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Sample records for minimum inhibitory concentrations

  1. Minimum inhibitory concentration testing of flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A simple, accurate and reliable microdilution method has been developed to test the susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare to antibiotics. The method has been used to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 23 F. columnare isolates. The developed method conducted at 28 °C for 4...

  2. Determining the minimum inhibitory concentration of Tetraclean against Candida albicans.

    PubMed

    Qyasian, A; Mohammadi, Z; Giardino, L; Palazzi, F; Shalavi, S; Sabbaghi, S; Khoshbin, E

    2014-01-01

    The purpose of the present study was to determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations of Tetraclean, chlorhexidine, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium hypochlorite against Candida albicans.Amphotericin B was used as positive control and RPMI plus 1 ml Candida suspension was used as negative control. Serial dilution method was used to determine MIC of the irrigants. Findings showed that all positive controls demonstrated complete inhibition of C. albicans at concentration of 0.78 microg mL(-1). On the other hand, all negative controls were positive for fungal growth which confirms the methodology of the study. Findings showed that the MIC of CHX was significantly lesser than other tested irrigants (p < 0.05). The MICs of other groups in an ascending order were as follows: Tetraclean, NaOCl, and H2O2. However, the difference betweenTetraclean and NaOCI was not significant (p > 0.05). It can be concluded that MIC of CHX was significantly lower than other irrigations solutions which confirms its strong antifungal activity. PMID:25185376

  3. Minimum inhibitory concentration distribution in environmental Legionella spp. isolates.

    PubMed

    Sandalakis, Vassilios; Chochlakis, Dimosthenis; Goniotakis, Ioannis; Tselentis, Yannis; Psaroulaki, Anna

    2014-12-01

    In Greece standard tests are performed in the watering and cooling systems of hotels' units either as part of the surveillance scheme or following human infection. The purpose of this study was to establish the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) distributions of environmental Legionella isolates for six antimicrobials commonly used for the treatment of Legionella infections, by MIC-test methodology. Water samples were collected from 2004 to 2011 from 124 hotels from the four prefectures of Crete (Greece). Sixty-eight (68) Legionella isolates, comprising L. pneumophila serogroups 1, 2, 3, 5, 6, 8, 12, 13, 15, L. anisa, L. rubrilucens, L. maceachernii, L. quinlivanii, L. oakridgensis, and L. taurinensis, were included in the study. MIC-tests were performed on buffered charcoal yeast extract with α-ketoglutarate, L-cysteine, and ferric pyrophosphate. The MICs were read after 2 days of incubation at 36 ± 1 °C at 2.5% CO2. A large distribution in MICs was recorded for each species and each antibiotic tested. Rifampicin proved to be the most potent antibiotic regardless of the Legionella spp.; tetracycline appeared to have the least activity on our environmental isolates. The MIC-test approach is an easy, although not so cost-effective, way to determine MICs in Legionella spp. These data should be kept in mind especially since these Legionella species may cause human disease. PMID:25473976

  4. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of selected antimicrobials against Escherichia coli and Trueperella pyogenes of bovine uterine origin.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Melvin; Heuer, Cord; Hussein, Hassan; McDougall, Scott

    2015-07-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of 9 antimicrobials for isolates of 2 common bovine intrauterine bacterial pathogens, Escherichia coli (n=209) and Trueperella pyogenes (n=35), were determined using broth microdilution methodology. The isolates were recovered from dairy cows from 7 herds postpartum using the cytobrush technique. The pathogens were initially identified using phenotypic techniques. Additionally, PCR was used to confirm the identity of T. pyogenes isolates and to categorize the E. coli isolates into phylogenetic groups A, B1, B2, and D. Minimum inhibitory concentrations in excess of published cut-points or bimodal distributions of MIC indicated potential antimicrobial resistance to ampicillin, cefuroxime, cephapirin, and oxytetracycline for E. coli, and to oxytetracycline for T. pyogenes. Of the antimicrobials tested, ticarcillin/clavulanic acid, ceftiofur, and enrofloxacin had the lowest MIC for these 2 pathogens. Differences in MIC of some antimicrobials were found between herds, age, breeds, and E. coli phylogenetic groups. Isolation of E. coli with an MIC ?8?g/mL of oxytetracycline at 23d postpartum was associated with a lower probability of pregnancy within 6wk of commencement of breeding compared with those isolates with an MIC <8?g/mL (relative risk=0.66). Minimum inhibitory concentrations for uterine pathogens were determined for isolates from New Zealand dairy cows. However, in the absence of either epidemiological or clinical interpretive criteria, the interpretation of these MIC remains unclear. Further studies are required to define interpretative criteria, including determination of pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic profiles for antimicrobials. PMID:25935246

  5. Determination of minimum inhibitory and minimum bactericidal concentrations of tiamulin against field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Pridmore, Andrew; Burch, David; Lees, Peter

    2011-08-01

    Tiamulin activity was measured against 19 UK field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae collected between 2003 and 2009 and the type strain ATCC 27090 as a control, with the intention of comparing broth with serum as growth media. Broth microdilution MIC/MBC tests were performed in accordance with the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) guideline M31-A3, in 'Veterinary Fastidious Medium' (VFM) (supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth at pH 7.3) and in 100% swine serum. For improved precision, a modified, overlapping doubling-dilution series was used (tiamulin concentration range 0.3-72 μg/ml). The MBC was reported as the lowest concentration producing a 99.9% reduction in bacterial density in the sub-cultured well contents, relative to the starting inoculum. The mean MBC/MIC ratio for tiamulin against A. pleuropneumoniae in VFM was low (1.74:1), even though tiamulin is classed as a bacteriostatic drug. Only three of the 19 isolates and the reference strain grew in 100% serum and their MICs were higher than those determined in VFM. It is postulated that this difference was due to differences in pH of the matrices or binding of tiamulin to serum proteins or a combination of both factors. PMID:21497460

  6. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of medicinal plants used in Northern Peru as antibacterial remedies

    PubMed Central

    Malca-Garca, G.; Glenn, A.; Sharon, D.; Chait, G.; Daz, D.; Pourmand, K.; Jonat, B.; Somogy, S.; Guardado, G.; Aguirre, C.; Chan, R.; Meyer, K.; Kuhlman, A.; Townesmith, A.; Effio-Carbajal, J.; Fras-Fernandez, F.; Benito, M.

    2010-01-01

    Aim The plant species reported here are traditionally used in Northern Peru to treat bacterial infections, often addressed by the local healers as inflammation. The aim of this study was to evaluate the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) of their antibacterial properties against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Materials and methods The antimicrobial activity of ethanolic and water extracts of 141 plant species was determined using a deep-well broth microdilution method on commercially available bacterial strains. Results The ethanolic extracts of 51 species inhibited Escherichia coli, and 114 ethanolic extracts inhibited Staphylococcus aureus. In contrast, only 30 aqueous extracts showed activity against E. coli and 38 extracts against S. aureus. The MIC concentrations were mostly very high and ranged from 0.008 to 256mg/ml, with only 36 species showing inhibitory concentrations of <4mg/ml. The ethanolic extracts exhibited stronger activity and a much broader spectrum of action than the aqueous extracts. Hypericum laricifolium, Hura crepitans, Caesalpinia paipai, Cassia fistula, Hyptis sidifolia, Salvia sp., Banisteriopsis caapi, Miconia salicifolia and Polygonum hydropiperoides showed the lowest MIC values and would be interesting candidates for future research. Conclusions The presence of antibacterial activity could be confirmed in most species used in traditional medicine in Peru which were assayed in this study. However, the MIC for the species employed showed a very large range, and were mostly very high. Nevertheless, traditional knowledge might provide some leads to elucidate potential candidates for future development of new antibiotic agents. PMID:20678568

  7. Comparison of automated and traditional minimum inhibitory concentration procedures for microbiological cosmetic preservatives.

    PubMed

    Lenczewski, M E; McGavin, S T; VanDyke, K

    1996-01-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) is used to test resistance of microorganisms against antibiotics and to test cosmetic preservatives. This research expanded traditional MIC with automation and application of colorimetric endpoint MIC. All experiments included common cosmetic preservatives and microorganisms used in testing preservative efficacy. An autodilutor using three 96-well microtiter plates processed 6 preservatives against 1 microorganism in 15 min. The unique tip design made it possible to accurately deliver viscous test materials that cannot be dispensed accurately with vacuum or fluid-filled systems. Tetrazolium violet, a redox indicator, provided a visual color change from clear to purple at the MIC. Optimum concentration of tetrazolium violet was 0.01% with addition of 0.2% glucose to Mueller-Hinton broth for both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria. The colorimetric endpoint was evident after 24 h from previously cryogenically stored organisms that were thawed before use and after 4 h for 18-24 h broth cultures subcultured from agar plates. The autodilutor accurately pipetted viscous cosmetic products such as hand lotion and shampoo, which cannot be pipetted with a traditional micropipetter. PMID:8946707

  8. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of selected antimicrobial agents for Moraxella bovoculi associated with infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis.

    PubMed

    Angelos, John A; Ball, Louise M; Byrne, Barbara A

    2011-05-01

    Infectious bovine keratoconjunctivitis (IBK) has been associated with ocular infections by Moraxella bovis, the established etiologic agent of IBK, and more recently, Moraxella bovoculi, a recently described species of Moraxella. To assist in designing rational treatment regimens for M. bovoculi infections associated with IBK, the in vitro susceptibilities of 57 M. bovoculi field isolates cultured from eyes of cattle with IBK in California from 2002 through 2007 were determined. The minimum inhibitory concentration required to inhibit the growth of 90% of organisms (MIC(90)) of the following 18 antibiotics tested in the present study were: danofloxacin and enrofloxacin: ≤0.12 µg/ml; ampicillin and ceftiofur: ≤0.25 µg/ml; penicillin: 0.25 µg/ml; gentamicin: ≤1 µg/ml; chlortetracycline, oxytetracycline, and tiamulin: 1 µg/ml; florfenicol: 0.5 µg/ml; trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole: ≤2/38 µg/ml; clindamycin: 2 µg/ml; neomycin and tilmicosin: ≤4 µg/ml; tulathromycin: 4 µg/ml; spectinomycin and tylosin: 16 µg/ml; and sulfadimethoxine: >256 µg/ml. The low MIC(90) of these M. bovoculi isolates suggests that commonly used antibiotics for treatment of IBK associated with M. bovis should also be effective against M. bovoculi. PMID:21908289

  9. Medium Effects on Minimum Inhibitory Concentrations of Nylon-3 Polymers against E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejun; Chakraborty, Saswata; Liu, Runhui; Gellman, Samuel H.; Weisshaar, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) against E. coli were measured for three nylon-3 polymers using Luria-Bertani broth (LB), brain-heart infusion broth (BHI), and a chemically defined complete medium (EZRDM). The polymers differ in the ratio of hydrophobic to cationic subunits. The cationic homopolymer is inert against E. coli in BHI and LB, but becomes highly potent in EZRDM. A mixed hydrophobic/cationic polymer with a hydrophobic t-butylbenzoyl group at its N-terminus is effective in BHI, but becomes more effective in EZRDM. Supplementation of EZRDM with the tryptic digest of casein (often found in LB) recapitulates the LB and BHI behavior. Additional evidence suggests that polyanionic peptides present in LB and BHI may form electrostatic complexes with cationic polymers, decreasing activity by diminishing binding to the anionic lipopolysaccharide layer of E. coli. In contrast, two natural antimicrobial peptides show no medium effects. Thus, the use of a chemically defined medium helps to reveal factors that influence antimicrobial potency of cationic polymers and functional differences between these polymers and evolved antimicrobial peptides. PMID:25153714

  10. Transferable genes putatively conferring elevated minimum inhibitory concentrations of narasin in Enterococcus faecium from Swedish broilers.

    PubMed

    Nilsson, Oskar; Myrens, Mattias; gren, Joakim

    2016-02-29

    The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the polyether ionophore antibiotic narasin is elevated in a large proportion of Enterococcus faecium from Swedish broilers. The aim of this study was to identify gene(s) responsible for these elevated MICs. Six plasmids, four conferring vancomycin resistance and elevated MIC of narasin and two only conferring resistance to vancomycin, were sequenced. The genes for a putative mechanism for elevated MIC of narasin was used to design a PCR assay which in turn was used to screen 100 isolates of E. faecium from Swedish broilers. A 5.9kb area was only found in the plasmids transferring elevated MIC of narasin. This area included two genes coding for an ABC-type transporter; an 'ABC transporter permease protein' and an 'ABC-type multidrug transport system, ATPase component'. These genes are known to confer resistance to the ionophore tetronasin. PCR investigation confirmed a correlation between the presence of the genes and a MIC of narasin ?2mg/L. The results of this study indicate that the ABC permease together with the ABC ATPase are responsible for the elevated MIC of narasin present among E. faecium in Swedish broilers. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a putative transferable mechanism for elevated MIC of narasin. PMID:26854348

  11. Species characterization and minimum inhibitory concentration patterns of Brachyspira species isolates from swine with clinical disease.

    PubMed

    Clothier, Kristin A; Kinyon, Joann M; Frana, Timothy S; Naberhaus, Nadine; Bower, Leslie; Strait, Erin L; Schwartz, Kent

    2011-11-01

    Typhlocolitis and dysentery due to Brachyspira hyodysenteriae infection represent an economically important disease syndrome in growing pigs. Largely disappearing from U.S. swine herds in the late 1990 s and early 2000s, Brachyspira-associated disease and bacterial isolation from swine with clinical disease has increased in the last several years, and non-B. hyodysenteriae isolates are commonly identified. Antimicrobial resistance has been demonstrated in Brachyspira spp. isolates from Europe and Asia, and may be the reason for the resurgence in U.S. herds. Seventy-nine clinical isolates identified at the Iowa State University Veterinary Diagnostic Lab were tested with multiple polymerase chain reaction assays to establish species identity, and evaluated for minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) using an agar dilution method against lincomycin, gentamicin, valnemulin, tiamulin, salinomycin, and carbadox. Only 38.0% of isolates could be confirmed as the known pathogens B. hyodysenteriae (30.4%) or Brachyspira pilosicoli (7.6%). Twenty of the 79 isolates (25.3%) were identified as Brachyspira murdochii, and 13.9% could not be identified to species. The MIC values were consistently high against lincomycin and moderately high against gentamicin. The remaining antimicrobials had MICs that were at the low end of the test ranges. Brachyspira murdochii and Brachyspira spp. had significantly greater MIC values against several of these drugs than other Brachyspira spp. examined. The increased incidence of these less definitively characterized Brachyspira species with increased MIC values to commonly prescribed antimicrobials may, at least in part, explain the increased prevalence and severity of this disease complex in recent years. Further research is necessary to understand these changes. PMID:22362794

  12. Epidemiology and Prognosis of Coagulase-Negative Staphylococcal Endocarditis: Impact of Vancomycin Minimum Inhibitory Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Castañeda, Ximena; Armero, Yolanda; Soy, Dolors; Almela, Manel; Ninot, Salvador; Falces, Carlos; Mestres, Carlos A.; Gatell, Jose M.; Moreno, Asuncion; Marco, Francesc; Miró, José M.

    2015-01-01

    This study describes coagulase-negative staphylococcal (CoNS) infective endocarditis (IE) epidemiology at our institution, the antibiotic susceptibility profile, and the influence of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) on patient outcomes. One hundred and three adults with definite IE admitted to an 850-bed tertiary care hospital in Barcelona from 1995-2008 were prospectively included in the cohort. We observed that CoNS IE was an important cause of community-acquired and healthcare-associated IE; one-third of patients involved native valves. Staphylococcus epidermidis was the most frequent species, methicillin-resistant in 52% of patients. CoNS frozen isolates were available in 88 patients. Vancomycin MICs of 2.0 μg/mL were common; almost all cases were found among S. epidermidis isolates and did not increase over time. Eighty-five patients were treated either with cloxacillin or vancomycin: 38 patients (Group 1) were treated with cloxacillin, and 47 received vancomycin; of these 47, 27 had CoNS isolates with a vancomycin MIC <2.0 μg/mL (Group 2), 20 had isolates with a vancomycin MIC ≥2.0 μg/mL (Group 3). One-year mortality was 21%, 48%, and 65% in Groups 1, 2, and 3, respectively (P=0.003). After adjusting for confounders and taking Group 2 as a reference, methicillin-susceptibility was associated with lower 1-year mortality (OR 0.12, 95% CI 0.02-0.55), and vancomycin MIC ≥2.0 μg/mL showed a trend to higher 1-year mortality (OR 3.7, 95% CI 0.9-15.2; P=0.069). Other independent variables associated with 1-year mortality were heart failure (OR 6.2, 95% CI 1.5-25.2) and pacemaker lead IE (OR 0.1, 95%CI 0.02-0.51). In conclusion, methicillin-resistant S.epidermidis was the leading cause of CoNS IE, and patients receiving vancomycin had higher mortality rates than those receiving cloxacillin; mortality was higher among patients having isolates with vancomycin MICs ≥2.0 μg/mL. PMID:25961578

  13. Minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations of 44 antimicrobial agents against three standard control strains in broth with and without human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Reimer, L G; Stratton, C W; Reller, L B

    1981-01-01

    Standard minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations are not established for most antimicrobial agents against strains of bacteria commonly used for quality control in susceptibility testing. The effects of cation and human serum supplementation of broth on the values are also unknown. Therefore, we performed 10 minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentration determinations for 44 antimicrobial agents against the standard control strains Escherichia coli ATCC 25922, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853 in Mueller-Hinton broth and in Mueller-Hinton broth supplemented with calcium, magnesium, and 50% pooled human serum. Agreement of replicates was within one twofold dilution 97% of the time. Supplemented Mueller-Hinton broth gave higher minimum inhibitory concentrations for 24 antibiotics against S. aureus, for 17 drugs against E. coli, and for 12 drugs against P. aeruginosa, whereas it gave lower minimum inhibitory concentrations for 1 antibiotic against S. aureus, for 5 against E. coli, and for 5 against P. aeruginosa. Results for minimum bactericidal concentrations were similar. Added serum did not further affect the increased resistance of P. Aeruginosa to aminoglycosides encountered with cation supplementation of broth. These results provide expected values for the quality control strains when minimum inhibitory and bactericidal concentrations are determined in these two Mueller-Hinton media. PMID:6791584

  14. More accurate measurement of vancomycin minimum inhibitory concentration indicates poor outcomes in meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bacteraemia.

    PubMed

    Shoji, Hisashi; Maeda, Masayuki; Shirakura, Tetsuro; Takuma, Takahiro; Ugajin, Kazuhisa; Fukuchi, Kunihiko; Ishino, Keiko; Niki, Yoshihito

    2015-11-01

    Meticillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an important pathogen associated with community-acquired and nosocomial infections. The aim of this study was to validate the vancomycin (VAN) minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and administration of VAN that may affect the prognosis of patients with MRSA bacteraemia. In total, 140 clinical MRSA strains from blood cultures were collected from January 2009 to December 2013 at a university hospital in Tokyo (Japan). Patient background, their clinical situation and the susceptibility of isolates to anti-MRSA agents in all cases were reviewed, and factors contributing to 30-day mortality were analysed. Susceptibility to anti-MRSA agents was measured by a microdilution susceptibility testing method. The VAN MIC was further evaluated at 0.25 ?g/mL intervals from 0.5 ?g/mL to 2.0 ?g/mL. Multiple logistic regression analysis revealed a 4-fold increase in mortality of patients with a VAN MIC ?1.5 ?g/mL [odds ratio (OR)=3.952, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.471-10.614; P=0.006]. A one-score increase in the Charlson co-morbidity index resulted in a 1.2-fold increase in the risk of death (OR=1.199, 95% CI 1.054-1.364; P=0.006). However, no significant difference was found in the ratio of the VAN 24-h area under the concentration-time curve to MIC between VAN MIC ?1.5 ?g/mL and <1.5 ?g/mL. A significant increase in the MICs of teicoplanin and daptomycin was observed in strains with high VAN MICs. For patients with high VAN MICs, administration of these anti-MRSA antibiotics may have a poor outcome owing to cross-resistance. PMID:26364848

  15. The effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration of ciprofloxacin concentrations on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect

    Mortensen, Ninell P; Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Trevino-Dopatka, Sonia; Maggart, Michael J; Boisen, Nadia; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Nataro, James; Allison, David P

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  16. A long journey from minimum inhibitory concentration testing to clinically predictive breakpoints: deterministic and probabilistic approaches in deriving breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Dalhoff, A; Ambrose, P G; Mouton, J W

    2009-08-01

    Since the origin of an "'International Collaborative Study on Antibiotic Sensitivity Testing'" in 1971, considerable advancement has been made to standardize clinical susceptibility testing procedures of antimicrobial agents. However, a consensus on the methods to be used and interpretive criteria was not reached, so the results of susceptibility testing were discrepant. Recently, the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing achieved a harmonization of existing methods for susceptibility testing and now co-ordinates the process for setting breakpoints. Previously, breakpoints were set by adjusting the mean pharmacokinetic parameters derived from healthy volunteers to the susceptibilities of a population of potential pathogens expressed as the mean minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) or MIC90%. Breakpoints derived by the deterministic approach tend to be too high, since this procedure does not take the variabilities of drug exposure and the susceptibility patterns into account. Therefore, first-step mutants or borderline susceptible bacteria may be considered as fully susceptible. As the drug exposure of such sub-populations is inadequate, resistance development will increase and eradication rates will decrease, resulting in clinical failure. The science of pharmacokinetics/pharmacodynamics integrates all possible drug exposures for standard dosage regimens and all MIC values likely to be found for the clinical isolates into the breakpoint definitions. Ideally, the data sets used originate from patients suffering from the disease to be treated. Probability density functions for both the pharmacokinetic and microbiological variables are determined, and a large number of MIC/drug exposure scenarios are calculated. Therefore, this method is defined as the probabilistic approach. The breakpoints thus derived are lower than the ones defined deterministically, as the entire range of probable drug exposures from low to high is modeled. Therefore, the amplification of drug-resistant sub-populations will be reduced. It has been a long journey since the first attempts in 1971 to define breakpoints. Clearly, this implies that none of the various approaches is right or wrong, and that the different approaches reflect different philosophies and mirror the tremendous progress made in the understanding of the pharmacodynamic properties of different classes of antimicrobials. PMID:19629383

  17. Effect of beta-lactamase inhibitors on minimum inhibitory concentration of ampicillin and amoxicillin for Staphylococcus aureus strains.

    PubMed

    Paniagua, G L; Monroy, E; Garca, O; Vaca, S

    1998-01-01

    Seventy strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from the nasopharynx (80%), urinary tract (16%), skin (1 strain) and eyes (2 strains) of patients at the clinical laboratory "El eritrocito" were analyzed. Susceptibility to 12 antibiotics was tested by the method of Kirby-Bauer. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ampicillin, ampicillin + sulbactam, amoxicillin and amoxicillin + clavulanic acid were determined by plate dilution. Percentages of resistance were: Penicillin and ampicillin (100%), ceftazidime (81.4%), erythromycin (68.6%), tetracycline (31.4%) trimethoprim-sulphametoxasol (25.7%), dicloxacillin and pefloxacin (12.8%), cefuroxime and cefotaxime (4.3%), gentamicin (2.8%), cephalothin (0%). All strains were resistant to three or more antibiotics, with higher percentages of resistance to four (31.4%), three (27.1%), five (21.4%) and six (12.9%) drugs. One strain was resistant to nine antibiotics and 5.9% were resistant to seven. 97.5% of the strains were beta-lactamase-positive. The MIC50 of ampicillin and amoxicillin was 500 micrograms/ml and the MIC90 were 1727 micrograms/ml and 2000 micrograms/ml, respectively. beta-lactamase inhibitors sulbactam and clavulanic acid reduced these values eightfold, except for the MIC50 of ampicillin + sulbactam whose reduction was sixteen fold. These results show that the combination of beta-lactamic + beta-lactamase inhibitor was more efficient than cephalosporins for killing these beta-lactamase-positive strains. PMID:10932741

  18. Minimum inhibitory (MIC) and minimum microbicidal concentration (MMC) of polihexanide and triclosan against antibiotic sensitive and resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli strains

    PubMed Central

    Assadian, Ojan; Wehse, Katrin; Hbner, Nils-Olaf; Koburger, Torsten; Bagel, Simone; Jethon, Frank; Kramer, Axel

    2011-01-01

    Background: An in-vitro study was conducted investigating the antimicrobial efficacy of polihexanide and triclosan against clinical isolates and reference laboratory strains of Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli. Methods: The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) and the minimal microbicidal concentration (MMC) were determined following DIN 58940-81 using a micro-dilution assay and a quantitative suspension test following EN 1040. Polihexanide was tested in polyethylene glycol 4000, triclosan in aqueous solutions. Results: Against all tested strains the MIC of polihexanide ranged between 12 g/mL. For triclosan the MICs varied depending on strains ranging between 0.5 g/mL for the reference strains and 64 g/mL for two clinical isolates. A logRF >5 without and logRF >3 with 0.2% albumin burden was achieved at 0.6 g/mL triclosan. One exception was S. aureus strain H-5-24, where a triclosan concentration of 0.6 g/mL required 1 minute without and 10 minutes with albumin burden to achieve the same logRFs. Polihexanide achieved a logRF >5 without and logRF >3 with albumin burden at a concentration of 0.6 g/mL within 30 sec. The exception was the North-German epidemic MRSA strain, were an application time of 5 minutes was required. Conclusion: The clinical isolates of E. coli generally showed higher MICs against triclosan, both in the micro-dilution assay as well in the quantitative suspension test than comparable reference laboratory strains. For polihexanide and triclosan strain dependant susceptibility was shown. However, both antimicrobial compounds are effective when used in concentrations common in practice. PMID:22242087

  19. Effects of sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin on enteroaggregative Escherichia coli and the role of the surface protein dispersin

    SciTech Connect

    Fowlkes, Jason Davidson; Doktycz, Mitchel John; Allison, David Post

    2011-01-01

    Enteroaggregative Escherichia coli (EAEC) are bacterial pathogens that cause watery diarrhoea, which is often persistent and can be inflammatory. The antibiotic ciprofloxacin is used to treat EAEC infections, but a full understanding of the antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin is needed for more efficient treatment of bacterial infections. In this study, it was found that sub-minimum inhibitory concentrations (sub-MICs) of ciprofloxacin had an inhibitory effect on EAEC adhesion to glass and mammalian HEp-2 cells. It was also observed that bacterial surface properties play an important role in bacterial sensitivity to ciprofloxacin. In an EAEC mutant strain where the hydrophobic positively charged surface protein dispersin was absent, sensitivity to ciprofloxacin was reduced compared with the wild-type strain. Identified here are several antimicrobial effects of ciprofloxacin at sub-MIC concentrations indicating that bacterial surface hydrophobicity affects the response to ciprofloxacin. Investigating the effects of sub-MIC doses of antibiotics on targeted bacteria could help to further our understanding of bacterial pathogenicity and elucidate future antibiotic treatment modalities.

  20. Effect of higher minimum inhibitory concentrations of quaternary ammonium compounds in clinical E. coli isolates on antibiotic susceptibilities and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Buffet-Bataillon, S; Branger, B; Cormier, M; Bonnaure-Mallet, M; Jolivet-Gougeon, A

    2011-10-01

    Quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) are cationic surfactants used as preservatives and environmental disinfectants. Limited data are available regarding the effect of QACs in the clinical setting. We performed a prospective cohort study in 153 patients with Escherichia coli bacteraemia from February to September 2008 at University Hospital in Rennes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of antibiotics and QACs alkyldimethylbenzylammonium chloride (ADBAC) and didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) were determined by the agar dilution method. The capacity of biofilm production was assayed using the Crystal Violet method, and mutation frequencies by measuring the capacity of strains to generate resistance to rifampicin. Logistic regression analysis showed that one of the significant factors related to low MICs for ADBAC (?16 mg/L) and DDAC (?8 mg/L), was cotrimoxazole susceptibility (odds ratio: 3.72; 95% confidence interval: 1.22-11.24; P=0.02 and OR: 3.61; 95% CI: 1.56-7.56; P<0.01, respectively). Antibiotic susceptibility to cotrimoxazole was strongly associated with susceptibility to amoxicillin and nalidixic acid (P<0.01). Community-acquired or healthcare-associated bacteraemia, severity of bacteraemia, and patient outcome were independent of the MICs of ADBAC and DDAC. Our findings demonstrate an epidemiological relationship between higher MIC values of QACs in clinical E. coli isolates and antibiotic resistance. PMID:21807440

  1. Prognosis of patients with methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus bloodstream infection treated with teicoplanin: a retrospective cohort study investigating effect of teicoplanin minimum inhibitory concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The present study was designed to investigate whether teicoplanin minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) isolates play a role in the prognosis of patient with teicoplanin-treated MRSA bloodstream infection (BSI). Methods Between 1 January 2006 and 31 December 2009, adult patients with teicoplanin-treated MRSA BSI in two Taiwan medical centers were retrospectively enrolled. Their blood MRSA isolates were submitted for determination of MICs to various antibiotics and multi-locus sequence types. All-cause mortalities on Days 14 and 30, as well as clinical response at the end of teicoplanin therapy were treated as endpoints. Results Two hundred seventy adult patients were enrolled and 210 blood MRSA isolates were available. Independent risk factors for un-favorable outcome at the end of teicoplanin therapy included septic shock (p?

  2. Effects of intracanal irrigant MTAD Combined with nisin at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration levels on Enterococcus faecalis growth and the expression of pathogenic genes.

    PubMed

    Tong, Zhongchun; Huang, Lijia; Ling, Junqi; Mao, Xueli; Ning, Yang; Deng, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to antibiotics is considered to be the major driver in the selection of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and may induce diverse biological responses in bacteria. MTAD is a common intracanal irrigant, but its bactericidal activity remains to be improved. Previous studies have indicated that the antimicrobial peptide nisin can significantly improve the bactericidal activity of MTAD against Enterococcus faecalis. However, the effects of MTAD and its modification at sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) levels on Enterococcus faecalis growth and the expression of pathogenic genes still need to be explored. In this study, the results of post-antibiotic effects (PAE) and post-antibiotic sub-MIC effects (PASME) showed that MTADN (nisin in combination with MTAD) had the best post-antibiotic effect. E. faecalis after challenge with MTAD was less sensitive to alkaline solutions compared with MTAN (nisin in place of doxycycline in MTAD) and MTADN. E. faecalis induced with sub-MIC of MTAD generated resistance to the higher concentration, but induction of E. faecalis with MTAN did not cause resistance to higher concentrations. Furthermore, real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that the stress caused by sub-MIC exposure to MTAD, MTAN, or MTADN resulted in up- or down-regulation of nine stress genes and four virulence-associated genes in E. faecalis and resulted in different stress states. These findings suggested that nisin improved the post-antibacterial effect of MTAD at sub-MIC levels and has considerable potential for use as a modification of MTAD. PMID:24603760

  3. A novel colorimetric broth microdilution method to determine the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antibiotics and essential oils against Helicobacter pylori.

    PubMed

    Weseler, A; Geiss, H K; Saller, R; Reichling, J

    2005-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori infections have been associated with the pathogenesis of a number of stomach and gastroduodenal diseases. In order to find alternative drugs for their treatment the search is increasingly focused on new antimicrobial products. However, no standardized methods are available to test the anti-Helicobacter pylori activity in particular of natural substances. Therefore we developed a broth microdilution assay to investigate the susceptibility of this fastidious slow growing bacterium against 15 essential oils widely used to treat disorders of the gastrointestinal tract. The MIC values were determined colorimetrically using p-iodonitrophenyltetrazolium violet (INT) as an indicator for bacterial cell viability. The test sytem was evaluated with three common antibiotics: amoxicillin, ampicillin and levofloxacin. The antibiotic MICs were controlled by Etest. The Helicobacter reference strain was remarkably susceptible to both the antibiotics (amoxicillin MIC: 0.02 microg/ml, ampicillin MIC: 0.064 microg/ml, levofloxacin MIC: 0.39 microg/ml) and the essential oils. Most of their MICs ranged from 0.015 to 0.064% (v/v) and about 140.0 to 280.0 microg/ml, respectively. Interestingly, chamomile oil, orange flower oil and ginger oil inhibited the bacterial growth in extraordinarily low concentrations of 0.0075% (v/v) and about 65 microg/ml, respectively. The bactericidal concentrations were generally one to two dilution steps higher. In conclusion, we could develop an innovative assay for the MIC determination of essential oils and antibiotics against Helicobacter pylori, which is simple to handle, accurate, reproducible and not as time- and material-consuming as traditional agar dilution techniques. PMID:16076074

  4. Efflux Pump Inhibitor Phenylalanine-Arginine Β-Naphthylamide Effect on the Minimum Inhibitory Concentration of Imipenem in Acinetobacter baumannii Strains Isolated From Hospitalized Patients in Shahid Motahari Burn Hospital, Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Gholami, Mehrdad; Hashemi, Ali; Hakemi-Vala, Mojdeh; Goudarzi, Hossein; Hallajzadeh, Masoumeh

    2015-01-01

    Background: Acinetobacter baumannii has emerged as a highly troublesome pathogen and a leading cause of mortality and morbidity among hospitalized burn patients. Objectives: The aims of this study were to determine the frequency of the AdeABC genes and the role of the efflux pump (s) in the imipenem resistance of A. baumannii strains isolated from burn patients. Materials and Methods: This study was conducted on 60 A. baumannii isolates collected from 240 wound samples of burn patients admitted to the Burn Unit of Shahid Motahari Burn hospital, Tehran, Iran. Antibiotic susceptibility tests were performed using the Kirby-Bauer disc diffusion and broth microdilution according to the clinical and laboratory standards institute (CLSI) guidelines. The activity of the efflux pump was evaluated using the efflux pump inhibitor, the phenylalanine-arginine Β-naphthylamide (PAΒN). The AdeABC genes were detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing. Results: In this study, 100% of the isolates were resistant to cefotaxime, ceftazidime, ceftriaxone, ciprofloxacin, cefepime, piperacillin, meropenem, co-trimoxazole, and piperacillin/tazobactam; 56 (94%) to gentamicin; 50 (81%) to amikacin; 58 (97%) to imipenem; and 45 (76%) to tetracycline. Additionally,all the isolates were susceptible to colistin. The susceptibility of the strains to imipenem was highly increased in the presence of the efflux pump inhibitor such that for 58 (96.6%) of the isolates, the PAΒN reduced the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) by 4- to 64-fold. The adeA and adeB genes were detected in 60 (100%) of the isolates, and the adeC gene was present in 51 (85%). Conclusions: The efflux pump may play a role in antibiotic resistance in A. baumannii isolates. The ability of A. baumannii isolates to acquire drug resistance by the efflux pump mechanism is a concern. Thus, new strategies are required in order to eliminate the efflux transport activity from resistant A. baumannii isolates causing nosocomial infections. PMID:26568800

  5. Flammability limits of dusts: Minimum inerting concentrations

    SciTech Connect

    Dastidar, A.G.; Amyotte, P.R.; Going, J.; Chatrathi, K.

    1999-05-01

    A new flammability limit parameter has been defined as the Minimum Inerting Concentration (MIC). This is the concentration of inertant required to prevent a dust explosion regardless of fuel concentration. Previous experimental work at Fike in a 1-m{sup 3} spherical chamber has shown this flammability limit to exist for pulverized coal dust and cornstarch. In the current work, inerting experiments with aluminum, anthraquinone and polyethylene dusts as fuels were performed, using monoammonium phosphate and sodium bicarbonate as inertants. The results show that an MIC exists only for anthraquinone inerted with sodium bicarbonate. The other combustible dust and inertant mixtures did not show a definitive MIC, although they did show a strong dependence between inerting level and suspended fuel concentration. As the fuel concentration increased, the amount of inertant required to prevent an explosion decreased. Even though a definitive MIC was not found for most of the dusts an effective MIC can be estimated from the data. The use of MIC data can aid in the design of explosion suppression schemes.

  6. Minimum eliciting patch test concentration of thimerosal.

    PubMed

    Lisi, P; Perno, P; Ottaviani, M; Morelli, P

    1991-01-01

    Positive patch test reactions to thimerosal 0.1% pet. (40/690 subjects: 5.8%) were more common in younger age groups, in the allergic contact dermatitis group and in subjects who had used contact lens solutions. In the 40 thimerosal-positive patients, the minimum eliciting quantity of preservative was evaluated using different test concentrations: 0.05% and 0.01% pet. (patch testing) and 1:10,000 in saline (intradermal testing). Cross-reactions between thimerosal and other mercury compounds and sensitivity to thiosalicylic acid were also examined. The results of the investigation demonstrate that many of the reactions to 0.1% thimerosal are probably irritant, because only half the subjects studied had positive patch tests when allergen concentrations 5 to 10x lower than that conventionally used for patch testing, were utilized. In these subjects, the average strength of patch test reactions was higher, intradermal testing was more often positive and cross-reactions between mercurials more frequent. These data indicate that the optimal eliciting patch test concentration for studying thimerosal sensitivity is 0.05% pet. PMID:2044366

  7. Recovery of alicyclobacillus from inhibitory fruit juice concentrates.

    PubMed

    McNamara, Christopher J; Wiebe, Deborah; Gomez, Margarita

    2011-08-01

    Growth of Alicyclobacillus in low-pH fruit juices may result in off-odors and off-flavors due to the production of compounds such as guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol). An important step in preventing Alicyclobacillus contamination of fruit juices is the screening of incoming ingredients. Many fruit juice concentrates contain compounds that inhibit Alicyclobacillus growth, but beverages produced from the concentrates may not contain sufficient amounts of the active component to prevent spoilage. Therefore, accurate screening of juice concentrates is essential to prevent false-negative test results and product spoilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate isolation methods for detection of Alicyclobacillus in inhibitory juice concentrates. Recovery of Alicyclobacillus spores from inoculated and naturally contaminated concentrates was compared by using pour plate, spread plate, and filtration methods. Pour plates consistently recovered the lowest number of spores from inoculated concentrates. Spread plating was the most effective method used to recover spores from inoculated apple and pomegranate juice concentrates, while filtration resulted in the highest recovery from cranberry concentrate. When tested on naturally contaminated concentrates, the pour plate method failed to detect Alicyclobacillus in many samples. Filtration was much more effective. The filtration method increased the likelihood of detecting Alicyclobacillus contamination of fruit juice concentrates containing inhibitory compounds. PMID:21819669

  8. Recovery of alicyclobacillus from inhibitory fruit juice concentrates.

    TOXLINE Toxicology Bibliographic Information

    McNamara CJ; Wiebe D; Gomez M

    2011-08-01

    Growth of Alicyclobacillus in low-pH fruit juices may result in off-odors and off-flavors due to the production of compounds such as guaiacol (2-methoxy phenol). An important step in preventing Alicyclobacillus contamination of fruit juices is the screening of incoming ingredients. Many fruit juice concentrates contain compounds that inhibit Alicyclobacillus growth, but beverages produced from the concentrates may not contain sufficient amounts of the active component to prevent spoilage. Therefore, accurate screening of juice concentrates is essential to prevent false-negative test results and product spoilage. The objective of this study was to evaluate isolation methods for detection of Alicyclobacillus in inhibitory juice concentrates. Recovery of Alicyclobacillus spores from inoculated and naturally contaminated concentrates was compared by using pour plate, spread plate, and filtration methods. Pour plates consistently recovered the lowest number of spores from inoculated concentrates. Spread plating was the most effective method used to recover spores from inoculated apple and pomegranate juice concentrates, while filtration resulted in the highest recovery from cranberry concentrate. When tested on naturally contaminated concentrates, the pour plate method failed to detect Alicyclobacillus in many samples. Filtration was much more effective. The filtration method increased the likelihood of detecting Alicyclobacillus contamination of fruit juice concentrates containing inhibitory compounds.

  9. Antiretroviral drugs saquinavir and ritonavir reduce inhibitory concentration values of itraconazole against Histoplasma capsulatum strains in vitro.

    PubMed

    Brilhante, Raimunda Sâmia Nogueira; Caetano, Érica Pacheco; Riello, Giovanna Barbosa; Guedes, Glaucia Morgana de Melo; Castelo-Branco, Débora de Souza Collares Maia; Fechine, Maria Auxiliadora Bezerra; Oliveira, Jonathas Sales de; Camargo, Zoilo Pires de; Mesquita, Jacó Ricarte Lima de; Monteiro, André Jalles; Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Rocha, Marcos Fábio Gadelha; Sidrim, José Júlio Costa

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that some drugs that are not routinely used to treat fungal infections have antifungal activity, such as protease inhibitor antiretroviral drugs. This study investigated the in vitro susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum var. capsulatum to saquinavir and ritonavir, and its combination with the antifungal itraconazole. The susceptibility assay was performed according to Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute guidelines. All strains were inhibited by the protease inhibitor antiretroviral drugs. Saquinavir showed minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.125 to 1μgmL(-1) for both phases, and ritonavir presented minimum inhibitory concentrations ranging from 0.0312 to 4μgmL(-1)and from 0.0625 to 1μgmL(-1) for filamentous and yeast phase, respectively. Concerning the antifungal itraconazole, the minimum inhibitory concentration values ranged from 0.0019 to 0.125μgmL(-1) and from 0.0039 to 0.0312μgmL(-1) for the filamentous and yeast phase, respectively. The combination of saquinavir or ritonavir with itraconazole was synergistic against H. capsulatum, with a significant reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentrations of both drugs against the strains (p<0.05). These data show an important in vitro synergy between protease inhibitors and itraconazole against the fungus H. capsulatum. PMID:26748233

  10. Spacecraft Minimum Allowable Concentrations: Determination, Application, and Contingency Situations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshburn, Thomas H.; Dawson, David L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    This document is an outline of a presentation about the determination of minimum allowable concentrations in spacecraft. The presentation reviews the type of toxins and mechanisms to determine the acceptable concentrations of these toxic substances. The considerations for the unique situation that spaceflight entails including zero gravity, and the intense scrutiny are reviewed. The current measurement hardware is reviewed. The spacecraft atmospheres on the Shuttle, airflow, the Space Station and the EMU in respect to airflow, pressure, constituents are also summarized. Contingency situations and potential hazards are also discussed.

  11. Minimal inhibitory concentration drift of glycopeptides and linezolid against S. Aureus at a Chinese children's center, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Jing, Chun-Mei; Xie, Wei; Chen, Yuan; Wang, Cai

    2015-01-01

    We analyzed the drift in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of glycopeptides and linezolid against 793 methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and 4696 methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) isolates from Chinese children. For vancomycin and teicoplanin, no significant change occurred in different years for MIC values ? 2 ?g/mL, either in MRSA or MSSA. For linezolid, there was an MIC drift in MRSA and in MSSA. PMID:25741804

  12. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G induce biofilm formation by field isolates of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Hathroubi, S; Fontaine-Gosselin, S-È; Tremblay, Y D N; Labrie, J; Jacques, M

    2015-09-30

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is a Gram-negative bacterium and causative agent of porcine pleuropneumonia. This is a highly contagious disease that causes important economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. Penicillins are extensively used in swine production and these antibiotics are associated with high systemic clearance and low oral bioavailability. This may expose A. pleuropneumoniae to sub-inhibitory concentrations of penicillin G when the antibiotic is administered orally. Our goal was to evaluate the effect of sub-minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of penicillin G on the biofilm formation of A. pleuropneumoniae. Biofilm production of 13 field isolates from serotypes 1, 5a, 7 and 15 was tested in the presence of sub-MIC of penicillin G using a polystyrene microtiter plate assay. Using microscopy techniques and enzymatic digestion, biofilm architecture and composition were also characterized after exposure to sub-MIC of penicillin G. Sub-MIC of penicillin G significantly induced biofilm formation of nine isolates. The penicillin G-induced biofilms contained more poly-N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (PGA), extracellular DNA and proteins when compared to control biofilms grown without penicillin G. Additionally, penicillin G-induced biofilms were sensitive to DNase which was not observed with the untreated controls. Furthermore, sub-MIC of penicillin G up-regulated the expression of pgaA, which encodes a protein involved in PGA synthesis, and the genes encoding the envelope-stress sensing two-component regulatory system CpxRA. In conclusion, sub-MICs of penicillin G significantly induce biofilm formation and this is likely the result of a cell envelope stress sensed by the CpxRA system resulting in an increased production of PGA and other matrix components. PMID:26130517

  13. Production Responses of Channel Catfish to Minimum Daily Dissolved Oxygen Concentrations in Earthen Ponds

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of the minimum daily dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration on production parameters of channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus in earthen ponds. Fifteen one-acre ponds (5 ponds per treatment) were managed as High Oxygen (minimum DO concentrations aver...

  14. Effect of (Minimum) D.O. Concentration on Channel Catfish

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Farmers have long known that increased aeration allows them feed more and grow more fish. However, since we still do not know how specific D.O. concentrations affect various production parameters, every farm has its own oxygen management plan, most based largely on keeping the fish alive over night....

  15. Sub-Inhibitory Concentration of Piperacillin-Tazobactam May be Related to Virulence Properties of Filamentous Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    de Andrade, Joo Paulo Lopes; de Macdo Farias, Luiz; Ferreira, Joo Fernando Gonalves; Bruna-Romero, Oscar; da Glria de Souza, Daniele; de Carvalho, Maria Auxiliadora Roque; Dos Santos, Knia Valria

    2016-01-01

    Sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics are always generated as a consequence of antimicrobial therapy and the effects of such residual products in bacterial morphology are well documented, especially the filamentation generated by beta-lactams. The aim of this study was to investigate some morphological and pathological aspects (virulence factors) of Escherichia coli cultivated under half-minimum inhibitory concentration (1.0g/mL) of piperacillin-tazobactam (PTZ sub-MIC). PTZ sub-MIC promoted noticeable changes in the bacterial cells which reach the peak of morphological alterations (filamentation) and complexity at 16h of antimicrobial exposure. Thereafter the filamentous cells and a control one, not treated with PTZ, were comparatively tested for growth curve; biochemical profile; oxidative stress tolerance; biofilm production and cell hydrophobicity; motility and pathogenicity in vivo. PTZ sub-MIC attenuated the E. coli growth rate, but without changes in carbohydrate fermentation or in traditional biochemical tests. Overall, the treatment of E. coli with sub-MIC of PTZ generated filamentous forms which were accompanied by the inhibition of virulence factors such as the oxidative stress response, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, and motility. These results are consistent with the reduced pathogenicity observed for the filamentous E. coli in the murine model of intra-abdominal infection. In other words, the treatment of E. coli with sub-MIC of PTZ suggests a decrease in their virulence. PMID:26364189

  16. Agar and broth dilution methods to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of antimicrobial substances.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Irith; Hilpert, Kai; Hancock, Robert E W

    2008-01-01

    The aim of broth and agar dilution methods is to determine the lowest concentration of the assayed antimicrobial agent (minimal inhibitory concentration, MIC) that, under defined test conditions, inhibits the visible growth of the bacterium being investigated. MIC values are used to determine susceptibilities of bacteria to drugs and also to evaluate the activity of new antimicrobial agents. Agar dilution involves the incorporation of different concentrations of the antimicrobial substance into a nutrient agar medium followed by the application of a standardized number of cells to the surface of the agar plate. For broth dilution, often determined in 96-well microtiter plate format, bacteria are inoculated into a liquid growth medium in the presence of different concentrations of an antimicrobial agent. Growth is assessed after incubation for a defined period of time (16-20 h) and the MIC value is read. This protocol applies only to aerobic bacteria and can be completed in 3 d. PMID:18274517

  17. Determination of MICING: a new assay for assessing minimal inhibitory concentration for invasive growth.

    PubMed

    Zupan, J; Tomi?i?, Z; Raspor, P

    2015-05-01

    Our work was focused on a new assay for characterising clinically important yeast. This assay was developed due to the need for new diagnostic methods for recognising potentially virulent strains of increasingly important non-albicans yeast pathogens, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Candida glabrata. With the great diversity among strains for virulence and virulence factors, identification to the species level is not sufficient; therefore, testing for specific virulent traits remains the best option. We show here that the proposed assay uncovers the relationships between the three most important yeast virulence traits in a single test: the ability of a strain to invade solid medium, while resisting the presence of an antimycotic and high temperature (37C). We combined the quantitative agar invasion assay with classical antimycotic susceptibility testing into a single assay. Similarly to the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) value, we defined the MICING (minimal inhibitory concentration of antimycotic for invasive growth) as the concentration of an antimycotic above which the yeast invasive growth is significantly repressed. In this study, we tested three of the most common antimycotics: fluconazole, itraconazole and amphotericin B. The response of yeast strains invasion was characteristic of each antimycotic, indicating their mechanisms of action. In addition to MICING, the assay provides quantitative information about the superficial and invasive growth, and also about the relative invasion, which helps in identifying clinically important yeast, such as azole-resistant and/or invasive strains of S. cerevisiae and C. glabrata. PMID:25620781

  18. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance... Certification and Operation 120.828 Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio... consecutive fiscal years. (b) A CDC's 504 loan portfolio must be diversified by business sector....

  19. 13 CFR 120.828 - Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and restrictions on portfolio concentrations. 120.828 Section 120.828 Business Credit and Assistance... Certification and Operation 120.828 Minimum level of 504 loan activity and restrictions on portfolio... consecutive fiscal years. (b) A CDC's 504 loan portfolio must be diversified by business sector....

  20. Effects of Subminimum Inhibitory Concentrations of Antibiotics on the Pasteurella multocida Proteome: A Systems Approach

    PubMed Central

    Nanduri, Bindu; Lawrence, Mark L.; Peddinti, Divya Swetha; Burgess, Shane C.

    2008-01-01

    To identify key regulators of subminimum inhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) antibiotic response in the Pasteurella multocida proteome, we applied systems approaches. Using 2D-LC-ESI-MS2, we achieved 53% proteome coverage. To study the differential protein expression in response to sub-MIC antibiotics in the context of protein interaction networks, we inferred P. multocida Pm70 protein interaction network from orthologous proteins. We then overlaid the differential protein expression data onto the P. multocida protein interaction network to study the bacterial response. We identified proteins that could enhance antimicrobial activity. Overall compensatory response to antibiotics was characterized by altered expression of proteins involved in purine metabolism, stress response, and cell envelope permeability. PMID:18464924

  1. The influence of subminimal inhibitory concentrations of benzalkonium chloride on biofilm formation by Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, Sagrario; López, Victoria; Martínez-Suárez, Joaquín V

    2014-10-17

    Disinfectants, such as benzalkonium chloride (BAC), are commonly used to control Listeria monocytogenes and other pathogens in food processing plants. Prior studies have demonstrated that the resistance to BAC of L. monocytogenes was associated with the prolonged survival of three strains of molecular serotype 1/2a in an Iberian pork processing plant. Because survival in such environments is related to biofilm formation, we hypothesised that the influence of BAC on the biofilm formation potential of L. monocytogenes might differ between BAC-resistant strains (BAC-R, MIC≥10mg/L) and BAC-sensitive strains (BAC-S, MIC≤2.5mg/L). To evaluate this possibility, three BAC-R strains and eight BAC-S strains, which represented all of the molecular serotype 1/2a strains detected in the sampled plant, were compared. Biofilm production was measured using the crystal violet staining method in 96-well microtitre plates. The BAC-R strains produced significantly (p<0.05) less biofilm than the BAC-S in the absence of BAC, independent of the rate of planktonic growth. In contrast, when the biofilm values were measured in the presence of BAC, one BAC-R strain (S10-1) was able to form biofilm at 5mg/L of BAC, which prevented biofilm formation among the rest of the strains. A genetic determinant of BAC resistance recently described in L. monocytogenes (Tn6188) was detected in S10-1. When a BAC-S strain and its spontaneous mutant BAC-R derivative were compared, resistance to BAC led to biofilm formation at 5mg/L of BAC and to a significant (p<0.05) stimulation of biofilm formation at 1.25mg/L of BAC, which significantly (p<0.05) reduced the biofilm level in the parent BAC-S strain. Our results suggest that the effect of subminimal inhibitory concentrations of BAC on biofilm production by L. monocytogenes might differ between strains with different MICs and even between resistant strains with similar MICs but different genetic determinants of BAC resistance. For BAC-R strains similar to S10-1, subminimal inhibitory BAC may represent an advantage, compensating for the weak biofilm formation level that might be associated with resistance. Biofilm formation in the presence of increased subminimal inhibitory concentrations of the disinfectant may represent an important attribute among certain resistant and persistent strains of L. monocytogenes. PMID:25136789

  2. Cheburator Software for Automatically Calculating Drug Inhibitory Concentrations from In Vitro Screening Assays

    PubMed Central

    Nevozhay, Dmitry

    2014-01-01

    In the process of new cancer drug development, as the first step of their assessment, their activities are usually studied in vitro against a panel of cancer cell lines. The results of these in vitro drug screening assays are commonly expressed as inhibitory concentration 50% (IC50): the concentration of the tested agent that inhibits the proliferation of the cancer cell population to 50% of the theoretically possible effect (absolute IC50) or maximum effect practically achieved by the drug (relative IC50). The currently available software for calculating IC50 values requires manual data entry, is time consuming, and is prone to calculation errors. Thus, we have developed open source, free, easy-to-use software for performing standardized data evaluations and automatically calculating the IC50. This software eliminates the laborious and error-prone manual entry of data, substantially reduces the amount of time spent for data analysis. It has been extensively used in our department as the main tool for in vitro data processing during the past several years and can be useful for other research groups working in the area of anticancer drug discovery, either alone or combined with other software packages. The current version of our program, Cheburator, together with sample data, source code, and documentation, is freely available at the following URL: http://www.cheburator.nevozhay.com (it is free for academic use, but a license is required for commercial use). PMID:25184280

  3. Radiative constraints on the minimum atomic oxygen concentration in the mesopause region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mlynczak, Martin G.; Hunt, Linda A.; Marshall, B. Thomas; Mertens, Christopher J.; Russell, James M.; Siskind, David; Thompson, R. Earl; Gordley, Larry L.

    2013-07-01

    Atomic oxygen [O] plays a fundamental role in the photochemistry and energy budget of the terrestrial mesopause region (80-100 km). [O] is difficult to measure directly and is typically inferred at night from measurements of hydroxyl [OH] or molecular oxygen [O2] emissions. During the day, measurements of ozone [O3] concentration are used to infer [O]. These inferences carry significant uncertainties [Mlynczak et al., 2013a]. Recently, Mlynczak et al. [2013b] have used energy balance principles to set an upper limit on the annual global mean [O] concentration in the mesopause region. In this paper, we use night measurements of OH emission to set a lower limit on the global annual mean atomic oxygen concentration. These independent, radiatively constrained values of the maximum and minimum atomic oxygen concentration also place constraints on the magnitude of dynamical processes in the annual global mean energy budget of the mesopause region.

  4. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefotaxime enhances the systemic colonization of Salmonella Typhimurium in BALB/c mice

    PubMed Central

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C.; Silva, Cecilia A.; Molina, Cristian F.; Leiva, Lorenzo E.; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastián; Contreras, Inés; Santiviago, Carlos A.

    2015-01-01

    It has been proposed that sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics play a role in virulence modulation. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (hereafter S. Typhimurium) to colonize systemically BALB/c mice after exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of cefotaxime (CTX). In vivo competition assays showed a fivefold increase in systemic colonization of CTX-exposed bacteria when compared to untreated bacteria. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, we carried out a high-throughput genetic screen. A transposon library of S. Typhimurium mutants was subjected to negative selection in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX and genes related to anaerobic metabolism, biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids and other metabolites were identified as needed to survive in this condition. In addition, an impaired ability for oxygen consumption was observed when bacteria were cultured in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX. Altogether, our data indicate that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of CTX increases the systemic colonization of S. Typhimurium in BALB/c mice in part by the establishment of a fitness alteration conducive to anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26468132

  5. Exposure to sub-inhibitory concentrations of cefotaxime enhances the systemic colonization of Salmonella Typhimurium in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Molina-Quiroz, Roberto C; Silva, Cecilia A; Molina, Cristian F; Leiva, Lorenzo E; Reyes-Cerpa, Sebastin; Contreras, Ins; Santiviago, Carlos A

    2015-10-01

    It has been proposed that sub-inhibitory concentrations of antibiotics play a role in virulence modulation. In this study, we evaluated the ability of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (hereafter S. Typhimurium) to colonize systemically BALB/c mice after exposure to a sub-inhibitory concentration of cefotaxime (CTX). In vivo competition assays showed a fivefold increase in systemic colonization of CTX-exposed bacteria when compared to untreated bacteria. To identify the molecular mechanisms involved in this phenomenon, we carried out a high-throughput genetic screen. A transposon library of S. Typhimurium mutants was subjected to negative selection in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX and genes related to anaerobic metabolism, biosynthesis of purines, pyrimidines, amino acids and other metabolites were identified as needed to survive in this condition. In addition, an impaired ability for oxygen consumption was observed when bacteria were cultured in the presence of a sub-inhibitory concentration of CTX. Altogether, our data indicate that exposure to sub-lethal concentrations of CTX increases the systemic colonization of S. Typhimurium in BALB/c mice in part by the establishment of a fitness alteration conducive to anaerobic metabolism. PMID:26468132

  6. Sub-Inhibitory Concentrations of Trans-Cinnamaldehyde Attenuate Virulence in Cronobacter sakazakii in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Kim, Kwang Sik; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogen, which causes a life-threatening form of meningitis, necrotizing colitis and meningoencephalitis in neonates and children. Epidemiological studies implicate dried infant formula as the principal source of C. sakazakii. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SIC) of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), an ingredient in cinnamon, for reducing C. sakazakii virulence in vitro using cell culture, microscopy and gene expression assays. TC significantly (p ≤ 0.05) suppressed C. sakazakii adhesion to and invasion of human and rat intestinal epithelial cells, and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, TC inhibited C. sakazakii survival and replication in human macrophages. We also observed that TC reduced the ability of C. sakazakii to cause cell death in rat intestinal cells, by inhibiting nitric oxide production. Results from gene expression studies revealed that TC significantly downregulated the virulence genes critical for motility, host tissue adhesion and invasion, macrophage survival, and LPS (Lipopolysaccharide) synthesis in C. sakazakii. The efficacy of TC in attenuating these major virulence factors in C. sakazakii underscores its potential use in the prevention and/or control of infection caused by this pathogen. PMID:24837831

  7. Sub-inhibitory concentrations of trans-cinnamaldehyde attenuate virulence in Cronobacter sakazakii in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Kim, Kwang Sik; Venkitanarayanan, Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Cronobacter sakazakii is a foodborne pathogen, which causes a life-threatening form of meningitis, necrotizing colitis and meningoencephalitis in neonates and children. Epidemiological studies implicate dried infant formula as the principal source of C. sakazakii. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of sub-inhibitory concentrations (SIC) of trans-cinnamaldehyde (TC), an ingredient in cinnamon, for reducing C. sakazakii virulence in vitro using cell culture, microscopy and gene expression assays. TC significantly (p ? 0.05) suppressed C. sakazakii adhesion to and invasion of human and rat intestinal epithelial cells, and human brain microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, TC inhibited C. sakazakii survival and replication in human macrophages. We also observed that TC reduced the ability of C. sakazakii to cause cell death in rat intestinal cells, by inhibiting nitric oxide production. Results from gene expression studies revealed that TC significantly downregulated the virulence genes critical for motility, host tissue adhesion and invasion, macrophage survival, and LPS (Lipopolysaccharide) synthesis in C. sakazakii. The efficacy of TC in attenuating these major virulence factors in C. sakazakii underscores its potential use in the prevention and/or control of infection caused by this pathogen. PMID:24837831

  8. [Influence of technical factors in the determination of minimal inhibitory concentration by microdilution].

    PubMed

    Forey, F; Coulet, M; Brun, Y; Fleurette, J

    1985-05-01

    Minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of a new quinolone, norfloxacin, as determined by agar dilution are greater than those found using a liquid dilution micromethod. We report herein an analysis of the various parameters possibly involved in this discrepancy: Mueller-Hinton and BioMrieux, glass or plastic, small or large inoculum, and comparative volumes in which the inoculum (IN) and antibiotic (AB) are presented (1 ml IN + 1 ml AB or 1.5 microliter IN + 50 microliter AB or 50 microliter IN + 50 microliter AB). Volume of the inoculum suspension had a bearing on the results obtained with all three reference strains tested. Norfloxacin MICs for S. aureus 7625 and P. aeruginosa 76110 increased commensurately with the ratio of inoculum volume to antibiotic volume, and vice versa. In contrast, no significant variation was found for E. coli 7624. To evaluate the frequency of this effect, we tested 40 antibiotics on the reference strains, and several antibiotics on savage strains (16 Enterobacteriaceae, 40 Staphylococcus, 12 Pseudomonas and 17 P. aeruginosa). The significance of inoculum and antibiotic volumes was corroborated for some antibiotics. Results most consistent with the reference method were obtained with 50 microliter inoculum and 50 microliter antibiotic solution. PMID:3162138

  9. Predicting the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration for Antimicrobial Peptides with Rana-Box Domain.

    PubMed

    Kozi?, Mara; Vuki?evi?, Damir; Simuni?, Juraj; Ron?evi?, Tomislav; Antcheva, Nikolinka; Tossi, Alessandro; Jureti?, Davor

    2015-10-26

    The global spreading of multidrug resistance has motivated the search for new antibiotic classes including different types of antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). Computational methods for predicting activity in terms of the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of AMPs can facilitate "in silico" design and reduce the cost of synthesis and testing. We have used an original method for separating training and test data sets, both of which contain the sequences and measured MIC values of non-homologous anuran peptides having the Rana-box disulfide motif at their C-terminus. Using a more flexible profiling methodology (sideways asymmetry moment, SAM) than the standard hydrophobic moment, we have developed a two-descriptor model to predict the bacteriostatic activity of Rana-box peptides against Gram-negative bacteria--the first multilinear quantitative structure-activity relationship model capable of predicting MIC values for AMPs of widely different lengths and low identity using such a small number of descriptors. Maximal values for SAMs, as defined and calculated in our method, furthermore offer new structural insight into how different segments of a peptide contribute to its bacteriostatic activity, and this work lays the foundations for the design of active artificial AMPs with this type of disulfide bridge. PMID:26332863

  10. A comparison of minimum detectable and proposed maximum allowable soil concentration cleanup levels for selected radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Wood, J L; Benke, R R; Rohrer, S M; Kearfott, K J

    1999-04-01

    Regulations on the release of a radioactively contaminated site for unrestricted use are currently being established by the Environmental Protection Agency. The effective dose equivalent rate limit for the reasonably maximally exposed individual was proposed at 0.15 mSv y(-1). The purpose of this study is to investigate whether or not maximum allowable soil concentrations of common radionuclides corresponding to 0.15 mSv y(-1) are readily detectable. These maximum allowable soil concentrations were estimated using RESRAD. The RESRAD estimates account for an effective dose equivalent rate from external radiation plus the committed effective dose equivalent rate from internal radiation delivering 0.15 mSv y(-1) to the reasonably maximally exposed individual. For Michigan and Arizona soil, the minimum detectable activities were calculated for a few radionuclides and compared to the RESRAD estimated maximum allowable concentrations. Considering only gamma-ray spectroscopy, this study found no evidence that concentrations of gamma-ray emitting radionuclides in soil contributing to 0.15 mSv y(-1) were undetectable. PMID:10086603

  11. Determination of the minimum measurement time for estimating long-term mean radon concentration.

    PubMed

    Janik, M; ?oskiewicz, J; Tokonami, S; Kozak, K; Mazur, J; Ishikawa, T

    2012-11-01

    Radon measurements, as do any measurements, include errors in their readings. The relative values of such errors depend principally on the measurement methods used, the radon concentration to be measured and the duration of the measurements. Typical exposure times for radon surveys using passive detectors [nuclear track detectors, activated charcoal, electrostatic (E-perm), etc.)] may extend from a few days to months, whereas, in the case of screening methods utilising active radon monitors (AlphaGUARD, RAD7, EQF, etc.), the measurements may be completed quickly within a few hours to a few days. Thus, the latter may have relatively large error values, which affect the measurement accuracy significantly compared with the former measurements made over long time periods. The method presented in this paper examines the uncertainty of a short-term radon measurement as an estimate of the long-term mean and suggests a minimum measurement time to achieve a given margin of uncertainty of that estimate. PMID:22923240

  12. Dynamics of Changing Intercellular CO2 Concentration (ci) during Drought and Determination of Minimum Functional ci.

    PubMed Central

    Brodribb, T.

    1996-01-01

    Nine conifer species with narrow (<5 mm), single-veined leaves were selected for the purpose of examining changes in intercellular CO2 concentration (ci) during drought. Due to the leaf morphology of the study plants, the confounding effects of nonhomogenous photosynthesis common to most reticulate-veined angiosperms were largely avoided, giving a clear picture of ci dynamics under increasing drought. A characteristic biphasic response was observed in all species, with an initial stomatal control phase resulting in a substantial reduction in ci as stomatal conductance (gs) decreased. As gs reached low levels, a strong nonstomatal limitation phase was observed, causing ci to increase as gs approached a minimum. This nonstomatal phase was linked to a concomitant rapid decrease in the fluorescence parameter quantum efficiency, indicating the onset of nonreversible photoinhibition. The ratio of internal to atmospheric CO2 concentration (ci/ca) decreased from values of between 0.68 and 0.57 in undroughted plants to a minimum, (ci/ca)min, which was well defined in each species, ranging from 0.10 in Actinostrobus acuminatus to 0.36 in Acmopyle pancheri. A high correlation was found to exist between (ci/ca)min and leaf water potential measured at (ci/ca)min. Species developing high maximum intrinsic water use efficiencies (low [ci/ca]min), such as A. acuminatus, did so at lower leaf water potentials (-4.5 MPa) than more mesic species (-1.75 MPa for A. pancheri). It is concluded that in the absence of patchy stomatal closure, (ci/ca)min gives a good representation of the drought tolerance of foliage. PMID:12226283

  13. Sub-inhibitory concentration of biogenic selenium nanoparticles lacks post antifungal effect for Aspergillus niger and Candida albicans and stimulates the growth of Aspergillus niger

    PubMed Central

    Kazempour, Zahra Bahri; Yazdi, Mohammad Hossein; Rafii, Fatemeh; Shahverdi, Ahmad Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background The antifungal activity of selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) prepared by Klebsiella pneumoniae has been reported previously for different fungi. In the present study, freshly prepared Se NPs produced by K. pneumoniae were purified and characterized by transmission electron microscopy and Energy-Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and its post antifungal effects for two fungi were evaluated. Materials and Methods The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of Se NPs, determined by serial dilution were 250 g/ml for Aspergillus niger and 2,000 g/ml for Candida albicans. The effect of exposure of A. niger and C. albicans to Se NPs on later growth was evaluated by incubating the fungi for 1 hour at 25 C in media containing 0, 1, 2 and 4 x MIC of Se NPs and diluting the cultures 100 times with Se free medium. The kinetics of growth of the fungi in control cultures and in non-toxic Se NPs concentration of, 0.01 MIC, 0.02 MIC or 0.04 MIC were measured. Results The exposure of A. niger and C. albicans to 2 and 4 x MIC of Se NPs stimulated the growth of both fungi in the absence of toxic concentrations of Se. The strongest stimulation was observed for A. niger. Conclusion It is concluded that exposure to high concentration of the Se NPs did not have any post-inhibitory effect on A. niger and C. albicans and that trace amounts of this element promoted growth of both fungi in a dose- dependent-manner. The role of nanoparticles serving as needed trace elements and development of microorganism tolerance to nanoparticles should not be dismissed while considering therapeutic potential. PMID:23466957

  14. Effect of cigarette smoke on human serum trypsin inhibitory capacity and antitrypsin concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Chowdhury, P.; Bone, R.C.; Louria, D.B.; Rayford, P.L.

    1982-07-01

    Investigation of the effect of cigarette smoke on the serum trypsin inhibitory capacity (TIC) and antitrypsin content in 89 smokers compared with 37 nonsmokers revealed that cigarette smoking is associated with a significantly lower level of TIC. No alteration in serum antitrypsin content was found because of cigarette smoking. Further analysis of the data indicated a correlation between the magnitude of smoking and the reduction in serum TIC. The reduction of TIC in cigarette smokers is consistent with the recent findings of decreased alpha 1-antitrypsin activity in rat lung and the reduced elastase inhibitory capacity per mg of alpha 1-antitrypsin found in the serum of smokers. The decrease in TIC in the serum of smokers, in addition to the reported decrease in elastolytic activity, may be useful in explaining the pathogenesis of emphysema frequently found in smokers.

  15. Chirality in anesthesia I: minimum alveolar concentration of secondary alcohol enantiomers.

    PubMed

    Won, Albert; Oh, Irene; Laster, Michael J; Popovich, John; Eger, Edmond I; Sonner, James M

    2006-07-01

    Most studies of chirality in inhaled anesthetic action have used the enantiomers of isoflurane. These enantiomers are expensive and scarce, which limits studies, such as the preliminary identification of molecular targets of anesthetic action, that can be performed with these isomers. We hypothesized that secondary alcohols (i.e., compounds having a -CH2-CHOH-CH3 group) that are experimental anesthetics would show enantioselectivity. To test this hypothesis, we determined the minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration (MAC) of the enantiomers of the homologous series of 2-alcohols from 2-butanol to 2-heptanol in rats. Because these alcohols are partially metabolized to 2-ketones during the course of study (i.e., having a -CH2-CO-CH3 group), we independently measured the MAC of the 2-ketones. Assuming additivity of MAC of the ketones with the alcohols, we corrected for the anesthetic effect of the ketones in rats to determine the MAC of the alcohols. We found that the 2-butanol and 2-pentanol isomers were enantioselective. S-(+)-2-butanol had a MAC that was 17% larger than for the R-(-)-enantiomer, whereas S-(+)-2-pentanol had a MAC that was 38% larger than the R-(-)- enantiomer. No stereoselectivity was observed for 2-hexanol and 2-heptanol. These findings may permit studies of chirality in anesthesia, particularly in in vitro systems where metabolism does not occur, using inexpensive volatile compounds. PMID:16790631

  16. Effects of Lidocaine, Dexmedetomidine or Their Combination on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Sevoflurane in Dogs

    PubMed Central

    MORAN-MUOZ, Rafael; IBANCOVICHI, J. A.; Gutierrez-BLANCO, Eduardo; ACEVEDO-ARCIQUE, Carlos M.; Victoria MORA, J. Mauro; TENDILLO, Francisco J.; SANTOS-GONZALEZ, Martin; YAMASHITA, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The aim of this study was to determine the effects of lidocaine (LIDO) and dexmedetomidine (DEX) or their combination (LIDODEX), administered by constant-rate infusion (CRI), on the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of sevoflurane in dogs. Seven healthy mongrel dogs were used with a 2-week washout interval between treatments in this study. Anesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with sevoflurane in oxygen, and MAC of sevoflurane was determined after 90 min equilibration period in the dogs (SEV-MACBASAL). Then, sevoflurane MAC was determined again in the dogs after 45 min equilibration period of one of the following treatments: an intravenous loading dose of lidocaine 2 mg/kg followed by 6 mg/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACLIDO); an intravenous loading dose of dexmedetomidine 2 g/kg followed by 2 g/kg/hr CRI (SEV-MACDEX); or their combination (SEV-MACLIDO-DEX). These SEV-MACs were determined in duplicate. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and post hoc Tuckey test when appropriate. The SEV-MACBASAL was 1.82 0.06%, SEV-MACLIDO was 1.38 0.08%, SEV-MACDEX was 1.22 0.10%, and SEV-MACLIDO-DEX was 0.78 0.06%. The CRI administration of lidocaine, dexmedetomidine and their combination produced a significant reduction in the MAC of sevoflurane by 26.1 9.0% (P<0.0001), 43.7 11.8% (P<0.0002) and 54.4 9.8% (P<0.0001), respectively. The MAC reduction was significantly greater after the CRI combination of lidocaine and dexmedetomidine when compared with lidocaine CRI (P<0.0001) or dexmedetomidine CRI treatments (P<0.025). PMID:24572631

  17. Mutations in the 50S ribosomal subunit of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae associated with altered minimum inhibitory concentrations of pleuromutilins.

    PubMed

    Hillen, Sonja; Willems, Hermann; Herbst, Werner; Rohde, Judith; Reiner, Gerald

    2014-08-01

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae, the causative agent of swine dysentery, is responsible for severe mucohaemorrhagic colitis with considerable financial loss to worldwide swine production. Antimicrobial resistance against macrolides and lincosamides is widespread and the mechanisms are well known. Currently, the most common treatment for swine dysentery is the use of pleuromutilins and resistance to these drugs also is increasingly being reported. Although resistance mechanisms against pleuromutilins are less clear than for other drugs, they seem to involve alterations of the peptidyl transferase centre (PTC), including ribosomal RNA and the ribosomal protein L3. The present study was conducted to examine molecular mechanisms of resistance on a representative set of B. hyodysenteriae field strains with different resistance patterns. In total, we identified 24 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the 23S rRNA gene and genes of the ribosomal proteins L3, L4, L2 and L22. The SNP in the ribosomal protein gene L3 at position 443 led to an amino acid substitution of asparagine (Asn) by serine (Ser) at position 148, significantly associated with MICs for pleuromutilins. Based on this SNP a correct assignment of 71% of the strains with respect to a threshold of >0.625 μg tiamulin/ml was reached. Unexpectedly low MICs in some of the Asn-strains were explained by a second SNP at position 2535 of the 23S rRNA. Our results clearly show the associations between MICs for pleuromutilins and mutations in their binding site. A complete list of SNPs that influence MICs of B. hyodysenteriae strains is needed to enable the interpretation of future molecular susceptibility testing. PMID:24948419

  18. Comparative production of channel catfish and channel x blue hybrid catfish subjected to two minimum dissolved oxygen concentrations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effect of daily minimum dissolved oxygen concentration on growth and yield (kg/ha) of the channel catfish (Ictalurus punctatus) and the channel x blue hybrid catfish (I. punctatus female x I. furcatus male), which shared the Jubilee strain of channel catfish as the maternal parent, was evaluated...

  19. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Li-Wu; Wu, Qiangen; Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg; Shi, Leming; LoSurdo, Jessica; Deng, Helen; Bauer, Steven; Fang, Jia-Long; Ning, Baitang

    2012-07-15

    Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (≥ 5.0 μM TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (≤ 2.5 μM TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 μM range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. -- Highlights: ► TCS is cytotoxic to un-induced hMSCs at concentrations ≥ 5.0 μM. ► TCS at concentrations ≤ 2.5 μM is not cytotoxic to induced hMSCs. ► TCS at non-cytotoxic concentrations inhibits lipid formation in induced hMSCs. ► TCS decreases the expression of specific biomarkers of adipocyte differentiation. ► TCS at concentrations observed in human blood inhibits adipogenesis of hMSCs.

  20. Cytotoxicity and inhibitory effects of low-concentration triclosan on adipogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Li-Wu; Wu, Qiangen; Green, Bridgett; Nolen, Greg; Shi, Leming; Losurdo, Jessica; Deng, Helen; Bauer, Steven; Fang, Jia-Long; Ning, Baitang

    2012-07-15

    Humans at all ages are continually exposed to triclosan (TCS), a widely used antimicrobial agent that can be found in many daily hygiene products, such as toothpastes and shampoos; however, the toxicological and biological effects of TCS in the human body after long-term and low-concentration exposure are far from being well understood. In the current study, we investigated the effects of TCS on the differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) by measuring the cytotoxicity, morphological changes, lipid accumulation, and the expression of adipocyte differentiation biomarkers during 21-day adipogenesis. Significant cytotoxicity was observed in un-induced hMSCs treated with high-concentration TCS (? 5.0 ?M TCS), but not with low-concentration treatments (? 2.5 ?M TCS). TCS inhibited adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs in a concentration-dependent manner in the 0.156 to 2.5 ?M range as indicated by morphological changes with Oil Red O staining, which is an index of lipid accumulation. The inhibitory effect was confirmed by a decrease in gene expression of specific adipocyte differentiation biomarkers including adipocyte protein 2, lipoprotein lipase, and adiponectin. Our study demonstrates that TCS inhibits adipocyte differentiation of hMSCs under concentrations that are not cytotoxic and in the range observed in human blood. PMID:22726953

  1. Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV inhibitory peptides generated by tryptic hydrolysis of a whey protein concentrate rich in ?-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Silvana T; Martnez-Maqueda, Daniel; Recio, Isidra; Hernndez-Ledesma, Blanca

    2013-11-15

    Dipeptidyl peptidase-IV (DPP-IV) is a serine protease involved in the degradation and inactivation of incretin hormones that act by stimulating glucose-dependent insulin secretion after meal ingestion. DPP-IV inhibitors have emerged as new and promising oral agents for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. The purpose of this study was to investigate the potential of ?-lactoglobulin as natural source of DPP-IV inhibitory peptides. A whey protein concentrate rich in ?-lactoglobulin was hydrolysed with trypsin and fractionated using a chromatographic separation at semipreparative scale. Two of the six collected fractions showed notable DPP-IV inhibitory activity. These fractions were analysed by HPLC coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) to identify peptides responsible for the observed activity. The most potent fragment (IPAVF) corresponded to ?-lactoglobulin f(78-82) which IC50 value was 44.7?M. The results suggest that peptides derived from ?-lactoglobulin would be beneficial ingredients of foods against type 2 diabetes. PMID:23790888

  2. Inhibitory effect of gels loaded with a low concentration of antibiotics against biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis.

    PubMed

    A Algarni, Amnah; H Yassen, Ghaeth; L Gregory, Richard

    2015-09-01

    We explored longitudinally the inhibitory effect of gels loaded with 1 mg/mL modified triple antibiotic paste (MTAP) or double antibiotic paste (DAP) against biofilm formation by Enterococcus faecalis and Porphyromonas gingivalis. Methylcellulose-based antibiotic gels of MTAP (ciprofloxacin, metronidazole and clindamycin) and DAP (ciprofloxacin and metronidazole) were prepared at a concentration of 1 mg/mL. Individually cultured E. faecalis and P. gingivalis bacterial suspensions were treated with MTAP, DAP, or placebo (vehicle only) gels at different dilutions and allowed to grow in 96-well microtiter plates. Untreated bacterial suspensions served as a negative control. Crystal violet assays were used to evaluate biofilm formation after 48 h. The ability of the gels to inhibit biofilm formation was determined immediately, and at 1 month and 3 months after the gels had been prepared. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model ANOVA. The MTAP and DAP gels significantly reduced biofilm formation by both bacterial species at all time points, regardless of the tested dilution. No-significant differences in biofilm-inhibitory effects between MTAP and DAP gels were observed at the majority of the tested dilutions through various time points. Gels loaded with 1 mg/mL MTAP and DAP demonstrated a significant antibiofilm effect against E.faecalis and P. gingivalis. PMID:26369485

  3. Antioxidant capacity and angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase.

    PubMed

    Carillon, Julie; Del Rio, Daniele; Teissdre, Pierre-Louis; Cristol, Jean-Paul; Lacan, Dominique; Rouanet, Jean-Max

    2012-12-01

    Antioxidant capacity and angiotensin 1-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of a melon concentrate rich in superoxide dismutase (SOD-MC) were investigated in vitro. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC) was measured by the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity assay (TEAC), the 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical assay, and the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP). The ability of the extract to scavenge three specific reactive oxygen species (superoxide radical anion (O(2)(-)), hydroxyl radical (HO()) and hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2))) was also investigated in order to better evaluate its antioxidant properties. Even if the measures of TAC were relatively low, results clearly established an antioxidant potential of SOD-MC that exhibited the highest radical-scavenging activity towards O(2)(-), with a IC(50) 12-fold lower than that of H(2)O(2) or HO(). This lets hypothesis that the antioxidant potential of SOD-MC could be mainly due to its high level of SOD. Moreover, for the first time, an ACE inhibitory activity of SOD-MC (IC(50)=2.40.1mg/mL) was demonstrated, showing that its use as a functional food ingredient with potential preventive benefits in the context of hypertension may have important public health implications and should be carefully considered. PMID:22953857

  4. Inadequate vancomycin therapy in term and preterm neonates: a retrospective analysis of trough serum concentrations in relation to minimal inhibitory concentrations

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Vancomycin is effective against gram-positive bacteria and the first-line antibiotic for treatment of proven coagulase-negative staphylococcal infections. The aim of this study is bipartite: first, to assess the percentage of therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations and second, to evaluate the adequacy of the therapeutic range in interrelationship with the observed MIC-values in neonates. Methods In this study, preterm and term neonates admitted at a tertiary NICU in the Netherlands from January 2009 to December 2012 and treated with vancomycin for a proven gram-positive infection were included. Trough serum concentrations were measured prior to administration of the 5th dose. Trough concentrations in the range of 10 to 15mg/L were considered therapeutic. Staphylococcal species minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using the E-test method. Species identification was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation mass spectrometry. Results Of the 112 neonates, 53 neonates (47%) had sub-therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations of vancomycin, whereas 22% had supra-therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations. In all patients doses were adjusted on basis of the initial trough concentration. In 40% (23/57) of the neonates the second trough concentration remained sub-therapeutic. MICs were determined for 30 coagulase-negative Staphylococcus isolates obtained from 19 patients. Only 4 out of 19 subjects had a trough concentration greater than tenfold the MIC. Conclusions Forty-seven percent of the neonates had sub-therapeutic initial trough serum concentrations of vancomycin. The MIC-data indicate that the percentages of underdosed patients may be greater. It may be advisable to increase the lower limit of the therapeutic range for European neonates. PMID:25066951

  5. Inhibitory effect of post-micellar SDS concentration on thermal aggregation and activity of papain.

    PubMed

    Qadeer, A; Zaman, M; Khan, R H

    2014-08-01

    Papain, a cysteine protease isolated from the latex of Carica papaya, is known to undergo irreversible thermal unfolding. In this study, we found that thermal unfolding of papain is accompanied by a simultaneous self-assembly process where this protein is observed to aggregate above 50°C. The extent of aggregation increased with increasing protein concentration from 3-40 µM. The aggregation was confirmed by enhanced turbidity, light scattering intensity, 1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulfonate (ANS) fluorescence intensity and by transmission electron microscopy. Furthermore, we noted that post-micellar concentration of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) remarkably suppresses the thermal aggregation of papain. Far-UV circular dichroism studies revealed that SDS significantly enhances α-helical content of the protein and also tends to prevent its unfolding, and thus inhibits aggregation. Additionally, papain showed maximal activity at 65°C in neutral buffer. However, in the presence of 6 mM SDS (above its critical micellar concentration), the enzyme lost activity by about 10-fold. Thus, promoting the helical propensity of the protein does not appear to be a suitable strategy to overcome the aggregation related problems of industrially important proteins such as papain, which are not only required to be protected against aggregation but also need to remain functionally active in the presence of aggregation inhibitors. PMID:25365488

  6. Efficiency calibration and minimum detectable activity concentration of a real-time UAV airborne sensor system with two gamma spectrometers.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xiao-Bin; Meng, Jia; Wang, Peng; Cao, Ye; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2016-04-01

    A small-sized UAV (NH-UAV) airborne system with two gamma spectrometers (LaBr3 detector and HPGe detector) was developed to monitor activity concentration in serious nuclear accidents, such as the Fukushima nuclear accident. The efficiency calibration and determination of minimum detectable activity concentration (MDAC) of the specific system were studied by MC simulations at different flight altitudes, different horizontal distances from the detection position to the source term center and different source term sizes. Both air and ground radiation were considered in the models. The results obtained may provide instructive suggestions for in-situ radioactivity measurements of NH-UAV. PMID:26773821

  7. Role of PBPD1 in stimulation of Listeria monocytogenes biofilm formation by subminimal inhibitory ?-lactam concentrations.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Uyen T; Harvey, Hanjeong; Hogan, Andrew J; Afonso, Alexandria C F; Wright, Gerard D; Burrows, Lori L

    2014-11-01

    Disinfectant-tolerant Listeria monocytogenes biofilms can colonize surfaces that come into contact with food, leading to contamination and, potentially, food-borne illnesses. To better understand the process of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation and dispersal, we screened 1,120 off-patent FDA-approved drugs and identified several that modulate Listeria biofilm development. Among the hits were more than 30 ?-lactam antibiotics, with effects ranging from inhibiting (?50%) to stimulating (?200%) biofilm formation compared to control. Most ?-lactams also dispersed a substantial proportion of established biofilms. This phenotype did not necessarily involve killing, as >50% dispersal could be achieved with concentrations as low as 1/20 of the MIC of some cephalosporins. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) profiling using a fluorescent penicillin analogue showed similar inhibition patterns for most ?-lactams, except that biofilm-stimulatory drugs did not bind PBPD1, a low-molecular-weight d,d-carboxypeptidase. Compared to the wild type, a pbpD1 mutant had an attenuated biofilm response to stimulatory ?-lactams. The cephalosporin-responsive CesRK two-component regulatory system, whose regulon includes PBPs, was not required for the response. The requirement for PBPD1 activity for ?-lactam stimulation of L. monocytogenes biofilms shows that the specific set of PBPs that are inactivated by a particular drug dictates whether a protective biofilm response is provoked. PMID:25136010

  8. Effect of daily minimum pond dissolved oxygen concentration on hybrid striped bass fingerling yield

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Management of dissolved oxygen (DO) concentration in ponds at night during the growing season is important because fish growth and yield are greater in ponds with higher nightly DO concentrations. The purpose of this study was to quantify the production and water quality responses of hybrid striped ...

  9. Identification of the Major ACE-Inhibitory Peptides Produced by Enzymatic Hydrolysis of a Protein Concentrate from Cuttlefish Wastewater

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez Amado, Isabel; Vázquez, José Antonio; González, Pilar; Esteban-Fernández, Diego; Carrera, Mónica; Piñeiro, Carmen

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this work was the purification and identification of the major angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides produced by enzymatic hydrolysis of a protein concentrate recovered from a cuttlefish industrial manufacturing effluent. This process consisted on the ultrafiltration of cuttlefish softening wastewater, with a 10 kDa cut-off membrane, followed by the hydrolysis with alcalase of the retained fraction. Alcalase produced ACE inhibitors reaching the highest activity (IC50 = 76.8 ± 15.2 μg mL−1) after 8 h of proteolysis. Sequential ultrafiltration of the 8 h hydrolysate with molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) membranes of 10 and 1 kDa resulted in the increased activity of each permeate, with a final IC50 value of 58.4 ± 4.6 μg mL−1. Permeate containing peptides lower than 1 kDa was separated by reversed-phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC). Four fractions (A–D) with potent ACE inhibitory activity were isolated and their main peptides identified using high performance liquid chromatography coupled to an electrospray ion trap Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance-mass spectrometer (HPLC-ESI-IT-FTICR) followed by comparison with databases and de novo sequencing. The amino acid sequences of the identified peptides contained at least one hydrophobic and/or a proline together with positively charged residues in at least one of the three C-terminal positions. The IC50 values of the fractions ranged from 1.92 to 8.83 μg mL−1, however this study fails to identify which of these peptides are ultimately responsible for the potent antihypertensive activity of these fractions. PMID:24619242

  10. Inhibitory effects of pomegranate concentrated solution on the activities of hyaluronidase, tyrosinase, and metalloproteinase.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Park, Soo Jin; Song, Chang Hyun; Park, Ji Ha; Lee, Young Joon; Kwang, Sae

    2015-01-01

    Synopsis Botanical antioxidants have attracted much attention as useful preventatives of skin damage. Pomegranate is consumed throughout the world for its beneficial health effects, including its antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities. We investigated whether pomegranate concentrated solution (PCS) could serve as a potential functional cosmetic ingredient that exerts a skin-whitening effect and antiwrinkle activity. To investigate the moisturizing effect of PCS, hyaluronidase activity was examined in human keratinocytes (HaCaT). Elastase and procollagenase activities were assessed in normal human primary dermal fibroblast-neonatal (HDF-N) cells to determine their antiwrinkle effects. Metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) activity was also assessed following ultraviolet A (UVA) irradiation. Whitening effects were measured by a tyrosinase inhibition assay and melanin formation test in mouse melanocytes (Melan-a). In addition, histopathological analysis was performed to determine the number of microfolds formed on the epithelial surface, mean epithelial thickness, mean number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the dermis, and collagen fiber-occupied regions within the dermis. Hyaluronan synthesis was significantly increased by PCS in HaCaT cells, while procollagenase and elastase activities were decreased in HDF-N cells. A significant decrease in UVA-induced MMP-1 activity was also observed in PCS-treated HDF-N cells, compared with UVA-exposed cells. PCS effectively reduced melanin production and mushroom tyrosinase activity in Melan-a cells. Moreover, UVB-induced histopathological dermal sclerosis and inflammatory signs were significantly attenuated in PCS-administered mice compared with UVB-exposed mice. Conclusions: Our results suggest that PCS prevents signs of aging, including those related to photoaging. These effects are associated with enhanced hyaluronan synthesis, as well as suppressed elastase, collagenase, MMP-1, and tyrosinase activities and melanin production. UVB-induced photoaging, such as histopathological dermal sclerosis and inflammatory signs, were effectively reduced on the addition of PCS. These results also suggest that skin aging can be prevented and reduced by the antioxidant effects of PCS. PMID:26454903

  11. Evaluation of minimal inhibitory concentration of two new materials using tube dilution method: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Hiremath, Geeta S.; Kulkarni, Raghavendra D.; Naik, Balaram D.

    2015-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the study is to evaluate and compare the antimicrobial efficacy of two new materials MTA Plus and Biodentine with ProRoot MTA using tube dilution method. Materials and Methods: The materials used were ProRoot MTA (Dentsply), MTA Plus (compounded by Prevest Denpro, Jammu, India for Avalon Biomed Inc, USA) and a calcium silicate based material Biodentine (Septodont, Saint-Maur-des-Fosses, France). Doubling dilutions of the material were prepared in Sabouraud's dextrose broth (SDB) and Brain Heart Infusion (BHI) broth for Candida albicans and Enterococcus faecalis, respectively. The minimal concentration at which inhibition of microorganism occurred was measured and noted as minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the material. Results: There was no statistically significant difference between the materials against C. albicans. Biodentine was statistically significant than MTA Plus against E. faecalis (P-value-0.022). ProRoot MTA was statistically significant at different time intervals against E. faecalis (P-value-0.001). Conclusion: ProRoot MTA and Biodentine proved to have antimicrobial property. MTA Plusproved as a good antifungal agent. PMID:25829698

  12. A New Freeze Concentration Process for Minimum Effluent Process in Bleached Pulp

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Ru-Ying; Botsaris, Gregory D.

    2001-03-06

    This project researches freeze concentration as a primary volume reduction technology for bleaching plant effluents from paper-pulp mills before they are treated by expensive technologies, such as incineration, for the destruction of the adsorbable organic halogens. Previous laboratory studies show that freeze concentration has a greater than 99.5% purification efficiency for volatile, semivolatile, and nonprocess elements, or any other solute, thus producing pure ice that can be reused in the mill as water. The first section evaluates the anticipated regulatory and public pressures associated with implementing the technology; the remaining sections deal with the experimental results from a scaled-up freeze concentration process in a 100-liter pilot-plant at Tufts University. The results of laboratory scale experiments confirmed that the freeze concentration technology could be an efficient volume reduction technology for the above elements and for removing adsorbable organic hologens and or nonprocess elements from recycled water. They also provide the necessary data for designing and operating a larger pilot plant, and identify the technical problems encountered in the scale-up and the way they could be addressed in the larger scale plants. This project was originally planned to include the operation of a large pilot plant in the facilities of Swenson Process Equipment Inc., and a field test at a pulp mill, but the paper company withdrew its financial support for the field test. In place of a final economic evaluation after the field test, a preliminary evaluation based on the small pilot plant data predicts an economically reasonable freeze concentration process in the case of reduction of the bleaching-effluent flow to less than 5 m3/kkg pulp, a target anticipated in the near future.

  13. Antibacterial activity against ?- lactamase producing Methicillin and Ampicillin-resistants Staphylococcus aureus: fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) determination

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The present study reports the antibacterial capacity of alkaloid compounds in combination with Methicillin and Ampicillin-resistants bacteria isolated from clinical samples. The resistance of different bacteria strains to the current antibacterial agents, their toxicity and the cost of the treatment have led to the development of natural products against the bacteria resistant infections when applied in combination with conventional antimicrobial drugs. Method The antibacterial assays in this study were performed by using inhibition zone diameters, MIC, MBC methods, the time-kill assay and the Fractional Inhibitory Concentration Index (FICI) determination. On the whole, fifteen Gram-positive bacterial strains (MRSA/ARSA) were used. Negative control was prepared using discs impregnated with 10 % DMSO in water and commercially available Methicillin and Ampicillin from Alkom Laboratories LTD were used as positive reference standards for all bacterial strains. Results We noticed that the highest activities were founded with the combination of alkaloid compounds and conventional antibiotics against all bacteria strains. Then, results showed that after 7 h exposition there was no viable microorganism in the initial inoculums. Conclusion The results of this study showed that alkaloid compounds in combination with conventional antibiotics (Methicillin, Ampicillin) exhibited antimicrobial effects against microorganisms tested. These results validate the ethno-botanical use of Cienfuegosia digitata Cav. (Malvaceae) in Burkina Faso. Moreover, this study demonstrates the potential of this herbaceous as a source of antibacterial agent that could be effectively used for future health care purposes. PMID:22716026

  14. A sensitive and quick microplate method to determine the minimal inhibitory concentration of plant extracts for bacteria.

    PubMed

    Eloff, J N

    1998-12-01

    Agar diffusion techniques are used widely to assay plant extracts for antimicrobial activity, but there are problems associated with this technique. A micro-dilution technique was developed using 96-well microplates and tetrazolium salts to indicate bacterial growth. p-Iodonitrotetrazolium violet [0.2 mg/ml] gave better results than tetrazolium red or thiazolyl blue. The method is quick, worked well with Staphylococcus aureus, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Escherichia coli and with non-aqueous extracts from many different plants. The method gave reproducible results; required only 10-25 microliters of extract to determine minimal inhibitory concentrations, distinguished between microcidal and microstatic effects, and provided a permanent record of the results. Using S. aureus, and a Combretum molle extract, the technique was 32 times more sensitive than agar diffusion techniques and was not sensitive to culture age of the test organism up to 24 hours. The S. aureus culture could be stored up to 10 days in a cold room with little effect on the assay results. This method was useful in screening plants for antimicrobial activity and for the bioassay-guided isolation of antimicrobial compounds from plants. MIC values determined for sulfisoxazole, norfloxacin, gentamicin, and nitrofuratoin were similar to values indicated in the literature but values obtained with trimethroprim and ampicillin were higher with some bacteria. PMID:9933989

  15. Inhibitory effects of ZnO nanoparticles on aerobic wastewater biofilms from oxygen concentration profiles determined by microelectrodes.

    PubMed

    Hou, Jun; Miao, Lingzhan; Wang, Chao; Wang, Peifang; Ao, Yanhui; Qian, Jin; Dai, Shanshan

    2014-07-15

    The presence of ZnO NPs in waste streams can negatively affect the efficiency of biological nutrient removal from wastewater. However, details of the toxic effects of ZnO NPs on microbial activities of wastewater biofilms have not yet been reported. In this study, the temporal and spatial inhibitory effects of ZnO NPs on the O2 respiration activities of aerobic wastewater biofilms were investigated using an O2 microelectrode. The resulting time-course microelectrode measurements demonstrated that ZnO NPs inhibited O2 respiration within 2h. The spatial distributions of net specific O2 respiration were determined in biofilms with and without treatment of 5 or 50mg/L ZnO NPs. The results showed that 50mg/L of nano-ZnO inhibited the microbial activities only in the outer layer (?200?m) of the biofilms, and bacteria present in the deeper parts of the biofilms became even more active. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis showed that the ZnO NPs were adsorbed onto the biofilm, but these NPs had no adverse effects on the cell membrane integrity of the biofilms. It was found that the inhibition of O2 respiration induced by higher concentrations of ZnO NPs (50mg/L) was mainly due to the release of zinc ions by dissolution of the ZnO NPs. PMID:24880618

  16. Estimation of the minimum uncertainty of DNA concentration in a genetically modified maize sample candidate certified reference material.

    PubMed

    Prokisch, J; Zeleny, R; Trapmann, S; Le Guern, L; Schimmel, H; Kramer, G N; Pauwels, J

    2001-08-01

    Homogeneity testing and the determination of minimum sample mass are an important part of the certification of reference materials. The smallest theoretically achievable uncertainty of certified concentration values is limited by the concentration distribution of analyte in the different particle size fractions of powdered biological samples. This might be of special importance if the reference material is prepared by dry mixing, a dilution technique which is used for the production of the new and third generation of genetically modified (GMO) plant certified reference materials. For the production of dry mixed PMON 810 maize reference material a computer program was developed to calculate the theoretically smallest uncertainty for a selected sample intake. This model was used to compare three differently milled maize samples, and the effect of dilution on the uncertainty of the DNA content of GMO maize was estimated as well. In the case of a 50-mg sample mass the lowest achievable standard deviation was 2% for the sample containing 0.1% GMO and the minimum deviation was less than 0.5% for the sample containing 5% GMO. PMID:11569879

  17. Subminimal inhibitory concentrations of the disinfectant benzalkonium chloride select for a tolerant subpopulation of Escherichia coli with inheritable characteristics.

    PubMed

    Moen, Birgitte; Rudi, Knut; Bore, Erlend; Langsrud, Solveig

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to a subminimal inhibitory concentration (25% below MIC) of benzalkonium chloride (BC), an antimicrobial membrane-active agent commonly used in medical and food-processing environments, resulted in cell death and changes in cell morphology (filamentation). A small subpopulation (1-5% of the initial population) survived and regained similar morphology and growth rate as non-exposed cells. This subpopulation maintained tolerance to BC after serial transfers in medium without BC. To withstand BC during regrowth the cells up regulated a drug efflux associated gene (the acrB gene, member of the AcrAB-TolC efflux system) and changed expression of outer membrane porin genes (ompFW) and several genes involved in protecting the cell from the osmotic- and oxidative stress. Cells pre-exposed to osmotic- and oxidative stress (sodium chloride, salicylic acid and methyl viologen) showed higher tolerance to BC. A control and two selected isolates showing increased BC-tolerance after regrowth in BC was genome sequenced. No common point mutations were found in the BC- isolates but one point mutation in gene rpsA (Ribosomal protein S1) was observed in one of the isolates. The observed tolerance can therefore not solely be explained by the observed point mutation. The results indicate that there are several different mechanisms responsible for the regrowth of a tolerant subpopulation in BC, both BC-specific and general stress responses, and that sub-MIC of BC may select for phenotypic variants in a sensitive E. coli culture. PMID:22605968

  18. Subminimal Inhibitory Concentrations of the Disinfectant Benzalkonium Chloride Select for a Tolerant Subpopulation of Escherichia coli with Inheritable Characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Moen, Birgitte; Rudi, Knut; Bore, Erlend; Langsrud, Solveig

    2012-01-01

    Exposure of Escherichia coli to a subminimal inhibitory concentration (25% below MIC) of benzalkonium chloride (BC), an antimicrobial membrane-active agent commonly used in medical and food-processing environments, resulted in cell death and changes in cell morphology (filamentation). A small subpopulation (15% of the initial population) survived and regained similar morphology and growth rate as non-exposed cells. This subpopulation maintained tolerance to BC after serial transfers in medium without BC. To withstand BC during regrowth the cells up regulated a drug efflux associated gene (the acrB gene, member of the AcrAB-TolC efflux system) and changed expression of outer membrane porin genes (ompFW) and several genes involved in protecting the cell from the osmotic- and oxidative stress. Cells pre-exposed to osmotic- and oxidative stress (sodium chloride, salicylic acid and methyl viologen) showed higher tolerance to BC. A control and two selected isolates showing increased BC-tolerance after regrowth in BC was genome sequenced. No common point mutations were found in the BC- isolates but one point mutation in gene rpsA (Ribosomal protein S1) was observed in one of the isolates. The observed tolerance can therefore not solely be explained by the observed point mutation. The results indicate that there are several different mechanisms responsible for the regrowth of a tolerant subpopulation in BC, both BC-specific and general stress responses, and that sub-MIC of BC may select for phenotypic variants in a sensitive E. coli culture. PMID:22605968

  19. Evaluation of AQUI-S(TM) (efficacy and minimum toxic concentration) as a fish anaesthetic/sedative for public aquaculture in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stehly, G.R.; Gingerich, W.H.

    1999-01-01

    A preliminary evaluation of efficacy and minimum toxic concentration of AQUI-S(TM), a fish anaesthetic/sedative, was determined in two size classes of six species of fish important to US public aquaculture (bluegill, channel catfish, lake trout, rainbow trout, walleye and yellow perch). In addition, efficacy and minimum toxic concentration were determined in juvenile-young adult (fish aged 1 year or older) rainbow trout acclimated to water at 7 ??C, 12 ??C and 17 ??C. Testing concentrations were based on determinations made with range-finding studies for both efficacy and minimum toxic concentration. Most of the tested juvenile-young adult fish species were induced in 3 min or less at a nominal AQUI-S(TM) concentration of 20 mg L-1. In juvenile-young adult fish, the minimum toxic concentration was at least 2.5 times the selected efficacious concentration. Three out of five species of fry-fingerlings (1.25-12.5 cm in length and < 1 year old) were induced in ??? 4.1 min at a nominal concentration of 20 mg L-1 AQUI-S(TM), with the other two species requiring nominal concentrations of 25 and 35 mg L-1 for similar times of induction. Recovery times were ??? 7.3 rain for all species in the two size classes. In fry-fingerlings, the minimum toxic concentration was at least 1.4 times the selected efficacious concentration. There appeared to be little relationship between size of fish and concentrations or times to induction, recovery times and minimum toxic concentration. The times required for induction and for recovery were increased in rainbow trout as the acclimation temperature was reduced.

  20. Effects of isoflurane upon minimum alveolar concentration and cerebral cortex depression in pigs and goats: an interspecies comparison.

    PubMed

    Haga, Henning A; Ranheim, Birgit; Spadavecchia, Claudia

    2011-02-01

    This study compared the effects of isoflurane in pigs (n=10 Yorkshire-Landrace cross) and dairy goats (n=10) by evaluation of electroencephalographic (EEG) burst suppression thresholds (BST) in the cerebral cortex and minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) values in the spinal cord. The study also investigated whether individual MAC values can predict the effects of isoflurane on the cerebral cortex. MAC values and BST/MAC ratios were significantly different between species. Inhibition of movement by isoflurane may be less effective in pigs than in goats. No significant correlation was found between individual MAC and BST values, indicating that in single animals the individual MAC poorly reflects the cerebrocortical depressant effect of isoflurane in pigs and goats. PMID:20045357

  1. Sparing effect of robenacoxib on the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Jun; Itami, Takaharu; Ishizuka, Tomohito; Fukui, Sho; Ooyama, Norihiko; Miyoshi, Kenjiro; Sano, Tadashi; Yamashita, Kazuto

    2014-01-01

    Robenacoxib is a newer nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug approved for dogs and cats. This study was designed to evaluate the effect of robenacoxib on the minimum alveolar concentration for blunting adrenergic response (MAC-BAR) of sevoflurane in dogs. Sevoflurane MAC-BAR was determined by judging dogs' response to a noxious electrical stimulus (50 V, 50 Hz and 10 msec) for 10 sec in 6 beagle dogs on two occasions at least a 7-day interval. In each occasion, saline (0.1 ml/kg) or robenacoxib (2 mg/kg) was administered subcutaneously at 1 hr prior to the MAC-BAR determination. Robenacoxib significantly decreased the sevoflurane MAC-BAR (3.44 0.53% for saline vs. 2.84 0.38% for robenacoxib, P=0.039). These results suggest that subcutaneous robenacoxib provides a clinically relevant sparing effect on anesthetic requirement. PMID:24004933

  2. The effects of isoflurane minimum alveolar concentration on withdrawal reflex activity evoked by repeated transcutaneous electrical stimulation in ponies.

    PubMed

    Spadavecchia, Claudia; Levionnois, Olivier; Kronen, Peter; Andersen, Ole K

    2010-03-01

    The aim of this study was to quantify the effects of isoflurane at approximately the minimum alveolar concentration (peri-MAC) on the temporal summation (TS) of reflex activity in ponies. TS was evoked by repeated electrical stimulations applied at 5 Hz for 2 s on the digital nerve of the left forelimb of seven ponies. Surface electromyographic activity was recorded from the deltoid and common digital extensor muscles. TS thresholds and amplitude of response to stimulations of increasing intensities were assessed during anaesthesia at 0.85, 0.95 and 1.05 times the individual MAC, and after anaesthesia in standing animals. Under isoflurane anaesthesia, TS thresholds increased significantly in a concentration-dependent fashion and at each isoflurane MAC, the responses increased significantly for increasing stimulation intensities. A concentration-dependent depression of evoked reflexes with a reduction in the slopes of the stimulus-response function was observed for both muscles. The results demonstrated that with this model it is possible to describe and quantify the effects of anaesthetics on spinal sensory-motor processing in ponies. PMID:19186084

  3. In silico and in vitro analyses of the angiotensin-I converting enzyme inhibitory activity of hydrolysates generated from crude barley (Hordeum vulgare) protein concentrates.

    PubMed

    Gangopadhyay, Nirupama; Wynne, Kieran; O'Connor, Paula; Gallagher, Eimear; Brunton, Nigel P; Rai, Dilip K; Hayes, Maria

    2016-07-15

    Angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) plays a key role in control of hypertension, and type-2 diabetes mellitus, which frequently co-exist. Our current work utilised in silico methodologies and peptide databases as tools for predicting release of ACE-I inhibitory peptides from barley proteins. Papain was the enzyme of choice, based on in silico analysis, for experimental hydrolysis of barley protein concentrate, which was performed at the enzyme's optimum conditions (60°C, pH 6.0) for 24h. The generated hydrolysate was subjected to molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filtration, following which the non-ultrafiltered hydrolysate (NUFH), and the generated 3kDa and 10kDa MWCO filtrates were assessed for their in vitro ACE-I inhibitory activities. The 3kDa filtrate (1mg/ml), that demonstrated highest ACE-I inhibitory activity of 70.37%, was characterised in terms of its peptidic composition using mass spectrometry and 1882 peptides derived from 61 barley proteins were identified, amongst which 15 peptides were selected for chemical synthesis based on their predicted ACE-I inhibitory properties. Of the synthesized peptides, FQLPKF and GFPTLKIF were most potent, demonstrating ACE-I IC50 values of 28.2μM and 41.2μM respectively. PMID:26948626

  4. Effects on indicators of tissue perfusion in dogs anesthetized with isoflurane at two multiples of the minimum alveolar concentration.

    PubMed

    Floriano, Beatriz P; Wagatsuma, Juliana T; Ferreira, Joana Z; Abimussi, Caio J X; Menegheti, Thais M; Santos, Paulo S P; Oliva, Valria N L S

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To investigate the effects of isoflurane anesthesia administered at 2 multiples of the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) on tissue perfusion in dogs. ANIMALS 8 healthy young adult Beagles. PROCEDURES A randomized crossover design was used. Dogs were anesthetized with isoflurane at 1.5 or 2.0 times the MAC for 2 hours, a 7-day washout period was provided, and dogs were reanesthetized with the alternate treatment. Various physiologic variables were monitored before anesthesia (baseline), at 20-minute intervals during anesthesia, and after anesthetic recovery. Variable values were compared between MAC multiples by means of repeated-measures ANOVA, with the Tukey test used for multiple comparisons. RESULTS During anesthesia, mean arterial blood pressure, cardiac output, and mixed venous oxygen saturation were significantly greater when isoflurane was administered at 1.5 versus 2.0 times the MAC. Cardiac output gradually increased during anesthesia at 1.5 times but not at 2.0 times the MAC. Arterial blood lactate concentration did not differ between MAC multiples at any point; however, this concentration decreased with increasing anesthetic duration at both MAC multiples. Oxygen delivery differed between MAC multiples, and oxygen consumption differed from baseline during anesthesia at 2.0 times the MAC. Oxygen extraction was higher at 2.0 versus 1.5 times the MAC. Heart rate differed between MAC multiples only after anesthetic recovery. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Isoflurane anesthesia impaired tissue perfusion in dogs, but these changes would not be clinically relevant with oxygen delivery at 100%. Peripheral tissue perfusion was maintained or improved with time. PMID:26709933

  5. Lack of Sex Difference in Minimum Local Analgesic Concentration of Ropivacaine for Ultrasound-Guided Supraclavicular Brachial Plexus Block

    PubMed Central

    Pei, Qingqing; Yang, Yanqing; Liu, Qin; Peng, Zhiyou; Feng, Zhiying

    2015-01-01

    Background Sex differences, which may be an important variable for determining anesthetic requirements, have not been well investigated in the aspect of local anesthetic. This investigation aimed to compare the minimum local analgesic concentration (MLAC) of ropivacaine for ultrasound-guided supraclavicular brachial plexus block (US-SCB) between men and women. Material/Method Patients aged 1845 years undergoing elective forearm, wrist, or hand surgeries under US-SCB were divided into 2 groups according to sex. The initial concentration was 0.375% ropivacaine 20 mL and the concentration for the next patient was determined by the up-down technique at 0.025% intervals. Success was defined as the absence of any pain in response to a pinprick in the region of all 4 terminal nerves and the skin incision within 45 min. The primary outcome was the MLAC of ropivacaine, which was estimated by the Dixon and Massey method. The analgesia duration, which was defined as the time from the end of the US-SCB injection to the time of feeling discomfort and need for additional analgesics, was observed for each patient. Results The MLAC of ropivacaine 20 mL for US-SCB was 0.2675% (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.25120.2838%) in men and 0.2675% (95% CI, 0.25240.2826%) in women. There was no significant difference in MLAC or the analgesia duration between the 2 groups (P>0.05). Conclusions We found no significant sex-related differences in MLAC or analgesia duration of ropivacaine for US-SCB. PMID:26556653

  6. Dissolved Trace Metal Concentrations over the Peru Shelf and in the Subsurface Oxygen Minimum Zone Off Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parker, C.; Bruland, K. W.

    2014-12-01

    The Peru coast is the site of one of the largest fisheries in the world, and home to some of the highest f-ratios ever recorded. As a result of this highly productive surface water, an intense subsurface oxygen minimum zone (OMZ) persists. Despite the import of the effect of OMZs due to their predicted increase with global warming, there is very little trace metal data from this region. Here we present dissolved trace metal data from the U.S. GEOTRACES Eastern Pacific Zonal Transect over the Peru shelf and through the OMZ. Results suggest a sink of Pb, Cd, Sc, Cu and Ga in the suboxic region of the shelf, and a shelf source of Co and Fe. Trace metal concentrations within the OMZ will also be discussed. As many of these metals have not been analyzed in this region previously, this work can serve as a baseline for future comparison and adds to the understanding of global trace metal distributions.

  7. Effect of Acetaminophen Alone and in Combination with Morphine and Tramadol on the Minimum Alveolar Concentration of Isoflurane in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Chavez, Julio R.; Ibancovichi, Jos A.; Sanchez-Aparicio, Pedro; Acevedo-Arcique, Carlos M.; Moran-Muoz, Rafael; Recillas-Morales, Sergio

    2015-01-01

    Background It has been observed that acetaminophen potentiates the analgesic effect of morphine and tramadol in postoperative pain management. Its capacity as an analgesic drug or in combinations thereof to reduce the minimum alveolar concentration (MAC) of inhalational anesthetics represents an objective measure of this effect during general anesthesia. In this study, the effect of acetaminophen with and without morphine or tramadol was evaluated on the isoflurane MAC. Methods Forty-eight male Wistar rats were anesthetized with isoflurane in oxygen. MACISO was determined from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamping without the drug, after administering acetaminophen (300 mg/kg), morphine (3 mg/kg), tramadol (10 mg/kg), acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + morphine (3 mg/kg), and acetaminophen (300 mg/kg) + tramadol (10 mg/kg). Results The control and acetaminophen groups did not present statistically significant differences (p = 0.98). The values determined for MACISO after treatment with acetaminophen + morphine, acetaminophen + tramadol, morphine, and tramadol were 0.98% 0.04%, 0.99% 0.009%, 0.97% 0.02%, and 0.99% 0.01%, respectively. Conclusions The administration of acetaminophen did not reduce the MAC of isoflurane and did not potentiate the reduction in MACISO by morphine and tramadol in rats, and therefore does not present a sparing effect of morphine or tramadol in rats anesthetized with isoflurane. PMID:26605541

  8. Assessment of Antioxidant and Phenolic Compound Concentrations as well as Xanthine Oxidase and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Properties of Different Extracts of Pleurotus citrinopileatus Fruiting Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Nuhu; Yoon, Ki Nam; Lee, Kyung Rim; Kim, Hye Young; Shin, Pyung Gyun; Cheong, Jong Chun; Yoo, Young Bok; Shim, Mi Ja; Lee, Min Woong

    2011-01-01

    Cellular damage caused by reactive oxygen species has been implicated in several diseases, thus establishing a significant role for antioxidants in maintaining human health. Acetone, methanol, and hot water extracts of Pleurotus citrinopileatus were evaluated for their antioxidant activities against β-carotene-linoleic acid and 1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radicals, reducing power, ferrous ion-chelating abilities, and xanthine oxidase inhibitory activities. In addition, the tyrosinase inhibitory effects and phenolic compound contents of the extracts were also analyzed. Methanol and acetone extracts of P. citrinopileatus showed stronger inhibition of β-carotene-linoleic acid compared to the hot water extract. Methanol extract (8 mg/mL) showed a significantly high reducing power of 2.92 compared to the other extracts. The hot water extract was more effective than the acetone and methanole extracts for scavenging DPPH radicals. The strongest chelating effect (92.72%) was obtained with 1.0 mg/mL of acetone extract. High performance liquid chromatography analysis detected eight phenolic compounds, including gallic acid, protocatechuic acid, chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, naringenin, hesperetin, formononetin, and biochanin-A, in an acetonitrile and hydrochloric acid (5 : 1) solvent extract. Xanthine oxidase and tyrosinase inhibitory activities of the acetone, methanol, and hot water extracts increased with increasing concentration. This study suggests that fruiting bodies of P. citrinopileatus can potentially be used as a readily accessible source of natural antioxidants. PMID:22783067

  9. Enzyme-triggered self-assembly of a small molecule: a supramolecular hydrogel with leaf-like structures and an ultra-low minimum gelation concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Huaimin; Ren, Chunhua; Song, Zhijian; Wang, Ling; Chen, Xuemei; Yang, Zhimou

    2010-06-01

    We report on the use of a phosphatase to assist the formation of leaf-like structures and a supramolecular hydrogel with an ultra-low minimum gelation concentration. The compound can gel water at a minimum gelation concentration of 0.01 wt%, which is the lowest gelation concentration reported up to now. The images obtained by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) reveal the existence of leaf-like structures serving as the matrix of the hydrogels. The stability of the hydrogels was studied and emission spectra were used to get information about the molecular packing in the leaf-like structures. Since lowering the concentration of the gelator decreases the toxicity of the resulting hydrogels, ultra-low concentration gels have potential uses as biocompatible biomaterials for, e.g., cell cultures, tissue engineering, and drug delivery.

  10. The physiological concentration of ferrous iron (II) alters the inhibitory effect of hydrogen peroxide on CD45, LAR and PTP1B phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Kuban-Jankowska, Alicja; Gorska, Magdalena; Jaremko, Lukasz; Jaremko, Mariusz; Tuszynski, Jack A; Wozniak, Michal

    2015-12-01

    Hydrogen peroxide is an important regulator of protein tyrosine phosphatase activity via reversible oxidation. However, the role of iron in this reaction has not been yet elucidated. Here we compare the influence of hydrogen peroxide and the ferrous iron (reagent for Fenton reaction) on the enzymatic activity of recombinant CD45, LAR, PTP1B phosphatases and cellular CD45 in Jurkat cells. The obtained results show that ferrous iron (II) is potent inhibitor of CD45, LAR and PTP1B, but the inhibitory effect is concentration dependent. We found that the higher concentrations of ferrous iron (II) increase the inactivation of CD45, LAR and PTP1B phosphatase caused by hydrogen peroxide, but the addition of the physiological concentration (500 nM) of ferrous iron (II) has even a slightly preventive effect on the phosphatase activity against hydrogen peroxide. PMID:26407665

  11. A growth inhibitory model with SOx influenced effective growth rate for estimation of algal biomass concentration under flue gas atmosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A theoretical model for the prediction of biomass concentration under real flue gas emission has been developed. The model considers the CO2 mass transfer rate, the critical SOx concentration and its role on pH based inter-conversion of bicarbonate in model building. The calibration and subsequent v...

  12. Inhibitory effects of antimicrobial agents against Fusarium species.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Hideaki; Inuzuka, Hiroko; Hori, Nobuhide; Takahashi, Nobumichi; Ishida, Kyoko; Mochizuki, Kiyofumi; Ohkusu, Kiyofumi; Muraosa, Yasunori; Watanabe, Akira; Kamei, Katsuhiko

    2015-08-01

    We investigated the inhibitory effects of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents against Fusarium spp. Seven Fusarium spp: four F. falciforme (Fusarium solani species complex), one Fusarium spp, one Fusarium spp. (Fusarium incarnatum-equiseti species complex), and one F. napiforme (Gibberella fujikuroi species complex), isolated from eyes with fungal keratitis were used in this study. Their susceptibility to antibacterial agents: flomoxef, imipenem, gatifloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, gentamicin, tobramycin, and Tobracin® (contained 3,000 μg/ml of tobramycin and 25 μg/ml of benzalkonium chloride (BAK), a biocidal agent: BAK, and antifungal agents: amphotericin B, pimaricin (natamycin), fluconazole, itraconazole, miconazole, voriconazole, and micafungin, was determined by broth microdilution tests. The half-maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50), 100% inhibitory concentration (IC100), and minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the Fusarium isolates were determined. BAK had the highest activity against the Fusarium spp. except for the antifungal agents. Three fluoroquinolones and two aminoglycosides had inhibitory effects against the Fusarium spp. at relatively high concentrations. Tobracin® had a higher inhibitory effect against Fusarium spp. than tobramycin alone. Amphotericin B had the highest inhibitory effect against the Fusarium spp, although it had different degrees of activity against each isolate. Our findings showed that fluoroquinolones, aminoglycosides, and BAK had some degree of inhibitory effect against the seven Fusarium isolates, although these agents had considerably lower effect than amphotericin B. However, the inhibitory effects of amphotericin B against the Fusarium spp. varied for the different isolates. Further studies for more effective medications against Fusarium, such as different combinations of antibacterial, biocidal, and antifungal agents are needed. PMID:25841054

  13. Impact of Synaptic Neurotransmitter Concentration Time Course on the Kinetics and Pharmacological Modulation of Inhibitory Synaptic Currents

    PubMed Central

    Barberis, Andrea; Petrini, Enrica Maria; Mozrzymas, Jerzy W.

    2011-01-01

    The time course of synaptic currents is a crucial determinant of rapid signaling between neurons. Traditionally, the mechanisms underlying the shape of synaptic signals are classified as pre- and post-synaptic. Over the last two decades, an extensive body of evidence indicated that synaptic signals are critically shaped by the neurotransmitter time course which encompasses several phenomena including pre- and post-synaptic ones. The agonist transient depends on neurotransmitter release mechanisms, diffusion within the synaptic cleft, spill-over to the extra-synaptic space, uptake, and binding to post-synaptic receptors. Most estimates indicate that the neurotransmitter transient is very brief, lasting between one hundred up to several hundreds of microseconds, implying that post-synaptic activation is characterized by a high degree of non-equilibrium. Moreover, pharmacological studies provide evidence that the kinetics of agonist transient plays a crucial role in setting the susceptibility of synaptic currents to modulation by a variety of compounds of physiological or clinical relevance. More recently, the role of the neurotransmitter time course has been emphasized by studies carried out on brain slice models that revealed a striking, cell-dependent variability of synaptic agonist waveforms ranging from rapid pulses to slow volume transmission. In the present paper we review the advances on studies addressing the impact of synaptic neurotransmitter transient on kinetics and pharmacological modulation of synaptic currents at inhibitory synapses. PMID:21734864

  14. Nonlinear concentration gradients regulated by the width of channels for observation of half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of transporter proteins.

    PubMed

    Abe, Yuta; Kamiya, Koki; Osaki, Toshihisa; Sasaki, Hirotaka; Kawano, Ryuji; Miki, Norihisa; Takeuchi, Shoji

    2015-08-21

    This paper describes a simple microfluidic device that can generate nonlinear concentration gradients. We changed the "width" of channels that can drastically shorten the total microfluidic channel length and simplify the microfluidic network design rather than the "length" of channels. The logarithmic concentration gradients generated by the device were in good agreement with those obtained by simulation. Using this device, we evaluated a probable IC50 value of the ABC transporter proteins by the competitive transport assays at five different logarithmic concentrations. This probable IC50 value was in good agreement with an IC50 value (0.92 ?M) obtained at the diluted concentrations of seven points. PMID:26153566

  15. A strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae evolved for fermentation of lignocellulosic biomass displays improved growth and fermentative ability in high solids concentrations and in the presence of inhibitory compounds

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Softwoods are the dominant source of lignocellulosic biomass in the northern hemisphere, and have been investigated worldwide as a renewable substrate for cellulosic ethanol production. One challenge to using softwoods, which is particularly acute with pine, is that the pretreatment process produces inhibitory compounds detrimental to the growth and metabolic activity of fermenting organisms. To overcome the challenge of bioconversion in the presence of inhibitory compounds, especially at high solids loading, a strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was subjected to evolutionary engineering and adaptation for fermentation of pretreated pine wood (Pinus taeda). Results An industrial strain of Saccharomyces, XR122N, was evolved using pretreated pine; the resulting daughter strain, AJP50, produced ethanol much more rapidly than its parent in fermentations of pretreated pine. Adaptation, by preculturing of the industrial yeast XR122N and the evolved strains in 7% dry weight per volume (w/v) pretreated pine solids prior to inoculation into higher solids concentrations, improved fermentation performance of all strains compared with direct inoculation into high solids. Growth comparisons between XR122N and AJP50 in model hydrolysate media containing inhibitory compounds found in pretreated biomass showed that AJP50 exited lag phase faster under all conditions tested. This was due, in part, to the ability of AJP50 to rapidly convert furfural and hydroxymethylfurfural to their less toxic alcohol derivatives, and to recover from reactive oxygen species damage more quickly than XR122N. Under industrially relevant conditions of 17.5% w/v pretreated pine solids loading, additional evolutionary engineering was required to decrease the pronounced lag phase. Using a combination of adaptation by inoculation first into a solids loading of 7% w/v for 24 hours, followed by a 10% v/v inoculum (approximately equivalent to 1 g/L dry cell weight) into 17.5% w/v solids, the final strain (AJP50) produced ethanol at more than 80% of the maximum theoretical yield after 72 hours of fermentation, and reached more than 90% of the maximum theoretical yield after 120 hours of fermentation. Conclusions Our results show that fermentation of pretreated pine containing liquid and solids, including any inhibitory compounds generated during pretreatment, is possible at higher solids loadings than those previously reported in the literature. Using our evolved strain, efficient fermentation with reduced inoculum sizes and shortened process times was possible, thereby improving the overall economic viability of a woody biomass-to-ethanol conversion process. PMID:22074982

  16. Optimization of Crystals of an Inhibitory Antibody of Urokinase Plasminogen Activator Receptor (uPAR) with Hydrogen Peroxide and Low Protein Concentration

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Yongdong; Shi, Xiaoli; Parry, Graham; Chen, Liqing; Callahan, Jennifer A.; Mazar, Andrew P.; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-07-19

    Optimization of protein crystal formation is often a necessary step leading to diffraction-quality crystals to enable collection of a full X-ray data set. Typical protein crystal optimization involves screening different components, e.g., pH, precipitants, and additives of the precipitant solution. Here we present an example using an inhibitory antibody of urokinase plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR) where such procedures did not yield diffracting crystals. In contrast, it was the treatment of the protein with hydrogen peroxide incubation and the protein concentration reduction that were found to be key factors in obtaining diffracting crystals. Final crystals diffracted to 1.75 {angstrom}, and belong to orthorhombic P212121 space group with unit cell parameters a = 37.162 {angstrom}, b = 84.474 {angstrom}, c = 134.030 {angstrom}, and contain one molecule of Fab fragment of anti-uro kinase receptor antibody in the asymmetric unit.

  17. Spectroscopic Characterization of Extracellular Polymeric Substances from Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens: Suppression using Sub-Inhibitory Concentrations of Bismuth Thiols

    SciTech Connect

    Badireddy, Appala R.; Korpol, Bhoom Reddy; Chellam, Shankararaman; Gassman, Paul L.; Engelhard, Mark H.; Lea, Alan S.; Rosso, Kevin M.

    2008-10-21

    Free and capsular EPS produced by Escherichia coli and Serratia marcescens were characterized in detail using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). Total EPS production decreased upon treatment with sub-inhibitory concentrations of lipophilic bismuth thiols (bismuth dimercaptopropanol, BisBAL; bismuth ethanedithiol, BisEDT; and bismuth pyrithione, BisPYR), BisBAL being most effective. Bismuth thiols also influenced acetylation and carboxylation of polysaccharides in EPS from S. marcescens. Extensive homology between EPS samples in the presence and absence of bismuth was observed with proteins, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids varying predominantly only in the total amount expressed. Second derivative analysis of the amide I region of FTIR spectra revealed decreases in protein secondary structures in the presence of bismuth thiols. Hence, anti-fouling properties of bismuth thiols appear to originate in their ability to suppress O-acetylation and protein secondary structures in addition to total EPS secretion.

  18. Role of PBPD1 in Stimulation of Listeria monocytogenes Biofilm Formation by Subminimal Inhibitory β-Lactam Concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Uyen T.; Harvey, Hanjeong; Hogan, Andrew J.; Afonso, Alexandria C. F.; Wright, Gerard D.

    2014-01-01

    Disinfectant-tolerant Listeria monocytogenes biofilms can colonize surfaces that come into contact with food, leading to contamination and, potentially, food-borne illnesses. To better understand the process of L. monocytogenes biofilm formation and dispersal, we screened 1,120 off-patent FDA-approved drugs and identified several that modulate Listeria biofilm development. Among the hits were more than 30 β-lactam antibiotics, with effects ranging from inhibiting (≤50%) to stimulating (≥200%) biofilm formation compared to control. Most β-lactams also dispersed a substantial proportion of established biofilms. This phenotype did not necessarily involve killing, as >50% dispersal could be achieved with concentrations as low as 1/20 of the MIC of some cephalosporins. Penicillin-binding protein (PBP) profiling using a fluorescent penicillin analogue showed similar inhibition patterns for most β-lactams, except that biofilm-stimulatory drugs did not bind PBPD1, a low-molecular-weight d,d-carboxypeptidase. Compared to the wild type, a pbpD1 mutant had an attenuated biofilm response to stimulatory β-lactams. The cephalosporin-responsive CesRK two-component regulatory system, whose regulon includes PBPs, was not required for the response. The requirement for PBPD1 activity for β-lactam stimulation of L. monocytogenes biofilms shows that the specific set of PBPs that are inactivated by a particular drug dictates whether a protective biofilm response is provoked. PMID:25136010

  19. Nearest Neighbor Averaging and its Effect on the Critical Level and Minimum Detectable Concentration for Scanning Radiological Survey Instruments that Perform Facility Release Surveys.

    SciTech Connect

    Fournier, Sean Donovan; Beall, Patrick S; Miller, Mark L.

    2014-08-01

    Through the SNL New Mexico Small Business Assistance (NMSBA) program, several Sandia engineers worked with the Environmental Restoration Group (ERG) Inc. to verify and validate a novel algorithm used to determine the scanning Critical Level (L c ) and Minimum Detectable Concentration (MDC) (or Minimum Detectable Areal Activity) for the 102F scanning system. Through the use of Monte Carlo statistical simulations the algorithm mathematically demonstrates accuracy in determining the L c and MDC when a nearest-neighbor averaging (NNA) technique was used. To empirically validate this approach, SNL prepared several spiked sources and ran a test with the ERG 102F instrument on a bare concrete floor known to have no radiological contamination other than background naturally occurring radioactive material (NORM). The tests conclude that the NNA technique increases the sensitivity (decreases the L c and MDC) for high-density data maps that are obtained by scanning radiological survey instruments.

  20. Influence of electron donor on the minimum sulfate concentration required for sulfate reduction in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vroblesky, D.A.; Bradley, P.M.; Chapelle, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    Fluctuations in the availability of electron donor (petroleum hydrocarbons) affected the competition between sulfate-reducing bacteria (SRB) and methanogenic bacteria (MB) for control of electron flow in a petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. The data suggest that abundant electron donor availability allowed MB to sequester a portion of the electron flow even when sulfate was present in sufficient concentrations to support sulfate reduction. For example, in an area of abundant electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to be unable to sequester the electron flow from MB in the presence of 1.4 mg/L sulfate. The data also suggest that when electron-donor availability was limited, SRB outcompeted MB for available substrate at a lower concentration of sulfate than when electron donor was plentiful. For example, in an area of limited electron-donor availability, SRB appeared to maintain dominance of electron flow at sulfate concentrations less than 1 mg/L. The presence of abundant electron donor and a limited amount of sulfate reduced competition for available substrate, allowing both SRB and MB to metabolize available substrates concurrently.

  1. On the mimimum length of leader channel and the minimum volume of space charge concentration necessary to initiate lightning flashes in thunderclouds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Vernon

    2015-12-01

    Minimum length to which a leader channel has to grow before it can propagate continuously as a stable leader as a function of the background electric field inside a thundercloud is estimated. For electric field magnitudes comparable to the values measured inside thunderclouds, the minimum length of the leader channel that is required for it to propagate continuously is about 3-5 m. In other words, a leader discharge that originated inside a thundercloud has to grow to a length of 3-5 m before it can culminate in a stable and continuously propagating leader discharge that can give rise to a lightning flash. The minimum size of charge concentrations that can make this event possible have radii in the range of 2-4 m and should carry about 300-900 μC of electric charge, respectively. This in turn shows that the high field regions inside the cloud where electrical discharges that can culminate in stable leader discharges, and hence in lightning discharges, may be confined to volumes which are no larger than a few meters in radius.

  2. A rapid real-time quantitative PCR assay to determine the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration of antibiotics against an intracellular Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain

    PubMed Central

    Aloni-Grinstein, Ronit; Shifman, Ohad; Lazar, Shlomi; Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2015-01-01

    Francisella tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular bacterium. The lack of a safe and efficient vaccine makes antibiotics the preferred treatment. F. tularensis antibiotic susceptibility tests are based on the in vitro standard CLSI-approved microdilution method for determining the MIC. However, limited data are available regarding the minimal inhibitory extracellular concentration (MIEC) needed to eradicate intracellular bacteria. Here, we evaluated the MIEC values of various WHO-recommended antibiotics and compared the MIEC values to the established MICs. We describe a rapid 3-h quantitative PCR (qPCR) intracellular antibiogram assay, which yields comparable MIEC values to those obtained by the classical 72-h cfu assay. This rapid qPCR assay is highly advantageous in light of the slow growth rates of F. tularensis. Our results showed that the MIECs obtained for doxycycline, chloramphenicol and ciprofloxacin were indicative of intracellular activity. Gentamicin was not effective against intracellular bacteria for at least 32 h post treatment, raising the question of whether slow-penetrating gentamicin should be used for certain stages of the disease. We suggest that the qPCR intracellular antibiogram assay may be used to screen for potentially active antibiotics against intracellular F. tularensis as well as to detect strains with acquired resistance to recommended antibiotics. PMID:26579112

  3. The interaction of nitrous oxide and fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane blocking motor movement (MACNM) in dogs.

    PubMed

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J; Kukanich, Butch; Egger, Christine M; Henn, Melissa A; Long, Whitney M; Rohrbach, Barton W

    2014-07-01

    The study objective was to determine the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and fentanyl on the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane necessary to prevent movement (MACNM) in response to noxious stimulation in dogs. Six healthy, adult, intact male, mixed-breed dogs were used on 3 occasions in a randomized crossover design. After induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, each of the following treatments was randomly administered: fentanyl loading dose (Ld) of 15 ?g/kg and infusion of 6 ?g/kg per hour [treatment 1 (T1)], 70% N2O (T2), or fentanyl (Ld of 15 ?g/kg and infusion of 6 ?g/kg per hour) combined with 70% N2O (T3). Each dog received each of the 3 treatments once during the 3-week period. Determination of MACNM was initiated 90 min after the start of each treatment. The values were compared using the baseline MACNM, which had been determined in a previous study on the same group of dogs. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer tests, and expressed as least squares mean SEM. The baseline MACNM decreased by 36.6 4.0%, 15.0 4.0%, and 46.0 4.0% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P < 0.05), and differed (P < 0.05) among treatments. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations did not differ (P ? 0.05) between T1 (3.70 0.56 ng/mL) and T3 (3.50 0.56 ng/mL). The combination of fentanyl and N2O resulted in a greater sevoflurane MACNM sparing effect than either treatment alone. PMID:24982551

  4. The interaction of nitrous oxide and fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane blocking motor movement (MACNM) in dogs

    PubMed Central

    Seddighi, Reza; Doherty, Thomas J.; Kukanich, Butch; Egger, Christine M.; Henn, Melissa A.; Long, Whitney M.; Rohrbach, Barton W.

    2014-01-01

    The study objective was to determine the effects of 70% nitrous oxide (N2O) and fentanyl on the end-tidal concentration of sevoflurane necessary to prevent movement (MACNM) in response to noxious stimulation in dogs. Six healthy, adult, intact male, mixed-breed dogs were used on 3 occasions in a randomized crossover design. After induction of anesthesia with sevoflurane, each of the following treatments was randomly administered: fentanyl loading dose (Ld) of 15 ?g/kg and infusion of 6 ?g/kg per hour [treatment 1 (T1)], 70% N2O (T2), or fentanyl (Ld of 15 ?g/kg and infusion of 6 ?g/kg per hour) combined with 70% N2O (T3). Each dog received each of the 3 treatments once during the 3-week period. Determination of MACNM was initiated 90 min after the start of each treatment. The values were compared using the baseline MACNM, which had been determined in a previous study on the same group of dogs. Data were analyzed using a mixed-model analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Tukey-Kramer tests, and expressed as least squares mean SEM. The baseline MACNM decreased by 36.6 4.0%, 15.0 4.0%, and 46.0 4.0% for T1, T2, and T3, respectively (P < 0.05), and differed (P < 0.05) among treatments. Mean fentanyl plasma concentrations did not differ (P ? 0.05) between T1 (3.70 0.56 ng/mL) and T3 (3.50 0.56 ng/mL). The combination of fentanyl and N2O resulted in a greater sevoflurane MACNM sparing effect than either treatment alone. PMID:24982551

  5. Inhibitory Effect of Dried Pomegranate Concentration Powder on Melanogenesis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells; Involvement of p38 and PKA Signaling Pathways.

    PubMed

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Song, Chang Hyun; Lee, Young Joon; Ku, Sae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Plants rich in antioxidant substances may be useful for preventing skin aging. Pomegranates, containing flavonoids and other polyphenolic compounds, are widely consumed due to their beneficial properties. We examined the underlying mechanisms of dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. The antioxidant effects of PCP were determined by measuring free radical scavenging capacity and transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes. To explore the inhibitory effects of PCP on melanin synthesis, we measured tyrosinase activity and melanin content in ?-melanocyte stimulating hormone (?-MSH)-stimulated B16F10 cells. In addition, the levels of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, tyrosinase, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression were determined by Western blotting. Changes in the phosphorylation status of protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), serine/threonine kinase Akt, and glycogen kinase 3? (GSK3?) were also examined. The free radical scavenging activity of PCP increased in a dose-dependent manner. In PCP-treated B16F10 cells, transcript levels of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) were increased compared with ?-MSH-stimulated cells. In addition, PCP led to the down-regulation of phospho-p38, phospho-PKA, phospho-CREB, phospho-GSK3?, MITF, and TRP-1 compared with ?-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. We believe this effect may be associated with PCP activity, which leads to the inhibition of melanin production and tyrosinase activity. These results suggest that PCP decreases tyrosinase activity and melanin production via inactivation of the p38 and PKA signaling pathways, and subsequently decreases phosphorylation of CREB, MITF, and melanogenic enzymes. These observations provided new insights on the molecular mechanisms of the skin-whitening property of PCP. PMID:26473849

  6. Inhibitory Effect of Dried Pomegranate Concentration Powder on Melanogenesis in B16F10 Melanoma Cells; Involvement of p38 and PKA Signaling Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Su Jin; Choi, Beom Rak; Lee, Eun Kyoung; Kim, Seung Hee; Yi, Hae Yeon; Park, Hye Rim; Song, Chang Hyun; Lee, Young Joon; Ku, Sae Kwang

    2015-01-01

    Plants rich in antioxidant substances may be useful for preventing skin aging. Pomegranates, containing flavonoids and other polyphenolic compounds, are widely consumed due to their beneficial properties. We examined the underlying mechanisms of dried pomegranate concentrate powder (PCP) on melanin synthesis in B16F10 melanoma cells. The antioxidant effects of PCP were determined by measuring free radical scavenging capacity and transcript levels of antioxidant enzymes. To explore the inhibitory effects of PCP on melanin synthesis, we measured tyrosinase activity and melanin content in α-melanocyte stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-stimulated B16F10 cells. In addition, the levels of tyrosinase-related protein-1 (TRP-1), TRP-2, tyrosinase, and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) expression were determined by Western blotting. Changes in the phosphorylation status of protein kinase A (PKA), cAMP response element-binding protein (CREB), mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K), serine/threonine kinase Akt, and glycogen kinase 3β (GSK3β) were also examined. The free radical scavenging activity of PCP increased in a dose-dependent manner. In PCP-treated B16F10 cells, transcript levels of glutathione peroxidase-1 (GPx-1) were increased compared with α-MSH-stimulated cells. In addition, PCP led to the down-regulation of phospho-p38, phospho-PKA, phospho-CREB, phospho-GSK3β, MITF, and TRP-1 compared with α-MSH-stimulated B16F10 cells. We believe this effect may be associated with PCP activity, which leads to the inhibition of melanin production and tyrosinase activity. These results suggest that PCP decreases tyrosinase activity and melanin production via inactivation of the p38 and PKA signaling pathways, and subsequently decreases phosphorylation of CREB, MITF, and melanogenic enzymes. These observations provided new insights on the molecular mechanisms of the skin-whitening property of PCP. PMID:26473849

  7. Inhibitory Effects of Cytosolic Ca2+ Concentration by Ginsenoside Ro Are Dependent on Phosphorylation of IP3RI and Dephosphorylation of ERK in Human Platelets

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Hyuk-Woo; Shin, Jung-Hae; Lee, Dong-Ha; Park, Hwa-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) is platelet aggregation-inducing molecule and is involved in activation of aggregation associated molecules. This study was carried out to understand the Ca2+-antagonistic effect of ginsenoside Ro (G-Ro), an oleanane-type saponin in Panax ginseng. G-Ro, without affecting leakage of lactate dehydrogenase, dose-dependently inhibited thrombin-induced platelet aggregation, and the half maximal inhibitory concentration was approximately 155??M. G-Ro inhibited strongly thrombin-elevated [Ca2+]i, which was strongly increased by A-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS compared to G-kinase inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cGMPS. G-Ro increased the level of cAMP and subsequently elevated the phosphorylation of inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor I (IP3RI) (Ser1756) to inhibit [Ca2+]i mobilization in thrombin-induced platelet aggregation. Phosphorylation of IP3RI (Ser1756) by G-Ro was decreased by PKA inhibitor Rp-8-Br-cAMPS. In addition, G-Ro inhibited thrombin-induced phosphorylation of ERK 2 (42?kDa), indicating inhibition of Ca2+ influx across plasma membrane. We demonstrate that G-Ro upregulates cAMP-dependent IP3RI (Ser1756) phosphorylation and downregulates phosphorylation of ERK 2 (42?kDa) to decrease thrombin-elevated [Ca2+]i, which contributes to inhibition of ATP and serotonin release, and p-selectin expression. These results indicate that G-Ro in Panax ginseng is a beneficial novel Ca2+-antagonistic compound and may prevent platelet aggregation-mediated thrombotic disease. PMID:26355658

  8. Uterine inhibitory effect of reticuline.

    PubMed

    Martin, M L; Sagredo, J A; Morais, J M; Montero, M J; Sanchez, M T; San Roman, L

    1988-11-01

    Reticuline, the most abundant benzylisoquinoleic alkaloid of Laurobasidium lauri, exerts a uterine inhibitory effect mainly related to a decrease in the concentration of cytosolic calcium available for contraction. PMID:2907562

  9. Anesthesia with isoflurane and sevoflurane in the crested serpent eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): minimum anesthetic concentration, physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry and behavioral effects.

    PubMed

    Chan, Fang-Tse; Chang, Geng-Ruei; Wang, Hsien-Chi; Hsu, Tien-Huan

    2013-12-30

    The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 0.30 and 2.03 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO? and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  10. Anesthesia with Isoflurane and Sevoflurane in the Crested Serpent Eagle (Spilornis cheela hoya): Minimum Anesthetic Concentration, Physiological Effects, Hematocrit, Plasma Chemistry and Behavioral Effects

    PubMed Central

    CHAN, Fang-Tse; CHANG, Geng-Ruei; WANG, Hsien-Chi; HSU, Tien-Huan

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT The initial goal of this study was to determine the minimum anesthetic concentration (MAC) for isoflurane (ISO) and sevoflurane (SEVO) for the crested serpent eagle. Next, we compared the anesthetic effects of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values and behavior in spontaneously breathing captive adult crested serpent eagles. Sixteen eagles were randomly allocated to two groups for anesthesia with ISO (n=8) or SEVO (n=8). First, we measured the MAC values of ISO and SEVO, and four weeks later, we investigated the effect of each on the physiological effects, hematocrit (HCT) and plasma chemistry values. The MAC values of ISO and SEVO for crested serpent eagles were 1.46 0.30 and 2.03 0.32%, respectively. The results revealed no significant differences between the two anesthetics in induction time, while time of extubation to recovery was significantly shorter with SEVO. A time-related increase in end-tidal CO2 and decreases in body temperature and respiratory rates were observed during anesthesia with each anesthetic. There were no significant differences between the effect of the two anesthetics on heart rate, hematocrit, plasma chemistry values or respiration, although each caused minor respiration depression. We concluded that SEVO is a more effective inhalant agent than ISO for use in eagles, showing the most rapidest induction and recovery from anesthesia. PMID:23955396

  11. Comparison of equi-minimum alveolar concentration of sevoflurane and isoflurane on bispectral index values during both wash in and wash out phases: A prospective randomised study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Madhu; Shri, Iti; Sakia, Prashant; Govil, Deepika

    2015-01-01

    Background and Aims: At equal minimum alveolar concentration (MAC), volatile agents may produce different bispectral index (BIS) values especially at low BIS levels when the effect is volatile agent specific. The present study was performed to compare the BIS values produced by sevoflurane and isoflurane at equal MAC and thereby assessing which is a better hypnotic agent. Methods: Sixty American Society of Anaesthesiologists I and II patients undergoing elective mastoidectomy were divided into groups receiving either isoflurane or sevoflurane, and at equi-MAC. BIS value was measured during both wash in and wash out phase, keeping other parameters same. Statistical analysis was performed using the Friedman two-way analysis and Mann-Whitney U-test. A P < 0.05 was considered significant. Results: BIS value was significantly lower with sevoflurane at all MAC values as compared to isoflurane, except in the beginning and at MAC awake. However, both the drugs proved to be cardiostable. Conclusion: At equi-MAC sevoflurane produces lower BIS values during wash in as well as wash out phase as compared to isoflurane, reflecting probably an agent specific effect and a deficiency in BIS algorithm for certain agents and their interplay. PMID:25788739

  12. Isoflurane but not halothane minimum alveolar concentration-sparing response of dexmedetomidine is enhanced in rats chronically treated with selective ?2-adrenoceptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Santos, M; Ibancovichi, J A; Milln, I; Tendillo, F J

    2012-07-01

    Halothane minimum alveolar concentration (MAC)-sparing response is preserved in rats rendered tolerant to the action of dexmedetomidine. It has been shown that halothane and isoflurane act at different sites to produce immobility. The authors studied whether there was any difference between halothane and isoflurane MAC-sparing effects of dexmedetomidine in rats after chronic administration of a low dose of this drug. Twenty-four female Wistar rats were randomly allocated into four groups of six animals: two groups received 10 ?g/kg intraperitoneal dexmedetomidine for five days (treated groups) and the other two groups received intraperitoneal saline solution for five days (naive groups) prior to halothane or isoflurane MAC determination (one treated and one naive group of halothane and one treated and one naive group of isoflurane). Halothane or isoflurane MAC determination was performed before (basal) and 30 min after an intraperitoneal dose of 30 ?g/kg of dexmedetomidine (post-dex) from alveolar gas samples at the time of tail clamp. Administration of an acute dose of dexmedetomidine to animals that had chronically received dexmedetomidine resulted in a MAC-sparing effect that was similar to that seen in naive animals for halothane; however, the same treatment increased the MAC-sparing response of dexmedetomidine for isoflurane. Isoflurane but not halothane MAC-sparing response of acutely administered dexmedetomidine is enhanced in rats chronically treated with this drug. PMID:22522415

  13. Reduction of the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane in dogs using a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine-ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl.

    PubMed

    Aguado, Delia; Benito, Javier; Gmez de Segura, Ignacio A

    2011-07-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a constant rate of infusion of lidocaine and ketamine in combination with either morphine or fentanyl on the minimum alveolar concentration of isoflurane (MAC(ISO)) during ovariohysterectomy in dogs. Female dogs (n=44) were premedicated with acepromazine and midazolam. Anaesthesia was induced with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. Dogs received ketamine (0.6 mg/kg/h) and lidocaine (3 mg/kg/h) together with morphine (0.24 mg/kg/h; MLK) or fentanyl (0.0036 mg/kg/h; FLK). The control group received Ringer's lactate solution. A skin incision was used as the noxious stimulus. The MAC(ISO) value was obtained with Dixon's up-and-down method. MAC(ISO) was 0.70.0 vol.% in the control group, 0.30.0 vol.% in the MLK group (45% MAC reduction) and 0.00.0 vol.% in the FLK group (97% MAC reduction). A combination of fentanyl with lidocaine and ketamine decreased the MAC(ISO) in dogs; this decrease was more pronounced than that produced by morphine, lidocaine and ketamine. PMID:20594878

  14. Prediction of movement following noxious stimulation during 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia by means of middle latency auditory evoked responses.

    PubMed

    Leistritz, L; Kochs, E; Galicki, M; Witte, H

    2002-06-01

    This paper investigates the applicability of generalized dynamic neural networks for the design of a two-valued anesthetic depth indicator during isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. The indicator construction is based on the processing of middle latency auditory evoked responses (MLAER) in combination with the observation of the patient's movement reaction to skin incision. The framework of generalized dynamic neural networks does not require any data preprocessing, visual data inspection or subjective feature extraction. The study is based on a data set of 106 patients scheduled for elective surgery under isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. The processing of the measured MLAER is performed by a recurrent neural network that transforms the MLAER signals into signals having a very uncomplex structure. The evaluation of these signals is self-evident, and yields to a simple threshold classifier. Using only evoked potentials before the pain stimulus, the patient's reaction could be predicted with a probability of 81.5%. The MLAER is closely associated to the patient's reaction to skin incision following noxious stimulation during 1 minimum alveolar anesthetic concentration isoflurane/nitrous oxide anesthesia. In combination with other parameters, MLAER could contribute to an objective and trustworthy movement prediction to noxious stimulation. PMID:12048053

  15. Inhibitory effect of silicon nanowires on the polymerase chain reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hongwei; Wang, Lei; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Weikang; Brash, John L.; Chen, Hong

    2012-09-01

    The effect of nanomaterials on biological reactions has received much attention. We report herein that silicon nanowires (SiNWs) inhibit the polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The inhibitory effect was found to be concentration-dependent, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of about 0.4 mg ml-1. DNA polymerase, restriction endonucleases, lysozyme and horseradish peroxidase maintained their bioactivities after exposure to SiNWs. Also the interaction of SiNWs with primers and dNTP did not lead to decreased PCR yield. Compared to primers and dNTP, template DNA showed 4.7-10.5-fold greater adsorption on SiNWs. Template bound to SiNWs was ineffective in the PCR, whereas addition of free template to the PCR system increased the yield. The results of this work suggest that the inhibitory effect of SiNWs on the PCR was due to the selective adsorption of double-stranded DNA on SiNWs, thereby decreasing the availability of template for the reaction.

  16. Impact of minimum daily dissolved oxygen concentration on performance of hybrid female channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus x male blue catfish I. furcatus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hybrid Catfish (female Channel Catfish Ictalurus punctatus X male Blue Catfish I. furcatus) were reared during two years as single-batch crops under two different dissolved oxygen (DO) regimes each year; a high-DO (control) treatment in which the minimum daily DO was maintained above 3.8 ppm during ...

  17. Modeling the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of peptide mixtures obtained from cheese whey hydrolysates using concentration-response curves.

    PubMed

    Estévez, Natalia; Fuciños, Pablo; Sobrosa, Ana C; Pastrana, Lorenzo; Pérez, Nelson; Luisa Rúa, M

    2012-01-01

    Three mathematical models, two logistic models (previously published in previous works) and one mechanistic, developed in this work and based on Michaelis-Menten kinetics, were compared to select the most adequate model in describing the angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory activity of bioactive peptide mixtures obtained from cheese whey protein. The significance of both the model and its parameters as well as the value of the regression coefficient was used as criteria to select the most adequate model for obtaining the IC(50) values corresponding to each bioactive peptides mixture. The best results were obtained with the Michaelis-Menten-based model because it provided the best fits and in addition the values for its parameters were always significant. As parameters of this model have a physical meaning, it could be used for inhibition-testing experiments in the development of novel bioactive peptides. The results obtained indicated that the peptide mixture derived from the neutrase hydrolysis exhibited strong ACE inhibition activity. The main active peptides were short, with molecular masses below 1 kDa (IC(50) = 40.37 ± 2.66 μg/mL) and represent 38% of the initial protein content in the hydrolysate. PMID:22736636

  18. Record Sea Ice Minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    Arctic sea ice reached a record low in September 2007, below the previous record set in 2005 and substantially below the long-term average. This image shows the Arctic as observed by the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer for EOS (AMSR-E) aboard NASA's Aqua satellite on September 16, 2007. In this image, blue indicates open water, white indicates high sea ice concentration, and turquoise indicates loosely packed sea ice. The black circle at the North Pole results from an absence of data as the satellite does not make observations that far north. Three contour lines appear on this image. The red line is the 2007 minimum, as of September 15, about the same time the record low was reached, and it almost exactly fits the sea ice observed by AMSR-E. The green line indicates the 2005 minimum, the previous record low. The yellow line indicates the median minimum from 1979 to 2000.

  19. Effects of sub-lethal neurite outgrowth inhibitory concentrations of chlorpyrifos oxon on cytoskeletal proteins and acetylcholinesterase in differentiating N2a cells

    SciTech Connect

    Flaskos, J.; Nikolaidis, E.; Harris, W.; Sachana, M.; Hargreaves, A.J.

    2011-11-15

    Previous work in our laboratory has shown that sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of chlorpyrifos (CPF), diazinon (DZ) and diazinon oxon (DZO) inhibit the outgrowth of axon-like neurites in differentiating mouse N2a neuroblastoma cells concomitant with altered levels and/or phosphorylation state of axonal cytoskeleton and growth-associated proteins. The aim of the present work was to determine whether chlorpyrifos oxon (CPO) was capable of inhibiting N2a cell differentiation in a similar manner. Using experimental conditions similar to our previous work, sub-lethal concentrations (1-10 {mu}M) of CPO were found to inhibit N2a cell differentiation. However, unlike previous studies with DZ and DZO, there was a high level of sustained inhibition of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) in CPO treated cells. Impairment of neurite outgrowth was also associated with reduced levels of growth associated protein-43 and neurofilament heavy chain (NFH), and the distribution of NFH in cells stained by indirect immunofluorescence was disrupted. However, in contrast to previous findings for DZO, the absolute level of phosphorylated NFH was unaffected by CPO exposure. Taken together, the findings suggest that sub-lethal concentrations of CPO inhibit axon outgrowth in differentiating N2a cells and that this effect involves reduced levels of two proteins that play key roles in axon outgrowth and maintenance. Although the inhibition of neurite outgrowth is unlikely to involve AChE inhibition directly, further work will help to determine whether the persistent inhibition of AChE by CPO can account for the different effects induced by CPO and DZO on the levels of total and phosphorylated NFH. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Sub-lethal levels of chlorpyrifos oxon inhibit neurite outgrowth in N2a cells Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Acetylcholinesterase exhibits sustained inhibition throughout exposure Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The levels of neurofilament heavy chain and GAP-43 protein are reduced Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Neurofilament heavy chain forms aggregates in cell bodies Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thus at least two axon-associated cytoskeletal proteins are disrupted by this agent.

  20. Minimum Critical Values Study

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, P.B.

    2005-07-11

    This report provides minimum critical values for various 30-cm water-reflected uranium and plutonium oxide and nitrate aqueous mixtures as calculated by the SCALE CSAS1X sequence using the 238-group ENDF/B-V neutron cross-section library. The minimum values were determined through parametric searches in one-dimensional geometry. The calculations have been performed to obtain the minimum values: critical volume and mass for spheres, critical radius for cylinders, critical thickness for slabs, and minimum critical concentration (infinite geometry) for the following homogeneous mixtures: (1) UO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (2) UNH for 3, 4, 5, 20, and 100 wt % {sup 235}U; (3) PuO{sub 2}-H{sub 2}O for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu); and (4) PuNH for 100/0/0, 95/5/0, 90/5/5, 80/10/10, and 71/17/11/1 wt % of {sup 239}Pu/{sup 240}Pu/{sup 241}Pu(/{sup 242}Pu). All bounding surfaces were fully reflected by 30 cm of H{sub 2}O.

  1. The Maunder Minimum Ionosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithtro, C. G.; Sojka, J. J.

    2004-12-01

    The Maunder Minimum epoch, from 1645 to 1715 A.D. was characterized by a near absence of sunspots. Studies of cosmogenic isotopes and Sun-like stars suggest that solar chromospheric and coronal emissions during this period were significantly lower than contemporary solar minima. To study the effect of such a reduction on the Earth's upper atmosphere, we employ a 1-D global average ionosphere and thermosphere model that accounts for the photon flux between 3 and 360 nm. Within the ionosphere, an unexpected transition occurs as the irradiance falls below normal solar minimum levels. The concentration of O+ ions decreases rapidly relative to the other ions, such that NO+ becomes the dominant F-region ion. The state of the underlying thermosphere, particularly the neutral gas temperature, is largely responsible for this behavior.

  2. Operational boundaries for nitrite accumulation in nitrification based on minimum/maximum substrate concentrations that include effects of oxygen limitation, pH, and free ammonia and free nitrous acid inhibition.

    PubMed

    Park, Seongjun; Bae, Wookeun; Rittmann, Bruce E

    2010-01-01

    Recent studies on shortcut biological nitrogen removal (SBNR), which use the concept of denitrification from nitrite, have reported the key factors affecting nitrite build-up, such as dissolved oxygen (DO) limitation, pH, and free ammonia (FA) and free nitrous acid (FNA) inhibition. This study extends the concept of the traditional minimum substrate concentration (S(min)) to explain the simultaneous effect of those factors. Thus, we introduce the minimum DO concentration (DO(min)) and the maximum substrate concentration (S(max)) that are needed to support a steady-state biological system. We define all three values as the MSC values. The model provides a method to identify good combinations of pH, DO, and total ammonium nitrogen (TAN) to support shortcut nitritation. We use MSC curves to show that the effect of DO-alone and the effect of DO plus direct pH inhibition cannot give strong enough selection against nitrite oxidizing bacteria to work in a practical setting. However, adding the FA and FNA effects gives a strong selection effect that is accentuated near pH 8. Thus, a generalized conclusion is that having pH approximately 8 is favorable in many situations. We defined a specific operational boundary to achieve shortcut nitritation coupled to anaerobic ammonium oxidation (ANAMMOX), in which the effluent concentrations of total nitrite and total ammonium should be approximately equal. Experimental results for alkaline and acidic nitrite-accumulating systems match the trends from the MSC approach. In particular, acidic systems had to maintain higher total ammonium, total nitrite, and DO concentrations. The MSC values are a practical tool to define the operational boundaries for selecting ammonium-oxidizing bacteria while suppressing nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. PMID:20039752

  3. Comparative effectiveness of flomoxef versus carbapenems in the treatment of bacteraemia due to extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae with emphasis on minimum inhibitory concentration of flomoxef: a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chen-Hsiang; Su, Lin-Hui; Chen, Fang-Ju; Tang, Ya-Feng; Li, Chia-Chin; Chien, Chun-Chih; Liu, Jien-Wei

    2015-12-01

    This study compared treatment outcomes of adult patients with bacteraemia due to extended-spectrum ?-lactamase-producing Escherichia coli or Klebsiella pneumoniae (ESBL-EK) receiving flomoxef versus those receiving a carbapenem as definitive therapy. In propensity score matching (PSM) analysis, case patients receiving flomoxef shown to be active in vitro against ESBL-EK were matched with controls who received a carbapenem. The primary endpoint was 30-day crude mortality. The flomoxef group had statistically significantly higher sepsis-related mortality (27.3% vs. 10.5%) and 30-day mortality (28.8% vs. 12.8%) than the carbapenem group. Of the bacteraemic episodes caused by isolates with a MICflomoxef of ?1mg/L, sepsis-related mortality rates were similar between the two treatment groups (8.7% vs. 6.4%; P=0.73). The sepsis-related mortality rate of the flomoxef group increased to 29.6% and 50.0% of episodes caused by isolates with a MICflomoxef of 2-4mg/L and 8mg/L, respectively, which was significantly higher than the carbapenem group (12.3%). In the PSM analysis of 86 case-control pairs infected with strains with a MICflomoxef of 2-8mg/L, case patients had a significantly higher 30-day mortality rate (38.4% vs. 18.6%). Multivariate regression analysis revealed that flomoxef therapy for isolates with a MICflomoxef of 2-8mg/L, concurrent pneumonia or urosepsis, and a Pitt bacteraemia score ?4 were independently associated with 30-day mortality. Definitive flomoxef therapy appears to be inferior to carbapenems in treating ESBL-EK bacteraemia, particularly for isolates with a MICflomoxef of 2-8mg/L, even though the currently suggested MIC breakpoint of flomoxef is ?8mg/L. PMID:26387064

  4. A population pharmacokinetic modeling approach shows that serum penicillin G concentrations are below inhibitory concentrations by two weeks after benzathine penicillin G injection in the majority of young adults.

    PubMed

    Neely, Michael; Kaplan, Edward L; Blumer, Jeffrey L; Faix, Dennis J; Broderick, Michael P

    2014-11-01

    Serum penicillin G falls to low levels 2 weeks after injection as benzathine penicillin G (BPG) in young adults. Using Pmetrics and previously reported penicillin G pharmacokinetic data after 1.2 million units were given as BPG to 329 male military recruits, here we develop the first reported population pharmacokinetic model of penicillin G after BPG injection. We simulated time-concentration profiles over a broad range of pediatric and adult weights after alternative doses and dose frequencies to predict the probability of maintaining serum penicillin G concentrations of >0.02 mg/liter, a proposed protective threshold against group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS). The final population model included linear absorption into a central compartment, distribution to and from a peripheral compartment, and linear elimination from the central compartment, with allometrically scaled volumes and rate constants. With 1.2 million units of BPG given intramuscularly every 4 weeks in four total doses, only 23.2% of 5,000 simulated patients maintained serum penicillin G trough concentrations of >0.02 mg/liter 4 weeks after the last dose. When the doses were 1.8 million units and 2.4 million units, the percentages were 30.2% and 40.7%, respectively. With repeated dosing of 1.2 million units every 3 weeks and every 2 weeks for 4 doses, the percentages of simulated patients with a penicillin G trough concentration of >0.02 mg/liter were 37.8% and 65.2%, respectively. Our simulations support recommendations for more frequent rather than higher BPG doses to prevent recurrent rheumatic heart disease in areas of high GAS prevalence or during outbreaks. PMID:25182635

  5. A Population Pharmacokinetic Modeling Approach Shows that Serum Penicillin G Concentrations Are Below Inhibitory Concentrations by Two Weeks after Benzathine Penicillin G Injection in the Majority of Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Edward L.; Blumer, Jeffrey L.; Faix, Dennis J.; Broderick, Michael P.

    2014-01-01

    Serum penicillin G falls to low levels 2 weeks after injection as benzathine penicillin G (BPG) in young adults. Using Pmetrics and previously reported penicillin G pharmacokinetic data after 1.2 million units were given as BPG to 329 male military recruits, here we develop the first reported population pharmacokinetic model of penicillin G after BPG injection. We simulated time-concentration profiles over a broad range of pediatric and adult weights after alternative doses and dose frequencies to predict the probability of maintaining serum penicillin G concentrations of >0.02 mg/liter, a proposed protective threshold against group A Streptococcus pyogenes (GAS). The final population model included linear absorption into a central compartment, distribution to and from a peripheral compartment, and linear elimination from the central compartment, with allometrically scaled volumes and rate constants. With 1.2 million units of BPG given intramuscularly every 4 weeks in four total doses, only 23.2% of 5,000 simulated patients maintained serum penicillin G trough concentrations of >0.02 mg/liter 4 weeks after the last dose. When the doses were 1.8 million units and 2.4 million units, the percentages were 30.2% and 40.7%, respectively. With repeated dosing of 1.2 million units every 3 weeks and every 2 weeks for 4 doses, the percentages of simulated patients with a penicillin G trough concentration of >0.02 mg/liter were 37.8% and 65.2%, respectively. Our simulations support recommendations for more frequent rather than higher BPG doses to prevent recurrent rheumatic heart disease in areas of high GAS prevalence or during outbreaks. PMID:25182635

  6. Antifungal properties and inhibitory effects upon aflatoxin production of Thymus vulgaris L. by Aspergillus flavus Link.

    PubMed

    Kohiyama, Cssia Yumie; Yamamoto Ribeiro, Milene Mayumi; Mossini, Simone Aparecida Galerani; Bando, Erika; Bomfim, Natlia da Silva; Nerilo, Samuel Botio; Rocha, Gustavo Henrique Oliveira; Grespan, Renata; Mikcha, Jane Martha Graton; Machinski, Miguel

    2015-04-15

    The antifungal and antiaflatoxigenic properties of Thymus vulgaris essential oil (TEO) were evaluated upon Aspergillus flavus "in vitro". Suspension containing 10(6) of A. flavus were cultivated with TEO in concentrations ranging from 50 to 500 ?g/mL. TEO reached minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum fungicidal concentration (MFC) at 250 ?g/mL. Inhibition of ergosterol biosynthesis was detected at a concentration of 100 ?g/mL of TEO. Morphological evaluation performed by both light microscopy and scanning electron microscopy showed that antifungal activity of TEO could be detected starting at a concentration of 50 ?g/mL and the fungicide effect at a concentration of 250 ?g/mL. TEO completely inhibited production of both B1 and B2 aflatoxins (AFB1 and AFB2) at a concentration of 150 ?g/mL. This way, fungal biomass development and aflatoxin production were dependent on TEO concentration. Therefore, TEO was capable of controlling the growth of A. flavus and its production of aflatoxins. PMID:25466118

  7. Nootropic dipeptide noopept enhances inhibitory synaptic transmission in the hippocampus.

    PubMed

    Povarov, I S; Kondratenko, R V; Derevyagin, V I; Ostrovskaya, R U; Skrebitskii, V G

    2015-01-01

    Application of nootropic agent Noopept on hippocampal slices from Wistar rats enhanced the inhibitory component of total current induced by stimulation of Shaffer collaterals in CA1 pyramidal neurons, but did not affect the excitatory component. A direct correlation between the increase in the amplitude of inhibitory current and agent concentration was found. The substance did not affect the release of inhibitory transmitters from terminals in the pyramidal neurons, which indicated changes in GABAergic interneurons. PMID:25573367

  8. The inhibitory effect of Zingiber corallinum Hance essential oil on drug-resistant bacteria and evaluation of its acute toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ce; Zhou, Lin-Lin; Wang, Hai-Yan; Huang, Su-Na; Liu, Qing; Hu, Shi-Lin; Li, Ting-Rong; Chen, Yan-Bing; Jiang, Jian-Xin

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background The excessive and irregular use of antibiotics could result in the generation and diffusion of drug-resistant bacteria. The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Zingiber corallinum Hance essential oil (ZCHO) on drug-resistant bacteria, especially on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Material/Methods Susceptibility testing was used to evaluate the effect of ZCHO on growth inhibition of drug-resistant bacteria by paper disk method. Mice orally administered with ZCHO were used to observe acute toxicity and to determine median lethal dose (LD50) of ZCHO. Broth dilution method was used to determine minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of ZCHO on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Results ZCHO exhibited an obvious inhibitory effect not only on gram-negative drug-resistant bacteria including Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Enterobacter cloacae and Acinetobacter baumannii, but also on gram-positive drug-resistant bacteria including Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis and Staphylococcus haemolyticus. The ZCHO containing 79% terpinen-4-ol revealed better bacteriostatic effect than ZCHO with 34% terpinen-4-ol. The LD50 of ZCHO was 1790.427 mg/kg. The MIC and MBC of ZCHO on drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii were 1457.81 mg/L. Conclusions ZCHO has obvious bacteriostasis and bactericidal effects, especially against drug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii. Therefore, ZCHO is a promising natural bioactive component with antibacterial effect and satisfactory safety due to its low toxicity. PMID:21525802

  9. The glycinergic inhibitory synapse.

    PubMed

    Legendre, P

    2001-05-01

    Glycine is one of the most important inhibitory neurotransmitters in the spinal cord and the brainstem, and glycinergic synapses have a well-established role in the regulation of locomotor behavior. Research over the last 15 years has yielded new insights on glycine neurotransmission. Glycinergic synapses are now known not to be restricted to the spinal cord and the brainstem. Presynaptic machinery for glycine release and uptake, the structure and function of postsynaptic receptors and the factors (both pre- and postsynaptic) which control the strength of glycinergic inhibition have been extensively studied. It is now established that glycinergic synapses can be excitatory in the immature brain and that some inhibitory synapses can corelease gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glycine. Moreover, the presence of glycine transporters on glial cells and the capacity of these cells to release glycine suggest that glycine may also act as a neuromodulator. Extensive molecular studies have revealed the presence of distinct subtypes of postsynaptic glycine receptors with different functional properties. Mechanisms of glycine receptors aggregation at postsynaptic sites during development are better understood and functional implications of variation in receptor number between postsynaptic sites are partly elucidated. Mutations of glycine receptor subunits have been shown to underly some human locomotor disorders, including the startle disease. Clearly, recent work on glycine receptor channels and the synapses at which they mediate inhibitory signalling in both young and adult animals necessitates an update of our vision of glycinergic inhibitory transmission. PMID:11437237

  10. Repulsive and inhibitory signals.

    PubMed

    Keynes, R J; Cook, G M

    1995-02-01

    Repulsive or inhibitory interactions between growth cones and their environment are now widely implicated in neural development and regeneration. Over the past year, descriptive studies of the various neuronal systems in which repulsion may participate have clarified its biology. Molecular and genetic studies have also provided the necessary entry point for further experimental manipulations, and are beginning to yield important clues regarding the function of repulsion in vivo. Although candidate second messengers underlying the growth cone response have been identified, they have yet to be incorporated into a comprehensive mechanism. PMID:7539649

  11. The Minimum Impulse Thruster

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, J. Morgan; Wilson, Michael J.

    2005-01-01

    The Minimum Impulse Thruster (MIT) was developed to improve the state-of-the-art minimum impulse capability of hydrazine monopropellant thrusters. Specifically, a new fast response solenoid valve was developed, capable of responding to a much shorter electrical pulse width, thereby reducing the propellant flow time and the minimum impulse bit. The new valve was combined with the Aerojet MR-103, 0.2 lbf (0.9 N) thruster and put through an extensive Delta-qualification test program, resulting in a factor of 5 reduction in the minimum impulse bit, from roughly 1.1 milli-lbf-seconds (5 milliNewton seconds) to - 0.22 milli-lbf-seconds (1 mN-s). To maintain it's extensive heritage, the thruster itself was left unchanged. The Minimum Impulse Thruster provides mission and spacecraft designers new design options for precision pointing and precision translation of spacecraft.

  12. Marine-derived quorum-sensing inhibitory activities enhance the antibacterial efficacy of tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Busetti, Alessandro; Shaw, George; Megaw, Julianne; Gorman, Sean P; Maggs, Christine A; Gilmore, Brendan F

    2015-01-01

    Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs). Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (-63%) and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (-33%). KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (-89%) and a 2-log reduction (-99%) in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL). Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL) of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments. PMID:25546516

  13. Marine-Derived Quorum-Sensing Inhibitory Activities Enhance the Antibacterial Efficacy of Tobramycin against Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Busetti, Alessandro; Shaw, George; Megaw, Julianne; Gorman, Sean P.; Maggs, Christine A.; Gilmore, Brendan F.

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial epiphytes isolated from marine eukaryotes were screened for the production of quorum sensing inhibitory compounds (QSIs). Marine isolate KS8, identified as a Pseudoalteromonas sp., was found to display strong quorum sensing inhibitory (QSI) activity against acyl homoserine lactone (AHL)-based reporter strains Chromobacterium violaceum ATCC 12472 and CV026. KS8 supernatant significantly reduced biofilm biomass during biofilm formation (−63%) and in pre-established, mature P. aeruginosa PAO1 biofilms (−33%). KS8 supernatant also caused a 0.97-log reduction (−89%) and a 2-log reduction (−99%) in PAO1 biofilm viable counts in the biofilm formation assay and the biofilm eradication assay respectively. The crude organic extract of KS8 had a minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of 2 mg/mL against PAO1 but no minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) was observed over the concentration range tested (MBC > 16 mg/mL). Sub-MIC concentrations (1 mg/mL) of KS8 crude organic extract significantly reduced the quorum sensing (QS)-dependent production of both pyoverdin and pyocyanin in P. aeruginosa PAO1 without affecting growth. A combinatorial approach using tobramycin and the crude organic extract at 1 mg/mL against planktonic P. aeruginosa PAO1 was found to increase the efficacy of tobramycin ten-fold, decreasing the MIC from 0.75 to 0.075 µg/mL. These data support the validity of approaches combining conventional antibiotic therapy with non-antibiotic compounds to improve the efficacy of current treatments. PMID:25546516

  14. Inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle via inhibition of growth and histidine decarboxylase activity of Morganella morganii.

    PubMed

    Kim, Dong Hyun; Kim, Koth Bong Woo Ri; Cho, Ji Young; Ahn, Dong Hyun

    2014-04-01

    This study was performed to investigate the inhibitory effects of brown algae extracts on histamine production in mackerel muscle. First, antimicrobial activities of brown algae extracts against Morganella morganii were investigated using a disk diffusion method. An ethanol extract of Ecklonia cava (ECEE) exhibited strong antimicrobial activity. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of ECEE was 2 mg/ml. Furthermore, the brown algae extracts were examined for their ability to inhibit crude histidine decarboxylase (HDC) of M. morganii. The ethanol extract of Eisenia bicyclis (EBEE) and ECEE exhibited significant inhibitory activities (19.82% and 33.79%, respectively) at a concentration of 1 mg/ml. To obtain the phlorotannin dieckol, ECEE and EBEE were subjected to liquid-liquid extraction, silica gel column chromatography, and HPLC. Dieckol exhibited substantial inhibitory activity with an IC50 value of 0.61 mg/ml, and exhibited competitive inhibition. These extracts were also tested on mackerel muscle. The viable cell counts and histamine production in mackerel muscle inoculated with M. morganii treated with ?2.5 MIC of ECEE (weight basis) were highly inhibited compared with the untreated sample. Furthermore, treatment of crude HDC-inoculated mackerel muscle with 0.5% ECEE and 0.5% EBEE (weight basis), which exhibited excellent inhibitory activities against crude HDC, reduced the overall histamine production by 46.29% and 56.89%, respectively, compared with the untreated sample. Thus, these inhibitory effects of ECEE and EBEE should be helpful in enhancing the safety of mackerel by suppressing histamine production in this fish species. PMID:24394193

  15. Caries inhibitory activity of cacao bean husk extract in in-vitro and animal experiments.

    PubMed

    Ooshima, T; Osaka, Y; Sasaki, H; Osawa, K; Yasuda, H; Matsumura, M; Sobue, S; Matsumoto, M

    2000-08-01

    Cacao bean husk extract (CBH) was examined for inhibitory effects on the caries-inducing properties of mutans streptococci in vitro and on caries development in specific pathogen-free Sprague-Dawley rats infected with mutans streptococci. CBH reduced the growth rate of almost all oral streptococci examined, which resulted in the reduction of acid production. Furthermore, insoluble glucan synthesis by the glucosyltransferases from Streptococcus mutans MT8148R and Streptococcus sobrinus 6715 was significantly inhibited by CBH. Hence, the sucrose-dependent cell adherence of mutans streptococci was also depressed by CBH. The administration of CBH in drinking water resulted in significant reductions of caries development and dental plaque accumulation in rats infected with either Strep. sobrinus 6715 or Strep. mutans MT8148R, and the minimum cariostatic concentration was 1.0 mg/ml. These results indicate that CBH possesses powerful anticariogenic potential. PMID:10869475

  16. Minimum Grading, Maximum Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carey, Theodore; Carifio, James

    2011-01-01

    Fair and effective schools should assign grades that align with clear and consistent evidence of student performance (Wormeli, 2006), but when a student's performance is inconsistent, traditional grading practices can prove inadequate. Understanding this, increasing numbers of schools have been experimenting with the practice of assigning minimum

  17. Minimum variance geographic sampling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrell, G. R. (principal investigator)

    1980-01-01

    Resource inventories require samples with geographical scatter, sometimes not as widely spaced as would be hoped. A simple model of correlation over distances is used to create a minimum variance unbiased estimate population means. The fitting procedure is illustrated from data used to estimate Missouri corn acreage.

  18. Rising above the Minimum Wage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Even, William; Macpherson, David

    An in-depth analysis was made of how quickly most people move up the wage scale from minimum wage, what factors influence their progress, and how minimum wage increases affect wage growth above the minimum. Very few workers remain at the minimum wage over the long run, according to this study of data drawn from the 1977-78 May Current Population…

  19. [Minimum quantities from a thoracic surgical standpoint].

    PubMed

    Kaiser, D

    2007-11-01

    The dependence of operation lethality on hospital volume has been scientifically determined for thoracic surgery. Conclusions on the quality of the results are possible based on the structure and quality of the procedure. Minimum quantities for specialized centers in thoracic surgery have been established as 300 resectional operations on thoracic organs without mediastinoscopy, operations with the heart-lung machine, and thoracic drainage. Minimum quantities are necessary to uphold sufficient complication management by appropriate practice and experience and to keep operation lethality down. They are also needed for financing staff (at least two full-time active specialists in thoracic surgery). The concentration of thoracic surgical services at main hospitals (minimum 300 operations per year) and organ centers (minimum 500 resectional operations on thoracic organs per year) is reasonable for the 45,500 operations expected in Germany. PMID:17932631

  20. Ozone Minimums, 1979 to 2013 - Duration: 32 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    Minimum concentration of ozone in the southern hemisphere for each year from 1979-2013 (there is no data from 1995). Each image is the day of the year with the lowest concentration of ozone. A grap...

  1. Minimum fuel mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    The minimum fuel mode of the NASA F-15 research aircraft is designed to minimize fuel flow while maintaining constant net propulsive force (FNP), effectively reducing thrust specific fuel consumption (TSFC), during cruise flight conditions. The test maneuvers were at stabilized flight conditions. The aircraft test engine was allowed to stabilize at the cruise conditions before data collection initiated; data were then recorded with performance seeking control (PSC) not-engaged, then data were recorded with the PSC system engaged. The maneuvers were flown back-to-back to allow for direct comparisons by minimizing the effects of variations in the test day conditions. The minimum fuel mode was evaluated at subsonic and supersonic Mach numbers and focused on three altitudes: 15,000; 30,000; and 45,000 feet. Flight data were collected for part, military, partial, and maximum afterburning power conditions. The TSFC savings at supersonic Mach numbers, ranging from approximately 4% to nearly 10%, are in general much larger than at subsonic Mach numbers because of PSC trims to the afterburner.

  2. Minimum cost casing design

    SciTech Connect

    Halal, A.S.; Warling, D.J.; Wagner, R.R.

    1996-12-31

    The casing program of most wells represents a significant portion of the total well cost, approximately between 15 and 35%. Hence, any reduction in tubular cost can generate considerable cost savings. This paper presents a novel and efficient minimum-cost casing design technique which employs a recursive branch-and-bound search method together with a streamlined load generator for complex loading conditions. The three-stage technique utilizes effective bounding methods which substantially reduce the search space and speed up convergence. To illustrate the efficiency of the technique in practical applications, a parametric study is presented for an example well which models a geopressured well in the Gulf of Mexico. The results show that a minimum-cost design for most casing strings in this example can be achieved in less than 2 seconds using a personal computer with a 75 MHz Intel 486DX processor. One key outcome of this research is a Microsoft Windows-based implementation of this technique which offers the casing designer a powerful and flexible tool to quickly assess the trade-off between the potential cost savings from increasing the design complexity and the accompanying increased risk.

  3. Brain stimulation and inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Juan, Chi-Hung; Muggleton, Neil G

    2012-04-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviours to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary or appropriate. Examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution and inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a very brief time window. Deficits in inhibitory control have been associated with problems in behavioural regulation in impulsive violence as well as a range of clinical disorders. The roles of various areas, including the frontal eye fields (FEF), the pre-supplementary motor area (pre-SMA) and the inferior frontal gyrus, in inhibitory control have been investigated using an inhibitory control task and both transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) and transcranial direct current stimulation (tDCS). Typically effects on response inhibition but no effects on response generation have been seen. The contributions of these areas to performance seem to differ with, for example, pre-SMA being involved when the task is relatively novel whereas this is not the case for FEF. The findings from brain stimulation studies offer both insight into which areas are necessary for effective inhibitory control and recent extension of findings for the role of the inferior frontal gyrus illustrate how the specific functions by which these areas contribute may be further clarified. Future work, including making use of the temporal specificity of TMS and combination of TMS/tDCS with other neuroimaging techniques, may further clarify the nature and functions played by the network of areas involved in inhibitory control. PMID:22494830

  4. Inhibitory Control Predicts Grammatical Ability

    PubMed Central

    Ibbotson, Paul; Kearvell-White, Jennifer

    2015-01-01

    We present evidence that individual variation in grammatical ability can be predicted by individual variation in inhibitory control. We tested 81 5-year-olds using two classic tests from linguistics and psychology (Past Tense and the Stroop). Inhibitory control was a better predicator of grammatical ability than either vocabulary or age. Our explanation is that giving the correct response in both tests requires using a common cognitive capacity to inhibit unwanted competition. The implications are that understanding the developmental trajectory of language acquisition can benefit from integrating the developmental trajectory of non-linguistic faculties, such as executive control. PMID:26659926

  5. Design for Minimum Risk

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wetherholt, Jon; Heimann, Timothy J.

    2010-01-01

    Design for Minimum Risk (DFMR) is a term used by NASA programs as an expansion of the general hazard reduction process where if an identified hazard cannot be eliminated, the design is modified to reduce the associated mishap risk to an acceptable level. DFMR is a set of specific requirements to minimize risk. DFMR is not well understood and there are many misconceptions concerning the meaning and use. This paper will provide insight into the use of DFMR for space applications; it s comparison to other hazard mitigation strategies and examples of how the approach has been used in the past. It will also highlight documents used by NASA on various programs to determine DFMR.

  6. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30…

  7. Inhibitory Control in Childhood Stuttering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eggers, Kurt; De Nil, Luc F.; Van den Bergh, Bea R. H.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was to investigate whether previously reported parental questionnaire-based differences in inhibitory control (IC; Eggers, De Nil, & Van den Bergh, 2010) would be supported by direct measurement of IC using a computer task. Method: Participants were 30 children who stutter (CWS; mean age = 7;05 years) and 30

  8. Osteoclastogenesis inhibitory effect of ergosterol peroxide isolated from Pleurotus eryngii.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Satoru; Bang, Tran Hai; Shimizu, Kuniyoshi; Kondo, Ryuichiro

    2012-09-01

    Ergosterol peroxide was isolated from the ethanol extract of Pleurotus eryngii as an inhibitor of osteoclast differentiation. This compound showed an inhibitory effect in a dose-dependent manner and an inhibition rate of up to 62% with low cytotoxicity, even at a concentration as low as 1.0 microg/mL. PMID:23074896

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Glycerin on Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella

    PubMed Central

    Chun, Doki; Seol, Sung Yong; Tak, Ryunbin; Park, Cheong Kyu

    1972-01-01

    In a study of the effect of glycerin in transport media on Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Salmonella, it was found that a concentration of 30% glycerin was highly inhibitory for V. parahaemolyticus and to a lesser degree for Salmonella. The incorporation of peptone or human feces in media did not reduce the inhibitory effect of glycerin. In media with 15% glycerin, viable counts of V. parahaemolyticus and Salmonella increased after 24 hr of incubation both in the presence and absence of feces. Due to the concurrent increase in the total bacterial count in the media containing feces, no enrichment effect was noted. PMID:4565633

  10. ACE inhibitory peptides derived from aquatic protein.

    PubMed

    Lin, Lin; Lv, Shun; Zhang, Xiaorong; Lu, Jianfeng; Ye, Yingwang; Jiang, Shaotong

    2013-05-01

    Among bioactive peptides derived from aquatic protein, those with ACE inhibitory activity are receiving special attention. This paper presented an overview of ACE inhibitory peptides derived from aquatic proteins, and the peptide sources were listed. The structure-activity relationship and mechanism of action of ACE inhibitory peptides were also discussed. Finally, the antihypertensive effects of ACE inhibitory peptides derived from marine protein, including short-term and long-term influence, were also discussed. PMID:23721314

  11. Cortical Neurodynamics of Inhibitory Control

    PubMed Central

    Ghuman, Avniel S.; Manoach, Dara S.; Jones, Stephanie R.; Luna, Beatriz

    2014-01-01

    The ability to inhibit prepotent responses is critical for successful goal-directed behaviors. To investigate the neural basis of inhibitory control, we conducted a magnetoencephalography study where human participants performed the antisaccade task. Results indicated that neural oscillations in the prefrontal cortex (PFC) showed significant task modulations in preparation to suppress saccades. Before successfully inhibiting a saccade, beta-band power (1838 Hz) in the lateral PFC and alpha-band power (1018 Hz) in the frontal eye field (FEF) increased. Trial-by-trial prestimulus FEF alpha-band power predicted successful saccadic inhibition. Further, inhibitory control enhanced cross-frequency amplitude coupling between PFC beta-band (1838 Hz) activity and FEF alpha-band activity, and the coupling appeared to be initiated by the PFC. Our results suggest a generalized mechanism for top-down inhibitory control: prefrontal beta-band activity initiates alpha-band activity for functional inhibition of the effector and/or sensory system. PMID:25031398

  12. Antifungal susceptibility and growth inhibitory response of oral Candida species to Brucea javanica Linn. extract

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Candida species have been associated with the emergence of resistant strains towards selected antifungal agents. Plant products have been used traditionally as alternative medicine to ease candidal infections. The present study was undertaken to investigate the antifungal susceptibility patterns and growth inhibiting effect of Brucea javanica seeds extract against Candida species. Methods A total of seven Candida strains that includes Candida albicans ATCC14053, Candida dubliniensis ATCCMYA-2975, Candida glabrata ATCC90030, Candida krusei ATCC14243, Candida lusitaniae ATCC64125, Candida parapsilosis ATCC22019 and Candida tropicalis ATCC13803 were used in this study. The antifungal activity, minimum inhibitory concentration and minimum fungicidal concentration of B. javanica extract were evaluated. Each strain was cultured in Yeast Peptone Dextrose broth under four different growth environments; (i) in the absence and presence of B. javanica extract at respective concentrations of (ii) 1mg/ml (iii) 3mg/ml and (iv) 6mg/ml. The growth inhibitory responses of the candidal cells were determined based on changes in the specific-growth rates (?) and doubling time (g). The values in the presence of extract were computed as percentage in the optical density relative to that of the total cells suspension in the absence of extract. Results B. javanica seeds extract exhibited antifungal properties. C. tropicalis showed the highest growth rate; 0.319??0.002h-1, while others were in the range of 0.141??0.001 to 0.265??0.005h-1. In the presence of extract, the lag and log phases were extended and deviated the ?- and g-values. B. javanica extract had significantly reduced the ?-values of C. dubliniensis, C. krusei and C. parapsilosis at more than 80% (??

  13. Minimum Competency Doesn't Mean Minimum Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valmont, William J.

    Many educators think that the end result of minimum competency programs has been the lowering of the quality of learning by most students. It appears that once minimum competencies are held up as the expected level of attainment for all students, there is a tendency to aim all instruction toward those competencies to the exclusion of a wider range

  14. Phytochemical, antimicrobial, and antioxidant activities of different citrus juice concentrates.

    PubMed

    Oikeh, Ehigbai I; Omoregie, Ehimwenma S; Oviasogie, Faith E; Oriakhi, Kelly

    2016-01-01

    The search for new antimicrobial compounds is ongoing. Its importance cannot be overemphasized in an era of emerging resistant pathogenic organisms. This study therefore investigated the phytochemical composition and antioxidant and antimicrobial activities of different citrus juice concentrates. Fruit juices of Citrus tangerine (tangerine), Citrus paradisi (grape), Citrus limon (lemon), and Citrus aurantifolia (lime) were evaluated. Antimicrobial activities against five bacterial and three fungal strains were evaluated. The results revealed the presence of alkaloids, flavonoids, steroids, terpenoids, saponins, cardiac glycosides, and reducing sugars in all the juice concentrates. DPPH (1,1-diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl) radical scavenging capacities varied with tangerine and grape juices having better scavenging capacities than lemon and lime juices. Grape juice was observed to have a significantly higher (P<0.05) ferric-reducing antioxidant potential (FRAP) value (364.210.25?mol/L Fe(II)/g of the extract) than the reference antioxidant, ascorbic acid (312.885.61?mol/L). Antimicrobial studies revealed differential antimicrobial activities against different microbial strains. Zones of inhibition ranging from 4 to 26mm were observed for the antibacterial tests with 0-24mm for antifungal test. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) and minimum bacteriostatic concentrations (MBC) for concentrates against bacterial strains ranged from 12.5 to 200?g/mL. Lemon and lime juice concentrates had lower MIC and MBC values with orange and tangerine having the highest values. Minimum fungicidal concentrations ranged from 50 to 200?g/mL. The results of this study suggest that these juice concentrates may have beneficial antimicrobial roles that can be exploited in controlling unwanted microbial growth. PMID:26788316

  15. In glucose-limited continuous culture the minimum substrate concentration for growth, smin, is crucial in the competition between the enterobacterium Escherichia coli and Chelatobacter heintzii, an environmentally abundant bacterium

    PubMed Central

    Füchslin, Hans Peter; Schneider, Christian; Egli, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The competition for glucose between Escherichia coli ML30, a typical copiotrophic enterobacterium and Chelatobacter heintzii ATCC29600, an environmentally successful strain, was studied in a carbon-limited culture at low dilution rates. First, as a base for modelling, the kinetic parameters μmax and Ks were determined for growth with glucose. For both strains, μmax was determined in batch culture after different precultivation conditions. In the case of C. heintzii, μmax was virtually independent of precultivation conditions. When inoculated into a glucose-excess batch culture medium from a glucose-limited chemostat run at a dilution rate of 0.075 h−1 C. heintzii grew immediately with a μmax of 0.17±0.03 h−1. After five transfers in batch culture, μmax had increased only slightly to 0.18±0.03 h−1. A different pattern was observed in the case of E. coli. Inoculated from a glucose-limited chemostat at D=0.075 h−1 into glucose-excess batch medium E. coli grew only after an acceleration phase of ∼3.5 h with a μmax of 0.52 h−1. After 120 generations and several transfers into fresh medium, μmax had increased to 0.80±0.03 h−1. For long-term adapted chemostat-cultivated cells, a Ks for glucose of 15 μg l−1 for C. heintzii, and of 35 μg l−1 for E. coli, respectively, was determined in 14C-labelled glucose uptake experiments. In competition experiments, the population dynamics of the mixed culture was determined using specific surface antibodies against C. heintzii and a specific 16S rRNA probe for E. coli. C. heintzii outcompeted E. coli in glucose-limited continuous culture at the low dilution rates of 0.05 and 0.075 h−1. Using the determined pure culture parameter values for Ks and μmax, it was only possible to simulate the population dynamics during competition with an extended form of the Monod model, which includes a finite substrate concentration at zero growth rate (smin). The values estimated for smin were dependent on growth rate; at D=0.05 h−1, it was 12.6 and 0 μg l−1 for E. coli and C. heintzii, respectively. To fit the data at D=0.075 h−1, smin for E. coli had to be raised to 34.9 μg l−1 whereas smin for C. heintzii remained zero. The results of the mathematical simulation suggest that it is not so much the higher Ks value, which is responsible for the unsuccessful competition of E. coli at low residual glucose concentration, but rather the existence of a significant smin. PMID:22030672

  16. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Paula M; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristn A

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a "kick start effect" over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the protocol. These results demonstrate a dynamical behavioral inhibition capacity in humans, as illustrated by the reward magnitude modulation and initial reward history effects. PMID:24860469

  17. Monetary rewards modulate inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Herrera, Paula M.; Speranza, Mario; Hampshire, Adam; Bekinschtein, Tristn A.

    2014-01-01

    The ability to override a dominant response, often referred to as behavioral inhibition, is considered a key element of executive cognition. Poor behavioral inhibition is a defining characteristic of several neurological and psychiatric populations. Recently, there has been increasing interest in the motivational dimension of behavioral inhibition, with some experiments incorporating emotional contingencies in classical inhibitory paradigms such as the Go/NoGo and Stop Signal Tasks (SSTs). Several studies have reported a positive modulatory effect of reward on performance in pathological conditions such as substance abuse, pathological gambling, and Attention Deficit Hyperactive Disorder (ADHD). However, experiments that directly investigate the modulatory effects of reward magnitudes on the performance of inhibitory tasks are scarce and little is known about the finer grained relationship between motivation and inhibitory control. Here we probed the effect of reward magnitude and context on behavioral inhibition with three modified versions of the widely used SST. The pilot study compared inhibition performance during six blocks alternating neutral feedback, low, medium, and high monetary rewards. Study One compared increasing vs. decreasing rewards, with low, high rewards, and neutral feedback; whilst Study Two compared low and high reward magnitudes alone also in an increasing and decreasing reward design. The reward magnitude effect was not demonstrated in the pilot study, probably due to a learning effect induced by practice in this lengthy task. The reward effect per se was weak but the context (order of reward) was clearly suggested in Study One, and was particularly strongly confirmed in study two. In addition, these findings revealed a kick start effect over global performance measures. Specifically, there was a long lasting improvement in performance throughout the task when participants received the highest reward magnitudes at the beginning of the protocol. These results demonstrate a dynamical behavioral inhibition capacity in humans, as illustrated by the reward magnitude modulation and initial reward history effects. PMID:24860469

  18. Inhibitory effect of linalool-rich essential oil from Lippia alba on the peptidase and keratinase activities of dermatophytes.

    PubMed

    Costa, Danielle Cristina Machado; Vermelho, Alane Beatriz; Almeida, Catia Amancio; de Souza Dias, Edilma Paraguai; Cedrola, Sabrina Martins Lage; Arrigoni-Blank, Maria de Ftima; Blank, Arie Fitzgerald; Alviano, Celuta Sales; Alviano, Daniela Sales

    2014-02-01

    Abstract Lippia alba (Miller) N.E. Brown is an aromatic plant known locally as "Erva-cidreira-do-campo" that has great importance in Brazilian folk medicine. The aim of our study was to evaluate the antidermatophytic potential of linalool-rich essential oil (EO) from L. alba and analyze the ability of this EO to inhibit peptidase and keratinase activities, which are important virulence factors in dermatophytes. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of L. alba EO were 39, 156 and 312 g/mL against Trichophyton rubrum, Epidermophyton floccosum and Microsporum gypseum, respectively. To evaluate the influence of L. alba EO on the proteolytic and keratinolytic activities of these dermatophytes, specific inhibitory assays were performed. The results indicated that linalool-rich EO from L. alba inhibited the activity of proteases and keratinases secreted from dermatophytes, and this inhibition could be a possible mechanism of action against dermatophytes. Due to the effective antidermatophytic activity of L. alba EO, further experiments should be performed to explore the potential of this linalool-rich EO as an alternative antifungal therapy. PMID:23323991

  19. Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart

    MedlinePLUS

    ... JSR 286) Actions ${title} Loading... Safe Minimum Internal Temperature Chart Safe steps in food handling, cooking, and ... from other foods. Cook —Cook to the right temperature. Chill —Refrigerate food promptly. Cook all food to ...

  20. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the incorporation by reference of this standard in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.../Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP) Chemicals. For each theft/diversion... possesses the STQ. (3) Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest,...

  1. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the incorporation by reference of this standard in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.../Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP) Chemicals. For each theft/diversion... possesses the STQ. (3) Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest,...

  2. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... the incorporation by reference of this standard in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.../Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP) Chemicals. For each theft/diversion... possesses the STQ. (3) Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest,...

  3. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the incorporation by reference of this standard in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.../Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP) Chemicals. For each theft/diversion... possesses the STQ. (3) Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest,...

  4. 6 CFR 27.204 - Minimum concentration by security issue.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... the incorporation by reference of this standard in accordance with 5 U.S.C. 552(a) and 1 CFR part 51.../Diversion-Explosives/Improvised Explosive Device Precursor (EXP/IEDP) Chemicals. For each theft/diversion... possesses the STQ. (3) Release-Explosive Chemicals. For each release-explosive chemical of interest,...

  5. Evaluation of the inhibitory effect of dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC) against wine microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Costa, A; Barata, A; Malfeito-Ferreira, M; Loureiro, V

    2008-04-01

    Several microbial species associated with wine were challenged against increasing concentrations of dimethyl dicarbonate (DMDC). The concentration inducing complete cell death upon addition to red wine was regarded as the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). In dry red wines with 12% (v/v) ethanol and pH 3.50, the inactivation depended on the initial cell concentration. For an initial inoculum of 500 CFU/ml, the MIC of the yeasts species Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Dekkera bruxellensis, Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia guilliermondii was 100mg/l. The most sensitive strains belong to Zygosaccharomyces bailii, Zygoascus hellenicus and Lachancea thermotolerans, with MIC of 25mg/l DMDC. For inoculation rates of about 10(6)CFU/ml, the maximum dose of DMDC legally authorized (200mg/l) was not effective against the most resistant species. The addition of 100mg/l potassium metabisulphite (PMB), equivalent to 1mg/l molecular sulphur dioxide, increased the inactivation effect of 100mg/l DMDC over initial yeast populations of 10(6)CFU/ml but did not fully kill S. pombe and S. cerevisiae. Lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria were not killed by the addition of 300 mg/l of DMDC. Trials performed in wines before bottling showed that in most samples indigenous bacterial populations were not affected by 200mg/l DMDC. Therefore, under winery practice, DMDC at the maximum dose legally permitted may be regarded as an efficient preservative to control low contamination rates of yeasts but ineffective against lactic acid and acetic acid bacteria. PMID:18206786

  6. In vitro growth-inhibitory effect of ethanol GRAS plant and supercritical CO₂ hop extracts on planktonic cultures of oral pathogenic microorganisms.

    PubMed

    Pilna, J; Vlkova, E; Krofta, K; Nesvadba, V; Rada, V; Kokoska, L

    2015-09-01

    Conventional chemical antiseptics used for treatment of oral infections often produce side-effects, which restrict their long-term use. Plants are considered as perspective sources of novel natural antiseptics. However, little is still known about their inhibitory properties against oral pathogens. The objective of this study was to test in vitro antimicrobial activities of generally recognized as safe (GRAS) species against planktonic cultures of cariogenic, periodontal and candidal microorganisms and identify active compounds of the most active extracts. Growth-inhibitory effects of ethanol extracts from 109 GRAS plant species, six Humulus lupulus cultivars and two hop supercritical CO2 extracts were evaluated using broth microdilution method. The chemical analysis was done through high-performance liquid chromatography. Best results were obtained for supercritical CO2 and ethanol extracts of H. lupulus with minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) ≥8 μg/mL and ≥16 μg/mL, respectively. The chemical analysis of supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts revealed that α- and β-acids were their main constituents. Capsicum annuum and Capsicum frutescens showed antibacterial effect against Streptococcus sobrinus and Streptococcus salivarius (MIC=64-128 μg/mL). These strains were further inhibited by Zanthoxylum clava-herculis (MIC=64-128 μg/mL) and Myristica fragrans (both MIC≥128 μg/mL). The latter also exhibited antimicrobial activity against Fusobacterium nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). Punica granatum possessed inhibitory effects against Candida albicans (MIC=128 μg/mL) and F. nucleatum (MIC=64 μg/mL). The results indicate that supercritical CO2H. lupulus extracts together with ethanol extracts of C. annuum, C. frutescens, M. fragrans, P. granatum and Z. clava-herculis are promising materials for further investigation on new antiseptic agents of oral care products. PMID:26232134

  7. Inhibitory effect of Allium sativum and Zingiber officinale extracts on clinically important drug resistant pathogenic bacteria

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Herbs and spices are very important and useful as therapeutic agent against many pathological infections. Increasing multidrug resistance of pathogens forces to find alternative compounds for treatment of infectious diseases. Methods In the present study the antimicrobial potency of garlic and ginger has been investigated against eight local clinical bacterial isolates. Three types of extracts of each garlic and ginger including aqueous extract, methanol extract and ethanol extract had been assayed separately against drug resistant Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Shigella sonnei, Staphylococcusepidermidis and Salmonella typhi. The antibacterial activity was determined by disc diffusion method. Results All tested bacterial strains were most susceptible to the garlic aqueous extract and showed poor susceptibility to the ginger aqueous extract. The (minimum inhibitory concentration) MIC of different bacterial species varied from 0.05?mg/ml to 1.0?mg/ml. Conclusion In the light of several socioeconomic factors of Pakistan mainly poverty and poor hygienic condition, present study encourages the use of spices as alternative or supplementary medicine to reduce the burden of high cost, side effects and progressively increasing drug resistance of pathogens. PMID:22540232

  8. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Trichosporon ovoides causing Piedra Hair Infection

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Seema; Uniyal, Veena; Bhatt, R.P.

    2012-01-01

    Piedra, is an asymptomatic fungal infection of the hair shaft, resulting in the formation of nodules of different hardness on the infected hair. The infection also known as Trichomycosis nodularis is a superficial fungal infection arising from the pathogen being restricted to the stratum corneum with little or no tissue reaction. The nodules are a concretion of hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus. Two varieties of Piedra may be seen, Black Piedra and White Piedra. The fungus Trichosporon ovoides is involved in the occurrence of both types of Piedras. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth of the fungus and to determine whether the antifungal effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. Two screening methods viz. Agar well diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration were adopted for the study. MIC and MFC were determined by tube dilution method. Essential oils from Eucalyptus, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon winterians, Trachyspermum ammi, Zingiber officinalis, Citrus limon, Cinnamomon zeylanicum, Salvia sclarea, Citrus aurantifolia, Melaleuca alternifolia, Citrus aurantium, Citrus bergamia, Pogostemon pathchouli, Cedrus atlantica, Jasminum officinale, Juniperus communis, Abelmoschus moschatus, Cyperus scariosus, Palargonium graveolens, Boswellia carterii, Rosa damascene, Veteveria zizanoides and Commiphora myrrha were evaluated. The essential oils of Cymbopogon winterians, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were proved to be most effective against the fungus Trichosporon ovoides. PMID:24031963

  9. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Trichosporon ovoides causing Piedra Hair Infection.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Seema; Uniyal, Veena; Bhatt, R P

    2012-10-01

    Piedra, is an asymptomatic fungal infection of the hair shaft, resulting in the formation of nodules of different hardness on the infected hair. The infection also known as Trichomycosis nodularis is a superficial fungal infection arising from the pathogen being restricted to the stratum corneum with little or no tissue reaction. The nodules are a concretion of hyphae and fruiting bodies of the fungus. Two varieties of Piedra may be seen, Black Piedra and White Piedra. The fungus Trichosporon ovoides is involved in the occurrence of both types of Piedras. The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of selected essential oils for the control of growth of the fungus and to determine whether the antifungal effect was due to the major compounds of the oils. Two screening methods viz. Agar well diffusion assay and Minimum Inhibitory Concentration were adopted for the study. MIC and MFC were determined by tube dilution method. Essential oils from Eucalyptus, Ocimum basilicum, Mentha piperita, Cymbopogon flexuosus, Cymbopogon winterians, Trachyspermum ammi, Zingiber officinalis, Citrus limon, Cinnamomon zeylanicum, Salvia sclarea, Citrus aurantifolia, Melaleuca alternifolia, Citrus aurantium, Citrus bergamia, Pogostemon pathchouli, Cedrus atlantica, Jasminum officinale, Juniperus communis, Abelmoschus moschatus, Cyperus scariosus, Palargonium graveolens, Boswellia carterii, Rosa damascene, Veteveria zizanoides and Commiphora myrrha were evaluated. The essential oils of Cymbopogon winterians, Mentha piperita, Cinnamomum zeylanicum, Melaleuca alternifolia and Eucalyptus globulus were proved to be most effective against the fungus Trichosporon ovoides. PMID:24031963

  10. Plasticity of Cortical Excitatory-Inhibitory Balance

    PubMed Central

    Froemke, Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Synapses are highly plastic and are modified by changes in patterns of neural activity or sensory experience. Plasticity of cortical excitatory synapses is thought to be important for learning and memory, leading to alterations in sensory representations and cognitive maps. However, these changes must be coordinated across other synapses within local circuits to preserve neural coding schemes and the organization of excitatory and inhibitory inputs, i.e., excitatory-inhibitory balance. Recent studies indicate that inhibitory synapses are also plastic and are controlled directly by a large number of neuromodulators, particularly during episodes of learning. Many modulators transiently alter excitatory-inhibitory balance by decreasing inhibition, and thus disinhibition has emerged as a major mechanism by which neuromodulation might enable long-term synaptic modifications naturally. This review examines the relationships between neuromodulation and synaptic plasticity, focusing on the induction of long-term changes that collectively enhance cortical excitatory-inhibitory balance for improving perception and behavior. PMID:25897875

  11. The Maunder minimum: a revision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, Nadezhda; Ponyavin, Dmitri

    2015-08-01

    One of the most enigmatic features of the solar history in the past was the Maunder minimum (1645-1715). We estimated the daily nominal sunspot counts of each observer individually from 1610 to 1720. Simultaneous comparison of textual reports, tables, and sunspot drawings reveals a significant difference between them. Some observers (among whom were Jean Picard and Giovanni Domenico Cassini, both from the Royal Observatory in Paris) systematically made gaps in reports when others noticed sunspots. Philippe de La Hire announced only fewer sunspot groups compared with the other observers. We argue that different points of view of observers of the seventeenth-century on the origin of sunspots resulted in strong underestimation of sunspot groups. Our findings suggest that the Maunder minimum was an ordinary secular minimum with reduced but non-stopped solar cyclicity.

  12. Inhibitory effects of essential oils of medicinal plants from growth of plant pathogenic fungi.

    PubMed

    Panjehkeh, N; Jahani Hossein-Abadi, Z

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells produce a vast amount of secondary metabolites. Production of some compounds is restricted to a single species. Some compounds are nearly always found only in certain specific plant organs and during a specific developmental period of the plant. Some secondary metabolites of plants serve as defensive compounds against invading microorganisms. Nowadays, it is attempted to substitute the biological and natural agents with chemically synthesized fungicides. In the present research, the antifungal activities of essential oils of seven medicinal plants on mycelial growth of three soilborne plant pathogenic fungi were investigated. The plants consisted of Zataria multiflora, Thymus carmanicus, Mentha pieperata, Satureja hortensis, Lavandual officinolis, Cuminum cyminum and Azadirachta indica. The first five plants are from the family Labiatae. Examined fungi, Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici, Fusarium solani and Rhizoctonia solani are the causal agents of tomato root rot. Essential oils of Z. multiflora, T. carmanicus, M. pieperata, S. hortensis and C. cyminum were extracted by hydro-distillation method. Essential oils of L. officinalis and A. indica were extracted by vapor-distillation method. A completely randomized design with five replicates was used to examine the inhibitory impact of each concentration (300, 600 and 900 ppm) of each essential oil. Poisoned food assay using potato dextrose agar (PDA) medium was employed. Results showed that essential oils of A. indica, Z. multiflora, T. carmanicus and S. hortensis in 900 ppm at 12 days post-inoculation, when the control fungi completely covered the plates, prevented about 90% from mycelial growth of each of the fungi. While, the essential oils of M. pieperata, C. cyminum and L. officinalis in the same concentration and time prevented 54.86, 52.77 and 48.84%, respectively, from F. solani growth. These substances did not prevent from F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici and R. solani growth. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of essential oils of T. carmanicus, Z. multiflora and A. indica from R. solani and F. solani growth was 900 and 600 ppm, respectively. In addition, the MIC of essential oils of these plants and essential oil of S. hortensis from F. oxysporum f.sp. lycopersici growth was 900 ppm. The MIC of essential oils of M. pieperata, C. cyminum and L. officinalis from F. solani growth was 900 ppm. PMID:22702190

  13. Inhibitory effects of emodin, baicalin, schizandrin and berberine on hefA gene: Treatment of Helicobacter pylori-induced multidrug resistance

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Yan-Qiang; Huang, Gan-Rong; Wu, Ming-Hui; Tang, Hua-Ying; Huang, Zan-Song; Zhou, Xi-Han; Yu, Wen-Qiang; Su, Jian-Wei; Mo, Xiao-Qiang; Chen, Bing-Pu; Zhao, Li-Juan; Huang, Xiao-Feng; Wei, Hong-Yu; Wei, Lian-Deng

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the inhibitory effects of emodin, baicalin, etc. on the hefA gene of multidrug resistance (MDR) in Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori). METHODS: The double dilution method was used to screen MDR H. pylori strains and determine the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of emodin, baicalin, schizandrin, berberine, clarithromycin, metronidazole, tetracycline, amoxicillin and levofloxacin against H. pylori strains. After the screened MDR stains were treated with emodin, baicalin, schizandrin or berberine at a 1/2 MIC concentration for 48 h, changes in MICs of amoxicillin, tetracycline, levofloxacin, metronidazole and clarithromycin were determined. MDR strains with reduced MICs of amoxicillin were selected to detect the hefA mRNA expression by real-time quantitative PCR. RESULTS: A total of four MDR H. pylori strains were screened. Treatment with emodin, baicalin, schizandrin and berberine significantly decreased the MICs of amoxicillin and tetracycline against some strains, decreased by 1 to 2 times, but did not significantly change the MICs of clarithromycin, levofloxacin, and metronidazole against MDR strains. In the majority of strains with reduced MICs of amoxicillin, hefA mRNA expression was decreased; one-way ANOVA (SPSS 12.0) used for comparative analysis, P < 0.05. CONCLUSION: Emodin, baicalin, schizandrin and berberine significantly decreased the MICs of amoxicillin and tetracycline against some H. pylori strains, possibly by mechanisms associated with decreasing hefA mRNA expression. PMID:25892872

  14. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat.

    PubMed

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graas Cardoso, Maria; de Arajo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 2 C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ? 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:24294222

  15. Inhibitory activity of Syzygium aromaticum and Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf. essential oils against Listeria monocytogenes inoculated in bovine ground meat

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira, Thales Leandro Coutinho; das Graças Cardoso, Maria; de Araújo Soares, Rodrigo; Ramos, Eduardo Mendes; Piccoli, Roberta Hilsdorf; Tebaldi, Victor Maximiliano Reis

    2013-01-01

    This research evaluated the antimicrobial effect of the clove (Syzygium aromaticum) and lemongrass (Cymbopogon citratus (DC.) Stapf.) essential oils (EOs) against Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 19117 growth added to bovine ground meat stored under refrigeration (5 ± 2 °C) for three days. The EOs, extracted by hydrodistillation and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), were tested in vitro using an agar well diffusion methodology for determination of Minimum Inhibitory Concentration (MIC). The MIC concentrations for both essential oils on culture tested of L. monocytogenes were 1.56%. The EOs concentrations applied in contaminated ground beef were 1.56, 3.125 and 6.25% (w/v) based on MIC levels and possible activity reductions by food constituents. The bacteria populations were significantly reduced (p ≤ 0.05) after one day of storage in ground meat samples treated with clove and lemongrass EOs at concentrations of 1.56%. There were no significant counts of L. monocytogenes in samples at the other concentrations of the two oils applied after the second day of storage. The sensory acceptability evaluation of the bovine ground meat samples treated with EOs showed that the addition at concentrations higher than 1.56% promote undesirable alterations of taste, odor and characteristic color. The application of EOs at low concentrations in food products can be used in combination with other preservation methods, such as refrigeration, to control pathogens and spoilage bacteria during shelf-life; which goes according to current market trends, where consumers are requesting natural products. PMID:24294222

  16. Probing inhibitory effects of nanocrystalline cellulose: inhibition versus surface charge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Male, Keith B.; Leung, Alfred C. W.; Montes, Johnny; Kamen, Amine; Luong, John H. T.

    2012-02-01

    NCC derived from different biomass sources was probed for its plausible cytotoxicity by electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS). Two different cell lines, Spodoptera frugiperda Sf9 insect cells and Chinese hamster lung fibroblast V79, were exposed to NCC and their spreading and viability were monitored and quantified by ECIS. Based on the 50%-inhibition concentration (ECIS50), none of the NCC produced was judged to have any significant cytotoxicity on these two cell lines. However, NCC derived from flax exhibited the most pronounced inhibition on Sf9 compared to hemp and cellulose powder. NCCs from flax and hemp pre-treated with pectate lyase were also less inhibitory than NCCs prepared from untreated flax and hemp. Results also suggested a correlation between the inhibitory effect and the carboxylic acid contents on the NCC.

  17. 76 FR 11668 - Minimum Capital

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-03

    ...The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is issuing a final rule to implement a provision of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act, as amended, that provides for a temporary increase in the minimum capital level for the entities regulated by FHFA--the Federal National Mortgage Association, the Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation and the Federal Home Loan Banks.......

  18. 75 FR 6151 - Minimum Capital

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-08

    ...The Federal Housing Finance Agency (FHFA) is issuing and seeking comment on a proposed rule to effect a provision of the Federal Housing Enterprises Financial Safety and Soundness Act that provides for a temporary increase in the minimum capital level for entities regulated by FHFA--Federal National Mortgage Association, Federal Home Loan Mortgage Corporation or the Federal Home Loan Banks.......

  19. Tennessee Minimum School Bus Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tennessee State Board of Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    The School Bus Specifications and Procedures adopted by the 2000 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) were used as guides by the Tennessee State Board of Education Pupil Transportation Advisory Committee in developing the revised minimum specifications for school bus chassis and school

  20. On the Minimum Vocabulary Problem.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chandrasekharan, N.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Demonstrates the use of a directed graph model as a tool for finding desirable minimum vocabularies to be used in indexing and information retrieval. The basic algorithm is outlined, possible enhancements to the model are discussed, and further research questions are suggested. (Author/CLB)

  1. Minimum Teaching Essentials: Grade 6.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Div. of Curriculum and Instruction.

    This guide presents the "minimum teaching essentials" published by the New York City Board of Education for grade 6. Covered are the following subject areas: (1) art; (2) bilingual education; (3) career education; (4) health education; (5) library media; (6) mathematics; (7) music; (8) physical education; (9) science; and (10) social studies. Work

  2. Minimum Qualifications and Intellectual Freedom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swan, John C.

    1981-01-01

    Contends that librarians are educators, not passive instruments of information processing. As such, the better prepared and more open the educating librarian is, the greater the contribution to intellectual freedom. Minimum employment qualifications must consider and include broad skills beyond the basic library competencies. Four references are

  3. Inhibitory dysfunction in frontotemporal dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    O'Callaghan, Claire; Hodges, John R; Hornberger, Michael

    2013-01-01

    Failure of inhibitory control is an early and consistent feature in patients suffering from frontotemporal dementia (FTD). This appears because of their pervasive ventromedial prefrontal atrophy-particularly in the orbitofrontal cortex-which has been linked to inhibitory dysfunction in studies on human and monkey lesions. However, the range of measures currently available to assess inhibitory processes in FTD is limited, and, as such, inhibitory dysfunction in FTD remains relatively underexplored. Subjective caregiver questionnaires are useful for defining disinhibition as it manifests behaviorally; however, endorsement of symptoms can vary largely across patients as it is contingent on the perceptiveness of the caregiver. The few objective neuropsychological tasks that tap directly into inhibitory functioning have potential, although they mostly rely on intact language and semantics, which can confound performance in FTD patients. An emergent possibility is to explore inhibitory functioning in FTD through nonverbal experimental tasks. Adaptation of such experimental tasks into clinical tools is a promising avenue for exploring one of the earliest behavioral features in FTD patients and concomitantly tap into their prevalent orbitofrontal cortex dysfunction. We suggest that improved characterization of early inhibitory dysfunction may facilitate more accurate diagnosis of FTD. PMID:22828322

  4. Studies of the in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities of selected Thai medicinal plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Traditional folk medicinal plants have recently become popular and are widely used for primary health care. Since Thailand has a great diversity of indigenous (medicinal) plant species, this research investigated 52 traditionally used species of Thai medicinal plants for their in vitro cytotoxic, antioxidant, lipase inhibitory and antimicrobial activities. Methods The 55 dried samples, derived from the medicinally used parts of the 52 plant species were sequentially extracted by hexane, dichloromethane, ethanol and water. These 220 extracts were then screened for in vitro (i) cytotoxicity against four cell lines, derived from human lung (A549), breast (MDA-MB-231), cervical (KB3-1) and colon (SW480) cancers, using the MTT cytotoxicity assay; (ii) antioxidant activity, analyzed by measuring the scavenging activity of DPPH radicals; (iii) lipase inhibitory activity, determined from the hydrolytic reaction of p-nitrophenyllaurate with pancreatic lipase; and (iv) antimicrobial activity against three Gram-positive and two Gram-negative bacteria species plus one strain of yeast using the disc-diffusion method and determination of the minimum inhibitory concentration by the broth micro-dilution assay. Results The crude dichloromethane and/or ethanol extracts from four plant species showed an effective in vitro cytotoxic activity against the human cancer cell lines that was broadly similar to that of the specific chemotherapy drugs (etoposide, doxorubicin, vinblastine and oxaliplatin). In particular, this is the first report of the strong in vitro cytotoxic activity of Bauhinia strychnifolia vines. The tested tissue parts of only six plant species (Allium sativum, Cocoloba uvifera, Dolichandrone spathacea, Lumnitzera littorea, Sonneratia alba and Sonneratia caseolaris) showed promising potential antioxidant activity, whereas lipase inhibitory activity was only found in the ethanol extract from Coscinum fenestratum and this was weak at 17-fold lower than Orlistat, a known lipase inhibitor. The highest antimicrobial activity was observed in the extracts from S. alba and S. caseolaris against Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Candida albicans, respectively. Conclusion The Thai medicinal plant B. strychnifolia is first reported to exert strong in vitro cytotoxic activities against human cancer cell lines and warrants further enrichment and characterization. The broad spectrum of the biological activities from the studied plant extracts can be applied as the guideline for the selection of Thai medicinal plant species for further pharmacological and phytochemical investigations. PMID:23145786

  5. [Quality evaluation of artificial musk based on its inhibitory effect on cyclooxygenase-2].

    PubMed

    Luo, Yun; Jin, Cheng; Zhou, Jian; Wen, Rui-qing; Li, Xing-feng; Li, Rui-sheng; Yang, Ming; Xiao, Xiao-he

    2011-04-01

    The inhibitory ratio (1%) of artificial musk on cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) was determined by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). The dose-effect relationship between concentrations of artificial musk and 1% was established. It was found that artificial musk had obvious inhibitory action on COX-2. The concentration for 50% of maximum inhibitory effect (IC50) was about 2.26 mg x mL(-1). There was a good relationship between the logarithm concentrations of artificial musk and 1% when the concentrations of artificial musk ranged from 0.31-20.0 mg x mL(-1). The results indicated that this EIA method could be applied to evaluate the anti-inflammatory activity of artificial musk quickly, conveniently, sensitively and exactly. This paper provided a novel method and foundational research for the bioassay of artificial musk. PMID:21751497

  6. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils.

    PubMed

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub-inhibitory concentrations should be generally avoided, since it could favor the emergence of hyper-resistant strains. To ascertain the true value of EOs and their ICs in the field of food preservation, further research thus needs to be conducted on the induction of increased transient and stable bacterial resistance via such antimicrobial compounds, as revealed in this study. PMID:26973641

  7. Emergence of Hyper-Resistant Escherichia coli MG1655 Derivative Strains after Applying Sub-Inhibitory Doses of Individual Constituents of Essential Oils

    PubMed Central

    Chueca, Beatriz; Berdejo, Daniel; Gomes-Neto, Nelson J.; Pagán, Rafael; García-Gonzalo, Diego

    2016-01-01

    The improvement of food preservation by using essential oils (EOs) and their individual constituents (ICs) is attracting enormous interest worldwide. Until now, researchers considered that treatments with such antimicrobial compounds did not induce bacterial resistance via a phenotypic (i.e., transient) response. Nevertheless, the emergence of genotypic (i.e., stable) resistance after treatment with these compounds had not been previously tested. Our results confirm that growth of Escherichia coli MG1655 in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs carvacrol, citral, and (+)-limonene oxide do not increase resistance to further treatments with either the same IC (direct resistance) or with other preservation treatments (cross-resistance) such as heat or pulsed electric fields (PEF). Bacterial mutation frequency was likewise lower when those IC's were applied; however, after 10 days of re-culturing cells in presence of sub-inhibitory concentrations of the ICs, we were able to isolate several derivative strains (i.e., mutants) displaying an increased minimum inhibitory concentration to those ICs. Furthermore, when compared to the wild type (WT) strain, they also displayed direct resistance and cross-resistance. Derivative strains selected with carvacrol and citral also displayed morphological changes involving filamentation along with cell counts at late-stationary growth phase that were lower than the WT strain. In addition, co-cultures of each derivative strain with the WT strain resulted in a predominance of the original strain in absence of ICs, indicating that mutants would not out-compete WT cells under optimal growth conditions. Nevertheless, growth in the presence of ICs facilitated the selection of these resistant mutants. Thus, as a result, subsequent food preservation treatments of these bacterial cultures might be less effective than expected for WT cultures. In conclusion, this study recommends that treatment with ICs at sub-inhibitory concentrations should be generally avoided, since it could favor the emergence of hyper-resistant strains. To ascertain the true value of EOs and their ICs in the field of food preservation, further research thus needs to be conducted on the induction of increased transient and stable bacterial resistance via such antimicrobial compounds, as revealed in this study. PMID:26973641

  8. Solar Effects on Climate and the Maunder Minimum: Minimum Certainty

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rind, David

    2003-01-01

    The current state of our understanding of solar effects on climate is reviewed. As an example of the relevant issues, the climate during the Maunder Minimum is compared with current conditions in GCM simulations that include a full stratosphere and parameterized ozone response to solar spectral irradiance variability and trace gas changes. The GISS Global Climate/Middle Atmosphere Model coupled to a q-flux/mixed layer model is used for the simulations, which begin in 1500 and extend to the present. Experiments were made to investigate the effect of total versus spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes; spectrally-varying solar irradiance changes on the stratospheric ozone/climate response with both pre-industrial and present trace gases; and the impact on climate and stratospheric ozone of the preindustrial trace gases and aerosols by themselves. The results showed that: (1) the Maunder Minimum cooling relative to today was primarily associated with reduced anthropogenic radiative forcing, although the solar reduction added 40% to the overall cooling. There is no obvious distinguishing surface climate pattern between the two forcings. (2)The global and tropical response was greater than 1 C, in a model with a sensitivity of 1.2 C per W m-2. To reproduce recent low-end estimates would require a sensitivity 1/4 as large. (3) The global surface temperature change was similar when using the total and spectral irradiance prescriptions, although the tropical response was somewhat greater with the former, and the stratospheric response greater with the latter. (4) Most experiments produce a relative negative phase of the NAO/AO during the Maunder Minimum, with both solar and anthropogenic forcing equally capable, associated with the tropical cooling and relative poleward EP flux refraction. (5) A full stratosphere appeared to be necessary for the negative AO/NAO phase, as was the case with this model for global warming experiments, unless the cooling was very large, while the ozone response played a minor role and did not influence surface temperature significantly. (6) Stratospheric ozone was most affected by the difference between present day and preindustrial atmospheric composition and chemistry, with increases in the upper and lower stratosphere during the Maunder Minimum. While the estimated UV reduction led to ozone decreases, this was generally less important than the anthropogenic effect except in the upper middle stratosphere, as judged by two different ozone photochemistry schemes. (7) The effect of the reduced solar irradiance on stratospheric ozone and on climate was similar in Maunder Minimum and current atmospheric conditions.

  9. Amniotic Fluid Exhibits an Innate Inhibitory Activity Against HIV Type 1 Replication in Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Farzin, Azadeh; Boyer, Pamela; Ank, Bonnie; Nielsen-Saines, Karin

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Indirect evidence suggests that amniotic fluid (AF) may play a role in the pathogenesis of in utero HIV-1 transmission. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the potential innate inhibitory role of AF on HIV replication, which may contribute to protection of the fetus against intrauterine transmission. AF was collected from term HIV-1-negative women undergoing scheduled cesarean section. The inhibitory effect of AF against HIV-1BA-L replication was tested in vitro with or without the addition of protease inhibitor cocktail (PIC) in PHA-stimulated PBMC cultures. Quantitative measurement of human neutrophil peptides 1-3 (HNP1-3) was performed on all AF samples, using an ELISA assay. AF exhibited a dose-dependent inhibitory activity against HIV-1BA-L replication, with all samples (n=12) reaching significant inhibitory effect using 50% AF. In vitro, this activity decreased over time, but was able to be sustained with the addition of PIC. The HNP1-3 concentration in AF samples (n=12) ranged from undetectable (<41?pg/ml, n=3) to >250,000?pg/ml with a median of 5,146?pg/ml. AF exhibited a significant and dose-dependent innate inhibitory activity against HIV-1 replication, which was present in all AF samples tested. This effect was prolonged in the presence of PIC, suggesting that the inhibitory factor was in the cell-free protein fraction. The HNP1-3 concentration in AF was in the subinhibitory range for HIV with no correlation between its concentration and the HIV-1 inhibitory activity. These data show the presence of a significant innate inhibitory activity against HIV in AF. PMID:22998428

  10. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency establishes a minimum charge of less than one hour, or establishes a different minimum charge...

  11. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency establishes a minimum charge of less than one hour, or establishes a different minimum charge...

  12. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency establishes a minimum charge of less than one hour, or establishes a different minimum charge...

  13. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency establishes a minimum charge of less than one hour, or establishes a different minimum charge...

  14. 5 CFR 630.206 - Minimum charge.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum charge. 630.206 Section 630.206... and General Provisions for Annual and Sick Leave 630.206 Minimum charge. (a) Unless an agency establishes a minimum charge of less than one hour, or establishes a different minimum charge...

  15. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  16. Understanding the Minimum Wage: Issues and Answers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Employment Policies Inst. Foundation, Washington, DC.

    This booklet, which is designed to clarify facts regarding the minimum wage's impact on marketplace economics, contains a total of 31 questions and answers pertaining to the following topics: relationship between minimum wages and poverty; impacts of changes in the minimum wage on welfare reform; and possible effects of changes in the minimum wage…

  17. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  18. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301... FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except... employees wages at rates not less than the minimum wage specified in section 6(a)(1) of the Act for...

  19. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53... Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide for minimum royalty payments, the lessee shall pay the minimum royalty as specified in the lease....

  20. GMTI radar minimum detectable velocity.

    SciTech Connect

    Richards, John Alfred

    2011-04-01

    Minimum detectable velocity (MDV) is a fundamental consideration for the design, implementation, and exploitation of ground moving-target indication (GMTI) radar imaging modes. All single-phase-center air-to-ground radars are characterized by an MDV, or a minimum radial velocity below which motion of a discrete nonstationary target is indistinguishable from the relative motion between the platform and the ground. Targets with radial velocities less than MDV are typically overwhelmed by endoclutter ground returns, and are thus not generally detectable. Targets with radial velocities greater than MDV typically produce distinct returns falling outside of the endoclutter ground returns, and are thus generally discernible using straightforward detection algorithms. This document provides a straightforward derivation of MDV for an air-to-ground single-phase-center GMTI radar operating in an arbitrary geometry.

  1. Law of the Minimum paradoxes.

    PubMed

    Gorban, Alexander N; Pokidysheva, Lyudmila I; Smirnova, Elena V; Tyukina, Tatiana A

    2011-09-01

    The "Law of the Minimum" states that growth is controlled by the scarcest resource (limiting factor). This concept was originally applied to plant or crop growth (Justus von Liebig, 1840, Salisbury, Plant physiology, 4th edn., Wadsworth, Belmont, 1992) and quantitatively supported by many experiments. Some generalizations based on more complicated "dose-response" curves were proposed. Violations of this law in natural and experimental ecosystems were also reported. We study models of adaptation in ensembles of similar organisms under load of environmental factors and prove that violation of Liebig's law follows from adaptation effects. If the fitness of an organism in a fixed environment satisfies the Law of the Minimum then adaptation equalizes the pressure of essential factors and, therefore, acts against the Liebig's law. This is the the Law of the Minimum paradox: if for a randomly chosen pair "organism-environment" the Law of the Minimum typically holds, then in a well-adapted system, we have to expect violations of this law.For the opposite interaction of factors (a synergistic system of factors which amplify each other), adaptation leads from factor equivalence to limitations by a smaller number of factors.For analysis of adaptation, we develop a system of models based on Selye's idea of the universal adaptation resource (adaptation energy). These models predict that under the load of an environmental factor a population separates into two groups (phases): a less correlated, well adapted group and a highly correlated group with a larger variance of attributes, which experiences problems with adaptation. Some empirical data are presented and evidences of interdisciplinary applications to econometrics are discussed. PMID:21088995

  2. Inhibitory receptor expression on neonatal immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Walk, J; Westerlaken, G H A; van Uden, N O; Belderbos, M E; Meyaard, L; Bont, L J

    2012-01-01

    Neonates are born with quantitative and qualitative defects in both adaptive and innate immune responses. The immune system is regulated by several mechanisms, including the signalling of inhibitory receptors. Increased expression of inhibitory receptors may result in a higher threshold for activation and suppressed function of neonatal cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of seven inhibitory receptors is increased on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. In a healthy birth cohort, we examined the expression of seven inhibitory immune receptors on neonatal neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The expression of leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1), signal inhibitory receptor on leucocytes-1 (SIRL-1), CD31, signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), Siglec-9, CD200R, immune receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (IREM-1) and the membrane-bound ligand CD200 was studied by flow cytometry on leucocytes in cord blood (n = 14), neonatal venous blood (n = 24) and adult venous blood (n = 22). Expression of LAIR-1, CD31 and CD200 was increased consistently across all neonatal T cell subsets. Neonatal monocytes exhibited decreased expression of LAIR-1 and IREM-1 compared to adults. Furthermore, cord blood and neonatal venous blood samples contained a distinct LAIR-1-positive neutrophil population, which was not detected in adult blood. We demonstrated distinct expression of inhibitory receptors on neonatal peripheral blood immune cells in a healthy birth cohort. This is the first evidence that inhibitory receptors play a role in regulation of the neonatal immune system. Consistently increased inhibitory receptor expression on T cells may be an important mechanism in preventing the development of allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:22774991

  3. Inhibitory receptor expression on neonatal immune cells.

    PubMed

    Walk, J; Westerlaken, G H A; van Uden, N O; Belderbos, M E; Meyaard, L; Bont, L J

    2012-08-01

    Neonates are born with quantitative and qualitative defects in both adaptive and innate immune responses. The immune system is regulated by several mechanisms, including the signalling of inhibitory receptors. Increased expression of inhibitory receptors may result in a higher threshold for activation and suppressed function of neonatal cells. The aim of this study was to determine whether the expression of seven inhibitory receptors is increased on neonatal immune cells compared to adult immune cells. In a healthy birth cohort, we examined the expression of seven inhibitory immune receptors on neonatal neutrophils, monocytes, natural killer (NK) cells, CD4(+) and CD8(+)T cells. The expression of leucocyte-associated immunoglobulin (Ig)-like receptor-1 (LAIR-1), signal inhibitory receptor on leucocytes-1 (SIRL-1), CD31, signal-regulatory protein alpha (SIRPα), Siglec-9, CD200R, immune receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (IREM-1) and the membrane-bound ligand CD200 was studied by flow cytometry on leucocytes in cord blood (n = 14), neonatal venous blood (n = 24) and adult venous blood (n = 22). Expression of LAIR-1, CD31 and CD200 was increased consistently across all neonatal T cell subsets. Neonatal monocytes exhibited decreased expression of LAIR-1 and IREM-1 compared to adults. Furthermore, cord blood and neonatal venous blood samples contained a distinct LAIR-1-positive neutrophil population, which was not detected in adult blood. We demonstrated distinct expression of inhibitory receptors on neonatal peripheral blood immune cells in a healthy birth cohort. This is the first evidence that inhibitory receptors play a role in regulation of the neonatal immune system. Consistently increased inhibitory receptor expression on T cells may be an important mechanism in preventing the development of allergy and autoimmunity. PMID:22774991

  4. Venus ionopause during solar minimum

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, K.K.; Mayr, H.G.

    1989-12-01

    During solar minimum, the Venus ionosphere is weak and the solar wind depresses the ionopause to a limiting altitude (Knudsen et al., 1987). With the knowledge gained from the ion composition measurements on Pioneer Venus during solar maximum and during conditions of high solar wind pressure, the authors argue that the typical topside electron density profile at Venus during solar minimum has two distinct regimes; one from about 140 km (the altitude of peak electron density) to 180 km and the other above 180 km. While the former is dominated by O{sub 2}{sup +} ions which are in photochemical equilibrium, the latter is dominated by O{sup +} ions which are strongly disturbed by the solar wind induced plasma transport. The disturbed ionosphere is formed in the photodynamical regime and has a scale height which is several times smaller than that expected under undisturbed conditions when the ionosphere is in diffusive equilibrium. The small scale height of the disturbed ionosphere is nearly equal to that of the ionizable constituent, atomic oxygen, and is only slightly larger than the chemical equilibrium scale height of the underlying chemical equilibrium region. While the photodynamical ionopause occurs rarely during solar maximum and only when the solar wind pressure is large, we believe that this kind of ionopause is observed much more frequently during solar minimum. The authors find evidence for this in the radio occultation data from Pioneer Venus, Mariner 10 and Venera 9 and 10.

  5. Inhibitory receptors as targets for cancer immunotherapy.

    PubMed

    Turnis, Meghan E; Andrews, Lawrence P; Vignali, Dario A A

    2015-07-01

    Inhibitory receptors expressed on T cells control immune responses while limiting autoimmunity. However, tumors can hijack these "checkpoints" for protection from immune attack. Tumor-specific T cells that exhibit an exhausted, unresponsive phenotype express high levels of inhibitory receptors including CTLA4, PD1, and LAG3, among others. Intratumoral regulatory T cells promote immunosuppression and also express multiple inhibitory receptors. Overcoming this inhibitory receptor-mediated immune tolerance has thus been a major focus of recent cancer immunotherapeutic developments. Here, we review how boosting the host's immune system by blocking inhibitory receptor signaling with antagonistic mAbs restores the capacity of T cells to drive durable antitumor immune responses. Clinical trials targeting the CTLA4 and PD1 pathways have shown durable effects in multiple tumor types. Many combinatorial therapies are currently being investigated with encouraging results that highlight enhanced antitumor immunogenicity and improved patient survival. Finally, we will discuss the ongoing identification and dissection of novel T-cell inhibitory receptor pathways, which could lead to the development of new combinatorial therapeutic approaches. PMID:26018646

  6. STATISTICAL PROCEDURES FOR DETERMINATION AND VERIFICATION OF MINIMUM REPORTING LEVELS FOR DRINKING WATER METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The United States Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Office of Ground Water and Drinking Water (OGWDW) has developed a single-laboratory quantitation procedure: the lowest concentration minimum reporting level (LCMRL). The LCMRL is the lowest true concentration for which fu...

  7. Rapid, learning-induced inhibitory synaptogenesis in murine barrel field

    PubMed Central

    Jasinska, M.; Siucinska, E.; Cybulska-Klosowicz, A.; Pyza, E.; Furness, D.N.; Kossut, M.; Glazewski, S.

    2010-01-01

    The structure of neurones changes during development and in response to injury or alteration in sensory experience. Changes occur in the number, shape and dimensions of dendritic spines together with their synapses. However, precise data on these changes in response to learning are sparse. Here, we show using quantitative transmission electron microscopy that a simple form of learning involving mystacial vibrissae results in about 70% increase in the density of inhibitory synapses on spines of neurones located in layer IV barrels that represent the stimulated vibrissae. The spines contain one asymmetrical (excitatory) and one symmetrical (inhibitory) synapse (double-synapse spines) and their density increases 3-fold due to learning with no apparent change in the density of asymmetrical synapses. This effect seems to be specific for learning as pseudoconditioning (where the conditioned and unconditioned stimuli are delivered at random) does not lead to the enhancement of symmetrical synapses, but instead results in an up-regulation of asymmetrical synapses on spines. Symmetrical synapses of cells located in barrels receiving the conditioned stimulus show also a greater concentration of ?-amino-butyric acid (GABA) in their presynaptic terminals. These results indicate that the immediate effect of classical conditioning in the conditioned barrels is rapid, pronounced and inhibitory. PMID:20089926

  8. Inhibitory morphogens and monopodial branching of the embryonic chicken lung

    PubMed Central

    Gleghorn, Jason P.; Kwak, Jiyong; Pavlovich, Amira L.; Nelson, Celeste M.

    2012-01-01

    Branching morphogenesis generates a diverse array of epithelial patterns, including dichotomous and monopodial geometries. Dichotomous branching can be instructed by concentration gradients of epithelial-derived inhibitory morphogens, including transforming growth factor-? (TGF?), which is responsible for ramification of the pubertal mammary gland. Here, we investigated the role of autocrine inhibitory morphogens in monopodial branching morphogenesis of the embryonic chicken lung. Computational modeling and experiments using cultured organ explants each separately revealed that monopodial branching patterns cannot be specified by a single epithelial-derived autocrine morphogen gradient. Instead, signaling via TGF?1 and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (BMP4) differentially affect the rates of branching and growth of the airways. Allometric analysis revealed that development of the epithelial tree obeys power-law dynamics; TGF?1 and BMP4 have distinct but reversible effects on the scaling coefficient of the power law. These data suggest that although autocrine inhibition cannot specify monopodial branching, inhibitory morphogens define the dynamics of lung morphogenesis. PMID:22410853

  9. Inhibitory effects of Korean plants on HIV-1 activities.

    PubMed

    Min, B S; Kim, Y H; Tomiyama, M; Nakamura, N; Miyashiro, H; Otake, T; Hattori, M

    2001-09-01

    In the search for novel anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (anti-HIV-1) agents from natural sources, 49 MeOH extracts of Korean plants were screened for their inhibitory effects against RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RT) and ribonuclease H (RNase H) activities of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase and HIV-1 protease, and anti-HIV-1 activity. Regarding the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase, Agrimonia pilosa (whole plant), Cornus kousa (stem and leaf), Limonium tetragonum (root) and Mallotus japonicus (stem) showed significant inhibitory activity on RT activity with 50% inhibitory activity (IC(50)) of 8.9, 6.3, 7.5 and 11.9 microg/mL, respectively, whereas Agrimonia pilosa was also active against RNase H activity (IC(50) = 98.4 microg/mL). Four plants, namely Agrimonia pilosa (whole plant), Atractylodes japonica (root), Clematis heracleifolia (whole plant) and Syneilesis palmata (whole plant), were appreciably active (<35%) against recombinant HIV-1 protease at a concentration of 100 microg/mL. Crinum asiaticum var. japonicum (root) showed significant anti-HIV-1 activity (ED(50) = 12.5 microg/mL) with a favourable SI value of 16. PMID:11536375

  10. Selective release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide by intraduodenal amino acid perfusion in man.

    PubMed

    Thomas, F B; Sinar, D; Mazzaferri, E L; Cataland, S; Mekhjian, H S; Caldwell, J H; Fromkes, J J

    1978-06-01

    Intraduodenal amino acids are known to stimulate the release of gastric inhibitory polypeptide and cholecystokinin. In order to separate and quantitate gastric inhibitory polypeptide secretion selectively, 12 normal subjects received an intraduodenal perfusion of a mixed amino acid solution (158 mM) containing either methionine, phenylalanine, tryptophan, and valine (perfusate 1), or an amino acid solution containing arginine, histidine, isoleucine, leucine, lysine, and threonine (perfusate 2). Serum concentrations of gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin were significantly greater in the group receiving perfusate 2 (P less than 0.001). In contrast, after administration of amino acid perfusate 1, there was only a slight increase in serum gastric inhibitory polypeptide concentration and insulin secretion increased only slightly. Mean trypsin and bilirubin outputs in the group receiving perfusate 1 were nearly 3 times greater than the outputs of the group receiving the other amino acid mixture. This study expands the importance of intraduodenal amino acid mixtures in stimulating secretion of gastric inhibitory polypeptide and insulin and quantitatively separates gastric inhibitory polypeptide release from release of hormones that stimulate pancreatic enzyme secretion, such as cholecystokinin. PMID:648819

  11. Antifungal Activity of Isoliquiritin and Its Inhibitory Effect against Peronophythora litchi Chen through a Membrane Damage Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Luo, Jianjun; Li, Zhibin; Wang, Jingjing; Weng, Qunfang; Chen, Shaohua; Hu, Meiying

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated the antifungal activity and potential antifungal mechanism(s) of isoliquiritin against P. litchi Chen, one of the main litchi pathogens. The antifungal activity of isoliquiritin against P. litchi Chen had been proven in a dose-dependent manner through in vitro (mycelial growth and sporangia germination) and in vivo (detached leaf) tests. Results revealed that isoliquiritin exhibited significant antifungal activity against the tested pathogens, especially, P. litchi Chen, with a minimum inhibitory concentration of 27.33 mg/L. The morphology of P. litchi Chen was apparently changed by isoliquiritin through cytoplasm leakage and distortion of mycelia. The cell membrane permeability of the P. litchi Chen increased with the increasing concentration of isoliquiritin, as evidenced by a rise in relative electric conductivity and a decrease in reducing sugar contents. These results indicated that the antifungal effects of isoliquiritin could be explained by a membrane lesion mechanism causing damage to the cell membrane integrity leading to the death of mycelial cells. Taken together, isoliquiritin may be used as a natural alternative to commercial fungicides or a lead compound to develop new fungicides for the control of litchi downy blight. PMID:26907232

  12. Gastric inhibitory polypeptide, dietary-induced thermogenesis, and obesity.

    PubMed

    Bahendeka, S K; Moore, R E; Tomkin, G H; Buchanan, K D

    1987-06-01

    Blood glucose, plasma concentrations of gastric inhibitory polypeptide, insulin, glucagon, cortisol, and thyroid hormones were measured in nonobese and obese human subjects at 30 and 22 degrees C ambient temperature (Ta). Oxygen consumption (VO2), carbon dioxide output (VCO2), and temperatures in the external auditory meatus (Tc) and on the skin surface (Tsk) were also measured. After 1 h, near naked at the chosen Ta, an oral dose of sucrose (approximately 1.5 g/kg) was given and the subjects were then monitored for a further 60 or 90 min. Following sucrose ingestion, both in the nonobese and obese, there were significant (p less than 0.001) increases in the following: glucose, gastric inhibitory polypeptide, insulin, VO2, and respiratory quotient. The effect of Ta on these responses in the nonobese was that gastric inhibitory polypeptide rose more at Ta 30 than at Ta 22 (p less than 0.05) and VO2 rose more at Ta 22 than at Ta 30 (p less than 0.05). In the obese, glucose rose more at Ta 30 than at Ta 22 (p less than 0.02), VO2 rise was less than in the nonobese at Ta 22 (p less than 0.05), and the respiratory quotient was lower than in the nonobese at both Ta 30 and 22 (p less than 0.001). Gastric inhibitory polypeptide changes with respect to Ta in the obese were inconsistent. It is concluded that responses to oral sucrose are modified by environmental temperature. PMID:3304593

  13. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against Lactobacillus rhamnosus and starter culture in fermented milk during its shelf-life period

    PubMed Central

    Moritz, Cristiane Mengue Feniman; Rall, Vera Lcia Mores; Saeki, Margarida Jri; Jnior, Ary Fernandes

    2012-01-01

    The use of essential oils in foods has attracted great interest, due to their antagonistic action against pathogenic microorganisms. However, this action is undesirable for probiotic foods, as products containing Lactobacillus rhamnosus. The aim of the present study was to measure the sensitivity profile of L. rhamnosus and a yogurt starter culture in fermented milk, upon addition of increasing concentrations of cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils. Essential oils were prepared by steam distillation, and chemically characterised by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and determination of density. Survival curves were obtained from counts of L. rhamnosus and the starter culture (alone and in combination), upon addition of 0.04% essential oils. In parallel, titratable acidity was monitored over 28 experimental days. Minimum inhibitory concentration values, obtained using the microdilution method in Brain Heart Infusion medium, were 0.025, 0.2 and 0.4% for cinnamon, clove and mint essential oils, respectively. Cinnamon essential oil had the highest antimicrobial activity, especially against the starter culture, interfering with lactic acid production. Although viable cell counts of L. rhamnosus were lower following treatment with all 3 essential oils, relative to controls, these results were not statistically significant; in addition, cell counts remained greater than the minimum count of 108CFU/mL required for a product to be considered a probiotic. Thus, although use of cinnamon essential oil in yogurt makes starter culture fermentation unfeasible, it does not prevent the application of L. rhamnosus to probiotic fermented milk. Furthermore, clove and mint essential oil caused sublethal stress to L. rhamnosus. PMID:24031939

  14. Short communication: Inhibitory activities of the lantibiotic nisin combined with phenolic compounds against Staphylococcus aureus and Listeria monocytogenes in cow milk.

    PubMed

    Alves, Fernanda C B; Barbosa, Lidiane N; Andrade, Bruna F M T; Albano, Mariana; Furtado, Fabiana Barcelos; Marques Pereira, Ana Flávia; Rall, Vera L M; Júnior, Ary Fernandes

    2016-03-01

    We aimed to investigate the antibacterial activities of carvacrol, thymol, eugenol, cinnamaldehyde, and lantibiotic nisin against standard bacterial strains of the milk pathogens Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 25923 and Listeria monocytogenes ATCC 15313 in cow milk. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of these substances were recorded. The synergistic effects were also assessed in culture medium (time kill curve) and in a food model (cow milk) during the storage period (4°C for 6 d) after inoculation with S. aureus and L. monocytogenes individually by combining nisin and the phenolic compounds at proportions of 1/4 + 1/4 the MIC (determined in a previous in vitro assay) in the culture medium and 1/4 + 1/4 of MIC in the food model. Inhibitory activities of nisin and the tested compounds, as well as synergism in the combinations, were found against both bacteria assayed. Bacteriostatic effects were found with all combinations and a significant difference in L. monocytogenes reduction was found compared with the control assays. Thus, the antibacterial activity of nisin combined with phenolic compounds was confirmed against these pathogenic bacteria that are important in the milk industry, or more broadly in food science, with potential applications for milk preservation. PMID:26774728

  15. Inhibitory effects of nisin and potassium sorbate alone or in combination on vegetative cells growth and spore germination of Bacillus sporothermodurans in milk.

    PubMed

    Aouadhi, Chedia; Mejri, Slah; Maaroufi, Abderrazak

    2015-04-01

    The inhibitory activities of nisin or/and potassium sorbate on spores and vegetative cells of Bacillus sporothermodurans LTIS27, which are known to be a contaminant of dairy products and to be extremely heat-resistant, were investigated. First, the tested concentrations of nisin or potassium sorbate inhibited vegetative cell growth; with the minimum inhibitory concentrations were 5 × 10(3) IU/ml and 2% (w/v), respectively. Then, the behaviour of vegetative cells and spores in presence of sub-lethal concentrations of nisin (50 UI/ml) or/and potassium sorbate (0.2%), in milk at 37 °C for 5 days, were evaluated. In the absence of inhibitors, strain grew and sporulated at the end of the exponential phase. Nisin (50 UI/ml) was able to inhibit spore outgrowth but didn't affect their germination. It induced an immediate and transitory reduction (1.6log(10) after 1 h and 2.8log(10) after 6 h of incubation) of vegetative cell growth which reappeared between 10 h and 24 h. Potassium sorbate (0.2%) had a durable bacteriostatic effect (1.1log(10) after 6 h), on vegetative cells, followed by a slower regrowth. It was able to inhibit both germination and outgrowth of spores. Association of nisin and potassium sorbate, at sub-lethal concentrations, showed a synergistic effect and resulted in a total inhibition of cells growth after 5 days. The results illustrate the efficacy of nisin and potassium sorbate in combination, and the commercial potential of applying such treatment to decontaminate any product that has a problem with persistence of bacterial spores. PMID:25475264

  16. Minimum Bayes risk image correlation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Minter, T. C., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of designing a matched filter for image correlation will be treated as a statistical pattern recognition problem. It is shown that, by minimizing a suitable criterion, a matched filter can be estimated which approximates the optimum Bayes discriminant function in a least-squares sense. It is well known that the use of the Bayes discriminant function in target classification minimizes the Bayes risk, which in turn directly minimizes the probability of a false fix. A fast Fourier implementation of the minimum Bayes risk correlation procedure is described.

  17. Resistance minimum and heavy fermions

    PubMed Central

    Jun, Kondo

    2006-01-01

    The phenomenon of the resistance minimum in dilute magnetic alloys is explained in terms of the s-d interaction which takes account of scattering of the conduction electron off the magnetic impurities in metals. Some of the intermetallic compounds which involve rare earth elements or uranium show a very large electronic specific heat and remain non-magnetic even though they show a Curie-like susceptibility at higher temperatures. These phenomena are also explained based on the s-d interaction model. PMID:25792794

  18. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control

    PubMed Central

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M.; Miller, Gregory A.; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T.

    2015-01-01

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties. PMID:26216985

  19. Flexible brain network reconfiguration supporting inhibitory control.

    PubMed

    Spielberg, Jeffrey M; Miller, Gregory A; Heller, Wendy; Banich, Marie T

    2015-08-11

    The ability to inhibit distracting stimuli from interfering with goal-directed behavior is crucial for success in most spheres of life. Despite an abundance of studies examining regional brain activation, knowledge of the brain networks involved in inhibitory control remains quite limited. To address this critical gap, we applied graph theory tools to functional magnetic resonance imaging data collected while a large sample of adults (n = 101) performed a color-word Stroop task. Higher demand for inhibitory control was associated with restructuring of the global network into a configuration that was more optimized for specialized processing (functional segregation), more efficient at communicating the output of such processing across the network (functional integration), and more resilient to potential interruption (resilience). In addition, there were regional changes with right inferior frontal sulcus and right anterior insula occupying more central positions as network hubs, and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex becoming more tightly coupled with its regional subnetwork. Given the crucial role of inhibitory control in goal-directed behavior, present findings identifying functional network organization supporting inhibitory control have the potential to provide additional insights into how inhibitory control may break down in a wide variety of individuals with neurological or psychiatric difficulties. PMID:26216985

  20. Inhibitory control and the frontal eye fields.

    PubMed

    Muggleton, Neil G; Chen, Chiao-Yun; Tzeng, Ovid J L; Hung, Daisy L; Juan, Chi-Hung

    2010-12-01

    Inhibitory control mechanisms are important in a range of behaviors to prevent execution of motor acts which, having been planned, are no longer necessary. Ready examples of this can be seen in a range of sports, such as cricket and baseball, where the choice between execution or inhibition of a bat swing must be made in a brief time interval. The role of the FEFs, an area typically described in relation to eye movement functions but also involved in visual processes, was investigated in an inhibitory control task using transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). A stop signal task with manual responses was used, providing measures of impulsivity and inhibitory control. TMS over FEF had no effect on response generation (impulsivity, indexed by go signal RT) but disrupted inhibitory control (indexed by stop signal RT). This is the first demonstration of a role for FEF in this type of task in normal subjects in a task which did not require eye movements and complements previous TMS findings of roles for pre-SMA and inferior frontal gyrus (IFG) in inhibitory control. PMID:20044887

  1. Antimicrobial assays of natural extracts and their inhibitory effect against Listeria innocua and fish spoilage bacteria, after incorporation into biopolymer edible films.

    PubMed

    Iturriaga, L; Olabarrieta, I; de Maran, I Martnez

    2012-08-01

    The antimicrobial activity of twelve natural extracts was tested against two fish spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas fluorescens and Aeromonas hydrophila/caviae) and Listeria innocua, in order to assess their potential utilization in the preservation and safety of minimally processed fish products. After a screening of the active extracts by agar diffusion and vapour diffusion methods, oregano and thyme essential oils and citrus extract were selected. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the selected extracts was determined by disc diffusion method against target bacteria and at two temperatures: bacteria's optimal growth temperature (30 C or 37 C) and refrigeration temperature (4 C). Due to its better solubility, lack of odour and greater inhibitory effect obtained against L. innocua at refrigerated temperature, citrus extract was selected and incorporated at 1% (v/v) into different biopolymer film forming solutions (gelatin, methyl cellulose and their blend 50:50 w/w). The antimicrobial activity of the developed films was then evaluated, just after preparation of the films and after one month of storage at 433% relative humidity and 243 C. Regardless of the biopolymer matrix, all the developed films showed antimicrobial activity against the target bacteria. The most sensitive bacterium towards active films was L. innocua while P. fluorescens appeared as the most resistant one, in accordance with the previously performed antimicrobial tests for pure extracts. The differences in activity of the films between the tested two temperatures were not significant except for L. innocua, for which three times higher inhibition diameters were observed at refrigerated temperature. The inhibitory effectiveness of the films against the tested strains was maintained regardless of the biopolymer matrix for at least one month. Therefore, these edible films show potential for their future use in fresh fish fillets preservation. PMID:22824340

  2. Angiotensin I-Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitory Activity and ACE Inhibitory Peptides of Salmon (Salmo salar) Protein Hydrolysates Obtained by Human and Porcine Gastrointestinal Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Darewicz, Małgorzata; Borawska, Justyna; Vegarud, Gerd E.; Minkiewicz, Piotr; Iwaniak, Anna

    2014-01-01

    The objectives of the present study were two-fold: first, to detect whether salmon protein fractions possess angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory properties and whether salmon proteins can release ACE inhibitory peptides during a sequential in vitro hydrolysis (with commercial porcine enzymes) and ex vivo digestion (with human gastrointestinal enzymes). Secondly, to evaluate the ACE inhibitory activity of generated hydrolysates. A two-step ex vivo and in vitro model digestion was performed to simulate the human digestion process. Salmon proteins were degraded more efficiently by porcine enzymes than by human gastrointestinal juices and sarcoplasmic proteins were digested/hydrolyzed more easily than myofibrillar proteins. The ex vivo digested myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic duodenal samples showed IC50 values (concentration required to decrease the ACE activity by 50%) of 1.06 and 2.16 mg/mL, respectively. The in vitro hydrolyzed myofibrillar and sarcoplasmic samples showed IC50 values of 0.91 and 1.04 mg/mL, respectively. Based on the results of in silico studies, it was possible to identify 9 peptides of the ex vivo hydrolysates and 7 peptides of the in vitro hydrolysates of salmon proteins of 11 selected peptides. In both types of salmon hydrolysates, ACE-inhibitory peptides IW, IY, TVY and VW were identified. In the in vitro salmon protein hydrolysates an ACE-inhibitory peptides VPW and VY were also detected, while ACE-inhibitory peptides ALPHA, IVY and IWHHT were identified in the hydrolysates generated with ex vivo digestion. In our studies, we documented ACE inhibitory in vitro effects of salmon protein hydrolysates obtained by human and as well as porcine gastrointestinal enzymes. PMID:25123137

  3. Cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant cyanidin glycosides in cherries and berries.

    PubMed

    Seeram, N P; Momin, R A; Nair, M G; Bourquin, L D

    2001-09-01

    Anthocyanins from tart cherries, Prunus cerasus L. (Rosaceae) cv. Balaton and Montmorency; sweet cherries, Prunus avium L. (Rosaceae); bilberries, Vaccinum myrtillus L. (Ericaceae); blackberries, Rubus sp. (Rosaceae); blueberries var. Jersey, Vaccinium corymbosum L. (Ericaceae); cranberries var. Early Black, Vaccinium macrocarpon Ait. (Ericaceae); elderberries, Sambucus canadensis (Caprifoliaceae); raspberries, Rubus idaeus (Rosaceae); and strawberries var. Honeoye, Fragaria x ananassa Duch. (Rosaceae), were investigated for cyclooxygenase inhibitory and antioxidant activities. The presence and levels of cyanidin-3-glucosylrutinoside 1 and cyanidin-3-rutinoside 2 were determined in the fruits using HPLC. The antioxidant activity of anthocyanins from cherries was comparable to the commercial antioxidants, tert-butylhydroquinone, butylated hydroxytoluene and butylated hydroxyanisole, and superior to vitamin E, at a test concentration of 125 microg/ml. Anthocyanins from raspberries and sweet cherries demonstrated 45% and 47% cyclooxygenase-I and cyclooxygenase-II inhibitory activities, respectively, when assayed at 125 microg/ml. The cyclooxygenase inhibitory activities of anthocyanins from these fruits were comparable to those of ibuprofen and naproxen at 10 microM concentrations. Anthocyanins 1 and 2 are present in both cherries and raspberry. The yields of pure anthocyanins 1 and 2 in 100 g Balaton and Montmorency tart cherries, sweet cherries and raspberries were 21, 16.5; 11, 5; 4.95, 21; and 4.65, 13.5 mg, respectively. Fresh blackberries and strawberries contained only anthocyanin 2 in yields of 24 and 22.5 mg/100 g, respectively. Anthocyanins 1 and 2 were not found in bilberries, blueberries, cranberries or elderberries. PMID:11695879

  4. Optimizing inhibitory learning during exposure therapy.

    PubMed

    Craske, Michelle G; Kircanski, Katharina; Zelikowsky, Moriel; Mystkowski, Jayson; Chowdhury, Najwa; Baker, Aaron

    2008-01-01

    Prevailing models of exposure therapy for phobias and anxiety disorders construe level of fear throughout exposure trials as an index of corrective learning. However, the evidence, reviewed herein, indicates that neither the degree by which fear reduces nor the ending fear level predict therapeutic outcome. Developments in the theory and science of fear extinction, and learning and memory, indicate that 'performance during training' is not commensurate with learning at the process level. Inhibitory learning is recognized as being central to extinction and access to secondary inhibitory associations is subject to influences such as context and time, rather than fear during extinction training. Strategies for enhancing inhibitory learning, and its retrieval over time and context, are reviewed along with their clinical implications for exposure therapy and directions for future research. PMID:18005936

  5. Inhibitory ryanodine prevents ryanodine receptor-mediated Ca? release without affecting endoplasmic reticulum Ca? content in primary hippocampal neurons.

    PubMed

    Adasme, Tatiana; Paula-Lima, Andrea; Hidalgo, Cecilia

    2015-02-27

    Ryanodine is a cell permeant plant alkaloid that binds selectively and with high affinity to ryanodine receptor (RyR) Ca(2+) release channels. Sub-micromolar ryanodine concentrations activate RyR channels while micromolar concentrations are inhibitory. Several reports indicate that neuronal synaptic plasticity, learning and memory require RyR-mediated Ca(2+)-release, which is essential for muscle contraction. The use of micromolar (inhibitory) ryanodine represents a common strategy to suppress RyR activity in neuronal cells: however, micromolar ryanodine promotes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release and endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) depletion in muscle cells. Information is lacking in this regard in neuronal cells; hence, we examined here if addition of inhibitory ryanodine elicited Ca(2+) release in primary hippocampal neurons, and if prolonged incubation of primary hippocampal cultures with inhibitory ryanodine affected neuronal ER calcium content. Our results indicate that inhibitory ryanodine does not cause Ca(2+) release from the ER in primary hippocampal neurons, even though ryanodine diffusion should produce initially low intracellular concentrations, within the RyR activation range. Moreover, neurons treated for 1 h with inhibitory ryanodine had comparable Ca(2+) levels as control neurons. These combined findings imply that prolonged incubation with inhibitory ryanodine, which effectively abolishes RyR-mediated Ca(2+) release, preserves ER Ca(2+) levels and thus constitutes a sound strategy to suppress neuronal RyR function. PMID:25623539

  6. Experimental investigations of the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of inert and combustible dust cloud mixtures.

    PubMed

    Addai, Emmanuel Kwasi; Gabel, Dieter; Krause, Ulrich

    2016-04-15

    The risks associated with dust explosions still exist in industries that either process or handle combustible dust. This explosion risk could be prevented or mitigated by applying the principle of inherent safety (moderation). This is achieved by adding an inert material to a highly combustible material in order to decrease the ignition sensitivity of the combustible dust. The presented paper deals with the experimental investigation of the influence of adding an inert dust on the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature of the combustible/inert dust mixtures. The experimental investigation was done in two laboratory scale equipment: the Hartmann apparatus and the Godbert-Greenwald furnace for the minimum ignition energy and the minimum ignition temperature test respectively. This was achieved by mixing various amounts of three inert materials (magnesium oxide, ammonium sulphate and sand) and six combustible dusts (brown coal, lycopodium, toner, niacin, corn starch and high density polyethylene). Generally, increasing the inert materials concentration increases the minimum ignition energy as well as the minimum ignition temperatures until a threshold is reached where no ignition was obtained. The permissible range for the inert mixture to minimize the ignition risk lies between 60 to 80%. PMID:26799221

  7. [Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex].

    PubMed

    Yin, Shuhui; Zhao, Ke

    2015-12-25

    The understanding of rectoanal inhibitory reflex (RAIR) is progressing for the latest 100 years. From the discovery of its important role in diagnosis of Hirschsprung's disease to all aspects of its development, reflex pathways, neural regulation and physiological functions, there have been more in-depth explorations. It is now recognized that a number of other diseases also have a more specific performance of RAIR. It has become an important and indispensable part to anorectal manometry. Research progress of rectoanal inhibitory reflex is reviewed in this article. PMID:26704013

  8. Activity-dependent adaptations in inhibitory axons.

    PubMed

    Frias, Ctia P; Wierenga, Corette J

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic connections in our brains change continuously and throughout our lifetime. Despite ongoing synaptic changes, a healthy balance between excitation and inhibition is maintained by various forms of homeostatic and activity-dependent adaptations, ensuring stable functioning of neuronal networks. In this review we summarize experimental evidence for activity-dependent changes occurring in inhibitory axons, in cultures as well as in vivo. Axons form many presynaptic terminals, which are dynamic structures sharing presynaptic material along the axonal shaft. We discuss how internal (e.g., vesicle sharing) and external factors (e.g., binding of cell adhesion molecules or secreted factors) may affect the formation and plasticity of inhibitory synapses. PMID:24312009

  9. Activity-dependent adaptations in inhibitory axons

    PubMed Central

    Frias, Ctia P.; Wierenga, Corette J.

    2013-01-01

    Synaptic connections in our brains change continuously and throughout our lifetime. Despite ongoing synaptic changes, a healthy balance between excitation and inhibition is maintained by various forms of homeostatic and activity-dependent adaptations, ensuring stable functioning of neuronal networks. In this review we summarize experimental evidence for activity-dependent changes occurring in inhibitory axons, in cultures as well as in vivo. Axons form many presynaptic terminals, which are dynamic structures sharing presynaptic material along the axonal shaft. We discuss how internal (e.g., vesicle sharing) and external factors (e.g., binding of cell adhesion molecules or secreted factors) may affect the formation and plasticity of inhibitory synapses. PMID:24312009

  10. Microbial adhesion of Cryptosporidium parvum: Identification of a colostrum-derived inhibitory lipid

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Joann; Kuhlenschmidt, Mark S.

    2008-01-01

    We previously described an unidentified lipid purified from calf small intestine that inhibits the in vitro adhesion of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites to host cells [Johnson JK, Schmidt J, Gelberg HB, Kuhlenschmidt MS. Microbial adhesion of Cryptosporidium parvum sporozoites: purification of an inhibitory lipid from bovine mucosa. J Parasitol 2004;90:98090]. Intestinal mucosa from some calves, however, failed to yield this bioactive lipid. Accordingly, we examined other potential sources, especially dietary sources, of the inhibitory lipid and discovered it was principally derived from bovine colostrum. Interestingly, fresh colostrum yielded little or no inhibitory lipid, however, the lipid was found in relatively large quantities following incubation of colostrum with the aqueous fraction of calf intestinal contents. Using FAB-MS and NMR analysis, the sporozoite inhibitory lipid (SIL) was identified as oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid likely released from colostrum triglycerides and phospholipids by digestion in the lumen of the calf small intestine. Oleic acid dose-dependently inhibited in vitro sporozoitehost cell adhesion with an inhibitory constant (IC50) of approximately 5 ?M. Comparison of oleic acid with other C-18 fatty acids revealed linolenic, but not stearic acid, also displayed potent inhibitory activity. Neither linolenic nor oleic acid, however, affect either sporozoite or host cell viability at concentrations that inhibit sporozoite adhesion. These results suggest certain colostrum-derived long-chain fatty acids may serve as natural inhibitors of the early steps in C. parvum sporozoitehost cell interactions. PMID:18675305

  11. Stability and cytotoxicity of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme inhibitory peptides derived from bovine casein*

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei; Yu, Pan-pan; Zhang, Feng-yang; Che, Hong-xia; Jiang, Zhan-mei

    2014-01-01

    This study investigated the effect of heat treatment combined with acid and alkali on the angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activity of peptides derived from bovine casein. The free amino group content, color, and cytotoxicity of the peptides were measured under different conditions. When heated at 100 °C in the pH range from 9.0 to 12.0, ACE inhibitory activity was reduced and the appearance of the peptides was significantly darkened. After thermal treatment in the presence of acid and alkali, the free amino group content of ACE inhibitory peptides decreased markedly. High temperature and prolonged heating also resulted in the loss of ACE inhibitory activity, the loss of free amino groups, and the darker coloration of bovine casein-derived peptides. However, ACE inhibitory peptides, within a concentration range of from 0.01 to 0.2 mg/ml, showed no cytotoxicity to Caco-2 and ECV-304 cell lines after heat treatment. This indicated that high temperature and alkaline heat treatment impaired the stability of bovine casein-derived ACE inhibitory peptides. PMID:24510707

  12. Increased circulating macrophage migration inhibitory factor levels are associated with coronary artery disease

    PubMed Central

    Yksel, Arif; Bilgir, Ferda; Bilgir, Oktay; Calan, Mehmet; Bozkaya, Giray

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: To evaluate the macrophage migration inhibitory factor and E-selectin levels in patients with acute coronary syndrome. MATERIALS/METHODS: We examined the plasma migration inhibitory factor and E-selectin levels in 87 patients who presented with chest pain at our hospital. The patients were classified into two groups according to their cardiac status. Sixty-five patients had acute myocardial infarction, and 22 patients had non-cardiac chest pain (non-coronary disease). We designated the latter group of patients as the control group. The patients who presented with acute myocardial infarction were further divided into two subgroups: ST-elevated myocardial infarction (n = 30) and non-ST elevated myocardial infarction (n = 35). RESULTS: We found higher plasma migration inhibitory factor levels in both acute myocardial infarction subgroups than in the control group. However, the E-selectin levels were similar between the acute myocardial infarction and control patients. In addition, we did not find a significant difference in the plasma migration inhibitory factor levels between the ST elevated myocardial infarction and NST-elevated myocardial infarction subgroups. DISCUSSION: The circulating concentrations of migration inhibitory factor were significantly increased in acute myocardial infarction patients, whereas the soluble E-selectin levels were similar between acute myocardial infarction patients and control subjects. Our results suggest that migration inhibitory factor may play a role in the atherosclerotic process. PMID:26017646

  13. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR RANGE MANAGEMENT (4000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid 3923.10 Minimum bid....

  14. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid 3923.10 Minimum...

  15. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid 3923.10 Minimum...

  16. 43 CFR 3923.10 - Minimum bid.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Minimum bid. 3923.10 Section 3923.10 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands (Continued) BUREAU OF LAND MANAGEMENT, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS MANAGEMENT (3000) OIL SHALE LEASING Minimum Bid 3923.10 Minimum...

  17. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of...

  18. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those…

  19. 5 CFR 551.301 - Minimum wage.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum wage. 551.301 Section 551.301 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS PAY ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Minimum Wage Provisions Basic Provision § 551.301 Minimum wage. (a)(1) Except as provided in paragraph (a)(2) of...

  20. Does the Minimum Wage Affect Welfare Caseloads?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Page, Marianne E.; Spetz, Joanne; Millar, Jane

    2005-01-01

    Although minimum wages are advocated as a policy that will help the poor, few studies have examined their effect on poor families. This paper uses variation in minimum wages across states and over time to estimate the impact of minimum wage legislation on welfare caseloads. We find that the elasticity of the welfare caseload with respect to the…

  1. Do Some Workers Have Minimum Wage Careers?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carrington, William J.; Fallick, Bruce C.

    2001-01-01

    Most workers who begin their careers in minimum-wage jobs eventually gain more experience and move on to higher paying jobs. However, more than 8% of workers spend at least half of their first 10 working years in minimum wage jobs. Those more likely to have minimum wage careers are less educated, minorities, women with young children, and those

  2. 30 CFR 202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.53 Section 202.53 Mineral Resources MINERALS MANAGEMENT SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR MINERALS REVENUE MANAGEMENT ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General § 202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide for minimum...

  3. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral... Considerations § 281.30 Minimum royalty. Unless otherwise specified in the leasing notice, each lease issued pursuant to the regulations in this part shall require the payment of a specified minimum annual...

  4. 30 CFR 202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 202.352 Section 202.352... ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual royalty payments for any producing lease be less than the minimum royalty established by the lease....

  5. 30 CFR 281.30 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 281.30 Section 281.30 Mineral... OIL, GAS, AND SULPHUR IN THE OUTER CONTINENTAL SHELF Financial Considerations § 281.30 Minimum royalty... part shall require the payment of a specified minimum annual royalty beginning with the year in...

  6. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352... Resources Revenue ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual royalty payments for any producing lease be less than the minimum royalty established by the lease....

  7. Minimum variance beamformer weights revisited.

    PubMed

    Moiseev, Alexander; Doesburg, Sam M; Grunau, Ruth E; Ribary, Urs

    2015-10-15

    Adaptive minimum variance beamformers are widely used analysis tools in MEG and EEG. When the target brain activity presents in the form of spatially localized responses, the procedure usually involves two steps. First, positions and orientations of the sources of interest are determined. Second, the filter weights are calculated and source time courses reconstructed. This last step is the object of the current study. Despite different approaches utilized at the source localization stage, basic expressions for the weights have the same form, dictated by the minimum variance condition. These classic expressions involve covariance matrix of the measured field, which includes contributions from both the sources of interest and the noise background. We show analytically that the same weights can alternatively be obtained, if the full field covariance is replaced with that of the noise, provided the beamformer points to the true sources precisely. In practice, however, a certain mismatch is always inevitable. We show that such mismatch results in partial suppression of the true sources if the traditional weights are used. To avoid this effect, the "alternative" weights based on properly estimated noise covariance should be applied at the second, source time course reconstruction step. We demonstrate mathematically and using simulated and real data that in many situations the alternative weights provide significantly better time course reconstruction quality than the traditional ones. In particular, they a) improve source-level SNR and yield more accurately reconstructed waveforms; b) provide more accurate estimates of inter-source correlations; and c) reduce the adverse influence of the source correlations on the performance of single-source beamformers, which are used most often. Importantly, the alternative weights come at no additional computational cost, as the structure of the expressions remains the same. PMID:26143207

  8. Free Energies of Molecular Bound States in Lipid Bilayers: Lethal Concentrations of Antimicrobial Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Huey W.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract The lipid matrix, or the lipid bilayer, of cell membranes is a natural binding site for amphipathic molecules, including antimicrobial peptides, pore-forming proteins, and many drugs. The unique property of pore-forming antimicrobial peptides is that they exhibit a threshold concentration (called the lethal concentration or the minimum inhibitory concentration) for activity, below which no effect is seen. Without this property, antimicrobial peptides would not be effective self-defense weapons, because they would have harmed all cells at any concentration. The question is what gives rise to this unique property? This study provides a free energy description for the origin of a threshold concentration. The same free energy applied differently also explains the binding of drugs that shows no threshold concentrations. The idea is compared with theories of micellar solutions that require a large oligomer size (n ? 15) to achieve a threshold concentration. The elasticity of lipid bilayers makes the phenomena in membranes different. The majority of antimicrobial peptides have a large negative binding energy to the bilayer interface, but the binding causes an expansion in the membrane area, or equivalently a thinning in the membrane thickness. This elastic energy of membrane thinning elevates the energy level of interfacial binding with the peptide concentration, hence gives rise to a threshold concentration for forming pores containing as few as four peptides. PMID:19383470

  9. Characterization of angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitory activity of fermented milk produced by Lactobacillus helveticus.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yongfu; Li, Changkun; Xue, Jiangang; Kwok, Lai-yu; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Heping; Menghe, Bilige

    2015-08-01

    Hypertension affects up to 30% of the adult population in most countries. It is a known risk factor for cardiovascular diseases, including coronary heart disease, peripheral artery disease, and stroke. Owing to the increased health awareness of consumers, the application of angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE)-inhibitory peptides produced by Lactobacillushelveticus to prevent or control high blood pressure has drawn wide attention. A total of 59 L. helveticus strains were isolated from traditional fermented dairy products and the ACE-inhibitory activity of the fermented milks produced with the isolated microorganisms was assayed. The ACE-inhibitory activity of 38 L. helveticus strains was more than 50%, and 3 strains (IMAU80872, IMAU80852, and IMAU80851) expressing the highest ACE-inhibitory activity were selected for further studies. Particularly, the gastrointestinal protease tolerance and thermostability of the ACE-inhibitory activity in the fermented milks were assessed. Based on these 2 criteria, IMAU80872 was found to be superior over the other 2 strains. Furthermore, IMAU80872 exhibited a high in vitro ACE-inhibitory activity at the following fermentation conditions: fermentation temperature at 40°C, inoculation concentration of 1×10(6) cfu/mL, and fermentation for 18h. Finally, by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionization quadrupole time-of-flight tandem mass spectrometry analysis, we observed changes of the metabolome along the milk fermentation process of IMAU80872. Furthermore, 6 peptides were identified, which might have ACE-inhibitory activity. In conclusion, we identified a novel ACE-inhibitory L. helveticus strain suitable for the production of fermented milk or other functional dairy products. PMID:26004829

  10. The inhibitory effect of Mesembryanthemum edule (L.) bolus essential oil on some pathogenic fungal isolates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesembryanthemum edule is a medicinal plant which has been indicated by Xhosa traditional healers in the treatment HIV associated diseases such as tuberculosis, dysentery, diabetic mellitus, laryngitis, mouth infections, ringworm eczema and vaginal infections. The investigation of the essential oil of this plant could help to verify the rationale behind the use of the plant as a cure for these illnesses. Methods The essential oil from M. edule was analysed by GC/MS. Concentration ranging from 0.005 - 5 mg/ml of the hydro-distilled essential oil was tested against some fungal strains, using micro-dilution method. The plant minimum inhibitory activity on the fungal strains was determined. Result GC/MS analysis of the essential oil resulted in the identification of 28 compounds representing 99.99% of the total essential oil. A total amount of 10.6 and 36.61% constituents were obtained as monoterpenes and oxygenated monoterpenes. The amount of sesquiterpene hydrocarbons (3.58%) was low compared to the oxygenated sesquiterpenes with pick area of 9.28%. Total oil content of diterpenes and oxygenated diterpenes detected from the essential oil were 1.43% and 19.24%. The fatty acids and their methyl esters content present in the essential oil extract were found to be 19.25%. Antifungal activity of the essential oil extract tested against the pathogenic fungal, inhibited C. albican, C. krusei, C. rugosa, C. glabrata and C. neoformans with MICs range of 0.02-0.31 mg/ml. the activity of the essential oil was found competing with nystatin and amphotericin B used as control. Conclusion Having accounted the profile chemical constituent found in M. edule oil and its important antifungal properties, we consider that its essential oil might be useful in pharmaceutical and food industry as natural antibiotic and food preservative. PMID:24885234

  11. Minimum distance classification in remote sensing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    The utilization of minimum distance classification methods in remote sensing problems, such as crop species identification, is considered. Literature concerning both minimum distance classification problems and distance measures is reviewed. Experimental results are presented for several examples. The objective of these examples is to: (a) compare the sample classification accuracy of a minimum distance classifier, with the vector classification accuracy of a maximum likelihood classifier, and (b) compare the accuracy of a parametric minimum distance classifier with that of a nonparametric one. Results show the minimum distance classifier performance is 5% to 10% better than that of the maximum likelihood classifier. The nonparametric classifier is only slightly better than the parametric version.

  12. Dendritic Inhibitory Synapses Punch above Their Weight.

    PubMed

    Goetz, Lea; Roth, Arnd; Husser, Michael

    2015-08-01

    Mllner etal. (2015) show that single inhibitory synapses placed in the right location on the dendritic tree can exert a powerful impact on backpropagating action potentials in hippocampal pyramidal neurons by controlling local Ca(2+) influx with ?m and ms precision. PMID:26247855

  13. Bilingualism Influences Inhibitory Control in Auditory Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Marian, Viorica

    2011-01-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among

  14. Bilingualism Influences Inhibitory Control in Auditory Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K.; Marian, Viorica

    2011-01-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among…

  15. Preparation of ACE Inhibitory Peptides from Mytilus coruscus Hydrolysate Using Uniform Design

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jin-Chao; Cheng, Jie; Shi, Xiao-lai

    2013-01-01

    The angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides from mussel, Mytilus coruscus, were investigated and the variable factors, protease concentration, hydrolysis time, pH, and temperature, were optimized using Uniform Design, a new statistical experimental method. The results proved that the hydrolysate of alkali proteases had high ACE-inhibitory activity, especially the alkali protease E1. Optimization by Uniform Design showed that the best hydrolysis conditions for preparation of ACE-inhibitory peptides from Mytilus coruscus were protease concentration of 36.0 U/mL, hydrolysis time of 2.7 hours, pH 8.2, and Temperature at 59.5°C, respectively. The verification experiments under optimum conditions showed that the ACE-inhibitory activity (91.3%) were agreed closely with the predicted activity of 90.7%. The amino acid composition analysis of Mytilus coruscus ACE-inhibitory peptides proved that it had high percent of lysine, leucine, glycine, aspartic acid, and glutamic acid. PMID:23484103

  16. Inhibitory effect and cell damage on bacterial flora of fish caused by chitosan, nisin and sodium lactate.

    PubMed

    Schelegueda, Laura Inés; Zalazar, Aldana Lourdes; Gliemmo, María Fernanda; Campos, Carmen Adriana

    2016-02-01

    The effect of the combined use of chitosan, nisin and sodium lactate on the growth of Listeria innocua, Shewanella putrefaciens and psychrophilic bacteria isolated from fish was investigated in broth by means of minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC). Furthermore, the sites of cell-injury caused by mentioned antimicrobials and their combinations on L. innocua and S. putrefaciens were studied. MIC of antimicrobial mixtures were evaluated by Berembaum design and check board method. Antimicrobials' sites of injury were investigated by the evaluation of cell constituents' release, cell surface hydrophobicity and differential scanning calorimetry. Results depended on antimicrobial used; several combinations inhibited the growth of L. innocua and S. putrefaciens and all combinations inhibited psychrophilic bacteria. Besides, some mixtures showed synergistic effects. All the mixtures affected ribosomes and DNA of the studied bacteria. Regarding cellular envelope, antimicrobials acted according to the structural characteristics of target microorganisms. Cell damage was higher when antimicrobials were combined, which could explain the observed synergistic effects. This study demonstrates and justifies the synergistic action of chitosan, nisin and sodium lactate on the inhibition of microorganisms related to fish spoilage and remarks the promissory use of the synergic combination of antimicrobials for fish preservation. PMID:26597566

  17. Minimum additive waste stabilization (MAWS)

    SciTech Connect

    Beskid, N.; Mazer, J.; Gimpel, R.; Warner, R.

    1994-08-01

    Low-level radioactive and mixed waste remediation is a major concern at US Department of Energy (DOE) sites across the country. The objective of the Minimum Additive Waste Stabilization (MAWS) Program is to demonstrate a synergistic combination of technologies that makes treatment by vitrification an economical alternative to cementation for some types of low-level radioactive and mixed waste. Information and expertise gained from the MAWS demonstration will be useful to all other DOE sites considering vitrification as a waste treatment alternative. This program is providing information that shows how vitrification will work as a treatment for low-level radioactive wastes and mixed wastes and how it may be integrated with other treatment technologies before vitrification can be recommended as a treatment method for multimillion dollar remediation projects. A cost analysis illustrated how millions of dollars could be saved in the remediation efforts at the Fernald Environmental Management Project (FEMP) located near Cincinnati, Ohio. If the MAWS demonstration is successful, the technology may be adapted for further use in the DOE complex.

  18. Generalized minimum miscibility pressure correlation

    SciTech Connect

    Glaso, O.

    1984-03-01

    Correlations for predicting minimum miscibility pressure (MMP) are important tools in the selection of candidate reservoirs for gas miscible flooding. It is important that such correlations be accurate. Several CO2 MMP correlations have been published. None of these can be used with enough confidence for final project design, but are useful for screening and preliminary work. Correlations published on CO2 miscible flooding show temperature to be the most important parameter, but they disagree with regard to the effect of oil type. Compared with CO2 miscible flooding, little has been published on high-pressure hydrocarbon gas miscible flooding, and no correlation is available for predicting MMP with lean hydrocarbon gases or nitrogen. In 1960, Benham and coworkers presented empirical curves from which miscibility conditions can be estimated for reservoir oils being displaced by rich gas within a pressure range of 1500 to 3000 psia. From Benham's data, the proposed equations have been derived for predicting MMP. These equations are a result of curve fitting Benham's data. 22 references.

  19. Pharmacokinetics and tissue concentrations of tylosin in selected avian species

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Locke, D.; Bush, M.; Carpenter, J.W.

    1982-01-01

    Tissue and plasma concentrations and the biological half-life of tylosin in avian species of a variety of body sizes and metabolic rates were studied. The species chosen were eastern bobwhite quail (Colinus virginianus virginianus), pigeons (Columba livia), greater sandhill cranes (Grus canadensis tabida), and emus (Dromaius novaehollandiae). In the 1st phase of this study, tylosin was administered IM to quail, pigeons, and emus at a dosage rate of 25 mg/kg of body weight and to cranes at a dosage rate of 15 mg/kg. The average peak plasma concentrations of tylosin in quail, pigeons, cranes, and emus were 4.31, 5.63, 3.62, and 3.26 microgram/ml, respectively. These peak concentrations occurred at 0.5 to 1.5 hours after administration. The biological half-life of tylosin averaged 1.2 hours in quail, pigeons, and cranes, and was 4.7 hours in emus. In the 2nd phase of this study, tylosin concentrations in the tissues of quail, pigeons, and cranes were markedly higher than were plasma concentrations at corresponding sampling times. Six hours after antibiotic administration, tissue concentrations of tylosin in all species remained within the minimum inhibitory concentration for most pathogenic organisms. Dosage regimens of 25 mg of tylosin/kg 4 times daily for quail and pigeons, 15 mg/kg 3 times daily for cranes, and 25 mg/kg 3 times daily for emus would be needed to establish and maintain therapeutic tissue concentrations.

  20. Inhibitory coupling between inhibitory interneurons in the spinal cord dorsal horn.

    PubMed

    Labrakakis, Charalampos; Lorenzo, Louis-Etienne; Bories, Cyril; Ribeiro-da-Silva, Alfredo; De Koninck, Yves

    2009-01-01

    Local inhibitory interneurons in the dorsal horn play an important role in the control of excitability at the segmental level and thus determine how nociceptive information is relayed to higher structures. Regulation of inhibitory interneuron activity may therefore have critical consequences on pain perception. Indeed, disinhibition of dorsal horn neuronal networks disrupts the balance between excitation and inhibition and is believed to be a key mechanism underlying different forms of pain hypersensitivity and chronic pain states. In this context, studying the source and the synaptic properties of the inhibitory inputs that the inhibitory interneurons receive is important in order to predict the impact of drug action at the network level. To address this, we studied inhibitory synaptic transmission in lamina II inhibitory interneurons identified under visual guidance in spinal slices taken from transgenic mice expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under the control of the GAD promoter. The majority of these cells fired tonically to a long depolarizing current pulse. Monosynaptically evoked inhibitory postsynaptic currents (eIPSCs) in these cells were mediated by both GABAA and glycine receptors. Consistent with this, both GABAA and glycine receptor-mediated miniature IPSCs were recorded in all of the cells. These inhibitory inputs originated at least in part from local lamina II interneurons as verified by simultaneous recordings from pairs of EGFP+ cells. These synapses appeared to have low release probability and displayed potentiation and asynchronous release upon repeated activation. In summary, we report on a previously unexamined component of the dorsal horn circuitry that likely constitutes an essential element of the fine tuning of nociception. PMID:19432997

  1. Inhibitory effects of catechol accumulation on benzene biodegradation in Pseudomonas putida F1 cultures.

    PubMed

    Muoz, R; Daz, L F; Bordel, S; Villaverde, S

    2007-06-01

    The influence of benzene concentration on the specific growth rate (mu), CO(2) and metabolite production, and cellular energetic content (i.e., ATP content), during benzene biodegradation by Pseudomonas putida F1 was investigated. Within the concentration range tested (5-130mg benzene l(-1)) the mu, the specific CO(2) production, and the ATP content remained constant at 0.42-0.48h(-1), 1.86+/-0.21g CO(2) g(-1) biomass, and 5.3+/-0.4x10(-6)mol ATP g(-1) biomass, respectively. Catechol accumulated during process start-up at all tested concentrations. Catechol specific production increased with increasing benzene inlet concentrations. This confirms that the transformation of this intermediate was the limiting step during benzene degradation. It was shown that catechol inhibited both the conversion of benzene to catechol and its further transformation. In addition, catechol concentrations higher than 10mgl(-1) significantly decreased both benzene and catechol associated respiration, confirming the highly inhibitory effect of this intermediate. This inhibitory threshold concentration was approximately two orders of magnitude lower than the concentrations present in the culture medium during process start-up, suggesting that cellular activity was always far below its maximum. Thus, due to its toxic and inhibitory nature and its tendency to accumulate at high benzene loading, catechol must be carefully monitored during process operation. PMID:17316748

  2. Concentrator Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luque-Heredia, Ignacio; Luque, Antonio

    2015-10-01

    The following sections are included: * Introduction * The early development of CPV * Concentrator solar cells * Optics for photovoltaic concentrators * Photovoltaic concentration modules * Tracking systems for photovoltaic concentration * High-concentration systems * Rating and performance * Cost considerations * Conclusions * References

  3. Ascorbyl palmitate-loaded chitosan nanoparticles: characteristic and polyphenol oxidase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Kim, Mi Kyung; Lee, Ji-Soo; Kim, Kwang Yup; Lee, Hyeon Gyu

    2013-03-01

    The aim of this study was to produce ascorbyl palmitate (AP)-loaded nanoparticles in order to inhibit polyphenol oxidase (PPO) in bananas. AP-loaded chitosan nanoparticles were prepared using acetic acid and citric acid (denoted as CS/AA and CS/CA nanoparticles, respectively). As the initial AP concentration increases, the particle size significantly decreases, and the zeta potential, entrapment and loading efficiency significantly increases. The PPO inhibitory activity of AP was effectively improved when AP was nano-encapsulated by chitosan compared to no encapsulation. These results suggest that chitosan nano-encapsulation can be used to enhance the PPO inhibitory activity of AP. PMID:23247266

  4. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Rubén; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andréasson, Joakim; Grøtli, Morten

    2015-01-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ. PMID:25944708

  5. Design, Synthesis and Inhibitory Activity of Photoswitchable RET Kinase Inhibitors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Rubn; Nilsson, Jesper R.; Solano, Carlos; Andrasson, Joakim; Grtli, Morten

    2015-05-01

    REarranged during Transfection (RET) is a transmembrane receptor tyrosine kinase required for normal development and maintenance of neurons of the central and peripheral nervous systems. Deregulation of RET and hyperactivity of the RET kinase is intimately connected to several types of human cancers, most notably thyroid cancers, making it an attractive therapeutic target for small-molecule kinase inhibitors. Novel approaches, allowing external control of the activity of RET, would be key additions to the signal transduction toolbox. In this work, photoswitchable RET kinase inhibitors based on azo-functionalized pyrazolopyrimidines were developed, enabling photonic control of RET activity. The most promising compound displays excellent switching properties and stability with good inhibitory effect towards RET in cell-free as well as live-cell assays and a significant difference in inhibitory activity between its two photoisomeric forms. As the first reported photoswitchable small-molecule kinase inhibitor, we consider the herein presented effector to be a significant step forward in the development of tools for kinase signal transduction studies with spatiotemporal control over inhibitor concentration in situ.

  6. Proton pump inhibitory therapy: then and now.

    PubMed Central

    Schepp, W.

    1996-01-01

    Proton pump inhibitors (PPIs) have been established as the new "gold standard" for traditional acid-inhibitory treatment of the so called "peptic" diseases. Due to the high antisecretory and ulcer-healing potency of omeprazole, no major improvements of the efficacy in ulcer healing and pain relief can be expected. Pantoprazole, as a further development in PPIs, is characterized by improved pharmacokinetic behavior as well as by higher tissue selectivity and binding specificity and by a very low potential to interact with the cytochrome P450 enzyme system. These characteristics may provide the basis for a low potential for side effects and for a more favorable interaction profile, although the clinical relevance of these potential advantages remains to be proven. Reflux esophagitis will also remain a domain for the traditional use of PPIs in the future. However, in the treatment of gastroduodenal ulcers, the acid inhibitory potential of PPIs will be used mainly to facilitate the eradication of H. pylori. PMID:9112749

  7. Variation in the inhibitory potency of terbinafine among genetic variants ofCYP2D6.

    PubMed

    Akiyoshi, Takeshi; Ishiuchi, Miho; Imaoka, Ayuko; Ohtani, Hisakazu

    2015-08-01

    Cytochrome P450 2D6 (CYP2D6) is a highly polymorphic enzyme that is involved in the metabolism of many drugs. Terbinafine (TER) is a CYP2D6 inhibitor and causes persistent drug interactions in the clinical setting; however, its inhibitory mechanism and the differences in its inhibitory potency among genetic variants of CYP2D6 remain to be investigated. This study aimed to investigate the inhibitory mechanism of TER and the differences in its inhibitory potency among three CYP2D6 variants, CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10. In a competitive inhibition study, the metabolic activity of the CYP2D6 was assessed based on their demethylation of dextromethorphan in the presence or absence of TER, and the time-dependency of the inhibitory effects were examined by preincubating the enzymes with TER. TER had weaker inhibitory effects on CYP2D6.2 and CYP2D6.10 than on CYP2D6.1; i.e., TER exhibited Ki values (the concentration of inhibitor that results in half-maximal inhibition) of 0.0525, 0.355, and 1.85?M for CYP2D6.1, CYP2D6.2, and CYP2D6.10, respectively. The inhibitory effects of TER were not time-dependent. Since TER's Ki value for CYP2D6.10 was 35.2-fold higher than its Ki value for CYP2D6.1, the CYP2D6 genotype of subjects should be taken into account when estimating the severity of drug interactions involving TER. PMID:26195224

  8. Proactive inhibitory control: A general biasing account.

    PubMed

    Elchlepp, Heike; Lavric, Aureliu; Chambers, Christopher D; Verbruggen, Frederick

    2016-05-01

    Flexible behavior requires a control system that can inhibit actions in response to changes in the environment. Recent studies suggest that people proactively adjust response parameters in anticipation of a stop signal. In three experiments, we tested the hypothesis that proactive inhibitory control involves adjusting both attentional and response settings, and we explored the relationship with other forms of proactive and anticipatory control. Subjects responded to the color of a stimulus. On some trials, an extra signal occurred. The response to this signal depended on the task context subjects were in: in the 'ignore' context, they ignored it; in the 'stop' context, they had to withhold their response; and in the 'double-response' context, they had to execute a secondary response. An analysis of event-related brain potentials for no-signal trials in the stop context revealed that proactive inhibitory control works by biasing the settings of lower-level systems that are involved in stimulus detection, action selection, and action execution. Furthermore, subjects made similar adjustments in the double-response and stop-signal contexts, indicating an overlap between various forms of proactive action control. The results of Experiment 1 also suggest an overlap between proactive inhibitory control and preparatory control in task-switching studies: both require reconfiguration of task-set parameters to bias or alter subordinate processes. We conclude that much of the top-down control in response inhibition tasks takes place before the inhibition signal is presented. PMID:26859519

  9. Sleep, epilepsy and thalamic reticular inhibitory neurons.

    PubMed

    Steriade, Mircea

    2005-06-01

    Thalamic reticular neurons release the potent inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA and their main targets are thalamocortical neurons in the dorsal thalamus. This article focuses on two topics: (i) the role of thalamic reticular neurons in the initiation of spindles, a hallmark oscillation during early sleep stages; and (ii) the reticular-induced inhibition of thalamocortical neurons during cortically generated spike-wave seizures. Although hotly debated during the past decade, the idea of spindle generation by a network of GABAergic reticular neurons was recently supported by in vivo and in computo studies demonstrating interactions between inhibitory reticular neurons that lead to spindle sequences. During spike-wave seizures and electrical paroxysms of the Lennox-Gastaut type, which arise in the neocortex, reticular neurons are powerfully excited through corticofugal projections and they produce prolonged inhibitory postsynaptic potentials in thalamocortical neurons. Thus, GABAergic reticular neurons are crucial in the generation of some sleep rhythms, which produce synaptic plasticity, and in inhibiting external signals through thalamocortical neurons, which leads to unconsciousness during absence epilepsy. PMID:15927688

  10. Context specificity of inhibitory control in dogs

    PubMed Central

    MacLean, Evan L.; Hare, Brian A.

    2014-01-01

    Across three experiments, we explored whether a dog's capacity for inhibitory control is stable or variable across decision-making contexts. In the social task, dogs were first exposed to the reputations of a stingy experimenter that never shared food and a generous experimenter who always shared food. In subsequent test trials, dogs were required to avoid approaching the stingy experimenter when this individual offered (but withheld) a higher-value reward than the generous experimenter did. In the A-not-B task, dogs were required to inhibit searching for food in a previously rewarded location after witnessing the food being moved from this location to a novel hiding place. In the cylinder task, dogs were required to resist approaching visible food directly (because it was behind a transparent barrier), in favor of a detour reaching response. Overall, dogs exhibited inhibitory control in all three tasks. However, individual scores were not correlated between tasks, suggesting that context has a large effect on dogs' behavior. This result mirrors studies of humans, which have highlighted intra-individual variation in inhibitory control as a function of the decision-making context. Lastly, we observed a correlation between a subject's age and performance on the cylinder task, corroborating previous observations of age-related decline in dogs' executive function. PMID:23584618

  11. Inhibitory Control and Emotion Regulation in Preschool Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Stephanie M.; Wang, Tiffany S.

    2007-01-01

    This research investigated the relation between individual differences in inhibitory control and emotion regulation. Preschool children (N=53) ages 4-6 (M=5; 0) were assessed on brief batteries of inhibitory control of prepotent responses and emotion regulation. Individual differences in inhibitory control were significantly correlated with

  12. Inhibitory effect of DNA topoisomerase inhibitor isoliquiritigenin on the growth of glioma cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Shupeng; Chang, Haigang; Ma, Pengju; Gao, Guojun; Jin, Cailing; Zhao, Xinli; Zhou, Wenke; Jin, Baozhe

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of isoliquiritigenin on the activity of DNA topoisomerase (TOP I) and its inhibitory effect on the growth of U87 glioma cells. Methods: This study investigated the inhibitory effect of isoliquiritigenin on the growth of U87 glioma cells and its cytotoxicity by MTT method and determined the effect of isoliquiritigenin on TOP I activity by agarose gel electrophoresis. On this basis, we studied the interaction between isoliquiritigenin and TOP I and DNA. Finally, we further discussed the effect of isoliquiritigenin on the activity of Caspase 3, the apoptosis protein of U87 glioma cells. Results: Isoliquiritigenin could inhibit the growth of U87 glioma cells (half inhibitory concentration IC50: 0.221 mM) and is of low cytotoxicity to normal cells. Agarose gel electrophoresis showed that isoliquiritigenin had significant inhibitory effect on TOP I activity. Molecular simulation results indicated that isoliquiritigenin took priority of binding to the active center of TOP I, and formed hydrogen bonds with the catalytic site Try723. Finally, Caspase 3 activity detection results suggested that isoliquiritigenin could significantly increase the activity of Caspase 3 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Isoliquiritigenin had a reversible inhibitory effect on TOP I activity, reduced the rate of single strand DNA unwinding in tumor cells, and thus played an important role in inducing the apoptosis of U87 glioma cells. PMID:26722447

  13. Production of goat milk protein hydrolysate enriched in ACE-inhibitory peptides by ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Espejo-Carpio, Francisco Javier; Pérez-Gálvez, Raúl; Almécija, María del Carmen; Guadix, Antonio; Guadix, Emilia M

    2014-11-01

    A global process for the production of goat milk hydrolysates enriched in angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory peptides was proposed. Firstly, the protein fractions (caseins and whey proteins) were separated by ultrafiltration through a 0·14 μm ceramic membrane. The casein fraction obtained in the retentate stream of the above filtration step was subsequently hydrolysed with a combination of subtilisin and trypsin. After 3 h of reaction, the hydrolysate produced presented an IC50 of 218·50 μg/ml, which represent a relatively high ACE inhibitory activity. Finally, this hydrolysate was filtered through a 50 kDa ceramic membrane until reaching a volume reduction factor of 3. The permeate produced presented an improvement of more than 30% in the ACE inhibitory activity. In contrast, the retentate was concentrated in larger and inactive peptides which led to a decrease of more than 80% in its inhibitory activity. The process suggested in this work was suitable to obtain a potent ACE inhibitory activity product able to be incorporated into food formulas intended to control or lower blood pressure. Moreover, the liquid product could be easily stabilised by spray dried if it would be necessary. PMID:25003564

  14. Comparative mutant prevention concentration and antibacterial activity of fluoroquinolones against Escherichia coli in diarrheic buffalo calves.

    PubMed

    Beri, Supriya; Sidhu, Pritam K; Kaur, Gurpreet; Chandra, Mudit; Rampal, Satyavan

    2015-10-01

    Owing to emerging threat of antimicrobial resistance, mutant prevention concentration (MPC) is considered as an important parameter to evaluate the antimicrobials for their capacity to restrict/allow the emergence of resistant mutants. Therefore, MPCs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin, and norfloxacin were determined against Escherichia coli isolates of diarrheic buffalo calves. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and minimum bactericidal concentrations (MBCs) were also established. The MICs of ciprofloxacin, enrofloxacin, levofloxacin, moxifloxacin and norfloxacin were 0009, 0022, 0024, 0028, and 0036 ?g/ml, respectively. The MBCs obtained were very close to the MICs of respective drugs that suggested a bactericidal mode of action of antimicrobials. The MPCs (?g/ml) of ciprofloxacin (42MIC), moxifloxacin (48MIC), and norfloxacin (51MIC) were approximately equal but slightly lower than enrofloxacin (76MIC) and levofloxacin (85MIC) against clinical isolates of E. coli. The MPC data suggested that enrofloxacin has the potential for restricting the selection of E. coli mutants during treatment at appropriate dosing. PMID:24575977

  15. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  16. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  17. 30 CFR 1202.53 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.53 Section 1202.53 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Oil, Gas, and OCS Sulfur, General 1202.53 Minimum royalty. For leases that provide...

  18. 50 CFR 648.143 - Minimum sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum sizes. 648.143 Section 648.143 Wildlife and Fisheries FISHERY CONSERVATION AND MANAGEMENT, NATIONAL OCEANIC AND ATMOSPHERIC ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE FISHERIES OF THE NORTHEASTERN UNITED STATES Management Measures for the Black Sea Bass Fishery § 648.143 Minimum sizes....

  19. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer

  20. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark, Wascher); and "Wage Mobility of MW Workers" (Smith,…

  1. Minimum Wage Effects in the Longer Run

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Nizalova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    Exposure to minimum wages at young ages could lead to adverse longer-run effects via decreased labor market experience and tenure, and diminished education and training, while beneficial longer-run effects could arise if minimum wages increase skill acquisition. Evidence suggests that as individuals reach their late 20s, they earn less the longer…

  2. New Minimum Wage Research: A Symposium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ehrenberg, Ronald G.; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Includes "Introduction" (Ehrenberg); "Effect of the Minimum Wage [MW] on the Fast-Food Industry" (Katz, Krueger); "Using Regional Variation in Wages to Measure Effects of the Federal MW" (Card); "Do MWs Reduce Employment?" (Card); "Employment Effects of Minimum and Subminimum Wages" (Neumark, Wascher); and "Wage Mobility of MW Workers" (Smith,

  3. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  4. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's annual royalty payments for any producing lease be...

  5. 30 CFR 1202.352 - Minimum royalty.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Minimum royalty. 1202.352 Section 1202.352 Mineral Resources OFFICE OF NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR NATURAL RESOURCES REVENUE ROYALTIES Geothermal Resources § 1202.352 Minimum royalty. In no event shall the lessee's...

  6. Minimum Conditions for Congruence of Quadrilaterals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Irvin E.

    1982-01-01

    A complete characterization of minimum conditions for congruence of quadrilaterals is presented. Convex quadrilaterals are treated first, then concave quadrilaterals are considered. A study of such minimum conditions is seen to provide some interesting and important activities for students. Only background in triangle congruence is necessary. (MP)

  7. Acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity of some Turkish medicinal plants.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I; Sener, B; Choudhary, M I; Khalid, A

    2004-03-01

    The chloroform:medianol (1:1) extracts of a number of the plant species belonging to eight families, namely Corydalis solida (L.) Swartz subsp. solida and Glaucium corniculatum (L.) J. H. Rudolph (Papaveraceae), Rhododendron ponticum L. subsp. ponticum and Rhododendron luteum Sweet. (Ericaceae), Buxus sempervirens L. (Buxaceae), Vicia faba L. (Fabaceae), Robinia pseudoacacia L. (Caeselpiniaceae), Tribulus terrestris L. and Zygophyllum fabago L. (Zygophyllaceae), Lycopodium clavatum L. (Lycopodiaceae), Fumaria vaillantii Lois., Fumaria capreolata L., Fumaria kralikii Jordan, Fumaria asepala Boiss., Fumaria densiflora DC., Fumaria flabellata L., Fumaria petteri Reichb. subsp. thuretii (Boiss.) Pugsley, Fumaria macrocarpa Boiss. ex Hausskn., Fumaria cilicica Hauskkn., Fumaria parviflora Lam. and Fumaria judaica Boiss. (Fumariaceae) were screened for their anticholinesterase activity on acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) enzymes by in vitro Ellman method at 10 microg/ml and 1 mg/ml concentrations. The extracts did not show any noticeable inhibitory activity against both of the enzymes at 10 microg/ml. The extracts of Rhododendron ponticum subsp. ponticum, Rhododendron luteum, Corydalis solida subsp. solida, Glaucium corniculatum, and Buxus sempervirens showed remarkable inhibitory activity above 50% inhibition rate on AChE at 1 mg/ml. Among them, Rhododendron ponticum subsp. ponticum, Corydalis solida subsp. solida and Buxus sempervirens were the most active extracts against BChE having 95.46 +/- 1.03%, 93.08 +/- 0.97%, and 93.45 +/- 0.88% inhibition rates, respectively. Among the extracts screened, all of the Fumaria extracts displayed highly potent inhibition against both of the enzymes at 1 mg/ml concentration compared to the standard. PMID:15036468

  8. Minimum structural controllability problems of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Hongli; Zhang, Siying

    2016-02-01

    Controllability of complex networks has been one of the attractive research areas for both network and control community, and has yielded many promising and significant results in minimum inputs and minimum driver vertices. However, few studies have been devoted to studying the minimum controlled vertex set through which control over the network with arbitrary structure can be achieved. In this paper, we prove that the minimum driver vertices driven by different inputs are not sufficient to ensure the full control of the network when the associated graph contains the inaccessible strongly connected component which has perfect matching and propose an algorithm to identify a minimum controlled vertex set for network with arbitrary structure using convenient graph and mathematical tools. And the simulation results show that the controllability of network is correlated to the number of inaccessible strongly connected components which have perfect matching and these results promote us to better understand the relationship between the network's structural characteristics and its control.

  9. Alcohol and single-cell protein production by Kluyveromyces in concentrated whey permeates with reduced ash

    SciTech Connect

    Mahmoud, M.M.; Kosikowski, F.V.

    1982-01-01

    Five Kluyveromyces yeasts were grown in concentrated whey permeates under aerobic and anaerobic conditions to produce single-cell protein and ethanol. K. fragilis NRRL Y2415 produced the highest yield of alcohol, 9.1%, and K. bulgaricus ATCC 1605 gave the highest yield of biomass, 13.5 mg/mL. High ash, apparently through Na and K effects, inhibited production of biomass and alcohol. A 0.77% ash was optimum. Lactose utilization was more rapid under aerobic than anaerobic conditions. (NH/sub 4/)/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and urea supplementation were without effect on yeast growth or were slightly inhibitory. A 1% peptone inclusion gave the highest biomass yield with minimum alcohol production.

  10. Escherichia coli N-Acetylglucosamine-1-Phosphate-Uridyltransferase/Glucosamine-1-Phosphate-Acetyltransferase (GlmU) Inhibitory Activity of Terreic Acid Isolated from Aspergillus terreus.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Rashmi; Lambu, Mallikharjuna Rao; Jamwal, Urmila; Rani, Chitra; Chib, Reena; Wazir, Priya; Mukherjee, Debaraj; Chaubey, Asha; Khan, Inshad Ali

    2016-04-01

    Secondary metabolite of Aspergillus terreus, terreic acid, is a reported potent antibacterial that was identified more than 60 years ago, but its cellular target(s) are still unknown. Here we screen its activity against the acetyltransferase domain of a bifunctional enzyme, Escherichia coli N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphate-uridyltransferase/glucosamine-1-phosphate-acetyltransferase (GlmU). An absorbance-based assay was used to screen terreic acid against the acetyltransferase activity of E. coli GlmU. Terreic acid was found to inhibit the acetyltransferase domain of E. coli GlmU with an IC50 of 44.24 ± 1.85 µM. Mode of inhibition studies revealed that terreic acid was competitive with AcCoA and uncompetitive with GlcN-1-P. It also exhibited concentration-dependent killing of E. coli ATCC 25922 up to 4× minimum inhibitory concentration and inhibited the growth of biofilms generated by E. coli. Characterization of resistant mutants established mutation in the acetyltransferase domain of GlmU. Terreic acid was also found to be metabolically stable in the in vitro incubations with rat liver microsome in the presence of a NADPH regenerating system. The studies reported here suggest that terreic acid is a potent antimicrobial agent and support that E. coli GlmU acetyltransferase is a molecular target of terreic acid, resulting in its antibacterial activity. PMID:26762501

  11. Inhibitory neurotransmission and olfactory memory in honeybees.

    PubMed

    El Hassani, Abdessalam Kacimi; Giurfa, Martin; Gauthier, Monique; Armengaud, Catherine

    2008-11-01

    In insects, gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate mediate fast inhibitory neurotransmission through ligand-gated chloride channel receptors. Both GABA and glutamate have been identified in the olfactory circuit of the honeybee. Here we investigated the role of inhibitory transmission mediated by GABA and glutamate-gated chloride channels (GluCls) in olfactory learning and memory in honeybees. We combined olfactory conditioning with injection of ivermectin, an agonist of GluCl receptors. We also injected a blocker of glutamate transporters (L-trans-PDC) or a GABA analog (TACA). We measured acquisition and retention 1, 24 and 48 h after the last acquisition trial. A low dose of ivermectin (0.01 ng/bee) impaired long-term olfactory memory (48 h) while a higher dose (0.05 ng/bee) had no effect. Double injections of ivermectin and L-trans-PDC or TACA had different effects on memory retention, depending on the doses and agents combined. When the low dose of ivermectin was injected after Ringer, long-term memory was again impaired (48 h). Such an effect was rescued by injection of both TACA and L-trans-PDC. A combination of the higher dose of ivermectin and TACA decreased retention at 48 h. We interpret these results as reflecting the involvement of both GluCl and GABA receptors in the impairment of olfactory long-term memory induced by ivermectin. These results illustrate the diversity of inhibitory transmission and its implication in long-term olfactory memory in honeybees. PMID:18755283

  12. Polyphenols with indirect proprotein convertase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jingjing; Van de Ven, Wim; Vermorken, Alphons

    2013-09-01

    Polyphenols, a class of natural products, have been shown to exhibit cancer protective properties. Proprotein convertases form a family of mammalian subtilisin-like serine endoproteases. Increased expression of these enzymes has been associated with numerous pathologies including cancer. It has been suggested that the cancer protective effect of polyphenols might be related to their proprotein convertase inhibitory effects. Furin, the most studied proprotein convertase, was shown to be inhibited by polyphenols in an in vitro fluorescence peptide-based assay. Protein substrates or the presence of protein prevented this inhibition by prototype members of various classes of polyphenolic compounds. Inhibition appeared to be related to the reactivity of polyphenol auto-oxidation products to proteins. While direct inhibition by polyphenols of furin has, therefore, not been observed in cells, the existence of indirect mechanisms cannot be excluded. In the present investigation, 26 polyphenols and 5 control compounds were screened for indirect inhibition of furin in a cellular environment. Five polyphenols showed moderate inhibitory activity and three of these: octyl gallate, dodecyl gallate and nordihydroguariaretic acid were further studied. The processing in cells of several genuine furin substrates, including pro-IGF-1R, appeared to be inhibited by these polyphenols. The inhibition was not specific for furin but also affected other proprotein convertases. The three polyphenols inhibited the maturation of the furin zymogen, thereby limiting the formation of the active enzyme. The three polyphenols inhibited focus formation of HepG2 liver carcinoma cells suggesting reversal of the malignant phenotype. Anchorage-independent growth of these cells, a hallmark feature of tumor cells, was also inhibited. Since, dependent of the molecular subclass of hepatocellular carcinoma, overexpression of furin can have either favourable or detrimental effects, it seems advisable to take indirect proprotein convertase inhibitory activity into account when polyphenols are considered for therapy of hepatocellular carcinoma. PMID:23835774

  13. A peptide with HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity from the medicinal mushroom Russula paludosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jianbin; Wang, H X; Ng, T B

    2007-03-01

    Hot water extracts of 16 species of mushrooms, including both edible and medicinal mushrooms, were screened for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) inhibitory activity. Extracts of Lactarius camphoratus, Trametes suaveolens, Sparassis crispa, Pleurotus sajor-caju, Pleurotus pulmonarius, and Russula paludosa elicited over 50% inhibition when tested at the concentration of 1 mg/ml. The extract of R. paludosa demonstrated the highest inhibitory activity on HIV-1 RT (97.6%). Fraction SU2, purified from R. paludosa extract by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and gel filtration on Superdex 75, exhibited potent inhibitory activity on HIV-1 RT. At the concentrations of 1 mg/ml, 0.2 mg/ml, and 0.04 mg/ml, the inhibition ratios were 99.2%, 89.3%, and 41.8%, respectively, giving an IC50 of 11 microM. The molecular mass of SU2 was 4.5 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined to be KREHGQHCEF. The peptide was devoid of hemagglutinating, ribonuclease, antifungal, protease, protease inhibitory, and laccase activities. PMID:17113195

  14. Evaluation of traditional Indian antidiabetic medicinal plants for human pancreatic amylase inhibitory effect in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Ravindran, Remya; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Ravi Kumar, Ameeta

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic ?-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Eleven Ayurvedic Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for ?-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on pancreatic ?-amylase. Analysis of 91 extracts, showed that 10 exhibited strong Human Pancreatic Amylase (HPA) inhibitory potential. Of these, 6 extracts showed concentration dependent inhibition with IC(50) values, namely, cold and hot water extracts from Ficus bengalensis bark (4.4 and 125??gmL(-1)), Syzygium cumini seeds (42.1 and 4.1??gmL(-1)), isopropanol extracts of Cinnamomum verum leaves (1.0??gmL(-1)) and Curcuma longa rhizome (0.16??gmL(-1)). The other 4 extracts exhibited concentration independent inhibition, namely, methanol extract of Bixa orellana leaves (49??gmL(-1)), isopropanol extract from Murraya koenigii leaves (127??gmL(-1)), acetone extracts from C. longa rhizome (7.4??gmL(-1)) and Tribulus terrestris seeds (511??gmL(-1)). Thus, the probable mechanism of action of the above fractions is due to their inhibitory action on HPA, thereby reducing the rate of starch hydrolysis leading to lowered glucose levels. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, proteins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids as probable inhibitory compounds. PMID:20953430

  15. Evaluation of Traditional Indian Antidiabetic Medicinal Plants for Human Pancreatic Amylase Inhibitory Effect In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ponnusamy, Sudha; Ravindran, Remya; Zinjarde, Smita; Bhargava, Shobha; Ravi Kumar, Ameeta

    2011-01-01

    Pancreatic ?-amylase inhibitors offer an effective strategy to lower the levels of post prandial hyperglycemia via control of starch breakdown. Eleven Ayurvedic Indian medicinal plants with known hypoglycemic properties were subjected to sequential solvent extraction and tested for ?-amylase inhibition, in order to assess and evaluate their inhibitory potential on pancreatic ?-amylase. Analysis of 91 extracts, showed that 10 exhibited strong Human Pancreatic Amylase (HPA) inhibitory potential. Of these, 6 extracts showed concentration dependent inhibition with IC50 values, namely, cold and hot water extracts from Ficus bengalensis bark (4.4 and 125??gmL?1), Syzygium cumini seeds (42.1 and 4.1??gmL?1), isopropanol extracts of Cinnamomum verum leaves (1.0??gmL?1) and Curcuma longa rhizome (0.16??gmL?1). The other 4 extracts exhibited concentration independent inhibition, namely, methanol extract of Bixa orellana leaves (49??gmL?1), isopropanol extract from Murraya koenigii leaves (127??gmL?1), acetone extracts from C. longa rhizome (7.4??gmL?1) and Tribulus terrestris seeds (511??gmL?1). Thus, the probable mechanism of action of the above fractions is due to their inhibitory action on HPA, thereby reducing the rate of starch hydrolysis leading to lowered glucose levels. Phytochemical analysis revealed the presence of alkaloids, proteins, tannins, cardiac glycosides, flavonoids, saponins and steroids as probable inhibitory compounds. PMID:20953430

  16. Inhibitory effect of essential oils against herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Koch, C; Reichling, J; Schneele, J; Schnitzler, P

    2008-01-01

    Essential oils from anise, hyssop, thyme, ginger, camomile and sandalwood were screened for their inhibitory effect against herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) in vitro on RC-37 cells using a plaque reduction assay. Genital herpes is a chronic, persistent infection spreading efficiently and silently as sexually transmitted disease through the population. Antiviral agents currently applied for the treatment of herpesvirus infections include acyclovir and its derivatives. The inhibitory concentrations (IC50) were determined at 0.016%, 0.0075%, 0.007%, 0.004%, 0.003% and 0.0015% for anise oil, hyssop oil, thyme oil, ginger oil, camomile oil and sandalwood oil, respectively. A clearly dose-dependent virucidal activity against HSV-2 could be demonstrated for all essential oils tested. In order to determine the mode of the inhibitory effect, essential oils were added at different stages during the viral infection cycle. At maximum noncytotoxic concentrations of the essential oils, plaque formation was significantly reduced by more than 90% when HSV-2 was preincubated with hyssop oil, thyme oil or ginger oil. However, no inhibitory effect could be observed when the essential oils were added to the cells prior to infection with HSV-2 or after the adsorption period. These results indicate that essential oils affected HSV-2 mainly before adsorption probably by interacting with the viral envelope. Camomile oil exhibited a high selectivity index and seems to be a promising candidate for topical therapeutic application as virucidal agents for treatment of herpes genitalis. PMID:17976968

  17. [Inhibitory action amlexanox on interleukin-3-induced enhancement of histamine releasability of human leukocytes].

    PubMed

    Urisu, A; Iimi, K; Kondo, Y; Horiba, F; Masuda, S; Tsuruta, M; Yazaki, T; Torii, S

    1990-10-01

    Amlexanox, an anti-allergic drug, showed a concentration-dependent inhibition against hrIL-3-induced enhancement of in vitro histamine release from human leukocytes by anti-IgE. The significant inhibitory action of amlexanox was observed in one out of nine and six out of nine allergic subjects at concentrations of 10(-5) M and 10(-4) M, respectively. This means that the inhibitory effect of amlexanox varied from patient to patient. Post-treatment as well as simultaneous treatment with amlexanox produced an inhibitory action on the enhancing effect of hrIL-3, suggesting that hrIL-3-induced enhancement of releasability is a reversible reaction. AA-861, OKY-046, superoxide dismutase and prostaglandin E2 showed no effects on the hrIL-3-induced enhancement of histamine releasability. The inhibitory action of amlexamox to the hrIL-3-induced enhancement of histamine releasability may be a new anti-allergic mechanism, details of which remains unclear. PMID:1701989

  18. Inhibitory activity of phosphates on molds isolated from foods and food processing plants.

    PubMed

    Suárez, V B; Frisón, L; de Basílico, M Z; Rivera, M; Reinheimer, J A

    2005-11-01

    Six commercial phosphates were evaluated for inhibition of the growth of 17 molds isolated from food sources. The assays were performed at neutral and natural (without pH adjustment) pH values, and the molds were streaked on plate count agar with added phosphates. Phosphate concentrations of 0.1, 0.3, 0.5, 1.0, and 1.5% (wt/vol) were used, and the MIC was determined. The resistance of molds to phosphates depended on the species. At a neutral pH, Aspergillus ochraceus and Fusarium proliferatum were resistant to all phosphates at all concentrations assayed, and Byssochlamys nivea, Aureobasidium pullulans, and Penicillium glabrum were most sensitive. The most inhibitory phosphates were those with chain lengths greater than 15 phosphate units and the highest sequestering power. At natural pH values (resulting from dissolving the phosphate in the medium), inhibitory activity changed dramatically for phosphates that produced alkaline or acidic pH in the medium. Phosphates with alkaline pH values (sodium tripolyphosphate of high solubility, sodium tripolyphosphate, and sodium neutral pyrophosphate) were much more inhibitory than phosphates at a neutral pH, but sodium acid pyrophosphate (acidic pH) had decreased inhibitory activity. The results indicate that some phosphates could be used in the food industry to inhibit molds linked to food spoilage. PMID:16300093

  19. Alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control is linked to attenuated brain responses in right fronto-temporal cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Gabriela; Guevara, Alvaro; Marxen, Michael; Neumann, Maike; Jünger, Elisabeth; Kobiella, Andrea; Mennigen, Eva; Pilhatsch, Maximilian; Schwarz, Daniel; Zimmermann, Ulrich S.; Smolka, Michael N.

    2014-01-01

    Background A self-enhancing loop between impaired inhibitory control under alcohol and alcohol consumption has been proposed as a possible mechanism underlying dysfunctional drinking in susceptible people. However, the neural underpinnings of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control are widely unknown. Methods We measured inhibitory control in fifty young adults with a stop-signal task (SST) during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI). In a single-blind placebo-controlled cross-over design, all participants performed the SST once under alcohol with a breath alcohol concentration (BrAC) of 0.6 g/kg, and once under placebo. In addition, alcohol consumption was assessed using a free-access alcohol self-administration (ASA) paradigm in the same participants. Results Inhibitory control was robustly decreased under alcohol compared to placebo indicated by longer stop-signal reaction times (SSRTs). On the neural level, impaired inhibitory control under alcohol was associated with attenuated brain responses in the right fronto-temporal portion of the inhibition network that supports the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals, and subsequent updating of action plans from response execution to inhibition. Furthermore, the extent of alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control predicted free-access alcohol consumption. Conclusion We suggest that during inhibitory control alcohol affects cognitive processes preceding actual motor inhibition. Under alcohol, decreased brain responses in right fronto-temporal areas might slow down the attentional capture of infrequent stop-signals and subsequent updating of action plans which leads to impaired inhibitory control. In turn, pronounced alcohol-induced impairment of inhibitory control may enhance alcohol consumption in young adults which might promote future alcohol problems. PMID:24560581

  20. Herpesvirus Exploitation of Host Immune Inhibitory Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Stack, Gabrielle; Stacey, Maria A.; Humphreys, Ian R.

    2012-01-01

    Herpesviruses employ a plethora of mechanisms to circumvent clearance by host immune responses. A key feature of mammalian immune systems is the employment of regulatory pathways that limit immune responsiveness. The primary functions of these mechanisms are to control autoimmunity and limit exuberant responses to harmless antigen in mucosal surfaces. However, such pathways can be exploited by viral pathogens to enable acute infection, persistence and dissemination. Herein, we outline the current understanding of inhibitory pathways in modulating antiviral immunity during herpesvirus infections in vivo and discuss strategies employed by herpesviruses to exploit these pathways to limit host antiviral immunity. PMID:23012619

  1. Minimum emittance in TBA and MBA lattices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Gang; Peng, Yue-Mei

    2015-03-01

    For reaching a small emittance in a modern light source, triple bend achromats (TBA), theoretical minimum emittance (TME) and even multiple bend achromats (MBA) have been considered. This paper derived the necessary condition for achieving minimum emittance in TBA and MBA theoretically, where the bending angle of inner dipoles has a factor of 31/3 bigger than that of the outer dipoles. Here, we also calculated the conditions attaining the minimum emittance of TBA related to phase advance in some special cases with a pure mathematics method. These results may give some directions on lattice design.

  2. Solar wind structure during the solar minimums : Comparison between the cycle 22/23 minimum and 23/24 minimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    An, J.; Inoue, S.; Magara, T.; Lee, H.; Kang, J.

    2012-12-01

    In the solar cycle 23/24 minimum, the solar wind structure was specially different from the one observed in the previous minimum. In this period the region emanating fast solar winds was distributed not only near the polar region but also near the equatorial region while the region emanating slow solar winds extended more to the polar region than in the previous minimum. In this study we perform a global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic simulation of the solar winds during the Carrington rotation (CR) 1912 (22/23 minimum) and 2071 (23/24 minimum) to clarify a difference in 3D flow structure and magnetic field configuration between these two minimums. The simulations have been performed by using the finite volume total variation diminishing (TVD) scheme with a unstructured tetrahedron grid system, which enables to avoid the singularity at the poles in the spherical coordinate system (Tanaka 1995 ). We will compare the simulation results with some observations such as ACE satellite data and Interplanetary scintillation (IPS) provided by the Solar Terrestrial Environment Laboratory (STEL), Nagoya University in Japan. Through this comparison we investigate a suitable form of heat source function where the flux expansion factor may play a key role (Nakamizo et al. 2009).

  3. Microbial oceanography of anoxic oxygen minimum zones

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, Osvaldo; Canfield, Donald E.; DeLong, Edward F.; Letelier, Ricardo M.; Stewart, Frank J.

    2012-01-01

    Vast expanses of oxygen-deficient and nitrite-rich water define the major oxygen minimum zones (OMZs) of the global ocean. They support diverse microbial communities that influence the nitrogen economy of the oceans, contributing to major losses of fixed nitrogen as dinitrogen (N2) and nitrous oxide (N2O) gases. Anaerobic microbial processes, including the two pathways of N2 production, denitrification and anaerobic ammonium oxidation, are oxygen-sensitive, with some occurring only under strictly anoxic conditions. The detection limit of the usual method (Winkler titrations) for measuring dissolved oxygen in seawater, however, is much too high to distinguish low oxygen conditions from true anoxia. However, new analytical technologies are revealing vanishingly low oxygen concentrations in nitrite-rich OMZs, indicating that these OMZs are essentially anoxic marine zones (AMZs). Autonomous monitoring platforms also reveal previously unrecognized episodic intrusions of oxygen into the AMZ core, which could periodically support aerobic metabolisms in a typically anoxic environment. Although nitrogen cycling is considered to dominate the microbial ecology and biogeochemistry of AMZs, recent environmental genomics and geochemical studies show the presence of other relevant processes, particularly those associated with the sulfur and carbon cycles. AMZs correspond to an intermediate state between two end points represented by fully oxic systems and fully sulfidic systems. Modern and ancient AMZs and sulfidic basins are chemically and functionally related. Global change is affecting the magnitude of biogeochemical fluxes and ocean chemical inventories, leading to shifts in AMZ chemistry and biology that are likely to continue well into the future. PMID:22967509

  4. Bilingualism influences inhibitory control in auditory comprehension.

    PubMed

    Blumenfeld, Henrike K; Marian, Viorica

    2011-02-01

    Bilinguals have been shown to outperform monolinguals at suppressing task-irrelevant information. The present study aimed to identify how processing linguistic ambiguity during auditory comprehension may be associated with inhibitory control. Monolinguals and bilinguals listened to words in their native language (English) and identified them among four pictures while their eye-movements were tracked. Each target picture (e.g., hamper) appeared together with a similar-sounding within-language competitor picture (e.g., hammer) and two neutral pictures. Following each eye-tracking trial, priming probe trials indexed residual activation of target words, and residual inhibition of competitor words. Eye-tracking showed similar within-language competition across groups; priming showed stronger competitor inhibition in monolinguals than in bilinguals, suggesting differences in how inhibitory control was used to resolve within-language competition. Notably, correlation analyses revealed that inhibition performance on a nonlinguistic Stroop task was related to linguistic competition resolution in bilinguals but not in monolinguals. Together, monolingual-bilingual comparisons suggest that cognitive control mechanisms can be shaped by linguistic experience. PMID:21159332

  5. New cholinesterase inhibitory constituents from Lonicera quinquelocularis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Dilfaraz; Khan, Hidayat Ullah; Khan, Farmanullah; Khan, Shafiullah; Badshah, Syed; Khan, Abdul Samad; Samad, Abdul; Ali, Farman; Khan, Ihsanullah; Muhammad, Nawshad

    2014-01-01

    A phytochemical investigation on the ethyl acetate soluble fraction of Lonicera quinquelocularis (whole plant) led to the first time isolation of one new phthalate; bis(7-acetoxy-2-ethyl-5-methylheptyl) phthalate (3) and two new benzoates; neopentyl-4-ethoxy-3, 5-bis (3-methyl-2-butenyl benzoate (4) and neopentyl-4-hydroxy-3, 5-bis (3-methyl-2-butenyl benzoate (5) along with two known compounds bis (2-ethylhexyl phthalate (1) and dioctyl phthalate (2). Their structures were established on the basis of spectroscopic analysis and by comparison with available data in the literature. All the compounds (1-5) were tested for their acetylcholinesterase (AChE) and butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) inhibitory activities in dose dependent manner. The IC50 (50% inhibitory effect) values of compounds 3 and 5 against AChE were 1.65 and 3.43 M while the values obtained against BChE were 5.98 and 9.84 M respectively. Compounds 2 and 4 showed weak inhibition profile. PMID:24733024

  6. Maximizing Exposure Therapy: An Inhibitory Learning Approach

    PubMed Central

    Craske, Michelle G.; Treanor, Michael; Conway, Chris; Zbozinek, Tomislav; Vervliet, Bram

    2014-01-01

    Exposure therapy is an effective approach for treating anxiety disorders, although a substantial number of individuals fail to benefit or experience a return of fear after treatment. Research suggests that anxious individuals show deficits in the mechanisms believed to underlie exposure therapy, such as inhibitory learning. Targeting these processes may help improve the efficacy of exposure-based procedures. Although evidence supports an inhibitory learning model of extinction, there has been little discussion of how to implement this model in clinical practice. The primary aim of this paper is to provide examples to clinicians for how to apply this model to optimize exposure therapy with anxious clients, in ways that distinguish it from a ‘fear habituation’ approach and ‘belief disconfirmation’ approach within standard cognitive-behavior therapy. Exposure optimization strategies include 1) expectancy violation, 2) deepened extinction, 3) occasional reinforced extinction, 4) removal of safety signals, 5) variability, 6) retrieval cues, 7) multiple contexts, and 8) affect labeling. Case studies illustrate methods of applying these techniques with a variety of anxiety disorders, including obsessive-compulsive disorder, posttraumatic stress disorder, social phobia, specific phobia, and panic disorder. PMID:24864005

  7. Social inhibitory control in five lemur species.

    PubMed

    Reddy, Rachna B; MacLean, Evan L; Sandel, Aaron A; Hare, Brian

    2015-07-01

    We tested five lemur species-ring-tailed lemurs, ruffed lemurs, mongoose lemurs, black lemurs, and Coquerel's sifakas-(N=52) in an experiment that evaluated skills for inhibitory control in a social context. First, two human experimenters presented identical food rewards; the "generous" experimenter allowed the subject to eat from her hand, whereas the "competitive" experimenter always withheld the reward. Lemurs quickly learned to approach the generous experimenter and avoid the competitive one. In the inhibition test phase, we endowed the competitive experimenter with a more valuable food reward but the competitive experimenter continued to withhold food from the subject. Thus, lemurs were required to inhibit approaching the more desirable reward in favor of the lesser but obtainable reward presented by the generous experimenter. In test trials, lemurs' tendency to approach the competitive experimenter increased from the reputation phase, demonstrating sensitivity to the experimental manipulation. However, subjects approached the larger reward less frequently in test trials compared with pretest food-preference trials, evidencing some capacity for inhibitory control in this context. Despite differences in sociality and ecology, the five lemur species did not differ in this ability. Although the study did not uncover species differences, this experimental task may provide a useful measure of social inhibition in broader comparative studies. PMID:25822664

  8. Inhibitory Effect of Curcumin on the Contractility of Isolated Caprine Detrusor Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Manvizhi, S.; Kumar, A.; Shanthi, FX Margaret; Ernest, Kalpana

    2015-01-01

    Curcumin is a naturally occurring compound which has been used in traditional medicine in India for a long time. This study investigated the ability of curcumin to inhibit the contractility of isolated caprine (goat) detrusor muscle. The ability of three concentrations of curcumin (30, 100 and 300 µM) to inhibit the 100 µM acetylcholine-induced contractility of the isolated caprine urinary bladder detrusor muscle was investigated. The effect of raising the concentration of acetylcholine from 100, 200 and 400 µM to overcome the curcumin-induced inhibition of detrusor contractility and the effects of the reversal agents tetraethylammonium, a potassium channel blocker (100 µM), glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive potassium channel blocker (10 µM), and propranolol, a beta adrenergic receptor blocker (1 µM), on the inhibitory effect of detrusor contractility was also studied. Curcumin caused a concentration-dependent inhibition of acetylcholine-induced contractility of the isolated detrusor muscle which was statistically significant at all three concentrations of curcumin used. This inhibition was partially overcome by raising the concentration of ACh to 200 and 400 µM. The inhibition was overcome by the concurrent administration of tetraethylammonium. Glibenclamide reversed the inhibitory effect of 100 µM curcumin, but not that of 300 µM curcumin. Propranolol reversed the inhibitory effect of 100 µM curcumin but not that of 300 µM curcumin. These results suggest that curcumin inhibited the contractions of the isolated detrusor muscle. The results further suggest that the inhibitory effect is mediated by various mechanisms: stimulation of beta adrenergic receptors; an anticholinergic effect; and the opening of ATP-sensitive potassium channels. PMID:26009657

  9. Inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the growth of Babesia parasites.

    PubMed

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ichikawa, Madoka; Davaasuren, Batdorj; Nyamjargal, Tserendorj; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2012-10-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the in vitro and in vivo growths of Babesia parasites. The in vitro growth of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and B. equi was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by micromolar concentrations of pepstatin A (50% inhibitory concentrations = 38.5, 36.5, 17.6, and 18.1 ?M, respectively) and mefloquine (50% inhibitory concentrations = 59.7, 56.7, 20.7, and 4 ?M, respectively). Furthermore, both reagents either alone at a concentration of 5 mg/kg or in combinations (2.5/2.5 and 5/5 mg/kg) for 10 days significantly inhibited the in vivo growth of B. microti in mice. Mefloquine treatment was highly effective and the combination treatments were less effective than other treatments. Therefore, mefloquine may antagonize the actions of pepstatin A against babesiosis and aspartic proteases may play an important role in the asexual growth cycle of Babesia parasites. PMID:22890034

  10. Inhibitory Effects of Pepstatin A and Mefloquine on the Growth of Babesia Parasites

    PubMed Central

    Munkhjargal, Tserendorj; AbouLaila, Mahmoud; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Ichikawa, Madoka; Davaasuren, Batdorj; Nyamjargal, Tserendorj; Yokoyama, Naoaki; Igarashi, Ikuo

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated the inhibitory effects of pepstatin A and mefloquine on the in vitro and in vivo growths of Babesia parasites. The in vitro growth of Babesia bovis, B. bigemina, B. caballi, and B. equi was significantly inhibited (P < 0.05) by micromolar concentrations of pepstatin A (50% inhibitory concentrations = 38.5, 36.5, 17.6, and 18.1 ?M, respectively) and mefloquine (50% inhibitory concentrations = 59.7, 56.7, 20.7, and 4 ?M, respectively). Furthermore, both reagents either alone at a concentration of 5 mg/kg or in combinations (2.5/2.5 and 5/5 mg/kg) for 10 days significantly inhibited the in vivo growth of B. microti in mice. Mefloquine treatment was highly effective and the combination treatments were less effective than other treatments. Therefore, mefloquine may antagonize the actions of pepstatin A against babesiosis and aspartic proteases may play an important role in the asexual growth cycle of Babesia parasites. PMID:22890034

  11. Atomic hydrogen on Mars - Measurements at solar minimum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, J. S.; Mcdougal, D. S.; Anderson, D. E., Jr.; Barker, E. S.

    1978-01-01

    The Copernicus Orbiting Astronomical Observatory was used to obtain measurements of Mars Lyman-alpha (1215.671-angstrom) emission at the solar minimum, which has resulted in the first information on atomic hydrogen concentrations in the upper atmosphere of Mars at the solar minimum. The Copernicus measurements, coupled with the Viking in situ measurements of the temperature (170 plus or minus 30 K) of the upper atmosphere of Mars, indicate that the atomic hydrogen number density at the exobase of Mars (250 kilometers) is about 60 times greater than that deduced from Mariner 6 and 7 Lyman-alpha measurements obtained during a period of high solar activity. The Copernicus results are consistent with Hunten's hypothesis of the diffusion-limited escape of atomic hydrogen from Mars.

  12. The Social Consequences of Minimum Competence Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trusz, Andrew R.; Parks-Trusz, Sandra L.

    1981-01-01

    Examines the reasons behind and the effects of standardized and minimum competency tests. The authors conclude that the tests lead towards lower performance expectations for disadvantaged students, and increasingly rigid tracking along class, cultural, and racial lines. (AM)

  13. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the minimum induced drag of wings. The topics include: 1) The History of Spanload Development of the optimum spanload Winglets and their implications; 2) Horten Sailplanes; and 3) Flight Mechanics & Adverse yaw.

  14. Impact of the Minimum Wage on Compression.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolfe, Michael N.; Candland, Charles W.

    1979-01-01

    Assesses the impact of increases in the minimum wage on salary schedules, provides guidelines for creating a philosophy to deal with the impact, and outlines options and presents recommendations. (IRT)

  15. Quantitative Research on the Minimum Wage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldfarb, Robert S.

    1975-01-01

    The article reviews recent research examining the impact of minimum wage requirements on the size and distribution of teenage employment and earnings. The studies measure income distribution, employment levels and effect on unemployment. (MW)

  16. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed

    Russell, C T; Jian, L K; Luhmann, J G

    2013-05-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 23-24 transition. PMID:25685425

  17. How unprecedented a solar minimum was it?

    PubMed Central

    Russell, C.T.; Jian, L.K.; Luhmann, J.G.

    2012-01-01

    The end of the last solar cycle was at least 3 years late, and to date, the new solar cycle has seen mainly weaker activity since the onset of the rising phase toward the new solar maximum. The newspapers now even report when auroras are seen in Norway. This paper is an update of our review paper written during the deepest part of the last solar minimum [1]. We update the records of solar activity and its consequent effects on the interplanetary fields and solar wind density. The arrival of solar minimum allows us to use two techniques that predict sunspot maximum from readings obtained at solar minimum. It is clear that the Sun is still behaving strangely compared to the last few solar minima even though we are well beyond the minimum phase of the cycle 2324 transition. PMID:25685425

  18. Minimum-cost control of complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Guoqi; Hu, Wuhua; Xiao, Gaoxi; Deng, Lei; Tang, Pei; Pei, Jing; Shi, Luping

    2016-01-01

    Finding the solution for driving a complex network at the minimum energy cost with a given number of controllers, known as the minimum-cost control problem, is critically important but remains largely open. We propose a projected gradient method to tackle this problem, which works efficiently in both synthetic and real-life networks. The study is then extended to the case where each controller can only be connected to a single network node to have the lowest connection complexity. We obtain the interesting insight that such connections basically avoid high-degree nodes of the network, which is in resonance with recent observations on controllability of complex networks. Our results provide the first technical path to enabling minimum-cost control of complex networks, and contribute new insights to locating the key nodes from a minimum-cost control perspective.

  19. Minimum reflection channel in amplifying random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Seng Fatt; Cao, Hui

    2015-12-01

    We present a numerical study on the minimum reflection channel of a disordered waveguide and its modification by coherent amplification of light. The minimum reflection channel is formed by destructive interference of quasinormal modes at the front surface of a random medium. While the lowest reflection eigenvalue increases with optical gain in most random realizations, the minimum reflection channel can adjust its modal composition to enhance destructive interference and slow down the growth of reflectance with gain. Some of the random realizations display a further reduction of the minimum reflectance by adding optical gain. The differential amplification of the modes can make their destructive interference so effective that it dominates the amplitude growth of the modes, causing the reflectance to drop with gain in these cases. Therefore, the interplay between interference and amplification can further minimize light reflection from a strong scattering medium; indicating optical gain may provide an additional degree of freedom for coherent control of mesoscopic transport.

  20. 2011 Sea Ice Minimum - Duration: 61 seconds.

    NASA Video Gallery

    This video shows Arctic sea ice from March 7, 2011, to Sept. 9, 2011, ending with a comparison of the 30-year average minimum extent, shown in yellow, and the Northwest Passage, in red. (no audio) ...

  1. Minimum entropy deconvolution and blind equalisation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E. H.; Mulligan, J. J.

    1992-01-01

    Relationships between minimum entropy deconvolution, developed primarily for geophysics applications, and blind equalization are pointed out. It is seen that a large class of existing blind equalization algorithms are directly related to the scale-invariant cost functions used in minimum entropy deconvolution. Thus the extensive analyses of these cost functions can be directly applied to blind equalization, including the important asymptotic results of Donoho.

  2. Characterization of the inhibitory prostanoid receptors on human neutrophils.

    PubMed Central

    Wheeldon, A.; Vardey, C. J.

    1993-01-01

    1. We have evaluated the effects of various prostanoid agonists on the release of leukotriene B4 (LTB4) and superoxide anions (O2-) from human neutrophils stimulated with opsonized zymosan (OZ) and formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), respectively. 2. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and PGD2 inhibited both OZ-induced LTB4 release (EC50 0.72 microM and 0.91 microM respectively), and FMLP-induced O2- release (EC50 0.42 microM and 0.50 microM respectively). PGF2 alpha, the TP-receptor agonist, U46619, and the IP-receptor agonist, iloprost, were also active, but were all at least an order of magnitude less potent than PGE2 and PGD2. 3. The EP2/EP3-receptor agonist, misoprostol, and the selective EP2-agonist, AH13205, were both effective inhibitors of LTB4 release, being approximately equipotent with and 16-times less potent than PGE2, respectively. In contrast, the EP1/EP3-receptor agonist, sulprostone, had no inhibitory activity at concentrations of up to 10 microM. 4. The selective DP-receptor agonist, BW245C, inhibited LTB4 release, (EC50 0.006 microM) being approximately 50 times more potent than PGD2. BW245C also inhibited O2- release, and this inhibition was antagonized competitively by the DP-receptor blocking drug, AH6809 (pA2 6.6). 5. These data indicate the presence of both inhibitory EP- and DP-receptors on the human neutrophil. The rank order of potency of EP-receptor agonists suggest that the EP-receptors are of the EP2-subtype. PMID:8387383

  3. Anaerobic biodegradability and inhibitory effects of some anionic and cationic surfactants.

    PubMed

    Prez-Armendriz, Beatriz; Moreno, Ysica Mayett; Monroy-Hermosillo, Oscar; Guyot, Jean Pierre; Gonzlez, Rosa O

    2010-09-01

    The anaerobic biodegradability and inhibitory effects on the methane production of three different surfactants, two anionic: sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS) and sodium dodecylbenzene sulfonate (SDBS), and a cationic surfactant: trialkyl-methylammonium chloride (TMAC), were evaluated with two different anaerobic sludges, granular and flocculent. Five different concentrations of the surfactants, 5, 50, 100, 250 and 500 mg/L, were tested. SLS was biodegraded at concentrations of 5, 50 and 100 mg/L with flocculent sludge and at 100 and 250 mg/L with granular sludge. However an inhibitory effect on methane production was observed in both sludges at 500 mg/L. The results indicate that SDBS was not biodegradable under anoxic conditions. TMAC was slightly degraded 50 and 100 mg/L with the flocculent sludge, and from 100 to 500 mg/L with the granular sludge. PMID:20686749

  4. Thalamic Post-Inhibitory Bursting Occurs in Patients with Organic Dystonia more often than Controls

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, K.; Liu, C.C.; Jensen, A.L.; Vitek, J.L.; Mari, Z.; Lenz, F.A.

    2013-01-01

    We now test the hypothesis that post-inhibitory bursting in the human pallidal receiving nucleus of the thalamus (ventral oral) mediates inhibitory pallido-thalamic transmission during dystonia. We have compared thalamic single neuron activity in nine patients with organic dystonia to that in a patient with psychogenic dystonia (Psyd) and in healthy waking monkeys. In organic dystonia, EMG power is commonly concentrated at the lowest frequency of the smoothed autopower spectrum (0.39Hz). Therefore, segments of spike trains with a signal-to-noise ratio ? 2 at 0.39 Hz were termed dystonia frequency (DF) segments, which occurred more commonly during dystonia related to movement. Those with a SNR < 2 were termed non-dystonia frequency (nDF) segments, which are associated with spontaneous dystonia. We concentrated on nDF activity since neuronal activity in our controls was measured at rest. Neuronal spike trains were categorized into those with post-inhibitory bursts (G, grouped), with single spikes (NG, non-grouped), or with both single spikes and bursts (I, intermediate). nDF spike trains in ventral oral had more G category firing in dystonia than in controls. The burst rate and the pre-burst silent period in nDF firing of organic dystonia were consistently greater than those of both the monkeys and the patient with Psyd. The distribution of the pre-burst silent period was bimodal with a longer mode of approximately GABAb (gamma amino butyric acid receptor - type b) duration. These results demonstrate distinct differences of post-inhibitory bursting in organic dystonia versus controls. The presence of inhibitory events consistent with GABAb duration suggests interventions for treatment of dystonia. PMID:24125808

  5. Pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity of taraxacum officinale in vitro and in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Kang, Min-Jung; Kim, Myung-Jin; Kim, Mi-Eun; Song, Ji-Hyun; Lee, Young-Min

    2008-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide health problem. Orlistat, an inhibitor of pancreatic lipase, is currently approved as an anti-obesity drug. However, gastrointestinal side effects caused by Orlistat may limit its use. In this study the inhibitory activities of dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) against pancreatic lipase in vitro and in vivo were measured to determine its possible use as a natural anti-obesity agent. The inhibitory activities of the 95% ethanol extract of T. officinale and Orlistat were measured using 4-methylumbelliferyl oleate (4-MU oleate) as a substrate at concentrations of 250, 125, 100, 25, 12.5 and 4 µg/ml. To determine pancreatic lipase inhibitory activity in vivo, mice (n=16) were orally administered with corn oil emulsion (5 ml/kg) alone or with the 95% ethanol extract of T. officinale (400 mg/kg) following an overnight fast. Plasma triglyceride levels were measured at 0, 90, 180, and 240 min after treatment and incremental areas under the response curves (AUC) were calculated. The 95% ethanol extract of T. officinale and Orlistat, inhibited, porcine pancreatic lipase activity by 86.3% and 95.7% at a concentration of 250 µg/ml, respectively. T. officinale extract showed dose-dependent inhibition with the IC50 of 78.2 µg/ml. A single oral dose of the extract significantly inhibited increases in plasma triglyceride levels at 90 and 180 min and reduced AUC of plasma triglyceride response curve (p<0.05). The results indicate that T. officinale exhibits inhibitory activities against pancreatic lipase in vitro and in vivo. Further studies to elucidate anti-obesity effects of chronic consumption of T. officinale and to identify the active components responsible for inhibitory activity against pancreatic lipase are necessary. PMID:20016719

  6. Differential inhibitory action of two azoic compounds against arenaviruses.

    PubMed

    Garca, Cybele C; Candurra, Nlida A; Damonte, Elsa B

    2003-04-01

    The action of five azo-based compounds against the arenaviruses Junin (JUNV) and Tacaribe (TCRV) was evaluated in vitro by a virus yield inhibition assay in Vero cells and a cell-free virion inactivation assay. The compound 2-azo-(1'-(2'-nitroso)naphthyl)-benzoate (ANNB) was the most effective inhibitor of arenavirus production in Vero cells with EC(50) (effective concentration 50%) values in the range 6.5-26.2 microM and without inactivating properties. By contrast, the azodicarbonamide (ADA) was very effective in inactivating both arenaviruses with IC(50) (inactivating concentration 50%) values of 7.6 and 5.3 microM against JUNV and TCRV, respectively. The virucidal activity of ADA was time- and temperature-dependent. ANNB had no inhibitory action on virus binding or penetration of target cells and did not affect the synthesis of viral proteins. The most likely event susceptible to ANNB would be the process of intracellular virion assembly. PMID:12672577

  7. Acethylcholinesterase inhibitory potential and antioxidant properties of pyrogallol.

    PubMed

    Ozturk Sarikaya, S Beyza

    2015-01-01

    Pyrogallol is found naturally in crops and fruits of many plants. It is also an active ingredient of many pharmaceuticals. For this reason, we employed different in vitro antioxidant assays such as cupric ion Cu(2+) reducing power, Fe(3+) reducing power, total antioxidant activity by ferric thiocyanate method, ABTS radical scavenging, DMPD radical scavenging, DPPH scavenging, Fe(2+) chelating, [Formula: see text] scavenging and H(2)O(2) scavenging activities of pyrogallol. Pyrogallol inhibited 77.95% lipid peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at 30??g/mL concentration. BHA, BHT, ?-tocopherol and trolox exhibited inhibitions of 89.88, 89.97, 83.82 and 91.85% against peroxidation of linoleic acid emulsion at the same concentration, respectively. In addition, pyrogallol was an effective of all the scavenging and reducing power results. In this study, pyrogallol was also evaluated as potential inhibitor for acethycholinesterse enzyme. The results showed that pyrogallol exhibited potent acetylcholinesteras inhibitory activity with IC(50) and K(I) values 10.2 and 8.6??M, respectively. PMID:25297710

  8. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    SciTech Connect

    Tristan, I. Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-15

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  9. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tristan, I.; Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M.

    2014-03-01

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  10. Gonadotropin inhibitory hormone function in mammals.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jeremy T; Clarke, Iain J

    2010-04-01

    Reproductive function depends on the stimulatory action of gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH), secreted by the brain. Original work in birds identified and isolated a peptide that inhibits gonadotropin release, named gonadotropin inhibitory hormone (GnIH). There is no evidence for a similar factor operant in mammals. This mammalian orthologue of GnIH has been named RFamide-related peptide (RFRP), and negatively regulates GnRH function and gonadotropin secretion. In particular, mammalian GnIH inhibits the function of GnRH cells and acts at the level of gonadotropes. It appears to play a major role in seasonal regulation of reproduction and also to be involved in regulation of stress and food intake. PMID:20060314

  11. Matrix metalloproteinase inhibitory properties of benzalkonium chloride stabilizes adhesive interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sabatini, Camila; Patel, Shaival K

    2013-12-01

    This study evaluated the effects of different concentrations of benzalkonium chloride (BAC) on the preservation of adhesive interfaces created with two etch-and-rinse adhesives and its inhibitory properties on dentin matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity. The following groups were tested with the adhesive systems Optibond Solo Plus and All-Bond 3: Group 1, adhesive without inhibitor (control); Group 2, topical 2.0% chlorhexidine (2.0% CHX); Group 3, phosphoric acid with 1.0%wt BAC (BAC-PA); Group 4, 0.25% BAC-adhesive (0.25% BAC); Group 5, 0.5% BAC-adhesive (0.5% BAC); Group 6, 1.0% BAC-adhesive (1.0% BAC); and Group 7, 2.0% BAC-adhesive (2.0% BAC). Composite cylinders were fabricated, and shear bond strength (SBS) was evaluated after 24 h, 6 months, and 18 months of storage. Extracts from concentrated demineralized human dentin powder were subjected to SDS-PAGE and incubated in the presence of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0, and 2.0% BAC. Overall, stable bonds were maintained for 18 months. Improved bond strengths were seen for 0.5% BAC and 1.0% BAC when bonding with Optibond Solo Plus, and for 0.25% BAC and 0.5% BAC when bonding with All-Bond 3. Zymographic analysis revealed complete inhibition of gelatinolytic activity with BAC. Benzalkonium chloride, at all concentrations, inhibited dentin proteolytic activity, which seems to have contributed to the improved bond stability after 18 months for specific combinations of BAC concentration and adhesive. PMID:24206077

  12. Inhibitory Activities of Gatifloxacin (AM-1155), a Newly Developed Fluoroquinolone, against Bacterial and Mammalian Type II Topoisomerases

    PubMed Central

    Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Yasue, Tokutaro; Hosaka, Masaki; Oomori, Yasuo

    1998-01-01

    We determined the inhibitory activities of gatifloxacin against Staphylococcus aureus topoisomerase IV, Escherichia coli DNA gyrase, and HeLa cell topoisomerase II and compared them with those of several quinolones. The inhibitory activities of quinolones against these type II topoisomerases significantly correlated with their antibacterial activities or cytotoxicities (correlation coefficient [r] = 0.926 for S. aureus, r = 0.972 for E. coli, and r = 0.648 for HeLa cells). Gatifloxacin possessed potent inhibitory activities against bacterial type II topoisomerases (50% inhibitory concentration [IC50] = 13.8 μg/ml for S. aureus topoisomerase IV; IC50 = 0.109 μg/ml for E. coli DNA gyrase) but the lowest activity against HeLa cell topoisomerase II (IC50 = 265 μg/ml) among the quinolones tested. There was also a significant correlation between the inhibitory activities of quinolones against S. aureus topoisomerase IV and those against E. coli DNA gyrase (r = 0.969). However, the inhibitory activity against HeLa cell topoisomerase II did not correlate with that against either bacterial enzyme. The IC50 of gatifloxacin for HeLa cell topoisomerase II was 19 and was more than 2,400 times higher than that for S. aureus topoisomerase IV and that for E. coli DNA gyrase. These ratios were higher than those for other quinolones, indicating that gatifloxacin possesses a higher selectivity for bacterial type II topoisomerases. PMID:9756776

  13. Inhibitory Effects of Daiokanzoto (Da-Huang-Gan-Cao-Tang) on P-Glycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Yuka; Ikarashi, Nobutomo; Satoh, Toshiyuki; Ito, Kiyomi; Ochiai, Wataru; Sugiyama, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    We have studied the effects of various Kampo medicines on P-glycoprotein (P-gp), a drug transporter, in vitro. The present study focused on Daiokanzoto (Da-Huang-Gan-Cao-Tang), which shows the most potent inhibitory effects on P-gp among the 50 Kampo medicines studied, and investigated the P-gp inhibitory effects of Daiokanzoto herbal ingredients (rhubarb and licorice root) and their components by an ATPase assay using human P-gp membrane. Both rhubarb and licorice root significantly inhibited ATPase activity, and the effects of rhubarb were more potent than those of licorice root. The content of rhubarb in Daiokanzoto is double that in licorice root, and the inhibition patterns of Daiokanzoto and rhubarb involve both competitive and noncompetitive inhibition, suggesting that the inhibitory effects of Daiokanzoto are mainly due to rhubarb. Concerning the components of rhubarb, concentration-dependent inhibitory effects were observed for (?)-catechin gallate, (?)-epicatechin gallate, and (?)-epigallocatechin gallate. In conclusion, rhubarb may cause changes in the drug dispositions of P-gp substrates through the inhibition of P-gp. It appears that attention should be given to the interactions between these drugs and Kampo medicines containing rhubarb as an herbal ingredient. PMID:22969825

  14. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  15. Essential Oils from Ugandan Aromatic Medicinal Plants: Chemical Composition and Growth Inhibitory Effects on Oral Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Ocheng, Francis; Bwanga, Freddie; Joloba, Moses; Softrata, Abier; Azeem, Muhammad; Pütsep, Katrin; Borg-Karlson, Anna-Karin; Obua, Celestino; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The study assessed the growth inhibitory effects of essential oils extracted from ten Ugandan medicinal plants (Bidens pilosa, Helichrysum odoratissimum, Vernonia amygdalina, Hoslundia opposita, Ocimum gratissimum, Cymbopogon citratus, Cymbopogon nardus, Teclea nobilis, Zanthoxylum chalybeum, and Lantana trifolia) used traditionally in the management of oral diseases against oral pathogens. Chemical compositions of the oils were explored by GC-MS. Inhibitory effects of the oils were assessed on periodontopathic Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans and cariogenic Streptococcus mutans and Lactobacillus acidophilus using broth dilution methods at concentrations of 1%, 0.1%, and 0.01%. The most sensitive organism was A. actinomycetemcomitans. Its growth was markedly inhibited by six of the oils at all the concentrations tested. Essential oil from C. nardus exhibited the highest activity with complete growth inhibition of A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis at all the three concentrations tested, the major constituents in the oil being mainly oxygenated sesquiterpenes. Most of the oils exhibited limited effects on L. acidophilus. We conclude that essential oils from the studied plants show marked growth inhibitory effects on periodontopathic A. actinomycetemcomitans and P. gingivalis, moderate effects on cariogenic S. mutans, and the least effect on L. acidophilus. The present study constitutes a basis for further investigations and development of certain oils into alternative antiplaque agents. PMID:26170872

  16. Inducible Mixotrophy in the Dinoflagellate Prorocentrum minimum.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Matthew D

    2015-01-01

    Prorocentrum minimum is a neritic dinoflagellate that forms seasonal blooms and red tides in estuarine ecosystems. While known to be mixotrophic, previous attempts to document feeding on algal prey have yielded low grazing rates. In this study, growth and ingestion rates of P. minimum were measured as a function of nitrogen (-N) and phosphorous (-P) starvation. A P. minimum isolate from Chesapeake Bay was found to ingest cryptophyte prey when in stationary phase and when starved of N or P. Prorocentrum minimum ingested two strains of Teleaulax amphioxeia at higher rates than six other cryptophyte species. In all cases -P treatments resulted in the highest grazing. Ingestion rates of -P cells on T. amphioxeia saturated at ~5 prey per predator per day, while ingestion by -N cells saturated at 1 prey per predator per day. In the presence of prey, -P treated cells reached a maximum mixotrophic growth rate (?max ) of 0.5 d(-1), while -N cells had a ?max of 0.18 d(-1). Calculations of ingested C, N, and P due to feeding on T. amphioxeia revealed that phagotrophy can be an important source of all three elements. While P. minimum is a proficient phototroph, inducible phagotrophy is an important nutritional source for this dinoflagellate. PMID:25510417

  17. Stability and Inhibitory Activity of Pediocin PA-1 Against Listeria sp. in Simulated Physiological Conditions of the Human Terminal Ileum.

    PubMed

    Le Blay, Gwenalle; Hammami, Riadh; Lacroix, Christophe; Fliss, Ismal

    2012-12-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is responsible for severe foodborne infections, which can be life-threatening especially for infants and elderly populations. The emergence of antibiotic-resistant pathogens has stimulated the search for new strategies, such as the use of bacteriocins, to prevent or cure foodborne infectious diseases in the intestine. In this study, we evaluated the efficacy of the bacteriocin pediocin PA-1 from Pediococcus acidilactici UL5 to inhibit Listeria ivanovii, used as a surrogate for L. monocytogenes, under physiological conditions of the terminal ileum, simulated in a continuous in vitro fermentation model. A fecal sample from a healthy adult was immobilized and propagated for 30days in a continuous stirred tank reactor, fed with a nutritive medium simulating the ileal chime (pH 7.5). After reaching a pseudo-steady state, the reactor was inoculated five times with L. ivanovii to reach a final concentration of 10(7) CFU/ml within the reactor. Two spikes of L. ivanovii without adjunction of pediocin PA-1 served as control assays, and three other spikes were done to test the effects of three concentrations of pediocin PA-1 corresponding to 2, 3, and 5 the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) active against L. ivanovii. The concentration of L. ivanovii in the reactor was followed for 8h using the PALCAM selective medium. The different groups of commensal bacteria were enumerated on selective medium or using fluorescence in situ hybridization. Our data showed that pediocin PA-1 is stable in the ileum conditions and that it is able to exert its inhibition activity against L. ivanovii in a dose-dependent manner. The addition of pediocin PA-1 at 5נMIC induced a complete disappearance of L. ivanovii (5 log reduction) within 5h, compared to a reduction of 2 logs, corresponding to the washout phenomenon, when no pediocin PA-1 was added. Reduction of 0.8 and 1.3 logs within 8h was also obtained with the addition of 2 and 3נMIC, respectively. The same experiment has shown that addition of pediocin-PA1 in the reactor had a negligible effect on the balance of commensal bacteria. PMID:26782185

  18. A Lectin with Highly Potent Inhibitory Activity toward Breast Cancer Cells from Edible Tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. Nagaimo

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yau Sang; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2013-01-01

    A 70-kDa galactose-specific lectin was purified from the tubers of Dioscorea opposita cv. nagaimo. The purification involved three chromatographic steps: anion exchange chromatography on a Q-Sepharose column, FPLC-anion exchange chromatography on a Mono Q column, and FPLC-gel filtration on a Superdex 75 column. The purified nagaimo lectin presented as a single 35-kDa band in reducing SDS-PAGE while it exhibited a 70-kDa single band in non-reducing SDS-PAGE suggesting its dimeric nature. Nagaimo lectin displayed moderate thermostability, retaining full hemagglutinating activity after heating up to 62°C for 30 minutes. It also manifested stability over a wide pH range from pH 2 to 13. Nagaimo lectin was a galactose-specific lectin, as evidenced by binding with galactose and galactose-containing sugars such as lactose and raffinose. The minimum concentration of galactose, lactose and raffinose required to exert an inhibitory effect on hemagglutinating activity of nagaimo lectin was 20 mM, 5 mM and 40 mM, respectively. Nagaimo lectin inhibited the growth of some cancer cell lines including breast cancer MCF7 cells, hepatoma HepG2 cells and nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE2 cells, with IC50 values of 3.71 µM, 7.12 µM and 19.79 µM, respectively, after 24 hour treatment with nagaimo lectin. The induction of phosphatidylserine externalization and mitochondrial depolarization indicated that nagaimo lectin evoked apoptosis in MCF7 cells. However, the anti-proliferative activity of nagaimo lectin was not blocked by application of galactose, signifying that the activity was not related to the carbohydrate binding specificity of the lectin. PMID:23349827

  19. Feeding deterrent and growth inhibitory activities of PONNEEM, a newly developed phytopesticidal formulation against Helicoverpa armigera (Hubner)

    PubMed Central

    Packiam, Soosaimanickam Maria; Baskar, Kathirvelu; Ignacimuthu, Savarimuthu

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess the feeding deterrent, growth inhibitory and egg hatchability effects of PONNEEM on Helicoverpa armigera (H. armigera). Methods Five oil formulations were prepared at different ratios to assess the feeding deterrent, growth inhibitory and egg hatchability effects on H. armigera. Results Invariably all the newly formulated phytopesticidal oil formulations showed the feeding deterrent and growth inhibitory activities against H. armigera. The maximum feeding deterrent activity of 88.44% was observed at 15 µL/L concentration of PONNEEM followed by formulation A (74.54%). PONNEEM was found to be effective in growth inhibitory activities and egg hatchability at 10 µL/L concentration. It exhibited statistically significant feeding deterrent activity and growth inhibitory activity compared with all the other treatments. Conclusions PONNEEM was found to be effective phytopesticidal formulation to control the larval stage of H. armigera. This is the first report for the feeding deterrent activity of PONNEEM against H. armigera. This newly formulated phytopesticide was patented in India. PMID:25183105

  20. Optimized laser turrets for minimum phase distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderplaats, G. N.; Fuhs, A. E.; Blaisdell, G. A.

    1980-01-01

    An analysis and computer program which optimizes laser turret geometry to obtain minimum phase distortion is described. Phase distortion due to compressible, inviscid flow over small perturbation laser turrets in subsonic or supersonic flow is calculated. The turret shape is determined by a two dimensional Fourier series; in a similar manner, the flow properties are given by a Fourier series. Phase distortion is calcualted for propagation at serveral combinations of elevation and azimuth angles. A sum is formed from the set of values, and this sum becomes the objective function for an optimization computer program. The shape of the turret is varied to provide minimum phase distortion.

  1. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes

    PubMed Central

    Hady, Ahmed A.

    2013-01-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue. PMID:25685420

  2. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hady, Ahmed A.

    2013-05-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue.

  3. Minimum silicon wafer thickness for ID wafering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. P.

    1982-01-01

    An analytical model, based on fracture mechanics analysis, is proposed for estimating the minimum wafer thickness as a function of the diameter requirement for solar cells. The conditions under which the model can be applied are discussed with reference to the critical flaw size, the applied force, and the width of the side support. It is shown that the equivalent cantilever force applied during ID slicing can be estimated from the wafering mechanical yield data. The width of the wafer side support was found to be a significant factor in controlling the minimum allowable wafer thickness during slicing. Wafer side support width requirements were found to increase with decreasing wafer thickness.

  4. The minimum distance approach to classification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wacker, A. G.; Landgrebe, D. A.

    1971-01-01

    The work to advance the state-of-the-art of miminum distance classification is reportd. This is accomplished through a combination of theoretical and comprehensive experimental investigations based on multispectral scanner data. A survey of the literature for suitable distance measures was conducted and the results of this survey are presented. It is shown that minimum distance classification, using density estimators and Kullback-Leibler numbers as the distance measure, is equivalent to a form of maximum likelihood sample classification. It is also shown that for the parametric case, minimum distance classification is equivalent to nearest neighbor classification in the parameter space.

  5. Minimum induced drag configurations with jet interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pao, J. L.; Lan, C. E.

    1978-01-01

    A theoretical method is presented for determining the optimum camber shape and twist distribution for the minimum induced drag in the wing-alone case without prescribing the span loading shape. The same method was applied to find the corresponding minimum induced drag configuration with the upper-surface-blowing jet. Lan's quasi-vortex-lattice method and his wing-jet interaction theory was used. Comparison of the predicted results with another theoretical method shows good agreement for configurations without the flowing jet. More applicable experimental data with blowing jets are needed to establish the accuracy of the theory.

  6. Image Data Compression Having Minimum Perceptual Error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A method is presented for performing color or grayscale image compression that eliminates redundant and invisible image components. The image compression uses a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and each DCT coefficient yielded by the transform is quantized by an entry in a quantization matrix which determines the perceived image quality and the bit rate of the image being compressed. The quantization matrix comprises visual masking by luminance and contrast technique all resulting in a minimum perceptual error for any given bit rate, or minimum bit rate for a given perceptual error.

  7. Image data compression having minimum perceptual error

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Andrew B. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A method for performing image compression that eliminates redundant and invisible image components is described. The image compression uses a Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) and each DCT coefficient yielded by the transform is quantized by an entry in a quantization matrix which determines the perceived image quality and the bit rate of the image being compressed. The present invention adapts or customizes the quantization matrix to the image being compressed. The quantization matrix comprises visual masking by luminance and contrast techniques and by an error pooling technique all resulting in a minimum perceptual error for any given bit rate, or minimum bit rate for a given perceptual error.

  8. Deep solar minimum and global Climate Changes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdel Hady, Ahmed

    2012-07-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its likely impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 100 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activities are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue.

  9. Deep solar minimum and global climate changes.

    PubMed

    Hady, Ahmed A

    2013-05-01

    This paper examines the deep minimum of solar cycle 23 and its potential impact on climate change. In addition, a source region of the solar winds at solar activity minimum, especially in the solar cycle 23, the deepest during the last 500 years, has been studied. Solar activities have had notable effect on palaeoclimatic changes. Contemporary solar activity are so weak and hence expected to cause global cooling. Prevalent global warming, caused by building-up of green-house gases in the troposphere, seems to exceed this solar effect. This paper discusses this issue. PMID:25685420

  10. Amoxicillin concentrations in relation to beta-lactamase activity in sputum during exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Brusse-Keizer, Marjolein; VanderValk, Paul; van der Zanden, Rogier W; Nijdam, Lars; van der Palen, Job; Hendrix, Ron; Movig, Kris

    2015-01-01

    Background Acute exacerbations of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are often treated with antibiotics. Theoretically, to be maximally effective, the antibiotic concentration at sites of infection should exceed the minimum inhibitory concentration at which 90% of the growth of potential pathogens is inhibited (MIC90). A previous study showed that most hospitalized COPD patients had sputum amoxicillin concentrations concentrations had better clinical outcomes. Low amoxicillin concentrations can be caused by beta-lactamase activity in the lungs. This study investigated whether patients with sputum amoxicillin concentrations concentration ≥MIC90. Methods In total, 23 patients hospitalized for acute exacerbations of COPD and treated with amoxicillin/clavulanic acid were included. Sputum and serum samples were collected at day 3 of treatment to determine beta-lactamase activity in sputum and amoxicillin concentrations in both sputum and serum. Results We found no difference in beta-lactamase activity between patients with sputum amoxicillin concentrations concentrations concentrations were concentrations concentrations

  11. 20 CFR 229.4 - Applying for the overall minimum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE General 229.4 Applying for the overall minimum. The Board may... for the overall minimum. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  12. 20 CFR 229.4 - Applying for the overall minimum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE General 229.4 Applying for the overall minimum. The Board may... for the overall minimum. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  13. 20 CFR 229.4 - Applying for the overall minimum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE General 229.4 Applying for the overall minimum. The Board may... for the overall minimum. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  14. 20 CFR 229.4 - Applying for the overall minimum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE General 229.4 Applying for the overall minimum. The Board may... for the overall minimum. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  15. 20 CFR 229.4 - Applying for the overall minimum.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... SOCIAL SECURITY OVERALL MINIMUM GUARANTEE General 229.4 Applying for the overall minimum. The Board may... for the overall minimum. (Approved by the Office of Management and Budget under control number...

  16. Energy and IAQ Implications of Alternative Minimum Ventilation Rates in California Retail and School Buildings

    SciTech Connect

    Dutton, Spencer M.; Fisk, William J.

    2015-01-01

    For a stand-alone retail building, a primary school, and a secondary school in each of the 16 California climate zones, the EnergyPlus building energy simulation model was used to estimate how minimum mechanical ventilation rates (VRs) affect energy use and indoor air concentrations of an indoor-generated contaminant. The modeling indicates large changes in heating energy use, but only moderate changes in total building energy use, as minimum VRs in the retail building are changed. For example, predicted state-wide heating energy consumption in the retail building decreases by more than 50% and total building energy consumption decreases by approximately 10% as the minimum VR decreases from the Title 24 requirement to no mechanical ventilation. The primary and secondary schools have notably higher internal heat gains than in the retail building models, resulting in significantly reduced demand for heating. The school heating energy use was correspondingly less sensitive to changes in the minimum VR. The modeling indicates that minimum VRs influence HVAC energy and total energy use in schools by only a few percent. For both the retail building and the school buildings, minimum VRs substantially affected the predicted annual-average indoor concentrations of an indoor generated contaminant, with larger effects in schools. The shape of the curves relating contaminant concentrations with VRs illustrate the importance of avoiding particularly low VRs.

  17. Inhibitory Effect of Oleic Acid on Octanoylated Ghrelin Production.

    PubMed

    Oiso, Shigeru; Nobe, Miyuki; Iwasaki, Syuhei; Nii, Wakana; Goto, Natsumi; Seki, Yukari; Nakajima, Kensuke; Nakamura, Kazuo; Kariyazono, Hiroko

    2015-01-01

    Ghrelin is a growth hormone-releasing peptide that also displays orexigenic activity. Since serine-3 acylation with octanoylate (octanoylation) is essential for the orexigenic activity of ghrelin, suppression of octanoylation could lead to amelioration or prevention of obesity. To enable the exploration of inhibitors of octanoylated ghrelin production, we developed a cell-based assay system using AGS-GHRL8 cells, in which octanoylated ghrelin concentration increases in the presence of octanoic acid. Using this assay system, we investigated whether fatty acids contained in foods or oils, such as acetic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and ?-linolenic acid, have inhibitory effects on octanoylated ghrelin production. Acetic acid did not suppress the increase in octanoylated ghrelin production in AGS-GHRL8 cells, which was induced by the addition of octanoic acid. However, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid, and ?-linolenic acid significantly suppressed octanoylated ghrelin production, with the effect of oleic acid being the strongest. Additionally, oleic acid decreased the serum concentration of octanoylated ghrelin in mice. The serum concentration of des-acyl ghrelin (without acyl modification) was also decreased, but the decrease was smaller than that of octanoylated ghrelin. Decreased octanoylated ghrelin production likely resulted from post-translational ghrelin processing, as there were no significant differences in gene expression in the stomach between oleic acid-treated mice and controls. These results suggest that oleic acid is a potential inhibitor of octanoylated ghrelin production and that our assay system is a valuable tool for screening compounds with suppressive effects on octanoylated ghrelin production. PMID:26521811

  18. Residential Mobility, Inhibitory Control, and Academic Achievement in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Sara A.; Finders, Jennifer K.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct effects of residential mobility on children's inhibitory control and academic achievement during the preschool year. It also explored fall inhibitory control and academic skills as mediators linking residential mobility and spring achievement. Participants included 359 preschool children (49% female)…

  19. Sustained Attention and Age Predict Inhibitory Control during Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reck, Sarah G.; Hund, Alycia M.

    2011-01-01

    Executive functioning skills develop rapidly during early childhood. Recent research has focused on specifying this development, particularly predictors of executive functioning skills. Here we focus on sustained attention as a predictor of inhibitory control, one key executive functioning component. Although sustained attention and inhibitory

  20. Inhibitory Control Predicts Language Switching Performance in Trilingual Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linck, Jared A.; Schwieter, John W.; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of domain-general inhibitory control in trilingual speech production. Taking an individual differences approach, we examined the relationship between performance on a non-linguistic measure of inhibitory control (the Simon task) and a multilingual language switching task for a group of fifty-six native English (L1)

  1. Residential Mobility, Inhibitory Control, and Academic Achievement in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Sara A.; Finders, Jennifer K.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study investigated the direct effects of residential mobility on children's inhibitory control and academic achievement during the preschool year. It also explored fall inhibitory control and academic skills as mediators linking residential mobility and spring achievement. Participants included 359 preschool

  2. Residential Mobility, Inhibitory Control, and Academic Achievement in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Sara A.; Finders, Jennifer K.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    The present study investigated the direct effects of residential mobility on children's inhibitory control and academic achievement during the preschool year. It also explored fall inhibitory control and academic skills as mediators linking residential mobility and spring achievement. Participants included 359 preschool children (49% female)

  3. Bioavailability of angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Vermeirssen, Vanessa; Van Camp, John; Verstraete, Willy

    2004-09-01

    Hypertension or high blood pressure is a significant health problem worldwide. Bioactive peptides that inhibit angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) in the cardiovascular system can contribute to the prevention and treatment of hypertension. These ACE inhibitory peptides are derived from many food proteins, especially milk proteins. An ACE inhibitory activity in vitro does not always imply an antihypertensive effect in vivo. Even if it does, it is very difficult to establish a direct relationship between in vitro and in vivo activity. This is mainly due to the bioavailability of the ACE inhibitory peptides after oral administration and the fact that peptides may influence blood pressure by mechanisms other than ACE inhibition. To exert an antihypertensive effect after oral ingestion, ACE inhibitory peptides have to reach the cardiovascular system in an active form. Therefore, they need to remain active during digestion by human proteases and be transported through the intestinal wall into the blood. The bioavailability of some ACE inhibitory peptides has been studied. It is also known that (hydroxy)proline-containing peptides are generally resistant to degradation by digestive enzymes. Peptides can be absorbed intact through the intestine by paracellular and transcellular routes, but the potency of the bioactivity after absorption is inversely correlated to chain length. In addition, some strategies are proposed to increase the bioavailability of ACE inhibitory peptides. Further research into the bioavailability of ACE inhibitory peptides will lead to the development of more effective ACE inhibitory peptides and foods. PMID:15469639

  4. Inhibitory Control Predicts Language Switching Performance in Trilingual Speech Production

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linck, Jared A.; Schwieter, John W.; Sunderman, Gretchen

    2012-01-01

    This study investigated the role of domain-general inhibitory control in trilingual speech production. Taking an individual differences approach, we examined the relationship between performance on a non-linguistic measure of inhibitory control (the Simon task) and a multilingual language switching task for a group of fifty-six native English (L1)…

  5. Residential Mobility, Inhibitory Control, and Academic Achievement in Preschool

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, Sara A.; Finders, Jennifer K.; McClelland, Megan M.

    2015-01-01

    Research Findings: The present study investigated the direct effects of residential mobility on children's inhibitory control and academic achievement during the preschool year. It also explored fall inhibitory control and academic skills as mediators linking residential mobility and spring achievement. Participants included 359 preschool…

  6. Serum fractions inhibitory to the growth of Leptospires.

    PubMed

    Ryu, E

    1965-11-01

    It is known that the growth inhibitory substance of animal sera on Leptospires exists in the albumin fraction. Since the globulin fraction obtained from animal sera having growth inhibitory property may support, though variable individually, some degree of leptospiral growth, it may be added, with 5% of pooled rabbit serum, to the medium to be used for the propagation of Leptospires. PMID:4220645

  7. A novel lectin with antiproliferative and HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activities from dried fruiting bodies of the monkey head mushroom Hericium erinaceum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanrui; Zhang, Guoqing; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wang, Hexiang

    2010-01-01

    A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA) was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5 mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9-12.1 and at temperatures up to 70 degrees C, but was inhibited by Hg(2+), Cu(2+), and Fe(3+) ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF7) cells with an IC(50) of 56.1 microM and 76.5 microM, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC(50) of 31.7 microM. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity. PMID:20625408

  8. A Novel Lectin with Antiproliferative and HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitory Activities from Dried Fruiting Bodies of the Monkey Head Mushroom Hericium erinaceum

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yanrui; Zhang, Guoqing; Ng, Tzi Bun; Wang, Hexiang

    2010-01-01

    A lectin designated as Hericium erinaceum agglutinin (HEA) was isolated from dried fruiting bodies of the mushroom Hericium erinaceum with a chromatographic procedure which entailed DEAE-cellulose, CM-cellulose, Q-Sepharose, and FPLC Superdex 75. Its molecular mass was estimated to be 51 kDa and its N-terminal amino acid sequences was distinctly different from those of other isolated mushroom lectins. The hemagglutinating activity of HEA was inhibited at the minimum concentration of 12.5 mM by inulin. The lectin was stable at pH 1.9–12.1 and at temperatures up to 70°C, but was inhibited by Hg2+, Cu2+, and Fe3+ ions. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward mouse splenocytes, and demonstrated antiproliferative activity toward hepatoma (HepG2) and breast cancer (MCF7) cells with an IC50 of 56.1 μM and 76.5 μM, respectively. It manifested HIV-1 reverse transcriptase inhibitory activity with an IC50 of 31.7 μM. The lectin exhibited potent mitogenic activity toward murine splenocytes but was devoid of antifungal activity. PMID:20625408

  9. Inhibitory Effect of Black and Red Pepper and Thyme Extracts and Essential Oils on Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and DNase Activity of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Zarringhalam, Maryam; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Shadnoush, Mehdi; Safaeyan, Firouzeh; Tekieh, Elaheh

    2013-01-01

    In this study, extracts and essential oils of Black and Red pepper and Thyme were tested for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. Black and Red pepper and Thyme were provided from Iranian agricultural researches center. 2 g of each plant powder was added to 10 cc ethanol 96. After 24 h, the crude extract was separated as an alcoholic extract and concentrated by distillation method. Plants were examined for determining their major component and essential oils were separated. Phytochemical analyses were done for detection of some effective substances in extracts. The antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus was tested and the results showed that all extracts and essential oils were effective and essential oils were more active. The extracts and oils that showed antimicrobial activity were later tested to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Dilution (MID) for those bacteria. They were also effective on the inhibition of DNase activity. This study was indicated that extracts and essential oils of Black and Red pepper and Thyme can play a significant role in inhibition of Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24250643

  10. Inhibitory Effect of Black and Red Pepper and Thyme Extracts and Essential Oils on Enterohemorrhagic Escherichia coli and DNase Activity of Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Zarringhalam, Maryam; Zaringhalam, Jalal; Shadnoush, Mehdi; Safaeyan, Firouzeh; Tekieh, Elaheh

    2013-01-01

    In this study, extracts and essential oils of Black and Red pepper and Thyme were tested for antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. Black and Red pepper and Thyme were provided from Iranian agricultural researches center. 2 g of each plant powder was added to 10 cc ethanol 96. After 24 h, the crude extract was separated as an alcoholic extract and concentrated by distillation method. Plants were examined for determining their major component and essential oils were separated. Phytochemical analyses were done for detection of some effective substances in extracts. The antibacterial activity against Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus was tested and the results showed that all extracts and essential oils were effective and essential oils were more active. The extracts and oils that showed antimicrobial activity were later tested to determine the Minimum Inhibitory Dilution (MID) for those bacteria. They were also effective on the inhibition of DNase activity. This study was indicated that extracts and essential oils of Black and Red pepper and Thyme can play a significant role in inhibition of Escherichia coli O157: H7 and Staphylococcus aureus. PMID:24250643

  11. Design of rat renin inhibitory peptides.

    PubMed

    Hui, K Y; Holtzman, E J; Quinones, M A; Hollenberg, N K; Haber, E

    1988-09-01

    Because several well-studied strains of rats manifest spontaneous hypertension, we set out to design a renin inhibitor suitable for use in this species. On the basis of the sequence of the renin substrate, a series of substrate analogue inhibitory peptides were synthesized by systematically modifying the P5, P3, P2, P1P1', P2', P3', and P4' positions. In assays against rat plasma renin, we found that modifications at the C-terminal segment have a marked influence on potency, and that a secondary butyl side chain at the P2' position is important for obtaining optimal activity. The structure at the P3' position, however, could vary considerably without significant effect. The steric effect of the P2 position was important; there an isopropyl side chain provided optimal binding between the inhibitor and the enzyme. At the P3 and P5 positions, potency appeared to depend on aromatic side chains. The effects at the P1P1' position of the transition-state residue (3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy -6-methylheptanoic acid (statine) and its congeners (3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-5-phenylpentanoic acid (AHPPA) and (3S,4S)-4-amino-3-hydroxy-5-cyclohexylpentanoic acid (ACHPA) were found to depend on the sequence of the C-terminal segment. For peptides with an unfavorable C-terminal segment (-Ile-Phe-NH2), AHPPA and ACHPA resulted in a surprising retention of potency. For peptides with a favorable C-terminal segment (-Leu-Phe-NH2), the effect of AHPPA was mild, even though ACHPA still significantly enhanced potency. The hypotensive and plasma renin inhibitory effects of three of the analogues were then studied in anesthetized sodium-depleted rats. One of the compounds, acetyl-His-Pro-Phe-Val-Statine-Leu-Phe-NH2 (IC50 against rat plasma renin of 30 nM at pH 7.4), proved to be a potent hypotensive agent and a potentially useful probe for the study of the renin-angiotensin system in rats. PMID:3045320

  12. Effects of temperature and medium composition on inhibitory activities of gossypol-related compounds against aflatoxigenic fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of temperature and medium composition on growth/aflatoxin inhibitory activities of gossypol, gossypolone and apogossypolone against Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus were investigated. The compounds were tested in a Czapek agar medium at 25 C, 31 C and 37 C at a concentration of 100 g ...

  13. Serum bactericidal and inhibitory titres in the management of melioidosis.

    PubMed

    Simpson, A J; Dance, D A; Wuthiekanun, V; White, N J

    2000-01-01

    A retrospective evaluation of the relationship between serum bactericidal and inhibitory titres and treatment outcome in 195 adult Thai patients with severe melioidosis was conducted. Drug regimens included ceftazidime (52% of patients), co-amoxiclav (24%), imipenem (11%) or the conventional four-drug combination (11%). Pre- and 1 h post-dose serum samples were collected after 48-72 h of therapy, and serum inhibitory and bactericidal titrations determined. Median post-dose titres were: bactericidal 1:8 (range 0-1:128) and inhibitory 1:16 (range 0-1:128). Overall mortality was 26% and outcome was not influenced by either inhibitory or bactericidal titres. Pre-dose titres correlated with renal function; renal function was the most important predictor of mortality. Determination of serum inhibitory or bactericidal titres is unhelpful in the management of severe melioidosis. PMID:10629024

  14. Inhibitory activities of Cassia tora and its anthraquinone constituents on angiotensin-converting enzyme.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Sook Kyung; Lee, Hyang; Kang, Sam Sik; Chung, Hae Young; Choi, Jae Sue

    2009-02-01

    As a component of our program that pertains to the isolation of antihypertensive agents derived from natural products, we screened the bioactivity of seeds from raw and roasted Cassia tora via angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory assays. We found that both of the MeOH extracts from the raw and roasted C. tora exhibited significant inhibitory properties against ACE, demonstrating more than 50% inhibition at a concentration of 163.93 microg/mL. Emodin (3), alaternin (4), gluco-obtusifolin (5), cassiaside (6), gluco-aurantioobtusin (7), cassitoroside (8), toralactone gentiobioside (9), and chrysophanol triglucoside (10) had been previously isolated; however, questin (1) and 2-hydroxyemodin 1-methylether (2) were isolated from C. tora for the first time in this study. Among them, only anthraquinone glycoside (7) demonstrated marked inhibitory activity against ACE, with an IC(50) value of 30.24 +/- 0.20 microM. Conversely, aurantioobtusin (7a), obtained from the acid hydrolysis of 7, showed no activity. Further inhibitory kinetics analyzed from Lineweaver-Burk plots showed 7 to be a competitive inhibitor with a Ki value of 8.3 x 10(-5) M. Moreover, compound 7 showed marked inhibitory and scavenging activities with an IC(50) value of 49.64 +/- 0.37 microM (positive control; trolox: 26.07 +/- 1.05 microM) for total reactive oxygen species generation, and 4.60 +/- 1.12 microM (positive control; penicillamine: 0.24 +/- 0.04 microM) for ONOO(-). PMID:18803227

  15. The inhibitory effect of selenium nanoparticles on protein glycation in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Shaoxuan; Zhang, Wentao; Liu, Wei; Zhu, Wenxin; Guo, Ruochen; Wang, Yashan; Zhang, Daohong; Wang, Jianlong

    2015-04-01

    Selenium nanoparticles (Se NPs) possess well-known excellent biological activities and low toxicity, and have been employed for numerous applications except as inhibitors to protein glycation. Herein, the present study is carried out to investigate the inhibitory effect of Se NPs on protein glycation in a bovine serum albumin (BSA)/glucose system. By measuring the amount of glucose covalently bound onto BSA, the formation of fructosamine and fluorescent products, it is found that Se NPs can hinder the development of protein glycation in a dose-dependent but time-independent manner under the selected reaction conditions (55 C, 40 h). And after comparing the increase of inhibitory rate in different stages, it is observed that Se NPs show the greatest inhibitory effect in the early stage, then in the advanced stage, but no effect in the intermediate stage. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy characterization of Se NPs collected after glycation and determination of OH influence and glyoxal formation show that the mechanism for the inhibitory efficacy of Se NPs is related to their strong competitive activity against available amino groups in proteins, their great scavenging activity on reactive oxygen species and their inhibitory effect on ?-dicarbonyl compounds formation. In addition, it is proved that Se NPs protect proteins from structural modifications in the system and they do not exhibit significant cytotoxicity towards BV-2 and BRL-3A cells at low concentrations (10 and 50 ?g mL-1). Consequently, Se NPs may be suitable for further in vivo studies as novel anti-glycation agents.

  16. Ultrasonic extraction of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica and their antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Peng; Yang, Xiaoman; Cai, Bingna; Chen, Hua; Sun, Huili; Chen, Deke; Pan, Jianyu

    2015-08-01

    In the present study, ultrasonic extraction technique (UET) is used to improve the yield of polysaccharides from Laminaria japonica (LJPs). And their antioxidative as well as glycosidase inhibitory activities are investigated. Box-Behnken design (BBD) combined with response surface methodology (RSM) is applied to optimize ultrasonic extraction for polysaccharides. The optimized conditions are obtained as extraction time at 54 min, ultrasonic power at 1050 W, extraction temperature at 80°C and ratio of material to solvent at 1:50 (g mL-1). Under these optimal ultrasonic extraction conditions, an actual experimental yield (5.75% ± 0.3%) is close to the predicted result (5.67%) with no significant difference ( P > 0.05). Vitro antioxidative and glycosidase inhibitory activities tests indicate that the crude polysaccharides (LJP) and two major ethanol precipitated fractions (LJP1 and LJP2) are in a concentration-dependent manner. LJP2 (30%-60% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) possesses the strongest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity and moderate scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (66.09% ± 2.19%, 3.0 mg mL-1). Also, the inhibitory activity against α-glucosidase (59.08% ± 3.79%, 5.0 mg mL-1) is close to that of acarbose (63.99% ± 3.27%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP1 (30% ethanol precipitated polysaccharides) exhibits the strongest scavenging activity against hydroxyl radicals (99.80% ± 0.00%, 3.0 mg mL-1) and moderate α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (47.76% ± 1.92%, 5.0 mg mL-1). LJP shows the most remarkable DPPH scavenging activity (66.20% ± 0.11%, 5.0 mg mL-1) but weakest α-glucosidase inhibitory activity (37.77% ± 1.30%, 5.0 mg mL-1). However, all these LJPs exert weak inhibitory effects against α-amylase. These results show that UET is an effective method for extracting bioactive polysaccharides from seaweed materials. LJP1 and LJP2 can be developed as a potential ingredient in hypoglycemic agents or functional food for the management of diabetes. This study provides scientific evidence and advances in the preparation technology and a hypoglycemic activities evaluation method for seaweed polysaccharides, especially glycosidase inhibition in combination with an antioxidative activity evaluation method.

  17. Improving Attendance. Minimum Standards Implementation Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ohio State Dept. of Education, Columbus. Div. of Elementary and Secondary Education.

    One of a series of implementation documents prepared in conjunction with the revised minimum standards adopted in 1983 by the Ohio State Board of Education for elementary and secondary schools, this publication provides guidelines for developing attendance policies and procedures, reviews considerations related to attendance, and suggests…

  18. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.703 Minimum standards. Link to an amendment published at 78 FR 73987, Dec. 9, 2013. Heating... requirements of this standard. Appliances Heating and Cooling Equipment, Second Edition, with 1999...

  19. Menu Plans: Maximum Nutrition for Minimum Cost.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Texas Child Care, 1995

    1995-01-01

    Suggests that menu planning is the key to getting maximum nutrition in day care meals and snacks for minimum cost. Explores United States Department of Agriculture food pyramid guidelines for children and tips for planning menus and grocery shopping. Includes suggested meal patterns and portion sizes. (HTH)

  20. Missouri Minimum Standards for School Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Chris L.

    2008-01-01

    The revised minimum standards for school bus chassis and school bus bodies have been prepared in conformity with the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo) for school bus transportation. The standards recommended by the 2005 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) promulgated by the U. S.

  1. When the Minimum is Not Enough.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Michal

    1987-01-01

    Without an increase in five years, minimum wage workers, 60 percent of whom are women, have experienced a sharp decline in real earnings. Over seventeen million Americans fall outside the federal provision and rely on inadequate state standards. Overtime and tipping laws are discussed. Social costs of maintaining the "working poor" outweigh

  2. 7 CFR 905.141 - Minimum exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum exemption. 905.141 Section 905.141 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES,...

  3. 7 CFR 905.141 - Minimum exemption.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum exemption. 905.141 Section 905.141 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE ORANGES, GRAPEFRUIT, TANGERINES,...

  4. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum quantity. 35.13 Section 35.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT...

  5. 7 CFR 35.13 - Minimum quantity.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum quantity. 35.13 Section 35.13 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT...

  6. Completeness properties of the minimum uncertainty states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trifonov, D. A.

    1993-01-01

    The completeness properties of the Schrodinger minimum uncertainty states (SMUS) and of some of their subsets are considered. The invariant measures and the resolution unity measures for the set of SMUS are constructed and the representation of squeezing and correlating operators and SMUS as superpositions of Glauber coherent states on the real line is elucidated.

  7. 78 FR 63873 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-25

    ... NIGC published a final rule in the Federal Register called Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64 FR... technology and has substantively amended them numerous times, most recently on September 21, 2012. 77 FR... surveillance standards to Part 543 on February 20, 2013 (78 FR 11793). The Commission received...

  8. 77 FR 32444 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64 FR 590. The rule added a new part to the Commission's regulations..., 2002 (67 FR 43390), August 12, 2005 (70 FR 47108), and October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60498). In addition to... regulations, and the process NIGC should utilize to make revisions. 75 FR 70680 (Nov. 18, 2010). On April...

  9. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers…

  10. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum quantities. 966.53 Section 966.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  11. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum quantities. 966.53 Section 966.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  12. 24 CFR 5.630 - Minimum rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Minimum rent. 5.630 Section 5.630 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Section 8 and Public Housing, and Other HUD Assisted Housing Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family...

  13. 24 CFR 5.630 - Minimum rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Minimum rent. 5.630 Section 5.630 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Section 8 and Public Housing, and Other HUD Assisted Housing Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family...

  14. 24 CFR 5.630 - Minimum rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Minimum rent. 5.630 Section 5.630 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Section 8 and Public Housing, and Other HUD Assisted Housing Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family...

  15. 24 CFR 5.630 - Minimum rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Minimum rent. 5.630 Section 5.630 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Section 8 and Public Housing, and Other HUD Assisted Housing Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family...

  16. 24 CFR 5.630 - Minimum rent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Minimum rent. 5.630 Section 5.630 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development GENERAL HUD PROGRAM REQUIREMENTS; WAIVERS Section 8 and Public Housing, and Other HUD Assisted Housing Serving Persons with Disabilities: Family...

  17. Minimum Competency Standards: Three Points of View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    International Reading Association, Newark, DE.

    Three members of the Board of Directors of the International Reading Association express their positions about minimum competency standards. Kenneth Goodman presents a humanitarian, idealistic view of the controversy and questions the effectiveness of legislative mandates. Roger Farr expresses concern that limitations of testing procedures might

  18. 24 CFR 35.155 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Minimum requirements. 35.155 Section 35.155 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development LEAD-BASED PAINT POISONING PREVENTION IN CERTAIN RESIDENTIAL STRUCTURES General Lead-Based...

  19. 77 FR 58707 - Minimum Internal Control Standards

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-21

    ... Minimum Internal Control Standards. 64 FR 590. The rule added a new part to the Commission's regulations... (67 FR 43390), August 12, 2005 (70 FR 47108), and October 10, 2008 (73 FR 60498). In addition to... process NIGC should utilize to make revisions. 75 FR 70680. On April 4, 2011, after consulting with...

  20. Minimum Wage Effects throughout the Wage Distribution

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neumark, David; Schweitzer, Mark; Wascher, William

    2004-01-01

    This paper provides evidence on a wide set of margins along which labor markets can adjust in response to increases in the minimum wage, including wages, hours, employment, and ultimately labor income. Not surprisingly, the evidence indicates that low-wage workers are most strongly affected, while higher-wage workers are little affected. Workers

  1. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum quantities. 966.53 Section 966.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  2. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum quantities. 966.53 Section 966.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  3. 7 CFR 966.53 - Minimum quantities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum quantities. 966.53 Section 966.53 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS AND ORDERS; FRUITS, VEGETABLES, NUTS), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE TOMATOES GROWN IN FLORIDA...

  4. Minimum Entry Standards for Fire Prevention Officers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    San Jose Community Coll. District, CA.

    This guide outlines the minimum standards for entrance into the fire prevention career field in California. It contains descriptions of 50 tasks. Each task description consists of nine subsections. The task title briefly identifies the content of the task. The occupational analysis subsection identifies the block, unit, and task within the

  5. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.703 Minimum standards. Heating, cooling and fuel burning appliances and systems in manufactured... with any one such standard shall meet the requirements of this standard. Appliances Heating and...

  6. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  7. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  8. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  9. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  10. 7 CFR 33.10 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... ISSUED UNDER AUTHORITY OF THE EXPORT APPLE ACT Regulations § 33.10 Minimum requirements. No person shall... shipment of apples to any foreign destination unless: (a) Apples grade at least U.S. No. 1 or U.S. No. 1 Early: Provided, That apples for export to Pacific ports of Russia shall grade at least U.S. Utility...

  11. 2013 Missouri Minimum Standards for School Buses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nicastro, Chris L.

    2012-01-01

    The revised minimum standards for school bus chassis and school bus bodies have been prepared in conformity with the Revised Statutes of Missouri (RSMo) for school bus transportation. The standards recommended by the 2010 National Conference on School Transportation and the Federal Motor Vehicle Safety Standards (FMVSS) promulgated by the U. S.…

  12. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 5 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Minimum standards. 3280.703 Section 3280.703 Housing and Urban Development Regulations Relating to Housing and Urban Development (Continued) OFFICE OF ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR HOUSING-FEDERAL HOUSING COMMISSIONER, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED...

  13. Minimum-Time Control For Robotic Manipulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wen, John T.

    1988-01-01

    Current theories examined critically. Report surveys state of art in theory of minimum-time control of robotic manipulators. Discusses some of the promising developments, pointing out, however, optimal-control problem in full generality remains unsolved. Compares various solution methods, indicating merits and flaws.

  14. 7 CFR 35.11 - Minimum requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS EXPORT GRAPES... species table grapes unless such grapes meet the following quality and container marking requirements... shall meet each applicable minimum requirement of the U.S. Fancy Table grape grade as specified in the...

  15. Minimum Standards for Tribal Child Care Centers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Administration on Children, Youth, and Families (DHHS), Washington, DC. Child Care Bureau.

    These minimum standards for tribal child care centers are being issued as guidance. An interim period of at least 1 year will allow tribal agencies to identify implementation issues, ensure that the standards reflect tribal needs, and guarantee that the standards provide adequate protection for children. The standards will be issued as regulations

  16. 24 CFR 3280.703 - Minimum standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... DEVELOPMENT MANUFACTURED HOME CONSTRUCTION AND SAFETY STANDARDS Heating, Cooling and Fuel Burning Systems § 3280.703 Minimum standards. Heating, cooling and fuel burning appliances and systems in manufactured... 54-2002/ANSI Z223.1-2002. Warm Air Heating and Air Conditioning Systems, NFPA 90B, 1996...

  17. Inhibitory effects of phenolics on xanthine oxidase.

    PubMed

    Chang, W S; Chang, Y H; Lu, F J; Chiang, H C

    1994-01-01

    The stems of Bougainvillea spectabillis Wild (Nyctaginaceae) have been used in folk medicine against hepatitis. Spinasterol, 22, 23-dihydrospinasterol and caffeic acid were isolated from the plant stems and characterized. Caffeic acid has not been previously isolated from this plant but spinasterol has been isolated from the leaves. Caffeic acid was found to be the active principle exhibiting strong inhibition of xanthine oxidase in this study (IC50 = 39.21 microM). In order to study the structure-activity relationship of the phenolics as regards xanthine oxidase inhibition, twelve naturally occurring phenolics (esculetin, scopoletin, scoparone, barbaloin, berberine chloride, sinomenine, osthole, paeonol, honokiol, magnolol, methyleugenol and 6-gingerol) were tested for their inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase. The results showed that esculetin displayed the strongest activity (IC50 = 28.4 microM), and induced competitive inhibition of the enzyme with respect to the substrate xanthine. The apparent inhibition constant (Ki) of esculetin was 2.369 x 10(-6) M. Since xanthine oxidase serum levels are increased in hepatic and brain tumors, caffeic acid and esculetin should be tested as anti-hepatitis or/and anticancer agents. PMID:8017853

  18. Xanthine oxidase inhibitory lanostanoids from Ganoderma tsugae.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai-Wei; Chen, Yen-Ting; Yang, Shyh-Chyun; Wei, Bai-Luh; Hung, Chi-Feng; Lin, Chun-Nan

    2013-09-01

    Two new lanostanoids, 3?-acetoxy-22-oxo-5?-lanosta-8,24-dien-21-oic acid, named tsugaric acid D (1) and 16?-hydroxy-3-oxo-5?-lanosta-6,8,24(24(1))-trien-21-oic acid, named tsugaric acid E (2) were isolated from the fruit bodies of Ganoderma tsugae. The structures 1 and 2 were determined by spectroscopic methods. Compound 1 and known compounds 3 and 6 exhibited significant inhibitory effects on xanthine oxidase (XO) activity with an IC50 values of 90.224.2, 116.13.0, and 181.95.8 ?M, respectively. Known compound 5 was able to protect human keratinocytes against damage induced by UVB light, which showed 5 could protect keratinocytes from photodamage. The 1 and 5 ?M 1 combined with 5 ?M cisplatin, respectively, enhanced the cytotoxicity induced by cisplatin. It suggested that 1 and 5 ?M 1 combined with low dose of cisplatin may enhance the therapeutic efficacy of cisplatin and reduce side effect and cisplatin resistant. PMID:23769935

  19. Action potential initiation in neocortical inhibitory interneurons.

    PubMed

    Li, Tun; Tian, Cuiping; Scalmani, Paolo; Frassoni, Carolina; Mantegazza, Massimo; Wang, Yonghong; Yang, Mingpo; Wu, Si; Shu, Yousheng

    2014-09-01

    Action potential (AP) generation in inhibitory interneurons is critical for cortical excitation-inhibition balance and information processing. However, it remains unclear what determines AP initiation in different interneurons. We focused on two predominant interneuron types in neocortex: parvalbumin (PV)- and somatostatin (SST)-expressing neurons. Patch-clamp recording from mouse prefrontal cortical slices showed that axonal but not somatic Na+ channels exhibit different voltage-dependent properties. The minimal activation voltage of axonal channels in SST was substantially higher (?7 mV) than in PV cells, consistent with differences in AP thresholds. A more mixed distribution of high- and low-threshold channel subtypes at the axon initial segment (AIS) of SST cells may lead to these differences. Surprisingly, NaV1.2 was found accumulated at AIS of SST but not PV cells; reducing NaV1.2-mediated currents in interneurons promoted recurrent network activity. Together, our results reveal the molecular identity of axonal Na+ channels in interneurons and their contribution to AP generation and regulation of network activity. PMID:25203314

  20. Molecular inhibitory mechanism of tricin on tyrosinase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, Yan; Li, Lin; Hu, Song-Qing

    2013-04-01

    Tricin was evaluated as a type of tyrosinase inhibitor with good efficacy compared to arbutin. Tricin functioned as a non-competitive inhibitor of tyrosinase, with an equilibrium constant of 2.30 mmol/L. The molecular mechanisms underlying the inhibition of tyrosinase by tricin were investigated by means of circular dichroism spectra, fluorescence quenching and molecular docking. These assays demonstrated that the interactions between tricin and tyrosinase did not change the secondary structure. The interaction of tricin with residues in the hydrophobic pocket of tyrosinase was revealed by fluorescence quenching; the complex was stabilized by hydrophobic associations and hydrogen bonding (with residues Asn80 and Arg267). Docking results implied that the possible inhibitory mechanisms may be attributed to the stereospecific blockade effects of tricin on substrates or products and flexible conformation alterations in the tyrosinase active center caused by weak interactions between tyrosinase and tricin. The application of this type of flavonoid as a tyrosinase inhibitor will lead to significant advances in the field of depigmentation.

  1. Structural studies on leukaemia inhibitory factor

    SciTech Connect

    Norton, R.S.; Maurer, T.; Smith, D.K.; Nicola, N.A.

    1994-12-01

    Leukaemia Inhibitory Factor (LIF) is a pleiotropic cytokine that acts on a wide range of target cells, including mega-karyocytes, osteoblasts, hepatocytes, adipocytes, neurons, embryonic stem cells, and primordial germ cells. Many of its activities are shared with other cytokines, particularly interleukin-6, oncostatin-M, ciliary neurotrophic factor, and granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF). Although secreted in vivo as a glycoprotein, nonglycosylated recombinant protein expressed in E. coli is fully active and has been used in our nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies of the three-dimensional structure and structure-function relationships of LIF. With 180 amino acids and a molecular mass of about 20 kDa, OF is too large for direct structure determination by two-dimensional and three-dimensional {sup 1}HNMR. It is necessary to label the protein with the stable isotopes {sup 15}N and {sup 13}C and employ heteronuclear three-dimensional NMR in order to resolve and interpret the spectral information required for three-dimensional structure determination. This work has been undertaken with both human LIF and a mouse-human chimaera that binds to the human LIF receptor with the same affinity as the human protein and yet expresses in E. coli at much higher levels. Sequence-specific resonance assignments and secondary structure elements for these proteins will be presented and progress towards determination of their three-dimensional structures described.

  2. Tyrosinase Inhibitory Effects and Antioxidative Activities of Saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia Nutshell

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongmei; Zhou, Quancheng

    2013-01-01

    Certain saponins are bioactive compounds with anticancer, antivirus and antioxidant activities. This paper discussed inhibitory effects of saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia on tyrosinase, through the research of the rate of tyrosinase catalyzed L-DOPA oxidation. The inhibition rate of tyrosinase activity presented non-linear changes with the saponins concentration. The rate reached 52.0% when the saponins concentration was 0.96 mg/ml. Antioxidant activities of saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia were evaluated by using hydroxyl and superoxide radical scavenging assays. The hydroxyl radical scavenging effects of the saponins were 15.568.7%, respectively at the concentration of 0.182.52 mg/ml. The superoxide radical scavenging activity reduced from 96.6% to 7.05% with the time increasing at the concentration of 1.44 mg/ml. All the above antioxidant evaluation indicated that saponins from Xanthoceras Sorbifolia exhibited good antioxidant activity in a concentration- dependent manner. PMID:23990897

  3. Morphological, Biochemical and Molecular Characterization of Twelve Nitrogen-Fixing Bacteria and Their Response to Various Zinc Concentration

    PubMed Central

    Dadook, Mohammad; Mehrabian, Sedigheh; Salehi, Mitra; Irian, Saeed

    2014-01-01

    Background: Zinc is an essential micronutrient used in the form of zinc sulfate in fertilizers in the agriculture production system. Nitrogen-fixing microorganisms are also of considerable value in promoting soil fertility. Objectives: This study aimed to investigate the degree of sensitivity to varying concentrations of zinc, in the form of ZnSO4, in different strains of Azotobacter chroococcum in a laboratory environment. Materials and Methods: To isolate A. chroococcum strains, soil samples were collected from wheat, corn and asparagus rhizospheres and cultured in media lacking nitrogen at 30?C for 48 hours. Strains were identified based on morphological and biochemical characteristics. The presence of the nitrogenase enzyme system was confirmed by testing for the presence of the nifH gene using PCR analysis. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and optimal zinc concentration for the growth of each strain was determined. Results: A total of 12 bacterial strains were isolated from six different soil samples. A. chroococcum strains were morphologically and biochemically characterized. The presence of the nifH gene was confirmed in all the strains. MIC and the optimal zinc concentration for bacterial growth were 50 ppm and 20 ppm, respectively. Conclusions: It was concluded that increasing the concentration of zinc in the agricultural soil is harmful to beneficial microorganisms and reduces the soil fertility. A 20-ppm zinc concentration in soil is suggested to be optimal. PMID:25147702

  4. Screening of traditional European herbal medicines for acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Wszelaki, Natalia; Kuciun, Agnieszka; Kiss, Anna Karolina

    2010-03-01

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors are widely used for the symptomatic treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD) to enhance central cholinergic transmission. On the other hand, butyrylcholinesterase (BuChE) inhibitors were reported to produce a significant increase in brain extracellular AChE without triggering severe peripheral or central side effects. In the present study, we selected twelve plants used in traditional European medicine to treat different central nervous system (CNS) disorders or to improve memory. Methanolic and hexane extracts of these plants were tested for the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activity using Ellman's colorimetric method. The most potent AChE and BuChE inhibition was observed in the hexane extracts of the flowers of Arnica chamissonis Less. subs. foliosa and Ruta graveolens L. herb at a concentration of 400 microg mL(-1). However, methanolic extracts of the flowers of Arnica chamissonis Less. subs. foliosa and the Hypericum perforatum L. herb demonstrated at the same concentration, selective inhibition only against AChE but not against BuChE. The other extracts did not show any significant AChE or BuChE inhibitory activity. Our results show that further investigations of the extracts of arnica, rue and St. John's Wort are needed to identity the compounds responsible for the AChE and BuChE inhibitory activity. PMID:20228046

  5. Inhibitory effect of Salicornia europaea on the marine alga Skeletonema costatum.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Dan; Huang, Lingfeng; Lin, Yongqing; Nie, Lingling; Lv, Sulian; Kuang, Tingyun; Li, Yinxin

    2012-06-01

    Exploiting the negative biochemical interference between plants and algal species has been suggested as a method to control harmful algal blooms. In this work, we investigated the inhibitory effect of the salt marsh halophyte Salicornia europaea against the marine alga Skeletonema costatum. S. europaea suppressed the growth of S. costatum in a nutrient-sufficient co-culture system, indicating that the inhibition of algal growth was because of the phytotoxic effect of S. europaea, rather than nutrient competition. We tested aqueous and organic extracts from S. europaea roots against S. costatum. The organic extracts inhibited growth and affected the cell size and chlorophyll a content of S. costatum in a dose-dependent manner. Among the three tested organic extracts, the methanol extract had the greatest effects on S. costatum, followed by butanol extract, and then the chloroform extract. Two flavonoids, rutin and quercetin-3-β-D-glucoside, were identified in the methanol extract by high performance liquid chromatography. The concentration of rutin was much higher than that of quercetin-3-β-D-glucoside. In an algal bioassay, rutin inhibited the growth of S. costatum and the inhibitory effect increased with increasing rutin concentration and with decreasing initial algal density. Therefore, we concluded that S. europaea negatively affects the growth of S. costatum, and that rutin, a metabolite of S. europaea, may play a role in this inhibitory effect. PMID:22744186

  6. Experimental studies on glycolytic enzyme inhibitory and antiglycation potential of Triphala

    PubMed Central

    Ganeshpurkar, Aditya; Jain, Shubhangi; Agarwal, Sonam

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Imbalance in cellular metabolism of carbohydrates and lipids is observed in diabetes mellitus. Pancreatic α-amylase and α-glucosidases are responsible for the conversion of polysaccharides into glucose that enters in the blood stream. Triphala has shown antidiabetic effects (type 2) in human subjects. However, its effects on glycolytic enzymes and protein glycation have not been studied. Aim: To evaluate glycolytic enzyme inhibitory and antiglycation potential of Triphala. Materials and Methods: Triphala Churna was extracted with cold water and subjected to phytochemical analysis. Studies on α amylase and α glucosidase inhibition were performed, and its antiglycation potential was determined. Results: Triphala extract showed prominent α-amylase inhibitory potential (48.66% at concentration 250 μg/ml). Percent α-glucosidase inhibition increased with increasing concentration of the extract (6.32–40.64%). Extract showed remarkable results for antiglycation potential. Triphala extract showed glycation inhibition by inhibiting fructosamine; fructosamine inhibition was found to be 37.74%, protein carbonyls were inhibited up to 15.23% whereas protein thiols were inhibited up to 84.81%. Conclusion: Triphala showed glycolytic enzyme inhibitory and antiglycation potential. Hence, it can be effectively used in the diabetes management. PMID:26730147

  7. Paradoxical inhibitory effect of cromakalim on sup 86 Rb outflow from pancreatic islet cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, P.; Antoine, M.H.; Devreux, V.; Hermann, M.; Herchuelz, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Cromakalim appears to be the most potent pharmacologic agent belonging to the new class of smooth muscle relaxants: the K+ channel openers. The present study aimed at characterizing the effects of cromakalim on 86Rb outflow, 45Ca outflow and insulin release from prelabeled and perifused rat pancreatic islets. Cromakalim provoked a concentration-dependent reduction in 86Rb outflow. This inhibitory effect was attenuated in islets exposed throughout to glibenclamide or to a Ca+(+)-free medium. In islets exposed to glucose and extracellular Ca++, cromakalim induced a dose-dependent reduction in 45Ca outflow. The drug also inhibited the increase in 45Ca outflow mediated by K+ depolarization. Lastly, cromakalim elicited a concentration-dependent inhibition of insulin release from islets perifused in the presence of glucose and extracellular Ca++. The present data suggest that the paradoxical inhibitory effect of cromakalim on 86Rb outflow probably reflects the capacity of the drug to reduce the activity of the ATP-sensitive K+ channels and to indirectly inhibit the Ca+(+)-activated K+ channels. Furthermore, the cromakalim-induced changes in 45Ca outflow are compatible with an inhibitory effect of the drug on the voltage-dependent Ca++ channels.

  8. What causes geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirov, B.; Asenovski, S.; Georgieva, K.; Obridko, V. N.

    2015-12-01

    It is well known that the main drivers of geomagnetic disturbances are coronal mass ejections whose number and intensity are maximum in sunspot maximum, and high speed solar wind streams from low latitude solar coronal holes which maximize during sunspot declining phase. But even during sunspot minimum periods when there are no coronal mass ejections and no low latitude solar coronal holes, there is some "floor" below which geomagnetic activity never falls. Moreover, this floor changes from cycle to cycle. Here we analyze the factors determining geomagnetic activity during sunspot minimum. It is generally accepted that the main factor is the thickness of the heliospheric current sheet on which the portion of time depends which the Earth spends in the slow and dense heliospheric current sheet compared to the portion of time it spends in the fast solar wind from superradially expanding polar coronal holes. We find, however, that though the time with fast solar wind has been increasing in the last four sunspot minima, the geomagnetic activity in minima has been decreasing. The reason is that the parameters of the fast solar wind from solar coronal holes change from minimum to minimum, and the most important parameter for the fast solar wind's geoeffectivityits dynamic pressurehas been decreasing since cycle 21. Additionally, we find that the parameters of the slow solar wind from the heliospheric current sheet which is an important driver of geomagnetic activity in sunspot minimum also change from cycle to cycle, and its magnetic field, velocity and dynamic pressure have been decreasing during the last four minima.

  9. Screening of Indian medicinal plants for acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Pulok K; Kumar, Venkatesan; Houghton, Peter J

    2007-12-01

    The cholinergic hypothesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) has provided the rationale for the current pharmaco-therapy of this disease, in an attempt to reduce the cognitive decline caused by cholinergic deficits. Nevertheless, the search for potent and long-acting acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitors that exert minimal side effects in AD patients is still ongoing. AChE inhibitors are currently the only approved therapy for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease; only a limited number of drugs are commercially available. Hydroalcohol extracts of six herbs, Andrographis paniculata, Centella asiatica, Evalvulus alsinoides, Nardostachys jatamansi, Nelumbo nucifera, Myristica fragrans used in Indian systems of medicine, were tested for in vitro acetylcholinesterase inhibitory activity based on Ellman's method in 96-well microplates using AChE obtained from bovine erythrocytes. The results showed that the hydroalcohol extract from Centella asiatica, Nardostachys jatamansi, Myristica fragrans, Evalvulus alsinoides inhibited 50% of AChE activity at concentrations of 100-150 microg/mL. Andrographis paniculata and Nelumbo nucifera extracts showed a weak inhibition of acetylcholinesterase with IC(50) values of 222.41 +/- 19.87 microg/mL and 185.55 +/- 21.24 microg/mL, respectively. Physostigmine was used as a standard and showed inhibition of acetylcholinesterase with an IC(50) value of 0.076 +/- 0.0042 microg/mL. PMID:17639556

  10. Inhibitory activity of spices and essential oils on psychrotrophic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Fabio, A; Corona, A; Forte, E; Quaglio, P

    2003-01-01

    This study was designed to evaluate "in vitro" the inhibitory effects of spices and essential oils on the growth of psycrotrophic food-borne bacteria: Aeromonas hydrophila, Listeria monocytogenes and Yersinia enterocolitica. The sensitivity to nine spices and their oils (chilli, cinnamon, cloves, ginger, nutmeg, oregano, rosemary, sage, thyme) was studied. Antibacterial activity was evaluated on liquid and solid medium. Spices: 1% concentration of each spice was added separately to Triptic Soy Broth and then inoculated to contain 10(8)/ml organism and held to 4 degrees C for 7 days. Populations of test organism were determined on Triptic Soy Agar. Oils: Inhibition of growth was tested by using the paper disc agar diffusion method (at 35, 20 and 4 degrees C) and measuring their inhibition zone. MIC was determined by the broth microdilution method. Some culinary spices produce antibacterial activity: inhibition of growth ranged from complete (cinnamon and cloves against A. hydrophila) to no inhibition. Antibacterial inhibition zone ranged from 8 mm to 45 mm: thyme essential oil showed the greatest inhibition against A. hydrophila. PMID:12578319

  11. Inhibitory activity of isoniazid and ethionamide against Cryptococcus biofilms.

    PubMed

    Cordeiro, Rossana de Aguiar; Serpa, Rosana; Marques, Francisca Jakelyne de Farias; de Melo, Charlline Vldia Silva; Evangelista, Antonio Jos de Jesus; Mota, Valquria Ferreira; Brilhante, Raimunda Smia Nogueira; Bandeira, Tereza de Jesus Pinheiro Gomes; Rocha, Marcos Fbio Gadelha; Sidrim, Jos Jlio Costa

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the search for drugs to treat systemic and opportunistic mycoses has attracted great interest from the scientific community. This study evaluated the in vitro inhibitory effect of the antituberculosis drugs isoniazid and ethionamide alone and combined with itraconazole and fluconazole against biofilms of Cryptococcus neoformans and Cryptococcus gattii. Antimicrobials were tested at defined concentrations after susceptibility assays with Cryptococcus planktonic cells. In addition, we investigated the synergistic interaction of antituberculosis drugs and azole derivatives against Cryptococcus planktonic cells, as well as the influence of isoniazid and ethionamide on ergosterol content and cell membrane permeability. Isoniazid and ethionamide inhibited both biofilm formation and viability of mature biofilms. Combinations formed by antituberculosis drugs and azoles proved synergic against both planktonic and sessile cells, showing an ability to reduce Cryptococcus biofilms by approximately 50%. Furthermore, isoniazid and ethionamide reduced the content of ergosterol in Cryptococcus spp. planktonic cells and destabilized or permeabilized the fungal cell membrane, leading to leakage of macromolecules. Owing to the paucity of drugs able to inhibit Cryptococcus biofilms, we believe that the results presented here might be of interest in the designing of new antifungal compounds. PMID:26362025

  12. Inhibitory effects of ?-ionone on amyloid fibril formation of ?-lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Ma, Baoliang; You, Xiong; Lu, Fujiao

    2014-03-01

    ?-Lactoglobulin (?-LG) is the major constituent of whey food, which has been shown to interact with a wide range of aroma compounds. In the present work, a model aroma compound, ?-ionone, is used to investigate the influence of aroma compounds on the urea-induced unfolding of ?-LG at pH 7.0. ?-Ionone is observed to enhance the stability of ?-LG at pH 7.0. Moreover, the amyloid fibrils are observed when ?-LG at pH 7.0 is incubated for 12-20 days at 37 C in the presence of 3-5M urea. However, the formation of amyloid fibrils is inhibited when ?-ionone is added into the samples and the inhibitory effects follow a concentration-dependent fashion. There is a clear correlation between Cm and lag time. The correlation demonstrates that protein stability affects the amyloid fibril formation of ?-LG. The results highlight the critical role of protein stability and provide an approach to prevent the formation of amyloid fibrils in vitro. PMID:24325860

  13. The inhibitory effect of natural microflora of food on growth of Listeria monocytogenes in enrichment broths.

    PubMed

    Al-Zeyara, Shaikha A; Jarvis, Basil; Mackey, Bernard M

    2011-01-31

    The aims of this study were to (i) compare the inhibitory effects of the natural microflora of different foods on the growth of Listeria monocytogenes during enrichment in selective and non-selective broths; (ii) to isolate and identify components of the microflora of the most inhibitory food; and (iii) to determine which of these components was most inhibitory to growth of L. monocytogenes in co-culture studies. Growth of an antibiotic-resistant marker strain of L. monocytogenes was examined during enrichment of a range of different foods in Tryptone Soya Broth (TSB), Half Fraser Broth (HFB) and Oxoid Novel Enrichment (ONE) Broth. Inhibition of L. monocytogenes was greatest in the presence of minced beef, salami and soft cheese and least with prepared fresh salad and chicken pt. For any particular food the numbers of L. monocytogenes present after 24h enrichment in different broths increased in the order: TSB, HFB and ONE Broth. Numbers of L. monocytogenes recovered after enrichment in TSB were inversely related to the initial aerobic plate count (APC) in the food but with only a moderate coefficient of determination (R(2)) of 0.51 implying that microbial numbers and the composition of the microflora both influenced the degree of inhibition of L. monocytogenes. In HFB and ONE Broth the relationship between APC and final L. monocytogenes counts was weaker. The microflora of TSB after 24h enrichment of minced beef consisted of lactic acid bacteria, Brochothrix thermosphacta, Pseudomonas spp., Enterobacteriaceae, and enterococci. In co-culture studies of L. monocytogenes with different components of the microflora in TSB, the lactic acid bacteria were the most inhibitory followed by the Enterobacteriaceae. The least inhibitory organisms were Pseudomonas sp., enterococci and B. thermosphacta. In HFB and ONE Broth the growth of Gram-negative organisms was inhibited but lactic acid bacteria still reached high numbers after 24h. A more detailed study of the growth of low numbers of L. monocytogenes during enrichment of minced beef in TSB revealed that growth of L. monocytogenes ceased at a cell concentration of about 10(2)cfu/ml when lactic acid bacteria entered stationary phase. However in ONE Broth growth of lactic acid bacteria was slower than in TSB with a longer lag time allowing L. monocytogenes to achieve much higher numbers before lactic acid bacteria reached stationary phase. This work has identified the relative inhibitory effects of different components of a natural food microflora and shown that the ability of low numbers of L. monocytogenes to achieve high cell concentrations is highly dependent on the extent to which enrichment media are able to inhibit or delay growth of the more effective competitors. PMID:21176988

  14. Inhibitory effect of vanillin on cellulase activity in hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Qi, Benkun; Wan, Yinhua

    2014-09-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic material produces a wide variety of inhibitory compounds, which strongly inhibit the following enzymatic hydrolysis of cellulosic biomass. Vanillin is a kind of phenolics derived from degradation of lignin. The effect of vanillin on cellulase activity for the hydrolysis of cellulose was investigated in detail. The results clearly showed that vanillin can reversibly and non-competitively inhibit the cellulase activity at appropriate concentrations and the value of IC50 was estimated to be 30 g/L. The inhibition kinetics of cellulase by vanillin was studied using HCH-1 model and inhibition constants were determined. Moreover, investigation of three compounds with similar structure of vanillin on cellulase activity demonstrated that aldehyde group and phenolic hydroxyl groups of vanillin had inhibitory effect on cellulase. These results provide valuable and detailed information for understanding the inhibition of lignin derived phenolics on cellulase. PMID:24997375

  15. An anti-steroidogenic inhibitory primer pheromone in male sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chung-Davidson, Yu-Wen; Wang, Huiyong; Bryan, Mara B.; Wu, Hong; Johnson, Nicholas S.; Li, Weiming

    2013-01-01

    Reproductive functions can be modulated by both stimulatory and inhibitory primer pheromones released by conspecifics. Many stimulatory primer pheromones have been documented, but relatively few inhibitory primer pheromones have been reported in vertebrates. The sea lamprey male sex pheromone system presents an advantageous model to explore the stimulatory and inhibitory primer pheromone functions in vertebrates since several pheromone components have been identified. We hypothesized that a candidate sex pheromone component, 7?, 12?-dihydroxy-5?-cholan-3-one-24-oic acid (3 keto-allocholic acid or 3kACA), exerts priming effects through the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. To test this hypothesis, we measured the peptide concentrations and gene expressions of lamprey gonadotropin releasing hormones (lGnRH) and the HPG output in immature male sea lamprey exposed to waterborne 3kACA. Exposure to waterborne 3kACA altered neuronal activation markers such as jun and jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and lGnRH mRNA levels in the brain. Waterborne 3kACA also increased lGnRH-III, but not lGnRH-I or -II, in the forebrain. In the plasma, 3kACA exposure decreased all three lGnRH peptide concentrations after 1 h exposure. After 2 h exposure, 3kACA increased lGnRHI and -III, but decreased lGnRH-II peptide concentrations in the plasma. Plasma lGnRH peptide concentrations showed differential phasic patterns. Group housing condition appeared to increase the averaged plasma lGnRH levels in male sea lamprey compared to isolated males. Interestingly, 15?-hydroxyprogesterone (15?-P) concentrations decreased after prolonged 3kACA exposure (at least 24 h). To our knowledge, this is the only known synthetic vertebrate pheromone component that inhibits steroidogenesis in males.

  16. The Maunder minimum (1645-1715) was indeed a grand minimum: A reassessment of multiple datasets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Usoskin, Ilya G.; Arlt, Rainer; Asvestari, Eleanna; Hawkins, Ed; Käpylä, Maarit; Kovaltsov, Gennady A.; Krivova, Natalie; Lockwood, Michael; Mursula, Kalevi; O'Reilly, Jezebel; Owens, Matthew; Scott, Chris J.; Sokoloff, Dmitry D.; Solanki, Sami K.; Soon, Willie; Vaquero, José M.

    2015-09-01

    Aims: Although the time of the Maunder minimum (1645-1715) is widely known as a period of extremely low solar activity, it is still being debated whether solar activity during that period might have been moderate or even higher than the current solar cycle #24. We have revisited all existing evidence and datasets, both direct and indirect, to assess the level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum. Methods: We discuss the East Asian naked-eye sunspot observations, the telescopic solar observations, the fraction of sunspot active days, the latitudinal extent of sunspot positions, auroral sightings at high latitudes, cosmogenic radionuclide data as well as solar eclipse observations for that period. We also consider peculiar features of the Sun (very strong hemispheric asymmetry of the sunspot location, unusual differential rotation and the lack of the K-corona) that imply a special mode of solar activity during the Maunder minimum. Results: The level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum is reassessed on the basis of all available datasets. Conclusions: We conclude that solar activity was indeed at an exceptionally low level during the Maunder minimum. Although the exact level is still unclear, it was definitely lower than during the Dalton minimum of around 1800 and significantly below that of the current solar cycle #24. Claims of a moderate-to-high level of solar activity during the Maunder minimum are rejected with a high confidence level.

  17. Compounds from Gum Ammoniacum with Acetylcholinesterase Inhibitory Activity

    PubMed Central

    Adhami, Hamid-Reza; Lutz, Johannes; Kählig, Hanspeter; Zehl, Martin; Krenn, Liselotte

    2013-01-01

    The use of herbal medicinal preparations in dementia therapy has been studied based on experience from traditional medicine. A dichloromethane extract of gum ammoniacum, the gum-resin from Dorema ammoniacum D. Don had shown acetylcholinesterase (AChE) inhibitory activity in a previous study. The aim of this study was the isolation and characterization of the active compounds from this resin. The extract was investigated by a respective colorimetric microplate assay and the active zones were identified via TLC bioautography and isolated using several chromatographic techniques. The structures of the active components were characterized by one- and two-dimensional 1H and 13C NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry as (2′S,5′S)-2′-ethenyl-5′-(3-hy-droxy-6-methyl-4-oxohept-5-en-2-yl)-7-methoxy-2′-methyl-4H-spiro[chromene-3,1′-cyclopentane]-2,4-dione (1), which is an analogue of doremone A and a new natural compound, and as (2′S,5′R)-2′-ethenyl-5′-[(2R,4R)-4-hydroxy-6-methyl-3-oxohept-5-en-2-yl]-7-methoxy-2′-methyl-4H-spiro[chromene-3,1′-cyclo-pentane]-2,4-dione (2 = doremone A), (4E,8E)-1-(2,4-dihydroxyphenyl)-5,9,13-trimethyltetradeca-4,8,12-trien-1-one (3 = dshamirone), and 4,7-dihydroxy-3-[(2E,6E)-3,7,11-trimethyldodeca-2,6,10-trien-1-yl]-2H-chromen-2-one (4 = am-moresinol). Dshamirone turned out to be the most active compound with an IC50 value for AChE inhibitory activity of 23.5 μM, whereas the other substances showed weak activity. The concentrations of the analytes in the resin were determined by HPLC as 3.1%, 4.6%, 1.9%, and 9.9%, respectively. PMID:24106674

  18. Binding of inhibitory aromatic amino acids to Streptomyces griseus aminopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Reiland, V; Gilboa, R; Spungin-Bialik, A; Schomburg, D; Shoham, Y; Blumberg, S; Shoham, G

    2004-10-01

    The bacterial aminopeptidase isolated from the extracellular extract of Streptomyces griseus (SGAP) is a double-zinc exopeptidase with a high preference for large hydrophobic amino-terminus residues. It is a monomer of a relatively low molecular weight (30 kDa), is heat-stable, displays a high and efficient catalytic turnover and its activity is modulated by calcium ions. Several free amino acids were found to inhibit the activity of SGAP in the millimolar concentration range and can therefore serve for the study of binding of both inhibitors and reaction products. The current study is focused on the X-ray crystallographic analysis of the SGAP complexes with L-tryptophan and p-iodo-L-phenylalanine, both at 1.30 A resolution. These two bulky inhibitory amino acids were found to bind to the active site of SGAP in very similar positions and orientations. Both of them bind to the two active-site zinc ions via their free carboxylate group, while displacing the zinc-bound water/hydroxide that is present in the native enzyme. Further stabilization of the binding of the amino-acid carboxylate group is achieved by its relatively strong interactions with the hydroxyl group of Tyr246 and the carboxylate group of Glu131. The binding is also stabilized by three specific hydrogen bonds between the amine group of the bound amino acid and enzyme residues Glu131, Asp160 and Arg202. These consistent interactions confirm the key role of these residues in the specific binding of the free amine of substrates and products, as proposed previously. The phenyl ring of Phe219 of the enzyme is involved in stacking interactions with the corresponding aromatic ring of the bound affector. This interaction seems to be important for the binding and orientation of the aromatic side chain within the specificity pocket. These structural results correlate well with the results obtained for the complexes of SGAP with other inhibitory amino acids and support the general catalytic mechanism proposed for this and related enzymes. PMID:15388919

  19. Activity-dependent inhibitory synapse remodeling through gephyrin phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Carmen E.; Nikonenko, Irina; Mendez, Pablo; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Tyagarajan, Shiva K.; Muller, Dominique

    2015-01-01

    Maintaining a proper balance between excitation and inhibition is essential for the functioning of neuronal networks. However, little is known about the mechanisms through which excitatory activity can affect inhibitory synapse plasticity. Here we used tagged gephyrin, one of the main scaffolding proteins of the postsynaptic density at GABAergic synapses, to monitor the activity-dependent adaptation of perisomatic inhibitory synapses over prolonged periods of time in hippocampal slice cultures. We find that learning-related activity patterns known to induce N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent long-term potentiation and transient optogenetic activation of single neurons induce within hours a robust increase in the formation and size of gephyrin-tagged clusters at inhibitory synapses identified by correlated confocal electron microscopy. This inhibitory morphological plasticity was associated with an increase in spontaneous inhibitory activity but did not require activation of GABAA receptors. Importantly, this activity-dependent inhibitory plasticity was prevented by pharmacological blockade of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II (CaMKII), it was associated with an increased phosphorylation of gephyrin on a site targeted by CaMKII, and could be prevented or mimicked by gephyrin phospho-mutants for this site. These results reveal a homeostatic mechanism through which activity regulates the dynamics and function of perisomatic inhibitory synapses, and they identify a CaMKII-dependent phosphorylation site on gephyrin as critically important for this process. PMID:25535349

  20. The direct relationship between inhibitory currents and local field potentials.

    PubMed

    Trevelyan, Andrew J

    2009-12-01

    The frequency profiles of various extracellular field oscillations are known to reflect functional brain states, yet we lack detailed explanations of how these brain oscillations arise. Of particular clinical relevance are the high-frequency oscillations (HFOs) associated with interictal events and the onset of seizures. These time periods are also when pyramidal firing appears to be vetoed by high-frequency volleys of inhibitory synaptic currents, thereby providing an inhibitory restraint that opposes epileptiform spread (Trevelyan et al., 2006, 2007). The pattern and timing of this inhibitory volley is suggestive of a causal relationship between the restraint and HFOs. I show that at these times, isolated inhibitory currents from single pyramidal cells have a similarity to the extracellular signal that significantly exceeds chance. The ability to extrapolate from discrete currents in single cells to the extracellular signal arises because these inhibitory currents are synchronized in local populations of pyramidal cells. The visibility of these inhibitory currents in the field recordings is greatest when local pyramidal activity is suppressed: the correlation between the inhibitory currents and the field signal becomes worse when local activity increases, suggestive of a switch from one source of HFO to another as the restraint starts to fail. This association suggests that a significant component of HFOs reflects the last act of defiance in the face of an advancing ictal event. PMID:19955382

  1. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature.

    PubMed

    Savage, M J

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient (b?=?2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass and grass-surface minima yielded increased RMSEs compared to those for air temperature at 2m. The sufficiently small RMSEs using the 2-h ahead nowcasts of the air temperature minimum, for the exponential model, demonstrate that the methodology used may be applied operationally but with increased errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts. PMID:26123473

  2. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. J.

    2015-06-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient (b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass and grass-surface minima yielded increased RMSEs compared to those for air temperature at 2 m. The sufficiently small RMSEs using the 2-h ahead nowcasts of the air temperature minimum, for the exponential model, demonstrate that the methodology used may be applied operationally but with increased errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts.

  3. Anticipating Cycle 24 Minimum and Its Consequences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Robert M.; Hathaway, David H.

    2007-01-01

    On the basis of the 12-mo moving average of monthly mean sunspot number (R) through November 2006, cycle 23 has persisted for 126 mo, having had a minimum of 8.0 in May 1996, a peak of 120.8 in April 2000, and an ascent duration of 47 mo. In November 2006, the 12-mo moving average of monthly mean sunspot number was 12.7, a value just outside the upper observed envelope of sunspot minimum values for the most recent cycles 16-23 (range 3.4-12.3), but within the 90-percent prediction interval (7.8 +/- 6.7). The first spotless day during the decline of cycle 23 occurred in January 2004, and the first occurrence of 10 or more and 20 or more spotless days was February 2006 and April 2007, respectively, inferring that sunspot minimum for cycle 24 is imminent. Through May 2007, 121 spotless days have accumulated. In terms of the weighted mean latitude (weighed by spot area) (LAT) and the highest observed latitude spot (HLS) in November 2006, 12-mo moving averages of these parameters measured 7.9 and 14.6 deg, respectively, these values being the lowest values yet observed during the decline of cycle 23 and being below corresponding mean values found for cycles 16-23. As yet, no high-latitude new-cycle spots have been seen nor has there been an upturn in LAT and HLS, these conditions having always preceded new cycle minimum by several months for past cycles. Together, these findings suggest that cycle 24 s minimum amplitude still lies well beyond November 2006. This implies that cycle 23 s period either will lie in the period "gap" (127-134 mo), a first for a sunspot cycle, or it will be longer than 134 mo, thus making cycle 23 a long-period cycle (like cycle 20) and indicating that cycle 24 s minimum will occur after July 2007. Should cycle 23 prove to be a cycle of longer period, a consequence might be that the maximum amplitude for cycle 24 may be smaller than previously predicted.

  4. Nowcasting daily minimum air and grass temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. J.

    2016-02-01

    Site-specific and accurate prediction of daily minimum air and grass temperatures, made available online several hours before their occurrence, would be of significant benefit to several economic sectors and for planning human activities. Site-specific and reasonably accurate nowcasts of daily minimum temperature several hours before its occurrence, using measured sub-hourly temperatures hours earlier in the morning as model inputs, was investigated. Various temperature models were tested for their ability to accurately nowcast daily minimum temperatures 2 or 4 h before sunrise. Temperature datasets used for the model nowcasts included sub-hourly grass and grass-surface (infrared) temperatures from one location in South Africa and air temperature from four subtropical sites varying in altitude (USA and South Africa) and from one site in central sub-Saharan Africa. Nowcast models used employed either exponential or square root functions to describe the rate of nighttime temperature decrease but inverted so as to determine the minimum temperature. The models were also applied in near real-time using an open web-based system to display the nowcasts. Extrapolation algorithms for the site-specific nowcasts were also implemented in a datalogger in an innovative and mathematically consistent manner. Comparison of model 1 (exponential) nowcasts vs measured daily minima air temperatures yielded root mean square errors (RMSEs) <1 °C for the 2-h ahead nowcasts. Model 2 (also exponential), for which a constant model coefficient ( b = 2.2) was used, was usually slightly less accurate but still with RMSEs <1 °C. Use of model 3 (square root) yielded increased RMSEs for the 2-h ahead comparisons between nowcasted and measured daily minima air temperature, increasing to 1.4 °C for some sites. For all sites for all models, the comparisons for the 4-h ahead air temperature nowcasts generally yielded increased RMSEs, <2.1 °C. Comparisons for all model nowcasts of the daily grass and grass-surface minima yielded increased RMSEs compared to those for air temperature at 2 m. The sufficiently small RMSEs using the 2-h ahead nowcasts of the air temperature minimum, for the exponential model, demonstrate that the methodology used may be applied operationally but with increased errors for grass minimum temperature and the 4-h nowcasts.

  5. Inhibitory Receptors Beyond T Cell Exhaustion

    PubMed Central

    Fuertes Marraco, Silvia A.; Neubert, Natalie J.; Verdeil, Grégory; Speiser, Daniel E.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitory receptors (iRs) are frequently associated with “T cell exhaustion”. However, the expression of iRs is also dependent on T cell differentiation and activation. Therapeutic blockade of various iRs, also referred to as “checkpoint blockade”, is showing ­unprecedented results in the treatment of cancer patients. Consequently, the clinical potential in this field is broad, calling for increased research efforts and rapid refinements in the understanding of iR function. In this review, we provide an overview on the significance of iR expression for the interpretation of T cell functionality. We summarize how iRs have been strongly associated with “T cell exhaustion” and illustrate the parallel evidence on the importance of T cell differentiation and activation for the expression of iRs. The differentiation subsets of CD8 T cells (naïve, effector, and memory cells) show broad and inherent differences in iR expression, while activation leads to strong upregulation of iRs. Therefore, changes in iR expression during an immune response are often concomitant with T cell differentiation and activation. Sustained expression of iRs in chronic infection and in the tumor microenvironment likely reflects a specialized T cell differentiation. In these situations of prolonged antigen exposure and chronic inflammation, T cells are “downtuned” in order to limit tissue damage. Furthermore, we review the novel “checkpoint blockade” treatments and the potential of iRs as biomarkers. Finally, we provide recommendations for the immune monitoring of patients to interpret iR expression data combined with parameters of activation and differentiation of T cells. PMID:26167163

  6. 12 CFR 3.6 - Minimum capital ratios.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum capital ratios. 3.6 Section 3.6 Banks and Banking COMPTROLLER OF THE CURRENCY, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MINIMUM CAPITAL RATIOS; ISSUANCE OF DIRECTIVES Minimum Capital Ratios 3.6 Minimum capital ratios. (a) Risk-based capital ratio....

  7. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. Link to an amendment published at 76 FR 60622, Sept. 29, 2011. (a) Minimum length. The minimum length for surf clams is...

  8. 50 CFR 648.72 - Minimum surf clam size.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum surf clam size. 648.72 Section 648... Atlantic Surf Clam and Ocean Quahog Fisheries 648.72 Minimum surf clam size. (a) Minimum length. The minimum length for surf clams is 4.75 inches (12.065 cm). (b) Determination of compliance. No more than...

  9. Minimum Wage Laws and the Distribution of Employment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lang, Kevin

    The desirability of raising the minimum wage long revolved around just one question: the effect of higher minimum wages on the overall level of employment. An even more critical effect of the minimum wage rests on the composition of employment--who gets the minimum wage job. An examination of employment in eating and drinking establishments…

  10. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  11. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 10 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  12. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  13. 50 CFR 648.83 - Multispecies minimum fish sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 50 Wildlife and Fisheries 12 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Multispecies minimum fish sizes. 648.83... Measures for the NE Multispecies and Monkfish Fisheries § 648.83 Multispecies minimum fish sizes. (a) Minimum fish sizes. (1) Minimum fish sizes for recreational vessels and charter/party vessels that are...

  14. 43 CFR 3133.2-1 - Minimum royalties.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Minimum royalties. 3133.2-1 Section 3133.2... Rentals and Royalties § 3133.2-1 Minimum royalties. For leases which provide for minimum royalty payments, each lessee shall pay the minimum royalty specified in the lease at the end of each lease...

  15. 49 CFR 538.5 - Minimum driving range.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 6 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Minimum driving range. 538.5 Section 538.5... Minimum driving range. (a) The minimum driving range that a passenger automobile must have in order to be... electricity. (b) The minimum driving range that a passenger automobile using electricity as an...

  16. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  17. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  18. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  19. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  20. 5 CFR 551.601 - Minimum age standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Minimum age standards. 551.601 Section... ADMINISTRATION UNDER THE FAIR LABOR STANDARDS ACT Child Labor § 551.601 Minimum age standards. (a) 16-year minimum age. The Act, in section 3(l), sets a general 16-year minimum age, which applies to all...

  1. Hierarchical clustering in minimum spanning trees

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Meichen; Hillebrand, Arjan; Tewarie, Prejaas; Meier, Jil; van Dijk, Bob; Van Mieghem, Piet; Stam, Cornelis Jan

    2015-02-01

    The identification of clusters or communities in complex networks is a reappearing problem. The minimum spanning tree (MST), the tree connecting all nodes with minimum total weight, is regarded as an important transport backbone of the original weighted graph. We hypothesize that the clustering of the MST reveals insight in the hierarchical structure of weighted graphs. However, existing theories and algorithms have difficulties to define and identify clusters in trees. Here, we first define clustering in trees and then propose a tree agglomerative hierarchical clustering (TAHC) method for the detection of clusters in MSTs. We then demonstrate that the TAHC method can detect clusters in artificial trees, and also in MSTs of weighted social networks, for which the clusters are in agreement with the previously reported clusters of the original weighted networks. Our results therefore not only indicate that clusters can be found in MSTs, but also that the MSTs contain information about the underlying clusters of the original weighted network.

  2. Low Streamflow Forcasting using Minimum Relative Entropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, H.; Singh, V. P.

    2013-12-01

    Minimum relative entropy spectral analysis is derived in this study, and applied to forecast streamflow time series. Proposed method extends the autocorrelation in the manner that the relative entropy of underlying process is minimized so that time series data can be forecasted. Different prior estimation, such as uniform, exponential and Gaussian assumption, is taken to estimate the spectral density depending on the autocorrelation structure. Seasonal and nonseasonal low streamflow series obtained from Colorado River (Texas) under draught condition is successfully forecasted using proposed method. Minimum relative entropy determines spectral of low streamflow series with higher resolution than conventional method. Forecasted streamflow is compared to the prediction using Burg's maximum entropy spectral analysis (MESA) and Configurational entropy. The advantage and disadvantage of each method in forecasting low streamflow is discussed.

  3. Spontaneous clustering via minimum γ-divergence.

    PubMed

    Notsu, Akifumi; Komori, Osamu; Eguchi, Shinto

    2014-02-01

    We propose a new method for clustering based on local minimization of the gamma-divergence, which we call spontaneous clustering. The greatest advantage of the proposed method is that it automatically detects the number of clusters that adequately reflect the data structure. In contrast, existing methods, such as K-means, fuzzy c-means, or model-based clustering need to prescribe the number of clusters. We detect all the local minimum points of the gamma-divergence, by which we define the cluster centers. A necessary and sufficient condition for the gamma-divergence to have local minimum points is also derived in a simple setting. Applications to simulated and real data are presented to compare the proposed method with existing ones. PMID:24206383

  4. On finding minimum-diameter clique trees

    SciTech Connect

    Blair, J.R.S. . Dept. of Computer Science); Peyton, B.W. )

    1991-08-01

    It is well-known that any chordal graph can be represented as a clique tree (acyclic hypergraph, join tree). Since some chordal graphs have many distinct clique tree representations, it is interesting to consider which one is most desirable under various circumstances. A clique tree of minimum diameter (or height) is sometimes a natural candidate when choosing clique trees to be processed in a parallel computing environment. This paper introduces a linear time algorithm for computing a minimum-diameter clique tree. The new algorithm is an analogue of the natural greedy algorithm for rooting an ordinary tree in order to minimize its height. It has potential application in the development of parallel algorithms for both knowledge-based systems and the solution of sparse linear systems of equations. 31 refs., 7 figs.

  5. Global minimum essential requirements in medical education.

    PubMed

    2002-03-01

    The process of globalization is increasingly evident in medical education and makes the task of defining global essential competences required by 'global physicians' an urgent matter. This issue was addressed by the newly established Institute for International Medical Education (IIME). The IIME Core Committee developed the concept of 'global minimum essential requirements' ('GMER') and defined a set of global minimum learning outcomes that medical school students must demonstrate at graduation. The 'Essentials' are grouped under seven broad educational domains with a set of 60 learning objectives. Besides these 'global competences', medical schools should add national and local requirements. The focus on student competences as outcomes of medical education should have deep implications for curricular content as well as the educational processes of medical schools. PMID:12098431

  6. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2015-01-01

    Birds do not require the use of vertical tails. They do not appear to have any mechanism by which to control their yaw. As an example the albatross is notable in this regard. The authors believe this is possible because of a unique adaptation by which there exists a triple-optimal solution that provides the maximum aerodynamic efficiency, the minimum structural weight, and it provides for coordination of control in roll and yaw. Until now, this solution has eluded researchers, and remained unknown. Here it is shown that the correct specification of spanload provides for all three solutions at once, maximum aerodynamic efficiency, minimum structural weight, and coordinated control. The implications of this result has far reaching effects on the design of aircraft, as well as dramatic efficiency improvement.

  7. Autocorrelation of rainfall and streamflow minimums

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matalas, N.C.

    1963-01-01

    Hydrologic time series of annual minimum mean monthly rainfall and annual minimum 1-day and 7-day discharge, considered as drought indices, were used to study the distribution of droughts with respect to time. The rainfall data were found to be nearly random. The discharge data, however, were found to be nonrandomly distributed in time and generated by a first-order Markov process. The expected value of the variance for a time series generated by a first-order Markov process was compared with the expected value of the variance for a random time series. This comparison showed that the expected value of the variance for a nonrandom time series converged to the population variance with an increase in sample size at a slower rate than for a random time series.

  8. The minimum jet power and equipartition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zdziarski, Andrzej A.

    2014-12-01

    We derive the minimum power of jets and their magnetic field strength based on their observed non-thermal synchrotron emission. The correct form of this method takes into account both the internal energy in the jet and the ion rest-mass energy associated with the bulk motion. The latter was neglected in a number of papers, which instead adopted the well-known energy-content minimization method. That method was developed for static sources, for which there is no bulk-motion component of the energy. In the case of electron power-law spectra with index >2 in ion-electron jets, the rest-mass component dominates. The minimization method for the jet power taking it into account was considered in some other work, but only based on either an assumption of a constant total synchrotron flux or a fixed range of the Lorentz factors. Instead, we base our method on an observed optically thin synchrotron spectrum. We find the minimum jet power is independent of its radius when the ion rest-mass power dominates, which becomes the case below certain critical radius. This allows for robust minimum power estimates. We also present results for the case with observed turnover frequency, at which the source becomes optically thick. This method allows a determination of the source size, in addition to the power and the magnetic field. We also point out that when the ion rest-mass power dominates, the estimates of the minimum power lead to very different equipartition parameters than those based on minimization of the energy content. The former and latter lead to approximate equipartition between the internal energy in magnetic field and in particles including and excluding, respectively, their rest-mass energy.

  9. Is the new Grand minimum in progress?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, N. V.; Ponyavin, D. I.

    2014-05-01

    The sunspot numbers and polar faculae are analyzed to demonstrate that the current solar activity is close to the Grand minimum. Notably protracted Cycle 23 is found to be similar to the cycles on the eve of the Dalton and Gleissberg-Gnevyshev minima. The polar faculae as proxy of the polar field replicate variations of the sunspot cycle amplitude over the last 100 years. The weak sunspot activity of Cycle 24 is assumed to result in the weak polar field.

  10. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Time crystals from minimum time uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faizal, Mir; Khalil, Mohammed M.; Das, Saurya

    2016-01-01

    Motivated by the Generalized Uncertainty Principle, covariance, and a minimum measurable time, we propose a deformation of the Heisenberg algebra and show that this leads to corrections to all quantum mechanical systems. We also demonstrate that such a deformation implies a discrete spectrum for time. In other words, time behaves like a crystal. As an application of our formalism, we analyze the effect of such a deformation on the rate of spontaneous emission in a hydrogen atom.

  12. Minimum-time running: a numerical approach.

    PubMed

    Maroński, Ryszard; Rogowski, Krzysztof

    2011-01-01

    The article deals with the minimum-time running problem. The time of covering a given distance is minimized. The Hill-Keller model of running employed is based on Newton's second law and the equation of power balance. The problem is formulated in optimal control. The unknown function is the runner's velocity that varies with the distance. The problem is solved applying the direct Chebyshev's pseudospectral method. PMID:21761812

  13. Inhibitory effects of extractives from leaves of Morus alba on human and rat small intestinal disaccharidase activity.

    PubMed

    Oku, Tsuneyuki; Yamada, Mai; Nakamura, Mariko; Sadamori, Naoki; Nakamura, Sadako

    2006-05-01

    The inhibitory effect on human and rat intestinal disaccharidase by the extractive from the leaves of Morus alba (ELM) containing 0.24 % 1-deoxynojirimycin equivalent and its inhibitory activities were investigated by the modified Dahlqvist method. In the presence of 1000-fold diluted ELM solution, the sucrase activity of four human samples was inhibited by 96 % and that of maltase and isomaltase by 95 and 99 %, respectively. The activities of trehalase and lactase were inhibited by 44 and 38 %, respectively. The human disaccharidase activities varied from sample to sample because the samples were obtained from different resected regions after surgery. However, the ratio of the inhibitory effect for sucrase, maltase, isomaltase, trehalase and lactase was very similar among the four samples, and also that of resembled rat intestinal disaccharides. The inhibitory constant of the 1-deoxynojirimycin equivalent for sucrase, maltase and isomaltase was 2.1 x 10(-4), 2.5 x 10(-4) and 4.5 x 10(-4) mm, respectively, and these inhibitory activities were shown, using rat brush border membrane vesicles, to be competitive. These results demonstrate that digestion is inhibited when an appropriate amount of ELM is orally ingested with sucrose or polysaccharide in man. When ELM was orally administered in a sucrose solution to fasted rats, the elevation in blood glucose was significantly suppressed, depending on the concentration of ELM given. These results suggest that ELM could be used as an ingredient in health foods and in foods that help to prevent diabetes. PMID:16611383

  14. Could a future "Grand Solar Minimum" like the Maunder Minimum stop global warming?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meehl, Gerald A.; Arblaster, Julie M.; Marsh, Daniel R.

    2013-05-01

    A future Maunder Minimum type grand solar minimum, with total solar irradiance reduced by 0.25% over a 50 year period from 2020 to 2070, is imposed in a future climate change scenario experiment (RCP4.5) using, for the first time, a global coupled climate model that includes ozone chemistry and resolved stratospheric dynamics (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model). This model has been shown to simulate two amplifying mechanisms that produce regional signals of decadal climate variability comparable to observations, and thus is considered a credible tool to simulate the Sun's effects on Earth's climate. After the initial decrease of solar radiation in 2020, globally averaged surface air temperature cools relative to the reference simulation by up to several tenths of a degree Centigrade. By the end of the grand solar minimum in 2070, the warming nearly catches up to the reference simulation. Thus, a future grand solar minimum could slow down but not stop global warming.

  15. Minimum Requirements for Taxicab Security Cameras*

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Shengke; Amandus, Harlan E.; Amendola, Alfred A.; Newbraugh, Bradley H.; Cantis, Douglas M.; Weaver, Darlene

    2015-01-01

    Problem The homicide rate of taxicab-industry is 20 times greater than that of all workers. A NIOSH study showed that cities with taxicab-security cameras experienced significant reduction in taxicab driver homicides. Methods Minimum technical requirements and a standard test protocol for taxicab-security cameras for effective taxicab-facial identification were determined. The study took more than 10,000 photographs of human-face charts in a simulated-taxicab with various photographic resolutions, dynamic ranges, lens-distortions, and motion-blurs in various light and cab-seat conditions. Thirteen volunteer photograph-evaluators evaluated these face photographs and voted for the minimum technical requirements for taxicab-security cameras. Results Five worst-case scenario photographic image quality thresholds were suggested: the resolution of XGA-format, highlight-dynamic-range of 1 EV, twilight-dynamic-range of 3.3 EV, lens-distortion of 30%, and shutter-speed of 1/30 second. Practical Applications These minimum requirements will help taxicab regulators and fleets to identify effective taxicab-security cameras, and help taxicab-security camera manufacturers to improve the camera facial identification capability. PMID:26823992

  16. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2010-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb

  17. On the Minimum Induced Drag of Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowers, Albion H.

    2011-01-01

    Of all the types of drag, induced drag is associated with the creation and generation of lift over wings. Induced drag is directly driven by the span load that the aircraft is flying at. The tools by which to calculate and predict induced drag we use were created by Ludwig Prandtl in 1903. Within a decade after Prandtl created a tool for calculating induced drag, Prandtl and his students had optimized the problem to solve the minimum induced drag for a wing of a given span, formalized and written about in 1920. This solution is quoted in textbooks extensively today. Prandtl did not stop with this first solution, and came to a dramatically different solution in 1932. Subsequent development of this 1932 solution solves several aeronautics design difficulties simultaneously, including maximum performance, minimum structure, minimum drag loss due to control input, and solution to adverse yaw without a vertical tail. This presentation lists that solution by Prandtl, and the refinements by Horten, Jones, Kline, Viswanathan, and Whitcomb.

  18. Design for minimum energy in interstellar communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messerschmitt, David G.

    2015-02-01

    Microwave digital communication at interstellar distances is the foundation of extraterrestrial civilization (SETI and METI) communication of information-bearing signals. Large distances demand large transmitted power and/or large antennas, while the propagation is transparent over a wide bandwidth. Recognizing a fundamental tradeoff, reduced energy delivered to the receiver at the expense of wide bandwidth (the opposite of terrestrial objectives) is advantageous. Wide bandwidth also results in simpler design and implementation, allowing circumvention of dispersion and scattering arising in the interstellar medium and motion effects and obviating any related processing. The minimum energy delivered to the receiver per bit of information is determined by cosmic microwave background alone. By mapping a single bit onto a carrier burst, the Morse code invented for the telegraph in 1836 comes closer to this minimum energy than approaches used in modern terrestrial radio. Rather than the terrestrial approach of adding phases and amplitudes increases information capacity while minimizing bandwidth, adding multiple time-frequency locations for carrier bursts increases capacity while minimizing energy per information bit. The resulting location code is simple and yet can approach the minimum energy as bandwidth is expanded. It is consistent with easy discovery, since carrier bursts are energetic and straightforward modifications to post-detection pattern recognition can identify burst patterns. Time and frequency coherence constraints leading to simple signal discovery are addressed, and observations of the interstellar medium by transmitter and receiver constrain the burst parameters and limit the search scope.

  19. Identification of benzoquinones in pretreated lignocellulosic feedstocks and inhibitory effects on yeast.

    PubMed

    Stagge, Stefan; Cavka, Adnan; Jönsson, Leif J

    2015-12-01

    Pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass under acidic conditions gives rise to by-products that inhibit fermenting microorganisms. An analytical procedure for identification of p-benzoquinone (BQ) and 2,6-dimethoxybenzoquinone (DMBQ) in pretreated biomass was developed, and the inhibitory effects of BQ and DMBQ on the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae were assessed. The benzoquinones were analyzed using ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole-mass spectrometry after derivatization with 2,4-dinitrophenylhydrazine. Pretreatment liquids examined with regard to the presence of BQ and DMBQ originated from six different lignocellulosic feedstocks covering agricultural residues, hardwood, and softwood, and were produced through impregnation with sulfuric acid or sulfur dioxide at varying pretreatment temperature (165-204 °C) and residence time (6-20 min). BQ was detected in all six pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 6 mg/l, while DMBQ was detected in four pretreatment liquids in concentrations ranging up to 0.5 mg/l. The result indicates that benzoquinones are ubiquitous as by-products of acid pretreatment of lignocellulose, regardless of feedstock and pretreatment conditions. Fermentation experiments with BQ and DMBQ covered the concentration ranges 2 mg/l to 1 g/l and 20 mg/l to 1 g/l, respectively. Even the lowest BQ concentration tested (2 mg/l) was strongly inhibitory to yeast, while 20 mg/l DMBQ gave a slight negative effect on ethanol formation. This work shows that benzoquinones should be regarded as potent and widespread inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, and that they warrant attention besides more well-studied inhibitory substances, such as aliphatic carboxylic acids, phenols, and furan aldehydes. PMID:26384342

  20. Minimum energy control for in vitro neurons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nabi, Ali; Stigen, Tyler; Moehlis, Jeff; Netoff, Theoden

    2013-06-01

    Objective. To demonstrate the applicability of optimal control theory for designing minimum energy charge-balanced input waveforms for single periodically-firing in vitro neurons from brain slices of Long-Evans rats. Approach. The method of control uses the phase model of a neuron and does not require prior knowledge of the neuron’s biological details. The phase model of a neuron is a one-dimensional model that is characterized by the neuron’s phase response curve (PRC), a sensitivity measure of the neuron to a stimulus applied at different points in its firing cycle. The PRC for each neuron is experimentally obtained by measuring the shift in phase due to a short-duration pulse injected into the periodically-firing neuron at various phase values. Based on the measured PRC, continuous-time, charge-balanced, minimum energy control waveforms have been designed to regulate the next firing time of the neuron upon application at the onset of an action potential. Main result. The designed waveforms can achieve the inter-spike-interval regulation for in vitro neurons with energy levels that are lower than those of conventional monophasic pulsatile inputs of past studies by at least an order of magnitude. They also provide the advantage of being charge-balanced. The energy efficiency of these waveforms is also shown by performing several supporting simulations that compare the performance of the designed waveforms against that of phase shuffled surrogate inputs, variants of the minimum energy waveforms obtained from suboptimal PRCs, as well as pulsatile stimuli that are applied at the point of maximum PRC. It was found that the minimum energy waveforms perform better than all other stimuli both in terms of control and in the amount of energy used. Specifically, it was seen that these charge-balanced waveforms use at least an order of magnitude less energy than conventional monophasic pulsatile stimuli. Significance. The significance of this work is that it uses concepts from the theory of optimal control and introduces a novel approach in designing minimum energy charge-balanced input waveforms for neurons that are robust to noise and implementable in electrophysiological experiments.

  1. Inhibitory action of quercetin on eosinophil activation in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sakai-Kashiwabara, Misako; Asano, Kazuhito

    2013-01-01

    The influence of quercetin on eosinophil functions was examined in vitro and in vivo. The first set of experiments was undertaken to examine whether quercetin could suppress eosinophilia and IgE hyperproduction induced by Mesocestoides corti infection in BALB/c mice. The number of peripheral blood eosinophils and IgE levels were examined 21 days after infection. Oral administration of quercetin for 21 days could not suppress both peripheral blood eosinophilia and IgE hyperproduction, even when 20.0 mg/kg quercetin was used for treatment. The second part of the experiment was designed to examine the influence of quercetin on eosinophil activation induced by SCF stimulation in vitro. Eosinophils were obtained from M. corti-infected mice and stimulated with SCF in the presence of various concentrations of quercetin for 24 h. The addition of quercetin into cell cultures could suppress eosinophil activation induced by SCF stimulation as assessed by measuring the contents of RANTES, MIP-1 β , ECP, and MBP in culture supernatants. The minimum concentration of quercetin which caused significant suppression of factor secretion was 5.0  μ M. These results may suggest that quercetin will be a good candidate for the supplement on the management of eosinophil-mediated diseases, such as allergic rhinitis and asthma. PMID:23840245

  2. Inhibitory SMADs: Potential Regulators of Ovarian Function1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qinglei

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Transforming growth factor beta (TGFB) superfamily signaling regulates essential reproductive functions. Dysregulation of TGFB signaling results in cellular and molecular deficiencies in the ovary, leading to reproductive diseases and cancer development. SMAD proteins are canonical TGFB signaling components consisting of receptor-regulated SMADs (SMAD1/2/3/5/9), a common SMAD (SMAD4), and inhibitory SMADs (SMAD6/7). Inhibitory SMADs are negative regulators of TGFB and bone morphogenetic protein signaling, and their reproductive functions are poorly defined. Emerging evidence supports that inhibitory SMADs are potential regulators of ovarian function. Further efforts and new genetic models are needed to unveil the role of inhibitory SMADs in the ovary. PMID:25550343

  3. Inhibitory Receptors on Lymphocytes: Insights from Infections1

    PubMed Central

    Odorizzi, Pamela; Wherry, E. John

    2012-01-01

    Co-stimulatory and inhibitory receptors are critical regulators of adaptive immune cell function. These pathways regulate the initiation and termination of effective immune responses to infections while limiting autoimmunity and/or immunopathology. This review focuses on recent advances in our understanding of inhibitory receptor pathways and their roles in different diseases and/or infections, emphasizing potential clinical applications and important unanswered mechanistic questions. While significant progress has been made in defining the influence of inhibitory receptors at the cellular level, relatively little is known about the underlying molecular pathways. We will discuss our current understanding of the molecular mechanisms for key inhibitory receptor pathways, highlight major gaps in knowledge and explore current and future clinical applications. PMID:22442493

  4. Macrophage migration inhibitory factor in rheumatoid arthritis.

    PubMed

    Morand, Eric F; Leech, Michelle

    2005-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis is characterised by the interaction of multiple mediators, among the most important of which are cytokines. In recent years, extensive data demonstrates a pivotal role for one cytokine, macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), in fundamental events in innate and adaptive immunity. MIF has now been demonstrated to be involved in the pathogenesis of many diseases, but in the case of RA the evidence for a role of MIF is very strong. MIF is abundantly expressed in the serum of RA patients, and in RA synovial tissue where it correlates with disease activity. MIF induces synoviocyte expression of key proinflammatory genes including TNF, IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, cPLA2, COX2 and MMPs. MIF also regulates the function of endothelial cells and B cells. Moreover, MIF is implicated in the control of synoviocyte proliferation and apoptosis via direct effects on the expression of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In multiple rat and mouse models of RA, anti-MIF antibodies or genetic MIF deficiency are associated with significant inhibition of disease. MIF -/- mice further demonstrate increases in synovial apoptosis. That the human Mif gene is encoded by different functional alleles in subjects with inflammatory disease also provides evidence for the role of MIF in RA. The mechanism of action of MIF is becoming better understood. MIF appears to interact with cell surface CD74, with consequent activation of MAP kinases but possibly not NFkappaB intracellular signal transduction. This apparent selectivity may be implicated in the ability of MIF to antagonise the effects of glucocorticoids. As MIF expression is induced by glucocorticoids, inhibition of its antagonistic effects may permit enhanced therapeutic effect of glucocorticoids, or "steroid sparing". To date there are no clinical trials of MIF antagonism in any disease, but exploitation of antibody, soluble receptor, or small molecule approaches enabled by the unique crystal structure of MIF, may soon lead to the ability to test in the clinic the importance of this cytokine in human RA. PMID:15576336

  5. Effect of gamma radiation and oregano essential oil on murein and ATP concentration of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Caillet, Stphane; Ursachi, Laura; Shareck, Franois; Lacroix, Monique

    2009-01-01

    The study was carried out to evaluate the effects of gamma-irradiation alone or in combination with oregano essential oil on murein composition of Staphylococcus aureus and on the intracellular and extracellular concentration of ATP. The bacterial strain was treated with 3 irradiation doses: 1.2 kGy to induce cell damage, 2.9 kGy to obtain a viable but nonculturable state, and 3.5 kGy to cause cell death. Oregano essential oil was used at 0.010% and 0.013% (w/v), which is the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). All treatments had a significant effect (P < or = 0.05) on the murein composition, although some muropeptides did not seem to be affected by the treatment. Each treatment influenced differently the relative percentage and number of muropeptides. There was a significant (P < or = 0.05) correlation between the reduction of intracellular ATP and increase in extracellular ATP following treatment of the cells with oregano oil. The reduction of intracellular ATP was even more important when essential oil was combined with irradiation. Also, irradiation alone of S. aureus induced a significant decrease (P < or = 0.05) of the internal ATP and a significant increase (P < or = 0.05) of the external ATP. However, no significant difference (P > 0.05) was observed in ATP concentrations between different radiation doses. Transmission electron microscopic observation revealed that oregano oil and irradiation have an effect on cell wall structure. PMID:20492121

  6. Intracellular activity of clinical concentrations of phenothiazines including thioridiazine against phagocytosed Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Ordway, Diane; Viveiros, Miguel; Leandro, Clara; Arroz, Maria Jorge; Amaral, Leonard

    2002-07-01

    The effect of thioridazine (TZ) was studied on the killing activity of human peripheral blood monocyte derived macrophages (HPBMDM) and of human macrophage cell line THP-1 at extracellular concentrations below those achievable clinically. These macrophages have nominal killing activity against bacteria and therefore, would not influence any activity that the compounds may have against intracellular localised Staphylococcus aureus. The results indicated that whereas TZ has an in vitro minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) against the strains of S. aureus of 18, 0.1 mg/l of TZ in the medium completely inhibits the growth of S. aureus that has been phagocytosed by macrophages. The latter concentration was non-toxic to macrophages, did not cause cellular expression of activation marker CD69 nor induction of CD3+ T cell production of IFN-gamma, but blocked cellular proliferation and down-regulated the production of T cell-derived cytokines (IFN-gamma, IL-5). These results suggest that TZ induces intracellular bactericidal activities independent of the capacity to generate Type 1 responses against S. aureus. PMID:12127709

  7. Effects of subinhibitory concentrations of florfenicol on morphology, growth, and viability of Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Blickwede, M; Valentin-Weigand, P; Rohde, M; Schwarz, S

    2004-08-01

    Staphylococcus aureus strain Newman was investigated for changes in its growth pattern, its morphology and its viability when grown in the presence of 3 microg/ml florfenicol (Ff). This concentration corresponds to the 0.75-fold strain-specific minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). Under these conditions, S. aureus Newman showed a distinct retardation in its growth pattern and 20% dead cells were detected in a fluorescence microscopic viability assay. However, bactericidal activity - defined as a 3-log drop in the staphylococcal population - was not recorded at this Ff concentration. Further analysis of the cell wall revealed a significant increase in cell wall thickness of S. aureus Newman when grown in the presence of 3 microg/ml Ff. This might result in a compression of the protoplast with subsequent disruption of single staphylococcal cells. Accordingly, 20% of the staphylococcal cells analysed by electron microscopy proved to be disrupted. These observations suggest that Ff can cause a thickening of the cell wall accompanied by impaired viability of the staphylococcal cells. PMID:15458493

  8. Alveolar and serum concentrations of imipenem in two lung transplant recipients supported with extracorporeal membrane oxygenation.

    PubMed

    Welsch, C; Augustin, P; Allyn, J; Massias, L; Montravers, P; Allou, N

    2015-02-01

    Venovenous extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is increasingly used in patients with respiratory failure who fail conventional treatment. Postoperative pneumonia is the most common infection after lung transplantation (40%). Imipenem is frequently used for empirical treatment of nosocomial pneumonia in the intensive care unit. Nevertheless, few data are available on the impact of ECMO on pharmacokinetics, and no data on imipenem dosing during ECMO. Currently, no guidelines exist for antibiotic dosing during ECMO support. We report the cases of 2 patients supported with venovenous ECMO for refractory acute respiratory distress syndrome following single lung transplantation for pulmonary fibrosis, treated empirically with 1g of imipenem intravenously every 6h. Enterobacter cloacae was isolated from the respiratory sample of Patient 1 and Klebsiella pneumoniae was isolated from the respiratory sample of Patient 2. Minimum inhibitory concentrations of the 2 isolated strains were 0.125 and 0.25mg/L, respectively. Both patients were still alive on day 28. This is the first report, to our knowledge, of imipenem concentrations in lung transplantation patients supported with ECMO. This study confirms high variability in imipenem trough concentrations in patients on ECMO and with preserved renal function. An elevated dosing regimen (4g/24h) is more likely to optimize drug exposure, and therapeutic drug monitoring is recommended, where available. Population pharmacokinetic studies are indicated to develop evidence-based dosing guidelines for ECMO patients. PMID:25572932

  9. ?-Aescin at subinhibitory concentration (sub-MIC) enhances susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to nystatin.

    PubMed

    Franiczek, Roman; Gle?sk, Micha?; Krzy?anowska, Barbara; W?odarczyk, Maciej

    2015-11-01

    Aescin (escin) derived from the seeds of horse chestnut (Aesculus hippocastanum L.) is a natural mixture of triterpene saponins exhibiting a wide variety of pharmacological properties, including antiinflammatory, analgesic, and antipyretic activities. However, data concerning antifungal activities of these compounds are limited. This study aims to evaluate the in vitro antifungal susceptibility of Candida glabrata clinical isolates to ?-aescin sodium, ?-aescin crystalline and ?-aescin sodium using the disk diffusion (DD) and broth microdilution (BMD) methods. Moreover, the influence of subinhibitory concentration (0.5MIC) of ?-aescins on the nystatin MIC was also studied. In general, the results obtained by the DD assay correlated well with those obtained by the BMD method. Both ?-aescins effectively inhibited the growth of all 24 strains tested. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values ranging from 8 to 32??g/ml for ?-aescin crystalline, whereas those of ?-aescin sodium were slightly lower and ranged from 4 to 16??g/ml. In contrast, ?-aescin sodium was found to be completely ineffective against the strains studied. MIC values of nystatin were reduced 2-16-fold and 2-4-fold in the presence of subinhibitory concentration of ?-aescin crystalline and ?-aescin sodium, respectively. Results of the present study may suggest the additive interaction between ?-aescin and nystatin. PMID:26092104

  10. Myostatin inhibitory region of fish (Paralichthys olivaceus) myostatin-1 propeptide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Beum; Kim, Jeong Hwan; Jin, Deuk-Hee; Jin, Hyung-Joo; Kim, Yong Soo

    2016-01-01

    Myostatin (MSTN) is a potent negative regulator of skeletal muscle growth, and its activity is suppressed by MSTN propeptide (MSTNpro), the N-terminal part of MSTN precursor cleaved during post-translational MSTN processing. The current study examined which region of flatfish (Paralichthys olivaceus) MSTN-1 propeptide (MSTN1pro) is critical for MSTN inhibition. Six different truncated forms of MSTN1pro containing N-terminal maltose binding protein (MBP) as a fusion partner were expressed in Escherichia coli, and partially purified by an affinity chromatography for MSTN-inhibitory activity examination. Peptides covering different regions of flatfish MSTN1pro were also synthesized for MSTN-inhibitory activity examination. A MBP-fused MSTN1pro region consisting of residues 45-100 had the same MSTN-inhibitory potency as the full sequence flatfish MSTN1pro (residues 23-265), indicating that the region of flatfish MSTN1pro consisting of residues 45-100 is sufficient to maintain the full MSTN-inhibitory capacity. A MBP-fused MSTN1pro region consisting of residues 45-80 (Pro45-80) also showed MSTN-inhibitory activity with a lower potency, and the Pro45-80 demonstrated its MSTN binding capacity in a pull-down assay, indicating that the MSTN-inhibitory capacity of Pro45-80 is due to its binding to MSTN. Flatfish MSTN1pro synthetic peptides covering residues 45-65, 45-70, and 45-80 demonstrated MSTN-inhibitory activities, but not the synthetic peptide covering residues 45-54, indicating that residues 45-65 of flatfish MSTN1pro are essential for MSTN inhibition. In conclusion, current study show that like the mammalian MSTNpro, the MSTN-inhibitory region of flatfish MSTN1pro resides near its N-terminus, and imply that smaller sizes of MSTNpro can be effectively used in various applications designed for MSTN inhibition. PMID:26827850

  11. Concentrating Radioactivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herrmann, Richard A.

    1974-01-01

    By concentrating radioactivity contained on luminous dials, a teacher can make a high reading source for classroom experiments on radiation. The preparation of the source and its uses are described. (DT)

  12. The neural networks of inhibitory control in posttraumatic stress disorder

    PubMed Central

    Falconer, Erin; Bryant, Richard; Felmingham, Kim L.; Kemp, Andrew H.; Gordon, Evian; Peduto, Anthony; Olivieri, Gloria; Williams, Leanne M.

    2008-01-01

    Objective Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) involves deficits in information processing that may reflect hypervigilence and deficient inhibitory control. To date, however, no PTSD neuroimaging study has directly examined PTSD-related changes in executive inhibition. Our objective was to investigate the hypothesis that executive inhibitory control networks are compromised in PTSD. Methods Functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) was used during a Go/No-Go inhibition task completed by a sample of patients with PTSD (n = 23), a matched sample of healthy (i.e. without trauma exposure) control participants (n = 23) and a sample of control participants with trauma exposure who did not meet criteria for PTSD (n = 17). Results Participants with PTSD showed more inhibition-related errors than did individuals without trauma exposure. During inhibition, control participants activated a right-lateralized cortical inhibitory network, whereas patients with PTSD activated only the left lateral frontal cortex. PTSD was associated with a reduction in right cortical activation and increased activation of striatal and somatosensory regions. Conclusion The increased inhibitory error and reduced right frontal cortical activation are consistent with compromised inhibitory control in PTSD, while the increased activation of brain regions associated with sensory processing and a greater demand on inhibitory control may reflect enhanced stimulus processing in PTSD, which may undermine cortical control mechanisms. PMID:18787658

  13. AP-1 inhibitory peptides are neuroprotective following acute glutamate excitotoxicity in primary cortical neuronal cultures.

    PubMed

    Meade, Amanda J; Meloni, Bruno P; Cross, Jane; Bakker, Anthony J; Fear, Mark W; Mastaglia, Frank L; Watt, Paul M; Knuckey, Neville W

    2010-01-01

    Neuronal cell death caused by glutamate excitotoxicity is prevalent in various neurological disorders and has been associated with the transcriptional activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1). In this study, we tested 19 recently isolated AP-1 inhibitory peptides, fused to the cell penetrating peptide TAT, for their efficacy in preventing cell death in cortical neuronal cultures following glutamate excitotoxicity. Five peptides (PYC19D-TAT, PYC35D-TAT, PYC36D-TAT, PYC38D-TAT, PYC41D-TAT) displayed neuroprotective activity in concentration responses in both l- and retro-inverso d-isoforms with increasing levels of neuroprotection peaking at 83%. Interestingly, the D-TAT peptide displayed a neuroprotective effect increasing neuronal survival to 25%. Using an AP-1 luciferase reporter assay, we confirmed that the AP-1 inhibitory peptides reduce AP-1 transcriptional activation, and that c-Jun and c-Fos mRNA following glutamate exposure is reduced. In addition, following glutamate exposure the AP-1 inhibitory peptides decreased calpain-mediated alpha-fodrin cleavage, but not neuronal calcium influx. Finally, as neuronal death following glutamate excitotoxicity was transcriptionally independent (actinomycin D insensitive), our data indicate that activation of AP-1 proteins can induce cell death via non-transcriptional pathways. Thus, these peptides have potential application as therapeutics directly or for the rational design of small molecule inhibitors in both apoptotic and necrotic neuronal death associated with AP-1 activation. PMID:19878434

  14. Antioxidant, Iron Chelating and Tyrosinase Inhibitory Activities of Extracts from Talinum triangulare Leach Stem

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira Amorim, Ana Paula; Campos de Oliveira, Mrcia Cristina; de Azevedo Amorim, Thiago; Echevarria, Aurea

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this work is to evaluate the antioxidant activity against the radical species DPPH, the reducing capacity against Fe II ions, and the inhibitory activity on the tyrosinase enzyme of the T. triangulare. Hydromethanolic crude extract provided two fractions after the liquid/liquid partition with chloroform. The Folin-Ciocalteu method determined the total phenolic content of the crude extract (CE) and the hydromethanolic fraction (Fraction 1), resulting in a concentration of 0.5853 g/100 g for Fraction 1, and 0.1400 g/100 g for the CE. Taking into account the results of the DPPH, the free radical scavenging capacity was confirmed. The formation of complexes with Fe II ions was evaluated by UV/visible spectrometry; results showed that CE has complexing power similar to the positive control (Gingko biloba extract).The inhibitory capacity of samples against the tyrosinase enzyme was determined by the oxidation of L-DOPA, providing IC50 values of 13.3 ?gmL?1 (CE) and 6.6 ?gmL?1 (Fraction 1). The values indicate that Fraction 1 was more active and showed a higher inhibitory power on the tyrosinase enzyme than the ascorbic acid, used as positive control. The hydromethanolic extract of T. triangulare proved to have powerful antioxidant activity and to inhibit the tyrosinase enzyme; its potential is increased after the partition with chloroform. PMID:26784338

  15. Evaluation of 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful as antiandrogens.

    PubMed

    Nahata, A; Dixit, V K

    2014-08-01

    This study demonstrates 5α-reductase inhibitory activity of certain herbs useful in the management of androgenic disorders. Ganoderma lucidum (Curtis) P. Karst (GL), Urtica dioica Linn. (UD), Caesalpinia bonducella Fleming. (CB), Tribulus terrestris Linn. (TT), Pedalium murex Linn. (PM), Sphaeranthus indicus Linn. (SI), Cuscuta reflexa Roxb. (CR), Citrullus colocynthis Schrad. (CC), Benincasa hispida Cogn. (BH), Phyllanthus niruri Linn. (PN) and Echinops echinatus Linn. (EE) were included in the study. Petroleum ether, ethanol and aqueous extracts of these herbs were tested for their 5α-reductase inhibitory activity against the standard 5α-reductase inhibitor, finasteride. A biochemical method to determine the activity of 5α-reductase was used to evaluate the inhibition of different extracts to the enzyme. The optical density (OD) value of each sample was measured continuously with ultraviolet spectrophotometer for the reason that the substrate NADPH has a specific absorbance at 340 nm. As the enzyme 5α-reductase uses NADPH as a substrate, so in the presence of 5α-reductase inhibitor, the NADPH concentration will increase with the function of time. This method thus implicates the activity of 5α-reductase. The method proved to be extremely useful to screen the herbs for their 5α-reductase inhibitory potential. GL, UD, BH, SI and CR came out to be promising candidates for further exploring their antiandrogenic properties. PMID:23710567

  16. α-Glucosidase and α-amylase inhibitory activity of Senna surattensis.

    PubMed

    Thilagam, Ellappan; Parimaladevi, Balasubramaian; Kumarappan, Chidambaram; Mandal, Subhash Chandra

    2013-02-01

    In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effects of ethanolic extract of the leaves of Senna surattensis (EESS) on α-glucosidase and α-amylase. We also studied the in vitro antidiabetic activity of S. surattensis using the glucose uptake by isolated rat hemidiaphragm model. In vitro studies using mammalian α-glucosidase extracted from the small intestine homogenate of mouse showed that the extract was found to be more effective in inhibiting the activities of maltase [half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC(50)): 209.15 μg/mL] and sucrase (IC(50): 366.44 μg/mL) when compared with the control group (acarbose). The extract of S. surattensis were further quantified with respect to porcine pancreatic α-amylase inhibition using the chromogenic 3,5-dinitrosalicylic acid method. Interestingly, S. surattensis was also found to exhibit α-amylase (IC(50): 123.95 μg/mL) inhibitory activity. The glucose uptake in the rat hemidiaphragm was significantly (p < 0.01) increased by EESS (220.95 ± 5.4 mg/g/30 minute) when compared with the control group. The total polyphenolic content of EESS was found to be 98 μg pyrocatechol/mg of the extract. These results suggest that EESS inhibited carbohydrate digestive enzymes and increased the peripheral uptake of glucose. This study endorses the use of this plant for further studies to determine their potential for managing type II diabetes. PMID:23433052

  17. The inhibitory effect of Binens bipinnata L. extract on U14 tumour in mice.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Li-Hong; Qin, Rui-Ying; Guo, Hui-Min; Ding, Xiao-Li; Guan, Xin-Lei; Liu, Shan-Shan; Pan, Ying

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper was to study the in vitro and in vivo inhibitory effect of Bidens bipinnata L. extract on growth of cervical carcinoma U14 cells. MTT method was used to determine the inhibitory effect of Bidens bipinnata L. extract on U14 tumour cells, and the effects of Bidens bipinnata L. extract on inhibition rate of solid tumour and life prolongation rate of ascites tumour were observed through the establishment of two animal models of mouse cervical carcinoma U14 solid tumour and ascites tumour. In the in vitro MTT assay, the inhibition rate gradually increased with the increase of dose of Bidens bipinnata L. and the extension of time. Its inhibition rate was 70.44% at a concentration of 80g/L. Solid tumour inhibition rates in the high- and low-dose groups and cisplatin group were 49.13%, 2.26% and 75.72% respectively; life prolongation rates in each ascites tumour group were 63.63%, 34.86% and 87.34% respectively. The Bidens bipinnata L. extract has a certain inhibitory effect on growth of mouse cervical carcinoma U14. PMID:24146503

  18. Interaction of macrophage migration inhibitory factor with ceruloplasmin: role of labile copper ions.

    PubMed

    Kostevich, Valeria A; Sokolov, Alexey V; Grudinina, Natalia A; Zakharova, Elena T; Samygina, Valeria R; Vasilyev, Vadim B

    2015-10-01

    Macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine, is a target for pharmacological treatment of sepsis and malignant tumors. Inhibition of tautomerase activity of MIF in reaction with p-hydroxyphenylpyruvate (HPP) was observed in the presence of ceruloplasmin (CP), a copper-containing plasma protein. Binding labile copper ions to CP (CP+Cu(II)) is a prerequisite for MIF inhibiting. CP+Cu(II) is shown to be an uncompetitive inhibitor of MIF (Ki ~ 37 nM), which suggests formation of a complex 'MIF-HPP-CP-Cu(II)'. Filtration of CP+Cu(II) on a column with Chelex-100, otherwise the presence of high concentrations of histidine, cysteine or methionine abrogated the inhibitory effect of CP. Adding salts of Co(II) and Ni(II) that replace copper ions in the labile sites prevented the inhibitory effect of CP+Cu(II). Limited proteolysis of CP by thrombin diminished its oxidase activity in reaction with p-phenylenediamine, but endowed it with the capacity of inhibiting MIF. Covalent modification of MIF by phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF) resulted in binding of MIF-PMSF to CP immobilized on CM5 chip, the dissociation constant being 4.2 μM. In D-galactosamine-sensitized mice CP+Cu(II) increased the LPS-induced lethality from 54 to 100%, while administration of antibodies against MIF prevented the lethal effect. The enhancement by CP+Cu(II) of the pro-inflammatory signal of MIF is discussed. PMID:26091949

  19. Hypotensive and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme Inhibitory Activities of Eisenia fetida Extract in Spontaneously Hypertensive Rats

    PubMed Central

    Mao, Shumei; Li, Chengde

    2015-01-01

    Objectives. This study aimed to investigate the antihypertensive effects of an Eisenia fetida extract (EFE) and its possible mechanisms in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR rats). Methods. Sixteen-week-old SHR rats and Wistar-Kyoto rats (WKY rats) were used in this study. Rats were, respectively, given EFE (EFE group), captopril (captopril group), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) (normal control group and SHR group) for 4 weeks. ACE inhibitory activity of EFE in vitro was determined. The systolic blood pressure (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP) were measured using a Rat Tail-Cuff Blood Pressure System. Levels of angiotensin II (Ang II), aldosterone (Ald), and 6-keto-prostaglandin F1 alpha (6-keto-PGF1α) in plasma were determined by radioimmunoassay, and serum nitric oxide (NO) concentration was measured by Griess reagent systems. Results. EFE had marked ACE inhibitory activity in vitro (IC50 = 2.5 mg/mL). After the 4-week drug management, SHR rats in EFE group and in captopril group had lower SBP and DBP, lower levels of Ang II and Ald, and higher levels of 6-keto-PGF1α and NO than the SHR rats in SHR group. Conclusion. These results indicate that EFE has hypotensive effects in SHR rats and its effects might be associated with its ACE inhibitory activity. PMID:26798397

  20. Melanogenesis-inhibitory activity and cancer chemopreventive effect of glucosylcucurbic acid from shea (Vitellaria paradoxa) kernels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jie; Kurita, Masahiro; Ebina, Kodai; Ukiya, Motohiko; Tokuda, Harukuni; Yasukawa, Ken; Masters, Eliot T; Shimizu, Naoto; Akihisa, Momoko; Feng, Feng; Akihisa, Toshihiro

    2015-04-01

    Two jasmonate derivatives, glucosylcucurbic acid (1) and methyl glucosylcucurbate (2), were isolated from the MeOH extract of defatted shea (Vitellaria paradoxa; Sapotaceae) kernels. These and their deglucosylated derivatives, cucurbic acid (3) and methyl cucurbate (4), were evaluated for their melanogenesis-inhibitory and cancer chemopreventive potencies. Compounds 1, 3, and 4 exhibited potent melanogenesis-inhibitory activities in α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH)-stimulated B16 melanoma cells. Western-blot analysis revealed that compounds 1 and 3 reduced the protein levels of MITF (=microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), tyrosinase, TRP-1 (=tyrosine-related protein 1), and TRP-2 mostly in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, compound 1 exhibited inhibitory effects against Epstein-Barr virus early antigen (EBV-EA) activation induced with 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) in Raji cells, against TPA-induced inflammation in mice, and against skin tumor promotion in an in vivo two-stage mouse skin carcinogenesis test based on 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]anthracene (DMBA) as initiator, and with TPA as promoter. PMID:25879500