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Sample records for miocene hawthorn group

  1. Occurrence and distribution of phosphatic Miocene Hawthorne Group on Georgia inner continental shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Kellam, J.A.; Reuth, L.S.; Henry, V.J.

    1987-05-01

    Miocene-age strata contain economically significant quantities of phosphate in Florida and North Carolina. Previously, units of similar age and lithology offshore Georgia were poorly defined geographically and stratigraphically. Through interpretation of high-resolution seismic data and correlation with well logs, it is possible to delineate middle Miocene units on the Georgia shelf. The middle Miocene Coosawhatchie formation consists primarily of phosphatic, shallow marine, terrigenous sands and clays, with clays (Berryville clay member) dominating offshore and grading shoreward into the predominantly sandy Ebenezer member. The Tybee phosphoritic member, the basal unit of the middle Miocene in the coastal area, averages 20 ft thick in eastern Chatham County and is present in varying thickness along coastal Georgia. The Tybee phosphorite member is of interest as its phosphorite concentration is roughly comparable to the phosphorites currently being mined in Florida and North Carolina. It is not always possible to identify the Tybee phosphorite member as a unique reflector on seismic records. As the basal member of the Coosawhatchie formation, however, its geographic extent is approximated by the structure-contour of the base of the middle Miocene. The base of the middle Miocene deepens southward from about 82 ft below surface, adjacent to Tybee Island, to more than 395 ft, seaward of Cumberland Island. Middle Miocene sediments on the Georgia shelf range in thickness from 0 to greater than 175 ft, thickening to the east and south.

  2. Hawthorn

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hawthorn is a spiny, flowering shrub or small tree of the rose family. The species of hawthorn discussed here are native to northern European regions and grow throughout the world. Historically, hawthorn fruit has been used for heart ...

  3. Hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Fong, Harry H S; Bauman, Jerry L

    2002-07-01

    Crataegus monogyna Jacq (Lindm), C. laevigata (Poir) DC, or related Crataegus species, collectively known as hawthorn, have been used in the treatment of cardiovascular diseases. Clinical studies have found that standardized extracts show promise as adjunctive agents for the treatment of left ventricular dysfunction. Other trials consistently demonstrate its ability to improve exercise tolerance and symptoms of mild to moderate heart failure. Preliminary evidence indicates that it improves left ventricular performance, as measured by ejection fraction. In order to properly use hawthorn in the treatment of heart failure, a large, controlled, multicenter trial in which mortality serves as the primary endpoint is needed. PMID:12597258

  4. Biostratigraphy of the Hawthorn formation in northeast and north central Florida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoenstine, R. W.

    Cores recently drilled along Florida's east coast by the Florida Bureau of Geology have yielded a record of the most complete Florida Hawthorn fossiliferous sediments heretofor available for biostratigraphic analysis. The record of Hawthorn deposition extends from the Early Miocene in sediments near the base of this formation in Nassau County to what appears to be Early Pliocene time in core sediments present in Indian River and St. Lucie counties. A diversity of microfossil groups including diatoms, silicoflagellates, foraminifera and coccoliths were identified in the Hawthorn sediments. Diatoms, which represented the largest and most definitive number of species, where the primary group used to determine the biochronology and paleoenvironmental interpretations of this important phosphate-bearing formation. Three biostratigraphic zones of Middle Miocene to Late Middle Miocene age can be recognized in the Hawthorn sediments (Coscinodiscus plicatus, Coscinodiscus plicatus/Delphineis penelliptica, Delphineis penelliptica zones).

  5. Hawthorne Control Procedures in Educational Experiments: A Reconsideration of Their Use and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, John G.; And Others

    A meta-analysis was conducted on 44 educational studies that used either a (labelled) Hawthorne control group, a manipulation of Hawthorne effects, or a group designed to control for the Hawthorne effect. The sample included published journal articles, ERIC documents or unpublished papers, and dissertations. The studies were coded on 20 variables,

  6. Hawthorne Control Procedures in Educational Experiments: A Reconsideration of Their Use and Effectiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adair, John G.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    A descriptive analysis of research practices and a meta-analysis of control group effect sizes are used to address Hawthorne effects in educational experiments. The analysis of 86 studies and 256 treatment/Hawthorne/no-treatment control group effect size comparisons indicate that artifact controls have limited utility in dealing with the Hawthorne

  7. Process Writing with Hawthorne.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edwards, Lita R.

    Teachers can use the process writing format for many assignments to teach and refine more skills than are often incorporated in older methods, and this is exemplified by a teaching unit comparing two short stories by Nathaniel Hawthorne. Peer conferences and peer editing in the revision stages, which are features of the process model, can lead to

  8. Programmed Student Achievement: A Hawthorne Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haddad, Nabil F.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Three groups of college students were given instructions using different testing techniques to determine whether the superior performance obtained with Programed Student Achievement (PA) was due to a Hawthorne Effect. Results seem to preclude any attempt to interpret the effectiveness of PA on that basis. (Editor/JT)

  9. Depositional environments and paleogeography of the Upper Miocene Wassuk Group, west-central Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Golia, R.T.; Stewart, John H.

    1984-01-01

    Fluvial and lacustrine deposits of the Miocene Wassuk Group, exposed in Coal Valley, west-central Nevada, are divided into five lithofacies: (1) diatomite, claystone, siltstone, and carbonaceous siltstone deposited in a lake with paludal conditions at the margin; (2) upward-coarsening sequences of sandstone deposited on a delta and fan-delta; (3) channel-form sandstone deposited on a distal braided alluvial plain; (4) clast-supported conglomerate deposited on a proxial braided alluvial plain or distal alluvial fan; and (5) matrix-supported conglomerate deposited on a distal to middle alluvial fan. Petrographic analysis records an upsection change from a predominantly andesitic to a predominantly plutonic provenance. This change, combined with the overall upward-coarsening of the Wassuk Group and the great thickness (2400 m) of the sequence, suggests active uplift and rapid subsidence during deposition of the group. Facies relationships and paleocurrent directions indicate source areas to the south, southeast and west of Coal Valley. The Miocene Wassuk Group was deposited in an intra-arc basin with penecontemporaneous volcanism and tectonic activity. Syndepositional faulting at the southern margin of Coal Valley between 13 and 11 m.y. ago suggests an early episode of northeast-southwest extension prior to the onset of east-west basin and range extension. ?? 1984.

  10. The Hawthorne Misunderstanding (and How to Get the Hawthorne Effect in Action Research).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Gary D.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the original Hawthorne relay-assembly research. Asserts the "Hawthorne misunderstanding" is common in criminology and criminal justice because authors have failed to properly attribute the explanation of increased work output to the Hawthorne effect. Describes the Hawthorne effect, how it is produced, and ways to achieve the Hawthorne

  11. Funalichnus bhubani isp. nov. from Bhuban Formation, Surma Group (Lower -Middle Miocene) of Aizawl, Mizoram, India

    PubMed Central

    Tiwari, Raghavendra Prasad; Rajkonwar, Chinmoy; Patel, Satish Jaychandbhai

    2013-01-01

    A new ichnospecies of the ichnogenus Funalichnus Pokorný is described from the Middle Bhuban Unit, Bhuban Formation, Surma Group (Lower - Middle Miocene) of Aizawl, Mizoram, India. Funalichnus bhubani isp. Nov. Is a large burrow displaying cylindrical segments that are oriented nearly perpendicular to the bedding plane. The new ichnospecies can be identified on the basis of general form, size, unlined passive filling and twisted rod-like structure. The association of Funalichnus bhubani isp. Nov. With Arenicolites, Diplocraterion, Ophiomorpha Psilonichnus Skolithos and Thalassinoides points to its bathymetric restriction. The deep extension of the burrow in clastic sediments provides a favourable condition for preservation in the shoreface environment and occurrence in fine- to medium-grained clastic sediments may be a preservational preference. PMID:24204992

  12. A Hawthorne strategy: implications for performance measurement and improvement.

    PubMed

    Lied, T R; Kazandjian, V A

    1998-01-01

    The Hawthorne experiments are a backdrop for diverse studies assessing the impact of treatment and experimentation on human and organizational performance. The Hawthorne effect is used to describe the positive impact on behavior that sometimes occurs in a study or experiment as a result of the interest shown by the experimenter in humans who are being treated, studied, or observed. We propose that the Hawthorne effect can be viewed as an active construct to develop a coherent strategy for performance improvement. We propose a "Hawthorne strategy" that transcends the Hawthorne effect in that it offers an approach to improving performance indefinitely. This strategy uses external observations of performance to increase internal commitment to performance improvement. The focus of individual responsibility increases as does the perceived connection between individual efforts and external performance improvement. The sense of accountability is maintained by institutional recognition and periodic reinforcement of individual behaviors that contribute to performance improvement. A successful Hawthorne strategy encourages providers of care to be evaluators of their performance as individuals, as members of groups, and as members of institutions. PMID:10351289

  13. What Caused the Hawthorne Effect?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parsons, H. McIlvaine

    1978-01-01

    Together, information feedback and differential reward could account for the gradually increasing productivity in the Hawthorne plant, especially in an explanatory framework of response shaping in operant conditioning. (Author/IRT)

  14. Late Miocene diversification and phylogenetic relationships of the huge toads in the Rhinella marina (Linnaeus, 1758) species group (Anura: Bufonidae).

    PubMed

    Maciel, Natan Medeiros; Collevatti, Rosane Garcia; Colli, Guarino Rinaldi; Schwartz, Elisabeth Ferroni

    2010-11-01

    We investigated the phylogeny and biogeography of the Rhinella marina group, using molecular, morphological, and skin-secretion data, contributing to an understanding of Neotropical faunal diversification. The maximum-parsimony and Bayesian analyzes of the combined data recovered a monophyletic R. marina group. Molecular dating based on Bayesian inferences and fossil calibration placed the earliest phylogenetic split within the R. marina group at ? 10.47 MYA, in the late Miocene. Two rapid major diversifications occurred from Central Brazil, first northward (? 8.08 MYA) in late Miocene and later southward (? 5.17 MYA) in early Pliocene. These results suggest that barriers and dispersal routes created by the uplift of Brazilian Central Shield and climatic changes explain the diversification and current species distributions of the R. marina group. Dispersal-vicariance analyzes (DIVA) indicated that the two major diversifications of the R. marina group were due to vicariance, although eleven dispersals subsequently occurred. PMID:20813190

  15. The Hawthorne Misunderstanding (and How to Get the Hawthorne Effect in Action Research).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gottfredson, Gary D.

    1996-01-01

    Examines the original Hawthorne relay-assembly research. Asserts the "Hawthorne misunderstanding" is common in criminology and criminal justice because authors have failed to properly attribute the explanation of increased work output to the Hawthorne effect. Describes the Hawthorne effect, how it is produced, and ways to achieve the Hawthorne…

  16. An Observation of Hawthorne Effect in an Experiment in the Teaching of Reading in First Grade: A Hypothesis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCracken, Robert A.

    1968-01-01

    Speculates about the presence of a negative Hawthorne effect on a control group in addition to a positive effect on the experimental group in an experiment involving 2 first-grade teachers and their classes, and draws implications for studies which seek to control for possible interference by positive and negative Hawthorne effects. Bibliography.

  17. The Hawthorne Effect: A Fresh Examination.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Diaper, Gordon

    1990-01-01

    Reexamines definitions of and explanations for the Hawthorne Effect in research subjects. Notes that the Hawthorne Effect was tested in a study of the effectiveness of paired classroom reading among students. Challenges the notion that subject's behavior is modified by participation in research. Reviews various research studies that question the

  18. Hawthorn Fruit Extract Elevates Expression of Nrf2/HO-1 and Improves Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats.

    PubMed

    Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Liu, Yanan; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge) extract on the lipid profiles and antioxidant properties in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. After ovariectomy, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: the non-OVX control (Sham), the OVX-control (OVX), the OVX + 100 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OL), and the OVX + 200 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OH). The final body weights of the OVX group were significantly increased, but the increment was significantly decreased in hawthorn groups (p < 0.05). The serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups showed a significant decrease in these levels (p < 0.05). The hepatic triglyceride (TG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly reduced in the hawthorn groups compared with the OVX group (p < 0.05). The mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly decreased in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups exhibited a significant increase in expression (p < 0.05). The protein expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GPx were lower in the OVX group than the Sham group (p < 0.05). The oral administration of hawthorn extract reversed the suppression of protein levels. These results suggest that hawthorn extract could have protective effects in OVX rats by improving lipid profiles, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving the antioxidant defense system. PMID:27187458

  19. Hawthorn Fruit Extract Elevates Expression of Nrf2/HO-1 and Improves Lipid Profiles in Ovariectomized Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yoo, Jeong-Hyun; Liu, Yanan; Kim, Hyun-Sook

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bunge) extract on the lipid profiles and antioxidant properties in ovariectomized (OVX) rats. After ovariectomy, the rats were randomly divided into four groups: the non-OVX control (Sham), the OVX-control (OVX), the OVX + 100 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OL), and the OVX + 200 mg/kg b.w. of hawthorn extract (OH). The final body weights of the OVX group were significantly increased, but the increment was significantly decreased in hawthorn groups (p < 0.05). The serum total and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels were significantly elevated in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups showed a significant decrease in these levels (p < 0.05). The hepatic triglyceride (TG) and malondialdehyde (MDA) levels were significantly reduced in the hawthorn groups compared with the OVX group (p < 0.05). The mRNA expression of nuclear factor erythroid 2–related factor (Nrf2), heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1), and glutathione peroxidase (GPx) were significantly decreased in the OVX group, whereas the hawthorn groups exhibited a significant increase in expression (p < 0.05). The protein expressions of Nrf2, HO-1, and GPx were lower in the OVX group than the Sham group (p < 0.05). The oral administration of hawthorn extract reversed the suppression of protein levels. These results suggest that hawthorn extract could have protective effects in OVX rats by improving lipid profiles, decreasing oxidative stress, and improving the antioxidant defense system. PMID:27187458

  20. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene Jantetelco Granodiorites and Tepexco Volcanic Group and inferences for crustal block rotations in central Mexico - Reevaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, Alma Vàzquez; Böhnel, Harald; Yutsis, Vsevolod

    2015-09-01

    Miocene igneous rocks from a location in central Mexico provide paleomagnetic data that allow re-evaluation of previous data by Urrutia-Fucugauchi (1981) that were interpreted to suggest a counter clockwise rotation of a crustal block by about 50°. We sampled 31 sites from the Miocene trondhjemitic Chalcatzingo domes, the Tepexco volcanic group, and the Xalostoc diorite, covering the same area of approximately 50 km2 about 90 km SE of Mexico City. Magnetic analysis shows that these rocks contain magnetic phases of variable composition, with Curie temperatures characteristic for magnetite, but often accompanied by lower Curie temperature components. Magnetic hysteresis measurements point to the presence of PSD particles, and in combination these properties suggest that these rocks are also suitable for paleomagnetic study. Scanning electron microscope analysis supports the rock magnetic results, indicating the presence of magnetite and high-intermediate titanium titanomagnetite in many samples. Demagnetization experiments showed in most cases characteristic remanence directions of reasonable to good quality, and for 26 sites mean directions could be determined. Of these 14 (12) are of normal (reverse) polarity. Overall mean directions of normal and reverse sites are antipodal and pass a reversal test at the 95% probability level. The paleodirection from 26 sites is D = 348.1°E, I = 35.7°, α95 = 7.4°, and the paleopole is located at Lat = 78.3°N, Long = 184.2°E, A95 = 7.0°, which is indistinguishable from the 20 Ma reference pole for the stable North America plate. These data do not support any tectonic deformation of the sampling area since the Miocene. Based on the number of sites studied, their rock magnetic characteristics, and the quality of the magnetic remanence that results in a positive reversal test, we consider our data to be reliable and we therefore suggest that this result supersedes that of Urrutia-Fucugauchi (1981). The reason for this previous and much different result remains unknown.

  1. Genetic relationships among some hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) species and genotypes.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Kadir Ugurtan; Yanar, Makbule; Ercisli, Sezai; Sahiner, Hatice; Taskin, Tuncer; Zengin, Yasar

    2010-10-01

    The genus Crataegus is well distributed in Turkey as a wild plant, with numerous, inherently variable species and genotypes. RAPD markers were used to study 17 hawthorn genotypes belonging to Crataegus monogyna ssp. monogyna Jacq (2 genotypes), C. monogyna ssp. azarella Jacq (1), Crataegus pontica K.Koch (3), Crataegus orientalis var. orientalis Pallas Ex Bieb (3), Crataegus pseudoheterophylla Pojark (1), Crataegus aronia var. dentata Browicz (1), C. aronia var. aronia Browicz (4), and Crateagus x bornmuelleri Zabel (2). The 10 RAPD primers produced 72 polymorphic bands (88% polymorphism). A dendrogram based on Jaccard's index included four major groups and one outgroup according to taxa. The lowest genetic variability was observed within C. aronia var. aronia genotypes. The study demonstrated that RAPD analysis is efficient for genotyping wild-grown hawthorns. PMID:20640884

  2. Vertebrate-bearing eolian unit from the Ogallala Group (Miocene) in northwestern Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Winkler, D.A.

    1987-08-01

    The upper Couch Formation is part of the lower of two formations composing the Ogallala Group in Blanco and Yellowhouse canyons in northwestern Texas. An eolian origin for the upper Couch Formation is indicated by its mean grain size, pedogenic carbonate nodules, massive bedding, and blanketlike morphology. The unit conforms poorly to the usual eolian depositional models; it resulted from a combination of the processes involved in loess and sand-sheet formation. Grassland or savanna vegetation probably existed over the area and aided in sediment trapping. Vertebrates are unusual in eolian units, but the adaptations and mode of preservation of those in the upper Couch Formation also support an eolian interpretation. This and other widespread silty sand sheets in the Ogallala indicate major fluctuations in depositional style, possibly climatically controlled. Lateral continuity and preservation of vertebrates give silty sand sheets great potential as correlation tools.

  3. The Hawthorne Effect in Infection Prevention and Epidemiology.

    PubMed

    Chen, Luke F; Vander Weg, Mark W; Hofmann, David A; Reisinger, Heather Schacht

    2015-12-01

    The Hawthorne Effect is a prevalent observer effect that causes behavioral changes among participants of epidemiological studies or infection control interventions. The purpose of the review is to describe the origins of the Hawthorne Effect, to understand the term in relation to current scientific literature, to describe characteristics of the Hawthorne effect, and to discuss methods to quantify and overcome limitations associated with the Hawthorne Effect. PMID:26383964

  4. A "H--ll-Fired Story": Hawthorne's Rhetoric of Rumor.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harshbarger, Scott

    1994-01-01

    Considers Nathaniel Hawthorne's literary technique of providing various, often conflicting, accounts of a narrative scene or event. Analyzes Hawthorne's rhetoric of rumor as featured in "The Scarlet Letter." Shows how Hawthorne tried to translate the dynamics of interpersonal communication into print in this novel. (HB)

  5. Composition and health effects of phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) of different origins.

    PubMed

    Yang, Baoru; Liu, Pengzhan

    2012-06-01

    Epicatechin, aglycons and glycosides of B-type oligomeric procyanidins and flavonols, phenolic acids and C-glycosyl flavones are the major groups of phenolic compounds in hawthorn (Crataegus spp). The total content of phenolic compounds is higher in the leaves and flowers than in the fruits. Procyanidins dominate in the fruits, whereas flavonol glycosides and C-glycosyl flavones are most abundant in the leaves. Genotype and developmental/ripening stage have strong impacts. Procyanidin glycosides and C-glycosyl flavones may be chemotaxonomic markers differentiating species and varieties of hawthorn. Future research shall improve the separation, identification and quantification of procyanidins with degree of polymerisation (DP) ≥ 6, procyanidin glycosides, C-glycosyl flavones and some flavonol glycosides. In vitro and animal studies have shown cardioprotective, hypolipidaemic, hypotensive, antioxidant, radical-scavenging and anti-inflammatory potentials of hawthorn extracts, suggesting different phenolic compounds as the major bioactive components. However, the varying and insufficiently defined composition of the extracts investigated, as a result of different raw materials and extraction methods, makes comparison of the studies very difficult. Clinical evidence indicates that some hawthorn extracts may increase the exercise tolerance of patients with congestive heart failure. More clinical studies are needed to establish the effects of hawthorn, especially in healthy humans. PMID:22488722

  6. Correlation and analysis of Miocene paleochannels in the central Sierra Nevada, California, as displayed by the Stanislaus Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, S.; Pluhar, C. J.; Farner, M. J.; Deino, A. L.

    2013-12-01

    The proposed Neogene uplift of the Sierra Nevada has been debated for several decades. Although multiple lines of evidence indicate substantial uplift of the Sierran crest over the last ten million years, recent isotopic and paleobotanical methods have called the validity of these calculations into question. Our study focuses on the discontinuous units of the Miocene Stanislaus Group: Table Mountain Formation lavas, Dardenelles Formation lavas, and Eureka Valley Tuff (EVT) lava and tuffs. These units are significant because they have been used as a tilt indicator to calculate the uplift of the Sierra Nevada crest since their emplacement, 9.0-10.2 million years ago. Our research increased the quantity of primary data, which will be used to develop and verify a digitally-derived model of the paleodrainage systems of the ancient Sierra Nevada. The localities, Dorrington, Pikes Peak, Rancheria Mountain, Three Chimneys, and Sonora Pass are significant because they may represent the few remaining Table Mountain Formation (trachyandesite) outcrops of previously unmapped paleodrainage channels. To test this hypothesis, geochemical and paleomagnetic data were used to correlate the localities and thereby reconstruct the paleochannels. Outcrops near Dorrington, California contain biotite, display eutaxitic textures and are characterized by a reverse polarity indistinguishable from the Tollhouse Flat Member of the EVT. Previously mapped as Table Mountain Latite, we reclassify these units as Tollhouse Flat Member and eliminate the hypothesis that the units were once part of a potentially lava-back-flooded tributary of the paleo-Stanislaus River. The high potassium, columnar jointed lava at Pikes Peak, exhibits normal polarity; it is plausibly part of the Stanislaus Group and may be correlated to flows along the main 'cataract channel' of the Stanislaus Group. Results from Rancheria Mountain verify the presence of Stanislaus Group lavas and the EVT, previously mapped by Huber et al. (1989). The normal polarity trachyandesite lavas, which have a limited distribution, may be locally sourced; the reversed polarity lavas correlate to outcrops near the Stanislaus Group source area at Little Walker Caldera. Mapping near Three Chimneys confirms the presence of the EVT and a capping trachyandesite lava previously mapped by Huber (1983). We show that the capping lava is younger than the EVT and thus cannot be Table Mountain Formation, as attributed by Huber (1983). This high potassium normal-polarity lava could be part of the Lava Flow Member of the EVT or the Dardanelles Formation. Lastly, Ar/Ar geochronology on the reversed polarity lava of the 'Table Mountain Event' geomagnetic excursion within the Table Mountain Formation suggests that the dated lava erupted during the subchron C5n.2n-1, the first known direct dating of volcanic rocks of this subchron.

  7. The Hawthorne effect and energy awareness.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Daniel; Fischhoff, Baruch; Krishnamurti, Tamar; Sowell, Fallaw

    2013-09-17

    The feeling of being observed or merely participating in an experiment can affect individuals' behavior. Referred to as the Hawthorne effect, this inconsistently observed phenomenon can both provide insight into individuals' behavior and confound the interpretation of experimental manipulations. Here, we pursue both topics in examining how the Hawthorne effect emerges in a large field experiment focused on residential consumers' electricity use. These consumers received five postcards notifying, and then reminding, them of their participation in a study of household electricity use. We found evidence for a Hawthorne (study participation) effect, seen in a reduction of their electricity use--even though they received no information, instruction, or incentives to change. Responses to a follow-up survey suggested that the effect reflected heightened awareness of energy consumption. Consistent with that interpretation, the treatment effect vanished when the intervention ended. PMID:24003110

  8. Validation of the Antidiabetic and Hypolipidemic Effects of Hawthorn by Assessment of Gluconeogenesis and Lipogenesis Related Genes and AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Chun-Ching; Lin, Cheng-Hsiu; Lin, Yih-Jiun; Wu, Jin-Bin

    2013-01-01

    Since with the increased use of antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic effect of phytonutrients for daily supplement has gained considerable attention worldwide, we examine the effect and molecular mechanism of Crataegus pinnatifida Bge. var. major N.E. Br. (hawthorn) by quantifying the expression of hepatic gluconeogenesis and lipogenesis on diabetes and dyslipidemia in high-fat (HF)-fed C57BL/6J mice. Firstly, mice were divided randomly into two groups: the control (CON) group was fed with a low-fat diet, whereas the experimental group was fed a 45% HF diet for 8 weeks. Afterwards, the CON group was treated with vehicle, whereas the HF group was subdivided into five groups and was given orally hawthorn extract (including 0.2, 0.5, 1.0 g/kg/day extracts) or rosiglitazone (Rosi) or vehicle for 4 weeks afterward. Diabetic mice showed an increase in plasma glucose and insulin. Glucose lowering was comparable with Rosi-treated mice. This study demonstrated that hawthorn was effective in ameliorating the HF diet-induced hyperglycemia, hypertriglyceridemia and hypercholesterolaemia. Hawthorn extract significantly increases the hepatic protein contents of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation and reduces expression of phosphenol pyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK) and glucose production. Furthermore, hawthorn decreased in hepatic triacylglycerol and cholesterol synthesis (including sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), fatty acid synthase (FAS), SREBP2). An increase in expressions of apoA-I gene and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) was detected in HF-fed mice treated with high dose hawthorn. Our data suggest that hawthorn extract are capable of decreasing glucose production and triacylglycerol synthesis by inducing AMPK-phosphorylation and hawthorn is a candidate source of antidiabetic and antihyperlipidemic phytonutrients factors. PMID:23690849

  9. Miocene-to-Quaternary oblique rifting signature in the Western Ross Sea from fault patterns in the McMurdo Volcanic Group, north Victoria Land, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vignaroli, Gianluca; Balsamo, Fabrizio; Giordano, Guido; Rossetti, Federico; Storti, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Mt. Overlord and Mt. Melbourne are part of the fossil-to-active eruptive centre belt of the McMurdo Volcanic Group, located along the western shoulder of the West Antarctic Rift System in north Victoria Land (Antarctica). The formation and localisation of these volcanic centres are intimately connected to the regional fault patterns associated with Neogene transtensional stretching in the West Antarctic Rift System. This study reports about 900 structural data of faults and fault-related joints affecting the Miocene-Pliocene deposits of Mt. Overlord and the Plio-Quaternary deposits of Mt. Melbourne. Fault surfaces strike along three main directions (NW-SE, NE-SW, and N-S) with high (> 70°) dip angles. The reconstructed fault geometries and kinematics document a NW-SE strike-slip fault system having dextral motion in the Mt. Overlord area, which evolves into a more complex structural architecture characterised by transtensional deformations in the Mt. Melbourne area, where volcanism is still active. The fault array can be reconciled with principal and subordinate deformation structures developed at the termination region of NW-SE intraplate strike-slip fault systems inducing oblique rifting in the West Antarctic Rift System. The structural dataset, integrated with available geochronological constraints, gives rise to a two-step (Miocene-to-Holocene) tectonic scenario in which the spatial migration of the volcanic activity towards the eastern boundary of the Transantarctic Mountains occurred during the evolution of the West Antarctic Rift System.

  10. A comparison of the composition of epicuticular wax from red raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) and hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) flowers.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, D W; Robertson, G W; Shepherd, T; Birch, A N; Gordon, S C; Woodford, J A

    2000-09-01

    Epicuticular waxes have been characterised from the flowers of raspberry and hawthorn, on both of which adult raspberry beetles (Byturus tomentosus) can feed. The flower wax from both species had similar alkane profiles and also contained long-chain alcohols, aldehydes and fatty acids. The range of the carbon numbers detected for these classes of compounds was broadly similar in both but the relative amounts of each differed between species. Raspberry flower wax also contained fatty acid methyl esters, a group of compounds that has rarely been detected in plant epicuticular waxes, however, these were not observed in hawthorn flower wax. Long-chain alcohol-fatty acid esters with carbon numbers ranging from C36 to C48 were also detected in both plant species. However, an examination of their constituent acids indicated that in hawthorn the esters based on the C16 fatty acid predominated, whilst in raspberry flower wax, esters based on the C20 fatty acid were most abundant. Both species also contained pentacyclic triterpenoids, which accounted for, on average, over 16 and 48% of the total wax extracted from raspberry and hawthorn flowers respectively. In the former, ursolic and oleanolic acids accounted for over 90% of the pentacyclic triterpenes, whilst hawthorn flower wax, in addition to containing these acids, also contained high relative concentrations of both free and esterified alpha- and beta-amyrins. PMID:11065285

  11. 75 FR 17406 - Hawthorn Oil Transportation; Notice of Filing

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Hawthorn Oil Transportation; Notice of Filing March 31, 2010. Take notice that on February 12, 2010, Hawthorn Oil Transportation submitted a request for the waiver of...

  12. Sedimentology of the Whiteclay Gravel Beds (Ogallala Group) in northwestern Nebraska, USA: Structurally controlled drainage promoted by Early Miocene uplift of the Black Hills Dome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fielding, Christopher R.; LaGarry, Hannan E.; LaGarry, Leigh Anne; Bailey, Bruce E.; Swinehart, James B.

    2007-11-01

    The newly recognized Whiteclay Gravel Beds (WGB) of the Miocene Ogallala Group crop out as a narrow, discontinuous ribbon of sands and gravels in Dawes and Sheridan Counties, northwestern Nebraska, USA. The WGB are exposed in a series of municipal gravel quarries and natural exposures that define a linear trench in underlying strata at least 20 m deep and up to 300 m wide, with short, southeast-trending reaches separating generally longer east-trending sections. This gravel-filled trench can be recognized from the Nebraska-South Dakota border near Whiteclay, Nebraska southeastward to east of Gordon, Nebraska, a distance of ˜ 30 km. The outcrop belt of the WGB is coincident in location and trend with the Whiteclay Fault Zone. Where exposed in quarries, the walls of the trench are steep-sided, vertical, or locally overhanging. Polished surfaces, slickensides, and parallel joint sets are common in the walls of the trench near Whiteclay, but uncommon in those to the east. The narrow belt defined by this trench is filled by stratified gravel (< 2.0 m, typically < 0.3 m) of sedimentary lithologies derived from various Cenozoic units (but principally Anderson Ranch Formation), and sand. Relatively small amounts of unrounded granitic, volcanic, and quartz gravel are preserved in places. Cross-bedding and clast imbrication indicate palaeoflow towards the east. The WGB are interpreted to have formed in response to tectonic upheaval associated with uplift of the Black Hills of South Dakota in Early Miocene times. Fault rupture topography facilitated formation of a steep-sided canyon, or valley, up to 20 m deep, being virtually straight with sharp bends at intervals of several km. An alluvial channel belt developed in the floor of the valley, filling the available accommodation space with coarse sand and gravel via aggradational stacking of the deposits of successive channels and channel belts. Channel belts were probably braided, with individual channels up to 4 m deep and a few tens of metres wide. The multi-storey character of the deposit indicates multiple episodes of cutting and filling. The coarse grain-size of the fill suggests energetic discharge with frequent bankfull flows, even though the system had a relatively low gradient (0.004). An abundance of reworked fossil debris is derived from several stratigraphic units, clasts of which have been identified in the fill. The presence of a contemporary merychippine horse and a primitive species of the oreodont Brachycrus constrain formation of the WGB to a short interval within the Early Miocene (c. 17.5 Ma). The mammal fauna suggests that this stream was a valuable source of water, while fragments of aquatic organisms such as turtles and fish indicate perennial discharge. The WGB provides a crucial window into a pluvial period in the Miocene that is largely unpreserved elsewhere in the basin, facilitated in part by fault rupture topography.

  13. AN OBSERVATION ABOUT HAWTHORNE EFFECT IN AN EXPERIMENT IN THE TEACHING OF READING IN FIRST GRADE--A HYPOTHESIS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MCCRACKEN, ROBERT A.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS STUDY WAS TO DETERMINE IF A HAWTHORNE EFFECT WERE PRESENT IN A 3-YEAR LONGITUDINAL STUDY WHICH COMPARED TWO METHODS OF TEACHING READING IN FIRST GRADE. THE INITIAL SUBJECTS WERE TWO TEACHERS AND FIVE FIRST-GRADE CLASSES OF RANDOMLY ASSIGNED STUDENTS WHO COMPOSED ONE EXPERIMENTAL, ONE CONTROL, AND THREE SUBCONTROL GROUPS.

  14. Tissue distribution comparison between healthy and fatty liver rats after oral administration of hawthorn leaf extract.

    PubMed

    Yin, Jingjing; Qu, Jianguo; Zhang, Wenjie; Lu, Dongrui; Gao, Yucong; Ying, Xixiang; Kang, Tingguo

    2014-05-01

    Hawthorn leaves, a well-known traditional Chinese medicine, have been widely used for treating cardiovascular and fatty liver diseases. The present study aimed to investigate the therapeutic basis treating fatty liver disease by comparing the tissue distribution of six compounds of hawthorn leaf extract (HLE) in fatty liver rats and healthy rats after oral administration at first day, half month and one month, separately. Therefore, a sensitive and specific HPLC method with internal standard was developed and validated to determine chlorogenic acid, vitexin-4''-O-glucoside, vitexin-2''-O-rhamnoside, vitexin, rutin and hyperoside in the tissues including heart, liver, spleen, kidney, stomach and intestine. The results indicated that the six compounds in HLE presented some bioactivity in treating rat fatty liver as the concentrations of the six compounds varied significantly in inter- and intragroup comparisons (healthy and/or fatty liver group). PMID:24254959

  15. Hawthorne Concept--Does It Affect Reading Progress?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubeck, Patricia A.

    1975-01-01

    Concludes that the extra attention paid to children during the administration of reading tests does not have a significant effect on test performance and that the Hawthorne effect does not influence reading test results. (RB)

  16. Meeting the dark: autobiography in Hawthorne's unfinished tales.

    PubMed

    Loughman, C

    1992-12-01

    This essay discusses the autobiographical implications of Nathaniel Hawthorne's last, unfinished tales. Biographical documents, as well as the tales, demonstrate that Hawthorne's personal condition shaped the characters and ideas in his fiction, particularly the aged protagonist, the meditations on old age and death, and the quest for immortality. The conflict between the moral vision in the tales and his personal attitude toward old age and death caused creative difficulties that he could not overcome. PMID:1478489

  17. Secular variation of the middle and late Miocene geomagnetic field recorded by the Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon, Idaho and Washington, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez, Ada R.; Van der Voo, Rob

    2014-06-01

    This study of 118 discrete volcanic flows from the Columbia River Basalt Group is aimed to determine their distribution of geomagnetic field directions and virtual geomagnetic poles (VGPs) and to compare the inherent secular variation parameters with those from other studies. The magnetic signature of these rocks is uniformly carried by primary titanomagnetite, indicating that magnetic changes are due to variations in the magnetic field. Although most flows are flat lying, those that are tilted pass the Tauxe and Watson tilt test. Sequential flows with statistically similar site means were grouped, and directions that were considered outliers were evaluated and removed using the Vandamme cut-off method. Three normal-polarity (N-polarity) and three reversed-polarity (R-polarity) intervals are revealed by the stratigraphically ordered flows and have mean directions of N polarity (dec/inc = 6.6°/+61.2°, k = 29.3, α95 = 4.2°), and R polarity (dec/inc = 178.2°/-59.2°, k = 16, α95 = 5.5°). Regression analysis indicates that the secular variation analysis has not been affected by regional rotation, and that apparent polar wander is negligible. The VGP distribution is almost perfectly circular and supports the preference of VGP positions for the dispersion analysis. Dispersion parameters with corrections for within-site scatter (Sb) show a range of 14.3°-25.5°, including error limits, and were consistently higher for R-polarity results than for those of N polarity. Published dispersion parameters for extrusives <5 Ma show Sb values slightly lower than ours, yielding values of 16°-19°, although the difference is not statistically significant. In contrast, published dispersion parameters from high quality data from the Cretaceous Normal Superchron are lower than those for the Neogene, which suggests that the noisiness of the magnetic field correlates with the frequency of reversals. Our new results allow us to extend the Plio-Pleistocene palaeosecular variation database to the bottom of the middle Miocene. Many Miocene formations on a variety of continents are suitable targets for future analysis. Furthermore, the significant difference between the reversed and N-polarity dispersion parameters is intriguing and needs substantiation.

  18. Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) in the treatment of cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Tassell, Mary C.; Kingston, Rosari; Gilroy, Deirdre; Lehane, Mary; Furey, Ambrose

    2010-01-01

    The medicinal properties of hawthorn (Crataegus spp., a genus comprising approximately 300 species) have been utilized by many cultures for a variety of therapeutic purposes for many centuries. In the Western world cardiovascular disease (CVD) has become one of the single most significant causes of premature death. Echoing this situation, more recent research into the therapeutic benefits of hawthorn preparations has focused primarily upon its cardiovascular effects. This review covers research into the various mechanisms of action proposed for Crataegus preparations, clinical trials involving Crataegus preparations, and the herb's safety profile. Clinical trials reviewed have been inconsistent in terms of criteria used (sample size, preparation, dosage, etc) but have been largely consistent with regard to positive outcomes. An investigation into data available to date regarding hawthorn preparations and herb/drug interactions reveals that theoretical adverse interactions have not been experienced in practice. Further, adverse reactions relating to the use of hawthorn preparations are infrequent and mild, even at higher dosage ranges. A recent retrospective study by Zick et al. has suggested a negative outcome for the long-term use of hawthorn in the prognosis of heart failure. These findings are examined in this paper. Although further research is needed in certain areas, current research to date suggests that hawthorn may potentially represent a safe, effective, nontoxic agent in the treatment of CVD and ischemic heart disease (IHD). PMID:22228939

  19. The Effectiveness of Crataegus orientalis M Bieber. (Hawthorn) Extract Administration in Preventing Alveolar Bone Loss in Rats with Experimental Periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Hatipoğlu, Mükerrem; Sağlam, Mehmet; Köseoğlu, Serhat; Köksal, Ekrem; Keleş, Ali; Esen, Hacı Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this animal study was to evaluate the effects of hawthorn (Crataeus orientalis M Bieber.) extract on serum oxidative status and alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Twenty-seven Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: non- ligated+placebo (saline) (NL, n = 9), ligature only+placebo (saline) (LO, n = 9), and ligature and treated with hawthorn extract in saline (H, n = 9) (100 mg/kg orogastrically, once a day for 11 days). Periodontitis was induced by submerging a 4/0 silk ligature in the sulcus of the mandibular right first molars of rats, and the animals were sacrificed after 11 days. Micro-CT examinations were performed for linear and volumetric parameter assessment of alveolar bone. Periodontal tissues were histopathologically examined to assess the differences among the study groups. Levels of serum total antioxidant status (TAS)/total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also analyzed. Alveolar bone loss was significantly reduced by hawthorn administration compared to LO group (p<0.05). The number of inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in the LO group was significantly higher than that of the NL and H groups (p< 0.05). The number of osteoblasts in the LO and H groups was significantly higher than that of the NL group (p<0.05). TOS and OSI levels were significantly reduced in H group compared to LO group (P <0.05) and TAS levels were similar in H and NL group (p< 0.05). Hawthorn extract showed inhibitory effect on periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss by regulating TAS, TOS and OSI levels in periodontal disease in rats when administered systemically. PMID:26030160

  20. The Effectiveness of Crataegus orientalis M Bieber. (Hawthorn) Extract Administration in Preventing Alveolar Bone Loss in Rats with Experimental Periodontitis

    PubMed Central

    Hatipoğlu, Mükerrem; Sağlam, Mehmet; Köseoğlu, Serhat; Köksal, Ekrem; Keleş, Ali; Esen, Hacı Hasan

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this animal study was to evaluate the effects of hawthorn (Crataeus orientalis M Bieber.) extract on serum oxidative status and alveolar bone loss in experimental periodontitis. Twenty-seven Wistar rats were assigned to one of the following groups: non- ligated+placebo (saline) (NL, n = 9), ligature only+placebo (saline) (LO, n = 9), and ligature and treated with hawthorn extract in saline (H, n = 9) (100 mg/kg orogastrically, once a day for 11 days). Periodontitis was induced by submerging a 4/0 silk ligature in the sulcus of the mandibular right first molars of rats, and the animals were sacrificed after 11 days. Micro-CT examinations were performed for linear and volumetric parameter assessment of alveolar bone. Periodontal tissues were histopathologically examined to assess the differences among the study groups. Levels of serum total antioxidant status (TAS)/total oxidant status (TOS), and oxidative stress index (OSI) were also analyzed. Alveolar bone loss was significantly reduced by hawthorn administration compared to LO group (p<0.05). The number of inflammatory cells and osteoclasts in the LO group was significantly higher than that of the NL and H groups (p< 0.05). The number of osteoblasts in the LO and H groups was significantly higher than that of the NL group (p<0.05). TOS and OSI levels were significantly reduced in H group compared to LO group (P <0.05) and TAS levels were similar in H and NL group (p< 0.05). Hawthorn extract showed inhibitory effect on periodontal inflammation and alveolar bone loss by regulating TAS, TOS and OSI levels in periodontal disease in rats when administered systemically. PMID:26030160

  1. Postdepositional tilt of the Miocene-Pliocene Ogallala Group on the western Great Plains: Evidence of late Cenozoic uplift of the Rocky Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McMillan, Margaret E.; Angevine, Charles L.; Heller, Paul L.

    2002-01-01

    The Rocky Mountains and adjacent western Great Plains share a common history of late Cenozoic stream incision. Both epeirogenic uplift and climate change (with no associated uplift) have been proposed as the cause of this subcontinental-scale erosional episode. However, the lack of a well-defined Cenozoic paleoelevation history for the region has hampered our ability to distinguish between the two. A tilt analysis of the Cheyenne Tablelands in the western Great Plains of Wyoming and Nebraska provides us with a datum from which postdepositional changes in slope can be determined. Miocene to earliest Pliocene gravels of the Ogallala Group (17.5 5 Ma) cap the tablelands, which currently tilt down to the east at slopes as great as 10-2. However, paleohydraulic analysis of the Ogallala gravels indicates depositional slopes of 10-3 to 10-4, implying a postdepositional increase in tilt. If a hinge point at the eastern edge of the Cheyenne Tablelands is assumed, this tilt translates into differential uplift of 680 m (815 410 m) at the western edge of the Great Plains. Flexural isostatic rebound of the tablelands due to known young erosion in surrounding basins only produces a few hundred meters of uplift. Therefore, even if all of the recent erosion in the region can be attributed to climate change, the resulting rebound is insufficient to account for the observed uplift of the tablelands. Thus, the tilting of the Cheyenne Tablelands is most consistent with broad- wavelength tectonic uplift centered under the Rocky Mountains initiated during Ogallala deposition and continuing since deposition ceased.

  2. Hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) extract exhibits atropine-sensitive activity in a cultured cardiomyocyte assay.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Satin; Long, Shannon R; Proteau, Philip J; Filtz, Theresa M

    2009-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) plant extract is used as a herbal alternative medicine for the prevention and treatment of various cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it was shown that hawthorn extract preparations caused negative chronotropic effects in a cultured neonatal murine cardiomyocyte assay, independent of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade. The aim of this study was to further characterize the effect of hawthorn extract to decrease the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes. To test the hypothesis that hawthorn is acting via muscarinic receptors, the effect of hawthorn extract on atrial versus ventricular cardiomyocytes in culture was evaluated. As would be expected for activation of muscarinic receptors, hawthorn extract had a greater effect in atrial cells. Atrial and/or ventricular cardiomyocytes were then treated with hawthorn extract in the presence of atropine or himbacine. Changes in the contraction rate of cultured cardiomyocytes revealed that both muscarinic antagonists significantly attenuated the negative chronotropic activity of hawthorn extract. Using quinuclidinyl benzilate, L-[benzylic-4,4'-(3)H] ([(3)H]-QNB) as a radioligand antagonist, the effect of a partially purified hawthorn extract fraction to inhibit muscarinic receptor binding was quantified. Hawthorn extract fraction 3 dose-dependently inhibited [(3)H]-QNB binding to mouse heart membranes. Taken together, these findings suggest that decreased contraction frequency by hawthorn extracts in neonatal murine cardiomyocytes may be mediated via muscarinic receptor activation. PMID:18696181

  3. Mozart, Hawthorne, and Mario Savio: Aesthetic Power and Political Complicity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herbert, T. Walter

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the false dichotomy pitting aesthetic power against political complicity in literary criticism. Considers the sexual politics of the household of Nathaniel Hawthorne in light of this opposition. Suggests how literary works keep warring voices and inner conflicts alive and at odds. (HB)

  4. Nathaniel Hawthorne's Garden of Eden Story: "Rappaccini's Daughter."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Meixner, Linda L.

    1990-01-01

    Presents a four-day lesson plan for secondary U.S. literature or Bible-and-literature classes, using the Garden of Eden story and Nathaniel Hawthorne's "Rappaccini's Daughter." Identifies objectives, materials, procedure, and evaluation measures. Develops students' ability to discover analogies and irony in literary texts. Lists teacher resources,

  5. Is the Hawthorne Effect in Educational Experiments a Chimera?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauernfeind, Robert H.; Olson, Carl J.

    1973-01-01

    Reports on an experimental study designed to investigate the relationship between two factors commonly regarded as components of the Hawthorne Effect on pupil performance and on intellectual task. These factors are (1) direct cue, or awareness of experimentation, as represented by an announcement that pupils were the subjects of an experiment; and…

  6. Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville: A Research Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Noate, Judith, Comp.

    This handout is a guide to library resources in the J. Murrey Atkins Library at the University of North Carolina-Charlotte for the study of the 19th-century American authors Nathaniel Hawthorne and Herman Melville. The guide details resources in Atkins library for biographical and critical material on the two authors. The guide is in four…

  7. Fourth Period Discovers Hester as Mother: Hawthorne's Mother?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heginbotham, Eleanor

    1986-01-01

    A teacher discusses how she used criticism of "The Scarlet Letter," when studying the book, in her honors class. The students were also intrigued by the biographical information they learned about Hawthorne, and eager to use it in interpreting his novel. (SRT)

  8. Is the Hawthorne Effect in Educational Experiments a Chimera?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bauernfeind, Robert H.; Olson, Carl J.

    1973-01-01

    Reports on an experimental study designed to investigate the relationship between two factors commonly regarded as components of the Hawthorne Effect on pupil performance and on intellectual task. These factors are (1) direct cue, or awareness of experimentation, as represented by an announcement that pupils were the subjects of an experiment; and

  9. In Praise of the Hawthorne Effect: Perspectives from the Profs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raywid, Mary Anne

    1979-01-01

    Successful teacher education and effective teacher and student motivation may be obtainable through a positive approach to the Hawthorne Effect, which is the principle that increased attention to an operative situation leads to an increased productivity by that operation, regardless of all other surrounding variables. (LH)

  10. [Detection of Hawthorn Fruit Defects Using Hyperspectral Imaging].

    PubMed

    Liu, De-hua; Zhang, Shu-juan; Wang, Bin; Yu, Ke-qiang; Zhao, Yan-ru; He, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Hyperspectral imaging technology covered the range of 380-1000 nm was employed to detect defects (bruise and insect damage) of hawthorn fruit. A total of 134 samples were collected, which included damage fruit of 46, pest fruit of 30, injure and pest fruit of 10 and intact fruit of 48. Because calyx · s⁻¹ tem-end and bruise/insect damage regions offered a similar appearance characteristic in RGB images, which could produce easily confusion between them. Hence, five types of defects including bruise, insect damage, sound, calyx, and stem-end were collected from 230 hawthorn fruits. After acquiring hyperspectral images of hawthorn fruits, the spectral data were extracted from region of interest (ROI). Then, several pretreatment methods of standard normalized variate (SNV), savitzky golay (SG), median filter (MF) and multiplicative scatter correction (MSC) were used and partial least squares method(PLS) model was carried out to obtain the better performance. Accordingly to their results, SNV pretreatment methods assessed by PLS was viewed as best pretreatment method. Lastly, SNV was chosen as the pretreatment method. Spectral features of five different regions were combined with Regression coefficients(RCs) of partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model was used to identify the important wavelengths and ten wavebands at 483, 563, 645, 671, 686, 722, 777, 819, 837 and 942 nm were selected from all of the wavebands. Using Kennard-Stone algorithm, all kinds of samples were randomly divided into training set (173) and test set (57) according to the proportion of 3:1. And then, least squares-support vector machine (LS-SVM) discriminate model was established by using the selected wavebands. The results showed that the discriminate accuracy of the method was 91.23%. In the other hand, images at ten important wavebands were executed to Principal component analysis (PCA). Using "Sobel" operator and region growing algrorithm "Regiongrow", the edge and defect feature of 86 Hawthorn could be recognized. Lastly, the detect precision of bruised, insect damage and two-defect samples is 95.65%, 86.67% and 100%, respectively. This investigation demonstrated that hyperspectral imaging technology could detect the defects of bruise, insect damage, calyx, and stem-end in hawthorn fruit in qualitative analysis and feature detection which provided a theoretical reference for the defects nondestructive detection of hawthorn fruit. PMID:26978929

  11. Screening low fire blight susceptible Crataegus species for host suitability to hawthorn leaf-curling aphids (Dysaphis spp.).

    PubMed

    Bribosia, E; Bylemans, D; Van Impe, G; Migon, M

    2002-01-01

    The group of hawthorn leaf-curling aphids (Dysaphis spp.) hosted by the common hawthorn Crataegus monogyna Jacq. may play an important role in the biological control of the rosy apple aphid, Dysaphis plantaginea (Passerini), by increasing reproduction opportunities for the indigenous hymenopteran parasitoid Ephedrus persicae Froggatt. Unfortunately, most fruitgrowers hesitate to introduce the common hawthorn in their orchards because they fear fire blight infections which may be transmitted by this highly susceptible hawthron species. This potential hazard led us to investigate the suitability to leaf-curling aphids of alternative Crataegus species. As representative for these closely-related aphids, the species Dysaphis apiifolia petroselini (Börner) was used in the trials. Ten Crataegus species characterized by their very low susceptibility to fire blight were examined from two angles. Firstly, aphid sexuals were introduced in autumn onto the different species to verify whether egg laying could take place. Secondly, the development of fundatrices and gall formation were followed the next spring. Although eggs and mature fundatrices could be obtained on almost all species, no fundatrice-hosting galls were recorded in spring. The possible causes of these negative results with respect to the geographical origin of the particular Crataegus species involved in this work are discussed. PMID:12696414

  12. Capillary electrophoretic analysis of flavonoids in single-styled hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) ethanolic extracts.

    PubMed

    Urbonaviciūte, A; Jakstas, V; Kornysova, O; Janulis, V; Maruska, A

    2006-04-21

    Flavonoids are an important group of natural compounds, which can prevent coronary heart disease and have antioxidant properties. Hawthorn is a well known and widely used medicinal plant due to its cardiotonic activity. Previous studies refer mostly to the HPLC analysis of the flavonoids: vitexin, quercetin, hyperoside, oligomeric procyanidins, which appear to be primarily responsible for the cardiac action of the plant. Aqueous ethanolic extracts of single-styled hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq., f.: Rosaceae Juss.) leaves and sprouts were analyzed by means of capillary zone electrophoresis (CZE). Influence of vegetation period on the extract qualitative composition and flavonoids quantities was evaluated. Sample preparation by extraction using different concentration of aqueous ethanol (40-96%, v/v) and the influence of extractant composition on the recovery of flavonoids are discussed in detail. The results obtained using CZE are compared to the results of spectrophotometric and HPLC analysis of the extracts. The effect of storage conditions of extracts (solar irradiation, temperature and duration) on degradation of flavonoids was investigated. PMID:16443232

  13. The Miocene Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, R. D.; Herold, N.; Huber, M.

    2012-04-01

    We model paleoclimate and ocean circulation during the Miocene climatic optimum (~17 ¬ 14.5 Ma) using the Community Climate System Model 3 (CCSM3), focussing particularly on the effect of Miocene model boundary conditions including reconstructed topography, bathymetry, and vegetation. The modelled Miocene climate exhibits broad increases in mean annual precipitation over central and northern Africa, northern Eurasia, northern North America and Greenland compared to the present. In northern Africa, summer precipitation is significantly higher in the Miocene due to the replacement of desert with broadleaf vegetation, consistent with previously published sensitivity studies. Our results qualitatively support interpretations of carbon and neodymium isotope records indicating NCW formation in the North Atlantic as well as a dominant bottom water source in the Southern Ocean. Major tectonic changes in our Miocene Atlantic bathymetry compared to the present day are the severe constriction of the Fram Strait, closure of the Panama Strait and the less elevated Greenland-Scotland Ridge. We find that the structure of ocean circulation in the Miocene Atlantic is somewhat opposite to the present day, with the primary region of Miocene bottom water formation in the Weddell Sea. The strength of Weddell Sea bottom water and North Component Water (NCW) formation are moderated by atmospheric CO2 levels, which suggests that very weak NCW formation could have existed under significantly higher concentrations than the present-day CO2 concentration used in our model. Such a state would be consistent with the hypothesis of negligible NCW formation in the early Miocene, suggested previously. In our model, the NCW is relatively warm and saline compared to modern North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW). This is likely a robust result, caused by a northward deflection of North Atlantic subtropical water below the mixed-layer, a weakening of the subpolar gyre and weaker convection, as opposed to warm Tethys outflow. An interesting model result concerns the importance of the geometry of reconstructed gateways. Regarding the Panama gateway we find only a small eastward throughflow, in contrast in contrast with other published estimates. The difference appears to be related to the exact orientation of the reconstructed gateway. A gateway oriented in a zonal direction results in a natural extension of the equatorial countercurrent, whereas a more meridionally oriented gateway, as in our reconstruction, largely prohibits such a current, emphasizing the effect of subtle model boundary conditions. A decreased northern hemisphere ocean heat transport in the Miocene compared to the present is a result of a significant weakening of North Atlantic Deep Water formation. Modelled flow into the Arctic Ocean is consistent with the idea of an enclosed estuarine sea. Coupled with a relatively deeper Greenland-Scotland Ridge it permits substantial Miocene ocean warming. Determining how this warming varied under changes in modelled bathymetry may elucidate ways in which near ice-free Arctic conditions were sustainable.

  14. 76 FR 25320 - Hawthorn Water LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for Filing and Soliciting...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-04

    ... Energy Regulatory Commission Hawthorn Water LLC; Notice of Preliminary Permit Application Accepted for..., Hawthorn Water LLC filed an application, pursuant to section 4(f) of the Federal Power Act, proposing to... reservoirs; (6) a powerhouse/pumping station containing 3 pump/generating units with a total...

  15. The Impact of the Hawthorne Effect in Experimental Designs in Educational Research. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, Desmond L.

    Project objectives included (1) establishing a body of knowledge concerning the role of the Hawthorne effect in experimental designs in educational research, (2) assessing the influence of the Hawthorne effect on educational experiments conducted under varying conditions of control, (3) identifying the major components comprising the effect, and

  16. The "Hawthorne effect" is a myth, but what keeps the story going?

    PubMed

    Kompier, Michiel A J

    2006-10-01

    The Hawthorne studies became famous because of the discovery of the "Hawthorne effect": "a marked increase in production related only to special social position and social treatment". They mark the beginning of the Human Relations School. This article demonstrates that the Hawthorne research does not pass a methodological quality test. Even if methodological shortcomings were waived, there is no proof of a Hawthorne effect in the original data. The following five myths are debunked: (i) scientific worth, (ii) continuous improvement, (iii) social factors prevailing over physical factors and pay, (iv) wholehearted cooperation, and (v) the neurotic worker. The following five factors are held responsible for the creation and survival of the Hawthorne myth: (i) a story too good to be untrue, (ii) bias and selective accounts by original researchers and "laziness" among later scientists, (iii) social factors do matter, and (iv) a story that fits the cognitive world and interests of psychologists, and (v) management. PMID:17091208

  17. The 2011 Hawthorne, Nevada, Earthquake Sequence; Shallow Normal Faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, K. D.; Johnson, C.; Davies, J. A.; Agbaje, T.; Knezevic Antonijevic, S.; Kent, G.

    2011-12-01

    An energetic sequence of shallow earthquakes that began in early March 2011 in western Nevada, near the community of Hawthorne, has slowly decreased in intensity through mid-2011. To date about 1300 reviewed earthquake locations have been compiled; we have computed moment tensors for the larger earthquakes and have developed a set of high-precision locations for all reviewed events. The sequence to date has included over 50 earthquakes ML 3 and larger with the largest at Mw 4.6. Three 6-channel portable stations configured with broadband sensors and accelerometers were installed by April 20. Data from the portable instruments is telemetered through NSL's microwave backbone to Reno where it is integrated with regional network data for real-time notifications, ShakeMaps, and routine event analysis. The data is provided in real-time to NEIC, CISN and the IRIS DMC. The sequence is located in a remote area about 15-20 km southwest of Hawthorne in the footwall block of the Wassuk Range fault system. An initial concern was that the sequence might be associated with volcanic processes due to the proximity of late Quaternary volcanic flows; there have been no volcanic signatures observed in near source seismograms. An additional concern, as the sequence has proceeded, was a clear progression eastward toward the Wassuk Range front fault. The east dipping range bounding fault is capable of M 7+ events, and poses a significant hazard to the community of Hawthorne and local military facilities. The Hawthorne Army Depot is an ordinance storage facility and the nation's storage site for surplus mercury. The sequence is within what has been termed the 'Mina Deflection' of the Central Walker Lane Belt. Faulting along the Whiskey Flat section of the Wassuk front fault would be primarily down-to-the-east, with an E-W extension direction; moment tensors for the 2011 earthquake show a range of extension directions from E-W to NW-SE, suggesting a possible dextral component to the Wassuk Range front fault at this latitude. At least two faults have been imaged within the sequence; these structures are at shallow depth (3-6 km), strike NE, and dip ~NW. Prior to temporary station installation event depths were poorly constrained, with the nearest network station 25 km from the source area. Early sequence moment tensor solutions show depths are on the order of 2-6 km and locations using the near source stations also confirm the shallow depths of the Hawthorne sequence. S-P times of 0.5 sec and less have been observed on a near-source station, illustrating extremely shallow source depths for some events. Along with the 2011 Hawthorne activity, very shallow depths in Nevada have been observed from near source stations in the 2008 west Reno earthquake sequence (primarily strike-slip faulting; main shock Mw 5.0) and the 1993 Rock Valley sequence in southern NNSS (strike-slip faulting; main shock Mw 4.0). These shallow sequences tend to include high rates of low magnitude earthquakes continuing over several months duration.

  18. Metal characterization of white hawthorn organs and infusions.

    PubMed

    Juranović Cindrić, Iva; Zeiner, Michaela; Konanov, Darija Mihajlov; Stingeder, Gerhard

    2015-02-18

    Hawthorn is one of the most commonly used European and North American phytopharmaceuticals. Because there is no information on metals in seeds, and only rare data for leaves and flowers, the aim of the present study was elemental analysis of the white hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) by inductively coupled plasma emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) or inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after digestion in a microwave-assisted system. The limits of detection are below 2 μg/g for ICP-AES and 0.5 μg/g for ICP-MS. Hawthorn leaves and flowers contain essential elements at concentrations (mean values, RSD 2-8%) in mg/g of Ca, 1-4; K, 4-5; Mg, 1-2; and Na, <0.2); and at μg/g levels of Ba, 1-10; Co, <0.16; Cr, <1.4; Cu, 0.6-7; Fe, 1-37; Li, <0.5; Mn, 1-13; Mo, <0.17; Ni, <0.6; Sr, 0.2-2; and Zn, 1-31. Toxic elements were found in low quantities: As (<0.04), Cd (0.04-0.1), and Pb (0.1-2). Up to 10% of the metals is extracted into the infusions. The analyzed plant parts and infusions contain essential elements justifying its use as a medicinal plant, whereas the low quantities of harmful elements will not pose any risk to humans when consumed. PMID:25630398

  19. Miocene Coralline algae

    SciTech Connect

    Bosence, D.W.J.

    1988-01-01

    The coralline algae (Order Corallinales) were sedimentologically and ecologically important during the Miocene, a period when they were particularly abundant. The many poorly described and illustrated species and the lack of quantitative data in coralline thalli make specific determinations particularly difficult, but some species are well known and widespread in the Tethyan area. The sedimentologic importance of the Miocene coralline algae is reflected in the abundance of in-situ coralline buildups, rhodoliths, and coralline debris facies at Malta and Spain; similar sequences are known throughout the Tethyan Miocene. In-situ buildups vary from leafy crustose biostromes to walled reefs with dense coralline crusts and branches. Growth forms are apparently related to hydraulic energy. Rhodoliths vary from leafy, crustose, and open-branched forms in muddy sediments to dense, crustose, and radial-branching forms in coarse grainstones. Rhodolith form and internal structure correlate closely with hydraulic energy. Coralline genera are conservative and, as such, are useful in paleoenvironmental analysis. Of particular interest are the restricted depth ranges of recent coralline genera. More research is needed on the sedimentology, paleoecology, and systematics of the Cenozoic corallines, as they have particular value in paleoenvironmental analysis.

  20. Antarctic Miocene Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A. R.

    2013-12-01

    Fossils from Antarctic Miocene terrestrial deposits, coupled with stratigraphic, geochemical and paleontological data from marine boreholes, provide new insights into the climatic history of the continent. During the Miocene, ice caps coalesced to form ice sheets and vegetated surfaces gave way to barren expanses. The cryospheric changes especially have global climatic implications. The fossil data consists of diatoms, pollen and spores, and macroscopic remains of plants, ostracods, insects, molluscs and a fish. Plant fossils include wood and leaves of Nothofagus (southern beech), seeds of several vascular plants, including Ranunculus (buttercup), Hippuris (mare's-tail) and Myriophyllum (watermilfoil), megaspores of Isoetes (quillwort), and moss species. The insect chitin consists of larval head capsules of Chironomidae (midges) and exoskeletal parts of Coleoptera (beetles). The molluscs include freshwater gastropods and bivalves. The majority of these taxa are likely descendants of taxa that had survived on the continent from the Paleogene or earlier. Even though early Miocene glaciations may have been large, the climate was never cold enough to cause the extinction of the biota, which probably survived in coastal refugia. Early Miocene (c. 20 Ma) macrofossils from the McMurdo Dry Valleys (77°S) support palynological interpretations from the Cape Roberts and ANDRILL marine records that the upland vegetation was a shrub tundra. Mean summer temperature (MST) in the uplands was c. 6°C and possibly higher at the coast. The climate was wet, supporting mires and lakes. By the mid-Miocene, even though the climate continued to be wet. MST was c. 4°C which was too cold to support Nothofagus and most vascular plant species. Stratigraphic evidence indicates that the time between the Early and Mid-Miocene was a time of repeated ice advances and retreats of small glaciers originating from ice caps. At c. 14 Ma there appears to have been a modal shift in climate to significantly colder and drier conditions that resulted in the extinction of the upland biota and a shift in glacial regimes from wet to cold-based. Paleontological and geochemical evidence from the deep marine record supports a major climatic event at this time. Based on pollen from the SHALDRIL cores a tundra biota survived until c. 12.8 Ma on the islands of the Antarctic Peninsula (65°S). Recently, sparse angiosperm pollen of chenopods or similar taxa, has been reported from deposits in the Prince Charles mountains (70°S) with a biostratigraphic age of Mid- to Late Miocene (12-9 Ma) making it possible that remnants of a tundra vegetation continued to exist on the edges of the continent after it had become extinct on the islands of the Antarctic Peninsula. Evidence for Pliocene warmth in the Ross Sea from thick diatomite sequence in ANDRILL cores is so far unsupported by terrestrial paleontological evidence. Pliocene wood-like structures reported from a DVDP core are interpreted as the remains of in situ shrubs but the evidence is unconvincing. Pliocene warmth in the Ross sea region, unaccompanied by an unambiguous terrestrial response can be explained in one of two ways: 1. Pliocene MSTs remained below the 3-4°C threshold needed to support shrub or herb tundra, or 2. Pliocene MSTs were warm enough but terrestrial taxa were unavailable because of extinction. Research supported by NSF 0739693,0947821.

  1. Review of Miocene larger foraminifera

    SciTech Connect

    Glenn, E.C.

    1988-01-01

    Miocene larger foraminifera were generally restricted to shallow (<100m), warm, clear, normal marine environments and were primarily dependent on brief drifting of juveniles and rafting on vegetation for dispersal. These factors are reflected in both regional and local occurrences. Regional occurrences of Miocene larger foraminifera vary with bio-province and time. Three main foraminiferal provinces (Central American, Mediterranean, and Indo-West Pacific) developed through a combination of tectonics, eustasy, climate, and faunal evolution and migration. Important effects of Miocene tectonics included widening of the Atlantic, early Miocene occlusion of the western neo-Tethys, and northern movement of the Australian plate into the tropics. Changes in climate primarily expanded or constricted latitudinal provincial boundaries. Eustatic sea level variations caused by the destruction of the late Miocene Mediterranean fauna. Globally, Miocene faunas underwent a progressive loss of taxa. This is particularly noticeable in post-early Miocene faunas of the Mediterranean and Central American provinces. Although post-early Miocene taxa evolved in all three areas, faunal migration was prevented by environmental barriers. For a given time and province, the occurrence of larger foraminifera in well-preserved Miocene reef facies is related to paleoenvironmental factors of water depth, turbidity, water energy, and substrate and to post-mortem processes of transport and selective test destruction. Environmentally related changes in test morphology, together with the relative abundances of planktonic species and small benthic taxa, allow an estimation of the magnitude of the various environmental factors, even without detailed foraminiferal taxonomy.

  2. The Hawthorne experiments and the introduction of Jean Piaget in American industrial psychology, 1929-1932.

    PubMed

    Hsueh, Yeh

    2002-05-01

    The Hawthorne interview program between 1929 and 1932 was one of the most significant industrial studies in the United States. The Hawthorne researchers applied Jean Piaget's clinical method in their extensive interviews with tens of thousands of workers. Chiefly responsible for the program's methodology was Elton Mayo, an Australian who saw interviewing as a means to promote social cooperation. Previous discussions of the Hawthorne experiments have ignored the influence of Piaget in the social sciences. This article provides an account of Mayo's and the Hawthorne researchers' efforts to fuse Piaget's innovation with burgeoning American industrial psychology. The endeavor was not an isolated event but rather drew on the theories and practice of Janet-Piaget psychology, on the support of the Laura Spelman Rockefeller Memorial Foundation, and on the discourse among social scientists about Piaget's work. PMID:12096759

  3. Miocene Antarctic Terrestrial Realm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A.; Marchant, D. R.

    2009-12-01

    The discovery of several locations in the Transantarctic Mountains that contain macrofossils and pollen is transforming our understanding of late Cenozoic Antarctica. The most southerly location is on the Beardmore Glacier (85.1°S) about 500 km from the South Pole. The environment was an active glacial margin in which plants, insects and freshwater mollusks inhabited the sand and gravel bars and small lakes on an outwash plain. In addition to leaves and wood of dwarf Nothofagus (Southern Beech) shrubs, achenes of Ranunculus (Buttercup), in situ cushion growth forms of mosses and a vascular plant, the assemblages contains various exoskeletal parts of carabid and curculionid beetles and a cyclorrhaphan fly, the shells of freshwater bivalve and gastropod species and a fish tooth. Initially the deposits were assigned a Pliocene age (3.5 Ma) but a mid- to early Miocene age is more probable (c. 14 - 25 Ma) based on correlation of fossil pollen from the deposits with 39Ar/40Ar dated pollen assemblages from the McMurdo Dry Valleys locations. The oldest location within the Dry Valleys also involved an active ice margin but was part of a valley system that was completely deglaciated for intervals long enough for thick paleosols to develop. The Friis Hills fossil deposits of the Taylor Valley region (77.8°S) are at least 19.76 Ma based on the 39Ar/40Ar age of a volcanic ash bed. The valley floor during the non-glacial phases had poorly-drained soils and the extensive development of mossy mires. Wood and leaves of Nothofagus are abundant in lacustrine deposits. The silts of shallow fluvial channels contain abundant megaspores and spiky leaves of the aquatic lycopod Isoetes (Quillwort). Fossils of beetles are also present in these deposits. During the glacial phases, proglacial lakes were surrounded by dwarfed, deciduous Nothofagus shrubs. The youngest fossils recovered from the Dry Valleys are from the Olympus Range (77.5°S) with an age of 14.07 Ma. The environment was an alpine lake that formed behind a recessional moraine. The fossils are mostly those of freshwater organisms including numerous species of diatoms and an ostracod species in which the soft anatomy is preserved. The base of the lake is marked by a moss bed with exceptionally well-preserved stems and leaves of the extant species Drepanocladus longifolius. Pollen evidence from the Cape Roberts borehole in the Ross Sea basin suggests that tundra existed from the Oligocene to the Early Miocene. Fossil evidence from the Dry Valleys locations indicates that organisms that could not inhabit Antarctica today persisted until c. 14 Ma. At 14 Ma there was a shift in glacial regimes from wet- to cold-based, marking a profound and abrupt climatic shift. We hypothesize that this climate change from warmer and wetter to colder and drier conditions caused the extinction of the tundra biota. It seems probable that at least some of the mid-Miocene fossils are of organisms whose descendants evolved in Antarctica during the Paleogene or earlier. An important consequence of this hypothesis is that the Cenozoic climate of Antarctica was warm enough until the mid-Miocene to support vascular plants and insects. This research was funded by NSF OPP 0739693.

  4. Reticulate evolution in North American black-fruited hawthorns (Crataegus section Douglasia; Rosaceae): evidence from nuclear ITS2 and plastid sequences

    PubMed Central

    Zarrei, M.; Stefanović, S.; Dickinson, T. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and Aims The taxonomic complexity of Crataegus (hawthorn; Rosaceae, Maleae), especially in North America, has been attributed by some to hybridization in combination with gametophytic apomixis and polyploidization, whereas others have considered the roles of hybridization and apomixis to be minimal. Study of the chemical composition and therapeutic value of hawthorn extracts requires reproducible differentiation of entities that may be difficult to distinguish by morphology alone. This study sought to address this by using the nuclear ribosomal spacer region ITS2 as a supplementary DNA barcode; however, a lack of success prompted an investigation to discover why this locus gave unsatisfactory results. Methods ITS2 was extensively cloned so as to document inter- and intraindividual variation in this locus, using hawthorns of western North America where the genus Crataegus is represented by only two widely divergent groups, the red-fruited section Coccineae and the black-fruited section Douglasia. Additional sequence data from selected loci on the plastid genome were obtained to enhance further the interpretation of the ITS2 results. Key Results In the ITS2 gene tree, ribotypes from western North American hawthorns are found in two clades. Ribotypes from diploid members of section Douglasia occur in one clade (with representatives of the east-Asian section Sanguineae). The other clade comprises those from diploid and polyploid members of section Coccineae. Both clades contribute ribotypes to polyploid Douglasia. Data from four plastid-derived intergenic spacers demonstrate the maternal parentage of these allopolyploids. Conclusions Repeated hybridization between species of section Douglasia and western North American members of section Coccineae involving the fertilization of unreduced female gametes explains the observed distribution of ribotypes and accounts for the phenetic intermediacy of many members of section Douglasia. PMID:24984714

  5. The Miocene rodents of Serbia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Z.

    2009-04-01

    During the Miocene period a group of shallow lakes was created in depressions at the territory of present-day Serbia. This caused the present wide distribution of lacustrine sediments, which occasionally alternate with the alluvial and marsh sediments. The remains of large mammals are relatively common, while the remains of small mammals used to be known only from two localities - Mala Miliva and Sibnica. The method of sediment sieving, used during the last decade, led to discovery of 6 new localities with remains of fossil vertebrates - Sibnica 1, Vračevići, village Lazarevac, Bele Vode, Brajkovac and Tavnik. Most of the fossil material is represented by osteological and odontological remains of small mammals. The best represented group of small mammals at each of the localities was the rodents. According to the odontological material presence was proven for 35 rodent species from 6 families. MN zonation was determined according to structure of associations. The geological age of fossil-bearing sediments was determined by using the method of correlation with the sites in Europe and Turkey.

  6. Miocene reef corals: A review

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, S.H.

    1988-01-01

    Tectonic blockage in the Middle East of westward-flowing Tethys surface circulation during the latest Oligocene led to creation in the earliest Miocene of endemic Mediterranean, Western Atlantic-Caribbean, and Indo-Pacific realms. A great reduction in reef coral diversity from 60-80 Oligocene species to 25-35 early Miocene species occurred in the Western Atlantic-Caribbean and Mediterranean areas accompanied by a decrease in reef growth. A slower and less drastic change apparently occurred in the Indo-Pacific area. Early Miocene reef corals of the Western Atlantic-Caribbean comprise a transition between the cosmopolitan Oligocene fauna and its endemic mid-Miocene to modern counterpart. Although early Miocene reefs were dominated by a Porites-Montastrea assemblage, eastward flow of Pacific circulation brought with it ''exotic'' corals such as Coscinaraea and Pseudocolumnastrea. Also, many cosmopolitan genera persisted from the Oligocene. During the middle to late Miocene, most of the species still living on Holocene reefs evolved. As the Mediterranean basin became more restricted, there was a slow decline in reef corals from 20 - 25 species in the Aquitainian to less than five species in the Messinian. Eustatic lowstand led to the extinction of reef-building corals in the late Messinian. In the Indo-Pacific, Neogene evolution of reef corals was conservative. Excluding the Acroporidae and Seriatoporidae, most Holocene framework species had evolved by the middle Miocene. Interplay between regional tectonics and eustatic sea level changes led to extensive development of middle to late Miocene pinnacle reefs over the southwestern Pacific.

  7. Miocene reefs of Dominican Republic

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, C.C.

    1988-01-01

    The reefs are overlain by conglomeratic strata. The stratigraphic setting of these reefs suggests that they have developed along the stalled portions of rapidly prograding fan deltas. Thickets and layers of coral debris are found seaward and stratigraphically above the well-developed reef. The matrix sediments are exclusively fine-grained sand to mud, and the fauna are suggestive of more open shelf conditions. In thickets, branched (porites spp., Pocillopora spp.), small massive (Montastrea spp., Siderastrea spp.), and foliose or plate like (Agaricia spp.) corals are found upright in the muddy sediment. Similarities in coral species and areal proximity suggest that thickets are the source of most layers of coralline debris. The association of coral debris with graded bedding and cross-bedding suggests that coral debris has been reworked by storms. The growth of corals and development of coral reefs in the Miocene-Pliocene Yaque Group is limited only by opportunities created by the slowing of siliciclastic sedimentation. Soft, muddy, terrigenous substrates and a continuing supply of terrigenous mud exert only a limited, indirect effect on reef growth.

  8. Apatite (U-Th)/He Thermochronometry as an innovative Geothermal Exploration Tool - A case study from the Wassuk Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorynski, K. E.; Stockli, D. F.; Walker, J. D.

    2010-12-01

    A utility-grade geothermal system requires increased, near-surface temperatures (>120°C), water to transfer heat, and structural or sedimentological fluid conduits. In extensional tectonic settings, geothermal anomalies often occur in areas with recent, high strain accumulation and complex faulting (i.e., cross-faults, accommodation zones) where exhumation and uplift of footwall rocks transfer heat, via advection, to the near-surface which is further carried by water through structural fluid conduits. Apatite helium (AHe) thermochronometric footwall age mapping can be used in conjunction with these genetic occurrence models to further focus regional-scale geothermal exploration efforts to areas of probabilistic increased fracture permeability and most recent, rapid footwall exhumation. Furthermore, partially reset apatites resulting from interaction with hydrothermal fluids (>40°C) will show which areas have been hottest most recently. This case study in the Wassuk Range, Hawthrone, NV confirms the utility of AHe thermochronometry as a geothermal exploration tool. A dense grid of footwall samples were collected adjacent to the Hawthorne geothermal anomaly (>85°C BHT) located in the hanging wall of the Wassuk Range block. Our data show that the location of the present-day geothermal anomaly correlates with the location of 1) the most recent episode of rapid footwall exhumation at 3.5-4 Ma, 2) km scale accommodation zones between differentially tilted Wassuk Range blocks, and 3) an elevated Miocene geothermal gradient. Furthermore, anomalously young AHe ages (<3.5 Ma) mimic the lateral extent of the Hawthorne geothermal anomaly and likely resulted from interaction with a deep-seated geothermal cell or hot hydrothermal fluids.

  9. The Effects of Using In-Class Focus Groups on Student Course Evaluations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Diane M.; Pritchard, Robert E.; Welsh, Carol N.; Potter, Gregory C.; Saccucci, Michael S.

    2002-01-01

    Student course evaluations were collected from four sections of finance course (two included focus groups). Student recommendations were implemented in all four. Students in focus group sections reported higher satisfaction with the course, perhaps due to the Hawthorne Effect. (SK)

  10. An overview of Miocene reefs

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, C.F. Jr. ); Colgan, M.W. ); Frost, S.H. ); Glenn, E.C. ); Bosence, D. ); Esteban, M. )

    1990-05-01

    Miocene reefs lived approximately within the latitudes of 27{degree}S to 48{degree}N compared with 25{degree}S and 32{degree}N for Holocene reefs. This expansion of reef-growing environments was the result of warm Miocene climates, aided by a eustatic sea level rise and tectonic styles that provided numerous foundations for reef development. The majority of Miocene reefs are found in three main areas: (1) Southeast Asia and the western Pacific, (2) the Mediterranean-Middle East, and (3) Middle America and the Caribbean. These regions, with their distinctive suites of coral and foramineral species, formed three biological provinces; respectively, they are the Indo-Pacific, Tethyan, and Western Atlantic provinces. Miocene reefs in Southeast Asia occur in several foreland basins as patch reef complexes on paleohighs and as barrier reefs in back-arc basins. Those reefs in the Mediterranean occur as fringing reefs, middle-shelf patch reefs, or as barrier reefs on the edges of tectonic blocks associated with Alpine thrust belts. Most reefs in the Caribbean grew on isolated open-ocean highs of volcanic origin. Miocene reefs display a diversity of framework types: (1) coral-encrusting, red algal boundstones with diverse coral faunas, (2) branching coral-encrusting, red algal boundstones with a limited Poritid fauna, (3) encrusting red algal boundstones. Barrier reef systems are especially rich in encrusting red algae and robust corals; grainstones are common as interbedded sediment. Patch reef complexes, however, display muddy carbonate textures, may have less diverse coral faunas, and commonly have larger foraminifera. The global distribution of Miocene reefs is important because (1) it provides insight into a paleoclimatic view of the earth during a major greenhouse stage and (2) Miocene buildups, such as the Arun (EUR of 14 tcf) and Bima fields (EUR of about 100 MMBO), are exploration targets.

  11. Antitumoral, antioxidant, and antimelanogenesis potencies of Hawthorn, a potential natural agent in the treatment of melanoma.

    PubMed

    Mustapha, Nadia; Mokdad-Bzéouich, Imèn; Maatouk, Mouna; Ghedira, Kamel; Hennebelle, Thierry; Chekir-Ghedira, Leila

    2016-06-01

    The lack of an efficient agent that does not have the disadvantage of low activity (kojic acid), high cytotoxicity, and mutagenicity (hydroquinone), poor skin penetration (arbutin), or low stability in formulation (glabridin) led us to continue our research on new antipigmentation/skin-lightening agents. Therefore, research of natural products that can modulate the metabolism of pigmentation is of great interest. Otherwise, malignant melanoma is one of the most aggressive forms of skin cancer, with high metastatic potential, and currently, there is no effective chemotherapy against invasive melanoma. Therefore, it is necessary to develop new drugs with potent activity and weak side effects against melanoma. The in-vitro anticancer effect of hawthorn was analyzed against B16F10 melanoma cells using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. The effect of isolated compounds from hawthorn on melanogenesis in B16F10 melanoma cells was investigated by measuring the amounts of melanin and tyrosinase spectrophotometrically at 475 nm. Balb/c mice models inoculated with B16F10 mouse tumor cells were used to evaluate the in-vivo antitumoral potential of hawthorn by assessing its effect on the growth of transplanted tumors. The antioxidant potential of tested samples was evaluated in B16F10 and primary human keratinocyte cells using a cellular antioxidant activity assay. Hawthorn tested samples inhibited effectively the growth of melanoma cells in vitro. Furthermore, it appears that tested samples from hawthorn reduced melanogenesis by inhibiting the tyrosinase activity of B16F10 cells in a dose-dependent manner. In-vivo studies showed that hawthorn total oligomer flavonoids extract treatment at a dose of 150 mg/kg body weight for 21 days in implanted tumor mice resulted in significant inhibition of the tumor growth volume and weight. In addition, tested samples showed significant cellular antioxidant capacity against the reactive oxygen species in B16F10 and primary human keratinocyte cells. Our results indicate that hawthorn could be considered as a promising agent for the treatment of melanoma as it shows antitumor activity in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, hawthorn constituents are shown to be highly effective at inhibiting tyrosinase-mediated melanogenesis in vitro on melanoma cells by preventing oxidation in these cells and without affecting the viability of normal human keratinocyte cells. Then, hawthorn might also be used as a new candidate of natural skin depigmenting agents in skin care products. PMID:26795272

  12. Identification of host fruit volatiles from domestic apple (Malus domestica), native black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii) and introduced ornamental hawthorn (C. monogyna) attractive to R. pomonella flies from the western U.S.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, infests apple (Malus domestica) and hawthorn species (most notably the downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis) in the eastern USA. Evidence suggests that the fly was introduced into the western USA sometime in the last 60 years. In addition to apple, R. pomonel...

  13. A macroecological glance at the structure of late Miocene rodent assemblages from Southwest Europe

    PubMed Central

    Cano, Ana Rosa Gómez; Cantalapiedra, Juan L.; Álvarez-Sierra, M. Ángeles; Fernández, Manuel Hernández

    2014-01-01

    Deep-time perspectives in macroecology are essential with regard to understanding the impact of climate forcing on faunal communities. Using late Miocene rodent faunas (12 to 5 Ma) from two different biogeographical provinces from southwestern Europe, we asked whether the waxing and waning of faunas with dissimilar ecological affinities tracked climate in different ways. The latest middle Miocene featured a fauna dominated by dormice with forest and mixed-habitat affinities. This group declined towards the Upper Miocene. Rodent taxa with the highest values of richness at the beginning of the Upper Miocene are generalists in the southern province and specialists of forested habitats in the northern province. Finally, we identified a third, increasingly significant group of rodents linked to open landscapes towards the end of the Miocene. These three broad ecological groups showed differential responses to a complex set of interconnected circumstances, including the biogeographic structure of the study area and climatic changes throughout time. PMID:25297009

  14. A macroecological glance at the structure of late Miocene rodent assemblages from Southwest Europe.

    PubMed

    Gómez Cano, Ana Rosa; Cantalapiedra, Juan L; Álvarez-Sierra, M Ángeles; Hernández Fernández, Manuel

    2014-01-01

    Deep-time perspectives in macroecology are essential with regard to understanding the impact of climate forcing on faunal communities. Using late Miocene rodent faunas (12 to 5 Ma) from two different biogeographical provinces from southwestern Europe, we asked whether the waxing and waning of faunas with dissimilar ecological affinities tracked climate in different ways. The latest middle Miocene featured a fauna dominated by dormice with forest and mixed-habitat affinities. This group declined towards the Upper Miocene. Rodent taxa with the highest values of richness at the beginning of the Upper Miocene are generalists in the southern province and specialists of forested habitats in the northern province. Finally, we identified a third, increasingly significant group of rodents linked to open landscapes towards the end of the Miocene. These three broad ecological groups showed differential responses to a complex set of interconnected circumstances, including the biogeographic structure of the study area and climatic changes throughout time. PMID:25297009

  15. Intentional use of the Hawthorne effect to improve oral hygiene compliance in orthodontic patients.

    PubMed

    Feil, Philip H; Grauer, Jennifer Sherah; Gadbury-Amyot, Cynthia C; Kula, Katherine; McCunniff, Michael D

    2002-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate whether the home care of noncompliant adolescent orthodontic patients with "poor" oral hygiene could be improved through the use of a deception strategy designed to intentionally induce the Hawthorne effect. This effect is often cited as being responsible for oral health improvements of control groups that receive placebo treatments. It is thought that participating in and fulfilling the requirements of a study alters subjects' behavior, thereby contributing to the improvement. Forty patients with histories of poor oral hygiene were assigned, in a quasi-random fashion, to two groups. Experimental subjects (n = 20) were presented with a situation that simulated participation in an experiment. These included the use of a consent form; distribution of tubes of toothpaste labeled "experimental"; instructions to brush twice a day for two minutes using a timer; and a request to return unused toothpaste. Control subjects (n = 20) had no knowledge of study participation. Tooth surface area covered with plaque was used as a proxy measure of home care behavior. It was measured at baseline, three months, and six months. Mean percentages of tooth surface covered with plaque for the experimental and control groups were 71 (+/- 11.52) and 74 (+/- 11.46) at baseline; 54 (+/- 13.79) and 78 (+/- 12.18) at three months; and 52 (+/- 13.04) and 79 (+/- 10.76) at six months. No statistically significant difference (p > .05) was obtained between groups at baseline. Statistically significant differences (p < .05) were found between groups at three and six months. Significant differences (p < .05) were also found only for the experimental subjects between baseline and each of the two subsequent observation periods. The efficiency and potential effectiveness of this strategy suggest that additional research be conducted to assess oral health improvements and possible applications to the private practice setting. PMID:12449206

  16. Miocene-Oligocene sequence stratigraphy of the Malay Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Lovell, R.; Elias, M.R. ); Hill, R.E.; Feeley, M.H. )

    1994-07-01

    The Malay Basin has experienced extension of the Eocene ( ) through Oligocene, sag in the early Miocene, and compression in the middle Miocene through Pliocene-Pleistocene. The interaction of structurally induced and glacial-eustatic accommodation changes has resulted in complex, interrelated play elements, including multiple reservoirs, diverse nonmarine sources, discontinuous migration pathways, and thin seals. Extensional subbasins were filled with braided streams, associated coastal plain, lacustrine deltas, and thick lake shales (groups M-K). This initial rift fill comprises an overall second order progradational cycle punctuated by 3rd-order cycles. These 3rd-order cycles are capped by thick, source-rich, lacustrine shale packages. The lower Miocene section (groups I and J) consists of progradational to aggradational fluvial to tidally-dominated estuarine sands. Hydrocarbons are generated from interbedded coals and other coal-related lithologies.

  17. Abundances of apple maggot, Rhagoletis pomonella, across different areas in central Washington, with special reference to black-fruited hawthorns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), has infested native black-fruited hawthorn (mostly Crataegus douglasii Lindl.) in central Washington since at least 2003, but little is known about the fly’s ecology in hawthorns there. The main objective here was to determine adult and larval abu...

  18. Identification of host fruit volatiles from domestic apple (Malus domestica), native black hawthorn (Crataegus douglasii) and introduced ornamental hawthorn (C. monogyna) attractive to Rhagoletis pomonella flies from the western United States.

    PubMed

    Cha, Dong H; Yee, Wee L; Goughnour, Robert B; Sim, Sheina B; Powell, Thomas H Q; Feder, Jeffrey L; Linn, Charles E

    2012-03-01

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, infests apple (Malus domestica) and hawthorn species (most notably the downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis) in the eastern USA. Evidence suggests that the fly was introduced into the western USA sometime in the last 60 years. In addition to apple, R. pomonella also infests two species of hawthorns in the western USA as major hosts: the native black hawthorn (C. douglasii) and the introduced ornamental English hawthorn, C. monogyna. Apple and downy hawthorn-origin flies in the eastern USA use volatile blends emitted from the surface of their respective ripening fruit to find and discriminate among host trees. To test whether the same is true for western flies, we used coupled gas chromatography and electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD) and developed a 7-component apple fruit blend for western apple-origin flies, an 8-component black hawthorn fruit blend for flies infesting C. douglasii, and a 9-component ornamental hawthorn blend for flies from C. monogyna. Crataegus douglasii and C. monogyna-origin flies showed similar levels of upwind directed flight to their respective natal synthetic fruit blends in flight tunnel assays compared to whole fruit adsorbent extracts, indicating that the blends contain all the behaviorally relevant fruit volatiles to induce maximal response levels. The black and ornamental hawthorn blends shared four compounds in common including 3-methylbutan-1-ol, which appears to be a key volatile for R. pomonella populations in the eastern, southern, and western USA that show a preference for fruit from different Crataegus species. However, the blends also differed from one another and from domesticated apple in several respects that make it possible that western R. pomonella flies behaviorally discriminate among fruit volatiles and form ecologically differentiated host races, as is the case for eastern apple and hawthorn flies. PMID:22399441

  19. Changes in physicochemical characteristics and free amino acids of hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida) fruits during maturation.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei-Qin; Hu, Qing-Ping; Xu, Jian-Guo

    2015-05-15

    In this study, changes in physicochemical characteristics associated with fruit quality and free amino acids were investigated during maturation of hawthorn fruits. Significant differences in these parameters were found during maturation. The color turned progressively from mature green to semi-red, to reach bright red; the shape changed gradually from oval to round or approached round; the size, weight, and edible part (flesh/core ratio) of hawthorns increased while the density of intact fruits did not change. The content of moisture, total soluble sugars, soluble pectin, reduced ascorbic acid, total ascorbic acid, fructose, and sucrose increased while crude protein content decreased significantly. The levels of starch, sucrose, titratable acidity, protopectin, pectin, total free amino acids, and total essential amino acids initially increased and then decreased gradually during maturation. The outcomes of this study provide additional and useful information for fresh consumption and processing as well as utilization of dropped unripe hawthorn fruits. PMID:25577050

  20. Polyphenolic profile and biological activity of Chinese hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida BUNGE) fruits.

    PubMed

    Jurikova, Tunde; Sochor, Jiri; Rop, Otakar; Mlcek, Jiri; Balla, Stefan; Szekeres, Ladislav; Adam, Vojtech; Kizek, Rene

    2012-01-01

    Chinese hawthorn (Crataegus pinnatifida Bge.) fruits are rich in polyphenols (e.g., epicatechin, procyanidin B2, procyanidin B5, procyanidin C1, hyperoside, isoquercitrin and chlorogenic acid)--active compounds that exert beneficial effects. This review summarizes all information available on polyphenolic content and methods for their quantification in Chinese hawthorn berries and the relationships between individual polyphenolic compounds as well. The influence of species or cultivars, the locality of cultivation, the stage of maturity, and extract preparation conditions on the polyphenolic content were discussed as well. Currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. Recent trials have demonstrated the efficacy of Chinese hawthorn fruit in lowering blood cholesterol and the risk of cardiovascular diseases. The fruit has also demonstrated anti-inflammatory and anti-tumour activities. This review deals mainly with the biological activity of the fruit related to its antioxidant properties. PMID:23222867

  1. Applied environmental stresses to enhance the levels of polyphenolics in leaves of hawthorn plants.

    PubMed

    Kirakosyan, Ara; Kaufman, Peter; Warber, Sara; Zick, Suzanna; Aaronson, Keith; Bolling, Steven; Chul Chang, Soo

    2004-06-01

    In this investigation, two species of Crataegus (hawthorn) were chosen because their polyphenolic constituents have recently received greater attention for the treatment of patients with severe heart disease. One-year-old plants of hawthorn (Crataegus laevigata and C. monogyna) were subjected to water-deficit (continuous water deprivation), cold (4 degrees C), flooding (immersion of roots of plants in water) or herbivory (leaf removal) stress treatments (each of 10 days duration) in order to assess their effects on levels of polyphenolics, namely (-)-epicatechin, catechin, chlorogenic acid, vitexin, vitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, acetylvitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, hyperoside, quercetin, and rutin in the leaves. The working hypothesis followed is that one or more of these stress treatment will elicit increases in the levels of these polyphenolics. Cold stress causes increases in levels of vitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, acetylvitexin-2"-O-rhamnoside, hyperoside, and quercetin in both Crataegus species. Water-deficit stress increased the productivity of chlorogenic acid, catechin, and (-)-epicatechin in both hawthorn species. Flooding and herbivory caused no net increases, and in some cases, decreases in levels of polyphenolics. These studies indicate that either water-deficit stress or cold stress treatments, or a combination of the two, can be used to enhance the levels of desired polyphenolics in the leaves of these two hawthorn species in a photobioreactor system. These results may have significance for hawthorn in adapting to water-deficit or cold stress and are important considerations for the use of hawthorn in the treatment of heart disease in humans. PMID:15153184

  2. Comparative Protective Effect of Hawthorn Berry Hydroalcoholic Extract, Atorvastatin, and Mesalamine on Experimentally Induced Colitis in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shafie-Irannejad, Vahid; Hobbenaghi, Rahim; Tabatabaie, Seyed Hamed; Moshtaghion, Seyed-Mehdi

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The protective effect of hydroalcoholic extract of hawthorn berries (HBE) on acetic acid (AA)–induced colitis in rats was investigated. Forty-two Wistar rats were divided into seven groups, including control and test groups (n=6). The control animals received saline, and the test animals were treated with saline (sham group), mesalamine (50 mg/kg; M group), atorvastatin (20 mg/kg; A group), HBE (100 mg/kg; H group), mesalamine and HBE (HM group), or atorvastatin plus HBE (HA group), 3 days before and a week after colitis induction. Colitis was induced by administration of 1 mL AA (4%) via a polyethylene catheter intrarectally. High-performance liquid chromatography analyses showed that HBE contained 0.13% and 0.5% oleanolic acid and ursolic acid, respectively. Elevated myeloperoxidase activity and lipid peroxidation were attenuated in the HA group. The H and HM groups showed marked reductions in colitis-induced decreases in total thiol molecules and body weight. The histopathological studies revealed that HBE decreased colitis-induced edema and infiltration of neutrophils. Our data suggest the anti-inflammatory and antioxidant effects of HBE and atorvastatin protect against AA-induced colitis. The anti-inflammatory effect of HBE may be attributable to its ability to decrease myeloperoxidase activity as a biomarker of neutrophil infiltration. PMID:23875899

  3. Diagenesis of the Oligocene-Miocene rocks of the Upper Floridan and Intermediate aquifer systems by meteoric and mixing-zone waters in southwest Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Weedman, S.D. ); McCartan, L. )

    1993-03-01

    Optical and SEM of samples from 6 cores of Oligocene and Miocene rocks that compose portions of the Florida and Intermediate aquifers and the intervening semiconfining unit documents meteoric and mixing-zone (seawater and fresh carbonate ground water) diagenesis inferred to have occurred over several cycles of sea level change. Dolomite, limestone, sandstone, and claystone of the Suwannee Formation and the Arcadia Formation (Hawthorn Group) were examined. Core samples from time-equivalent strata in two E--W transects in Manatee, Hardee, Highlands, Sarasota, and DeSoto Counties are estimated to be 16--33 Ma on the basis of [sup 87]Sr/[sup 86]Sr ratios from unaltered mollusk shells and by molluscan biostratigraphy. Lithostratigraphic correlations are based on examination of 19 cores, 62 thin sections, 60 geophysical logs, and mineralogy determined by X-ray diffraction. Diagenetic indicators that the authors tracked petrographically include shell micritization, shell dissolution, equant and (or) fibrous CaCO[sub 3] cement, neomorphism, dolomite, etched phosphate grains, echinoderm fragment syntaxial overgrowths, and amorphous silica pore lining. Infiltration of meteoric water caused dissolution of carbonate minerals, especially aragonite, and precipitation of equant calcite crystals in voids of dissolved fossils and in pore spaces between grains. The silica was precipitated as pore linings in zones having soil textures. Observed replacement of calcite by limpid dolomite is consistent with modeling predictions of mixing-zone diagenesis. Etched crystals of limpid dolomite may indicate freshwater dissolution of a mixing-zone precipitate. Mapping of regional unconformities revealed pronounced thickening and thinning of some units. Evidence of meteoric water diagenesis is observed in the upper 600 ft of the transects examined. Evidence of mixing-zone diagenesis is observed at varying depths, but appears to increase in abundance and thickness toward the west.

  4. Hawthorn leaf flavonoids alleviate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by enhancing the adiponectin/AMPK pathway.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhongping; Xu, Jiaoya; Zheng, Peiyong; Xing, Lianjun; Shen, Hongyi; Yang, Lili; Zhang, Li; Ji, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataeguspinnatifida) belongs to the genus Rosaceae family of plants. The hawthorn leaf, Crataeguspinnatifida Bunge, is used for both condiment and medicinal purposes to prevent and treat metabolic dysfunctions, such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in traditional Chinese medicine. However, its effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain obscure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of hawthorn leaf flavonoids (HLF), the dominant bioactive extracts of hawthorn leaves, on high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. HLF supplementation significantly lowered body weight, liver weight, liver/body weight ratio, improved serum parameters and liver dysfunction and markedly decreased hepatic lipid accumulation in HFD-fed rats. In addition, HLF intervention dramatically increased circulating adiponectin levels and up-regulated the expression of adiponectin receptors, particularly adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in the liver. Moreover, adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated, as well as AMPK-mediated alteration of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and their downstream targets. Taken together, our data suggest that HLF ameliorates hepatic steatosis by enhancing the adiponectin/AMPK pathway in the liver of HFD-induced NAFLD rats. PMID:26770322

  5. Hawthorn leaf flavonoids alleviate nonalcoholic fatty liver disease by enhancing the adiponectin/AMPK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhongping; Xu, Jiaoya; Zheng, Peiyong; Xing, Lianjun; Shen, Hongyi; Yang, Lili; Zhang, Li; Ji, Guang

    2015-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataeguspinnatifida) belongs to the genus Rosaceae family of plants. The hawthorn leaf, Crataeguspinnatifida Bunge, is used for both condiment and medicinal purposes to prevent and treat metabolic dysfunctions, such as hyperlipidemia, hypertension, and cardiovascular disease in traditional Chinese medicine. However, its effects on nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) remain obscure. The purpose of the present study was to investigate the protective effect of hawthorn leaf flavonoids (HLF), the dominant bioactive extracts of hawthorn leaves, on high fat diet (HFD)-induced hepatic steatosis and to elucidate its underlying mechanisms. HLF supplementation significantly lowered body weight, liver weight, liver/body weight ratio, improved serum parameters and liver dysfunction and markedly decreased hepatic lipid accumulation in HFD-fed rats. In addition, HLF intervention dramatically increased circulating adiponectin levels and up-regulated the expression of adiponectin receptors, particularly adiponectin receptor 2 (AdipoR2) in the liver. Moreover, adenosine monophosphate (AMP)-activated protein kinase (AMPK) was also activated, as well as AMPK-mediated alteration of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) and their downstream targets. Taken together, our data suggest that HLF ameliorates hepatic steatosis by enhancing the adiponectin/AMPK pathway in the liver of HFD-induced NAFLD rats. PMID:26770322

  6. The Repressive Nature of the Past: Hawthorne's "House of the Seven Gables."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loges, Max L.

    "The House of the Seven Gables" describes the problems that emerge when a family allows itself to become so locked into the traditions and sins of the past that each new generation becomes a slightly degenerated facsimile of the previous generation. Nathaniel Hawthorne manages this task by comparing Clifford, a descendent of a long line of

  7. The investigation of some bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna subsp. monogyna Jacq)

    PubMed Central

    Keser, Serhat; Celik, Sait; Turkoglu, Semra; Yilmaz, Ökkes; Turkoglu, Ismail

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The antioxidant and pharmacological effects of hawthorn have mainly been attributed to the polyphenolic contents. The aim of this research is to determine some bioactive compounds and antioxidant properties of hawthorn aqueous and ethanol extracts of leaves, flowers, and ripened fruits. Materials and Methods: For this purpose, antioxidant activities of extracts were assessed on DPPH•, ABTS•+, superoxide scavenging, reducing power and ferrous metal chelating activity assays and phenolic content of extracts was determined by Folin—Cioacalteu’s reagent. Results: The flavonoids including rutin, apigenin, myricetin, quercetin, naringenin and kaempferol, were identified by high-performance liquid chromatography in the hawthorn extract. Conclusion: It was observed the aqueous and ethanol extracts of Crataegus monogyna subsp. monogyna fruits showed the highest activity in reducing power and metal chelating activity assays. In addition, it was determined that the aqueous flower extract showed higher flavonoid content than aqueous leaves extract. The antioxidant and pharmacological effects of hawthorn have mainly been attributed to the polyphenolic contents. PMID:26401347

  8. Gall production on hawthorns caused by Gymnosporangium spp.in Hatay province, Turkey

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Three hawthorn and related rust diseases caused by Gymnosporangium confusum on Crataegus monogyna, G. clavariiforme on C. orientalis, and G. sabinae on Pyrus communis were detected in Hatay province, Turkey. Gymnosporangium confusum was also found causing telial galls on Juniperus communis. Gymnospo...

  9. Singing and Companionship in the Hawthorn University of the Third-Age Choir, Australia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joseph, Dawn; Southcott, Jane

    2015-01-01

    The international University of the Third Age (U3A) embodies the principles of lifelong learning and personal fulfilment amongst members. The research reported in this article focused on the Choir of the U3A Hawthorn, Melbourne, Australia and the benefits perceived by members undertaking this active music engagement in non-competitive choral…

  10. 77 FR 7525 - Revision of Class D and Class E Airspace; Hawthorne, CA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-13

    ... amend controlled airspace at Hawthorne, CA (76 FR 67103). Interested parties were invited to participate... Force, and the Los Angeles Class B Workgroup, enhances the safety and management of aircraft operations... Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26, 1979); and (3) does not warrant preparation...

  11. Assessment of phenolic acid content and in vitro antiradical characteristics of hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Öztürk, Nilgün; Tunçel, Muzaffer

    2011-06-01

    The infusions and extracts obtained from leaves with flowers, fruit peel, and seed from hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq., Family Rosaceae) were subjected to evaluation as potential sources of antioxidant phytochemicals on the basis of their total content of phenolics, levels of phenolic acids, and in vitro antiradical activity. Total phenolic content of extracts was determined using the modified Folin-Ciocalteau method. Antioxidant activity was determined for phenolic extracts by a method involving the use of the free radical 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH). Phenolic acids containing extracts and infusions from hawthorn leaves, fruit peel, and seeds were obtained using different polarity solvents and separated by reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, which enabled improved separation by the use of a C(18) column, an acidic mobile phase, and gradient elusion. The highest total phenolic content (343.54 mg of gallic acid equivalents/g) and the highest DPPH radical scavenging activity as the inhibition percentage (60.36%) were obtained in ethyl acetate extract from hawthorn leaves with flower. Also, the highest phenolic acid content was measured in the extracts of hawthorn leaves with flowers: protocathechuic (108-128 mg/100 g), p-hydroxy benzoic (141-468 mg/100 g), caffeic (137-3,580 mg/100 g), chlorogenic (925-4,637 mg/100 g), ferulic (3,363-3,462 mg/100 g), vanillic (214 mg/100 g), and syringic (126 mg/100 g) acids. The results indicate that hawthorn is a promising plant because of its high antioxidant activity. PMID:21554133

  12. Mediterranean Miocene carbonates: facies models and diagenesis

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, M.E.

    1987-11-01

    Miocene carbonates can bridge the gap between Holocene and older carbonate sequences, thus enhancing understanding of depositional and diagenetic patterns. Miocene carbonates can bridge this gap because of their similarity to Holocene counterparts and the ease of using these carbonates to reconstruct tectonic, paleogeographic, and paleoclimatic settings. In the Mediterranean, the Miocene provides a superb set of exposures and a wide variety of facies models in different geologic settings.

  13. Ammonium carbonate is more attractive than apple and hawthorn fruit volatile lures to Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) in Washington State.

    PubMed

    Yee, Wee L; Nash, Meralee J; Goughnour, Robert B; Cha, Dong H; Linn, Charles E; Feder, Jeffrey L

    2014-08-01

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella (Walsh), is an introduced, quarantine pest of apple (Malus domestica Borkhausen) in the Pacific Northwest of the United States. In the eastern United States where the fly is native, fruit volatiles have been reported to be more attractive than ammonia compounds to R. pomonella. However, the opposite may be true in the western United States. Here, we determined whether newly identified western apple and western hawthorn fruit volatiles are more attractive than ammonium carbonate (AC) to R. pomonella in apple, black hawthorn, and ornamental hawthorn trees in western Washington State. In all three host trees, sticky red sphere or yellow panel traps baited with AC generally caught more flies than traps baited with lures containing the four newly developed fruit blends (modified eastern apple, western apple, western ornamental hawthorn, and western black hawthorn) or two older blends (eastern apple and eastern downy hawthorn). Fruit volatiles also displayed more variation among trapping studies conducted at different sites, in different host trees, and across years than AC. The results imply that traps baited with AC represent the best approach to monitoring R. pomonella in Washington State. PMID:24915519

  14. Phenylpropanoid-substituted procyanidins and tentatively identified procyanidin glycosides from hawthorn (Crataegus spp.).

    PubMed

    Sendker, Jandirk; Petereit, Frank; Lautenschläger, Marcus; Hellenbrand, Nils; Hensel, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    The rational use of hawthorn leafs and flowers from Crataegus spp. for declining cardiac performance is mainly due to flavon-C-glycosides and oligomeric procyanidins (OPC). From OPC-enriched extracts from different batches, a dimeric phenylpropanoid-substituted procyanidin (cinchonain II b, 1) was isolated and characterized by MS, CD, and NMR. Also the presence of higher oligomeric cinchonains (degree of polymerization 3 to 8) in hawthorn extracts was shown by a specific ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-ESI-qTOF-MS method. Interestingly, strong evidence for the occurrence of oligomeric procyanidin hexosides was found by ultrahigh-pressure liquid chromatography-ESI-qTOF-MS analysis which additionally revealed the presence of peaks indicative of dimeric procyanidin hexosides by their exact mass, which were clearly distinguishable from the cinchonain II type peaks. PMID:23154843

  15. B. F. Skinner and T. N. Whitehead: a brief encounter, research similarities, hawthorne revisited, what next?

    PubMed

    Claus, Calvin K

    2007-01-01

    B. F. Skinner and T. N. Whitehead recalled a personal interaction in 1934, with differing memories of the event. No evidence of other subsequent interactions or mutual citations has been found. Although they went their separate ways, three similarities in their research strategies have been found and are discussed. Elements of Whitehead's Hawthorne study and Skinner's concurrent, parallel work reveal that they both (a) introduced the cumulative curve to report data, (b) used a small number of subjects studied over time, and (c) used highly accurate recording devices. A few "afterwords" are offered on their lives and writings, and again, on the Hawthorne effect. A suggestion is made that a Skinner-Whitehead research approach might be useful in studying gambling behavior. PMID:22478490

  16. B. F. Skinner and T. N. Whitehead: A Brief Encounter, Research Similarities, Hawthorne Revisited, What Next?

    PubMed Central

    Claus, Calvin K

    2007-01-01

    B. F. Skinner and T. N. Whitehead recalled a personal interaction in 1934, with differing memories of the event. No evidence of other subsequent interactions or mutual citations has been found. Although they went their separate ways, three similarities in their research strategies have been found and are discussed. Elements of Whitehead's Hawthorne study and Skinner's concurrent, parallel work reveal that they both (a) introduced the cumulative curve to report data, (b) used a small number of subjects studied over time, and (c) used highly accurate recording devices. A few “afterwords” are offered on their lives and writings, and again, on the Hawthorne effect. A suggestion is made that a Skinner–Whitehead research approach might be useful in studying gambling behavior. PMID:22478490

  17. Oxygen species scavenging activity of phenolic extracts from hawthorn fresh plant organs and pharmaceutical preparations.

    PubMed

    Bahorun, T; Gressier, B; Trotin, F; Brunet, C; Dine, T; Luyckx, M; Vasseur, J; Cazin, M; Cazin, J C; Pinkas, M

    1996-11-01

    Different extracts of fresh vegetative and reproductive organs from Crataegus monogyna harvested during a whole season and from some pharmaceutical hawthorn preparations exhibit in vitro antioxidant activities using three different models of oxygen reactive species generation (superoxide anion, hydrogen peroxide and hypochlorous acid). All the tested samples show low IC50 values, the most efficient being fresh young leaves, fresh floral buds and pharmaceutical dried flowers. The activities seem to be especially bound to the total phenolic proanthocyanidin and flavonoid contents. PMID:8955870

  18. Activity of hawthorn leaf and bark extracts in relation to biological membrane.

    PubMed

    Włoch, Aleksandra; Kapusta, Ireneusz; Bielecki, Krzysztof; Oszmiański, Jan; Kleszczyńska, Halina

    2013-07-01

    The aim of the study was to identify and determine the percent content of polyphenols in extracts from leaves and hawthorn bark, to examine the effect of the extracts on the properties of the biological membrane as well as to determine their antioxidant activity toward membrane lipids. In particular, a biophysical investigation was conducted on the effect of hawthorn extracts on the osmotic resistance and morphology of erythrocyte cells and on the packing of the heads of membrane lipids. Analysis of the polyphenol content of extracts used the HPLC method. Analysis of the polyphenol composition has shown a dominant share of procyanidins and epicatechin in both extracts. The research showed that the polyphenolic compounds contained in hawthorn extracts are incorporated mainly into the hydrophilic part of the erythrocyte membrane, inducing echinocyte shapes. They also diminish the packing order of the lipid polar heads of the membrane, as evidenced by the lowered generalized polarization values of Laurdan. The substances used induced increased osmotic pressure of erythrocytes, making them less sensitive to changes in osmotic pressure. The presence of the extract compounds in the outer hydrophilic part of the erythrocyte membrane, evidenced by examination of the shapes and packing in the hydrophilic part of membrane, indicates that the substances constitute a kind of barrier that protects the erythrocyte membrane against free radicals, while the membrane-bound extracts do not disturb the membrane structure and, thus, do not cause any side effects. PMID:23774969

  19. Miocene benthic foraminiferal isotope records: A synthesis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Savin, S.M.; Douglas, R.G.; Keller, G.; Killingley, J.S.; Shaughnessy, L.; Sommer, M.A.; Vincent, E.; Woodruff, F.

    1981-01-01

    18O 16O and 13C 12C ratios of Miocene benthic foraminifera from a number of Atlantic, Pacific and Indian Ocean DSDP sites (71, 77B, 206, 208, 238, 279, 289, 296, 329, 357 and 366A) have been compiled. These provide a rather detailed history of Miocene deep water especially in the Pacific Ocean. Bottom-water temperatures rose during the early Miocene and then declined rapidly during the middle Miocene. This decline was accompanied by an increase in Antarctic glaciation. Late Miocene bottom temperatures and Antarctic ice volumes are inferred to be similar to today's, but exhibited some fluctuation. The early Miocene ocean was less thermally stratified at intermediate and abyssal depths while the late Miocene deep ocean had a thermal structure generally similar to the modern ocean. Foraminiferal carbon isotope ratios at most of the sites varied quasi-sympathetically throughout the Miocene. These variations must reflect comparable variations in the mean 13C 12C of marine HCO3-. However, the causes of such variations are not yet clear. ?? 1981.

  20. Miocene reefs in western Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect

    Esteban, M.

    1988-01-01

    Coral reefs were particularly abundant and well developed during the late Tortonian and Messinian in southeastern Spain, the Balearic Islands, Italy, Sicily, Algeria, and Morocco. These reefs occurred just before and during the deposition of the thick Messinian evaporite units in the basinal areas and disappeared completely from Mediteranean during the early Pliocene. Most of the coral reefs are fringing terrigenous coastal fan complexes with very small lagoons and show progradation of less than 2 km. Some of the reefs occur on, or are intercalated with, Neogene volcanics or Messinian evaporites. Barrier-reef complexes are less common, have extensive lagoons behind them, and show complex progradational geometries more than 10 km wide. Excellent outcrops allow detailed reconstruction of paleogeography and sea level changes. Progradation predominated during phases of relative sea level drops and stillsands, while significant retrogradation occurred during sea level rises. The coral reef wall framework is commonly less than 20 m thick and is dominated by Porites and, locally, Tarbellastrae. Older Miocene reefs are less well developed, but show greater diversity of corals and reef organisms. Younger Miocene reef complexes occurring in open ocean settings are formed by only one branching coral genus (Porites or, locally, Tarbellastraea) with branching colonies up to 7 m high. Halimeda sands are particularly abundant in the upper reef slopes with occasional intercalations of red algae pavements that most likely coincide with episodes of terrigenous influx.

  1. The comparison of anti-oxidative kinetics in vitro of the fluid extract from maidenhair tree, motherwort and hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Bernatoniene, Jurga; Kucinskaite, Agne; Masteikova, Ruta; Kalveniene, Zenona; Kasparaviciene, Giedre; Savickas, Arunas

    2009-01-01

    The aim of the study was to perform a quantitative analysis of fluid extracts of maidenhair tree (Ginkgo biloba L.), motherwort (Leonurus cardiaca L.) and hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.), to evaluate their antioxidant activity and to compare their ability to inactivate free radicals. The antioxidant activity was measured using the DPPH*and the ABTS*+ radical scavenging reaction systems. The study showed that the manifestation of the radical scavenging capacity in the DPPH* reaction system was in the following order: the fluid extract of hawthorn (70.37 +/- 0.80%) > the fluid extract of maidenhair tree (82.63 +/- 0.23%) > the fluid extract of motherwort (84.89 +/- 0.18%), while in the ABTS*+ reaction system, the manifestation of the radical scavenging capacity was in the following order: the fluid extract of hawthorn (87.09 +/- 0.55%) > the fluid extract of motherwort (88.28 +/- 1.06%) > the fluid extract of maidenhair tree (88.39 +/- 0.72%). The results showed that in the DPPH* reaction system, fluid extract of motherwort manifested higher antioxidant activity, compared to the fluid extracts of maidenhair tree and hawthorn. By contrast, in the ABTS*+ reaction system, higher antioxidant activity was found in the fluid extract of maidenhair tree, compared to the fluid extracts of motherwort and hawthorn. This would suggest that preparations manufactured from these herbal raw materials could be used as effective preventive means and valuable additional remedies in the treatment of diseases caused by oxidative stress. PMID:19702174

  2. Influence of extraction technique on the anti-oxidative potential of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) extracts in bovine muscle homogenates.

    PubMed

    Shortle, E; O'Grady, M N; Gilroy, D; Furey, A; Quinn, N; Kerry, J P

    2014-12-01

    Six extracts were prepared from hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) leaves and flowers (HLF) and berries (HB) using solid-liquid [traditional (T) (HLFT, HBT), sonicated (S) (HLFS, HBS)] and supercritical fluid (C) extraction (HLFC, HBC) techniques. The antioxidant activities of HLF and HB extracts were characterised using in vitro antioxidant assays (TPC, DPPH, FRAP) and in 25% bovine muscle (longissimus lumborum) homogenates (lipid oxidation (TBARS), oxymyoglobin (% of total myoglobin)) after 24h storage at 4°C. Hawthorn extracts exhibited varying degrees of antioxidant potency. In vitro and muscle homogenate (TBARS) antioxidant activity followed the order: HLFS>HLFT and HBT>HBS. In supercritical fluid extracts, HLFC>HBC (in vitro antioxidant activity) and HLFC≈HBC (TBARS). All extracts (except HBS) reduced oxymyoglobin oxidation. The HLFS extract had the highest antioxidant activity in all test systems. Supercritical fluid extraction (SFE) exhibited potential as a technique for the manufacture of functional ingredients (antioxidants) from hawthorn for use in muscle foods. PMID:25170819

  3. Panafrican distribution of Lower Miocene Hominoidea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senut, Brigitte; Pickford, Martin; Wessels, Dudley

    1997-11-01

    Palaeontological survey of the Neogene littoral deposits of the Namaqualand coastal strip, Northern Cape Province, South Africa, has resulted in the collection of the first Lower Miocene faunas from South Africa. Among the mammals from Ryskop and Hondeklip Bay is a gorilla-sized hominoid. This discovery greatly increases the geographic range of early Miocene hominoids and suggests that even at this remote epoch, the superfamily had a Panafrican distribution.

  4. Updated chronology for the Miocene hominoid radiation in Western Eurasia

    PubMed Central

    Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; Alba, David M.; Garcés, Miguel; Robles, Josep M.; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2011-01-01

    Extant apes (Primates: Hominoidea) are the relics of a group that was much more diverse in the past. They originated in Africa around the Oligocene/Miocene boundary, but by the beginning of the Middle Miocene they expanded their range into Eurasia, where they experienced a far-reaching evolutionary radiation. A Eurasian origin of the great ape and human clade (Hominidae) has been favored by several authors, but the assessment of this hypothesis has been hampered by the lack of accurate datings for many Western Eurasian hominoids. Here we provide an updated chronology that incorporates recently discovered Iberian taxa and further reevaluates the age of many previously known sites on the basis of local biostratigraphic scales and magnetostratigraphic data. Our results show that identifiable Eurasian kenyapithecins (Griphopithecus and Kenyapithecus) are much younger than previously thought (ca. 14 Ma instead of 16 Ma), which casts serious doubts on the attribution of the hominoid tooth from Engelswies (16.3–16.5 Ma) to cf. Griphopithecus. This evidence is further consistent with an alternative scenario, according to which the Eurasian pongines and African hominines might have independently evolved in their respective continents from similar kenyapithecin ancestors, resulting from an early Middle Miocene intercontinental range extension followed by vicariance. This hypothesis, which would imply an independent origin of orthogrady in pongines and hominines, deserves further testing by accurately inferring the phylogenetic position of European dryopithecins, which might be stem pongines rather than stem hominines. PMID:21436034

  5. Preliminary plan for the development of geothermal energy in the town of Hawthorne, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1981-11-01

    Site characteristics pertinent to the geothermal development are described, including: physiography, demography, economy, and goals and objectives of the citizens as they relate to geothermal development. The geothermal reservoir is characterized on the basis of available information. The probable drilling depth to the reservoir, anticipated water production rates, water quality, and resource temperature are indicated. Uses of the energy that seem appropriate to the situation both now and in the near future at Hawthorne are described. The essential institutional requirements for geothermal energy development are discussed, including the financial, environmental, and legal and regulatory aspects. The various steps that are necessary to accomplish the construction of the geothermal district heating system are described.

  6. Pioneer contributions of Harris Hawthorne Wilder, Ph.D., to forensic sciences.

    PubMed

    Stewart, T D

    1982-10-01

    In his youth Harris Hawthorne Wilder developed interests in both zoology and human anatomy. Following graduate study in Germany (1886-1891), he was appointed professor of zoology at Smith College but retained his dual interests throughout his career. As a result, he was instrumental in introducing to American audiences two new European developments in human identification; dermatoglyphics and face reconstruction on skulls. The details of his contributions in these two areas, summarized here, establish him as an important pioneer in American forensic sciences. PMID:6757376

  7. Anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, free-radical-scavenging, and antimicrobial activities of hawthorn berries ethanol extract.

    PubMed

    Tadić, Vanja M; Dobrić, Silva; Marković, Goran M; Dordević, Sofija M; Arsić, Ivana A; Menković, Nebojsa R; Stević, Tanja

    2008-09-10

    Hawthorn [Crataegus monogyna Jacq. and Crataegus oxyacantha L.; sin. Crataegus laevigata (Poiret) DC., Rosaceae] leaves, flowers, and berries are used in traditional medicine in the treatment of chronic heart failure, high blood pressure, arrhythmia, and various digestive ailments, as well as geriatric and antiarteriosclerosis remedies. According to European Pharmacopoeia 6.0, hawthorn berries consist of the dried false fruits of these two species or their mixture. The present study was carried out to test free-radical-scavenging, anti-inflammatory, gastroprotective, and antimicrobial activities of hawthorn berries ethanol extract. Phenolic compounds represented 3.54%, expressed as gallic acid equivalents. Determination of total flavonoid aglycones content yielded 0.18%. The percentage of hyperoside, as the main flavonol component, was 0.14%. With respect to procyanidins content, the obtained value was 0.44%. DPPH radical-scavenging capacity of the extract was concentration-dependent, with EC50 value of 52.04 microg/mL (calculation based on the total phenolic compounds content in the extract). Oral administration of investigated extract caused dose-dependent anti-inflammatory effect in a model of carrageenan-induced rat paw edema. The obtained anti-inflammatory effect was 20.8, 23.0, and 36.3% for the extract doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively. In comparison to indomethacin, given in a dose producing 50% reduction of rat paw edema, the extract given in the highest tested dose (200 mg/kg) showed 72.4% of its activity. Gastroprotective activity of the extract was investigated using an ethanol-induced acute stress ulcer in rats with ranitidine as a reference drug. Hawthorn extract produced dose-dependent gastroprotective activity (3.8 +/- 2.1, 1.9 +/- 1.7, and 0.7 +/- 0.5 for doses of 50, 100, and 200 mg/kg, respectively), with the efficacy comparable to that of the reference drug. Antimicrobial testing of the extract revealed its moderate bactericidal activity, especially against gram-positive bacteria Micrococcus flavus, Bacillus subtilis, and Lysteria monocytogenes, with no effect on Candida albicans. All active components identified in the extract might be responsible for activities observed. PMID:18698794

  8. Astronomical age calibration in the Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shackleton, N. J.; Roehl, U.; Raffi, I.

    2001-05-01

    The Middle Miocene comprises the Langhian and Serravallian Stages of European stratigraphy. Boundary stratotypes for the base of the Langian, the base of the Serravallian and the top of the Serravallian (base of the Tortonian) have not yet been formally defined but in round figures the age interval is from 15.5 Ma to 10.5 Ma with the intervening boundary at about 13.5 Ma. In the deep sea this time interval is particularly difficult to deal with because the carbonate compensation depth shallowed more than once, with the effect of generating condensed sections devoid of critical microfossils. In addition true hiatuses exist in many deep ocean sections that may have been induced either/both by instability caused by carbonate dissolution or by changes in deep currents. ODP Leg 154 had the good fortune to core two sites (925 and 926) that both contain a complete record of the Middle Miocene. Site 929 also preserves a more-or-less complete record but the record is intensely dissolved and includes several turbidites. Astronomical tuning of the earlier Middle Miocene time scale proved quite difficult on the basis only of shipboard data but with scanning XRF data for several critical cores we have completed a robust time scale. The base of the Tortonian is generally characterised by the first occurrence of Neogloboquadrina acostoensis, which has an open-ocean age around 10 Ma. Additional work is needed to characterise this boundary, but the astronomical time scale for a number of open-ocean nannofossil biostratigraphic events is secure. During the Serravallian intense 40-ka dissolution cycles cover the interval 12.4 to 11.4 Ma after which the CCD gradually deepens and precession cycles start to dominate the record again. If the base of the Serravallian is recognised by the LO of Sphenolithus heteromorphus, this coincides with the first of a group of three strong 100-ka eccentricity cycles within which there is a vigorous precession response. Both the biostratigraphic event and the astronomical age (13.54 Ma) are secure. The base of the Langian is transgressive and post-dates the first appearance of P. sicana in European sections. It is often approximated in open ocean records by the LO of Helicosphaera ampliaperta (15.8 Ma published age) or by the FO of Discoaster signus (which often coincides with the end of an abundance acme of D. deflandrei; 16.2 Ma published age). The boundary is generally supposed to be close to C5Cn, although the normally magnetised material in the Moria Section must represent C5Dn if the radiometric dates have any credibility. In Leg 154 material the LO of Helicosphaera ampliaperta has an age close to 15.0 Ma; the FO of Discoaster signus is at about 15.6 Ma, and the FO of P. sicana older than 17 Ma making this a very insecurely calibrated boundary. We have correlated the record of DSDP holes 521 and 521A, which have an excellent magnetostratigraphy for C5Cn to C5Bn, to the ODP Leg 154 material, enabling us to estimate the age of the young end of C5Cn as about 15.9 Ma (cf 16.014 in CK95) and the old end of C5Bn as about 15.1 Ma (cf 15.155 in CK95). This interval is characterised by a strong response to eccentricity cycles (both in ODP Leg 154 sites and in DSDP521). After about 14.6 Ma there are very strongly expressed 40-ka dissolution cycles associated with a very shallow CCD until about 14.0 Ma. Published stable isotope data suggest that there was a significant cooling and/or antarctic ice build up at about 14.0 Ma.

  9. Allopolyploidy, diversification, and the Miocene grassland expansion.

    PubMed

    Estep, Matt C; McKain, Michael R; Vela Diaz, Dilys; Zhong, Jinshun; Hodge, John G; Hodkinson, Trevor R; Layton, Daniel J; Malcomber, Simon T; Pasquet, Rémy; Kellogg, Elizabeth A

    2014-10-21

    The role of polyploidy, particularly allopolyploidy, in plant diversification is a subject of debate. Whole-genome duplications precede the origins of many major clades (e.g., angiosperms, Brassicaceae, Poaceae), suggesting that polyploidy drives diversification. However, theoretical arguments and empirical studies suggest that polyploid lineages may actually have lower speciation rates and higher extinction rates than diploid lineages. We focus here on the grass tribe Andropogoneae, an economically and ecologically important group of C4 species with a high frequency of polyploids. A phylogeny was constructed for ca. 10% of the species of the clade, based on sequences of four concatenated low-copy nuclear loci. Genetic allopolyploidy was documented using the characteristic pattern of double-labeled gene trees. At least 32% of the species sampled are the result of genetic allopolyploidy and result from 28 distinct tetraploidy events plus an additional six hexaploidy events. This number is a minimum, and the actual frequency could be considerably higher. The parental genomes of most Andropogoneae polyploids diverged in the Late Miocene coincident with the expansion of the major C4 grasslands that dominate the earth today. The well-documented whole-genome duplication in Zea mays ssp. mays occurred after the divergence of Zea and Sorghum. We find no evidence that polyploidization is followed by an increase in net diversification rate; nonetheless, allopolyploidy itself is a major mode of speciation. PMID:25288748

  10. Allopolyploidy, diversification, and the Miocene grassland expansion

    PubMed Central

    Estep, Matt C.; McKain, Michael R.; Vela Diaz, Dilys; Zhong, Jinshun; Hodge, John G.; Hodkinson, Trevor R.; Layton, Daniel J.; Malcomber, Simon T.; Pasquet, Rémy; Kellogg, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    The role of polyploidy, particularly allopolyploidy, in plant diversification is a subject of debate. Whole-genome duplications precede the origins of many major clades (e.g., angiosperms, Brassicaceae, Poaceae), suggesting that polyploidy drives diversification. However, theoretical arguments and empirical studies suggest that polyploid lineages may actually have lower speciation rates and higher extinction rates than diploid lineages. We focus here on the grass tribe Andropogoneae, an economically and ecologically important group of C4 species with a high frequency of polyploids. A phylogeny was constructed for ca. 10% of the species of the clade, based on sequences of four concatenated low-copy nuclear loci. Genetic allopolyploidy was documented using the characteristic pattern of double-labeled gene trees. At least 32% of the species sampled are the result of genetic allopolyploidy and result from 28 distinct tetraploidy events plus an additional six hexaploidy events. This number is a minimum, and the actual frequency could be considerably higher. The parental genomes of most Andropogoneae polyploids diverged in the Late Miocene coincident with the expansion of the major C4 grasslands that dominate the earth today. The well-documented whole-genome duplication in Zea mays ssp. mays occurred after the divergence of Zea and Sorghum. We find no evidence that polyploidization is followed by an increase in net diversification rate; nonetheless, allopolyploidy itself is a major mode of speciation. PMID:25288748

  11. The late early Miocene Sabine River

    SciTech Connect

    Manning, E. )

    1990-09-01

    Work on a new late early Miocene vertebrate fossil site, in a paleochannel deposit of the upper Carnahan Bayou Member of the lower Fleming Formation, has revealed unexpected data on the course and nature of the Sabine River of that time. Screen washing for smaller vertebrate remains at the site, just west of the Sabine River in Newton County, central eastern Texas, has resulted in the recovery of early Permian, Early Cretaceous, Late Cretaceous (Maestrichtian), Paleocene/Eocene, late Eocene, and Oligocene/Miocene fossils, in addition to the main early Miocene fauna. The reworked fossils, as well as distinctive mineral grains, show that the late early Miocene Sabine River was connected to the Texas/Oklahoma/Arkansas boundary section of the Red River, as well as to rivers draining the southern Ouachita Mountains. These rivers must have joined the Texas/Louisiana boundary section of the Sabine River somewhere in northwest Louisiana at that time. This suggests that the Louisiana section of the present Red River pirated the Texas/Oklahoma/Arkansas boundary section of the river some time after the early Miocene. The preservation of recognizable fossils transported hundreds of miles in a large river itself requires explanation. It is speculated here that the late early Miocene Sabine River incorporated a large amount of the then recently deposited volcanic ash from the Trans-Pecos Volcanic Field. Montmorillonite clay from the altered volcanic ash would have made the river very turbid, which could have allowed coarse sand-sized particles to be carried in the suspended load of the river, rather than in its bed load (where they would have been destroyed by the rolling chert gravel). Additional evidence for such long-distance fossil transport in the late early Miocene rivers of the western Gulf Coastal Plain comes from the abundant Cretaceous fossils of the upper Oakville Formation of southeast Texas and the Siphonina davisi zone of the southeast Texas subsurface.

  12. Metsulfuron spray drift reduces fruit yield of hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna L.).

    PubMed

    Kjaer, Christian; Strandberg, Morten; Erlandsen, Mogens

    2006-03-01

    This study was carried out to investigate whether spray drift of metsulfuron has a potential to negatively affect hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna) hedgerows near agricultural fields. For this purpose four doses of metsulfuron ranging from 5% to 40% of the field dose (4 g metsulfuron per hectare) were sprayed on trees in seven different hawthorn hedgerows. The actual deposition on the leaves was measured by means of a tracer (glycine). Spraying was conducted both at the bud stage and at early flowering. Leaves, flowers, green berries and mature berries were harvested and the number and weight of each were measured. The spraying at the bud stage caused a highly significant reduction in number and dry weight of berries, whereas it had no effects on leaf and flower production. The berry reduction was close to 100% at actual depositions relevant for spray drift under normal conditions. Spraying at early flowering also significantly reduced berries although the effect was smaller than for the spraying at bud stage. The early flower stage spraying caused no reduction in number and size of leaves. The possible ecological consequence is that metsulfuron spray drift from agricultural fields has a potential to reduce the amount of berries available for frugivorous birds in nearby hedgerows. A potential need for regulatory measures to reduce herbicide spray drift to hedgerows situated near agricultural fields with herbicide use is also indicated. PMID:15893364

  13. Preliminary plan for the development of geothermal energy in the town of Hawthorne, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-11-04

    The results of the analyses as well as a plan for the development of the geothermal resource are described. Site characteristics pertinent to the geothermal development are described. These characteristics include physiography, demography, economy, and goals and ojectives of the citizens as they would relate to geothermal development. The geothermal resource is described. The reservoir is characterized on the basis of available information. The probable drilling depth to the reservoir, anticipated water production rates, water quality, and resource temperatures ae indicated. Uses of the energy that seem appropriate to the situation both now and in the near future at Hawthorne are described. The amounts and types of energy currently consumed by end users are estimated. Using this data base, conceptual engineering designs and cost estimates for three alternative district heating systems are presented. In addition, the results of a life cycle cost analysis for these alternatives are discussed. The essential institutional requirements for geothermal energy development, including the financial, environmental, and legal and regulatory aspects are discussed. The various steps that are necessary to accomplish the construction of the geothermal district heating system at Hawthorne are described. A time-line chart shows the tasks, the time estimated to be required for each, and the interrelationships among the activities.

  14. Miocene reef carbonates of Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, H.G. Jr.

    1988-02-01

    Miocene carbonates in the southern Mariana Islands are impressive for their lithologic diversity, thicknesses (over 250 m), and geographic extent (> 20% combined outcrop coverage over four major high islands: Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan). Sections are dominated either by lagoonal algal-foraminiferal wackestones and mudstones with locally abundant high-energy shelly-skeletal facies, or by rubbly to muddy, fore-reef-to-bank deposits of packstones and grainstones with highly diverse and variable biogenic clasts. Fresh to deeply weathered volcaniclastic material may comprise at least 80% of some high-energy fore-reef facies, whereas lagoonal and bank deposits usually contain less than 0.5% terrigenous material. Surprisingly, the Miocene in the Marianas lacks almost completely any reef-core facies. Several poorly developed coral-rich mounds on Saipan and localized laminated red algal buildups on Guam appear to constitute the extant reef-wall facies in the Miocene. The lack of buildups may be a matter of differential survival; it may result from headland erosion and benching associated with emergence of narrow reef tracts as has been postulated by others for south Guam. Alternatively, the authors are proposing that Miocene bathymetry and the volume of terrigenous influx militated against significant reef core formation. Radiometric age dating of these reef carbonates has proven unsuccessful because pervasive diagenesis has transformed the entire Miocene section into low-magnesium calcite with minor and occasional dolomite. Freshwater phreatic diagenesis accounts for the principal porosity variation and trace element distribution.

  15. Transcript Assembly and Quantification by RNA-Seq Reveals Differentially Expressed Genes between Soft-Endocarp and Hard-Endocarp Hawthorns

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Liu, Zhongchi; Li, Xiaoming; Li, Wenran; Ma, Yue; Li, He; Liu, Yuexue; Zhang, Zhihong

    2013-01-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) is an important pome with a long history as a fruit, an ornamental, and a source of medicine. Fruits of hawthorn are marked by hard stony endocarps, but a hawthorn germplasm with soft and thin endocarp was found in Liaoning province of China. To elucidate the molecular mechanism underlying the soft endocarp of hawthorn, we conducted a de novo assembly of the fruit transcriptome of Crataegus pinnatifida and compared gene expression profiles between the soft-endocarp and the hard-endocarp hawthorn varieties. De novo assembly yielded 52,673 putative unigenes, 20.4% of which are longer than 1,000 bp. Among the high-quality unique sequences, 35,979 (68.3%) had at least one significant match to an existing gene model. A total of 1,218 genes, represented 2.31% total putative unigenes, were differentially expressed between the soft-endocarp hawthorn and the hard-endocarp hawthorn. Among these differentially expressed genes, a number of lignin biosynthetic pathway genes were down-regulated while almost all the flavonoid biosynthetic pathway genes were strongly up-regulated, concomitant with the formation of soft endocarp. In addition, we have identified some MYB and NAC transcription factors that could potentially control lignin and flavonoid biosynthesis. The altered expression levels of the genes encoding lignin biosynthetic enzymes, MYB and NAC transcription factors were confirmed by quantitative RT-PCR. This is the first transcriptome analysis of Crataegus genus. The high quality ESTs generated in this study will aid future gene cloning from hawthorn. Our study provides important insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying soft endocarp formation in hawthorn. PMID:24039819

  16. Additional material of the enigmatic Early Miocene mammal Kelba and its relationship to the order Ptolemaiida

    PubMed Central

    Cote, Susanne; Werdelin, Lars; Seiffert, Erik R.; Barry, John C.

    2007-01-01

    Kelba quadeemae, a fossil mammal from the Early Miocene of East Africa, was originally named on the basis of three isolated upper molars. Kelba has previously been interpreted as a creodont, a pantolestid, an insectivoran, and a hemigaline viverrid. The true affinities of this taxon have remained unclear because of the limited material and its unique morphology relative to other Miocene African mammals. New material of Kelba from several East African Miocene localities, most notably a skull from the Early Miocene locality of Songhor in Western Kenya, permits analysis of the affinities of Kelba and documents the lower dentition of this taxon. Morphological comparison of this new material clearly demonstrates that Kelba is a member of the order Ptolemaiida, a poorly understood group whose fossil record was previously restricted to the Oligocene Fayum deposits of northern Egypt. Phylogenetic analysis supports the monophyly of the Ptolemaiida, including Kelba, and recovers two monophyletic clades within the order. We provide new family names for these groups and an emended diagnosis for the order. The discovery of ptolemaiidans from the Miocene of East Africa is significant because it extends the known temporal range of the order by >10 million years and the geographic range by >3,200 km. Although the higher-level affinities of the Ptolemaiida remain obscure, their unique morphology and distribution through a larger area of Africa (and exclusively Africa) lend support to the idea that Ptolemaiida may have an ancient African origin. PMID:17372202

  17. Shark-bitten vertebrate coprolites from the Miocene of Maryland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Godfrey, Stephen J.; Smith, Joshua B.

    2010-05-01

    Coprolites (fossilized feces) preserve a wide range of biogenic components, from bacteria and spores to a variety of vertebrate tissues. Two coprolites from the Calvert Cliffs outcrop belt (Miocene-aged Chesapeake Group), MD, USA, preserve shark tooth impressions in the form of partial dental arcades. The specimens are the first known coprolites to preserve vertebrate tooth marks. They provide another example of trace fossils providing evidence of prehistoric animal behaviors that cannot be directly approached through the study of body fossils. Shark behaviors that could account for these impressions include: (1) aborted coprophagy, (2) benthic or nektonic exploration, or (3) predation.

  18. Norcholestane in Miocene Onnagawa siliceous sediments, Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Noriyuki; Sampei, Yoshikazu; Koga, Osamu )

    1993-09-01

    A significant amount of 24-norcholestane with 20R, 5[alpha](H), 14[alpha](H), 17[alpha](H) stereochemistry is often found in marine siliceous sediments of the Middle Miocene Onnagawa Formation, Japan. Some Onnagawa siliceous sediments are abnormally abundant in 24-norcholestane. The primary production in the northeastern Japan Sea during the Middle Miocene was markedly increased due to the invasion of nutrient-rich cold seawater from the north accompanied by the tectonic opening of the Japan Sea. 24-norcholestane in high relative abundance is derived mainly from the marine diatoms which were enhanced during this event. The drastic ecological change caused by rapid tectonic opening of the Japan Sea and global climatic deterioration during Middle Miocene time is suggested to be influential in the formation of 24-norcholestane-rich Onnagawa siliceous sediments.

  19. Miocene precursors to Great Barrier Reef

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, P.J.; Symonds, P.A.; Feary, D.A.; Pigram, C.

    1988-01-01

    Huge reefs of Miocene age are present in the Gulf of Papua north of the present-day Great Barrier Reef and to the east on the Marion and Queensland Plateaus. In the Gulf of Papua, Miocene barrier reefs formed the northern forerunner of the Great Barrier Reef, extending for many hundreds of kilometers along the eastern and northern margin of the Australian craton within a developing foreland basin. Barrier reefs, slope pinnacle reefs, and platform reefs are seen in seismic sections and drill holes. Leeside talus deposits testify to the high energy impinging on the eastern margin of these Miocene reefs. The Queensland Plateau is a marginal plateau east of the central Great Barrier Reef and separated from it by a rift trough. Miocene reefs occupied an area of about 50,000 km/sup 2/ and grew on salt-controlled highs on the western margin of the plateau and on a regional basement high extending from the platform interior to its southern margin. Reef growth has continued to the present day, although two major contractions in the area covered by reefs occurred during the Miocene. The Marion Plateau is present directly east of the Great Barrier Reef and during the Micoene formed a 30,000-km/sup 2/ platform with barrier reefs along its northern margin and huge platform reefs and laggons on the platform interior. These reefs grew on a flat peneplained surface, the whole area forming a large shallow epicontinental sea. In all three areas, the middle Miocene formed the acme of reef expansion in the region.

  20. Phytochemical characterization of several hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) species sampled from the Eastern Mediterranean region of Turkey

    PubMed Central

    Çalişkan, Oğuzhan; Gündüz, Kazim; Serçe, Sedat; Toplu, Celil; Kamiloğlu, Önder; Şengül, Memnune; Ercişli, Sezai

    2012-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the total phenolic content, antioxidant capacity as well as antioxidant activity of five Crataegus species (A1, A2, Y1, Y2, Y4 accessions of Crataegus aronia var. aronia; B2, B3, B5, B6, B7, B9, Y5 accessions of C. aronia var. dentata; B10 accession of C. aronia var. minuta; Y3 accession of Crataegus orientalis var. orientalis and A3 accession of Crataegus monogyna subsp. azarella). Materials and Methods: Antioxidant activity and total phenolic content of fruits were determined by β-carotene bleaching and Folin–Ciocalteu assays. Antioxidant capacity was determined by using 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) assay. Results: C. monogyna subsp. azarella had the highest total phenol, antioxidant activity and antioxidant capacity of 55.2 mg gallic acid equivalents (GAE)/g dry weight (DW), 81.9% and 31.2%, respectively. C. aronia var. aronia was found to have the lowest total phenolic content (35.7 mg GAE/g DW). The antioxidant activities of fruit extracts increased in the order of C. orientalis var. orientalis < C. aronia var. minuta < C. aronia var. dentata < C. aronia var. aronia < C. monogyna subsp. azarella according to β-carotene/linoleic acid assay. In recent years, C. aronia var. dentata has gained importance as a commercial species in this region. B3 and B7 accessions had fruit weight more than 14 g, and considerable total phenol content, antioxidant activity and antioxidant capacity. Conclusion: This investigation shows the potential value of hawthorn fruit species as a good source of natural antioxidants and that consumption of hawthorn fruit or its products may contribute substantial amounts of antioxidants to the diet. PMID:22438658

  1. Isolation and quantification of oligomeric and polymeric procyanidins in leaves and flowers of Hawthorn (Crataegus spp.).

    PubMed

    Hellenbrand, N; Sendker, J; Lechtenberg, M; Petereit, F; Hensel, A

    2015-07-01

    Proanthocyanidins (PAs) constitute a class of polyphenols with flavan-3-ols as monomeric building blocks. These polyphenols are mostly quantified by colorimetric methods or by chromatographic determination of monomeric flavan-3-ols or low molecular oligomers as lead compounds. No reliable analytical methods are available for unambiguous identification of the homologues series of oligo- and polymeric PAs. For Hawthorn leaf and flower (Crataegi folium cum flore) from Crataegus spp. (Rosaceae) a protocol for preparative isolation of oligomeric and polymeric PAs from an acetone-water extract was developed, yielding procyanidin reference clusters with defined degree of polymerization (DP) from 2 to 10 besides a procyanidin-polymer. Identity and purity of these clusters were proven by HPLC, MS and in part NMR studies. For identification and quantification from Hawthorn an ICH-Q2 validated UHPLC method with fluorimetric detection and less than 10min runtime was developed. The method enabled quantification of procyanidin clusters with DP from 2 to 10 besides the polymer fraction. Batch analysis revealed procyanidin contents of about 20 to 45mg/g from a homologues series of oligomeric PAs and about 50% of polymer fraction. Monitoring of procyanidin distribution during seasonal growth of fresh plants of Crataegus monogyna showed more or less constant contents between 20 and 55mg/g dry weight of oligomeric procyanidins during the growing season in the different plant organs with strong accumulation in the flowers and fruits (55mg/g dry weight). From these data it can be speculated that procyanidins serve as part of the plants defense system in the reproductive organs of the plant. PMID:25917901

  2. Miocene reef carbonates of Mariana Islands

    SciTech Connect

    Siegrist, H.G. Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Miocene carbonates in the southern Mariana Islands are impressive for their lithologic diversity, thicknesses (over 250 m), and geographic extend (>20% combined outcrop coverage over four major high islands: Guam, Rota, Tinian and Saipan). Sections are dominated either by lagoonal algal-foraminiferal wackestones and mudstones with locally abundant high-energy shelly-skeletal facies, or by rubbly to muddy, fore-reef-to-bank deposits of packstones and grainstones with highly diverse and variable biogenic clasts. Fresh to deeply weathered volcaniclastic material may comprise at least 80% of some high-energy fore-reef facies, whereas lagoonal and bank deposits usually contain less than 0.5% terrigenous material. Surprisingly, the Miocene in the Marianas lacks almost completely any reef-core facies. Several poorly developed coral-rich mounds on Saipan and localized laminated red algal buildups on Guam appear to constitute the extant reef-wall facies in the Miocene. The lack of buildups may be a matter of differential survival; it may result from headland erosion and benching associated with emergency of narrow reef tracts as has been postulated by others for south Guam. Radiometric age dating of these reef carbonates has proven unsuccessful because pervasive diagenesis has transformed the entire Miocene section into low-magnesium calcite with minor and occasional dolomite. Freshwater phreatic diagenesis accounts for the principal porosity variation and trace element distribution.

  3. Murky details of the Miocene Atlantic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herold, N. K.; Huber, M.; Shevenell, A.; Müller, D.

    2013-12-01

    We examine Atlantic Ocean circulation during the Miocene based on published modelling and data. It has long been recognised that the Atlantic Ocean played a key role in climate changes throughout the Quaternary and determining whether this was the case earlier in the Cenozoic may be important for understanding the details of Miocene climate evolution. Current geochemical, sedimentological and micropaleontologic evidence allows for multiple interpretations of deep water activity, which is further hampered by a lack of precise dating of ocean gateway closures. Previous ocean modelling studies have shown strong increases in deep water formation due to closure of the Panama gateway but have disagreed on the oceanographic importance of the Tethys gateway and bathymetry of the far North Atlantic. This combination of ambiguous data and conflicting modelling results leaves the current state of knowledge of the Miocene ocean lacking. We propose several avenues of research to improve our knowledge of the Miocene Atlantic Ocean, which will ultimately improve our understanding of its response to climate change and vice versa.

  4. Effect of hawthorn standardized extract on flow mediated dilation in prehypertensive and mildly hypertensive adults: a randomized, controlled cross-over trial

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Hawthorn extract has been used for cardiovascular diseases for centuries. Recent trials have demonstrated its efficacy for the treatment of heart failure, and the results of several small trials suggest it may lower blood pressure. However, there is little published evidence to guide its dosing. The blood pressure lowering effect of hawthorn has been linked to nitric oxide-mediated vasodilation. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between hawthorn extract dose and brachial artery flow mediated dilation (FMD), an indirect measure of nitric oxide release. Methods We used a four-period cross-over design to evaluate brachial artery FMD in response to placebo or hawthorn extract (standardized to 50 mg oligomeric procyanidin per 250 mg extract). Randomly sequenced doses of hawthorn extract (1000 mg, 1500 mg, and 2500 mg) and placebo were assigned to each participant. Doses were taken twice daily for 3 1/2 days followed by FMD and a 4-day washout before proceeding to the next dosing period. Results Twenty-one prehypertensive or mildly hypertensive adults completed the study. There was no evidence of a dose-response effect for our main outcome (FMD percent) or any of our secondary outcomes (absolute change in brachial artery diameter and blood pressure). Most participants indicated that if given evidence that hawthorn could lower their blood pressure, they would be likely to use it either in conjunction with or instead of lifestyle modification or anti-hypertensive medications. Conclusion We found no evidence of a dose-response effect of hawthorn extract on FMD. If hawthorn has a blood pressure lowering effect, it is likely to be mediated via an NO-independent mechanism. Trial Registration This trial has been registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, a service of the U.S. National Institutes of Health: NCT01331486. PMID:22458601

  5. Antioxidant capacity of polyphenolic extracts from leaves of Crataegus laevigata and Crataegus monogyna (Hawthorn) subjected to drought and cold stress.

    PubMed

    Kirakosyan, Ara; Seymour, Elisabeth; Kaufman, Peter B; Warber, Sara; Bolling, Steven; Chang, Soo Chul

    2003-07-01

    Crataegus laevigata and Crataegus monogyna (hawthorn) were subjected to drought and cold stress treatments, and polyphenolic extracts from control and stress-treated plants were assayed for antioxidant capacities using a modified version of the Total Antioxidant Status Assay (Randox, San Francisco, CA). In addition, these plants were analyzed for levels of flavanol-type substance [(-)-epicatechin] and flavonoid (vitexin 2' '-O-rhamnoside, acetylvitexin 2' '-O-rhamnoside, and hyperoside) constituents that are important metabolites in hawthorn herbal preparations used to treat patients with heart disease. Drought and cold stress treatments caused increases in levels of (-)-epicatechin and hyperoside in both Crataegus species. Such treatments also enhanced the antioxidant capacity of the extracts. The results from this study thus indicate that these kinds of stress treatments can enhance the levels of important secondary metabolites and their total antioxidant capacities in leaves of Crataegus. PMID:12822932

  6. Miocene Soil Database: Global paleosol and climate maps of the Middle Miocene Thermal Maximum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Metzger, C. A.

    2013-12-01

    Paleosols, which record past climatic, biologic, and atmospheric conditions, can be used as a proxy to understand ancient terrestrial landscapes, paleoclimate, and paleoenvironment. In addition, the middle Miocene thermal maximum (~16 Ma) provides an ancient analog for understanding the effects of current and future climate change on soil and ecosystem regimes, as it contains records of shifts similar in magnitude to expected global climate change. The Miocene Soil Database (MSDB) combines new paleosol data from Australia and Argentina with existing and previously uncollated paleosol data from the literature and the Paleobiology Database. These data (n = 507) were then used to derive a paleogeographic map of climatically significant soil types zones during the Middle Miocene. The location of each diagnostic paleosol type (Aridisol, Alfisol, Mollisol, Histosol, Oxisol, and Ultisol) was plotted and compared with the extent of these soil types in the modern environment. The middle Miocene soil map highlights the extension of tropical soils (Oxisols, Ultisols), accompanied by thermophilic flora and fauna, into northern and southern mid-latitudes. Peats, lignites, and Histosols of wetlands were also more abundant at higher latitudes, especially in the northern hemisphere, during the middle Miocene. The paleosol changes reflect that the Middle Miocene was a peak of global soil productivity and carbon sequestration, with replacement of unproductive Aridisols and Gelisols with more productive Oxisols, Alfisols, Mollisols and Histosols. With expansion to include additional data such as soil texture, moisture, or vegetation type, the MSDB has the potential to provide an important dataset for computer models of Miocene climate shifts as well as future land use considerations of soils in times of global change.

  7. Longitudinal Variation in Terrestrial Oxygen Isotope Records of Modern Water and Mid-Miocene Authigenic Minerals: No Mid-Miocene Climatic Optimum in the Inland Pacific Northwest?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeuchi, A.; Larson, P. B.; Suzuki, K.; Goodwin, A. J.

    2005-12-01

    The stable isotopic compositions of benthic foraminifera quantitatively indicate that the middle Miocene climatic optimum was a period of global greenhouse conditions within the generally cooling and drying climatic trend in the past 65 million years. There are numerous red-colored weathering sequences preserved in intervolcanic paleosurfaces of the middle Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group. Even though most of the reddened layers were considered as thermally altered `baked' zones by the overlying basalt flows, many of them show much evidence of pedogenesis. Thus, it was suggested that these lateritic weathering horizons are products of intense chemical weathering under humid and temperate paleoclimate conditions in the inland Pacific Northwest during the middle Miocene climatic optimum. However, these weathering sequences are only common around the Blue Mountains region in southeastern Washington, Oregon, and Idaho, where modern mean annual precipitation is relatively higher than the surrounding basins. Therefore, we hypothesize that the observed intense chemical weathering is the result of higher mean annual precipitation due to the orographic effect in the Blue Mountains area. The orographic effect is associated with higher altitude than surroundings in an upwind region. Four mid-Miocene spectacular thick reddish paleosols on top of Columbia River basalt flows were found at nearly the same latitude of 46°N but with different longitudes, ranging from 116°W to 120°W. Authigenic minerals at depths greater than 50 cm below the overlying basaltic flows were collected at each location, and also, for comparison, several surface water samples were collected to determine the modern hydrologic isotopic conditions along the transect. The measured δ18O values of modern surface water show a negative shift of approximately 5‰ from west to east in the study area, and the observed negative shift within the δ18O authigenic mineral values is similar (~4.5‰). Using equilibrium fractionation equations, the estimated paleo-temperatures are also similar to the modern temperatures along the transect. Thus, the regional climate has not been changes significantly since the mid-Miocene. It is likely that topography of the study area in the Blue Mountains region has not been significantly changed either since at least late Miocene. The basalt stratigraphy also indicates that there was a tectonic uplift in the Blue Mountains area during the mid- to late-Miocene.

  8. Convective drying of hawthorn fruit (Crataegus spp.): Effect of experimental parameters on drying kinetics, color, shrinkage, and rehydration capacity.

    PubMed

    Aral, Serdar; Beşe, Ayşe Vildan

    2016-11-01

    Thin layer drying characteristics and physicochemical properties of hawthorn fruit (Crataegus spp.) were investigated using a convective dryer at air temperatures 50, 60 and 70°C and air velocities of 0.5, 0.9 and 1.3m/s. The drying process of hawthorn took place in the falling rate period, and the drying time decreased with increasing air temperature and velocity. The experimental data obtained during the drying process were fitted to eleven different mathematical models. The Midilli et al.'s model was found to be the best appropriate model for explaining the drying behavior of hawthorn fruit. Effective moisture diffusion coefficients (Deff) were calculated by Fick's diffusion model and their values varied from 2.34×10(-10)m(2)/s to 2.09×10(-9)m(2)/s. An Arrhenius-type equation was applied to determine the activation energies. While the shrinkage decreased, the rehydration ratio increased with increasing air temperature and air velocity. PMID:27211684

  9. Identification of fruit volatiles from green hawthorn (Crataegus viridis) and blueberry hawthorn (Crataegus brachyacantha) host plants attractive to different phenotypes of Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the southern United States.

    PubMed

    Cha, Dong H; Powell, Thomas H Q; Feder, Jeffrey L; Linn, Charles E

    2011-09-01

    The apple maggot fly, Rhagoletis pomonella, infests several hawthorn species in the southern USA. In a companion paper, we showed that R. pomonella flies infesting two different mayhaw species (Crataegus opaca and C. aestivalis) can discriminate between volatile blends developed for each host fruit, and that these blends are different from previously constructed blends for northern fly populations that infest domestic apple (Malus domestica), downy hawthorn (Crataegus mollis), and flowering dogwood (Cornus florida). Here, we show by using coupled gas chromatography and electroantennographic detection (GC-EAD), gas chromatography with mass spectrometry (GC-MS), and flight tunnel bioassays, that two additional southern hawthorn fly populations infesting C. viridis (green hawthorn) and C. brachyacantha (blueberry hawthorn) also can discriminate between volatile blends for each host fruit type. A 9-component blend was developed for C. viridis (3-methylbutan-1-ol [5%], butyl butanoate [19.5%], propyl hexanoate [1.5%], butyl hexanoate [24%], hexyl butanoate [24%], pentyl hexanoate [2.5%], 1-octen-3-ol [0.5%], pentyl butanoate [2.5%], and (3E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT) [20.5%]) and an 8-component blend for C. brachyacantha (3-methylbutan-1-ol [0.6%], butyl acetate [50%], pentyl acetate [3.5%], butyl butanoate [9%], butyl hexanoate [16.8%], hexyl butanoate [16.8%], 1-octen-3-ol [0.3%], and pentyl butanoate [3%]). Crataegus viridis and C. brachyacantha-origin flies showed significantly higher levels of upwind oriented flight to their natal blend in flight tunnel assays compared to the alternate, non-natal blend and previously developed northern host plant blends. The presence of DMNT in C. viridis and butyl acetate in C. brachyacantha appeared to be largely responsible for driving the differential response. This sharp behavioral distinction underscores the diversity of odor response phenotypes in the southern USA, points to possible host race formation in these populations, and despite the presence of several apple volatiles in both blends, argues against a functional apple race existing on southern host plants prior to the introduction of apple to North America. PMID:21887525

  10. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene Columbia River Basalt Group in Oregon and Washington from the Pacific Coast to the Columbia Plateau: Magnetostratigraphy, Vertical-Axis Rotations, Paleosecular Variation, and Remagnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagstrum, J. T.; Wells, R. E.; Evarts, R. C.; Niem, A. R.; Sawlan, M. G.; Blakely, R. J.

    2008-12-01

    Identification of individual flows within the Columbia River Basalt Group (CRBG) has mostly relied on minor differences in geochemistry, but magnetic polarity has also proved useful in differentiating flows and establishing a temporal framework. Within the thick, rapidly erupted Grande Ronde Basalt four major polarity chrons (R1 to N2) have been identified. Because cooling times of CRBG flows are brief compared to rates of paleosecular variation (PSV), within-flow paleomagnetic directions are expected to be constant across the extensive east-west reaches of these flows. Vertical-axis rotations in OR and WA, driven by northward-oblique subduction of the Juan de Fuca plate, thus can be measured by comparing directions for western sampling localities to directions for the same flow units on the relatively stable Columbia Plateau. Clockwise rotations calculated for outcrop locations within the Coast Range (CR) block are uniformly about 30° (N=102 sites). East of the northwest-trending en échelon Mt. Angel-Gales Creek, Portland Hills, and northern unnamed fault zones, as well as north of the CR block's northern boundary (~Columbia River), clockwise rotations abruptly drop to about 15° (N=39 sites), with offsets in these bounding fault zones corresponding to the Portland and Willamette pull-apart basins. The general agreement of vertical- axis rotation rates estimated from CRBG magnetizations with those determined from modern GPS velocities indicates a relatively steady rate over the last 10 to 15 Myr. Unusual directions due to PSV, field excursions, or polarity transitions could provide useful stratigraphic markers. Individual flow directions, however, have not been routinely used to identify flows. One reason this has been difficult is that remagnetization is prevalent, particularly in the Coast Ranges, coupled with earlier demagnetization techniques that did not completely remove overprint components. Except for the Ginkgo and Pomona flows of the Wanapum and Saddle Mountains Basalts, reference Plateau directions for the CRBG are poorly known. Moreover, field and drill- core relations indicate that flows with different chemistries were erupted at the same time. Renewed sampling, therefore, has been undertaken eastward from the Portland area into the Columbia River Gorge and out onto the Plateau. Resampling of the Patrick Grade section (23 flows) in southeastern WA has shown that overprint magnetizations were not successfully removed in many flows at this locality in an earlier study [1]. This brings into question blanket demagnetization studies of the CRBG as well as polarity measurements routinely made in the field with hand-held fluxgate magnetometers. [1] Choiniere and Swanson, 1979, Am. J. Sci., 279, p. 755

  11. A unique Middle Miocene European hominoid and the origins of the great ape and human clade

    PubMed Central

    Moyà-Solà, Salvador; Alba, David M.; Almécija, Sergio; Casanovas-Vilar, Isaac; Köhler, Meike; De Esteban-Trivigno, Soledad; Robles, Josep M.; Galindo, Jordi; Fortuny, Josep

    2009-01-01

    The great ape and human clade (Primates: Hominidae) currently includes orangutans, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, and humans. When, where, and from which taxon hominids evolved are among the most exciting questions yet to be resolved. Within the Afropithecidae, the Kenyapithecinae (Kenyapithecini + Equatorini) have been proposed as the sister taxon of hominids, but thus far the fragmentary and scarce Middle Miocene fossil record has hampered testing this hypothesis. Here we describe a male partial face with mandible of a previously undescribed fossil hominid, Anoiapithecus brevirostris gen. et sp. nov., from the Middle Miocene (11.9 Ma) of Spain, which enables testing this hypothesis. Morphological and geometric morphometrics analyses of this material show a unique facial pattern for hominoids. This taxon combines autapomorphic features—such as a strongly reduced facial prognathism—with kenyapithecine (more specifically, kenyapithecin) and hominid synapomorphies. This combination supports a sister-group relationship between kenyapithecins (Griphopithecus + Kenyapithecus) and hominids. The presence of both groups in Eurasia during the Middle Miocene and the retention in kenyapithecins of a primitive hominoid postcranial body plan support a Eurasian origin of the Hominidae. Alternatively, the two extant hominid clades (Homininae and Ponginae) might have independently evolved in Africa and Eurasia from an ancestral, Middle Miocene stock, so that the supposed crown-hominid synapomorphies might be homoplastic. PMID:19487676

  12. El Nino-like events during Miocene

    SciTech Connect

    Casey, R.E.; Nelson, C.O.; Weinheimer, A.L.; Oeth, P.A.; Swanson, R.J.

    1988-03-01

    El Nino-like events have been recorded from the Miocene laminated siliceous facies of the Monterey Formation. These El Nino-like Miocene events are compared to El Nino events recorded from Holocene varved sediments deposited within the anoxic Santa Barbara basin. Strong El Nino events can be recognized from Holocene Santa Barbara basin sediments by increases in radiolarian flux to the sea floor during those events. For the last 100-plus years, frequency of strong El Ninos has been on the order of one extremely strong event about every 100 years, and one easily recognizable event about every 18 years. Frequencies in the laminated (varved) Miocene range from about every 4-5 years to over 20 years. The higher frequencies occur within generally warm intervals and the lower frequencies within generally cold intervals. Perhaps the frequencies of these events may, in fact, be an important indicator in determining whether the intervals were cold or warm. Reconstructions of the paleo-California Current system during El Nino-like periods have been made for the west coast from the Gulf of California to northern California. Strong El Nino-like events occurred 5.5 and 8 Ma, and a strong anti-El Nino-like event occurred at about 6.5 Ma. Evidence from the 5.5 and 8 Ma events combined with other evidence suggests that modern El Ninos, similar to today's, were initiated at 5.5 Ma or earlier.

  13. Nanomechanics and Sodium Permeability of Endothelial Surface Layer Modulated by Hawthorn Extract WS 1442

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Wladimir; Drueppel, Verena; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Schubert, Carola; Oberleithner, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx (eGC) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of the vasculature. By binding plasma proteins, the eGC forms the endothelial surface layer (ESL) which acts as an interface between bloodstream and endothelial cell surface. The functions of the eGC include mechanosensing of blood flow induced shear stress and thus flow dependent vasodilation. There are indications that levels of plasma sodium concentrations in the upper range of normal and beyond impair flow dependent regulation of blood pressure and may therefore increase the risk for hypertension. Substances, therefore, that prevent sodium induced endothelial dysfunction may be attractive for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. By means of combined atomic force - epifluorescence microscopy we studied the impact of the hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) extract WS 1442, a herbal therapeutic with unknown mechanism of action, on the mechanics of the ESL of ex vivo murine aortae. Furthermore, we measured the impact of WS 1442 on the sodium permeability of endothelial EA.hy 926 cell monolayer. The data show that (i) the ESL contributes by about 11% to the total endothelial barrier resistance for sodium and (ii) WS 1442 strengthens the ESL resistance for sodium up to about 45%. This mechanism may explain some of the vasoprotective actions of this herbal therapeutic. PMID:22253842

  14. Nanomechanics and sodium permeability of endothelial surface layer modulated by hawthorn extract WS 1442.

    PubMed

    Peters, Wladimir; Drüppel, Verena; Drueppel, Verena; Kusche-Vihrog, Kristina; Schubert, Carola; Oberleithner, Hans

    2012-01-01

    The endothelial glycocalyx (eGC) plays a pivotal role in the physiology of the vasculature. By binding plasma proteins, the eGC forms the endothelial surface layer (ESL) which acts as an interface between bloodstream and endothelial cell surface. The functions of the eGC include mechanosensing of blood flow induced shear stress and thus flow dependent vasodilation. There are indications that levels of plasma sodium concentrations in the upper range of normal and beyond impair flow dependent regulation of blood pressure and may therefore increase the risk for hypertension. Substances, therefore, that prevent sodium induced endothelial dysfunction may be attractive for the treatment of cardiovascular disease. By means of combined atomic force-epifluorescence microscopy we studied the impact of the hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) extract WS 1442, a herbal therapeutic with unknown mechanism of action, on the mechanics of the ESL of ex vivo murine aortae. Furthermore, we measured the impact of WS 1442 on the sodium permeability of endothelial EA.hy 926 cell monolayer. The data show that (i) the ESL contributes by about 11% to the total endothelial barrier resistance for sodium and (ii) WS 1442 strengthens the ESL resistance for sodium up to about 45%. This mechanism may explain some of the vasoprotective actions of this herbal therapeutic. PMID:22253842

  15. Phenolic contents and cellular antioxidant activity of Chinese hawthorn "Crataegus pinnatifida".

    PubMed

    Wen, Lingrong; Guo, Xingbo; Liu, Rui Hai; You, Lijun; Abbasi, Arshad Mehmood; Fu, Xiong

    2015-11-01

    It is evident from various epidemiological studies that consumption of fruits and vegetables is essential to maintain health and in the disease prevention. Present study was designed to examine phenolic contents and antioxidant properties of three varieties of Crataegus pinnatifida (Chinese hawthorn). Shanlihong variety exhibited elevated levels of total phenolics and flavonoid contents, including free and bond phenolics. Procyanidin B2 was most abundant phenolic compound in all samples, followed by epicatechin, chlorogenic acid, hyperoside, and isoquercitrin. The free ORAC values, and free hydro-PSC values were 398.3-555.8 μmol TE/g DW, and 299.1-370.9 μmol VCE/g DW, respectively. Moreover, the free cellular antioxidant activity (CAA) values were 678-1200 μmol of QE/100 g DW in the no PBS wash protocol, and 345.9-532.9 μmol of QE/100 g DW in the PBS wash protocol. C. pinnatifida fruit could be valuable to promote consumer health. PMID:25976791

  16. Miocene mollusks from the Simojovel area in Chiapas, southwestern Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Carmen Perrilliat, María; Vega, Francisco J.; Coutiño, Marco A.

    2010-11-01

    The fauna of gastropods and bivalves from the amber-bearing lithostratigraphic units of the Simojovel area, Chiapas is reported, including the description of two new species and one subspecies: Turbinella maya new species, Melongena corona tzeltal new subspecies and Agladrillia ( Eumetadrillia) vermeiji new species. Stratigraphic affinities of the previously described species suggest an Early Miocene age for the Mazantic Shale, and a Middle Miocene age for the overlying Balumtum Sandstone. One specimen of gastropod, with a relatively large piece of amber attached to the adapertural part of the shell is representative for an Early Miocene age and estuarine paleoenvironmental interpretation for the Mazantic Shale. Mollusca, Miocene, Chiapas, Amber, Mexico.

  17. The dietary adaptations of European Miocene catarrhines.

    PubMed Central

    Ungar, P S; Kay, R F

    1995-01-01

    European Miocene "apes" have been known for nearly a century and a half but their phylogenetic significance is only now becoming apparent with the recent discovery of many relatively complete remains. Some appear to be close in time and morphology to the last common ancestor of modern great apes and humans. The current study is an attempt to reconstruct the diets of these fossils on the basis of quantitative data. Results suggest that these primates varied more greatly in their diets than modern apes, with adaptations ranging from hard-object feeding to soft-object frugivory to folivory. PMID:7777533

  18. Isotope geochemistry of the Miocene and Quaternary carbonate rocks in Rabigh area, Red Sea coast, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawood, Yehia H.; Aref, Mahmoud A.; Mandurah, Mohammed H.; Hakami, Ahmed; Gameil, Mohammed

    2013-11-01

    The Rabigh area, a coastal region north of Jeddah city, Saudi Arabia contains raised Quaternary coral reefal terraces and reworked coral fragments mixed with sand and gravel. This area has a thin exposure Lower Miocene shallow marine carbonate rocks that laterally pass into evaporites. The Miocene carbonate and evaporite rocks conformably overly the Lower Miocene siliciclastic sequence, are in turn capped by the Harrat basaltic boulders. The Miocene carbonates are made up of dolomitic packstone, wackestone and mudstone, whereas the overlying Quaternary reefal terraces are composed of coral boundstone and grainstones. The Quaternary reefal terraces of Rabigh area have been dated using the uranium-series dating method to obtain precise dates for these corals. The calculated ages (128, 212 and 235 ka) indicate that deposition took place during high sea level stands associated with interglacial times during Oxygen Isotope Stages (OIS) 5 and 7. The youngest age (128 ka) clearly corresponds to stage 5e of the last interglacial period. The obtained ages correlate well with those of the emerged reefs on the Sudanese and Egyptian coasts at the western side of the Red Sea. The broad distribution of wet climate, pluvial deposits on the continents and high sea level stands indicate a wide geographical range of the interglacial events of the Oxygen Isotope Stages (OIS) 5 and 7. The oxygen and carbon isotopic composition of the Miocene and Quaternary carbonate rocks in Rabigh area show a broad range of ?13C and ?18O. The Quaternary carbonate rocks have significantly higher ?13C than the Miocene ones, but low ?13C values of the Miocene samples likely indicate a high contribution of carbon from organic sources at the time of deposition. Linear trends are evident in both groups of samples supporting the likelihood of secondary alteration.

  19. Effect of Temperature on Demographic Parameters of the Hawthorn Red Midget Moth, Phyllonorycter corylifoliella, on Apple

    PubMed Central

    Amiri, Abbas; Talebi, Ali Asghar; Zamani, Abbas Ali; Kamali, Karim

    2010-01-01

    The hawthorn red midget moth, Phyllonorycter corylifoliella (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Gracillariidae), is one of the most serious pests of apple and pear orchards in Iran, however little is known about its biology and relationship with environmental factors. The reproduction and population growth parameters of P. corylifoliella were examined at six constant temperatures (15, 20, 25, 30, 33 and 35° C) on apple var. golden delicious. At 35° C, P. corylifoliella failed to develop beyond the first instar. The lowest (13%) and highest (64%) mortality rates of immature stages occurred at 25 and 33° C, respectively. The life expectancies (ex) decreased with increasing of age and the life expectancies of one-day-old larvae were estimated to be 38.68, 33.34, 35.11, 26.28 and 16.11 days at 15, 20, 25, 30 and 33° C, respectively. The highest intrinsic rate of natural increase (rm), net reproductive rate (Ro) and finite rate of increase (λ) at 25° C were 0.100 ± 0.003, 47.66 ± 5.47 and 1.11 ± 0.00, respectively. The mean generation time (T) decreased with increasing temperatures from 86.86 ± 0.53 days at 15° C to 33.48 ± 0.16 days at 30° C. Doubling time (DT) varied significantly with temperature and the shortest doubling time was obtained at 25° C. The results of this study provide direction for future research on evaluating the performance of P. corylifoliella and the efficiency of its natural enemies in apple orchards under variable environmental conditions. PMID:20883137

  20. Scale-dependent effects of habitat fragmentation on hawthorn pollination, frugivory, and seed predation.

    PubMed

    García, Daniel; Chacoff, Natacha P

    2007-04-01

    Habitat fragmentation is a major cause of functional disruption in plant-animal interactions. The net effect on plant regeneration is, however, controversial because a given landscape change can simultaneously hamper mutualism and attenuate antagonism. Furthermore, fragmentation effects may emerge at different spatial scales, depending on the size of the foraging range of the different interacting animals. We studied pollination by insects, frugivory by birds acting as seed dispersers, and postdispersal seed predation by rodents in 60 individual hawthorn (Crataegus monogyna Jacq.) trees in relation to structural fragmentation in the surrounding habitat. We evaluated fragmentation at three spatial scales by measuring the percentage of forest cover in three concentric areas around each tree of, respectively, 10-m, 20- to 50-m, and 50- to 100-m radius. The number of developing pollen tubes per flower style and fruit set decreased in proportion to the decrease of forest cover. Similarly, the magnitude of frugivory in focal trees was negatively affected by habitat loss. In contrast, seed predation was higher under plants in highly fragmented contexts. The effect of fragmentation was additive in terms of reducing the potential of plant regeneration. Moreover, the functional scale of response to habitat loss differed among interactions. Fragmentation effects on pollination emerged at the largest scale, whereas seed predation was mostly affected at the intermediate scale. In contrast to expectations from the larger foraging range of birds, fragmentation effects on frugivory mainly operated at the finest scale, favored by the ability of birds to cope hierarchically with spatial heterogeneity at different scales. Given that two opposing demographic forces (frugivory and seed predation) would be potentially affected by fine-scale features, we propose structural scale as the primary spatial dimension of fragmentation effects on the process of plant regeneration. PMID:17391190

  1. Phenolic constituents and antioxidant capacities of Crataegus monogyna (Hawthorn) callus extracts.

    PubMed

    Bahorun, Theeshan; Aumjaud, Esha; Ramphul, Hemlata; Rycha, Maheshwaree; Luximon-Ramma, Amitabye; Trotin, Francis; Aruoma, Okezie I

    2003-06-01

    Crataegus (Hawthorn) has long been used as a folk medicine and is widely utilized in pharmaceutical preparations mainly because of its neuro- and cardiosedative actions and its low toxicity. The pharmacological effects of Crataegus have mainly been attributed to the polyphenolic contents. In this study, the production of polyphenols by ten-year-old Crataegus monogyna calli was studied in relation to growth variation and antioxidant capacity within a subculture period. Assays based on the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric reducing antioxidant power (FRAP) and stability in oil-in-water emulsion were used to characterize the antioxidant actions of the callus cultures. High TEAC (3.66 micromol/g dry weight) and FRAP (208.19 micromol Fe2+/g dry weight) values were observed when maximal growth was reached(days 30-35), and this seemed to be influenced by optimum total phenol (47.40 mg/g dry weight), proanthocyanidin (20.81 mg/g dry weight), flavonoid (7.01 mg/g dry weight), anthocyanin (6.18 mg/g dry weight), (-)-epicatechin (1.77 mgl/g dry weight), procyanidin B2 (3.97 mg/g dry weight), and chlorogenic acid (1.11 mg/g dry weight) production during that period. The TEAC values were strongly associated with total flavonoids and to a lesser extent with total phenols, anthocyanins and total proanthocyanidins. The FRAP antioxidant values correlated to total phenols, proanthocyanidins and flavonoids, respectively. The polyphenolic rich calli were as effective as butylated hydroxytoluene (BHT) in preventing hydroperoxide and conjugated diene formation in a 30% oil-in-water emulsion prepared with stripped sunflower oil, during 7days storage at 30 degrees C. Crataegus monogyna cell culture represents an important alternative source for natural antioxidants. PMID:12866623

  2. "The most important technique …": Carl Rogers, Hawthorne, and the rise and fall of nondirective interviewing in sociology.

    PubMed

    Lee, Raymond M

    2011-01-01

    In the 1940s, interviewing practice in sociology became decisively influenced by techniques that had originally been developed by researchers in other disciplines working within a number of therapeutic or quasi-therapeutic contexts, in particular the "nondirective interviewing" methods developed by Carl Rogers and the interviewing procedures developed during the Hawthorne studies. This article discusses the development of nondirective interviewing and looks at how in the 1930s and '40s the approach came to be used in sociology. It examines the factors leading to both the popularity of the method and its subsequent fall from favor. PMID:21462193

  3. Distributional patterns of decapod crustaceans in the circum-Mediterranean area during the Oligo-Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyžný, Matúš

    2015-04-01

    During the Oligocene and Miocene, the circum-Mediterranean area was a complex network of (mostly) shallow marine basins. Significant biogeographic differentiation of this area has been documented (Harzhauser et al. 2007), mainly during the Miocene, when connections between Proto-Mediterranean, Paratethys and Proto-Indo-West Pacific were intermittently opening and closing. These seaways allowed migration of marine faunas. Distributional patterns has so far been discussed for several different animal groups, especially for molluscs (e.g. Studencka et al. 1998; Harzhauser et al. 2002, 2003, 2007). To test these patterns with decapod crustaceans, a database has been compiled including all previously published Oligocene and Miocene decapod occurrences and newly gathered data from examined material deposited in the institutional collections. Decapod associations have been significant components of marine habitats since the Mesozoic times with ever-increasing importance throughout the Cenozoic. Müller (1979) argued that brachyuran decapods are among the best zoogeographical indicators. Although decapods were used as such indicators before (e.g. Schweitzer 2001; Feldmann & Schweitzer 2006), no detailed analysis of the circum-Mediterranean taxa has been conducted so far. Based on proposed anti-estuarine circulation pattern, decapods originated in the Proto-Mediterranean, and migrated both into the North Sea and the Paratethys. Moreover, during the Early Miocene the Rhine Graben served as a connection between the North Sea and the Paratethys which enabled faunal exchange. The Middle Miocene Proto-Mediterranean and Paratethys decapod assemblages as taken together were relatively homogeneous, although distinct due to increasing rate of endemites in the Paratethys during the Miocene. The research has been supported by FWF: Lise Meitner Program M 1544-B25. References Feldmann R.M. & Schweitzer C.E. 2006: Paleobiogeography of Southern Hemisphere decapod Crustacea. J. Paleontol. 80, 83-103. Harzhauser M., Kroh A., Mandic O., Piller W.E., Göhlich U., Reuter M. & Berning B. 2007: Biogeographic responses to geodynamics: a key study all around the Oligo-Miocene Tethyan Seaway. Zool. Anz. 246, 241-256. Harzhauser M., Mandic O. & Zuschin M. 2003: Changes in Paratethyan marine molluscs at the Early/Middle Miocene transition: diversity, palaeogeography and palaeoclimate. Acta Geol. Pol. 53, 323-339. Harzhauser M., Piller W.E. & Steininger F.F. 2002: Circum-Mediterranean Oligo/Miocene Biogeographic Evolution - the Gastropods' Point of View. Palaeogeogr., Palaeoclimatol., Palaeoecol. 183, 103-133. Müller P. 1979: The Indo-West-Pacific character of the Badenian decapod crustaceans of the Paratethys. In: VII International Congress on Mediterranean Neogene. Athens, September 27-October 2. Ann. Géol. Pays Hellén., Tome hors série 2, 865-869. Schweitzer C.E. 2001: Paleobiogeography of Cretaceous and Tertiary decapod crustaceans of the North Pacific Ocean. J. Paleontol. 75, 808-826. Studencka B., Gontsharova I.A. & Popov S.V. 1998: The bivalve faunas as a basis for reconstruction of the Middle Miocene history of the Paratethys. Acta Geol. Pol. 48, 285-342.

  4. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes.

    PubMed

    Schoell, M; Schouten, S; Damsté, J S; de Leeuw, J W; Summons, R E

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ((13)C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in (18)O (delta(18)O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes (delta(13)C = 25.4 +/- 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C(35) hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing (13)C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples (delta(13)C = -29.5 to -31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone. PMID:17831625

  5. Miocene small-bodied ape from Eurasia sheds light on hominoid evolution.

    PubMed

    Alba, David M; Almécija, Sergio; DeMiguel, Daniel; Fortuny, Josep; Pérez de los Ríos, Miriam; Pina, Marta; Robles, Josep M; Moyà-Solà, Salvador

    2015-10-30

    Miocene small-bodied anthropoid primates from Africa and Eurasia are generally considered to precede the divergence between the two groups of extant catarrhines—hominoids (apes and humans) and Old World monkeys—and are thus viewed as more primitive than the stem ape Proconsul. Here we describe Pliobates cataloniae gen. et sp. nov., a small-bodied (4 to 5 kilograms) primate from the Iberian Miocene (11.6 million years ago) that displays a mosaic of primitive characteristics coupled with multiple cranial and postcranial shared derived features of extant hominoids. Our cladistic analyses show that Pliobates is a stem hominoid that is more derived than previously described small catarrhines and Proconsul. This forces us to reevaluate the role played by small-bodied catarrhines in ape evolution and provides key insight into the last common ancestor of hylobatids (gibbons) and hominids (great apes and humans). PMID:26516285

  6. A new Mammutidae (Proboscidea, Mammalia) from the Late Miocene of Gansu Province, China.

    PubMed

    Mothé, Dimila; Avilla, Leonardo S; Zhao, Desi; Xie, Guangpu; Sun, Boyang

    2016-03-01

    The "Yanghecun specimen", a proboscidean specimen represented by a mandible from Miocene of China and previously described as Gomphotheriidae, is here reviewed and described as a new genus and species of Mammutidae: Sinomammut tobieni. This taxon is a longirostrine mastodon, lacking lower tusks, and bearing a wide last molar with oblique and non-inflated lophids, broad transverse interlophids, and yoke-like wear figures. Phylogenetic analysis of Mammutidae based on dental and mandibular features recovered S. tobieni as sister group of the mastodon Mammut. The longirostrine condition and the well-developed lower incisors seem to be primitive for Mammutidae, while the brevirostry is the derived condition, probably emerged during the middle Miocene (12-11 Mya). However, two derived conditions are recognized to the lower tusks: the absence of lower tusks (S. tobieni) and the occasional presence of vestigial lower tusks (Mammut). PMID:26839998

  7. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar).

    PubMed

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J; Ali, Jason R; Samonds, Karen E

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar's Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine. PMID:26075723

  8. Miocene Shark and Batoid Fauna from Nosy Makamby (Mahajanga Basin, Northwestern Madagascar)

    PubMed Central

    Andrianavalona, Tsiory H.; Ramihangihajason, Tolotra N.; Rasoamiaramanana, Armand; Ward, David J.; Ali, Jason R.; Samonds, Karen E.

    2015-01-01

    Madagascar is well known for producing exceptional fossils. However, the record for selachians remains relatively poorly known. Paleontological reconnaissance on the island of Nosy Makamby, off northwest Madagascar, has produced a previously undescribed assemblage of Miocene fossils. Based on isolated teeth, ten taxonomic groups are identified: Otodus, Carcharhinus, Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Hemipristis, Squatina, Rostroraja, Himantura and Myliobatidae. Six are newly described from Madagascar for the Cenozoic (Galeocerdo, Rhizoprionodon, Sphyrna, Squatina, Rostroraja and Himantura). In association with these specimens, remains of both invertebrates (e.g., corals, gastropods, bivalves) and vertebrates (e.g., bony fish, turtles, crocodylians, and sirenian mammals) were also recovered. The sedimentary facies are highly suggestive of a near-shore/coastal plain depositional environment. This faunal association shares similarities to contemporaneous sites reported from North America and Europe and gives a glimpse into the paleoenvironment of Madagascar’s Miocene, suggesting that this region was warm, tropical shallow-water marine. PMID:26075723

  9. Early Miocene granitoids from the Leo Pargil gneiss dome, northwest Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassett, W.; Leech, M. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Leo Pargil gneiss dome is comprised of upper amphibolite-facies metasedimentary rocks of the lower Tethyan Himalayan sequence (known as the Haimantas Group), that are intruded by numerous small granitoid bodies and leucogranite dikes. The dome is located in northern India/southwestern Tibet at the junction of the Sutlej and Spiti rivers, west of the Zada basin. U-Pb SHRIMP dating of zircon yield concordant ages ranging from Late Archean to Late Proterozoic for paragneisses (2.6 Ga to 970 Ma) corresponding to the Haimantas group, and Early Oligocene to Middle Miocene ages for granitoid intrusions (33 Ma to 15 Ma). Concordant analyses and lower intercept ages from Tera-Wasserburg concordia plots range from 28.1-17.2 Ma. Late Oligocene to Early Miocene ages are from zircon domains with consistently high U contents (1500 to over 25000 ppm). Linear regression of age vs. U content scatter plots show a trend toward younger ages (22-20 Ma) corresponding to ages from zircon with lower U contents (1000-3000 ppm) and that is consistent with lower intercept ages. These Early Miocene ages for Leo Pargil granitoids correspond to the ages for the widespread leucogranite bodies exposed throughout the Himalaya and granites from the North Himalayan gneiss domes further east.

  10. A new small pliopithecoid primate from the Middle Miocene of Thailand.

    PubMed

    Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Lazzari, Vincent; Benammi, Mouloud; Euriat, Adélaïde; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2015-11-01

    Pliopithecoids represent a monophyletic group of putative stem catarrhines whose evolutionary history is incompletely known. They have been recorded from Europe and Asia, between the late Early Miocene and the Late Miocene. Asian pliopithecoids are less well documented than their European counterparts, often being represented by a fragmentary fossil record. New discoveries are therefore critical to reconstruct the evolutionary history of the whole group. Here, we describe two isolated molars from Ban San Klang, a late Middle Miocene locality in northern Thailand, which confirms the presence of pliopithecoids in Southeast Asia. The lower molar had originally been described as being that of a dendropithecoid, but it was later recognized as pertaining to a pliopithecoid. The discovery, in the same locality, of an additional upper molar attributed to the same species confirms the pliopithecoid status of this taxon and highlights its distinctiveness with respect to other known Asian pliopithecoids. However, the mosaic of primitive and autapomorphic features characterizing this Thai fossil, as well as its limited anatomical representation, preclude us from assigning it to either of the known pliopithecid subfamilies. Nevertheless, it represents the only pliopithecoid in Southeast Asia and displays a mosaic of unique characters which emphasizes the peculiarity of that province, as suggested previously with respect to its hominoid primate. PMID:26553815

  11. Interpretation of a 3D Seismic-Reflection Volume in the Basin and Range, Hawthorne, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louie, J. N.; Kell, A. M.; Pullammanappallil, S.; Oldow, J. S.; Sabin, A.; Lazaro, M.

    2009-12-01

    A collaborative effort by the Great Basin Center for Geothermal Energy at the University of Nevada, Reno, and Optim Inc. of Reno has interpreted a 3d seismic data set recorded by the U.S. Navy Geothermal Programs Office (GPO) at the Hawthorne Army Depot, Nevada. The 3d survey incorporated about 20 NNW-striking lines covering an area of approximately 3 by 10 km. The survey covered an alluvial area below the eastern flank of the Wassuk Range. In the reflection volume the most prominent events are interpreted to be the base of Quaternary alluvium, the Quaternary Wassuk Range-front normal fault zone, and sequences of intercalated Tertiary volcanic flows and sediments. Such a data set is rare in the Basin and Range. Our interpretation reveals structural and stratigraphic details that form a basis for rapid development of the geothermal-energy resources underlying the Depot. We interpret a map of the time-elevation of the Wassuk Range fault and its associated splays and basin-ward step faults. The range-front fault is the deepest, and its isochron map provides essentially a map of "economic basement" under the prospect area. There are three faults that are the most readily picked through vertical sections. The fault reflections show an uncertainty in the time-depth that we can interpret for them of 50 to 200 ms, due to the over-migrated appearance of the processing contractor’s prestack time-migrated data set. Proper assessment of velocities for mitigating the migration artifacts through prestack depth migration is not possible from this data set alone, as the offsets are not long enough for sufficiently deep velocity tomography. The three faults we interpreted appear as gradients in potential-field maps. In addition, the southern boundary of a major Tertiary graben may be seen within the volume as the northward termination of the strong reflections from older Tertiary volcanics. Using a transparent volume view across the survey gives a view of the volcanics in full, providing a clear picture of prominent structures. Potential drill targets and areas of development are defined within the data volume by the intersections of the fault surfaces with the tracked, strong stratigraphic reflections. Target volumes for drilling and development are defined by the intersections of the faults and bright-spot stratigraphy, and their uncertainty bounds. There are a few such intersections present within the 3d volume. Analyzing seismic attributes gives the opportunity to identify characteristics common in geothermal environments.

  12. Paleomagnetic evidence for post-Late Miocene intra-arc rotation of South Kyushu, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kodama, Kazuto; Nakayama, Ken-Ichi

    1993-02-01

    Paleomagnetism of sedimentary rocks of the late Miocene Uchiumigawa Group exposed in southeast Kyushu yielded 17 tilt-corrected paleomagnetic directions with significant westward declinations. Fourteen of these were of reversed polarity, and three at the intervening horizons were of antipodal normal polarity. The overall formation mean direction is D = 322.0°, I = 48.6° with α95 = 6.0°. This is statistically indistinguishable from the mean direction of D = 331.2°, I = 41.3° with α95 = 9.9° for the middle Miocene deposits in Tanegashima Island of the northern Ryukyu arc. The common mean direction is D = 333.2°, I = 45.1° with α95 = 4.9°. This indicates that both south Kyushu and the northernmost Ryukyu arc have experienced 27° ± 6° of counterclockwise rotation with respect to the Eurasian continent after the latest Miocene, or during the last 6 m.y. This counterclockwise rotation cannot be fully explained by either a conventional model which links an arc rotation with the formation of back-arc oceanic crust, or the collision of the Kyushu-Palau ridge with southwest Japan arc. We propose that this intra-arc rotation took place during the period of extension of the continental crust behind the north Ryukyu arc. This study demonstrates that arc rotation may generally occur when the back-arc spreading is of a much less advanced phase.

  13. Early Miocene hippopotamids (Cetartiodactyla) constrain the phylogenetic and spatiotemporal settings of hippopotamid origin

    PubMed Central

    Orliac, Maeva; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud; MacLatchy, Laura; Lihoreau, Fabrice

    2010-01-01

    The affinities of the Hippopotamidae are at the core of the phylogeny of Cetartiodactyla (even-toed mammals: cetaceans, ruminants, camels, suoids, and hippos). Molecular phylogenies support Cetacea as sister group of the Hippopotamidae, implying a long ghost lineage between the earliest cetaceans (∼53 Ma) and the earliest hippopotamids (∼16 Ma). Morphological studies have proposed two different sister taxa for hippopotamids: suoids (notably palaeochoerids) or anthracotheriids. Evaluating these phylogenetic hypotheses requires substantiating the poorly known early history of the Hippopotamidae. Here, we undertake an original morphological phylogenetic analysis including several “suiform” families and previously unexamined early Miocene taxa to test previous conflicting hypotheses. According to our results, Morotochoerus ugandensis and Kulutherium rusingensis, until now regarded as the sole African palaeochoerid and the sole African bunodont anthracotheriid, respectively, are unambiguously included within the Hippopotamidae. They are the earliest known hippopotamids and set the family fossil record back to the early Miocene (∼21 Ma). The analysis reveals that hippopotamids displayed an unsuspected taxonomic and body size diversity and remained restricted to Africa during most of their history, until the latest Miocene. Our results also confirm the deep nesting of Hippopotamidae within the paraphyletic Anthracotheriidae; this finding allows us to reconstruct the sequence of dental innovations that links advanced selenodont anthracotheriids to hippopotamids, previously a source of major disagreements on hippopotamid origins. The analysis demonstrates a close relationship between Eocene choeropotamids and anthracotheriids, a relationship that potentially fills the evolutionary gap between earliest hippopotamids and cetaceans implied by molecular analyses. PMID:20547829

  14. Chaungtha, a new Middle Miocene mammal locality from the Irrawaddy Formation, Myanmar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chavasseau, Olivier; Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Tun, Soe Thura; Soe, Aung Naing; Barry, John C.; Marandat, Bernard; Sudre, Jean; Marivaux, Laurent; Ducrocq, Stéphane; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2006-12-01

    We describe here a mammalian assemblage originating from the locality of Chaungtha (Irrawaddy Formation, Myanmar). It represents one of the rare descriptions of a precisely located, in space, vertical section and time, fossil mammal fauna from the Irrawaddy Formation. Classically the fossil record of Irrawaddy Formation is essentially known from isolated fossils of imprecise or unknown provenance, especially concerning the stratigraphic position of the fossils along several hundred meter thick sections. The Chaungtha faunal association consists of the rhino Brachypotherium fatehjangense, the pig Conohyus thailandicus, the ruminants cf. Siamotragulus sanyathanai, cf. Siamotragulus sp. and a gomphotheriid proboscidean. This assemblage indicates that the locality is Miocene in age, and not Late Eocene as previously claimed, and roughly contemporaneous with the Chinji Formation of India-Pakistan (ca. 14-11 Ma) and with the Mae Moh Group of northern Thailand. The Chaungtha fauna, even if it displays regional characteristics, shows a strong resemblance to those of the Middle Miocene of India-Pakistan and of Thailand and reinforces the idea that South-East Asia and Pakistan were part of the same biogeographical province during the Middle Miocene.

  15. Early Miocene hippopotamids (Cetartiodactyla) constrain the phylogenetic and spatiotemporal settings of hippopotamid origin.

    PubMed

    Orliac, Maeva; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud; Maclatchy, Laura; Lihoreau, Fabrice

    2010-06-29

    The affinities of the Hippopotamidae are at the core of the phylogeny of Cetartiodactyla (even-toed mammals: cetaceans, ruminants, camels, suoids, and hippos). Molecular phylogenies support Cetacea as sister group of the Hippopotamidae, implying a long ghost lineage between the earliest cetaceans (approximately 53 Ma) and the earliest hippopotamids (approximately 16 Ma). Morphological studies have proposed two different sister taxa for hippopotamids: suoids (notably palaeochoerids) or anthracotheriids. Evaluating these phylogenetic hypotheses requires substantiating the poorly known early history of the Hippopotamidae. Here, we undertake an original morphological phylogenetic analysis including several "suiform" families and previously unexamined early Miocene taxa to test previous conflicting hypotheses. According to our results, Morotochoerus ugandensis and Kulutherium rusingensis, until now regarded as the sole African palaeochoerid and the sole African bunodont anthracotheriid, respectively, are unambiguously included within the Hippopotamidae. They are the earliest known hippopotamids and set the family fossil record back to the early Miocene (approximately 21 Ma). The analysis reveals that hippopotamids displayed an unsuspected taxonomic and body size diversity and remained restricted to Africa during most of their history, until the latest Miocene. Our results also confirm the deep nesting of Hippopotamidae within the paraphyletic Anthracotheriidae; this finding allows us to reconstruct the sequence of dental innovations that links advanced selenodont anthracotheriids to hippopotamids, previously a source of major disagreements on hippopotamid origins. The analysis demonstrates a close relationship between Eocene choeropotamids and anthracotheriids, a relationship that potentially fills the evolutionary gap between earliest hippopotamids and cetaceans implied by molecular analyses. PMID:20547829

  16. The late Miocene Panama isthmian strait

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Collins, Laurel S.; Coates, Anthony G.; Berggren, William A.; Aubry, Marie-Pierre; Zhang, Jijun

    1996-08-01

    Miocene sediments of the Caribbean Gatun and Chagres formations, Panama Canal basin, were deposited within an archipelagic strait that connected Caribbean and Pacific waters. Shallow-water (˜ 25 m) benthic foraminifera of the Gatun Formation have a strong Caribbean affinity, indicating that a significant interoceanic, biogeographic barrier had formed at ˜ 8 Ma. However, benthic foraminifera of the overlying Chagres Formation are bathyal and markedly Pacific in affinity, indicating that at ˜ 6 Ma, waters of the Panama isthmian strait deepened to ˜ 200 500 m and Pacific bathyal waters flowed into the Caribbean. The Chagres Formation crops out at the Caribbean entrance to the Panama Canal in a large wedge of cross-laminated sandstone and coquina. The cross-laminations and coarse grain size indicate high-energy currents atypical of bathyal settings. We infer that a jet of the Pacific North Equatorial Countercurrent Equatorial Undercurrent passed through the Panama isthmian strait to deposit these sediments on the Caribbean side. This later entry of Pacific taxa into the Caribbean had no apparent effect on the subsequent composition of Caribbean faunas.

  17. Miocene reef facies of Pelagian Block, central Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect

    Pedley, H.M.

    1988-01-01

    Miocene reefs outcrop in the Maltese Islands, southeastern Sicily, and the pelagian island of Lampedusa. Several rapid eustatic sea level fluctuations affected these late Tortonian-early Messinian build-ups; normal salinities appear to have been maintained during these events. Substrate, topography, sedimentation rate, and tectonic/eustatic events controlled reef development, which can be grouped into three settings: The most stable situation, the oldest Maltese and southeastern Sicilian reefs, has a ramp profile 15-30 km wide. The outermost zone consists of a broad belt of the large benthic foraminifer Heterostegina (compared with the underyling Oligocene beds rich in Lepidocyclina). Coralline algal carbonates, commonly rhodolitic, form a broad biostromal up-ramp association, kilometers in width, which commonly extends into the shallowest parts of the shelf. Scattered across the shallower ramp areas, in water depths generally less than 10 m, are coral-algal patch reefs, rarely larger than 20-50 m in diameter, commonly with truncated tops, and dominated by crustose coralline algae and the corals Porites and Tarbellastraea.

  18. Retained Hawthorn fragment in a child's foot complicated by infection: diagnosis and excision aided by localization with ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Harris, Edwin J

    2010-01-01

    Puncture wounds in children are very common and often result in foreign body retention. Organic materials in the form of plant thorns present problems in identification and localization because they are not visualized with plain radiographs. A case of a 10-year-old girl with a small piece of retained hawthorn is presented. Correct diagnosis and treatment were delayed because of misinterpretation of magnetic resonance image studies. Ultrasound ultimately located the foreign body, and assisted in its excision. Plant thorns may be toxic and produce an intense local inflammatory response. In the case described in this article, deep infection caused by Enterobacter cloacae and Pantoea agglomerans was associated with the retained thorn. The small size of the foreign body, misinterpretation of diagnostic images, and the deep infection highlight the challenges that can be encountered by physicians managing puncture wounds in children. PMID:19962326

  19. Miocene sequence biostratigraphy of the northern Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Jiang, M.M. )

    1993-09-01

    The Miocene floral pulse model of Jiang and Watkins is revised. The new revision suggests that the Gulf of Mexico Miocene floral pulses, corresponding to the traditional foraminiferal tops, are transgression surfaces of the fourth-order sequences. These pulses show diverse magnitudes and when they are plotted on a depth (or time) tract, their relative magnitudes show an orderly wavy pattern comparable to the Haq et al.'s third-order cycles in the Miocene. After iterative comparison, the condensed intervals of these Miocene third-order sequences have been determined as, in descending order, Cyclammina 3, the second Cibicides carstensi, the second Textularia W, Cristellaria I, Robulus 43, Discorbis B, the third Marginulina A, and Textularia panamensis (= fauna unit II). The least prominent pulses suggesting the third-order cycle highstands (or shelf-margin wedges) are suggested as, in descending order, Textularia X, Bolivina thalmanni, Globorotalia fohsi robusta, Bigenerina humblei, Cibicides opima, Saracenaria schencki, Marginulina A (= second Robulus chambersi), and Siphonina davisi. Redeposited Cretaceous nanno species are an important component in the Gulf of Mexico middle and lower Miocene. Significant concentrations of these species are found primarily in the third-order cycle highstands, one exception being the Marginulina A third-order cycle highstand that in the High Island and West Cameron areas contained only rare redeposited Cretaceous nannos.

  20. A molecular organic carbon isotope record of miocene climate changes

    SciTech Connect

    Schoell, M. ); Schouten, S.; Sinninghe Damste', J.S.; Leeuw, J.W. de ); Summons, R.E. )

    1994-02-25

    The difference in carbon-13 ([sup 13]C) contents of hopane and sterane biomarkers in the Monterey formation (Naples Beach, California) parallels the Miocene inorganic record of the change in [sup 18]O ([delta][sup 18]O), reflecting the Miocene evolution from a well-mixed to a highly stratified photic zone (upper 100 meters) in the Pacific. Steranes ([delta][sup 13]C = 25.4 [+-] 0.7 per mil versus the Pee Dee belemnite standard) from shallow photic-zone organisms do not change isotopically throughout the Miocene. In contrast, sulfur-bound C[sub 35] hopanes (likely derived from bacterial plankton living at the base of the photic zone) have systematically decreasing [sup 13]C concentrations in Middle and Late Miocene samples ([delta][sup 13]C = 29.5 to [minus]31.5 per mil), consistent with the Middle Miocene formation of a carbon dioxide-rich cold water mass at the base of the photic zone.

  1. Criteria for successful exploration for Miocene reef production in the Philippines

    SciTech Connect

    Downey, M.W. )

    1990-06-01

    An abundance of modern geologic, geophysical, and geochemical data has been provided to interested members of the petroleum industry by the Philippine government, in cooperation with the World Bank. These data have been analyzed to assess whether more, and larger, Miocene reef fields should be expected in the Philippines. In the past decade, exploration by Cities Service (OXY), Amoco, Alcorn, and others has resulted in the discovery of several small Miocene reef and Miocene sandstone oil fields in offshore Palawan. Phillips/Shell also made a significant gas discovery of about 750 bcf in a Palawan Miocene reef that is currently uneconomic to develop given the water depth (1,090 ft) and distance from users. Miocene reefs are commonly buried within Miocene clastics, and, where these impinging clastics are porous, they allow pathways for hydrocarbons to leak from the Miocene reefs. Drape closure is an important positive factor in assessing seal risk for Philippine Miocene reefs. Source rocks to charge middle and upper Miocene reefs are typically restricted to lower Miocene horizons. Geothermal gradients are modest in much of the Philippine offshore, and only select areas provide sufficient burial to mature and expel significant hydrocarbons. It is predicted by the author that additional, larger, and highly profitable Miocene reef fields will be found by future explorers in areas where Miocene reefs have drape closure top seals and are adjacent to deeply buried Miocene source rocks.

  2. Middle Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, C.; Cardona, A.; Jaramillo, C.; Pardo, A.; Silva, J. C.; Valencia, V.; Ayala, C.; Pérez-Angel, L. C.; Rodriguez-Parra, L. A.; Ramirez, V.; Niño, H.

    2015-04-01

    Uranium-lead geochronology in detrital zircons and provenance analyses in eight boreholes and two surface stratigraphic sections in the northern Andes provide insight into the time of closure of the Central American Seaway. The timing of this closure has been correlated with Plio-Pleistocene global oceanographic, atmospheric, and biotic events. We found that a uniquely Panamanian Eocene detrital zircon fingerprint is pronounced in middle Miocene fluvial and shallow marine strata cropping out in the northern Andes but is absent in underlying lower Miocene and Oligocene strata. We contend that this fingerprint demonstrates a fluvial connection, and therefore the absence of an intervening seaway, between the Panama arc and South America in middle Miocene times; the Central American Seaway had vanished by that time.

  3. Middle Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway.

    PubMed

    Montes, C; Cardona, A; Jaramillo, C; Pardo, A; Silva, J C; Valencia, V; Ayala, C; Pérez-Angel, L C; Rodriguez-Parra, L A; Ramirez, V; Niño, H

    2015-04-10

    Uranium-lead geochronology in detrital zircons and provenance analyses in eight boreholes and two surface stratigraphic sections in the northern Andes provide insight into the time of closure of the Central American Seaway. The timing of this closure has been correlated with Plio-Pleistocene global oceanographic, atmospheric, and biotic events. We found that a uniquely Panamanian Eocene detrital zircon fingerprint is pronounced in middle Miocene fluvial and shallow marine strata cropping out in the northern Andes but is absent in underlying lower Miocene and Oligocene strata. We contend that this fingerprint demonstrates a fluvial connection, and therefore the absence of an intervening seaway, between the Panama arc and South America in middle Miocene times; the Central American Seaway had vanished by that time. PMID:25859042

  4. Oligocene-Miocene deformational and depositional history of the Andean hinterland basin in the northern Altiplano plateau, southern Peru

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Perez, Nicholas D.; Horton, Brian K.

    2014-09-01

    Cenozoic basin fill of the northern Altiplano plateau records the tectonic development of the flanking Western Cordillera magmatic arc and Eastern Cordillera fold-thrust belt. The Ayaviri hinterland basin of southern Peru contains a ~2300 m thick succession of fluvial sandstones and overbank siltstones (upper Oligocene Puno Group and lower Miocene lower Tinajani Formation) capped by ~400 m of alluvial fan conglomerates (middle Miocene upper Tinajani Formation). New U-Pb zircon chronostratigraphic constraints from ~30 to 15 Ma yield sediment accumulation rates of 110-660 m/Myr. Newly dated growth strata highlight the genetic role played by thrust displacement in basin evolution. A several phase accumulation history derived from chronostratigraphic, provenance, and structural data reveals Oligocene basin filling by fluvial sand and mud that changes provenance from Western Cordillera Mesozoic-Cenozoic volcanic rocks to Paleozoic-Mesozoic Eastern Cordillera sedimentary rocks driven by deformation along the southwest directed, northeastern basin margin Ayaviri thrust at 28-26 Ma. Continued early Miocene fluvial deposition was sourced solely from the Eastern Cordillera. An abrupt middle Miocene shift to coarse alluvial fan deposition sourced from the Western Cordillera was driven by out-of-sequence deformation along the northeast directed, southwestern basin margin Pasani thrust at 18-16 Ma. This northern Altiplano out-of-sequence deformation was coincident with increased Eastern and Western Cordillera exhumation and thrusting and may be symptomatic of changes in critical wedge dynamics. The overall record of basin sedimentation and syndepositional fold-thrust deformation emphasizes the role of regional shortening in governing crustal thickening and basin evolution in the central Andes during the Oligocene to Miocene.

  5. The Late Miocene climate response to global vegetation change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micheels, Arne; Eronen, Jussi; Fortelius, Mikael; Mosbrugger, Volker; Uhl, Dieter

    2010-05-01

    The Late Miocene belongs to the late phase of the Cenozoic climate cooling, but proxy data indicate that it was still a generally warm and humid episode as compared to today. Corresponding to the overall warm and humid conditions, there were generally more forests and less desert in the Miocene. Especially northern high latitudes were warmer than at present and palaeovegetation was characterised rather more by boreal forests than tundra like today. The vegetation change from the Miocene to present was a result of the overall climate cooling, but based on a climate modelling sensitivity experiment we demonstrate that vegetation changes also contributed to Cenozoic climate cooling. We perform two experiments using the atmosphere-ocean general circulation model COSMOS with the physical boundary conditions representing the Late Miocene. For instance, the model runs consider a lower elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, an open Central American Isthmus and the Paratethys. In order to address the Miocene-to-present vegetation change, one experiment includes the modern vegetation while the other one uses the palaeovegetation. The global temperature of the experiment using the modern vegetation is by 1.6 °C lower than using the palaeovegetation. This is in the same order of magnitude as moderate future climate change projections, if one considers that the sign needs to be reversed. From our sensitivity experiment, we observe that particularly high latitudes get cooler because of replacing boreal forests with modern tundra vegetation. The albedo effect is relevant to understand how the vegetation change from the Miocene to present in the high latitudes contributes to the climate cooling trend. Our results emphasise that the role of vegetation is important to understand past climates.

  6. Miocene isotope chronostratigraphy: North-central Gulf of Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Trainor, D.M.; Williams, D.F. )

    1991-03-01

    Isotope chronostratigraphy has proven extremely useful in providing high resolution stratigraphic correlations and detailed information relating to the complex nature of sediment accumulation rates in Plio-Pleistocene exploration wells of the north-central Gulf of Mexico (GOM). Current research on the isotopic composition of foraminifera recovered from Miocene age sediments in the north-central GOM indicate that the glacio-eustatic cycles documented in the Plio-Pleistocene are found to continue into the late Miocene. During the middle Miocene ample isotopic signals (3 per mil) exist to provide a high resolution stratigraphy. {delta}{sup 18}O data from the planktonic foraminifera Orbulina universa from Eureka core 66-73 in the Desoto Canyon form a relatively complete record from approximately 8.5-16 Ma. The record displays a greater than 3 per mil range in {delta}{sup 18}O values through the middle Miocene. This Miocene {delta}{sup 18}O record from E66-73 is compared to exploration wells from the following areas: Mississippi Canyon, central GOM, East Breaks, South Galveston, and the Green Canyon. In the downdip, deeper water sections, the primary water column signal appears to be well preserved through the middle Miocene. When working updip in shallower water depths, there appears to be some diagenetic zones displaying extremely negative {delta}{sup 18}O values ({gt}-6 per mil) that could be related to fluid migration events or possibly related to sand occurrence. Also found in these updip wells is a zone of consistent diagenetic overprint in the lower section of the well. In this interval, the base line for the {delta}{sup 18}O values is shifted by as much as 3-4 per mil in the negative direction.

  7. Early, middle, and late Miocene basin development, California

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, S.B.

    1988-03-01

    Contrary to earlier models of progressive basin development related to northward migration of the Mendocino triple junction, it can now be documented that the major basins of coastal California developed at about the same time in the late Oligocene to early Miocene. This basin development is marked by rapid deepening of basin floors, subsequent changes in depositional facies from nonmarine and shallow marine to deep marine, and widespread volcanism dated at 23-20 Ma. The coastal basins likely formed by rifting and subsidence linked to the proximity of the Farallon-pacific spreading ridge and the subduction of hot young oceanic crust, but cannot be correlated to any existing models of triple junction migration. Indeed, strike-slip restored positions of the coastal basins at their inception indicate that the basins were spread out over about 800 km of the southern coast of California. The Miocene basins were likely larger than the present coastal basins, although their configurations are obscured by late Neogene faulting and erosion. It is likely, however, that paleohighs separated at least some of the margin into proximal and distal basins. With local exceptions, structuring in the Miocene basins was primarily extensional, with widespread strike-slip and thrust tectonics restricted mainly to latest Miocene and younger events. Plate reconstructions suggest several hundred kilometers of transform motion occurred along the California margin during the Miocene, but there is only limited evidence of this movement in the known history of either the basins or the major faults of California. Sedimentation during the Miocene was controlled by both oceanic conditions (biogenic component) and the relative abundance of clastic input. The clastic input was controlled by a combination of proximal vs distal basinal positions, eustatic sea level changes, and local tectonics.

  8. Late Miocene Tidal Deposits in the Amazonian Foreland Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rasanen, Matti E.; Linna, Ari M.; Santos, Jose C. R.; Negri, Francisco R.

    1995-07-01

    Late Miocene tidal sediments of Acre, Brazilian Amazonia, were deposited in an embayment or interior seaway located in the sub-Andean zone. This late Tertiary embayment system may once have connected the Caribbean with the South Atlantic. The tidal coasts of the embayment-seaway have provided an avenue for the earliest waif (over water) dispersal phases of the great American biotic interchange in the late Miocene. The subsequent change from semimarine to terrestrial environments is of value in assessing the importance of earlier hypotheses on the evolution of the western Amazonian landscape and gives insight into the formation of several observed biogeographic patterns, especially of aquatic biota.

  9. Interpretation of Samburupithecus, an upper Miocene hominoid from Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pickford, Martin; Ishida, Hidemi

    1998-02-01

    Samburupithecus, an extinct great ape from upper Miocene (9.5 Ma) deposits in Kenya, is compared with other fossil and extant hominoids. It possesses features which are derived in comparison with Proconsul and other Lower and Middle Miocene hominoids, but it has none of the derived features which characterize the Eurasian large apes. It possesses characters which indicate that its closest relationships lie with the AAH clade (extant African apes and man). Within this clade it is closest dentally to primitive hominids such as Praeanthropus.

  10. First record of Mylagaulid rodents (Rodentia, Mammalia) from the Miocene of Eastern Siberia (Olkhon Island, Baikal Lake, Irkutsk Region, Russia).

    PubMed

    Tesakov, A S; Lopatin, A V

    2015-01-01

    A new genus and species of rodent, Lamugaulus olkhonensis, belonging to the subfamily Promylagaulinae of the family Mylagaulidae, is described on the basis of isolated teeth from the Khalagay Formation of the Lower Miocene Tagay locality (Olkhon island, Lake Baikal, Irkutsk Region). This is the first record of mylagaulids in Eastern Siberia, significantly expanding the data on the distribution of this mainly North American group of rodents in Asia and showing its presence outside the Central Asian arid zone. PMID:25773245

  11. Preliminary assessment of injection, storage, and recovery of freshwater in the lower Hawthorn aquifer, Cape Coral, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quinones-Aponte, Vicente; Wexler, Eliezer J.

    1995-01-01

    A preliminary assessment of subsurface injection, storage and recovery of fresh canal water was made in the naturally brackish lower Hawthorn aquifer in Cape Coral, southwestern Florida. A digital modeling approach was used for this preliminary assessment, incorporating available data on hydrologic conditions, aquifer properties, and water quality to simulate density-dependent ground-water flow and advective-dispersive transport of a conservative ground-water solute (chloride ion). A baseline simulation was used as reference to compare the effects of changing various operational factors on the recovery efficiency. A recovery efficiency of 64 percent was estimated for the baseline simulation. Based on the model, the recovery efficiency increases if the injection rate and recovery rates are increased and if the ratio of recovery rate to injection rate is increased. Recovery efficiency decreases if the amount of water injected is increased; slightly decreases if the storage time is increased; is not changed significantly if the water is injected to a specific flow zone; increases with successive cycles of injection, storage, and recovery; and decreases if the chloride concentrations in either the injection water or native aquifer water are increased. In everal hypothetical tests, the recovery efficiency fluctuated between 22 and about 100 percent. Two successive cycles could bring the recovery efficiency from 60 to about 80 percent. Interlayer solute mass movement across the upper and lower boundaries seems to be the most important factor affecting the recovery efficiency. A sensitivity analysis was performed applying a technique in which the change in the various factors and the corresponding model responses are normalized so that meaningful comparisons among the responses could be made. The general results from the sensitivity analysis indicated that the permeabilities of the upper and lower flow zones were the most important factors that produced the greatest changes in the relative sensitivity of the recovery efficiency. Almost equally significant changes occurred in the relative sensitivity of the recovery efficiency when all porosity values of the upper and lower flow zones and the leaky confining units and the vertical anisotropy ratio were changed. The advective factors are the most important in the Cape Coral area according to the sensitivity analysis. However, the dispersivity values used in the model were extrapolated from studies conducted at the nearby Lee County Water Treatment Plant, and these values might not be representative of the actual dispersive characteristics of the lower Hawthorn aquifer in the Cape Coral area.

  12. Lower Miocene sequence stratigraphy of Taishi Basin, offshore Western Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Ting, J.S. ); Lee, T.Y. )

    1994-07-01

    By applying sequence stratigraphic concepts to the lower Miocene sedimentary sections in Taishi Basin, offshore western Taiwan, it is possible to identify four third-order sequences from subsurface information. The overall depositional environment of these sequences is in a deltaic setting. Following the early Aquitanian flood (24.8 Ma), the basin experienced a long period of sea level highstand, which generated more than 400 m of highstand prograding units. In late Aquitanian time, a thick retrogradational package ([approximately]250 m) was developed in response to rising sea level. Sandy units are now the dominant sediment type in the Taishi Basin. Until the early middle Miocene (15-16 Ma), the basin was flooded and deposited with thick marine shale. This analysis shows that the lower Miocene sedimentary sequences in the Taishi Basin have a good correlation with the Haq et al. (1987) chart, which would imply a passive margin setting for the Taishi Basin in the early Miocene. The predictive nature of the sequence stratigraphic technique can help in redefining the hydrocarbon play concepts in this area.

  13. A Transitional Gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae) from the Miocene of Israel

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Gutkin, Vitaly; Rabinovich, Rivka; Calvo, Ran; Grossman, Aryeh

    2016-01-01

    We describe a new species of gundi (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae: Ctenodactylinae), Sayimys negevensis, on the basis of cheek teeth from the Early Miocene of the Rotem Basin, southern Israel. The Rotem ctenodactylid differs from all known ctenodactylid species, including Sayimys intermedius, which was first described from the Middle Miocene of Saudi Arabia. Instead, it most resembles Sayimys baskini from the Early Miocene of Pakistan in characters of the m1-2 (e.g., the mesoflexid shorter than the metaflexid, the obliquely orientated hypolophid, and the presence of a strong posterolabial ledge) and the upper molars (e.g., the paraflexus that is longer than the metaflexus). However, morphological (e.g., presence of a well-developed paraflexus on unworn upper molars) and dimensional (regarding, in particular, the DP4 and M1 or M2) differences between the Rotem gundi and Sayimys baskini distinguish them and testify to the novelty and endemicity of the former. In its dental morphology, Sayimys negevensis sp. nov. shows a combination of both the ultimate apparition of key-characters and incipient features that would be maintained and strengthened in latter ctenodactylines. Thus, it is a pivotal species that bridges the gap between an array of primitive ctenodactylines and the most derived, Early Miocene and later, gundis. PMID:27049960

  14. Palynology of latest Neogene (Middle Miocene to late Pliocene) strata in the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland and Virginia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sirkin, L.; Owens, J.P.

    1998-01-01

    Palynology of Miocene and Pliocene formations in the Delmarva Peninsula of Maryland and Virginia reveals a significant representation of exotic pollen interspersed in pollen assemblages that are otherwise comparable to those from the modern vegetation of the Mid-Alantic coastal plain region. The late Tertiary arboreal pollen (AP) assemblages are dominated by oak, hickory, pine, birch and alder with minor amounts of mid- and southern coastal tree taxa, as well as minor spruce and hemlock and a trace of fir. Nonarboreal pollen (NAP) include grass, sedge, composite and aquatic taxa. Exotic pollen in these assemblages represent plants now foreign to this region. They may be placed in three categories. First, there are extinct forms, such as Labrapollis, Plicatopollis, and Multiporopollenites, that can be traced from the Cretaceous or Early Tertiary into the Late Tertiary. The second group includes forms, such as Podocarpus, Engelhardtia, Pterocarya, Ephedra, Eucommia, Ulmus-Zelkova, Glyptostrobus, Palmae, and Cyathea, that are not found in this region today and not found in early Pleistocene sediments in the eastern United States. Many of these taxa are subtropical or greatly restricted in geographic range. A third group of exotics, mainly Cyrilla, Planera, Gordonia, Jussiaea, and Sapotacaea, including Minusops, are generally found south of the study area or have their northern limit here at this time. The lack of the extinct or distant exotics in early to mid-Pleistocene sediments in the mid-Atlantic coastal plain and the last appearance of Pterocarya, as the last exotic taxon in the early Pleistocene of western Europe, support the stratigraphic assignment of the Pliocene units. The number of exotic taxa diminish markedly between the Miocene pollen assemblages and those of the Late Pliocene. Climatic fluctuations characterize the Late Tertiary environments. The Miocene, for example, incorporates a warming trend between the upper, middle Miocene and the Manokin beds and the late Miocene of the Pokomoke beds. The late Miocene was probably somewhat warner than the present climate in the Delmarva region. This trend is based on the presence of colder climate indicators, mainly spruce and hemlock, in the Manokin pollen record. The two distinct pollen assemblages constitute two pollen zones. Similarly, the Pliocene pollen record also shows a warming trend. The pollen zone of the Yorktown Formation of the early Pliocene age contains the colder climate indicators spruce and hemlock. The Beaverdam and Walston formation of late Pliocene age contain pollen assemblages that reflect climatic conditions warmer than the present time.

  15. Occlusal Enamel Complexity in Middle Miocene to Holocene Equids (Equidae: Perissodactyla) of North America

    PubMed Central

    Famoso, Nicholas A.; Davis, Edward Byrd

    2014-01-01

    Four groups of equids, “Anchitheriinae,” Merychippine-grade Equinae, Hipparionini, and Equini, coexisted in the middle Miocene, but only the Equini remains after 16 Myr of evolution and extinction. Each group is distinct in its occlusal enamel pattern. These patterns have been compared qualitatively but rarely quantitatively. The processes influencing the evolution of these occlusal patterns have not been thoroughly investigated with respect to phylogeny, tooth position, and climate through geologic time. We investigated Occlusal Enamel Index, a quantitative method for the analysis of the complexity of occlusal patterns. We used analyses of variance and an analysis of co-variance to test whether equid teeth increase resistive cutting area for food processing during mastication, as expressed in occlusal enamel complexity, in response to increased abrasion in their diet. Results suggest that occlusal enamel complexity was influenced by climate, phylogeny, and tooth position through time. Occlusal enamel complexity in middle Miocene to Modern horses increased as the animals experienced increased tooth abrasion and a cooling climate. PMID:24587267

  16. Occlusal enamel complexity in middle miocene to holocene equids (Equidae: Perissodactyla) of North America.

    PubMed

    Famoso, Nicholas A; Davis, Edward Byrd

    2014-01-01

    Four groups of equids, "Anchitheriinae," Merychippine-grade Equinae, Hipparionini, and Equini, coexisted in the middle Miocene, but only the Equini remains after 16 Myr of evolution and extinction. Each group is distinct in its occlusal enamel pattern. These patterns have been compared qualitatively but rarely quantitatively. The processes influencing the evolution of these occlusal patterns have not been thoroughly investigated with respect to phylogeny, tooth position, and climate through geologic time. We investigated Occlusal Enamel Index, a quantitative method for the analysis of the complexity of occlusal patterns. We used analyses of variance and an analysis of co-variance to test whether equid teeth increase resistive cutting area for food processing during mastication, as expressed in occlusal enamel complexity, in response to increased abrasion in their diet. Results suggest that occlusal enamel complexity was influenced by climate, phylogeny, and tooth position through time. Occlusal enamel complexity in middle Miocene to Modern horses increased as the animals experienced increased tooth abrasion and a cooling climate. PMID:24587267

  17. The early to mid-Miocene environment of Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A.

    2012-12-01

    Paleoecological studies in the Transantarctic Mountains of the McMurdo region provide evidence that the climate was both warmer and wetter in the early to mid-Miocene than it was during the late Miocene. The climate change was accompanied by a shift from wet- to cold-based glaciation in the TAM and the probable growth of the polar ice sheet. Terrestrial and freshwater aquatic fossil assemblages from the Friis Hills (77°S) and the Olympus Range (77°S), with endpoint 40Ar/39Ar ages on tephras of 19.76 Ma and 14.07 Ma, respectively, indicate climatic cooling during the interval. At c.14 Ma, the temperature dropped below the threshold required to support the plants and insects of a tundra biome, and they became extinct. This interpretation is supported by pollen studies from Ross Sea cores. The extinction of the tundra biota on the continent appears to have been time-transgressive, occurring at 12.8 Ma on the Antarctic Peninsula. Evidence of climatic cooling from early to mid-Miocene is based on a decrease in biodiversity. During interglacial phases of the early Miocene, the poorly drained valley of the Friis Hills supported a sexually-reproducing moss community dominated by Campylium cf. polygamum, which today grows on the margins of lakes and in soil between boulders. Wood and leaves of Nothofagus (Southern Beech), and the seeds of at least five other angiosperm species are preserved as fossils. In addition, there are abundant megaspores and spiny, curved leaves of the aquatic lycopod Isoetes (Quillwort), as well as chitinous remains of curculionid beetles and Chironomidae (midges). During glacial phases, the only fossils found are Nothofagus leaves of a species which appears to be different than that associated with the interglacial phases. Pollen supports the interpretation that there was more than one species of Nothofagus in the vegetation. The types and numbers of species indicate that the vegetation was a shrub tundra. The closest modern analog for the fossil assemblage is at treeline and higher on Isla Navarino (55°S) at the southern tip of South America. By mid-Miocene, the upland tundra biota was less diverse, most notably in the number of angiosperm taxa. Based on the autecology and geographic distributions of the descendants of the fossil biota which survive in the subantarctic islands, South America and Tasmania, there was a decline of mean summer temperatures from c. 6°C to c. 4°C from the early to the mid-Miocene. During the early Miocene, the MST of the TAM was c.19°C warmer than today. A paleotemperature estimate based on leaf waxes from a Ross Sea core is for a MST 11°C warmer than today which seems low considering it is based on a near sea-level vegetation. A recent paper utilizing a salt-hydration process to provide adequate moisture to support a Miocene tundra biota is based on erroneous data. The Miocene climate was wet with an annual precipitation of at least 3000 mm. A recent report of the possible survival of vegetation in the Taylor Valley until the Pliocene, based on the discovery of 5 Ma wood-like forms in a DVDP core, is improbable. Even if wood can be definitively identified from the Pliocene deposits it is likely to be reworked Miocene wood from uplands in the TAM (e.g. Friis Hills). Research supported by NSF OPP 0739693.

  18. Systematics and Evolution of the Miocene Three-Horned Palaeomerycid Ruminants (Mammalia, Cetartiodactyla)

    PubMed Central

    Sánchez, Israel M.; Cantalapiedra, Juan L.; Ríos, María; Quiralte, Victoria; Morales, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Palaeomerycids were strange three-horned Eurasian Miocene ruminants known through fossils from Spain to China. We here study their systematics, offering the first cladistic phylogeny of the best-known species of the group, and also reassess their phylogenetic position among ruminants, which is currently disputed. The beautifully preserved remains of a new palaeomerycid from middle Miocene deposits of Spain, Xenokeryx amidalae gen. et sp. nov., helps us to better understand palaeomerycid anatomy, especially that of the nuchal region in the skull, significantly improving our current knowledge on these enigmatic ruminants. Our results show two main lineages of palaeomerycids, one containing the genus Ampelomeryx diagnosed by a characteristic type of cranium / cranial appendages and some dental derived traits, and another one that clusters those forms more closely related to Triceromeryx than to Ampelomeryx, characterized by a more derived dentition and a set of apomorphic cranial features. Xenokeryx branches as a basal offshoot of this clade. Also, we find that Eurasian palaeomerycids are not closely related to North American dromomerycids, thus rejecting the currently more accepted view of palaeomerycids as the Eurasian part of the dromomerycid lineage. Instead of this, palaeomerycids are nested with the African Miocene pecoran Propalaeoryx and with giraffoids. On the other hand, dromomerycids are closely related to cervids. We define a clade Giraffomorpha that includes palaeomerycids and giraffids, and propose an emended diagnosis of the Palaeomerycidae based on cranial and postcranial characters, including several features of the cranium not described so far. We also define the Palaeomerycidae as the least inclusive clade of pecorans containing Triceromeryx and Ampelomeryx. Finally, we reassess the taxonomy of several palaeomerycid taxa. PMID:26630174

  19. Systematics and Evolution of the Miocene Three-Horned Palaeomerycid Ruminants (Mammalia, Cetartiodactyla).

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Israel M; Cantalapiedra, Juan L; Ríos, María; Quiralte, Victoria; Morales, Jorge

    2015-01-01

    Palaeomerycids were strange three-horned Eurasian Miocene ruminants known through fossils from Spain to China. We here study their systematics, offering the first cladistic phylogeny of the best-known species of the group, and also reassess their phylogenetic position among ruminants, which is currently disputed. The beautifully preserved remains of a new palaeomerycid from middle Miocene deposits of Spain, Xenokeryx amidalae gen. et sp. nov., helps us to better understand palaeomerycid anatomy, especially that of the nuchal region in the skull, significantly improving our current knowledge on these enigmatic ruminants. Our results show two main lineages of palaeomerycids, one containing the genus Ampelomeryx diagnosed by a characteristic type of cranium / cranial appendages and some dental derived traits, and another one that clusters those forms more closely related to Triceromeryx than to Ampelomeryx, characterized by a more derived dentition and a set of apomorphic cranial features. Xenokeryx branches as a basal offshoot of this clade. Also, we find that Eurasian palaeomerycids are not closely related to North American dromomerycids, thus rejecting the currently more accepted view of palaeomerycids as the Eurasian part of the dromomerycid lineage. Instead of this, palaeomerycids are nested with the African Miocene pecoran Propalaeoryx and with giraffoids. On the other hand, dromomerycids are closely related to cervids. We define a clade Giraffomorpha that includes palaeomerycids and giraffids, and propose an emended diagnosis of the Palaeomerycidae based on cranial and postcranial characters, including several features of the cranium not described so far. We also define the Palaeomerycidae as the least inclusive clade of pecorans containing Triceromeryx and Ampelomeryx. Finally, we reassess the taxonomy of several palaeomerycid taxa. PMID:26630174

  20. Simultaneous Determination of Seven Components from Hawthorn Leaves Flavonoids in Rat Plasma by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shourong; Yan, Huiyu; Niu, Kai; Zhang, Sixi

    2015-07-01

    In this study, a simple, sensitive, and throughout liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed for the simultaneous determination of seven flavonoid compounds, namely, rutin, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside, hyperoside, vitexin, shanyenoside A and quercetin in rat plasma after intravenous administration of hawthorn leaves flavonoids (HLF) using lysionotin as an internal standard (IS). The target compounds were extracted using protein precipitation by methanol. The detection was achieved by LC-MS/MS in multiple reaction monitoring mode. The optimal mass transition ion pairs (m/z) for quantitation were 609.3/300.1 for rutin, 593.1/413.2 for vitexin-4″-O-glucoside, 577.3/413.2 for vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside, 463.2/300.1 for hyperoside, 431.2/311.2 for vitexin, 407.2/245.1 for shanyenoside A, 301.1/151.1 for quercetin and 343.2/313.1 for the IS, respectively. The method was fully validated with respect to specificity, sensitivity, linearity, precision, accuracy, recovery and stability experiments. A sufficiently sensitive and selective LC-MS/MS method was first developed in this study to simultaneously evaluate the pharmacokinetics of seven flavonoids in rat plasma following intravenous administration of HLF. PMID:25368407

  1. Molecularly imprinted polymers combination with deep eutectic solvents for solid-phase extraction of caffeic acid from hawthorn.

    PubMed

    Li, Guizhen; Tang, Weiyang; Cao, Weimin; Wang, Qian; Zhu, Tao

    2015-08-01

    Molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) with caffeic acid as template and non-imprinted polymers (NIPs) materials were prepared in the same procedure. Field emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and adsorption capacity test were used to evaluate characteristic of the new materials. MIPs, NIPs and C18 were used for rapid purification of caffeic acid from hawthorn with solid-phase extraction ( SPE) , and extract yields of caffeic acid with the proposed materials were 3.46 µg/g, 1.01 µg/g and 1.17 µg/g, respectively. To optimize the MIPs-SPE procedures, different kinds of elution solutions were studied. Deep eutectic solvents (DESs) were prepared by choline chloride (ChCl)-glycerol (1/2, n/n) and choline chloride-urea (1/ 2, n/n). Methanol was mixed with the two kinds of DESs (glycerol-based DESs, urea-based DESs) in different ratios (0.5:1, 1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1, v/v), and they were used to investigated as elution solutions in the above MIPs-SPE procedures. The results showed that MIPs were potential SPE materials, and methanol/ glycerol-based DESs (3 :1, v/v) had the best elution capability with the recovery of 82.32%. PMID:26749853

  2. Simultaneous determination of three polyphenols in rat plasma after orally administering hawthorn leaves extract by the HPLC method.

    PubMed

    Ying, Xixiang; Meng, Xiansheng; Wang, Siyuan; Wang, Dong; Li, Haibo; Wang, Bing; Du, Yang; Liu, Xun; Zhang, Wenjie; Kang, Tingguo

    2012-01-01

    A simple and sensitive HPLC method was developed to simultaneously determine three active compounds, vitexin-4″-O-glucoside (VG), vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside (VR) and hyperoside (HP), in rat plasma after administering the hawthorn leaves extract (HLE). An HPLC assay with baicalin as the internal standard was carried out using a Phenomsil C₁₈ analytical column with UV detection at 332 nm. The mobile phase consisted of methanol-acetonitrile-tetrahydrofuran-1% glacial acetic acid (6 : 1.5 : 18.5 : 74, v/v/v/v). The calibration curves were linear over the range of 2.5-500, 0.2-25 and 0.25-12.5 µg mL⁻¹ for VG, VR and HP, respectively. The method was reproducible and reliable, with relative standard deviations of the intra- and inter-day precision between 1.2% and 13.2% for the analysis of the three analytes. The validated HPLC method herein described was successfully applied to the pharmacokinetic study of VG, VR and HP after oral administration of HLE to rats over the dose range of 2.5-10  mL kg⁻¹. PMID:21867394

  3. Chemical evolution of Miocene wood: Example from the Belchatow brown coal deposit, central Poland

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drobniak, A.; Mastalerz, Maria

    2006-01-01

    Miocene conifer wood samples from the Belchatow brown coal deposit in Poland were studied in order to discuss a range of chemical variations that occur as a result of biochemical coalification. Petrographic analysis, ultimate analysis, electron microprobe technique, and FTIR spectroscopy were used in this study. Our data show several progressive trends in functional groups distribution that take place during the wood transformation from group 1 to group 4, such as an overall increase in aromaticity, an increase in lignin/cellulose ratio, and an increase in oxygen functionalities. Other observations include an increase in aliphatic stretching and bending functionalities from groups 1 to 3; followed by a decrease in the wood of group 4; appearance of aliphatic out-of-plane bands in group 3 and increase in group 4; an increase in CH2/CH3 in group 4 compared to the other groups; and decrease in O-H groups in group 4 compared to other groups. These observations, together with other chemical and petrological observations, indicate that the progressive elimination of cellulose and modification of lignin are dominant processes of the wood transformation. ?? 2005 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. A New Late Miocene Odobenid (Mammalia: Carnivora) from Hokkaido, Japan Suggests Rapid Diversification of Basal Miocene Odobenids.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The modern walrus, Odobenus rosmarus, is specialized and only extant member of the family Odobenidae. They were much more diversified in the past, and at least 16 genera and 20 species of fossil walruses have been known. Although their diversity increased in the late Miocene and Pliocene (around 8-2 Million years ago), older records are poorly known. A new genus and species of archaic odobenid, Archaeodobenus akamatsui, gen. et sp. nov. from the late Miocene (ca. 10.0-9.5 Ma) top of the Ichibangawa Formation, Hokkaido, northern Japan, suggests rapid diversification of basal Miocene walruses. Archaeodobenus akamatsui is the contemporaneous Pseudotaria muramotoi from the same formation, but they are distinguishable from each other in size and shape of the occipital condyle, foramen magnum and mastoid process of the cranium, and other postcranial features. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, A. akamatsui might have split from P. muramotoi at the late Miocene in the western North Pacific. This rapid diversification of the archaic odobenids occurred with a combination of marine regression and transgression, which provided geological isolation among the common ancestors of extinct odobenids. PMID:26244784

  5. A New Late Miocene Odobenid (Mammalia: Carnivora) from Hokkaido, Japan Suggests Rapid Diversification of Basal Miocene Odobenids

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yoshihiro; Kohno, Naoki

    2015-01-01

    The modern walrus, Odobenus rosmarus, is specialized and only extant member of the family Odobenidae. They were much more diversified in the past, and at least 16 genera and 20 species of fossil walruses have been known. Although their diversity increased in the late Miocene and Pliocene (around 8–2 Million years ago), older records are poorly known. A new genus and species of archaic odobenid, Archaeodobenus akamatsui, gen. et sp. nov. from the late Miocene (ca. 10.0–9.5 Ma) top of the Ichibangawa Formation, Hokkaido, northern Japan, suggests rapid diversification of basal Miocene walruses. Archaeodobenus akamatsui is the contemporaneous Pseudotaria muramotoi from the same formation, but they are distinguishable from each other in size and shape of the occipital condyle, foramen magnum and mastoid process of the cranium, and other postcranial features. Based on our phylogenetic analysis, A. akamatsui might have split from P. muramotoi at the late Miocene in the western North Pacific. This rapid diversification of the archaic odobenids occurred with a combination of marine regression and transgression, which provided geological isolation among the common ancestors of extinct odobenids. PMID:26244784

  6. Middle and upper Miocene natural gas sands in onshore and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mink, R.M.; Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Smith, C.C.

    1988-09-01

    Thirty Miocene natural gas fields have been established in onshore and offshore Alabama since the discovery of Miocene gas in this area in 1979. These fields have produced over 16 bcf of natural gas from the middle Miocene Amos sand (24 fields) and upper Miocene Luce (3 fields), Escambia (1 field), and Meyer (3 fields) sands. Production from the Amos transgressive sands represents over 92% of the cumulative shallow Miocene natural gas produced in onshore and offshore Alabama. In addition, over 127 bcf of natural gas has been produced from upper Miocene sands in the Chandeleur area. The productive Miocene section in onshore and coastal Alabama is interpreted to present transgressive marine shelf and regressive shoreface sands. The middle Miocene Amos sand bars are the most productive reservoirs of natural gas in onshore and coastal Alabama, principally due to the porous and permeable nature of these transgressive sands and their stratigraphic relationship to the underlying basinal clays in this area. In offshore Alabama the upper Miocene sands become thicker and are generally more porous and permeable than their onshore equivalents. Because of their deeper burial depth in offshore Alabama, these upper Miocene sands are associated with marine clays that are thermally more mature. The combination of reservoir grade lithologies associated with moderately mature petroleum source rocks enhances the natural gas potential of the upper Miocene sands in offshore Alabama.

  7. Coarse-grained deltaic sedimentation in the Miocene Cuyama strike-slip basin, California Coast Ranges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alan, Bartow J.

    1990-01-01

    The Cuyama basin, located in the southern Coast Ranges of California southwest of the San Andreas fault, developed early in the history of the San Andreas transform system. The Miocene marine basin formed in a transtensional setting along a dextral strike-slip fault of the transform system following Oligocene non-marine basin formation in an extensional setting. The lower and middle Miocene Vaqueros Formation in the northwestern part of the basin, which represents the first of two transgressive-regressive cycles, is described here in terms of nine facies in two broad facies groups. The 400-m-thick Soda Lake Shale Member (of the Vaqueros) comprises deep-basin and starved-basin facies. A thin transgressive facies occurs locally at the base of the formation. The overlying Painted Rock Sandstone Member (of the Vaqueros), which is more than 2200 m thick and consists mostly of coarse-grained sandstone and pebbly sandstone, constitutes a delta complex of prodelta, slope channel, delta front, tide-influenced distributary channel, interdistributary bay, and fluvial channel facies. The basinal depositional system consisted of turbidite mud and sand, and hemipelagic and pelagic sediments of the basinal facies deposited in a rapidly subsiding basin. The delta depositional system consisted of the delta complex facies that prograded into the deep basin and had a steep prodelta slope that extended to bathyal depths. The delta is inferred to be a mixed fluvial-wave-dominated fan delta, analogous in its delta-front morphology and processes to a fjord delta, in which coarse sediment delivered to the delta front by braided streams was transported down the prodelta slope into deep water by sediment gravity flows. Transgression and rapid deepening of the basin in the early Miocene coincided with rapid tectonic subsidence. Deepening culminated with deposition of a starved-basin facies or condensed section at the time of maximum transgression, which was followed by the beginning of a regression and basin shallowing. The overall basin history and geometry of the northwestern Cuyama basin are typical of strike-slip basins. The initial rapid subsidence to bathyal depths at rates of more than 500 m/m.y. in the early Miocene is interpreted to be a result of extension at the releasing bend of a dextral strike-slip fault. ?? 1990.

  8. C4 expansion in the central Inner Mongolia during the latest Miocene and early Pliocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunfu; Wang, Yang; Deng, Tao; Wang, Xiaoming; Biasatti, Dana; Xu, Yingfeng; Li, Qiang

    2009-10-01

    The emergence of C4 photosynthesis in plants as a significant component of terrestrial ecosystems is thought to be an adaptive response to changes in atmospheric CO 2 concentration and/or climate during Neogene times and has had a profound effect on the global terrestrial biosphere. Although expansion of C4 grasses in the latest Miocene and Pliocene has been widely documented around the world, the spatial and temporal variations in the C4 expansion are still not well understood and its driving mechanisms remain a contentious issue. Here we present the results of carbon and oxygen isotope analyses of fossil and modern mammalian tooth enamel samples from the central Inner Mongolia. Our samples represent a diverse group of herbivorous mammals including deer, elephants, rhinos, horses and giraffes, ranging in age from the late Oligocene to modern. The δ13C values of 91 tooth enamel samples of early late-Miocene age or older, with the exception of two 13 Ma rhino samples (- 7.8 and - 7.6‰) and one 8.5 Ma suspected rhino sample (- 7.6‰), were all less than - 8.0‰ (VPDB), indicating that there were no C4 grasses present in their diets and thus probably few or no C4 grasses in the ecosystems of the central Inner Mongolia prior to ~ 8 Ma. However, 12 out of 26 tooth enamel samples of younger ages (~ 7.5 Ma to ~ 3.9 Ma) have δ13C values higher than - 8.0‰ (up to - 2.4‰), indicating that herbivores in the area had variable diets ranging from pure C3 to mixed C3-C4 vegetation during that time interval. The presence of C4 grasses in herbivores' diets (up to ~ 76% C4) suggests that C4 grasses were a significant component of the local ecosystems in the latest Miocene and early Pliocene, consistent with the hypothesis of a global factor as the driving mechanism of the late Miocene C4 expansion. Today, C3 grasses dominate grasslands in the central Inner Mongolia area. The retreat of C4 grasses from this area after the early Pliocene may have been driven by regional climate change associated with tectonic processes in central Asia as well as global climate change.

  9. Mid Miocene Terrestrial Ecosystems: Information from Mammalian Herbivore Communities.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janis, C. M.; Damuth, J.; Theodor, J. M.

    2001-05-01

    In present day ecosystems the numbers and proportions of different kinds of ecologically distinct ungulates (hoofed mammals) provide an indicator of the nature of the vegetation in the habitat. Different vegetation types (such as forest, savanna, or grassland) are characteristically associated with different arrays of ungulates, with species exhibiting differences in diet, body size, and type of digestive fermentation system. These biological attributes can also be inferred for fossil ungulate species, the first two from quantitative assessment of skull and dental anatomy, and the last from phylogenetic affinity. Thus fossil ungulate communities may be used as indicators of the vegetation types of the habitats in which they lived. Vegetation types, in turn, are determined largely by a number of physical environmental factors. Typical ungulate communities of the late early to early middle Miocene (17 - 15 Ma) from the Great Plains of North America contained a diversity of browsing (leaf-eating) and grazing (grass-eating) species, with proportions of dietary types and a diversity of body sizes indicative of a woodland savanna habitat. Paleobotanical evidence also indicates a woodland savanna type of vegetation. However, these communities included a much larger number of ungulate species than can be found in any present-day community. The "excess" ungulate species were primarily browsers. Throughout the rest of the middle Miocene both species numbers and the proportion of browsers in ungulate communities appear to have declined steadily. During this decline in browser species the numbers of grazer species remained relatively constant. Within-community species numbers comparable to the present day were attained by the late Miocene. We suggest that the early Miocene browser-rich communities, and their subsequent decline, carry an important paleoenvironmental signal. In particular, communities "over rich" in browsers may reflect higher levels of primary productivity in mid Miocene vegetation types in comparison with corresponding, structurally equivalent present-day vegetation types. The observed decline in species numbers may represent a gradual decline in terrestrial primary productivity, which would be consistent with one current hypothesis of a mid-Miocene decrease in atmospheric carbon dioxide concentrations from higher mid-Cenozoic values.

  10. Depositional styles from Miocene through Pleistocene in the North Central Gulf of Mexico: An historical reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, J.L. Jr.; Burgess, G.

    1995-10-01

    During the past two years, Minerals Management Service, U.S. Department of the Interior, has classified the reservoir sands from the approximately 1,100 fields across the entire Northern Gulf of Mexico into groups of genetically related plays defined by production, chronostratigraphy, lithostratigraphy, and structure. This study was undertaken in part for the 1995 National Gas and Oil Assessment. Each field was assigned a structural code, and each producible sand was classified by depositional environment. Correlation of the composite type logs with biostratigraphic and seismic data established twelve chronozones from lower Miocene to upper Pleistocene. Sands within each chronozone were classified as transgressive, aggradational, progradational, or deep-sea fan facies. Proved reserves plays, hydrocarbon extents, as well as facies sand limits were mapped for each chronozone. Dramatic changes in depositional styles from the Miocene through the Pliocene are observed in the north-central Gulf of Mexico as the ancestral Mississippi River delta moved both basinward and eastward across offshore Louisiana. The depocenter moved back to the west and significantly basinward during the Pleistocene. Depositional patterns were strongly influenced by localized salt structure and major growth faulting. Salt ridges on the paleo-slope had a damming effect on deposition. When the ridges were breached, the focused sediment supply created areas of slope fan deposits. The results of this study are useful hydrocarbon exploration and development tools.

  11. First hominoid from the Late Miocene of the Irrawaddy Formation (Myanmar).

    PubMed

    Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Soe, Aung Naing; Chavasseau, Olivier; Coster, Pauline; Emonet, Edouard-Georges; Guy, Franck; Lebrun, Renaud; Maung, Aye; Aung Khyaw, Aung; Shwe, Hla; Thura Tun, Soe; Linn Oo, Kyaw; Rugbumrung, Mana; Bocherens, Hervé; Benammi, Mouloud; Chaivanich, Kamol; Tafforeau, Paul; Chaimanee, Yaowalak

    2011-01-01

    For over a century, a Neogene fossil mammal fauna has been known in the Irrawaddy Formation in central Myanmar. Unfortunately, the lack of accurately located fossiliferous sites and the absence of hominoid fossils have impeded paleontological studies. Here we describe the first hominoid found in Myanmar together with a Hipparion (s.l.) associated mammal fauna from Irrawaddy Formation deposits dated between 10.4 and 8.8 Ma by biochronology and magnetostratigraphy. This hominoid documents a new species of Khoratpithecus, increasing thereby the Miocene diversity of southern Asian hominoids. The composition of the associated fauna as well as stable isotope data on Hipparion (s.l.) indicate that it inhabited an evergreen forest in a C3-plant environment. Our results enlighten that late Miocene hominoids were more regionally diversified than other large mammals, pointing towards regionally-bounded evolution of the representatives of this group in Southeast Asia. The Irrawaddy Formation, with its extensive outcrops and long temporal range, has a great potential for improving our knowledge of hominoid evolution in Asia. PMID:21533131

  12. First Hominoid from the Late Miocene of the Irrawaddy Formation (Myanmar)

    PubMed Central

    Jaeger, Jean-Jacques; Naing Soe, Aung; Chavasseau, Olivier; Coster, Pauline; Emonet, Edouard-Georges; Guy, Franck; Lebrun, Renaud; Maung, Aye; Aung Khyaw, Aung; Shwe, Hla; Thura Tun, Soe; Linn Oo, Kyaw; Rugbumrung, Mana; Bocherens, Hervé; Benammi, Mouloud; Chaivanich, Kamol; Tafforeau, Paul; Chaimanee, Yaowalak

    2011-01-01

    For over a century, a Neogene fossil mammal fauna has been known in the Irrawaddy Formation in central Myanmar. Unfortunately, the lack of accurately located fossiliferous sites and the absence of hominoid fossils have impeded paleontological studies. Here we describe the first hominoid found in Myanmar together with a Hipparion (s.l.) associated mammal fauna from Irrawaddy Formation deposits dated between 10.4 and 8.8 Ma by biochronology and magnetostratigraphy. This hominoid documents a new species of Khoratpithecus, increasing thereby the Miocene diversity of southern Asian hominoids. The composition of the associated fauna as well as stable isotope data on Hipparion (s.l.) indicate that it inhabited an evergreen forest in a C3-plant environment. Our results enlighten that late Miocene hominoids were more regionally diversified than other large mammals, pointing towards regionally-bounded evolution of the representatives of this group in Southeast Asia. The Irrawaddy Formation, with its extensive outcrops and long temporal range, has a great potential for improving our knowledge of hominoid evolution in Asia. PMID:21533131

  13. A study of uranium favorability of Cenozoic sedimentary rocks, Basin and Range Province, Arizona: Part I, General geology and chronology of pre-late Miocene Cenozoic sedimentary rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scarborough, Robert Bryan; Wilt, Jan Carol

    1979-01-01

    This study focuses attention on Cenozoic sedimentary rocks in the Basin and Range Province of Arizona. The known occurrences of uranium and anomalous radioactivity in these rocks are associated with sediments that accumulated in a low energy environment characterized by fine-grained clastics, including important tuffaceous materials, and carbonate rocks. Most uranium occurrences, in these rocks appear to be stratabound. Emphasis was placed on those sedimentary materials that pre-date the late Cenozoic Basin and Range disturbance. They are deformed and crop out on pedimented range blocks and along the province interface with the Transition Zone. Three tentative age groups are recognized: Group I - Oligocene, pre-22 m.y., Group II - early Miocene - 22 m.y. - 16 m.y., and Group III - middle Miocene - 16 m.y. to 13--10 m.y. Regionally, these three groups contain both coarse to fine-grained red clastics and low energy lighter colored 'lacustrine' phases. Each of the three groups has been the object of uranium exploration. Group II, the early Miocene strata, embraces the Anderson Mine - Artillery region host rocks and also the New River - Cave Creek early Miocene beds-along the boundary with the Transition Zone. These three groups of rocks have been tectonically deformed to the extent that original basins of deposition cannot yet be reconstructed. However, they were considerably more extensive in size than the late Cenozoic basins the origin of which deformed the former. Group II rocks are judged to be of prime interest because of: (1) the development and preservation of organic matter in varying lithologies, (2) apparent contemporaneity with silicic volcanic centers, (3) influence of Precambrian crystalline rocks, and (4) relative outcrop continuity near the stable Transition Zone. The Transition Zone, especially along its boundary with the Basin and Range Province, needs additional geologic investigation, especially as regards the depositional continuity of Group II sediment s.

  14. Upper Miocene reef complex of Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Pomar, L.

    1988-02-01

    The late Tortonian-Messinian coral reef platform of south Mallorca onlaps a folded middle late Miocene carbonate platform on which progradation of up to 20 km occurs. Vertical sea cliffs (up to 100 m high) superbly show the last 5 km of this progradation and complement the numerous water-well cores from the island interior. The Mallorca reef presents the most complete facies zonation of the Miocene reefs of the western Mediterranean. The reef wall framework is up to 20 m thick and shows (1) erosional reef flat with reef breccia and small corals; (2) spur-and-grove zone with large, massive corals; (3) deep buttresses and pinnacles with terraces of branching corals; and (4) deep reef wall with flat, laminar coral colonies, branching red algae, and Halimeda sands.

  15. Miocene characid fishes from Colombia: evolutionary stasis and extirpation.

    PubMed

    Lundberg, J G; Machado-Allison, A; Kay, R F

    1986-10-10

    Fossil fishes from the Miocene La Venta fauna of the Magdalena River Valley, Colombia, are identified as Colossoma macropomum (Characidae), a living species from the Orinoco and Amazon basins. The fossils document a long and conservative history for a species that is highly specialized for feeding on streamside plants. The phylogenetically advanced position of Colossoma in the subfamily Serrasalminae implies that six related genera and other higher characid taxa originated well before 15 million years ago. This discovery also corroborates neontological evidence for a vicariance event that contributed species from Miocene Orinoco-Amazon faunas to the original Magdalena region fauna. The fossils suggest a formerly diverse Magdalena fauna that has suffered local extinction, perhaps associated with late Cenozoic tectonism. This new evidence may help explain the depauperate nature of the modern Magdalena River. PMID:17746480

  16. Ostracods (Crustacea) and their palaeoenvironmental implication for the Solimões Formation (Late Miocene; Western Amazonia/Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines; Caporaletti, Marco; Piller, Werner E.

    2013-03-01

    Western Amazonia's landscape and biota were shaped by an enormous wetland during the Miocene epoch. Among the most discussed topics of this ecosystem range the question on the transitory influx of marine waters. Inter alia the occurrence of typically brackish water associated ostracods is repeatedly consulted to infer elevated salinities or even marine ingressions. The taxonomical investigation of ostracod faunas derived from the upper part of the Solimões Formation (Eirunepé; W-Brazil) documents a moderately diverse assemblage (19 species). A wealth of freshwater ostracods (mainly Cytheridella, Penthesilenula) was found co-occurring with taxa (chiefly Cyprideis) usually related to marginal marine settings today. The observed faunal compositions as well as constantly very light δ18O- and δ13C-values obtained by measuring both, the freshwater and brackish water ostracod group, refer to entirely freshwater conditions. These results corroborate with previous sedimentological and palaeontological observations, which proposed a fluvial depositional system for this part of western Amazonia during the Late Miocene. We demonstrate that some endemic, “brackish” water ostracods (i.e., Cyprideis) have been effectively adapted to freshwater conditions. Thus, their occurrence is no univocal evidence for the influence of brackish or marine waters in western Amazonia during the Miocene.

  17. Ostracods (Crustacea) and their palaeoenvironmental implication for the Solimões Formation (Late Miocene; Western Amazonia/Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines; Caporaletti, Marco; Piller, Werner E.

    2013-01-01

    Western Amazonia's landscape and biota were shaped by an enormous wetland during the Miocene epoch. Among the most discussed topics of this ecosystem range the question on the transitory influx of marine waters. Inter alia the occurrence of typically brackish water associated ostracods is repeatedly consulted to infer elevated salinities or even marine ingressions. The taxonomical investigation of ostracod faunas derived from the upper part of the Solimões Formation (Eirunepé; W-Brazil) documents a moderately diverse assemblage (19 species). A wealth of freshwater ostracods (mainly Cytheridella, Penthesilenula) was found co-occurring with taxa (chiefly Cyprideis) usually related to marginal marine settings today. The observed faunal compositions as well as constantly very light δ18O- and δ13C-values obtained by measuring both, the freshwater and brackish water ostracod group, refer to entirely freshwater conditions. These results corroborate with previous sedimentological and palaeontological observations, which proposed a fluvial depositional system for this part of western Amazonia during the Late Miocene. We demonstrate that some endemic, “brackish” water ostracods (i.e., Cyprideis) have been effectively adapted to freshwater conditions. Thus, their occurrence is no univocal evidence for the influence of brackish or marine waters in western Amazonia during the Miocene. PMID:26523090

  18. Across the Pacific: Climate Evolution in the Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, L. R.; Wade, B.; Holbourn, A. E.; Leng, M. J.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first high-resolution (3 kyr) astronomically-tuned record of δ18O and δ13C from planktonic foraminifera for the equatorial Pacific Ocean (16.5-13.5 Myr). Our data provides exciting new information on sea surface temperatures and primary productivity changes at the tropics during the middle Miocene at a resolution not achieved in any previous study, which sheds new light on the middle Miocene climatic transition (MMCT) and associated carbon-isotope excursion. Reliable sea surface temperature estimates are crucial to any reconstruction and modelling of past ocean salinity and density, water column stratification, thermohaline circulation, and ice volume. Despite extensive studies of benthic foraminifera, existing planktonic foraminiferal records of this interval are extremely scarce and of low resolution, with samples representing time intervals of 2x105 and 5x105 years. Previous studies have been hindered by the absence of biogenic carbonate (e.g., Leg 199). Consequently the impact of global warming and cooling on tropical surface waters and the propagation of orbital cycles in the Earth System are unknown. In 2009 Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320/321 recovered lower-middle Miocene sediments with high sedimentation rates (30m/myr), continuous recovery, and orbital cyclicity from the east equatorial Pacific Ocean. At Site U1338 planktonic foraminifera are abundant and diverse in the lower and middle Miocene sediments and exceptionally well preserved. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed open pore spaces, little evidence of calcitic overgrowth on the wall surface and in many cases preserved spines (Fox and Wade, in press). We compare our data from Site U1338 to Site 1146 in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, to reconstruct bottom and surface water conditions and changes in ocean dynamics across the equatorial Pacific during this highly complex interval of climate history.

  19. Across the Pacific: Climate Evolution in the Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Lyndsey; Wade, Bridget; Holbourn, Ann; Leng, Melanie

    2014-05-01

    We present the first high-resolution (3 kyr) astronomically-tuned record of δ18O and δ13C from planktonic foraminifera for the equatorial Pacific Ocean (16.5-13.5 Myr). Our data provides exciting new information on sea surface temperatures and primary productivity changes at the tropics during the middle Miocene at a resolution not achieved in any previous study, which sheds new light on the middle Miocene climatic transition (MMCT) and associated carbon-isotope excursion. Reliable sea surface temperature estimates are crucial to any reconstruction and modelling of past ocean salinity and density, water column stratification, thermohaline circulation, and ice volume. Despite extensive studies of benthic foraminifera, existing planktonic foraminiferal records of this interval are extremely scarce and of low resolution, with samples representing time intervals of 2x105and 5x105 years. Previous studies have been hindered by the absence of biogenic carbonate (e.g., Leg 199). Consequently the impact of global warming and cooling on tropical surface waters and the propagation of orbital cycles in the Earth System are unknown. In 2009 Integrated Ocean Drilling Program Expedition 320/321 recovered lower-middle Miocene sediments with high sedimentation rates (30m/myr), continuous recovery, and orbital cyclicity from the east equatorial Pacific Ocean. At Site U1338 planktonic foraminifera are abundant and diverse in the lower and middle Miocene sediments and exceptionally well preserved. Scanning electron microscope studies revealed open pore spaces, little evidence of calcitic overgrowth on the wall surface and in many cases preserved spines (Fox and Wade, 2013). We compare our data from Site U1338 to Site 1146 in the western equatorial Pacific Ocean, to reconstruct bottom and surface water conditions and changes in ocean dynamics across the equatorial Pacific during this highly complex interval of climate history.

  20. Pre-transform early Miocene extension in western California

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, M.E. )

    1989-09-01

    Earliest Miocene (20-24 Ma) faulting and volcanism were widespread in western California, including the San Joaquin-La Honda basin, Coast Ranges, and Transverse Ranges. Evidence for strike slip on faults of this age is lacing. Their arrangement on a pre-San Andreas restoration suggest continuity with early Miocene extended terranes in eastern California and southwestern Arizona. Deformation was probably not an effect of transform or triple-junction-migration tectonics, because it was synchronous over 300 km of latitude and there is no direct evidence for a transform boundary until late in early Miocene time. Magnetic anomalies in the eastern Pacific permit an interpretation that a spreading ridge supplied a still-active subduction zone with young oceanic crust until sometime after 20 Ma. If so, extension evidently took place in an arc-related setting. A transform regime probably formed about 18 Ma, when most basins underwent episodes of deepening or uplift, strike-slip faults became active, and rotation of the western Transverse Ranges block began.

  1. Early Miocene elevation in northern Tibet estimated by palaeobotanical evidence.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Cheng-Sen; Yang, Jian; Li, Jin-Feng; Li, Ye-Liang; Deng, Tao; Wang, Shi-Qi; Zhao, Min; Spicer, Robert A; Ferguson, David K; Mehrotra, Rakesh C

    2015-01-01

    The area and elevation of the Tibetan Plateau over time has directly affected Asia's topography, the characteristics of the Asian monsoon, and modified global climate, but in ways that are poorly understood. Charting the uplift history is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that link elevation and climate irrespective of time and place. While some palaeoelevation data are available for southern and central Tibet, clues to the uplift history of northern Tibet remain sparse and largely circumstantial. Leaf fossils are extremely rare in Tibet but here we report a newly discovered early Miocene barberry (Berberis) from Wudaoliang in the Hoh-Xil Basin in northern Tibet, at a present altitude of 4611 ± 9 m. Considering the fossil and its nearest living species probably occupied a similar or identical environmental niche, the palaeoelevation of the fossil locality, corrected for Miocene global temperature difference, is estimated to have been between 1395 and 2931 m, which means this basin has been uplifted ~2-3 km in the last 17 million years. Our findings contradict hypotheses that suggest northern Tibet had reached or exceeded its present elevation prior to the Miocene. PMID:25976244

  2. Miocene Oaks from Eastern Zhejiang, China and their Paleoenvironmental Significance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Hui; Ferguson, David

    2015-04-01

    The intertrappean fluvial-lacustrine beds belonging to the Upper Miocene Shengxian Formation in eastern China contain many exquisitely preserved plant fossils, e.g., leaves, fruits and seeds as well as plentiful pollen. The Fagaceae is the dominant taxon represented by 5 genera and 15 species, four of which belong to Quercus subgenus Cyclobalanopsis. Quercus species (oaks) are highly sensitive to environmental changes. The correlation between climate and trichome base density of Quercus glauca and Quercus delavayi of subg. Cyclobalanopsis, which are the NLRs of two fossil species, Quercus paraglauca and Quercus aff. delavayi, indicates that the trichome base density of Quercus glauca is comprehensively affected by various climate factors, but most influenced by solar radiation and latitude. The trichome base parametrics of Quercus paraglauca and the comparison of epidermal cell characteristics between Quercus paraglauca and Quercus aff. delavayi and their NLR species of subg. Cyclobalanopsis, show that the climate was warmer and more humid in the late Miocene than that of today in eastern Zhejiang, China. A study of the stomatal index of Quercus glauca and Quercus delavayi, collected in different years, demonstrates that they are very sensitive to the variation of atmospheric CO2 concentration. By comparing the stomatal ratio between the two fossil species and their NLRs, the paleoatmospheric CO2 concentration in the late Miocene is reconstructed as ca. 400 ppmv, i.e. higher than the present natural CO2 concentration eliminating the industrial influence.

  3. New Miocene Fossils and the History of Penguins in Australia.

    PubMed

    Park, Travis; Fitzgerald, Erich M G; Gallagher, Stephen J; Tomkins, Ellyn; Allan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Australia has a fossil record of penguins reaching back to the Eocene, yet today is inhabited by just one breeding species, the little penguin Eudyptula minor. The description of recently collected penguin fossils from the re-dated upper Miocene Port Campbell Limestone of Portland (Victoria), in addition to reanalysis of previously described material, has allowed the Cenozoic history of penguins in Australia to be placed into a global context for the first time. Australian pre-Quaternary fossil penguins represent stem taxa phylogenetically disparate from each other and E. minor, implying multiple dispersals and extinctions. Late Eocene penguins from Australia are closest to contemporaneous taxa in Antarctica, New Zealand and South America. Given current material, the Miocene Australian fossil penguin fauna is apparently unique in harbouring 'giant penguins' after they went extinct elsewhere; and including stem taxa until at least 6 Ma, by which time crown penguins dominated elsewhere in the southern hemisphere. Separation of Australia from Antarctica during the Palaeogene, and its subsequent drift north, appears to have been a major event in Australian penguin biogeography. Increasing isolation through the Cenozoic may have limited penguin dispersal to Australia from outside the Australasian region, until intensification of the eastwards-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the mid-Miocene established a potential new dispersal vector to Australia. PMID:27115739

  4. Early Miocene elevation in northern Tibet estimated by palaeobotanical evidence

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bin; Wang, Yu-Fei; Li, Cheng-Sen; Yang, Jian; Li, Jin-Feng; Li, Ye-Liang; Deng, Tao; Wang, Shi-Qi; Zhao, Min; Spicer, Robert A.; Ferguson, David K.; Mehrotra, Rakesh C.

    2015-01-01

    The area and elevation of the Tibetan Plateau over time has directly affected Asia’s topography, the characteristics of the Asian monsoon, and modified global climate, but in ways that are poorly understood. Charting the uplift history is crucial for understanding the mechanisms that link elevation and climate irrespective of time and place. While some palaeoelevation data are available for southern and central Tibet, clues to the uplift history of northern Tibet remain sparse and largely circumstantial. Leaf fossils are extremely rare in Tibet but here we report a newly discovered early Miocene barberry (Berberis) from Wudaoliang in the Hoh-Xil Basin in northern Tibet, at a present altitude of 4611 ± 9 m. Considering the fossil and its nearest living species probably occupied a similar or identical environmental niche, the palaeoelevation of the fossil locality, corrected for Miocene global temperature difference, is estimated to have been between 1395 and 2931 m, which means this basin has been uplifted ~2–3 km in the last 17 million years. Our findings contradict hypotheses that suggest northern Tibet had reached or exceeded its present elevation prior to the Miocene. PMID:25976244

  5. New Miocene Fossils and the History of Penguins in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Travis; Fitzgerald, Erich M. G.; Gallagher, Stephen J.; Tomkins, Ellyn; Allan, Tony

    2016-01-01

    Australia has a fossil record of penguins reaching back to the Eocene, yet today is inhabited by just one breeding species, the little penguin Eudyptula minor. The description of recently collected penguin fossils from the re-dated upper Miocene Port Campbell Limestone of Portland (Victoria), in addition to reanalysis of previously described material, has allowed the Cenozoic history of penguins in Australia to be placed into a global context for the first time. Australian pre-Quaternary fossil penguins represent stem taxa phylogenetically disparate from each other and E. minor, implying multiple dispersals and extinctions. Late Eocene penguins from Australia are closest to contemporaneous taxa in Antarctica, New Zealand and South America. Given current material, the Miocene Australian fossil penguin fauna is apparently unique in harbouring ‘giant penguins’ after they went extinct elsewhere; and including stem taxa until at least 6 Ma, by which time crown penguins dominated elsewhere in the southern hemisphere. Separation of Australia from Antarctica during the Palaeogene, and its subsequent drift north, appears to have been a major event in Australian penguin biogeography. Increasing isolation through the Cenozoic may have limited penguin dispersal to Australia from outside the Australasian region, until intensification of the eastwards-flowing Antarctic Circumpolar Current in the mid-Miocene established a potential new dispersal vector to Australia. PMID:27115739

  6. Miocene reef platforms from northwestern Tuamotu Islands, central Pacific

    SciTech Connect

    Montaggioni, L.F.; Mnhn-Ephe, A.

    1988-02-01

    Reef deposits of Miocene age occur on several northwestern Tuamotu atolls as either pointed residual and scattered reliefs through the Holocene reef sequence (Mataiva, Rangiroa, Tikehau, Kaukura) or elevated atoll-shaped platforms (Makatea). Throughout the region considered, the depositional/diagenetic history of Miocene reefs can be reconstructed as follows. During early Miocene times (e-f range-biozones), reef platforms developed on top of older carbonate banks, capping a midplate volcanic ridge of early Tertiary age. More than 100 m thick, these platforms displayed concentrically zoned environments of deposition: a peripheral subemergent rim composed of coralgalforaminiferal boundstones, and a very shallow central area in which foraminiferal and molluscan fine sands and muds were subhorizontally deposited. Local evidence of internal unconformity surfaces and subaerially produced features indicates that periods of relative emergency occurred as the reef piles grew upward. The ultimate stage of platform development is believed to have been a complete upfilling of the back-reef areas and subsequent emergence. Correlatively, a freshwater lens would have been formed close to the surface level of each of the so-formed islands. Dolomitization may have been initiated in the marine water/freshwater phreatic mixing zone. During lowstands, severe meteoric alteration affected emergent carbonate deposits, forming incipient cavity systems; the usual atoll morphology is considered to have been initiated at this time (presumably middle Micoene).

  7. Miocene Global Carbon Isotope Shifts and Marine Biological Productivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diester-Haass, L.; Billups, K.

    2005-12-01

    The Miocene contains two major global carbon isotope shifts: a negative shift during the late Miocene (~8-6 Ma) and a positive shift during the mid-Miocene (16-14 Ma). We aim at deciphering possible changes in marine biological export productivity during these shifts by calculating paleoproductivity in gC/cm*ky from benthic foraminiferal numbers and accumulation rates at a number of sites spanning the world oceans. Our previous work has illustrated that the onset of the late Miocene negative d 13C shift, which has been attributed to enhanced erosion of terrestrial biomass and expansion of C4 plants, is also accompanied by an increase in marine export productivity from lower than present day values up to 2-3 times modern values at six sites (982, 1088, 721, 846, 1146, 1172; Diester-Haass et al, in press; Diester-Haass et al., in preparation). The Mid-Miocene 'Monterey Event', on the other hand, has been attributed to sequestration of organic material in circum-Pacific basins (Vincent and Berger, 1985) or wide spread deposition of brown coal and drowning of carbonate platforms (Föllmi et al., 2005) . For this particular time interval, our initial results from Site 608 (Atlantic Ocean) reveal relatively constant paleoproductivity values similar to modern ones ( about 10 gC/cm*ky) until 16.5 Ma, after which time paleoproductivity begins to increase until the end of our record at 11 Ma. Superimposed on the trend of generally increasing productivity, there are a number of productivity minima spaced roughly 0.5 million years apart. The long term trend in the paleoproductivity finds some similarities in the global composite benthic foraminiferal d 13C record as both proxies show an overall increase until ~14 Ma. Thereafter, however, paleoproductivity continues to increase while d 13C values decrease marking the end of the Monterey excursion. Stable isotope analyses from these same intervals will show to what extend the smaller scale fluctuations in paleoproductivity can be related to changes in the d13C of the oceanic reservoir or regional water masses. Diester-Haass, L., Billups, K., Emeis, K-C., 2005, Paleoceanography, in press. Vincent, E. and Berger, W., 1985, In: The carbon cycle and atmospheric CO2: Natural variations Archaen to present, edited by Sunquist, E.T. and Broecker, W.S., Am.Geophys. Union Monogr. 32,455-468 Föllmi, K.B. et al., 2005, Geol.Soc.Am.Bull., 117/5, 589-619.

  8. Regional geological framework and petroleum geology of Miocene sandstones in coastal and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Mancini, E.A.; Bearden, B.L.; Mink, R.M.

    1987-05-01

    The Miocene natural gas trend of coastal and offshore Alabama is part of the regional Miocene oil and gas trend of the Gulf coastal area that extends from Texas into Alabama. The major Miocene productive area in Alabama is in southern Baldwin County and Mobile Bay. Since the discovery of Miocene gas in 1979, 28 natural gas fields have been established in coastal and offshore Alabama. The Miocene sandstones range in thickness from 10 to 200 ft, are very fine to coarse grained, are quartz rich, and have subangular to rounded and moderately to well-sorted quartz grains. The productive Miocene interval overlies upper Oligocene marine shelf deposits (Chickasawhay Limestone) and is overlain by Miocene fluvial clastics. The Miocene sandstones, which include the Amos, Escambia, Luce, and Meyer, are interpreted to represent a marine shelf-deltaic complex. A Miocene delta system prograded from the west in the area of offshore Louisiana-Mississippi into coastal and offshore Alabama. Reservoirs and potential reservoirs include highly constructive and highly destructive deltaic and marine shelf sandstones. Porosity in these sandstones is primary intergranular and generally ranges from 27 to 35%. Permeabilities may exceed 2000 md. Basinal Miocene marine clays and Oligocene marls are the probable petroleum source rocks. Petroleum traps are principally stratigraphic, typically involving lateral sandstone pinch-outs against regional dip. Seismic reflection is an excellent exploration tool for identifying potential Miocene fields. Miocene gas sands are best delineated with relative-amplitude seismic reflection data on which gas-charged sands are apparent as bright spots.

  9. Separation of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside from hawthorn leaves extracts using macroporous resins.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongjuan; Liu, Ying; Jin, Haizhu; Liu, Sujing; Fang, Shengtao; Wang, Chunhua; Xia, Chuanhai

    2015-12-15

    Vitexin-4″-O-glucoside and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside are the major flavonoids of hawthorn leaves. In this work, the adsorption and desorption characteristics of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside on seven macroporous resins were evaluated. Among the tested resins, the HPD-400 resin showed the best adsorption and desorption capacities. Adsorption isotherms were constructed for the HPD-400 resin and well fitted to Langmuir and Freundlich models. Dynamic adsorption and desorption tests were performed on column packed with the HPD-400 resin to optimize the chromatographic parameters. After one run treatment with the HPD-400 resin, the contents of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside in the product were increased 8.44-fold and 8.43-fold from 0.720% and 2.63% to 6.08% and 22.2% with recovery yields of 79.1% and 81.2%, respectively. These results show that the developed method is a promising basis for the large-scale purification of vitexin-4″-O-glucoside and vitexin-2″-O-rhamnoside from hawthorn leaves and other plant materials. PMID:26562804

  10. Transitional directions from Early Miocene Lavas at Samothraki Island, N. Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kondopoulou, Despina; Valet, Jean-Pierre; Zananiri, Irene; Voidomatis, Philippos

    2014-05-01

    The North Hellenic orogen was formed at the expenses of the Variscan and Jurassic oceanic crust, preserved in scattered ophiolitic massifs. Strong post-orogenic extension with coeval emplacement of granodioritic plutons, deposition of clastic sediments and calc-alkaline volcanism appeared from the Middle-Late Eocene to the Middle Miocene. These widespread Tertiary volcanic products, outcropping also in north and central Aegean, have been extensively studied as far as their emplacement conditions are concerned. In parallel, they have been the object of several palaeomagnetic studies, all consistently indicating a general pattern of clockwise rotations. The island of Samothraki belongs to the Circum-Rhodope Zone, a series of Triassic-Jurassic continental margin sedimentary and volcanic rocks that surround the crystalline Serbo-Macedonian and Rhodope Massifs. The geochronological data, along with the morphology and the eruption mode of the Samothraki Tertiary volcanic rocks, allow a division into three groups, namely the "old", the "intermediate" and the "young" ones. Several radiometric ages have been assigned to the three groups, spanning from 25 to 19 Ma. Isotope and trace-element modeling do not favor a continuous evolution of these magmas. The major granitic and volcanic formations of the island have been subjected to paleomagnetic studies. The results revealed a complex pattern with coexisting straightforward directions and puzzling ones, only within the younger lavas, mostly domes. These samples are characterized by a medium temperature component with an eastward declination and a positive inclination and a high temperature one with a negative inclination. Experiments of absolute paleointensity have been conducted on twenty-eight samples from 3 separate domes with ages between 22-19 Ma using a modified Thellier technique with very narrow 4°C to 10°C temperature steps between 500°C and 595°C. The results indicate significantly low field values at two sites. The presence of low paleointensities combined with intermediate directions suggest that they recorded a transitional field state. Interestingly, similar directions were obtained in miocene volcanics from the nearby island of Lemnos as well as from the mainland Thrace area. A further study of these formations will hopefully improve our knowledge of the field behavior in Early Miocene.

  11. Biofacies zonation of middle Miocene benthic foraminifera, southeastern San Joaquin basin, California

    SciTech Connect

    Olson, H.C.

    1987-05-01

    The quantitative distribution of benthic foraminifera across the middle Miocene margin of the southeastern San Joaquin basin constitutes a useful tool in applying benthic biofacies zonation to the interpretation of marine paleoenvironments. A middle Miocene transect (near the Luisian/Relizian boundary) was completed across the margin of the southeastern San Joaquin basin near Bakersfild, California. Surface and subsurface fauna encompass strandline through bathyal environments. Quantitative analyses of these fauna result in a useful biofacies zonation for the middle Miocene which can be applied to the interpretation of middle Miocene paleobathymetric and paleogeographic reconstructions, basin analysis, and subsidence histories of the San Joaquin basin. In addition, these data suggest that vertical faunal migration of continental slope fauna has occurred between the middle Miocene and Recent. During the early and middle Miocene, marine temperatures were warmer than today and lower latitudinal gradients prevailed. Stepwise climatic cooling since the middle Miocene has been accompanied by the latitudinal adjustment of surface isotherms, strengthening of the permanent thermocline, and the associated migration of temperature-sensitive planktonic and benthic biofacies. Sedimentologic and seismic evidence in the southeastern San Joaquin basin suggests that present-day lower bathyal biofacies may have been at shallower depths during the middle Miocene. Such migrations would have a significant impact on paleoenvironmental interpretations. Middle Miocene faunal transects from the southeastern San Joaquin basin are compared with equivalent Holocene transects from the eastern Pacific, and differences are discussed in light of this proposal.

  12. The genus Macroteleia Westwood in Middle Miocene amber from Peru (Hymenoptera, Platygastridae s.l., Scelioninae).

    PubMed

    Perrichot, Vincent; Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Flynn, John J; Engel, Michael S

    2014-01-01

    A new species of the scelionine genus Macroteleia Westwood (Platygastridae s.l., Scelioninae) is described and figured from a female beautifully preserved in Middle Miocene amber from Peru. Macroteleia yaguarum Perrichot & Engel, sp. n., shows a unique combination of characters otherwise seen independently within its congeners. It is most similar to the modern M. surfacei Brues, but differs from it by the non-foveolate notauli, the contiguous punctures of the vertex, and the continuous propodeum. The new species is the first New World fossil of the genus, suggesting a Cretaceous origin for the group and a relatively old age of the South American, tropical African, and Australian faunas, and a younger age of the modern Holarctic faunas. PMID:25147461

  13. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene.

    PubMed

    Bolton, Clara T; Hernández-Sánchez, María T; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone ɛp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity. PMID:26762469

  14. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolton, Clara T.; Hernández-Sánchez, María T.; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone εp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity.

  15. Decrease in coccolithophore calcification and CO2 since the middle Miocene

    PubMed Central

    Bolton, Clara T.; Hernández-Sánchez, María T.; Fuertes, Miguel-Ángel; González-Lemos, Saúl; Abrevaya, Lorena; Mendez-Vicente, Ana; Flores, José-Abel; Probert, Ian; Giosan, Liviu; Johnson, Joel; Stoll, Heather M.

    2016-01-01

    Marine algae are instrumental in carbon cycling and atmospheric carbon dioxide (CO2) regulation. One group, coccolithophores, uses carbon to photosynthesize and to calcify, covering their cells with chalk platelets (coccoliths). How ocean acidification influences coccolithophore calcification is strongly debated, and the effects of carbonate chemistry changes in the geological past are poorly understood. This paper relates degree of coccolith calcification to cellular calcification, and presents the first records of size-normalized coccolith thickness spanning the last 14 Myr from tropical oceans. Degree of calcification was highest in the low-pH, high-CO2 Miocene ocean, but decreased significantly between 6 and 4 Myr ago. Based on this and concurrent trends in a new alkenone ɛp record, we propose that decreasing CO2 partly drove the observed trend via reduced cellular bicarbonate allocation to calcification. This trend reversed in the late Pleistocene despite low CO2, suggesting an additional regulator of calcification such as alkalinity. PMID:26762469

  16. Life-History Traits of the Miocene Hipparion concudense (Spain) Inferred from Bone Histological Structure

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Alberdi, Maria Teresa; Nieto-Diaz, Manuel; Prado, José Luis

    2014-01-01

    Histological analyses of fossil bones have provided clues on the growth patterns and life history traits of several extinct vertebrates that would be unavailable for classical morphological studies. We analyzed the bone histology of Hipparion to infer features of its life history traits and growth pattern. Microscope analysis of thin sections of a large sample of humeri, femora, tibiae and metapodials of Hipparion concudense from the upper Miocene site of Los Valles de Fuentidueña (Segovia, Spain) has shown that the number of growth marks is similar among the different limb bones, suggesting that equivalent skeletochronological inferences for this Hipparion population might be achieved by means of any of the elements studied. Considering their abundance, we conducted a skeletechronological study based on the large sample of third metapodials from Los Valles de Fuentidueña together with another large sample from the Upper Miocene locality of Concud (Teruel, Spain). The data obtained enabled us to distinguish four age groups in both samples and to determine that Hipparion concudense tended to reach skeletal maturity during its third year of life. Integration of bone microstructure and skeletochronological data allowed us to identify ontogenetic changes in bone structure and growth rate and to distinguish three histologic ontogenetic stages corresponding to immature, subadult and adult individuals. Data on secondary osteon density revealed an increase in bone remodeling throughout the ontogenetic stages and a lesser degree thereof in the Concud population, which indicates different biomechanical stresses in the two populations, likely due to environmental differences. Several individuals showed atypical growth patterns in the Concud sample, which may also reflect environmental differences between the two localities. Finally, classification of the specimens’ age within groups enabled us to characterize the age structure of both samples, which is typical of attritional assemblages. PMID:25098950

  17. Ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn lowers serum cholesterol in mice by inhibiting transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase via nuclear factor-kappa B signal pathway.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hai-Jie; Luo, Xue-Gang; Dong, Qing-Qing; Mu, Ai; Shi, Guo-Long; Wang, Qiu-Tong; Chen, Xiao-Ying; Zhou, Hao; Zhang, Tong-Cun; Pan, Li-Wen

    2016-03-01

    Hawthorn is a berry-like fruit from the species of Crataegus. In China, it has another more famous name, Shan-Zha, which has been used to improve digestion as a traditional Chinese medicine or food for thousands of years. Moreover, during the last decades, hawthorn has received more attention because of its potential to treat cardiovascular diseases. However, currently, only fruits of C. pinnatifida and C. pinnatifida var. major are included as Shan-Zha in the Chinese Pharmacopoeia. In this study, our results showed that the ethanol extract of Zhongtian hawthorn, a novel grafted cultivar of C. cuneata (wild Shan-Zha), could markedly reduce body weight and levels of serum total cholesterol, triglyceride, low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and liver cholesterol of hyperlipidemia mice. It could suppress the stimulation effect of high-fat diet on the transcription of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase (HMGCR) and p65, and counteract the downregulation of CYP7A1 and LDLR. In addition, the results of luciferase reporter assay and Western blot showed that the transcriptional activity of HMGCR promoter was inhibited by Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract in a dose-dependent manner, while overexpression of p65 could reverse this transcriptional repression effect. These results suggested that Zhongtian hawthorn could provide health benefits by counteracting the high-fat diet-induced hypercholesteolemic and hyperlipidemic effects in vivo, and the mechanism underlying this event was mainly dependent on the suppressive effect of Zhongtian hawthorn ethanol extract on the transcription of HMGCR via nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signal pathway. Therefore, this novel cultivar of hawthorn cultivar which has much bigger fruits, early bearing, high yield, cold resistance, and drought resistance, might be considered as a good alternative to Shan-Zha and has great value in the food and medicine industry. In addition, to our best knowledge, this is also the first report that the extract of Crataegus could suppress the transcription of HMGCR via NF-κB signal pathway. PMID:26825354

  18. Sedimentary fabric analyses of two Miocene coals from NW Taiwan

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, L.L.

    1994-12-31

    Coal is very sensitive to the environmental temperature and pressure changes during coalification. Reflectance indicatrix of vitrinite had been proved to be able to indicate those environmental conditions. In addition, characteristics of maceral types such as their composition and arrangements can further provide some insight about the stratigraphic sequence, tectonic stress, metamorphic maturity, and burial history of their sedimentary environment. Two of the major Miocene coal-bearing formations in Taiwan, i.e., the Nanchuang and the Shihti Formations, are well-developed and outcrop in the northwestern part of Taiwan. They had been subjected to several periods of orogenic disturbances so that the geologic structures are complicated with the occurrence of large scale faults and intensive folds. Igneous activities are expected to further increase the rank of coal and resulting the rearrangements the aromatic micelles in coal. Coal and coal-bearing sedimentary rock samples, mostly from Miocene Nanchuang and Shihti Formations,were collected between Taipei and Miaoli, on the northwestern part of the Western Foothill Belt of Taiwan. Sedimentary fabric analyses were then performed by using a Galai Scan-array 2 image analyzing software equipped with a CCD camera, a TV monitor, a 486 PC and a reflecto-refractive polarized microscope. The particle size (maximum feret diameter), aspect ratio (or sphericity), shape factor (or roundness) and special linear orientation of sporinites were studied. Statistically significant results were analyzed and compared among different sampling sites and stratigraphic formations. A synthetic conclusion concerning the burial history during and after Miocene were thus derived.

  19. Miocene Vetigastropoda and Neritimorpha (Mollusca, Gastropoda) of central Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nielsen, Sven N.; Frassinetti, Daniel; Bandel, Klaus

    2004-09-01

    Species of Vetigastropoda (Fissurellidae, Turbinidae, Trochidae) and one species of Neritimorpha (Neritidae) from the Navidad area, south of Valparaı´so, and the Arauco Peninsula, south of Concepción, are described. Among these, the Fissurellidae comprise Diodora fragilis n. sp., Diodora pupuyana n. sp., two additional unnamed species of Diodora, and a species resembling Fissurellidea. Turbinidae are represented by Cantrainea sp., and Trochidae include Tegula (Chlorostoma) austropacifica n. sp., Tegula (Chlorostoma) chilena n. sp., Tegula (Chlorostoma) matanzensis n. sp., Tegula (Agathistoma) antiqua n. sp., Bathybembix mcleani n. sp., Gibbula poeppigii [Philippi, 1887] n. comb., Diloma miocenica n. sp., Fagnastesia venefica [Philippi, 1887] n. gen. n. comb., Fagnastesia matanzana n. gen. n. sp., Calliostoma mapucherum n. sp., Calliostoma kleppi n. sp., Calliostoma covacevichi n. sp., Astele laevis [Sowerby, 1846] n. comb., and Monilea riorapelensis n. sp. The Neritidae are represented by Nerita (Heminerita) chilensis [Philippi, 1887]. The new genus Fagnastesia is introduced to represent low-spired trochoideans with a sculpture of nodes below the suture, angulated whorls, and a wide umbilicus. This Miocene Chilean fauna includes genera that have lived at the coast and in shallow, relatively warm water or deeper, much cooler water. This composition therefore suggests that many of the Miocene formations along the central Chilean coast consist of displaced sediments. A comparison with different fossil and Recent faunas from around the Pacific and South America indicates that the vetigastropod and neritid fauna from the Miocene of Chile has only minor affinities with taxa living near New Zealand, Argentina, and the tropical eastern Pacific at that time.

  20. Multiple Miocene Melastomataceae dispersal between Madagascar, Africa and India.

    PubMed

    Renner, Susanne S

    2004-10-29

    Melastomataceae sensu stricto (excluding Memecylaceae) comprise some 3000 species in the neotropics, 1000 in Asia, 240 in Africa, and 230 in Madagascar. Previous family-wide morphological and DNA analyses have shown that the Madagascan species belong to at least three unrelated lineages, which were hypothesized to have arrived by trans-oceanic dispersal. An alternative hypothesis posits that the ancestors of Madagascan, as well as Indian, Melastomataceae arrived from Africa in the Late Cretaceous. This study tests these hypotheses in a Bayesian framework, using three combined sequence datasets analysed under a relaxed clock and simultaneously calibrated with fossils, some not previously used. The new fossil calibration comes from a re-dated possibly Middle or Upper Eocene Brazilian fossil of Melastomeae. Tectonic events were also tentatively used as constraints because of concerns that some of the family's fossils are difficult to assign to nodes in the phylogeny. Regardless of how the data were calibrated, the estimated divergence times of Madagascan and Indian lineages were too young for Cretaceous explanations to hold. This was true even of the oldest ages within the 95% credibility interval around each estimate. Madagascar's Melastomeae appear to have arrived from Africa during the Miocene. Medinilla, with some 70 species in Madagascar and two in Africa, too, arrived during the Miocene, but from Asia. Gravesia, with 100 species in Madagascar and four in east and west Africa, also appears to date to the Miocene, but its monophyly has not been tested. The study afforded an opportunity to compare divergence time estimates obtained earlier with strict clocks and single calibrations, with estimates based on relaxed clocks and different multiple calibrations and taxon sampling. PMID:15519967

  1. Multiple Miocene Melastomataceae dispersal between Madagascar, Africa and India.

    PubMed Central

    Renner, Susanne S

    2004-01-01

    Melastomataceae sensu stricto (excluding Memecylaceae) comprise some 3000 species in the neotropics, 1000 in Asia, 240 in Africa, and 230 in Madagascar. Previous family-wide morphological and DNA analyses have shown that the Madagascan species belong to at least three unrelated lineages, which were hypothesized to have arrived by trans-oceanic dispersal. An alternative hypothesis posits that the ancestors of Madagascan, as well as Indian, Melastomataceae arrived from Africa in the Late Cretaceous. This study tests these hypotheses in a Bayesian framework, using three combined sequence datasets analysed under a relaxed clock and simultaneously calibrated with fossils, some not previously used. The new fossil calibration comes from a re-dated possibly Middle or Upper Eocene Brazilian fossil of Melastomeae. Tectonic events were also tentatively used as constraints because of concerns that some of the family's fossils are difficult to assign to nodes in the phylogeny. Regardless of how the data were calibrated, the estimated divergence times of Madagascan and Indian lineages were too young for Cretaceous explanations to hold. This was true even of the oldest ages within the 95% credibility interval around each estimate. Madagascar's Melastomeae appear to have arrived from Africa during the Miocene. Medinilla, with some 70 species in Madagascar and two in Africa, too, arrived during the Miocene, but from Asia. Gravesia, with 100 species in Madagascar and four in east and west Africa, also appears to date to the Miocene, but its monophyly has not been tested. The study afforded an opportunity to compare divergence time estimates obtained earlier with strict clocks and single calibrations, with estimates based on relaxed clocks and different multiple calibrations and taxon sampling. PMID:15519967

  2. Middle Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montes, C.; Cardona, A.

    2014-12-01

    The final closure of the Panama Isthmus and permanent separation of Caribbean and Pacific waters is thought to have modified their salinity, faunistic assemblages, and ultimately, ocean circulation patterns and global climate. The Great American Biotic Interchange (GABI) is thought to have been the result of Plio-Pleistocene closure of the Isthmus that allowed land animals to massively cross the Isthmus. Similarly, the separation of Caribbean and Pacific waters by a rising Isthmus is thougth to be a prime example of vicariance. The role of Isthmus closure on global changes, however, remains controversial due in part to the difficulty of establishing a precise chronology of seaway closure. While timing of glaciation is well established, new data on the chronology of Isthmus emergence suggests that the process of closure is more complex, long, and old than previously thought. We sampled fluvial and shallow marine strata in northwesternmost South America to recover zircon grains for provenance analyses in the immediate vicinity of the docking site. Because the ages of magmatic provinces in northwestern South America and the Panama Isthmus are mutually exclusive, detrital zircon analyses provides a tool to evaluate land connections. We found that an uniquely Panamanian, 40-45 Ma (early Lutetian) detrital zircon fingerprint is abundant in middle Miocene strata, but absent in underlying lower Miocene and Oligocene strata of the northern Andes. This fingerprint represents the beginning of fluvial detrital exchange between the Panama arc and South America, and therefore marks the time of docking and the end of deep-water, and probably shallow-water connections by middle Miocene times.

  3. Paleoceanographic implications of Miocene deep-sea hiatuses.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Keller, G.; Barron, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    Miocene paleoceanographic evolution exhibits major changes resulting from the opening and closing of passages, the subsequent changes in oceanic circulation, and development of major Antarctic glaciation. The consequences and timing of these events can be observed in variations in the distribution of deep-sea hiatuses, sedimentation patterns, and biogeographic distribution of planktic organisms. The main aspects of the present oceanic circulation system and sediment distribution pattern were established by 13.5 to 12.5 Ma (hiatus NH 3), coincident with the establishment of a major East Antarctic ice cap. -from Authors

  4. Early Miocene mylonitization and detachment faulting, South Mountains, central Arizona

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.J.; Shafiqullah, M.; Damon, P.E.; DeWitt, E.

    1986-04-01

    The South Mountains of central Arizona are one of the geologically simplest metamorphic core complexes of the North American Cordillera. An early Miocene age of mylonitization is indicated by crosscutting relationships between mylonitic fabric and a composite pluton dated at 22-25 Ma by Rb-Sr, U-Th-Pb, and K-Ar techniques. The kinematic agreement and close temporal association of mylonitization and detachment faulting support models in which the two processes are related to an evolving crustal shear zone that accommodated mid-Tertiary continental extension. 19 references, 3 figures, 2 tables.

  5. Miocene phosphate-rich sediments in Salento (southern Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föllmi, Karl B.; Hofmann, Hélène; Chiaradia, Massimo; de Kaenel, Eric; Frijia, Gianluca; Parente, Mariano

    2015-08-01

    The upper Middle to lower Upper Miocene (Serravallian to Tortonian) sedimentary succession in Salento (southern Italy) includes glauconite- and phosphate-rich deposits, which are associated with pelagic micrite. In Baia del Ciolo and Marittima (southern Salento), the succession is composed of shallow-water platform carbonates of Late Oligocene age (Chattian; Porto Badisco Formation), which are overlain by a 20- to 30-cm-thick level of glauconite-rich micrite with abundant reworked particles and fossils of the underlying Porto Badisco Formation. This interval is in turn covered by an up to 15 cm thick phosphatic crust ("Livello ad Aturia"), which itself is overlain either by a hemipelagic chalk-like carbonate of Middle to Late Miocene age ("Pietra Leccese"; Marittima) or directly by a micrite of Late Miocene age (Messinian; Novaglie Formation; Baia del Ciolo), which shallows upwards into a shallow-water platform carbonate. A large hiatus is present in this succession, which likely includes the Lower and lower Middle Miocene. In the region of Lecce, two discrete levels enriched in glauconite and phosphate-each associated with a major discontinuity-occur within the Pietra Leccese. The strontium-isotope ages derived on phosphate nodules and phosphatized and non-phosphatized fossils and calcareous nannofossil ages indicate a time interval of phosphogenesis between 13.5 and 7.5 Ma, with two clusters at 12 and 10.5 Ma. The glauconite and phosphate-rich sediments resulted from a current-dominated regime, which was characterized by low overall sedimentation rates, erosion and sediment reworking, and authigenesis. This regime was likely related to a generally westward-directed bottom current, which was forced to upwell once it arrived at the western border of the eastern Mediterranean basin. The timing of the principal phosphogenic phases can only partly be correlated to those of other occurrences in this part of the Mediterranean (Malta, Gozo, southern Sicily, Matese, Latium-Abruzzi platform). The partial diachrony in phosphogenesis may express the effect of lateral switching in and/or focusing of upwelling zones.

  6. The beaver Anchitheriomys from the Miocene of Central Europe

    SciTech Connect

    Stefen, C.; Mors, T.

    2008-09-15

    New finds of teeth and mandibles of Anchitheriomys from the Hambach opencast lignite mine in Northwest Germany and the first detailed descriptions of other mandibles from South Germany and Switzerland allow a review of the Central European specimens of this rare beaver genus. The metric variation of cheek teeth and especially the great differences in dimensions of incisors can be much better assessed. The observed range in size can be attributed to ontogenetic changes, and all material is assigned to Anchitheriomys suevicus. Stratigraphically, this species is restricted to the early middle Miocene, European Mammalian Neogene biozones MN 5-6.

  7. Miocene shale tectonics in the Moroccan margin (Alboran Sea)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, D.; El Abbassi, M.; Ammar, A.; Gorini, C.; Estrada, F.; Letouzey, J.; Smit, J.; Jolivet, L.; Jabour, H.

    2011-12-01

    The Betic (Southern Spain) and Rif (Morocco) mountains form an arcuate belt that represents the westernmost termination of the peri-mediterranean Alpine mountain chain. The Miocene Alboran Basin and its subbasins is located in the hinterland of the Betic-Rif belt. It is considered to be a back-arc basin that developed during the coeval westward motion of the Alboran domain and the extensional collapse of previously thickened crust of the Betic-Rif belt. The Western Alboran Basin (WAB) is the major sedimentary depocenter with a sediment thickness in excess of 10 km, it is bordered by the Gibraltar arc, the volcanic Djibouti mounts and the Alboran ridge. Part of the WAB is affected by shale tectonics and associated mud volcanism. High-quality 2D seismic profiles acquired on the Moroccan margin of the Alboran Basin during the last decade reveal the multiple history of the basin. This study deals with the analysis of a number of these seismic profiles that are located along and orthogonal to the Moroccan margin. Seismic stratigraphy is calibrated from industrial wells. We focus on the interactions between the gravity-driven tectonic processes and the sedimentation in the basin. Our seismic interpretation confirms that the formation of the WAB began in the Early Miocene (Aquitanian - Burdigalian). The fast subsidence of the basin floor coeval to massive sedimentation induced the undercompaction of early miocene shales during their deposition. Downslope migration of these fine-grained sediments initiated during the deposition of the Langhian siliciclastics. This gravity-driven system was accompanied by continuous basement subsidence and induced disharmonic deformation in Mid Miocene units (i.e. not related to basement deformation). The development of shale-cored anticlines and thrusts in the deep basin is the result of compressive deformation at the front of the gravity-driven system and lasted for ca. 15 Ma. The compressive front has been re-activated by strong siliciclastic deposition, such as in the Serravalian-Tortonian period or more recently during the Quaternary contourites deposition. The Messinian dessication of the Mediterranean Sea and the following catastrophic Pliocene reflooding caused or enhanced re-activation of the deformation.

  8. Miocene reef facies of pelagian block, central Mediterranean

    SciTech Connect

    Pedley, H.M.

    1988-02-01

    Miocene reefs outcrop in the Maltese Islands, southeastern Sicily, and the pelagian island of Lampedusa. Several rapid eustatic sea level fluctuations affected these late Tortonian-early Messinian build-ups; normal salinities appear to have been maintained during these events. In addition to sea floor topography, reef development appears to have been controlled by turbulence. Encruster-dominated patch reefs are typical of platform and shallow ramp situations where turbulence is high. Branching and massive coral assemblages are typical of fore-reef curtains and steep slope substrates.

  9. Composition and provenance of the Puente Formation (Miocene), Los Angeles Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Critelli, S. ); Rumelhart, P.E.; Ingersoll, R.V. )

    1994-04-01

    The Puente Formation (PFm) is a middle to upper Miocene clastic unit lying unconformably on the middle to lower Miocene El Modeno Volcanics and Topanga Group, within the Los Angeles basin (LAB). The PFm, about 3900m thick, is composed of sandstone, conglomerate, and mudrock deposited on a submarine fan at bathyal depths. Several intrabasinal discordances suggest active tectonics during deposition. The succession consists of two main upward thickening and coarsening megacycles reflecting submarine fan progradation. The PFm is characterized up-section by: (1) thin-bedded fine sandstone and shale (La Vida M.) grading to thick-bedded coarse sandstone an conglomerate (soquel M.); (2) thin-bedded siltstone, mudrock and sandstone (Yorba M.) grading to thick- to very thick-bedded coarse-grained sandstone and conglomerate (Sycamore Canyon M.). Sandstones of the PFm are quartzofeldspathic and suggest a probable local provenance from the plutonic, volcanic, and metamorphic rocks of the San Gabriel Mountains. Petrological parameters, however, suggest variable contribution of these source rock units through time. Coarse-grained plutonic rock fragments are abundant for the entire succession and consist of plagioclase-rich plutonic rocks perhaps sourced from the Lowe granodiorite. Microlitic, lathwork to felsitic volcanic lithic grains are also present in the lower and middle part. In the Yorba M. there is a local increase of volcanic detritus (Lv/L - 0.80), represented by larger volcanic lithics and abundant volcaniclastic matrix. Metamorphic detritus is not very abundant; it is concentrated in the La Vida M. the PFm represents sedimentation during tectonically active time in the evolution of southern California.

  10. First North American fossil monkey and early Miocene tropical biotic interchange.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Jonathan I; Woodruff, Emily D; Wood, Aaron R; Rincon, Aldo F; Harrington, Arianna R; Morgan, Gary S; Foster, David A; Montes, Camilo; Jaramillo, Carlos A; Jud, Nathan A; Jones, Douglas S; MacFadden, Bruce J

    2016-05-12

    New World monkeys (platyrrhines) are a diverse part of modern tropical ecosystems in North and South America, yet their early evolutionary history in the tropics is largely unknown. Molecular divergence estimates suggest that primates arrived in tropical Central America, the southern-most extent of the North American landmass, with several dispersals from South America starting with the emergence of the Isthmus of Panama 3-4 million years ago (Ma). The complete absence of primate fossils from Central America has, however, limited our understanding of their history in the New World. Here we present the first description of a fossil monkey recovered from the North American landmass, the oldest known crown platyrrhine, from a precisely dated 20.9-Ma layer in the Las Cascadas Formation in the Panama Canal Basin, Panama. This discovery suggests that family-level diversification of extant New World monkeys occurred in the tropics, with new divergence estimates for Cebidae between 22 and 25 Ma, and provides the oldest fossil evidence for mammalian interchange between South and North America. The timing is consistent with recent tectonic reconstructions of a relatively narrow Central American Seaway in the early Miocene epoch, coincident with over-water dispersals inferred for many other groups of animals and plants. Discovery of an early Miocene primate in Panama provides evidence for a circum-Caribbean tropical distribution of New World monkeys by this time, with ocean barriers not wholly restricting their northward movements, requiring a complex set of ecological factors to explain their absence in well-sampled similarly aged localities at higher latitudes of North America. PMID:27096364

  11. The Costa Rican Jurassic to Miocene oceanic complexes: Origin, tectonics and relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denyer, Percy; Gazel, Esteban

    2009-12-01

    The occurrences of oceanic assemblages on the Pacific shore of Costa Rica are part of an intricate group of complexes with different tectonic origins. Although they are dismembered and disrupted, they are the only available inland source of information to decipher the evolution of this active margin. Six main regions are described in this paper: (1) Santa Elena Peninsula, constituted by a supra-subduction zone (Santa Elena Nappe), that is overthrusting an igneous-sedimentary Aptian-Cenomanian sequence (Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex), which includes OIB (Ocean Island Basalts) portions, (2) the Nicoya Complex, which is a Jurassic-Cretaceous chert sediment pile disrupted and detached from its original basement by multiple magmatic events that occurred during the formation of the CLIP (Caribbean Large Igneous Province), (3) the Tortugal area formed by the Tortugal Suite with OIB signature and surrounded by Nicoya Complex outcrops, (4) the Herradura Block composed of the Tulín Formation to Maastrichtian to Lower Eocene OIB accreted oceanic island and the Nicoya Complex as basement, (5) Quepos Block correlated with the Tulín Formation, (6) the Osa-Burica Block composed of the Golfito and Burica Terranes (geochemically and chronologically correlated to the Nicoya Complex), Rincón Block (Early Paleocene to Early Eocene accreted seamounts), and the Miocene Osa-Caño Accretionary Complex. The Santa Rosa Accretionary Complex together with the Tortugal Suite have OIB signatures and possibly without Galapagos hotspot geochemical affinity. These coincidences would be explained by the hypothetical existence of an "autochthonous" Cretaceous basement formed by these two regions together with the rest of the Caribbean. Costa Rican basement is constituted by several CLIP portions and seamounts accreted from the end of Cretaceous in the northwest to the Miocene in the southeast, forming the diverse oceanic occurrences of the Pacific, which are mainly connected to the Galapagos hotspot activity.

  12. Miocene to Pliocene osmium isotopic records of Mediterranean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Junichiro; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Gennari, Rocco; Lugli, Stefano; Manzi, Vinicio; Roveri, Marco; Flecker, Rachel; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Sierro, Francisco; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2015-04-01

    In the late Miocene the Mediterranean Sea experienced a salinity crisis and thick sequences of evaporites precipitated across the basin. In this study we report Os isotopic records from drilled cores in the Mediterranean; the Balearic Sea, the Tyrrhenian Sea, the Ionian Basin and the Florence Rise. Pliocene sediments at all sites show 187Os/188Os values close to that of the coeval ocean water, indicating that the Mediterranean was connected to the North Atlantic. Evaporitic sediments deposited during the late Miocene however, have 187Os/188Os values lower than coeval ocean water values and samples from the eastern Mediterranean and Ionian basins are particularly low. Os isotopic ratios of the pre-evaporite sediments in the western Mediterranean are almost identical to that of the coeval ocean water. In contrast, equivalent sediments from the Florence Rise have significantly lower 187Os/188Os values. The offset of Mediterranean evaporite 187Os/188Os is attributed to limited exchange with the North Atlantic during the Messinian Salinity Crisis (MSC). The source of unradiogenic Os is likely to be weathering of ultramafic rocks (ophiolites) cropping out in the Mediterranean's drainage basins. The offset in the Os ratio on the Florence Rise is attributed either to limited water exchange between eastern and western Mediterranean, or to local effects associated with exhumation of ophiolites around the eastern Mediterranean Sea.

  13. Early Miocene sequence development across the New Jersey margin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monteverde, D.H.; Mountain, Gregory S.; Miller, K.G.

    2008-01-01

    Sequence stratigraphy provides an understanding of the interplay between eustasy, sediment supply and accommodation in the sedimentary construction of passive margins. We used this approach to follow the early to middle Miocene growth of the New Jersey margin and analyse the connection between relative changes of sea level and variable sediment supply. Eleven candidate sequence boundaries were traced in high-resolution multi-channel seismic profiles across the inner margin and matched to geophysical log signatures and lithologic changes in ODP Leg 150X onshore coreholes. Chronologies at these drill sites were then used to assign ages to the intervening seismic sequences. We conclude that the regional and global correlation of early Miocene sequences suggests a dominant role of global sea-level change but margin progradation was controlled by localized sediment contribution and that local conditions played a large role in sequence formation and preservation. Lowstand deposits were regionally restricted and their locations point to both single and multiple sediment sources. The distribution of highstand deposits, by contrast, documents redistribution by along shelf currents. We find no evidence that sea level fell below the elevation of the clinoform rollover, and the existence of extensive lowstand deposits seaward of this inflection point indicates efficient cross-shelf sediment transport mechanisms despite the apparent lack of well-developed fluvial drainage. ?? 2008 The Authors. Journal compilation ?? 2008 Blackwell Publishing.

  14. Plate-induced Miocene extension in southern California

    SciTech Connect

    Stuart, W.D. Univ. of California, Santa Barbara, CA )

    1992-01-01

    Miocene crustal extension in southern California can be explained by the interaction of tectonic plates in relative motion. The Pacific, Juan de Fuca, and Farallon (Guadalupe) plates are represented by flat elastic plates surrounded by an infinite elastic plate, the eastern part of which represents the North America plate. Forcing is by assigned subduction pull, and tractions at all plate boundaries satisfy a viscous constitutive law. Plate bottoms are stress-free. In the first part of the solution plate velocities and boundary tractions are found from static equilibrium. Then principal horizontal stresses and strains in plate interiors caused by tractions and subduction pull are found by a boundary element procedure. Using plate boundary geometry from Stock and Hodges for early- and mid-Miocene times, it is found that the portion of the North America plate margin between the Mendocino and Rivera triple junctions has maximum extensional strain directed westward. This result is generally consistent with directions associated with metamorphic core complex formation in southern California. The model is also consistent with extensional strain and rotation sense of crustal blocks in the vicinity of Los Angeles, as inferred by Luyendyk and others from paleomagnetic data. In the model the greatest extensional strain of the North America plate occurs near the Pacific-North America transform, in the area above the absent Farallon slab. Extension direction varies from northwest to southwest according to plate geometry, subduction pull (Juan de Fuca and Guadalupe), and plate boundary tractions.

  15. Upper Miocene reef complex of Mallorca, Balearic Islands, Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Pomar, L.

    1988-01-01

    The late Tortonian-Messinian coral reef platform of south Mallorca onlaps a folded middle late Miocene carbonate platform on which progradation of up to 20 km occurs. Vertical sea cliffs (up to 100 m high) superbly show the last 5 km of this progradation and complement the numerous water-well cores from the island interior. The coral reef platform consists of a series of progradational-accretional sequences and erosion surfaces of different orders of magnitude. The first-order sequence is bounded by significant erosion surfaces with breccias, major facies shifts, and vertical accretion. The second-order sequences show accretional events of up to 100 m thick with 1 to 2 km of progradation, and the third-order sequences occur in packages of tens of meters. Individual reef units are bounded by minor erosional surfaces and define the fourth-order sequences. This composite accretional-progradational architecture implies cyclic variations of relative sea level. Episodes of sea level rise were responsible for the vertical accretion. Sea level falls produced the erosional surfaces; most progradation occurred during lowering sea level episodes. This sedimentological framework of the Mallorca reef suggests late Miocene glacio-eustatic fluctuations of sea level similar to the Quaternary.

  16. Miocene diatom biostratigraphy of DSDP (Deep Sea Drilling Project) hole 272: Stratigraphic relationship to the underlying Miocene of DSDP hole 270, Ross Sea

    SciTech Connect

    Steinhauff, D.M.; Renz, M.E.; Harwood, D.M.; Webb, P.N. )

    1987-01-01

    Diatoms are the best biostratigraphic tool for high-resolution dating the Ross Sea Miocene. Discussed here are: previous diatom investigations of DSDP hole 272; new diatom data from the Ross Sea, including re-study of diatoms in DSDP 272 and the first report of pre-Pleistocene diatoms from DSDP site 270; and estimation of the temporal and stratigraphic gap separating the bottom of DSDP hole 272 from the top of the underlying Miocene of DSDP hole 270.

  17. Petrology of Early Miocene volcanic rocks from Okushiri Island, Japan: geochemical characteristics of lithospheric mantle beneath the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, M.; Shuto, K.; Ishimoto, H.; Yagi, M.; Takazawa, E.

    2004-12-01

    The Sr and Nd isotopic studies on Tertiary to Quaternary basaltic rocks of the NE Japan arc have shown that isotopic characteristics of basaltic rocks found on the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc changed drastically from an undepleted isotopic signature (initial 87Sr/86Sr (SrI)=0.7040-0.7060 and initial 143Nd/144Nd (NdI)=0.51260-0.51284) to a depleted isotopic signature (SrI=0.7030-0.7040 and NdI=0.70284-0.51308) at around 15 Ma (Shuto et., 2004). This feature may have resulted from changes around 15 Ma in the isotopic compositions of the magma source beneath the back-arc side in the NE Japan arc due to the thinning of the undepleted subcontinental lithospheric mantle by upwelling of depleted asthenospheric mantle material during the opening of Japan Sea. Based on major and trace element data as well as SrI and NdI values for Early Miocene basaltic rocks from the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc, we examined geochemical characterization of the magma source (lithospheric mantle) for these basaltic rocks. Early Miocene (23-18 Ma) basalts and associated more felsic volcanic rocks form seven volcanic fields (Okushiri Is., Matsumae Pen., Fukaura, Oga Pen., Honjo, Atsumi and Sado Is.) delineating a 500 km-long array in the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc. In terms of major, trace element and Nd isotopic compositions, two groups of Early Miocene basalts can be distinguished. Group 1 is composed of tholeiitic basalts and alkali basalts, and is characterized by high TiO2 contents (1.5-2.5 %) and high (La/Yb)n ratios (>5.5), and high Zr/Y ratios (>6). These samples show the chondrite-normalized LREE-enriched patterns and have NdI values ranging from 0.51259 to 0.51282. Group 2 is composed of tholeiitic basalts, and is different from Group 1 by lower TiO2 contents (<1.5 %), lower (La/Yb)n ratios (<5) and lower Zr/Y ratios (<5.5). These samples show modelately LREE-enriched patterns and have NdI values ranging from 0.51250 to 0.51278. In contrast, Middle Miocene (after 15 Ma) basaltic rocks from the Niigata and Honjo areas in the back-arc side of the NE Japan arc have NdI values of 0.51286 to 0.51310, which are higher than those of Early Miocene basalts. These Middle Miocene samples are lower in TiO2 contents and (La/Yb)n and Zr/Y ratios than Early Miocene Group 1 samples, but partly overlap with Early Miocene Group 2 samples. The geochemical differences between Group 1 and 2 basalt magmas possibly originated from subcontinental lithospheric mantle may be due to differences in degrees of partial melting or heterogeneity of the mantle.

  18. Ostracoda (Arthropoda, Crustacea) in a Miocene oxygen minimum zone, Trinidad, West Indies: A test of the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Brent; Coimbra, João C.; Hayek, Lee-Ann C.

    2014-10-01

    Studies of Recent ostracodes around the area of South America shed little light on the paleoenvironmental interpretation of Miocene assemblages. Consequently, interpretations of the Miocene ostracode assemblages must be supplemented using evidence from better documented taxa. Benthic foraminifera in samples from the Lower to Middle Miocene Brasso Formation at Brasso Village, Trinidad, have previously been used to distinguish three sample groupings (Beneath, Within and Above) around an oxygen minimum zone (OMZ), this being a layer of water within which dissolved oxygen concentrations can be as low as 0.1-1.0 mL/L. Using these same samples and the foraminiferal assemblage demarcations relative to the OMZ, this paper examines the associated and rich ostracode fauna of the Brasso Formation. The mean recovery of ostracode valves per sample was approximately three times greater in the Within OMZ sample group than in either of the Beneath OMZ or Above OMZ groups, perhaps reflecting the exclusion of macro-predators from within the OMZ. Individual rarefaction of species richness S to N = 300 valves was conducted for each sample group. This showed that S did not differ between the sample groups, ranging from 22.4 to 24.8. We used all ostracode species to model group separation. Based upon the Mahalanobis' criterion, we obtained significant group separation using a model with four taxa: Munseyella ex gr. minuta, Argilloecia posterotruncata, Munseyella sp. and Xestoleberis sp., while a fifth, Argilloecia spp., provided a significant but minor increase in separation probabilities over all groups. The two most abundant species (Bradleya sp., Gangamocytheridea reticulata) were thus not the best species for detecting the OMZ. Platycopid ostracodes of the genus Cytherella were found throughout the section, rather than concentrated within the OMZ, which contradicts the Platycopid Signal Hypothesis that OMZs are characterized by platycopid dominance. The total distribution and turnover of both ostracodal and foraminiferal assemblages were compared and contrasted quantitatively using a total assemblage turnover index (ATI) and the paleoenvironmental importance evaluated. The correlated between-sample ATI is for both groups lowest within the OMZ.

  19. Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha L.) bark extract regulates antioxidant response element (ARE)-mediated enzyme expression via Nrf2 pathway activation in normal hepatocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Krajka-Kuźniak, Violetta; Paluszczak, Jarosław; Oszmiański, Jan; Baer-Dubowska, Wanda

    2014-04-01

    Hawthorn (Crataegus oxyacantha L.), a plant used in traditional medicine, is a rich source of procyanidins which have been reported to exhibit antioxidant and anti-carcinogenic activity. In this study, we assessed the effect of hawthorn bark extract (HBE) on Nrf2 pathway activation in THLE-2 and HepG2 cells. Treatment with 1.1 µg/mL, 5.5 µg/mL and 11 µg/mL of HBE resulted in the translocation of Nrf2 from the cytosol to the nucleus in both cell lines; however, the accumulation of phosphorylated Nrf2 was observed only in THLE-2. Accordingly, treatment of cells with HBE was associated with an increase in the mRNA and protein level of such Nrf2-dependent genes as glutathione S-transferases (GSTA, GSTP, GSTM, GSTT), NAD(P)H:quinone oxidoreductase 1 (NQO1) and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) (0.2-1.1-fold change, p < 0.05), however, only in normal THLE-2 hepatocytes. The induction of NQO1 correlated with an increased level of p53 (0.21-0.42-fold change, p < 0.05). These effects may be related to induction of phosphorylation of upstream ERK and JNK kinases. Collectively, the results suggest that the Nrf2/ARE pathway may play an important role in the regulation of procyanidin-mediated antioxidant/detoxifying effects in hepatocytes, and this may explain the hepatoprotective and chemopreventive properties of these phytochemicals. PMID:23843400

  20. A mantle plume beneath California? The mid-Miocene Lovejoy Flood Basalt, northern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Garrison, N.J.; Busby, C.J.; Gans, P.B.; Putirka, K.; Wagner, D.L.

    2008-01-01

    The Lovejoy basalt represents the largest eruptive unit identified in California, and its age, volume, and chemistry indicate a genetic affinity with the Columbia River Basalt Group and its associated mantle-plume activity. Recent field mapping, geochemical analyses, and radiometric dating suggest that the Lovejoy basalt erupted during the mid-Miocene from a fissure at Thompson Peak, south of Susanville, California. The Lovejoy flowed through a paleovalley across the northern end of the Sierra Nevada to the Sacramento Valley, a distance of 240 km. Approximately 150 km3 of basalt were erupted over a span of only a few centuries. Our age dates for the Lovejoy basalt cluster are near 15.4 Ma and suggest that it is coeval with the 16.1-15.0 Ma Imnaha and Grande Ronde flows of the Columbia River Basalt Group. Our new mapping and age dating support the interpretation that the Lovejoy basalt erupted in a forearc position relative to the ancestral Cascades arc, in contrast with the Columbia River Basalt Group, which erupted in a backarc position. The arc front shifted trenchward into the Sierran block after 15.4 Ma. However, the Lovejoy basalt appears to be unrelated to volcanism of the predominantly calc-alkaline Cascade arc; instead, the Lovejoy is broadly tholeiitic, with trace-element characteristics similar to the Columbia River Basalt Group. Association of the Lovejoy basalt with mid-Miocene flood basalt volcanism has considerable implications for North American plume dynamics and strengthens the thermal "point source" explanation, as provided by the mantle-plume hypothesis. Alternatives to the plume hypothesis usually call upon lithosphere-scale cracks to control magmatic migrations in the Yellowstone-Columbia River basalt region. However, it is difficult to imagine a lithosphere-scale flaw that crosses Precambrian basement and accreted terranes to reach the Sierra microplate, where the Lovejoy is located. Therefore, we propose that the Lovejoy represents a rapid migration of plume-head material, at ??20 cm/yr to the southwest, a direction not previously recognized. ?? 2008 The Geological Society of America.

  1. Paleosols and paleoenvironments of the middle Miocene, Maboko Formation, Kenya.

    PubMed

    Retallack, Gregory J; Wynn, Jonathan G; Benefit, Brenda R; Mccrossin, Monte L

    2002-06-01

    The middle Miocene (15 Ma) Maboko Formation of Maboko Island and Majiwa Bluffs, southwestern Kenya, has yielded abundant fossils of the earliest known cercopithecoid monkey (Victoriapithecus macinnesi), and of a kenyapithecine hominoid (Kenyapithecus africanus), as well as rare proconsuline (Simiolus leakeyorum, cf. Limnopithecus evansi) and oreopithecine apes (Mabokopithecus clarki, M. pickfordi), and galagids (Komba winamensis). Specific habitat preferences can be interpreted from large collections of primate fossils in different kinds of paleosols (pedotypes). Fossiliferous drab-colored paleosols with iron-manganese nodules (Yom pedotype) are like modern soils of seasonally waterlogged depressions (dambo). Their crumb structure and abundant fine root-traces, as well as scattered large calcareous rhizoconcretions indicate former vegetation of seasonally wet, wooded grassland. Other fossiliferous paleosols are evidence of nyika bushland (Ratong), and early-successional riparian woodland (Dhero). No fossils were found in Mogo paleosols interpreted as saline scrub soils. Very shallow calcic horizons (in Yom, Ratong, and Mogo paleosols) and Na-montmorillonite (in Mogo) are evidence of dry paleoclimate (300-500 mm MAP=mean annual precipitation). This is the driest paleoclimate and most open vegetation yet inferred as a habitat for any Kenyan Miocene apes or monkeys. Victoriapithecus was abundant in dambo wooded grassland (Yom) and riparian woodland (Dhero), a distribution like that of modern vervet monkeys. Kenyapithecus ranged through all these paleosols, but was the most common primate in nyika bushland paleosols (Ratong), comparable to baboons and macaques today. Mabokopithecus was virtually restricted to riparian woodland paleosols (Dhero), and Simiolus had a similar, but marginally wider, distribution. Habitat preferences of Mabokopithecus and Simiolus were like those of modern colobus monkeys and mangabeys. A single specimen of Komba was found in dambo wooded grassland paleosol (Yom), a habitat more like that of the living Senegal bushbaby than of rainforest galagids. A shift to non-forest habitats may explain the terrestrial adaptations of Victoriapithecus, basal to the cercopithecid radiation, and of Kenyapithecus, basal to the hominoid radiation. Both taxa are distinct from earlier Miocene arboreal proconsulines, oreopithecines and galagids. PMID:12069506

  2. Extreme Warmth in the Late Miocene North Atlantic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pohlman, E. E.; Lawrence, K.; Morabito, J.; Harper, B.; Herbert, T. D.

    2008-12-01

    Climate in the late Miocene was unquestionably much warmer and less glaciated than the following Pliocene. This is implied by benthic oxygen isotope records, but as they necessarily combine the effects of temperature and ice volume, a precise climate history leading up to the onset of Northern Hemisphere glaciation is difficult to resolve. Unambiguous, continuous, and well-dated sea surface temperature (SST) records are required to characterize a pre-glacial world. Ideal sites lie in the sensitive high-latitudes, physically close to the growing ice sheets. ODP Site 907 (69N, 12E) is situated at a sensitively balanced location with respect to the world's ocean dynamics. A temperature record from this location may help to constrain the history of northern-sourced deep water, which plays a pivotal role in global climate. Located at the conflux of three major surface currents, Site 907 experienced the effects of migrating wind fronts, sea-ice cover, and current migration. Magnetostratigraphy demonstrates continuous sedimentation at the level of polarity zonation, and provides an age model to 14 ma. However, lack of abundant microfossils has prevented traditional isotope or faunal assemblage-based climate analysis from this Site. We present an alkenone-based SST and productivity (Total C37 alkenones/gram sediment = C37 total) record from this location, at moderate resolution (~50k between samples) covering the past ~14 ma. SSTs were as high as 23C at ~14 ma, cooling gradually (~1.6/my) to around 10C by 6 ma. A small increase in C37 total indicates a response to the 5 ma global biogenic bloom event observed in other records, but the most distinctive feature of the productivity record is a crash in haptophyte productivity at ~3.5 ma. This crash is echoed by biogenic opal records, and presumably total productivity in the high-latitude North Atlantic was equally affected. The long-term trends (e.g. the Miocene cooling trend) of global benthic ?18O records correlate well with this alkenone-derived local record. The dramatic late Miocene cooling and the mid-Pliocene productivity crash, however, hint at precursor adjustments to the climate system that significantly preceded the establishment of permanent ice sheets in the northern hemisphere.

  3. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, southern Spain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-01-01

    Sea cliffs 40 km east of Almeria, southeastern Spain, expose upper Miocene reefs and patch reefs of the Plomo formation. These reefs are formed of scleractinian corals, calcareous algae, and mollusks. The reef cores are as much as 65 m thick and several hundred meters wide. Fore-reef talus beds extend 1,300 m across and are 40 m thick. The reefs and reef breccias are composed of calcific dolomite. They lie on volcanic rocks that have a K-Ar date of 11.5 m.y. and in turn are overlain by the upper Miocene Vicar Formation. In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity is both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Plomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Dolomite rhombs are between 10 and 30 μ across. More moldic porosity was formed by the dissolution of the calclte bioclasts. Some porosity reduction has occurred by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsurface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene(?) and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef deposits may form traps for oil and gas in the offshore areas southwest of the type locality. Stratigraphic traps also may occur where the Neogene sequence above the Plomo reef complex onlaps the volcanic ridge.

  4. A new family of bizarre durophagous carnivorous marsupials from Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland.

    PubMed

    Archer, M; Hand, S J; Black, K H; Beck, R M D; Arena, D A; Wilson, L A B; Kealy, S; Hung, T-T

    2016-01-01

    A new specimen of the bizarrely specialised Malleodectes mirabilis from middle Miocene deposits in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area provides the first and only information about the molar dentition of this strange group of extinct marsupials. Apart from striking autapomorphies such as the enormous P3, other dental features such as stylar cusp D being larger than B suggest it belongs in the Order Dasyuromorphia. Phylogenetic analysis of 62 craniodental characters places Malleodectes within Dasyuromorphia albeit with weak support and without indication of specific relationships to any of the three established families (Dasyuridae, Myrmecobiidae and Thylacinidae). Accordingly we have allocated Malleodectes to the new family, Malleodectidae. Some features suggest potential links to previously named dasyuromorphians from Riversleigh (e.g., Ganbulanyi) but these are too poorly known to test this possibility. Although the original interpretation of a steeply declining molar row in Malleodectes can be rejected, it continues to seem likely that malleodectids specialised on snails but probably also consumed a wider range of prey items including small vertebrates. Whatever their actual diet, malleodectids appear to have filled a niche in Australia's rainforests that has not been occupied by any other mammal group anywhere in the world from the Miocene onwards. PMID:27229325

  5. Diagenesis of Late Miocene micritic lacustrine carbonates, Madrid Basin, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, V. P.; Zarza, A. M. Alonso; Sanz, M. E.; Calvo, J. P.

    1997-12-01

    Mud-grade lacustrine limestones of Miocene age from the Madrid Basin, Spain, reveal varied and complex diagenetic histories. Microporous micrites occur as well as micrites with anhedral mosaics. The micrites have recrystallized from a metastable precursor, in part under sub-oxic meteoric diagenetic conditions probably before extensive karstification in the Pliocene. The absence of aragonite relics, their mainly micritic microfabric, low Sr content and covariant trend of Sr and Mg suggest that the micrites formed from mainly high-magnesian calcite muds. Lacustrine micrites can be compared to marine forms and criteria used to assess the composition of the marine precursor muds can be applied to lacustrine limestones to complement other techniques to identify original lake water compositions.

  6. A Miocene submarine volcano at Low Layton, Jamaica

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wadge, G.

    1982-01-01

    A submarine fissure eruption of Upper Miocene age produced a modest volume of alkaline basalt at Low Layton, on the north coast of Jamaica. The eruption occurred in no more than a few hundred meters of water and produced a series of hyaloclastites, pillow breccias and pillow lavas, massive lavas, and dikes with an ENE en echelon structure. The volcano lies on the trend of one of the island's major E-W strike-slip fault zones; the Dunavale Fault Zone. The K-Ar age of the eruption of 9.5 plus or minus 0.5 Ma. B.P. corresponds to an extension of the Mid-Cayman Rise spreading center inferred from magnetic anomalies and bathymetry of the Cayman Trough to the north and west of Jamaica. The Low Layton eruption was part of the response of the strike-slip fault systems adjacent to this spreading center during this brief episode of tectonic readjustment.

  7. Middle Miocene Southern Ocean cooling and Antarctic cryosphere expansion.

    PubMed

    Shevenell, Amelia E; Kennett, James P; Lea, David W

    2004-09-17

    Magnesium/calcium data from Southern Ocean planktonic foraminifera demonstrate that high-latitude (approximately 55 degrees S) southwest Pacific sea surface temperatures (SSTs) cooled 6 degrees to 7 degrees C during the middle Miocene climate transition (14.2 to 13.8 million years ago). Stepwise surface cooling is paced by eccentricity forcing and precedes Antarctic cryosphere expansion by approximately 60 thousand years, suggesting the involvement of additional feedbacks during this interval of inferred low-atmospheric partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2). Comparing SSTs and global carbon cycling proxies challenges the notion that episodic pCO2 drawdown drove this major Cenozoic climate transition. SST, salinity, and ice-volume trends suggest instead that orbitally paced ocean circulation changes altered meridional heat/vapor transport, triggering ice growth and global cooling. PMID:15375266

  8. Simultaneous Miocene Extension and Shortening in the Himalayan Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodges, K. V.; Parrish, R. R.; Housh, T. B.; Lux, D. R.; Burchfiel, B. C.; Royden, L. H.; Chen, Z.

    1992-11-01

    The South Tibetan detachment system separates the high-grade metamorphic core of the Himalayan orogen from its weakly metamorphosed suprastructure. It is thought to have developed in response to differences in gravitational potential energy produced by crustal thickening across the mountain front. Geochronologic data from the Rongbuk Valley, north of Qomolangma (Mount Everest) in southern Tibet, demonstrate that at least one segment of the detachment system was active between 19 and 22 million years ago, an interval characterized by large-scale crustal thickening at lower structural levels. These data suggest that decoupling between an extending upper crust and a converging lower crust was an important aspect of Himalayan tectonics in Miocene time.

  9. Biostratigraphic sequence analysis of two Lower Miocene to Pliocene sections, Eastern Falcon, Northwestern Venezuela

    SciTech Connect

    Diaz De Gamero, M.L. ); Giffuni, G.; Castro Mora, M. )

    1993-02-01

    The eastern region of the Falcon Basin in northwestern Venezuela comprises a thick sedimentary sequence deposited from a deep marine bathyal to neritic environment, ranging in age from the Middle Eocene to the Pliocene. A detailed biostratigraphic study (foraminifera and calcareous nannoplankton) was carried out in two sedimentary sequences outcropping in Cumarebo and Piritu, adjacent areas of eastern Falcon, representing: platform, slope and basinal settings. The Cumarebo section is continuous in the studied interval, from the Middle Miocene to the Pliocene. The Piritu section is continuous from the Lower to the lower Upper Miocene, terminating unconformably beneath a thin interval of middle Pliocene platform sediments, indicating tectonism during the latest Miocene. The sequence stratigraphical interpretation was based on the biostratigraphic analysis of the benthic and planktonic fossils, facies distribution and sedimentological data. Systems tracts, sequence boundaries and maximum flooding surfaces from cycles TB2.4 to TB3.5 of the cycle chart were identified. In the Cumarebo section, the upper Middle and Upper Miocene is mostly composed of shales, with some turbiditic sands belonging to a LSW system tract. The upper most Miocene contains a thick carbonate buildup (HST), and it is overlain by a Pliocene section that shallows upward from upper slope to outer shelf depositional environments. In the basinal (Piritu) section, most of the sediments are deep-water shales belonging to a LSW system tract, with some turbiditic sands in the upper Lower Miocene. TST and HST sediments, with scattered carbonate buildups in the upper Middle Miocene were also identified.

  10. Miocene to Pleistocene osmium isotopic records of the Mediterranean sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuroda, Junichiro; Jiménez-Espejo, Francisco J.; Nozaki, Tatsuo; Gennari, Rocco; Lugli, Stefano; Manzi, Vinicio; Roveri, Marco; Flecker, Rachel; Sierro, Francisco J.; Yoshimura, Toshihiro; Suzuki, Katsuhiko; Ohkouchi, Naohiko

    2016-01-01

    In the late Miocene the Mediterranean Sea experienced a salinity crisis and thick sequences of evaporites precipitated across the deep and marginal basins. In this study we report Os isotopic records from Deep Sea Drilling Project and Ocean Drilling Project cores in the Mediterranean: the Balearic Sea (Site 372), the Tyrrhenian Sea (Site 654), the Ionian Basin (Site 374), and the Florence Rise (Sites 375-376), as well as Integrated Ocean Drilling Project Site U1387 in Gulf of Cadiz, North Atlantic. Pliocene-Pleistocene sediments at all sites show 187Os/188Os values close to that of the coeval ocean water, indicating that the Mediterranean was connected to the North Atlantic. Evaporitic sediments deposited during the latest Miocene, however, have 187Os/188Os values significantly lower than coeval ocean water values. The offset of the Mediterranean evaporite 187Os/188Os is attributed to limited exchange with the North Atlantic during the Messinian salinity crisis. The source of unradiogenic Os is likely to be weathering of ultramafic rocks (ophiolites) cropping out in the Mediterranean's drainage basins. Based on a box model we estimated the amount of unradiogenic Os and the Atlantic-Mediterranean exchange rate to explain this offset. Os isotopic ratios of the pre-evaporite sediments in the western Mediterranean are almost identical to that of the coeval ocean water. In contrast, equivalent sediments from the Florence Rise have significantly lower 187Os/188Os values. The offset in the Os isotopic ratio on the Florence Rise is attributed either to limited water exchange between eastern and western Mediterranean or to local effects associated with exhumation of the Troodos ophiolites (Cyprus).

  11. Assessment of geotechnical features of Miocene volcaniclastics using integrated logging

    SciTech Connect

    Toshiyuki, Kurahashi; Tomio, Inazaki; Yasuo, Nakamura

    1996-11-01

    This paper describes that integrated logging evaluates geotechnical conditions of fractures in Miocene volcaniclastics, where the damsites are for proposed. The purpose of this study was to detect fractures for seepage contols along borehole wall and characterize its geotechnical features by integrated logging. It is First step to evaluate the continuity and permeability of fractures. Integrated logging comprises of caliper, acoustic borehole televiewer, full-wave sonic, temperature, borehole video logging, natural gamma spectrum, and magnetic loggings. Natural gamma spectrum and magnetic logs would characterize litholofacies. Caliper, acoustic borehole televiewer and borehole video loggings would identify the depth, the dip and the azimuth of fractures. Besides temperature logging would determine the groudwater flow and suggest the permeable fracture. Integrated loggings were performed at damsites for proposed in northern Kanto district, middle part of Japan, where Miocene volcaniclastics are widely exposed. In Yunishigawa site, thermal jump was remarkably observed at 84 meters in depth from temperature logging. Its thermal gradient, differentiation of temperature, was 30 {degrees}C/m. The fracture causing it was recognized by the borehole enlargements from caliper logging, and had low slowness of full-wave sonic logging. Integrated logging enabled us to identify the fractures in the order of a dozen centimeters along a borehole wall. The identification would be useful for the geotechnical evaluation. Especially Differentiation of temperature revealed the fracture for seepage controls and classified the fractures into three types, which are (1) the permeable fracture circulating the runoff, (2) the permeable one controlling the groundwater from the deep, (3) the non-permeable fracture. As the first and the second are fractures for the seepage controls, they would involve the geotechnical problems.

  12. Miocene reef and nonreef carbonate rocks in Japan

    SciTech Connect

    Konishi, K.

    1988-01-01

    Japan's main islands experienced temperature climates throughout the Neogene with a tropical invasion around 16 Ma (early middle Miocene). This climatic warming, accompanied by a eustatic sea level rise, caused the unusual occurrence of reef facies, mangrove deposits, and lateritic beds in Japan. In cooler climates both before and after reef growth, sediments rich in bryozoan and algal material were widespread. Reef rocks emplaced as penecontemporaneous olistoliths in deep-water clastics at the Pacific coast of central Honshu are characterized by a wide lithologic spectrum, ranging from grainstone to bindstone. These rocks include rudstone and floatstone, which are rich in coralline algae (encrusting forms such as Lithophyllum and Mesophyllum and articulate forms such as Amphiroa) and codiacean algae (Halimeda) with hermatypic corals and large benthic formainifera (e.g., Nephrolepidina and Miogypsina) being less common. Two types of dolomite occur: (1) limpid dolomite with O/sup 18/ = -5.77 and with bipyramidal quartz and (2) microcrystalline dolomite with O/sup 18/ = 2.00 and with length-slow chalcedony. While microcrystalline dolomite tends to predominate in muddy matrix material, limpid dolomite appears to fill pores, some of which are moldic. Younger nonreef carbonate rocks, as occur on the Noto Peninsula of central Honshu, are commonly cross-bedded, contain Bryozoa, mollusks, small foraminifera, and echinoids, and are locally dolomitized. These dolomites are ascribed to a mixed-water origin. A different type of nonreef, yet reservoir-forming, dolostone occurs in the late middle Miocene of northeast Honshu and is interpreted to have formed as a transformation from bathyal opal.

  13. Gulf of Mexico miocene CO₂ site characterization mega transect

    SciTech Connect

    Meckel, Timothy; Trevino, Ramon

    2014-09-30

    This project characterized the Miocene-age sub-seafloor stratigraphy in the near-offshore portion of the Gulf of Mexico adjacent to the Texas coast. The large number of industrial sources of carbon dioxide (CO₂) in coastal counties and the high density of onshore urbanization and environmentally sensitive areas make this offshore region extremely attractive for long-term storage of carbon dioxide emissions from industrial sources (CCS). The study leverages dense existing geologic data from decades of hydrocarbon exploration in and around the study area to characterize the regional geology for suitability and storage capacity. Primary products of the study include: regional static storage capacity estimates, sequestration “leads” and prospects with associated dynamic capacity estimates, experimental studies of CO₂-brine-rock interaction, best practices for site characterization, a large-format ‘Atlas’ of sequestration for the study area, and characterization of potential fluid migration pathways for reducing storage risks utilizing novel high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic surveys. In addition, three subcontracted studies address source-to-sink matching optimization, offshore well bore management and environmental aspects. The various geologic data and interpretations are integrated and summarized in a series of cross-sections and maps, which represent a primary resource for any near-term commercial deployment of CCS in the area. The regional study characterized and mapped important geologic features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone, the regionally extensive Marginulina A and Amphistegina B confining systems, etc.) that provided an important context for regional static capacity estimates and specific sequestration prospects of the study. A static capacity estimate of the majority of the Study area (14,467 mi2) was estimated at 86 metric Gigatonnes. While local capacity estimates are likely to be lower due to reservoir-scale characteristics, the offshore Miocene interval is a storage resource of National interest for providing CO₂ storage as an atmospheric emissions abatement strategy. The natural petroleum system was used as an analog to infer seal quality and predict possible migration pathways of fluids in an engineered system of anthropogenic CO₂ injection and storage. The regional structural features (e.g., Clemente-Tomas fault zone) that exert primary control on the trapping and distribution of Miocene hydrocarbons are expected to perform similarly for CCS. Industrial-scale CCS will require storage capacity utilizing well-documented Miocene hydrocarbon (dominantly depleted gas) fields and their larger structural closures, as well as barren (unproductive, brine-filled) closures. No assessment was made of potential for CO₂ utilization for enhanced oil and gas recovery. The use of 3D numerical fluid flow simulations have been used in the study to greatly assist in characterizing the potential storage capacity of a specific reservoir. Due to the complexity of geologic systems (stratigraphic heterogeneity) and inherent limitations on producing a 3D geologic model, these simulations are typically simplified scenarios that explore the influence of model property variability (sensitivity study). A specific site offshore San Luis Pass (southern Galveston Island) was undertaken successfully, indicating stacked storage potential. Downscaling regional capacity estimates to the local scale (and the inverse) has proven challenging, and remains an outstanding gap in capacity assessments. In order to characterize regional seal performance and identify potential brine and CO₂ leakage pathways, results from three high-resolution 3D (HR3D) seismic datasets acquired by the study using novel HR3D (P-Cable) acquisition system showed steady and significant improvements in data quality because of improved acquisition and processing technique. Finely detailed faults and stratigraphy in the shallowest 1000 milliseconds (~800 m) of data allowed for the identification and mapping of unconformable surfaces including what is probably a surface associated with the last Pleistocene glacial lowstand. The identification of a previously unrecognized (in commercial seismic data) gas chimney that was clearly defined in the 2013 HR3D survey, indicates that HR3D surveys may be useful as both a characterization tool for the overburden of a potential carbon sequestration site and as an additional monitoring tool for future engineered injection sites. Geochemical modeling indicated that injection of CO₂ would result in minor dissolution of calcite, K-feldspar and albite. In addition, modeling of typical brines in Miocene age rocks indicate that approximately 5% of injection capacity would result from CO₂ dissolution into the brine. After extensive searches, no rock samples of the Marginulina A and Amphistegina B seals (“caprocks”) were obtained, but analyses of available core samples of other Miocene age mudrocks (seals or caprocks) indicate that they have sealing ability sufficient for potential CO2 storage in underlying sandstone units.

  14. Study of fossil wood from the Middle-Late Miocene sediments of Dhemaji and Lakhimpur districts of Assam, India and its palaeoecological and palaeophytogeographical implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehrotra, R. C.; Bera, S. K.; Basumatary, S. K.; Srivastava, G.

    2011-08-01

    In order to reconstruct the palaeoclimate, a number of fossil wood pieces were collected and investigated from two new fossil localities situated in the Dhemaji and Lakhimpur districts of Assam. They belong to the Tipam Group considered to be of Middle-Late Miocene in age and show affinities with Gluta (Anacardiaceae), Bischofia (Euphorbiaceae), Bauhinia, Cynometra, Copaifera-Detarium-Sindora, Millettia-Pongamia, and Afzelia-Intsia (Fabaceae). The flora also records a new species of Bauhinia named Bauhinia miocenica sp. nov. The assemblage indicates a warm and humid climate in the region during the deposition of the sediments. The occurrence of some southeast Asian elements in the fossil flora indicates that an exchange of floral elements took place between India and southeast Asia during the Miocene.

  15. Scope and construction of a gas and oil atlas series of the Gulf of Mexico: Examples from Texas offshore lower Miocene plays

    SciTech Connect

    Seni, S.J.; Desselle, B.A.; Standen, A.

    1994-12-31

    An atlas series about the offshore northern Gulf of Mexico will group gas and oil reservoirs into subregional plays and will display reservoir data on a computerized geographical information system. The atlas series will provide critically compiled reservoir engineering data to help the private sector explore and develop hydrocarbons and to help the public sector analyze the hydrocarbon endowment in this basin. In this report, we cover aspects of the play-analysis procedure and provide specific examples of lower Miocene plays from the upper Texas coast and Federal Outer Continental Shelf (OCS). Play analysis emphasizes using broad classes of structural style, depositional style and environments, and defining attributes to group reservoirs into plays. To date, we have identified 4 Oligocene and 25 Miocene plays in Texas State offshore waters and 115 plays in the Federal OCS. Texas State offshore plays are gas prone (cumulative production 3.7 TcF) and are preferentially trapped in rollover anticlines. Miocene plays include submarine-fan Lenticulina sandstones; progradational Dicorbis b., Siphonina d., Marginulina a., and Lenticulina sandstones; transgressive sandstones associated with a barrier-bar system in the Matagorda Area; and transgressive Amphistegina B sandstones. Particularly productive gas-prone plays are progradational Sihonina d. deltas in the High Island Area and progradational Marginulia a. shelf and deltaic sandstones in the Matagorda Island and Brazos Areas.

  16. Miocene climate seasonality in southern India - first direct evidence for a weak Indian monsoon during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piller, W. E.; Reuter, M.; Kern, A. K.; Harzhauser, M.

    2012-04-01

    The Asian monsoon is an integral component of the global climate system. This large-scale atmospheric circulation comprises the East Asian summer and winter monsoon and the Indian monsoon subsystems, all characterized by seasonal reversing winds and precipitation changes associated with asymmetric heating of land and sea. The Neogene monsoon history is mainly reconstructed from chemical and physical weathering rates recorded in widely continuous marine sequences of the Indus Fan, Bengal Fan and South China Sea, which, depending on the source, physiography and sediment, indicate drier or wetter climates. These indirect climate proxies display an unusually dry period during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum (MMCO, 16.5-15 Ma). As part of the FWF-projects P18189, P21414 and P23492, we present an Early/Middle Miocene coastal palynoflora record from the siliciclastic Ambalapuzha Formation at the coastal cliff of Varkala (Kerala Basin, SW India). Pollen assemblages and facies document a coastal wetland with mangrove vegetation. The Coexistence Approach was applied for palaeoclimatic reconstructions. This method uses climatic tolerances of all nearest living relatives known for a fossil flora by assuming that the tolerances of a fossil taxon are not significantly different from its modern counterpart. The maximum overlap of the environmental tolerances of all nearest living relatives (coexistence interval) is then regarded as being indicative of the most likely palaeoenvironment. By enquiring the Palaeoflora Database (http://www.palaeoflora.de/), the palaeoclimatic parameters of the pollen flora were calculated. The reconstructed climatic parameters for the MMCO show a seasonal precipitation pattern with a dry and a wet period and moderate rainfalls during the warmest period, which is comparable to the present day annual precipitation cycle in coastal Kerala, and affirms the presence of a monsoon-like atmospheric circulation over South India during the MMCO. However, the precipitation amounts during the wet (average 75%) and the warmest period (average 68%) were significantly reduced compared to today, while the rainfalls during the dry seasons are in the same order. This implies a weak Indian monsoon during the MMCO and a low thermal land - sea gradient between the Eurasian landmass and the Indian Ocean. Although a ~3C warmer global climate during the MMCO and a weaker monsoon accounts for a higher near-surface air temperature during summer, the calculated mean annual temperature (MAT; 24.4C) is 2.7C lower than at present. The estimated warmest month temperature is, however, in the same range as today. Therefore, the low coldest month temperature (CMT; 20.6-22.8C) in the Miocene has to account for the high MAT difference. This parameter represents the lower temperature threshold of the Varkala flora, and displays only the minimum temperature during the coldest month, which is significantly lower than the average CMT. Accordingly, the Miocene CMT approximates the present 24-h minimum temperature during the coldest month in Kerala (22.4C). The reconstructed seasonal temperature cycle supports climate models, which suggest a higher temperature increase in mid-latitudes than in low-latitudes as well as warmer equatorial sea surface temperatures during the MMCO.

  17. A partial hominoid innominate from the Miocene of Pakistan: Description and preliminary analyses

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Michèle E.; Lewton, Kristi L.; Kelley, Jay; Otárola-Castillo, Erik; Barry, John C.; Flynn, Lawrence J.; Pilbeam, David

    2015-01-01

    We describe a partial innominate, YGSP 41216, from a 12.3 Ma locality in the Siwalik Group of the Potwar Plateau in Pakistan, assigned to the Middle Miocene ape species Sivapithecus indicus. We investigate the implications of its morphology for reconstructing positional behavior of this ape. Postcranial anatomy of extant catarrhines falls into two distinct groups, particularly for torso shape. To an extent this reflects different although variable and overlapping positional repertoires: pronograde quadrupedalism for cercopithecoids and orthogrady for hominoids. The YGSP innominate (hipbone) is from a primate with a narrow torso, resembling most extant monkeys and differing from the broader torsos of extant apes. Other postcranial material of S. indicus and its younger and similar congener Sivapithecus sivalensis also supports reconstruction of a hominoid with a positional repertoire more similar to the pronograde quadrupedal patterns of most monkeys than to the orthograde patterns of apes. However, Sivapithecus postcranial morphology differs in many details from any extant species. We reconstruct a slow-moving, deliberate, arboreal animal, primarily traveling above supports but also frequently engaging in antipronograde behaviors. There are no obvious synapomorphic postcranial features shared exclusively with any extant crown hominid, including Pongo. PMID:25489095

  18. Herds Overhead: Nimbadon lavarackorum (Diprotodontidae), Heavyweight Marsupial Herbivores in the Miocene Forests of Australia

    PubMed Central

    Black, Karen H.; Camens, Aaron B.; Archer, Michael; Hand, Suzanne J.

    2012-01-01

    The marsupial family Diprotodontidae (Diprotodontia, Vombatiformes) is a group of extinct large-bodied (60–2500 kg) wombat-like herbivores that were common and geographically widespread in Cenozoic fossil deposits of Australia and New Guinea. Typically they are regarded to be gregarious, terrestrial quadrupeds and have been likened in body form among placental groups to sheep, rhinoceros and hippopotami. Arguably, one of the best represented species is the zygomaturine diprotodontid Nimbadon lavarackorum which is known from exceptionally well-preserved cranial and postcranial material from the middle Miocene cave deposit AL90, in the Riversleigh World Heritage Area, northwestern Queensland. Here we describe and functionally analyse the appendicular skeleton of Nimbadon lavarackorum and reveal a far more unique lifestyle for this plesiomorphic and smallest of diprotodontids. Striking similarities are evident between the skeleton of Nimbadon and that of the extant arboreal koala Phascolarctos cinereus, including the powerfully built forelimbs, highly mobile shoulder and elbow joints, proportionately large manus and pes (both with a semi-opposable digit I) and exceedingly large, recurved and laterally compressed claws. Combined with the unique (among australidelphians) proportionately shortened hindlimbs of Nimbadon, these features suggest adept climbing ability, probable suspensory behaviour, and an arboreal lifestyle. At approximately 70 kg, Nimbadon is the largest herbivorous mammal to have occupied the forest canopies of Australia - an ecological niche that is no longer occupied in any Australian ecosystem and one that further expands the already significant niche diversity displayed by marsupials during the Cenozoic. PMID:23185250

  19. Paleomagnetic Evidence for 'Oroclinal' Rotation in the Central Japan Arc from Early Miocene Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, H.; Sako, K.; Namikawa, T.; Ando, Y.

    2013-12-01

    In this study we focus on the general curvilinear trend of geologic zones (mainly accretionary complexes) in the central Japan arc. This feature is best represented by the Median Tectonic Line (MTL), a major boundary fault between the Sanbagawa high-P/T and Ryoke low-P/T metamorphic belts. Previous paleomagnetic data imply that the curvature is of 'oroclinal' origin, that is, the curved system was originally straight and formed after the accretionary processes and metamorphism. In order to quantitatively assess this possibility, we have carried out a paleomagnetic study for Early Miocene sedimentary rocks from two areas (Morozaki in Aichi Prefecture and Tomikusa in Nagano Prefecture) in central Japan. In Morozaki, oriented cores were collected at 22 sites from felsic tuff and siltstone beds of the Himaka Formation, which is the lowermost formation of the sedimentary sequence in this area. In Tomikusa, cores were taken at 24 sites from various lithologies of the Tomikusa Group. Rock specimens were subjected to stepwise alternating-field or thermal demagnetization in order to extract characteristic remanent magnetization (ChRM) components. Rock magnetic experiments suggest that ChRMs are carried primarily by magnetite. The Himaka Formation sites have reverse-polarity ChRM directions, and we consider this formation to be correlative to Chronozone C5Dr (18.056-17.533 Ma). The Tomikusa Group indicates both normal and reverse polarities and can be correlated to Chronozone C5D (18.056-17.235 Ma). Mean paleomagnetic directions for the two areas were determined and, together with existing paleomagnetic data from other areas, they were used for a paleomagnetic orocline test with a declination-strike diagram. Our result strongly suggests that the geologic zones and boundary faults (including the MTL) in the central Japan arc was straight before 18 Ma. We suggest that the oroclinal rotation results from a combination of the clockwise rotation of the southwestern Japan arc and the start of collision of the Izu-Bonin-Mariana arc with the central Japan arc, both during the late Early to early Middle Miocene (ca. 17-15 Ma).

  20. Megalictis, the Bone-Crushing Giant Mustelid (Carnivora, Mustelidae, Oligobuninae) from the Early Miocene of North America

    PubMed Central

    Valenciano, Alberto; Baskin, Jon A.; Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Álvarez-Sierra, M. Ángeles; Morales, Jorge; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We describe cranial and mandibular remains of three undescribed individuals of the giant mustelid Megalictis ferox Matthew, 1907 from the latest Arikareean (Ar4), Early Miocene mammal fauna of Nebraska, and Wyoming (USA) housed at the American Museum of Natural History (New York, USA). Our phylogenetic hypothesis indicates that Ar4 specimens assigned to M. ferox constitute a monophyletic group. We assign three additional species previously referred to Paroligobunis to Megalictis: M. simplicidens, M. frazieri, and “M.” petersoni. The node containing these four species of Megalictis and Oligobunis forms the Oligobuninae. We test the hypothesis that Oligobuninae (Megalictis and Oligobunis) is a stem mustelid taxon. Our results indicate that the Oligobuninae form the sister clade to the crown extant mustelids. Based on the cranium, M. ferox is a jaguar-size mustelid and the largest terrestrial mustelid known to have existed. This new material also sheds light on a new ecomorphological interpretation of M. ferox as a bone-crushing durophage (similar to hyenas), rather than a cat-like hypercarnivore, as had been previously described. The relative large size of M. ferox, together with a stout rostrum and mandible made it one of the more powerful predators of the Early Miocene of the Great Plains of North America. PMID:27054570

  1. Megalictis, the Bone-Crushing Giant Mustelid (Carnivora, Mustelidae, Oligobuninae) from the Early Miocene of North America.

    PubMed

    Valenciano, Alberto; Baskin, Jon A; Abella, Juan; Pérez-Ramos, Alejandro; Álvarez-Sierra, M Ángeles; Morales, Jorge; Hartstone-Rose, Adam

    2016-01-01

    We describe cranial and mandibular remains of three undescribed individuals of the giant mustelid Megalictis ferox Matthew, 1907 from the latest Arikareean (Ar4), Early Miocene mammal fauna of Nebraska, and Wyoming (USA) housed at the American Museum of Natural History (New York, USA). Our phylogenetic hypothesis indicates that Ar4 specimens assigned to M. ferox constitute a monophyletic group. We assign three additional species previously referred to Paroligobunis to Megalictis: M. simplicidens, M. frazieri, and "M." petersoni. The node containing these four species of Megalictis and Oligobunis forms the Oligobuninae. We test the hypothesis that Oligobuninae (Megalictis and Oligobunis) is a stem mustelid taxon. Our results indicate that the Oligobuninae form the sister clade to the crown extant mustelids. Based on the cranium, M. ferox is a jaguar-size mustelid and the largest terrestrial mustelid known to have existed. This new material also sheds light on a new ecomorphological interpretation of M. ferox as a bone-crushing durophage (similar to hyenas), rather than a cat-like hypercarnivore, as had been previously described. The relative large size of M. ferox, together with a stout rostrum and mandible made it one of the more powerful predators of the Early Miocene of the Great Plains of North America. PMID:27054570

  2. A new Middle Miocene tarsier from Thailand and the reconstruction of its orbital morphology using a geometric–morphometric method

    PubMed Central

    Chaimanee, Yaowalak; Lebrun, Renaud; Yamee, Chotima; Jaeger, Jean-Jacques

    2011-01-01

    Tarsius is an extant genus of primates endemic to the islands of Southeast Asia that is characterized by enormously enlarged orbits reflecting its nocturnal activity pattern. Tarsiers play a pivotal role in reconstructing primate phylogeny, because they appear to comprise, along with Anthropoidea, one of only two extant haplorhine clades. Their fossils are extremely rare. Here, we describe a new species of Tarsius from the Middle Miocene of Thailand. We reconstructed aspects of its orbital morphology using a geometric–morphometric method. The result shows that the new species of Tarsius had a very large orbit (falling within the range of variation of modern Tarsius) with a high degree of frontation and a low degree of convergence. Its relatively divergent lower premolar roots suggest a longer mesial tooth row and therefore a longer muzzle than in extant species. The new species documents a previous unknown Miocene group of Tarsius, indicating greater taxonomic diversity and morphological complexity during tarsier evolution. The current restriction of tarsiers to offshore islands in Southeast Asia appears to be a relatively recent phenomenon. PMID:21123264

  3. Late Miocene lineage divergence and ecological differentiation of rare endemic Juniperus blancoi: clues for the diversification of North American conifers.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Letelier, Alejandra; Mastretta-Yanes, Alicia; Barraclough, Timothy G

    2014-07-01

    Western North America and Mexico contain a large number of conifer species. This diversity could be the product of orographic and climate changes of the late Tertiary and Quaternary. In this study, we focus on the evolutionary history of Juniperus blancoi, in order to determine the impact of climate change and environmental heterogeneity on population differentiation. We estimated the population structure, phylogenetic relationships and historical demography of J. blancoi populations using nuclear genes. We correlated genetic structure with ecological differentiation, divergence times and changes in population size. Populations of J. blancoi are differentiated into three lineages that correspond to low-, mid- and high-altitude populations. The three groups diversified in the late Miocene, early Pliocene, with only a few events of gene flow since then. Two lineages in the north exhibited a pattern of population growth during the Pleistocene that could be linked to climate changes. Populations of J. blancoi experienced significant ecological differentiation and early divergence events, which correspond to periods of global cooling and mountain uplift during the Miocene. This suggests that mountain ranges in tropical and subtropical latitudes play an important role in the speciation and persistence of conifer taxa in diversity hotspots, by providing diverse environmental conditions. PMID:24611638

  4. A new genus and species of Planopinae (Xenarthra: Tardigrada) from the Miocene of Santa Cruz Province, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Carlini, Alfredo A; Brandoni, Diego; Dal Molin, Carlos N

    2013-01-01

    Prepoplanops boleadorensis, a new genus and species of Planopinae (Xenarthra, Tardigrada), is described herein. The new taxon is based on a nearly complete specimen recovered from the Cerro Boleadoras Formation (Miocene, Rio Zeballos Group), in northwestern Santa Cruz Province, Argentina. The shape and length of the predentary region of the skull and the length of the diastema of Prepoplanops boleadorensis differ from those present in the species of Planops. The posterolateral opening of the mandibular canal and the position of the posterior margin of the mandibular symphysis differ from those of species of Prepotherium. In addition, Prepoplanops boleadorensis differs from Planops martini in the size of the humeral tuberosities, the development of the deltoid crest, the position of the distal margin of the humeral trochlea, the shape and position of the olecranon, the development of the femoral epicondyles, and the shape of the medial margins of the patellar trochlea and medial condyle. On the other hand, it differs from Prepotherium potens in the shape of the medial margin of the medial condyle. The recognition of Prepoplanops boleadorensis increases the diversity of Planopinae for the Miocene of Patagonia, Argentina. PMID:26312311

  5. A new genus of the family Jaculinidae (Cheilostomata, Bryozoa) from the Miocene of the tropical western Atlantic.

    PubMed

    Zágoršek, Kamil; Ramalho, Laís V; Berning, Björn; De Araújo Távora, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    Pirabasoporella gen. nov. is introduced for three new bryozoan species from the Early Miocene of the tropical western Atlantic. The genus is placed in the family Jaculinidae Zabala, a peculiar group of cheilostome bryozoans characterised by reticulate colonies formed by uni- or biserial branches that are connected by kenozooidal struts. This colonial morphology superficially resembles colonies of the Paleozoic order Fenestrata (Stenolaemata) and some Recent Cyclostomata. As jaculinid colonies are anchored to soft sediments via rhizoids, however, they differ in life habit from Paleozoic and modern fenestrate colonies, which are firmly attached to stable substrata by an encrusting base.        The three new species are Pirabasoporella atalaiaensis n. sp. from the Brazilian Pirabas Formation, Pirabasoporella baitoae n. sp. from the Baitoa Formation (Dominican Republic), and Pirabasoporella chipolae n. sp. from the Floridan Chipola Formation. Their presence in the Early Miocene western Atlantic represents the earliest record of Jaculinidae, and suggests that the origin of the family, the only living species of which are known from the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea, extends well into the Paleogene.        The Jaculinidae is here transferred from the lepraliomorph superfamily Schizoporelloidea Jullien to the umbonulomorph Lepralielloidea Vigneaux owing to the partly umbonuloid frontal shield and non-schizoporelloid ovicell. PMID:25081761

  6. Deformation of the late Miocene to Pliocene Inyo Surface, eastern Sierra region, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jayko, A.S.

    2009-01-01

    A middle and late Miocene erosion surface, the Inyo Surface, underlies late Miocene mafic flows in the White Mountains and late Miocene and (or) early Pliocene flows elsewhere in the eastern Sierra region. The Inyo Surface is correlated with an erosion surface that underlies late Miocene mafic flows in the central and northern Sierra Nevada. The mafic flows had outpourings similar to flood basalts, although of smaller volume, providing paleohorizontal and paleolowland indicators. The flows filed and locally topped the existing landscape forming broad plateau-like flats. Topographic relief in the region was characterized by weathered and rounded slopesp rior to late Miocene mafic magmatism. Relicts of the older landscape lie adjacent to late Miocene and early Pliocene basalt-covered lowlands that now occur within the crests of ranges that have 2500-3000 m relief and dramatically steep escarpments. Late Miocene mafic flows that lie on the crest of the Sierra Nevada adjacent to the White Mountains predate significant activity on the Sierra Nevada frontal fault zone. These deposits and accompanying erosion surfaces provide excellent strain markers for reconstructing part of the Walker Lane north of the Garlock fault and west of the Amargosa drainage, here referred to as the eastern Sierra region. The Inyo Surface is a compound erosional surface that records at least four major erosion events during the Cenozoic. These four surfaces were first recognized on the Kern Plateau and named from oldest to youngest, the Summit Upland, the Subsummit Plateau, the Chagoopa Plateau, and the Canyon. The three older surfaces have also been subsequently modifi ed by Pleistocene glaciation. The compound erosion surface, which is locally overlain by late Miocene mafic flows in the northern and central Sierra Nevada, is here referred to as the Lindgren Surface. Correlatives in the eastern Sierra region are found in the White Mountains, Inyo Mountains, Darwin Plateau, Coso Range, and nearby ranges. Copyright ?? 2009 The Geological Society of America.

  7. Widespread Miocene deep-sea hiatuses: coincidence with periods of global cooling.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, J.A.; Keller, G.

    1982-01-01

    High-resolution biostratigraphic analyses of Miocene deep-sea cores reveal eight intervals of widespread hiatuses in the world ocean. In complete sections these hiatuses correspond to intervals of cool faunal and floral assemblages, rapid enrichment of delta 18O, and sea-level regressions. These factors suggest that Miocene deep-sea hiatuses result from an increased intensity of circulation and corrosiveness of bottom currents during periods of increased polar refrigeration.-Authors

  8. Astrochronology of the Mediterranean Early and Middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hüsing, Silja Katherine; Hilgen, Frederik; Krijgsman, Wout; Turco, Elena

    2013-04-01

    An accurate high-resolution astronomical time scale is of crucial importance in Earth Sciences. It allows not only to reconstruct astronomical climate forcing but also to precisely date geological events, to determine rates of changes, and to discriminate between cause and effect related to fundamental processes controlling Earth's history. The accuracy, precision and resolution of the geological time scale for the Neogene have improved considerably over the last decades, thanks to the combination of an integrated stratigraphic approach and astronomical tuning, which resulted in the "Astronomically Tuned Neogene Time Scale" (ATNTS2004, ATNTS2012). The most recent ATNTS2012 (Gradstein et al. 2012) includes direct astronomical ages for chron boundaries back to ~15 Ma based on the tuning of marine successions from the Mediterranean. Reversal ages for the interval between 15 and 23 Ma were calculated from a seafloor-spreading-rate history model in combination with limited astronomical control. Completing the Neogene time scale should be exclusively based on deep marine sections. The most suitable section in the Mediterranean is the Monte dei Corvi-La Vedova-Spiaggia della Scalaccia composite section near Ancona in Italy as an integrated stratigraphy and astronomical tuning has been established for the Late to Middle Miocene interval (Hüsing et al. 2007, 2009, 2010, Mourik et al. 2010, Turco et al. 2011). The resultant astronomically tuned reversal ages have already been incorporated into the GTS (Gradstein et al. 2012). The section has now been further extended into the Early Miocene along the cliffs near Ancona (Spiaggia della Scalaccia composite section). We will present our high-resolution integrated stratigraphy including cyclostratigraphy, biostratigraphy, magnetostratigraphy, colour and elemental proxy records. The sedimentary cycle pattern is very complex in this interval, and we thus use the detailed colour and elemental proxy records to achieve a match with an astronomical target curve, which is different to the nominal astronomical solution. The astronomical tuning in turn provides accurate numerical ages for reversal boundaries, which, we suggest, should replace the existing ages in the ATNTS2012.

  9. Evolution of a Miocene sag basin in the Alboran Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Do Couto, D.; Gorini, C.; Jolivet, L.; Letouzey, J.; Smit, J.; d'Acremont, E.; Auxietre, J. L.; Le Pourhiet, L.; Estrada, F.; Elabassi, M.; Ammar, A.; Jabour, H.; Vendeville, B.

    2012-04-01

    The Alboran domain represents the westernmost termination of the peri-Mediterranean Alpine orogen. Its arcuate shape, delimited to the North by the Betic range and to the South by the Rif range, is the result of subduction, collision and slab migration processes. During the Neogene, several sedimentary basins formed on the Betics metamorphic basement, mainly due to the extensional collapse of the previously thickened crust of the Betic-Rif belt. The major sedimentary depocentre, the Western Alboran Basin (WAB), is surrounded by the Gibraltar arc, the volcanic Djibouti mounts and the Alboran ridge, and is partly affected by shale tectonics and associated mud volcanism. High-quality 2-D seismic profiles acquired along the Moroccan margin during the last decade reveal a complete history of the basin. Our study deals with the analysis of seismic profiles oriented parallel and orthogonal to the Mediterranean Moroccan margin. The stratigraphy was calibrated using well data from offshore Spain and Morocco. Our study focuses particularly on the tectono-stratigraphic reconstruction of the basin. The formation of the WAB began in the Early Miocene (Aquitanian - Burdigalian). A massive unit of Early Miocene to Lower Langhian shales and olistostromes forms a thick mobile décollement layer that controls and accommodates deformation of the basin fill. From the Upper Langhian to the Upper Tortonian, the basin is filled by a thick sequence of siliciclastic deposits. Stratigraphic geometries identified on seismic data clearly indicate that deformation of the basin fill started during deposition of Upper Langhian to the Upper Tortonian clastics. Shale tectonic deformation was re-activated recently, during the Messinian desiccation of the Mediterranean Sea (and the following catastrophic Pliocene reflooding) or during the Quaternary contourite deposition The sedimentary layers gently dip towards the basin centre and "onlaps" onto the basin margin, especially onto the basement high that bounds the basin toward the East. The contacts observed between the sediment and the basement reflectors are purely stratigraphic. These observations confirm that the geometry is essentially that of a sag basin. We discuss all these stratigraphic observations in the scope of the geodynamic evolution of the eastern and western Alboran basin and the extension recorded onshore during the basin development time interval.

  10. Miocene Slab Detachment in Central Mexico: Causes and Consequences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, L.

    2002-12-01

    I propose that the lower part of the Farallon slab subducted beneath Mexico has detached twice during the Miocene. Initiation of slab detachment is a consequence of the incoming of increasingly buoyant oceanic crust at the paleotrench off Baja California and, eventually, the capture by the Pacific plate of the microplates left over by the Farallon plate that produced a retrograde motion of the shallow part of the slab. Our first integration of the geology of the whole central Mexico reveals a number of features that support the detachment model and allow inferring the location through time of these events. A main consequence of detachments is the influx of hotter and geochemically enriched sub-slab material into the slab-free area. The process is thus expected to generate a pulse of volcanism and a geochemically heterogeneous mantle wedge. A first detachment is inferred to have begun shortly before the contact between the Pacific and North America plate at 28.5 Ma. A tear in the slab propagated to the SSE, producing a transient thermal anomaly, ignimbrite flare up, and extension at ~24-20 Ma in the southern Sierra Madre Occidental. A second detachment event is inferred as a result of the end of subduction off the southern half of Baja California at 12.5 Ma. In this case the slab detached from the southern Gulf of California toward the ESE, paralleling the southern Mexico trench system. This event caused an eastward migrating mafic pulse of volcanism, presently observed in the northern part of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB), between 11 and 7 Ma. New geochronological and geochemical data suggest the continuation of the detachment to the SSE in Veracruz state (Sierra de Tantima, Alamo, Poza Rica, Palma Sola and Los Tuxtlas volcanic fields). The occurrence of OIB volcanism in the TMVB since the end of Miocene is explained by the influx of enriched asthenospheric material into the gap formed by the detachment, enhanced by the corner flow induced by the continuing subduction. Slowing convergence of the Rivera and Cocos plate with respect to North America after ~10 Ma is a likely consequence of the loss of slab pull following the last detachment event. Our case study suggests that mantle dynamic is driven from above (subducting plate) and that slab detachment may produce a plume-like thermal/magmatic effect in the upper plate.

  11. Early Miocene origin and cryptic diversification of South American salamanders

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The currently recognized species richness of South American salamanders is surprisingly low compared to North and Central America. In part, this low richness may be due to the salamanders being a recent arrival to South America. Additionally, the number of South American salamander species may be underestimated because of cryptic diversity. The aims of our present study were to infer evolutionary relationships, lineage diversity, and timing of divergence of the South American Bolitoglossa using mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data from specimens primarily from localities in the Andes and upper Amazon Basin. We also estimated time of colonization of South America to test whether it is consistent with arrival via the Panamanian Isthmus, or land bridge connection, at its traditionally assumed age of 3 million years. Results Divergence time estimates suggest that Bolitoglossa arrived in South America from Central America by at least the Early Miocene, ca. 23.6 MYA (95% HPD 15.9-30.3 MYA), and subsequently diversified. South American salamanders of the genus Bolitoglossa show strong phylogeographic structure at fine geographic scales and deep divergences at the mitochondrial gene cytochrome b (Cytb) and high diversity at the nuclear recombination activating gene-1 (Rag1). Species often contain multiple genetically divergent lineages that are occasionally geographically overlapping. Single specimens from two southeastern localities in Ecuador are sister to the equatoriana-peruviana clade and genetically distinct from all other species investigated to date. Another single exemplar from the Andes of northwestern Ecuador is highly divergent from all other specimens and is sister to all newly studied samples. Nevertheless, all sampled species of South American Bolitoglossa are members of a single clade that is one of several constituting the subgenus Eladinea, one of seven subgenera in this large genus. Conclusions The ancestors of South American salamanders likely arrived at least by the Early Miocene, well before the completion of the Late Pliocene Panamanian land bridge (widely accepted as ca. 3 MYA). This date is in agreement with recent, controversial, arguments that an older, perhaps short-lived, land connection may have existed between South America and present-day Panama 23–25 MYA. Since its arrival in South America, Bolitoglossa has diversified more extensively than previously presumed and currently includes several cryptic species within a relatively small geographic area. Rather than two upper Amazonian species currently recorded for this region, we propose that at least eight should be recognized, although these additional lineages remain to be formally described. PMID:23497060

  12. Late Miocene ignimbrites at the southern Puna-northern Sierras Pampeanas border (˜27°S): Stratigraphic correlation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero-López, Carolina; Guzmán, Silvina; Barrios, Fabiola

    2015-10-01

    New field observations and petrographic and geochemical data of pyroclastic deposits exposed along the Las Papas valley (border between southern Puna and northern Sierras Pampeanas, Argentina) and further north, lead us to propose a new stratigraphic correlation and classification of the late Miocene volcanism in this area. We redefine the Las Papas, Las Juntas, Aguada Alumbrera and Rosada ignimbrites and define the Agua Caliente and Del Medio ignimbrites. The whole set of ignimbrites are rhyolites and less frequently dacites of calc-alkaline affinity. In the present contribution we divide ignimbrites into the Agua Negra and Rincón groups, based mainly on their geochemical signature. The Agua Negra Group is formed by the Las Papas and Las Juntas ignimbrites, indurated and welded, lithic-rich, with crystal-poor pumices and crystal-rich matrix. The Rincón Group comprises the Agua Caliente, Aguada Alumbrera, Rosada and Del Medio ignimbrites, with variable welding degrees, lithic and crystal content. The greater enrichment of crystals in the matrix in comparison with the crystal content in pumices indicates significant elutriation during flow transport and thus volume estimations are to be considered lower bounds for the actual erupted volume. The total minimum estimated volume for the ignimbrites of the Agua Negra and Rincón groups is 2.8 km3 (2.3 km3 DRE). Field relationships and new analytical data indicate that the different acid ignimbrites that crop out in this small area are related to at least two different magma chambers. The widespread Quaternary volcanism in this area covers the older deposits, thus making it difficult to recognize the volcanic centers that produced these late Miocene ignimbrites.

  13. Miocene karst drainage system: seismic stratigraphy of the continental shelf west of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    Herbert, J.A.

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution geophysical data recorded on the continental shelf west of Tampa Bay, Florida show three stratigraphic units: Holocene, Plio-Pleistocene, and Miocene. Within the Miocene unit is an expansive drainage system extending about 80 kilometers offshore. In most areas, a system such as this would typically be characterized as a paleo-fluvial system. Although this drainage system probably initiated fluvially, geophysical data showing much evidence of karstification suggest that this system probably formed on the inner shelf as a result of large scale dissolution and collapse of Miocene limestones during lowered sea-level. The overlying Plio-Pleistocene unit infills the Miocene drainage system, while exiguously covering Miocene rocks in areas where the system is absent. Deposition of this unit probably took place during high-stands of sea-level, followed by erosion and transport of sediment farther offshore, exposing Miocene rocks. The Holocene unit sporadically covers underlying units throughout the study area. Sediments making up this unit have been reworked into several bedform types probably resulting from various boundary layer flow events such as hurricanes, storms, currents and tides. This scenario is probably not unique to the continental shelf west of Tampa Bay, Florida, but may also characterize other karstic shelves where paleo-fluvial processes were previously thought to be the dominant mechanism forming paleo-coastal drainage systems.

  14. Paleoecology of middle and late Miocene Monterey Formation, Upper Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California

    SciTech Connect

    Carlos, A.P.; Douglas, R.G.

    1986-07-01

    The Miocene Monterey Formation exposed along the cliffs of Upper Newport Bay represents a lower calcareous facies dominated by foraminifera and coccoliths, indicating warm climate and low nutrient waters, and a siliceous facies consisting of diatomaceous rocks, which records high productivity as a result of climatic deterioration and intensified upwelling. Using the distribution and preservation of foraminifera in the California continental borderland basins as a modern analog, they interpret the effect of changing environmental (climatic and oceanographic) conditions during the middle and late Miocene on the distribution and preservation of foraminifera, calcareous nannofossils, radiolarians, diatoms, and sediments. Two stratigraphic sections were sampled: (1) middle Miocene (Luisian) section 1, and (2) late Miocene (upper Mohnian) section 2. Section 1 best correlates with the middle Miocene Sphenolithus heteromorphus nannofossil zone. Benthic foraminifera indicate deposition in upper bathyal to upper middle bathyal depths. Poor preservation of calcareous tests is generally associated with homogeneous sediments, whereas better preservation is correlated with indistinctly laminated rocks. Stratigraphic section 2, which accumulated in upper bathyal depths, covers parts of the early late Miocene (upper Mohnian) Denticulopsis hustedtii-D. lauta and D. hustedtii diatom zones. Foraminifera and nannofossils are generally more abundant and better preserved in well laminated sediments than in sediments with homogeneous to indistinct laminations. Benthic foraminifera favoring low oxygen conditions have low diversities in rocks with poorly preserved laminations, but have higher densities in well laminated intervals.

  15. The biostratigraphic basis for Gulf Coast Miocene sequence stratigraphy

    SciTech Connect

    Shaffer, B.L.; Pacht, J.A.; Bowen, B.E. )

    1991-03-01

    A chronostratigraphic framework was developed as a prelude to a regional sequence stratigraphic and associated systems tracts analysis of the offshore Louisiana and Texas Miocene. The integrated data base for this study included over 10,000 line mi of seismic data, 230 wireline logs, and detailed biostratigraphic analyses on 35 wells. The objective of the study was to map systems tracts and facies that may help delineate prospective areas. Because they are a fundamental stratigraphic unit within a sequence, this framework emphasizes condensed sections and their calibration by microfossil highest occurrence datums. Condensed sections have been delineated utilizing planktonic foraminiferal and calcareous nannofossil abundance and species diversity patterns, as well as detailed paleo-water depth determinations based on benthic foraminiferal biofacies. Pitfalls in the use of condensed sections may arise in shallow paleoshelf settings where datums may be unreliable, and in deeper environments where multiple abundance/diversity peaks may occur. However, an event stratigraphic scheme is generally the most satisfactory method for overcoming correlation problems inherent in the Gulf Coast unstable prograding shelf margin.

  16. Deposition and diagenesis of Miocene limestones, Senkang Basin, Sulawesi, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayall, M. J.; Cox, M.

    1988-09-01

    Miocene Knoll-reef limestones form gas reservoirs in the East Senkang Basin of southwest Sulawesi. They are composed predominantly of packstones and wackestones, but grainstones and boundstones also occur. Uplift and exposure of the reef occurred during deposition. This, together with burial, resulted in dissolution of bioclasts, precipitation of meniscus and blocky spar cements, extensive fissuring of the rock and filling of the fissures by internal sediment, predominantly carbonate silts. The meniscus cements are unusual in that they occur mostly within biomouldic pores, particularly after corals. The meniscus form of the cement may be a result of air bubbles trapped within the complex pore-system formed from the dissolution of corals. The fissures, which are probably a product of fracturing associated with local fault movements, form complex networks linking biomouldic pores. Carbonate internal sediments, mostly crystal silt but also pelleted, which form thin graded layers in places, completely fill the fissures and adjacent biomouldic pores. These features, in association with bioclasts dissolution and meniscus cements, suggest a vadose origin. This interpretation is supported by the variation in the ɛ 180 and ɛ 130 stable isotope values of the internal sediment compared with the depositional matrix. Equant sparry calcite cements are locally extensive. On the basis of only moderately depleted ɛ 80 values and elevated strontium values they are tentatively interpreted to be of marine phreatic origin.

  17. Resource partitioning among top predators in a Miocene food web

    PubMed Central

    Domingo, M. Soledad; Domingo, Laura; Badgley, Catherine; Sanisidro, Oscar; Morales, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The exceptional fossil sites of Cerro de los Batallones (Madrid Basin, Spain) contain abundant remains of Late Miocene mammals. From these fossil assemblages, we have inferred diet, resource partitioning and habitat of three sympatric carnivorous mammals based on stable isotopes. The carnivorans include three apex predators: two sabre-toothed cats (Felidae) and a bear dog (Amphicyonidae). Herbivore and carnivore carbon isotope (δ13C) values from tooth enamel imply the presence of a woodland ecosystem dominated by C3 plants. δ13C values and mixing-model analyses suggest that the two sabre-toothed cats, one the size of a leopard and the other the size of a tiger, consumed herbivores with similar δ13C values from a more wooded portion of the ecosystem. The two sabre-toothed cats probably hunted prey of different body sizes, and the smaller species could have used tree cover to avoid encounters with the larger felid. For the bear dog, δ13C values are higher and differ significantly from those of the sabre-toothed cats, suggesting a diet that includes prey from more open woodland. Coexistence of the sabre-toothed cats and the bear dog was likely facilitated by prey capture in different portions of the habitat. This study demonstrates the utility of stable isotope analysis for investigating the behaviour and ecology of members of past carnivoran guilds. PMID:23135673

  18. Resource partitioning among top predators in a Miocene food web.

    PubMed

    Domingo, M Soledad; Domingo, Laura; Badgley, Catherine; Sanisidro, Oscar; Morales, Jorge

    2013-01-01

    The exceptional fossil sites of Cerro de los Batallones (Madrid Basin, Spain) contain abundant remains of Late Miocene mammals. From these fossil assemblages, we have inferred diet, resource partitioning and habitat of three sympatric carnivorous mammals based on stable isotopes. The carnivorans include three apex predators: two sabre-toothed cats (Felidae) and a bear dog (Amphicyonidae). Herbivore and carnivore carbon isotope (δ(13)C) values from tooth enamel imply the presence of a woodland ecosystem dominated by C(3) plants. δ(13)C values and mixing-model analyses suggest that the two sabre-toothed cats, one the size of a leopard and the other the size of a tiger, consumed herbivores with similar δ(13)C values from a more wooded portion of the ecosystem. The two sabre-toothed cats probably hunted prey of different body sizes, and the smaller species could have used tree cover to avoid encounters with the larger felid. For the bear dog, δ(13)C values are higher and differ significantly from those of the sabre-toothed cats, suggesting a diet that includes prey from more open woodland. Coexistence of the sabre-toothed cats and the bear dog was likely facilitated by prey capture in different portions of the habitat. This study demonstrates the utility of stable isotope analysis for investigating the behaviour and ecology of members of past carnivoran guilds. PMID:23135673

  19. Late Oligocene-early Miocene birth of the Taklimakan Desert.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Hongbo; Wei, Xiaochun; Tada, Ryuji; Clift, Peter D; Wang, Bin; Jourdan, Fred; Wang, Ping; He, Mengying

    2015-06-23

    As the world's second largest sand sea and one of the most important dust sources to the global aerosol system, the formation of the Taklimakan Desert marks a major environmental event in central Asia during the Cenozoic. Determining when and how the desert formed holds the key to better understanding the tectonic-climatic linkage in this critical region. However, the age of the Taklimakan remains controversial, with the dominant view being from ∼ 3.4 Ma to ∼ 7 Ma based on magnetostratigraphy of sedimentary sequences within and along the margins of the desert. In this study, we applied radioisotopic methods to precisely date a volcanic tuff preserved in the stratigraphy. We constrained the initial desertification to be late Oligocene to early Miocene, between ∼ 26.7 Ma and 22.6 Ma. We suggest that the Taklimakan Desert was formed as a response to a combination of widespread regional aridification and increased erosion in the surrounding mountain fronts, both of which are closely linked to the tectonic uplift of the Tibetan-Pamir Plateau and Tian Shan, which had reached a climatically sensitive threshold at this time. PMID:26056281

  20. Late Oligocene–early Miocene birth of the Taklimakan Desert

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Hongbo; Wei, Xiaochun; Tada, Ryuji; Clift, Peter D.; Wang, Bin; Jourdan, Fred; Wang, Ping; He, Mengying

    2015-01-01

    As the world’s second largest sand sea and one of the most important dust sources to the global aerosol system, the formation of the Taklimakan Desert marks a major environmental event in central Asia during the Cenozoic. Determining when and how the desert formed holds the key to better understanding the tectonic–climatic linkage in this critical region. However, the age of the Taklimakan remains controversial, with the dominant view being from ∼3.4 Ma to ∼7 Ma based on magnetostratigraphy of sedimentary sequences within and along the margins of the desert. In this study, we applied radioisotopic methods to precisely date a volcanic tuff preserved in the stratigraphy. We constrained the initial desertification to be late Oligocene to early Miocene, between ∼26.7 Ma and 22.6 Ma. We suggest that the Taklimakan Desert was formed as a response to a combination of widespread regional aridification and increased erosion in the surrounding mountain fronts, both of which are closely linked to the tectonic uplift of the Tibetan–Pamir Plateau and Tian Shan, which had reached a climatically sensitive threshold at this time. PMID:26056281

  1. Hydrologic cycling over Antarctica during the middle Miocene warming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feakins, Sarah J.; Warny, Sophie; Lee, Jung-Eun

    2012-08-01

    From 20 to 15 million years (Myr) ago, a period of global warmth reversed the previous ice growth on Antarctica, leading to the retreat of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet and the contraction of the East Antarctic Ice Sheet. Pollen recovered from the Antarctic shelf indicates the presence of substantial vegetation on the margins of Antarctica 15.7Myr ago. However, the hydrologic regime that supported this vegetation is unclear. Here we combine leaf-wax hydrogen isotopes and pollen assemblages from Ross Sea sediments with model simulations to reconstruct vegetation, precipitation and temperature in Antarctica during the middle Miocene. Average leaf-wax stable hydrogen isotope (δD) values from 20 to 15.5Myr ago translate to average δD values of -50‰ for precipitation at the margins of Antarctica, higher than modern values. We find that vegetation persisted from 20 to 15.5Myr ago, with peak expansions 16.4 and 15.7Myr ago coinciding with peak global warmth and vegetation growth. Our model experiments are consistent with a local moisture source in the Southern Ocean. Combining proxy measurements with climate simulations, we conclude that summer temperatures were about 11°C warmer than today, and that there was a substantial increase in moisture delivery to the Antarctic coast.

  2. Porosity evolution of upper Miocene reefs, Almeria Province, Southern Spain

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, A.K.; Snavely, P.D. Jr.; Addicott, W.O.

    1980-02-01

    In the reef cores and fore-reef breccia beds, porosity in both primary and postdepositional. Primary porosity is of three types: (a) boring clam holes in the scleractinian coral heads, cemented reef rocks, and breccias; (b) intraparticle porosity within the corals, Halimeda plates, and vermetid worm tubes; and (c) interparticle porosity between bioclastic fragments and in the reef breccia. Postdepositional moldic porosity was formed by the solution of aragonitic material such as molluscan and coral fragments. The Polomo reef carbonate rocks have high porosity and permeability, and retain a great amount of depositional porosity. Pores range in size from a few micrometers to 30 cm. The extensive intercrystalline porosity and high permeability resulted from dolomitization of micritic matrix. Some porosity reduction has occured by incomplete and partial sparry calcite infilling of interparticular, moldic, and intercrystalline voids. The high porosity and permeability of these reefs make them important targets for petroleum exploration in the western Mediterranean off southern Spain. In these offshore areas in the subsuface the volcanic ridge and the Plomo reef complex are locally onlapped or overlapped by 350 m or more of Miocene and Pliocene fine-grained sedimentary rocks. The possibility exists that the buried Plomo reef deposits may form traps for oil and gas in the offshore areas southwest of the type locality. Stratigraphic traps also may occur where the Neogene sequence above the Plomo reef complex onlaps the volcanic ridge. 17 figures.

  3. Late Miocene calcareous nannofossil genus Catinaster: taxonomy, evolution and magnetobiochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peleo-Alampay, A.; Bukry, D.; Liu, L.; Young, J.R.

    1998-01-01

    A systematic study on the evolution and stratigraphic distribution of the species of Catinaster from several DSDP/ODP sites with magnetostratigraphic records is presented. The evolution of Catinaster from Discoaster is established by documentation of a transitional nannofossil species, Dicoaster transitus. Two new subspecies, Catinaster coalitus extensus and Catinaster calyculus rectus are defined which appear to be intermediates in the evolution of Catinaster coalitus coalitus to Catinaster calyculus calyculus. The first occurrence of C. coalitus is shown to be in the lower part of C5n.2n at 10.7-10.9 Ma in the low to mid-latitude Atlantic and Pacific oceans. The last occurrence of C. coalitus coalitus varies from the upper part of C5n.2n to the lower portion of C4A. Magnetobiostratigraphic evidence suggests that the FO of C. calyculus rectus is diachronous. Catinaster mexicanus occurs in the late Miocene and has been found only in the eastern equatorial Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Mexico.

  4. A new species of Metopocetus (Cetacea, Mysticeti, Cetotheriidae) from the Late Miocene of the Netherlands.

    PubMed

    Marx, Felix Georg; Bosselaers, Mark E J; Louwye, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The family Cetotheriidae has played a major role in recent discussions of baleen whale phylogenetics. Within this group, the enigmatic, monotypic Metopocetus durinasus has been interpreted as transitional between herpetocetines and other members of the family, but so far has been restricted to a single, fragmentary cranium of uncertain provenance and age. Here, we expand the genus and shed new light on its phylogenetic affinities and functional morphology by describing Metopocetus hunteri sp. nov. from the Late Miocene of the Netherlands. Unlike the holotype of M. durinasus, the material described here is confidently dated and preserves both the tympanic bulla and additional details of the basicranium. M. hunteri closely resembles M. durinasus, differing primarily in its somewhat less distally expanded compound posterior process of the tympanoperiotic. Both species are characterised by the development of an unusually large fossa on the ventral surface of the paroccipital process, which extends anteriorly on to the compound posterior process and completely floors the facial sulcus. In life, this enlarged fossa may have housed the posterior sinus and/or the articulation of the stylohyal. Like other cetotheriids, Metopocetus also bears a well-developed, posteriorly-pointing dorsal infraorbital foramen near the base of the ascending process of the maxilla, the precise function of which remains unclear. PMID:26835183

  5. Subcellular preservation in giant ostracod sperm from an early Miocene cave deposit in Australia

    PubMed Central

    Matzke-Karasz, Renate; Neil, John V.; Smith, Robin J.; Symonová, Radka; Mořkovský, Libor; Archer, Michael; Hand, Suzanne J.; Cloetens, Peter; Tafforeau, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Cypridoidean ostracods are one of a number of animal taxa that reproduce with giant sperm, up to 10 000 µm in length, but they are the only group to have aflagellate, filamentous giant sperm. The evolution and function of this highly unusual feature of reproduction with giant sperm are currently unknown. The hypothesis of long-term evolutionary persistence of this kind of reproduction has never been tested. We here report giant sperm discovered by propagation phase contrast X-ray synchrotron micro- and nanotomography, preserved in five Miocene ostracod specimens from Queensland, Australia. The specimens belong to the species Heterocypris collaris Matzke-Karasz et al. 2013 (one male and three females) and Newnhamia mckenziana Matzke-Karasz et al. 2013 (one female). The sperm are not only the oldest petrified gametes on record, but include three-dimensional subcellular preservation. We provide direct evidence that giant sperm have been a feature of this taxon for at least 16 Myr and provide an additional criterion (i.e. longevity) to test hypotheses relating to origin and function of giant sperm in the animal kingdom. We further argue that the highly resistant, most probably chitinous coats of giant ostracod sperm may play a role in delaying decay processes, favouring early mineralization of soft tissue. PMID:24827442

  6. Miocene dispersal drives island radiations in the palm tribe Trachycarpeae (Arecaceae).

    PubMed

    Bacon, Christine D; Baker, William J; Simmons, Mark P

    2012-05-01

    The study of three island groups of the palm tribe Trachycarpeae (Arecaceae/Palmae) permits both the analysis of each independent radiation and comparisons across the tribe to address general processes that drive island diversification. Phylogenetic relationships of Trachycarpeae were inferred from three plastid and three low-copy nuclear genes. The incongruent topological position of Brahea in CISP5 was hypothesized to be caused by a gene duplication event and was addressed using uninode coding. The resulting phylogenetic trees were well-resolved and the genera were all highly supported except for Johannesteijsmannia and Serenoa. Divergence time analysis estimated the stem of the tribe to be approximately 86 Ma and the crown to be 38 Ma, indicating that significant extinction may have occurred along this branch. Historical biogeographic analysis suggested that Trachycarpeae are of southern North American, Central American, or Caribbean origin and supports previous hypotheses of a Laurasian origin. The biogeography and disjunctions within the tribe were interpreted with respect to divergence times, the fossil record, and geological factors such as the formation of the Greater Antilles--Aves Ridge, the Bering and the North Atlantic land bridges, tectonic movement in Southeast Asia, climatic shifts between the Eocene and Pliocene, and volcanism in the Pacific basin. In considering the three major island radiations within Trachycarpeae, Miocene dispersal appears to have been the driving force in allopatric speciation and is highlighted here as an emerging pattern across the tree of life. PMID:22223444

  7. A new species of Metopocetus (Cetacea, Mysticeti, Cetotheriidae) from the Late Miocene of the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Bosselaers, Mark E.J.; Louwye, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    The family Cetotheriidae has played a major role in recent discussions of baleen whale phylogenetics. Within this group, the enigmatic, monotypic Metopocetus durinasus has been interpreted as transitional between herpetocetines and other members of the family, but so far has been restricted to a single, fragmentary cranium of uncertain provenance and age. Here, we expand the genus and shed new light on its phylogenetic affinities and functional morphology by describing Metopocetus hunteri sp. nov. from the Late Miocene of the Netherlands. Unlike the holotype of M. durinasus, the material described here is confidently dated and preserves both the tympanic bulla and additional details of the basicranium. M. hunteri closely resembles M. durinasus, differing primarily in its somewhat less distally expanded compound posterior process of the tympanoperiotic. Both species are characterised by the development of an unusually large fossa on the ventral surface of the paroccipital process, which extends anteriorly on to the compound posterior process and completely floors the facial sulcus. In life, this enlarged fossa may have housed the posterior sinus and/or the articulation of the stylohyal. Like other cetotheriids, Metopocetus also bears a well-developed, posteriorly-pointing dorsal infraorbital foramen near the base of the ascending process of the maxilla, the precise function of which remains unclear. PMID:26835183

  8. Geochemistry of rare earth elements in early-diagenetic miocene phosphatic concretions of Patagonia, Argentina: Phosphogenetic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, A. M.; Scasso, R. A.; Castro, L. N.; Carey, S.

    2007-06-01

    Phosphatic concretions in the Early Miocene, shallow marine, clastic deposits of the Gaiman Formation (Gaiman Fm.) show typical major element ratios, rare earth element (REE) patterns, and total REE contents. These characteristics are similar within different stratigraphic levels and geographic locations of the unit in central-north Patagonia, Argentina and suggest a common process for the origin of the concretions. Major element oxides in concretions are grouped into a "clastic" group (Si, Al, Ti, K and Fe), that mostly corresponds to the silicates in the terrigenous fraction, and an "authigenic" group (P, Ca and total REEs), that corresponds to authigenic francolite and calcite. Mn is the only element that exhibits a separate behavior, most likely because of its high mobility in seawater. Major element ratios in host shales are similar to those of the clastic fraction within the concretions and coquinas. Concretions are slightly depleted in LREEs and slightly enriched in HREEs in comparison to shales and display a weak negative Ce anomaly. Their La/Yb and La/Sm ratios indicate REEs incorporation from pore water without strong postdepositional recrystallization or strong adsorption. Y anomalies and La/Nd ratios in concretions are equivalent to seawater or slightly lower, suggesting that Gaiman concretions did not undergo intense diagenesis, but they were probably formed from phosphatic solutions impoverished in Y and La as a result of REEs release to solution from organic complexes in the early diagenesis. Flat, linear REE patterns also support an early-diagenetic origin for the concretions, via quantitative precipitation of phosphate from oxic-suboxic pore waters. Water circulation through burrows at the Miocene seawater-sediment interface improved ion diffusion and pore water renewal in the sediments, allowing the development of a widened early-diagenetic oxic-suboxic zone and the precipitation of phosphate with a homogeneous REE pattern.

  9. More evidence for a glacial world prior to the middle Miocene oxygen-isotope enrichment event: resolution of early Miocene glacioeustatic sea-level cyclicity from North Carolina

    SciTech Connect

    Synder, S.W.; Synder, S.W.; Waters, V.J.; Steinmetz, J.C.; Hine, A.C.; Riggs, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    Benthic delta/sup 18/O analyses from DSDP sites worldwide have documented a positive excursion (similarly ordered + 1.5%) through the early-middle Miocene. These data are traditionally interpreted as marking the transition from an ice-free world to one that was extensively glaciated. Recently, however, this doctrine has been challenged, and an alternative hypothesis suggests the benthic delta/sup 18/O excursion primarily reflects a temperature drop within a previously glaciated world. Within the North Carolina continental margin, a chronostratigraphic framework consisting of 6 discrete early Miocene depositional sequences was established via stratigraphic interpretations from over 21,000 Km of high-resolution seismic reflection profiles. Each sequence is bound by unconformities which were mapped throughout the continental margin. Biostratigraphic analyses of 140 vibracores penetrating these sequences demonstrate that each sequence is a consequence of 4th-order (10/sup 5/yrs) sea-level cyclicity, similar in duration (100-300 Ka) and amplitude (100-150 m) to the glacioeustatic sea-level fluctuations of the Quaternary Epoch. Recognition of late Burdigalian high-frequency (4th-order) sea-level cyclicity demonstrates that continental ice-sheets were large enough during the early Miocene to drive eustatic sea-level fluctuations with Milankovitch-type periodicities. This further supports Matthews (1984) hypothesis that continental ice-caps existed on Antarctica PRIOR to the well-documented middle Miocene benthic delta/sup 18/O global enrichment event.

  10. Seismic reflection profiling around the hypocentral area of the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake (Mj6.4): Reactivated thrust faulting of a Miocene normal fault.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokokura, T.; Yamaguchi, K.; Kano, N.; Yokota, T.; Tanaka, A.; Ohtaki, T.

    2004-12-01

    The 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu (northern Miyagi) earthquake occurred on July 26, which was preceded by the largest foreshock of Mj5.6 and was followed by the largest aftershock of Mj5.5. Although these earthquakes were not so large in magnitude, they caused large damages. The earthquakes occurred just beneath the Asahiyama hills, where exist the active Asahiyama flexure. Aftershock observations delineate a clear fault plane that extends toward the Sue hills in the east, not toward the Asahiyama hills. However neither surface ruptures nor active fault assocciated with the earthquakes were observed in this region. To clarify both the surface extension of the fault and geologic structure of this region, we conducted 17km-long seismic reflection profiling, using a 17.5-ton vibrator. Geologically, this region was subjected rapid EW extension in middle Miocene and thus produced rift basin was filled by the Matsushima-wan Group (syn-rift sediments) which was bounded by a normal fault, the Ishinomaki-wan fault, in the eastern side of the basin. The Matsushima-wan Group was unconformably overlain by the Shida Group (Miocene post-rift sediments). The Shida Group was unconformably overlain by the Pliocene and post-Pliocene sediments. Deformed Pliocene strata show thrust faulting, indicating EW compression after early Pliocene. Detailed data processing reveals that the seismic profile is essentially concordant with the structure inferred from surface geology. A west-dipping fault with about 50 degrees is found beneath the southeastern extension of the Sue hills where the Ishinomaki-wan fault was supposed to extend. The deeper part of the fault extends toward the earthquake fault plane determined by aftershocks and the shallower part shows a thrust-like structure, which indicate basin inversion using this fault. Thus the 2003 Miyagi-ken Hokubu earthquake occurred as reactivated thrust faulting of the Miocene normal fault bounding the eastern side of the rift basin.

  11. Middle Miocene Hominoids dispersion and radiation: impact of climate and vegetation changes in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamon, N.; Sepulchre, P.; Contoux, C.; Jaeger, J.-J.; Ramstein, G.

    2012-04-01

    The middle Miocene is a time of important climatic changes, and a crucial period for ape's evolution. The Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO), that occurred approximately 17 to 15 Ma, was one of the last global warming event of the Cenozoic. This period also corresponds to the first dispersion of apes from Africa to Europe, which was made possible by tectonic and environmental changes, in particular the expansion of hominoids habitat: (sub-)tropical forest. Following the MMCO, an abrupt global cooling occurred that coincides with an important radiation of European hominoids. The most common view is that the widening of hominoids habitat during the MMCO was the main factor of their dispersion from Africa to Europe. Moreover, the major climatic change that followed induced an opening of the environment because of cooler and dryer conditions, which should have lead to a fragmentation of hominoids' habitat. This imply that hominoids evolved separately in refuges during the end of the Miocene, so the radiation observed in the fossil record of European Miocene apes is interpreted as a divergent evolution in a fragmented habitat. However, no study has yet demonstrated this evolutionary scenario. Our aim is to study the environmental changes during the middle Miocene, in particular climate and vegetation changes, and to link them with these two major events of hominoids' evolution. Using climate and vegetation models, we investigate the role of environmental variation in hominoids' evolution during the middle Miocene, in particular between 17 and 14 Ma. We perform two climatic experiments (16Ma and 14Ma) with the atmospheric general circulation model LMDZ. The results of these experiments will then be used to force the dynamic vegetation model CARAIB. This should help us to simulate hominoids' habitat for the two time period chosen, and to discuss the role of important climate change for Miocene apes evolution.

  12. Regional biostratigraphy and paleoenvironmental history of Miocene of onshore and offshore Alabama

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, C.C. )

    1989-09-01

    Subsurface Miocene sediments of coastal Alabama and the adjoining state and federal waters consist of a clastic wedge varying in thickness from less than 1,000 ft in southern Alabama to a maximum of about 6,000 ft in the northeastern portion of the Main Pass area. Relatively deep-water and open-marine transgressive basal Miocene clays and shales unconformably overlie a gently southwestward-dipping late Oligocene-earliest Miocene carbonate platform. Middle and late Miocene sediments consist of a regressive offlapping sequence of sand and shale deposited in varying neritic paleoenvironments. Analysis of planktonic and benthonic foraminifera has resulted in a refined biostratigraphic zonation of these sediments, permitting the recognition of several regional time-equivalent datum levels, or biohorizons. These biohorizons are shown on a series of subsurface cross sections that show the dramatic southwestward thickening of middle and late Miocene sediments as well as illustrate the relationships of the producing intervals within the Cibicides carstensi and Discorbis 12 interval zones. The paleoenvironmental history of the Miocene has been reconstructed on a series of paleobathymetric maps drawn for selected regional biohorizons. Among other features, these maps have proven the existence and outlined the margins of previously unrecognized shallow-meritic deltaic sediments in southeastern Mobile County and in the Chandeleur and Viosca Knoll (north) areas. Analysis of sedimentation rates, which range from less than 25 to 1,370 ft/m.y., further aids in understanding the coastal shelf, deltaic, and open-marine depositional history of the Miocene of Alabama and the adjoining state and federal waters.

  13. Miocene ungulates and terrestrial primary productivity: Where have all the browsers gone?

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Christine M.; Damuth, John; Theodor, Jessica M.

    2000-01-01

    Progressive changes are observed in both the composition of mammal faunas and vegetation during the Miocene epoch [24–5 mega-annum (Ma)]. These changes are usually interpreted as a response to climatic changes. In the traditional view, forests or woodlands gradually gave way to more open habitats, with grazing (grass-eating) ungulate (hoofed) mammal species replacing the browsing (leafy-vegetation-eating) species as grasslands expanded. However, data from fossil assemblages in the Great Plains region of North America show that this faunal change was not a one-for-one replacement of browsers by grazers, as usually thought. Typical late early Miocene (17 Ma) fossil communities included extraordinarily high numbers of browsing ungulate species, comprising a fauna that cannot be directly analogized with any present-day community. Both maximum species richness of all ungulates and the proportion of browsers declined steadily in ungulate communities through the middle Miocene, to levels comparable to those of the present by the late Miocene. The resulting dramatic, cumulative loss of browsing species constitutes one of the strongest faunal signals of the late Tertiary (but was not a single “event”). We suggest that the early Miocene browser-rich communities may reflect higher levels of primary productivity in Miocene vegetation, compared with equivalent present-day vegetation types. The observed decline in species richness may represent a gradual decline in primary productivity, which would be consistent with one current hypothesis of a mid-Miocene decrease in atmospheric CO2 concentrations from higher mid-Cenozoic values. PMID:10884422

  14. The Late Miocene Carbon Isotope Shift and Marine Biological Productivity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diester-Haass, L.; Billups, K.; Emeis, K. C.

    2004-12-01

    The late Miocene global carbon isotope shift of approximately 1 per mil is not well understood. Is it linked to ocean-related processes such as the AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.â_oBiologic BloomAƒAøAøâ_sA¬ \\(Farrell et al., 1995\\), or to changes in type \\(C3/C4 plants\\) or cover of terrestrial vegetation? Here we examine the evolution of marine biological productivity during the isotope shift at ODP Site 846 \\(Pacific equatorial upwelling, where the AƒAøAøâ_sA¬A.â_oBiologic BloomAƒAøAøâ_sA¬ has been first described, Farrell al, 1995\\) and at Indian Ocean Site 721 \\(monsoon-driven upwelling\\), and compare their productivity history with non upwelling locations in the Atlantic Ocean. The onset of the carbon isotope shift is accompanied at all locations by an increase in paleoproductivity derived from benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates \\(expressed as gC/cm2 * ky; Huerguera, 2000\\) and increased abundance of Uvigerina spp.. At the equatorial upwelling sites the increase is comparable to half present-day values to present-day values; in the Atlantic Ocean paleoproductivity increases from present-day up to 3 times present-day values. But the productivity maxima are not concurrent. The carbon isotope shift is accompanied by severe carbonate dissolution and reduced ventilation of bottom waters, as reflected in the occurrence of pyrite and good preservation of cartilageous fish debris. Carbonate preservation is good since about 6 Ma despite high productivity. We discuss changing deep water circulation patterns, increased weathering and continental nutrient delivery, as well as erosion of terrestrial vegetation as possible factors to explain our findings.

  15. Late Miocene “washhouse” climate in Europe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böhme, Madelaine; Ilg, August; Winklhofer, Michael

    2008-11-01

    We present two eight-million year long proxy records of precipitation for Southwest and Central Europe, covering the middle to late Miocene (5.3-13 Ma) at a temporal resolution of about 60 kyr and 150 kyr, respectively. The estimates of precipitation are based on the ecophysiological structure of herpetological assemblages (amphibians and reptiles). From 13.0 Ma until about 9 Ma, both records show a similar trend, evolving from a long dry period (13-11 Ma) into a "washhouse climate" (10.2-9.8 Ma), characterized by global warm conditions and several times more precipitation than present. The transition from washhouse to a dryer climate between 9.7 and 9.5 Ma and the concomitant cooling episode appear to have triggered a severe biotic event known as the Vallesian crisis, which included the extinction of hominoids in Western Europe. A second washhouse period (9.0-8.5 Ma), coeval with a global warm episode, was unprecedentedly intense in Southwest Europe, but less pronounced in Central Europe. From 8 Ma onward, a divergence in the two precipitation records is observed, with Southwest Europe staying wetter and Central Europe becoming dryer than present. Both precipitation records are combined into a common run-off curve as a measure of the relative intensity of the hydrological cycle for moderate latitudes of continental Europe. The run-off curve shows a remarkable positive correlation with Atlantic deep-water temperatures from Ceará Rise by Lear et al. (2003), which are significantly higher (up to + 3 °C) during the two washhouse periods and show no other positive excursion of comparable magnitude. We discuss potential links and the role of the coeval temporary restriction of the Central American Seaway on ocean and atmosphere circulation.

  16. Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M. )

    1996-01-01

    Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R[sub o] ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally [open quotes]cool[close quotes] basin.

  17. Miocene fluvial-tidal sedimentation in a residual forearc basin of the Northeastern Pacific Rim: Cook Inlet, Alaska case study

    SciTech Connect

    Stricker, G.D.; Flores, R.M.

    1996-12-31

    Cook Inlet in southern Alaska represents a Cenozoic residual forearc basin in a convergent continental margin, where the Pacific Plate is being subducted beneath the North American Plate. This basin accumulated the >6,700-m-thick, mainly nonmarine, Eocene-Pliocene Kenai Group. These rocks contain biogenic coal-bed methane estimated to be as high as 245 TCF. Lignites to subbituminous coals with subsurface R{sub o} ranging from 0.38 to 0.73 percent and the stage of clay-mineral diagenesis and expandibility indicate a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin. Miocene Tyonek and Beluga Formations compose 65 percent (>4,300 m thick) of the Kenai Group. The Tyonek includes conglomeratic sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, coals, and carbonaceous shales, interpreted as braided- stream deposits. These fluvial deposits are interbecided with burrowed, lenticular, and flaser-bedded sandstones, siltstones, and mudstones, interpreted as tidal deposits. Tyonek framework conglomerates formed in wet alluvial fans incised on paleovalleys of the Chugach terrane. Coal-forming mires are well developed on abandoned braided-stream deposits. Tyonek drainages formed in high-gradient alluvial plains inundated by tides similar to environments in the modern upper Cook Inlet. The upper Miocene Beluga consists of sandstones, siltstones, mudstones, carbonaceous shales, and coals deposited in meandering (low sinuosity) and anastomosed fluvial systems. These fluvial deposits alternated vertically with deposits of coal-forming mires. The Beluga drainages formed in low-gradient alluvial plains. The high-gradient Tyonek alluvial plain was probably controlled by provenance uplift and eustatic change, whereas the low-gradient Beluga alluvial plain was influenced by subdued provenance uplift and rapid basin subsidence. Rapid sedimentation on both these low- and high-gradient alluvial plains, which kept up with subsidence, produced a thermally {open_quotes}cool{close_quotes} basin.

  18. Post-Miocene extension in Central Anatolia; It's linkage to Aegean extension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojay, Bora; Özsayın, Erman

    2013-04-01

    Post-Miocene extension in Central Anatolia; It's linkage to Aegean extension Anatolian Plate, -where Central Anatolia situated on-, escapes westward onto African plate along Eastern Mediterranean-Cyprus subduction zone, sliding by North and East Anatolian faults. Central Anatolia is bounded by dextral North Anatolian Fault from north, Taurides from south and it is fragmented by strike slip faults evolving under N-S compression in east and by Aegean horst and grabens evolving under N-S extension in west. To be able to delineate and understand the deformational order in Central Anatolia and its linkage to Aegean region, various sectors with the Anatolia are chosen, namely, Ankara region (Beypazarı to Kazan Miocene basins), Eskişehir region (Mihallıçık to İnönü Miocene basins) in Central Anatolia, Gediz-Alaşehir Graben and Efes areas in Western Anatolia are selected. To sum up, in a wide region from Central Anatolia to Western Anatolia, i. Unconformities btw uppermost Late Miocene and Plio-Quaternary, and btw Plio-Quaternary and Quaternary are clearly identified in both regions, ii) ENE-WSW to N-S compression (intense post-Late Miocene - pre-Pliocene folding) with almost E-W extension operates during post-Miocene (during Pliocene) is followed by a short lived strike slip deformation during Early Pliocene, and finally by NW-SE to WNW-ESE oriented multi directional extension during post-Plio-Quaternary. And in Gediz-Alaşehir Graben and Efes (western Anatolia); a continuous NNE-SSW to NE-SW multi directed extension since post-Late Miocene following almost N-S compression (post-Early Miocene) operated. Dextral strike slip faulting with normal components and normal faulting with right lateral strike slip components are recorded on same fault planes, iii) Quaternary normal faulting post dates folding, reverse and strike slip faulting in both regions. However, right lateral strike slip faulting is recorded to the NW tip of the normal faults like Efes, Manisa and Eskişehir faults, iv) under the new kinematic findings, the boundary conditions of neotectonic domains should have to be redefined in Anatolian plate, and v) during the escape of Anatolian plate towards east-southeast, based on the shift of principal stress directions counterclockwise block rotations can be operated along the "microplates" where northern blocks of the "microplates" are downthrown. Key words: normal faulting, extension, neotectonic domains, post-Miocene, central Anatolia.

  19. The late Miocene 'paradox' of the CO2 climate sensitivity (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Pagani, M.

    2013-12-01

    Ancient climates provide opportunities for studying the impact of CO2 change on global temperatures. While advances in CO2-reconstruction techniques are yielding a clearer picture of the Cenozoic history of CO2 (Beerling and Royer, 2011), the late Miocene (~12-5 Ma) remains enigmatic. For example, recent sea-surface temperature reconstructions from 12-5 Ma have shown that mid-latitude and equatorial regions of the Pacific cooled 6°C (LaRiviere et al., 2012) and 2°C (Zhang et al., 2013), respectively. This cooling trend was probably initiated at the mid-Miocene climate transition (14 Ma), and continued into the Plio-Pleistocene. However, existing compilation of late Miocene - Pliocene CO2 records show little variability, with some indicating a rise in CO2 concurrent with global cooling. Here we present four continuous alkenone-based CO2 records using Pacific sediment samples (ODP Sites 769, 806, 850 and 1143), from late Miocene to Pliocene. Compound-specific carbon isotope measurements show a broad decrease in alkenone δ13C values in all four sites, suggesting increasing pCO2 levels in the late Miocene. Decreasing ocean temperature and increasing pCO2 in the late Miocene appears to challenge a leading climatic role for CO2 during this time. Alternatively, alkenone-CO2 estimates are flawed in the late Miocene because factors other than CO2, such as algal growth rate, cell geometry, and carbon-fixation pathways, can influence carbon isotopic fractionation during algae growth. We explore the uncertainty of the alkenone-CO2 methodology and assess the potential influence that non-CO2 variables have in producing spurious CO2 estimates and trends. Beerling, D.J., Royer, D.L., 2011. Convergent Cenozoic CO2 history. Nat. Geosci. 4, 418-420. LaRiviere, J.P., Ravelo, A.C., Crimmins, A., Dekens, P.S., Ford, H.L., Lyle, M., Wara, M.W., 2012. Late Miocene decoupling of oceanic warmth and atmospheric carbon dioxide forcing. Nature 486, 97-100. Zhang, Y.G., Pagani, M., Liu, Z., 2013. Temperature evolution of the equatorial Pacific since late Miocene and the ancient El Nino. In Preperation.

  20. Provenance of the lower Miocene of the Gulf of Mexico from detrital zircon double dating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    xu, J.

    2013-12-01

    The lower Miocene interval of the Gulf of Mexico (GOM) has recently gained increasing attention from oil and gas industry due to its hydrocarbon potential below the salt canopy. However, it has been less well studied than both the underlying Oligocene and overlying middle Miocene strata. The lower Miocene worldwide is a transitional period of tectonic, climatic, and oceanographic change. In particular, it is a period of major tectonic reorganization in the western interior of North America (Rocky Mountains), involving a shift from the Oligocene thermal phase, with abundant volcanic activity recorded in the thick Frio/Vicksburg succession of the GOM, to the Miocene Basin-Range extensional phase. Climatic conditions also changed from a relatively arid Oligocene to wetter Miocene, resulting in increased sediment yields from exhumed tectonic structures. Previous provenance studies used proportions of quartz, feldspar and lithic fragments and consideration of likely river courses through known paleogeomorphological elements. Only limited detrital zircon (DZ) U-Pb studies on Paleocene strata have been undertaken and there has been no previous U-Pb and (U-Th)/He double dating in the GOM. In this study we apply the latest analytical approaches, such as DZ U-Pb dating to gain robust source terranes ages and more fully elucidate the complex sediment provenance and dispersal history of GOM. We also employ DZ (U-Th)/He (ZHe) dating, combined with DZ U-Pb, to not only define sedimentary provenance but also the exhumation histories of detrital source regions. Samples of lower Miocene outcrop exposures in Texas and Louisiana have been collected to discriminate the varied tectonic and drainage system changes across the basin in lateral. In addition, samples from the Eocene, Oligocene and middle Miocene have been obtained to reveal vertical shift of source terranes contributions. Our initial age data show detrital zircons of lower Miocene sediments come from a wide range of source terranes including a large populations from the western interior of North America (Rocky Mountains), Grenville, Mid-Continent, and Yavapai-Mazatzal provinces, with smaller populations from the Appalachian-Ouachita, Wyoming or Superior regions. Based on U-Pb dating results, we will carry out (U-Th)/He dating on selected zircons to reveal the detailed exhumation histories of the sediment source regions. Using the dual criteria of DZ crystallization age (U-Pb) and cooling age (U-Th/He) to constrain provenance will enable us to generate rigorous reconstructions of the lower Miocene depositional systems from source terrane to deep-water sink for this key transitional period in geologic history.

  1. Paleomagnetism of the Ishikoshi Andesite: a Middle Miocene paleomagnetic pole for northeastern Japan and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoshi, Hiroyuki; Teranishi, Yuki

    2007-07-01

    To determine a Middle Miocene paleomagnetic pole for northeastern Japan and discuss its tectonic implications, we obtained new paleomagnetic results from Middle Miocene (about 14 Ma) dacite and andesite flows of the Ishikoshi Andesite. Characteristic remanent magnetizations were isolated from 12 lava sites by means of detailed alternating field and thermal demagnetizations. Analysis of demagnetization results and rock magnetic experiments indicated that magnetite or Ti-poor titanomagnetite is the main magnetic carrier. We obtained a formation mean direction ( D = 9.2°, I = 65.9°, α95 = 7.3°, k = 40.5, N = 11) and compared it with published paleomagnetic results from other areas of northeastern Japan to discuss tectonic rotation. This comparison provided a mean paleomagnetic pole (85.9°N, 236.6°E, A 95 = 6.2°, K = 115.9, N = 6) that we consider represents the Middle Miocene pole for northeastern Japan. It is statistically indistinguishable from coeval poles for southwestern Japan, South Korea, and northern China, and we therefore conclude that northeastern Japan as a whole has not been subjected to tectonic rotation since the Middle Miocene. A reassessment of geologic and paleomagnetic data suggests that a previous model of the Late Miocene or later counterclockwise rotation of northeastern Japan is based on tilt-uncorrected paleomagnetic directions from tilted rock units.

  2. Sequence stratigraphy, basin dynamics, and petroleum geology of the Miocene from eastern Tunisia

    SciTech Connect

    Bedir, M. |; Tlig, S.; Bobier, C.

    1996-01-01

    On the eastern margin of Tunisia, Miocene limestones, marl, and siliciclastic deposits crop out poorly and are lacking in age-diagnostic faunal content. The biostratigraphic and lithostratigraphic subdivisions of these series are not clearly defined. A regional study of subsurface sequences of this margin (Cap Bon, Gulf of Hammamet, and Sahel) by means of sequence stratigraphy and subsurface structural analyses permits the identification of seven third-order sedimentary sequences of inferred Langhian to Messinian age, the boundaries of which are characterized by downlap and onlap/toplap relationships. These sequences include turbidites, sands, and sandstones deposited in connection with eustatic sea level changes and tectonic movements of east-west and south-north deep-seated faults due to the Alpine and Atlassic paroxysm. Stratal sequences are organized around Miocene syndepositional grabens, half-grabens, platforms, and folds occurring inside and outside of regional tectonic corridors. The geodynamic evolution of Miocene basins has led to the deposition of turbiditic black argillaceous source rocks, and sandstone and carbonate reservoirs that present new Miocene petroleum targets. The basin subsidence in response to the Alpine/Atlassic orogeny has permitted the maturation of Miocene source rocks, oil generation, and the formation of oil traps, stratigraphic pinch-outs, and structural enclosures on the flanks of folds and on the borders of grabens.

  3. Oligocene-Miocene Sr-isotope stratigraphy: Examples from eastern North America

    SciTech Connect

    Sugarman, P.J. ); Owens, J.P.; Gibson, T.G.; McCartan, L. ); Feigenson, M.D. )

    1994-03-01

    Sr-isotopic age estimates from the coastal plain in New Jersey, Maryland Virginia, and Florida have allowed correlation of upper Oligocene-Miocene stratigraphic sequences with an accuracy of [+-] 0.5--2.0 m.y. The upper Oligocene sequence mapped in New Jersey has an age range of 28.7--24.2 Ma, and is tentatively correlated with the Old Church Formation in Virginia. Sr-isotope age estimates of 28.6--25.3 in the lower part of the Arcadia Formation in Florida provide a chronostratigraphic correlation with the upper Oligocene, N.J. sequence. Miocene Sr-isotopic correlations are better constrained by improved age resolution of [+-]1 m.y. and less in the Miocene. The uppermost lower Miocene sequence in N.J. with Sr-isotopic age estimates of 17.4--15.5 Ma, can be correlated with the Calvert Formation in Maryland and the upper part of the Arcadia Formation in Florida based on Sr-isotopic correlations. The uppermost calcareous marine sequence in New Jersey is lower middle Miocene, with a Sr-isotopic age range of 13.6--12.2 Ma. This sequence is correlative with the Choptank Formation in Maryland. The St. Mary's Formation in Maryland has a Sr-isotopic age range of 10--9.6 Ma, and may be equivalent to the Cohansey Formation in New Jersey.

  4. Miocene-Pliocene transition in the southern Cyprus basins: The sedimentary expression of regional tectonic events

    SciTech Connect

    Orzag-Sperber, F.; Rouchy, J.M. )

    1988-08-01

    In the southern part of Cyprus, a Maastrichtian-Pleistocene sedimentary area fringes Troodos Mountain, a fragment of an ancient crust. During the Neogene, three basins formed in this area: Polemi, Pissouri, and Psematismenos. A deep marine condition has prevailed since the Maastrichtian. During the Paleocene and early Miocene, the sea gradually become shallower until the Messinian, where the most spectacular sedimentary event concerns the deposition of evaporites contemporaneous with other Mediterranean evaporites. Some sedimentary phenomena express the tectonic instability during the upper Miocene. A well-known tectonic event affecting the east Mediterranean region generally referred to as the Miocene-Pliocene phase occurs at the Miocene-Pliocene limit. Recent sedimentological studies indicate this event is in fact complex. The Tortonian-lower Pliocene period is marked by a constraint involving an N20 distension in the Polemi and Pissouri basins and an N100 distension in the Psematismenos basin. Sedimentologic studies have demonstrated three tectonic pulsations during the Messinian prior to the Pliocene transgression. These are expressed by two episodes of seismic brecciation and a paleoemersion indicated by paleosols and detrital discharges. These phenomena suggest brief tectonic instability during the Messinian. Microtectonic studies reveal that the main change in tectonic constraint does not coincide with the Miocene-Pliocene contact but occurs at the top of the lower Pliocene.

  5. Molluscan evidence for early middle Miocene marine glaciation in southern Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marincovich, L., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    Profound cooling of Miocene marine climates in southern Alaska culminated in early middle Miocene coastal marine glaciation in the northeastern Gulf of Alaska. This climatic change resulted from interaction of the Yakutat terrane with southern Alaska beginning in late Oligocene time. The ensuing extreme uplift of the coastal Chugach and St. Elias Mountains resulted in progressive regional cooling that culminated in coastal marine glaciation beginning in the early middle Miocene (15-16 Ma) and continuing to the present. The counterclockwise flow of surface water from the frigid northeastern Gulf of Alaska resulted in a cold-temperate shallow-marine environment in the western Gulf of Alaska, as it does today. Ironically, dating of Gulf of Alaska marine glaciation as early middle Miocene is strongly reinforced by the presence of a few tropical and subtropical mollusks in western Gulf of Alaska faunas. Shallow-marine waters throughout the Gulf of Alaska were cold-temperate to cold in the early middle Miocene, when the world ocean was undergoing peak Neogene warming. -Author

  6. A fish assemblage from an early Miocene horizon from Jabal Zaltan, Libya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Argyriou, Thodoris; Cook, Todd D.; Muftah, Ahmed M.; Pavlakis, Paris; Boaz, Noel T.; Murray, Alison M.

    2015-02-01

    Recent excavations and prospecting in the early to middle Miocene deposits of the Maradah Formation in Jabal Zaltan, Libya, yielded a diverse fish assemblage coming from an early Miocene locality. The material described here includes more than 18 marine and freshwater taxa most of which were previously unreported from the area. Jabal Zaltan is one of the very few early Miocene Afroarabian fossil sites that produced such a diverse fish sample. Therefore, the fossils described here provide a unique insight into the composition of the early Miocene fish faunas from the northern African coast; a critical time period for faunas of the continent, as contact with Eurasia ended 100 million years of African isolation. In addition, the Jabal Zaltan fossils help consolidate the validity of Galeocerdo mayumbensis and extend its geographic range to include the Tethys. The Maradah deposits also host the first occurrences of two genera (Pteromylaeus, Distichodus) in the fossil record. The fish finds support the presumed depositional environment that of tropical shallow estuarine to deltaic conditions, and the freshwater fishes document the presence of a modern-type Nilosudanian fauna containing elements with both African and Asian affinities. The Jabal Zaltan ichthyofauna, with its diversity of taxa, has the potential to become a key reference fauna for future studies of early Miocene African fishes.

  7. Strong winter monsoon wind causes surface cooling over India and China in the Late Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, H.; Eronen, J. T.; Kaakinen, A.; Utescher, T.; Ahrens, B.; Fortelius, M.

    2015-01-01

    Modern Asian winter monsoon characterised by the strong northwesterly wind in East Asia and northeasterly wind in South Asia, has a great impact on the surface temperature of the Asian continent. Its outbreak can result in significant cooling of the monsoon region. However, it is still unclear whether such an impact existed and is detectable in the deep past. In this study, we use temperature reconstructions from plant and mammal fossil data together with climate model results to examine the co-evolution of surface temperature and winter monsoon in the Late Miocene (11-5 Ma), when a significant change of the Asian monsoon system occurred. We find that a stronger-than-present winter monsoon wind might have existed in the Late Miocene due to the lower Asian orography, particularly the northern Tibetan Plateau and the mountains north of it. This can lead to a pronounced cooling in southern China and northern India, which counteracts the generally warmer conditions in the Late Miocene compared to present. The Late Miocene strong winter monsoon was characterised by a marked westerly component and primarily caused by a pressure anomaly between the Tibetan Plateau and Northern Eurasia, rather than by the gradient between the Siberian High and the Aleutian Low. As a result, the close association of surface temperature with winter monsoon strength on inter-annual scale as observed at present may not have established in the Late Miocene.

  8. Organic geochemical evaluations of bituminous rock and coals in Miocene Himmetoglu basin (Bolu, Turkey)

    SciTech Connect

    Sari, A.; Geze, Y.

    2008-07-01

    The studied area is a lake basin located in Bolu basin in Turkey. In the basin, from Upper Cretaceous to Upper Miocene 3,000-m thickness sediments were deposited. Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation consisted of sandstone, claystone, and marl. To the middle level of the formation are located coal, bituminous limestone, and bituminous shales. In the basin, there are two coal beds whose thicknesses range from 1 to 13 m. The coals are easily breakable and black in color. In the coal beds exists some bituminous limestone and bituminous shales, and their thicknesses are between 5 and 45 cm. The amount of organic matter of the bituminous rocks from the Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation are between 6.83 and 56.34 wt%, and the amount of organic matter of the bituminous limestone from the formation are between 13.58 and 57.16 wt%. These values indicate that these rocks have very good source potential. According to hydrogen index (HI), S2/S3, HI-T{sub max}, and HI-OI (oxygen index) parameters, kerogen types of the bituminous rocks and coals belonging to Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation are Type I, Type II, and Type III. In accordance with HI, S2/S3, HI-T{sub max}, and HI-OI parameters, the bituminous rocks and coals from the Upper Miocene Himmetoglu formation are mostly immature.

  9. Distribution history and climatic controls of the Late Miocene Pikermian chronofauna

    PubMed Central

    Eronen, Jussi T.; Ataabadi, Majid Mirzaie; Micheels, Arne; Karme, Aleksis; Bernor, Raymond L.; Fortelius, Mikael

    2009-01-01

    The Late Miocene development of faunas and environments in western Eurasia is well known, but the climatic and environmental processes that controlled its details are incompletely understood. Here we map the rise and fall of the classic Pikermian fossil mammal chronofauna between 12 and 4.2 Ma, using genus-level faunal similarity between localities. To directly relate land mammal community evolution to environmental change, we use the hypsodonty paleoprecipitation proxy and paleoclimate modeling. The geographic distribution of faunal similarity and paleoprecipitation in successive timeslices shows the development of the open biome that favored the evolution and spread of the open-habitat adapted large mammal lineages. In the climate model run, this corresponds to a decrease in precipitation over its core area south of the Paratethys Sea. The process began in the latest Middle Miocene and climaxed in the medial Late Miocene, about 7–8 million years ago. The geographic range of the Pikermian chronofauna contracted in the latest Miocene, a time of increasing summer drought and regional differentiation of habitats in Eastern Europe and Southwestern Asia. Its demise at the Miocene-Pliocene boundary coincides with an environmental reversal toward increased humidity and forestation, changes inevitably detrimental to open-adapted, wide-ranging large mammals. PMID:19571012

  10. Early Miocene Antarctic glacial history: new insights from heavy mineral analysis from ANDRILL AND-2A drill core sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacoviello, Francesco; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Turbanti Memmi, Isabella; Passchier, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    The present study deals with heavy mineral analysis of late Early Miocene marine sediments recovered in the McMurdo Sound region (Ross Sea, Antarctica) during the ANDRILL—SMS Project in 2007. The main objective is to investigate how heavy mineral assemblages reflect different source rocks and hence different provenance areas. These data contribute to a better understanding of East Antarctica ice dynamics in the Ross Sea sector during the Early Miocene (17.6-20.2 Ma), a time of long-term global warming and sea level rise. The AND-2A drill core recovered several stratigraphic intervals that span from Early Miocene to Pleistocene and it collected a variety of terrigenous lithologies. The heavy mineral assemblages of the lower 650-m-thick sedimentary succession were analyzed through SEM observations and SEM-EDS microanalyses on heavy mineral grains. The heavy mineral analysis shows that the sediments are a mix of detritus dominated by McMurdo Volcanic Group sources most likely located in the present-day Mount Morning area (Proto-Mount Morning) with minor contribution from Transantarctic Mountains source rocks located west of the drill site. The heavy mineral assemblages in Interval 1 indicate that between 20.2 and 20.1 Ma, the grounding line of the ice sheet advanced to a position near the present-day Mount Morning volcanic center. During deposition of Interval 2 (20.1-19.3 Ma), the ice sheet most likely experienced a dynamic behavior with interval of ice advance alternating with periods of ice retreat, while Interval 3 (19.3-18.7 Ma) records further retreat to open water conditions. A dynamic behavior is noted in Interval 4 (18.7-17.6 Ma) with a decreasing contribution of materials derived from the basalts of the Mount Morning volcanic center located to the south of the drill site and a consequent increasing contribution of materials derived from the Transantarctic Mountains to the west of the drill site.

  11. First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae)

    PubMed Central

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Maksoud, Sibelle; Azar, Dany

    2015-01-01

    Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis. PMID:26250050

  12. First Miocene rodent from Lebanon provides the 'missing link' between Asian and African gundis (Rodentia: Ctenodactylidae).

    PubMed

    López-Antoñanzas, Raquel; Knoll, Fabien; Maksoud, Sibelle; Azar, Dany

    2015-01-01

    Ctenodactylinae (gundis) is a clade of rodents that experienced, in Miocene time, their greatest diversification and widest distribution. They expanded from the Far East, their area of origin, to Africa, which they entered from what would become the Arabian Peninsula. Questions concerning the origin of African Ctenodactylinae persist essentially because of a poor fossil record from the Miocene of Afro-Arabia. However, recent excavations in the Late Miocene of Lebanon have yielded a key taxon for our understanding of these issues. Proafricanomys libanensis nov. gen. nov. sp. shares a variety of dental characters with both the most primitive and derived members of the subfamily. A cladistic analysis demonstrates that this species is the sister taxon to a clade encompassing all but one of the African ctenodactylines, plus a southern European species of obvious African extraction. As such, Proafricanomys provides the 'missing link' between the Asian and African gundis. PMID:26250050

  13. Miocene non-marine diatoms from the western Cordillera basins of northern Peru

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Fourtanier, E.; Gasse, F.; Bellier, O.; Bonhomme, M.G.; Robles, I.

    1993-01-01

    Diatom assemblages are documented from diatomite layers of two Miocene fluvio-lacustrine units from the basins of the western Cordillera of northern Peru: the Namora Formation and the Cajabamba Formation. Emphasis is given to taxa of particular stratigraphic interest. The diatom assemblages indicate for the Namora Formation the occurrence of swampy conditions with very dilute, low alkalinity water. The diatom assemblages of the Cajabamba Formation reflect the occurrence of fresh, slightly alkaline, eutrophic lakes with deep water in some samples, and swampy conditions with relatively high salt content in other samples. The Namora formation is late Miocene in age based on the diatom assemblages and radiometric analyses. The diatom layers of the Cajabamba Formation are dated as late middle to early late Miocene. -from Authors

  14. The impact of Miocene atmospheric carbon dioxide fluctuations on climate and the evolution of terrestrial ecosystems.

    PubMed

    Kürschner, Wolfram M; Kvacek, Zlatko; Dilcher, David L

    2008-01-15

    The Miocene is characterized by a series of key climatic events that led to the founding of the late Cenozoic icehouse mode and the dawn of modern biota. The processes that caused these developments, and particularly the role of atmospheric CO2 as a forcing factor, are poorly understood. Here we present a CO2 record based on stomatal frequency data from multiple tree species. Our data show striking CO2 fluctuations of approximately 600-300 parts per million by volume (ppmv). Periods of low CO2 are contemporaneous with major glaciations, whereas elevated CO2 of 500 ppmv coincides with the climatic optimum in the Miocene. Our data point to a long-term coupling between atmospheric CO2 and climate. Major changes in Miocene terrestrial ecosystems, such as the expansion of grasslands and radiations among terrestrial herbivores such as horses, can be linked to these marked fluctuations in CO2. PMID:18174330

  15. Major Mid-Miocene Climate Change In The Transantarctic Mountains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashworth, A. C.; Lewis, A. R.; Marchant, D. R.

    2007-12-01

    Independent lines of evidence from paleoecology, glacial geology and marine isotopes indicate major climate change in the Dry Valley sector of the Transantarctic Mountains (TAM) at c.14 Ma. A fossil assemblage of pollen and spores, freshwater diatoms, ostracods, mosses, and insect remains has been recovered from lacustrine sediments preserved in a small morainic lake basin in the western Olympus Range. The diatom assemblage indicates that the lake existed for >103yr and was ice-free during summers. Based on the moss and insect fossils the minimum mean summer temperature (MST- Dec-Feb) was 2°C but could have been as high as 5°C. Today at the site the MST is c. -15°C. The lake-marginal vegetation was a sparse tundra dominated by mosses and liverworts. Based on pollen, Nothofagus (southern beech) was part of the lowland regional vegetation and individual dwarfed shrubs may have grown on the slopes surrounding the lake basin. The age of the deposits is well-constrained by an 40Ar/39Ar age of 14.11 ± 0.11 Ma from an in situ volcanic ash within related lacustrine sediments. Based on an independent study of the glacial stratigraphy of the western Wright and McKelvey valleys, diamictites of a wet-based glacial regime had been replaced by those of cold-based regime by 13.85 ± 0.03 Ma. The drop in temperatures and the cessation of meltwater at c. 14 Ma would have caused the regional extinction of all plant and insect life with the exception of the hardiest of soil-dwelling organisms. Paleobotanical evidence indicates that Antarctica had likely been vegetated throughout the Cenozoic, with forests replaced by tundra during the early Oligocene. The mid-Miocene extinction marks the end of tundra in the interior of Antarctica and its replacement by the polar desert biota which exists today. Changes in δ18O and Mg/Ca ratios from different sectors of the Southern Ocean indicate sea surface temperature cooling and ice sheet growth between 13.8 - 14.2 Ma. The close correlation of events in these marine records with the glaciological and biological records from the Dry Valleys strongly suggests that they are part of a major hemispheric or global climatic event.

  16. The evolution of pCO2, ice volume and climate during the middle Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Gavin L.; Lear, Caroline H.; Rae, James W. B.

    2012-08-01

    The middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (17-15 Ma; MCO) is a period of global warmth and relatively high CO2 and is thought to be associated with a significant retreat of the Antarctic Ice Sheet (AIS). We present here a new planktic foraminiferal δ11B record from 16.6 to 11.8 Ma from two deep ocean sites currently in equilibrium with the atmosphere with respect to CO2. These new data demonstrate that the evolution of global climate during the middle Miocene (as reflected by changes in the cyrosphere) was well correlated to variations in the concentration of atmospheric CO2. What is more, within our sampling resolution (∼1 sample per 300 kyr) there is no evidence of hysteresis in the response of ice volume to CO2 forcing during the middle Miocene, contrary to what is understood about the Antarctic Ice Sheet from ice sheet modelling studies. In agreement with previous data, we show that absolute levels of CO2 during the MCO were relatively modest (350-400 ppm) and levels either side of the MCO are similar or lower than the pre-industrial (200-260 ppm). These new data imply the presence of either a very dynamic AIS at relatively low CO2 during the middle Miocene or the advance and retreat of significant northern hemisphere ice. Recent drilling on the Antarctic margin and shore based studies indicate significant retreat and advance beyond the modern limits of the AIS did occur during the middle Miocene, but the complete loss of the AIS was unlikely. Consequently, it seems that ice volume and climate variations during the middle Miocene probably involved a more dynamic AIS than the modern but also some component of land-based ice in the northern hemisphere.

  17. Ramu basin, Papua New Guinea: A record of late Miocene terrane collision

    SciTech Connect

    Cullen, A.B.

    1996-05-01

    The Ramu basin lies along a plate boundary where the Finisterre terrane is colliding with the Indo-Australian plate. Estimates for the age of initial collision range from early Miocene to middle Pliocene. Two unsuccessful wells (Keram 1 and Tsumba 1) drilled to basement and two-dimensional seismic data show that folded and faulted early to middle Miocene carbonates and clastics (the Wogamush sequence) are overlain by relatively undeformed Pliocene marine clastics (the Wewak sequence) along a regional unconformity. The pre-Pliocene section, which is at the crux of resolving the age of initial collision, has been correlated previously to the Finisterre terrane. Clastics within that section, derived from older terranes south of the basin, imply an early Miocene age for collision. I propose that Miocene sedimentary and volcanic rocks in the two wells are correlative with the Wogamush beds of the Maramuni arc. The Ramu basin can then be viewed as having a two-stage evolution. During the Miocene, the basin was part of the Maramuni arc, the polarity of which is unresolved. A collisional successor basin developed in the late Miocene as the Finisterre terrane (Adelbert block) collided with the arc. Thrust faults on the northeastern side of the basin, truncated by a regional unconformity, are interpreted to mark the suture of the Adelbert block. A northern earliest Pliocene sediment source for the basal Wewak sequence was probably the Finisterre terrane, but multiple source areas are inferred for the rest of that sequence. Middle Pliocene inversion of the basin`s northeastern flank, characterized by reverse faulting and forced folding, is attributed to plate boundary reorganization caused by rifting in the Bismarck Sea. The Ramu basin has numerous untested structures related to both collision and basin inversion. Gas-prone source rocks are present, but are largely immature. Reservoir and charge considerations place the Ramu basin in the very high risk sector for exploration.

  18. Miocene Continental Chronology From Iberian Basins: State of The Art and Future Research.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcés, M.; Pérez-Rivarés, F. J.; Arenas, C.; Pardo, G.; Cabrera, L.; Krijgsman, W.; Agustí, J.

    Building an absolute continental chronology of the european Neogene is a multi- disciplinary priority task for modeling terrestrial environments in the Mediterranean region. Integration of the fragmentary databases from very different settings in a high-resolution time framework is fundamental to determine causal links between the global, regional and local forcing factors and their on-land environmental response. To date, integrated bio- and magnetoestratigraphic studies on the continental Miocene from Spain have focused on areas with abundant and rich vertebrate fossil localities, such as the Calatayud-Daroca, Teruel, Cabriel, Vallès-Penedès, Guadix-Baza and For- tuna basins. Some constitute reference sections for the continental standard chronol- ogy. Despite decades of work, this chronological framework is still lacking a direct calibration in some key time slices, such as the early Miocene (Agenian and Ramblian continental units). On the other hand, correlation with Early and Middle Miocene con- tinental records of central Europe leads to significant discrepancies on the position of same biochronological boundaries. In the last years several projects have focused on the Ebro Foreland Basin (NE Spain) continental sequences, which extend from Middle Eocene to late Middle Miocene. Despite the scarcity of vertebrate fossil findings, the Ebro basin bears one of the best exposed Early to Middle Miocene continental records in Europe. Work in progress in the central part of the Ebro Basin has revealed a con- tinuous magnetostratigraphic record from 22 Ma to 14 Ma. The studied sequences have a potential for calibration of the early Miocene mammal chronology. The age of these lacustrine to alluvial sediments also provides constraints on the late stages of endorreic sedimentation preceding onset of basin drainage to the Mediterranean.

  19. A giant termite from the Late Miocene of Styria, Austria (Isoptera)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engel, Michael S.; Gross, Martin

    2009-02-01

    A giant termite is described and figured from the Late Miocene of the Styrian Basin in southeastern Austria. Gyatermes styriensis gen. n. et sp. n. is represented by a relatively complete forewing, with basal scale. The fossil approximates in size the largest of all termites today and is the largest fossil termite on record. The presence of this species in the Late Miocene fauna of Europe indicates that climatic conditions were appropriate for the persistence of species and colonies requiring relatively stable, warm conditions. The genus is primitive in overall features but shares some similarity with the dampwood termites.

  20. Red Sea oil shows attract attention to Miocene salt, post-salt sequence

    SciTech Connect

    Nagati, M. )

    1992-12-07

    This paper reports that for several decades oil companies have failed to mimic the traditional play concept of the Gulf of Suez by targeting potential oil reservoirs below the Upper/Middle Miocene salt in the Red Sea. The absence of a Pre-Miocene sequence in the majority of outcrops on both sides of the rift and its assumed absence in the subsurface, together with the perception of the Red Sea being geothermally hot and only gas-prone, have led to an exploration lull in this 280,000 sq mile intracratonic rift basin.

  1. Amber from western Amazonia reveals Neotropical diversity during the middle Miocene

    PubMed Central

    Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; De Franceschi, Dario; Flynn, John J.; Nel, André; Baby, Patrice; Benammi, Mouloud; Calderón, Ysabel; Espurt, Nicolas; Goswami, Anjali; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo

    2006-01-01

    Tertiary insects and arachnids have been virtually unknown from the vast western Amazonian basin. We report here the discovery of amber from this region containing a diverse fossil arthropod fauna (13 hexapod families and 3 arachnid species) and abundant microfossil inclusions (pollen, spores, algae, and cyanophyceae). This unique fossil assemblage, recovered from middle Miocene deposits of northeastern Peru, greatly increases the known diversity of Cenozoic tropical–equatorial arthropods and microorganisms and provides insights into the biogeography and evolutionary history of modern Neotropical biota. It also strengthens evidence for the presence of more modern, high-diversity tropical rainforest ecosystems during the middle Miocene in western Amazonia. PMID:16950875

  2. Stratigraphical investigations on a new Miocene fossil-bearing sequence in Central Inner Mongolia, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaakinen, Anu; Aziz, Hayfaa Abdul; Passey, Benjamin H.; Zhang, Zhaoqun; Liu, Liping; Krijgsman, Wout; Fortelius, Mikael

    2014-05-01

    Central Inner Mongolia has been an area of great paleontological interest since the beginning of the 20th century. Although the area has produced numerous diverse collections of Miocene faunas, fossil records from the early Miocene of Inner Mongolia are relatively rare. The localities occur mainly as scattered faunal horizons and their stratigraphy is challenging owing to lack of continuous vertical exposures. Consequently, most age estimations of these Miocene sites are based on paleontological evidence alone, with very few sites having been dated independently based on paleomagnetics. The Damiao site in Siziwang Qi, Inner Mongolia, was discovered in 2006, and during the following four years extensive field activities were undertaken. The focus was on paleontological studies and on the stratigraphy of the Neogene sediments. The field survey led to the recovery of approximately 30 new fossiliferous localities, which have produced a rich mammalian fauna, including pliopithecid remains. The bulk of the vertebrate fossils and localities have been recovered from three main fossil horizons. We have interpreted the Damiao sequence as the remains of a fluvio-lacustrine system comprising channels, subaerially exposed floodplains and ephemeral/marginal lacustrine environments. This study presents the litho- and magnetostratigraphy of the Damiao area and provides age estimations for the important fossil-bearing localities. The two local stratigraphic sections measured and sampled for paleomagnetic analysis coincide with important vertebrate fossil localities. The western section is about 30 m thick and includes fossil locality DM16 while the eastern section spans up 40 m and comprises localities DM01 and DM02. The paleomagnetic results and faunal evidence suggest a correlation in the magnetozones C6Ar through C5r with an age range of ca 21 to 11 Ma. The interval of reversed polarity at the base of the section (C6Ar) coincides with fossil locality DM16. The pliopithecid locality DM01 represents late middle Miocene and has an age estimate of about 12 Ma while the locality DM02 represents earliest late Miocene with an age estimate of about 11.6- 11.7 Ma. Our magnetostratigraphic results confirm that the Damiao strata constitute one of the most continuous sequences in Inner Mongolia with early, middle and late Miocene fossil faunas in stratigraphic superposition. The results also provide constraints on the paleoenvironmenal evolution and bioevents of the area. The occurrence of pliopithecid primates in the middle Miocene of Inner Mongolia suggests relatively humid habitats and challenges the scenarios suggesting arid and highly seasonal conditions for Central Asia since Early Miocene.

  3. Eocene and miocene rocks off the northeastern coast of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gibson, T.G.

    1965-01-01

    A grab sample from a depth of 1675 m at a point south of Cape Cod contains early Eocene planktonic Foraminifera and is correlated with the Globorotalia rex zone of Trinidad. The assemblage indicates a depth comparable to that existing today. Regional relations suggest that the Cretaceous and Eocene deposits deepen to the west toward New Jersey. Two mollusk-bearing blocks dredged from the northern side of Georges Bank are correlative with the Miocene Yorktown Formation. Rocks from two other stations are probably Miocene. Benthonic Foraminifera in one sample indicate deposition in cool temperate waters of less than 60 m depth. ?? 1965.

  4. An age for Kajong, a Miocene fossil site east of Lake Turkana, Kenya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Francis H.; Jicha, Brian R.; Leakey, R. E.

    2016-02-01

    The Kajong Formation in Marsabit District, northern Kenya has yielded a Miocene mammalian fauna consisting of nine taxa. It is capped by a basalt 40Ar/39Ar dated at 19.1 ± 0.1 Ma, and a volcanic clast from a conglomerate within the formation yielded an age of 20.3 Ma, only slightly older. The entire fauna from this site thus lies close to the base of the Miocene Epoch and is older than 19.2 Ma. The site has yielded some of the oldest examples of Archaeobelodon filholi, Prodeinotherium hobleyi, and Gomphotherium sp. in east Africa.

  5. Implications of some flow sedimentary structures within Miocene evaporitic sequence, Red Sea, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Wali, A.

    1984-09-01

    Some typical flow sedimentary structures were clearly detected within the middle Miocene alternating gypsiferous and anhydritic clays of the evaporitic sequence in Ras Gemsa and Um El-Huweitat localities. Sedimentologic analyses of the different structural forms revealed that they were originally formed from unlithified sediments and due to submarine flowage. These structures were formed as a result of stress-load, compression, and rotation. Such a genetic approach is helpful in deducing the environmental conditions within which these sediments accumulated. Degrees of flowage and affected stresses on similar lithologic associations could be considered strong evidence for correlation within the extended Miocene evaporitic sequence along the Red Sea coast.

  6. Miocene Blanca Fan, Northern Channel Islands, California: Small fans reflecting tectonism and volcanism

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McLean, H.; Howell, D.G.

    1984-01-01

    Blanca fan is a submarine fan composed of Miocene volcaniclastic strata. Parts of the fan system are exposed on Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa Islands, and possibly correlative strata crop out on San Miguel and Santa Catalina Islands. The Blanca fan and underlying breccia reflect regional transcurrent faulting in the California Continental Borderland and development of a system of rapidly subsiding basins and uplifted linear ridges during early and middle Miocene time. Erosion of uplifted crystalline basement rocks followed by the onset of silicic volcanism created linear sediment sources for the alluvial and submarine fans, respectively. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag New York Inc.

  7. Miocene and Pliocene dominated diversification of the lichen-forming fungal genus Melanohalea (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) and Pleistocene population expansions

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Factors promoting diversification in lichen symbioses remain largely unexplored. While Pleistocene events have been important for driving diversification and affecting distributions in many groups, recent estimates suggest that major radiations within some genera in the largest clade of macrolichens (Parmeliaceae, Ascomycota) vastly predate the Pleistocene. To better understand the temporal placement and sequence of diversification events in lichens, we estimated divergence times in a common lichen-forming fungal genus, Melanohalea, in the Northern Hemisphere. Divergence times were estimated using both concatenated gene tree and coalescent-based multilocus species tree approaches to assess the temporal context of major radiation events within Melanohalea. In order to complement our understanding of processes impacting genetic differentiation, we also evaluated the effects of Pleistocene glacial cycles on population demographics of distinct Melanohalea lineages, differing in reproductive strategies. Results We found that divergence estimates, from both concatenated gene tree and coalescent-based multilocus species tree approaches, suggest that diversification within Melanohalea occurred predominantly during the Miocene and Pliocene, although estimated of divergence times differed by up to 8.3 million years between the two methods. These results indicate that, in some cases, taxonomically diagnostic characters may be maintained among divergent lineages for millions of years. In other cases, similar phenotypic characters among non-sister taxa, including reproductive strategies, suggest the potential for convergent evolution due to similar selective pressures among distinct lineages. Our analyses provide evidence of population expansions predating the last glacial maximum in the sampled lineages. These results suggest that Pleistocene glaciations were not inherently unfavorable or restrictive for some Melanohalea species, albeit with apparently different demographic histories between sexually and vegetatively reproducing lineages. Conclusions Our results contribute to the understanding of how major changes during the Miocene and Pliocene have been important in promoting diversification within common lichen-forming fungi in the northern Hemisphere. Additionally, we provide evidence that glacial oscillations have influenced current population structure of broadly distributed lichenized fungal species throughout the Holarctic. PMID:22963132

  8. Partial record of a Miocene geomagnetic field excursion: Paleomagnetic data from the Paiute Ridge volcanic center, southern Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Ratcliff, C.D.; Geissman, J.W.; Perry, F.V. ); Crowe, B.M. )

    1993-04-01

    In the Palute Ridge area, northern Halfpint Range, a complex system of late Miocene (about 8.5 Ma) intrusive and extrusive alkaline mafic rocks crops out over an area of about 25km[sup 2]. Post-magmatic faulting and erosion have resulted in excellent exposure of this sub-volcanic center, allowing for a detailed study of mechanisms and timing of magma emplacement. Paleomagnetic data have been obtained from over 50 sites in mafic rocks, and host ash-flow tuffs and carbonate strata, to better understand the duration of magmatic activity. Magnetizations, isolated in progressive alternating field and thermal demagnetization, for most of the sites at Palute Ridge deviate significantly from expected directions for a time-averaged late Miocene field. Demagnetization data show that there are two types of sample behavior. First, samples with close to expected reverse polarity directions (e.g., the chilled margin of a sill, D=209.2, l=[minus]36.4, [alpha]95=13.2, N=5, k=34.8). Second, and far more common, are samples giving magnetizations of southwest to northwest declination, with both shallow to moderate positive and negative inclination. Within this second grouping are several sites, including syenite pods which differentiated in situ from a large lopolith, having mean declinations that are due west and of shallow inclination. Contact tests performed at several sites are positive and show a clear correlation between sample position and isolated remanence direction. The authors preferred interpretation of the anomalously directed magnetization is that these rocks acquired a TRM during either a high amplitude excursion, or the transitional portion of a field reversal. Thermal models based on larger intrusions [+-] 10m thick at Paiute Ridge indicate that the magmas could cool through estimated magnetization blocking temperatures within weeks or months of emplacement.

  9. Quantitative analysis of phenolic compounds in Chinese hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) fruits by high performance liquid chromatography-electrospray ionisation mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Liu, Pengzhan; Kallio, Heikki; Lü, Deguo; Zhou, Chuansheng; Yang, Baoru

    2011-08-01

    Eleven major phenolic compounds (hyperoside, isoquercitrin, chlorogenic acid, ideain, epicatechin, two procyanidin (PA) dimers, three PA trimers and a PA dimer-hexoside) were quantified in the fruits of 22 cultivars/origins of three species of the Chinese hawthorn (Crataegus spp.) by HPLC-ESI-MS-SIR. Hyperoside (0.1-0.8mg/g dry mass [DM]), isoquercitrin (0.1-0.3mg/g DM), chlorogenic acid (0.2-1.6mg/g DM), epicatechin (0.9-11.7mg/g DM), PA B2 (0.7-12.4mg/g DM), PA dimer II (0.1-1.5mg/g DM), PA trimer I (0.1-2.7mg/g DM), PA trimer II (0.7-6.9mg/g DM), PA trimer III (0.01-1.2mg/g DM) and a PA dimer-hexoside (trace-1.1mg/g DM) were detected in all the samples. Ideain (0.0-0.7mg/g DM) was found in all the samples except Crataegus scabrifolia. Significant correlations between the contents of individual PA aglycons were observed (r>0.9, P<0.01). A strong correlation between flavonols was also shown (r=0.71, P<0.01). Fruits of Crataegus pinnatifida var. major had higher contents of PAs but lower contents of flavonols compared with Crataegus brettschneideri. The fruits of C. scabrifolia contained the highest level of PA dimer-hexoside, which was present in trace amounts in the fruits of C. pinnatifida. PMID:25214140

  10. Provenance Analysis of Lower Miocene Sediments in the Lower Austrian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knierzinger, Wolfgang; Palzer, Markus; Wagreich, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In the Early Miocene (Late Ottnangian) a global drop of the sea level and the continuous rise of the Alps caused a regression of the Paratethys. During this time interval the Traisen Formation (formerly Oncophora beds) was deposited in the Lower Austrian Molasse Basin. These yellowish-brownish to greyish mica-rich and carbonate-free sands and silts with clayish interlayers were originally named after a brackish water bivalve ("Oncophora"- now Rzehakia). The southeastern part of the TF partly interfingers with finer sands of the Dietersdorf Formation (DF). The Pixendorf Group combines the TF and the DF [coarse sands, conglomerates, blocks] of the Upper Ottnangian lithostratigraphic units in Lower Austria. West to the Waschberg Zone a deeper-water environment (so called Oncophora beds in former literature, herein [informally] renamed to Wildendürnbach Member) with sediment gravity flows (turbidites, muddy/sandy slumps) is inferred from OMV well data. Examinations of these fine sandstones, silts and laminated pelites have been carried out on the basis of the Wildendürnbach-4 OMV drilling core. Analyses of the TF revealed rather homogenous heavy mineral assemblages, dominated by high amounts of garnet (~65%) and relatively high amounts of epidote/zoisite (~10%) and amphiboles (~10%). Conducted surveys point towards a primary influence of metamorphic (metapelitic) source rocks of Austroalpine Crystalline Complexes of the rising Eastern Alps. Heavy mineral analysis of the WDK-4 drilling core showed even higher amounts of garnet (~80%) combined with minor amounts of rutile, staurolite, apatite, epidote/zoisite, tourmalines, zircon and amphiboles. Consistent heavy mineral assemblages and chemical data (EMPA) suggest a stratigraphical correlation with the Křepice Formation and the Ždánice-Hustopeče Formation in the Czech Republic and sedimentary influence from the Western Carpathian Flysch Belt.

  11. Diagenetic gypsum related to sulfur deposits in evaporites (Libros Gypsum, Miocene, NE Spain)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortí, Federico; Rosell, Laura; Anadón, Pere

    2010-07-01

    The Libros Gypsum is the thickest evaporite unit of the Miocene infill of the Teruel Basin in NE Spain. During the deposition of this unit, intense bacterial sulfate-reducing (BSR) activity in the lake depocenter generated a native sulfur deposit. Diagenetic gypsum resulted from subsequent sulfur oxidation. The different processes involved in these transformations were first investigated by Anadón et al. (1992). The present paper is concerned with this diagenetic gypsum from the stratigraphic, petrographic, isotopic and genetic points of view. Diagenetic gypsum occurs mainly as continuous or discontinuous layers, individual levels or lenses, irregular masses, nodules and micronodules, and veins. Its main textures are coarse-crystalline anhedral and fine-grained (alabastrine), both of which can replace any former lithology (carbonate, gypsum, and sulfur). The following sequence of processes and mineral/textural transformations is deduced: primary gypsum deposition — BSR and biodiagenetic carbonate/H 2S production — growth of native sulfur — growth of diagenetic gypsum — partial recrystallization of the diagenetic gypsum textures. The gypsification of the native sulfur generated two types of banded structures in the diagenetic gypsum: (1) concentric structures of centripetal growth, and (2) expansive, roughly concentric structures. In the first type, the gypsification operated from the outer boundaries towards the inner parts. In the second type, part of the carbonate hosting the sulfur was also gypsified (replaced/cemented). In the diagenetic gypsum, the δ34S values are in agreement with a native sulfur and H 2S provenance. The δ18O sulfate values, however, enable us to differentiate two main groups of values: one with positive values and the other with negative values. In the group of positive values, interstitial (evaporated) solutions participated in the sulfur oxidation; this process presumably occurred in a first oxidation stage during shallow-to-deeper burial of the Libros Gypsum unit. In the group of negative values, however, only meteoric waters participated in the oxidation, which presumably occurred in a second oxidation stage during the final exhumation of the unit. A third group of values is characterized by very high sulfur and oxygen values, suggesting that BSR residual solutions also participated in the oxidation processes locally. During the two oxidation stages, both the textural characteristics and the isotopic composition of the diagenetic gypsum indicate that gypsification operated as a multistadic process.

  12. Tracking Arabia-India motion from Miocene to Present

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chamot-Rooke, N. R.; Fournier, M.

    2009-12-01

    Although small, the present-day Arabia-India motion has been captured by several global and regional geodetic surveys that consistently show dextral motion of a few mm/yr, either transpressive or transtensive (Fournier et al., 2008). This motion is accommodated along the Owen Fracture Zone, an active strike-slip boundary that runs for more than 700 km from the Somalia-India-Arabia triple junction in the south to the Dalrymple trough in the north. Two recent marine cruises conducted along this fault aboard the BHO Beautemps-Beaupré (AOC 2006 and OWEN 2009) using a high resolution multibeam sounder (Simrad EM120, 10 m vertical resolution) provided a complete map of the active fault and confirmed a present-day pure dextral motion. The surface breaks closely follow a small circle of the Arabia-India motion, with several pull-part basins at the junctions between the main segments of the fault. Geomorphologic offsets reach 10 km, suggesting that the mapped fault has been active with the same style for past several million years. When did this motion start? The difficulty in tracking the past Arabia-India motion is that there is no direct kinematic indicator available, since the boundary has been strike-slip and/or convergent during the Tertiary. Motion was most probably sinistral during the rapid northward travelling of India towards Eurasia in the early Tertiary, Arabia being rigidly attached to Africa until the opening of the Gulf of Aden. However, the nature and location of the Arabia-India boundary at that time remain speculative. Throughout the Miocene, the relative motion between India and Arabia has been indirectly recorded at the Sheba and Carslberg ridges, the former recording Arabia-Somalia motion (opening of the Gulf of Aden) and the latter India-Somalia motion (Indian Ocean opening). Both ridges have been studied with some details recently, using up to date magnetic lineations identification (Merkouriev and DeMets, 2006; Fournier et al., 2009). We combine these studies to derive Arabia/India kinematics for the past 20 Myrs. As observed today, opening rates at Sheba ridge and at Carlsberg ridge remained closed since Chron 5D (17.2 Ma), thus pointing to small differential motion between Arabia and India. However, our kinematic model suggests that dextral shearing prevailed since the very beginning of opening of the Gulf of Aden. This has significant implications for the forces that drive the Arabia plate and Arabia-India coupling at their transform boundary. Fournier et al., 2008, In-situ evidence for dextral active motion at the Arabia-India plate boundary, Nature Geoscience, doi:10.1038/ngeo.2007.24. Fournier et al., 2009, Arabia-Somalia plate kinematics, evolution of the Aden-Owen-Carlsberg triple junction, and opening of the Gulf of Aden, J. Geophys. Res., in revision. Merkouriev and DeMets, 2006, Constraints on Indian plate motion since 20 Ma from dense Russian magnetic data: Implications for Indian plate dynamics, Geochem. Geophys. Geosyst., doi:10.1029/2005GC001079.

  13. Shallow and deep rotations in the Miocene Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laubscher, H.

    Mapping and the construction of balanced cross-sections reveal dextral rotation in addition to N-S contraction during the late middle to late Miocene Jura phase both at the northern and the southern front of the Central Alps (Jura and Lombardic Southern Alps, respectively). These rotations may be ascribed to one and the same shallow domain or sublid, rotated clockwise around a pivot somewhere at the southwestern end of the Aar massif. In a crude first approximation model the sublid may be considered rigid, although the data indicate differential rotations and longitudinal stretching within the lid. The eastern boundary of the sublid crosses the Alps at the Giudicarie-Brenner line, which, according to very recent data, in the Jura phase formed a kinematically linked system, whereas from Innsbruck to the northwest it is postulated to join, as a diffuse or accommodation zone, the eastern tip of the Jura. In the southwest, the Lombardic thrusts enter into the interior of the Western Alps. From there to the southwestern end of the Jura the lid boundary is tentatively chosen arbitrarily to pass somewhere near the northern end of the Belledonne Massif. A similar sublid, though less well substantiated, may comprise the Tauern and the Venetian Southern Alps. The rotational components are superimposed on elements of internal strain, particularly transverse contraction and longitudinal stretching due to simple dextral shear and lateral escape. The model of dextrally rotating sublids pulls together a number of hitherto unexplained structures and opens new perspectives on such recalcitrant problems as the eastward disappearance of the Jura and the Adige embayment in the Southern Alps. Dextral rotation of such shallow sublids may be considered to constitute ``mode 1'' of the dextral component at the Europa-Adria plate boundary. There is also a ``mode 2'' that affects its deep parts. At the surface, its manifestation is a dextral belt of en échelon folds and pull-apart domains that crosses the sublids diagonally. It consists of the Massifs line in the west and the Neo-Pustertal line in the east. They approximately join in the Brenner area, where they cross and interfere with the sublid boundaries. The combined Massifs-Pustertal line describes an arcuate partial northern boundary of the Adriatic plate with an apparent center of sinistral rotation in central Italy. This sinistral rotation may be responsible for the contractional features in the southern part of the western Alps which cannot be accounted for by SE-NW Adria-Europa convergence. It could have caused the development of the fold and thrust belts of Sisteron, Castellane and Nice. These arcs, in turn, suggest the action of more or less independent shallow sublids also in this part of the Alps.

  14. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean.

    PubMed

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate. PMID:27041737

  15. Abundance variations of benthic foraminifera in Upper Oligocene and Miocene strata of south Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, L.L.; Sen Gupta, B.K.

    1986-09-01

    Abundance variations of benthic foraminifera in some upper Oligocene and Miocene strata of south Louisiana were studied to evaluate trends of species dominance, associations, and faunal diversity. Fifty-seven well-cutting samples were obtained from eleven wells in six parishes: Vermilion, St. Mary, St. Martin, Assumption, Terrebonne, and Lafourche. In addition, core samples were obtained from two wells in Terrebonne Parish.

  16. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-04-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate.

  17. Structures and sequence stratigraphy of the Miocene successions, southwestern Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abd El Naby, Ahmed; Abdel-Rahman, Ahmed; Abd El-Aal, Mohamed; Alhamshry, Asmaa

    2016-05-01

    The subsurface structural evolution, facies changes and sequence stratigraphic interpretations of the Miocene successions of the southwestern part of the Gulf of Suez, Egypt, were studied by seismic reflection data of Twenty seven 3D seismic sections supported by the composite, velocity and vertical seismic profiles (VSP) logs of eight wells. Among them five sections and two geoseismic cross sections were selected to reveal the structural framework and depositional history of the study area. The analysis of depth-structure contour maps revealed that the Miocene strata are dissected by two major faults trends: The NW-SE trending faults (Clysmic trend) and the NE-SW trending cross faults running nearly perpendicular to the Clysmic faults. The facies changes of the syn-depositional Miocene units are controlled by the structural framework of the southern part of the Gulf of Suez being evolving diapiric structure of South Gharib Formation. The Miocene units are subdivided into two major 3rd order depositional sequences: S1 and S2.

  18. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Gasson, Edward; Kuhn, Gerhard; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco; SMS Science Team; Acton, Gary; Askin, Rosemary; Atkins, Clifford; Bassett, Kari; Beu, Alan; Blackstone, Brian; Browne, Gregory; Ceregato, Alessandro; Cody, Rosemary; Cornamusini, Gianluca; Corrado, Sveva; DeConto, Robert; Del Carlo, Paola; Di Vincenzo, Gianfranco; Dunbar, Gavin; Falk, Candice; Field, Brad; Fielding, Christopher; Florindo, Fabio; Frank, Tracy; Giorgetti, Giovanna; Grelle, Thomas; Gui, Zi; Handwerger, David; Hannah, Michael; Harwood, David M.; Hauptvogel, Dan; Hayden, Travis; Henrys, Stuart; Hoffmann, Stefan; Iacoviello, Francesco; Ishman, Scott; Jarrard, Richard; Johnson, Katherine; Jovane, Luigi; Judge, Shelley; Kominz, Michelle; Konfirst, Matthew; Krissek, Lawrence; Kuhn, Gerhard; Lacy, Laura; Levy, Richard; Maffioli, Paola; Magens, Diana; Marcano, Maria C.; Millan, Cristina; Mohr, Barbara; Montone, Paola; Mukasa, Samuel; Naish, Timothy; Niessen, Frank; Ohneiser, Christian; Olney, Mathew; Panter, Kurt; Passchier, Sandra; Patterson, Molly; Paulsen, Timothy; Pekar, Stephen; Pierdominici, Simona; Pollard, David; Raine, Ian; Reed, Joshua; Reichelt, Lucia; Riesselman, Christina; Rocchi, Sergio; Sagnotti, Leonardo; Sandroni, Sonia; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Schmitt, Douglas; Speece, Marvin; Storey, Bryan; Strada, Eleonora; Talarico, Franco; Taviani, Marco; Tuzzi, Eva; Verosub, Kenneth; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Warny, Sophie; Wilson, Gary; Wilson, Terry; Wonik, Thomas; Zattin, Massimiliano

    2016-03-01

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23-14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3-4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (˜280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (˜500 ppm) atmospheric CO2. These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2 during the early to mid-Miocene.

  19. Carbonate depositional environments and reservoir properties of the Miocene rocks, east Gulf of Suez, Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Bakarat, M.A.K.; Kholief, M.M.

    1988-08-01

    Miocene carbonate rocks in six surface sections on the eastern side of the Gulf of Suez were carefully studied in the field, petrographically examined, and mineralogically analyzed using SEM and x-ray microanalysis for all elements. In general, reservoir quality of the Miocene carbonates was poor because of original composition and texture. Three different types of porosity were distinguished in the studied Miocene carbonates: primary (intergranular and moldic), secondary (leached), and fracture. Much of the porosity in the Miocene reservoirs is secondary; however, sometimes this secondary porosity may be reduced by compaction and/or precipitation of evaporites in fractures and pores. The authors conclude that the primary porosity of the carbonate rocks in the reef complex was eliminated by lithification and cementation; only secondary porosity remained. This secondary porosity developed in all environments (supratidal, intertidal, and subtidal), but the best porosity developed in the subtidal facies. This high porosity occurs because the dolomites in the subtidal facies are coarser and free from anhydrite cement, whereas in supratidal and intertidal facies the dolomites are finer and their porosity is plugged by secondary anhydrite cement.

  20. Upper-miocene submarine volcanism in the strait of sicily (banco senza nome)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaluva, L.; Colantoni, P.; Savelli, C.; di Girolamo, P.

    1981-09-01

    Two basaltic fragments dredged from a volcanic seamount in the Sicilian continental slope of the Strait of Sicily show petrochemical features typical of within plate alkalibasaltic lavas and K/Ar age of about 10 m.y. The data represent the first volcanic evidence of Upper Miocene tensional tectonics in this sector of the African plate.

  1. Revised Miocene and Pliocene diatom biostratigraphy of Upper Newport Bay, Newport Beach, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barron, J.A.

    1976-01-01

    North Pacific diatom zones XXIII through IX of Schrader are recognizable in the middle Miocene to lower Pliocene stratigraphic section exposed around Upper Newport Bay in Newport Beach, California. Correlation with DSDP Site 173 and other stratigraphic sections in California allows the selection of diatom datums that are the most reliable for long-distance correlation. Individual diatom datums are proposed as markers for North Pacific diatom zones XXIII through IX. Correlations with DSDP Site 173 reveal a hiatus in the lower part of Core 15 that corresponds with a distinct lithologic and floral change in the core. Preliminary silicoflagellate data for the Upper Newport Bay stratigraphic section supports the diatom correlations. Correlation with calcareous nannofossil, radiolarian, and silicoflagellate zones at Upper Newport Bay and at DSDP Site 173 suggests that the boundary between North Pacific diatom zones XVII and XVI approximates the middle Miocene/upper Miocene boundary. The Miocene/Pliocene boundary is estimated to be in North Pacific diatom zone X. One new stratigraphically useful diatom species is described, Lithodesmium reynoldsii. ?? 1976.

  2. Middle Miocene E-W tectonic horst structure of Crete through extensional detachment faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papanikolaou, D.; Vassilakis, E.

    2008-07-01

    Two east-west trending extensional detachment faults have been recognized in Crete, one with top-to-the-north motion of the hanging wall toward the Cretan Sea and one with top-to-the-south motion of the hanging wall toward the Libyan Sea. The east-west trending zone between these two detachment faults, which forms their common footwall, comprises a tectonic horst formed during Middle Miocene slip on the detachment faults. The detachment faults disrupt the overall tectono-stratigraphic succession of Crete and are localized along pre-existing thrust faults and along particular portions of the stratigraphic sequence, including the transition between the Permo-Triassic Tyros Beds and the base of the Upper Triassic-Eocene carbonate platform of the Tripolis nappe. By recognizing several different tectono-stratigraphic formations within what is generally termed the 'phyllite-quartzite', it is possible to distinguish these extensional detachment faults from thrust faults and minor discontinuities in the sequence. The deformation history of units within Crete can be summarized as: (i) compressional deformation producing arc-parallel east-west trending south-directed thrust faults in Oligocene to Early Miocene time (ii) extensional deformation along arc-parallel, east-west trending detachment faults in Middle Miocene time, with hanging wall motion to the north and south; (iii) Late Miocene-Quaternary extensional deformation along high-angle normal and oblique normal faults that disrupt the older arc-parallel structures.

  3. Foraminiferal record of Oligocene-Miocene shales from the Limon Basin, eastern Costa Rica

    SciTech Connect

    Cassell, D.T.; Sen Gupta, B.K.

    1985-01-01

    Foraminiferal analysis of an unusually thick and continuous section of Tertiary shales from the western margin of the Limon Basin, Costa Rica, indicates that rocks from this section are older than similar facies elsewhere in the basin. Approximately 620 meters of silty shales from the Quebrada Terciopelo belong to zones N3 through N9 while the oldest shales from the rest of the basin are in N12 to N13. The lowermost N3 zone is characterized by the presence of the Late Oligocene larger foraminifera Lepidocyclina waylandvaughani and Heterostegina antillea associated with oncolite clasts in a siltstone. Shales above contain typical Early to Middle Miocene planktonic foraminifera, including Catapsydrax stainforthi, Globorotalia kugleri, G. sicanus, and G. peripheroronda. The first two species, used widely as Early Miocene markers and reported to have nonoverlapping stratigraphic ranges, are found together within a short interval in this section. This Quebrada Terciopelo sedimentary section shows the transition from a shallow nearshore environment in the Late Oligocene to an open marine outer shelf or upper slope in the Miocene. The biostratigraphic analysis demonstrates than an approximately 70 meter thick Late Oligocene (N3) to Early Miocene (N5) section is repeated. This is apparently related to normal faulting associated with the uplift of the Talamanca Mountains.

  4. Anthracothere dental anatomy reveals a late Miocene Chado-Libyan bioprovince

    PubMed Central

    Lihoreau, Fabrice; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud; Viriot, Laurent; Coppens, Yves; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassane Taisso; Tafforeau, Paul; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2006-01-01

    Recent discovery of an abundant and diverse late Miocene fauna at Toros-Ménalla (Chad, central Africa) by the Mission Paléoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne provides a unique opportunity to examine African faunal and hominid evolution relative to the early phases of the Saharan arid belt. This study presents evidence from an African Miocene anthracotheriid Libycosaurus, particularly well documented at Toros-Ménalla. Its remains reveal a large semiaquatic mammal that evolved an autapomorphic upper fifth premolar (extremely rare in Cenozoic mammals). The extra tooth appeared ≈12 million years ago, probably in a small northern African population isolated by climate-driven fragmentation and alteration of the environments inhabited by these anthracotheriids [Flower, B. P. & Kennett, J. P. (1994) Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 108, 537–555 and Zachos, J., Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. (2001) Science 292, 686–693]. The semiaquatic niche of Libycosaurus, combined with the distribution and relationships of its late Miocene species, indicates that by the end of the Miocene, wet environments connected the Lake Chad Basin to the Libyan Sirt Basin, across what is now the Sahara desert. PMID:16723392

  5. Oligo-Miocene rift of Sardinia and the early history of the Western Mediterranean Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cherchi, A.

    1982-08-01

    The geodynamic evolution of the Western Mediterranean Basin, in spite of many studies, is still uncertain. There is some consensus for interpreting this basin as a kind of small oceanic marginal basin. Its opening has generally been related to a subduction process which was active during the Oligocene-Miocene somewhere east of Sardinia-Corsica1-7. As the margins of the basin are deeply buried below Miocene-to-present sediments, direct lithological and stratigraphical data which could explain the events responsible for its formation are rare8-10 or missing altogether. To obtain such data, detailed field studies have been undertaken in Sardinia (Fig. 1), and the first results are presented here. This approach is justified by the fact that in that island, Oligocene and Miocene sediments were deposited in a rift (fossa tettonica sarda of Verdabasso11), which is the easternmost arm of the complex rift system that affected the European plate during Oligocene and Miocene times. One of these arms evolved towards a small oceanic basin-the Western Mediterranean or Algero-Provençal Basin-while others such as the Gulf of Valencia and the Sardinia rift aborted and remained at the rift stage. Its exceptional exposures make it possible to examine the Sardinia rift to clarify the sequence of events which created it, and to establish a sedimentological model which we believe is directly applicable to the Western Mediterranean Basin.

  6. Late Oligocene and Early Miocene Muroidea of the Zinda Pir Dome

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Everett H.; Flynn, Lawrence J.

    2016-01-01

    A series of Oligocene through Early Miocene terrestrial deposits preserved in the foothills of the Zinda Pir Dome of western Pakistan produce multiple, superposed fossil mammal localities. These include small mammal assemblages that shed light on the evolution of rodent lineages, especially Muroidea, in South Asia. Nine small mammal localities span approximately 28–19 Ma, an interval encompassing the Oligocene–Miocene boundary. The Early Miocene rodent fossil assemblages are dominated by muroid rodents, but muroids are uncommon and archaic in earlier Oligocene horizons. The Zinda Pir sequence includes the evolutionary transition to modern Muroidea at about the Oligocene–Miocene boundary. We review the muroid record for the Zinda Pir Dome, which includes the early radiation of primitive bamboo rats (Rhizomyinae) and early members of the modern muroid radiation, which lie near crown Cricetidae and Muridae. The Zinda Pir record dates diversification of modern muroids in the Indian Subcontintent and establishment by 19 Ma of muroid assemblages characteristic of the later Siwaliks. PMID:26681836

  7. First record of Mesopithecus (Cercopithecidae, Colobinae) from the Miocene of the Iberian Peninsula.

    PubMed

    Alba, David M; Montoya, Plini; Pina, Marta; Rook, Lorenzo; Abella, Juan; Morales, Jorge; Delson, Eric

    2015-11-01

    We report dental remains of the extinct colobine monkey Mesopithecus from the Turolian (MN13, Late Miocene, ca. 6.23 Ma) locality of Venta del Moro (Valencia, Spain). They include most of the deciduous dentition and the unerupted germs of the first molars of a single infantile individual, as well as two lower left lateral incisors from two additional individuals. On the basis of morphometric comparisons, mainly based on the M1s, these remains are attributed to the Late Miocene species Mesopithecus pentelicus. They represent a significant addition to the knowledge of the deciduous dentition of this taxon, much less well-known than the permanent dentition. Although this genus was widely distributed from the Late Miocene through the Pliocene across Europe, southwestern Asia, Pakistan, and China, until now its occurence in the Late Miocene of the Iberian Peninsula had not been documented conclusively. Hence, the reported remains considerably enlarge southwestwards the known geographic distribution of Mesopithecus. The presence of this genus at Venta del Moro must be understood within the framework of the significant faunal turnover that took place in European faunas during the latest Turolian (the second Messinian mammalian dispersal), which is further documented at this locality by the occurrence of other eastern immigrants. At the same time, the presence of M. pentelicus at this site agrees well with previous paleoenvironmental and sedimentological evidence, indicating a lacustrine depositional environment with strong hydrologic seasonality. PMID:26553814

  8. Evidence for ice-free summers in the late Miocene central Arctic Ocean

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Ruediger; Fahl, Kirsten; Schreck, Michael; Knorr, Gregor; Niessen, Frank; Forwick, Matthias; Gebhardt, Catalina; Jensen, Laura; Kaminski, Michael; Kopf, Achim; Matthiessen, Jens; Jokat, Wilfried; Lohmann, Gerrit

    2016-01-01

    Although the permanently to seasonally ice-covered Arctic Ocean is a unique and sensitive component in the Earth's climate system, the knowledge of its long-term climate history remains very limited due to the restricted number of pre-Quaternary sedimentary records. During Polarstern Expedition PS87/2014, we discovered multiple submarine landslides along Lomonosov Ridge. Removal of younger sediments from steep headwalls has led to exhumation of Miocene sediments close to the seafloor. Here we document the presence of IP25 as a proxy for spring sea-ice cover and alkenone-based summer sea-surface temperatures >4 °C that support a seasonal sea-ice cover with an ice-free summer season being predominant during the late Miocene in the central Arctic Ocean. A comparison of our proxy data with Miocene climate simulations seems to favour either relatively high late Miocene atmospheric CO2 concentrations and/or a weak sensitivity of the model to simulate the magnitude of high-latitude warming in a warmer than modern climate. PMID:27041737

  9. Evidence for sediment fan deposition on outer Texas shelf during Miocene eustatic sea level highstands

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, W.C.; Olsen, R.S.; Rosen, R.N.

    1988-02-01

    Four types of data were reviewed in an attempt to clearly define the environments of deposition for reservoir sands in the Matagorda 668 field: well log curve shapes, seismic amplitude responses, micropaleontology, and thin section sedimentary petrology. All four lines of evidence support the interpretation that these lower Miocene sands were deposited as fan complexes.

  10. Early to Middle Miocene vegetation and climate of Wilkes Land, Antarctica (IODP 318)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salzmann, U.; Sangiorgi, F.; Bijl, P. K.; Pross, J.; Schouten, S.; Tauxe, L.; Bendle, J.; Brinkhuis, H.; Escutia, C.; IODP Expedition 318 Science Party

    2012-04-01

    The question of whether continental Antarctic climate was warm enough to support a substantial vegetation cover during the Neogene is of great significance to the ongoing controversial debate on the behaviour of Antarctic land ice during the Miocene-Pliocene transition from dynamic to persistent ice sheets. Here we present palynological results from a Miocene sediment record provided by the Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 318 to the Wilkes Land margin (East Antarctica). The reconstructed vegetation changes are compared with climate estimates derived from dinoflagellate cysts and MBT/CBT organic palaeotemperature proxies. Analyses of pollen and spores indicate a low-diverse vegetation dominated by Podocarpus- and Nothofagus- trees and shrubs. Particular high Podocarpus percentages occur during the Middle Miocene Climatic Optimum (MMCO). For this time period MBT/CBT suggests a cool temperate climate with increased mean air temperatures (MAT). Dinoflagellate cyst assemblages, dominated by autotrophic species, are indicative of ice-free surface waters. After MMCO a subsequent decline in MAT is indicated by MBT and dinoflagellate cyst assemblages, though pollen percentages (e.g. Podocarpus/Nothofagus ratio) remain relatively stable. However, very high Nothofagus and low Podocarpus pollen percentages may suggest lower temperatures towards the end of the middle Miocene.

  11. Middle Miocene vertebrates from the Amazonian Madre de Dios Subandean Zone, Perú

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antoine, Pierre-Olivier; Roddaz, Martin; Brichau, Stéphanie; Tejada-Lara, Julia; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Altamirano, Ali; Louterbach, Mélanie; Lambs, Luc; Otto, Thierry; Brusset, Stéphane

    2013-03-01

    A new middle Miocene vertebrate fauna from Peruvian Amazonia is described. It yields the marsupials Sipalocyon sp. (Hathliacynidae) and Marmosa (Micoureus) cf. laventica (Didelphidae), as well as an unidentified glyptodontine xenarthran and the rodents Guiomys sp. (Caviidae), “Scleromys” sp., cf. quadrangulatus-schurmanni-colombianus (Dinomyidae), an unidentified acaremyid, and cf. Microsteiromys sp. (Erethizontidae). Apatite Fission Track provides a detrital age (17.1 ± 2.4 Ma) for the locality, slightly older than its inferred biochronological age (Colloncuran-early Laventan South American Land Mammal Ages: ˜15.6-13.0 Ma). Put together, both the mammalian assemblage and lithology of the fossil-bearing level point to a mixture of tropical rainforest environment and more open habitats under a monsoonal-like tropical climate. The fully fluvial origin of the concerned sedimentary sequence suggests that the Amazonian Madre de Dios Subandean Zone was not part of the Pebas mega-wetland System by middle Miocene times. This new assemblage seems to reveal a previously undocumented “spatiotemporal transition” between the late early Miocene assemblages from high latitudes (Patagonia and Southern Chile) and the late middle Miocene faunas of low latitudes (Colombia, Perú, Venezuela, and ?Brazil).

  12. Relationship of benthic foraminiferal biofacies to lithofacies in phosphatic Miocene sediments, mid-Atlantic Continental Shelf

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.W.; Waters, V.J.; Riggs, S.R.

    1984-04-01

    Changes in benthic foraminiferal assemblages accompany changes in total sediment texture and mineralogy (primarily percent phosphatic grains) throughout the Pungo River Formation in Onslow Bay, North Carolina. Only Burdigalian (late-early Miocene) deposits have been cored in southern Onslow Bay. Basal phosphorite sands (30% phosphate) are overlain by phosphatic (8%) muds and slightly phosphatic (4%) quartz sands. Elongate buliminaceans (Bolivina, Bulimina, Buliminella, Uvigerina) comprise over 50% of the benthic assemblage in phosphorites. They also predominate (43%) in phosphatic muds where Siphogenerina and Florilus become conspicuous faunal elements. Diverse trochospirally coiled forms (mainly Hanzawaia, also Valvulineria and Cibicides) become predominant in quartz sands; buliminaceans decline to 30% of the fauna. Pungo River deposits in northern Onslow Bay are Burdigalian, Langhian (early-middle Miocene), and Serravallian (middle Miocene) in age. Burdigalian deposits are nonphosphatic, muddy quartz sands in which Hanzawaia predominates and buliminaceans comprise only 22% of the fauna; Florilus accounts for 5%. Hanzawaia remains the dominant genus in the slightly phosphatic (4%) quartz sands of the Langhian and the phosphatic (10%) sands of the Serravallian; buliminaceans increase to 29% of the fauna, but Florilus nearly disappears. Both vertically and laterally through the Miocene of Onslow Bay, nutrient-loving buliminaceans thrive where phosphate content increases. Florilus and Siphogenerina are associated with the influx of fine-grained terrigenous sediments. The Hanzawaia-dominated assemblage thrives in clean, coarser-grained substrates. Regional trends in the distributional patterns of these taxa may aid in locating additional phosphate deposits.

  13. The Miocene avifauna of the Li Mae Long locality, Thailand: systematics and paleoecology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheneval, Jacques; Ginsburg, Lonard; Mourer-Chauvire, Ccile; Ratanasthien, Benjavun

    The Miocene avifauna from Li Mae Long includes an anhinga, a heron, a new species of lesser flamingo, Phoeniconaias siamensis n. sp., two Anatidae, a Phasianidae, three Rallidae, and a Strigidae. The landscape indicated by the mammalian and avian faunas corresponds to a large swampy depression, with probably saline or alkaline waters, surrounded by humid forests, under a warm climate.

  14. A remarkable new pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera, Tetrigidae) in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic

    PubMed Central

    Heads, Sam W.; Thomas, M. Jared; Wang, Yinan

    2014-01-01

    Abstract A new genus and species of pygmy grasshopper (Orthoptera: Tetrigidae) is described from Early Miocene (Burdigalian) Dominican amber. Electrotettix attenboroughi Heads & Thomas, gen. et sp. n. is assigned to the subfamily Cladonotinae based on the deeply forked frontal costa, but is remarkable for the presence of tegmina and hind wings, hitherto unknown in this subfamily. PMID:25147472

  15. Anthracothere dental anatomy reveals a late Miocene Chado-Libyan bioprovince.

    PubMed

    Lihoreau, Fabrice; Boisserie, Jean-Renaud; Viriot, Laurent; Coppens, Yves; Likius, Andossa; Mackaye, Hassane Taisso; Tafforeau, Paul; Vignaud, Patrick; Brunet, Michel

    2006-06-01

    Recent discovery of an abundant and diverse late Miocene fauna at Toros-Ménalla (Chad, central Africa) by the Mission Paléoanthropologique Franco-Tchadienne provides a unique opportunity to examine African faunal and hominid evolution relative to the early phases of the Saharan arid belt. This study presents evidence from an African Miocene anthracotheriid Libycosaurus, particularly well documented at Toros-Ménalla. Its remains reveal a large semiaquatic mammal that evolved an autapomorphic upper fifth premolar (extremely rare in Cenozoic mammals). The extra tooth appeared approximately 12 million years ago, probably in a small northern African population isolated by climate-driven fragmentation and alteration of the environments inhabited by these anthracotheriids [Flower, B. P. & Kennett, J. P. (1994) Palaeogeogr. Palaeoclimatol. Palaeoecol. 108, 537-555 and Zachos, J., Pagani, M., Sloan, L., Thomas, E. & Billups, K. (2001) Science 292, 686-693]. The semiaquatic niche of Libycosaurus, combined with the distribution and relationships of its late Miocene species, indicates that by the end of the Miocene, wet environments connected the Lake Chad Basin to the Libyan Sirt Basin, across what is now the Sahara desert. PMID:16723392

  16. Tectono-stratigraphic evolution of the continental Miocene basins in southern Anatolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koç, Ayten; Kaymakci, Nuretdin; van Hinsbergen, Douwe J. J.; Kuiper, Klaudia F.; Vissers, Reinoud L. M.

    2014-05-01

    The exposed portion of the Tauride fold-thrust belt in southern Turkey is flanked and overlain by Neogene sedimentary basins. To the south and on top of the high ranges, these basins are mainly marine, whereas previously poorly studied intra-montane basins dominated by continental deposits are exposed to the north. We have studied the stratigraphy and structure of these continental basins - the Altınapa, Yalvaç and Ilgın Basins. Their stratigraphy displays overall fining upward sequences of fluvio-lacustrine sediments, deposition of which interrupted by basin-wide unconformities; similar hiatuses seems to exist in each basin. The most prominent unconformity surface occurred during the Middle Miocene and corresponds to the timing of volcanic activity in the region. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the volcaniclastic samples from the Altınapa and Ilgın basins yielded 11.8-11.6 Ma ages. The main basin forming regional deformation phase was extensional and occurred during the Middle Miocene. The extension directions obtained from paleostress inversion techniques indicate multidirectional extension under vertical uniaxial stress which are compatible with the recent seismic activity and available focal mechanism solutions. The main basin-bounding faults, however, are constrained mainly N-S to NW-SE implying that they are reactivated structures. The Middle Miocene and onwards extensional history of these basins occurs behind and atop a thrust front along the Cyprus arc, extending towards the Antalya nappes and Aksu thrust in the heart of the Isparta angle. The synchrounous, curved pairs of thrust fronts associated with subduction and overriding plate extension suggests that the Cyprus subduction zone has been retreating relative to central Anatolia since, at least, the Middle Miocene time. In addition to extensional history of the region, these continental basins contain evidence for the post-Late Miocene differential uplift of the Taurides in southern Anatolia. All of these continental basins were above sea level during the Middle and Late Miocene and are now found at an elevation of 1 km. On the other hand, the upper Miocene marine deposits just south of the study area currently are at an elevation of ~2 km, and have therefore been uplifted at least 1 km more than the continental basins to the north. We conclude that the current high elevation of the Taurides is synchronous with, and at least in part related to late Neogene extension and vertical differential uplift, likely related to the dynamics of the Cyprian subduction zone.

  17. Miocene benthic foraminiferal Cd/Ca records: South Atlantic and western equatorial Pacific

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delaney, M. L.

    1990-10-01

    Cadmium-to-calcium records in benthic foraminifera, interpreted in conjunction with carbon isotope records, reflect oceanic circulation patterns and oceanic inventories of Cd, carbon 13/carbon 12, and indirectly, phosphorus. Cd/Ca ratios have been determined in benthic foraminifera Cibicidoides spp. for the late, middle, and early Miocene from a site in the South Atlantic (Deep Sea Drilling Project (DSDP) site 525, leg 74, ˜2500 m, Walvis Ridge) and from a site in the western equatorial Pacific (DSDP site 289, leg 30, ˜2200 m, Ontong-Java Plateau). Both sites have well-established carbon isotope records for benthic foraminifera typical of the global record dominated by inventory changes. Cd/Ca ratios and carbon isotope values were averaged for the Miocene in time intervals substantially longer than estimated oceanic residence times of Cd, C, or P. Oceanic mean Cd/Ca and carbon isotopes were estimated as weighted means of the values from both sites using weighting factors based on replicating modern oceanic means; this may tend to underestimate oceanic inventories earlier than the late Miocene because of changing water mass dominance at the South Atlantic site. From these means, the oceanic Cd inventory appears relatively stable during the Miocene, while there are large changes in carbon isotope inventories. Miocene Cd inventory estimates are at least 20% lower than published estimates for Quaternary stages 1 and 2. Increasing oceanic Cd inventories over the past 10 m.y. are consistent with hypotheses of increased river fluxes in the recent geologic past. Cd/Ca differences between sites may be indicative of the extent of basin-basin fractionation from bottom water circulation, although the validity of this comparison depends on how representative each of these two sites is through time for its respective ocean basin. The Pacific-Atlantic Cd/Ca difference based on these two sites was larger in the late Miocene compared to the middle and early Miocene. The relationship between Cd/Ca and carbon isotope inventories and intersite gradients for these sites suggests that either oceanic phosphorus inventories or parameters related to marine organic matter composition must have been different in the Miocene than at present. Large changes in the carbon isotope balance, reflected as both positive and negative excursions in the carbon isotope inventories, occurred with little effect on Cd inventories. Changes in phosphorus fluxes associated with these carbon isotope flux changes may have been compensated for by changing deposition fluxes to other phosphorus sinks. Phosphorus inventories may have increased from the middle to late Miocene with increasingly negative oceanic carbon isotope inventories. However, confirmation of these suggestions depend on collecting more Cd/Ca (and δ13C) data throughout the Miocene oceans and on developing the application of other constraints for these interpretations.

  18. Inferences for the Miocene to present evolution of the Anatolia Plateau south margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Blanco, David; Bertotti, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    The Miocene to recent Central Anatolia Plateau (CAP) is a first-order morphotectonic feature with high average elevations, low-relief dry interior and steep humid flacks. The ESF-sponsored Vertical Anatolia Movement Project (VAMP) aims at increasing the temporal and spatial resolution of plateau-building processes, using the CAP as a case study. Unravelling the tectonic history of its margins is essential. Our component of the VAMP strives to determine the subsidence-uplift mechanisms in the south margin of the Anatolia Plateau, structures responsible for, and age of growth of this margin, as well as achieve a quantitative understanding of the regional tectonics. A common division of the study area, from north to south, is: (i) south part of the continental basins of Central Turkey, with Tuz Gölü Basin as the main representative, in the high flat area of the Anatolian Plateau, (ii) the arcuate Tauride fold-thrust belt and the Miocene Basins on top of it, forming part of the south flank of the plateau, (iii) offshore Cilicia Basin between Turkey and Cyprus, as the downward continuation of the south flank of the plateau, and (iv) the southward-thrusted Kyrenia Mountain Range and Circum-Troodos sedimentary succession. Miocene marine sediments in southern Turkey are presently found in Manavgat, Mut and Adana Basins. These sediments, possibly originally belonging to one single basin, are fundamental archives to constrain the tectonic stages immediately preceding and contemporaneous with plateau development. Miocene Mut Basin lies between Manavgat and Adana Basins, and is considered to have developed on a relatively stable area of Mesozoic Tauride basement, thus is a strategic area to solve the tectonic history that existed in southern Turkey since Miocene. Three N-S regional geological sections from Mut Basin to Mesoaria Basin (north Cyprus) that reproduce the present relationships among the units of the area have been constructed. These sections show a pre-Cenozoic highly-deformed metamorphic basement with paleotopography, unconformably overlain by relatively undeformed marine Miocene sediments, and post-Miocene continental deposits. These Miocene deposits are uplifted at more than 2000m in Mut Basin and located at depths of more than 2500m in the Cilicia Basin, outcroping again in the Kyrenia ridge. Two main periods of differential tectonic activity are distinguished within the post-Eocene succession; Miocene, with subsidence of the whole area, and post-Messinian, characterized by uplift in the north, subsidence in the central transtensional domains and thrust activity and uplift in the Kyrenia Range. In this contribution, using data from previous studies, a 3D visualization program and structural fieldwork techniques, we aim to determine the areal distribution and tectonic evolution of a Miocene basin that probably covered an area from Karaman to Mesoaria basins and from Antalya to Adana basins.

  19. Orbital and suborbital-scale sedimentary rhythms in the Middle Miocene Onnagawa Formation, Northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, S.; Tada, R.; Takahashi, S.; Itaki, T.; Kubota, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Late Quaternary climate is characterized by millennial-scale abrupt climatic changes namely Dansgaard-Oeschger Cycles. Such millennial-scale changes are faithfully recorded in the Japan Sea sediments as alternation of dark and light colored silty clay, and the relationship between the millennial-scale variability and orbitally-driven changes in ice volume has been explored. On the other hand, presence of similar millennial-scale changes was reported from the Middle Miocene alternations of dark and light colored siliceous rocks in the Onnnagawa Formation, Northeastern Japan. Because large, unstable ice sheet was present during the Late Quaternary and the Middle Miocene, it is suggested that such millennial-scale variability and waxing and waning of unstable ice sheet could be interrelated. Thus, it is important to specify the cyclicity and the amplitude variability of millennial-scale cycles during the Middle Miocene to understand the underlying mechanism and the ultimate cause. The Middle Miocene Onnagawa Formation is known as bedded siliceous rocks equivalent to the Monterey Formation, California. Tada (1991) demonstrated that its cm-scale dark-light colored alternations reflected millennial-scale variability. However, the timing, periodicity, and duration of the millennial-scale variability are not fully understood. Thus, we aim to clarify when the millennial-scale variability became distinct and faded out, and examine its possible association with ice volume changes. We conducted a field survey in the Yashima area, Akita, Northeastern Japan to reconstruct a continuous sedimentary record throughout the Middle Miocene, and constructed the age model based on biostratigraphy. In addition, we identified cyclic changes in lithology, and applied cyclostratigraphy to produce the high-resolution age model. Based on this age model, we attempt correlation with δ18O curve to examine the relationship between cyclicity of δ18O changes and occurrence of millennial-scale variability.

  20. The Oligocene-Miocene transition at the East Antarctic Wilkes Land margin: IODP Site 1356

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salabarnada, Ariadna; Escutia, Carlota; Nelson, Hans; Damuth, John E.; Jimenez-Espejo, Francisco

    2015-04-01

    IODP drilling in the flank of a levee deposit at continental rise Site U1356 recovered a thick section of Oligocene to upper Miocene sediments indicative of relatively deep water, sea ice -- influenced setting. Three main lithological units characterize the sediment record: 1) hemipelagic and bottom current deposition dominated during the late early to late Oligocene; 2) debris flows with interbedded turbidite deposits characterize sedimentation during late Oligocene to early Miocene; and 3) turbidite and hemipelagic sedimentation dominated during the early Miocene. The regional grid of multichannel seismic lines, provide a regional depositional context for the three units. Early to late Oligocene deposits record abyssal plain sedimentation under the influence of bottom currents. The sharp transition from abyssal plain facies to distal debris flows during the late Oligocene coincides with the deposition of large mass transport deposits at the base of the continental slope and erosion of large channels on the continental rise. The distal end of these mass transport deposits is recovered in our cores interbedded with levee turbidites from the nearby channel. The Oligocene to Miocene transition marks the disappearance of debris flows in our cores and the start of turbidite and hemipelagic deposition that characterizes levee sedimentation of the early Miocene environment. The studied section records one of the major climate transitions in the history of Earth's climate and ice sheet evolution during leading to the Mi-1 event. We argue that mass transport processes resulted from East Antarctic Ice Sheet expansion during the climate cooling leading to the Mi-1 glaciation. Following the Mi-1 event, sedimentation is characterized by hemipelagic, turbidity-, and bottom-current deposition. In addition, we present elemental and clay mineralogy data that provide insights into terrigenous fluxes, productivity, and the transition from a poorly oxygenated low-silica system to a ventilated silica-enriched system that is more similar to the modern Southern Ocean.

  1. Seawater osmium isotope evidence for a middle Miocene flood basalt event in ferromanganese crust records

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Klemm, V.; Frank, M.; Levasseur, S.; Halliday, A.N.; Hein, J.R.

    2008-01-01

    Three ferromanganese crusts from the northeast, northwest and central Atlantic were re-dated using osmium (Os) isotope stratigraphy and yield ages from middle Miocene to the present. The three Os isotope records do not show evidence for growth hiatuses. The reconstructed Os isotope-based growth rates for the sections older than 10??Ma are higher than those determined previously by the combined beryllium isotope (10Be/9Be) and cobalt (Co) constant-flux methods, which results in a decrease in the maximum age of each crust. This re-dating does not lead to significant changes to the interpretation of previously determined radiogenic isotope neodymium, lead (Nd, Pb) time series because the variability of these isotopes was very small in the records of the three crusts prior to 10??Ma. The Os isotope record of the central Atlantic crust shows a pronounced minimum during the middle Miocene between 15 and 12??Ma, similar to a minimum previously observed in two ferromanganese crusts from the central Pacific. For the other two Atlantic crusts, the Os isotope records and their calibration to the global seawater curve for the middle Miocene are either more uncertain or too short and thus do not allow for a reliable identification of an isotopic minimum. Similar to pronounced minima reported previously for the Cretaceous/Tertiary and Eocene/Oligocene boundaries, possible interpretations for the newly identified middle Miocene Os isotope minimum include changes in weathering intensity and/or a meteorite impact coinciding with the formation of the No??rdlinger Ries Crater. It is suggested that the eruption and weathering of the Columbia River flood basalts provided a significant amount of the unradiogenic Os required to produce the middle Miocene minimum. ?? 2008 Elsevier B.V.

  2. Contrasting accommodation zones linking Miocene-Pliocene basins in the Big Bend (West Texas)

    SciTech Connect

    Dickerson, P.W. . Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1992-01-01

    N-NW-trending Miocene-Pliocene basins of the Big Bend (West Texas) are linked or segmented by westerly to west-northwesterly accommodation zones of varying antiquity, relief and displacement. They are boundaries between basins of similar age but differing dimensions and geometries. All demonstrably predate Miocene-Pliocene extensional/transtensional deformation and foundering of the basins. Shafter zone, the northernmost, segments Presidio graben into a 20-km-wide north-trending subbasin and a 30-km-wide northwest-trending one to the south. Hot springs mark border fault-accommodation zone intersections. Vertical displacement there is 5 m. From 50 to 90 km still farther east Shafter zone defines the northern margins of two basins, northern Tornillo and Black Gap, which flank the Santiago range. Presidio zone intervenes between the 30-km-wide southern Presidio graben and the 10-km-wide Redford graben on the south. Early Miocene pre- and synmagmatic faulting occurred along Tascotal Mesa fault, the principal structure of the zone. Post-Early Miocene displacement has been dominantly vertical (as much as 100 m), accompanied by ca. 1 km of right slip. The west-northwesterly Colorado Canyon/Terlingua zone links Redford graben with Castolon graben and its southeastward continuation into Mexico. Fault displacement in this accommodation zone, as in the other two, is primarily vertical with evidence for more significant right slip. Small Miocene mafic bodies intrude the zone; some bear lower crustal or mantle xenoliths, attesting that the zone is a deeply rooted crustal flaw.

  3. Rifting, rotation, detachment faulting, and sedimentation: Miocene evolution of the southern California margin

    SciTech Connect

    Bachman, S.B.; Crouch, J.K. )

    1990-05-01

    The evolution of the Los Angeles and adjacent offshore Santa Monica and San Pedro basins of southern California began during the earliest Miocene. The basins formed as the result of rifting and subsequent large scale rotation of segments within a preexisting Mesozoic-Paleogene forearc basin. Clockwise rotation (less than 90{degree}) of the outer two-thirds of this fore-arc basin during the early and middle Miocene moved these once north-trending forearc strata into an east-west trend (the modern Transverse Ranges). The eastern margin of the initial rift remains in its original location and is best documented from outcrop and subsurface data in the San Joaquin Hills. What was once the western margin of the rift has been rotated to a position north of the rift, along the southern Santa Monica Mountains. The early Miocene Vaqueros sandstones. which that are entirely shallow-marine and thousands of feet thick provide evidence for initial subsidence of the rift. Widening of the rift and separation of the Santa Monica Mountains and the San Joaquin Hills in the early and middle Miocene was accompanied by detachment faulting and volcanism along the rift margins. These detachment faults can be documented in the subsurface of the San Joaquin Hills and in outcrop in the Santa Monica Mountains. A unique aspect of this inner borderland rift is the rapid uplift, exposure, erosion, and then subsidence of high pressure/temperature metamorphic basement blocks (Catalina schist) within the rift itself. These basement rocks were buried 20 to 30 km beneath the ancestral fore arc prior to rifting. They were uplifted, perhaps due to thermal effects, during pervasive early and middle Miocene volcanism within the rift. Evidence of these dramatic events is provided by the distinctive San Onofre breccia deposit exposed along the margins of the rift.

  4. Depositional history of Oligocene-Miocene carbonate rocks of northeastern Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlach, R. )

    1990-05-01

    The apparent tectonic stability of the northern Puerto Rico platform during the late Oligocene and early Miocene allows for the depositional history of subsurface carbonate rocks of northeastern Puerto Rico to be related to major changes in eustatic sea level. During a late Oligocene north to south transgression of sea level, fluvial/deltaic to shallow marine terrigenous sediments (San Sebastian Formation) and, subsequently, open-ramp carbonates (Lares Limestone) accumulated in the central basin. Following a minor regression (third-order cycle ), a more extensive early Miocene( ) transgression resulted in deposition of deeper ramp carbonate mudstone and marl (Mudstone unit) in an apparent trough in the central basin, and open-ramp reefal carbonate (upper Lares) was deposited over a wider area of the basin. The San Sebastian Formation/Lares Limestone/Mudstone Unit sequence was most likely deposited during the second-order supercycle, TB{sub 1}. An early Miocene relative fall in sea level resulted in deposition of interfingering inner-ramp limestone and terrigenous sediments (Cibao Formation) and the development of subaerial costs, especially in the upper part of the unit. During a sea level rise, terrigenous deposition decreased and gave way to inner- and middle-ramp carbonate sediments (Los Puertos Limestone). A middle Miocene highstand in sea level brought basin-wide deposition of open-ramp carbonate sediments (Aymamon Ls). The Cibao Formation/Los Puertos Limestone/Aymamon. Limestone sequence may correspond to the second-order supercycle, TB{sub 2}. During the late middle Miocene( ), the carbonate platform was exposed and extensively karsted, possibly in an event related to the sea level drop at the end of TB{sub 2}.

  5. Seismic-stratigraphic analysis of Miocene system, offshore Texas - models and implications

    SciTech Connect

    Riese, W.C.; Hill, W.A.; Rosen, R.N.

    1989-03-01

    The application of traditional seismic-stratigraphic models to the Miocene System offshore Texas was tested and found to be inadequate for the description of this section. Although the basic principles inherent to the application of seismic stratigraphy are useful, there are significant deviations from the model geometries of system tracts in the Miocene System. The most significant of these discrepancies is the apparent absence of lowstand wedges and shelf-margin wedges. Problems with applying the traditional seismic stratigraphic models and geometries to the interpretation of this section have been recognized by others, and alternative ramp and growth-fault models have been suggested. These, too, appear to be inadequately for interpretation of this section: the ramp model fails to account adequately for outer neritic bathymetries in apparent outer-shelf settings during lowstands; the growth-fault model fails to adequately explain downthrown expansion of predominantly shale intervals. The alternatives proposed postulate a fundamental difference in global, or at least basinal, water budgets for Miocene time relative to the Pleistocene or Holocene: eustatic levels in the Gulf of Mexico during the Miocene were apparently several hundred feet higher than during the Pleistocene and therefore erosion of the shelf during lowstands was minimal. The authors may also infer that surface gradients on the Texas shelf were steep during the Miocene and there was no pronounced continental shelf-slope break. Without such a break there is no steep surface against which to onlap the updip reaches of shelf-margin wedges or lowstand wedges, thus accounting for the absence of these geometries in their seismic data. this accounts for the presence of depositional fans in outer neritic, apparently shelfal settings during lowstands.

  6. Paleogeographic and structural setting of Miocene strata in central western Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    Stewart, J.H. )

    1993-04-01

    Late Cenozoic sedimentary rocks as old as 19 Ma are widely distributed in central western Nevada. They are greatly more abundant than older Cenozoic strata and are commonly interpreted to have formed in fault-bounded basins that mark the onset of widespread extension in the Basin and Range Province. Miocene strata are largely coeval with a magmatic arc that extended south southeast near the boundary of the Basin and Range and Sierra Nevada Provinces. This arc produced voluminous andesitic flows and lahars that locally interfinger with the Miocene strata. Miocene depositional basins apparently varied greatly in size. The largest that can be defined clearly is the Esmeralda Basin that was at least 65 km long and 45 km wide. Other basins may have been larger but are difficult to reconstruct; still other basins may be small and isolated, particularly within the magmatic arc. Lacustrine deposits and minor interfingering deltaic and distal fluvial units predominate; near-source, coarse alluvial-fan and megabreccia landslide deposits are locally conspicuous. coarse near-source deposits, particularly landslide deposits, are interpreted to be adjacent to basin-bounding normal faults. The Esmeralda, Coal Valley, and Gabbs Valley-Stewart Valley-Tonopah Basins are interpreted to be related to large-scale Miocene extension. Other basins may be (1) pull-apart structures related to strike-slip faults, (2) downdropped blocks in areas of cross-cutting normal and/or strike-slip faults related to changes in the extension direction or (3) grabens or half-grabens related to uniform extension. Younger Cenozoic basins, including present-day basins, overprint and cut across the Miocene basins.

  7. Late Miocene carbon isotope records and marine biological productivity: Was there a (dusty) link?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diester-Haass, Liselotte; Billups, Katharina; Emeis, Kay C.

    2006-12-01

    We examine whether or not a relationship exists between the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (˜7.6-6.6 Ma) and marine productivity at four sites from the Indian and Pacific Oceans (Ocean Drilling Program Sites 721, 1146, 1172, and 846). We use a multiproxy approach based on benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, elemental ratios, and dissolution indices, and we compare these data to benthic foraminiferal δ13C values measured on the same samples. Although some of these sites have been targeted previously in studies of either the late Miocene/early Pliocene "biogenic bloom" (Sites 721 and 846) or the late Miocene carbon isotope shift (Site 1172), our records are the first to establish paired proxy records of carbon isotopes and paleoproductivity allowing a direct assessment of a potential link. Our results indicate that at all sites, productivity increased sometime during the δ13C shift; at three sites (721, 1146, and 846), productivity increased at the beginning of the shift. The correlation coefficients derived from linear regression between micropaleontologically derived productivity and foraminiferal δ13C values are relatively high during the time interval containing the late Miocene δ13C shift (and statistically significant at three of the sites). Carbon flux and isotope mass balance considerations illustrate that transfer of organic matter between the terrestrial and marine reservoirs together with enhanced oceanic upwelling best approximates observed changes in carbon isotope records and paleoproductivity. We note that long-term trend in the Site 846 paleoproductivity record can be correlated to the long-term trend in the Site 848 eolian flux reconstructions of Hovan (1995) hinting at a link between strengthened wind regime and productivity during the late Miocene.

  8. The giant bite of a new raptorial sperm whale from the Miocene epoch of Peru.

    PubMed

    Lambert, Olivier; Bianucci, Giovanni; Post, Klaas; de Muizon, Christian; Salas-Gismondi, Rodolfo; Urbina, Mario; Reumer, Jelle

    2010-07-01

    The modern giant sperm whale Physeter macrocephalus, one of the largest known predators, preys upon cephalopods at great depths. Lacking a functional upper dentition, it relies on suction for catching its prey; in contrast, several smaller Miocene sperm whales (Physeteroidea) have been interpreted as raptorial (versus suction) feeders, analogous to the modern killer whale Orcinus orca. Whereas very large physeteroid teeth have been discovered in various Miocene localities, associated diagnostic cranial remains have not been found so far. Here we report the discovery of a new giant sperm whale from the Middle Miocene of Peru (approximately 12-13 million years ago), Leviathan melvillei, described on the basis of a skull with teeth and mandible. With a 3-m-long head, very large upper and lower teeth (maximum diameter and length of 12 cm and greater than 36 cm, respectively), robust jaws and a temporal fossa considerably larger than in Physeter, this stem physeteroid represents one of the largest raptorial predators and, to our knowledge, the biggest tetrapod bite ever found. The appearance of gigantic raptorial sperm whales in the fossil record coincides with a phase of diversification and size-range increase of the baleen-bearing mysticetes in the Miocene. We propose that Leviathan fed mostly on high-energy content medium-size baleen whales. As a top predator, together with the contemporaneous giant shark Carcharocles megalodon, it probably had a profound impact on the structuring of Miocene marine communities. The development of a vast supracranial basin in Leviathan, extending on the rostrum as in Physeter, might indicate the presence of an enlarged spermaceti organ in the former that is not associated with deep diving or obligatory suction feeding. PMID:20596020

  9. Correlation and zonation of miocene strata along the atlantic margin of North America using diatoms and silicoflagellates

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Abbott, W.H.

    1978-01-01

    Six Atlantic Miocene siliceous microfossil zones are proposed based on onshore and offshore samples from the United States Atlantic Margin. Diatoms and silicoflagellates are used to establish the zones. These zones are from oldest to youngest: 1. Zone I Actinoptychus heliopelta Concurrent Range Zone - Early Miocene 2. Zone II Delphineis ovata Partial Range Zone - late Early to early Middle Miocene 3. Zone III Delphineis ovata/Delphineis penelliptica Concurrent Range Zone - early Middle Miocene 4. Zone IV Delphineis penelliptica Partial Range Zone - Middle Miocene 5. Zone V Delphineis penelliptica/Coscinodiscus plicatus Concurrent Range Zone - Middle Miocene 6. Zone VI Coscinodiscus plicatus Partial Range Zone - Middle Miocene. The six zones are easily traced along the Southern and Middle Atlantic Seaboard, but the older three are found for the most part between Cape Hatteras and New Jersey. There is some suggestion of sea-level change during Zone IV. Using rare planktonic diatoms that are index species from other regions and the zonal markers established in this study, correlation can be made with the Standard Foraminiferal Zones, the North Pacific Diatom Zones and with DSDP core 391A in the Blake-Bahama Basin. ?? 1978.

  10. Cementation in Oligo-Miocene non-tropical shelf limestones, Otway Basin, Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaides, Stelios

    1995-02-01

    The Oligocene to Miocene Heytesbury Group of the Otway Basin, southeastern Australia, is a non-tropical carbonate shelf succession. This subsurface stratigraphic succession consists of bioclastic grainstones to mudstones containing bryozoa, benthonic and planktonic foraminifera, echinoderms, brachiopods, and molluscs. The basal bryozoa-dominated Clifton Formation was deposited in relatively shallow waters. The overlying Gellibrand Marl, rich in planktonic foraminifera and bryozoa, formed under deep waters. The uppermost unit, benthonic foraminifera-dominated Port Campbell Limestone, was deposited in a moderately deep, middle shelf environment. Cementation is limited and includes: (1) scalenohedral calcite (non-luminescent to bright, Mn- and Fe-poor, in inter- and intraparticle porosity); (2) blocky equant calcite (dull, Mn- and Fe-rich, in interparticle porosity); (3) syntaxial calcite overgrowths on echinoderm particles (non/bright/dull-zoned); (4) euhedral dolomite (in the interparticle pore space of the Port Campbell Limestone); (5) bladed-prismatic calcite (ferroan, in planktonic foraminifera); (6) fibrous calcite (non-luminescent, in intraparticle porosity); and (7) glauconite and iron-oxides (only in intraparticle porosity). All CaCO 3 cements are low-Mg calcites (< 4 mol% MgCO 3). The cements observed in the Heytesbury Group appear to have formed in three successive diagenetic environments: (1) early shallow burial (early Fe- and Mn-poor, non-luminescent syntaxial overgrowths and non-luminescent scalenohedral calcite, under oxidising conditions); (2) late shallow burial (bright, more Mn-rich syntaxial overgrowth zone, i.e., more than the initial non-luminescent one, and bright scalenohedral calcite, under moderately reducing pore water conditions); and (3) moderate burial (ferroan, dull blocky calcite and dull syntaxial overgrowth zone, under reducing conditions). Pressure solution was the main cement-producing mechanism, although seawater and aragonite dissolution could account for the precipitation of the early non-luminescent cements. Scarcity of early interparticle cements may have been caused by the calcite-rich character of the original sediments. The ferroan dully luminescent blocky equant calcite and syntaxial overgrowths, typically interpreted to represent products of deep burial in ancient carbonate successions, are observed in the shallow-buried Port Campbell Limestone.

  11. Absolute magnitude of the second-order middle to late Miocene sea-level fall, Marion Plateau, northeast Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Pigram, C.J.; Davies, P.J.; Feary, D.A.; Symonds, P.A. )

    1992-09-01

    The Miocene carbonate platform of the Marion Plateau in northeast Australia preserves an excellent record of sea-level fluctuations. The warm-water platform consists of an early to middle Miocene second-order highstand complex, whereas the late Miocene platform is a second-order lowstand complex. Analysis of the sea-level fall that led to this relation shows that the amplitude of this event was at least 180 m. Furthermore, the authors suggest a methodology for determining the amplitude of sea-level fluctuations based on measurement of sea-level falls in structurally simple parts of passive margins or in distal parts of foreland basins.

  12. Style and age of late Oligocene-early Miocene deformation in the southern Stillwater Range, west central Nevada: Paleomagnetism, geochronology, and field relations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, Mark R.; John, David A.; Conrad, James E.; McKee, Edwin H.

    2000-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geochronologic data combined with geologic mapping tightly restrict the timing and character of a late Oligocene to early Miocene episode of large magnitude extension in the southern Stillwater Range and adjacent regions of west central Nevada. The southern Stillwater Range was the site of an Oligocene to early Miocene volcanic center comprising (1) 28.3 to 24.3 Ma intracaldera ash flow tuffs, lava flows, and subjacent plutons associated with three calderas, (2) 24.8 to 20.7 Ma postcaldera silicic dikes and domes, and (3) unconformably overlying 15.3 to 13.0 Ma dacite to basalt lava flows, plugs, and dikes. The caldera-related tuffs, lava flows, and plutons were tilted 60°-70° either west or east during the initial period of Cenozoic deformation that accommodated over 100% extension. Directions of remanent magnetization obtained from these extrusive and intrusive, caldera-related rocks are strongly deflected from an expected Miocene direction in senses appropriate for their tilt. A mean direction for these rocks after tilt correction, however, suggests that they were also affected by a moderate (33.4° ± 11.8°) component of counterclockwise vertical axis rotation. Paleomagnetic data indicate that the episode of large tilting occurred during emplacement of 24.8 to 20.7 Ma postcaldera dikes and domes. In detail, an apparent decrease in rotation with decreasing age of individual, isotopically dated bodies of the postcaldera group indicates that most tilting occurred between 24.4 and 24.2 Ma. The onset of tilting immediately following after the final caldera eruptions suggests that the magmatism and deformation were linked. Deformation was not driven by magma buoyancy, however, because tilting equally affected the caldera systems of different ages, including their plutonic roots. It is more likely that regional extension was focused in the southern Stillwater Range due to magmatic warming and reduction of tensile strength of the brittle crust. Faults that accommodated deformation in the southern Stillwater Range initially dipped steeply and cut deeply to expose more than 9 km of crustal section. The exposed crustal sections are probably rotated blocks above an unexposed basal detachment that lay near the early Miocene brittle-ductile transition.

  13. Tectonics or climate: What drove the Miocene global expansion of C4 grasslands?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Seema; Awasthi, A. K.; Parkash, B.; Kumar, S.

    2013-04-01

    Investigations into the most plausible causes which triggered the Late Miocene global expansion of C4 grasslands have reached no consensus and are still being debated. The global decline in CO2 levels in the Late Miocene has been thought to be the most common driver. Although C4 grassland expansion was largely confined to the Late Miocene, their first appearance varied significantly in different parts of the Old and New world and therefore emphasizes role of local and/or regional factors may or may not be in combination with one or more global factors. The dynamic Himalayan orogen constitutes a significant global tectonic event that is believed to have affected global climate. Hence, a study of the Himalayan foreland basin sediments could help in gleaning out possible causes behind this major paleoecologic event, which could perhaps be directly or indirectly related. Stable carbon isotope analyses of a total of 141 pedogenic carbonates in the Mio-Pleistocene Siwalik paleosols of the Ramnagar sub-basin are coherent, providing a better insight into paleovegetational changes across the sub-basin on temporal and spatial scales. Furthermore, paleovegetational history during Oligocene is reconstructed from Dagshai paleosols exposed in the Subathu sub-basin. The isotopic results show dominance of C3 vegetation pre-7 Ma and dominance of C4 vegetation post-5 Ma. Percentage abundance of C4 vegetation was less than 20 % pre-7 Ma but increased to more than 40 % post-5 Ma, reaching up to 100 % in the youngest analyzed sediments. There is exclusive dominance of C3 vegetation during Oligocene. These results conform to the pattern of change in vegetation documented in other parts of the Himalayan belt. The global expansion of C4 grasslands largely during Late Miocene have long been linked with then climate changes, particularly brought by declining atmospheric CO2 level, large-scale fires, intensification of monsoon, seasonality, and aridity as demonstrated by various researchers. These major hypotheses explaining expansion of C4 grasslands during Late Miocene are not very convincing due to significant shortcomings associated with them, for example, expansion of C4 grasslands in non-monsoonal regions put serious constraints on the monsoonal intensification hypothesis. Likewise, aridity as being the primary driver of C4 grassland expansion seems hard to support since there is no substantial evidence that could suggest global onset of arid conditions at about same geologic time, and some most arid periods, like the Triassic, show no evidence of C4 plants. We suggest that the initial lowering of CO2 below 450 ppmV created an environment for the beginning of C4 vegetation, but the persistence of this threshold value for a considerable time during Late Miocene appears to be the probable cause of the Late Miocene global expansion of C4 grasslands irrespective of their time of first appearance. It has been deduced through the correlation of Himalayan tectonic events with atmospheric CO2 levels and paleovegetational changes since Upper Miocene times that it was indeed the Late Miocene continuous, intense tectonic instability of the Himalayas that significantly decreased atmospheric CO2 levels and which perhaps played a key role in changing the nature of photosynthetic pathways.

  14. Interim report on the ground-water resources of Manatee County, Florida

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Peek, Harry M.; Anders, Robert B.

    1955-01-01

    Manatee County comprises an area of about 800 square miles adjacent to the Gulf of Mexico in the southwestern part of the Florida peninsula. The county is underlain at depths ranging from about 200 to 350 feet by a series of limestone formations of Tertiary age having a total thickness of several thousand feet. The upper part of the limestone section consists of the Ocala group of Eocene age, the Suwannee limestone of Oligocene age, and the Tampa formation of early Miocene age. These limestone formations are overlain by the Hawthorn formation of middle Miocene age which consists of interbedded clay, limestone, and sand. The Hawthorn is overlain by undifferentiated deposits of sand, limestone, and shell of Pliocene(?) and Pleistocene age that range in thickness from a few feet to about 75 feet.

  15. Orbitally paced phosphogenesis in Mediterranean shallow marine carbonates during the middle Miocene Monterey event

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Gerald; Hauzenberger, Christoph A.; Reuter, Markus; Piller, Werner E.

    2015-04-01

    During the Oligo-Miocene major phases of phosphogenesis occurred in the Earth's oceans. Particularly in the Mediterranean region phosphate-rich sediments are well-known during this time. However, most phosphate-rich beds represent condensed or allochthonous hemipelagic deposits, formed by a complex interplay of physical and chemical enrichment processes. These underlying processes limit the application of these records for the study of a possible Milankovitch-scale climate control on Miocene phosphogenesis. In this regard the middle Miocene "Monterey event" is of particular interest, as it represents a documented phase of phosphogenesis coupled with a prominent carbon isotope excursion containing nine orbitally paced carbon isotope maxima (CM-events). The Oligo-Miocene shallow marine Decontra section located on the Maiella Platform (central Apennines, Italy), is a widely continuous carbonate succession in a mostly outer to middle neritic setting. Of particular interest are the well-winnowed grain- to packstones of the Middle Miocene Bryozoan Limestone, were occurrences of authigenic phosphate grains coincide with the Monterey event. The depositional setting of the Bryozoan Limestone allows to resolve the influence of orbital forcing on phosphogenesis, within a bio-, chemo- and cyclostratigraphically constrained stratigraphic model. LA-ICP-MS analyses revealed a significant enrichment of Uranium in the studied authigenic phosphate grains compared to the surrounding carbonate sediment. Notably, the Uranium enrichment allowed the use of natural gamma radiation (GR) as a proxy for the qualitative estimation of autochthonous phosphate content within the section, based on the absence of any other major gamma ray sources within the sediment. Time series analyses of high-resolution GR data indicate a strong influence of the 405kyr long-eccentricity cycle on natural gamma radiation in the Bryozoan Limestone. Our results link maxima in the GR record and thus phosphate content to orbitally paced increases in the burial of organic carbon, particularly during the CM-events of the "Monterey event". Thus, phosphogenesis during the middle Miocene in the Mediterranean was consequently controlled by the 405-kyr-eccentricity and its influence on large-scale paleoproductivity patterns in the Mediterranean.

  16. Evolution of the Northern Nicaragua Rise during the Oligocene Miocene: Drowning by environmental factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutti, Maria; Droxler, Andr W.; Cunningham, Andrew D.

    2005-04-01

    Possible causes to explain platform drowning have been hotly debated by carbonate sedimentologists for more than a decade now. In this paper, we present multiple evidence to explain the drowning of a carbonate megabank that covered most of the modern Northern Nicaragua Rise (NNR) during an interval spanning from late Oligocene to early Miocene by the interaction of several environmental factors. The recovery during ODP Leg 165 of late Oligocene to middle Miocene sedimentary sequences in the sub-seafloor of the modern channels and basin, Pedro Channel and Walton Basin, respectively, that dissect the NNR (Site 1000) and south of the rise in the Colombian Basin (Site 999), combined with information from dredged rock samples, allows us to explore in more detail the timing and possible mechanisms responsible for the drowning of the megabank and its relationship to Miocene climate change. The modern system of isolated banks and shelves dissected by a series of intervening seaways and basins on the NNR has evolved from a continuous, shallow-water carbonate megabank that extended from the Honduras/Nicaraguan mainland to the modern island of Jamaica. Available information suggests that this megabank broke apart and partially drowned in the late part of the late Oligocene at around 27 Ma and finally foundered during the late early Miocene around 20 Ma, resulting in limited neritic coral growth in the areas where the modern isolated carbonate banks and shelves are occurring today. Available information also suggests that the southern and central parts of Pedro Channel were already a deep-water area before the major episode of platform drowning, and its formation predates the initiation of the Caribbean Current. However, after the partial drowning of the megabank, the channel has become a major pathway for the Caribbean Current. Stratigraphic units identified in deep-water carbonates sampled at ODP Sites 999 and 1000 help to constrain the environmental setting leading to the drowning of the banks. Changes in lithology and mass accumulation rates of both the carbonate and non-carbonate fraction parallel stable isotope shifts and likely indicate regional changes in climate and circulation during the late Oligocene middle Miocene interval. Carbonate mass accumulation rates (MARs) at Site 999 suggest increased regional productivity during the early Miocene. Terrigenous MARs at both Sites 999 and 1000 show a general increase from the Burdigalian through the Serravallian. The temporal association among episodes of neritic platform deposition, followed by increased productivity as identified by higher carbonate MARs and positive excursion in carbon isotopes, suggests that oceanographic changes such as local upwelling and nutrification have led to the partial drowning of the NNR megabank.

  17. The role of CO2 in modulating Miocene climate and ice volume (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenop, R.; Sosdian, S. M.; Lear, C. H.; Foster, G. L.; Wilson, P.

    2013-12-01

    The Neogene period is characterised by long term cooling interrupted by a number of prominent warming events, for example the Middle Miocene climate optimum (MCO), an interval of global warmth, that was followed by the Mid-Miocene climate transition (MMCT), a step cooling superimposed on the long-term climate trend. Several Antarctic climate records suggest that the East Antarctic ice sheet was dynamic during the early Miocene (Lewis et al., 2006, Passchier et al., 2011). However, the output from ice sheet modeling experiments suggest that once large ice sheets have grown on East Antarctica they are inherently stable and consequently relatively high levels of CO2 are needed in order to initiate a deglaciation (~1000 ppm; Pollard and DeConto 2005). Over the past 5 years or so an increasing number of studies have illustrated that atmospheric CO2 was much more variable during the Miocene than previously thought, although the magnitude of CO2 change remains much smaller than anticipated by the ice sheet models (Foster et al., 2012, Kurshner et al., 2008, Zhang et al., 2013). Here we will draw together δ11B-pCO2 records, both new published, to evaluate the role of CO2 in modulating Miocene climate. Calculated δ11B-CO2 spanning 5-23 Ma from ODP Sites 926 and 872 are in broad agreement with the other recently published alkenone CO2 records despite the limitations of δ11B based CO2 reconstruction over these long timescales (e.g. variable δ11B of seawater) (Sosdian et al. 2013). We will also present high-temporal resolution boron isotope records from ODP Site 761 across the MCO and ODP Site 926 across the Oligocene-Miocene boundary. We examine the role of CO2 in controlling the stability of the East Antarctic ice sheet during these short time intervals thought to be characterised by substantial retreat of the AIS (Feakins et al. 2012, Passchier et al. 2011, Warny et al. 2009). References: Feakins et al. (2012) Nat. Geoscience 5(8) 557-560, Foster et al., (2012) ESPL 341 243-254, Lewis et al., (2006) Geology 34(7) 513-516, Kurshner et al., (2008) PNAS 105(2) 449-453, Passchier et al., (2011) Geol Soc Am Bull, 123(11-12), 2352-2365, Pollard & DeConto (2005) Global and Planetary Change 45(1-3) 9-21, Sosdian et al. (2013) ICP11 abstract no. 161, Warny et al. (2009) Geology 37(10) 955-958, Zhang et al., (2013) in press, Phil. Trans. R. Soc. A

  18. Ocean Circulation and Gateway Closures During the Late Miocene (~13-5 Ma)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nathan, S. A.; Leckie, R. M.

    2004-12-01

    Long-term climate change is driven by tectonic influences, including changes in ocean circulation that are the result of ocean gateway closure. During the middle to late Miocene (~13-5 Ma), both tropical ocean circulation and deep water production were reorganized due to the increasing constriction of the Indonesian and Central American seaways. For example, the waters of the modern Pacific equatorial current system do not move freely into the Indian Ocean (i.e., via the Indonesian Throughflow, ITF) but instead pile up to form the Western Pacific Warm Pool (a thermal anomaly that greatly influences tropical Pacific climate and ocean circulation). Here we use a continuous record of multispecies stable isotope stratigraphy and foraminiferal assemblage counts from Ontong Java Plateau to demonstrate that during middle to late Miocene time, progressive restriction of the ITF, modulated by sea level fluctuations, resulted in the waxing and waning of a proto-warm pool in the western equatorial Pacific (WEP). The proto-warm pool profoundly affected the early late Miocene "carbonate crash" (an anomalous decrease of carbonate in deep sea sediments) and the late Miocene "biogenic bloom" (sharp increase in carbonate accumulation rates across the tropical Indo-Pacific). We hypothesize that El Niño/La Niña-like alternations of tropical carbonate preservation and productivity between the western and eastern equatorial Pacific during the late Miocene were the consequence of early warm pool development and decay. A proto-warm pool was formed ~12.1-10.6 Ma, which initiated a nutrient-rich Equatorial Undercurrent and/or increased Trade Wind strength. These La Niña-like conditions sustained carbonate productivity in the eastern equatorial Pacific (EEP) at a time when carbonate preservation sharply declined in the Caribbean. Proto-warm pool weakening and El Niño-like conditions ~10.6-8.8 Ma intensified a "carbonate crash" in the EEP, while resurgence of the warm pool and La Niña-like conditions after ~6.5 Ma spurred a "biogenic bloom". The production of deep water in the northern North Atlantic (i.e., Northern Component Water, NCW) may also have been modulated by sea level fluctuations as the Central American Seaway became increasingly constricted by the uplift of the Panama sill during the late Miocene. We suggest that the sea level fluctuations that facilitated the early development of a proto-warm pool in the WEP, particularly the Mi5 event at 11.4 Ma, also constricted flow through the Central American Seaway and controlled NCW production at this time in the North Atlantic.

  19. Post-Miocene Tectonics from Black Sea to Mediterrenean Sea along Central Anatolian Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rojay, B.; Özsayın, E.; Çiner, A.

    2012-04-01

    The existences of the gross structures are crucial elements in the understanding of the Neogene evolution of the Anatolia. The structures, from north to south, are fairly documented extensional Black Sea coast structures, "N vergent tectonics" in Black Sea region, the cross cutting scar/shear zone -North Anatolian Fault- , S verging tectonics in central Anatolian overthrust belt (Cretaceous ophiolitic mélange belt), extensional Tuzgölü basin, basins like Cilicia, Mut situated to the back of the Cyprian arc and Cyprus locked subduction and accretionary tectonics (locked by approaching and colliding of the Eratosthenes and Hecatacus "seamount" obstacles). The closure of the northern Neotethys during post-Late Eocene- pre-Miocene end with the collision of the squeezed "Anatolian Block" from south with the Eurasian Continent. Consequently the linkage of the central Anatolian basins is lost with the Seas (Paratethys) in north by the evolution of Black Sea Mountains. However, the subduction in southern Neotethys continued with a complex array due to oblique subduction between "Anatolian Block" and downgoing African-Arabian plates. The growth of the accretionary wedge along southeast Anatolia resulted in retreat of the Miocene Seas towards Basra Bay (Iraq) and collision of the southeast Anatolian belt operated to the end of late Miocene where the marine realm in eastern Mediterrenean Sea continues. The rifting - sea-floor spreading in Red Sea, propagating of Dead Sea Transform to the north and oblique subduction in southern Tethys Ocean during different times in Miocene-Pliocene manifested a various different tectonic mechanism stories in the evolution of the Neogene basin in Anatolia. Consequently progressive closure of the Tethys Oceans resulted in the development Central Anatolian and Eastern Anatolian Plateaus. The growth of the Plateaus, in other words, the progressive shortening from north to south during Late Miocene, ended with the escape of the Anatolian Block to the west during Pliocene as a result of the initiation of the North and East Anatolian Faults. The escape can be caused by the retreat of downgoing slab or enlargement of downgoing slab window or solely initiation of the North and East Anatolian faults as single shears or all. The escape was resulted in the NW-SE to NE-SW multi oriented extension in central Anatolian Plateau (from Ankara to Tuzgölü lake to Mut region) between North Anatolian in north and Cyprus in south. To sum up, the regions between the seismogenic North Anatolian Fault in north and Kirenia of northern Cyprus in south experience an extension since Pliocene. Key words: uplift, plateau evolution, locked subduction, Miocene, Anatolia.

  20. Miocene sedimentation and subsidence during continent-continent collision, Bengal basin, Bangladesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Ashraf; Lundberg, Neil

    2004-02-01

    The Bengal basin, a complex foreland basin south of the eastern Himalayas, exhibits dramatic variability in Neogene sediment thickness that reflects a complicated depositional and tectonic history. This basin originally formed as a trailing margin SE of the Indian continental crust, complicated by convergence with Asia to the north and oblique convergence with Burma to the east. Newly compiled isopach data and previously reported seismic data show evidence of thickening of basin fill toward the south, opposite of the pattern typically seen in foreland basins. This is presumably due to sedimentary loading of voluminous deltaic sediments near the continent-ocean boundary and basinward downfaulting analogous to that in the Gulf of Mexico. Isopach data show that there is considerable vertical relief along the base of the Miocene stratigraphic sequence, probably due to down-to-the-basin faulting caused by focused deltaic sedimentation and associated crustal flexure. In contrast, when viewed in east-west profile, basin shape is more typical of a foreland basin, with strata thickening eastward toward the Indo-Burman ranges, which reflects east-west convergence with Southeast Asia. Comparison of the lateral and vertical extent of the Bhuban and Boka Bil Formations with the Bouguer anomaly map of Bangladesh suggests that considerable subsidence of the Sylhet trough (in the northeastern part of the Bengal basin), which has the lowest gravity value of the region, had not taken place by the end of the Miocene. This post-Miocene subsidence is attributed to tectonic loading from southward thrusting of the Shillong Plateau along the Dauki fault. Relatively uniform Miocene isopachs across the Sylhet trough confirm that this began in the Pliocene, consistent with results of recent research on sediment provenance. In the northwest, in the region south of the Siwalik foreland basin, continental crust has not as yet been loaded, allowing relatively little accommodation space for sediment accumulation. The Miocene here is very thin. Deltaic progradation across most of Bangladesh during the Miocene followed earlier, more proximal progradation across Assam, immediately northeast of the Bengal basin, and has been followed by continued progradation into the southern Bangladesh coastal and offshore region.

  1. A High-Resolution Investigation of mid-Miocene Global Cooling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddison, E. J.; Coe, A. L.; Cohen, A. S.; Weedon, G. P.; Gilmour, M. A.

    2007-12-01

    The mid-Miocene encompasses one of the four major cooling steps that formed part of the long-term decrease in global temperature during the Cenozoic. Four distinct mechanisms have been suggested to explain this mid- Miocene (c. 14 Ma) climatic change: drawdown of CO¬2 by burial of large amounts of marine organic matter (the "Monterey Hypothesis"); drawdown of CO¬2 by an increase in chemical weathering of fresh silicate rocks resulting from uplift of the Himalaya; changing ocean circulation patterns redistributing ocean-atmosphere heat; and the congruence of orbital parameters. However, the duration, timing and causative mechanisms of mid-Miocene cooling remain poorly constrained, largely due to incomplete sedimentary successions spanning this time period. In an attempt to resolve these issues we have conducted a high-resolution study of the Monterey Formation near Santa Barbara. Our detailed graphic logging has enabled us to identify eleven mudrock facies that are distributed cyclically (length-scales ranging from c. 0.5 to 20 m) throughout the section. Biostratigraphic dating of this section is based on diatom (this study) and calcareous nannofossil (Föllmi et al., 2005, GSA Bulletin, 117: 589-619) datums. Utilising these biostratigraphic age constraints and Fourier analysis of geochemical and physical parameters, we have produced an astronomical timescale that we have correlated with the Laskar orbital solution (Laskar et al. 2004, Astronomy and Astrophysics, 428: 261-285). High-resolution scanning electron microscopy has shown that several benthic foraminifera species are well preserved in these sedimentary deposits. The exceptional preservation of this sedimentary succession allows us to use a suite of geochemical proxies to investigate this global cooling event. The mid-Miocene carbon isotope record is characterised by a positive excursion, which commenced during global warming and ended after major expansion of the Antarctic ice sheet. We present an astronomically tuned high-resolution record (sampling on a sub-millenial timescale) of total organic carbon abundance and carbon isotope data that provides a detailed record of changes in the carbon cycle in the mid-Miocene. This new high- resolution carbon isotope record can be correlated with the distinctive carbon isotope maxima events CM5 and CM6 that have been identified previously in deep-sea sections. Our high-resolution data from the Monterey Formation provides us with a robust framework within which we can examine the dynamics and mechanisms of mid-Miocene global cooling.

  2. The occurrence of an abdominal fauna in an articulated tapir (Tapirus polkensis) from the Late Miocene Gray Fossil Site, Northeastern Tennessee.

    PubMed

    McConnell, Shannon M; Zavada, Michael S

    2013-03-01

    The analysis of samples recovered from the abdominal area of an articulated tapir (Tapirus polkensis) from the Late Miocene (4.5-7 million BP) Gray Fossil Site (GFS) revealed a rich palyno-fauna comprised of about 94% egg/oocyst-like structures and 6% pollen and other palynomorphs. In addition, a group of 6 hickory nuts (Carya) was recovered from the same area suggesting that the samples represent the abdominal contents. The analysis of a sample from immediately outside the tapir produced a sample with 98% pollen and less than 0.5% egg/oocyst-like structures. The size, shape, and general morphology of egg/oocyst-like structures were analyzed with light and scanning electron microscopy and were compared to a variety of intestinal parasites found in extant ungulates, and the Perissodactyla in particular. We also compared fossil structures to the numbers and kind of intestinal parasites recovered from fecal samples from the Baird's tapir (T. bairdii) in Costa Rica and from samples collected from the lowland tapir (T. terrestris) from Ecuador to assess their similarity to our fossil sample. Based on these data, we discuss what role parasites may have played in the biology of T. polkensis during the Late Miocene-Early Pliocene. PMID:23586562

  3. Petrofacies and provenance of the Puente Formation (middle to upper Miocene), Los Angeles basin, southern California: Implications for rapid uplift and accumulation rates

    SciTech Connect

    Critelli, S.; Rumelhart, P.E.; Ingersoll, R.V.

    1995-10-02

    The Peunte Formation is a Middle-Upper Miocene clastic unit lying unconformably on the Lower-Middle Miocene El Modeno Volcanics and Topanga Group, in the Los Angeles basin. The Puente Formation, about 3900 m thick, is composed of conglomerate, sandstone, and mudrock deposit;ed as a submarine fan at bathyal depths. Several intrabasinal discordances suggest tectonic activity during deposition. The succession consists of two main upward-thickening and -coarsening megacycles, reflecting submarine-fan progradation. The Puente Formation is characterized up-section by: (1) thin-bedded sandstone and shale (La Vida member) grading to thick-bedded sandstone and conglomerate (Soquel Member); and (2) thin-bedded mudrock and sandstone (Yorba Member) grading to thick- to very thick-bedded sandstone and conglomerate (Sycamore Canyon Member). There is consistent provenance signal in spite of complex transportation tectonics, responsible for opening of the Los Angeles Basin, and later transpressional processes, which are still active. Detailed provenance study of the Puente Formation and related units provides important constraints on paleogeographic and paleotectonic reconstructions of southern California basins and uplifts.

  4. The antiquity of riverine adaptations in Iniidae (Cetacea, Odontoceti) documented by a humerus from the late Miocene of the Ituzaingó Formation, Argentina.

    PubMed

    Gutstein, Carolina Simon; Cozzuol, Mario Alberto; Pyenson, Nicholas D

    2014-06-01

    "River dolphins" are a paraphyletic group of toothed whales (Odontoceti) that represent independent secondary invasions of freshwater habitats. Different "river dolphin" lineages display suites of convergent morphological specializations that commonly reflect adaptations to riverine and freshwater environments, such as longirostry, reduced orbits, and wide, paddle-like flippers. One lineage, the Iniidae, is presently endemic to South America, and includes several extinct Neogene taxa along with their sole extant genus, Inia (the Amazon River dolphin). We report here a humerus recovered from the late Miocene deposits of the Ituzaingó Formation in the Paraná Basin of Argentina. The specimen exhibits diagnostic features of the family Iniidae, including a scapular-sternal joint of the humerus, which is a unique anatomical connection among mammals. This joint permits enhanced parasagittal adduction of the flipper as a control surface, relative to other odontocetes, providing Inia with a high degree of maneuverability in its structurally complex and heterogenous riverine habitat. This unique anatomical connection, here documented from the late Miocene (∼9 million years-6.5 million years old), not only provides the oldest diagnostic record for Iniidae, but it also indicates a similar habitat use for this lineage, a finding coincident with the current paleoenvironmental interpretation for the Ituzaingó Formation. PMID:24585575

  5. Facies analysis of the Plateau Sandstones (Eocene to early Miocene?), Bako National Park, Sarawak, Malaysia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johansson, M.

    1999-04-01

    Sandstones, located in the Kuching area, western Sarawak, are known as the 'Plateau Sandstones' (of possible Eocene to early Miocene age). However, based on a number of factors, including: (i) anomalous kerogene compositions; (ii) proximity of the on-lap surface; and (iii) palaeocurrent direction (generally to the NNE), it is thought that the sands exposed on the Bako Peninsula are unrelated to the Plateau Formation (located to the south of the Bako Penisula) and therefore a new name is coined; the Bako Sandstones, which form a subgroup of the Bako Sandstone Group. The Bako Sandstones form the Bako Peninsula, a flat-topped cliffed plateau which extends into the South China Sea at a latitude of 1°30'N. The plateau has a gently dipping surface, sloping northwards from a height of about 300 to 150 m. The sandstones form a succession of very thick bedded sandstones (up to 6 m thick), with lenses of conglomerates and subordinate sandy mudstones. The sandstones consist of pebbly coarse-medium grained sands, interbedded with polymictic pebble conglomerates. The sandstones are mainly lithic arenite, poorly to moderately sorted and consist of subangular to subrounded grains. Isolated pebbles are common throughout the sandstones. The most common structure in both sandstones and conglomerates is cross-bedding; planar cross-bedding and trough cross-bedding, together with thick sequences of climbing ripples. These structures suggest extensive tractional transport, forming both ripple and dune structures along the base of the channel. The geometry of the sands is either (i) lensoidal, or (ii) tabular, with the channel-fill interpreted as scour-fill channels or migrating dunes, respectively. Both types are commonly stacked vertically or amalgamate laterally to form thick interconnected units. The conglomeratic lenses, scour-fill features and rip-up shale clasts are related to higher energy erosional events, whilst the mud-draped ripples, ripple rejuvenation surfaces and two-tiered channel margins indicate a lower energy and stasis period. Slope instabilities at the channel margin are inferred from the slump structures present and shale clast slurries. The sandstones at Bako are thought to have formed within a braided channel environment (subject to exposure, from the presence of mud cracks within the formation).

  6. Magmatic Genesis Versus Evolution: the Tale of the Miocene - Pliocene Tuscan Magmatic Province

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poli, G.; Perugini, D.

    2007-12-01

    Miocene-Pliocene Tuscan Magmatic Province (TMP, Central Italy) reveals a complex magmatic setting with a large variety of volcanic and plutonic rock types closely associated in space and time (8-1 Ma). The main rock associations are represented by three group of rocks with different degree of evolution: i) mafic rocks with lamproitic, high-potassium calc-alkaline, and shoshonitic affinity; ii) intermediate rocks showing strong field, petrographic, and geochemical evidence of magma interaction processes; iii) felsic volcanics and intrusives showing petrological and geochemical characteristics of both extreme evolved and pure anatectic melts. Geochemical and thermodynamical characteristics of volcanic and plutonic rocks of TMP suggest a complex petrological evolution in which interaction between mafic and felsic magmas played a major role. The development of interaction processes between mafic and felsic magmas involves several evolutionary stages including the evolution of mafic magmas by Contamination and Fractional Crystallization (CFC) processes, once injected into the felsic reservoirs, followed by widespread mixing processes in magma chambers. Petrologic data indicate that felsic end-members are crustal anatectic melts derived by partial melting at ca 4-6 Kbar of a metasedimentary protolith constituting the Tuscan basement. Residual assemblages of the partial melting process, calculated by geochemical models, are consistent with experimental petrology data, and constraint the levels of emplacement for intrusive complexes, and the paths of extrusion for the effusive ones. Mafic end-members are compositionally akin to basic-intermediate magmas cropping out on the island of Capraia and to lamproites; such a variety of mafic magmas are found associated even in a single volcanic or plutonic complex, testifying for an extremely heterogeneous mantle source. The petrological model proposed in this work fits well with geophysical data. Starting from Middle Pliocene, western Tuscany underwent a strong regional uplift caused by an asthenospheric intrusion that thinned the crustal stack and completely restructured the crust-mantle boundary with possible intercalation of stack of high- level crust even in the lower crust. In response to the increasing heat flow both asthenosphere and heterogeneously metasomatized lithosphere melted to give basaltic magmas that either extruded or intruded and mixed with anatectic melts, the latter generated in the interlayered metasedimentary crustal stacks.

  7. Absolute Paleointensity Study of Miocene Tiva Canyon Tuff, Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patiman, A.; Bowles, J.

    2014-12-01

    Unoriented samples from the ~12.7 Ma Tiva Canyon (TC) tuff from Yucca Mountain, Nevada are studied in terms of magnetic properties and geomagnetic paleointensity. The magnetic mineralogy and magnetic properties of the TC tuff have previously been well documented, and the remanence-carrier in ~15-m thick zones at the top and bottom of the unit is dominantly is single domain (SD) to superparamagnetic (SP) magnetite, which may be considered ideal for absolute paleointensity studies. Among one of the several episodic volcanic eruptions of the Southwestern Nevada Volcanic Field (SWNVF), the welded TC tuff belongs to the Paintbrush Group. Here we present magnetic properties from two previously unreported sections of the TC tuff, as well as Thellier-type absolute paleointensity estimates. Samples were collected from the lower ~7 m at the base of the flow. Magnetic properties studied include hysteresis, bulk magnetic susceptibility, frequency-dependent susceptibility, and anhysteretic remanent magnetization acquisition. Magnetic property results are consistent with earlier work, showing that the main magnetic mineral is magnetite. SP samples are dominant from the lower ~1 m to ~3.6 m basal unit while the middle unit of ~3.7 m to 7.0 m mainly consists of SD samples. The paleointensity results are closely tied to the stratigraphic height and magnetic properties linked to domain state. The SD samples have consistent absolute paleointensity values 32.40±0.22 uT, VADM 5.74*1022 A.m2 and behaved ideally during paleointensity experiments. The SP samples have consistently higher paleointensity and less ideal behavior, but would likely pass many traditional quality-control tests. Since the magnetite has been interpreted to form by precipitation out of the glass post-emplacement, but at temperatures higher than the Curie temperature, we tentatively interpret the SD remanence to be a primary thermal remanent magnetization and the paleointensity result to be a valid estimate of geomagnetic paleointensity for the Miocene. Post-emplacement vapor-phase alteration might be expected to alter magnetic mineralogy and magnetization, and has been reported in the upper portions of the TC tuff, but not in the lower sections discussed here.

  8. Fluid-Rock Interaction in the Miocene Tejeda Caldera, Gran Canaria, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donoghue, E.; Troll, V. R.; Harris, C.; Walter, T. R.; Pérez Torrado, F. J.

    2007-12-01

    Rhyolite-trachyte tuffs deposited within the Miocene Tejeda caldera (Mogán Group 14-13.3Ma) show evidence of severe fluid-rock interaction. The altered tuffs are restricted to a peripheral zone directly inside the caldera margin, and occur at four distinct horizons within the mid-upper Mogán ignimbrite succession. Upper-Mogán tuffs display pervasive intermediate argillic alteration (smectite+illite+zeolites+adularia) and silicification (microcrystalline quartz+amorphous silica), indicative of low-temperature (≤250°C) near-neutral pH conditions. Quartz+kaolinite+muscovite+chlorite+calcite alteration of mid-Mogán tuffs and breccias may reflect boiling of higher-temperature, acidic hydrothermal fluids at depth. Si+Na+K+Pb+Sr+Rb were highly mobile during fluid-rock interaction, whereas Ti+Zr+Nb were dominantly refractory. Altered intra-caldera tuffs (n=65) have higher δ18O values than equivalent unaltered extra-caldera ignimbrites, reflecting an overall low-temperature near-surface environment in which meteoric water (δD ca.-15‰, δ18O ca.-3‰) was the dominant fluid source. A decrease in δ18O from upper- to mid- Mogán altered tuffs is consistent with an increase in fluid temperature with depth. Unaltered ignimbrites have δD values of -110 to -168‰ (n=6) and ≤0.2wt% H2O, indicative of Rayleigh-type H2O-exsolution. Altered tuffs have δD values of -52 to -117‰ (n=75) and up to 4wt% H2O, reflecting interaction with steam (δD\\ll-15‰) or an evolved low-δD fluid. Apparently unaltered ignimbrites between altered horizons (n=13), and shield basalts directly outside the caldera margin (n=6), have elevated δD and H2O values relative to equivalent unaltered rocks, indicative of minor alteration. Supported by numerical modelling, our Gran Canaria data reflect an intrusion-related, structurally controlled epithermal system, in which fluids and/or vapours migrated through intra-caldera tuffs via channelised, porous flow. This study may help to unravel the complex processes of fluid-rock interaction characteristic of both active and fossil caldera-hosted epithermal systems that are presently inaccessible or poorly exposed.

  9. Lower Miocene (Upper Ottnangian) sands in the Lower Austrian Molasse Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palzer, Markus; Knierzinger, Wolfgang; Wagreich, Michael; Gier, Susanne; Meszar, Maria Elisabeth; Soliman, Ali

    2015-04-01

    In the Early Miocene (late Ottnangian), a global sea level drop and the continuous rise of the Alps lead to the regression of the Parathethys sea, and to the sedimentation of the Upper Freshwater Molasse. In the Lower Austrian Molasse Basin, this event is represented by yellowish-brownish to greyish white mica-rich and carbonate-free sands and silts with clayish interlayers, formerly called Oncophora Beds (OB), which crop out between St. Plten and Tulln. A new lithostratigraphy combines these sediments, now called Traisen-Formation (TF) together with the Dietersdorf Formation within the Pixendorf Group. Drill cores from OMV-wells predominantly from the NE show hundreds of meters thick sequences of pelites with intersections of sands interpreted as representing the OB. Contrary to the mainly brackish TF, a turbiditic marine deeper-water environment is inferred. An OMV-funded project investigates the relationship between these sediments, their stratigraphical and chronological range, provenance, facies and internal stratigraphy. First results from outcrops and several wells in the NE confirm large differences in grain size, structures and carbonate content. XRD-results indicate quartz, feldspar, muscovite, chlorite, calcite and dolomite as the main minerals within the sands and pelites. Pyrite is frequent. Halite and kaolinite occur. Whole rock chemistry, carbonate content measurements and biostratigraphic investigations of samples from the Wildendrnbach K4 well indicate, that these turbiditic OB can be divided into two sections: A lower fossil-free, carbonate poor and probably brackish (indicated by B/Al* and TOC/S) section with only few turbiditic very fine sands, and an upper microfossil bearing, marine section with carbonate contents up to 30% and more and coarser turbiditic sands. Therefore we use the working terms Lower and Upper Wildendrnbach Member (LWM, UWM). The lower part is enriched in (redox sensitive) heavy minerals such as Ce, Co, Cr, Cu, Gd, Ni, Pb, Sc, Zn and REE. It shows much lower constant Sr (about 140 ppm) values and B/Al* ratios (about 80) than the upper part (150 - 250 ppm; >120). The TOC/S ratio is much higher (17-23) in the LWM than in the UWM (>5). These two members can be correlated quite well by SP-logs over several wells. Therefore it can be concluded, that the lower part represents a period of salinity and carbonate crisis which may correspond to an (more or less) isolated deep basin probably poor in oxygen. At the beginning of the upper interval, a connection with the open sea was reestablished.

  10. Palynology of the Heath Formation (Miocene) from the Progreso Basin, Peru

    SciTech Connect

    Engelhardt, D.W. ); Wood, G.D. )

    1993-02-01

    A diverse and well preserved assemblage of pollen, spores, dinoflagellates, and acritarchs were recovered from outcrop samples of the Heath Formation, exposed along Bocapan Creek near Tumbes, Peru. The pollen and spores include representatives of Arecipites, Bombacacidites, Caryapollenites, Cicatricosisporites, Couperipollis, Cyathidites, Diporisporites, Distaverrusporites, Dyadosporites, Echiperiporites, Faramea, Foveodiporites, Foveotriletes, Fusiformisporites, Gothanipollis, Granitricolpites, Hymenophyllum, Hexpollenties, Involutisporites, Laevigatosporites, Lygodiumsporites, Magniperiporites, Malvacearumpollis, Monocolpopollenites, Perissyncolporites, Peritheciumites, Phragmothyrites, Polyadadporites, Polypodiaceisporites, Polypodiisporites, Retibrevitricolpites, Striadisporites, Tetracolporites, Tricolporopollenties, and Verrucosisporites. Plankton are assignable to Lejeunecysta, Operculodinium, Pterospermella, Selenopemphix, Spiniferites, Sumatradinium, Tythodiscus, and Tuberculodinium. The palynomorph assemblage can be placed in the Early Miocene based on the co-occurrence of Cicatricosisporites dorogensis, Couperipollis rarispinosus, Echiperiporites estelae, Magniperiporites echinatus, Perisyncolporites porkornii, Polypodiaceoisporites minor, P. potoniei, Reticolporites guianesnsis, R. irregularis, Scabriporites asymetricus, Selenopemphix nephroides and Tuberculodinium vancampoae. This is an agreement with foraminiferal evidence which positions the Heath Formation in the Early Miocene Catapsydrax dissimilis, Catapsydrax stainforthi and oldest portion of the Globigerinatella insueta zones.

  11. Chemical composition and palaeobotanical origin of Miocene resins from Kerala-Konkan Coast, western India

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Suryendu; Mallick, Monalisa; Mathews, Runcie Paul; Mann, Ulrich; Greenwood, Paul F.; Saxena, Rakesh

    2010-10-01

    The terpenoid composition of resins from the Miocene lignite horizons from the Kerala-Konkan Coast, western India was analyzed by Curie-point pyrolysis-gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (Cupy-GC-MS). The major pyrolysates were cadalene-based bicyclic sesquiterpenoids including some C30-C31 bicadinenes and bicadinanes typical of dammar resin from angiosperm plants of Dipterocarpaceae family. These plants are typically supported by tropical climates which the western Indian region was known to have experienced during early Tertiary period. The present study suggests that these palaeoclimatic conditions persisted until at least the Miocene epoch. These sesquiterpenoids which are commonly detected in many SE Asian crude oils may be utilised as useful biomarkers for petroleum exploration in the western Indian region.

  12. REE geochemistry of late Miocene lavas from Pioneertown, Fry Mountain and Ruby Mountain, California

    SciTech Connect

    Mehegan, J.M.; Thorpe, R. )

    1993-04-01

    A series of flows, dikes and cinder cones of alkaline and subalkaline basalts erupted in late Miocene time along the northeastern flank of the San Bernardino Mountains and in contiguous parts of the Mojave Desert. Previous studies of lavas from the region yielded K-Ar ages of 6 to 9 Ma, and reported that lavas from the Ruby Mountain locality often contain ultramafic inclusions of probable mantle origin. This study (1) characterizes the rare earth element (REE; light = LREE; heavy = HREE) and trace element compositions of the young lavas from this region, (2) discusses the relationship of the Pioneertown lavas with the hot-spring ( ) deposits stratigraphically beneath the lava flows, (3) speculates on the possible volcanic conduit for the Pioneertown lavas, and (4) discusses the petrogenesis of these late Miocene lavas.

  13. Faunal change in the Turkana Basin during the late Oligocene and Miocene.

    PubMed

    Leakey, Meave; Grossman, Ari; Gutiérrez, Mercedes; Fleagle, John G

    2011-01-01

    Faunal evolution over the last 65 million years of earth's history was dominated by mammalian radiations, but much of this era is poorly represented in Africa. Mammals first appeared early in the Mesozoic, living alongside dinosaurs for millions of years, but it was not until the extinction of dinosaurs 65 myr ago that the first major explosion of mammalian taxa took place. The Cenozoic (65 Ma to Recent) witnessed repeated and dynamic events involving the radiation, evolution, and extinction of mammalian faunas. Two of these events, each marking the extinction of one diverse fauna and subsequent establishment of another equally diverse fauna, both involving advanced catarrhine primates, are recorded in sites in the Turkana Basin, despite the poorly represented record of Cenozoic faunas elsewhere in sub-Saharan Africa. The first of these events occurred at the Oligocene-Miocene transition and the other at the Miocene-Pliocene transition. PMID:22170693

  14. Basal Adare volcanics, Robertson Bay, North Victoria Land, Antarctica: Late Miocene intraplate basalts of subaqueous origin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mortimer, N.; Dunlap, W.J.; Isaac, M.J.; Sutherland, R.P.; Faure, K.

    2007-01-01

    Late Cenozoic lavas and associated hyaloclastite breccias of the Adare volcanics (Hallett volcanic province) in Robertson Bay, North Victoria Land rest unconformably on Paleozoic greywackes. Abundant hyaloclastite breccias are confined to a paleovalley; their primary geological features, and the stable isotope ratios of secondary minerals, are consistent with eruption in a subaqueous environment with calcite formation probably involving seawater. In contrast, the lavas which stratigraphically overlie the hyaloclastites on Mayr Spur probably were erupted subaerially. K-Ar dating of eight samples from this basal sequence confirms the known older age limit (Late Miocene) of the Hallett volcanic province. Geochemical data reveal an ocean island basalt-like affinity, similar to other Cenozoic igneous rocks of the Hallett volcanic province. If a submarine eruptive paleoenvironment is accepted then there has been net tectonic or isostatic post-Late Miocene uplift of a few hundred metres in the Robertson Bay-Adare Peninsula area

  15. Sexual dimorphism in Laccopithecus robustus, a late miocene hominoid from China.

    PubMed

    Pan, Y R; Waddle, D M; Fleagle, J G

    1989-06-01

    Laccopithecus robustus is a siamang-sized fossil ape from the Miocene site of Lufeng, China. The species is known from a partial cranium, numerous mandibles, and scores of isolated teeth. This species shows striking dental similarities to Pliopithecus from the Miocene of Europe and a number of cranial similarities to extant gibbons. Laccopithecus differs from extant gibbons and resembles other fossil and extant apes in showing marked sexual dimorphism in the size and shape of the canines and anterior lower premolars. Evidence for sexual differences in either the size or shape of other teeth is less clear. There is some evidence for a sexual size dimorphism based on the variability of molar teeth. PMID:2742002

  16. Geopressured geothermal resource potential of Miocene Bayou Hebert Prospect, Vermilion and Iberia parishes, Louisiana

    SciTech Connect

    McCulloh, R.P.; Pino, M.A.; Bebout, D.G.; Bachman, A.L.

    1981-01-01

    The Bayou Hebert prospect is a fault-bounded block of lower Miocene shale and sandstone which covers a 75-square-mile area in southeastern Vermilion and southwestern Iberia parishes, southwestern Louisiana. The average depth to the top of the geopressured zone is 12,500 feet. Detailed correlation of shale resistivity patterns on well logs from this area has delineated faults, local unconformities, and changes in thickness and facies of lithologic units. Most faults revealed by this method are associated with the boundary fault zones, but the few delineated in the interior of the prospect could reduce the volume of potential reservoir units. Cross sections show that the lower Miocene section thickens across growth faults by addition of new units as well as by expansion. Of the parameters of reservoir volume, salinity, temperature, and permeability, reservoir volume shows the most significant variation and indicates that the eastern fourth of the prospect has the most geopressured geothermal potential.

  17. A Toba-scale eruption in the Early Miocene: The Semilir eruption, East Java, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smyth, Helen R.; Crowley, Quentin G.; Hall, Robert; Kinny, Peter D.; Hamilton, P. Joseph; Schmidt, Daniela N.

    2011-10-01

    The Indonesian archipelago is well-known for volcanic activity and has been the location of three catastrophic eruptions in the last million years: Krakatau, Tambora and Toba. However, there are no reports of large magnitude eruptions during the earlier Cenozoic despite a long volcanic record in Indonesia during subduction of Indian Ocean lithosphere since the Eocene. Here we report an Early Miocene major eruption, the Semilir eruption, in south Java, the main phase of which occurred at 20.7 ± 0.02 Ma. This major volcanic eruption appears similar in scale, but not in type, to the 74 ka Toba event. Its products can be identified elsewhere in Java and are likely to have been distributed widely in SE Asia and adjacent oceans. The Semilir eruption could have triggered a climate response, but cannot yet be linked with certainty to Early Miocene climatic events such as glaciations.

  18. Late Miocene hominin teeth from the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project area, Afar, Ethiopia.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Scott W; Kleinsasser, Lynnette; Quade, Jay; Levin, Naomi E; McIntosh, William C; Dunbar, Nelia; Semaw, Sileshi; Rogers, Michael J

    2015-04-01

    Since 2000, significant collections of Latest Miocene hominin fossils have been recovered from Chad, Kenya, and Ethiopia. These fossils have provided a better understanding of earliest hominin biology and context. Here, we describe five hominin teeth from two periods (ca. 5.4 Million-years-ago and ca. 6.3 Ma) that were recovered from the Adu-Asa Formation in the Gona Paleoanthropological Research Project area in the Afar, Ethiopia that we assign to either Hominina, gen. et sp. indet. or Ardipithecus kadabba. These specimens are compared with extant African ape and other Latest Miocene and Early Pliocene hominin teeth. The derived morphology of the large, non-sectorial maxillary canine and mandibular third premolar links them with later hominins and they are phenetically distinguishable and thus phyletically distinct from extant apes. PMID:25795338

  19. Some palynological aspects of Oligocene to Early Miocene transition Southern Alaska

    SciTech Connect

    Wiggins, V.D.

    1985-04-01

    The Oligocene to early Miocene transition in southern Alaska perhaps represents one of the most dramatic floristic changes in the entire Tertiary of Alaska. The basic modification is from a dominant deciduous, broadleaved forest biome in the late Eocene - early Oligocene (early Zemorrian) to a dominant moist, temperate, coniferous forest biome in the early Miocene (Saucesian). A similar change can be seen between the deciduous broad-leaved forests and the montane boreal coniferous forest of China today. This change in flora - and from a palynological perspective this change in microflora - reflects the onset of global cooling in the Neogene and the concurrent change from a dominant marine transgressive to a dominant nonmarine regressive mode of sedimentation.

  20. Sr-isotopic, paleomagnetic, and biostratigraphic calibration of horse evolution: Evidence from the Miocene of Florida

    SciTech Connect

    MacFadden, B.J.; Bryant, J.D.; Mueller, P.A. )

    1991-03-01

    During the middle Miocene an explosive adaptive radiation resulted in the advent of grazing horses with high-crowned teeth in North America. New Sr isotopic, paleomagnetic, and biostratigrahic evidence from the Miocene marine and nonmarine sequence of the Florida panhandle calibrates the base of this adaptive radiation. The transition from the primitive outgroup species 'Parahippus' leonensis to the most primitive high-crowned horse, 'Merychippus' gunteri occured after about 17.7 Ma. After this event, the lowest known stratigraphic level at which diversification (i.e., presence of two or more sympatric species) of grazing merychippine horses occurs is about 16.2 Ma, or within the early part of Chron C5BR. Although this currently is the only sequence where the parahippine-merychippine transition is directly calibrated, biochronologic evidence from other important, contemporaneous localities in Texas, Nebraska, and California indicate that diversification occured rapidly throughout North America between 15 and 16 Ma.

  1. Sensitivity of climate and Atlantic overturning circulation to uncertain ocean gateway configurations for the late Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradshaw, C.; Lunt, D. J.; Flecker, R.; Martinez-Mendez, G.

    2013-12-01

    The palaeorecord documents late Miocene (11.6-5.3 Ma) climate to be much warmer and wetter than today yet CO2 reconstructions are similar to modern levels. Given the apparent decoupling between CO2 and warmth for this period we investigate here the role of the oceans. The late Miocene experienced significant tectonic change including the restriction of some of the last ocean gateways to close (Panama Gateway and Indonesian Seaway) and open (Bering Strait and Barents/Kara Sea). However, the timing and configuration of these tectonic changes is uncertain. The final closure of the Panama Gateway is dated to the Pliocene, but continental mammal exchange suggests the existence of a Central American archipelago from the mid-late Miocene. The Bering Strait is typically assumed to have opened at the very end of the late Miocene/early Pliocene based on diatom exchange, but other marine and terrestrial evidence points to a much earlier, perhaps intermittent, opening. The timing of the restriction of the Indonesian Seaway is very poorly constrained at middle Miocene to Pliocene. The Barents Sea and Kara Sea shelves are documented as having being subject to extensive glacial erosion and post-glacial uplift since the Pliocene and throughout the Quaternary but records of uplift and erosion during the earlier Cenozoic are limited. However, the presence of significant preglacial sediments suggests that this region underwent tectonic uplift, volcanism and subsequent erosion during the Eocene-Miocene period although the age assignment of the data remains controversial. The Panama Gateway has been suggested to influence North Atlantic Deep Water (NADW) production through numerous modelling studies, the Bering Strait has been suggested to greatly impact NADW during the Quaternary, and the strength of Indonesian Throughflow is hypothesised to influence Agulhas Leakage, which, in turn, has been speculated to influence Atlantic meridional overturning and thus NADW production. Here, we investigate how the opening and closing of these gateways might influence ocean circulation, and hence climate, with late Miocene boundary conditions using the fully coupled atmosphere-ocean-vegetation GCM HadCM3L with TRIFFID. We show how the model suggests these gateways in different configurations might influence NADW production, with results from all possible combinations of these three gateways presented and compared to the available proxy data. The climatic implications of the presence of the Barents Shelf and Kara Shelf land masses prior to their final erosion has not been the subject of much research, either through modelling or data interpretation, and indeed many model simulations for the Miocene do not include these shelves as land masses at all. Here we also test our hypothesis that these land masses also impact NADW production through the restriction of the exchange of water between the Arctic Ocean and the Greenland-Iceland-Norwegian Sea. We hypothesize that their presence as land masses results in a saltier North Atlantic than occurs after their erosion; without the land masses there, the North Atlantic would experience more influence from the East Greenland Current (colder/fresher) and less influence of the Irminger Current (warmer/saltier).

  2. From middle Miocene to late Quaternary spatial and temporal evolution of Cappadocian Volcanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydar, E.; Cubukcu, E.; Ersoy, O.; Kabadayı, E.; Duncan, R.

    2009-04-01

    Cappadocian Volcanism, Central Turkey was active from Miocene to upper Holocene, originating from varying sources and presents various dynamics. Central Anatolia constitutes a plateau reaching to 1100-1200 meters from the sea level. From Miocene to Quaternary, the volcanism and/or its relationships with local tectonic targeted in numerous works. Those works can be classified as follows: (i) volcanism-tectonic relationship (Pasquare et al, 1988; Toprak and Goncuoglu, 1993; Toprak, 1998, Dhont et al, 1998; Froger et al, 1998), (ii) volcanological, petrological, geochemical works on stratovolcanoes, monogenetic vents, ignimbrites (Batum, 1978; Ercan, 1985; Aydar, 1992; Aydar and Gourgaud, 1993; Aydar et al, 1994; Aydar et al, 1995; Le Pennec et al, 1994; Druitt et al, 1995; Aydar and Gourgaud, 1998; Deniel et al, 1998, Temel, 1998; Kuzucuoglu et al, 1998; Mouralis et al, 2002; Sen et al, 2003) (iii) Geophysical works on the missing calderas (Ongur, 1978; Ekingen, 1982; Froger et al,1998). Cappadocian landscape is made principally of eroded ignimbirites forming fair chimneys. Apart from the ignimbrites, Cappadocia bears several stratovolcanoes (Mt Erciyes, Mt. Hasan) and numerous monogenetic vents (cinder cones, maars, domes) and some andesitic dacitic relicts of lava fields intercalated within the ignimbritic sequence. Although the stratovolcanoes have some historical activities, their initial eruptions occured in Miocene (Kecikalesi stage of Mt Hasan- 13 My), Pliocene (Kocdag stage of Mt Erciyes). The monogenetic vents demonstrate interestingly bi-modal character which is typically found in rifted regions of the world. Origin of this young volcanism is proposed as collision related transitional alkaline-calcalkaline association (Aydar, 1992, Deniel et al, 1998), is also linked to the subduction (Olanca, 1994). Our preliminary data on the Quaternary rhyolitic glass combined with chemical analysis of the Miocene volcanics exhibit that a slight transition from peraluminious to metaluminious toward a rough peralkaline character of volcanics with time. A Rifting (?) occurs and its evolution is unknown and in the frame of this work, a detailed geochronology and geochemistry will be proposed.

  3. Middle Miocene hiatus in volcanic activity in the Great Basin area of the Western United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McKee, E.H.; Noble, D.C.; Silberman, M.L.

    1970-01-01

    A summary of potassium-argon dates shows that a high level of igneous activity in the Great Basin and adjacent regions during middle Tertiary time (40 to 20 my ago) was followed by a period of relative quiescence in middle Miocene time that lasted for several million years (from 20 to 17 my ago). Volcanism resumed 16 my ago mainly at the margins of the region and has continued to the present. ?? 1970.

  4. A Miocene termite nest from southern Argentina and its paleoclimatological implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bown, T.M.; Laza, J.H.

    1990-01-01

    A Miocene termitarium attributable to the extant termite Syntermes (Isoptera: Termitidae, Nasutitermitinae) is the first fossil termite nest reported from South America and possibly the oldest record of the Isoptera from that continent. A new ichnogenus and ichnospecies, Syntermesichnus fontanae, is proposed for this distinctive trace fossil. It differs from nests constructed by other members of the Nasutitermitinae in its architectural organization and its large size. -from Authors

  5. Miocene Antarctic ice sheet simulations using an asynchronously coupled RCM-ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gasson, Edward; DeConto, Rob; Pollard, David

    2015-04-01

    Both direct and indirect evidence suggests that there was fluctuation of the Antarctic ice sheet over the past 34 million years. For example, sediment provenance studies suggest retreat into the Wilkes Subglacial Basin during the Pliocene and possibly earlier, in the Miocene. Indirect evidence, such as from the oxygen isotope record from benthic formanifera, suggests fluctuations in ice volume exceeding 50 m in sea level equivalence during the Miocene. Ice sheet models have struggled to achieve such large-scale retreat under the relatively modest atmospheric CO2 concentrations suggested by proxy records. Attempts to resolve this data-model conflict have recently focused on simulating retreat into the marine basins of Antarctica, with retreat into the Wilkes Subglacial Basin during the Pliocene simulated in 2 recent ice sheet modeling studies using different approaches. Although retreat into the subglacial basins may explain approximately 20 m of ice volume fluctuation from Antarctica, it is still lower than the magnitudes suggested by the oxygen isotope record for the Miocene. Here we focus on improving simulation of the Antarctic ablation zone by using an asynchronously coupled RCM to provide climate forcing to an ice sheet model. We use a GCM with a Miocene paleo-geography to provide boundary forcing for the RCM, with atmospheric CO2 at various concentrations. In previous simulations there was limited retreat of the ice sheet away from the continental margin, due to a strong hysteresis mechanism. In these asynchronous simulations there is increased retreat of the Antarctic ice sheet, with continental sectors retreating away from the continental margin. This results in a greater overall decrease in ice volume than for non-asynchronously coupled simulations.

  6. A new species of Proceroplatus Edwards (Diptera: Keroplatidae) in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic.

    PubMed

    Penney, David; Evenhuis, Neal L; Green, David I

    2013-01-01

    Keroplatid fungus gnats (Diptera: Keroplatidae) were hitherto known from the Caribbean island of Hispaniola from a single named species in Miocene amber from the Dominican Republic. Here we describe the new fossil species Proceroplatus preziosii Evenhuis & Penney based on a mature male specimen, which differs markedly from both fossil and extant taxa in the structure of its gonostyli and U-shaped wing pattern. We also document the first record of extant Keroplatidae, Proceroplatus pictipennis (Williston), from Hispaniola. PMID:26473245

  7. Paleoenvironmental conditions in the Spanish Miocene-Pliocene boundary: isotopic analyses of Hipparion dental enamel.

    PubMed

    Domingo, Laura; Grimes, Stephen T; Domingo, M Soledad; Alberdi, M Teresa

    2009-04-01

    Expansion of C(4) grasses during Late Miocene and Early Pliocene constitutes one of the most remarkable biotic events of the Cenozoic era. The Teruel-Alfambra region (northeastern Spain) contains one of the most complete Miocene-Pliocene sequences of mammalian fossil sites in the world. In this study, stable isotope (delta (13)C and delta (18)O) analyses have been performed on the tooth enamel from the equid Hipparion from 19 localities spanning a time interval from approximately 10.9 to 2.7 Ma. This time range starts with the first appearance of this genus in Spain and ends at its extinction. An increase in delta (13)C at about 4.2 Ma has been observed, indicative of a shift toward a more open habitat. This shift may be related to a large scale vegetation change which occurred across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary when C(4) grasses expanded. This expansion might in turn be linked to global tectonic events such as the uplift of the Himalaya and/or the closure of the Panama Isthmus. However, other more regional factors may have ultimately enhanced the trend toward more open habitats in the Western Mediterranean Basin. The Messinian Salinity Crisis was a major environmental event that may have been responsible for the isotopic changes seen in the equid Hipparion from the Iberian Peninsula along with an increase in the aridity detected approximately 4.6 Ma ago in the Sahara. Even though the exact factor triggering the isotopic change observed in the Hipparion enamel remains mostly unknown, this study demonstrates that the global environmental changes detected across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary are also recorded in the realm of the Iberian Peninsula. PMID:19190888

  8. A molecular stable carbon isotope study of organic matter in immature Miocene Monterey sediments, Pismo basin

    SciTech Connect

    Schouten, S.; Rijpstra, I.C.; De Leeuw, J.W.

    1997-05-01

    The 300 m section of the Miocene Monterey Formation outcropping at Shell Beach is composed of calcareous phosphatic (15.1 -14.5 Ma) and siliceous facies (14.5-11.0 Ma). An objective of this paper is to document lateral paleoenvironmental changes in the Miocene Monterey Formation by comparing the Shell Beach (SB) profile with the Naples Beach (NB) section in the Santa Barbara-Ventura basin. Eight samples (one sample representing, on average, a time period of ca. 2000 y) from this section were analyzed for variations of extractable biomarkers and their carbon isotopic signatures as indicators for paleoenvironmental change during the Miocene. Saturated hydrocarbons present include 28,30-dinorhopane, phytane, n-alkanes (C{sub 17}-C{sub 31}), lycopane, and 17{beta}, 21{beta}(H)-homohopane. The biomarkers released after desulfurization of the polar fractions predominantly consist of phytane, 2,6.10,14-tetramethyl-7-(3-methylpentyl)pentadecane, C{sub 17}-C{sub 31} n-alkanes. regular 5{alpha}- and 5{beta}-steranes, dinosteranes, and (22R)-17{beta},21{beta}(H)-pentakishomohopane. Steranes have similar carbon isotopic compositions (-25 to -27{per_thousand}) throughout the section and are isotopically similar at both sites, indicating laterally similar and vertically stable environmental conditions for algae living in the upper part of the photic zone. Free and S-bound n-alkanes at SB mainly originate from marine organisms and not from terrestrial sources as in the NB section. S-bound pentakishomohopane is ca. 1-49{per_thousand} depleted compared to the steranes and is thought to be derived from the deeper water dwelling cyanobacteria. These findings are consistent with stable carbon isotopic data obtained for these compounds from Middle Miocene Monterey sediments at Naples Beach and indicates similar environmental conditions in the depositional environments of the Santa Barbara-Ventura and the Pismo basin. 64 refs., 14 figs., 6 tabs.

  9. Confirmation of a late Oligocene-early Miocene age of the Deseadan Salla Beds of Bolivia.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Naeser, C.W.; McKee, E.H.; Johnson, N.M.; Macfadden, B.J.

    1987-01-01

    Three new fission-track (zircon) and four new K-Ar (biotite) dates corroborate a late Oligocene-early Miocene age (22-28 Ma) for the Salla Beds of Bolivia. These ages contrast markedly with the previously accepted age of about 35 Ma for these strata and their contained faunas, and recasts of order and chronology of interchange between New World and Old World mammals. -Authors

  10. Paleomagnetic evidence for Late Miocene counterclockwise rotation of north coast carbonate sequence, Puerto Rico

    SciTech Connect

    Reid, J.A.; Plumley, P.W. ); Schellekens, J.H. )

    1991-03-01

    A paleomagnetic study of the essentially undeformed middle Tertiary carbonate sequence along the north coast of Puerto Rico reveals statistically significant pre-Pliocene discordance of characteristic component directions against those expected from cratonic North America for much of the section. Despite generally weak to moderately weak magnetic intensities, confirmation of the magnetization as primary in origin comes from the presence of two distinct components of magnetization, intrasite bipolarity, and/or the reproducibility of measurements. The mean geographic direction for the upper Oligocene to middle Miocene strata is 335.2{degree}/32.9{degree} and the corrected mean paleomagnetic pole is 207.6{degree}/66.5{degree}, (N = 3, {alpha}95 = 4.3{degree}). This suggests a counter-clockwise (CCW) block rotation of Puerto Rico and its microplate of 24.5{degrees} ({plus minus} 5.8{degrees}) during the late Miocene. Using a width of 250 km for the Northern Caribbean Plate Boundary Zone (NCPBZ) between the North American Plate and Caribbean Plate, the mean left lateral displacement implied is 1.8 to 2.4 cm/yr, which agrees fairly well with published relative motion rates for the two plates. Average rotation rate for 50 Ma to 20 Ma was 0.7{degree}/my but perhaps as great as 4{degree}/my in the Miocene. Resolution of mean paleolatitude indicates northward motion of a degree or less during the period of rotation. Causes of this short-lived rotation may include (1) tectonic escape from the inhibiting presence of the Bahama Banks and Beata Ridge during eastward motion of Puerto Rico along the sinistral transpressive Puerto Rico Trench and Muertos Trough fault systems or (2) changes in relative plate motions of the Caribbean and North American Plate during the late Miocene.

  11. Paleoaltimetry of the Early Miocene-Pliocene Oiyug basin, southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currie, B. S.; Polissar, P. J.; Rowley, D. B.; Freeman, K. H.

    2008-12-01

    The stable isotope composition of carbonate and organic samples from the Oiyug basin in southern Tibet allows for model calculations of the Miocene-Pliocene paleoelevation of the Tibetan Plateau. We measured the oxygen isotope composition of pedogenic and lacustrine carbonates, and hydrogen isotope composition of n-alkanes from epicuticular plant waxes to reconstruct the δ18O and δD of Oiyug basin paleometeoric waters. Calculated δ18O and δD values from Oiyug carbonate and organic samples, respectively, are in close agreement, suggesting the preservation of an unaltered paleometeoric water isotopic signal for both archives. Calculated early-middle Miocene (~20-15 Ma) paleoelevation estimates for the Oiyug basin range from 3000-5400 m with an average of ~4700 m. Individual and average elevation estimates are identical within uncertainty to paleoelevation estimates based on Oiyug basin fossil floral physiognomy from the same interval. This is the first time that three independent paleoaltimeters have been directly compared and are in accord. Calculated late Miocene-Pliocene (~5 Ma) paleoelevation estimates range from 5300-6400 m with an average of ~5600 m. Given that the modern hypsometric mean elevation of the Oiyug basin is ~5000 m, our results allow for a possible decrease in the average elevation of the southern part of the Tibetan Plateau since the late Miocene, compatible with widespread east-west extension in Tibet since at least that time. The results of our study further demonstrate the utility of lipid-based estimates of paleoelevation and the value of a multiple-proxy approach of testing the fidelity of isotope-based paleoelevation records.

  12. Sporopollen evidence for Late Miocene stepwise aridification on the Northeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, J.; Li, J. J.; Song, C. H.; Yu, H.; Peng, T. J.; Hui, Z. C.; Ye, X. Y.

    2015-11-01

    Holding a climatically and geologically key position both regionally and globally, the northeastern Tibetan Plateau provides a natural laboratory for understanding the interactions between tectonic activity and the evolution of Asian aridification. Determining when and how the Late Miocene climate evolved on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau may help us understand better relations between tectonic uplift, global cooling and ecosystem evolution. Previous paleoenvironmental research has focused on the western Longzhong Basin. Late Miocene aridification data derived from sporopollen now requires corroborative evidence from the eastern Longzhong Basin. Here, we present a Late Miocene sporopollen record from the Tianshui Basin in the eastern Longzhong Basin. Our results show a two-stage stepwise aridification: a temperate forest with a more humid climate developed in the basin between 11.4 and 10.1 Ma, followed by a temperate open forest environment with a less humid climate between 10.1 and 7.4 Ma; and an open temperate forest-steppe environment with a relatively arid climate occupied the basin during 7.4 to 6.4 Ma. The vegetation succession demonstrates that Asian aridification occurred after ~ 7-8 Ma, which is confirmed by other evidence from Asia. Furthermore, this persistent aridification on the northeastern Tibetan Plateau parallels the global cooling of the Late Miocene; the stepwise vegetation succession is consistent with the major uplift of the northeastern Tibetan Plateau during this time. These integrated environmental proxies indicate that global cooling may have been a potential driving force for Asian interior aridification, most likely enhanced by stepwise uplift of the Tibetan Plateau.

  13. Miocene to Recent structural evolution of the Nevado de Toluca volcano region, Central Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García-Palomo, A.; Macías, J. L.; Garduño, V. H.

    2000-03-01

    Based on aerial photography, satellite imagery, and detailed field work, a geological and structural model of Nevado de Toluca and its surroundings is presented. The Nevado de Toluca volcano is built upon the intersection of three complex fault systems of different age, orientation, and kinematics. These systems from the older to the younger are: (a) The Taxco-Querétaro Fault System (NNW-SSE) with clear expression south of the volcano; (b) The San Antonio Fault System (NE-SW) that runs between the San Antonio and Nevado de Toluca volcanoes; and (c) The Tenango Fault System (E-W) located to the east of Nevado de Toluca volcano. Our field data, supported by previous studies, suggest that these systems have coexisted since the late Miocene. In addition, the stratigraphy, chronology, and kinematics of fault planes point to the existence of at least three main deformation events that have affected the region since the late Miocene. During the early Miocene, an extensional phase with the same deformation style as the Basin and Range tectonics of northern Mexico caused the formation of horsts and grabens south of Nevado de Toluca and allowed the intrusion of sub-vertical dikes oriented NW-SE and NNW-SSE. During the middle Miocene, a transcurrent episode generated NE-SW faults that presented two main motions: the first movement was left-lateral with a σ3 oriented NW-SE and later turned into normal through a counter-clockwise rotation of σ3 up to a N-S position. The latest deformation phase started during the late Pliocene and produced oblique extension ( σ3 oriented NE-SW) along E-W-trending faults that later changed to pure extension by shifting of σ3 to a N-S orientation. These faults appear to control the late Pleistocene to Holocene monogenetic volcanism, the flank collapses of Nevado de Toluca volcano and the seismic activity of the region.

  14. A new Late Miocene hominoid from Kenya: Samburupithecus kiptalami gen. et sp. nov.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishida, Hidemi; Pickford, Martin

    1997-11-01

    A new genus and species of hominoid, Samburupithecus kiptalami, is erected on the basis of a maxillary specimen with complete post canine dentition. Its age is established as upper Miocene (9.5 Ma) on the basis of radioisotopic dating and associated mammalian fauna. The new genus is more closely related to the African ape —human clade (AAH) than is any other known extinct hominoid and it may well be on the line leading to hominids.

  15. Plate kinematics of the central Atlantic during the Oligocene and early Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schettino, Antonio; Macchiavelli, Chiara

    2016-04-01

    A new plate motions model for the northwest Africa-North America Plate pair during the Oligocene and early Miocene is presented. The model is accompanied by a high-resolution isochron map for the central Atlantic region, resulting from a re-examination of 423 ship tracks from the NGDC data base for the area between the 15°20' FZ and the Azores triple junction. A new digital model of fracture zones for this region and a set of 309 magnetic profiles crossing the Oligocene to recent oceanic crust within the study area allowed to determine accurate finite reconstruction poles for the North America-northwest Africa conjugate plate pair between the early Miocene (Chron 6) and the early Oligocene (Chron 13). For times older than Chron 7 (˜25 Ma), the finite reconstruction poles were calculated using a reliable data set coming exclusively from the region south of the Canary Islands FZ (˜32°N), which allowed to test the rigidity of the northwest African oceanic lithosphere during the Oligocene-early Miocene phase of Atlas orogeny. A comparison of theoretical magnetic isochrons with observed magnetic lineations systematically shows that anomalously high spreading rates occurred in the area north of the Canary Islands FZ before Chron 7, thereby suggesting that the formation of the Atlas mountain, rather than being a localized intracontinental process, was logically linked to the central Atlantic spreading history. Thus, an independent Moroccan Plate could have existed during the Oligocene-early Miocene time interval, which included both the oceanic lithosphere north of the Canary Islands FZ and the northern Maghrebian areas of Morocco, Algeria and Tunisia. In this eventuality, the Atlas mountain belt should be reinterpreted as a giant flower structure associated with dextral transpression.

  16. The Miocene Cyprideis species flock (Ostracoda; Crustacea) of western Amazonia (Solimões Formation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Martin; Ramos, Maria Ines F.; Piller, Werner E.

    2015-04-01

    The Miocene mega-wetland of western Amazonia holds a diverse, largely endemic aquatic invertebrate fauna (e.g., molluscs, ostracods). Among ostracods, the genus Cyprideis experienced a remarkable radiation. Micropalaeontologic investigations of a 400-m-long sediment core (~62 km SW Benjamin Constant, Amazonia, Brazil) permitted a taxonomic revision of about two-thirds of hitherto described Cyprideis species. Ostracod index species enabled a biostratigraphic allocation of the well succession to the Cyprideis minipunctata to Cyprideis cyrtoma biozones (late middle to early late Miocene age). The current study underlines once more Cyprideis' remarkable capability to produce species flocks and western Amazonian Cyprideis comply with the criteria of a species flock: i) endemicity: up to now not a single species is recorded in adjacent areas; ii) monophyly: although hardly verifiable to date and probably Amazonian Cyprideis is not monophyletic s.str., several closely related, quite rapidly evolving species are proved; iii) speciosity: due to the present study, 30 formally described species exist; several further species, left in open nomenclature, are recorded in the literature, which strongly hints to a much higher, still unrecorded species richness; iv) ecological diversity: based on rare sedimentologic cross-references, ecological diversity within a highly structured wetland is possible; the current results demonstrate the sympatric occurrence of up to 12 Cyprideis species, which may indicate adaptations to different microhabitats; v) habitat dominance: regularly Cyprideis holds more than >90 % in western Amazonian ostracod assemblages during the early and middle Miocene. Explanations for this extreme habitat monopolisation are still arguable and touch the highly disputed question about the nature of western Amazonia's environments during the Miocene. It seems, however, evident that a strictly actualistic approach to endemic Neogene Amazonian biota is highly problematic. This study was funded by Austrian Science Fund (FWF project P21748-N21).

  17. Etisus evamuellerae, a new xanthid crab (Decapoda, Brachyura) from the Middle Miocene of Austria and Hungary

    PubMed Central

    Hyžný, M.; van Bakel, B.W.M.; Guinot, D.

    2015-01-01

    On the basis of several carapaces, a new species of xanthid crab, Etisus evamuellerae, is described from the Middle Miocene of the Vienna (Austria) and Great Hungarian basins. It differs from the coeval xanthids, Xantho moldavicus and Pilodius vulgaris, in having a distinctly protruding front and comparatively longer carapace. Contrary to those two species, the new one makes up for just a small percentage in the decapod crustacean assemblages studied. PMID:25983383

  18. Marine biological productivity, carbon cycling, and climate cooling during the Oligocene to Miocene transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diester-Haass, Liselotte; Billups, Katharina; Emeis, Kay-Christian

    2010-05-01

    The Oligocene to Miocene boundary (the so-called Mi1 event) marks one of the major Cenozoic cooling steps. A corresponding but slightly out of phase 13C maximum has been attributed to increased organic matter burial associated with global climate cooling (e.g., Zachos et al., 2001). To test this idea we have constructed records of marine biological productivity (based on benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, BFAR) to parallel the stable isotope records from 20-25 Ma at three sites from the Atlantic Ocean sampling different hydrographic regimes. Our data show that the 18O and 13C maximum that characterize the Oligocene/Miocene boundary is accompanied by a pronounced maximum in BFAR derived paleoproductivity at all sites. In the subtropical Atlantic (Site 1265) and the Southern Ocean (Site 1090), productivity increases about 500 kyr prior to Mi1 in tune with the beginning of enhanced amplitude variations in the benthic foraminiferal 13C record. In the tropical Atlantic (Site 926), where we have appropriate sampling resolution (~10 kyr), eccentricity-scale variations in paleoproductivity are coherent with the stable isotope records and in-phase with the 18O values. Paleoproductivity leads 13C at the 400 kyr period in agreement with the lead of 18O values with respect to 13C values. These results illustrate that the link between Oligocene to Miocene climate transition and the carbon cycle is one of marine primary productivity both during the glacial event of Mi1 as well as on eccentricity time scales. The late Oligocene (24 Ma) increase of productivity suggests that a reduction of atmospheric CO2 levels mediated by increased biological productivity may have lead to climate cooling at the Oligocene to Miocene boundary.

  19. Paleoenvironmental conditions in the Spanish Miocene-Pliocene boundary: isotopic analyses of Hipparion dental enamel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domingo, Laura; Grimes, Stephen T.; Domingo, M. Soledad; Alberdi, M. Teresa

    2009-04-01

    Expansion of C4 grasses during Late Miocene and Early Pliocene constitutes one of the most remarkable biotic events of the Cenozoic era. The Teruel-Alfambra region (northeastern Spain) contains one of the most complete Miocene-Pliocene sequences of mammalian fossil sites in the world. In this study, stable isotope ( δ 13C and δ 18O) analyses have been performed on the tooth enamel from the equid Hipparion from 19 localities spanning a time interval from approximately 10.9 to 2.7 Ma. This time range starts with the first appearance of this genus in Spain and ends at its extinction. An increase in δ 13C at about 4.2 Ma has been observed, indicative of a shift toward a more open habitat. This shift may be related to a large scale vegetation change which occurred across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary when C4 grasses expanded. This expansion might in turn be linked to global tectonic events such as the uplift of the Himalaya and/or the closure of the Panama Isthmus. However, other more regional factors may have ultimately enhanced the trend toward more open habitats in the Western Mediterranean Basin. The Messinian Salinity Crisis was a major environmental event that may have been responsible for the isotopic changes seen in the equid Hipparion from the Iberian Peninsula along with an increase in the aridity detected ~4.6 Ma ago in the Sahara. Even though the exact factor triggering the isotopic change observed in the Hipparion enamel remains mostly unknown, this study demonstrates that the global environmental changes detected across the Miocene-Pliocene boundary are also recorded in the realm of the Iberian Peninsula.

  20. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23–14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2 concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3–4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2 concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (∼280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (∼500 ppm) atmospheric CO2. These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2 during the early to mid-Miocene. PMID:26903644

  1. Antarctic ice sheet sensitivity to atmospheric CO2 variations in the early to mid-Miocene.

    PubMed

    Levy, Richard; Harwood, David; Florindo, Fabio; Sangiorgi, Francesca; Tripati, Robert; von Eynatten, Hilmar; Gasson, Edward; Kuhn, Gerhard; Tripati, Aradhna; DeConto, Robert; Fielding, Christopher; Field, Brad; Golledge, Nicholas; McKay, Robert; Naish, Timothy; Olney, Matthew; Pollard, David; Schouten, Stefan; Talarico, Franco; Warny, Sophie; Willmott, Veronica; Acton, Gary; Panter, Kurt; Paulsen, Timothy; Taviani, Marco

    2016-03-29

    Geological records from the Antarctic margin offer direct evidence of environmental variability at high southern latitudes and provide insight regarding ice sheet sensitivity to past climate change. The early to mid-Miocene (23-14 Mya) is a compelling interval to study as global temperatures and atmospheric CO2concentrations were similar to those projected for coming centuries. Importantly, this time interval includes the Miocene Climatic Optimum, a period of global warmth during which average surface temperatures were 3-4 °C higher than today. Miocene sediments in the ANDRILL-2A drill core from the Western Ross Sea, Antarctica, indicate that the Antarctic ice sheet (AIS) was highly variable through this key time interval. A multiproxy dataset derived from the core identifies four distinct environmental motifs based on changes in sedimentary facies, fossil assemblages, geochemistry, and paleotemperature. Four major disconformities in the drill core coincide with regional seismic discontinuities and reflect transient expansion of grounded ice across the Ross Sea. They correlate with major positive shifts in benthic oxygen isotope records and generally coincide with intervals when atmospheric CO2concentrations were at or below preindustrial levels (∼280 ppm). Five intervals reflect ice sheet minima and air temperatures warm enough for substantial ice mass loss during episodes of high (∼500 ppm) atmospheric CO2 These new drill core data and associated ice sheet modeling experiments indicate that polar climate and the AIS were highly sensitive to relatively small changes in atmospheric CO2during the early to mid-Miocene. PMID:26903644

  2. A new Middle Miocene Niveria Jousseaume, 1884 (Mollusca: Gastropoda: Trivioidea) from Hungary

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fehse, Dirk

    2011-02-01

    A new species of Niveria from the Middle Miocene (Badenian) of the Paratethys of Borsodbóta, Hungary is described. This species is characterized by its callused dorsum and dorsal depression. Niveria jozefgregoi sp. nov. is discussed with comparative species from the Badenian of Hungary, the Pliocene of the Mediterranean region, Florida and Recent species from Madeira and the Islas Galápagos.

  3. Middle-Miocene counterclockwise rotation of rocks from west-central Nevada; implications for Basin and Range extension

    SciTech Connect

    Hudson, M.R.; Geissman, J.W.

    1985-01-01

    Drilling and geophysical data from Dixie Valley and Fallon Basin of west-central Nevada have shown that dip-slip normal faults accommodated post-Miocene Basin and Range extension in this area, but the presence of an earlier, less-understood phase of Basin and Range deformation is suggested in the adjacent West Humboldt, Stillwater, and Clan Alpine Ranges where the late-Miocene basalts lie in angular unconformity on Oligocene to early-Miocene ash-flow tuffs. Paleomagnetic components obtained from the tuffs and underlying gabbroic and basaltic rocks of the Jurassic Humboldt Lopolith have declinations that are statistically different and counterclockwise from the expected Oligo-Miocene and Jurassic directions for the area. Paleomagnetic components from the late-Miocene basalts statistically overlap their expected direction. These data imply that the rocks were rotated counterclockwise during middle-Miocene. The common association of such rotations with strike-slip faulting suggests that this earlier phase of Basin and Range extension was largely a strike-slip faulting deformation. If so, the total amount of extension in the area may be significantly larger than estimates based solely on the moderate tilts (<30/sup 0/) of the ranges.

  4. Slowing extrusion tectonics: Lowered estimate of post-Early Miocene slip rate for the Altyn Tagh fault

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yue, Y.; Ritts, B.D.; Graham, S.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Gehrels, G.E.; Zhang, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Determination of long-term slip rate for the Altyn Tagh fault is essential for testing whether Asian tectonics is dominated by lateral extrusion or distributed crustal shortening. Previous slip-history studies focused on either Quaternary slip-rate measurements or pre-Early Miocene total-offset estimates and do not allow a clear distinction between rates based on the two. The magmatic and metamorphic history revealed by SHRIMP zircon dating of clasts from Miocene conglomerate in the Xorkol basin north of the Altyn Tagh fault strikingly matches that of basement in the southern Qilian Shan and northern Qaidam regions south of the fault. This match requires that the post-Early Miocene long-term slip rate along the Altyn Tagh fault cannot exceed 10 mm/year, supporting the hypothesis of distributed crustal thickening for post-Early Miocene times. This low long-term slip rate and recently documented large pre-Early Miocene cumulative offset across the fault support a two-stage evolution, wherein Asian tectonics was dominated by lateral extrusion before the end of Early Miocene, and since then has been dominated by distributed crustal thickening and rapid plateau uplift. ?? 2003 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Slowing extrusion tectonics: lowered estimate of post-Early Miocene slip rate for the Altyn Tagh fault

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yue, Yongjun; Ritts, Bradley D.; Graham, Stephan A.; Wooden, Joseph L.; Gehrels, George E.; Zhang, Zhicheng

    2004-01-01

    Determination of long-term slip rate for the Altyn Tagh fault is essential for testing whether Asian tectonics is dominated by lateral extrusion or distributed crustal shortening. Previous slip-history studies focused on either Quaternary slip-rate measurements or pre-Early Miocene total-offset estimates and do not allow a clear distinction between rates based on the two. The magmatic and metamorphic history revealed by SHRIMP zircon dating of clasts from Miocene conglomerate in the Xorkol basin north of the Altyn Tagh fault strikingly matches that of basement in the southern Qilian Shan and northern Qaidam regions south of the fault. This match requires that the post-Early Miocene long-term slip rate along the Altyn Tagh fault cannot exceed 10 mm/year, supporting the hypothesis of distributed crustal thickening for post-Early Miocene times. This low long-term slip rate and recently documented large pre-Early Miocene cumulative offset across the fault support a two-stage evolution, wherein Asian tectonics was dominated by lateral extrusion before the end of Early Miocene, and since then has been dominated by distributed crustal thickening and rapid plateau uplift.

  6. Clay mineralogy indicates a mildly warm and humid living environment for the Miocene hominoid from the Zhaotong Basin, Yunnan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chunxia; Guo, Zhengtang; Deng, Chenglong; Ji, Xueping; Wu, Haibin; Paterson, Greig A.; Chang, Lin; Li, Qin; Wu, Bailing; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-02-01

    Global and regional environmental changes have influenced the evolutionary processes of hominoid primates, particularly during the Miocene. Recently, a new Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis hominoid fossil with a late Miocene age of ~6.2 Ma was discovered in the Shuitangba (STB) section of the Zhaotong Basin in Yunnan on the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. To understand the relationship between paleoclimate and hominoid evolution, we have studied sedimentary, clay mineralogy and geochemical proxies for the late Miocene STB section (~16 m thick; ca. 6.7-6.0 Ma). Our results show that Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis lived in a mildly warm and humid climate in a lacustrine or swamp environment. Comparing mid to late Miocene records from hominoid sites in Yunnan, Siwalik in Pakistan, and tropical Africa we find that ecological shifts from forest to grassland in Siwalik are much later than in tropical Africa, consistent with the disappearance of hominoid fossils. However, no significant vegetation changes are found in Yunnan during the late Miocene, which we suggest is the result of uplift of the Tibetan plateau combined with the Asian monsoon geographically and climatically isolating these regions. The resultant warm and humid conditions in southeastern China offered an important refuge for Miocene hominoids.

  7. Clay mineralogy indicates a mildly warm and humid living environment for the Miocene hominoid from the Zhaotong Basin, Yunnan, China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chunxia; Guo, Zhengtang; Deng, Chenglong; Ji, Xueping; Wu, Haibin; Paterson, Greig A; Chang, Lin; Li, Qin; Wu, Bailing; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-01-01

    Global and regional environmental changes have influenced the evolutionary processes of hominoid primates, particularly during the Miocene. Recently, a new Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis hominoid fossil with a late Miocene age of ~6.2 Ma was discovered in the Shuitangba (STB) section of the Zhaotong Basin in Yunnan on the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. To understand the relationship between paleoclimate and hominoid evolution, we have studied sedimentary, clay mineralogy and geochemical proxies for the late Miocene STB section (~16 m thick; ca. 6.7-6.0 Ma). Our results show that Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis lived in a mildly warm and humid climate in a lacustrine or swamp environment. Comparing mid to late Miocene records from hominoid sites in Yunnan, Siwalik in Pakistan, and tropical Africa we find that ecological shifts from forest to grassland in Siwalik are much later than in tropical Africa, consistent with the disappearance of hominoid fossils. However, no significant vegetation changes are found in Yunnan during the late Miocene, which we suggest is the result of uplift of the Tibetan plateau combined with the Asian monsoon geographically and climatically isolating these regions. The resultant warm and humid conditions in southeastern China offered an important refuge for Miocene hominoids. PMID:26829756

  8. Clay mineralogy indicates a mildly warm and humid living environment for the Miocene hominoid from the Zhaotong Basin, Yunnan, China

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Chunxia; Guo, Zhengtang; Deng, Chenglong; Ji, Xueping; Wu, Haibin; Paterson, Greig A.; Chang, Lin; Li, Qin; Wu, Bailing; Zhu, Rixiang

    2016-01-01

    Global and regional environmental changes have influenced the evolutionary processes of hominoid primates, particularly during the Miocene. Recently, a new Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis hominoid fossil with a late Miocene age of ~6.2 Ma was discovered in the Shuitangba (STB) section of the Zhaotong Basin in Yunnan on the southeast margin of the Tibetan Plateau. To understand the relationship between paleoclimate and hominoid evolution, we have studied sedimentary, clay mineralogy and geochemical proxies for the late Miocene STB section (~16 m thick; ca. 6.7–6.0 Ma). Our results show that Lufengpithecus cf. lufengensis lived in a mildly warm and humid climate in a lacustrine or swamp environment. Comparing mid to late Miocene records from hominoid sites in Yunnan, Siwalik in Pakistan, and tropical Africa we find that ecological shifts from forest to grassland in Siwalik are much later than in tropical Africa, consistent with the disappearance of hominoid fossils. However, no significant vegetation changes are found in Yunnan during the late Miocene, which we suggest is the result of uplift of the Tibetan plateau combined with the Asian monsoon geographically and climatically isolating these regions. The resultant warm and humid conditions in southeastern China offered an important refuge for Miocene hominoids. PMID:26829756

  9. Late Miocene remagnetization within the internal sector of the Northern Apennines, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Aiello, I.W.; Hagstrum, J.T.; Principi, G.

    2004-01-01

    Paleomagnetic and geologic evidence indicates that Upper Jurassic radiolarian cherts of both the Tuscan Cherts Formation (continental margin, Tuscan Units) and the Monte Alpe Cherts Formation (oceanic crust, Ligurian Units) were remagnetized during Miocene orogenesis of the Northern Apennines of Italy. Characteristic overprint magnetizations with reversed polarities have been found over a large area within the internal sector of the Northern Apennines, including eastern Liguria, Elba Island and the Thyrrenian margin, and west of the Middle Tuscan Ridge. The reversed-polarity overprint (average direction: D=177??, I=-52??, ??95=15??) was most likely acquired during Late Miocene uplift and denudation of the orogenic chain, and thermochemical remagnetization was a probable consequence of increased circulation of orogenic fluids. Similarly, mostly reversed-polarity directions of magnetization have been found by other workers in overlying post-orogenic Messinian sediments (D=177??, I=-57??, ??95=3??), which show little counterclockwise (CCW) vertical-axis rotation with respect to stable Europe (-8??5??). The Monte Alpe Cherts sampled at sites in the external sector of the Northern Apennines, close to major tectonic features, have normal- polarity overprint directions with in situ W-SW declinations. Since the overlying post-orogenic Messinian sediments have not been substantially rotated about vertical axes, the evidence points to an earlier,pre-Late Miocene remagnetization in the external parts of the orogenic chain. ?? 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Juvenile hominoid cranium from the late Miocene of southern China and hominoid diversity in Asia

    PubMed Central

    Kelley, Jay; Gao, Feng

    2012-01-01

    The fossil ape Lufengpithecus is known from a number of late Miocene sites in Yunnan Province in southern China. Along with other fossil apes from South and Southeast Asia, it is widely considered to be a relative of the extant orangutan, Pongo pygmaeus. It is best represented at the type site of Shihuiba (Lufeng) by several partial to nearly complete but badly crushed adult crania. There is, however, an additional, minimally distorted cranium of a young juvenile from a nearly contemporaneous site in the Yuanmou Basin, which affords the opportunity to better assess the relationships between Lufengpithecus and Pongo. Comparison with similarly aged juvenile skulls of extant great apes reveals no features suggesting clear affinities to orangutans, and instead reveals a morphological pattern largely consistent with a stem member of the hominid (great ape and human) clade. The existence at this time of other hominids in South Asia (Sivapithecus) and Southeast Asia (Khoratpithecus) with clear craniofacial affinities to Pongo suggests both more diversity among Asian Late Miocene apes and more complex patterns of dispersal than previously supposed. Major differences in the associated mammal faunas from the southern China sites and those from South and Southeast Asia are consistent with these findings and suggest more than one dispersal route of apes into East Asia earlier in the Miocene. PMID:22511723

  11. Terpenoid compositions and botanical origins of Late Cretaceous and Miocene amber from China.

    PubMed

    Shi, Gongle; Dutta, Suryendu; Paul, Swagata; Wang, Bo; Jacques, Frédéric M B

    2014-01-01

    The terpenoid compositions of the Late Cretaceous Xixia amber from Central China and the middle Miocene Zhangpu amber from Southeast China were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to elucidate their botanical origins. The Xixia amber is characterized by sesquiterpenoids, abietane and phyllocladane type diterpenoids, but lacks phenolic abietanes and labdane derivatives. The molecular compositions indicate that the Xixia amber is most likely contributed by the conifer family Araucariaceae, which is today distributed primarily in the Southern Hemisphere, but widely occurred in the Northern Hemisphere during the Mesozoic according to paleobotanical evidence. The middle Miocene Zhangpu amber is characterized by amyrin and amyrone-based triterpenoids and cadalene-based sesquiterpenoids. It is considered derived from the tropical angiosperm family Dipterocarpaceae based on these compounds and the co-occurring fossil winged fruits of the family in Zhangpu. This provides new evidence for the occurrence of a dipterocarp forest in the middle Miocene of Southeast China. It is the first detailed biomarker study for amber from East Asia. PMID:25354364

  12. Middle Miocene to present sediment transport and deposits in the Southeastern Weddell Sea, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Xiaoxia; Jokat, Wilfried

    2016-04-01

    Understanding the transport and deposition of sediments along the Antarctic continental shelves helps to provide constraints on past ice sheet dynamics. Seismic stratigraphic and scientific drilling data from the Antarctic continental margins have provided much direct evidence concerning ice sheet evolution and sedimentation history. In this study, we describe a series of sedimentary features along the continental margin of the southeastern Weddell Sea to constrain glacial-influenced sedimentation processes from the Middle Miocene to the present. The Crary Trough Mouth Fan (CTMF), channel systems, Mix-system turbidity-contourites are investigated by using seismic reflection, sub-bottom profiler, and results from ODP Site 693. The sinuous, NE-SW-oriented turbidity-contourites are characterized by bathymetric highs that are more than 150 km wide, 700 km long, and have a sediment thickness of up to 2 km. The unique sedimentation environment of the southeastern Weddell Sea is controlled by a large catchment area and its fast (paleo-)ice streams feeding the Filchner Ronne Ice Shelf, turbidity/bottom currents as well as sea level changes. A remarkable increase in mass transport deposits (MTDs) in the Late Miocene and Early Pliocene strata has been related to, ice sheet loading, eustatic sea level fall, earthquakes, and overpressure of rapid sediment accumulation. Our seismic records also imply that fluctuations of East Antarctic ice sheet similar to those that occurred during the last glacial cycle might have been typical for southeastern Weddell Sea during glacial periods since the Late Miocene or even earlier.

  13. Terpenoid Compositions and Botanical Origins of Late Cretaceous and Miocene Amber from China

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Gongle; Dutta, Suryendu; Paul, Swagata; Wang, Bo; Jacques, Frédéric M. B.

    2014-01-01

    The terpenoid compositions of the Late Cretaceous Xixia amber from Central China and the middle Miocene Zhangpu amber from Southeast China were analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) to elucidate their botanical origins. The Xixia amber is characterized by sesquiterpenoids, abietane and phyllocladane type diterpenoids, but lacks phenolic abietanes and labdane derivatives. The molecular compositions indicate that the Xixia amber is most likely contributed by the conifer family Araucariaceae, which is today distributed primarily in the Southern Hemisphere, but widely occurred in the Northern Hemisphere during the Mesozoic according to paleobotanical evidence. The middle Miocene Zhangpu amber is characterized by amyrin and amyrone-based triterpenoids and cadalene-based sesquiterpenoids. It is considered derived from the tropical angiosperm family Dipterocarpaceae based on these compounds and the co-occurring fossil winged fruits of the family in Zhangpu. This provides new evidence for the occurrence of a dipterocarp forest in the middle Miocene of Southeast China. It is the first detailed biomarker study for amber from East Asia. PMID:25354364

  14. Miocene structural features of north and south Padre Island and OCS areas, offshore south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghamdi, A.M.; Watkins, J.S. )

    1996-01-01

    Integration of 2-D seismic reflection data, paleontological reports, velocity analysis, and well logs has provided a new structural model for North and South Padre Island OCS areas. The Clemente-Tomas fault system (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) is located above overpressured shale ridges. Sediment loading initiated the faulting over the compacted shale. The Corsair fault system (Early-Middle Miocene) is located seaward of Clemente-Tomas and was formed due to a huge sediment influx that forced the salt to withdraw basinward. The Wanda fault system formed during the Late Miocene because of the further salt withdrawal. Study area is dominated by shale ridges and the salt are only formed beneath the present shelf edge as salt diapirs. Overpressured shale was mapped throughout the study area. Well logs show overpressured shale between 8,800 to 12,000 feet. Berg and Avery suggested that growth faults can seal the faults sheared zones which may cause a structural hydrocarbon trap. We examined most of the responses of the dip logs in the study area and we found that the seal general trend is the drag (non seal) type.

  15. Miocene structural features of north and south Padre Island and OCS areas, offshore south Texas

    SciTech Connect

    Al-Ghamdi, A.M.; Watkins, J.S.

    1996-12-31

    Integration of 2-D seismic reflection data, paleontological reports, velocity analysis, and well logs has provided a new structural model for North and South Padre Island OCS areas. The Clemente-Tomas fault system (Late Oligocene-Early Miocene) is located above overpressured shale ridges. Sediment loading initiated the faulting over the compacted shale. The Corsair fault system (Early-Middle Miocene) is located seaward of Clemente-Tomas and was formed due to a huge sediment influx that forced the salt to withdraw basinward. The Wanda fault system formed during the Late Miocene because of the further salt withdrawal. Study area is dominated by shale ridges and the salt are only formed beneath the present shelf edge as salt diapirs. Overpressured shale was mapped throughout the study area. Well logs show overpressured shale between 8,800 to 12,000 feet. Berg and Avery suggested that growth faults can seal the faults sheared zones which may cause a structural hydrocarbon trap. We examined most of the responses of the dip logs in the study area and we found that the seal general trend is the drag (non seal) type.

  16. Upper Miocene Stevens sands in the Maricopa depocenter southern San Joaquin Valley, California

    SciTech Connect

    Quinn, M.J. )

    1991-02-01

    During the late Miocene, the Maricopa depocenter was a northwest-southeast-trending trough located in the southeastern corner of the San Joaquin Valley. Uplifting granitic source terranes in the Salinian block to the southwest, the Sierra Nevada to the northeast, and the Tehachapi Mountains to the southeast shed coarse-grained quartz-rich sands into the subsiding basin in the form of deep marine turbidites. These upper Miocene turbidites are collectively referred to as the Stevens sands. Based upon studies from several oil fields within the depocenter, a generalized model has been developed for the ramp, channel, and fan deposits seen within the Stevens system. This model, and the field studies are used to examine the size, morphology, sand distribution patterns, and seismic response of these sand-rich turbidite deposits. Within the Stevens system, the majority of the hydrocarbons are found within the middle to outer parts of the turbidites fans, with post depositional compaction, uplift, and folding providing three primary types of trapping mechanism: closure due to shale compaction over sand thicks, emplacement of sands across an anticlinal axis, and updip porosity pinch-outs. Finally, the chronostratigraphy of the basin developed from the field studies is used to examine upper Miocene strike-slip movement along the San Andreas fault, uplift of the Sierra Nevada, strike-slip and normal movement along the White Wolf fault, and how these various tectonic events relate to the Stevens deposition.

  17. Re-organization of Pacific intermediate and deep water circulation during middle Miocene stepwise onset of

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holbourn, A.; Kuhnt, W.; Regenberg, M.; Haley, B.; Frank, M.; Mix, A.; Andersen, N.

    2008-12-01

    We use benthic and planktonic foraminiferal δ13C and δ18O, planktonic Mg/Ca together with Nd isotopes and deep-water ventilation proxies (benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, proportion of coarse fraction and XRF Fe) in ODP cores from the NW and SE Pacific to track circulation changes across the Pacific and to elucidate the role of the tropics during middle Miocene global climate change (16.5-12.5 Ma). Our high resolution (3-4 kyr) planktonic δ18O record from South China Sea Site 1146 exhibits high amplitude variability with significant power in the obliquity and precessional bands, suggesting that a monsoonal regime was established in SE Asia by the middle Miocene. Following episodes of ice expansion at 14.6, 14.2 and 13.9 Ma, planktonic δ18O values strikingly decreased and SST estimates increased, suggesting intensification of summer monsoon coupled with northwards shifts of the ITCZ (close to present day position). Nd isotopes and ventilation proxies in SE Pacific Sites 1236 and 1237 also reveal that Antarctic glaciation events were associated with deepening of the Calcite Compensation Depth and major re- organization of intermediate and deep water circulation in the Pacific. Thus, our results indicate a tight coupling of tropical and southern hemisphere climate as well as heightened sensitivity to obliquity and precessional forcing during the stepwise onset of icehouse conditions in the middle Miocene.

  18. Miocene honey bees from the Randeck Maar of southwestern Germany (Hymenoptera, Apidae)

    PubMed Central

    Kotthoff, Ulrich; Wappler, Torsten; Engel, Michael S.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The Miocene Randeck Maar (southwestern Germany) is one of the only sites with abundant material of fossil honey bees. The fauna has been the focus of much scrutiny by early authors who recognized multiple species or subspecies within the fauna. The history of work on the Randeck Maar is briefly reviewed and these fossils placed into context with other Tertiary and living species of the genus Apis Linnaeus (Apinae: Apini). Previously unrecorded specimens from Randeck Maar were compared with earlier series in an attempt to evaluate the observed variation. A morphometric analysis of forewing venation angles across representative Recent and Tertiary species of Apis as well as various non-Apini controls was undertaken to evaluate the distribution of variation in fossil honey bees. The resulting dendrogram shows considerable variation concerning the wing venation of Miocene Apini, but intergradation of other morphological characters reveals no clear pattern of separate species. This suggests that a single, highly variable species was present in Europe during the Miocene. The pattern also supports the notion that the multiple species and subspecies proposed by earlier authors for the Randeck Maar honey bee fauna are not valid, and all are accordingly recognized as Apis armbrusteri Zeuner. PMID:21594072

  19. Seastacks buried beneath newly reported Lower Miocene sandstone, northern Santa Barbara County, California

    SciTech Connect

    Fritsche, A.E.; Hanna, F.M.

    1985-04-01

    Three large, isolated exposures of a light-gray, coarse-grained, thick-bedded sandstone unit occur in the northern San Rafael Mountains of Santa Barbara County, California. These rocks are moderately fossiliferous and contain Vertipecten bowersi, Amussiopecten vanvlecki, Aequipecten andersoni, Otrea howelli, shark teeth, whale bones, and regular echinoid spines. The fossils indicate that the sandstone unit, although previously reported as upper(.) Miocene, correlates best with the lower Miocene Vaqueros Formation. This unit was deposited in angular unconformity on a Cretaceous, greenish-gray turbidite sequence of interbedded sandstone and shale, and onlaps the unconformity erosion surface from west to east, the unit being thicker in the west and older at its base. The underlying Cretaceous sandstone beds are well indurated, and during the eastward transgression of the early Miocene sea, they resisted wave erosion and stood as seastacks offshore of the advancing coastline, thus creating a very irregular topographic surface upon which the Vaqueros Formation was deposited. Some seastacks were as much as 4 m tall, as indicated by inliers of Cretaceous rock surrounded by 4-m thick sections of the Vaqueros Formation.

  20. Equatorial Precession Drove Mid-Latitude Changes in ENSO-Scale Variation in the Earliest Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, B.; D'Andrea, W. J.; Lee, D. E.; Wilson, G. S.

    2014-12-01

    Foulden Maar is an annually laminated lacustrine diatomite deposit from the South Island of New Zealand. The deposit was laid down over ~100 kyr of the latest Oligocene and earliest Miocene, during the peak and deglaciation phase of the Mi-1 Antarctic glaciation event. At this time, New Zealand was located at approximately the same latitude as today (~45°S). Evidence from organic geochemical proxies (δD, δ13C) and physical properties (density, colour) indicates the presence of an 11-kyr cycle at the site. Although it is known that 11-kyr insolation (half-precession) cycles occur between the Tropics, this cycle is rarely seen in sedimentary archives deposited outside the immediate vicinity of the Equator. Records from Foulden Maar correlate well with the amplitude and phase of the modelled equatorial half-precession cycle for the earliest Miocene. High-resolution (50 µm) colour intensity measurements and lamina thickness measurements both indicate the presence of significant ENSO-like (2-8 year) variation in the Foulden Maar sediments. Early results from targeted lamina thickness measurements suggest that ENSO-band variation is modulated by the 11-kyr cycle, with power in the ENSO band increasing during periods of increased insolation at the Equator. This implies that equatorial half-precession had a significant effect on ENSO-like variation in the early Miocene, and that this effect was felt as far afield as the mid-latitudes of the Southern Hemisphere.

  1. First Occurrence of Platycladus from the Upper Miocene of Southwest China and Its Phytogeographic Implications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi-Jia; Zhao, Zhen-Rui; Sun, Bai-Nian

    2014-01-01

    Platycladus Spach is native to Central China, but its natural occurrences are very difficult to establish. According to molecular phylogenetic data, this genus might have originated since the Oligocene, but no fossil record has been reported. Here, we describe eight foliage branches from the upper Miocene in western Yunnan, Southwest China as a new species, P. yunnanensis sp. nov., which is characterized by foliage branches spread in flattened sprays, and leaves decussate, imbricate, scale-like and dimorphic. The leaves are amphistomatic, and the stomata are elliptical or oblong, haplocheilic, and monocyclic type. Based on a detailed comparison with the extant genera of Cupressaceae sensu lato, our fossils are classified into the genus Platycladus. The occurrence of P. yunnanensis sp. nov. indicates that this genus had a more southernly natural distribution in the late Miocene than at present. Molecular phylogeny and fossil records support a pre-Oligocene common ancestor for the genera Platycladus, Microbiota and Calocedrus. The separation of the three taxa was most likely caused by the arid belt across Central China during the Oligocene. In addition, the cooling down of the global temperature and the strengthening of Asian monsoon since the Miocene will further promote the migration of these genera. PMID:25517767

  2. First occurrence of Platycladus from the upper Miocene of Southwest China and its phytogeographic implications.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jing-Yu; Ding, Su-Ting; Li, Qi-Jia; Zhao, Zhen-Rui; Sun, Bai-Nian

    2014-01-01

    Platycladus Spach is native to Central China, but its natural occurrences are very difficult to establish. According to molecular phylogenetic data, this genus might have originated since the Oligocene, but no fossil record has been reported. Here, we describe eight foliage branches from the upper Miocene in western Yunnan, Southwest China as a new species, P. yunnanensis sp. nov., which is characterized by foliage branches spread in flattened sprays, and leaves decussate, imbricate, scale-like and dimorphic. The leaves are amphistomatic, and the stomata are elliptical or oblong, haplocheilic, and monocyclic type. Based on a detailed comparison with the extant genera of Cupressaceae sensu lato, our fossils are classified into the genus Platycladus. The occurrence of P. yunnanensis sp. nov. indicates that this genus had a more southernly natural distribution in the late Miocene than at present. Molecular phylogeny and fossil records support a pre-Oligocene common ancestor for the genera Platycladus, Microbiota and Calocedrus. The separation of the three taxa was most likely caused by the arid belt across Central China during the Oligocene. In addition, the cooling down of the global temperature and the strengthening of Asian monsoon since the Miocene will further promote the migration of these genera. PMID:25517767

  3. Molluscan fauna from the Miocene sediments of Kachchh, Gujarat, India — Part 3. Gastropods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, Kantimati G.; Kapoor, Satarupa Bhattacharjee; Borkar, Vidyadhar D.

    2010-06-01

    Systematic description of 25 gastropod species from the Khari Nadi Formation (Aquitanian) and Chhasra Formation (Burdigalian) from the Kachchh District, Gujarat, India is given. A checklist of 116 forms including those reported by earlier researchers, emending taxonomic identifications wherever necessary, is also provided. Vredenburg had referred these two formations together as ‘the Gaj Beds of Kachchh’. He noticed the affinity of molluscs among the Miocene deposits of Kachchh and Kathiawar regions of Gujarat, and Sind province of Pakistan. He also observed that molluscs from his ‘Lower Gaj’ and ‘Upper Gaj’ Formations showed relationship respectively with the Rembang (Aquitanian) and Njalindung (Burdigalian) series of the East Indies. Aquitanian and Burdigalian ages assigned by him were later substantiated by Raju on the basis of foraminifera. Present studies corroborated that the molluscan assemblage from the Miocene rocks of Kachchh is closely related to that from the Gaj Beds of Sind and the Ashapura Clay Member of Kathiawar; besides revealing that the fauna from these three formations taken together is essentially endemic. Discovery of certain species from the Quilon Beds in the Miocene of Kachchh evinces a close affinity between these two formations. The present fauna includes five extant forms, while 29 forms have related species in the Recent fauna.

  4. New magnetochronology of Late Miocene mammal fauna, NE Tibetan Plateau, China: Mammal migration and paleoenvironments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Hong; Zhang, Peng; Dekkers, Mark J.; Roberts, Andrew P.; An, Zhisheng; Li, Yongxiang; Lu, Fengyan; Lin, Shan; Li, Xingwen

    2016-01-01

    Lanzhou Basin lies on the northeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau in western China and is a rich source of Oligocene-Miocene mammalian fossils. Obtaining precise age determinations for these fossils is important to address key questions concerning mammalian and environmental evolution in Asia associated with stepwise Tibetan Plateau uplift. Here we report a new magnetostratigraphic record for the Xingjiawan fluvio-lacustrine section from the northwestern margin of Lanzhou Basin that can be correlated to the geomagnetic polarity timescale with two options. The Late Miocene Xingjiawan Fauna is located either at the boundary between reversed polarity chron C4r.1r and normal polarity chron C4n.2n or at the boundary between subchrons C5r.1r and C5n.2n, with an estimated age of at least ∼8 Ma or perhaps as early as ∼11 Ma. Both age estimations imply that the fossil Stegodon in the Lanzhou Basin is the oldest known record of Stegodon worldwide; it predates the formerly oldest Stegodon find from Africa by at least one million years and perhaps by as many as four million years. This provides new evidence for an Asian origin of Stegodon. Together with other faunal components, a mixed woodland/grassland setting existed in the Lanzhou Basin during the Late Miocene, in contrast to its modern arid environment.

  5. Fossil wood from the Miocene and Oligocene epoch: chemistry and morphology.

    PubMed

    Bardet, Michel; Pournou, Anastasia

    2015-01-01

    Fossil wood is the naturally preserved remain of the secondary xylem of plants that lived before the Holocene epoch. Typically, fossil wood is preserved as coalified or petrified and rarely as mummified tissue. The process of fossilization is very complex and it is still unknown why in the same fossil record, wood can be found in different fossilisation forms. In 2007, a fossil forest was found in the Bükkábrány open-pit coal mine in Hungary. The non-petrified forest is estimated to be 7 million years old (Miocene epoch) and its trees were found standing in an upright position. This fossil assemblage is exceptionally rare because wood has been preserved as soft waterlogged tissue. This study aimed to investigate this remarkable way of fossil wood preservation, by examining its chemistry with (13)C CPMAS NMR and its morphology with light and electron microscopy. For comparison reasons, a petrified wood trunk from the Oligocene epoch (30 Myr) found in 2001 at Porrentruy region in Switzerland and two fresh wood samples of the modern equivalents of the Miocene sample were also examined. The results obtained showed that the outstanding preservation state of the Miocene fossil is not owed to petrification or coalification. Mummification is a potential mechanism that could explain Bükkábrány trunks' condition, however this fossilisation process is not well studied and therefore this hypothesis needs to be further investigated. PMID:25294390

  6. Global warming and South Indian monsoon rainfall—lessons from the Mid-Miocene

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Markus; Kern, Andrea K.; Harzhauser, Mathias; Kroh, Andreas; Piller, Werner E.

    2013-01-01

    Precipitation over India is driven by the Indian monsoon. Although changes in this atmospheric circulation are caused by the differential seasonal diabatic heating of Asia and the Indo-Pacific Ocean, it is so far unknown how global warming influences the monsoon rainfalls regionally. Herein, we present a Miocene pollen flora as the first direct proxy for monsoon over southern India during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum. To identify climatic key parameters, such as mean annual temperature, warmest month temperature, coldest month temperature, mean annual precipitation, mean precipitation during the driest month, mean precipitation during the wettest month and mean precipitation during the warmest month the Coexistence Approach is applied. Irrespective of a ~ 3–4 °C higher global temperature during the Middle Miocene Climate Optimum, the results indicate a modern-like monsoonal precipitation pattern contrasting marine proxies which point to a strong decline of Indian monsoon in the Himalaya at this time. Therefore, the strength of monsoon rainfall in tropical India appears neither to be related to global warming nor to be linked with the atmospheric conditions over the Tibetan Plateau. For the future it implies that increased global warming does not necessarily entail changes in the South Indian monsoon rainfall. PMID:27087778

  7. Late Miocene sedimentary environments in south-western Amazonia (Solimões Formation; Brazil)

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E.; Ramos, Maria Ines; Douglas da Silva Paz, Jackson

    2011-01-01

    In Miocene times a vast wetland existed in Western Amazonia. Whereas the general development of this amazing ecosystem is well established, many questions remain open on sedimentary environments, stratigraphical correlations as well as its palaeogeographical configuration. Several outcrops located in a barely studied region around Eirunepé (SW Amazonas state, Brazil) were investigated to obtain basic sedimentological data. The observed deposits belong to the upper part of the Solimões Formation and are biostratigraphically dated to the Late Miocene. Vertically as well as laterally highly variable fine-grained clastic successions were recorded. Based on the lithofacies assemblages, these sediments represent fluvial deposits, possibly of an anastomosing river system. Sand bodies formed within active channels and dominant overbank fines are described (levees, crevasse splays/channels/deltas, abandoned channels, backswamps, floodplain paleosols). Lacustrine environments are restricted to local floodplain ponds/lakes. The mollusc and ostracod content as well as very light δ18O and δ13C values, measured on ostracod valves, refer to exclusively freshwater conditions. Based on palaeontological and geological results the existence of a long-lived lake (“Lake Pebas”) or any influx of marine waters can be excluded for that region during the Late Miocene. PMID:26523089

  8. Tectonic control on past circulation of the Mediterranean Sea: A model study of the Late Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meijer, P. Th.; Slingerland, R.; Wortel, M. J. R.

    2004-03-01

    We examine the effect of Late Miocene paleogeography on the circulation and water properties of the Mediterranean Sea by using an ocean circulation model. Results obtained for the past are compared to a control experiment with the present-day geometry. To focus on paleogeography, atmospheric forcing is always based on the present-day climatology. We seek insight that allows us to test ideas based on observations and to formulate new working hypotheses. The Late Miocene is examined first, since it represents an important stage in the evolution of the Mediterranean. The present-day model reproduces the main aspects of the surface to intermediate depth circulation and water properties. The model does not capture the deep circulation known to occur at present in both subbasins. When the subbasins are reconstructed to their Late Miocene shape (keeping intervening sills at present-day levels) the overall nature of the surface/intermediate depth circulation proves unaffected. The model, however, predicts intense deep circulation in the eastern Mediterranean, most likely due to the greater surface area of the reconstructed Adriatic Sea. Using the first paleoexperiment as a starting point several additional paleogeographical aspects are examined.

  9. Middle Miocene environmental and climatic evolution at the Wilkes Land margin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgi, Francesca; Bijl, Peter; Passchier, Sandra; Salzmann, Ulrich; Schouten, Stefan; Pross, Jörg; Escutia, Carlota; Brinkhuis, Henk

    2015-04-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 318 successfully drilled a Middle Miocene (~ 17 - 12.5 Ma) record from the Wilkes Land Margin at Site U1356A (63°18.6138'S, 135°59.9376'E), located at the transition between the continental rise and the abyssal plain at 4003 mbsl. We present a multiproxy palynological (dinoflagellate cyst, pollen and spores), sedimentological and organic geochemical (TEX86, MBT/CBT) study, which unravels the environmental and climate variability across the Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO, ~17-15 Ma) and the Mid Miocene Climate Transition (MMCT). Several independent lines of evidence suggest a relatively warm climate during the MCO. Dinocyst and pollen assemblage diversity at the MCO is unprecedented for a Neogene Antarctic record and indicates a temperate, sea ice-free marine environment, with woody sub-antarctic vegetation with elements of forest/shrub tundra and peat lands along the coast. These results are further confirmed by relatively warm TEX86-derived Sea Surface Temperatures and mild MBT-derived continental temperatures, and by the absence of glacially derived deposits and very few ice-rafted clasts. A generally colder but highly dynamic environment is suggested for the interval 15-12.5 Ma.

  10. Middle Miocene environmental and climatic evolution at the Wilkes Land margin, East Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangiorgi, F.; Passchier, S.; Salzmann, U.; Schouten, S.; Pross, J.; Bijl, P.; Tauxe, L.; Bendle, J. A.; Escutia, C.; Brinkhuis, H.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 318 successfully drilled a Middle Miocene (~ 17 - 12.5 Ma) record from the Wilkes Land Margin at Site U1356A (63°18.6138'S, 135°59.9376'E), located at the transition between the continental rise and the abyssal plain at 4003 mbsl. We present a multiproxy palynological (dinoflagellate cyst, pollen and spores), sedimentological and organic geochemical (TEX86, MBT/CBT) study, which unravels the environmental and climate variability across the Miocene Climatic Optimum (MCO, ~17-15 Ma) and the Mid Miocene Climate Transition (MMCT). Several independent lines of evidence indeed suggest a relatively warm climate during the MCO. Dinocyst and pollen assemblage diversity at the MCO is unprecedented for a Neogene Antarctic record and indicates a temperate, sea ice-free marine environment, with woody sub-antarctic vegetation with elements of forest/shrub tundra and peat lands along the coast. These results are further confirmed by relatively warm TEX86-derived Sea Surface Temperatures and mild MBT-derived continental temperatures, and by the absence of glacially derived deposits and very few ice-rafted clasts. A generally colder but highly dynamic environment is suggested for the interval 15-12.5 Ma.

  11. Marine biological productivity and carbon cycling during the Oligocene to Miocene climate transition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Billups, K.; Diester-Haass, L.; Emeis, K.

    2009-12-01

    The Oligocene to Miocene boundary marks one of the major Cenozoic cooling steps. A corresponding but slightly out of phase δ13C maximum has been attributed to increased organic matter burial associated with global climate cooling (e.g., Zachos et al., 2001). To test this idea we have constructed records of marine biological productivity (based on benthic foraminiferal accumulation rates, BFAR) and sequestration of total organic carbon (TOC) in pelagic sediments to parallel the stable isotope records from 20-25 Ma. Here we present first results from Ceara Rise Site 926 located in the tropical northwestern Atlantic. Our data show that the δ18O/δ13C maximum that characterized the Oligocene/Miocene boundary is accompanied by a pronounced maximum in BFAR derived paleoproductivity. In addition, there are longer term variations in paleoproductivity that follow the well established eccentricity-scale variations in the δ18O and δ13C record. Cross-spectral analysis focusing on the Oligocene/Miocene boundary interval (22-24 Ma), for which we have an average sampling resolution of about 10 kyr, verifies that paleoproductivity is coherent with the stable isotope records above the 80% level. These results support the hypothesis that there is a relationship between global climate cooling and the carbon cycle via marine primary productivity.

  12. Late Miocene sedimentary environments in south-western Amazonia (Solimões Formation; Brazil)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gross, Martin; Piller, Werner E.; Ramos, Maria Ines; Douglas da Silva Paz, Jackson

    2011-08-01

    In Miocene times a vast wetland existed in Western Amazonia. Whereas the general development of this amazing ecosystem is well established, many questions remain open on sedimentary environments, stratigraphical correlations as well as its palaeogeographical configuration. Several outcrops located in a barely studied region around Eirunepé (SW Amazonas state, Brazil) were investigated to obtain basic sedimentological data. The observed deposits belong to the upper part of the Solimões Formation and are biostratigraphically dated to the Late Miocene. Vertically as well as laterally highly variable fine-grained clastic successions were recorded. Based on the lithofacies assemblages, these sediments represent fluvial deposits, possibly of an anastomosing river system. Sand bodies formed within active channels and dominant overbank fines are described (levees, crevasse splays/channels/deltas, abandoned channels, backswamps, floodplain paleosols). Lacustrine environments are restricted to local floodplain ponds/lakes. The mollusc and ostracod content as well as very light δ18O and δ13C values, measured on ostracod valves, refer to exclusively freshwater conditions. Based on palaeontological and geological results the existence of a long-lived lake (“Lake Pebas”) or any influx of marine waters can be excluded for that region during the Late Miocene.

  13. Mantle-induced subsidence and compression in SE Asia since the early Miocene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ting; Gurnis, Michael; Zahirovic, Sabin

    2016-03-01

    Rift basins developed extensively across Sundaland, the continental core of Southeast Asia, since the Eocene. Beginning in the early Miocene, basins in southern Sundaland experienced widespread synchronous compression (inversion) and marine inundation, despite a large drop in long-term global sea level. The mechanism for this large-scale synchronous regional sea level rise, basin inversion, and subsidence is not well understood and contrary to expectations from traditional basin models and eustatic sea level trends. We present geodynamic models of mantle convection with both deformable and rigid plate reconstructions to investigate this enigma. Models suggest that a slab stagnates within the transition zone beneath Southeast Asia before the Miocene. The stagnant slab penetrated through the 660 km mantle discontinuity during the early Miocene and formed a slab avalanche event, due to continuous subduction and accumulation of negatively buoyant slabs. This avalanche may have induced large-scale marine inundation, regional compression, and basin inversion across southern Sundaland. We argue mantle convection induced large-scale basin compression, in contrast to conventional plate margin-induced compression; this suggests mantle convection may exert a much stronger control on surface processes than previously recognized.

  14. Thermochronologic constraints on the Miocene slip history of the South Tibetan detachment system in the Everest region, central Himalaya

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, M.; Hodges, K. V.; Van Soest, M. C.; Wartho, J. A.

    2014-12-01

    North-dipping, low-angle normal faults of the South Tibetan detachment system (STDS) can be traced for a distance of more than 2000 km along strike and represent an important tectonic characteristic of the Miocene Himalayan-Tibetan orogenic system. Nowhere is the STDS better exposed than the N-S-trending Rongbuk Valley in southern Tibet, where it can be traced down dip from the summit of Everest for a distance of over 30 km before disappearing beneath the valley floor. This places a minimum constraint on Miocene displacement on the feature in this area, but some research groups have suggested ~200 km of displacement based on the difference in metamorphic pressures across the STDS and the very low (< 15˚) primary dip of the structure. We are exploring this issue further using developing (U-Th)/He and 40Ar/39Ar datasets from deformed footwall sillimanite gneisses and leucogranites. Data obtained thus far indicate relatively rapid cooling of the footwall after the intrusion of deformed leucogranites at ca. 16.7 Ma to muscovite 40Ar/39Ar closure temperatures (ca. 15.5-14.2 Ma) and zircon (U-Th)/He closure temperatures (ca. 14.5-11 Ma). We attribute this cooling to tectonic denudation related to ca. 16 Ma STDS slip. Although the (U-Th)/He systematics of apatites from these rocks is complex, our current interpretation of available data places cooling through the ca. 75˚C closure isotherm at ca. 8-9 Ma, which would suggest a significant reduction in cooling rate that is observed in our inverse model runs of the 1D program, HeFTy. Ongoing analyses of footwall samples from ~8 km to the north of our Rongbuk sample localities in the Ra Chu river valley will greatly strengthen our datasets. With the Ra Chu analyses, our datasets will constrain the cooling history of the footwall for more than 20 km perpendicular to the strike of the detachment. Our presentation will also incorporate results from the program Pecube that will contribute to our calculation of the slip rate by specifying the appropriate exhumation rate.

  15. Magnetostratigraphy and tectonic rotation of Middle-Late Miocene deposits from the north-central Transverse Ranges, California

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, E.L. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-04-01

    Luyendyk and others (1980) found that most of the crustal blocks in the Transverse Ranges of souther California had undergone approximately 90[degree] clockwise rotation since the early Miocene. The authors sampled three sequences of middle-late Miocene rocks in different parts of the Transverse Ranges. The Tejon Hills, south of Arvin in the southern San Joaquin Valley, are the type area of the Cerrotejonian land mammal subage' and span the early and late Clarendonian (about 12.5--10.5 Ma). They sampled 200 m of marine Santa Margarita Fm. and the overlying fluvial Chanac Fm., which appeared to span Chrons C5AN-C5N, based on correlation with the magnetostratigraphy and mammals of the Clarendonian Ricardo Group. No tectonic rotation was found, consistent with other studies which showed that the blocks north of the Garlock and San Andreas faults have not moved in the late Cenozoic. They also samples the Hemingfordian-Hemphillian (18--5 Ma) Caliente Formation in the Dry Canyon area in the Cuyama Badlands, located on a crustal block between the Big Pine and the San Andreas faults. These beds show a progressive clockwise rotation from about 40[+-]30 in the late Hemingfordian-Barstovian (18--12 Ma) to about 35[+-]43[degree] in the Clarendonian (between 10--8 Ma) to 24[+-]6 in the Hemphillian (7--5 Ma). These data are in good agreement with other studies of the Transverse Ranges. Finally, they sampled the Santa Margarita Formation in Chorro Grande Canyon in the Sespe Creek drainage, located on the block between the Pine Mountain fault and the Munson Creek fault. This sequence was entirely of reversed polarity (probably Chron C5R, based on correlation with the Santa Margarita Fm. in the Tejon Hills) and showed a counterclockwise rotation of about 97[+-]52[degree]. This does not match any previously published results, but is consistent with the counterclockwise rotation of the middle Eocene Sespe Fm. at Hartman Ranch, on the same fault block.

  16. Reflections on the Hawthorne Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrett, Frank

    2006-01-01

    When researchers carry out an experiment, they do so in a systematic and regulated manner, attempting to note all of the circumstances and outcomes very carefully, so that they can come to some firm conclusions about causes and effects. Sometimes, however, unaccountable outcomes do occur. Researchers are clearly very interested in such events and…

  17. Reflections on the Hawthorne Effect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Merrett, Frank

    2006-01-01

    When researchers carry out an experiment, they do so in a systematic and regulated manner, attempting to note all of the circumstances and outcomes very carefully, so that they can come to some firm conclusions about causes and effects. Sometimes, however, unaccountable outcomes do occur. Researchers are clearly very interested in such events and

  18. A multi-gene dataset reveals a tropical New World origin and Early Miocene diversification of croakers (Perciformes: Sciaenidae).

    PubMed

    Lo, Pei-Chun; Liu, Shu-Hui; Chao, Ning Labbish; Nunoo, Francis K E; Mok, Hin-Kiu; Chen, Wei-Jen

    2015-07-01

    Widely distributed groups of living animals, such as the predominantly marine fish family Sciaenidae, have always attracted the attention of biogeographers to document the origins and patterns of diversification in time and space. In this study, the historical biogeography of the global Sciaenidae is reconstructed within a molecular phylogenetic framework to investigate their origin and to test the hypotheses explaining the present-day biogeographic patterns. Our data matrix comprises six mitochondrial and nuclear genes in 93 globally sampled sciaenid species from 52 genera. Within the inferred phylogenetic tree of the Sciaenidae, we identify 15 main and well-supported lineages; some of which have not been recognized previously. Reconstruction of habitat preferences shows repeated habitat transitions between marine and euryhaline environments. This implies that sciaenids can easily adapt to some variations in salinity, possibly as the consequence of their nearshore habitats and migratory life history. Conversely, complete marine/euryhaline to freshwater transitions occurred only three times, in South America, North America and South Asia. Ancestral range reconstruction analysis concomitant with fossil evidence indicates that sciaenids first originated and diversified in the tropical America during the Oligocene to Early Miocene before undergoing two range expansions, to Eastern Atlantic and to the Indo-West Pacific where a maximum species richness is observed. The uncommon biogeographic pattern identified is discussed in relation to current knowledge on origin of gradients of marine biodiversity toward the center of origin hypothesis in the Indo-West Pacific. PMID:25848970

  19. Chewing through the Miocene: an examination of the feeding musculature in the ground sloth Hapalops from South America (Mammalia: Pilosa)

    PubMed Central

    Naples, Virginia L.; McAfee, Robert K.

    2014-01-01

    Hapalops, a smaller-sized and early sloth of the Megatheroidea, appeared in the middle Miocene Santa Cruz formation of Argentina. This genus is part of the group from which later, larger megatheroids arose, i.e., Nothrotheriops and Megatherium. Many cranial characters support this idea; however Hapalops is not merely a smaller antecedent of the later forms. Specifically, Hapalops retains short anterior caniniform teeth, and a temporomandibular joint elevated above the cheek tooth row; a combination distinct among sloths. An elevated temporomandibular joint occurs in Bradypus, a tree sloth with anterior chisel-shaped teeth instead of caniniforms, and the tree sloth Choloepus, which is aligned with the megalonychids, has anterior caniniforms. Hapalops has an elongated zygomatic ascending process that is reminiscent of that in Bradypus; however, the Bradypus skull is extremely foreshortened while that of Hapalops is elongated, as in nothrotheres, but not deepened as in megatheres. Previous work identified many sloth cranial character complexes, and functional limitations on skull feature combinations. The unique Hapalops character patterns indicate a selective feeder with a mediolaterally oriented grinding stroke during mastication. PMID:25075299

  20. From Problem Taxa to Problem Solver: A New Miocene Family, Tranatocetidae, Brings Perspective on Baleen Whale Evolution

    PubMed Central

    Gol’din, Pavel; Steeman, Mette Elstrup

    2015-01-01

    Miocene baleen whales were highly diverse and included tens of genera. However, their taxonomy and phylogeny, as well as relationships with living whales, are still a subject of controversy. Here, “Mesocetus” argillarius, a poorly known specimen from Denmark, is redescribed with a focus on the cranial anatomy. It was found to represent not only a new genus, Tranatocetus gen. nov., but also a new family; Tranatocetidae. The whales of this family have the rostral bones either overriding or dividing the frontals; the rostral bones are contacting the parietals and nasals dividing the maxillae on the vertex; the occipital shield is dorsoventrally bent. The tympanic bulla is particularly characteristic of this family featuring a short, narrow anterior portion with a rounded or squared anterior end and a wider and higher posterior portion that is swollen in the posteroventral area. A phylogenetic analysis including 51 taxa supports a monophyletic group comprising most Neogene and modern whales, with Tranatocetidae being possibly closer related to Balaenopteridae (rorquals) than to Cetotheriidae. Tranatocetidae exhibit a charahteristic bulla shape. In fact, all Neogene and modern mysticete families examined have a unique shape of the tympanic bulla that is diagnostic at family-level. Inclusion of problematic taxa like Tranatocetus argillarius in phylogenies brings new understanding of the distribution and diagnostic value of character traits. This underlines the need for re-examination of earlier described specimens in the light of the wealth of new information published in later years. PMID:26331471

  1. From Problem Taxa to Problem Solver: A New Miocene Family, Tranatocetidae, Brings Perspective on Baleen Whale Evolution.

    PubMed

    Gol'din, Pavel; Steeman, Mette Elstrup

    2015-01-01

    Miocene baleen whales were highly diverse and included tens of genera. However, their taxonomy and phylogeny, as well as relationships with living whales, are still a subject of controversy. Here, "Mesocetus" argillarius, a poorly known specimen from Denmark, is redescribed with a focus on the cranial anatomy. It was found to represent not only a new genus, Tranatocetus gen. nov., but also a new family; Tranatocetidae. The whales of this family have the rostral bones either overriding or dividing the frontals; the rostral bones are contacting the parietals and nasals dividing the maxillae on the vertex; the occipital shield is dorsoventrally bent. The tympanic bulla is particularly characteristic of this family featuring a short, narrow anterior portion with a rounded or squared anterior end and a wider and higher posterior portion that is swollen in the posteroventral area. A phylogenetic analysis including 51 taxa supports a monophyletic group comprising most Neogene and modern whales, with Tranatocetidae being possibly closer related to Balaenopteridae (rorquals) than to Cetotheriidae. Tranatocetidae exhibit a charahteristic bulla shape. In fact, all Neogene and modern mysticete families examined have a unique shape of the tympanic bulla that is diagnostic at family-level. Inclusion of problematic taxa like Tranatocetus argillarius in phylogenies brings new understanding of the distribution and diagnostic value of character traits. This underlines the need for re-examination of earlier described specimens in the light of the wealth of new information published in later years. PMID:26331471

  2. Multivariate statistical analyses of palynodebris from the Middle Miocene of the Niger Delta and their environmental significance

    SciTech Connect

    Oboh, F.E. )

    1992-12-01

    Fourteen types of palynodebris have been identified in Middle Miocene reservoir sediments from the Niger Delta. They include palynomorphs, cuticle, parenchyma, resins, black debris, woody fragments and degraded components. The palynodebris types were interpreted by Principal Components Analysis and Average Linkage Cluster Analysis. Four assemblages of samples emerged and they have been grouped into two palynofacies associations, A/C and B/D, because of their correlation with mudstone and muddy heterolithic lithofacies and sandstone lithofacies, respectively. The significant palynodebris components are black debris, parenchyma, resins and amorphous organic matter. The size, shape and texture of all the components were integrated with sedimentological features, palynomorph and foraminiferal assemblages to recognize seven, possibly eight, deltaic sub-environments of deposition in the reservoir. Mudstones and muddy heteroliths from low energy depositional environments are characterized by small-sized, lath-shaped woody debris, and high concentration of buoyant components such as palynomorphs, cuticles and degraded bundles. The sandstones contain larger and more equidimensional woody fragments. These sediments are also richer in black debris which are believed to be a function of exposure to oxidizing conditions for a longer period of time. Parenchyma and resins, though rare, are characteristic of distributary channel-fill sandstones. 59 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  3. Chewing through the Miocene: an examination of the feeding musculature in the ground sloth Hapalops from South America (Mammalia: Pilosa).

    PubMed

    Naples, Virginia L; McAfee, Robert K

    2014-01-01

    Hapalops, a smaller-sized and early sloth of the Megatheroidea, appeared in the middle Miocene Santa Cruz formation of Argentina. This genus is part of the group from which later, larger megatheroids arose, i.e., Nothrotheriops and Megatherium. Many cranial characters support this idea; however Hapalops is not merely a smaller antecedent of the later forms. Specifically, Hapalops retains short anterior caniniform teeth, and a temporomandibular joint elevated above the cheek tooth row; a combination distinct among sloths. An elevated temporomandibular joint occurs in Bradypus, a tree sloth with anterior chisel-shaped teeth instead of caniniforms, and the tree sloth Choloepus, which is aligned with the megalonychids, has anterior caniniforms. Hapalops has an elongated zygomatic ascending process that is reminiscent of that in Bradypus; however, the Bradypus skull is extremely foreshortened while that of Hapalops is elongated, as in nothrotheres, but not deepened as in megatheres. Previous work identified many sloth cranial character complexes, and functional limitations on skull feature combinations. The unique Hapalops character patterns indicate a selective feeder with a mediolaterally oriented grinding stroke during mastication. PMID:25075299

  4. Early evidence for complex social structure in Proboscidea from a late Miocene trackway site in the United Arab Emirates

    PubMed Central

    Bibi, Faysal; Kraatz, Brian; Craig, Nathan; Beech, Mark; Schuster, Mathieu; Hill, Andrew

    2012-01-01

    Many living vertebrates exhibit complex social structures, evidence for the antiquity of which is limited to rare and exceptional fossil finds. Living elephants possess a characteristic social structure that is sex-segregated and multi-tiered, centred around a matriarchal family and solitary or loosely associated groups of adult males. Although the fossil record of Proboscidea is extensive, the origin and evolution of social structure in this clade is virtually unknown. Here, we present imagery and analyses of an extensive late Miocene fossil trackway site from the United Arab Emirates. The site of Mleisa 1 preserves exceptionally long trackways of a herd of at least 13 individuals of varying size transected by that of a single large individual, indicating the presence of both herding and solitary social modes. Trackway stride lengths and resulting body mass estimates indicate that the solitary individual was also the largest and therefore most likely a male. Sexual determination for the herd is equivocal, but the body size profile and number of individuals are commensurate with those of a modern elephant family unit. The Mleisa 1 trackways provide direct evidence for the antiquity of characteristic and complex social structure in Proboscidea. PMID:22357934

  5. Early evidence for complex social structure in Proboscidea from a late Miocene trackway site in the United Arab Emirates.

    PubMed

    Bibi, Faysal; Kraatz, Brian; Craig, Nathan; Beech, Mark; Schuster, Mathieu; Hill, Andrew

    2012-08-23

    Many living vertebrates exhibit complex social structures, evidence for the antiquity of which is limited to rare and exceptional fossil finds. Living elephants possess a characteristic social s