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Sample records for minkwan won joonhong

  1. Impotence Drugs Won't Raise Melanoma Risk, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159365.html Impotence Drugs Won't Raise Melanoma Risk, Study Suggests Researchers say skin cancer in ... aren't likely to boost the risk of melanoma skin cancer, a new study reports. Why the ...

  2. Donated Blood Won't Transmit Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... fullstory_159577.html Donated Blood Won't Transmit Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Disease Swedish study of nearly 1.5 ... who have received blood transfusions from patients with Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease," said Dr. Irving Gomolin, a ...

  3. Just Spraying Adult Mosquitoes Won't Curb Zika

    MedlinePlus

    ... html Just Spraying Adult Mosquitoes Won't Curb Zika: Study Lab work suggests larvicide also needed to ... 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Female mosquitoes can transmit the Zika virus to their eggs and offspring, and this ...

  4. Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_159955.html Hormone Therapy Won't Help Memory After Menopause 5- ... important risk cognitively associated with the use of hormone therapy over at least five years," said lead ...

  5. Healthy Fats in Mediterranean Diet Won't Boost Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fats in Mediterranean Diet Won't Boost Weight Vegetable oils, nuts can be a part of a healthful ... health benefits and includes healthy fats, such as vegetable oils, fish and nuts," Estruch explained in a journal ...

  6. Painkillers for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction

    MedlinePlus

    ... for Teen Athletes Won't Spur Addiction: Study Sports may actually provide protective effect against opioid abuse ... prescription painkillers than kids who don't play sports or exercise, a new study finds. The study ...

  7. Acetaminophen Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Won't Help Arthritis Pain, Study Finds Prescription diclofenac a more effective choice for short-term pain ... drugs (NSAIDs) such as ibuprofen (Advil, Motrin) or diclofenac are better choices for short-term pain relief, ...

  8. College Students Discount Money "Won" More than Money "Owed"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam; Terrell, Heather K.

    2010-01-01

    Evidence in the research literature indicates people may treat "won" money differently than they would their own money. The present study had a sample of 648 college students complete a delay-discounting task that involved the hypothetical monetary amounts of $1,000 or $100,000. Participants were asked repeatedly what amount they would accept…

  9. Technology Alone Won't Transform Teacher to Facilitator

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Monica; McGrath, Dennis

    2014-01-01

    Technology alone won't be enough to improve teaching and learning to where it needs to be for 21st century skills. Where it is being done successfully, teachers collectively share a vision of promoting deeper learning in all their students, and have collaboratively redesigned the role of the teacher to that of facilitator who uses technology…

  10. Climate science, character, and the "hard-won" consensus.

    PubMed

    Ranalli, Brent

    2012-06-01

    What makes a consensus among scientists credible and convincing? This paper introduces the notion of a "hard-won" consensus and uses examples from recent debates over climate change science to show that this heuristic standard for evaluating the quality of a consensus is widely shared. The extent to which a consensus is "hard won" can be understood to depend on the personal qualities of the participating experts; the article demonstrates the continuing utility of the norms of modern science introduced by Robert K. Merton by showing that individuals on both sides of the climate science debate rely intuitively on Mertonian ideas--interpreted in terms of character--to frame their arguments. PMID:23002583

  11. [The fate of the old Jejoong Won following the establishment of the new Jejoong Won (Severance Hospital)].

    PubMed

    Yeo, I S; Park, Y J; Lee, K l; Park, H W

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Allen, the first Protestant missionary in Korea, had an opportunity of saving the life of the queen's nephew shortly after his arrival in Korea in 1884. In gratitude the King established the Royal Korean Hospital (Jejoong Won), the first hospital in Korea, and appointed Dr. Allen in charge of the medical affairs of the hospital. After Dr. Allen's resignation from the mission, the work was successively carried on by Drs. JW Heron, RA Hardie, CC Vinton and OR Avison, the last of whom arrived in 1893. In 1894 the connection of the Hospital with the Korean Government was severed and the work taken over by the Northern Presbyterian Mission. Since then, it has been a distinctly mission institute. In 1900, while attending the Ecumenical Conference of Foreign Missions in Carnegie Hall, New York, Dr. Avison made the acquaintance of a philanthropist LH Severance, who made a gift of $10,000 for a new hospital. This building, the first modern hospital in Korea, was opened and dedicated in 1904. It was named the Severance Hospital. As the new hospital was built, the old hospital building was to be returned to the Korean Government according to the agreement made in 1894. On retaking the old hospital, the Korean Government paid $30,289.99 won for the renovation of the original building and new buildings established in the site during the period of Avison's entire charge of Jejoong Won. The old hospital building was used as an official residence for a diplomatic adviser Stevens, who was assassinated for his pro-Japan activities, and as a social club for Japanese officials. PMID:11624251

  12. How the web was won … by some.

    PubMed

    Tattersall, Andy

    2011-09-01

    HILJ readers may have encountered the phrase library 2.0 which has polarised librarians, with some sceptical whether library 2.0 offers anything new. Others are confident that the convergence of service goals and ideas with emerging Web 2.0 technologies will lead to a new generation of library services. Andrew Tattersall's article, 'How the Web was Won', belongs in the latter camp. His thesis is that Web 2.0 and Library 2.0 have opened up a whole new world for exploration by information and library professionals. Although the Web has created problems for the modern day explorer, potentially there is a bright future for information professionals if they are to succeed in deploying the resources. PMID:21831222

  13. Volunteers who won't give up in Tanzania.

    PubMed

    2000-02-01

    The voluntary position of community-based distribution agent (CBDA) is not one to be taken lightly. There are many responsibilities and burdens, and the community looks to CBDAs for guidance. However, when support for their activities stop and funding runs dry, many volunteers give up. Consequently, the Family Planning Association of Tanzania (UMATI) has gone to great lengths to ensure the quality and success of those chosen to be CBDAs, nurturing them into "volunteers who won't give up". In Tanzania, CBDAs are tested and selected through the joint efforts of the community and UMATI, and they therefore become respected members of the community. UMATI ensures their success by regular supervision and community participation. The active participation of the community leaders creates a sense of responsibility and ownership for a project, and this helps to support the CBDAs as well. UMATI's CBD training includes management of income generating activities (IGA), since the volunteers have to earn a living in addition to working for the community. There is also a network of support of IGAs that CBDAs can draw on. In addition to this support, there are nonmonetary incentives, such as bicycles and uniforms, which give the CBDAs a visible social presence. In some areas, village authorities have exempted CBDAs from other community services, and some villages provide space or land for IGAs for CBDAs. All of these factors, especially community support, lead to a very low dropout rate for volunteers, and the high morale and commitment of the CBDAs. PMID:12295747

  14. Breast Cancer Meds Won't Raise Chances of Heart Attack, Stroke, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Meds Won't Raise Chances of Heart Attack, Stroke, Study Suggests But there was a slightly ... aromatase inhibitors doesn't raise the risk of heart attacks and strokes among breast cancer survivors, a new ...

  15. Vitamin D While Pregnant Won't Boost Most Infants' Bone Health, Study Says

    MedlinePlus

    ... nlm.nih.gov/medlineplus/news/fullstory_157567.html Vitamin D While Pregnant Won't Boost Most Infants' ... born in winter might benefit from mom's 'sunshine vitamin' supplements To use the sharing features on this ...

  16. Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease'

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus/news/fullstory_158042.html Study: Longer-Term Antibiotics Won't Ease 'Chronic Lyme Disease' Dutch trial ... are unlikely to find relief from longer-term antibiotic therapy, according to a new Dutch study. Although ...

  17. Breast Cancer Meds Won't Raise Chances of Heart Attack, Stroke, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_158441.html Breast Cancer Meds Won't Raise Chances of Heart Attack, ... the risk of heart attacks and strokes among breast cancer survivors, a new study suggests. However, the researchers ...

  18. Probabilistic Discounting of Hypothetical Monetary Gains: University Students Differ in How They Discount "Won" and "Owed" Money

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weatherly, Jeffrey N.; Derenne, Adam

    2013-01-01

    The present study tested whether participants would discount "won" money differently than they would "owed" money in a probability-discounting task. Participants discounted $1000 or $100,000 that they had won in a sweepstakes or that was owed to them using the multiple-choice (Experiment 1) or fill-in-the-blank (Experiment 2) method of collecting…

  19. 47 CFR 27.604 - Limitation on licenses won at auction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Limitation on licenses won at auction. 27.604 Section 27.604 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES Guard Band A and B Blocks (757-758/787-788 MHz and...

  20. Training vs. Education in Forming Won Buddhist "Kyomus" in the USA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Bokin

    2006-01-01

    An historically familiar tension in East Asian Buddhism between meditation and cultivation in broad learning has appeared in discussions and planning for preparing ministerial students in Won Buddhism. This paper reviews the history of preparation in this order, which was founded in 1916. While the alternatives of training based on practice and…

  1. The "Hollywoodization" of Education Reform in "Won't Back Down"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goering, Christian Z.; Witte, Shelbie; Jennings Davis, Jennifer; Ward, Peggy; Flammang, Brandon; Gerhardson, Ashley

    2015-01-01

    What happens when forces attempting to privatize education create and produce a Hollywood film with an education reform plot line? This essay explores "Won't Back Down" through cultural studies and progressive education lenses in an effort to unveil misrepresentations of education and education reform. Drawing on scholarship in these…

  2. Online Educators Won't Be Forced to Spy on Students, New Rules Say

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parry, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Distance educators won't have to become FBI-style investigators, installing cameras in the homes of online students and scanning fingerprints to ensure that people are who they say they are. At least not yet. The recently reauthorized Higher Education Opportunity Act requires accreditors to monitor steps colleges take to verify that an enrolled…

  3. Effects of Wonli Acupuncture Procedure in Patients with LSS: A Clinical, Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Geon-Mok; Lee, Eun-Yong; Han, Jong-Hyun; Cho, Kyong-Ha; Kang, Se-Rin; Yoon, Sang-Hoon

    2014-01-01

    Background. Lumbar spinal stenosis (LSS) is a disease with increasing prevalence due to prolongation of average life span. Despite various treatment methods, many limitations remain unsolved. Objective. We are reporting cases of patients who have been treated with Wonli Acupuncture, a method of treating LSS by directly approaching the intervertebral foramen and interlaminar space with acupuncture needles different from those used in original acupuncture. Methods. A total of 82 patients with LSS were treated with Wonli Acupuncture, and out of those, 47 patients without exclusion criteria were selected for the following research. We compared the pretreatment VAS and ODI scores based on 1-year follow-up measurements. Results. The ODI value dropped by 15.3 ± 24.8 on average (from 35.2 ± 19.9 at the baseline to 19.8 ± 20.6 at the reading) (P < 0.01) and the average VAS also dropped by 19.2 ± 37.2 (from 60.7 ± 23.1 at baseline to 41.5 ± 31.9 at the reading) (P < 0.01). Conclusions. Wonli Acupuncture was found to have clinical efficacy for lumbar spinal stenosis. PMID:25045387

  4. Mechanical and optical characterization of tungsten oxynitride (W-O-N) nano-coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nunez, Oscar Roberto

    Aation and cation doping of transition metal oxides has recently gained attention as a viable option to design materials for application in solar energy conversion, photo-catalysis, transparent electrodes, photo-electrochemical cells, electrochromics and flat panel displays in optoelectronics. Specifically, nitrogen doped tungsten oxide (WO3) has gained much attention for its ability to facilitate optical property tuning while also demonstrating enhanced photo-catalytic and photochemical properties. The effect of nitrogen chemistry and mechanics on the optical and mechanical properties of tungsten oxynitride (W-O-N) nano-coatings is studied in detail in this work. The W-O-N coatings were deposited by direct current (DC) sputtering to a thickness of ˜100 nm and the structural, compositional, optical and mechanical properties were characterized in order to gain a deeper understanding of the effects of nitrogen incorporation and chemical composition. All the W-O-N coatings fabricated under variable nitrogen gas flow rate were amorphous. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements revealed that nitrogen incorporation is effective only for a nitrogen gas flow rates ?9 sccm. Optical characterization using ultraviolet-visible-near infrared (UV-VIS-NIR) spectroscopy and spectroscopic ellipsometry (SE) indicate that the nitrogen incorporation induced effects on the optical parameters is significant. The band gap (Eg) values decreased from ˜2.99 eV to ˜1.89 eV indicating a transition from insulating WO3 to metallic-like W-N phase. Nano-mechanical characterization using indentation revealed a corresponding change in mechanical properties; maximum values of 4.46 GPa and 98.5 GPa were noted for hardness and Young?s modulus, respectively. The results demonstrate a clear relationship between the mechanical, physical and optical properties of amorphous W-O-N nano-coatings. The correlation presented in this thesis could

  5. Phase Won.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kocher, Erik

    2003-01-01

    Describes ten steps involved in successful renovation of a college recreation center. They are as follows: hire the right architect, be realistic about costs, devise a plan, do a mental walk through, approach the renovation in phases, communicate to users, expect lost revenue and displacement issues, continue to communicate with architects and…

  6. Professor Jin Yuan in ZOC Won the "Grand Challenge 2015 Young Scientist" Award.

    PubMed

    Seliman, Helen X

    2015-12-01

    Professor Yuan Jin from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center (ZOC) affiliated with Sun Yat-sen University has recently won the "Grand Challenge 2015 Young Scientist" award in "2015 Innovation Challenge Annual Meeting" held in Beijing. The meeting is organized by the Ministry of Science and Technology of the People Republic of China (MOST), the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation in the United States and the US Agency for International Development. The journal Eye Science (ES) is the official publication of ZOC, sponsored by Sun Yat-sen University. PMID:27214997

  7. "The boys won't let us play:" fifth-grade mestizas challenge physical activity discourse at school.

    PubMed

    Oliver, Kimberly L; Hamzeh, Manal

    2010-03-01

    Drawing on feminist, critical, and poststructural theories, the purpose of this research was: (a) to understand fifth-grade mestizas self-identified barriers to physical activity, and (b) to work with them to develop strategies for challenging these barriers. Data were collected over the 2005-06 school year. Our interpretations are divided into three sections: (a) the barriers the girls identified to their physical activity participation; (b) how we worked with them to study their primary self-identified barrier to physical activity--"the boy's won't let us play"; and (c) how we refocused our research to help the girls publicize their barrier to challenge the inequities in physical activity at their school. PMID:20387397

  8. Nothing a Hot Bath Won't Cure: Infection Rates of Amphibian Chytrid Fungus Correlate Negatively with Water Temperature under Natural Field Settings

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Dramatic declines and extinctions of amphibian populations throughout the world have been associated with chytridiomycosis, an infectious disease caused by the pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Previous studies indicated that Bd prevalence correlates with cooler temperatures in the field, and laboratory experiments have demonstrated that Bd ceases growth at temperatures above 28°C. Here we investigate how small-scale variations in water temperature correlate with Bd prevalence in the wild. We sampled 221 amphibians, including 201 lowland leopard frogs (Rana [Lithobates] yavapaiensis), from 12 sites in Arizona, USA, and tested them for Bd. Amphibians were encountered in microhabitats that exhibited a wide range of water temperatures (10–50°C), including several geothermal water sources. There was a strong inverse correlation between the water temperature in which lowland leopard frogs were captured and Bd prevalence, even after taking into account the influence of year, season, and host size. In locations where Bd was known to be present, the prevalence of Bd infections dropped from 75–100% in water <15°C, to less than 10% in water >30°C. A strong inverse correlation between Bd infection status and water temperature was also observed within sites. Our findings suggest that microhabitats where water temperatures exceed 30°C provide lowland leopard frogs with significant protection from Bd, which could have important implications for disease dynamics, as well as management applications. There must be quite a few things a hot bath won't cure, but I don't know many of them - Sylvia Plath, “The Bell Jar” (1963). PMID:22205950

  9. News & Views Seven Billion Yuan for Basic Research in 2009 Fossil Web Won World Summit Award Tsinghua Professors Publish Papers in Nature and Science Overview of Trends and Policies in International Collaboration for Science in National Natural Science Foundation of China Three China-Demark Joint Research Projects Approved in 2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2009-01-01

    Seven Billion Yuan for Basic Research in 2009 Fossil Web Won World Summit Award Tsinghua Professors Publish Papers in Nature and Science Overview of Trends and Policies in International Collaboration for Science in National Natural Science Foundation of China Three China-Demark Joint Research Projects Approved in 2009

  10. A Problem That Won't Register.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    Physicians are running into trouble with meeting an EHR meaningful use objective that requires public health reporting. To fulfill the public health reporting objective, physicians must meet two of these three measures: active engagement with a public health agency to submit immunization data; active engagement with a public agency to submit syndromic surveillance data; and active engagement to submit data to a specialized registry. PMID:27175926

  11. How Zucchini Won Fifth-Grade Hearts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaliere, Denise

    1987-01-01

    A nutrition education program for grades K through 6 in Arizona is described, and essential elements of the program are given. Children learn about foods and the role of nutrients in health through gardening. (MT)

  12. When Status Quo Won't Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conyers, John G.

    2000-01-01

    Inspired by tips from a Motorola Corporation executive, the superintendent of an Illinois district initiated strategic- planning and total-quality practices to improve student performance, customer satisfaction, and operational efficiency. Teachers have also successfully implemented quality and continuous-improvement practices in their classrooms.…

  13. We Fought for Fairness and Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradley, Maceo

    2015-01-01

    This chapter tells the story of how and why one student who received a ticket for being late to school joined the fight against policies that criminalize students in Los Angeles Unified School District.

  14. Generators that won`t wear out

    SciTech Connect

    White, M.A.; Colenbrander, K.; Olan, R.W.; Penswick, L.B.

    1996-02-01

    Stirling power generators typically offer much higher conversion efficiencies than direct energy-conversion systems, such as thermoelectric and photovoltaic ones, but their life and reliability are generally considered inferior to those of direct conversion systems. New design approaches to free-piston Stirling generator sets, however, avoid all rubbing parts and generate no wear. Such engines have demonstrated tens of thousands of hours of maintenance-free, degradation-free operation, combining the efficiency of dynamic systems with the reliability of static systems. These technologies are used in the RemoteGen systems from Stirling Technology Co. (STC) in Kennewick, Wash., including a 10-watt RG-10, a 350-watt RG-350, and a 3-kilowatt RG-3000. They all use the same basic configuration, with flexure bearings, clearance seals, and moving-iron linear alternators. The third-generation RG-10 has entered limited production with a radioisotope-fueled version, and a niche market for a propane-fueled version has been identified. The RG-3000 is approaching a laboratory demonstration stage. The company has decided to focus on the commercial production of the RG-350.

  15. Have Ability, Won't Travel

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lonergan, David

    2009-01-01

    This article discusses the sad state of affairs in academic recruitment and retention--of library upper management. Anyone who has taken part in searches for library directors or deans knows frustration first-hand. At times there may be more open leadership positions around the country than there are applicants for them (any applicants whatsoever,…

  16. An Admissions Race that's Already Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Mitchell L.

    2008-01-01

    The author recently spent a year and a half in the admissions office of a highly selective Eastern college as an ethnographer, seeking to understand just how admissions officers make their decisions. He accompanied them on recruitment trips to high schools and college fairs, helped manage their offices' relentless current of visitors and mail, and…

  17. How Zucchini Won 5th-Grade Hearts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavaliere, Denise

    1987-01-01

    Describes an innovative gardening/nutrition education program in Tucson, Arizona, public elementary schools--Meals for Millions "Sow and Grow"--where children in kindergarten to sixth grade invest time and "tender loving cultivation" into their own school vegetable gardens and learn to like foods--zucchini--that are good for them. (Author/BB)

  18. I Won't Back down from Anyone!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pfeifer, Douglas

    2013-01-01

    Routine life stressors can trigger anger and violence with children who have poor emotional regulation. This article describes "Response Ability Pathways" (RAP) strategies that equip youth in managing these daily challenges. The strategies require establishing steps to gain the young persons trust and providing alternative methods to…

  19. Fearing Our Students Won't Help Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pavela, Gary

    2008-01-01

    This article argues that colleges should not dismiss troubled students first and ask questions later. There are better ways to prevent campus violence than trying to predict students' future behavior, including mental-health support and thoughtful, responsible risk assessment. While no panacea exists, there are helpful, proven strategies: (1)…

  20. Who Won the Debate in Women Education? Rousseau or Wollstonecraft?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owusu-Gyamfi, Clifford

    2016-01-01

    Curriculum framework in the education of children became debatable during the enlightenment. Jean-Jacque Rousseau's treatise, "Emile," outlined an educational curriculum based on natural rights. Rousseau thought education should be based on espousing and exploring the natural abilities of a person. Therefore, since women have a natural…

  1. Why fat taxes won't make us thin.

    PubMed

    Cornelsen, Laura; Green, Rosemary; Dangour, Alan; Smith, Richard

    2015-03-01

    Increasing prevalence of overweight and obesity has led policy-makers to consider health-related taxes to limit the consumption of unhealthy foods and beverages. Such taxes are currently already in place in countries in Europe (e.g. Hungary, France and Finland) and in various states in the USA. Although these taxes are possibly efficient in reducing by a small amount the consumption of targeted products if the tax is fully transmitted to the consumer, there is too little available evidence on what will be consumed instead and whether these food substitutions undermine the hoped-for health benefits of the tax. We also know very little on how the food supply side will respond and what overall impact this will have. Without a proper appreciation of the potential indirect impacts we do not know the overall impact of taxes foods on unhealthy foods and beverages and further that there is a very real possibility that they may not be beneficial for health after all. PMID:24854986

  2. "We Won't Back Down!" Political Action in Ontario.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coles, Rich

    2001-01-01

    Discusses educators' responses to the attempts to take over the educational system by the government of Ontario, Canada. Discusses the background to the crisis, the "Final Straw" (Bill 160), public relations and the largest work stoppage by educators in North America (October, 1997), and lessons learned from the political protests. (RS)

  3. We won't repeat the mistakes of the past.

    PubMed

    Amanor, A

    1991-09-01

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Ghana and the country's Ministry of Health have seized on an innovative new method for promoting immunization coverage -- a baby contest. The event seeks to promote the benefits of good health habits, a sound environment, and immunization on a child's development. The contest is designed to determine whether the mother has understood the educational lessons concerning family planning and family health given at the immunization centers and welfare clinics. The prize for winning the contest consists of 3 plastic basins, bars of bath soap, and a white shirt. In order to take part in the baby contest, a mother has to demonstrate the following: that she took 2 doses of tetanus vaccine during pregnancy; that she is able to administer first aid and oral rehydration therapy; that she has a certain level of knowledge concerning family planning methods, environmental sanitation, and personal hygiene; and that she is able to prepare Weanimix, a local weaning food for children. The 1st baby contest was held in December 1989 in the 9 communities that form the Integrated Family Planning, Nutrition and Parasite Control Project (IP) area. This 1st competition succeeded in getting 513 mothers to complete their immunization schedules prior to the event. Because the initial contests took place in remote villages, they received little media coverage, which affected attendance. But as more contests were held and more people became involved, the media picked up the story, further increasing participation. Organizers indicate that the number of people taking part in the contests, as well as the number of children being immunized, has increased steadily every month. PMID:12284293

  4. Why Won't They Just Do It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilbride, Dennis; Stensrud, Robert

    2008-01-01

    The gap (structural hole) between the manner in which rehabilitation agencies and business are structured, organized and managed has grown exponentially over the past 10-20 years. Three key changes have radically transformed American business: the globalization of financial capital and competition, the information technology revolution, and the…

  5. IVF Won't Raise Risk for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Avner Hershlag, chief of the Center for Human Reproduction at North Shore University Hospital in Manhasset, N. ... Avner Hershlag, M.D., chief, Center For Human Reproduction, North Shore University Hospital, Manhasset, N.Y.; Stephanie ...

  6. Atom Transfer Radical Polymerization of Methacrylic Acid: A Won Challenge.

    PubMed

    Fantin, Marco; Isse, Abdirisak A; Venzo, Alfonso; Gennaro, Armando; Matyjaszewski, Krzysztof

    2016-06-15

    Polymerization of acidic monomers is one of the biggest challenges for atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP). An intramolecular cyclization reaction leading to the loss of the C-X chain-end functionality was found to be the main reason for the partial termination of the growing polymer chains. Three approaches were used to overcome this problem: using Cl as the chain-end halogen, lowering the pH (to 0.9), and increasing polymerization rate. Methacrylic acid (MAA) was polymerized by both electrochemically mediated ATRP and supplemental activator and reducing agent ATRP up to high conversion (>90%), in t ≤ 4 h at 25 °C, using inexpensive and nontoxic reagents (NaCl, diluted HCl, water). Control over molecular weight (MW) dispersity was satisfactory, and MWs were in agreement with theoretical values. The "livingness" of the process was confirmed by an electrochemical switch, used to repeatedly and periodically deactivate/reactivate growing chains. PMID:27244091

  7. Why Won't Physicians Make Nursing Home Visits?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Janet B.; Hewes, Helene T.

    1986-01-01

    Michigan physicians (N=930) were asked whether they made nursing home visits and if not, why not. A typology was developed to differentiate among various physician types based on reasons given. Six physician types were found, each identified with a different policy lever that could be used to encourage them to treat nursing home patients. (Author)

  8. Pakistan and kidney trade: battles won, battles to come.

    PubMed

    Moazam, Farhat

    2013-11-01

    This essay provides a brief overview of the rise of organ trade in Pakistan towards the end of the last century and the concerted, collective struggle--of physicians and medical associations aided by the media, journalists, members of civil society, and senior judiciary--in pressuring the government to bring about and implement a national law criminalizing such practices opposed by an influential pro-organ trade lobby. It argues that among the most effective measures to prevent re-emergence of organ trafficking in the country is increasing ethical live donations and above all, establishing sustainable, public supported deceased donor programs. To do this, the transplant community must recognize that organ transplantation is not merely a donor-recipient-physician transaction but a complex issue in which decisions to donate an organ are influenced by indigenous values and belief systems about human illness, life and death. PMID:23203387

  9. Production gains won't offset dips elsewhere

    SciTech Connect

    LeBlanc, L.; Redden, J.; Cornitius, T.; Tanner, R.

    1984-12-01

    It's not the best of times currently for the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). The cartel is struggling to maintain its benchmark price of $29/bbl for crude, primarily through a disparate set of production cutbacks among its member nations. Though it's too early to tell if their effort has succeeded, the members are putting up a front and vowing to hang tough. OPEC still has the bulk of the world's hydrocarbon reserves, with the bonus of being able to produce those reserves more cheaply than competing producers in most cases. World supply and demand should be more closely in balance by the end of the decade, allowing OPEC to regain much of its price leverage.

  10. Impotence Drugs Won't Raise Melanoma Risk, Study Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... in these patients is likely due to more sun exposure To use the sharing features on this page, ... in some cases. In particular, they suggested that sun exposure may play a big role. The study was ...

  11. Why Diversity for Diversity's Sake Won't Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Delton, Jennifer

    2007-01-01

    Proponents of "diversity hiring" insist that faculty members of color have a different perspective on issues of race and ethnicity that will increase students' understanding of the multiracial, multicultural world they will inhabit in the 21st century. The mere presence of "diverse" faculty members will prepare students for workplace realities,…

  12. No We Won't! Teachers' Resistance to Educational Reform

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berkovich, Izhak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Teachers' resistance to educational reform has been explored, with special attention given to the reasons driving opposition and the resistance practices employed inside school walls. These studies have not, however, examined the agenda setting strategy employed by teachers opposing new policy on the national level, nor has any extensive…

  13. Donated Blood Won't Transmit Alzheimer's, Parkinson's Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... exceedingly rare," said Gomolin. He is chief of geriatric medicine at Winthrop-University Hospital in Mineola, N. ... Hyde Park, NY; Irving Gomolin, M.D., chief, geriatric medicine, Winthrop-University Hospital, Mineola, N.Y.; June ...

  14. Faking It Won't Make It in Science

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cavanagh, Sean

    2004-01-01

    For years, educators and researchers have seen teachers at all grade levels attempt to upgrade their grasp of physics, chemistry, and biology, from basic theories to complex material. Now, the pressure on schools and instructors to improve science instruction is likely to intensify, with approaching federal requirements on states to test students…

  15. Information Literacy: The Battle We Won That We Lost?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowan, Susanna M.

    2014-01-01

    As we continue to revise our formal definitions of "information literacy" and to hone our delivery of information literacy across higher education, have we failed to see that information literacy as a programmatic aim, for all of its successes to date, is no longer relevant? The essay charts how the institutionalization of information…

  16. Healthy Fats in Mediterranean Diet Won't Boost Weight

    MedlinePlus

    ... such as olive oil and nuts had little effect on body weight or waist circumference compared to people on ... of Health, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, or federal policy. More Health News on: Diets Weight Control Recent Health News Related MedlinePlus Health Topics Diets ...

  17. Children Who Won't Go to School (Separation Anxiety)

    MedlinePlus

    ... sleep have nightmares have exaggerated, unrealistic fears of animals, monster, burglars fear being alone in the dark, or have severe tantrums when forced to go to school Such symptoms and behaviors are common among children with separation anxiety disorder. ...

  18. Wisdom won from illness: the psychoanalytic grasp of human being.

    PubMed

    Lear, Jonathan

    2014-08-01

    From its inception psychoanalysis claimed not merely to be an effective therapy for psychological suffering, but to shed light on the human condition. But what kind of insight does psychoanalysis offer? This paper locates psychoanalysis in the western philosophical tradition, arguing that psychoanalysis provides not only theoretical wisdom about the human, but practical wisdom of a peculiar kind. The human mind, through its self-conscious understanding can be immediately and directly efficacious in shaping its own structure. PMID:24724744

  19. The Tests that Won't Go Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scherer, Marge

    2009-01-01

    There is no doubt that in the past 10 years, school culture has become a testing culture. But all the "multiple measures" do not really lead one to achieve the three most often cited goals of testing: building proficiency in basic skills, closing achievement gaps, and fostering the top-notch knowledge and skills that students will need in a…

  20. From 1:1 to 1 to Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hall, Don

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author discusses on the emphasis of how 1:1 computing program transforms classroom and education experience for students. Moreover, the author stresses that with this type of program, they have created vision where the culture, curriculum, and chores were designed to meet the needs of the digital age students in terms of rigor…

  1. Banning Weapons on Campuses: The Battle Is Far from Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLelland, Sandra J.; Frenkil, Steven D.

    2009-01-01

    Utah is the only state that prohibits its state institutions from barring guns on its campuses. The University of Utah fought that statutory requirement vigorously in court, but the interests of pro-gun groups prevailed. In 2006 the Supreme Court of Utah held that the university lacked the authority to issue firearms policies, including barring…

  2. 2 Aspirin and Bedrest Won't Help!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scagliotta, Edward G.

    1983-01-01

    The author contends that falling barometric pressure hampers the flow of blood throughout the nervous system, thus encouraging maladaptive behavior in some neurologically impaired children. Among guidelines offered are to create a calm environment and to check the barometer frequently during the day. (CL)

  3. Majority of hospitals won't bill for 'never events'.

    PubMed

    2008-01-01

    Policy also includes apologies, reporting events to agencies such as The Joint Commission. What are considered normal customer service practices in other industries are 'radical' in health care. Risk manager says 'doing the right thing' also can help reduce your hospital's liability exposure. PMID:18447240

  4. How the Middle West was won: women enter dentistry.

    PubMed

    Loevy, H T; Kowitz, A A

    1998-04-01

    At the beginning of the 19th century, the settlement of the Middle West of the United States was taking place and soon thereafter dental schools were being founded. With the establishment of dental schools, dentistry slowly evolved from a craft transmitted by a preceptor to a profession taught within established schools. Starting with Lucy Beaman Hobbs Taylor, a number of women from the Middle West entered dental schools when they were opened to them. Many active women of the Middle West became dentists and provided impetus for the profession as well as founding of the American Association of Women Dentists. PMID:9779089

  5. Why won't Polish women birth at home?

    PubMed

    Pendleton, John

    2015-09-01

    Polish women living in the United Kingdom (UK) are statistically more likely to have normal births than their British counterparts, yet anecdotally, do not choose to birth their babies at home. A medicalised approach to birth in their country of origin means women are unaware of the benefits of midwifery-led care, which they often perceive as sub-standard. Affordable travel means Polish women can access care in both countries and compounds the difficulties in acclimatising to UK maternity services. Online discussion groups and Internet forums represent an opportunity for midwives to engage with women to promote their services. This is increasingly important with rising numbers of both Polish migrants to the UK and Polish residents applying for British citizenship. PMID:26547999

  6. How adaptive optics may have won the Cold War

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyson, Robert K.

    2013-05-01

    While there are many theories and studies concerning the end of the Cold War, circa 1990, I postulate that one of the contributors to the result was the development of adaptive optics. The emergence of directed energy weapons, specifically space-based and ground-based high energy lasers made practicable with adaptive optics, showed that a successful defense against inter-continental ballistic missiles was not only possible, but achievable in a reasonable period of time.

  7. Fire Won't Wait--Plan Your Escape!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    PTA Today, 1991

    1991-01-01

    Discusses the importance of home fire escape drills, detailing fire safety plans. Early detection and warning (smoke detectors) coupled with well-rehearsed escape plans help prevent serious injury. Children need to be taught about fire safety beginning at a very early age. (SM)

  8. Library Thefts: A Problem that Won't Go Away.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Griffith, J. W.

    1978-01-01

    Discusses the increasing rate of book losses in libraries and some ways to combat the problem. Topics covered include: who steals; what is being taken; how much is disappearing; results of loss; theft detection systems; effectiveness of detection systems; whether you should invest in a system; and mutilation, an unwanted by-product. (JPF)

  9. They fought the law and the law won.

    PubMed

    Petsko, Gregory A

    2007-01-01

    The new science geo-engineering doesn't try to alter a few corn plants; it aims to tinker with the entire planet, based on the notion that ultimately we can actively manipulate the planet to have any climate pattern we want. But there is no way we can ever assess all of the likely consequences. PMID:18001484

  10. "A campaign won as a public issue will stay won": using cartoons and comics to fight national health care reform, 1940s and beyond.

    PubMed

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-02-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption "Result of ObamaCare" to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word "socialism." The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform. PMID:24328659

  11. When Talking Won't Work: Implementing Experiential Group Activities with Addicted Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hagedorn, W. Bryce; Hirshhorn, Meredith A.

    2009-01-01

    Traditional talk therapy, particularly cognitive behavioral techniques, are often ineffective when working with addicted clients for many reasons. By tapping into the power of the group modality, experiential activities can serve as a powerful facilitator of insight and behavior change. The authors provide a brief review of the literature followed…

  12. [Words that won't fade off in the wind: identity and diagnosis in psychiatry].

    PubMed

    Levín, Santiago A

    2013-01-01

    The main focus of this paper is to analyze the role of the word pronounced by members of the health staff as it is constitutive of identity in the patient recepting the word. How is identity constructed? How does the word spoken by a significant Other impinge on this process? In particular, what about the influence of words denoting medical diagnoses? Regarding such queries we also look, on a preliminary basis, at each of the two main currents in Western medicine (biomedicine and medical anthropology), to find out if and how it addresses the relation between the word as an element of identity and the same word as a therapeutic tool. PMID:24251293

  13. Intractable Headache - The Pain in Your Head that Just Won't Quit

    MedlinePlus

    ... t have constant pain. There is very exciting research going on looking into these changes, but we don’t have definite answers yet. Like a car engine, you have to understand how it works before ...

  14. Teacher Education at the Crossroads: Burning Questions That Just Won't Go Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alter, Mark; Naiditch, Fernando

    2012-01-01

    This article identifies some critical areas regarding teacher education that need to be addressed by any institution responsible for educating teachers. The authors outline some of the paradoxical pressures that constitute the context for this crisis in teacher education and specify the kinds of basic questions that need systematic answers in…

  15. Talk Alone Won't Close the 30-Million Word Gap

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasik, Barbara A.; Hindman, Annemarie H.

    2015-01-01

    Interventions that affect children's vocabulary development focus on the quality of language as well as quantity. Children need opportunities to talk, use vocabulary words, and respond to adults' questions. Adults need to create opportunities to talk, provide quality feedback on children's language, and use a lot of new vocabulary repeatedly in…

  16. On-the-job training won't cut it any more, experts say.

    PubMed

    2013-07-01

    Today's case managers need far more than on-the-job training to understand the complexities of the job and all of the tasks they must do on a daily basis. The length and content of the training must be geared to individual case managers and take into account their knowledge, skill set and experience. New case managers should be able to pass competencies and should meet with the case manager director and the person doing the training at the end of the week to discuss how the training is going. Hospital case managers must develop their own case management training programs that are based on hospital procedures and policies, specific job descriptions, and goals of the department, some experts say. In many cases, rather than hiring an experienced case manager who may not fit well into your department, it's better to hire someone with the characteristics you are looking for and teach him or her case management. PMID:23844435

  17. You Won't Lay an Egg with the Bald Headed Chicken.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gammon, Gareth H.

    1989-01-01

    A computer program titled "The Bald Headed Chicken," written for the Apple IIE and Apple IIGS, is described. The program enables primary-level students, as well as limited-English-speaking students, to manipulate graphics and text to create their own stories which can then be saved on disk or printed. (Author/JDD)

  18. Induced Labor Won't Raise Autism Risk in Kids, Research Suggests

    MedlinePlus

    ... will not increase their child's risk of developing autism spectrum disorders," said senior researcher Dr. Brian Bateman. He's an ... induced labor and a greater risk for an autism spectrum disorder. This association disappeared, however, once they also considered ...

  19. Why It Won't Happen to Me: How Older Adolescents Make Personal Risk Assessments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chapin, John; Chirico, JoAnn

    This study sought to document optimistic bias among older adolescents in the context of numerous hazards. It was among the first studies to triangulate quantitative and qualitative measures to investigate how individuals make personal risk assessments within the optimistic bias literature. Results from a small-scale survey and follow-up interviews…

  20. 10A. When Behaviors Won't Change: From Genetics to Biochemistry to Beyond

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Focus Areas: Integrative Approaches to Care, Supporting Behavioral Change, Mental Health With more than 75% of medical expenditures relating to lifestyle choices and chronic disease, shifting resistant behavior patterns is the great challenge of medicine and healing modalities. A potential operational approach to this problem addresses the underlying subclinical depression and/or anxiety as a root cause of impaired neuroplasticity. Understanding single nucleotide polymorphisms in the COMT, MOA, and serotonin receptor genes can provide justification for utilizing SAMe and 5-methylfolate as adjuvants to traditional mood medications. Early childhood trauma increases the likelihood that inflammation contributes to mood imbalances and provides reason to explore somatoemotional release techniques such as hypnotherapy and Native American healing modalities. Understanding neurotransmitter abundance dynamics allows focused replacement of specific neurotransmitter populations using key amino acids such as tryptophan, tyrosine, and taurine. Biofeedback provides the means to test the strength of positive relative to negative mental and emotional inputs and thus facilitates replacement of non-functional thought processes.

  1. A Heavy Hand Won't Help Create a Climate for Discipline.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stealy, Marjorie

    1990-01-01

    An assistant principal in charge of student discipline cites the importance of developing teamwork among staff members; ensuring adult supervision of the school; and developing a disciplinary approach that emphasizes student responsibility and the faculty's concern for students. (MLF)

  2. Middle management terminations: things HR probably won't tell you.

    PubMed

    Snuttjer, Denise

    2002-01-01

    Being a manager or director, you may have received training for how to prepare your subordinates for layoffs or terminations. But, would you be prepared if the employee being terminated were you? Termination practice rules for a manager are very different from the rules required for a staff employee. There are many things you can do ahead of time to help you respond to being terminated: Keep copies of important information at home. If you are terminated, you may be asked to go home without going back to your office for an extended time. If you are given time to consider options, you will do that from your home. Keep a copy of an updated resume on file. If you do not have internet, email or fax capabilities at your home, get them. Many companies offer ongoing education as a benefit option. Take advantage of it. Ongoing education will keep as many doors open as possible as you look for another job. Keep copies of summary plan descriptions of your benefits, especially your retirement plan. To be prepared for change, you should know the "street value" of the benefits that you require. Make sure you have an attorney you can trust. Find out how many years of experience in employment law he or she has. Also, make sure your current attorney would not have a conflict of interest in handling your case against your company. There are no set laws for severance benefits, but your company may have a policy based on the years of service and the level of management. Upon receipt of a severance agreement, you should have it reviewed by your attorney. You will be given a time frame within which to sign or to respond to the proposal. The company will offer the least amount they feel you will accept, and it is appropriate to negotiate the severance agreement. Termination is not the time to make amends for hard feelings that may have been created in the workplace. The advice, "Always be a little nicer than you have to be," will bear fruit when you are looking for a new job. Your reputation will precede you. Remember that your job does not define who you are. You are defined by the endless decisions you have made, actions you have taken, the relationships you have built and the values you have portrayed. Your job description may change, but you will not. If you have done your job in a way that you can be proud of, then you have been successful. Change can be difficult, but change is always easier if you are prepared. Job changes are not always within your control, but preparing to accept the change is something that managers can control. PMID:12229056

  3. Tinnitus -- The Noise in Your Head that Won't Go Away

    MedlinePlus

    ... the Noise in Your Head that Won’t Go Away Almost everyone has experienced tinnitus—what’s commonly ... inner ear and the brain where things can go wrong to cause tinnitus. If we can understand ...

  4. Failing Our Kids: Why the Testing Craze Won't Fix Our Schools.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swope, Kathy, Ed.; Miner, Barbara, Ed.

    This book presents more than 50 articles from parents, community activists, teachers, students, and researchers that analyze standardized tests and outline alternative ways to assess how well students are learning. The seven sections look at: (1) "The Testing Craze: An Overview," including "Why Standardized Tests Are Bad" (Terry Meier) and…

  5. "He Won't Get Anything out of This!" Intersections of Race, Disability, and Access

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theoharis, George; Causton, Julie

    2016-01-01

    This case describes the leadership role and challenges in moving a school in a more inclusive direction for students with disabilities. Assistant Principal Mosier plays a key role and in that role meets Charles, sixth grader, who has been educated in self-contained special education. While 58% of the students at Reynolds are African American and…

  6. Can Compute, Won't Compute: Women's Participation in the Culture of Computing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Fiona

    2003-01-01

    Surveys of 130 psychology students and 52 computer science students (20 of the latter were interviewed) indicated that more males read computer magazines and were confident in computer use. Many did not perceive an equity problem. Men seemed to feel the equity situation is improving. Some felt that women do not enjoy computing as much as men and…

  7. Why the war on drugs in sport will never be won.

    PubMed

    Smith, Aaron C T; Stewart, Bob

    2015-01-01

    Recent exposes of drug use in sports suggest that doping might be more problematic than doping-control test results reveal. A zero-tolerance (ZT) model, which aims to eliminate the use, has dominated the thinking of sport's policy makers over the last 15 years. In light of the limitations associated with ZT-based policy, we propose an alternative policy, one based on controlled use and harm reduction principles. We argue that substance control policies underpinned by harm reduction (HR) principles of social utility and public value will deliver superior social outcomes. First, a harm reduction approach better accommodates the competitive realities of sports and the impact of elite sports' emphasis on performance at all costs. Second, HR prioritises athlete welfare over sport and brand reputation. Finally, while appreciating the regulatory and risk management responsibilities of sports' governing bodies, the HR model offers greater space to the athlete's right to privacy, and right to personal autonomy. PMID:26556215

  8. Diversity in academic medicine no. 2 history of battles lost and won.

    PubMed

    Strelnick, A Hal; Lee-Rey, Elizabeth; Nivet, Marc; Soto-Greene, Maria L

    2008-12-01

    Spurred by its rapidly changing demographics, the United States is striving to reduce and eliminate racial and ethnic health disparities. To do so, it must overcome the legacy of individual, institutional, and structural racism and resolve conflicts in related political and social ideologies. This has moved the struggle over diversity in the health professions outside the laboratories and ivy-covered walls of academic medicine into the halls of Congress and chambers of the US Supreme Court. Although equal employment opportunity and affirmative action programs began as legal remedies for distinct histories of legally sanctioned racial and gender discrimination, they also became effective means for increasing the representation of underrepresented minorities in higher education and the health professions. Beginning in the 1970s and continuing today, legal challenges to measures for realizing equal opportunity and leveling the playing field have reached the US Supreme Court and state-wide ballot initiatives. These historical challenges and successes are the subject of this article. Although the history is not exhaustive, it aims to provide an important context for the struggles of advocates to improve the representation of underrepresented minorities in medicine and reduce racial and ethnic health disparities. PMID:19021213

  9. Youth Work and Ethics: Why the "Professional Turn" Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Youth work is deemed to require a distinctive commitment to ethical behaviour from the adults involved. This is expressed in the requirements for the initial education of workers, in the subject benchmarks and national expectations for youth workers. A significant influence in this debate is Howard Sercombe. Sercombe seeks a substantive framework…

  10. The Battle for the History Books: Who Won the Cold War?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meyerson, Adam

    1990-01-01

    Discusses liberal and conservative foreign policy contributions to the end of the Cold War, as marked by the rapid liberalization of Eastern Europe and the Soviet Union. Emphasizes that the collapse of the Soviet empire occurred at the end of a decade of sustained conservative government in every major country of the Western world. (FMW)

  11. Who Won the Cold War? A Learning Packet for Secondary Level Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas Univ., Lawrence. Center for Russian and East European Studies.

    Realizing that the Cold War is a topic that often is neglected as time runs short at the end of a school year, a group of University of Kansas (Lawrence) educators sought to create effective classroom materials for secondary/community college instructors to teach about the Cold War. The group's main goal was to create a flexible model that…

  12. Unmet Needs in LDL-C Lowering: When Statins Won't Do!

    PubMed

    Krähenbühl, Stephan; Pavik-Mezzour, Ivana; von Eckardstein, Arnold

    2016-08-01

    The use of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C)-lowering medications has led to a significant reduction of cardiovascular risk in both primary and secondary prevention. Statin therapy, one of the cornerstones for the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular disease (CVD), has been demonstrated to be effective in lowering LDL-C levels and in reducing the risk for CVD and is generally well-tolerated. However, compliance with statins remains suboptimal. One of the main reasons is limitations by adverse events, notably myopathies, which can lead to non-compliance with the prescribed statin regimen. Reducing the burden of elevated LDL-C levels is critical in patients with CVD as well as in patients with very high baseline levels of LDL-C (e.g. patients with familial hypercholesterolaemia), as statin therapy is insufficient for optimally reducing LDL-C below target values. In this review, we discuss alternative treatment options after maximally tolerated doses of statin therapy, including ezetimibe, proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) inhibitors, and cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP) inhibitors. Difficult-to-treat patients may benefit from combination therapy with ezetimibe or a PCSK9 inhibitor (evolocumab or alirocumab, which are now available). Updates of treatment guidelines are needed to guide the management of patients who will best benefit from these new treatments. PMID:27456066

  13. Why won't they listen: Negotiating the technological and social context for science teaching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liuzzo, Anna M.

    The purpose of this study was to gather information to identify the obstacles and the impact an implementation of technology had in a middle school science classroom. This study explored a teaching environment where the teacher planned on using a variety of technology tools including laptops, probeware, hardware and software to promote scientific study. This study took place in two phases consisting of three consecutive years. In phase one the teacher reported great success. In phase two a shift in the school implementation created a significant impact on the learning taking place. This study identified the obstacles faced by a teacher providing an environment that combined her pedagogy with technology implementation. This teacher's pedagogy included research-based practices such a authentic problem-based learning, scientific inquiry, conceptual understanding of problem solving, connections to real-life situations and the use of metacognition in her practice. This study looked to determined if this implementation had an effect on student engagement and achievement; how the nature of technical and professional development impacted the implementation; and the barriers that were faced in creating a student-centered, technology rich approach to science. This qualitative study was conducted meeting the criteria of a case study of one teacher. The participant teacher's accounts of events through interviews were the primary source of data. In addition, multiple sources of information were also gathered. These included the teacher's reflective journal, student interviews, student focus groups, student artifacts, classroom observations, field notes, e-mail correspondences and students' test scores. This study proposes to contribute to the growing research evidence of implementation in the classroom and to identify specific obstacles that hinder success. The current state of education is calling for reform.

  14. [Situational awareness: you won't see it unless you understand it].

    PubMed

    Graafland, Maurits; Schijven, Marlies P

    2015-01-01

    In dynamic, high-risk environments such as the modern operating theatre, healthcare providers are required to identify a multitude of signals correctly and in time. Errors resulting from failure to identify or interpret signals correctly lead to calamities. Medical training curricula focus largely on teaching technical skills and knowledge, not on the cognitive skills needed to interact appropriately with fast-changing, complex environments in practice. The term 'situational awareness' describes the dynamic process of receiving, interpreting and processing information in such dynamic environments. Improving situational awareness in high-risk environments should be part of medical curricula. In addition, the flood of information in high-risk environments should be presented more clearly and effectively. It is important that physicians become more involved in this regard. PMID:26173660

  15. AIDS may be rising, but Romania won't admit it.

    PubMed

    Doder, D

    1994-07-18

    Pronatalist policy under Nicolae Ceausescu and the Orthodox Church have perpetuated a social climate in Romania in which family planning and contraceptive usage are taboo. Abortion is the most common method of birth control and condoms are expensive when available. The consistent and correct use of condoms has been demonstrated to largely prevent the transmission of sexually transmitted diseases like AIDS. The prurient attitude toward sexuality and contraception in Romania, however, combined with ignorance about AIDS and its prevention is fueling an impending epidemic of HIV infection and disease in the country. The Ministry of Health under the control of Health Minister Iulian Minu, former dictator Ceausescu's personal physician and creator of the Communist diet claiming meat and other foods in short supply to be unhealthy, is doing nothing to control the spread of HIV and AIDS. Funding for AIDS research ended in 1992 when Minu was appointed in a new government of nonreformers. Some say that government inaction against AIDS and its refusal to acknowledge the existence of a growing problem in Romania stem from the desire based in national pride to avoid worldwide scrutiny like that of 1990 about AIDS babies in the country. Many children with AIDS remain in inhuman conditions, even chained to cots in villages in Transylvania. Vertical transmission of HIV has appeared for the first time and youths aged 13-14 years are now falling ill from HIV-related diseases. Charges have also been leveled that national blood banks are contaminated with HIV and the Health Ministry has misused World Health Organization funds. Although the government claims that 2547 children and 189 adults were registered as having AIDS in the four years ending March 1994, more people are definitely infected in the country, but no one knows for sure how many. PMID:12287705

  16. Social Problems and America's Youth: Why School Reform Won't Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rittenmeyer, Dennis C.

    1987-01-01

    Using the schools to achieve racial balance, eliminate poverty, fight drug abuse, prevent pregnancy, and reduce youth suicide is too large a task. Teachers and principals should address educational issues, not unmet social needs. To improve the educational performance of the schools, the quality of life for youth must first be improved. (MSE)

  17. "Blackwoods" Would; "PMLA" Won't; or How to Write a "PMLA" Article.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gale, Steven H.

    The de facto signature style of the Modern Language Association's "PMLA" magazine not only bores many readers (contributing to the decline in MLA membership), but mandates rejection of any papers stylistically distinct from previous "PMLA" articles. In addition, to judge from several rejection letters, "PMLA" subject matter bias proscribes even…

  18. The Precarious Survival and Hard-Won Satisfactions of White Single-Parent Families.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Leslie N.

    1989-01-01

    Examined interviews with 43 White single mothers for thematic content relating to economics of single parenthood, feelings about single parenting, the children's fathers, and stigmatization. Results showed that these women had developed coping strategies and were proud of their ability to survive under adverse circumstances, but that they felt…

  19. Oh, Won't You Stay? Predictors of Faculty Intent to Leave a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John F.; Healy, Richard; Sullivan, Jason

    2012-01-01

    Understanding and predicting faculty intent to leave is important to the development of improved conceptual frameworks of faculty success as well as the implementation of effective retention strategies for academic leaders and institutions that invest considerable resources in recruitment, institutional support, and compensation. This study…

  20. Trading trash: why the U.S. won't sign on to the Basel convention.

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, C W

    1999-01-01

    Environmentalists worry that hazardous wastes produced in industrialized nations are being dumped in cash-starved developing countries--the countries with the least political or economic clout to resist and the fewest resources for managing these toxic imports. Imported waste can pose a serious threat to the health of human populations and ecosystems if not managed appropriately. In 1989, the international community initiated efforts to reduce the flow of hazardous wastes from industrialized countries to developing countries by drafting a treaty known as the Basel Convention on the Control of Transboundary Wastes and their Disposal. The convention's mission is to strictly regulate the international transfer of hazardous wastes and to ensure that wastes are managed and disposed of in an environmentally sound manner. Although the United States supports the convention in theory, it remains the only industrialized country within the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development yet to ratify it. However, legislation drafted by the Clinton administration that is soon to go before the 106th Congress could make the United States a party to the convention. PMID:10417374

  1. "When the pain won't wane it's mainly in the brain".

    PubMed

    Pawl, Ron

    2013-01-01

    Chronic pain syndromes either have no underlying organic explanation, or include patients whose chronic pain complaints (without focal deficits or significant radiographic findings) were not alleviated by surgery (in 80% of cases). Patients with chronic pain typically "turn off" members of the medical community; they are often "written off" as malingerers or psychiatric cases. The Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory often shows elevations on the hysteria and hypochondriasis scales; together these constitute somatization defined as patients converting emotional distress into bodily complaints. Depression, anxiety, and borderline personality disorders are also often encountered. Secondary gain also plays a critical role in patients with chronic pain syndromes (e.g., includes avoiding onerous tasks/work, or rewards opioid-seeking behaviors). Tertiary gain pertains to the physicians' financial rewards for administering ineffective and repeated treatment of these patients, while validating for the patient that there is truly something organically wrong with them. Self-mutilation (part of Munchausen Syndrome/Fictitious Disorders) also brings these chronic pain patients to the attention of the medical community. They are also often involved in the legal system (e.g., workmen's compensation or tort action) that in the United States, unfortunately financially rewards "pain and suffering." The main purpose of this commentary is to reeducate spinal surgeons about the pitfalls of operating on patients with chronic pain syndromes in the absence of significant neurological deficits or radiographic findings, as such "last ditch surgery" invariably fails. PMID:23878768

  2. When "t"-Tests or Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney Tests Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McElduff, Fiona; Cortina-Borja, Mario; Chan, Shun-Kai; Wade, Angie

    2010-01-01

    "t"-Tests are widely used by researchers to compare the average values of a numeric outcome between two groups. If there are doubts about the suitability of the data for the requirements of a "t"-test, most notably the distribution being non-normal, the Wilcoxon-Mann-Whitney test may be used instead. However, although often applied, both tests may…

  3. Zika Won't Pose Risks At the Olympics: Health Experts

    MedlinePlus

    ... virus can cause the brain-related birth defect microcephaly if an expectant mother becomes infected. Pregnant women ... but most of the infections and cases of microcephaly have occurred in the northeast part of the ...

  4. Teacher Preparation Solutions: Rumbling for Quality Just Won't Do

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brewer, Thomas M.

    2006-01-01

    Due to rapid population growth and critical teacher shortages on the national level in today's fast-changing public school systems, we are witnessing an unprecedented crisis in higher education and teacher preparation. To better understand the current state of teacher certification and preparation, this article examines the contentious atmosphere…

  5. Why Janie Can't--or Won't--Do Math

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tobias, Sheila

    1978-01-01

    From elementary school through college women have failed to keep up with men in the study of mathematics. Examines the differences in social experience for men and women in learning mathematics, some reasons for these differences, and what a number of colleges are doing to offset the problem of anxiety suffered by women who attempt to study…

  6. Malaysia family-planning centers strive to maintain gains won in 15-year period.

    PubMed

    Roemer, R

    1968-09-12

    Family planning in Malaysia is discussed. Family planning began in Malaysia about 15 years ago through the efforts of voluntary family Planning Associations in the various Malay states. In 1966 the Malaysian Parliament passed the National Family Planning Act setting up the National FAmily Planning Board to formulate policies and methods for the promotion and spread of family planning knowledge and practice on the grounds of health of mothers and children and welfare of the family. In 1967, the board set a target of 40,000 new acceptors of family planning and 90% of the target was reached. This represents 3% of the child-bearing married women aged 15-49. The target for 1968 of 65,000 new acceptors is being achieved. A survey of acceptors is to be carried out from December 1968 to April 1969 to ascertain how many women who accepted family planning continue to practice it. Malaysia's crude birth rate declined from 46.2 in 1957 to 37.3 in 1966 before the government program was instituted. Abortion attempts have been frequent. The main method of contraception used is oral contraceptives. According to a 1957 survey, 31% of the married women in the metropolitan areas and 2% of rural women were using contraception. Presently, in Malaysia there is a need to: 1) train personnel to provide services, 2) inform and motivate families to accept family planning, 3) continue a broad educational program, 4) reform Malaysia's antiquated abortion law, and 5) integrate family planning services more fully into the general health services of the country. PMID:12229348

  7. "No! I Won't!": Understanding and Responding to Student Defiance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Andrea; Bondy, Elizabeth

    2007-01-01

    Student defiance, or resisting the authority of the teacher, is commonplace. In fact, some researchers have reported that the vast majority of discipline referrals are due to defiance. Due to the prevalence of childhood defiance and its potential for bringing instruction to a grinding halt, it is essential for educators to be prepared to…

  8. If You Record It, Some Won't Come: Using Lecture Capture in Introductory Psychology

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drouin, Michelle A.

    2014-01-01

    In this study, I examined the effects of offering supplemental video lecture recordings to students in a face-to-face introductory psychology course. I employed a quasi-experimental design, in which one section had lectures recordings available (recordings of the face-to-face lecture) and one section did not, and I examined whether class section…

  9. "We're Number One!" How a First-Year Principal Won South Carolina's "Finest" Award.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pitts, Elizabeth

    1982-01-01

    Describes a number of specific projects undertaken by the new principal of an elementary school in Myrtle Beach (South Carolina) to build staff support and morale, student enthusiasm, and parent and community involvement. (PGD)

  10. Intractable Headache - The Pain in Your Head that Just Won't Quit

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pinterest Follow us on Instagram DONATE TODAY About Migraine Patient Registry Corporate Roundtable Info for Residents & Fellows Living With Migraines Types of Headache/Migraine Life with Headache/Migraine ...

  11. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of its...) business days after the auction closes, and the remainder of the down payment (five percent) shall be paid within five (5) business days following Public Notice that the Commission is prepared to award...

  12. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of its...) business days after the auction closes, and the remainder of the down payment (five percent) shall be paid within five (5) business days following Public Notice that the Commission is prepared to award...

  13. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of its...) business days after the auction closes, and the remainder of the down payment (five percent) shall be paid within five (5) business days following Public Notice that the Commission is prepared to award...

  14. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of its...) business days after the auction closes, and the remainder of the down payment (five percent) shall be paid within five (5) business days following Public Notice that the Commission is prepared to award...

  15. 47 CFR 90.811 - Reduced down payment for licenses won by small businesses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... winning bidder that qualifies as a small business shall make a down payment equal to ten percent of its...) business days after the auction closes, and the remainder of the down payment (five percent) shall be paid within five (5) business days following Public Notice that the Commission is prepared to award...

  16. Oh, Won't You Stay: A Multilevel Analysis of the Difficulties in Retaining Qualified Teachers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strunk, Katharine Omenn; Robinson, Joseph Paul

    2006-01-01

    The No Child Left Behind Act of 2001 requires that every classroom be staffed with a "qualified teacher." A growing literature is focusing on what causes teachers to leave their jobs and/or the teaching occupation, rather than solely on factors influencing teacher recruitment. This article uses nationally representative data from the 1999-2000…

  17. It Won't Be Easy, but You Must Learn the Arcane New Rules of Arbitrage.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, David; Brennan, William

    1988-01-01

    With passage of the Tax Reform Act of 1986, school systems became liable to the federal government for any profits earned on tax-exempt bonds. Understanding the requirements is essential for any board facing significant capital financing. Outlines requirements, exceptions to the rule, penalties, costs, and debt planning. (MLF)

  18. Build a Wind Tunnel that Won't Blow Your Budget

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fitzgerald, Mike

    2005-01-01

    In this article, the author gives basic information on constructing a wind tunnel that teachers can use for instructional activities with their students for many years to come. He illustrates and describes the procedure and materials that he developed in constructing his own wind tunnel. This information should be viewed as a guide. (Contains 1…

  19. When Protein Crystallography Won't Show You the Membranes (446th Brookhaven Lecture)

    SciTech Connect

    Yan, Lin

    2009-02-18

    High fever, stomach ache, coughing, sneezing, and fatigue -- these are all painful signs that you may have caught the flu virus. But how does your body actually 'catch' a virus? Somewhere along the way, the virus infected your body by penetrating the membranes, or surfaces, of some of your body's cells. And then it spreads. Cell membranes are permeable surfaces made of proteins and lipids that allow vital materials to enter and exit cells. Many proteins and cell structures are studied at Brookhaven's National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) using a procedure called protein crystallography. But they sometimes have unique characteristics that do not allow them to be easily studied using this widely adopted method. These characteristics make it difficult to understand the cell membrane structure and its ability to both welcome and refuse certain materials and viruses, such as the flu, on behalf of the cell's internal components. Yang will explain the protein crystallography procedure, the simple structure of the cell membrane, and the unusual characteristics of its proteins and lipids. He will also discuss a new, unique method being developed at the NSLS to study proteins and lipids within their native environment as they form the essential permeable surface of a cell membrane.

  20. Cash Rewards Won't Change Outcomes for HIV-Infected Drug Addicts

    MedlinePlus

    ... be available after 10/11/2016) By Mary Elizabeth Dallas Wednesday, July 13, 2016 WEDNESDAY, July 13, ... the United States. Patients were randomly assigned to one of three groups: usual treatment (patients were linked ...

  1. Delaying 2nd Shock After Cardiac Arrest Won't Boost Survival

    MedlinePlus

    ... been lacking, the study authors said. The authors -- led by Dr. Steven Bradley of the VA Eastern ... after the first defibrillation, researchers said. The study -- led by Dr. Michael Donnino of Beth Israel Deaconess ...

  2. Gilded and gelded. Hard-won lessons from the PR wars.

    PubMed

    Martin, Dick

    2003-10-01

    A golden statue of a winged youth once perched on the roof of AT&T's old headquarters. But when AT&T lowered the 24-foot-high statue for regilding so that it could be placed in the company's new headquarters, the chairman was shocked to discover that the figure was anatomically correct. So he decreed that it also be gelded. The altered "Golden Boy" thus became a metaphor for AT&T's recent embattled history, and it serves as a cautionary symbol for all companies operating in today's brutal business environment, where perception can be as important as reality. While image consultants and executives work to gild a company's image, special interest groups and the media can geld a company with countless little cuts. The author, a former executive vice president of public relations for AT&T, provides an insider's view of some of the company's most painful public-relations scrapes. They include the collapse of two apparent CEO succession plans, AT&T's inability to meet heightened expectations after Mike Armstrong was appointed CEO, and the racially charged furor over a cartoon in an employee publication. The author offers four lessons: Don't become hypnotized by your own buzz; understand the way the business media think; address the needs of all your stakeholders; and be sensitive to the possible emotional resonance of what appear to be straightforward facts. To illustrate the final point, the author mentions AT&T's elimination of 40,000 jobs in 1996. Wall Street was impressed, but NBC's Tom Brokaw said the workforce reduction might signal "another long, anxious year for the American middle class." No rational argument from AT&T could overcome the layoffs' symbolic impact. Wounded but wiser after numerous public-relations battles, the company eventually learned to stop aggregating job-reduction information for the media. PMID:14521097

  3. Time pacing: competing in markets that won't stand still.

    PubMed

    Eisenhardt, K M; Brown, S L

    1998-01-01

    Most companies change in reaction to events such as moves by the competition, shifts in technology, or new customer demands. In fairly stable markets, "event pacing" is an effective way to deal with change. But successful companies in rapidly changing, intensely competitive industries take a different approach. They change proactively, through regular deadlines. The authors call this strategy time pacing. Like a metronome, time pacing creates a rhythm to which managers can synchronize the speed and intensity of their efforts. For example, 3M dictates that 25% of its revenues every year will come from new products, Netscape introduces a new product about every six months, and Intel adds a new fabrication facility to its operations approximately every nine months. Time pacing creates a relentless sense of urgency around meeting deadlines and concentrates people on a common set of goals. Its predictability also provides people with a sense of control in otherwise chaotic markets. The authors show how companies such as Banc One, Cisco Systems, Dell Computer, Emerson Electric, Gillette, Intel, Netscape, Shiseido, and Sony implement the two essentials of time pacing. The first is managing transitions--the shift, for example, from one new-product-development project to the next. The second is setting the right rhythm for change. Companies that march to the rhythm of time pacing build momentum, and companies that effectively manage transitions sustain that momentum without missing important beats. PMID:10177867

  4. Oh, Won't You Stay? Predictors of Faculty Intent to Leave a Public Research University

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, John F.; Healy, Richard; Sullivan, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Understanding and predicting faculty intent to leave is important to the development of improved conceptual frameworks of faculty success as well as the implementation of effective retention strategies for academic leaders and institutions that invest considerable resources in recruitment, institutional support, and compensation. This study…

  5. Why Won't You Do What I Want? The Informative Failures of Children and Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatham, Christopher H.; Yerys, Benjamin E.; Munakata, Yuko

    2012-01-01

    Computational models are powerful tools--too powerful, according to some. We argue that the idea that models can "do anything" is wrong, and we describe how their failures have been informative. We present new work showing surprising diversity in the effects of feedback on children's task-switching, such that some children perseverate despite this…

  6. Small Changes Won't Assure Sustainability--but Reimagining Might

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holdaway, Xarissa

    2008-01-01

    Almost every day, the author learns about new green buildings from press releases. One example is that of Arizona State University's new Biodesign Institute, a soaring, "uber"-chic, high-performance, Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design-certified center. However, the author maintains that such buildings are undoubtedly a step up from…

  7. Why Won't They Listen: Negotiating the Technological and Social Context for Science Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liuzzo, Anna M.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to gather information to identify the obstacles and the impact an implementation of technology had in a middle school science classroom. This study explored a teaching environment where the teacher planned on using a variety of technology tools including laptops, probeware, hardware and software to promote scientific…

  8. EPA`s White Paper won`t ease everyone`s Title V headaches

    SciTech Connect

    Merrill, J.W.

    1996-01-01

    The Environmental Protection Agency issued a White Paper for Streamlined Development of a Part 70 Permit Application. The paper was developed in response to industry`s and permitting authorities` concerns that the current permitting process is costly and burdensome. The paper comes on the heels of a recent congressional debate over EPA cutbacks and intervention in the air program. This policy statement appears to be an attempt to keep Congress at bay while appeasing industry in the wake of numerous lawsuits which were filed after the original Part 70 regulations were issued. The White Paper acknowledges the lack of clarity in the original Part 70 permit program, and attempts to limit the scope and responsibility that sources have in preparing a complete Title 5 application. Unfortunately for many sources, states already have initiated their Title 5 programs and, in many cases, already have requested application submittals. It is unlikely that these states will be able to revise state laws, regulations and applications in time for sources to take advantage of the change in EPA`s position.

  9. How Superstition Won and Science Lost. Popularizing Science and Health in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burnham, John C.

    This book studies the history of changing patterns in the dissemination, or popularization of scientific findings, to the general public since 1830. It focuses on three different areas of science: (1) health; (2) psychology; and (3) the natural sciences. The document explores the ways in which this process of popularization has deteriorated. It…

  10. Mission Organization: How One Program Tackled Their Parent Handbook and Won

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carlson, Debra

    2007-01-01

    Early care and education center directors have a whole host of reasons for printing comprehensive and informative parent handbooks. The parents of the children who attend early care and education centers have their own set of expectations and needs for information contained in parent handbooks. When these sets of needs and expectations collide, it…

  11. When Rights Just Won't Do: Ethical Considerations When Making Decisions for Severely Disabled Newborns.

    PubMed

    Hester, D Micah; Lew, Cheryl D; Swota, Alissa

    2016-01-01

    Children born with severe handicapping conditions, where survival and quality of survival is indeterminate, present special challenges for families and health-care professionals tasked with deciding the best courses of treatment and care. The case of Baby G presents an opportunity to compare the relative effectiveness of ethical versus rights theories in providing guidance about what obligations are owed to such children at bedside and how those obligations pertain to broader societal duties in a rights framework. We review common theories of determining the "best interests standard" of newborn decision-making and the priority of families to decide on behalf of their children. We then discuss what support the rights framework of the U.N. Convention on the Rights of the Child (CRC) might lend to the best implementation of clinical ethics decision-making. Finally, we conclude that the universal nature of rights theory does not provide the particular, specific guidance needed at the bedside of the critically ill infant. PMID:27157349

  12. "I Won't Write--But I'll Do Calligraphy."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Donnell, Peg; Duncan, Karen F.

    1980-01-01

    The article presents a technique for using calligraphy instruction to develop pride and skill in written expression with special students. Guidelines for the teacher cover materials needed, instructional procedures, and remedial advantages for students with handwriting problems. (SBH)

  13. Applying the Helmholtz illusion to fashion: horizontal stripes won't make you look fatter.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Peter; Mikellidou, Kyriaki

    2011-01-01

    A square composed of horizontal lines appears taller and narrower than an identical square made up of vertical lines. Reporting this illusion, Hermann von Helmholtz noted that such illusions, in which filled space seems to be larger than unfilled space, were common in everyday life, adding the observation that ladies' frocks with horizontal stripes make the figure look taller. As this assertion runs counter to modern popular belief, we have investigated whether vertical or horizontal stripes on clothing should make the wearer appear taller or fatter. We find that a rectangle of vertical stripes needs to be extended by 7.1% vertically to match the height of a square of horizontal stripes and that a rectangle of horizontal stripes must be made 4.5% wider than a square of vertical stripes to match its perceived width. This illusion holds when the horizontal or vertical lines are on the dress of a line drawing of a woman. We have examined the claim that these effects apply only for 2-dimensional figures in an experiment with 3-D cylinders and find no support for the notion that horizontal lines would be 'fattening' on clothes. Significantly, the illusion persists when the horizontal or vertical lines are on pictures of a real half-body mannequin viewed stereoscopically. All the evidence supports Helmholtz's original assertion. PMID:23145226

  14. I won't tell: Young children show loyalty to their group by keeping group secrets.

    PubMed

    Misch, Antonia; Over, Harriet; Carpenter, Malinda

    2016-02-01

    Group loyalty is highly valued. However, little is known about young children's loyal behavior. This study tested whether 4- and 5-year-olds (N=96) remain loyal to their group even when betraying it would be materially advantageous. Children and four puppets were allocated to novel groups. Two of these puppets (either in-group or out-group members) then told children a group secret and urged them not to disclose the secret. Another puppet (not assigned to either group) then bribed children with stickers to tell the secret. Across ages, children were significantly less likely to reveal the secret in the in-group condition than in the out-group condition. Thus, even young children are willing to pay a cost to be loyal to their group. PMID:26513328

  15. Joseph Erlanger (1874-1965): the cardiovascular investigator who won a Nobel Prize in neurophysiology.

    PubMed

    Breathnach, Caoimhghín S; Moynihan, John B

    2014-11-01

    Born in San Francisco in 1874 into the family of German immigrants in which he was the only one to proceed beyond elementary education, Joseph Erlanger graduated from the University of California (Berkeley) in 1894. He was about to enter the local Cooper Medical School when he was told that the new medical school in Johns Hopkins University (Baltimore) aimed to surpass all others, and there he graduated and was later coached for a career in academic life by William H Howell (1860-1945). In due course he held the Chairs of Physiology in the University of Wisconsin (Madison) and Washington University at St Louis, Missouri. He showed that the Bundle of His is indeed the functional link between the atria and the ventricles in the mammalian heart and that the Korotkoff sounds are produced by a 'breaker' phenomenon resulting from instability of the pulse wave in a partially occluded artery. With Herbert S Gasser (1888-1963) he was awarded the Nobel Prize in 1944 for their work on action currents in peripheral nerve fibres. The history of science occupied him during his retirement. He died at St Louis in 1965. PMID:24585622

  16. At Yale, an Unlikely Champion for "The Building that Won't Go Away"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biemiller, Lawrence

    2008-01-01

    It is most surprising that Yale University is spending $126-million to renovate and add to a 1963 Modernist building that almost everyone has hated for decades. Aside from that, the project's champion is a high-society architect whose own career refutes pretty much the whole Modernist design theology. This article talks about the renovation of…

  17. From Oasis to Mirage: The Aquifers That Won't Replenish.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Gary

    1995-01-01

    Tells the story of three fossil aquifers, in Saudi Arabia, Libya, and the United States, that are mined at nonrenewable rates for agricultural irrigation. Examines the consequences of a collision between rising consumption and falling groundwater supplies. Charts Libya's projected water needs compared to renewable supply, 1985-2030. (LZ)

  18. Stopping the Brain Drain of Skilled Veteran Teachers: Retaining and Valuing Their Hard-Won Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fibkins, William L.

    2011-01-01

    Veteran educators are being encouraged to take early retirement in order to create jobs for less-experienced, lower-paid novices. Veteran educators are not alone: early retirement promotions have become the norm for aging workers in America. Consequently, there is a brain-drain of skilled workers at the national, state, and local levels. The early…

  19. As cost of living grows, a 1% rise won't go far.

    PubMed

    Walker, Christine

    2016-01-20

    A pay rise of no more than 1% is what nurses in England can expect in the coming year. This - coupled with fewer automatic incremental pay increases year on year under the national pay system Agenda for Change and more links to performance - is in the health department's main evidence to the independent pay review body. PMID:26786418

  20. Jobs You Won't Find in the Dictionary of Occupational Titles.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Paul R.; Helmstetter, Christopher L.

    1992-01-01

    Written in whimsical style, this article points out the value-laden nature of the "Dictionary of Occupational Titles," the premier source of occupational information. Other than legal occupations, classifies jobs that are remunerative into three categories: (1) illegal occupations (drug dealer, hitperson); (2) underground or counterculture…

  1. When Boys Won't Be Boys: Discussing Gender with Young Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katch, Hannah; Katch, Jane

    2010-01-01

    In this Voices Inside Schools essay, Hannah Katch and Jane Katch reflect on gender roles and how they are enacted in the classroom. When Timothy, a student in Jane's kindergarten class, refuses to count himself as one of the boys during a math lesson, Jane begins a conversation about social constructions of gender with her daughter, Hannah.…

  2. The Humanities: Who Won the '90s in Scholarly Book Publishing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wiberley, Stephen E., Jr.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data on prize-winning books during the 1990s from the American Historical Association, American Musicological Society, the College Art Association, and the Modern Language Association. Suggests that studying awards from the leading humanities scholarly associations can tell much about the disciplines, publishing industry, and library…

  3. At least it won't hurt: the personal risks of antibiotic exposure.

    PubMed

    Stewardson, Andrew J; Huttner, Benedikt; Harbarth, Stephan

    2011-10-01

    This review presents recent evidence regarding the adverse effects of antibiotic therapy mediated by collateral damage to commensal flora. Two major drivers have characterized recent research in this field: new perspectives into human microbiota afforded by next-generation DNA sequencing techniques and ongoing attention to antimicrobial resistance. New molecular techniques have illustrated that antibiotic therapy can disturb human microbiota, and that these changes are associated with infection. Concurrently, epidemiologic studies using patient-level data offer new insights into the role of antibiotics in the emergence, selection and spread of antimicrobial resistance, and Clostridium difficile infection (CDI). PMID:21775205

  4. Relational Aggression and Friendship during Early Childhood: "I Won't Be Your Friend!"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burr, Jean E.; Ostrov; Jamie M.; Jansen, Elizabeth A.; Cullerton-Sen, Crystal; Crick, Nicki R.

    2005-01-01

    Associations between relational aggression and mutual, dyadic friendships during early childhood were assessed in the context of a year-long, short-term longitudinal study. Children's mutual friendships were determined via sociometric ratings and their relationally aggressive behavior among peers was assessed via naturalistic, free play…

  5. Higher Education and the "American Dream": Why the Status Quo Won't Get Us There

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keene, Sara E.

    2008-01-01

    The community college represents the only form of universal access to education, and is thus purported to be the gateway to low-income and minority students' realization of the "American Dream." That dream is growing more and more elusive for a substantial number of people. Instead of breaking down ethnic and class barriers to economic and social…

  6. When the Battle is Lost and Won: Delayed Chest Closure After Bilateral Lung Transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Soresi, Simona; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Simon, André R.; Popov, Aron-Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we summarize benefits of delayed chest closure strategy in lung transplantation, addressing indications, different surgical techniques, and additional perioperative treatment. Delayed chest closure seems to be a valuable and safe strategy in managing patients with various conditions after lung transplantation, such as instable hemodynamics, need for high respiratory pressures, coagulopathy, and size mismatch. Therefore, this approach should be considered in lung transplant centers to give patients time to recover before the chest is closed. PMID:26456363

  7. When the Battle is Lost and Won: Delayed Chest Closure After Bilateral Lung Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Soresi, Simona; Sabashnikov, Anton; Weymann, Alexander; Zeriouh, Mohamed; Simon, André R; Popov, Aron-Frederik

    2015-01-01

    In this article we summarize benefits of delayed chest closure strategy in lung transplantation, addressing indications, different surgical techniques, and additional perioperative treatment. Delayed chest closure seems to be a valuable and safe strategy in managing patients with various conditions after lung transplantation, such as instable hemodynamics, need for high respiratory pressures, coagulopathy, and size mismatch. Therefore, this approach should be considered in lung transplant centers to give patients time to recover before the chest is closed. PMID:26456363

  8. Have the Creationists Already Won? or The Teaching of Faux-Biology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firenze, Richard

    1997-01-01

    Recounts the perspectives of several biologists who believe that evolutionary theory is the key to an understanding of biology. Cites examples from textbooks and educational practices which support the theory that many students develop and maintain misconceptions about evolution due to instruction. Contains 53 references. (DDR)

  9. The TPSR Alliance: Learning with a Family Who Won't Give up on You

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarthy, John; Ettl, Fritz I.; Altieri, Val

    2016-01-01

    The TPSR Alliance has become a vital community of practice for my graduate students and for me personally. During the past decade, I (the first author) have worked with graduate students at Boston University to provide a program for youth development through sports and fitness at a large, high-needs public high school in the Boston area. Our…

  10. Can the War against Child Labour Be Won? Oslo Conference Says an Emphatic "Yes."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    World of Work, 1997

    1997-01-01

    A conference on child labor sponsored by the International Labour Organization and UNICEF identified strategies for eliminating child labor and developing cooperative programs to assess the effects of child labor. (JOW)

  11. What you need to know about diving medicine but won't find in a textbook.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Gregory M

    2002-12-01

    The old adage that 'if a patient in your emergency department (ED) is wearing a wetsuit, fins and a mask, then he/she probably has a diving related illness' is one that should be remembered. This is an obvious statement that should not need stating; however, simple clues can be missed or disregarded. This article will address issues that may confront emergency physicians and for which there are few resources to find the answers. It aims to explain the reasons behind some of the advice given during consultation with a hyperbaric physician. The second aim is to bring emergency physicians up to date with new diving practices and how these may impact upon traditional diving injuries. To achieve these aims, this article is a compilation of answers to frequently asked or pertinent questions related to diving medicine. PMID:12534479

  12. Could Caldecott Have Won the Caldecott? Victorian Views on Selection and Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lundin, Anne

    1998-01-01

    Provides a close description of the ways that Randolph Caldecott's work continues to compel admiration to show how classic texts that are selected and evaluated in the marketplace are the product of historical contingencies. Suggests that the choice of Caldecott as the name for the big prize in children's book illustration was and is fitting. (RS)

  13. It All Depends on You: A Rural Music Educator Who Won't Quit

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilcox, Ella

    2005-01-01

    Shickley Nebraska is an agricultural community where people have great pride in their school, community, and youth. With 98 percent of the students at the local high school college bound, the town motto is displayed on the brick "Welcome to Shickley" sign, and says "Welcome to Shickley, A Big Little Town." What makes rural music teachers special?…

  14. A response to Rudolf Klein: a battle may have been won but perhaps not the war.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David J

    2013-08-01

    The British National Health Service (NHS) is undergoing possibly the most far-reaching set of changes in its sixty-five-year history. While some commentators (like Rudolf Klein) insist that little of substance is likely to change, others consider that the politics of reform may prove quite different on this occasion. The coalition government is committed to restructuring the welfare state and public services and to rolling back the state. The NHS as a popular monopoly public service runs counter to its neoliberal ideology. While (for now) remaining committed to a publicly funded system of health care that is largely free at point of use, the government wishes to encourage much greater diversity in the provision of care, including a much larger role for the for-profit private sector. Despite significant opposition to its proposals, few concessions have been forthcoming, and the legislation that passed onto the statute book in March 2012 remained essentially unchanged. Notwithstanding the lack of convincing evidence, the government is wedded to encouraging greater competition and choice. Thosewho believe the changes will amount to far less than its architects hope for are being too complacent and overlooking the strength of the government's ideological convictions. These threaten to dismantle the NHS and replace it with a more costly, fragmented, and less effective system of care that is driven by profit in place of the public interest. PMID:23645872

  15. Line Manager Involvement in Work-Life Balance and Career Development: Can't Manage, Won't Manage?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dick, Penny; Hyde, Rosie

    2006-01-01

    Line manager involvement in HRM is an increasing trend across Europe. With the numbers of employees taking advantage of work-life balance policies also on the increase, line manager responsibility for this specific policy area is likely to become more marked. In this paper, we argue that line managers have a critical role to play in the career…

  16. Wishing Won't Work: 10 Things You Need to Know and Do when Applying for Technology Grants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gerding, Stephanie; MacKellar, Pam

    2006-01-01

    This article explores obtaining grants as a way of funding technology projects in the library. The authors' approach views technology as a component of a grant project or a way to accomplish the goals of a project. One can be more successful in his or her grant work by addressing existing community needs, rather than by requesting funding for…

  17. I Won't Teach Evolution; It's Against My Religion. And Now for the Rest of the Story...

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trani, Randy

    2004-01-01

    In Oregon, biology teachers have a definite understanding of the nature of science and the theory of evolution. These understandings translate into a significant presentation of the theory of evolution in their classrooms.

  18. The European Universities, Citizenship and Its Limits: What Won't Solve the Problems of Our Time

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lock, Grahame; Martins, Herminio

    2009-01-01

    This article attempts to weave together in an original manner a number of themes regarding citizenship and higher education in Europe. Thus, the authors look critically at the notion of citizenship itself; its role in Aristotle and in Hegel's state-versus-civil-society contrast; its relation to the world of work or labour; its connection with the…

  19. Water won't run uphill: the New Deal and malaria control in the American South, 1933-1940.

    PubMed

    Humphreys, M

    1998-06-01

    During the 1930s the United States Government poured significant funds into malaria control, via a variety of New Deal agencies. These projects were largely confined to drainage of mosquito-producing wetlands. Malaria had diminished significantly by the early 1940s, and this paper queries whether that reduction was due to the control projects of the thirties, and, if so, whether such projects should be a model for the current developing world, where malaria is a growing problem today. Malaria statistics from the 1930s and 1940s are unreliable, making this assessment, from the outset, complex. Further, the so-called "malaria projects" from the 1930s were, in fact, poorly planned "make-work" enterprises promoted by the Works Projects Administration and its ilk for the creation of unskilled, ditch-digging jobs. The drainage work lacked the oversight of competent engineers (many of them proving, in fact, that water wont's run uphill), and little of the work had permanent impact as the ditches were not maintained. Further, the work was not necessarily concentrated in malarious areas, since the unemployed's distribution did not overlap that of greatest mosquito density. Of the conflicting goals--unemployment relief and malaria control--the former consistently dominated the latter. The results were predictable. The author suggests that the depopulation of the rural south in the late 1930s had more of an impact (albeit indirect and unintended) on the malaria rates than did the large sums spent allegedly for the purpose of malaria control. PMID:9653745

  20. I Won't Think Of Meself As A Learning Disability. But I Have: Social Identity And Self-Advocacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beart, Suzie

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the small body of research which looks at how people labelled as having learning disabilities view this social identity is considered. The author argues that this research has implications for our assumptions about self-advocacy groups for people with learning disabilities.

  1. Why I'm a Yearbook Sponsor Again and Why I Won't Be for Long.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tarasovic, Janet

    1995-01-01

    Offers advice, in the form of a letter, to an aspiring teacher about the benefits of being a yearbook advisor. Reviews some of the basic skills needed to be an advisor, such as writing, photography and design skills, computer skills, budgetary and advertising skills, and public relations skills. (TB)

  2. All Might Have Won, But Not All Have the Prize: Optimal Treatment for Substance Abuse Among Adolescents with Conduct Problems

    PubMed Central

    Spas, Jayson; Ramsey, Susan; Paiva, Andrea L.; Stein, L.A.R.

    2012-01-01

    Considerable evidence from the literature on treatment outcomes indicates that substance abuse treatment among adolescents with conduct problems varies widely. Treatments commonly used among this population are cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT), 12-step facilitation, multisystemic therapy (MST), psychoeducation (PE), and motivational interviewing (MI). This manuscript thoroughly and systematically reviews the available literature to determine which treatment is optimal for substance-abusing adolescents with conduct problems. Results suggest that although there are several evidence-based and empirically supported treatments, those that incorporate family-based intervention consistently provide the most positive treatment outcomes. In particular, this review further reveals that although many interventions have gained empirical support over the years, only one holds the prize as being the optimal treatment of choice for substance abuse treatment among adolescents with conduct problems. PMID:23170066

  3. They Won't Accept the What of Science If They Don't Get the Why and How

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holt, Rush

    2016-03-01

    Denial of evidence by policy makers on controversial issues, substituting ideology for research-based findings, and suspicion of scientists of bias or even conspiracy are all enormously distasteful and sometimes bewildering to scientists. Whatever the subject-climate change, nuclear power, or GMO's- scientists should understand that the problems originate, not with demagogic or misguided politicians, but rather with millions of Americans who do not appreciate the essence of science and have a poor understanding of the basic nature and procedures of science. The public appreciation of science shows signs of further erosion, suggesting that the problems may get even worse in the future. Scientists do little to help the problem by insistently trying to teach the specifics of the controversial subjects, however clearly and logically, when the public does not even understand how science works.

  4. We Won't Get Fooled Again: On the Absence of Angry Responses to Plagiarism in Composition Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robillard, Amy E.

    2007-01-01

    This is an article about the complex relationship between anger and plagiarism in composition studies. Here, the author brings into dialogue two strands of inquiry that have shaped recent disciplinary conversations in composition studies but that have yet to publicly influence each other. Because emotions and authorship have both been perceived…

  5. Don't ask, they won't tell: the quality of adolescent health screening in five practice settings.

    PubMed Central

    Blum, R W; Beuhring, T; Wunderlich, M; Resnick, M D

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: This study examined the extent to which comprehensive, age-appropriate adolescent health screening is undertaken in the clinical setting and whether the extent of such screening varies by setting. METHODS: Charts of adolescents 13 to 17 years old (n = 788) were randomly selected from five practice settings in Minneapolis, Minn. Each was assessed for the number of biomedical and sociobehavioral health risks screened. RESULTS: In no practice setting was there screening to the level recommended. The two teen clinics screened more extensively for behavioral, psychosocial, substance use and sexual behavior risks than the community family practice setting, which, in turn, screened more extensively than either the private family practice or private pediatric practice settings, which did not differ from each other. Age differences and gender accounted for only small amounts of variance in total number of health risks screened, whereas differences among practice settings accounted for a larger amount. CONCLUSIONS: Results suggest substantive deficiencies in private practice settings' implementation of preventive care screening protocols for adolescents. PMID:9003135

  6. Won't You Be My Neighbor? Using an Ecological Approach to Examine the Impact of Community on Revictimization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Obasaju, Mayowa A.; Palin, Frances L.; Jacobs, Carli; Anderson, Page; Kaslow, Nadine J.

    2009-01-01

    An ecological model is used to explore the moderating effects of community-level variables on the relation between childhood sexual, physical, and emotional abuse and adult intimate partner violence (IPV) within a sample of 98 African American women from low incomes. Results from hierarchical, binary logistics regressions analyses show that…

  7. From fission to fusion: a perspective on the research that won the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine, 2013.

    PubMed

    Ray, Krishanu

    2014-03-01

    Secretion is widespread in all eukaryotic cells: all of us experience this in the course of daily life--saliva, mucus, sweat, tears, bile juice, adrenalin, etc.--the list is extremely long. How does a cell manage to repeatedly spit out some stuff without losing the rest? The answer is: through regulated vesicle trafficking within the cell. The Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine 2013 was awarded to Drs Randy Schekman, James E Rothman and Thomas C Südhof for their 'discoveries of machinery regulating vesicle traffic, a major transport system in our cells'. Dr Randy Schekman and his colleagues discovered a number of genes required for vesicle trafficking from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and Golgi; the James E Rothman group unravelled the protein machinery that allows vesicles to bud off from the membrane and fuse to their targets; and Dr Thomas C Südhof along with his colleagues revealed how calcium ions could instruct vesicles to fuse and discharge their contents with precision. These enabled the biotechnology industry to produce a variety of pharmaceutical and industrial products like insulin and hepatitis B vaccines, in a cost-efficient manner, using yeast and tissue cultured cells. PMID:24499785

  8. Report from Oslo conference. Can the war against child labour be won? Oslo conference says an emphatic "yes".

    PubMed

    1997-12-01

    Worldwide, about 250 million children work, often in exploitative and dangerous conditions. Child labor is most prevalent in the less developed countries, with 61% of the world's total child laborers being in Asia, 32% in Africa, and 7% in Latin America. The government of Norway, together with the International Labor Organization (ILO) and UNICEF, recently organized an international conference to organize action against child labor. 350 high-level representatives from governments, workers' and employers' organizations, nongovernmental organizations, and a number of international organizations and independent experts attended. The ILO Director-General proposed a 4-point strategy involving a political commitment to the effective and absolute abolition of child labor; a program of action involving prevention, removal, and rehabilitation; adoption of a new international convention to end all extreme forms of child labor; and a global agreement for international cooperation and mutual assistance to allocate more resources against poverty and child labor. The strategy would also fight the international aspects of the problem, such as the sale and trafficking of children and child sex tourism. PMID:12293265

  9. What You Don't Know Won't Hurt Me: Impression Management Functions of Communication Channels in Relationships.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Sullivan, Patrick B.

    2000-01-01

    Addresses the implications of interpersonal communication technology use for personal relationships. Tests elements of an impression management model, which specifies the processes and outcomes of strategic uses of channel and message for self-presentational goals. Supports a functional perspective that views mediated communication channels as a…

  10. "I won't call it rationing...": an ethnographic study of healthcare disinvestment in theory and practice.

    PubMed

    Rooshenas, Leila; Owen-Smith, Amanda; Hollingworth, William; Badrinath, Padmanabhan; Beynon, Claire; Donovan, Jenny L

    2015-03-01

    Healthcare decision-makers have always faced the challenge of allocating finite resources, but the global economic downturn places extra pressure on health systems to meet rising demands. The National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) and UK government have therefore called on commissioners to consider opportunities for 'disinvestment'- the cessation or restriction of health-care practices, and subsequent shift of resources to higher value care. However, there are no clear guidelines on how to approach disinvestment, and little is known about how this is tackled in practice. This paper presents results from a study that used ethnographic methods to investigate how disinvestment is understood and enacted. Eight routine local-level commissioning meetings where resource allocation decisions were discussed were observed over one year in two demographically contrasting regions of England. 28 interviews accompanied observations, conducted with purposefully-sampled professionals who were involved in, or potentially impacted by, disinvestments. Analysis of interviews/meeting recordings was undertaken using constant comparison methods, complemented by observational field notes. We found variation in informants' reported definitions of disinvestment, and an absence of disinvestment decision-making in observed meetings. Observations and interviews showed evidence of practical and ideological barriers to disinvestment, including an absence of tools and capacity, difficulties in collaboration and communication, a reluctance to engage in explicit rationing, and a perceived lack of central/political support. These findings support the need for the development of methods to encourage and guide disinvestment, including a clear definition of what 'disinvestment' entails. Crucially, disinvestment needs to be a collaborative effort, involving health-care providers and commissioners in decision-making processes. PMID:25635374

  11. "What She Doesn't Know Won't Hurt Her": Gender Effects on Patterns of Interpersonal Deception.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Justice, Paula Lippard

    A study was conducted to determine if (1) significant gender differences exist in prevalence of deception, motivation for deception, and recipients of deception; and (2) whether such differences support traditional gender role perceptions and expectations. Seventy-four subjects, 50 female and 24 male undergraduate students, recorded all instances…

  12. Reflections on an Argument That Won't Go Away: Or, a Turn of the Ideological Screw.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, Sharon

    1992-01-01

    Reviews criticism of Philip Wander's 1983 article, "The Ideological Turn in Modern Criticism." Shows how critics of Wander's "ideological criticism" subscribed to an essentialist notion of rhetoric, adopted a theory of innocent reading, and displayed unexamined prejudices about canonical texts. Urges academic rhetoricians to acknowledge that all…

  13. 'I won't be able to go home being pregnant': sex work and pregnancy in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Katz, Karen R; McDowell, Misti; Johnson, Laura; Aziz, Sultana

    2016-07-01

    Sex workers report high rates of unintended pregnancy that are inconsistent with widespread reports of condom use. Greater understanding of the implications of an unintended pregnancy and barriers to contraceptive use is needed to better meet the broader sexual and reproductive health needs of this population. We conducted in-depth interviews with 20 women sex workers in Dhaka, Bangladesh. Findings reveal that most women are trying to conform to societal norms and protect their reputations. They fear pregnancy would reveal that they are having unsanctioned sex and that they are sex workers. This could lead to ostracism from families and society, resulting in homelessness and abandonment by partners. Pregnancy may affect a sex worker's ability to work and leave her unable to meet financial obligations. All study participants were using condoms but most acknowledged they could not use them consistently. They had all tried other contraceptive methods, notably injectables and the pill, but some noted experience of side-effects, difficulties in adherence and the desire to use other methods. Understanding the context of sex workers' lives is an important step in informing stakeholders about the range of services needed to improve their sexual and reproductive health. PMID:26835735

  14. "Why Won't You Just Tell Us the Answer?": Teaching Historical Thinking in Grades 7-12

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesh, Bruce

    2011-01-01

    Every major measure of students' historical understanding since 1917 has demonstrated that students do not retain, understand, or enjoy their school experiences with history. Bruce Lesh believes that this is due to the way we teach history--lecture and memorization. Over the last fifteen years, Bruce has refined a method of teaching history that…

  15. "They Won't Come": Increasing Parent Involvement in Parent Management Training Programs for At-Risk Youths in Schools

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ouellette, Philip M.; Wilkerson, David

    2008-01-01

    The absence of parents from schools is seen as an important factor related to the significant number of adolescents at risk of school failure. Effective parenting is known to be a key protective factor for adolescents at risk for school failure and other maladaptive developmental outcomes. While evidence-based parent management training models…

  16. "Why Won't You Speak to Me in Gaelic?" Authenticity, Integration, and the Heritage Language Learning Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstrong, Timothy Currie

    2013-01-01

    The last speakers of an endangered language often include many individuals who have acquired less than full productive proficiency in the language, language users Nancy Dorian (1977) called semi-speakers. When these individuals enter formal education and seek to learn or relearn their endangered heritage language, they are often frustrated by…

  17. Danusia Latosinski on the Work that Won City College Norwich This Year's AoC President's Award

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latosinski, Danusia

    2009-01-01

    The transition from school to college can be a daunting experience for any young adult. But for someone who suffers from Asperger Syndrome (AS)--an Autistic Spectrum Disorder (ASD) which affects how a person makes sense of the world, processes information and relates to other people--adapting to new surroundings and meeting new people is an even…

  18. "Drinking won't get you thinking": a content analysis of adolescent-created print alcohol counter-advertisements.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Smita C; Greene, Kathryn; Hecht, Michael L; Magsamen-Conrad, Kate; Elek, Elvira

    2013-01-01

    Involvement in creating antialcohol advertisements generates enthusiasm among adolescents; however, little is known about the messages adolescents develop for these activities. In this article, we present a content analysis of 72 print alcohol counteradvertisements created by high school (age 14-17 years old) and college (18-25 years old) students. The posters were content analyzed for poster message content, persuasion strategies, and production components, and we compared high school and college student posters. All of the posters used a slogan to highlight the main point/message of the ad and counterarguments/consequences to support the slogans. The most frequently depicted consequences were negative consequences of alcohol use, followed by negative-positive consequence comparison. Persuasion strategies were sparingly used in advertisements and included having fun/one of the gang, humor/unexpected, glamour/sex appeal, and endorsement. Finally, posters displayed a number of production techniques including depicting people, clear setting, multiple colors, different font sizes, and object placement. College and high school student-constructed posters were similar on many features (e.g., posters displayed similar frequency of utilization of slogans, negative consequences, and positive-negative consequence comparisons), but were different on the use of positive consequences of not using alcohol and before-after comparisons. Implications for teaching media literacy and involving adolescents and youth in developing alcohol prevention messages are discussed. PMID:23980705

  19. "We Won't Get Ahead Speaking like That!" Expressing and Managing Language Criticism in Hawai'i

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marlow, Mikaela L.; Giles, Howard

    2010-01-01

    Ample research has explored language attitudes and speaker evaluations, yet it has not attended to direct incidences of language criticism. This article presents evidence demonstrating that a majority of those surveyed in Hawai'i have experienced language criticism. Coded data suggest that criticism takes place during employment, educational,…

  20. Large employers that have lived through transformation say payment reform alone won't cut costs and reengineer care.

    PubMed

    Sepúlveda, Martín J; Darling, Helen

    2012-09-01

    As payment reform in health care gathers momentum, employers, as major payers, endorse the effort to move away from volume-driven payment to incentivizing and rewarding the delivery of better health care at lower cost. In this commentary we discuss large employers' perspectives on three particular challenges that payment reform alone, as important as it is, may not be sufficient to address: high health care prices, inefficient and complex systems, and an outdated work environment ill designed to meet the pressing goals of better health care at lower cost. We believe that policies that support health care organizations in redesigning work processes will be essential to reducing prices and simplifying interactions in care delivery. We also believe that health care organizations will need to redesign their compensation systems to align their employees' pay with improvements in performance. To that end, we describe the major transformation that IBM underwent in the 1990s to position itself to compete in a radically changed computer marketplace. We also offer several policy recommendations to support health care organizations in making the necessary changes. PMID:22949453

  1. NE Won't Return to Pre-Recession Employment until 2015, but Region's "Education" Advantage Could Offer "Economic" Advantage

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gittell, Ross

    2012-01-01

    The New England states continue to experience slow growth and slow recovery of the jobs lost in the 2008 to 2009 recession. The main reason for this is the continued weakness in global and U.S. economic conditions. The U.S. and New England economies continue to be affected by the weak European economy and sovereign debt crisis and by weakness in…

  2. Breaking Up Is Hard to Do...When Your Downloaded File Won't Fit into Your Word Processor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koga, James S.

    1989-01-01

    Discussion of lack of room when downloading long searches onto a word processor focuses on three remedies: (1) choosing the right word processor; (2) using a utility program, such as CHOP2 or SPLIT.EXE; and (3) using the EDLIN program, which is part of a DOS disk. (five references) (LRW)

  3. "English King Frederick I Won at Arsuf, Then Took Acre, Then They All Went Home": Exploring the Challenges Involved in Reading and Writing Historical Narrative

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Worth, Paula

    2014-01-01

    Paula Worth draws on three professional traditions in history education in order to build a lesson sequence on the Crusades for her Year 7s. First, she draws on the growing tradition of classroom practice using historical scholarship, not only to inform the teacher's knowledge but to deepen her pupils' direct acquaintance with scholarly…

  4. You won`t find these leaks with a blower door: The latest in {open_quotes}leaking electricity{close_quotes} in homes

    SciTech Connect

    Rainer, L.; Greenberg, S.; Meier, A.

    1996-08-01

    Leaking electricity is the energy consumed by appliances when they are switched off or not performing their principal functions. Field measurements in Florida, California, and Japan show that leaking electricity represents 50 to 100 Watts in typical homes, corresponding to about 5 GW of total electricity demand in the United States. There are three strategies to reduce leaking electricity: eliminate leakage entirely, eliminate constant leakage and replace with intermittent charge plus storage, and improve efficiency of conversion. These options are constrained by the low value of energy savings-less than $5 per saved Watt. Some technical and lifestyle solutions are proposed. 13 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  5. The View from Topeka: Brown Plaintiffs, Local Officials Recall Victories Won, Declare Battles that Remain to Be Fought: Brown@50-- How Far Have We Come?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Kendra; Cerstvik, Joan Preston

    2004-01-01

    It's a little-known fact, but, 50 years ago, the junior high and high schools of Topeka, Kan., were integrated--though in name only. Fear was the order of the day at the high school, where an African American assistant superintendent by the name of Harrison Caldwell roamed the halls as the "White folks' enforcer," ensuring that African American…

  6. Device costs go under the knife. With four hospitals having won HHS' approval for gain-sharing to shave supply costs, some observers say it's just the beginning.

    PubMed

    Becker, Cinda

    2005-02-21

    HHS' inspector general's office recently had some good news for four hospitals--they can use gain-sharing programs to help cut spending on devices. Joane Goodroe, left, is the consultant who helped the facilities devise proposals with safeguards that could satisfy the feds' worries about violating antikickback laws. "This is about paying physicians to take on the extra job of of reducing costs," Goodroe says. PMID:15765835

  7. Why Some Faces won't be Remembered: Brain Potentials Illuminate Successful Versus Unsuccessful Encoding for Same-Race and Other-Race Faces

    PubMed Central

    Lucas, Heather D.; Chiao, Joan Y.; Paller, Ken A.

    2011-01-01

    Memory is often less accurate for faces from another racial group than for faces from one's own racial group. The mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are a topic of active debate. Contemporary theories invoke factors such as inferior expertise with faces from other racial groups and an encoding emphasis on race-specifying information. We investigated neural mechanisms of this memory bias by recording event-related potentials while participants attempted to memorize same-race (SR) and other-race (OR) faces. Brain potentials at encoding were compared as a function of successful versus unsuccessful recognition on a subsequent-memory test. Late positive amplitudes predicted subsequent memory for SR faces and, to a lesser extent, for OR faces. By contrast, the amplitudes of earlier frontocentral N200 potentials and occipito-temporal P2 potentials were larger for later-remembered relative to later-forgotten OR faces. Furthermore, N200 and P2 amplitudes were larger for OR faces with features considered atypical of that race relative to faces that were race-stereotypical (according to a consensus from a large group of other participants). In keeping with previous reports, we infer that these earlier potentials index the processing of unique or individuating facial information, which is key to remembering a face. Individuation may tend to be uniformly high for SR faces but lower and less reliable for OR faces. Individuation may also be more readily applied for OR faces that appear less stereotypical. These electrophysiological measures thus provide novel evidence that poorer memory for OR faces stems from encoding that is inadequate because it fails to emphasize individuating information. PMID:21441983

  8. What if You Build It and They Still Won't Come? Addressing Student Awareness of Resources and Services with Promotional Videos

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dalal, Heather A.; Lackie, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    After a needs assessment exposed that even daily library users were unaware of the best resources, tools, and services, the Rider University Libraries switched gears from a focus on the creation of long step-by-step tutorials, to the creation of short promotional videos for all users, with attention on the needs of distance learners. This project…

  9. Commentary on community-led total sanitation and human rights: should the right to community-wide health be won at the cost of individual rights?

    PubMed

    Bartram, Jamie; Charles, Katrina; Evans, Barbara; O'Hanlon, Lucinda; Pedley, Steve

    2012-12-01

    The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set out to halve the proportion of the population without access to basic sanitation between 1990 and 2015. The slow pace of progress has lead to a search for innovative responses, including social motivation approaches. One example of this type of approach is 'Community-led Total Sanitation' (CLTS). CLTS represents a major shift for sanitation projects and programmes in recognising the value of stopping open-defecation across the whole community, even when the individual toilets built are not necessarily wholly hygienic. However, recent publications on CLTS document a number of examples of practices which fail to meet basic ethical criteria and infringe human rights. There is a general theme in the CLTS literature encouraging the use of 'shame' or 'social stigma' as a tool for promoting behaviours. There are reported cases where monetary benefits to which individuals are otherwise entitled or the means to practice a livelihood are withheld to create pressures to conform. At the very extreme end of the scale, the investigation and punishment of violence has reportedly been denied if the crime occurred while defecating in the open, violating rights to a remedy and related access to justice. While social mobilisation in general, and CLTS in particular, have drastically and positively changed the way we think about sanitation, they neither need nor benefit from an association with any infringements of human rights. PMID:23165706

  10. "Won't Somebody 'Think' of the Children?" Emotions, Child Poverty, and Post-Humanitarian Possibilities for Social Justice Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Liz

    2014-01-01

    Under models of moral and global citizenship education, compassion and caring are emphasized as a counterpoint to pervasive, heartless, neo-liberal globalization. According to such views, these and related emotions such as empathy, sympathy, and pity, can cause people to act righteously to aid others who are disadvantaged through no fault of their…

  11. 'They won't change it back in their heads that we're trash': the intersection of sex work-related stigma and evolving policing strategies.

    PubMed

    Krüsi, Andrea; Kerr, Thomas; Taylor, Christina; Rhodes, Tim; Shannon, Kate

    2016-09-01

    In Vancouver, Canada, there has been a continuous shift in the policing of sex work away from arresting sex workers, which led to the implementation of a policing strategy that explicitly prioritised the safety of sex workers and continued to target sex workers' clients. We conducted semi-structured interviews with 26 cisgender and five transgender women street-based sex workers about their working conditions. Data were analysed thematically and by drawing on concepts of structural stigma and vulnerability. Our results indicated that despite police rhetoric of prioritising the safety of sex workers, participants were denied their citizenship rights for police protection by virtue of their 'risky' occupation and were thus responsiblised for sex work related violence. Our findings further suggest that sex workers' interactions with neighbourhood residents were predominantly shaped by a discourse of sex workers as a 'risky' presence in the urban landscape and police took swift action in removing sex workers in the case of complaints. This study highlights that intersecting regimes of stigmatisation and criminalisation continued to undermine sex workers citizenship rights to police protection and legal recourse and perpetuated labour conditions that render sex workers at increased risk for violence and poor health. PMID:27113456

  12. When Multiplication Facts Won't Stick: Could a Language/Story Approach Work? A Research Study Examining the Effectiveness of the "Memorize in Minutes" Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mahler, Joni D.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined whether a story/language based method of teaching the multiplication facts would be helpful to students who previously had difficulty with the memorization of those facts. Using the curriculum "Memorize in Minutes" by Alan Walker (Walker, 2000), the researcher taught six fourth-grade students the multiplication facts (3s…

  13. “A Campaign Won as a Public Issue Will Stay Won”: Using Cartoons and Comics to Fight National Health Care Reform, 1940s and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Knoblauch, Heidi Katherine

    2014-01-01

    On March 23, 2010, President Barack Obama signed the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act (ACA) into law. As it went through Congress, the legislation faced forceful resistance. Individuals and organizations opposing the ACA circulated propaganda that varied from photographs of fresh graves or coffins with the caption “Result of ObamaCare” to portrayals of President Obama as the Joker from the Batman movies, captioned with the single word “socialism.” The arguments embedded in these images have striking parallels to cartoons circulated by physicians to their patients in earlier fights against national health care. Examining cartoons used in the formative health care reform debates of the 1940s provides a means for tracing the lineage of emotional arguments employed against health care reform. PMID:24328659

  14. Body size dissatisfaction and avoidance behavior: how gender, age, ethnicity, and relative clothing size predict what some won't try.

    PubMed

    Maphis, Laura E; Martz, Denise M; Bergman, Shawn S; Curtin, Lisa A; Webb, Rose Mary

    2013-06-01

    Sixty-eight percent of U.S. adults are overweight/obese, and this epidemic has physical, psychosocial, and behavioral consequences. An internet sample of adults (N=2997) perceiving themselves as larger than ideal in clothing size reported their body mass index (BMI), relative clothing size (RS; discrepancy between current and ideal size), and avoidance behaviors. Exploratory factor analysis of 10 avoidance items produced social avoidance and body display avoidance factors. A relative importance analysis revealed RS as a better predictor than BMI for avoidance. A hierarchical multivariate analysis of covariance found RS to predict both avoidance constructs. The relationship between RS and both avoidance constructs was stronger for women than men, and for younger as compared to older participants. Caucasians reported more body display avoidance than African Americans. This suggests that personal dissatisfaction with body size may deter involvement in varied life events and that women are especially avoidant of activities that entail displaying their bodies. PMID:23540887

  15. Secrets of the Super Net Searchers: The Reflections, Revelations, and Hard-Won Wisdom of 35 of the World's Top Internet Researchers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Basch, Reva

    This book presents the collected wisdom of 35 leading Internet hunters and gatherers. Through interviews, these experts offer insights, anecdotes, tips, techniques, and case histories which will raise the "searching IQ" of any serious Internet user. The Super Net Searchers explain how they find valuable information on the Internet, revealing their…

  16. Infants' Understanding of the Link between Visual Perception and Emotion: "If She Can't See Me Doing It, She Won't Get Angry."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Repacholi, Betty M.; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Olsen, Berit

    2008-01-01

    Two experiments investigated 18-month-olds' understanding of the link between visual perception and emotion. Infants watched an adult perform actions on objects. An emoter then expressed neutral affect or anger toward the adult in response to the adult's actions. Subsequently, infants were given 20 s to interact with each object. In Experiment 1,…

  17. "I Won't Trust You if I Think You're Trying to Deceive Me": Relations between Selective Trust, Theory of Mind, and Imitation in Early Childhood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DiYanni, Cara; Nini, Deniela; Rheel, Whitney; Livelli, Alicia

    2012-01-01

    This study explores connections between 3-, 4-, and 5-year-olds' performance in theory-of-mind tasks, their performance on an assessment of selective trust, and their decisions to (not) imitate the questionable tool choices of an adult model. The prediction was that all the tasks would be related, with improvements in theory of mind and selective…

  18. Won't Get Fooled Again: An Event-Related Potential Study of Task and Repetition Effects on the Semantic Processing of Items without Semantics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laszlo, Sarah; Stites, Mallory; Federmeier, Kara D.

    2012-01-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that semantic access is obligatory. Several studies have demonstrated that brain activity associated with semantic processing, measured in the N400 component of the event-related brain potential (ERP), is elicited even by meaningless, orthographically illegal strings, suggesting that semantic access is not gated…

  19. I'd Do Anything for Research, But I Won't Do That: Interest in Pharmacological Interventions in Older Adults Enrolled in a Longitudinal Aging Study

    PubMed Central

    Calamia, Matthew; Bernstein, John P. K.; Keller, Jeffrey N.

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) ranks as the 6th leading cause of death in the United States, yet unlike other diseases in this category, there are no disease-modifying medications for AD. Currently there is significant interest in exploring the benefits of pharmacological treatment before the onset of dementia (e.g., in those with mild cognitive impairment); however, recruitment for such studies is challenging. The current study examined interest in pharmacological intervention trials relative to other types of clinical interventions. A total of 67 non-demented older adults enrolled in a longitudinal cognitive aging study completed a questionnaire assessing interest in participating in a variety of hypothetical research study designs. Consistent with past research, results showed that the opportunities for participants to advance science, receive feedback about their current health, and help themselves or others, were associated with increased interest in clinical trial participation. Some factors were not associated with change in interest (e.g., a doctor not recommending participation) while others were associated with decreased interest (e.g., having to come in for multiple visits each week). Relative to other types of interventions, pharmacological intervention trials were associated with the least interest in participation, despite pharmacological interventions being rated as more likely to result in AD treatment. Decreased interest was not predicted by subjective memory concerns, number of current medications, cardiovascular risk, or beliefs about the likely success of pharmacological treatments. These results highlight the challenges faced by researchers investigating pharmacological treatments in non-demented older individuals, and suggest future research could contribute to more effective ways of recruiting participants in AD-related clinical trials. PMID:27438465

  20. "If you don't believe it, it won't help you": use of bush medicine in treating cancer among Aboriginal people in Western Australia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Little is known about the use of bush medicine and traditional healing among Aboriginal Australians for their treatment of cancer and the meanings attached to it. A qualitative study that explored Aboriginal Australians' perspectives and experiences of cancer and cancer services in Western Australia provided an opportunity to analyse the contemporary meanings attached and use of bush medicine by Aboriginal people with cancer in Western Australia Methods Data collection occurred in Perth, both rural and remote areas and included individual in-depth interviews, observations and field notes. Of the thirty-seven interviews with Aboriginal cancer patients, family members of people who died from cancer and some Aboriginal health care providers, 11 participants whose responses included substantial mention on the issue of bush medicine and traditional healing were selected for the analysis for this paper. Results The study findings have shown that as part of their healing some Aboriginal Australians use traditional medicine for treating their cancer. Such healing processes and medicines were preferred by some because it helped reconnect them with their heritage, land, culture and the spirits of their ancestors, bringing peace of mind during their illness. Spiritual beliefs and holistic health approaches and practices play an important role in the treatment choices for some patients. Conclusions Service providers need to acknowledge and understand the existence of Aboriginal knowledge (epistemology) and accept that traditional healing can be an important addition to an Aboriginal person's healing complementing Western medical treatment regimes. Allowing and supporting traditional approaches to treatment reflects a commitment by modern medical services to adopting an Aboriginal-friendly approach that is not only culturally appropriate but assists with the cultural security of the service. PMID:20569478

  1. When the Cat Is Near, the Mice Won't Play: The Effect of External Examiners in Italian Schools. CEP Discussion Paper No. 1191

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertoni, Marco; Brunello, Giorgio; Rocco, Lorenzo

    2013-01-01

    We use a natural experiment to show that the presence of an external examiner has both a direct and an indirect negative effect on the performance of monitored classes in standardized educational tests. The direct effect is the difference in the test performance between classes of the same school with and without external examiners. The indirect…

  2. I won't let you down... or will I? Core self-evaluations, other-orientation, anticipated guilt and gratitude, and job performance.

    PubMed

    Grant, Adam M; Wrzesniewski, Amy

    2010-01-01

    Although core self-evaluations have been linked to higher job performance, research has shown variability in the strength of this relationship. We propose that high core self-evaluations are more likely to increase job performance for other-oriented employees, who tend to anticipate feelings of guilt and gratitude. We tested these hypotheses across 3 field studies using different operationalizations of both performance and other-orientation (prosocial motivation, agreeableness, and duty). In Study 1, prosocial motivation strengthened the association between core self-evaluations and the performance of professional university fundraisers. In Study 2, agreeableness strengthened the association between core self-evaluations and supervisor ratings of initiative among public service employees. In Study 3, duty strengthened the association between core self-evaluations and the objective productivity of call center employees, and this moderating relationship was mediated by feelings of anticipated guilt and gratitude. We discuss implications for theory and research on personality and job performance. PMID:20085409

  3. Why Johnny Won't Read: Schools Often Dismiss What Boys Like. No Wonder They're Not Wild about Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sullivan, Michael

    2004-01-01

    It's not that boys can not read, they just do not read. Study after study reveals that boys read less than girls. And according to the U.S. Department of Education, school-age boys tend to read a grade and a half lower than girls. How can librarians get guys to turn the page? For starters, they need to move beyond their traditional "here is a book…

  4. Distributed Leadership: A Good Theory but What if Leaders Won't, Don't Know How, or Can't Lead?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McKenzie, Kathryn Bell; Locke, Leslie Ann

    2014-01-01

    This article presents the results from an empirical qualitative study of the challenges faced by teacher leaders in their attempts to work directly with their colleagues to change instructional strategies and improve student success. Additionally, it offers a challenge to the utility of a naïvely espoused theory of distributed leadership, which…

  5. I'd Do Anything for Research, But I Won't Do That: Interest in Pharmacological Interventions in Older Adults Enrolled in a Longitudinal Aging Study.

    PubMed

    Calamia, Matthew; Bernstein, John P K; Keller, Jeffrey N

    2016-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) ranks as the 6th leading cause of death in the United States, yet unlike other diseases in this category, there are no disease-modifying medications for AD. Currently there is significant interest in exploring the benefits of pharmacological treatment before the onset of dementia (e.g., in those with mild cognitive impairment); however, recruitment for such studies is challenging. The current study examined interest in pharmacological intervention trials relative to other types of clinical interventions. A total of 67 non-demented older adults enrolled in a longitudinal cognitive aging study completed a questionnaire assessing interest in participating in a variety of hypothetical research study designs. Consistent with past research, results showed that the opportunities for participants to advance science, receive feedback about their current health, and help themselves or others, were associated with increased interest in clinical trial participation. Some factors were not associated with change in interest (e.g., a doctor not recommending participation) while others were associated with decreased interest (e.g., having to come in for multiple visits each week). Relative to other types of interventions, pharmacological intervention trials were associated with the least interest in participation, despite pharmacological interventions being rated as more likely to result in AD treatment. Decreased interest was not predicted by subjective memory concerns, number of current medications, cardiovascular risk, or beliefs about the likely success of pharmacological treatments. These results highlight the challenges faced by researchers investigating pharmacological treatments in non-demented older individuals, and suggest future research could contribute to more effective ways of recruiting participants in AD-related clinical trials. PMID:27438465

  6. "This Computer Gives You a Hard Bargain": Is It Conflict or Frustration When Software Won't Let You Change Your Mind?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kuschner, David

    This study focused on the cognitive conflicts experienced by young children in using software programs that provided them with tools to create and/or combine individual graphic elements into larger structures. Six 5-year-old children, none with prior computer experience, were observed using three programs--Kids at Work, Picture Perfect, and…

  7. Can't do it, won't do it! Developing a theoretically framed intervention to encourage better decontamination practice in Scottish dental practices

    PubMed Central

    Bonetti, Debbie; Young, Linda; Black, Irene; Cassie, Heather; Ramsay, Craig R; Clarkson, Jan

    2009-01-01

    Background Guidance on the cleaning of dental instruments in primary care has recently been published. The aims of this study are to determine if the publication of the guidance document was enough to influence decontamination best practice and to design an implementation intervention strategy, should it be required. Methods A postal questionnaire assessing current decontamination practice and beliefs was sent to a random sample of 200 general dental practitioners. Results Fifty-seven percent (N = 113) of general dental practitioners responded. The survey showed large variation in what dentists self-reported doing, perceived as necessary or practical to do, were willing to do, felt able to do, as well as what they planned to change. Only 15% self-reported compliance with the five key guideline-recommended individual-level decontamination behaviours; only 2% reported compliance with all 11 key practice-level behaviours. The results also showed that our participants were almost equally split between dentists who were completely unmotivated to implement best decontamination practice or else highly motivated. The results suggested there was scope for further enhancing the implementation of decontamination guidance, and that an intervention with the greatest likelihood of success would require a tailored format, specifically targeting components of the theory of planned behaviour (attitude, perceived behavioural control, intention) and implementation intention theory (action planning). Conclusion Considerable resources are devoted to encouraging clinicians to implement evidence-based practice using interventions with erratic success records, or no known applicability to a specific clinical behaviour, selected mainly by means of researchers' intuition or optimism. The methodology used to develop this implementation intervention is not limited to decontamination or to a single segment of primary care. It is also in accordance with the preliminary stages of the framework for evaluating complex interventions suggested by the medical research council. The next phases of this work are to test the intervention feasibility and evaluate its effectiveness in a randomised control trial. PMID:19500342

  8. Scary Stories You Won't Be Afraid To Use! Resources and Activities for a K-6 Audience. The Professional Growth Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schembri, Pamela

    This book contains more than 500 "scary story" resources that are designed to fascinate, delight, and educate students in grades K-6. Written by a school librarian who thinks storytelling is essential in the classroom, the book includes many lesson plans and activities for all curricular areas--English, language arts, social studies, science,…

  9. Why I Force My Students to Memorize Poetry: Despite the Fact that It Won't Be on the Standardized Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waddell, Andy

    2011-01-01

    So often teachers see education as a series of units leading to an examination, which will in turn prepare students for the SATs or APs they need to pass to enter university where, if they pass other examinations, they will graduate and earn large incomes. Teachers hold those future earnings before their students like a carrot while beating them…

  10. We Made Your Bed, Why Won't You Lie in It? Food Availability and Disease May Affect Reproductive Output of Reintroduced Frogs.

    PubMed

    Klop-Toker, Kaya; Valdez, Jose; Stockwell, Michelle; Fardell, Loren; Clulow, Simon; Clulow, John; Mahony, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Mitigation to offset the impacts of land development is becoming increasingly common, with reintroductions and created habitat programs used as key actions. However, numerous reviews cite high rates of poor success from these programs, and a need for improved monitoring and scientific testing to evaluate outcomes and improve management actions. We conducted extensive monitoring of a released population of endangered green and golden bell frogs, Litoria aurea, within a created habitat, as well as complementary surveys of a surrounding wild population. We then compared differences between the created habitat and natural ponds where extant frogs either bred or didn't breed in order to determine factors that contributed to the breeding failure within the created habitat. We evaluated differences of L. aurea abundance, abundance of other fauna, vegetation, water quality, habitat structure, invasive fish, and disease between the three pond types (created habitat, breeding ponds, non-breeding ponds). We discovered that vegetation and invertebrate diversity were low within the created habitat, potentially reducing energy and nutritional resources required for breeding. Also, a greater proportion of frogs in the created habitat were carrying the chytrid fungal pathogen, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, compared to the wild populations. In addition to causing the potentially fatal disease, chytridiomycosis, this pathogen has been shown to reduce reproductive functioning in male L. aurea, and subsequently may have reduced reproductive activities in the created habitat. Conspecific attraction, pond hydrology, and aquatic vegetation may also have had some influence on breeding behaviours, whilst the presence of the invasive mosquitofish, Gambusia holbrooki, and heterospecific tadpoles were unlikely to have deterred L. aurea from breeding within the created habitat. Through the use of scientific testing and monitoring, this study is able to make recommendations for future amphibian breed and release programs, and suggests planting a diversity of plant species to attract invertebrates, creating some permanent ponds, connecting habitat with existing populations, trialling artificial mating calls, and following recommendations to reduce the prevalence of disease within the population. PMID:27463095

  11. Can't Sing? Won't Sing? Aotearoa/New Zealand "Tone-Deaf" Early Childhood Teachers' Musical Beliefs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Swain, Nicola; Bodkin-Allen, Sally

    2014-01-01

    Singing is an important part of teaching for early childhood teachers. However, some teachers find this difficult and may even identify themselves as "tone-deaf". We invited a group of early childhood teachers who self-identified as "tone-deaf" to participate in a study to investigate their beliefs and behaviours about singing…

  12. Why Counting Attendees Won't Cut it for Evaluation in the 21st Century: Planning and Evaluating Informal Science Programs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korn, R.

    2012-08-01

    Yogi Berra once said, "If you don't know where you are going, how will you know when you get there?" One could ask the same question to those of us who work in science education and outreach - if you haven't articulated clear goals about what you would like your program to achieve, how on Earth will you know whether you have achieved them? While all of us want to do the right thing for our audiences, knowing that we have actually done so is another story. Without sound planning (clarifying outcomes) evaluation is a moot point, and with more and more funding agencies asking their grantees to evaluate their informal science education efforts, planning with the end in mind is becoming a necessity. With budget, staffing, and time limitations, it's easy to lose track of the value of planning and evaluation. And evaluation can seem a daunting task for those who have not done it, especially when an audience is temporary or spread out over a region or the entire nation. To respond to the demands, many good books are now available with ideas for evaluating projects outside the formal classroom, including several published by the National Research Academies and NSF. In this article, we will discuss the importance of planning and evaluation, no matter what your budget size, we will share examples of how unusual projects have been evaluated, and we will suggest questions you can ask yourself and your audiences that will help you think like an evaluator. To achieve results, program leaders must first clarify what they want to achieve and then align all actions and resources towards achieving those ends. Will your strategic and daily work change as a result? Absolutely! But only if you want your program to make a difference in people's lives.

  13. 'It's The Sun Wot Won It': Evidence of media influence on political attitudes and voting from a UK quasi-natural experiment.

    PubMed

    Reeves, Aaron; McKee, Martin; Stuckler, David

    2016-03-01

    Do print media significantly impact political attitudes and party identification? To examine this question, we draw on a rare quasi-natural experiment that occurred when The Sun, a right-leaning UK tabloid, shifted its support to the Labour party in 1997 and back to the Conservative party in 2010. We compared changes in party identification and political attitudes among Sun readers with non-readers and other newspaper readerships. We find that The Sun's endorsements were associated with a significant increase in readers' support for Labour in 1997, approximately 525,000 votes, and its switch back was associated with about 550,000 extra votes for the Conservatives in 2010. Although we observed changes in readers' party preference, there was no effect on underlying political preferences. The magnitude of these changes, about 2% of the popular vote, would have been unable to alter the outcome of the 1997 General Election, but may have affected the 2010 Election. PMID:26857171

  14. Healthcare holds on tight. As the markets roil and financial giants fall, experts say things won't be all that bad for healthcare organizations.

    PubMed

    Galloro, Vince

    2008-09-22

    Investor fear stirred up by the news last week about Lehman Bros. and AIG should eventually subside, leaving little long-term effect on healthcare finance, experts say. Chris Payne, left, with healthcare financial advisory firm Ponder & Co., says, "I don't see any fundamental reason why this will cause a lack of capital to healthcare organizations". PMID:18825808

  15. Infants' understanding of the link between visual perception and emotion: "If she can't see me doing it, she won't get angry.".

    PubMed

    Repacholi, Betty M; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Olsen, Berit

    2008-03-01

    Two experiments investigated 18-month-olds' understanding of the link between visual perception and emotion. Infants watched an adult perform actions on objects. An emoter then expressed neutral affect or anger toward the adult in response to the adult's actions. Subsequently, infants were given 20 s to interact with each object. In Experiment 1, the emoter faced infants with a neutral expression during each 20-s response period but looked at either a magazine or the infant. In Experiment 2, the emoter faced infants with a neutral expression, and her eyes were either open or closed. When the emoter visually monitored infants' actions, the infants regulated their object-directed behavior on the basis of their memory of the emoter's affect. However, if the previously angry emoter read a magazine (Experiment 1) or closed her eyes (Experiment 2), infants were not governed by her prior emotion. Infants behaved as if they expected the emoter to get angry only if she could see them performing the actions. These findings suggest that infants appreciate how people's visual experiences influence their emotions and use this information to regulate their own behavior. PMID:18331144

  16. Key opinion leaders and the corruption of medical knowledge: what the Sunshine Act will and won't cast light on.

    PubMed

    Sismondo, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    The pharmaceutical industry, in its marketing efforts, often turns to "key opinion leaders" or "KOLs" to disseminate scientific information. Drawing on the author's fieldwork, this article documents and examines the use of KOLs in pharmaceutical companies' marketing efforts. Partly due to the use of KOLs, a small number of companies with well-defined and narrow interests have inordinate influence over how medical knowledge is produced, circulated, and consumed. The issue here, as in many other cases of institutional corruption, is that a few actors have accumulated the power to shape the information on which many others base their decisions. Efforts to address this corruption should focus on correcting large imbalances in the current political economy of medical knowledge. A sequestration of pharmaceutical research and development on one hand from pharmaceutical marketing on the other, though difficult to achieve, would address this and many other problems. PMID:24088154

  17. In a Year, Memory Will Benefit from Learning, Tomorrow It Won't: Distance and Construal Level Effects on the Basis of Metamemory Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halamish, Vered; Nussinson, Ravit; Ben-Ari, Liat

    2013-01-01

    Metamemory judgments may rely on 2 bases of information: subjective experience and abstract theories about memory. On the basis of construal level theory, we predicted that psychological distance and construal level (i.e., concrete vs. abstract thinking) would have a qualitative impact on the relative reliance on these 2 bases: When considering…

  18. Why Won't My Torch Work? Physics for 4 to 8 Year Olds. Australian Early Childhood Resource Booklets No. 1.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fleer, Marilyn

    Young children in Australia enter early childhood education settings eager to make sense of the world that surrounds them. Their interest in every day experiences is evident in the range of questions asked, many of which are scientific in nature. Intended as a resource for adults working with 4-to 8-year-old children, this booklet provides an…

  19. What You Don't Look For, You Won't Find: A Commentary on Card and Giuliano's Examination of Universal Screening

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McBee, Matthew T.

    2016-01-01

    Card and Giuliano's National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) working paper on universal screening is discussed. This commentary provides a brief summary and critique of the article, proposes an explanation of the results in light of the author's research on the role of nominations or screening tests in the gifted identification process, and…

  20. "I won't be around forever": Understanding the decision-making experiences of adults with severe TBI and their parents.

    PubMed

    Knox, Lucy; Douglas, Jacinta M; Bigby, Christine

    2016-01-01

    There is growing recognition of the right of all individuals, including those with cognitive impairment, to make decisions about their own lives. However, little is known about how the process of decision making is experienced after severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study used constructivist grounded theory to explore processes used by adults with severe TBI and their parents in making decisions about life after injury. Data consisted of 18 individual, in-depth interviews with four dyads (consisting of an individual with severe TBI and his or her parent). The overlying construct emerging from the data was a process of reimagining the future, which influenced how participants approached and participated in making decisions. In line with this construct, two central themes described processes of joint decision making within parent-adult child relationships after severe TBI over time: (1) making decisions with parental support, and (2) reducing parental involvement. These findings emphasise the complexity of supporting decision making after injury, and illustrate that both parents and their adult children with TBI use explicit and implicit strategies to facilitate increased participation in making decisions. This study also underscores the need for brain injury clinicians to consider the needs of parents who find themselves in this role. PMID:25751119

  1. "You Won't Believe What They Said in Class Today": Professors' Reflections on Student Resistance in Multicultural Education Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunn, Alyssa Hadley; Dotson, Erica K.; Ford, Jillian C.; Roberts, Mari Ann

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the authors Dunn, Dotson, Ford, and Roberts, discuss the ways they, as professors of multicultural education with different identities and experiences, attempt to understand and respond to students' implicit or explicit resistance in their classes. Though there has been a broad range of literature on student resistance, the…

  2. "But They Won't Let You Read!" A Case Study of an Urban Middle School Male's Response to School Reading

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enriquez, Grace

    2013-01-01

    This qualitative case study presents the perceptions of Derrick, a Black urban adolescent male who enjoys reading but believes that inconsistent school discourses hinder his success and enjoyment as a reader. Findings show that Derrick's purposeful work while reading was limited and misunderstood because, among other factors, there was a pervasive…

  3. "They Won't Let Us Play ... Unless You're Going out with One of Them": Girls, Boys and Butler's "Heterosexual Matrix" in the Primary Years

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Renold, Emma

    2006-01-01

    Judith Butler's conceptualisation of how gender is routinely spoken through a hegemonic heterosexual matrix has been pivotal for many social scientists researching within and beyond educational settings for exposing the ways in which children's normative gender identities ("intelligible genders") are inextricably tied to dominant notions of…

  4. Beyond the Network News: Progressive Sources for the News You and Your Students Won't See on Fox or CNN

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorski, Paul

    2007-01-01

    Multicultural educators have long fought for diversity in the curriculum, equitable representation in text books, and the inclusion of student voices in the learning process. These are important fights, but they are doomed to result only in tokenism if multicultural educators do not incorporate the skills of critical thinking into the…

  5. The HIPAA headache. It just won't go away. An exclusive survey of privacy officers says full compliance with the 1-year-old regulations is still elusive.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, John

    2004-04-12

    After a year of HIPAA, there's still some adjusting to do. Some don't grasp the value of accounting to patients about disclosures, but HHS' Richard Campanelli, left, says it offers patients reassurance that their data was safeguarded. Baylor's Donna Bowers, on the cover, says caregivers are now understanding that "Maybe (patients) do care that I'm asking all these personal questions in front of all these people." PMID:15124410

  6. In the Maelstrom of American Independent Education: A School Leader's Guide to Chaos, Change, Competing Agendas, and the Dilemmas that Won't Go Away

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Valentine, Stephen J.

    2014-01-01

    Today, independent school leaders operate at the fault line of pundits, parents, teachers, staff, students, board members, researchers, consultants, and more. They need to lead key constituents while weighing constituent expectations. They need to know how to sift through the increasing flow of evolving practices, research, and viewpoints…

  7. Reversing hard won victories in the name of human rights: a critique of the General Comment on Article 12 of the UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Melvyn Colin; Kolappa, Kavitha; de Almeida, Jose Miguel Caldas; Kleinman, Arthur; Makhashvili, Nino; Phakathi, Sifiso; Saraceno, Benedetto; Thornicroft, Graham

    2015-09-01

    The UN Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities (CRPD) is a major milestone in safeguarding the rights of persons with disabilities. However, the General Comment on Article 12 of the CRPD threatens to undermine critical rights for persons with mental disabilities, including the enjoyment of the highest attainable standard of health, access to justice, the right to liberty, and the right to life. Stigma and discrimination might also increase. Much hinges on the Committee on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities' view that all persons have legal capacity at all times irrespective of mental status, and hence involuntary admission and treatment, substitute decision-making, and diversion from the criminal justice system are deemed indefensible. The General Comment requires urgent consideration with the full participation of practitioners and a broad range of user and family groups. PMID:26236004

  8. "You've Got to Teach People that Racism Is Wrong and Then They Won't Be Racist": Curricular Representations and Young People&'s Understandings of "Race" and Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bryan, Audrey

    2012-01-01

    This paper critically examines the discursive (mis) representation of "race" and racism in the formal curriculum. Combining qualitative data derived from interviews with 35 young people who were enrolled in a Dublin-based, ethnically diverse secondary school, with a critical discursive analysis of 20 textbooks, the paper explores parallels between…

  9. Jackie Joyner-Kersee: Living with Asthma | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Table of Contents Jackie Joyner-Kersee Olympic triple Gold Medalist Jackie Joyner-Kersee became the world’s top ... the Year. In 1988, she won two Olympic Gold Medals. And in 1992, she won Olympic Gold ...

  10. Erratum: Suicidal ideation and suicide attempts in five groups with different severities of gambling: Findings from the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions by Jacquelene F. Moghaddam, Gihyun Yoon, Daniel L. Dickerson, Suck Won Kim, and Joseph Westermeyer DOI: 10.1111/ajad.12197.

    PubMed

    2015-12-01

    In Ref.[1], the following error was published under the Declaration of Interest. The article erroneously acknowledged the receipt of a funding source #1R01AA022066-01. We apologize for this error. PMID:26767449

  11. Other School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights selected construction projects for learning centers, early childhood and development schools, and special purpose educational facilities that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001.(GR)

  12. Elementary School Projects.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights elementary school construction projects that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001. Projects covered involve new school construction; and renovation, additions, and restoration. (GR)

  13. Title Attributes of Successful Books in the United States: 1910-1990.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, William C.

    This study examined titles of successful books, i.e., those that were best sellers or won literary prizes. In all, 3,239 titles in 71 lists by decade were characterized. The single largest category was popular general fiction followed by general nonfiction. About 49% of the titles won or were nominated for awards, and 45% were best sellers. Most…

  14. Ralph Bunche's International Legacy: The Middle East, Congo, and United Nations Peacekeeping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lyman, Princeton N.

    2004-01-01

    Ralph Bunche is remembered most for three major achievements in the international field. His mediation of the end of the first Israel-Arab war, for which he won the Nobel Peace Prize; his work in the tumultuous period of independence in the Congo; and his "invention" of United Nations peacekeeping, which itself won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1950.…

  15. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: StreetScape Development, LLC, Libertyville, Illinois

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2013-09-01

    These single-family, HERS 45 homes incorporate 2×6 wood framed walls with R-20 open cell spray insulation and OSB. The builder, StreetScape Development, won a 2013 Housing Innovation Award in the custom builder category.

  16. DOE Zero Energy Ready Home Case Study: Amerisips Homes — Miller-Bloch Residence, Johns Island, SC

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2014-09-01

    For this DOE Zero Energy Ready Home that won a Custom Builder award in the 2014 Housing Innovation Awards, the builder uses structural insulated panels to construct the entire building shell, including the roof, walls, and floor of the home.

  17. 47 CFR 22.221 - Eligibility for partitioned licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... won at auction (see 47 CFR 1.2105(a)(2)(viii)); (b) Each party to an agreement to partition the... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Competitive Bidding Procedures §...

  18. 47 CFR 22.221 - Eligibility for partitioned licenses.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... won at auction (see 47 CFR 1.2105(a)(2)(viii)); (b) Each party to an agreement to partition the... PUBLIC MOBILE SERVICES Licensing Requirements and Procedures Competitive Bidding Procedures §...

  19. Vaccines Stop Illness

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Vaccines Stop Illness Past Issues / Spring 2008 Table of ... meningitis won't infect, cripple, or kill children. Vaccine Safety In light of recent questions about vaccine ...

  20. Toxocariasis (For Parents)

    MedlinePlus

    ... español Toxocariasis When common parasites of dogs and cats infect humans, the illness is called toxocariasis (or ... or kids whose families have pet dogs or cats. Signs and Symptoms Many kids won't have ...

  1. If My Child Has Asthma, Can We Keep Our Pet?

    MedlinePlus

    ... people say that certain breeds of dogs or cats, particularly those that don't shed, won't ... HEPA air cleaners can really help, especially for cat allergies. Vacuums are available with HEPA filters as ...

  2. Looking Back on Books and Other Guides.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Carl D.

    1981-01-01

    Presents 11 responses received from U.S. scientists who have won Nobel Prizes (physics or physics-related work) indicating what books, discoveries, people, or issues of the last 50 years have most decisively influenced them. (Author/JN)

  3. Preschool Language Disorder

    MedlinePlus

    ... not get a language disorder from learning a second language. It won't confuse your child to speak ... on child language disorders describes research supporting the benefits of speech-language pathology treatment for children with language disorders. It ...

  4. Sertraline

    MedlinePlus

    Sertraline is used to treat depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder (bothersome thoughts that won't go away and the need to perform certain actions over and over), panic attacks (sudden, unexpected attacks ...

  5. Taking Care of Your Teeth

    MedlinePlus

    ... but it won't remove the plaque and particles of food between your teeth, under the gumline, ... frequency sound waves to loosen plaque deposits. The particles are then rinsed off with water. After cleaning, ...

  6. Initiating Improvements: The HR Department as the Architect of Quality-of-Life Initiatives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reis, Frank William

    2002-01-01

    Describes how a wellness program, campus safety and security program, and institutional knowledge management program are succeeding at Cuyahoga Community College after the human resources (HR) department won administrative support for their implementation. (EV)

  7. Electric Shock Injuries in Children

    MedlinePlus

    ... comes into direct contact with a source of electricity, the current passes through it, producing what's called ... sturdy, dry, nonmetallic object that won't conduct electricity. Move the child as little as possible because ...

  8. Considering Concierge.

    PubMed

    Berlin, Joey

    2016-01-01

    Concierge medicine, a practice model in which the patient pays an annual membership fee or retainer for services that won't be covered by insurance, is garnering more attention from physicians. PMID:27295287

  9. Prepare for Diabetes Care in Heat and Emergencies

    MedlinePlus

    ... room fan won't cool you enough. Too Hot to Handle Know what else feels the heat? ... diabetes medicine in direct sunlight or in a hot car. Check package information about how high temperatures ...

  10. Middle/High School Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Learning By Design, 2001

    2001-01-01

    Highlights middle school/high school construction projects that have won the Learning By Design Awards for 2001. Projects covered involve new school construction; and renovation, additions, and restoration. (GR)