition of temperament-based inhibitory

  14. Response Selectivity Is Correlated to Dendritic Structure in Parvalbumin-Expressing Inhibitory Neurons in Visual Cortex

    E-print Network

    Runyan, Caroline A.

    Inhibitory neurons have been shown to perform a variety of functions within brain circuits, including shaping response functions in target cells. Still, how the properties of specific inhibitory neuron classes relate to ...

  15. Protein Kinase Inhibitor reciprocally regulates osteoblast and adipocyte differentiation by downregulating Leukemia Inhibitory

    E-print Network

    by downregulating Leukemia Inhibitory Factor Xin Chen1, Bryan S. Hausman1, Guangbin Luo2, Guang Zhou1,2, Shunichi-induced expression of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor (Lif) mRNA and LIF protein. LIF neutralizing antibodies inhibited

  16. Prolyl endopeptidase inhibitory activity of fourteen Kampo formulas and inhibitory constituents of Tokaku-joki-to.

    PubMed

    Fan, W; Tezuka, Y; Kadota, S

    2000-07-01

    Prolyl endopeptidase (PEP, EC 3.4.21.26) is an enzyme playing a role in the metabolism of proline-containing neuropeptides which have been suggested to be involved in learning and memory processes. In screening for PEP inhibitors from fourteen traditional Kampo formulas, we found that Tokaku-joki-to shows a significant inhibitory activity. Examination of the constituents of the Kampo formula resulted in the isolation of two new compounds, cis-3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene 4'-O-beta-D-(6-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (10) and 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone 4'-O-beta-D-(6-O-galloyl-2-O-cinnamoyl)glucopyranoside (16), along with twenty-five known compounds, cinnamic acid (1), protocatechuic acid (2), gallic acid (3), torachrysone 8-O-beta-D-glucoside (4), emodin (5), emodin 8-O-beta-D-glucoside (6), 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (7), 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene 4'-O-beta-D-(2-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (8), 3,5,4'-trihydroxystilbene 4'-O-beta-D-(6-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (9), 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone 4'-O-beta-D-glucopyranoside (11), isolindleyin (12), lindleyin (13), 4(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone 4'-O-beta-D-(2,6-di-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (14), 4-(4-hydroxyphenyl)-2-butanone 4'-O-beta-D-(2-O-galloyl-6-O-cinnamoyl)glucopyranoside (15), 1-O-galloylglucose (17), 1,2,6-tri-O-galloylglucose (18), gallic acid 4-O-beta-D-(6-O-galloyl)glucopyranoside (19), liquiritigenin (20), liquiritigenin 4'-O-beta-D-glucoside (21), liquiritigenin 7,4'-diglucoside (22), liquiritigenin 4'-O-beta-D-apiofuranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-D-glucopyranoside (23), licuroside (24), (-)-epicatechin (25), (-)-epicatechin 3-O-gallate (26) and (+)-catechin (27). Among these compounds, twelve (7-10, 14-16, 18, 19, 24-26) showed noncompetitive inhibition with an IC50 of 22.9, 3.0, 14.9, 2.8, 10.5, 0.69, 8.2, 0.44, 9.39, 26.5, 28.1 and 0.052 microM, respectively. PMID:10923840

  17. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the minimum induced drag of wings. The topics include: 1) The History of Spanload Development of the optimum spanload Winglets and their implications; 2) Horten Sailplanes; and 3) Flight Mechanics & Adverse yaw.

  18. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition. PMID:25685425

  19. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C.T.; Jian, L.K.; Luhmann, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23–24 transition. PMID:25685425

  20. 30 CFR 202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual royalty payments for any producing...

  1. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum - Duration: 61 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  2. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    E-print Network

    Ulloa, Osvaldo

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, ...

  3. Minimum Energy Diagrams for Multieffect Distillation Arrangements

    E-print Network

    Skogestad, Sigurd

    Minimum Energy Diagrams for Multieffect Distillation Arrangements Hilde K. Engelien and Sigurd distillation arrangements for separating a ternary mixture have been considered. The focus is on a heat-integrated complex distillation configuration, called a multieffect prefractionator arrangement. The comparison

  4. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Regulations § 35.11 Minimum requirements...any shipment of any variety of vinifera species table grapes unless such grapes meet the following quality and container...

  5. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Exemptions § 35.13 Minimum quantity...a shipment of 25 packages or less of vinifera species table grapes, either a single variety or a combination of two or more...

  6. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Regulations § 35.11 Minimum requirements...any shipment of any variety of vinifera species table grapes unless such grapes meet the following quality and container...

  7. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Exemptions § 35.13 Minimum quantity...a shipment of 25 packages or less of vinifera species table grapes, either a single variety or a combination of two or more...

  8. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Exemptions § 35.13 Minimum quantity...a shipment of 25 packages or less of vinifera species table grapes, either a single variety or a combination of two or more...

  9. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Exemptions § 35.13 Minimum quantity...a shipment of 25 packages or less of vinifera species table grapes, either a single variety or a combination of two or more...

  10. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Regulations § 35.11 Minimum requirements...any shipment of any variety of vinifera species table grapes unless such grapes meet the following quality and container...

  11. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Regulations § 35.11 Minimum requirements...any shipment of any variety of vinifera species table grapes unless such grapes meet the following quality and container...

  12. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES AND PLUMS Exemptions § 35.13 Minimum quantity...a shipment of 25 packages or less of vinifera species table grapes, either a single variety or a combination of two or more...

  13. Minimum entropy deconvolution and blind equalisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E. H.; Mulligan, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between minimum entropy deconvolution, developed primarily for geophysics applications, and blind equalization are pointed out. It is seen that a large class of existing blind equalization algorithms are directly related to the scale-invariant cost functions used in minimum entropy deconvolution. Thus the extensive analyses of these cost functions can be directly applied to blind equalization, including the important asymptotic results of Donoho.

  14. REPRODUCTIONRESEARCH Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) receptor gene is

    E-print Network

    Ramachandran, Ramesh

    REPRODUCTIONRESEARCH Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) receptor gene is expressed Ramachandran; Email: rameshr@psu.edu Abstract Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), an RFamide peptide, has (2008) 135 267­274 Introduction Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH), first isolated from quail

  15. The Role of Inhibitory Control in Behavioral and Physiological Expressions of Toddler Executive Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morasch, Katherine C.; Bell, Martha Ann

    2011-01-01

    A total of 81 toddlers (24-27 months of age) participated in a biobehavioral investigation of inhibitory control. Maternal report measures of inhibitory control were related to laboratory tasks assessing inhibitory abilities under conditions of conflict, delay, and compliance challenge as well as toddler verbal ability. In addition, unique…

  16. Psychological Review Inhibitory Control in Mind and Brain 2.0: Blocked-Input

    E-print Network

    Palmeri, Thomas

    Psychological Review Inhibitory Control in Mind and Brain 2.0: Blocked-Input Models of Saccadic., Schall, J. D., & Palmeri, T. J. (2015, February 23). Inhibitory Control in Mind and Brain 2.0: Blocked.1037/a0038893 #12;Inhibitory Control in Mind and Brain 2.0: Blocked-Input Models of Saccadic

  17. Wide Dispersion and Diversity of Clonally Related Inhibitory Interneurons.

    PubMed

    Harwell, Corey C; Fuentealba, Luis C; Gonzalez-Cerrillo, Adrian; Parker, Phillip R L; Gertz, Caitlyn C; Mazzola, Emanuele; Garcia, Miguel Turrero; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cepko, Constance L; Kriegstein, Arnold R

    2015-09-01

    The mammalian neocortex is composed of two major neuronal cell types with distinct origins: excitatory pyramidal neurons and inhibitory interneurons, generated in dorsal and ventral progenitor zones of the embryonic telencephalon, respectively. Thus, inhibitory neurons migrate relatively long distances to reach their destination in the developing forebrain. The role of lineage in the organization and circuitry of interneurons is still not well understood. Utilizing a combination of genetics, retroviral fate mapping, and lineage-specific retroviral barcode labeling, we find that clonally related interneurons can be widely dispersed while unrelated interneurons can be closely clustered. These data suggest that migratory mechanisms related to the clustering of interneurons occur largely independent of their clonal origin. PMID:26299474

  18. Inhibitory effects of acetylsalicylic acid on exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Y?ld?z, H; Oztas, H; Y?ld?z, D; Koc, A; Kalipci, E

    2013-05-01

    We investigated short (6 months) and long (12 months) term inhibitory effects of low (200 ppm) and high (400 ppm) dosages of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) on exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis. It is known that exocrine pancreatic carcinogenesis can be detected by the presence of atypical acinar cell foci (AACF) in pancreas. We investigated possible inhibitory effects of acetylsalicylic acid in an azaserine-treated rat model. AACF were produced in rats by injection with azaserine according to previous studies. Our findings showed that the number, volume and diameter of pancreatic AACF were reduced after acetylsalicylic acid application. These observations suggest that acetylsalicylic acid may exert a protective effect against neoplastic development of pancreatic acinar cells in azaserine injected rats. Our findings corroborate reports in the literature concerning the effects of aspirin in reducing neoplastic development. PMID:23331184

  19. Synthesis and ribonucleotide reductase inhibitory activity of thiosemicarbazones.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Kesavan; Prathiba, Kumari; Jayaprakash, Venkatesan; Basu, Arijit; Mishra, Nibha; Zhou, Bingsen; Hu, Shuya; Yen, Yun

    2008-12-01

    Ribonucleotide reductase (RR) is an important therapeutic target for anticancer drugs. The structure of human RR features a 1:1 complex of two homodimeric subunits, hRRM1 and hRRM2. Prokaryotically expressed and highly purified recombinant human RR subunits, hRRM1 and hRRM2, were used for holoenzyme-based [(3)H]CDP reduction in vitro assay. Ten new thiosemicarbazones (7-16) were synthesized and screened for their RR inhibitory activity. Two thiosemicarbazones derived from p-hydroxy benzaldehyde (9 and 10) were found to be active but less potent than the standard, Hydroxyurea (HU). Guided by the activity of compounds 9 and 10, 11 new thiosemicarbazones (17-27) derived from p-hydroxy benzaldehyde were prepared and screened for their RR inhibitory activity. All the 11 compounds were more potent than HU. PMID:18976907

  20. Flavonoids from Salvia chloroleuca with ?-Amylsae and ?-Glucosidase Inhibitory Effect

    PubMed Central

    Asghari, Behvar; Salehi, Peyman; Sonboli, Ali; Nejad Ebrahimi, Samad

    2015-01-01

    It is believed that the inhibition of carbohydrate hydrolyzing enzymes including ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase is one of the therapeutic approaches to decrease the postprandial glucose level after a meal, especially in the people with type 2 diabetes. Medicinal plants and their extracts are one of the main sources to find new inhibitors to the enzymes. In our study four flavonoids, namely luteolin 7-O-glucoside (1), luteolin 7-O-glucuronide (2), diosmetin 7-O-glucuronide (3) and salvigenin (4) were isolated from aerial parts of Salvia chloroleuca. The inhibitory activity of these compounds against ?-amylase and ?-glucosidase were evaluated. Compounds 1, 2 and 3 showed potent ?-glucosidase inhibitory effect with IC50 values of 18.3, 14.7, and 17.1 µM, respectively. Also these compounds exhibited moderate ?-amylase activity with IC50 values 81.7, 61.5, and 76.3 µM, respectively. PMID:25901170

  1. Inhibitory activity of Aloe vera gel on some clinically isolated cariogenic and periodontopathic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fani, Mohammadmehdi; Kohanteb, Jamshid

    2012-03-01

    Aloe vera is a medicinal plant with anti-inflammatory, antimicrobial, antidiabetic and immune-boosting properties. In the present study we investigated the inhibitory activities of Aloe vera gel on some cariogenic (Streptococcus mutans), periodontopathic (Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Porphyromonas gingivalis) and an opportunistic periodontopathogen (Bacteroides fragilis) isolated from patients with dental caries and periodontal diseases. Twenty isolates of each of these bacteria were investigated for their sensitivity to Aloe vera gel using the disk diffusion and microdilution methods. S. mutans was the species most sensitive to Aloe vera gel with a MIC of 12.5 µg/ml, while A. actinomycetemcomitans, P. gingivalis, and B. fragilis were less sensitive, with a MIC of 25-50 µg/ml (P < 0.01). Based on our present findings it is concluded that Aloe vera gel at optimum concentration could be used as an antiseptic for prevention of dental caries and periodontal diseases. PMID:22466882

  2. Colistin A and colistin B among inhibitory substances of Paenibacillus polymyxa JB05-01-1.

    PubMed

    Naghmouchi, Karim; Hammami, Riadh; Fliss, Ismail; Teather, Ron; Baah, John; Drider, Djamel

    2012-05-01

    Recently, we isolated and reported the antagonism of Paenibacillus polymyxa JB05-01-1 (P. polymyxa JB05-01-1) against Gram-negative bacteria. Here, we provide more insights and attribute the abovementioned antagonism to the production of colistins A and B, which were purified by Amberlite column exchange, C18 column hydrophobicity, superdex 75 16/60 gel filtration chromatography connected to fast protein liquid chromatography and identified by MALDI TOF/TOF, and manual nanospray analysis. The amount of colistin A and colistin B recovered from 500 ml of culture supernatant was about 0.05 mg. The specific activity and the average recovery of the eluted substances were 5,120 AU/mg and 1.1%, respectively. The minimal inhibitory concentrations of the purified colistins against Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Pseudomonas fluorescens LRC R73 were 0.13 and 0.62 ?g/ml, respectively. PMID:22038095

  3. “Brain MR spectroscopy in autism spectrum disorder—the GABA excitatory/inhibitory imbalance theory revisited”

    PubMed Central

    Brix, Maiken K.; Ersland, Lars; Hugdahl, Kenneth; Grüner, Renate; Posserud, Maj-Britt; Hammar, Åsa; Craven, Alexander R.; Noeske, Ralph; Evans, C. John; Walker, Hanne B.; Midtvedt, Tore; Beyer, Mona K.

    2015-01-01

    Magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) from voxels placed in the left anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) was measured from 14 boys with Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) and 24 gender and age-matched typically developing (TD) control group. Our main aims were to compare the concentration of ?-aminobutyric acid (GABA) between the two groups, and to investigate the relationship between brain metabolites and autism symptom severity in the ASD group. We did find a significant negative correlation in the ASD group between Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ) and GABA+/Cr, which may imply that severity of symptoms in ASD is associated with differences in the level of GABA in the brain, supporting the excitatory/inhibitory (E/I) imbalance theory. However we did not find a significant difference between the two groups in GABA levels. PMID:26157380

  4. RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN STRUCTURE OF BENZIMIDAZOLE DERIVATIVES AND SELECTIVE VIRUS INHIBITORY ACTIVITY

    PubMed Central

    Tamm, Igor; Bablanian, Rostom; Nemes, Marjorie M.; Shunk, Clifford H.; Robinson, Franklin M.; Folkers, Karl

    1961-01-01

    The virus inhibitory activity and selectivity of certain benzimidazole, benzotriazole, and naphthimidazole derivatives were determined with influenza B and polio type 2 viruses. Among the sixty-five compounds examined, several were highly active inhibitors of influenza B virus multiplication in the chorioallantoic membrane in vitro. The following compounds, listed in order of increasing inhibitory activity, were more than 100 times as active as benzimidazole: 5-(4'-toluenesulfonamido)-benzimidazole, 5-hydroxybenzotriazole-4-carboxy-?-naphthylamide, 4,5,6-trichlorobenzotriazole, 5-(3',4'-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido)-benzimidazole, 5-(3',4'-dichlorobenzenesulfonamido) - 1 - (3'',4'' - dichlorobenzenesulfonyl)-benzimidazole, 4-(p-chlorophenylazo)-5-hydroxybenzotriazole, and 4,5,6,7-tetrachlorobenzotriazole. However, none showed high selectivity. Of the sixty-five compounds studied with influenza virus, twenty-five were also examined with poliovirus type 2 in monkey kidney cells in vitro. Included in this group were five of the seven most active inhibitors of influenza virus, listed above. All five were more than 100 times as active in inhibiting poliovirus multiplication as the reference compound. In addition to these, two other compounds were highly active: 2-(?-hydroxybenzyl)-benzimidazole (HBB), and 2-(?-hydroxybenzyl)-5-chlorobenzimidazole, with relative inhibitory activities of 78 and 130, respectively. These two compounds, and the much less active 5,6-dichloro derivative of HBB, were the only ones which showed no, or only slight, toxic effects on cells at concentrations sufficient to cause considerable inhibition of poliovirus multiplication. Furthermore, HBB and the 5-chloro derivative were the only compounds which caused significant inhibition of the cytopathic effects of poliovirus. HBB, and its 5-chloro and 5,6-dichloro derivatives had no effect on the multiplication of influenza B virus in the chorioallantoic membrane. In addition, HBB failed to inhibit influenza B virus multiplication and cytopathic effects in monkey kidney cells. Inhibition of poliovirus-induced cell damage by HBB was characterized by the following features: the curves relating reduction in virus yield or cytopathic effects to concentration of the compound followed an approximately parallel course; somewhat higher concentrations were required to inhibit virus-induced cell damage than to reduce virus yield. HBB suppressed viral cytopathic effects for a period of time which varied directly with the concentration of compound, and inversely with the size of virus inoculum. The development of virus-induced cell damage in treated cultures on prolonged incubation was not due to inactivation of HBB. The inhibitory effect of HBB on virus-induced cell damage was reversible by removal of the compound. HBB inhibited viral cytopathic effects when given during the exponential increase phase in virus multiplication. Inhibition of virus-induced cell damage by HBB was demonstrated by photomicrographs. HBB did not inactivate the infectivity of poliovirus type 2. PMID:13775109

  5. Alpha-glucosidase inhibitory constituents of Linaria kurdica subsp. eriocalyx.

    PubMed

    Aydo?du, Irfan; Zihnio?lu, Figen; Karayildirim, Tamer; Gülcemal, Derya; Alanku?-Cali?kan, Ozgen; Bedir, Erdal

    2010-06-01

    Three known iridoid glycosides, antirrhide (1), antirrhinoside (2), and 5-O-beta-allosylantirrhinoside (3), and two known flavone glycosides, linariin (4"'-O-acetylpectolinarin) (4) and linarin (acacetin-7-O-beta-D-rutinoside) (5) were isolated from Linaria kurdica Boiss & Hohen. subsp. eriocalyx. The structures of the isolated compounds were established from spectroscopic evidence. Compounds 1-3 showed high inhibitory potential against alpha-glucosidase. PMID:20614804

  6. Nitric oxide inhibitory principles from Derris trifoliata stems.

    PubMed

    Tewtrakul, Supinya; Cheenpracha, Sarot; Karalai, Chatchanok

    2009-06-01

    Nine rotenoids were isolated from the hexane and dichloromethane extracts of Derris trifoliata stems and were tested for nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity using RAW264.7 cells. The result indicated that 12a-hydroxyrotenone (7) possessed very potent NO inhibitory activity with an IC(50) value of 0.002 microM, followed by 1 (deguelin, IC(50)=0.008 microM), 9 (12a-hydroxyelliptone, IC(50)=0.010 microM) and 2 (alpha-toxicarol, IC(50)=0.013 microM), respectively. In addition, the DPPH scavenging activity of rotenoids was also investigated. It was found that 6a,12a-dehydrodeguelin (5) possessed the highest activity against DPPH with an IC(50) value of 7.4 microM, followed by deguelin (1, IC(50)=27.4 microM). All compounds did not show any cytotoxicity at their IC(50) values for NO inhibitory activity. Structure-activity relationships (SARs) of these rotenoids against NO release are as follows: (1) hydroxylation at C12a dramatically increased activity, (2) prenylation at furan ring increased activity markedly and (3) hydrogenation of a double bond at C6a-C12a conferred higher activity. For the DPPH radical scavenging effect, it was found that (1) introduction of a double bond at C6a-C12a increased activity and (2) hydroxylation of C11 at the D-ring decreased activity. As regards active compounds of Derris trifoliata stems, the isolated compounds are responsible for the NO inhibitory effect, especially 7, 1, 9 and 2, whereas 5 and 1 are those for the DPPH scavenging activity. PMID:19303755

  7. Repetitive magnetic stimulation induces plasticity of inhibitory synapses.

    PubMed

    Lenz, Maximilian; Galanis, Christos; Müller-Dahlhaus, Florian; Opitz, Alexander; Wierenga, Corette J; Szabó, Gábor; Ziemann, Ulf; Deller, Thomas; Funke, Klaus; Vlachos, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) is used as a therapeutic tool in neurology and psychiatry. While repetitive magnetic stimulation (rMS) has been shown to induce plasticity of excitatory synapses, it is unclear whether rMS can also modify structural and functional properties of inhibitory inputs. Here we employed 10-Hz rMS of entorhinohippocampal slice cultures to study plasticity of inhibitory neurotransmission on CA1 pyramidal neurons. Our experiments reveal a rMS-induced reduction in GABAergic synaptic strength (2-4?h after stimulation), which is Ca(2+)-dependent and accompanied by the remodelling of postsynaptic gephyrin scaffolds. Furthermore, we present evidence that 10-Hz rMS predominantly acts on dendritic, but not somatic inhibition. Consistent with this finding, a reduction in clustered gephyrin is detected in CA1 stratum radiatum of rTMS-treated anaesthetized mice. These results disclose that rTMS induces coordinated Ca(2+)-dependent structural and functional changes of specific inhibitory postsynapses on principal neurons. PMID:26743822

  8. Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors in cancer development.

    PubMed

    Zhang, FeiFei; Zheng, JunKe; Kang, XunLei; Deng, Mi; Lu, ZhiGang; Kim, Jaehyup; Zhang, ChengCheng

    2015-12-01

    Inhibitory leukocyte immunoglobulin-like receptors (LILRB1-5) signal through immunoreceptor tyrosine-based inhibitory motifs (ITIMs) in their intracellular domains and recruit phosphatases protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6, SHP-1), protein tyrosine phosphatase, non-receptor type 6 (PTPN6, SHP-2), or Src homology 2 domain containing inositol phosphatase (SHIP) to negatively regulate immune cell activation. These receptors are known to play important regulatory roles in immune and neuronal functions. Recent studies demonstrated that several of these receptors are expressed by cancer cells. Importantly, they may directly regulate development, drug resistance, and relapse of cancer, and the activity of cancer stem cells. Although counterintuitive, these findings are consistent with the generally immune-suppressive and thus tumor-promoting roles of the inhibitory receptors in the immune system. This review focuses on the ligands, expression pattern, signaling, and function of LILRB family in the context of cancer development. Because inhibition of the signaling of certain LILRBs directly blocks cancer growth and stimulates immunity that may suppress tumorigenesis, but does not disturb normal development, LILRB signaling pathways may represent ideal targets for treating hematological malignancies and perhaps other tumors. PMID:26566804

  9. Plants from Brazilian Cerrado with Potent Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Paula Monteiro; Elias, Silvia Taveira; Simeoni, Luiz Alberto; de Paula, José Elias; Gomes, Sueli Maria; Guerra, Eliete Neves Silva; Fonseca, Yris Maria; Silva, Elton Clementino; Silveira, Dâmaris; Magalhães, Pérola Oliveira

    2012-01-01

    The increased amount of melanin leads to skin disorders such as age spots, freckles, melasma and malignant melanoma. Tyrosinase is known to be the key enzyme in melanin production. Plants and their extracts are inexpensive and rich resources of active compounds that can be utilized to inhibit tyrosinase as well as can be used for the treatment of dermatological disorders associated with melanin hyperpigmentation. Using in vitro tyrosinase inhibitory activity assay, extracts from 13 plant species from Brazilian Cerrado were evaluated. The results showed that Pouteria torta and Eugenia dysenterica extracts presented potent in vitro tyrosinase inhibition compared to positive control kojic acid. Ethanol extract of Eugenia dysenterica leaves showed significant (p<0.05) tyrosinase inhibitory activity exhibiting the IC50 value of 11.88 µg/mL, compared to kojic acid (IC50 value of 13.14 µg/mL). Pouteria torta aqueous extract leaves also showed significant inhibitory activity with IC50 value of 30.01 µg/mL. These results indicate that Pouteria torta and Eugenia dysenterica extracts and their isolated constituents are promising agents for skin-whitening or antimelanogenesis formulations. PMID:23173036

  10. Role of inhibitory feedback for information processing in thalamocortical circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Mayer, Joerg; Schuster, Heinz Georg; Claussen, Jens Christian

    2006-03-15

    The information transfer in the thalamus is blocked dynamically during sleep, in conjunction with the occurrence of spindle waves. In order to describe the dynamic mechanisms which control the sensory transfer of information, it is necessary to have a qualitative model for the response properties of thalamic neurons. As the theoretical understanding of the mechanism remains incomplete, we analyze two modeling approaches for a recent experiment by Le Masson et al. [Nature (London) 417, 854 (2002)] on the thalamocortical loop. We use a conductance based model in order to motivate an extension of the Hindmarsh-Rose model, which mimics experimental observations of Le Masson et al. Typically, thalamic neurons posses two different firing modes, depending on their membrane potential. At depolarized potentials, the cells fire in a single spike mode and relay synaptic inputs in a one-to-one manner to the cortex. If the cell gets hyperpolarized, T-type calcium currents generate burst-mode firing which leads to a decrease in the spike transfer. In thalamocortical circuits, the cell membrane gets hyperpolarized by recurrent inhibitory feedback loops. In the case of reciprocally coupled excitatory and inhibitory neurons, inhibitory feedback leads to metastable self-sustained oscillations, which mask the incoming input, and thereby reduce the information transfer significantly.

  11. Inhibitory Conductance Changes at Synapses in the Lamprey Brainstem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Michael R.; Martin, A. R.

    1983-07-01

    Although the conductance and kinetic behavior of inhibitory synaptic channels have been studied in a number of nerve and muscle cells, there has been little if any detailed study of such channels at synapses in the vertebrate central nervous system or of the relation of such channels to natural synaptic events. In the experiments reported here, current noise measurements were used to obtain such information at synapses on Muller cells in the lamprey brainstem. Application of glycine to the cells activated synaptic channels with large conductances and relaxation time constants (70 picosiemens and 33 milliseconds, respectively, at 3 degrees to 10 degrees C). Spontaneous inhibitory synaptic currents had a mean conductance of 107 nanosiemens and decayed with the same time constant. In addition, the glycine responses and the spontaneous currents had the same reversal potential and both were abolished by strychnine. These results support the idea that glycine is the natural inhibitory transmitter at these synapses and suggest that one quantum of transmitter activates about 1500 elementary conductance channels.

  12. Excitatory and inhibitory enteric innervation of horse lower esophageal sphincter.

    PubMed

    Chiocchetti, R; Giancola, F; Mazzoni, M; Sorteni, C; Romagnoli, N; Pietra, M

    2015-06-01

    The lower esophageal sphincter (LES) is a specialized, thickened muscle region with a high resting tone mediated by myogenic and neurogenic mechanisms. During swallowing or belching, the LES undergoes strong inhibitory innervation. In the horse, the LES seems to be organized as a "one-way" structure, enabling only the oral-anal progression of food. We characterized the esophageal and gastric pericardial inhibitory and excitatory intramural neurons immunoreactive (IR) for the enzymes neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) and choline acetyltransferase. Large percentages of myenteric plexus (MP) and submucosal (SMP) plexus nNOS-IR neurons were observed in the esophagus (72 ± 9 and 69 ± 8 %, respectively) and stomach (57 ± 17 and 45 ± 3 %, respectively). In the esophagus, cholinergic MP and SMP neurons were 29 ± 14 and 65 ± 24 vs. 36 ± 8 and 38 ± 20 % in the stomach, respectively. The high percentage of nitrergic inhibitory motor neurons observed in the caudal esophagus reinforces the role of the enteric nervous system in the horse LES relaxation. These findings might allow an evaluation of whether selective groups of enteric neurons are involved in horse neurological disorders such as megaesophagus, equine dysautonomia, and white lethal foal syndrome. PMID:25578519

  13. Potential xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae.

    PubMed

    Kapoor, Neha; Saxena, Sanjai

    2014-07-01

    Xanthine oxidase is considered as a potential target for treatment of hyperuricemia. Hyperuricemia is predisposing factor for gout, chronic heart failure, atherosclerosis, tissue injury, and ischemia. To date, only two inhibitors of xanthine oxidase viz. allopurinol and febuxostat have been clinically approved for used as drugs. In the process of searching for new xanthine oxidase inhibitors, we screened culture filtrates of 42 endophytic fungi using in vitro qualitative and quantitative XO inhibitory assays. The qualitative assay exhibited potential XO inhibition by culture filtrates of four isolates viz. #1048 AMSTITYEL, #2CCSTITD, #6AMLWLS, and #96 CMSTITNEY. The XO inhibitory activity was present only in the chloroform extract of the culture filtrates. Chloroform extract of culture filtrate #1048 AMSTITYEL exhibited the highest inhibition of XO with an IC50 value of 0.61 ?g ml(-1) which was better than allopurinol exhibiting an IC50 of 0.937 ?g ml(-1) while febuxostat exhibited a much lower IC50 of 0.076 ?g ml(-1). Further, molecular phylogenetic tools and morphological studies were used to identify #1048 AMSTITYEL as Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae. This is the first report of an endophytic Lasiodiplodia pseudotheobromae from Aegle marmelos exhibiting potential XO Inhibitory activity. PMID:24801403

  14. Inhibitory Control of Synaptic and Behavioral Plasticity by Octopaminergic Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Koon, Alex C.; Budnik, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Adrenergic receptors and their ligands are important regulators of synaptic plasticity and metaplasticity, but the exact mechanisms underlying their action are still poorly understood. Octopamine, the invertebrate homolog of mammalian adrenaline or noradrenaline, plays important roles in modulating behavior and synaptic functions. We previously uncovered an octopaminergic positive feedback mechanism to regulate structural synaptic plasticity during development and in response to starvation. Under this mechanism, activation of Octß2R autoreceptors by octopamine at octopaminergic neurons initiated a cAMP-dependent cascade that stimulated the development of new synaptic boutons at the Drosophila larval neuromuscular junction (NMJ). However, the regulatory mechanisms that served to brake such positive feedback were not known. Here, we report the presence of an alternative octopamine autoreceptor, Octß1R, with antagonistic functions on synaptic growth. Mutations in octß1r result in the overgrowth of both glutamatergic and octopaminergic NMJs suggesting that Octß1R is a negative regulator of synaptic expansion. As Octß2R, Octß1R functioned in a cell autonomous manner at presynaptic motorneurons. However, unlike Octß2R, which activated a cAMP pathway, Octß1R likely inhibited cAMP production through inhibitory Go?. Despite its inhibitory role, Octß1R was required for acute changes in synaptic structure in response to octopamine and for starvation-induced increase in locomotor speed. These results demonstrate the dual action of octopamine on synaptic growth and behavioral plasticity, and highlight the important role of inhibitory influences for normal responses to physiological stimuli. PMID:22553037

  15. Neural mechanisms of inhibitory control continue to mature in adolescence.

    PubMed

    Vara, Anjili S; Pang, Elizabeth W; Vidal, Julie; Anagnostou, Evdokia; Taylor, Margot J

    2014-10-01

    Inhibition is a fundamental executive function necessary for self-management of behaviour. The ability to withhold prepotent responses shows protracted development, extending through childhood and into adulthood. Using magnetoencephalography (MEG) with co-registered MRI, the spatiotemporal neural processes involved in inhibitory control were examined in 15 adolescents and 15 adults during a Go/No-go task. Two tasks were run that contained inverse ratios of Go to No-go trials for the experimental (2:1) and control conditions (1:2). Using vector beamforming, images of neural activation between No-go and Go trials were compared for both age-groups and revealed recruitment of the right inferior frontal gyrus in adults (BA 45; 200-250ms), but delayed recruitment of the left inferior frontal gyri in adolescents (BA 45; 250-300ms). Left anticipatory-related activity near the hand motor region (BA 6) was present in both adolescents and adults, but for a longer duration in adults. Adolescents additionally recruited the right middle and superior temporal gyri (BA21, BA22), while adults engaged the right temporal gyrus (BA41) but for a much briefer duration. These findings of delayed recruitment of canonical inhibitory control areas with supplementary and prolonged involvement of temporal areas in adolescents compared to adults indicate an immature inhibitory network even in adolescence. PMID:25212682

  16. Inhibitory effect of 5- and 6-ring PAHs on pyrene mineralization by a mixed enrichment culture

    SciTech Connect

    Molina, M.; Agraujo, R.

    1995-12-31

    This research investigates the mineralization of pyrene in mixtures of PAHs to identify potential synergistic or antagonistic interactions that affect the degradation of individual compounds. Mineralization of {sup 14}C pyrene (25 RM) by a mixed enrichment culture was studied in systems containing mixtures of 5- and 6-ring PAHs in minimal salts medium (MSM). In the absence of the High Molecular Weight (HMW)-PAHs, the culture mineralized 62% of the added pyrene. Addition of an equal mixture of benzo(a)pyrene, dibenzanthracene, and benzo(g,h,i)peryiene (25 {micro}M total concentration) reduced pyrene mineralization to 25% after a 9-day lag phase. An increase on the molar concentration of the HMW-PAH mixture to 75 and 125 {micro}M decreased pyrene mineralization to 9.2 and 1%, respectively. Results from treatments containing individual (25 {micro}M each), or pairs of the HMW-compounds demonstrated that none of the three individual compounds caused a significant reduction in the extent of pyrene mineralization. However, the combination of benzo(a)pyrene and benzanthracene significantly inhibited pyrene activity. In addition, the presence of both benzo(a)pyrene and benzo(g,h,i)peryiene reduced mineralization by almost 23%. Determination of bacterial density by epifluorescence microscopy showed that mineralization of pyrene coincides with growth of the bacterial culture; presence of the 5- and 6-ring PAHs delayed growth with a concurrent inhibition of mineralization. When growth resumes, the inhibitory effect is reduced. A decrease of pyrene inhibition was also noted when MSM was replaced with sediment extract, or when sediment (1 {micro}g/ml) was added to the medium. These results suggest a synergistic inhibitory effect by combinations of specific HMW-PAHs rather than inhibition by individual compounds of the mixture on both the growth of the bacterial culture and the extent of pyrene mineralization.

  17. Growth-inhibitory activity of natural and synthetic isothiocyanates against representative human microbial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kurepina, Natalia; Kreiswirth, Barry N.; Mustaev, Arkady

    2013-01-01

    Aims The aim of this study was to test the growth inhibition activity of isothiocyanates (ITC), defense compounds of plants, against common human microbial pathogens. Methods and Results In this study we have tested the growth inhibitory activity of a diverse collection of new and previously known representative ITC of various structural classes against pathogenic bacteria, fungi and molds by a serial dilution method. Generally, the compounds were more active against Gram-positive bacteria and fungi exhibiting species-specific bacteriostatic or bactericidal effect. The most active compounds inhibited the growth of both drug-susceptible and multi drug resistant (MDR) pathogens at micromolar concentrations. In the case of Mycobacterium tuberculosis some compounds were more active against MDR, rather than against susceptible strains. The average anti-microbial activity for some of new derivatives was significantly higher than previously reported for the most active ITC compounds. The structure-activity relationship (SAR) established for various classes of ITC with Bacillus cereus (model organism for B. anthracis) followed a distinct pattern, thereby enabling prediction of new more efficient inhibitors. Remarkably, tested bacteria failed to develop resistance to ITC. While effectively inhibiting microbial growth, ITCs displayed moderate toxicity towards eukaryotic cells. Conclusions High antimicrobial activity coupled with moderate toxicity grants further thorough studies of the ITC compounds aimed at elucidation of their cellular targets and inhibitory mechanism. Significance and impact of the study This systematic study identified new ITC compounds highly active against common human microbial pathogens at the concentrations comparable with those for currently used antimicrobial drugs (e.g. rifampicin, fluconazole). Tested representative pathogens do not develop resistance to the inhibitors. These properties justify further evaluation of ITC compounds as potential antimicrobial agents for medicinal use and for industrial applications. PMID:23789822

  18. Application of microalgal fucoxanthin for the reduction of colon cancer risk: inhibitory activity of fucoxanthin against beta-glucuronidase and DLD-1 cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Kawee-Ai, Arthitaya; Kim, Sang Moo

    2014-07-01

    Intestinal bacterial beta-glucuronidases are capable of retoxifying compounds that have been detoxified by liver glucuronidation and are also known to accelerate colon cancer invasion and metastasis. In this study, fucoxanthin extracted from the microalga Phaeodactylum tricornutum was investigated for its inhibitory activity against Escherichia coli beta-glucuronidase and DLD-1 cancer cells. Fucoxanthin inhibited beta-glucuronidase in a concentration-dependent manner with an IC50 value of 2.32 mM and a mixed inhibition type. Fucoxanthin had more potent inhibitory activity on beta-glucuronidase at 37 degrees C and in alkaline conditions. Fucoxanthin also inhibited the beta-glucuronidase activity of DLD-1 cancer cells at a concentration of 20-50 microM. The presence of beta-glucuronidase and substrate in the medium decreased the inhibitory activity of fucoxanthin against DLD-1 cancer cells. Therefore, microalgal fucoxanthin might prevent colon cancer because of its strong beta-glucuronidase inhibitory activity and could be utilized as a novel functional ingredient of food and pharmaceutical supplements. PMID:25230493

  19. New dammarane-type triterpenoids from the leaves of Panax notoginseng and their protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B inhibitory activity

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dawei; Cao, Jiaqing; Bi, Xiuli; Xia, Xichun; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yuqing

    2013-01-01

    Background Panax notoginseng has been used as a general tonic agent to invigorate human body for millennia in China and continued to be used until present. Methods Some chromatographic methods were performed to isolate pure triterpenoids, and their structures were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) experiments. Anti-diabetes activities of isolated compounds were evaluated through their inhibitory activity of protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B) enzyme. Results and Conclusion Three new dammarane-type triterpenoids, notoginsenoside-LX (1), notoginsenoside-LY (2), and notoginsenoside-FZ (3) together with eighteen known compounds were isolated from the Panax notoginseng leaves. The structure-activity relationship of the compounds with dammarane-type triterpenoids and their PTP1B inhibitory activity were also reported. Results showed that compounds 2, 15, 20, and 21 can significantly inhibit the enzyme activity of PTP1B in a dose-dependent manner, with inhibitory concentration 50 (IC50) values of 29.08 ?M, 21.27 ?M, 28.12 ?M, and 26.59 ?M, respectively. The results suggested that Panax notoginseng leaves might have potential as a new therapeutic agent for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:24558307

  20. Phlorotannin Extracts from Fucales Characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn: Approaches to Hyaluronidase Inhibitory Capacity and Antioxidant Properties

    PubMed Central

    Ferreres, Federico; Lopes, Graciliana; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Andrade, Paula B.; Sousa, Carla; Mouga, Teresa; Valentão, Patrícia

    2012-01-01

    Purified phlorotannin extracts from four brown seaweeds (Cystoseira nodicaulis (Withering) M. Roberts, Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss, Cystoseira usneoides (Linnaeus) M. Roberts and Fucus spiralis Linnaeus), were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn. Fucophloroethol, fucodiphloroethol, fucotriphloroethol, 7-phloroeckol, phlorofucofuroeckol and bieckol/dieckol were identified. The antioxidant activity and the hyaluronidase (HAase) inhibitory capacity exhibited by the extracts were also assessed. A correlation between the extracts activity and their chemical composition was established. F. spiralis, the species presenting higher molecular weight phlorotannins, generally displayed the strongest lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity (IC50 = 2.32 mg/mL dry weight) and the strongest HAase inhibitory capacity (IC50 = 0.73 mg/mL dry weight). As for superoxide radical scavenging, C. nodicaulis was the most efficient species (IC50 = 0.93 mg/mL dry weight), followed by F. spiralis (IC50 = 1.30 mg/mL dry weight). These results show that purified phlorotannin extracts have potent capabilities for preventing and slowing down the skin aging process, which is mainly associated with free radical damage and with the reduction of hyaluronic acid concentration, characteristic of the process. PMID:23222802

  1. Phlorotannin extracts from fucales characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn: approaches to hyaluronidase inhibitory capacity and antioxidant properties.

    PubMed

    Ferreres, Federico; Lopes, Graciliana; Gil-Izquierdo, Angel; Andrade, Paula B; Sousa, Carla; Mouga, Teresa; Valentão, Patrícia

    2012-12-01

    Purified phlorotannin extracts from four brown seaweeds (Cystoseira nodicaulis (Withering) M. Roberts, Cystoseira tamariscifolia (Hudson) Papenfuss, Cystoseira usneoides (Linnaeus) M. Roberts and Fucus spiralis Linnaeus), were characterized by HPLC-DAD-ESI-MSn. Fucophloroethol, fucodiphloroethol, fucotriphloroethol, 7-phloroeckol, phlorofucofuroeckol and bieckol/dieckol were identified. The antioxidant activity and the hyaluronidase (HAase) inhibitory capacity exhibited by the extracts were also assessed. A correlation between the extracts activity and their chemical composition was established. F. spiralis, the species presenting higher molecular weight phlorotannins, generally displayed the strongest lipid peroxidation inhibitory activity (IC?? = 2.32 mg/mL dry weight) and the strongest HAase inhibitory capacity (IC?? = 0.73 mg/mL dry weight). As for superoxide radical scavenging, C. nodicaulis was the most efficient species (IC?? = 0.93 mg/mL dry weight), followed by F. spiralis (IC?? = 1.30 mg/mL dry weight). These results show that purified phlorotannin extracts have potent capabilities for preventing and slowing down the skin aging process, which is mainly associated with free radical damage and with the reduction of hyaluronic acid concentration, characteristic of the process. PMID:23222802

  2. Identification of Small Aliphatic Aldehydes in Pretreated Lignocellulosic Feedstocks and Evaluation of Their Inhibitory Effects on Yeast.

    PubMed

    Cavka, Adnan; Stagge, Stefan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-11-11

    Six lignocellulosic hydrolysates produced through acid pretreatment were analyzed for the occurrence of formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, and glycolaldehyde. Acetaldehyde was found in all six (0.3-1.6 mM) and formaldehyde in four (?4.4 mM), whereas glycolaldehyde was not detected. To assess the relevance of these findings, fermentations with yeast and formaldehyde or acetaldehyde were performed in the concentration interval 0.5-10 mM. Formaldehyde already inhibited at 1.0 mM, whereas 5.0 mM acetaldehyde was needed to obtain a clear inhibitory effect. After 24 h of fermentation, 1.5 mM formaldehyde reduced the glucose consumption by 85%, the balanced ethanol yield by 92%, and the volumetric productivity by 91%. The results show that formaldehyde and acetaldehyde are prevalent in pretreated lignocellulose and that formaldehyde in some cases could explain a large part of the inhibitory effects on yeast by lignocellulosic hydrolysates, as three of six hydrolysates contained ?1.9 mM formaldehyde, which was shown to be strongly inhibitory. PMID:26528761

  3. Inhibitory Effects of Highly Oxygenated Lanostane Derivatives from the Fungus Ganoderma lucidum on P-Glycoprotein and ?-Glucosidase.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xi-Run; Huo, Xiao-Kui; Dong, Pei-Pei; Wang, Chao; Huang, Shan-Shan; Zhang, Bao-Jing; Zhang, Hou-Li; Deng, Sa; Liu, Ke-Xin; Ma, Xiao-Chi

    2015-08-28

    Twelve new highly oxygenated lanostane triterpenoids and nine known ganoderic acids were isolated from the fruiting body of Ganoderma lucidum. The new compounds were lanostane nortriterpenoids with 27 carbons (1-5 and 8), lanostane nor-triterpenoids with 25 carbons (6 and 7), and lanostane triterpenoids (9-12) based on multiple spectroscopic data analysis, including HRESIMS, 1D-NMR, 2D-NMR, and CD. Compounds 1-5 were identified as rare nor-lanostanoids that contain a 17?-pentatomic lactone ring. Compound 13, possessing a lactone ring, had been isolated previously. The P-glycoprotein (P-gp) inhibitory effects of compounds 1-21 were evaluated at a concentration of 20 ?M using an adriamycin (ADM)-resistant human breast adenocarcinoma cell line (MCF-7/ADR). Compounds 1, 5, 18, and 20 and verapamil increased the accumulation of ADM in MCF-7/ADR cells approximately 3-fold when compared with the negative control. These data support the significant P-glycoprotein inhibitory activities of compounds 1, 5, 18, and 20. In silico docking analysis suggested these compounds had similar P-gp recognition mechanisms compared with those of verapamil (a classical inhibitor). Furthermore, in an in vitro bioassay, compounds 2, 4, 5, 6, and 18 showed moderate inhibitory effects against ?-glucosidase compared with those of the positive control acarbose. PMID:26222905

  4. 13 CFR 107.210 - Minimum capital requirements for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ...2010-01-01 false Minimum capital requirements for Licensees. 107.210...Sbic § 107.210 Minimum capital requirements for Licensees. (a...applicable minimum Regulatory Capital requirement: (1) Licensees...

  5. 13 CFR 107.210 - Minimum capital requirements for Licensees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ...2011-01-01 false Minimum capital requirements for Licensees. 107.210...Sbic § 107.210 Minimum capital requirements for Licensees. (a...applicable minimum Regulatory Capital requirement: (1) Licensees...

  6. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93 Section 648.93...Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General provisions. ...Federal monkfish permit must meet the minimum fish size requirements established in this...

  7. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93 Section 648.93...Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General provisions. ...Federal monkfish permit must meet the minimum fish size requirements established in this...

  8. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93 Section 648.93...Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General provisions. ...Federal monkfish permit must meet the minimum fish size requirements established in this...

  9. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93 Section 648.93...Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General provisions. ...Federal monkfish permit must meet the minimum fish size requirements established in this...

  10. 47 CFR 73.807 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.807 Section 73...LPFM) § 73.807 Minimum distance separation between stations. Minimum separation requirements for LP100 and LP10...

  11. 47 CFR 73.207 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.207 Section...Stations § 73.207 Minimum distance separation between stations. (a...points meet all of the minimum distance separation requirements of this section....

  12. 47 CFR 73.507 - Minimum distance separations between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Minimum distance separations between stations. 73.507 Section...Stations § 73.507 Minimum distance separations between stations. (a) Minimum distance separations. No application for a new...

  13. 47 CFR 73.507 - Minimum distance separations between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Minimum distance separations between stations. 73.507 Section...Stations § 73.507 Minimum distance separations between stations. (a) Minimum distance separations. No application for a new...

  14. 47 CFR 73.207 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.207 Section...Stations § 73.207 Minimum distance separation between stations. (a...points meet all of the minimum distance separation requirements of this section....

  15. 47 CFR 73.807 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.807 Section 73...LPFM) § 73.807 Minimum distance separation between stations. Minimum separation requirements for LP100 and LP10...

  16. 47 CFR 73.507 - Minimum distance separations between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Minimum distance separations between stations. 73.507 Section...Stations § 73.507 Minimum distance separations between stations. (a) Minimum distance separations. No application for a new...

  17. 47 CFR 73.507 - Minimum distance separations between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Minimum distance separations between stations. 73.507 Section...Stations § 73.507 Minimum distance separations between stations. (a) Minimum distance separations. No application for a new...

  18. 47 CFR 73.807 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ...2014-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.807 Section...LPFM) § 73.807 Minimum distance separation between stations. Minimum separation requirements for LPFM stations are...

  19. 47 CFR 73.207 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ...2011-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.207 Section...Stations § 73.207 Minimum distance separation between stations. (a...points meet all of the minimum distance separation requirements of this section....

  20. 47 CFR 73.507 - Minimum distance separations between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Minimum distance separations between stations. 73.507 Section...Stations § 73.507 Minimum distance separations between stations. (a) Minimum distance separations. No application for a new...

  1. 47 CFR 73.807 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.807 Section 73...LPFM) § 73.807 Minimum distance separation between stations. Minimum separation requirements for LP100 and LP10...

  2. 47 CFR 73.807 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ...2013-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.807 Section...LPFM) § 73.807 Minimum distance separation between stations. Minimum separation requirements for LPFM stations are...

  3. 47 CFR 73.207 - Minimum distance separation between stations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ...2012-10-01 false Minimum distance separation between stations. 73.207 Section...Stations § 73.207 Minimum distance separation between stations. (a...points meet all of the minimum distance separation requirements of this section....

  4. 50 CFR 648.93 - Monkfish minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 false Monkfish minimum fish sizes. 648.93 Section 648.93...Fisheries § 648.93 Monkfish minimum fish sizes. (a) General provisions. ...Federal monkfish permit must meet the minimum fish size requirements established in this...

  5. A UNIVERSAL MODEL FOR HALO CONCENTRATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Diemer, Benedikt; Kravtsov, Andrey V.

    2015-01-20

    We present a numerical study of dark matter halo concentrations in ?CDM and self-similar cosmologies. We show that the relation between concentration, c, and peak height, ?, exhibits the smallest deviations from universality if halo masses are defined with respect to the critical density of the universe. These deviations can be explained by the residual dependence of concentration on the local slope of the matter power spectrum, n, which affects both the normalization and shape of the c-? relation. In particular, there is no well-defined floor in the concentration values. Instead, the minimum concentration depends on redshift: at fixed ?, halos at higher z experience steeper slopes n, and thus have lower minimum concentrations. We show that the concentrations in our simulations can be accurately described by a universal seven-parameter function of only ? and n. This model matches our ?CDM results to ? 5% accuracy up to z = 6, and matches scale-free ?{sub m} = 1 models to ? 15%. The model also reproduces the low concentration values of Earth-mass halos at z ? 30, and thus correctly extrapolates over 16 orders of magnitude in halo mass. The predictions of our model differ significantly from all models previously proposed in the literature at high masses and redshifts. Our model is in excellent agreement with recent lensing measurements of cluster concentrations.

  6. Physiologically based pharmacokinetic modeling to predict drug-drug interactions involving inhibitory metabolite: a case study of amiodarone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan; Mao, Jialin; Hop, Cornelis E C A

    2015-02-01

    Evaluation of drug-drug interaction (DDI) involving circulating inhibitory metabolites of perpetrator drugs has recently drawn more attention from regulatory agencies and pharmaceutical companies. Here, using amiodarone (AMIO) as an example, we demonstrate the use of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling to assess how a potential inhibitory metabolite can contribute to clinically significant DDIs. Amiodarone was reported to increase the exposure of simvastatin, dextromethorphan, and warfarin by 1.2- to 2-fold, which was not expected based on its weak inhibition observed in vitro. The major circulating metabolite, mono-desethyl-amiodarone (MDEA), was later identified to have a more potent inhibitory effect. Using a combined "bottom-up" and "top-down" approach, a PBPK model was built to successfully simulate the pharmacokinetic profile of AMIO and MDEA, particularly their accumulation in plasma and liver after a long-term treatment. The clinical AMIO DDIs were predicted using the verified PBPK model with incorporation of cytochrome P450 inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA. The closest prediction was obtained for CYP3A (simvastatin) DDI when the competitive inhibition from both AMIO and MDEA was considered, for CYP2D6 (dextromethorphan) DDI when the competitive inhibition from AMIO and the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from MDEA were incorporated, and for CYP2C9 (warfarin) DDI when the competitive plus time-dependent inhibition from AMIO and the competitive inhibition from MDEA were considered. The PBPK model with the ability to simulate DDI by considering dynamic change and accumulation of inhibitor (parent and metabolite) concentration in plasma and liver provides advantages in understanding the possible mechanism of clinical DDIs involving inhibitory metabolites. PMID:25324279

  7. Evaluation of the inhibitory effects of heavy metals on anammox activity: A batch test study.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zheng-Zhe; Zhang, Qian-Qian; Xu, Jia-Jia; Deng, Rui; Ji, Zheng-Quan; Wu, Yu-Huan; Jin, Ren-Cun

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the interactive effect of Cu(II) and Zn(II) on anaerobic ammonium oxidation (anammox) activity using response surface methodology with a central composite design. A regression model equation was developed and validated to predict the normalized anammox activity (NAA) of anammox granules exposed to various heavy metal concentrations. The joint inhibitory effect tended to exacerbate initially and reversed as the concentrations increased and then moderated again. The most severe inhibition, resulting in a NAA of 20.1%, occurred at Cu(II) and Zn(II) concentrations of 16.3 and 20.0mgL(-1), respectively. Notably, the cumulative toxicity was mitigated with the aid of intermittent exposure acclimatization. Additionally, pre-exposure to Cu(II) in the absence of substrates strongly inhibited anammox activity. However, the presence of NO2(-) significantly enhanced Cu(II) inhibition. Therefore, such conditions should be avoided to minimize the disturbance of the anammox process. PMID:26492173

  8. Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard (April 2015) Page 1

    E-print Network

    Wapstra, Erik

    Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard (April 2015) Page 1 Alcohol, Tobacco and Other Drugs Minimum Standard April 2015 Contents 1 Executive .............................................................................................................. 2 4.3 Illicit drugs

  9. Biodegradable drug-eluting nanofiber-enveloped implants for sustained release of high bactericidal concentrations of vancomycin and ceftazidime: in vitro and in vivo studies

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yung-Heng; Chen, Dave Wei-Chih; Tai, Chun-Der; Chou, Ying-Chao; Liu, Shih-Jung; Ueng, Steve Wen-Neng; Chan, Err-Cheng

    2014-01-01

    We developed biodegradable drug-eluting nanofiber-enveloped implants that provided sustained release of vancomycin and ceftazidime. To prepare the biodegradable nanofibrous membranes, poly(D,L)-lactide-co-glycolide and the antibiotics were first dissolved in 1,1,1,3,3,3-hexafluoro-2-propanol. They were electrospun into biodegradable drug-eluting membranes, which were then enveloped on the surface of stainless plates. An elution method and a high-performance liquid chromatography assay were employed to characterize the in vivo and in vitro release rates of the antibiotics from the nanofiber-enveloped plates. The results showed that the biodegradable nanofiber-enveloped plates released high concentrations of vancomycin and ceftazidime (well above the minimum inhibitory concentration) for more than 3 and 8 weeks in vitro and in vivo, respectively. A bacterial inhibition test was carried out to determine the relative activity of the released antibiotics. The bioactivity ranged from 25% to 100%. In addition, the serum creatinine level remained within the normal range, suggesting that the high vancomycin concentration did not affect renal function. By adopting the electrospinning technique, we will be able to manufacture biodegradable drug-eluting implants for the long-term drug delivery of different antibiotics. PMID:25246790

  10. On k-minimum and m-minimum Edge-Magic Injections of Graphs

    E-print Network

    McSorley, John

    On k-minimum and m-minimum Edge-Magic Injections of Graphs John P. McSorley Department of Mathematics Mailcode 4408 Southern Illinois University Carbondale, IL 62901-4408 mcsorley60@hotmail.com John A-magic total labellings (EMTL's). Here we use `EMTL' instead of `magic valuation'. Wallis, Baskoro, Miller

  11. Optimized laser turrets for minimum phase distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Fuhs, A. E.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis and computer program which optimizes laser turret geometry to obtain minimum phase distortion is described. Phase distortion due to compressible, inviscid flow over small perturbation laser turrets in subsonic or supersonic flow is calculated. The turret shape is determined by a two dimensional Fourier series; in a similar manner, the flow properties are given by a Fourier series. Phase distortion is calcualted for propagation at serveral combinations of elevation and azimuth angles. A sum is formed from the set of values, and this sum becomes the objective function for an optimization computer program. The shape of the turret is varied to provide minimum phase distortion.

  12. Image Data Compression Having Minimum Perceptual Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for performing color or grayscale image compression that eliminates redundant and invisible image components. The image compression uses a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and each DCT coefficient yielded by the transform is quantized by an entry in a quantization matrix which determines the perceived image quality and the bit rate of the image being compressed. The quantization matrix comprises visual masking by luminance and contrast technique all resulting in a minimum perceptual error for any given bit rate, or minimum bit rate for a given perceptual error.

  13. A Minimum-Mass Extrasolar Nebula

    E-print Network

    Marc J. Kuchner

    2004-06-07

    By analogy with the minimum-mass solar nebula, we construct a surface-density profile using the orbits of the 26 precise-Doppler planets found in multiple planet systems: Sigma = 2200 grams per square centimeter (a/1 AU)^- beta, where a is the circumstellar radius, and beta = 2.0 plus or minus 0.5. The minimum-mass solar nebula is consistent with this model, but the uniform-alpha accretion disk model is not. In a nebula with beta > 2, the center of the disk is the likely cradle of planet formation.

  14. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Hady, Ahmed A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue. PMID:25685420

  15. A Proof of Moll's Minimum Conjecture

    E-print Network

    Chen, William Y C

    2009-01-01

    Let $d_i(m)$ denote the coefficients of the Boros-Moll polynomials. Moll's minimum conjecture states that the sequence $\\{i(i+1)(d_i^2(m)-d_{i-1}(m)d_{i+1}(m))\\}_{1\\leq i \\leq m}$ attains its minimum with $i=m$. This conjecture is a stronger than the log-concavity conjecture proved by Kausers and Paule. We give a proof of Moll's conjecture by utilizing the spiral property of the sequence $\\{d_i(m)\\}_{0\\leq i \\leq m}$, and the log-concavity of the sequence $\\{i!d_i(m)\\}_{0\\leq i \\leq m}$.

  16. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes.

    PubMed

    Hady, Ahmed A

    2013-05-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue. PMID:25685420

  17. Image data compression having minimum perceptual error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for performing image compression that eliminates redundant and invisible image components is described. The image compression uses a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and each DCT coefficient yielded by the transform is quantized by an entry in a quantization matrix which determines the perceived image quality and the bit rate of the image being compressed. The present invention adapts or customizes the quantization matrix to the image being compressed. The quantization matrix comprises visual masking by luminance and contrast techniques and by an error pooling technique all resulting in a minimum perceptual error for any given bit rate, or minimum bit rate for a given perceptual error.

  18. Minimum induced drag configurations with jet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for determining the optimum camber shape and twist distribution for the minimum induced drag in the wing-alone case without prescribing the span loading shape. The same method was applied to find the corresponding minimum induced drag configuration with the upper-surface-blowing jet. Lan's quasi-vortex-lattice method and his wing-jet interaction theory was used. Comparison of the predicted results with another theoretical method shows good agreement for configurations without the flowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  19. A new species of the family Thyasiridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the oxygen minimum zone

    E-print Network

    Levin, Lisa

    margin thyasirids were present but at depths beyond 1000 m where the oxygen concentrations were above 0A new species of the family Thyasiridae (Mollusca: Bivalvia) from the oxygen minimum zone are discussed. It occurs between 800 m and 1000 m water depth in a low oxygen environment, where

  20. Inhibitory effects of 5-hydroxy polymethoxyflavones on colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Peiju; Dong, Ping; Guan, Huashi; Li, Shiming; Ho, Chi-Tang; Pan, Min-Hsiung; McClements, David Julian; Xiao, Hang

    2010-07-01

    Hydroxylated polymethoxyflavones (PMFs) are a class of novel flavonoid compounds mainly found in citrus plants. We studied the effects of three major 5-hydroxy PMFs, namely: 5-hydroxy-6,7,8,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone, 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxyflavone, and 5-hydroxy-6,7,8,4'-tetramethoxyflavone, on human colon cancer HCT116 and HT29 cells. Their effects were compared with those produced by their permethoxylated counterparts, namely: nobiletin, 3,5,6,7,8,3',4'-heptamethoxylflavone, and tangeretin. 5-Hydroxy PMFs showed much stronger inhibitory effects on the growth of the colon cancer cells in comparison with their permethoxylated counterparts, suggesting the pivotal role of hydroxyl group at 5-position in the enhanced inhibitory activity by 5-hydroxy PMFs. Flow cytometry analysis demonstrated that three 5-hydroxy PMFs produced different effects on the cell cycle and apoptosis, which may suggest that three 5-hydroxy PMFs act through different mechanisms. For example, 5-hydroxy-6,7,8,3',4'-pentamethoxyflavone caused cell cycle arrest at G2/M phase in HT29 cells, while 5-hydroxy-3,6,7,8,3',4'-hexamethoxyflavone led to significant G0/G1 phase arrest. In contrast, 5-hydroxy-6,7,8,4'-tetramethoxyflavone increased sub-G0/G1 cell population, which has been confirmed to be due to enhanced apoptosis. Our results further demonstrated that the inhibitory effects of 5-hydroxy PMFs were associated with their ability in modulating key signaling proteins related to cell proliferation and apoptosis, such as p21(Cip1/Waf1), CDK-2, CDK-4, phosphor-Rb, Mcl-1, caspases 3 and 8, and poly ADP ribose polymerase (PARP). PMID:20397199

  1. Normal hearing is required for the emergence of long-lasting inhibitory potentiation in cortex

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Han; Kotak, Vibhakar C.; Sanes, Dan H.

    2010-01-01

    Long-term synaptic plasticity is a putative mechanism for learning in adults. However, there is little understanding of how synaptic plasticity mechanisms develop or whether their maturation depends on experience. Since inhibitory synapses are particularly malleable to sensory stimulation, long-lasting potentiation of inhibitory synapses was characterized in auditory thalamocortical slices. Intracortical high frequency electrical stimulation led to a 67% increase in inhibitory synaptic currents. In the absence of stimulation, inhibitory potentiation was induced by a brief exposure to exogenous BDNF. BDNF exposure occluded any further potentiation by high frequency afferent stimulation, suggesting that BDNF signaling is sufficient to account for inhibitory potentiation. Moreover, inhibitory potentiation was reduced significantly by extracellular application of a BDNF scavenger or by intracellular blockade of BDNF receptor (TrkB) signaling. In contrast, glutamatergic or GABAergic antagonists did not prevent the induction of inhibitory potentiation. Since BDNF and TrkB expression are influenced strongly by activity, we predicted that inhibitory potentiation would be diminished by manipulations that decrease central auditory activity, such as hearing loss. Two forms of hearing loss were examined: conductive hearing loss in which the cochleae are not damaged or sensorineural hearing loss in which both cochleae are removed. Both forms of hearing loss were found to reduce significantly the magnitude of inhibitory potentiation. These data indicate that early experience is necessary for the normal development of BDNF-mediated long-lasting inhibitory potentiation, which may be associated with perceptual deficits at later ages. PMID:20053914

  2. Hydrogen Sulfide Plays a Key Role in the Inhibitory Neurotransmission to the Pig Intravesical Ureter

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Vítor S.; Ribeiro, Ana S. F.; Martínez, Pilar; López-Oliva, María Elvira; Barahona, María Victoria; Orensanz, Luis M.; Martínez-Sáenz, Ana; Recio, Paz; Benedito, Sara; Bustamante, Salvador; García-Sacristán, Albino; Prieto, Dolores; Hernández, Medardo

    2014-01-01

    According to previous observations nitric oxide (NO), as well as an unknown nature mediator are involved in the inhibitory neurotransmission to the intravesical ureter. This study investigates the hydrogen sulfide (H2S) role in the neurogenic relaxation of the pig intravesical ureter. We have performed western blot and immunohistochemistry to study the expression of the H2S synthesis enzymes cystathionine ?-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine ?-synthase (CBS), measurement of enzymatic production of H2S and myographic studies for isometric force recording. Immunohistochemical assays showed a high CSE expression in the intravesical ureter muscular layer, as well as a strong CSE-immunoreactivity within nerve fibres distributed along smooth muscle bundles. CBS expression, however, was not consistently observed. On ureteral strips precontracted with thromboxane A2 analogue U46619, electrical field stimulation (EFS) and the H2S donor P-(4-methoxyphenyl)-P-4-morpholinylphosphinodithioic acid (GYY4137) evoked frequency- and concentration-dependent relaxations. CSE inhibition with DL-propargylglycine (PPG) reduced EFS-elicited responses and a combined blockade of both CSE and NO synthase (NOS) with, respectively, PPG and NG-nitro-L-arginine (L-NOARG), greatly reduced such relaxations. Endogenous H2S production rate was reduced by PPG, rescued by addition of GYY4137 and was not changed by L-NOARG. EFS and GYY4137 relaxations were also reduced by capsaicin-sensitive primary afferents (CSPA) desensitization with capsaicin and blockade of ATP-dependent K+ (KATP) channels, transient receptor potential A1 (TRPA1), transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), vasoactive intestinal peptide/pituitary adenylyl cyclase-activating polypeptide (VIP/PACAP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) receptors with glibenclamide, HC030031, AMG9810, PACAP6–38 and CGRP8–37, respectively. These results suggest that H2S, synthesized by CSE, is involved in the inhibitory neurotransmission to the pig intravesical ureter, through an NO-independent pathway, producing smooth muscle relaxation via KATP channel activation. H2S also promotes the release of inhibitory neuropeptides, as PACAP 38 and/or CGRP from CSPA through TRPA1, TRPV1 and related ion channel activation. PMID:25415381

  3. Enhanced Detection of Vibrio Cholerae in Oyster Homogenate Based on Centrifugal Removal of Inhibitory Agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexander, Donita; DePaola, Angelo; Young, Ronald B.

    1998-01-01

    The disease cholera, caused by Vibrio cholerae, has been associated with consumption of contaminated seafood, including raw oysters. Detection of V. cholerae in foods typically involves blending the oysters, diluting the homogenate in alkaline peptone water (APW), overnight enrichment, and isolation on selective agar. Unfortunately, the oyster homogenate must be diluted to large volumes because lower dilutions inhibit the growth of V. cholerae. The goals of this study were to develop an alternative to large dilutions and to evaluate the basis for the inhibition observed in lower dilutions of oyster homogenates. Centrifugation of oyster homogenates at 10,000 x g for 15 min, followed by enrichment of the resulting pellet in APW, was found to eliminate the inhibition of V. cholerae growth. Inhibition appears not to be due to competing microflora but to a component(s) released when V. cholerae grows in the presence of oyster homogenate. The inhibitory component(s) kills the V. cholerae after the cell concentration reaches > 10(exp 8) cells/mL, rather than initially preventing their growth. The pH also declines from 8.0 to 5.5 during this period; however, the pH decline by itself appears not to cause V. cholerae death. Seven strains of V. cholerae (01 and non-01) and two strains of V. vulnificus were susceptible to the inhibitory agent(s). However, other Vibrio and non-Vibrio species tested were not inhibited by the oyster homogenates. Based on digestion of oyster homogenates with pronase, trypsin and lipase, the inhibitory reaction involves a protein(s). In a preliminary trial with oyster homogenate seeded with 1 cfu/g of V. cholerae, the modified centrifugation technique detected a slightly higher percentage of samples at a 1:10 dilution than the standard FDA Bacteriological Analytical Method (BAM) detected in uncentrifuged oyster homogenate at a 1:100 dilution. V. cholerae in seeded samples could also be detected more frequently by the modified centrifugation method than by PCR at a 1:10 dilution.

  4. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Minimum standards. 3280.703 Section 3280.703 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED...

  5. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minimum standards. 3280.703 Section 3280.703 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED...

  6. Uses & Disclosures of PHI Minimum Necessary Standard

    E-print Network

    Chapman, Michael S.

    a patient's lab results. The documents below describe OHSU's minimum necessary standards for disclosures according to attached policy on standards for recurring disclosures, or as required by law. Board Of Medical Examiners Investigation, licensure As required by law. Cancer Registry - State Law Req'd Diagnosis dependent

  7. Minimum Standards for Tribal Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Child Care Bureau.

    These minimum standards for tribal child care centers are being issued as guidance. An interim period of at least 1 year will allow tribal agencies to identify implementation issues, ensure that the standards reflect tribal needs, and guarantee that the standards provide adequate protection for children. The standards will be issued as regulations…

  8. 77 FR 58707 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64 FR 590. The rule added a new part to the Commission's regulations... (67 FR 43390), August 12, 2005 (70 FR 47108), and October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60498). In addition to... process NIGC should utilize to make revisions. 75 FR 70680. On April 4, 2011, after consulting with...

  9. Designing Minimum Cost Nonblocking Communication Networks

    E-print Network

    Turner, Jonathan S.

    of providing connections 1 #12;Figure 1: Alternative Campus Network Designs with a guaranteed qualityDesigning Minimum Cost Nonblocking Communication Networks J. Andrew Fingerhut Subhash Suri Jonathan This paper addresses the problem of topological design of ATM (and similar) communication networks. We

  10. 2013 Missouri Minimum Standards for School Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Chris L.

    2012-01-01

    The revised minimum standards for school bus chassis and school bus bodies have been prepared in conformity with the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo) for school bus transportation. The standards recommended by the 2010 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) promulgated by the U. S.…

  11. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.703 Minimum standards. Heating, cooling and fuel burning appliances and systems in manufactured... with any one such standard shall meet the requirements of this standard. Appliances Heating and...

  12. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  13. 78 FR 63873 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... NIGC published a final rule in the Federal Register called Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64 FR... technology and has substantively amended them numerous times, most recently on September 21, 2012. 77 FR... surveillance standards to Part 543 on February 20, 2013 (78 FR 11793). The Commission received...

  14. 77 FR 32444 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64 FR 590. The rule added a new part to the Commission's regulations..., 2002 (67 FR 43390), August 12, 2005 (70 FR 47108), and October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60498). In addition to... regulations, and the process NIGC should utilize to make revisions. 75 FR 70680 (Nov. 18, 2010). On April...

  15. Advanced Placement Program (AP) Examination Minimum

    E-print Network

    Mohaghegh, Shahab

    Advanced Placement Program (AP) Examination Minimum Score Credit Hours Course Equivalent ART (Studio) Studio Art Drawing 3 3 ART 111 Studio Art-2-D Design 3 or 4 3 Open credit ART Studio Art-2-D Science A 3 3 Open credit CS Computer Science AB 3 6 Open credit CS (6 units maximum for both tests

  16. RESEARCH ARTICLE Short Term Minimum Water Temperatures

    E-print Network

    Carrascal, Luis M.

    RESEARCH ARTICLE Short Term Minimum Water Temperatures Determine Levels of Infection by the Amphibian Chytrid Fungus in Alytes obstetricans Tadpoles Saioa Fernández-Beaskoetxea1 , Luis M. Carrascal1 against water temperature, with the highest burdens of infection seen during the colder months. Short

  17. Minimum Spanning Trees weighted graph API

    E-print Network

    Wu, Xiaolin

    1 Minimum Spanning Trees weighted graph API cycles and cuts Kruskal's algorithm Prim's algorithm of the evolutionary spirit." - Gordon Gecko #12;9 weighted graph API cycles and cuts Kruskal's algorithm Prim's algorithm advanced topics #12;10 Weighted Graph API iterate through all edges (once in each direction

  18. A Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum

    E-print Network

    Stanford University

    and Modeling3D Digital Imaging and Modeling 3DIM 20013DIM 2001 #12;2 Scanner Designs #12;3 Scanner DesignXing ChenChen Stanford Computer Graphics LaboratoryStanford Computer Graphics Laboratory 3D Digital ImagingA Laser Range Scanner Designed for Minimum Calibration Complexity James Davis,James Davis, Xing

  19. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES... species table grapes unless such grapes meet the following quality and container marking requirements... shall meet each applicable minimum requirement of the U.S. Fancy Table grape grade as specified in the...

  20. Minimum Entry Standards for Fire Prevention Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Jose Community Coll. District, CA.

    This guide outlines the minimum standards for entrance into the fire prevention career field in California. It contains descriptions of 50 tasks. Each task description consists of nine subsections. The task title briefly identifies the content of the task. The occupational analysis subsection identifies the block, unit, and task within the…

  1. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  2. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  3. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  4. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  5. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  6. Minimum-Time Control For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Current theories examined critically. Report surveys state of art in theory of minimum-time control of robotic manipulators. Discusses some of the promising developments, pointing out, however, optimal-control problem in full generality remains unsolved. Compares various solution methods, indicating merits and flaws.

  7. Missouri Minimum Standards for School Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Chris L.

    2008-01-01

    The revised minimum standards for school bus chassis and school bus bodies have been prepared in conformity with the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo) for school bus transportation. The standards recommended by the 2005 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) promulgated by the U. S.…

  8. Completeness properties of the minimum uncertainty states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trifonov, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The completeness properties of the Schrodinger minimum uncertainty states (SMUS) and of some of their subsets are considered. The invariant measures and the resolution unity measures for the set of SMUS are constructed and the representation of squeezing and correlating operators and SMUS as superpositions of Glauber coherent states on the real line is elucidated.

  9. Time Crystals from Minimum Time Uncertainty

    E-print Network

    Mir Faizal; Mohammed M. Khalil; Saurya Das

    2014-12-29

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra, and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal.

  10. Minimum Recombination Histories by Branch and Bound

    E-print Network

    Song, Yun S.

    Minimum Recombination Histories by Branch and Bound Rune B. Lyngsø1 , Yun S. Song2 , and Jotun Hein@cs.ucdavis.edu Abstract. Recombination plays an important role in creating genetic diversity within species, and inferring past recombination events is central to many prob- lems in genetics. Given a set M of sampled sequences

  11. Zeta Inhibitory Peptide, a Candidate Inhibitor of Protein Kinase M?, Is Excitotoxic to Cultured Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Sadeh, Noa; Verbitsky, Sima; Dudai, Yadin; Segal, Menahem

    2015-09-01

    The ?-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) is considered a candidate inhibitor of the atypical protein kinase M? (PKM?). ZIP has been shown to reverse established LTP and disrupt several forms of long-term memory. However, recent studies have challenged the specificity of ZIP, as it was reported to exert its effect also in PKM? knock-out mice. These results raise the question of what are the targets of ZIP that may underlie its effect on LTP and memory. Here we report that ZIP as well as its inactive analog, scrambled ZIP, induced a dose-dependent increase in spontaneous activity of neurons in dissociated cultures of rat hippocampus. This was followed by a sustained elevation of intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) which could not be blocked by conventional channel blockers. Furthermore, ZIP caused an increase in frequency of mEPSCs followed by an increase in membrane noise in patch-clamped neurons both in culture and in acute brain slices. Finally, at 5-10 ?M, ZIP-induced excitotoxic death of the cultured neurons. Together, our results suggest that the potential contribution of cellular toxicity should be taken into account in interpretation of ZIP's effects on neuronal and behavioral plasticity. Significance statement: The ?-inhibitory peptide (ZIP) is considered a candidate inhibitor of the atypical protein kinase M? (PKM?). ZIP has been shown to reverse established LTP and disrupt several forms of long-term memory. Here we report that ZIP as well as its inactive analog, scrambled ZIP, induced a dose-dependent increase in spontaneous activity of neurons in dissociated cultures and brain slices of rat hippocampus. Furthermore, ZIP caused a dose- and time-dependent neuronal death in the dissociated cultures. These findings impact on the assumption that ZIP erases memory due to specific inhibition of PKMz. PMID:26354909

  12. An innovative reactor design for the treatment of biologically inhibitory wastewater

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.

    1989-01-01

    The anaerobic expanded-bed granular activated carbon (GAC) reactor combines biological and physical removal mechanisms to continuously treat biologically inhibitory wastewaters. An innovative reactor design that decouples biological and physical removal mechanisms by combining a GAC adsorber with a biological reactor was developed and studied. The innovative reactor design was compared with a single stage GAC reactor while both reactor systems were operated with identical influents. A synthetic wastewater composed of acetate and 3-ethylphenol was used throughout the study. Acetate was removed biologically while 3-ethylphenol was removed by both adsorption onto GAC and by biodegradation. The performance of the innovative reactor design was superior to the conventional reactor in all respects. The innovative reactor design provided both long sludges and control over the amount of physical adsorptive capacity. These features made the hybrid reactor design ideal for the treatment of high-strength wastewater. Long sludge ages allowed for growth of slow growing 3-ethylphenol utilizing organisms while control of adsorptive removal capacity maintained the concentration of 3-ethylphenol below the inhibitory level. Variations in the influent loading were easily compensated for by varying the amount of adsorptive removal capacity. In the single-stage GAC reactor 3-ethylphenol utilizing organisms washed out of the reactor at a sludge age of 9.3 days. Under biologically inhibited conditions, the single-stage GAC reactor failed. Biological kinetics were characterized through the use of batch tests. A unique fed batch technique was used to observe the biodegradation of 3-ethylphenol. Biodegradation of 3-ethylphenol was described by Haldane kinetics and the effect of 3-ethylphenol on the biodegradation of acetate was described by competitive inhibition.

  13. The effect of gastric inhibitory polypeptide on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Ogawa, Eiichi; Hosokawa, Masaya; Faculty of Human Sciences, Tezukayama Gakuin University, Osaka ; Harada, Norio; Yamane, Shunsuke; Hamasaki, Akihiro; Toyoda, Kentaro; Fujimoto, Shimpei; Fujita, Yoshihito; Fukuda, Kazuhito; Tsukiyama, Katsushi; Yamada, Yuichiro; Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Endocrinology, Diabetes and Geriatric Medicine, Akita University School of Medicine, Akita ; Seino, Yutaka; Kansai Electric Power Hospital, Osaka ; Inagaki, Nobuya; CREST of Japan Science and Technology Cooperation , Kyoto

    2011-01-07

    Research highlights: {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway. {yields} Exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility. {yields} The GIP-receptor-mediated action in intestine does not involve in GLP-1-mediated pathway. -- Abstract: Gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP) is released from the small intestine upon meal ingestion and increases insulin secretion from pancreatic {beta} cells. Although the GIP receptor is known to be expressed in small intestine, the effects of GIP in small intestine are not fully understood. This study was designed to clarify the effect of GIP on intestinal glucose absorption and intestinal motility. Intestinal glucose absorption in vivo was measured by single-pass perfusion method. Incorporation of [{sup 14}C]-glucose into everted jejunal rings in vitro was used to evaluate the effect of GIP on sodium-glucose co-transporter (SGLT). Motility of small intestine was measured by intestinal transit after oral administration of a non-absorbed marker. Intraperitoneal administration of GIP inhibited glucose absorption in wild-type mice in a concentration-dependent manner, showing maximum decrease at the dosage of 50 nmol/kg body weight. In glucagon-like-peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor-deficient mice, GIP inhibited glucose absorption as in wild-type mice. In vitro examination of [{sup 14}C]-glucose uptake revealed that 100 nM GIP did not change SGLT-dependent glucose uptake in wild-type mice. After intraperitoneal administration of GIP (50 nmol/kg body weight), small intestinal transit was inhibited to 40% in both wild-type and GLP-1 receptor-deficient mice. Furthermore, a somatostatin receptor antagonist, cyclosomatostatin, reduced the inhibitory effect of GIP on both intestinal transit and glucose absorption in wild-type mice. These results demonstrate that exogenous GIP inhibits intestinal glucose absorption by reducing intestinal motility through a somatostatin-mediated pathway rather than through a GLP-1-mediated pathway.

  14. ?-Citronellol, an alcoholic monoterpene with inhibitory properties on the contractility of rat trachea.

    PubMed

    Vasconcelos, T B; Ribeiro-Filho, H V; Lucetti, L T; Magalhães, P J C

    2016-01-01

    ?-Citronellol is an alcoholic monoterpene found in essential oils such Cymbopogon citratus (a plant with antihypertensive properties). ?-Citronellol can act against pathogenic microorganisms that affect airways and, in virtue of the popular use of ?-citronellol-enriched essential oils in aromatherapy, we assessed its pharmacologic effects on the contractility of rat trachea. Contractions of isolated tracheal rings were recorded isometrically through a force transducer connected to a data-acquisition device. ?-Citronellol relaxed sustained contractions induced by acetylcholine or high extracellular potassium, but half-maximal inhibitory concentrations (IC50) for K+-elicited stimuli were smaller than those for cholinergic contractions. It also inhibited contractions induced by electrical field stimulation or sodium orthovanadate with pharmacologic potency equivalent to that seen against acetylcholine-induced contractions. When contractions were evoked by selective recruitment of Ca2+ from the extracellular medium, ?-citronellol preferentially inhibited contractions that involved voltage-operated (but not receptor-operated) pathways. ?-Citronellol (but not verapamil) inhibited contractions induced by restoration of external Ca2+ levels after depleting internal Ca2+ stores with the concomitant presence of thapsigargin and recurrent challenge with acetylcholine. Treatment of tracheal rings with L-NAME, indomethacin or tetraethylammonium did not change the relaxing effects of ?-citronellol. Inhibition of transient receptor potential vanilloid subtype 1 (TRPV1) or transient receptor potential ankyrin 1 (TRPA1) receptors with selective antagonists caused no change in the effects of ?-citronellol. In conclusion, ?-citronellol exerted inhibitory effects on rat tracheal rings, with predominant effects on contractions that recruit Ca2+ inflow towards the cytosol by voltage-gated pathways, whereas it appears less active against contractions elicited by receptor-operated Ca2+ channels. PMID:26648088

  15. 14 CFR 25.149 - Minimum control speed.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum control speed. 25.149 Section 25... Minimum control speed. (a) In establishing the minimum control speeds required by this section, the method... prevent a heading change of more than 20 degrees. (e) VMCG, the minimum control speed on the ground,...

  16. Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Kevin

    The desirability of raising the minimum wage long revolved around just one question: the effect of higher minimum wages on the overall level of employment. An even more critical effect of the minimum wage rests on the composition of employment--who gets the minimum wage job. An examination of employment in eating and drinking establishments…

  17. 28 CFR 50.24 - Annuity broker minimum qualifications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Annuity broker minimum qualifications. 50.24 Section...STATEMENTS OF POLICY § 50.24 Annuity broker minimum qualifications. (a) Minimum...Justice, shall establish a list of annuity brokers who meet minimum qualifications...

  18. 50 CFR 648.103 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.103 Section 648.103...Flounder Fisheries § 648.103 Minimum fish sizes. (a) The minimum size for...minimum sizes in this section apply to whole fish or to any part of a fish found in...

  19. 50 CFR 648.124 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.124 Section 648.124...the Scup Fishery § 648.124 Minimum fish sizes. (a) The minimum size...c) The minimum size applies to whole fish or any part of a fish found in...

  20. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  1. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  2. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  3. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  4. 50 CFR 648.124 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.124 Section 648... Scup Fishery § 648.124 Minimum fish sizes. (a) The minimum size for scup is 9 inches (22.9 cm) TL for... charter boat, or more than five crew members if a party boat. (c) The minimum size applies to whole...

  5. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  6. 50 CFR 648.103 - Minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum fish sizes. 648.103 Section 648... Summer Flounder Fisheries § 648.103 Minimum fish sizes. (a) The minimum size for summer flounder is 14... carrying more than five crew members. (c) The minimum sizes in this section apply to whole fish or to...

  7. The Maunder minimum (1645-1715) was indeed a grand minimum: A reassessment of multiple datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Arlt, Rainer; Asvestari, Eleanna; Hawkins, Ed; Käpylä, Maarit; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.; Krivova, Natalie; Lockwood, Michael; Mursula, Kalevi; O'Reilly, Jezebel; Owens, Matthew; Scott, Chris J.; Sokoloff, Dmitry D.; Solanki, Sami K.; Soon, Willie; Vaquero, José M.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Although the time of the Maunder minimum (1645-1715) is widely known as a period of extremely low solar activity, it is still being debated whether solar activity during that period might have been moderate or even higher than the current solar cycle #24. We have revisited all existing evidence and datasets, both direct and indirect, to assess the level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum. Methods: We discuss the East Asian naked-eye sunspot observations, the telescopic solar observations, the fraction of sunspot active days, the latitudinal extent of sunspot positions, auroral sightings at high latitudes, cosmogenic radionuclide data as well as solar eclipse observations for that period. We also consider peculiar features of the Sun (very strong hemispheric asymmetry of the sunspot location, unusual differential rotation and the lack of the K-corona) that imply a special mode of solar activity during the Maunder minimum. Results: The level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum is reassessed on the basis of all available datasets. Conclusions: We conclude that solar activity was indeed at an exceptionally low level during the Maunder minimum. Although the exact level is still unclear, it was definitely lower than during the Dalton minimum of around 1800 and significantly below that of the current solar cycle #24. Claims of a moderate-to-high level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum are rejected with a high confidence level.

  8. Tumor inhibitory and non-tumor inhibitory L-asparaginases from Pseudomonas geniculata.

    PubMed

    Kitto, G B; Smith, G; Thiet, T Q; Mason, M; Davidson, L

    1979-01-01

    Two enzymes that catalyze the hydrolysis of l-asparagine have been isolated from extracts of Pseudomonas geniculata. After initial salt fractionation, the enzymes were separated by chromatography on diethylaminoethyl-Sephadex and purified to homogeneity by gel filtration, ion-exchange chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide electrophoresis. The enzymes differ markedly in physicochemical properties. One enzyme, termed asparaginase A, has a molecular weight of approximately 96,000 whereas the other, termed asparaginase AG, has a molecular weight of approximately 135,000. Both enzymes are tetrameric. The asparaginase A shows activity only with l-asparagine as substrate, whereas the asparaginase AG hydrolyzes l-asparagine and l-glutamine at approximately equal rates and it is also active with d-asparagine and d-glutamine as substrates. The asparaginase A was found to be devoid of antitumor activity in mice, whereas the asparaginase AG was effective in increasing the mean survival times of both C3H mice carrying the asparagine-requiring Gardner 6C3HED tumor line and Swiss mice bearing the glutamine-requiring Ehrlich ascites tumor line. These differences in antitumor activity were related to differences in the K(m) values for l-asparagine for the two enzymes. The asparaginase A has a K(m) value of 1 x 10(-3) M for this substrate whereas the corresponding value for the AG enzyme is 1.5 x 10(-5) M. Thus the concentration of asparagine necessary for maximal activity of the asparaginase A is very high compared with that of the normal plasma level of asparagine, which is approximately 50 muM. PMID:33147

  9. Cholinestrase inhibitory effects of geranylated flavonoids from Paulownia tomentosa fruits.

    PubMed

    Cho, Jung Keun; Ryu, Young Bae; Curtis-Long, Marcus J; Ryu, Hyung Won; Yuk, Heung Joo; Kim, Dae Wook; Kim, Hye Jin; Lee, Woo Song; Park, Ki Hun

    2012-04-15

    Alzheimer's disease is rapidly becoming one of the most prevalent human diseases. Inhibition of human acetylcholinestrase (hAChE) and butyrylcholinestrase (BChE) has been linked to amelioration of Alzheimer's symptoms and research into inhibitors is of critical importance. Purification of the methanol extract of Paulownia tomentosa fruits yielded potent hAChE and BChE inhibitory flavonoids (1-9). A comparative activity screen indicated that a geranyl group at C6 is crucial for both hAChE and BChE. For example, diplacone (8) showed 250-fold higher efficacy than its parent eriodictyol (12). IC(50)s of diplacone (8) were 7.2 ?M for hAChE and 1.4 ?M for BChE. Similar trends were also observed for 4'-O-methyldiplacone (4) (vs its parent, hesperetin 10) and mimulone (7) (vs its parent, naringenin 11). Representative inhibitors (1-8) showed mixed inhibition kinetics as well as time-dependent, reversible inhibition toward hAChE. The binding affinities of these compounds to hAChE were investigated by monitoring quenching of inherent enzyme fluorescence. The affinity constants (K(SA)) increased in proportion to inhibitory potencies. PMID:22445674

  10. Inhibitory Control and Working Memory in Post-Institutionalized Children

    PubMed Central

    Merz, Emily C.; McCall, Robert B.; Wright, Amanda J.; Luna, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Inhibitory control and working memory were examined in post-institutionalized (PI) children adopted into United States families from Russian institutions. The PI sample originated from institutions that were less severely depriving than those represented in previous studies and approximated the level of psychosocial deprivation, which is characterized by adequate physical resources but a lack of consistent and responsive caregiving. PI children (N=75; 29 male) ranged in age from 8–17 years (M=12.97; SD=3.03) and were grouped according to whether they were adopted after 14 months or before 9 months. A non-adopted comparison group (N=133; 65 male) ranged in age from 8–17 years (M=12.26; SD=2.75). PI children adopted after 14 months of age displayed poorer performance on the stop-signal and spatial span tasks relative to PI children adopted before 9 months of age after controlling for age at assessment. The two PI groups did not differ in their performance on a spatial self-ordered search task. Older-adopted PI children also showed poorer spatial span task performance compared to non-adopted children, but younger-adopted PI children did not. Task performance was significantly associated with parent-rated hyperactive-impulsive behavior in everyday contexts. These findings suggest that exposure to prolonged early institutional deprivation may be linked with inhibitory control and working memory difficulties years after adoption. PMID:23519375

  11. The inhibitory spillover effect: Controlling the bladder makes better liars *

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Elise; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Coons, Jennifer; Pineda, Catherine; Echon, Reinalyn

    2015-01-01

    The Inhibitory-Spillover-Effect (ISE) on a deception task was investigated. The ISE occurs when performance in one self-control task facilitates performance in another (simultaneously conducted) self-control task. Deceiving requires increased access to inhibitory control. We hypothesized that inducing liars to control urination urgency (physical inhibition) would facilitate control during deceptive interviews (cognitive inhibition). Participants drank small (low-control) or large (high-control) amounts of water. Next, they lied or told the truth to an interviewer. Third-party observers assessed the presence of behavioral cues and made true/lie judgments. In the high-control, but not the low-control condition, liars displayed significantly fewer behavioral cues to deception, more behavioral cues signaling truth, and provided longer and more complex accounts than truth-tellers. Accuracy detecting liars in the high-control condition was significantly impaired; observers revealed bias toward perceiving liars as truth-tellers. The ISE can operate in complex behaviors. Acts of deception can be facilitated by covert manipulations of self-control. PMID:26366466

  12. Generalized motor inhibitory deficit in Parkinson's disease patients who freeze.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Patrick G; Logan, Gordon D; van Wouwe, Nelleke C; Tolleson, Christopher M; Phibbs, Fenna T; Claassen, Daniel O; Wylie, Scott A

    2015-12-01

    Freezing of gait is a disabling symptom of Parkinson's disease (PD) that involves failure to initiate and continue motor activity appropriately. PD disrupts fronto-basal ganglia circuitries that also implement the inhibition of responses, leading to the hypothesis that freezing of gait may involve fundamental changes in both initiation and inhibition of motor actions. We asked whether PD patients who show freezing of gait show selective deficits in their ability to inhibit upper and lower extremity reactions. We compared older healthy controls, older PD controls without freezing of gait, and older PD participants with freezing of gait, in stop-signal tasks that measured the initiation (go trials) and inhibition (stop trials) of both hand and foot responses. When only go trials were presented, all three groups showed similar initiation speeds across lower and upper extremity responses. When stop-signal trials were introduced, both PD groups slowed their reactions nearly twice as much as healthy controls. While this adjustment helped PD controls stop their actions as quickly as healthy controls, PD patients with freezing showed significantly delayed inhibitory control of both upper and lower extremities. When anticipating the need to stop their actions urgently, PD patients show greater adjustments (i.e., slowing) to reaction speed than healthy controls. Despite these proactive adjustments, PD patients who freeze show marked impairments in inhibiting both upper and lower extremity responses, suggesting that freezing may involve a fundamental disruption to the brain's inhibitory control system. PMID:26354102

  13. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory activity of extracts prepared from Polygonaceae species.

    PubMed

    Orbán-Gyapai, Orsolya; Lajter, Ildikó; Hohmann, Judit; Jakab, Gusztáv; Vasas, Andrea

    2015-03-01

    The xanthine oxidase (XO) inhibitory activity of aqueous and organic extracts of 27 selected species belonging in five genera (Fallopia, Oxyria, Persicaria, Polygonum and Rumex) of the family Polygonaceae occurring in the Carpathian Basin were tested in vitro. From different plant parts (aerial parts, leaves, flowers, fruits and roots), a total of 196 extracts were prepared by subsequent extraction with methanol and hot H2O and solvent-solvent partition of the MeOH extract yielding n-hexane, chloroform and 50% MeOH subextracts. It was found that the chloroform subextracts and/or the remaining 50% MeOH extracts of Fallopia species (F. bohemica, F. japonica and F. sachalinensis), Rumex species (R. acetosa, R. acetosella, R. alpinus, R. conglomeratus, R. crispus, R. hydrolapathus, R. pulcher, R. stenophyllus, R. thyrsiflorus, R. obtusifolius subsp. subalpinus, R. patientia) and Polygonum bistorta, Polygonum hydropiper, Polygonum lapathifolium and Polygonum viviparum demonstrated the highest XO inhibitory activity (>85% inhibition) at 400?µg/mL. The IC50 values of the active extracts were also determined. On the basis of the results, these plants, and especially P. hydropiper and R. acetosella, are considered worthy of activity-guided phytochemical investigations. PMID:25510560

  14. Inhibitory effects of dobutamine on human gastric adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hui-Xia; Wu, Li-Na; Xiao, Hong; Du, Qian; Liang, Jian-Fang

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the inhibitory effects of dobutamine on gastric adenocarcinoma cells. METHODS: Dobutamine was used to treat gastric adenocarcinoma cells (SGC-7901) and cell viability was determined by the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of dobutamine combined with cisplatin on cell viability were also analyzed. Cell migration was studied using the wound healing assay, and cell proliferation was analyzed using the colony formation assay. A cell invasion assay was carried out using Transwell cell culture chambers. The cell cycle and cell apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Western blot and immunocytochemistry were performed to determine the expression of Yes-associated protein (YAP) in treated cells. RESULTS: Dobutamine significantly inhibited cell growth, migration, cell colony formation, and cell invasion into Matrigel. Dobutamine also arrested the cell cycle at G1/S phase, and increased the rate of apoptosis of gastric adenocarcinoma cells. The expression of YAP was detected mainly in the nucleus in the absence of dobutamine. However, reduced expression of phosphorylated YAP was mainly found in the cytosol following treatment with dobutamine. CONCLUSION: Dobutamine has significant inhibitory effects on gastric adenocarcinoma cells and may be used in neoadjuvant therapy not only for gastric cancer, but also for other tumors. PMID:25493021

  15. Enhanced fermentation systems with continuous removal of inhibitory products

    SciTech Connect

    Davison, B.H.; Kaufman, E.N.

    1994-06-01

    A variety of advanced bioreactors are being developed to improve production of fuels, solvents, organic acids, and other fermentation products. A major limitation of microbial fermentations is the dilute aqueous product streams that result, largely due to inhibition of the microbes by the desired products. If these inhibitory products can be removed during the ongoing fermentation, the overall rates, yields, and net product formation may be increased. Simultaneous fermentation and separation have been tested with different separation techniques, such as adsorption, liquid extraction, pervaporation, membrane separations, distillation, and others. These separations can occur directly in situ within the fermentor or indirectly using a sidestream separator with recycle of the unused substrate. These approaches are briefly reviewed. At Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), we have investigated two modified immobilized-cell fluidized-bed bioreactors (FBRs) to remove the inhibitory product directly from the continuous fermentation. One involves the separation by adsorption of tactic acid, and the other uses liquid solvent extraction for the production of butanol. Keywords: extractive fermentation, in situ separation, adsorption, tactic acid, butanol.

  16. A direct translaminar inhibitory circuit tunes cortical output.

    PubMed

    Pluta, Scott; Naka, Alexander; Veit, Julia; Telian, Gregory; Yao, Lucille; Hakim, Richard; Taylor, David; Adesnik, Hillel

    2015-11-01

    Anatomical and physiological experiments have outlined a blueprint for the feedforward flow of activity in cortical circuits: signals are thought to propagate primarily from the middle cortical layer (layer 4, L4) up to L2/3 and down to the major cortical output layer (L5). Pharmacological manipulations, however, have contested this model and have suggested that L4 may not be critical for sensory responses of neurons in either superficial or deep layers. To address these conflicting models, we reversibly manipulated L4 activity in awake, behaving mice using cell type-specific optogenetics. In contrast with both prevailing models, we found that activity in L4 directly suppressed L5, in part by activating deep, fast-spiking inhibitory neurons. Our data suggest that the net effect of L4 activity is to sharpen the spatial representations of L5 neurons. Thus, we establish a previously unknown translaminar inhibitory circuit in the sensory cortex that acts to enhance the feature selectivity of cortical output. PMID:26414615

  17. Soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitory activity of anthraquinone components from Aloe.

    PubMed

    Sun, Ya Nan; Kim, Jang Hoon; Li, Wei; Jo, A Reum; Yan, Xi Tao; Yang, Seo Young; Kim, Young Ho

    2015-10-15

    Aloe is a short-stemmed succulent herb widely used in traditional medicine to treat various diseases and as raw material in cosmetics and heath foods. In this study, we isolated and identified two new anthraquinone derivatives, aloinoside C (6) and aloinoside D (7), together with six known compounds from an aqueous dissolved Aloe exudate. Their structures were identified by spectroscopic analysis. The inhibitory effects of the isolated compounds on soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH) were evaluated. Compounds 1-8 inhibited sEH activity potently, with IC50 values ranging from 4.1±0.6 to 41.1±4.2?M. A kinetic analysis of compounds 1-8 revealed that the inhibitory actions of compounds 1, 6 and 8 were non-competitive, whereas those of compounds 2-5 and 7 were the mixed-type. Molecular docking increases our understanding of receptor-ligand binding of all compounds. These results demonstrate that compounds 1-8 from Aloe are potential sEH inhibitors. PMID:26372074

  18. Cytokinin signalling inhibitory fields provide robustness to phyllotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besnard, Fabrice; Refahi, Yassin; Morin, Valérie; Marteaux, Benjamin; Brunoud, Géraldine; Chambrier, Pierre; Rozier, Frédérique; Mirabet, Vincent; Legrand, Jonathan; Lainé, Stéphanie; Thévenon, Emmanuel; Farcot, Etienne; Cellier, Coralie; Das, Pradeep; Bishopp, Anthony; Dumas, Renaud; Parcy, François; Helariutta, Ykä; Boudaoud, Arezki; Godin, Christophe; Traas, Jan; Guédon, Yann; Vernoux, Teva

    2014-01-01

    How biological systems generate reproducible patterns with high precision is a central question in science. The shoot apical meristem (SAM), a specialized tissue producing plant aerial organs, is a developmental system of choice to address this question. Organs are periodically initiated at the SAM at specific spatial positions and this spatiotemporal pattern defines phyllotaxis. Accumulation of the plant hormone auxin triggers organ initiation, whereas auxin depletion around organs generates inhibitory fields that are thought to be sufficient to maintain these patterns and their dynamics. Here we show that another type of hormone-based inhibitory fields, generated directly downstream of auxin by intercellular movement of the cytokinin signalling inhibitor ARABIDOPSIS HISTIDINE PHOSPHOTRANSFER PROTEIN 6 (AHP6), is involved in regulating phyllotactic patterns. We demonstrate that AHP6-based fields establish patterns of cytokinin signalling in the meristem that contribute to the robustness of phyllotaxis by imposing a temporal sequence on organ initiation. Our findings indicate that not one but two distinct hormone-based fields may be required for achieving temporal precision during formation of reiterative structures at the SAM, thus indicating an original mechanism for providing robustness to a dynamic developmental system.

  19. Sleep deprivation impairs inhibitory control during wakefulness in adult sleepwalkers.

    PubMed

    Labelle, Marc-Antoine; Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh; Petit, Dominique; Desautels, Alex; Montplaisir, Jacques; Zadra, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    Sleepwalkers often complain of excessive daytime somnolence. Although excessive daytime somnolence has been associated with cognitive impairment in several sleep disorders, very few data exist concerning sleepwalking. This study aimed to investigate daytime cognitive functioning in adults diagnosed with idiopathic sleepwalking. Fifteen sleepwalkers and 15 matched controls were administered the Continuous Performance Test and Stroop Colour-Word Test in the morning after an overnight polysomnographic assessment. Participants were tested a week later on the same neuropsychological battery, but after 25 h of sleep deprivation, a procedure known to precipitate sleepwalking episodes during subsequent recovery sleep. There were no significant differences between sleepwalkers and controls on any of the cognitive tests administered under normal waking conditions. Testing following sleep deprivation revealed significant impairment in sleepwalkers' executive functions related to inhibitory control, as they made more errors than controls on the Stroop Colour-Word Test and more commission errors on the Continuous Performance Test. Sleepwalkers' scores on measures of executive functions were not associated with self-reported sleepiness or indices of sleep fragmentation from baseline polysomnographic recordings. The results support the idea that sleepwalking involves daytime consequences and suggest that these may also include cognitive impairments in the form of disrupted inhibitory control following sleep deprivation. These disruptions may represent a daytime expression of sleepwalking's pathophysiological mechanisms. PMID:26087833

  20. Novel in vitro inhibitory functions of potato tuber proteinaceous inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Matthias; Kuckenberg, Markus; Kastilan, Robin; Muth, Jost; Gebhardt, Christiane

    2015-02-01

    Plant protease inhibitors are a structurally highly diverse and ubiquitous class of small proteins, which play various roles in plant development and defense against pests and pathogens. Particular isoforms inhibit in vitro proteases and other enzymes that are not their natural substrates, for example proteases that have roles in human diseases. Mature potato tubers are a rich source of several protease inhibitor families. Different cultivars have different inhibitor profiles. With the objective to explore the functional diversity of the natural diversity of potato protease inhibitors, we randomly selected and sequenced 9,600 cDNA clones originated from mature tubers of ten potato cultivars. Among these, 120 unique inhibitor cDNA clones were identified by homology searches. Eighty-eight inhibitors represented novel sequence variants of known plant protease inhibitor families. Most frequent were Kunitz-type inhibitors (KTI), potato protease inhibitors I and II (PIN), pectin methylesterase inhibitors, metallocarboxypeptidase inhibitors and defensins. Twenty-three inhibitors were functionally characterized after heterologous expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. The purified recombinant proteins were tested for inhibitory activity on trypsin, eleven pharmacological relevant proteases and the non-proteolytic enzyme 5-lipoxygenase. Members of the KTI and PIN families inhibited pig pancreas elastase, ?-Secretase, Cathepsin K, HIV-1 protease and potato 5-lipoxygenase. Our results demonstrate in vitro inhibitory diversity of small potato tuber proteins commonly known as protease inhibitors, which might have biotechnological or medical applications. PMID:25260821

  1. Providing a food reward reduces inhibitory avoidance learning in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Manuel, Remy; Zethof, Jan; Flik, Gert; Bos, Ruud van den

    2015-11-01

    As shown in male rats, prior history of subjects changes behavioural and stress-responses to challenges: a two-week history of exposure to rewards at fixed intervals led to slightly, but consistently, lower physiological stress-responses and anxiety-like behaviour. Here, we tested whether similar effects are present in zebrafish (Danio rerio). After two weeks of providing Artemia (brine shrimp; Artemia salina) as food reward or flake food (Tetramin) as control at fixed intervals, zebrafish were exposed to a fear-avoidance learning task using an inhibitory avoidance protocol. Half the number of fish received a 3V shock on day 1 and were tested and sacrificed on day 2; the other half received a second 3V shock on day 2 and were tested and sacrificed on day 3. The latter was done to assess whether effects are robust, as effects in rats have been shown to be modest. Zebrafish that were given Artemia showed less inhibitory avoidance after one shock, but not after two shocks, than zebrafish that were given flake-food. Reduced avoidance behaviour was associated with lower telencepahalic gene expression levels of cannabinoid receptor 1 (cnr1) and higher gene expression levels of corticotropin releasing factor (crf). These results suggest that providing rewards at fixed intervals alters fear avoidance behaviour, albeit modestly, in zebrafish. We discuss the data in the context of similar underlying brain structures in mammals and fish. PMID:26342856

  2. The inhibitory spillover effect: Controlling the bladder makes better liars.

    PubMed

    Fenn, Elise; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris; Coons, Jennifer; Pineda, Catherine; Echon, Reinalyn

    2015-12-01

    The Inhibitory-Spillover-Effect (ISE) on a deception task was investigated. The ISE occurs when performance in one self-control task facilitates performance in another (simultaneously conducted) self-control task. Deceiving requires increased access to inhibitory control. We hypothesized that inducing liars to control urination urgency (physical inhibition) would facilitate control during deceptive interviews (cognitive inhibition). Participants drank small (low-control) or large (high-control) amounts of water. Next, they lied or told the truth to an interviewer. Third-party observers assessed the presence of behavioral cues and made true/lie judgments. In the high-control, but not the low-control condition, liars displayed significantly fewer behavioral cues to deception, more behavioral cues signaling truth, and provided longer and more complex accounts than truth-tellers. Accuracy detecting liars in the high-control condition was significantly impaired; observers revealed bias toward perceiving liars as truth-tellers. The ISE can operate in complex behaviors. Acts of deception can be facilitated by covert manipulations of self-control. PMID:26366466

  3. Inhibitory control and error monitoring by human subthalamic neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bastin, J; Polosan, M; Benis, D; Goetz, L; Bhattacharjee, M; Piallat, B; Krainik, A; Bougerol, T; Chabardès, S; David, O

    2014-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) has been shown to be implicated in the control of voluntary action, especially during tasks involving conflicting choice alternatives or rapid response suppression. However, the precise role of the STN during nonmotor functions remains controversial. First, we tested whether functionally distinct neuronal populations support different executive control functions (such as inhibitory control or error monitoring) even within a single subterritory of the STN. We used microelectrode recordings during deep brain stimulation surgery to study extracellular activity of the putative associative-limbic part of the STN while patients with severe obsessive-compulsive disorder performed a stop-signal task. Second, 2–4 days after the surgery, local field potential recordings of STN were used to test the hypothesis that STN oscillations may also reflect executive control signals. Extracellular recordings revealed three functionally distinct neuronal populations: the first one fired selectively before and during motor responses, the second one selectively increased their firing rate during successful inhibitory control, and the last one fired selectively during error monitoring. Furthermore, we found that beta band activity (15–35?Hz) rapidly increased during correct and incorrect behavioral stopping. Taken together, our results provide critical electrophysiological support for the hypothesized role of the STN in the integration of motor and cognitive-executive control functions. PMID:25203170

  4. High Stimulus-Related Information in Barrel Cortex Inhibitory Interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Reyes-Puerta, Vicente; Kim, Suam; Sun, Jyh-Jang; Imbrosci, Barbara; Kilb, Werner; Luhmann, Heiko J.

    2015-01-01

    The manner in which populations of inhibitory (INH) and excitatory (EXC) neocortical neurons collectively encode stimulus-related information is a fundamental, yet still unresolved question. Here we address this question by simultaneously recording with large-scale multi-electrode arrays (of up to 128 channels) the activity of cell ensembles (of up to 74 neurons) distributed along all layers of 3–4 neighboring cortical columns in the anesthetized adult rat somatosensory barrel cortex in vivo. Using two different whisker stimulus modalities (location and frequency) we show that individual INH neurons – classified as such according to their distinct extracellular spike waveforms – discriminate better between restricted sets of stimuli (?6 stimulus classes) than EXC neurons in granular and infra-granular layers. We also demonstrate that ensembles of INH cells jointly provide as much information about such stimuli as comparable ensembles containing the ~20% most informative EXC neurons, however presenting less information redundancy – a result which was consistent when applying both theoretical information measurements and linear discriminant analysis classifiers. These results suggest that a consortium of INH neurons dominates the information conveyed to the neocortical network, thereby efficiently processing incoming sensory activity. This conclusion extends our view on the role of the inhibitory system to orchestrate cortical activity. PMID:26098109

  5. Inhibitory effect of Pulsatilla chinensis polysaccharides on glioma.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Fenggang; Lv, Ou; Zheng, Yongri; Wang, Jianjiao; Hu, Peng; Wang, Zhenyu; Yang, Lizhuang

    2012-06-01

    Malignant glioma is a very devastating disease. Conventional surgery, radio-and chemotherapy are of limited benefit to improve the cure of patients with malignant astrocytomas. In this research, we evaluated the inhibitory effect of Pulsatilla chinensis polysaccharides (PCPS) on glioma in vivo and in vitro. PCPS had a significant anti-proliferative effect on C6 glioma in vitro assay. Meanwhile a remarkable inhibitory effect PCPS on the growth of C6 glioma and prolongation of life survival could be observed in vivo, comparable to carmustine (BCNU) administration. Moreover PCPS treatment to tumor bearing mice could not only decrease the body weight loss, but also elevate the thymus and spleen indices. In addition, PCPS administration to tumor bearing mice could relieve the liver and kidney damage with decreased levels of aspartate aminotransferase (AST), alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and urea, and enhance superoxide dismutase (SOD) and catalase (CAT) enzyme activities with lower MDA levels in the plasma of tumor bearing mice. The above data proved that PCPS had strong antitumor activity and could be considered as a possible candidate drugs for the glioma therapy. PMID:22342738

  6. Short communication: Potential of Fresco-style cheese whey as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory activities.

    PubMed

    Tarango-Hernández, S; Alarcón-Rojo, A D; Robles-Sánchez, M; Gutiérrez-Méndez, N; Rodríguez-Figueroa, J C

    2015-11-01

    Recently, traditional Mexican Fresco-style cheese production has been increasing, and the volume of cheese whey generated represents a problem. In this study, we investigated the chemical composition of Fresco-style cheese wheys and their potential as a source of protein fractions with antioxidant and angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activities. Three samples from Fresco, Panela, and Ranchero cheeses whey were physicochemically characterized. Water-soluble extracts were fractionated to obtain whey fractions with different molecular weights: 10-5, 5-3, 3-1 and <1 kDa. The results indicated differences in the lactose, protein, ash, and dry matter contents (% wt/wt) in the different Fresco-style cheese wheys. All whey fractions had antioxidant and ACE-inhibitory activities. The 10-5 kDa whey fraction of Ranchero cheese had the highest Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (0.62±0.00 mM), and the 3-1 kDa Panela and Fresco cheese whey fractions showed the highest ACE-inhibitory activity (0.57±0.02 and 0.59±0.04?g/mL 50%-inhibitory concentration values, respectively). These results suggest that Fresco-style cheese wheys may be a source of protein fractions with bioactivity, and thus could be useful ingredients in the manufacture of functional foods with increased nutritional value. PMID:26364114

  7. Proteolytic and ACE-inhibitory activities of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria as affected by different levels of fat, inulin and starter culture.

    PubMed

    Shakerian, Mansour; Razavi, Seyed Hadi; Ziai, Seyed Ali; Khodaiyan, Faramarz; Yarmand, Mohammad Saeid; Moayedi, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In this study, the effects of fat (0.5 %, 3.2 % and 5.0 %), inulin (0.0 and 1.0 %) and starter culture (0.0 %, 0.5 %, 1.0 % and 1.5 %) on the angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of probiotic yogurt containing non-viable bacteria were assessed. Proteolytic activities of bacteria were also investigated. Yogurts were prepared either using a sole yogurt commercial culture including Streptococcus thermophilus and Lactobacillus delbrueckii subs. bulgaricus or bifidobacterium animalis BB-12 and Lactobacillus acidophilus La5 in addition to yogurt culture. Relative degrees of proteolysis were found to be considerably higher in yogurt samples than UHT milk as the control. Both regular and probiotic yogurts showed considerable ACE-inhibitory activities. Results showed that degree of proteolysis was not influenced by different fat contents, while was increased by high concentration of starter culture (1.5 % w/w) and reduced by inulin (1 % w/w). ACE-inhibitory activities of yogurt were also negatively affected by the presence of inulin and high levels of fat (5 % w/w). Moreover, yogurt containing probiotic bacteria showed higher inhibitory against ACE in comparison to the yogurt prepared with non-probiotic strains. PMID:25829629

  8. Inhibitory and excitatory spike-timing-dependent plasticity in the auditory cortex.

    PubMed

    D'amour, James A; Froemke, Robert C

    2015-04-22

    Synapses are plastic and can be modified by changes in spike timing. Whereas most studies of long-term synaptic plasticity focus on excitation, inhibitory plasticity may be critical for controlling information processing, memory storage, and overall excitability in neural circuits. Here we examine spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP) of inhibitory synapses onto layer 5 neurons in slices of mouse auditory cortex, together with concomitant STDP of excitatory synapses. Pairing pre- and postsynaptic spikes potentiated inhibitory inputs irrespective of precise temporal order within ?10 ms. This was in contrast to excitatory inputs, which displayed an asymmetrical STDP time window. These combined synaptic modifications both required NMDA receptor activation and adjusted the excitatory-inhibitory ratio of events paired with postsynaptic spiking. Finally, subthreshold events became suprathreshold, and the time window between excitation and inhibition became more precise. These findings demonstrate that cortical inhibitory plasticity requires interactions with co-activated excitatory synapses to properly regulate excitatory-inhibitory balance. PMID:25843405

  9. Inhibitory potential of pure isoflavonoids, red clover, and alfalfa extracts on hemoglobin glycosylation

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Mohsen; Asgary, Sedigheh; Najafi, Somayeh

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-enzymatic glycosylation of hemoglobin is complications of diabetes. Antioxidant system imbalance can result in the emergence of free radicals’ destructive effects in the long-term. Red clover (Trifolium pratense L.) and alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) contain isoflavonoids and have antioxidant activity. This experimental study evaluated the inhibitory activity of pure isoflavonoids (daidzein and genistein), red clover and alfalfa extracts on hemoglobin glycosylation. METHODS This study was performed in Iran. Stock solution of hydroalcoholic extracts of red clover and alfalfa in concentrations of 1 and 10 g/100 ml and stock solution of daidzein and genistein in concentrations of 250 ng, 500 ng, 25 µg and 250 µg/100 ml were prepared as case groups. Control group was without hydroalcoholic extracts of plants and pure isoflavonoids. All experiments were performed in triplicate. Hemoglobin was prepared and antioxidant activities were investigated to estimate degree of nonenzymatic hemoglobin glycosylation. RESULTS There was no significantly difference between used extracts (extract of red clover and alfalfa) and control of the hemoglobin glycosylation but using daidzein (P = 0.046, 0.029 and 0.021, respectively) and genistein (P = 0.034, 0.036 and 0.028) significantly inhibited (P < 0.050) this reaction in 25 µg/100 ml, 250 and 500 ng/100 ml concentrations when compared to control. in 25 µg/100 ml, 250 ng and 500 ng/100 ml concentrations percentage of inhibition were 32, 80 and 74.5% respectively with used of daidzein and were 21, 83 and 76% respectively with consumption of genistein. CONCLUSION According to decrease of glycation of hemoglobin with isoflavonoids, two used plant in this study containing isoflavonoid may be useful on diabetes. PMID:26405442

  10. Inhibitory effects of the ?-casein macropeptide isolated from milk protein on the biofilm formation and virulence of Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Yun, Hyun Sun; Kim, Younghoon; Park, Mi Ri; Kim, Sae Hun; Oh, Sejong

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate the inhibitory effects of ?-casein macropeptide (CMP) on the biofilm formation and virulence of Listeria monocytogenes Scott A. The inhibition of biofilm formation by CMP was initially investigated by using the protocol applied for the 96-well microtiter plate assay. Low concentrations of CMP (0.1, 0.2, 0.3, 0.4, and 0.5 mg/mL) that were tested resulted in a profound inhibitory effect on biofilm formation at a concentration of 0.4 mg/mL. CMP also significantly repressed the transcription of inlA (encoding internalin A) that was responsible for the initial adhesion and invasion event, and prolonged the survival of Caenorhabditis elegans infected by L. monocytogenes. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis showed that newly identified proteins in the presence of CMP were involved in the stress response and metabolic processes that have important roles in developing listerial biofilms. Our results suggest that CMP from milk protein would be capable of eliminating biofilm formation and virulence by L. monocytogenes in the food industry. PMID:25036840

  11. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient (b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass and grass-surface minima yielded increased RMSEs compared to those for air temperature at 2 m. The sufficiently small RMSEs using the 2-h ahead nowcasts of the air temperature minimum, for the exponential model, demonstrate that the methodology used may be applied operationally but with increased errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts.

  12. Anticipating Cycle 24 Minimum and Its Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the 12-mo moving average of monthly mean sunspot number (R) through November 2006, cycle 23 has persisted for 126 mo, having had a minimum of 8.0 in May 1996, a peak of 120.8 in April 2000, and an ascent duration of 47 mo. In November 2006, the 12-mo moving average of monthly mean sunspot number was 12.7, a value just outside the upper observed envelope of sunspot minimum values for the most recent cycles 16-23 (range 3.4-12.3), but within the 90-percent prediction interval (7.8 +/- 6.7). The first spotless day during the decline of cycle 23 occurred in January 2004, and the first occurrence of 10 or more and 20 or more spotless days was February 2006 and April 2007, respectively, inferring that sunspot minimum for cycle 24 is imminent. Through May 2007, 121 spotless days have accumulated. In terms of the weighted mean latitude (weighed by spot area) (LAT) and the highest observed latitude spot (HLS) in November 2006, 12-mo moving averages of these parameters measured 7.9 and 14.6 deg, respectively, these values being the lowest values yet observed during the decline of cycle 23 and being below corresponding mean values found for cycles 16-23. As yet, no high-latitude new-cycle spots have been seen nor has there been an upturn in LAT and HLS, these conditions having always preceded new cycle minimum by several months for past cycles. Together, these findings suggest that cycle 24 s minimum amplitude still lies well beyond November 2006. This implies that cycle 23 s period either will lie in the period "gap" (127-134 mo), a first for a sunspot cycle, or it will be longer than 134 mo, thus making cycle 23 a long-period cycle (like cycle 20) and indicating that cycle 24 s minimum will occur after July 2007. Should cycle 23 prove to be a cycle of longer period, a consequence might be that the maximum amplitude for cycle 24 may be smaller than previously predicted.

  13. Regional climate impacts of a possible future grand solar minimum.

    PubMed

    Ineson, Sarah; Maycock, Amanda C; Gray, Lesley J; Scaife, Adam A; Dunstone, Nick J; Harder, Jerald W; Knight, Jeff R; Lockwood, Mike; Manners, James C; Wood, Richard A

    2015-01-01

    Any reduction in global mean near-surface temperature due to a future decline in solar activity is likely to be a small fraction of projected anthropogenic warming. However, variability in ultraviolet solar irradiance is linked to modulation of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations, suggesting the potential for larger regional surface climate effects. Here, we explore possible impacts through two experiments designed to bracket uncertainty in ultraviolet irradiance in a scenario in which future solar activity decreases to Maunder Minimum-like conditions by 2050. Both experiments show regional structure in the wintertime response, resembling the North Atlantic Oscillation, with enhanced relative cooling over northern Eurasia and the eastern United States. For a high-end decline in solar ultraviolet irradiance, the impact on winter northern European surface temperatures over the late twenty-first century could be a significant fraction of the difference in climate change between plausible AR5 scenarios of greenhouse gas concentrations. PMID:26102364

  14. Regional climate impacts of a possible future grand solar minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ineson, Sarah; Maycock, Amanda C.; Gray, Lesley J.; Scaife, Adam A.; Dunstone, Nick J.; Harder, Jerald W.; Knight, Jeff R.; Lockwood, Mike; Manners, James C.; Wood, Richard A.

    2015-06-01

    Any reduction in global mean near-surface temperature due to a future decline in solar activity is likely to be a small fraction of projected anthropogenic warming. However, variability in ultraviolet solar irradiance is linked to modulation of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations, suggesting the potential for larger regional surface climate effects. Here, we explore possible impacts through two experiments designed to bracket uncertainty in ultraviolet irradiance in a scenario in which future solar activity decreases to Maunder Minimum-like conditions by 2050. Both experiments show regional structure in the wintertime response, resembling the North Atlantic Oscillation, with enhanced relative cooling over northern Eurasia and the eastern United States. For a high-end decline in solar ultraviolet irradiance, the impact on winter northern European surface temperatures over the late twenty-first century could be a significant fraction of the difference in climate change between plausible AR5 scenarios of greenhouse gas concentrations.

  15. Evaluation the initial estimators using deterministic minimum covariance determinant algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alrawashdeh, Mufda Jameel; Sabri, Shamsul Rijal Muhammad; Ismail, Mohd Tahir

    2014-07-01

    The aim of the study is to examine five initial estimators introduced by Hubert et al. [1] with five additional new initial estimators by using the Deterministic Minimum Covariance Determinant algorithm, DetMCD. The objective of the DetMCD is to robustify the location and scatter matrix parameters. Since these parameters are highly influenced by the presence of outliers, the DetMCD is a newly highly robust algorithm, where it is constructed to overcome the outlier's problem. DetMCD precedes the non-random subsets, which computes a small number of deterministic initial estimators and followed by concentration steps. Here, we are going to compare the DetMCD algorithm based on two groups of estimators - one with original five Huberts' estimators and the other five new estimators. The determinant values of these estimators are observed to evaluate the performance via several cases.

  16. Regional climate impacts of a possible future grand solar minimum

    PubMed Central

    Ineson, Sarah; Maycock, Amanda C.; Gray, Lesley J.; Scaife, Adam A.; Dunstone, Nick J.; Harder, Jerald W.; Knight, Jeff R.; Lockwood, Mike; Manners, James C.; Wood, Richard A.

    2015-01-01

    Any reduction in global mean near-surface temperature due to a future decline in solar activity is likely to be a small fraction of projected anthropogenic warming. However, variability in ultraviolet solar irradiance is linked to modulation of the Arctic and North Atlantic Oscillations, suggesting the potential for larger regional surface climate effects. Here, we explore possible impacts through two experiments designed to bracket uncertainty in ultraviolet irradiance in a scenario in which future solar activity decreases to Maunder Minimum-like conditions by 2050. Both experiments show regional structure in the wintertime response, resembling the North Atlantic Oscillation, with enhanced relative cooling over northern Eurasia and the eastern United States. For a high-end decline in solar ultraviolet irradiance, the impact on winter northern European surface temperatures over the late twenty-first century could be a significant fraction of the difference in climate change between plausible AR5 scenarios of greenhouse gas concentrations. PMID:26102364

  17. Manganese flux from continental margin sediments in a transect through the oxygen minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, K.S. Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Inst., Pacific Grove, CA ); Berelson, W.M.; Iams, H.D.; Kilgore, T.E. ); Coale, K.H.; Coley, T.L.; Elrod, V.A.; Fairey, W.R.; Nowicki, J.L. )

    1992-08-28

    The flux of manganese from continental margin sediments to the ocean was measured with a free-vehicle, benthic flux chamber in a transect across the continental shelf and upper slope of the California margin. The highest fluxes were observed on the shallow continental shelf. Manganese flux decreased linearly with bottom water oxygen concentration, and the lowest flux occurred in the oxygen minimum zone (at a depth of 600 to 1,000 meters). Although the flux of manganese from continental shelf sediments can account for the elevated concentrations observed in shallow, coastal waters, the flux from sediments that intersect the oxygen minimum cannot produce the subsurface concentration maximum of dissolved manganese that is observed in the Pacific Ocean.

  18. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2015-01-01

    Birds do not require the use of vertical tails. They do not appear to have any mechanism by which to control their yaw. As an example the albatross is notable in this regard. The authors believe this is possible because of a unique adaptation by which there exists a triple-optimal solution that provides the maximum aerodynamic efficiency, the minimum structural weight, and it provides for coordination of control in roll and yaw. Until now, this solution has eluded researchers, and remained unknown. Here it is shown that the correct specification of spanload provides for all three solutions at once, maximum aerodynamic efficiency, minimum structural weight, and coordinated control. The implications of this result has far reaching effects on the design of aircraft, as well as dramatic efficiency improvement.

  19. Global minimum essential requirements in medical education.

    PubMed

    2002-03-01

    The process of globalization is increasingly evident in medical education and makes the task of defining global essential competences required by 'global physicians' an urgent matter. This issue was addressed by the newly established Institute for International Medical Education (IIME). The IIME Core Committee developed the concept of 'global minimum essential requirements' ('GMER') and defined a set of global minimum learning outcomes that medical school students must demonstrate at graduation. The 'Essentials' are grouped under seven broad educational domains with a set of 60 learning objectives. Besides these 'global competences', medical schools should add national and local requirements. The focus on student competences as outcomes of medical education should have deep implications for curricular content as well as the educational processes of medical schools. PMID:12098431

  20. On finding minimum-diameter clique trees

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.R.S. . Dept. of Computer Science); Peyton, B.W. )

    1991-08-01

    It is well-known that any chordal graph can be represented as a clique tree (acyclic hypergraph, join tree). Since some chordal graphs have many distinct clique tree representations, it is interesting to consider which one is most desirable under various circumstances. A clique tree of minimum diameter (or height) is sometimes a natural candidate when choosing clique trees to be processed in a parallel computing environment. This paper introduces a linear time algorithm for computing a minimum-diameter clique tree. The new algorithm is an analogue of the natural greedy algorithm for rooting an ordinary tree in order to minimize its height. It has potential application in the development of parallel algorithms for both knowledge-based systems and the solution of sparse linear systems of equations. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  1. The minimum jet power and equipartition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2014-12-01

    We derive the minimum power of jets and their magnetic field strength based on their observed non-thermal synchrotron emission. The correct form of this method takes into account both the internal energy in the jet and the ion rest-mass energy associated with the bulk motion. The latter was neglected in a number of papers, which instead adopted the well-known energy-content minimization method. That method was developed for static sources, for which there is no bulk-motion component of the energy. In the case of electron power-law spectra with index >2 in ion-electron jets, the rest-mass component dominates. The minimization method for the jet power taking it into account was considered in some other work, but only based on either an assumption of a constant total synchrotron flux or a fixed range of the Lorentz factors. Instead, we base our method on an observed optically thin synchrotron spectrum. We find the minimum jet power is independent of its radius when the ion rest-mass power dominates, which becomes the case below certain critical radius. This allows for robust minimum power estimates. We also present results for the case with observed turnover frequency, at which the source becomes optically thick. This method allows a determination of the source size, in addition to the power and the magnetic field. We also point out that when the ion rest-mass power dominates, the estimates of the minimum power lead to very different equipartition parameters than those based on minimization of the energy content. The former and latter lead to approximate equipartition between the internal energy in magnetic field and in particles including and excluding, respectively, their rest-mass energy.

  2. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Minimum standards. 3280.703 Section...—UL 307B-1995. Gas Clothes Dryers Volume 1, Type 1 Clothes Dryers—ANSI Z21.5.1-/CSA 7.1-M99—1999 with Addendum Z21.5.1a-1999. Gas Fired Absorption Summer Air Conditioning Appliances—ANSI Z21.40.1/CGA...

  3. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  4. Minimum-time running: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Maro?ski, Ryszard; Rogowski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the minimum-time running problem. The time of covering a given distance is minimized. The Hill-Keller model of running employed is based on Newton's second law and the equation of power balance. The problem is formulated in optimal control. The unknown function is the runner's velocity that varies with the distance. The problem is solved applying the direct Chebyshev's pseudospectral method. PMID:21761812

  5. Interplanetary conditions: lessons from this minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luhmann, J.; Lee, C. O.; Riley, P.; Jian, L. K.; Russell, C. T.; Petrie, G.

    2012-07-01

    Interplanetary conditions during the Cycle 23-24 minimum have attracted attention because they are noticeably different than those during other minima of the space age, exhibiting more solar wind stream interaction structures in addition to reduced mass fluxes and low magnetic field strengths. In this study we consider the differences in the solar wind source regions by applying Potential Field Source Surface models of the coronal magnetic field. In particular, we consider the large scale coronal field geometry that organizes the open field region locations and sizes, and the appearance of the helmet streamer structure that is another determiner of solar wind properties. The recent cycle minimum had an extraordinarily long entry phase (the decline of Cycle 23) that made it difficult to identify when the actual miminum arrived. In particular, the late 23 rd cycle was characterized by diminishing photospheric fields and complex coronal structures that took several extra years to simplify to its traditional dipolar solar minimum state. The nearly dipolar phase, when it arrived, had a duration somewhat shorter than those of the previous cycles. The fact that the corona maintained an appearance more like a solar maximum corona through most of the quiet transitional phase between Cycles 23 and 24 gave the impression of a much more complicated solar minimum solar wind structure in spite of the weaknesses of the mass flux and interplanetary field. The extent to which the Cycle 23-24 transition will affect Cycle 24, and/or represents what happens during weak cycles in general, remains to be seen.

  6. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2010-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb

  7. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  8. The minimum entropy principle and task performance.

    PubMed

    Guastello, Stephen J; Gorin, Hillary; Huschen, Samuel; Peters, Natalie E; Fabisch, Megan; Poston, Kirsten; Weinberger, Kelsey

    2013-07-01

    According to the minimum entropy principle, efficient cognitive performance is produced with a neurocognitive strategy that involves a minimum of degrees of freedom. Although high performance is often regarded as consistent performance as well, some variability in performance still remains which allows the person to adapt to changing goal conditions or fatigue. The present study investigated the connection between performance, entropy in performance, and four task-switching strategies. Fifty-one undergraduates performed 7 different computer-based cognitive tasks producing sets of 49 responses under instructional conditions requiring task quotas or no quotas. The temporal patterns of performance were analyzed using orbital decomposition to extract pattern types and lengths, which were then compared with regard to Shannon entropy, topological entropy, and overall performance. Task switching strategies from a previous study were available for the same participants as well. Results indicated that both topological entropy and Shannon entropy were negatively correlated with performance. Some task-switching strategies produced lower entropy in performance than others. Stepwise regression showed that the top three predictors of performance were Shannon entropy and arithmetic and spatial abilities. Additional implications for the prediction of work performance with cognitive ability measurements and the applicability of the minimum entropy principle to multidimensional performance criteria and team work are discussed. PMID:23735494

  9. Design for minimum energy in interstellar communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2015-02-01

    Microwave digital communication at interstellar distances is the foundation of extraterrestrial civilization (SETI and METI) communication of information-bearing signals. Large distances demand large transmitted power and/or large antennas, while the propagation is transparent over a wide bandwidth. Recognizing a fundamental tradeoff, reduced energy delivered to the receiver at the expense of wide bandwidth (the opposite of terrestrial objectives) is advantageous. Wide bandwidth also results in simpler design and implementation, allowing circumvention of dispersion and scattering arising in the interstellar medium and motion effects and obviating any related processing. The minimum energy delivered to the receiver per bit of information is determined by cosmic microwave background alone. By mapping a single bit onto a carrier burst, the Morse code invented for the telegraph in 1836 comes closer to this minimum energy than approaches used in modern terrestrial radio. Rather than the terrestrial approach of adding phases and amplitudes increases information capacity while minimizing bandwidth, adding multiple time-frequency locations for carrier bursts increases capacity while minimizing energy per information bit. The resulting location code is simple and yet can approach the minimum energy as bandwidth is expanded. It is consistent with easy discovery, since carrier bursts are energetic and straightforward modifications to post-detection pattern recognition can identify burst patterns. Time and frequency coherence constraints leading to simple signal discovery are addressed, and observations of the interstellar medium by transmitter and receiver constrain the burst parameters and limit the search scope.

  10. Growth inhibitory, antiandrogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects of punicic acid in LNCaP human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gasmi, Jihane; Sanderson, J Thomas

    2010-12-01

    Prostate cancer is a commonly diagnosed cancer in men, and dietary chemoprevention by pomegranate (Punica granatum) extracts has shown noticeable benefits. In this study, we investigated the growth inhibitory, antiandrogenic, and pro-apoptotic effects of 13 pure compounds found in the pomegranate in androgen-dependent LNCaP human prostate cancer cells. Cells deprived of steroid hormones were exposed to increasing concentrations (1-100 ?M) of pomegranate compounds in the presence of 0.1 nM dihydrotestosterone (DHT), and the inhibition of cell growth was measured by WST-1 colorimetric assay after a 4 day exposure. Four compounds, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), delphinidin chloride, kaempferol, and punicic acid, were found to inhibit DHT-stimulated cell growth at concentrations of 10 ?M and above. These four pomegranate compounds inhibited DHT-stimulated androgen receptor nuclear accumulation and the expression of the androgen receptor-dependent genes prostate specific antigen and steroid 5?-reductase type 1 at concentrations ?10 ?M. We determined the possible contribution of apoptosis to the observed decrease in cell growth and found that three compounds, EGCG, kaempferol, and, in particular, punicic acid, induced DNA fragmentation after a 24 h treatment, at concentrations in the 10-100 ?M range. Punicic acid, an important fatty acid in pomegranate seeds, was further found to induce intrinsic apoptosis via a caspase-dependent pathway. In conclusion, punicic acid, the main constituent of pomegranate seed (70-80%), exhibited potent growth inhibitory activities in androgen-dependent LNCaP cells, which appear to be mediated by both antiandrogenic and pro-apoptotic mechanisms. PMID:21067181

  11. Inhibitory effects of Angelicae Gigantis Radix on osteoclast formation.

    PubMed

    Kil, Jong-Seob; Kim, Myung-Gyou; Choi, Hye Mi; Lim, Jong-Pil; Boo, Yungmin; Kim, Ee-Hwa; Kim, Jeung-Beum; Kim, Hye Kyung; Leem, Kang-Hyun

    2008-04-01

    Angelicae Gigantis Radix (AGR) is one of the most widely used herbal medications. AGR is the dried root of Angelica gigas Nakai (Umbelliferae), which is known as Korean angelica. This study investigated the effects of AGR on osteoclast formation using primary bone marrow cells. TNF-alpha treatment increased tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (Trap) positive cells and Trap activity in bone marrow cells. However, AGR significantly decreased both TNF-alpha-induced Trap positive cells and Trap activity. RT-PCR analyses revealed that AGR decreased mRNA levels of Trap and matrix metalloproteinase-9 in TNF-alpha-treated bone marrow cells. In addition, AGR decreased TNF-alpha-induced activation of NF-kappaB. These results suggest that AGR has an inhibitory effect on the formation of osteoclasts and its effect is partially related to the NF-kappaB pathway. PMID:18386252

  12. The desensitization gate of inhibitory Cys-loop receptors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gielen, Marc; Thomas, Philip; Smart, Trevor G.

    2015-04-01

    Cys-loop neurotransmitter-gated ion channels are vital for communication throughout the nervous system. Following activation, these receptors enter into a desensitized state in which the ion channel shuts even though the neurotransmitter molecules remain bound. To date, the molecular determinants underlying this most fundamental property of Cys-loop receptors have remained elusive. Here we present a generic mechanism for the desensitization of Cys-loop GABAA (GABAARs) and glycine receptors (GlyRs), which both mediate fast inhibitory synaptic transmission. Desensitization is regulated by interactions between the second and third transmembrane segments, which affect the ion channel lumen near its intracellular end. The GABAAR and GlyR pore blocker picrotoxin prevented desensitization, consistent with its deep channel-binding site overlapping a physical desensitization gate.

  13. Fluorescent Silica Nanoparticles with Multivalent Inhibitory Effects towards Carbonic Anhydrases.

    PubMed

    Touisni, Nadia; Kanfar, Nasreddine; Ulrich, Sébastien; Dumy, Pascal; Supuran, Claudiu T; Mehdi, Ahmad; Winum, Jean-Yves

    2015-07-13

    Multifunctional silica nanoparticles decorated with fluorescent and sulfonamide carbonic anhydrase (CA) inhibitors were prepared and investigated as multivalent enzyme inhibitors against the cytosolic isoforms hCA?I and II and the transmembrane tumor-associated ones hCA?IX and XII. Excellent inhibitory effects were observed with these nanoparticles, with KI values in the low nanomolar range (6.2-0.67?nM) against all tested isozymes. A significant multivalency effect was seen for the inhibition of the monomeric enzymes hCA?I and II compared to the dimeric hCA?IX and hCA?XII isoforms, where no multivalent effect was observed, suggesting that the multivalent binding is occurring through enzyme clustering. PMID:25965260

  14. Focal inhibitory seizures: a cause of recurrent transient weakness.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Fahmida A; Connor, Steve; Ferner, Rosalie; Leschziner, Guy

    2015-12-01

    Focal seizures are usually manifest with stereotyped positive phenomena. However, seizures may also give negative phenomena, such as paralysis, speech arrest, neglect, atonia and numbness. We report a 39-year-old man with neurofibromatosis 2 who had recurrent stereotyped episodes of weakness affecting his right leg and right arm. His MR scan of brain showed numerous meningiomas, the largest of which was near the vertex, adjacent to the left side of the falx. Interictal electroencephalogram, MR cerebral angiogram and Doppler carotid artery ultrasound scan were normal. He was diagnosed with epilepsy and started on levetiracetam, with no subsequent attacks. We postulate his negative motor seizures related to a meningioma overlying the supplementary negative motor area in the mesial superior frontal gyrus, and discuss diagnostic criteria for inhibitory seizures. PMID:26245512

  15. Function and developmental origin of a mesocortical inhibitory circuit.

    PubMed

    Kabanova, Anna; Pabst, Milan; Lorkowski, Markus; Braganza, Oliver; Boehlen, Anne; Nikbakht, Negar; Pothmann, Leonie; Vaswani, Ankita R; Musgrove, Ruth; Di Monte, Donato A; Sauvage, Magdalena; Beck, Heinz; Blaess, Sandra

    2015-06-01

    Midbrain ventral tegmental neurons project to the prefrontal cortex and modulate cognitive functions. Using viral tracing, optogenetics and electrophysiology, we found that mesocortical neurons in the mouse ventrotegmental area provide fast glutamatergic excitation of GABAergic interneurons in the prefrontal cortex and inhibit prefrontal cortical pyramidal neurons in a robust and reliable manner. These mesocortical neurons were derived from a subset of dopaminergic progenitors, which were dependent on prolonged Sonic Hedgehog signaling for their induction. Loss of these progenitors resulted in the loss of the mesocortical inhibitory circuit and an increase in perseverative behavior, whereas mesolimbic and mesostriatal dopaminergic projections, as well as impulsivity and attentional function, were largely spared. Thus, we identified a previously uncharacterized mesocortical circuit contributing to perseverative behaviors and found that the diversity of dopaminergic neurons begins to be established during their progenitor phase. PMID:25961790

  16. The inhibitory effects of Nardostachys jatamansi on alcoholic chronic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Bae, Gi-Sang; Park, Kyoung-Chel; Koo, Bon Soon; Choi, Sun Bok; Jo, Il-Joo; Choi, Chang-Min; Song, Ho-Joon; Park, Sung-Joo

    2012-07-01

    Nardostachys jatamansi (NJ) belonging to the Valerianaceae family has been used as a remedy for gastrointestinal inflammatory diseases for decades. However, the potential for NJ to ameliorate alcoholic chronic pancreatitis (ACP) is unknown. The aim of this study was to examine the inhibitory effects of NJ on ACP. C57black/6 mice received ethanol injections intraperitoneally for 3 weeks against a background of cerulein-induced acute pancreatitis. During ACP, NJ was ad libitum administrated orally with water. After 3 weeks of treatment, the pancreas was harvested for histological examination. NJ treatment increased the pancreatic acinar cell survival (confirmed by amylase level testing) and reduced collagen deposition and pancreatic stellate cell (PSC) activation. In addition, NJ treatment reduced the activation but not death of PSC. In conclusion, our results suggest that NJ attenuated ACP through the inhibition of PSC activation. PMID:22831975

  17. Screening of selected Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Vinutha, B; Prashanth, D; Salma, K; Sreeja, S L; Pratiti, D; Padmaja, R; Radhika, S; Amit, A; Venkateshwarlu, K; Deepak, M

    2007-01-19

    Seventy-six plant extracts including methanolic and successive water extracts from 37 Indian medicinal plants were investigated for acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity (in vitro). Results indicated that methanolic extracts to be more active than water extracts. The potent AChE inhibiting methanolic plant extracts included Withania somnifera (root), Semecarpus anacardium (stem bark), Embelia ribes (Root), Tinospora cordifolia (stem), Ficus religiosa (stem bark) and Nardostachys jatamansi (rhizome). The IC(50) values obtained for these extracts were 33.38, 16.74, 23.04, 38.36, 73.69 and 47.21mug/ml, respectively. These results partly substantiate the traditional use of these herbs for improvement of cognition. PMID:16950584

  18. Oligostilbenoids with acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity from Dipterocarpus alatus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Chao Jun; Jiang, Rong; Wang, Gang; Jiao, Rui Hua; Tancharoen, Chompoonuch; Sudto, Kanokorn; Vajarothai, Sranya; Hannongbua, Supa; Ge, Hui Ming; Tan, Ren Xiang

    2014-11-01

    Phytochemical investigation of the stem wood of Dipterocarpus alatus led to the isolation and characterization of four new oligostilbenoids, dipterocarpols A-D (1-4), together with two known resveratrol oligomers, hopeahainol (5) and hopeafuran (6). The structures of the new compounds were determined by comprehensive spectral analysis including 1D and 2D?NMR, and high-resolution MS. The absolute configurations were determined by NOESY and CD spectra. Dipterocarpol A (1) and hopeahainol A (5) showed moderate acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity with IC50 values of 8.28 µM and 11.28 µM, respectively. Furthermore, the discovery of compound 3 gave the first evidence that the biosynthetic origin of resveratrol aneuploids is related to the loss of a half resveratrol unit by oxidative cleavage. PMID:25317771

  19. Isoliquiritigenin, a Chalcone Compound, Enhances Spontaneous Inhibitory Postsynaptic Response

    PubMed Central

    Woo, Junsung; Cho, Suengmok

    2014-01-01

    Isoliquiritigenin (ILTG) is a chalcone compound and shows various pharmacological properties, including antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. In recent study, we have reported a novel role of ILTG in sleep through a positive allosteric modulation of gamma-aminobutyric acid type A (GABAA)-benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors. However, the effect of ILTG in GABAAR-mediated synaptic response in brain has not been tested yet. Here we report that ILTG significantly prolonged the decay of spontaneous inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sIPSCs) mediated by GABAAR in mouse hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons without affecting amplitude and frequency of sIPSCs. This enhancement was fully inhibited by flumazenil (FLU), a specific GABAA-BZD receptor antagonist. These results suggest a potential role of ILTG as a modulator of GABAergic synaptic transmission. PMID:24963281

  20. Amyloid fibril formation by macrophage migration inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Lashuel, Hilal A. . E-mail: hilal.lashuel@epfl.ch; Aljabari, Bayan; Sigurdsson, Einar M.; Metz, Christine N.; Leng Lin; Callaway, David J.E.; Bucala, Richard

    2005-12-16

    We demonstrate herein that human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine expressed in the brain and not previously considered to be amyloidogenic, forms amyloid fibrils similar to those derived from the disease associated amyloidogenic proteins {beta}-amyloid and {alpha}-synuclein. Acid denaturing conditions were found to readily induce MIF to undergo amyloid fibril formation. MIF aggregates to form amyloid-like structures with a morphology that is highly dependent on pH. The mechanism of MIF amyloid formation was probed by electron microscopy, turbidity, Thioflavin T binding, circular dichroism spectroscopy, and analytical ultracentrifugation. The fibrillar structures formed by MIF bind Congo red and exhibit the characteristic green birefringence under polarized light. These results are consistent with the notion that amyloid fibril formation is not an exclusive property of a select group of amyloidogenic proteins, and contribute to a better understanding of the factors which govern protein conformational changes and amyloid fibril formation in vivo.

  1. Irreversible competitive inhibitory kinetics of cardol triene on mushroom tyrosinase.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Jiang-Xing; Hu, Yong-Hua; Yang, Mei-Hua; Liu, Feng-Jiao; Qiu, Ling; Zhou, Xing-Wang; Chen, Qing-Xi

    2010-12-22

    Cardol triene was first purified from cashew (Anacardium occidentale L.) nut shell liquid and identified by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectroscopy and nuclear magnetic resonance. The effects of this compound on the activity of mushroom tyrosinase were studied. The results of the kinetic study showed that cardol triene was a potent irreversible competitive inhibitor and the inactivation was of the complexing type. Two molecules of cardol triene could bind to one molecule of tyrosinase and lead to the complete loss of its catalytic activity. The microscopic rate constants were determined for the reaction of cardol triene with the enzyme. The anti-tyrosinase kinetic research of this study provides a comprehensive understanding of inhibitory mechanisms of resorcinolic lipids and is beneficial for the future design of novel tyrosinase inhibitors. PMID:21121650

  2. Anterograde transport of leukemia inhibitory factor within transected sciatic nerves.

    PubMed

    Bennett, T M; Dowsing, B J; Austin, L; Messina, A; Nicola, N A; Morrison, W A

    1999-01-01

    Disappointing functional recovery following peripheral nerve repair can be improved by neurotrophic growth factors. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) is unique in that it has independent neurotrophic and myotrophic actions. The aim of this study was to explain this finding by establishing the existence of anterograde axonal transport of LIF from the site of nerve division to denervated muscles. Using 125I LIF, administered topically via an entubulation repair of divided rat sciatic nerve, we monitored its subsequent distribution by measuring the radioactivity associated with nerve segments and denervated muscles. We established that LIF preferentially accumulated in denervated muscles, a process we could reduce by 70% after tightly ligating the intervening nerve, confirming the presence of anterograde axonal transport. This was most likely an active mode of transport that ceased approximately 24 h after nerve division, establishing a narrow clinical time frame within which the myotrophic action of LIF could be optimized following nerve repair. PMID:9883860

  3. Inhibitory effects of Ramulus mori extracts on melanogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kang Tae; Lee, Kwang Sik; Jeong, Ji Hean; Jo, Byoung Kee; Heo, Moon Young; Kim, Hyun Pyo

    2003-01-01

    To develop an active agent for skin whitening, the inhibitory effects of 285 plant extracts on tyrosinase activity were examined, and one plant extract having tyrosinase inhibition activity was chosen. Ramulus mori (young twigs of Morus alba L.) extracts showed inhibition activity in tyrosinase and melanin synthesis in B-16 melanoma cells. To clarify the mechanism of its inhibition on melanogenesis, the effect of R. mori extracts on tyrosinase activity, synthesis, and gene expression was evaluated. R. mori extracts showed tyrosinase inhibition activity by competitive method, and there was no suppression of tyrosinase synthesis and gene expression. Further, to evaluate the inhibitory activity of R. mori in vivo, its effect on melanin production in UV-induced brown guinea pigs was examined, where a decrease of melanin production in the guinea pig model was observed. Also, R. mori extracts showed no toxicity in animal tests such as the acute toxicity test, the skin irritation test, the eye irritation test, the skin sensitization test, and the acute oral toxicity test, and no toxicity in the human skin irritation test. A single compound from R. mori extracts was purified using various column chromatography and recrystallization, and its chemical structure was identified using mass chromatography, IR spectroscopy, and NMR analysis. The chemical structure was that of 2,3',4,5'-tetrahydroxystilbene(2-oxyresveratrol) and showed inhibition activity on tyrosinase (IC(50) = 0.23 microg/ml). Also, R. mori extracts inhibited tyrosinase activity in a competitive manner (Ki = 1.5 x 10(-6) M) when L-tyrosine was used as a substrate. PMID:12715091

  4. Coagulation factor VII variants resistant to inhibitory antibodies.

    PubMed

    Branchini, Alessio; Baroni, Marcello; Pfeiffer, Caroline; Batorova, Angelika; Giansily-Blaizot, Muriel; Schved, Jean F; Mariani, Guglielmo; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2014-11-01

    Replacement therapy is currently used to prevent and treat bleeding episodes in coagulation factor deficiencies. However, structural differences between the endogenous and therapeutic proteins might increase the risk for immune complications. This study was aimed at identifying factor (F)VII variants resistant to inhibitory antibodies developed after treatment with recombinant activated factor VII (rFVIIa) in a FVII-deficient patient homozygous for the p.A354V-p.P464Hfs mutation, which predicts trace levels of an elongated FVII variant in plasma. We performed fluorescent bead-based binding, ELISA-based competition as well as fluorogenic functional (activated FX and thrombin generation) assays in plasma and with recombinant proteins. We found that antibodies displayed higher affinity for the active than for the zymogen FVII (half-maximal binding at 0.54 ± 0.04 and 0.78 ± 0.07 BU/ml, respectively), and inhibited the coagulation initiation phase with a second-order kinetics. Isotypic analysis showed a polyclonal response with a large predominance of IgG1. We hypothesised that structural differences in the carboxyl-terminus between the inherited FVII and the therapeutic molecules contributed to the immune response. Intriguingly, a naturally-occurring, poorly secreted and 5-residue truncated FVII (FVII-462X) escaped inhibition. Among a series of truncated rFVII molecules, we identified a well-secreted and catalytically competent variant (rFVII-464X) with reduced binding to antibodies (half-maximal binding at 0.198 ± 0.003 BU/ml) as compared to the rFVII-wt (0.032 ± 0.002 BU/ml), which led to a 40-time reduced inhibition in activated FX generation assays. Taken together our results provide a paradigmatic example of mutation-related inhibitory antibodies, strongly support the FVII carboxyl-terminus as their main target and identify inhibitor-resistant FVII variants. PMID:25104096

  5. Manganese-mefenamic acid complexes exhibit high lipoxygenase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jie; Du, Xin; Liu, Hui; Sui, Xin; Zhang, Chen; Tang, Yun; Zhang, Jingyan

    2014-07-28

    The coordination of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) to metal ions could improve the pharmaceutical efficacy of NSAIDs due to the unique characteristics of metal complexes. However, the structures of many metal-NSAID complexes are not well characterized; the functional mechanism and pharmaceutical effect of these complexes thus are not fully understood. In this work, three manganese-mefenamic acid (Mn-mef) complexes were synthesized and structurally characterized, and their pharmaceutical effect was investigated. We found that the three Mn-mef complexes exhibit higher lipoxygenase (LOX-1) inhibitory activity (IC50 values are 16.79, 38.63 and 28.06 ?M, respectively) than the parent ligand mefenamic acid (78.67 ?M). More importantly, the high inhibitory activity of the Mn-mef complexes is closely related to their spatial arrangements, which determine their interaction with LOX-1. Computer docking of the Mn-mef complexes with the LOX-1 confirms the experimental results: smaller Mn-mef complexes tend to bind competitively to LOX-1 at the substrate binding site, which is also analogous to the binding of the ligand mefenamic acid, while the bulky metal complexes inhibit the enzyme activity un-competitively. In addition, the Mn-mef complexes exhibit higher anti-oxidant activity than the ligand mefenamic acid. The higher anti-oxidant activity of the Mn-mef complexes apparently originated from the manganese centre of the complexes. We thus conclude that Mn-mef complexes enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of mefenamic acid by increasing their activity via changing their interaction mode with the enzymes, and/or by improving their anti-oxidant ability using metal ions. This work provides experimental evidence that with the unique spatial arrangements, metal-NSAID complexes could interact with the target enzymes more specifically and efficiently, which is superior to their parent NSAID ligand. PMID:24903101

  6. Muscarinic Receptors Modulate Dendrodendritic Inhibitory Synapses to Sculpt Glomerular Output

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Wachowiak, Matt; Rothermel, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cholinergic [acetylcholine (ACh)] axons from the basal forebrain innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the initial site of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Both nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed in glomeruli. The activation of nAChRs directly excites both mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) and external tufted cells (ETCs), the two major excitatory neurons that transmit glomerular output. The functional roles of mAChRs in glomerular circuits are unknown. We show that the restricted glomerular application of ACh causes rapid, brief nAChR-mediated excitation of both MTCs and ETCs in the mouse olfactory bulb. This excitation is followed by mAChR-mediated inhibition, which is blocked by GABAA receptor antagonists, indicating the engagement of periglomerular cells (PGCs) and/or short axon cells (SACs), the two major glomerular inhibitory neurons. Indeed, selective activation of glomerular mAChRs, with ionotropic GluRs and nAChRs blocked, increased IPSCs in MTCs and ETCs, indicating that mAChRs recruit glomerular inhibitory circuits. Selective activation of glomerular mAChRs in the presence of tetrodotoxin increased IPSCs in all glomerular neurons, indicating action potential-independent enhancement of GABA release from PGC and/or SAC dendrodendritic synapses. mAChR-mediated enhancement of GABA release also presynaptically suppressed the first synapse of the olfactory system via GABAB receptors on sensory terminals. Together, these results indicate that cholinergic modulation of glomerular circuits is biphasic, involving an initial excitation of MTC/ETCs mediated by nAChRs followed by inhibition mediated directly by mAChRs on PGCs/SACs. This may phasically enhance the sensitivity of glomerular outputs to odorants, an action that is consistent with recent in vivo findings. PMID:25855181

  7. Muscarinic receptors modulate dendrodendritic inhibitory synapses to sculpt glomerular output.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shaolin; Shao, Zuoyi; Puche, Adam; Wachowiak, Matt; Rothermel, Markus; Shipley, Michael T

    2015-04-01

    Cholinergic [acetylcholine (ACh)] axons from the basal forebrain innervate olfactory bulb glomeruli, the initial site of synaptic integration in the olfactory system. Both nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptors (mAChRs) are expressed in glomeruli. The activation of nAChRs directly excites both mitral/tufted cells (MTCs) and external tufted cells (ETCs), the two major excitatory neurons that transmit glomerular output. The functional roles of mAChRs in glomerular circuits are unknown. We show that the restricted glomerular application of ACh causes rapid, brief nAChR-mediated excitation of both MTCs and ETCs in the mouse olfactory bulb. This excitation is followed by mAChR-mediated inhibition, which is blocked by GABAA receptor antagonists, indicating the engagement of periglomerular cells (PGCs) and/or short axon cells (SACs), the two major glomerular inhibitory neurons. Indeed, selective activation of glomerular mAChRs, with ionotropic GluRs and nAChRs blocked, increased IPSCs in MTCs and ETCs, indicating that mAChRs recruit glomerular inhibitory circuits. Selective activation of glomerular mAChRs in the presence of tetrodotoxin increased IPSCs in all glomerular neurons, indicating action potential-independent enhancement of GABA release from PGC and/or SAC dendrodendritic synapses. mAChR-mediated enhancement of GABA release also presynaptically suppressed the first synapse of the olfactory system via GABAB receptors on sensory terminals. Together, these results indicate that cholinergic modulation of glomerular circuits is biphasic, involving an initial excitation of MTC/ETCs mediated by nAChRs followed by inhibition mediated directly by mAChRs on PGCs/SACs. This may phasically enhance the sensitivity of glomerular outputs to odorants, an action that is consistent with recent in vivo findings. PMID:25855181

  8. Predicting Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitory Activity through Ligand-Based Models

    PubMed Central

    Vilar, Santiago; Ferino, Giulio; Quezada, Elias; Santana, Lourdes; Friedman, Carol

    2013-01-01

    The evolution of bio- and cheminformatics associated with the development of specialized software and increasing computer power has produced a great interest in theoretical in silico methods applied in drug rational design. These techniques apply the concept that “similar molecules have similar biological properties” that has been exploited in Medicinal Chemistry for years to design new molecules with desirable pharmacological profiles. Ligand-based methods are not dependent on receptor structural data and take into account two and three-dimensional molecular properties to assess similarity of new compounds in regards to the set of molecules with the biological property under study. Depending on the complexity of the calculation, there are different types of ligand-based methods, such as QSAR (Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship) with 2D and 3D descriptors, CoMFA (Comparative Molecular Field Analysis) or pharmacophoric approaches. This work provides a description of a series of ligand-based models applied in the prediction of the inhibitory activity of monoamine oxidase (MAO) enzymes. The controlled regulation of the enzymes’ function through the use of MAO inhibitors is used as a treatment in many psychiatric and neurological disorders, such as depression, anxiety, Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. For this reason, multiple scaffolds, such as substituted coumarins, indolylmethylamine or pyridazine derivatives were synthesized and assayed toward MAO-A and MAO-B inhibition. Our intention is to focus on the description of ligand-based models to provide new insights in the relationship between the MAO inhibitory activity and the molecular structure of the different inhibitors, and further study enzyme selectivity and possible mechanisms of action. PMID:23231398

  9. Benzophenones from Hypericum elegans with antioxidant and acetylcholinesterase inhibitory potential

    PubMed Central

    Zheleva-Dimitrova, Dimitrina; Nedialkov, Paraskev; Momekov, Georgi

    2013-01-01

    Background: Hypericum elegans is used in Bulgarian folk medicine for treatment of wounds, depression, gastrointestinal and bacterial diseases. Objective: Recently, new natural benzophenones: Elegaphenone and O-glycosides: Hypericophenonoside, Neoannulatophenonoside and Elegaphenonoside as well as already known 7-Epiclusianone were isolated from the titled species. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the antioxidant and acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory potential of the isolated compounds. Materials and Methods: 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) and 2,2’-azino-bis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) di-ammonium salt (ABTS) free radicals, ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) assay as well as inhibition of lipid peroxidation in linoleic acid system were used for determination of antioxidant activity. Modified Ellman's colorimetric method was carried out to assess the acetyl cholinesterase inhibition potential. Hyperoside and Galantamine hydrobromide were used as positive controls. Results: Hypericophenonoside was found to possess the strongest DPPH radical scavenging activity (IC50 = 181.85 ± 6.82 ?M), while Neoannulatophenonoside showed the highest ABTS (IC50 = 0.25 ± 0.005 ?M) and lipid peroxidation inhibitor activity. FRAP activity was demonstrated only by prenylated aglycones – Elegaphenone [942.16 ± 4.03 ?M Trolox Equivalent (TE)] and 7-Epiclusianone (642.95 ± 3.95 ?M TE) and was stronger compared to the control Hyperoside (421.75 ± 9.29 ?M TE). Elegaphenone and 7-Epiclusianone were found to possess moderate acetyl cholinesterase inhibitory potential with IC50 values of 192.19 ± 3.54 ?M and 142.97 ± 4.62 ?M, respectively. Conclusion: The results obtained revealed that H. elegans is a potential natural source of bioactive compounds and benzophenones could be useful in therapy of free radical pathologies and neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24143038

  10. Role of F1C Fimbriae, Flagella, and Secreted Bacterial Components in the Inhibitory Effect of Probiotic Escherichia coli Nissle 1917 on Atypical Enteropathogenic E. coli Infection

    PubMed Central

    Kleta, Sylvia; Nordhoff, Marcel; Tedin, Karsten; Wieler, Lothar H.; Kolenda, Rafal; Oswald, Sibylle; Oelschlaeger, Tobias A.; Bleiß, Wilfried

    2014-01-01

    Enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) is recognized as an important intestinal pathogen that frequently causes acute and persistent diarrhea in humans and animals. The use of probiotic bacteria to prevent diarrhea is gaining increasing interest. The probiotic E. coli strain Nissle 1917 (EcN) is known to be effective in the treatment of several gastrointestinal disorders. While both in vitro and in vivo studies have described strong inhibitory effects of EcN on enteropathogenic bacteria, including pathogenic E. coli, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain largely unknown. In this study, we examined the inhibitory effect of EcN on infections of porcine intestinal epithelial cells with atypical enteropathogenic E. coli (aEPEC) with respect to single infection steps, including adhesion, microcolony formation, and the attaching and effacing phenotype. We show that EcN drastically reduced the infection efficiencies of aEPEC by inhibiting bacterial adhesion and growth of microcolonies, but not the attaching and effacing of adherent bacteria. The inhibitory effect correlated with EcN adhesion capacities and was predominantly mediated by F1C fimbriae, but also by H1 flagella, which served as bridges between EcN cells. Furthermore, EcN seemed to interfere with the initial adhesion of aEPEC to host cells by secretion of inhibitory components. These components do not appear to be specific to EcN, but we propose that the strong adhesion capacities enable EcN to secrete sufficient local concentrations of the inhibitory factors. The results of this study are consistent with a mode of action whereby EcN inhibits secretion of virulence-associated proteins of EPEC, but not their expression. PMID:24549324

  11. Proliferative and Inhibitory Activity of Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) Extract on Cancer Cell Lines; A-549, XWLC-05, HCT-116, CNE and Beas-2b.

    PubMed

    Cichello, Simon Angelo; Yao, Qian; Dowell, Ashley; Leury, Brian; He, Xiao-Qiong

    2015-01-01

    Siberian ginseng (Eleutherococcus senticosus) is used primarily as an adaptogen herb and also for its immune stimulant properties in Western herbal medicine. Another closely related species used in East Asian medicine systems i.e. Kampo, TCM (Manchuria, Korea, Japan and Ainu of Hokkaido) and also called Siberian ginseng (Acanthopanax senticosus) also displays immune-stimulant and anti-cancer properties. These may affect tumour growth and also provide an anti-fatigue effect for cancer patients, in particular for those suffering from lung cancer. There is some evidence that a carbohydrate in Siberian ginseng may possess not only immune stimulatory but also anti-tumour effects and also display other various anti-cancer properties. Our study aimed to determine the inhibitory and also proliferative effects of a methanol plant extract of Siberan ginseng (E. senticosus) on various cancer and normal cell lines including: A-549 (small cell lung cancer), XWLC-05 (Yunnan lung cancer cell line), CNE (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line), HCT-116 (human colon cancer) and Beas-2b (human lung epithelial). These cell lines were treated with an extract from E. senticosus that was evaporated and re- constituted in DMSO. Treatment of A-549 (small cell lung cancer) cells with E. senticosus methanolic extract showed a concentration-dependent inhibitory trend from 12.5 - 50?g/mL, and then a plateau, whereas at 12.5 and 25 ?g/mL, there is a slight growth suppression in QBC-939 cells, but then a steady suppression from 50, 100 and 200?g/mL. Further, in XWLC-05 (Yunnan lung cancer cell line), E. senticosus methanolic extract displayed an inhibitory effect which plateaued with increasing dosage. Next, in CNE (human nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line) there was a dose dependent proliferative response, whereas in Beas-2 (human lung epithelial cell line), an inhibitory effect. Finally in colon cancer cell line (HCT-116) we observed an initially weak inhibitory effect and then plateau. PMID:26107240

  12. Influence of Pericarp, Cotyledon and Inhibitory Substances on Sharp Tooth Oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) Germination

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Liu, Guangquan; Li, Qingmei; Liu, Yong; Hou, Longyu; Li, GuoLei

    2012-01-01

    In order to explore the mechanism of delayed and uneven germination in sharp tooth oak (Quercus aliena var. acuteserrata) (STO), mechanical scarification techniques were used to study STO root and shoot germination and growth. The techniques used were: removing cup scar (RS), removing the pericarp (RP), and cutting off 1/2 (HC) and 2/3 (TC) cotyledons. Germination percentage and root and shoot length for Chinese cabbage (Beassica pekinensis) seeds (CCS) were also investigated for CCS cultivated in a Sanyo growth cabinet watered by distilled water and 80% methanol extracts from the acorn embryo, cotyledon and pericarp with concentrations of 1.0 g, 0.8 g, 0.6 g and 0.4 g dry acorn weight per ml methanol. The results showed that the majority of roots and shoots from acorns with RP and HC treatment emerged two weeks earlier, more simultaneously, and their total emergences were more than 46% and 28% higher, respectively. TC accelerated root and shoot emergence time and root length, but root and shoot germination rate and shoot height had no significant difference from the control. Positive consequences were not observed on all indices of RS treatment. The germination rates of CCS watered by 1.0 g·ml?1 methanol extracts from the embryo and cotyledon were significantly lower than those from the pericarp, and all concentrations resulted in decreased growth of root and shoot. Methanol extracts from pericarp significantly reduced root length of CCS, but presented little response in germination percentage and shoot length. The inhibitory effect was gradually increased with the increasing concentration of the methanol extract. We conclude that both the mechanical restriction of the pericarp and the presence of germination inhibitors in the embryo, cotyledon and pericarp are the causes for delayed and asynchronous germination of STO acorns. PMID:23133517

  13. Oxygen at Nanomolar Levels Reversibly Suppresses Process Rates and Gene Expression in Anammox and Denitrification in the Oxygen Minimum Zone off Northern Chile

    E-print Network

    Dalsgaard, Tage

    A major percentage (20 to 40%) of global marine fixed-nitrogen loss occurs in oxygen minimum zones (OMZs). Concentrations of O[subscript 2] and the sensitivity of the anaerobic N[subscript 2]-producing processes of anammox ...

  14. Inhibitory effect of D1-like dopamine receptors on neuropeptide Y-induced proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yongqiao; Shi, Weibin; Luo, Hao; Yue, Rongchuan; Wang, Zhen; Wang, Wei; Liu, Li; Wang, Wei Eric; Wang, Hongyong; Zeng, Chunyu

    2015-12-01

    Proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) is thought to have a key role in the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Neuropeptide Y (NPY), norepinephrine and dopamine are sympathetic neurotransmitters. NPY has been particularly shown to stimulate proliferation of VSMCs. NPY, norepinephrine and dopamine are all sympathetic transmitters. In our previous study, we found that in the presence of the dopamine receptor, the ?1-adrenergic receptor-mediated VSMC proliferation is reduced. We hypothesize that the activation of the D1-like receptor might inhibit the NPY-mediated VSMC proliferation. In our present study, we found that NPY, mainly via the Y1 receptor, increased VSMC proliferation. This was determined by [(3)H]-thymidine incorporation, in a concentration (10(-11) to 10(-8)?m)-dependent manner. In the presence of the D1-like receptor agonist, fenoldopam (10(-12) to 10(-5?)m), the stimulatory effect of NPY on VSMC proliferation was reduced. The involvement of the D1-like receptor was confirmed when the inhibitory effect of fenoldopam was reversed in the presence of the D1-like receptor antagonist SCH-23390 (10(-8?)m). Moreover, the inhibitory effect of fenoldopam on NPY-mediated VSMC proliferation was also blocked in the presence of the PKA inhibitor 14-22 (10(-6)?m). Protein kinase A activator 8-(4-chlorophenylthio) adenosine-3,5-cyclic monophosphorothioate, Sp-isomer sodium salt (10(-6)?m) could simulate the stimulatory effect of fenoldopam. It indicated that the inhibitory effect of D1-like receptors on NPY-mediated VSMC proliferation may have an important role in the regulation of blood pressure or prevention of atherosclerosis. PMID:26178154

  15. Release patterns of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids within the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus in response to direct nitric oxide administration during forced swimming in rats.

    PubMed

    Engelmann, Mario; Wolf, Gerald; Horn, Thomas F W

    2002-05-24

    The effect of direct intrahypothalamic nitric oxide (NO) administration on the release of selected amino acids in the hypothalamic supraoptic nucleus (SON) with and without concomitant forced swimming was investigated. Adult male Wistar rats were chronically fitted with U-shaped microdialysis probes in the SON and forced to swim for 10-min in 20-degree C warm water. Thirty-min microdialysis samples were collected before, during and after the forced swimming period while NO was administered into the SON via microdialysis. The results show that NO administration in combination with forced swimming affects the release of aspartate, glutamate, taurine, and gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA) in different patterns. Whereas the release of the excitatory amino acids aspartate and glutamate was triggered only during NO administration and forced swimming, the inhibitory amino acids GABA and taurine were found in the extracellular fluid in increased concentrations also after the treatment. These data indicate that NO administration differently affects the release of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids within the SON. Thus, SON neurons which contain high concentrations of neuronal NO synthase, might contribute to the regulation of their own secretory activity by releasing NO that controls the orchestrated release of excitatory and inhibitory amino acids from axon terminals of afferences and interneurons as well as release from glial cells. PMID:12009534

  16. The Role of Inhibitory Control in the Development of Human Figure Drawing in Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riggs, Kevin J.; Jolley, Richard P.; Simpson, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    We investigated the role of inhibitory control in young children's human figure drawing. We used the Bear-Dragon task as a measure of inhibitory control and used the classification system devised by Cox and Parkin to measure the development of human figure drawing. We tested 50 children aged between 40 and 64 months. Regression analysis showed…

  17. Homologues of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor from a Parasitic Nematode

    E-print Network

    Zang, Xingxing

    Homologues of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor from a Parasitic Nematode GENE CLONING the parasitic nematode Brugia malayi. This parasite is a causative agent of lymphatic filari- asis, one of the human cytokine macrophage migra- tion inhibitory factor (MIF) have been isolated from the parasitic

  18. Multilingual Stroop Performance: Effects of Trilingualism and Proficiency on Inhibitory Control

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marian, Viorica; Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Mizrahi, Elena; Kania, Ursula; Cordes, Anne-Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Previous research suggests that multilinguals' languages are constantly co-activated and that experience managing this co-activation changes inhibitory control function. The present study examined language interaction and inhibitory control using a colour-word Stroop task. Multilingual participants were tested in their three most proficient…

  19. Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor signaling and its impact on reproduction in chickens

    E-print Network

    Ramachandran, Ramesh

    Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone receptor signaling and its impact on reproduction in chickens Available online 28 March 2009 Keywords: Gonadotropin-inhibitory hormone (GnIH) Gonadotropin the stimulatory control of hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing hormone I (GnRH-I) which in turn, stimulates

  20. An essential function for b-arrestin 2 in the inhibitory signaling of natural killer cells

    E-print Network

    Tian, Weidong

    An essential function for b-arrestin 2 in the inhibitory signaling of natural killer cells Ming The inhibitory signaling of natural killer (NK) cells is crucial in the regulation of innate immune responses cells is regulated. Natural killer (NK) cells are critical components of the innate immune system