Science.gov

Sample records for mission measurement synergy

  1. Mars 2001 Lander Mission: Measurement Synergy Through Coordinated Operations Planning and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R.

    1999-01-01

    exposed at the site, together with quantitative information on material mineralogy, chemistry, and physical properties (rock textures; soil grain size and shape distributions; degree and nature of soil induration; soil magnetic properties). Observations from the APEX, MECA, and MIP Experiments, including use of the robotic arm robotic arm camera (RAC) and the Marie Curie rover, will be used to address these parameters in a synergistic way. Further, calibration targets on APEX will provide radiometric and mineralogical control surfaces, and magnet targets will allow observations of magnetic phases. Patch plates on MECA will be imaged to determine adhesive and abrasive properties of soils. Coordinated mission planning is crucial for optimizing the measurement synergy among the packages included on the lander. This planning has already begun through generation of multi-sol detailed operations activities.

  2. Mars 2001 Lander Mission: Measurement Synergy Through Coordinated Operations Planning And Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Kaplan, D.; Marshall, J.; Mishkin, A.; Saunders, S.; Smith, P.; Squyres, S.

    1999-01-01

    , together with quantitative information on material mineralogy, chemistry, and physical properties (rock textures; soil grain size and shape distributions; degree and nature of soil induration; soil magnetic properties). The calibration targets provide radiometric and mineralogical control surfaces. The magnets allow observations of magnetic phases. Patch plates are imaged to determine adhesive and abrasive properties of soils. Coordinated mission planning is crucial for optimizing the measurement synergy among the packages included on the lander. This planning has already begun through generation of multi-sol detailed operations activities. One focus has been to develop a scenario to use the arm to dig a soil trench to a depth of tens of centimeters. The activity will be monitored through use of Pancam and RAC to ensure nominal operations and to acquire data to determine subsurface physical properties (e.g., angle of repose of trench walls). Pancam and Mini-TES observations would also provide constraints on mineralogy and texture for the walls and bottom of the trench during excavation. If desired, soils excavated at depth could be deposited on the surface and Mossbauer and APXS measurements could be acquired for these materials. Soil samples from various depths would be delivered to MECA for characterization of aqueous geochemistry and physical properties of soil grains, particularly size, shape, and hardness. These physical properties would be determined by optical and atomic force microscopy. When completed, detailed information of soil properties as a function of depth would be obtained. These various data sets would constrain our understanding of whether or not there are systematic variations in soil characteristics as a function of depth. These variations might be related, for example, to evaporative moisture losses and formation of salt deposits, thereby indicating water transport processes occurred fairly recently. Many other value-added measurement scenarios are

  3. Mars 2001 Lander Mission: Measurement Synergy Through Coordinated Operations Planning And Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Kaplan, D.; Marshall, J.; Mishkin, A.; Saunders, S.; Smith, P.; Squyres, S.

    1999-01-01

    , together with quantitative information on material mineralogy, chemistry, and physical properties (rock textures; soil grain size and shape distributions; degree and nature of soil induration; soil magnetic properties). The calibration targets provide radiometric and mineralogical control surfaces. The magnets allow observations of magnetic phases. Patch plates are imaged to determine adhesive and abrasive properties of soils. Coordinated mission planning is crucial for optimizing the measurement synergy among the packages included on the lander. This planning has already begun through generation of multi-sol detailed operations activities. One focus has been to develop a scenario to use the arm to dig a soil trench to a depth of tens of centimeters. The activity will be monitored through use of Pancam and RAC to ensure nominal operations and to acquire data to determine subsurface physical properties (e.g., angle of repose of trench walls). Pancam and Mini-TES observations would also provide constraints on mineralogy and texture for the walls and bottom of the trench during excavation. If desired, soils excavated at depth could be deposited on the surface and Mossbauer and APXS measurements could be acquired for these materials. Soil samples from various depths would be delivered to MECA for characterization of aqueous geochemistry and physical properties of soil grains, particularly size, shape, and hardness. These physical properties would be determined by optical and atomic force microscopy. When completed, detailed information of soil properties as a function of depth would be obtained. These various data sets would constrain our understanding of whether or not there are systematic variations in soil characteristics as a function of depth. These variations might be related, for example, to evaporative moisture losses and formation of salt deposits, thereby indicating water transport processes occurred fairly recently. Many other value-added measurement scenarios are

  4. Mars 2001 Lander Mission: Measurement Synergy Through Coordinated Operations Planning And Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Kaplan, D.; Marshall, J.; Mishkin, A.; Saunders, S.; Smith, P.; Squyres, S.

    1999-09-01

    , together with quantitative information on material mineralogy, chemistry, and physical properties (rock textures; soil grain size and shape distributions; degree and nature of soil induration; soil magnetic properties). The calibration targets provide radiometric and mineralogical control surfaces. The magnets allow observations of magnetic phases. Patch plates are imaged to determine adhesive and abrasive properties of soils. Coordinated mission planning is crucial for optimizing the measurement synergy among the packages included on the lander. This planning has already begun through generation of multi-sol detailed operations activities. One focus has been to develop a scenario to use the arm to dig a soil trench to a depth of tens of centimeters. The activity will be monitored through use of Pancam and RAC to ensure nominal operations and to acquire data to determine subsurface physical properties (e.g., angle of repose of trench walls). Pancam and Mini-TES observations would also provide constraints on mineralogy and texture for the walls and bottom of the trench during excavation. If desired, soils excavated at depth could be deposited on the surface and Mossbauer and APXS measurements could be acquired for these materials. Soil samples from various depths would be delivered to MECA for characterization of aqueous geochemistry and physical properties of soil grains, particularly size, shape, and hardness. These physical properties would be determined by optical and atomic force microscopy. When completed, detailed information of soil properties as a function of depth would be obtained. These various data sets would constrain our understanding of whether or not there are systematic variations in soil characteristics as a function of depth. These variations might be related, for example, to evaporative moisture losses and formation of salt deposits, thereby indicating water transport processes occurred fairly recently. Many other value-added measurement scenarios are

  5. Mars 2001 Lander Mission: Measurement Synergy through Coordinated Operations Planning and Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R.; Bell, J. F., III; Kaplan, D.; Marshall, J.; Mishkin, A.; Saunders, S.; Smith, P.; Squyres, S.

    1999-03-01

    The Science Operations Working Group, Mars 2001 Mission, has developed coordinated plans for scientific observations that treat the instruments as an integrated payload. This approach ensures maximum return of scientific information.

  6. James Webb Space Telescope Synergy with Dark Energy Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gardner, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    As the successor to the Hubble Space Telescope (HST), the James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) will be a general-purpose observatory which will impact all areas of observational astronomy. Two future dark energy missions are being planned: Euclid in Europe and the Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) in the US. While JWST is designed to go very deep in the infrared, the dark energy missions will conduct wide-area surveys of a substantial fraction of the sky in the optical and near-infrared. Synergy between JWST and Euclid or WFIRST could proceed in several ways. (1) JWST will make contributions to dark energy science that will be complementary to the results from the wide-area surveys. These contributions could include a more precise measurement of the current value of the Hubble constant, and rest-frame near-infrared light curves for high-redshift type Ia supernovae. (2) JWST could directly contribute to the dark energy science of the wide-area missions by providing additional calibration, investigating anomalies in the dataset, or with complementary observations that are deeper over a smaller area. (3) JWST could make follow-up observations of Euclid or WFIRST discoveries of rare objects, such as high-redshift quasars, strong-lens systems, galaxy clusters and supernovae.

  7. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Tropical rainfall affects the lives and economics of a majority of the Earth's population. Tropical rain systems, such as hurricanes, typhoons, and monsoons, are crucial to sustaining the livelihoods of those living in the tropics. Excess rainfall can cause floods and great property and crop damage, whereas too little rainfall can cause drought and crop failure. The latent heat release during the process of precipitation is a major source of energy that drives the atmospheric circulation. This latent heat can intensify weather systems, affecting weather thousands of kilometers away, thus making tropical rainfall an important indicator of atmospheric circulation and short-term climate change. Tropical forests and the underlying soils are major sources of many of the atmosphere's trace constituents. Together, the forests and the atmosphere act as a water-energy regulating system. Most of the rainfall is returned to the atmosphere through evaporation and transpiration, and the atmospheric trace constituents take part in the recycling process. Hence, the hydrological cycle provides a direct link between tropical rainfall and the global cycles of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur, all important trace materials for the Earth's system. Because rainfall is such an important component in the interactions between the ocean, atmosphere, land, and the biosphere, accurate measurements of rainfall are crucial to understanding the workings of the Earth-atmosphere system. The large spatial and temporal variability of rainfall systems, however, poses a major challenge to estimating global rainfall. So far, there has been a lack of rain gauge networks, especially over the oceans, which points to satellite measurement as the only means by which global observation of rainfall can be made. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of

  8. A synergy of values. Catholic healthcare leaders must implement their organization's mission and model its values.

    PubMed

    Clifton, R M; McEnroe, J J

    1994-06-01

    Catholic organizations need to select, develop, and retain healthcare leaders who dedicate themselves to carrying on the Church's healing ministry and the work begun by those who have preceded them. Persons entrusted to carry on Jesus' healing mission perform their duties out of a sense of commitment to the ministry and a love for the persons with whom they work and whom they serve. They recognize a synergy between their own values and the values of the healthcare organizations they lead. Dedication to leadership in Catholic healthcare can be viewed from three perspectives: the Bible and selected documents of the Catholic Church; the transfer of responsibility for Catholic healthcare from religious congregations to evolving forms of sponsorship; and the implications for the selection, development, and retention of healthcare leaders, both lay and religious. Servant-leadership is an integral part of the religious tradition that underlies Catholic healthcare. As cooperation increases between healthcare providers, third-party payers, employers, and other healthcare agents. Catholic healthcare organizations are challenged to reassert a mission and values that will enable healthcare in the United States to be delivered both compassionately and competently. PMID:10134188

  9. A Methodology to Measure Synergy Among Energy-Efficiency Programs at the Program Participant Level

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, B.E.

    2003-11-14

    This paper presents a methodology designed to measure synergy among energy-efficiency programs at the program participant level (e.g., households, firms). Three different definitions of synergy are provided: strong, moderate, and weak. Data to measure synergy can be collected through simple survey questions. Straightforward mathematical techniques can be used to estimate the three types of synergy and explore relative synergistic impacts of different subsets of programs. Empirical research is needed to test the concepts and methods and to establish quantitative expectations about synergistic relationships among programs. The market for new energy-efficient motors is the context used to illustrate all the concepts and methods in this paper.

  10. Ground-based and spacecraft-based data sets: examples of synergy from recent missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buratti, Bonnie; Hicks, Michael; Bauer, James

    2015-08-01

    Missions to small bodies have returned a wealth of observations at high spatial resolution and new wavelengths. Nevertheless, spacecraft data is often deficient in many ways, lacking in temporal coverage, specific viewing geometries, context, spectral range, and calibrations. Several recent examples illustrate how modest ground-based “support” measurements for missions to small bodies have substantially enhanced the results from these missions. Triton, Neptune’s giant moon, was observed by Voyager 2 in 1989: high resolution images showed a sublimating polar cap and explosive plumes of volatiles. This instant in time was placed into context by subsequent ground-based and HST observations of the moon that showed continued volatile transport. Similarly, decades of ground-based observations leading up to the New Horizons fast flyby of Pluto monitored long-term changes in frosts on the dwarf planet’s surface. Another example of synergistic measurements for small-body missions is that of complementary solar phase angle coverage. Space-based missions seldom have small phase angle measurements; similarly, ground-based measurements are often lacking at large solar phase angles (except of course for NEOs). This complementary phase angle coverage enables accurate photometric modeling, including determination of the bolometric Bond albedo, which is a key parameter for thermal modeling. Another key use of ground-based observations is to check and refine spacecraft calibrations, at least at wavelengths that are visible from Earth. In some cases, complete calibration sets are provided by Earth-based observing programs, such as that of ROLO (RObotic Lunar Observatory) for the Moon. Finally, context and the “big picture” in both time and space are provided by telescopic views of spacecraft targets before, during, and after mission durations or critical events.The astronomical community should continue to support, and participate in, teams that make synergistic

  11. Synergies of the European Microwave Remote Sensing Missions SMOS and ASCAT for Monitoring Soil Moisture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scipal, K.; Wagner, W.

    2003-04-01

    The lack of global soil moisture observations is one of the most glaring and pressing deficiencies in current research activities of related fields, from climate monitoring and ecological applications to the quantification of biogeophysical fluxes. This has implications for important issues of the international political agenda like managing global water resources, securing food production and studying climate change. Currently it is held that only microwave remote sensing offers the potential to produce reliable global scale soil moisture information economically. Recognising the urgent need for a soil moisture mission several international initiatives are planning satellite missions dedicated to monitor the global hydrological cycle among them two European microwave satellites. ESA is planning to launch the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity Mission SMOS, in 2006. SMOS will measure soil moisture over land and ocean salinity over the oceans. The mission rests on a passive microwave sensor (radiometer) operated in L-band which is currently believed to hold the largest potential for soil moisture retrieval. One year before (2005) EUMETSAT will launch the Meteorological Operational satellite METOP which carries the active microwave system Advanced Scatterometer ASCAT on board. ASCAT has been designed to retrieve winds over the oceans but recent research has established its capability to retrieve soil moisture. Although currently it is hold that, using active microwave techniques, the effect of surface roughness dominates that of soil moisture (while the converse is true for radiometers), the ERS scatterometer was successfully used to derive global soil moisture information at a spatial resolution of 50 km with weekly to decadal temporal resolution. The quality of the soil moisture products have been assessed by independent experts in several pilot projects funded by the European Space Agency. There is evidence to believe that both missions will provide a flow of

  12. Creating synergy between ground and space-based precipitation measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gourley, J. J.; Hong, Y.; Petersen, W. A.; Howard, K.; Flamig, Z.; Wen, Y.

    2010-12-01

    As the successor of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite launched in 1997, the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, to be launched in 2013, will provide next-generation global precipitation estimates from space within a unified framework. On the ground, several countries worldwide are in the throes of expanding their weather radar networks with gap-filling radars and upgrading them to include polarimetric capabilities. While significant improvements in precipitation estimation capabilities have been realized from space- and ground-based platforms separately, little effort has been focused on aligning these communities for synergistic, joint development of algorithms. In this study, we demonstrate the integration of real-time rainfall products from the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) into the National Severe Storms Laboratory’s (NSSL) National Mosaic and QPE (NMQ/Q2; http://nmq.ou.edu) system. The NMQ system enables a CONUS-wide comparison of TRMM products to NEXRAD-based Q2 rainfall products. Moreover, NMQ’s ground validation software ingests and quality controls data from all automatic-reporting rain gauge networks throughout the US and provides robust graphical and statistical validation tools, accessible by anyone with internet access. This system will readily incorporate future products from GPM as well as those from the dual-polarization upgrade to the NEXRAD network. While initial efforts are on the intercomparison of rainfall products, we envision this system will ultimately promote the development of precipitation algorithms that capitalize on the strengths of spatiotemporal and error characteristics of space and ground remote-sensing data. An example algorithm is presented where the vertical structure of precipitating systems over complex terrain is more completely resolved using combined information from NMQ and TRMM precipitation radar (PR), leading to more accurate surface rainfall estimates.

  13. Measure and exploitation of multisensor and multiwavelength synergy for remote sensing: 2. Application to the retrieval of atmospheric temperature and water vapor from MetOp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aires, Filipe; Paul, Maxime; Prigent, Catherine; Rommen, BjöRn; Bouvet, Marc

    2011-01-01

    In the companion paper, classical information content (IC) analysis was used to measure the potential synergy between the microwave (MW) and infrared (IR) observations from Atmospheric Microwave Sounding Unit-A, Microwave Humidity Sounder, and Improved Atmospheric Sounding in the Infrared instruments, used to retrieve the atmospheric profiles of temperature and water vapor over ocean, under clear-sky conditions. Some limitations of IC were pointed out that questioned the reliability of this technique for synergy characterization. The goal of this second paper is to develop a methodology to measure realistic potential synergies and to construct retrieval methods able to exploit them. Three retrieval methods are considered: the k nearest neighbors, the linear regression, and the neural networks (NN). These statistical retrieval schemes are tested on an application involving IR and MW synergy. Only clear-sky, near-nadir radiances over ocean are considered. The IR/MW synergy is expected to be stronger in cloudy cases, but it will be shown that it can also be observed in clear situations. The inversion algorithms are calibrated and tested with simulated observations, without any loss of generality, using similar theoretical assumption (same radiative transfer model, observational noise, and a priori information) in order to truly compare the IC and the direct statistical retrieval approaches. Multivariate and nonlinear methods such as the NN approach show that there is a strong potential for synergy. Synergy measurement tools such as the method proposed in this study should be considered in the future for the definition of new missions: The instrument characteristics should be determined not independently, sensor by sensor, but taking into account all the instruments together as a whole observing system.

  14. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2014-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission's Core satellite, scheduled for launch at the end of February 2014, is well designed estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)'s highly successful rain-sensing package [3]. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements will place greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM Core Observatory was developed and tested at NASA

  15. Study of atmospheric parameters measurements using MM-wave radar in synergy with LITE-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine Y.

    1994-01-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment, (LITE), has been developed, designed, and built by NASA Langley Research Center, to be flown on the space shuttle 'Discovery' on September 9, 1994. Lidar, which stands for light detecting and ranging, is a radar system that uses short pulses of laser light instead of radio waves in the case of the common radar. This space-based lidar offers atmospheric measurements of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosols, the planetary boundary layer, cloud top heights, and atmospheric temperature and density in the 10-40 km altitude range. A study is being done on the use, advantages, and limitations of a millimeterwave radar to be utilized in synergy with the Lidar system, for the LITE-2 experiment to be flown on a future space shuttle mission. The lower atmospheric attenuation, compared to infrared and optical frequencies, permits the millimeter-wave signals to penetrate through the clouds and measure multi-layered clouds, cloud thickness, and cloud-base height. These measurements would provide a useful input to radiation computations used in the operational numerical weather prediction models, and for forecasting. High power levels, optimum modulation, data processing, and high antenna gain are used to increase the operating range, while space environment, radar tradeoffs, and power availability are considered. Preliminary, numerical calculations are made, using the specifications of an experimental system constructed at Georgia Tech. The noncoherent 94 GHz millimeter-wave radar system has a pulsed output with peak value of 1 kW. The backscatter cross section of the particles to be measured, that are present in the volume covered by the beam footprint, is also studied.

  16. Study of atmospheric parameters measurements using MM-wave radar in synergy with LITE-2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrawis, Madeleine Y.

    1994-12-01

    The Lidar In-Space Technology Experiment, (LITE), has been developed, designed, and built by NASA Langley Research Center, to be flown on the space shuttle 'Discovery' on September 9, 1994. Lidar, which stands for light detecting and ranging, is a radar system that uses short pulses of laser light instead of radio waves in the case of the common radar. This space-based lidar offers atmospheric measurements of stratospheric and tropospheric aerosols, the planetary boundary layer, cloud top heights, and atmospheric temperature and density in the 10-40 km altitude range. A study is being done on the use, advantages, and limitations of a millimeterwave radar to be utilized in synergy with the Lidar system, for the LITE-2 experiment to be flown on a future space shuttle mission. The lower atmospheric attenuation, compared to infrared and optical frequencies, permits the millimeter-wave signals to penetrate through the clouds and measure multi-layered clouds, cloud thickness, and cloud-base height. These measurements would provide a useful input to radiation computations used in the operational numerical weather prediction models, and for forecasting. High power levels, optimum modulation, data processing, and high antenna gain are used to increase the operating range, while space environment, radar tradeoffs, and power availability are considered. Preliminary, numerical calculations are made, using the specifications of an experimental system constructed at Georgia Tech. The noncoherent 94 GHz millimeter-wave radar system has a pulsed output with peak value of 1 kW. The backscatter cross section of the particles to be measured, that are present in the volume covered by the beam footprint, is also studied.

  17. Precursor Asteroid Missions and Synergies to Human Exploration of Phobos and Deimos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abell, Paul

    2013-01-01

    U.S. President Obama stated on April 15, 2010 that the next goal for human spaceflight will be to send human beings to a near-Earth asteroid by 2025 and then on to the Martian system in the 2030s. Given this direction from the White House, NASA has been involved in studying various strategies for near-Earth object (NEO) exploration in order to follow U.S. space exploration policy. These missions would be the first human expeditions to interplanetary bodies beyond the Earth-Moon system and would prove useful for testing technologies required for human missions to Mars and its moons, as well as other Solar System destinations. Robotic precursor missions to NEOs would undoubtedly provide a great deal of technical and engineering data on spacecraft operations for future human space exploration while conducting in-depth scientific investigations of these primitive objects. In addition, the resulting scientific investigations would refine designs for future extraterrestrial resource extraction and utilization, which may play a vital role in leveraging potential resources from the Martian moons that in turn could enable robotic and human exploration of Mars.

  18. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Architecture and Mission Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bundas, David

    2005-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is a collaboration between the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), and other partners, with the goal of monitoring the diurnal and seasonal variations in precipitation over the surface of the earth. These measurements will be used to improve current climate models and weather forecasting, and enable improved storm and flood warnings. This paper gives an overview of the mission architecture and addresses some of the key trades that have been completed, including the selection of the Core Observatory s orbit, orbit maintenance trades, and design issues related to meeting orbital debris requirements.

  19. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Development Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azarbarzin, Ardeshir Art

    2011-01-01

    Mission Objective: (1) Improve scientific understanding of the global water cycle and fresh water availability (2) Improve the accuracy of precipitation forecasts (3) Provide frequent and complete sampling of the Earth s precipitation Mission Description (Class B, Category I): (1) Constellation of spacecraft provide global precipitation measurement coverage (2) NASA/JAXA Core spacecraft: Provides a microwave radiometer (GMI) and dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) to cross-calibrate entire constellation (3) 65 deg inclination, 400 km altitude (4) Launch July 2013 on HII-A (5) 3 year mission (5 year propellant) (6) Partner constellation spacecraft.

  20. Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Operation Summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nio, Tomomi; Saito, Susumu; Stocker, Erich; Pawloski, James H.; Murayama, Yoshifumi; Ohata, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) is a joint U.S. and Japan mission to observe tropical rainfall, which was launched by H-II No. 6 from Tanegashima in Japan at 6:27 JST on November 28, 1997. After the two-month commissioning of TRMM satellite and instruments, the original nominal mission lifetime was three years. In fact, the operations has continued for approximately 17.5 years. This paper provides a summary of the long term operations of TRMM.

  1. Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Mission and Synergies with LISA and LIGO-Virgo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gehrels, N.; Spergel, D.

    2015-01-01

    The Wide-Field InfraRed Survey Telescope (WFIRST) is a NASA space mission in study for launch in 2024. It has a 2.4 m telescope, wide-field IR instrument operating in the 0.7 - 2.0 micron range and an exoplanet imaging coronagraph instrument operating in the 400 - 1000 nm range. The observatory will perform galaxy surveys over thousands of square degrees to J=27 AB for dark energy weak lensing and baryon acoustic oscillation measurements and will monitor a few square degrees for dark energy SN Ia studies. It will perform microlensing observations of the galactic bulge for an exoplanet census and direct imaging observations of nearby exoplanets with a pathfinder coronagraph. The mission will have a robust and wellfunded guest observer program for 25% of the observing time. WFIRST will be a powerful tool for time domain astronomy and for coordinated observations with gravitational wave experiments. Gravitational wave events produced by mergers of nearby binary neutron stars (LIGO-Virgo) or extragalactic supermassive black hole binaries (LISA) will produce electromagnetic radiation that WFIRST can observe.

  2. The NASA Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) Mission - Algorithm and Cal/Val Activities and Synergies with SMOS and Other L-Band Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Njoku, Eni; Entekhabi, Dara; O'Neill, Peggy; Jackson, Tom; Kellogg, Kent; Entin, Jared

    2011-01-01

    NASA's Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) mission, planned for launch in late 2014, has as its key measurement objective the frequent, global mapping of near-surface soil moisture and its freeze-thaw state. SMAP soil moisture and freeze/thaw measurements at 10 km and 3 km resolutions respectively, would enable significantly improved estimates of water, energy and carbon transfers between the land and atmosphere. Soil moisture control of these fluxes is a key factor in the performance of atmospheric models used for weather forecasts and climate projections Soil moisture measurements are also of great importance in assessing floods and for monitoring drought. In addition, observations of soil moisture and freeze/thaw timing over the boreal latitudes can help reduce uncertainties in quantifying the global carbon balance. The SMAP measurement concept utilizes an L-band radar and radiometer sharing a rotating 6-meter mesh reflector antenna. The SMAP radiometer and radar flight hardware and ground processing designs are incorporating approaches to identify and mitigate potential terrestrial radio frequency interference (RFI). The radar and radiometer instruments are planned to operate in a 680 km polar orbit, viewing the surface at a constant 40-degree incidence angle with a 1000-km swath width, providing 3-day global coverage. Data from the instruments would yield global maps of soil moisture and freeze/thaw state to be provided at 10 km and 3 km resolutions respectively, every two to three days. Plans are to provide also a radiometer-only soil moisture product at 40-km spatial resolution. This product and the underlying brightness temperatures have characteristics similar to those provided by the Soil Moisture and Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission. As a result, there are unique opportunities for common data product development and continuity between the two missions. SMAP also has commonalities with other satellite missions having L-band radiometer and/or radar sensors

  3. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Nikesha; Deweese, Keith; Vess, Missie; Welter, Gary; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    During launch and early operation of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, the Guidance, Navigation and Control (GNC) analysis team encountered four main on orbit anomalies. These include: (1) unexpected shock from Solar Array deployment, (2) momentum buildup from the Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTBs) phasing errors, (3) transition into Safehold due to albedo-induced Course Sun Sensor (CSS) anomaly, and (4) a flight software error that could cause a Safehold transition due to a Star Tracker occultation. This paper will discuss ways GNC engineers identified and tracked down the root causes. Flight data and GNC on board models will be shown to illustrate how each of these anomalies were investigated and mitigated before causing any harm to the spacecraft. On May 29, 2014, GPM was handed over to the Mission Flight Operations Team after a successful commissioning period. Currently, GPM is operating nominally on orbit, collecting meaningful scientific data that will significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's climate and water cycle.

  4. Muscle Synergies in Cycling after Incomplete Spinal Cord Injury: Correlation with Clinical Measures of Motor Function and Spasticity

    PubMed Central

    Barroso, Filipe O.; Torricelli, Diego; Bravo-Esteban, Elisabeth; Taylor, Julian; Gómez-Soriano, Julio; Santos, Cristina; Moreno, Juan C.; Pons, José L.

    2016-01-01

    Background: After incomplete spinal cord injury (iSCI), patients suffer important sensorimotor impairments, such as abnormal locomotion patterns and spasticity. Complementary to current clinical diagnostic procedures, the analysis of muscle synergies has emerged as a promising tool to study muscle coordination, which plays a major role in the control of multi-limb functional movements. Objective: Based on recent findings suggesting that walking and cycling share similar synergistic control, the analysis of muscle synergies during cycling might be explored as an early descriptor of gait-related impaired control. This idea was split into the following two hypotheses: (a) iSCI patients present a synergistic control of muscles during cycling; (b) muscle synergies outcomes extracted during cycling correlate with clinical measurements of gait performance and/or spasticity. Methods: Electromyographic (EMG) activity of 13 unilateral lower limb muscles was recorded in a group of 10 healthy individuals and 10 iSCI subjects during cycling at four different cadences. A non-negative matrix factorization (NNMF) algorithm was applied to identify synergistic components (i.e., activation coefficients and muscle synergy vectors). Reconstruction goodness scores (VAF and r2) were used to evaluate the ability of a given number of synergies to reconstruct the EMG signals. A set of metrics based on the similarity between pathologic and healthy synergies were correlated with clinical scales of gait performance and spasticity. Results: iSCI patients preserved a synergistic control of muscles during cycling. The similarity with the healthy reference was consistent with the degree of the impairment, i.e., less impaired patients showed higher similarities with the healthy reference. There was a strong correlation between reconstruction goodness scores at 42 rpm and motor performance scales (TUG, 10-m test and WISCI II). On the other hand, the similarity between the healthy and affected

  5. [Gestalt synergy.].

    PubMed

    Carpentier, L

    1980-01-01

    The author describes a new psychotherapeutic approach called Gestalt Synergy. After presenting it's originality among others Body/Mind approaches, the author retraces the history of it's development through the personal history of the founder of Gestalt Synergy : Ilana Rubenfeld. Then follows an introduction of the Alexander Technique and the Feldenkrais Method which, with Gestalt, inspired Gestalt Synergy. The concepts and techniques of Gestalt Synergy are discussed and, the sequence of one session is illustrated. The author concludes on some personal changes noted from her use of this approach. PMID:17093697

  6. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Kummerow, Christian D.; Meneghini, Robert; Hou, Arthur; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Barkstrom, Bruce; Wielicki, Bruce; Goodman, Steven J.; Christian, Hugh; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of rain in the tropics and the accompanying latent heat release, NASA for the U.S. and NASDA for Japan have partnered in the design, construction and flight of an Earth Probe satellite to measure tropical rainfall and calculate the associated heating. Primary mission goals are: 1) the understanding of crucial links in climate variability by the hydrological cycle, 2) improvement in the large-scale models of weather and climate, and 3) improvement in understanding cloud ensembles and their impacts on larger scale circulations. The linkage with the tropical oceans and landmasses are also emphasized. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched in November 1997 with fuel enough to obtain a four to five year data set of rainfall over the global tropics from 37 deg N to 37 deg S. This paper reports progress from launch date through the spring of 1999. The data system and its products and their access is described, as are the algorithms used to obtain the data. Some exciting early results from TRMM are described. Some important algorithm improvements are shown. These will be used in the first total data reprocessing, scheduled to be complete in early 2000. The reader is given information on how to access and use the data.

  7. Statistical sampling analysis for stratospheric measurements from satellite missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drewry, J. W.; Harrison, E. F.; Brooks, D. R.; Robbins, J. L.

    1978-01-01

    Earth orbiting satellite experiments can be designed to measure stratospheric constituents such as ozone by utilizing remote sensing techniques. Statistical analysis techniques, mission simulation and model development have been utilized to develop a method for analyzing various mission/sensor combinations. Existing and planned NASA satellite missions such as Nimbus-4 and G, and Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas Experiment-Application Explorer Mission (SAGE-AEM) have been analyzed to determine the ability of the missions to adequately sample the global field.

  8. Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Launch and Commissioning

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Nikesha; DeWeese, Keith; Vess, Melissa; O'Donnell, James R., Jr.; Welter, Gary

    2015-01-01

    During launch and early operation of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, the Guidance, Navigation, and Control (GN&C) analysis team encountered four main on-orbit anomalies. These include: (1) unexpected shock from Solar Array deployment, (2) momentum buildup from the Magnetic Torquer Bars (MTBs) phasing errors, (3) transition into Safehold due to albedo induced Course Sun Sensor (CSS) anomaly, and (4) a flight software error that could cause a Safehold transition due to a Star Tracker occultation. This paper will discuss ways GN&C engineers identified the anomalies and tracked down the root causes. Flight data and GN&C on-board models will be shown to illustrate how each of these anomalies were investigated and mitigated before causing any harm to the spacecraft. On May 29, 2014, GPM was handed over to the Mission Flight Operations Team after a successful commissioning period. Currently, GPM is operating nominally on orbit, collecting meaningful scientific data that will significantly improve our understanding of the Earth's climate and water cycle.

  9. Synergies between Visible/Near-Infrared imaging spectrometry and the Thermal Infrared in an urban environment: An evaluation of the Hyperspectral Infrared Imager (HyspIRI) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D. A.; Quattrochi, D. A.; Hulley, G. C.; Hook, S.; Green, R. O.

    2011-12-01

    More than half of humanity lives in urban areas, projected to exceed 80% by 2015. Urban areas are major sources of environmental contaminants and sinks of energy and materials. Globally, remote sensing contributes to improved understanding of urban impacts through mapping urban extent, vegetation and impervious cover fractions and urban energy balance including albedo, emissivity and land surface temperature (LST). HyspIRI is a NRC "Decadal Survey" mission combining a visible, near-infrared and shortwave infrared (VSWIR) imaging spectrometer with a multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) instrument . Potential synergies between VSWIR and TIR data were explored using analogous airborne data acquired over Santa Barbara in June, 2008. These data were analyzed at their native spatial resolutions (7.5m VSWIR and 15m TIR), and aggregated 60 m spatial resolution similar to HyspIRI. A spectral library of common urban materials (e.g., grass, trees, soil, roofs, roads) was built from field and airborne-measured spectra . LST and emissivity were also retrieved from the airborne data. Co-located pixels from airborne data were used to generate reflectance/emissivity spectra for a subset of urban materials. Multiple Endmember Spectral Mixture Analysis (MESMA) was used to map fractions of impervious, soil, green vegetation (GV) and non-photosynthetic vegetation (NPV) at the different spatial resolutions and to compare the fractional estimates across spatial scales. Surface energy parameters, including albedo, vegetation cover fraction, broadband emissivity and LST were also determined for urban and natural land-cover classes in the region. Fractions were validated using 1m digital photography. GV and NPV Fractions were highly correlated with validation data at all spatial scales, producing a near 1:1 relationship but with a <10% overestimate of GV from MESMA. Similar, high correlations were observed for impervious surfaces, although impervious was underestimated in most urban areas

  10. RF propagation measurement and model validation during RF/IR synergy trial VAMPIRA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heemskerk, Eric

    2005-10-01

    The member nations of AC/323 SET-RTG056/RTG32 on Integration of Radar and Infrared for Ship Self Defence have performed the Validation Measurements for Propagation in the Infrared and Radar (VAMPIRA). The objective was to get insight into the radar and infrared synergy concentrated on propagation in a coastal environment including horizontal inhomogeneity and to validate radar and infrared propagation models. The trial was held in the period 25 March-5 April 2004 near Surendorf Germany. As part of the trial TNO made RF 1-way transmission measurements, 24 hours/day during the whole trial period. The transmission path over the Eckernforder Bucht in Northern Germany had a length of 8.2 km. The transmitted signal was a sweep consisting of 6 frequencies i.e. 3.36, 5.32, 8.015, 9.7, 13.45, and 15.71 GHz. The transmitter height was 11.5 m, the receiver height 6.4 m above 'normal null'. At each end of the path a meteorological station was installed measuring every 30s the air temperature, relative humidity, air pressure, wind speed and wind direction. About halfway the path the TNO meteo buoy was anchored measuring air temperature and relative humidity at 5 heights between 0.65 and 5.15m above the sea surface. Also the sea water temperature was measured by the buoy on a depth of 1m below the sea surface. The effects of evaporation ducting at the propagation at the various frequencies were clearly demonstrated. Some times very deep fadings were present at 13.45 and 15.71 GHz where at the same time almost no effect at 3.36 and 5.32 GHz was observed. The measured propagation at 15.71 GHz was more enhanced than at 13.45 GHz due to the ducting conditions and the elevation angle of the transmitter and receiver antenna. In several sample cases the 1-way propagation factors are computed for every 5 minutes using the propagation model TERPEM (Signal Science) and the vertical refractivity profiles computed by the TNO model TARMOS. The 1-way computed propagation factors compared very

  11. TRMM (Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission): A satellite mission to measure tropical rainfall

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is presented. TRMM is a satellite program being studied jointly by the United States and Japan which would carry out the systematic study of tropical rainfall required for major strides in weather and climate research. The scientific justification for TRMM is discussed. The implementation process for the scientific community, NASA management, and the other decision-makers and advisory personnel who are expected to evaluate the priority of the project is outlined.

  12. Professional Synergy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harris, P. R.

    1981-01-01

    True professionals develop and create together a better future by their human endeavors in synergy. They must operate comfortably in two cultures--the industrial culture which is disappearing, and the superindustrial or cyberculture which is emerging. (CT)

  13. The development of motor synergies in children: Ultrasound and acoustic measurements

    PubMed Central

    Noiray, Aude; Ménard, Lucie; Iskarous, Khalil

    2013-01-01

    The present study focuses on differences in lingual coarticulation between French children and adults. The specific question pursued is whether 4–5 year old children have already acquired a synergy observed in adults in which the tongue back helps the tip in the formation of alveolar consonants. Locus equations, estimated from acoustic and ultrasound imaging data were used to compare coarticulation degree between adults and children and further investigate differences in motor synergy between the front and back parts of the tongue. Results show similar slope and intercept patterns for adults and children in both the acoustic and articulatory domains, with an effect of place of articulation in both groups between alveolar and non-alveolar consonants. These results suggest that 4–5 year old children (1) have learned the motor synergy investigated and (2) have developed a pattern of coarticulatory resistance depending on a consonant place of articulation. Also, results show that acoustic locus equations can be used to gauge the presence of motor synergies in children. PMID:23297916

  14. Utilizing The Synergy of Airborne Backscatter Lidar and In-Situ Measurements for Evaluating CALIPSO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsekeri, Alexandra; Amiridis, Vassilis; Marenco, Franco; Marinou, Eleni; Rosenberg, Phil; Solomos, Stavros; Trembath, Jamie; Allan, James; Bacak, Asan; Nenes, Athanasios

    2016-06-01

    Airborne campaigns dedicated to satellite validation are crucial for the effective global aerosol monitoring. CALIPSO is currently the only active remote sensing satellite mission, acquiring the vertical profiles of the aerosol backscatter and extinction coefficients. Here we present a method for CALIPSO evaluation from combining lidar and in-situ airborne measurements. The limitations of the method have to do mainly with the in-situ instrumentation capabilities and the hydration modelling. We also discuss the future implementation of our method in the ICE-D campaign (Cape Verde, August 2015).

  15. Precipitation Measurements from Space: The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2007-01-01

    Water is fundamental to the life on Earth and its phase transition between the gaseous, liquid, and solid states dominates the behavior of the weather/climate/ecological system. Precipitation, which converts atmospheric water vapor into rain and snow, is central to the global water cycle. It regulates the global energy balance through interactions with clouds and water vapor (the primary greenhouse gas), and also shapes global winds and dynamic transport through latent heat release. Surface precipitation affects soil moisture, ocean salinity, and land hydrology, thus linking fast atmospheric processes to the slower components of the climate system. Precipitation is also the primary source of freshwater in the world, which is facing an emerging freshwater crisis in many regions. Accurate and timely knowledge of global precipitation is essential for understanding the behavior of the global water cycle, improving freshwater management, and advancing predictive capabilities of high-impact weather events such as hurricanes, floods, droughts, and landslides. With limited rainfall networks on land and the impracticality of making extensive rainfall measurements over oceans, a comprehensive description of the space and time variability of global precipitation can only be achieved from the vantage point of space. This presentation will examine current capabilities in space-borne rainfall measurements, highlight scientific and practical benefits derived from these observations to date, and provide an overview of the multi-national Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission scheduled to bc launched in the early next decade.

  16. Prehension Synergies

    PubMed Central

    Zatsiorsky, Vladimir M.; Latash, Mark L.

    2010-01-01

    The precision grip requires the control of the normal and tangential forces exerted by the fingers as well as the control of the rotational equilibrium of the grasped object. Prehension synergies involve the conjoint changes in finger forces and moments during multifinger gripping tasks. Some of these adjustments are dictated by mechanics, whereas others are the result of a choice by the performer. PMID:15064652

  17. Mars In-situ Measurements and Sample Return: Trades and Synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arvidson, R. E.

    2002-05-01

    An overarching emphasis for Mars exploration should focus on defining the global tectonic and climatic cycles and how they have evolved in space and time. Further, as part of the delineation of these cycles we should define the locations and nature of reservoirs of biogeochemically active species (C, N, P, S compounds, water), particularly for key settings (energy sources available, biochemically active species present, some degree of protection) where life may have developed and evolved. At least two discovery-driven pathways can be defined to address the exploration focus: a. We discover through analysis of observations acquired through end of the 2009 Smart Lander (SML) Mission that these key settings can be found and accessed and we go for sample return at the Smart Lander site. b. We discover through analysis of observations acquired through the end of SML Mission era that these key settings can be found and accessed and we go for detailed in-situ analyses of these areas as an alternative to sample return. The Program would be successful for all pathways whether or not life is found as long as we define the global cycles through space and time and we find and explore the key setting areas where life may have developed and evolved. It would be equally interesting to go to an area where protection, energy, and biogeochemically active species have been present for a long time and: (a) not find prebiotic compounds or extinct or extant life, or (b) find prebiotic com-pounds and evidence of extinct or extant life. If the former, why did prebiotic compounds and life fail to develop? If the latter, what compounds or organisms do we have and why? In either case we need to understand the context for these measurements and that demands an understanding of the global cycles and how they have varied in space and time. The question is not whether to go for sample return or in-situ observations. Rather the two methods are com-plementary in that in-situ observations pave the

  18. Synergy between cellulolytic enzymes during the biodegradation of cellulose microfibrils measured using angle-scanning surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raegen, Adam; Dion, Alexander; Reiter, Kyle; Clarke, Anthony; Lipkowski, Jacek; Dutcher, John

    2014-03-01

    The use of cellulosic ethanol, a promising emerging energy source, is limited by the energy intensive and costly step of first converting the cellulose fibers into their constituent glucose monomers. Industrial processes mimic those that occur in nature, using mixtures or ``cocktails'' of different classes of cellulolytic enzymes derived from fungi. Despite several decades of investigation, the molecular mechanisms for enzyme synergy remain poorly understood. To gain additional insight, we have used a custom angle-scanning surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging apparatus to obtain a sensitive measure of enzymatic degradation. By implementing a novel SPR data analysis procedure, we have been able to track the thickness and roughness of laterally heterogeneous cellulose microfibril-coated substrates as enzymatic degradation proceeds. This has allowed us to measure the synergistic actions of the different enzymes, providing data that are directly relevant to the cellulosic ethanol industry.

  19. Prototype of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Ground Validation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwaller, M. R.; Morris, K. R.; Petersen, W. A.

    2007-01-01

    NASA is developing a Ground Validation System (GVS) as one of its contributions to the Global Precipitation Mission (GPM). The GPM GVS provides an independent means for evaluation, diagnosis, and ultimately improvement of GPM spaceborne measurements and precipitation products. NASA's GPM GVS consists of three elements: field campaigns/physical validation, direct network validation, and modeling and simulation. The GVS prototype of direct network validation compares Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite-borne radar data to similar measurements from the U.S. national network of operational weather radars. A prototype field campaign has also been conducted; modeling and simulation prototypes are under consideration.

  20. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-95

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kenneth

    2000-01-01

    John H. Glenn's historic return to space was a primary focus of the STS-95 mission. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) Orbital Systems Test (HOST). an STS-95 payload, was an in-flight demonstration of HST components to be installed during the next HST servicing mission. One of the components under evaluation was the cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Based on concerns about vibrations from the operation of the NICMOS cryocooler affecting the overall HST line-of-sight requirements, the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free-Flyers (SAMS-FF) was employed to measure the vibratory environment of the STS-95 mission, including any effects introduced by the NICMOS cryocooler. The STS-95 mission represents the first STS mission supported by SAMS-FF. Utilizing a Control and Data Acquisition Unit (CDU) and two triaxial sensor heads (TSH) mounted on the HOST support structure in Discovery's cargo bay, the SAMS-FF and the HOST project were able to make vibratory measurements both on-board the vibration-isolated NICMOS cryocooler and off-board the cryocooler mounting plate. By comparing the SAMS-FF measured vibrations on-board and off-board the NICMOS cryocooler, HST engineers could assess the cryocooler g-jitter effects on the HST line-of-sight requirements. The acceleration records from both SAMS-FF accelerometers were analyzed and significant features of the microgravity environment are detailed in this report.

  1. Status and Future of the Tropical Rainfall, Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert F.

    2006-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) will have completed nine years in orbit in November 2006. This successful research mission, a joint U.S./Japan effort, has become a key element in the routine monitoring of global precipitation. The package of rain measuring instrumentation, including the first meteorological radar in space, continues to function perfectly, and with the increase in orbital altitude (from 350 km to 400 km) in August 2001 and the mission extension approval in 2005, the satellite has sufficient station-keeping fuel to potentially last until 2012, or perhaps longer. The status of TRMM algorithms and products will be summarized, including the impact of the altitude boost in 2001, and the plans for the upcoming Version 7 of the products will be outlined. The role of TRMM as part of the constellation of rain-measuring satellites preceding GPM will be discussed, as well as its role in climate analysis using its unique radar/radiometer combination.

  2. Aquarius Satellite Salinity Measurement Mission Status, and Science Results from the initial 3-Year Prime Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagerloef, G. S. E.; Kao, H. Y.

    2014-12-01

    The Aquarius satellite microwave sensor, launched June 2011, as part of the US-Argentina joint Aquarius/SAC-D mission, and commenced observations on 25 Aug2011, and completed three years of ocean surface salinity measurements in late August 2014. The Aquarius measurement objectives are to describe unknown features in the sea surface salinity (SSS) field, and document seasonal and interannual variations on regional and basin scales. This presentation will first describe the structure of the mean annual global salinity field compared with the previous in situ climatology and contemporary in situ measurements , including small persistent biases of opposite sign in high latitudes versus low latitudes, currently under intense investigation, as well as global and regional error statistics. Then we summarize highlights of various studies and papers submitted to the JGR-Oceans special section on satellite salinity (2014). The most prominent seasonal variations, most notably the extant and variability of the SSS signature of the Atlantic and Pacific inter-tropical convergence zones, Amazon-Orinoco and other major rivers, and other important regional patterns of seasonal variability. Lastly we will examine the trends observed during the three Sep-Aug measurement years beginning Sep2011, Sep2012 and Sep2013, respectively, in relation to ENSO and other climate indices, as the first step in analyzing interannual SSS variability. An outline for extended mission operations beyond the initial three-year prime mission will be presented.

  3. Earth Sensor Assembly for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prince, Steven S.; Hoover, James M.

    1995-01-01

    EDO Corporation/Barnes Engineering Division (BED) has provided the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Earth Sensor Assembly (ESA), a key element in the TRMM spacecraft's attitude control system. This report documents the history, design, fabrication, assembly, and test of the ESA.

  4. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Neeck, Steven

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission to unify and advance global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational microwave sensors. The GPM concept centers on the deployment of a Core SpacecraR in a non-Sun-synchronous orbit at 65 deg. inclination carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer (GMI) with high-frequency capabilities to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and calibration standard for the constellation radiometers. The baseline GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise conical-scanning microwave imagers (e.g., GMI, SSMIS, AMSR, MIS, MADRAS, GPM-Brazil) augmented with cross-track microwave temperaturethumidity sounders (e.g., MHS, ATMS) over land. In addition to the Core Satellite, the GPM Mission will contribute a second GMI to be flown in a low-inclination (approximately 40 deg.) non-Sun-synchronous orbit to improve near-realtime monitoring of hurricanes. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals aimed at (1) advancing the knowledge of the global watertenergy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional partners in satellite constellation and ground validation activities. Within the framework of the inter-governmental Group ob Earth Observations (GEO) and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), GPM has been identified as a cornerstone for the Precipitation Constellation (PC) being developed under the auspices of Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in 2013, followed by the launch of the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory in 2014

  5. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission to unify and advance global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational microwave sensors. The GPM concept centers on the deployment of a Core Spacecraft in a non-Sun-synchronous orbit at 65' inclination carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer (GMI) with high-frequency capabilities to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and calibration standard for the constellation radiometers. The baseline GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise conical-scanning microwave imagers (e.g., GMI, SSMIS, AMSR, MIS, MADRAS, GPM-Brazil) augmented with cross-track microwave temperaturelhumidity sounders (e.g., MHS, ATMS) over land. In addition to the Core Satellite, the GPM Mission will contribute a second GMI to be flown in a low-inclination (approx.40deg) non-Sun-synchronous orbit to improve near real-time monitoring of hurricanes. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals aimed at (1) advancing the knowledge of the global waterlenergy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional partners in satellite constellation and ground validation activities. Within the framework of the inter-governmental Group ob Earth Observations (GEO) and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), GPM has been identified as a cornerstone for the Precipitation Constellation (PC) being developed under the auspices of Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in 201 3, followed by the launch of the GPM Low- Inclination Observatory in 2014. An

  6. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2008-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission to unify and advance global precipitation measurements from a constellation of dedicated and operational microwave sensors. The GPM concept centers on the deployment of a Core Spacecraft in a non-Sun-synchronous orbit at 65 degrees inclination carrying a dual-frequency precipitation radar (DPR) and a multi-frequency passive microwave radiometer (GMI) with high-frequency capabilities to serve as a precipitation physics observatory and calibration standard for the constellation radiometers. The baseline GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise conical-scanning microwave imagers (e.g., GMI, SSMIS, AMSR, MIS, MADRAS, GPM-Brazil) augmented with cross-track microwave temperature/humidity sounders (e.g., MHS, ATMS) over land. In addition to the Core Satellite, the GPM Mission will contribute a second GMI to be flown in a low-inclination (approximately 40 deg.) non-Sun-synchronous orbit to improve near real-time monitoring of hurricanes. GPM is a science mission with integrated applications goals aimed at (1) advancing the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle variability and freshwater availability and (2) improving weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional partners in satellite constellation and ground validation activities. Within the framework of the inter-governmental Group ob Earth Observations (GEO) and Global Earth Observation System of Systems (GEOSS), GPM has been identified as a cornerstone for the Precipitation Constellation (PC) being developed under the auspices of Committee of Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS). The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in 2013, followed by the launch of the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory in

  7. Neutral Gas and Ion Measurements by the CONTOUR Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mahaffy, Paul R.; Niemann, Hasso B. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The Neutral Gas and Ion Mass Spectrometer (NGIMS) on the Comet Nucleus Tour (CONTOUR) Mission will measure the chemical and isotopic composition of neutral and ion species in the coma of comet Encke and the subsequent targets of this mission. Currently the second target of this mission is comet Schwassmann-Wachmann 3. This neutral gas and ion data together with complementary data from the dust analyzer and the imaging spectrometer is designed to allow a broad characterization of the molecular and elemental composition of each cometary nucleus. These experiments enable the study of the of the likely variations in chemical conditions present in different regions of the early solar nebula where the comets formed. With these experiments we will also test ideas about cometary contributions of organics, water, and other volatiles to the inner planets. The CONTOUR NGIMS data set from multiple comets is expected to provide an important extension of to the only other detailed in situ data set from a close flyby of a nucleus, that from Halley. CONTOUR will extend this measurement of an Oort cloud comet to the class of short period comets thought to originate in the Kuiper belt. This data will complement the detailed measurements to be carried out at a single nucleus by the Rosetta Mission.

  8. Tropospheric Wind Measurements from Space: The SPARCLE Mission and Beyond

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Emmitt, G. David

    1998-01-01

    For over 20 years researchers have been investigating the feasibility of profiling tropospheric vector wind velocity from space with a pulsed Doppler lidar. Efforts have included theoretical development, system and mission studies, technology development, and ground-based and airborne measurements. Now NASA plans to take the next logical step towards enabling operational global tropospheric wind profiles by demonstrating horizontal wind measurements from the Space Shuttle in early 2001 using a coherent Doppler wind lidar system.

  9. ARIM-1: The Atmospheric Refractive Index Measurements Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruiz, B. Ian (Editor)

    1995-01-01

    A conceptual design study of the ARIM-1 sounding rocket mission, whose goal is to study atmospheric turbulence in the tropopause region of the atmosphere, is presented. The study was conducted by an interdisciplinary team of students at the University of Alaska Fairbanks who were enrolled in a Space Systems Engineering course. The implementation of the ARIM-1 mission will be carried out by students participating in the Alaska Student Rocket Program (ASRP), with a projected launch date of August 1997. The ARIM-1 vehicle is a single stage sounding rocket with a 3:1 ogive nose cone, a payload diameter of 8 in., a motor diameter of 7.6 in., and an overall height of 17.0 ft including the four fins. Emphasis is placed on standardization of payload support systems. The thermosonde payload will measure the atmospheric turbulence by direct measurement of the temperature difference over a distance of one meter using two 3.45-micron 'hot-wire' probes. The recovery system consists of a 6 ft. diameter ribless guide surface drogue chute and a 33 ft. diameter main cross parachute designed to recover a payload of 31 pounds and slow its descent rate to 5 m/s through an altitude of 15 km. This document discusses the science objectives, mission analysis, payload mechanical configuration and structural design, recovery system, payload electronics, ground station, testing plans, and mission implementation.

  10. ATMOS: Long term atmospheric measurements for mission to planet Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    A long-term, space-based measurement program, together with continued balloon and aircraft-borne investigations, is essential to monitor the predicted effects in the atmosphere, to determine to what extent the concentration measurements agree with current models of stratospheric chemistry, and to determine the condition of the ozone layer. The Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy (ATMOS) Experiment is currently making comprehensive, global measurements of Earth's atmosphere as part of the Atmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS) program on the Space Shuttle. Part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, ATLAS is a continuing series of missions to study Earth and the Sun and provide a more fundamental understanding of the solar influences on Earth's atmosphere. The ATMOS program, instruments, and science results are presented.

  11. Program control on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennington, Dorothy J.; Majerowicw, Walter

    1994-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), an integral part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth, is the first satellite dedicated to measuring tropical rainfall. TRMM will contribute to an understanding of the mechanisms through which tropical rainfall influences global circulation and climate. Goddard Space Flight Center's (GSFC) Flight Projects Directorate is responsible for establishing a Project Office for the TRMM to manage, coordinate, and integrate the various organizations involved in the development and operation of this complex satellite. The TRMM observatory, the largest ever developed and built inhouse at GSFC, includes state-of-the-art hardware. It will carry five scientific instruments designed to determine the rate of rainfall and the total rainfall occurring between the north and south latitudes of 35 deg. As a secondary science objective, TRMM will also measure the Earth's radiant energy budget and lightning.

  12. The Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: NASA Status and Early Results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Huffman, G.; Petersen, W.; Kidd, Chris

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission’s Core satellite, launched 27 February 2014, is well-designed to estimate precipitation from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect falling snow. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth’s water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. GPM is a joint NASA-JAXA mission. The design of the GPM Core Observatory is an advancement of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)’s highly successful rain-sensing package. The cornerstone of the GPM mission is the deployment of a Core Observatory in a unique 65 (°) non-Sun-synchronous orbit serving as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. The Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR provides measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improving retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The combined use of DPR and GMI measurements places greater constraints on possible solutions to radiometer retrievals to improve the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. The GPM mission science objectives and instrument

  13. NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission for Science and Society

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail

    2016-04-01

    Water is fundamental to life on Earth. Knowing where and how much rain and snow falls globally is vital to understanding how weather and climate impact both our environment and Earth's water and energy cycles, including effects on agriculture, fresh water availability, and responses to natural disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, launched February 27, 2014, is an international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. The joint NASA-JAXA GPM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone and anchor to unite the constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory carries a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). Furthermore, since light rain and falling snow account for a significant fraction of precipitation occurrence in middle and high latitudes, the GPM instruments extend the capabilities of the TRMM sensors to detect falling snow, measure light rain, and provide, for the first time, quantitative estimates of microphysical properties of precipitation particles. As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is designed to (1) advance precipitation measurement capability from space through combined use of active and passive microwave sensors, (2) advance the knowledge of the global water/energy cycle and freshwater availability through better description of the space-time variability of global precipitation, and (3) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of instantaneous precipitation rates and time-integrated rainfall accumulation. Since launch, the instruments have been collecting outstanding precipitation data. New scientific insights resulting from GPM data, an overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities in the United States

  14. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Applications: Activities, Challenges, and Vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kirschbaum, Dalia; Hou, Arthur

    2012-01-01

    Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) is an international satellite mission to provide nextgeneration observations of rain and snow worldwide every three hours. NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) will launch a "Core" satellite carrying advanced instruments that will set a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The data they provide will be used to unify precipitation measurements made by an international network of partner satellites to quantify when, where, and how much it rains or snows around the world. The GPM mission will help advance our understanding of Earth's water and energy cycles, improve the forecasting of extreme events that cause natural disasters, and extend current capabilities of using satellite precipitation information to directly benefit society. Building upon the successful legacy of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), GPM's next-generation global precipitation data will lead to scientific advances and societal benefits within a range of hydrologic fields including natural hazards, ecology, public health and water resources. This talk will highlight some examples from TRMM's IS-year history within these applications areas as well as discuss some existing challenges and present a look forward for GPM's contribution to applications in hydrology.

  15. Status of Validation Program for Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adler, Robert

    2004-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is in its sixth year of operation. This successful research mission, a joint U.S./Japan effort, has become-a key element in the routine monitoring of global precipitation. The package of rain measuring instrumentation, including the first meteorological radar in space, continues to function perfectly, and with the increase in orbital altitude (from 350 km to 400 km) the mission will hopefully continue for a number of years. The validation effort has been a combination of routine use of 1) ground-based radar and raingauge measurements for comparison with the satellite-based estimates, 2) the use of field experiment data for evaluation of the satellite data products and investigation of some of the assumptions in the satellite retrievals, and 3) use of other comparison data sets, including atoll and buoy gauges over ocean and research and operational gauge data sets over land. The status of the program will be described along with "lessons learned". Near term plans for improved validation products and new thrusts related to validation of TRMM-based multi-satellite products that extend into middle latitudes will be outlined.

  16. Solar oblateness as measured with the PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbah, A.; Meftah, M.; Hauchecorne, A.; Djelloul, D.; Cisse, M.

    2013-12-01

    PICARD is a space mission launched in June 2010. One of its scientific objectives is to study the geometry of the Sun including measurements of the solar oblateness at several wavelengths. This physical parameter is however difficult to achieve since all image defaults due to the whole system telescope-CCD affect its measurement. Rolling the satellite as already done with previous space missions allows discriminating from the telescope-CCD contribution when considering the Sun as constant during the observations. This supposes however that the telescope optical response is time-invariant during the roll operations. This is not the case for PICARD where an orbital signature is clearly observed in the solar radius obtained from its images. We have taken advantage of this effect and developed a new method to process the PICARD images to deduce the solar oblateness. This method supposes that there are both a time and an angular modulation of the solar limb due to the satellite moving on its orbit and when it is rotated around the line of sight during the specific observations. We will first give in this work an overview of the PICARD mission and present after the solar observations recorded for the oblateness measurements. The new method developed to process the data is then detailed and some results are given and discussed.

  17. Synergy benefit in temperature, humiditiy and cloud property profiling by integrating ground based and satellite measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebell, K.; Orlandi, E.; Hünerbein, A.; Crewell, S.; Löhnert, U.

    2012-12-01

    Accurate, highly vertically resolved temperature, humidity and cloud property profiles are needed for many applications. They are essential for climate monitoring, a better process understanding and the subsequent improvement of parameterizations in numerical weather prediction and climate models. In order to provide such profiles with a high temporal resolution, multiple wavelength active and passive remote sensing techniques available at ground based observatories, e.g. the Atmospheric Radiation Measruement (ARM) Program and Cloudnet facilities, need to be exploited. In particular, the Integrated Profiling Technique (IPT, Löhnert et al., 2008) has been successfully applied to simultaneously derive profiles of temperature, humidity and liquid water by a Bayesian based retrieval using a combination of ground based microwave radiometer, cloud radar and a priori information. Within the project ICOS (Integrating Cloud Observations from Ground and Space - a Way to Combine Time and Space Information), we develop a flexible IPT, which allows for the combination of a variety of ground based measurements from cloud radar, microwave radiometer (MWR) and IR spectrometer as well as satellite based information from the Spinning Enhanced Visible and InfraRed Imager (SEVIRI) onboard of METEOSAT. As ground based observations are mainly sensitive to the lower parts of the troposphere, the satellite measurements provide complementary information and are thus expected to improve the estimates of the thermodynamic and cloud property profiles, i. e. hydrometeor content and effective radius, considerably. In addition to the SEVIRI IR measurements, which are provided with a high repetition time, information from polar orbiting satellites could be included. In paticular, the potential of the Advanced Microwave Sounding Unit-A (AMSU-A) and Microwave Sounding Unit (MHS) in the retrieval is investigated. In order to understand the improvement by integrating the measurements of the above

  18. Analysis of plasma measurements for the Geotail mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Louis A.

    1995-01-01

    The first phase of the Geotail mission, an exploration of the distant magnetotail, was successfully concluded in October 1994. Geotail is currently engaged in a survey of plasmas at distances from Earth approximately 10 to 30 R(sub E). Throughout the mission the Comprehensive Plasma Instrumentation has functioned well with successful return of data. The analysis of the CPI measurements has resulted in a series of publications, and research efforts are ongoing. Research topics include interaction of the magnetotail with the fields and plasmas of the solar wind, steady-state magnetic reconnection in the distant magnetotail at a neutral line bounded by a pair of slow-mode magnetohydrodynamic shocks, development and evolution of plasmoids in magnetotail and magnetospheric substorms, and cold ion beams coexisting as distinct components in the presence of hot plasma-sheet plasmas.

  19. Atmospheric Measurements by the 2002 Geoscience Laser Altimeter System Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spinhirne, James D.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Earth Observing System (EOS) program is a multiple platform NASA initiative for the study of global change. As part of the EOS project, the Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) was selected as a laser sensor filling complementary requirements for several earth science disciplines including atmospheric and surface applications. Late in 2002, the GaAs instrument is to be launched for a three to five year observational mission. For the atmosphere, the instrument is designed to full fill comprehensive requirements for profiling of radiatively significant cloud and aerosol. Algorithms have been developed to process the cloud and aerosol data and provide standard data products. After launch there will be a three-month project to analyze and understand the system performance and accuracy of the data products. As an EOS mission, the GaAs measurements and data products will be openly available to all investigators. An overview of the instrument, data products and evaluation plan is given.

  20. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies Among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Chu, Allen; Levy, Robert; Remer, Lorraine; Kaufman, Yoram; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Eck, Tom; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2004-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, .biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERON" at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  1. Aerosol Sources, Absorption, and Intercontinental Transport: Synergies among Models, Remote Sensing, and Atmospheric Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chin, Mian; Ginoux, Paul; Dubovik, Oleg; Holben, Brent; Kaufman, Yoram; chu, Allen; Anderson, Tad; Quinn, Patricia

    2003-01-01

    Aerosol climate forcing is one of the largest uncertainties in assessing the anthropogenic impact on the global climate system. This uncertainty arises from the poorly quantified aerosol sources, especially black carbon emissions, our limited knowledge of aerosol mixing state and optical properties, and the consequences of intercontinental transport of aerosols and their precursors. Here we use a global model GOCART to simulate atmospheric aerosols, including sulfate, black carbon, organic carbon, dust, and sea salt, from anthropogenic, biomass burning, and natural sources. We compare the model calculated aerosol extinction and absorption with those quantities from the ground-based sun photometer measurements from AERONET at several different wavelengths and the field observations from ACE-Asia, and model calculated total aerosol optical depth and fine mode fractions with the MODIS satellite retrieval. We will also estimate the intercontinental transport of pollution and dust aerosols from their source regions to other areas in different seasons.

  2. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2012-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy a Core Observatory in 2014 to serve as a reference satellite to unify precipitation measurements from the constellation of sensors. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR will be the first dual-frequency radar in space to provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will be used as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1 satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder

  3. Ion Flow Measurements from the JOULE Sounding Rocket Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Knudsen, D.; Pfaff, R.; Burchil, J.; Larsen, M.; Clemmons, J.; Steigies, C.

    2006-12-01

    The JOULE sounding rocket mission was designed to investigate structured Joule dissipation in the auroral ionosphere. JOULE was launched March 27, 2003 from Poker Flat, Alaska, during a substorm. The mission included two instrumented rockets and two chemical release (TMA) rockets. One of the instrumented payloads carried a Suprathermal Ion Imager (SII) that measured 2-D (energy/angle) distributions of the core (0- 8 eV) ion population at a rate of 125 per second. SII measured one component of the ion drift velocitiy perpendicular to the magnetic field and the field-aligned component of the ion drift velocity. We present results showing good agreement between ion drifts measured perpendicular to the geomagnetic field and those inferred from an ěc E×ěc B measurement, with signs of ion demagnetization as the payload reached the upper E region. Also, the SII shows evidence of downward field-aligned ion flows at altitudes of 140-170 km within a region of enhanced auroral precipitation.

  4. Earthquake-Lightning Signature Probed by Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hao; Liu, Jann-Yenq Tiger

    2016-04-01

    The lightning activity is one of the key parameters to understand the atmospheric electric fields near the Earth's surface and the lithosphere-atmosphere-ionosphere coupling during the earthquake preparation period. A statistical study shows more lightning before magnitude M>=5.0 earthquakes in Taiwan during 1993-2004. In this paper, the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) onboard Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is used to statistically exam the lightning activity 30 days before and after 198 M>=7.0 earthquakes in the tropical area of the globe during the 17-year period of 1988-2014. The statistical results show that lightning activities over epicenter significantly enhance before the earthquakes.

  5. Electro-optical Synergy Technique

    PubMed Central

    El-Domyati, Moetaz; El-Ammawi, Tarek S.; Medhat, Walid; Moawad, Osama; Mahoney, My G.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Electro-optical synergy technology is one of the most recently described methods for nonablative skin rejuvenation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the effects of electro-optical synergy on connective tissue composition by histological and immunohistochemical techniques coupled with computerized morphometric analysis. Design: A prospective clinical study. Participants: Six volunteers with Fitzpatrick skin types 3 to 4 and Glogau class I to II wrinkles were subjected to three months (6 sessions at 2-week intervals) of electro-optical synergy treatment. Measurements: Standard photographs and skin biopsies were obtained at baseline as well as three and six months after the start of treatment. The authors performed quantitative evaluation of total elastin, tropoelastin, collagen types I, III, and VII, and newly synthesized collagen. Results: Noticeable clinical and histological improvement was observed after electro-optical synergy treatment. A statistically significant increase in the means of collagen types I, III, and VII, as well as newly synthesized collagen, together with increased levels of tropoelastin, were detected, while the mean level of total elastin was significantly decreased at the end of treatment and three months post-treatment. Conclusion: Electro-optical synergy is an effective treatment for contouring facial skin laxity. This modality stimulates the repair processes and reverses the clinical, as well as the histopathological, signs of aging with the advantage of being a relatively risk-free procedure with minimal patient recovery time. PMID:21203352

  6. A proposed tropical rainfall measuring mission (TRMM) satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Adler, Robert F.; North, Gerald R.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite (presently in its third year of planning), is described. The TRMM satellite, planned for an operational duration of at least three years beginning in the mid-1990s, is intended to obtain high-quality measurements of tropical precipitation by means of information derived from a quantitative spaceborne radar, a multichannel passive microwave radiometer, and an AVHRR. The satellite's orbit will be low-altitude (320 km), for high resolution, and low-inclination (30 to 35 deg), for making it possible to visit each sampling area twice a day. Radar and passive microwave algorithms and rain-retrieval algorithms to be used in precipitation measurements are discussed together with cloud dynamical models designed to test these algorithms.

  7. Analysis of TRMM Microphysical Measurements: Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    SPEC Incorporated participated in three of the four TRMM field campaigns (TEFLUN-A, TEFLUN-B and KWAJEX), installing and operating a cloud particle imager (CPI) and a high volume precipitation spectrometer (HVPS) on the SPEC Learjet in TEFLUN-A, the University of North Dakota Citation in TEFLUN-B and KWAJEX, and a CPI on the NASA DC-8 in KWAJEX. This report presents and discusses new software tools and algorithms that were developed to analyze microphysical data collected during these field campaigns, as well as scientific interpretations of the data themselves. Software algorithms were developed to improve the analysis of microphysical measurements collected by the TRMM aircraft during the field campaigns. Particular attention was paid to developing and/or improving algorithms used to compute particle size distributions and ice water content. Software was also developed in support of production of the TRMM Common Microphysical Product (CMP) data files. CMP data files for TEFLUN-A field campaign were produced and submitted to the DAAC. Typical microphysical properties of convective and stratiform regions from TEFLUN-A and KWAJEX clouds were produced. In general, it was found that in the upper cloud region near -20 to -25 C, stratiform clouds contain very high (greater than 1 per cubic centimeter) concentrations of small ice particles, which are suspected to be a residual from homogeneous freezing and sedimentation of small drops in a convective updraft. In the upper cloud region near -20 to -25 C, convective clouds contain aggregates, which are not found lower in the cloud. Stratiform clouds contain aggregates at all levels, with the majority in the lowest levels. Convective cloud regions contain much higher LWC and drop concentrations than stratiform regions at all levels, and higher LWC in the middle and upper regions. Stratiform clouds contain higher IWC than convective clouds only at the lowest level. Irregular shaped ice particles are found in very high

  8. New method for astrometric measurements in Space Mission, JASMINE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Gouda, N.; Yamada, Y.

    We present a new method for measuring positions of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy by astrometric satellite, JASMINE, which is in progress at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. JASMINE is the acronym of the Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared (z-band : 0.9 micron) Exploration, and is planned to be launched around 2015 The main objective of JASMINE is to study the fundamental structure and evolution of the bulge components of the Milky Way Galaxy. In order to accomplish these objectives, JASMINE will measure trigonometric parallaxes, positions and proper motions of about a few million stars during the observational program, with the precision of 10 microarcsec at z =14mag. The telescope of JASMINE has just one field of view, which is different from other astrometric satellites like Hipparcos and GAIA, that have two fields of view with large angle. These satellites, Hipparcos and GAIA, scan along the great circle with the spin axis perpendicular to both two fields of view to estimate the relative positions of stars on the great circle. They scan many different great circles to observe all the sky. On the other hand, JASMINE will take overlapping fields of view without any gaps to survey an area of about 20deg×10deg. Accordingly survey area covers the region of about 20deg×10deg in the bulge component. JASMINE will continue the above procedure for observing the area during the mission life. As a consequence, JASMINE will observe the restricted regions around the Galactic bulge and sweep repeatedly. The mission life is planned to be 5 years.

  9. New Method for Astrometric Measurements in Space Mission, JASMINE.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yano, T.; Gouda, N.; Yamada, Y.

    2006-08-01

    We present a new method for measuring positions of stars in the Milky Way Galaxy by astrometric satellite, JASMINE, which is in progress at the National Astronomical Observatory of Japan. JASMINE is the acronym of the Japan Astrometry Satellite Mission for Infrared (z-band : 0.9 micron) Exploration, and is planned to be launched around 2015 The main objective of JASMINE is to study the fundamental structure and evolution of the bulge components of the Milky Way Galaxy. In order to accomplish these objectives, JASMINE will measure trigonometric parallaxes, positions and proper motions of about a few million stars during the observational program, with the precision of 10 microarcsec at z =14mag. The telescope of JASMINE has just one field of view, which is different from other astrometric satellites like Hipparcos and GAIA, that have two fields of view with large angle. These satellites, Hipparcos and GAIA, scan along the great circle with the spin axis perpendicular to both two fields of view to estimate the relative positions of stars on the great circle. They scan many different great circles to observe all the sky. On the other hand, JASMINE will take overlapping fields of view without any gaps to survey an area of about 20deg*10deg. Accordingly survey area covers the region of about 20deg*10deg in the bulge component. JASMINE will continue the above procedure for observing the area during the mission life. As a consequence, JASMINE will observe the restricted regions around the Galactic bulge and sweep repeatedly. The mission life is planned to be 5 years.

  10. SRAG Measurements Performed During the Orion EFT-1 Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gaza, Ramona

    2015-01-01

    The Exploration Flight Test 1 (EFT-1) was the first flight of the Orion Multi-Purpose Crew Vehicle (MPCV). The flight was launched on December 5, 2014, by a Delta IV Heavy rocket and lasted 4.5 hours. The EFT-1 trajectory involved one low altitude orbit and one high altitude orbit with an apogee of almost 6000 km. As a result of this particular flight profile, the Orion MPCV passed through intense regions of trapped protons and electron belts. In support of the radiation measurements aboard the EFT-1, the Space Radiation Analysis Group (SRAG) provided a Battery-operated Independent Radiation Detector (BIRD) based on Timepix radiation monitoring technology similar to that employed by the ISS Radiation Environmental Monitors (REM). In addition, SRAG provided a suite of optically and thermally stimulated luminescence detectors, with 2 Radiation Area Monitor (RAM) units collocated with the BIRD instrument for comparison purposes, and 6 RAM units distributed at different shielding configurations within the Orion MPCV. A summary of the EFT-1 Radiation Area Monitors (RAM) mission dose results obtained from measurements performed in the Space Radiation Dosimetry Laboratory at the NASA Johnson Space Center will be presented. Each RAM included LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-100), (6)LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-600), (7)LiF:Mg,Ti (TLD-700), Al2O3:C (Luxel trademark), and CaF2:Tm (TLD-300). The RAM mission dose values will be compared with the BIRD instrument total mission dose. In addition, a similar comparison will be shown for the ISS environment by comparing the ISS RAM data with data from the six Timepix-based REM units deployed on ISS as part of the NASA REM Technology Demonstration.

  11. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Progress Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Meneghini, Robert; Kummerow, Christian D.; Meneghini, Robert; Hou, Arthur; Adler, Robert F.; Huffman, George; Barkstrom, Bruce; Wielicki, Bruce; Goodman, Steve

    1999-01-01

    Recognizing the importance of rain in the tropics and the accompanying latent heat release, NASA for the U.S. and NASDA for Japan have partnered in the design, construction and flight of an Earth Probe satellite to measure tropical rainfall and calculate the associated heating. Primary mission goals are 1) the understanding of crucial links in climate variability by the hydrological cycle, 2) improvement in the large-scale models of weather and climate 3) Improvement in understanding cloud ensembles and their impacts on larger scale circulations. The linkage with the tropical oceans and landmasses are also emphasized. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched in November 1997 with fuel enough to obtain a four to five year data set of rainfall over the global tropics from 37'N to 37'S. This paper reports progress from launch date through the spring of 1999. The data system and its products and their access is described, as are the algorithms used to obtain the data. Some exciting early results from TRMM are described. Some important algorithm improvements are shown. These will be used in the first total data reprocessing, scheduled to be complete in early 2000. The reader is given information on how to access and use the data.

  12. Ground-based solar astrometric measurements during the PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irbah, A.; Meftah, M.; Corbard, T.; Ikhlef, R.; Morand, F.; Assus, P.; Fodil, M.; Lin, M.; Ducourt, E.; Lesueur, P.; Poiet, G.; Renaud, C.; Rouze, M.

    2011-11-01

    PICARD is a space mission developed mainly to study the geometry of the Sun. The satellite was launched in June 2010. The PICARD mission has a ground program which is based at the Calern Observatory (Observatoire de la C^ote d'Azur). It will allow recording simultaneous solar images from ground. Astrometric observations of the Sun using ground-based telescopes need however an accurate modelling of optical e®ects induced by atmospheric turbulence. Previous works have revealed a dependence of the Sun radius measurements with the observation conditions (Fried's parameter, atmospheric correlation time(s) ...). The ground instruments consist mainly in SODISM II, replica of the PICARD space instrument and MISOLFA, a generalized daytime seeing monitor. They are complemented by standard sun-photometers and a pyranometer for estimating a global sky quality index. MISOLFA is founded on the observation of Angle-of-Arrival (AA) °uctuations and allows us to analyze atmospheric turbulence optical e®ects on measurements performed by SODISM II. It gives estimations of the coherence parameters characterizing wave-fronts degraded by the atmospheric turbulence (Fried's parameter, size of the isoplanatic patch, the spatial coherence outer scale and atmospheric correlation times). This paper presents an overview of the ground based instruments of PICARD and some results obtained from observations performed at Calern observatory in 2011.

  13. Development of a prototype fluid volume measurement system. [for urine volume measurement on space missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppendiek, H. F.; Sabin, C. M.; Meckel, P. T.

    1974-01-01

    The research is reported in applying the axial fluid temperature differential flowmeter to a urine volume measurement system for space missions. The fluid volume measurement system is described along with the prototype equipment package. Flowmeter calibration, electronic signal processing, and typical void volume measurements are also described.

  14. Successes with the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George; Stocker, Erich; Petersen, Walter

    2016-01-01

    Water is essential to our planet Earth. Knowing when, where and how precipitation falls is crucial for understanding the linkages between the Earth's water and energy cycles and is extraordinarily important for sustaining life on our planet during climate change. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory spacecraft launched February 27, 2014, is the anchor to the GPM international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products. GPM is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Status and successes in terms of spacecraft, instruments, retrieval products, validation, and impacts for science and society will be presented. Precipitation, microwave, satellite

  15. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission Data and Data Access

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz

    2014-05-01

    If all goes as plans, the core satellite of the GPM mission will have launched on February 28, 2014 from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. The core satellite is the center of the GPM mission as it carries both an imagining radiometer with high frequency channels and a dual-frequency precipitation radar. In addition, the core satellite is at a 65 degree inclination so that it affords many opportunities of coincident measurements with the polar orbiting radiometers that form the GPM constellation. This allows the science team to intercalibrate the brightness temperature data retrieved from the constellation satellites by using the core satellite data as the reference satellite. This will ensure that GPM produces consistent mission brightness temperatures that should lead to consistent precipitation retrievals. The paper will also present the data production status as of the week before the conference. The precipitation community will, of course, be very interested in the data generated by the core satellite instruments as well as the intercalibrated brightness temperatures and precipitation retrievals from the partner constellation satellites. This paper will present the various data products, from the instrument count data through the monthly precipitation retrievals, produced as part of the mission. It will present the key parameters available in the products; provide information of the purpose of the various products; and provide some preliminary information about the weaknesses of the new products when compared to Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) products. If the official public release of the first image has taken place before the conference, then the paper will provide some early examples of the data products. Near realtime (NRT) products from the core satellite radiometer and radar are available in both near-realtime and research mode. NRT precipitation retrievals will also be made from each of the partner radiometers. All these retrievals

  16. Charge measurements for an asteroid sample return mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macfaden, A.; Aplin, K. L.; Bowles, N. E.

    2013-09-01

    Photoelectric charging of asteroid regolith material influences particle motion and escape. Differing spacecraft and asteroid charges may also affect sample return on missions such as Marco Polo-R. To study this, bespoke 2D particle-in-cell code simulating the behaviour of photoelectrons trapped near a photoemitting surface (photosheath) has been written and implemented. The spacecraft- photosheath system reaches equilibrium in 1 ms, which is rapid compared to the descent timescale. Equilibria reached in simulations are therefore assumed representative of the dynamic spacecraft environment. Predicted potentials at different heightsand with different solar zenith angle are presented, so that an instrument to measure the potential difference across the spacecraft can be defined. The distorting effect of the spacecraft significantly modifies the potential difference and displacement currents during the terminal descent, by introducing an equipotential body, creating a shadow, and photoemitting itself. By considering the distortion from different parts of the spacecraft, optimal locations for a set of electrodes to measure the potential difference are suggested. Potential differences of about 100 mV are expected to be generated across the electrodes, which should be representative of the electrical environment. The results demonstrate that a simple set of electrodes can measure the asteroid's surface electric field during sample collection.

  17. Space acceleration measurement system description and operations on the First Spacelab Life Sciences Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, Richard; Finley, Brian D.

    1991-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) project and flight units are briefly described. The SAMS operations during the STS-40 mission are summarized, and a preliminary look at some of the acceleration data from that mission are provided. The background and rationale for the SAMS project is described to better illustrate its goals. The functions and capabilities of each SAMS flight unit are first explained, then the STS-40 mission, the SAMS's function for that mission, and the preparation of the SAMS are described. Observations about the SAMS operations during the first SAMS mission are then discussed. Some sample data are presented illustrating several aspects of the mission's microgravity environment.

  18. The PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, G.; Prado, J.-Y.

    The understanding of the physical processes taking place in the Sun allows construction of solar models. These models are validated by comparison between predictions and observations. Most of the observations are total and spectral solar irradiance, temperature, frequencies of oscillation, diameter, and asphericity, as well as their variations as a function of time. By 2006 and beyond, several missions dedicated to solar observations will be operated in particular PICARD and Solar Dynamics Observer which have complementary measurements and a strong scientific synergy for the study of the solar variability and its consequence for the Earth's climate.

  19. Analysis of plasma measurements for the Geotail mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frank, Louis A.

    1994-01-01

    Data processing and research efforts for the period October 1993 to September 1994 are reported. Routine data processing includes the production of color spectrograms and computing of quantitative plasma parameters such as the plasma number density, bulk flow velocity, temperature, and pressure. In addition, specialized analysis software is being developed for specific and general applications. Research activities include the measurement of plasmas from the Geotail spacecraft; the processing of the measurements from a hot plasma analyzer to compute one minute averages of plasma densities, temperatures, and velocities for a substantial part of the Geotail deep tail mission; and, a preliminary survey of the magnetotail for geocentric radial distances of 10 to 210 earth radii. The topology of the magnetotail with its various regions and boundaries is determined by a complex interaction with the fields and plasmas of the solar wind. Observations of the rotation of the magnetic field in the solar wind show that it is well correlated with repeated transitions at Geotail from the magnetotail lobe to a magnetosheath-like boundary layer.

  20. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-89

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Support of microgravity research on the 89th flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-89) and a continued effort to characterize the acceleration environment of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Mir Space Station form the basis for this report. For the STS-89 mission, the Space Shuttle Endeavour was equipped with a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) unit, which collected more than a week's worth of data. During docked operations with Mir, a second SAMS unit collected approximately a day's worth of data yielding the only set of acceleration measurements recorded simultaneously on the two spacecraft. Based on the data acquired by these SAMS units, this report serves to characterize a number of acceleration events and quantify their impact on the local nature of the accelerations experienced at the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment location. Crew activity was shown to nearly double the median root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration level calculated below 10 Hz, while the Enhanced Orbiter Refrigerator/Freezer operating at about 22 Hz was a strong acceleration source in the vicinity of the MGM location. The MGM science requirement that the acceleration not exceed plus or minus 1 mg was violated numerous times during their experiment runs; however, no correlation with sample instability has been found to this point. Synchronization between the SAMS data from Endeavour and from Mir was shown to be close much of the time, but caution with respect to exact timing should be exercised when comparing these data. When orbiting as a separate vehicle prior to docking, Endeavour had prominent structural modes above 3 Hz, while Mir exhibited a cluster of modes around 1 Hz. When mated, a transition to common modes was apparent in the two SAMS data sets. This report is not a comprehensive analysis of the acceleration data, so those interested in further details should contact the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services team at the National Aeronautics

  1. (abstract) MEASURE-Jupiter: Low Cost Missions to Explore Jupiter in the Post-Galileo Era

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, R. A.; Stern, S. A.; Ayon, J. A.; Lane, A. L.; Nunez, C. L.; Sauer, C. G.; Stetson, D. G.; West, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    MEASURE-Jupiter is a new mission concept for the exploration of giant planets, with initial application to Jupiter. By flying sets of lightweight spacecraft with highly focused measurement objectives, it is designed to break the apparent impass in giant planet exploration beyond Cassini. The MEASURE-Jupiter concept is characterized by: 1) intensive exploration of a giant planet system, 2) multiple small missions flown in focused waves using spacecraft costing $100M to $200M, and 3) mission sets launched every 2 to 3 years. Why Jupiter? Jupiter is the most complex planetary system in the Solar System with many scientifically intriguing bodies and phenomena to explore. The Galileo mission will scratch the surface of the exploration of Jupiter, posing many questions for the MEASURE-Jupiter missions to address. Jupiter is also the easiest planet in the Outer Solar System to reach, making possible flight times of 2 years and total mission durations of 3 years or less. Concept design studies have uncovered a number of scientifically rewarding, simple, low-cost mission options. These options have the additional attraction of being able to launch on 2-year trajectories to Jupiter with low-cost Delta II expendable launch vehicles. A partial list of mission concepts studied to date include: Io Very Close Flyby, Jupiter Close Polar Pass, Mini-Orbiters, and Galilean Satellite Penetrators. Key to the realization of the MEASURE-Jupiter missions is the judicious use of the new low power consuming advanced technology and applicable systems from the Pluto Fast Flyby mission spacecraft design. Foremost of the new technologies planned for inclusion are the elements of hybrid solar array/battery power systems which make it possible to perform the identified missions without the need for Radioactive Thermoelectric Generators (RTGs). This relieves the mission design of the attendant programmatic complexities, cost, and constraints attendant with the use of RTGs.

  2. Heat capacity mapping mission. [satellite for earth surface temperature measurement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Price, J. C.

    1978-01-01

    A Heat Capacity Mapping Mission (HCMM), part of a series of Applications Explorers Missions, is designed to provide data on surface heating as a response to solar energy input. The data is obtained by a two channel scanning radiometer, with one channel covering the visible and near-IR band between 0.5 and 1.1 micrometers, and the other covering the thermal-IR between 10.5 and 12.5 micrometers. The temperature range covered lies between 260 and 340 K, in 0.3 deg steps, with an accuracy at 280 K of plus or minus 0.5 K. Nominal altitude is 620 km, with a ground swath 700 km wide.

  3. Measuring Staff Perceptions of University Identity and Activities: The Mission and Values Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Velcoff, Jessica

    2006-01-01

    Higher education institutions need to ascertain whether their stakeholders understand the school's mission, vision, and values. In the present study, the psychometric properties of a mission identity and activity measure were investigated with two staff samples. Using a principal component factor analysis (varimax rotation), respondents in Sample…

  4. Terrestrial outgoing radiation measurements with small satellite mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Ping; Dewitte, Steven; Karatekin, Ozgur; Chevalier, André; Conscience, Christian

    2015-04-01

    The solar force is the main driver of the Earth's climate. For a balanced climate system, the incoming solar radiation is equal to the sum of the reflected visible and reemitted thermal radiation at top of the atmosphere (TOA). Thus the energy imbalance plays an important role to diagnose the health of nowadays climate. However it remains a challenge to directly track the small Energy imbalance in Earth's Radiation Budget (EIERB) from space due to the complicities of the Earth's climate system and the limitation on long term stability of space instrument. The terrestrial outgoing radiation (TOR) has been recoded with a Bolometric Oscillation Sensor onboard PICAD microsatellite. In this presentation, we will report the three years TOR observed with PICARD-BOS and its further comparison with the CERES product. However the data acquired from this mission is still not enough to derive the EIERB. But the heritage gained from this experiment shields a light on the EIERB tracking with the small satellite even a cubesat mission.

  5. Radiation environment measurements on shuttle missions using the CREAM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dyer, C. S.; Sims, A. J.; Truscott, P. R.; Farren, J.; Underwood, C.

    1992-12-01

    The Cosmic Radiation Environment and Activation Monitor (CREAM) was successfully deployed in the middeck area on Shuttle missions STS-48 and STS-44 during September and November 1991 with the aim of monitoring those aspects of the primary and secondary radiation environment responsible for single event upsets in microelectronics and background noise in sensors. Results are compared with the outputs of standard radiation environment models. For the accurate location of trapped protons the choice of geomagnetic field model is shown to be critical, while results at high latitudes show the low-altitude manifestation of the new trapped proton belt observed to follow the March 1991 solar flare event. From deployment at a number of locations there is clear evidence for a significant build-up with shielding of secondary charged particles and neutrons.

  6. Measurement of process variables in solid-state fermentation of wheat straw using FT-NIR spectroscopy and synergy interval PLS algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hui; Liu, Guohai; Mei, Congli; Yu, Shuang; Xiao, Xiahong; Ding, Yuhan

    2012-11-01

    The feasibility of rapid determination of the process variables (i.e. pH and moisture content) in solid-state fermentation (SSF) of wheat straw using Fourier transform near infrared (FT-NIR) spectroscopy was studied. Synergy interval partial least squares (siPLS) algorithm was implemented to calibrate regression model. The number of PLS factors and the number of subintervals were optimized simultaneously by cross-validation. The performance of the prediction model was evaluated according to the root mean square error of cross-validation (RMSECV), the root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) and the correlation coefficient (R). The measurement results of the optimal model were obtained as follows: RMSECV = 0.0776, Rc = 0.9777, RMSEP = 0.0963, and Rp = 0.9686 for pH model; RMSECV = 1.3544% w/w, Rc = 0.8871, RMSEP = 1.4946% w/w, and Rp = 0.8684 for moisture content model. Finally, compared with classic PLS and iPLS models, the siPLS model revealed its superior performance. The overall results demonstrate that FT-NIR spectroscopy combined with siPLS algorithm can be used to measure process variables in solid-state fermentation of wheat straw, and NIR spectroscopy technique has a potential to be utilized in SSF industry.

  7. On the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM): Bringing NASA's Earth System Science Program to the Classroom

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, J. Marshall

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission is the first mission dedicated to measuring tropical and subtropical rainfall using a variety of remote sensing instrumentation, including the first spaceborne rain-measuring radar. Since the energy released when tropical rainfall occurs is a primary "fuel" supply for the weather and climate "engine"; improvements in computer models which predict future weather and climate states may depend on better measurements of global tropical rainfall and its energy. In support of the STANYS conference theme of Education and Space, this presentation focuses on one aspect of NASA's Earth Systems Science Program. We seek to present an overview of the TRMM mission. This overview will discuss the scientific motivation for TRMM, the TRMM instrument package, and recent images from tropical rainfall systems and hurricanes. The presentation also targets educational components of the TRMM mission in the areas of weather, mathematics, technology, and geography that can be used by secondary school/high school educators in the classroom.

  8. Science, Measurement, and Technology Requirements for Infrared Climate Benchmark Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David G.; Mlynczak, Martin G.

    2011-01-01

    Quantifying climate change in the presence of natural variability requires highly accurate global measurements covering more than a decade. Instrument design considerations for trending terrestrial emitted radiance are described.

  9. The coarticulation/invariance scale: Mutual information as a measure of coarticulation resistance, motor synergy, and articulatory invariance

    PubMed Central

    Iskarous, Khalil; Mooshammer, Christine; Hoole, Phil; Recasens, Daniel; Shadle, Christine H.; Saltzman, Elliot; Whalen, D. H.

    2013-01-01

    Coarticulation and invariance are two topics at the center of theorizing about speech production and speech perception. In this paper, a quantitative scale is proposed that places coarticulation and invariance at the two ends of the scale. This scale is based on physical information flow in the articulatory signal, and uses Information Theory, especially the concept of mutual information, to quantify these central concepts of speech research. Mutual Information measures the amount of physical information shared across phonological units. In the proposed quantitative scale, coarticulation corresponds to greater and invariance to lesser information sharing. The measurement scale is tested by data from three languages: German, Catalan, and English. The relation between the proposed scale and several existing theories of coarticulation is discussed, and implications for existing theories of speech production and perception are presented. PMID:23927125

  10. Compliant Synergies in Locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travers, Matthew; Choset, Howie; Goldman @ Georgia Tech. Physics Department Collaboration

    Biological systems appear to have natural mechanisms that allow them to readily compensate for unexpected environmental variations when compared to their mechanical (i.e., robotic) counterparts. We hypothesize that the basis for this discrepancy is almost innate: what biology appears to be born with, built-in mechanisms for coordinating their many degrees of freedom, we struggle to ``program.'' We therefore look toward biology for inspiration. In particular, we are interested in kinematic synergies, low-dimensional representations that explicitly encode the underlying structure of how systems coordinate their internal degrees of freedom to achieve high-level tasks. In this work, we derive parametric representations of kinematic synergies and present a new compliant locomotion control framework that enables the parameters to be directly controlled in response to external disturbances. We present results of this framework implemented on two separate platforms, a snake-like and hexapod robot. Our results show that, using synergies, the locomotion control of these very different systems can be reduced to simple, extremely capable, and common forms, thus offering new insights into both robotic as well as biological locomotion in complex terrains.

  11. Onboard Processing of Electromagnetic Measurements for the Luna - Glob Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruska, F.; Kolmasova, I.; Santolik, O.; Skalski, A.; Pronenko, V.; Belyayev, S.; Lan, R.; Uhlir, L.

    2013-12-01

    The LEMRA-L instrument (Long-wavelength Electro-Magnetic Radiation Analyzer) will be implemented on the LUNA-GLOB spacecraft. It will analyze the data of the three-axial flux gate (DC - 10Hz) and searchcoil (1Hz - 10kHz) magnetometers LEMI. It will measure intensity, polarization, and coherence properties of waves in plasmas of the solar wind, in the lunar wake and its boundaries, and study the magnetic anomalies. We will use new modern robust onboard analysis methods to estimate the wave coherence, sense of polarization, ellipticity, and wave-vector direction, and thus substantially compress the transmitted data volumes, while conserving the important scientific information. In the burst mode data set intended for studying nonlinear phenomena, we will conserve the continuous flux-gate magnetometer data and discrete snapshots of three axial waveform measurements. In the survey-mode data set, continuous flux-gate magnetometer data will be transmitted together with onboard analyzed and averaged spectral matrices from the higher-frequency wave measurements or with onboard calculated propagation and polarization parameters.

  12. In-Situ Environmental Measurements Needed for Future Mars Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, D.; Wilson, G. R.; Murphy, J. R.; Banfield, D.; Barnes, J. R.; Farrell, W. M.; Haberle, R. M.; Magalhaes, J.; Paige, D. A.; Tillman, J. E.

    2000-01-01

    Existing measurements and modeling studies indicate that the climate and general circulation of the thin, predominately CO2 Martian atmosphere are characterized by large-amplitude variations with a wide range of spatial and temporal scales. Remote sensing observations from Earth-based telescopes and the Mariner 9, Viking, Phobos, and Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) orbiters show that the prevailing climate includes large-scale seasonal variations in surface and atmospheric temperatures (140 to 300 K), dust optical depth (0.15 to 1), and water vapor (10 to 100 precipitable microns). These observations also provided the first evidence for episodic regional and global dust storms that produce even larger perturbations in the atmospheric thermal structure and general circulation. In-situ measurements by the Viking and Mars Pathfinder Landers reinforced these conclusions, documenting changes in the atmospheric pressure on diurnal (5%) and seasonal (>20%) time scales, as well as large diurnal variations in the near-surface temperature (40 to 70 K), wind velocity (0 to 35 m/s), and dust optical depth (0.3 to 6). These in-situ measurements also reveal phenomena with temporal and spatial scales that cannot be resolved from orbit, including rapid changes in near-surface temperatures (+/- 10 K in 10 seconds), large near-surface vertical temperature gradients (+/- 15 K/meter), diurnally-varying slope winds, and dust devils . Modeling studies indicate that these changes are forced primarily by diurnal and seasonal variations in solar insolation, but they also include contributions from atmospheric thermal tides, baroclinic waves (fronts), Kelvin waves, slope winds, and monsoonal flows from the polar caps.

  13. An optimum opportunity for interstellar dust measurements by the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Kempf, S.; Krüger, H.; Postberg, F.; Soja, R. H.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2012-10-01

    The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) is an ESA L-class mission concept designed to explore the Galilean satellites of the Jovian system. Although the current mission science goals do not include any astrophysical observations, we find that the planned period of the JUICE mission is optimal for in situ measurements of Interstellar Dust (ISD), due to highly increased flux levels at that time. In case that JUICE carries a dust detector, this could lead to in situ high-resolution mass spectra of ISD grains. Such compositional information on the ISD grains is important for understanding the origins of solar/planetary systems, and therefore could represent a valuable addition to the core JUICE mission science.

  14. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurement for STS-87: Launched November 19, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; DeLombard, Richard; Reckart, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Two accelerometer systems, the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and the Space Acceleration Measurement System, were used to measure and record the microgravity environment of the Orbiter Columbia during the STS-87 mission in November-December 1997. Data from two separate Space Acceleration Measurement System units were telemetered to the ground during the mission and data plots were displayed for investigators of the Fourth United States Microgravity Payload experiments in near real-time using the World Wide Web. Plots generated using Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment data (telemetered to the ground using a tape delay) were provided to the investigators using the World Wide Web approximately twelve hours after data recording. Disturbances in the microgravity environment as recorded by these instruments are grouped by source type: Orbiter systems, on-board activities, payload operations, and unknown sources. The environment related to the Ku-band antenna dither, Orbiter structural modes, attitude deadband collapses, water dump operations, crew sleep, and crew exercise was comparable to the effects of these sources on previous Orbiter missions. Disturbances related to operations of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement Systems that were not observed on previous missions are detailed. The effects of Orbiter cabin and airlock depressurization and extravehicular activities are also reported for the first time. A set of data plots representing the entire mission is included in the CD-ROM version of this report.

  15. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurement for STS-87, Launched November 19, 1997

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin; DeLombard, Richard; Reckart, Timothy

    1999-01-01

    Two accelerometer systems, the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment and the Space Acceleration Measurement System, were used to measure and record the microgravity environment of the Orbiter Columbia during the STS-87 mission in November-December 1997. Data from two separate Space Acceleration Measurement System units were telemetered to the ground during the mission and data plots were displayed for investigators of the Fourth United States Microgravity Payload experiments in near real-time using the World Wide Web. Plots generated using Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment data (telemetered to the ground using a tape delay) were provided to the investigators using the World Wide Web approximately twelve hours after data recording. Disturbances in the microgravity environment as recorded by these instruments are grouped by source type: Orbiter systems, on-board activities, payload operations, and unknown sources. The environment related to the Ku-band antenna dither, Orbiter structural modes, attitude deadband collapses, water dump operations, crew sleep, and crew exercise was comparable to the effects of these sources on previous Orbiter missions. Disturbances related to operations of the Isothermal Dendritic Growth Experiment and Space Acceleration Measurement Systems that were not observed on previous missions are detailed. The effects of Orbiter cabin and airlock depressurization and extravehicular activities are also reported for the first time. A set of data plots representing the entire mission is included in the CD-ROM version of this report.

  16. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-95: Launched October 19, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McPherson, Kevin; Hrovat, Kevin

    2000-01-01

    John H. Glenn's historic return to space was a primary focus of the STS-95 mission. The Hubble Space Telescope (HST) orbital Systems Test (HOST), an STS-95 payload, was an in-flight demonstration of HST components to be installed during the next HST servicing mission. One of the components under evaluation was the cryocooler for the Near Infrared Camera and Multi-Object Spectrometer (NICMOS). Based on concerns about vibrations from the operation of the NICMOS cryocooler affecting the overall HST line-of-sight requirements, the Space Acceleration Measurement System for Free-Flyers (SAMS-FF) was employed to measure the vibratory environment of the STS-95 mission, including any effects introduced by the NICMOS cryocooler. The STS-95 mission represents the first STS mission supported by SAMS-FF. Utilizing a Control and Data Acquisition Unit (CDU) and two triaxial sensor heads (TSH) mounted on the HOST support structure in Discovery's cargo bay, the SAMS-FF and the HOST project were able to make vibratory measurements both on-board the vibration-isolated NICMOS cryocooler and off-board the cryocooler mounting plate. By comparing the SAMS-FF measured vibrations on-board and off-board the NICMOS cryocooler, HST engineers could assess the cryocooler g-jitter effects on the HST line-of-sight requirements. The acceleration records from both SAMS-FF accelerometers were analyzed and significant features of the microgravity environment are detailed in this report.

  17. Investigating aerosol properties in Peninsular Malaysia via the synergy of satellite remote sensing and ground-based measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanniah, Kasturi Devi; Lim, Hui Qi; Kaskaoutis, Dimitris G.; Cracknell, Arthur P.

    2014-03-01

    Spatio-temporal variation and trends in atmospheric aerosols as well as their impact on solar radiation and clouds are crucial for regional and global climate change assessment. These topics are not so well-documented over Malaysia, the fact that it receives considerable amounts of pollutants from both local and trans-boundary sources. The present study aims to analyse the spatio-temporal evolution and decadal trend of Aerosol Optical Depth (AOD) from Terra and Aqua MODIS sensors, to identify different types and origin of aerosols and explore the link between aerosols and solar radiation. AOD and fine-mode fraction (FMF) products from MODIS, AOD and Ångström Exponent (AE) values from AERONET stations along with ground-based PM10 measurements and solar radiation recordings at selected sites in Peninsular Malaysia are used for this scope. The MODIS AODs exhibit a wide spatio-temporal variation over Peninsular Malaysia, while Aqua AOD is consistently lower than that from Terra. The AOD shows a neutral-to-declining trend during the 2000s (Terra satellite), while that from Aqua exhibits an increasing trend (~ 0.01 per year). AERONET AODs exhibit either insignificant diurnal variation or higher values during the afternoon, while their short-term availability does not allow for a trend analysis. Moreover, the PM10 concentrations exhibit a general increasing trend over the examined locations. The sources and destination of aerosols are identified via the HYSPLIT trajectory model, revealing that aerosols during the dry season (June to September) are mainly originated from the west and southwest (Sumatra, Indonesia), while in the wet season (November to March) they are mostly associated with the northeast monsoon winds from the southern China Sea. Different aerosol types are identified via the relationship of AOD with FMF, revealing that the urban and biomass-burning aerosols are the most abundant over the region contributing to a significant reduction (~- 0.21 MJ m- 2) of

  18. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) update and its role in EOS and GEWEX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne

    1992-01-01

    Updated information is presented on the U.S./Japan Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), which is a relatively low-budget earth-probe satellite with a secondary objective of measuring upwelling radiation from the clouds and the surfaces below the satellite. Particular attention is given to the TRMM rain measurements and the characteristics of the three TRMM rain measuring instruments: the microwave radiometer, the radar, and the visible/IR radiometer. Also discussed are the TRMM contributions to EOS and GEWEX.

  19. Global precipitation measurement (GPM) mission and its application for flood monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Oki, Riko; Shimizu, Shuji; Kojima, Masahiro

    2006-12-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an expanded follow-on mission of the current Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The concept of GPM is, 1) TRMM-like, non-sun-synchronous core satellite carrying the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) to be developed by Japan and a microwave radiometer to be developed by United States, and 2) constellation of satellites in polar orbit, each carrying a microwave radiometer provided by international partner. The constellation system of GPM will make it possible every three-hour global precipitation measurement. Because of its concept on focusing high-accurate and high-frequent global precipitation observation, GPM has a unique position among future Earth observation missions. GPM international partnerships will embody concept of GEOSS. Observation data acquired by the GPM mission are expected to be used for both Earth environmental research and various societal benefit areas. One of most expected application fields is weather prediction. Use of high-frequent observation in numerical weather prediction models will improve weather forecasting especially for extreme events such as tropical cyclones and heavy rain. Another example is application to flood monitoring and forecasting. Recent increasing needs of real-time flood information required from many countries especially in Asia will strongly support operational application of GPM products in this field.

  20. DXL: A sounding rocket mission measuring Solar Wind Charge eXchange properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galeazzi, Massimiliano

    2016-04-01

    Solar Wind interacts with the interstellar neutrals via charge exchange mechanism to produce spatially and temporally varying x-rays making it difficult to separate from other diffuse sources. The Diffuse X-rays from the Local Galaxy (DXL) mission measured the spatial signature of Solar Wind Charge eXchange (SWCX) emission due to the helium focusing cone. The mission used 2 large area proportional counters and was able to separate the SWCX contribution from Local Hot Bubble emission. The data from the mission provide a robust estimate of the SWCX contribution to the ROSAT maps, measuring the compound SWCX cross section with He in all ROSAT bands. The results showed that the total SWCX contribution in the ¼ keV band is, on average, ~27%. A new mission, DXL-2, was launched on December 4, 2015 with two new counters for a better understanding of the energy distribution of heliospheric SWCX photons, by using a multi-band approach. A dedicated scan to accurately measure the cone position and solve the IBEX controversy was also performed. The talk will discuss the DXL mission, the results from the first flight, and the preliminary results from the latest flight.Submitted for the DXL Collaboration

  1. Coordinated science with the Solar Orbiter, Solar Probe Plus, Interhelioprobe and SPORT missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maksimovic, Milan; Vourlidas, Angelos; Zimovets, Ivan; Velli, Marco; Zhukov, Andrei; Kuznetsov, Vladimir; Liu, Ying; Bale, Stuart; Ming, Xiong

    The concurrent science operations of the ESA Solar Orbiter (SO), NASA Solar Probe Plus (SPP), Russian Interhelioprobe (IHP) and Chinese SPORT missions will offer a truly unique epoch in heliospheric science. While each mission will achieve its own important science objectives, taken together the four missions will be capable of doing the multi-point measurements required to address many problems in Heliophysics such as the coronal origin of the solar wind plasma and magnetic field or the way the Solar transients drive the heliospheric variability. In this presentation, we discuss the capabilities of the four missions and the Science synergy that will be realized by concurrent operations

  2. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Science Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur

    2007-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission, an international satellite mission to unify and advance space-based precipitation measurements around the globe, is a science mission with integrated application goals. The mission is designed to (1) advance the knowledge of the global water cycle and freshwater availability, and (2) improve weather, climate, and hydrological prediction capabilities through more accurate and frequent measurements of global precipitation. The cornerstone of GPM is the deployment of a Core Spacecraft in a unique 65 deg-inclined orbit to serve as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve the accuracy of precipitation measurements by a heterogeneous constellation of dedicated and operational passive microwave sensors. The Core Spacecraft will carry a dual-frequency (Ku-Ka band) radar and a multi-channel microwave radiometer with high-frequency capabilities to provide measurements of 3-D precipitation structures and microphysical properties, which are key to achieving a better understanding of precipitation processes and improved retrieval algorithms for passive microwave radiometers. The GPM constellation is envisioned to comprise 5 or more conical-scanning microwave radiometers provided by partners, augmented by cross-track microwave sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and MetOp satellites for improved sampling over land. The GPM Mission is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA), with opportunities for additional international partners in constellation satellites and ground validation. An overview of the GPM mission concept and science activities in the United States will be presented.

  3. A Plan for Measuring Climatic Scale Global Precipitation Variability: The Global Precipitation Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The outstanding success of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) stemmed from a near flawless launch and deployment, a highly successful measurement campaign, achievement of all original scientific objectives before the mission life had ended, and the accomplishment of a number of unanticipated but important additional scientific advances. This success and the realization that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool in the understanding of decadal climate variability has helped motivate a comprehensive global rainfall measuring mission, called 'The Global Precipitation Mission' (GPM). The intent of this mission is to address looming scientific questions arising in the context of global climate-water cycle interactions, hydrometeorology, weather prediction, the global carbon budget, and atmosphere-biosphere-cryosphere chemistry. This paper addresses the status of that mission currently planed for launch in the early 2007 time frame. The GPM design involves a nine-member satellite constellation, one of which will be an advanced TRMM-like 'core' satellite carrying a dual-frequency Ku-Ka band radar (df-PR) and a TMI-like radiometer. The other eight members of the constellation can be considered drones to the core satellite, each carrying some type of passive microwave radiometer measuring across the 10.7-85 GHz frequency range, likely based on both real and synthetic aperture antenna technology and to include a combination of new lightweight dedicated GPM drones and both co-existing operational and experimental satellites carrying passive microwave radiometers (i.e., SSM/l, AMSR, etc.). The constellation is designed to provide a minimum of three-hour sampling at any spot on the globe using sun-synchronous orbit architecture, with the core satellite providing relevant measurements on internal cloud precipitation microphysical processes. The core satellite also enables 'training' and 'calibration' of the drone retrieval process. Additional

  4. Greenhouses and their humanizing synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haeuplik-Meusburger, Sandra; Paterson, Carrie; Schubert, Daniel; Zabel, Paul

    2014-03-01

    Greenhouses in space will require advanced technical systems of automatic watering, soil-less cultivation, artificial lighting, and computerized observation of plants. Functions discussed for plants in space habitats include physical/health requirements and human psychology, social cohesion, as well as the complex sensorial benefits of plants for humans. The authors consider the role of plants in long-term space missions historically since 1971 (Salyut 1) and propose a set of priorities to be considered within the design requirements for greenhouses and constructed environments given a range of benefits associated with plant-human relationships. They cite recent research into the use of greenhouses in extreme environments to reveal the relative importance of greenhouses for people living in isolated locations. Additionally, they put forward hypotheses about where greenhouses might factor into several strata of human health. In a recent design-in-use study of astronauts' experiences in space habitats discussed in Architecture for Astronauts (Springer Press 2011) it was found that besides the basic advantages for life support there are clearly additional "side benefits" for habitability and physical wellbeing, and thus long-term mission success. The authors have composed several key theses regarding the need to promote plant-human relationships in space, including areas where synergy and symbiosis occur. They cite new comprehensive research into the early US Space Program to reveal where programmatic requirements could be added to space architecture to increase the less quantifiable benefits to astronauts of art, recreation, and poetic engagement with their existential condition of estrangement from the planet. Specifically in terms of the technological requirements, the authors propose the integration of a new greenhouse subsystem component into space greenhouses—the Mobile Plant Cultivation Subsystem—a portable, personal greenhouse that can be integrated

  5. Summary report of mission acceleration measurements for Spacehab-01, STS-57 launched 21 June 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finley, Brian; Grodsinsky, Carlos; Delombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The maiden voyage of the commercial Spacehab laboratory module onboard the STS-57 mission was integrated with several accelerometer packages, one of which was the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). The June 21st 1993, launch was the seventh successful mission for the Office of Life and Microgravity Sciences and Application's (OLMSA) SAMS unit. This flight was also complemented by a second accelerometer system. The Three Dimensional Microgravity Accelerometer (3-DMA), a Code C funded acceleration measurement system, offering an on-orbit residual calibration as a reference for the unit's four triaxial accelerometers. The SAMS accelerometer unit utilized three remote triaxial sensor heads mounted on the forward Spacehab module bulkhead and on one centrally located experiment locker door. These triaxial heads had filter cut-offs set to 5, 50, and 1000 Hz. The mission also included other experiment specific accelerometer packages in various locations.

  6. Synergy in satellite communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sachdev, D. K.

    1989-10-01

    After presenting a development history for satellite communications systems demonstrating the extent to which synergistic, efficiency-enhancing interactions between emerging technologies form the basis for much of the economic feasibility of these efforts, an evaluation is made of prospective synergisms. Among those identified as uniquely promising are the interactions of electric propulsion and Ni-H batteries, and of onboard data processing/bulk demultiplexing. An attempt is made to furnish a stimulus for system designers to actively seek out synergies rather than wait passively until they emerge.

  7. From silos to synergy.

    PubMed

    Treadwell, Janet; Levermann, Laurie; Soffar, Gail; Giardino, Angelo

    2007-08-01

    Texas Children's Health Plan (TCHP) redesigned its approach to care management in an effort to provide support for member-centric care and the medical home. The changes in process and structure focused on connecting information and programs to promote care for members in a collaborative manner and taking advantage of the synergy between staff, programming, and the physician practices serving health plan membership. The results brought about an improvement in job satisfaction, positive change in the medical-loss ratio, and new innovations to support preventive and chronic care service delivery needs of the TCHP membership. PMID:18041351

  8. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-62, Launched 4 March 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The second mission of the United States Microgravity Payload on-board the STS-62 mission was supported with three accelerometer instruments: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and two units of the Space Acceleration Measurements System (SAMS). The March 4, 1994 launch was the fourth successful mission for OARE and the ninth successful mission for SAMS. The OARE instrument utilizes a sensor for very low frequency measurements below one Hertz. The accelerations in this frequency range are typically referred to as quasisteady accelerations. One of the SAMS units had two remote triaxial sensor heads mounted on the forward MPESS structure between two furnance experiments, MEPHISTO and AADSF. These triaxial heads had low-pass filter cut-off frequencies at 10 and 25 Hz. The other SAMS unit utilized three remote triaxial sensor heads. Two of the sensor heads were mounted on the aft MPESS structure between the two experiments IDGE and ZENO. These triaxial heads had low-pass filter cut-off frequencies at 10 and 25 Hz. The third sensor head was mounted on the thermostat housing inside the IDGE experiment container. This triaxial head had a low-pass filter cut-off frequency at 5 Hz. This report is prepared to furnish interested experiment investigators with a guide to evaluating the acceleration environment during STS-62 and as a means of identifying areas which require further study. To achieve this purpose, various pieces of information are included, such as an overview of the STS-62 mission, a description of the accelerometer system flown on STS-62, some specific analysis of the accelerometer data in relation to the various mission activities, and an overview of the low-gravity environment during the entire mission. An evaluation form is included at the end of the report to solicit users' comments about the usefulness of this series of reports.

  9. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-75, Launched February 22, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Moskowitz, Milton E.; McPherson, Kevin M.; DeLombard, Richard

    1996-01-01

    Two accelerometers provided acceleration data during the STS-75 mission in support of the third United States Microgravity Payload (USMP-3) experiments. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) provided a measure of the microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia. The OARE provided investigators with quasi-steady acceleration measurements after about a six hour time lag dictated by downlink constraints. SAMS data were downlinked in near-real-time and recorded on-board for post-mission analysis. An overview of the mission is provided as are brief discussions of these two accelerometer systems. Data analysis techniques used to process SAMS and OARE data are discussed Using a combination of these techniques, the microgravity environment related to several different Orbiter, crew, and experiment operations is presented and interpreted. The microgravity environment represented by SAMS and OARE data is comparable to the environments measured by the instruments on earlier microgravity science missions. The OARE data compared well with predictions of the quasi-steady environment. The SAMS data show the influence of thruster firings and crew motion (transient events) and of crew exercise, Orbiter systems, and experiment operations (oscillatory events). Thruster activity on this mission appears to be somewhat more frequent than on other microgravity missions with the combined firings of the F5L and F5R jets producing significant acceleration transients. The specific crew activities performed in the middeck and flight deck, the SPREE table rotations, the waste collection system compaction, and the fuel cell purge had negligible effects on the microgravity environment of the USMP-3 carriers. The Ku band antenna repositioning activity resulted in a brief interruption of the ubiquitous 17 Hz signal in the SAMS data. In addition, the auxiliary power unit operations during the Flight Control System checkout

  10. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-78. Launched June 20, 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hakimzadeh, Roshanak; Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin M.; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Rogers, Melissa J. B.

    1997-01-01

    The microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia was measured during the STS-78 mission using accelerometers from three different instruments: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment, the Space Acceleration Measurement System and the Microgravity Measurement Assembly. The quasi-steady environment was also calculated in near real-time during the mission by the Microgravity Analysis Workstation. The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment provided investigators with real-time quasi-steady acceleration measurements. The Space Acceleration Measurement System recorded higher frequency data on-board for post-mission analysis. The Microgravity Measurement Assembly provided investigators with real-time quasi-steady and higher frequency acceleration measurements. The Microgravity Analysis Workstation provided calculation of the quasi-steady environment. This calculation was presented to the science teams in real-time during the mission. The microgravity environment related to several different Orbiter, crew and experiment operations is presented and interpreted in this report. A radiator deploy, the Flight Control System checkout, and a vernier reaction control system reboost demonstration had minimal effects on the acceleration environment, with excitation of frequencies in the 0.01 to 10 Hz range. Flash Evaporator System venting had no noticeable effect on the environment while supply and waste water dumps caused excursions of 2 x lO(exp -6) to 4 x 10(exp -6) g in the Y(sub b) and Z(sub b) directions. Crew sleep and ergometer exercise periods can be clearly seen in the acceleration data, as expected. Accelerations related to the two Life Science Laboratory Equipment Refrigerator/Freezers were apparent in the data as are accelerations caused by the Johnson Space Center Projects Centrifuge. As on previous microgravity missions, several signals are present in the acceleration data for which a source has not been identified. The causes of these accelerations

  11. Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Precipitation Processing System (PPS) GPM Mission Gridded Text Products Provide Surface Precipitation Retrievals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich Franz; Kelley, O.; Kummerow, C.; Huffman, G.; Olson, W.; Kwiatkowski, J.

    2015-01-01

    In February 2015, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission core satellite will complete its first year in space. The core satellite carries a conically scanning microwave imager called the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI), which also has 166 GHz and 183 GHz frequency channels. The GPM core satellite also carries a dual frequency radar (DPR) which operates at Ku frequency, similar to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Radar, and a new Ka frequency. The precipitation processing system (PPS) is producing swath-based instantaneous precipitation retrievals from GMI, both radars including a dual-frequency product, and a combined GMIDPR precipitation retrieval. These level 2 products are written in the HDF5 format and have many additional parameters beyond surface precipitation that are organized into appropriate groups. While these retrieval algorithms were developed prior to launch and are not optimal, these algorithms are producing very creditable retrievals. It is appropriate for a wide group of users to have access to the GPM retrievals. However, for researchers requiring only surface precipitation, these L2 swath products can appear to be very intimidating and they certainly do contain many more variables than the average researcher needs. Some researchers desire only surface retrievals stored in a simple easily accessible format. In response, PPS has begun to produce gridded text based products that contain just the most widely used variables for each instrument (surface rainfall rate, fraction liquid, fraction convective) in a single line for each grid box that contains one or more observations.This paper will describe the gridded data products that are being produced and provide an overview of their content. Currently two types of gridded products are being produced: (1) surface precipitation retrievals from the core satellite instruments GMI, DPR, and combined GMIDPR (2) surface precipitation retrievals for the partner constellation

  12. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meadows, B.; Davis, K.; Barrick, J. D. W.; Browell, E. V.; Chen, G.; Dobler, J. T.; Fried, A.; Lauvaux, T.; Lin, B.; McGill, M. J.; Miles, N. L.; Nehrir, A. R.; Obland, M. D.; O'Dell, C.; Sweeney, C.; Yang, M. M.

    2015-12-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital - 2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT - America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT - America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2 and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  13. Airborne Measurements in Support of the NASA Atmospheric Carbon and Transport - America (ACT-America) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meadows, Byron; Davis, Ken; Barrick, John; Browell, Edward; Chen, Gao; Dobler, Jeremy; Fried, Alan; Lauvaux, Thomas; Lin, Bing; McGill, Matt; Miles, Natasha; Nehrir, Amin; Obland, Michael; O'Dell, Chris; Sweeney, Colm; Yang, Melissa

    2015-01-01

    NASA announced the research opportunity Earth Venture Suborbital -2 (EVS-2) mission in support of the NASA's science strategic goals and objectives in 2013. Penn State University, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC), and other academic institutions, government agencies, and industrial companies together formulated and proposed the Atmospheric Carbon and Transport -America (ACT -America) suborbital mission, which was subsequently selected for implementation. The airborne measurements that are part of ACT-America will provide a unique set of remote and in-situ measurements of CO2 over North America at spatial and temporal scales not previously available to the science community and this will greatly enhance our understanding of the carbon cycle. ACT -America will consist of five airborne campaigns, covering all four seasons, to measure regional atmospheric carbon distributions and to evaluate the accuracy of atmospheric transport models used to assess carbon sinks and sources under fair and stormy weather conditions. This coordinated mission will measure atmospheric carbon in the three most important regions of the continental US carbon balance: Northeast, Midwest, and South. Data will be collected using 2 airborne platforms (NASA Wallops' C-130 and NASA Langley's B-200) with both in-situ and lidar instruments, along with instrumented ground towers and under flights of the Orbiting Carbon Observatory (OCO-2) satellite. This presentation provides an overview of the ACT-America instruments, with particular emphasis on the airborne CO2and backscatter lidars, and the, rationale, approach, and anticipated results from this mission.

  14. Operating the Dual-Orbiter GRAIL Mission to Measure the Moon's Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerer, Joseph G.; Havens, Glen G.

    2012-01-01

    NASA's mission to measure the Moon's gravity and determine the interior structure, from crust to core, has almost completed its 3-month science data collection phase. The twin orbiters of the Gravity Recovery and Interior Laboratory (GRAIL) mission were launched from Florida on September 10, 2011, on a Delta-II launch vehicle. After traveling for nearly four months on a low energy trajectory to the Moon, they were inserted into lunar orbit on New Year's Eve and New Year's Day. In January 2012 a series of circularization maneuvers brought the orbiters into co-planar near-circular polar orbits. In February a distant (75- km) rendezvous was achieved and the science instruments were turned on. A dual- frequency (Ka and S-band) inter-orbiter radio link provides a precise orbiter-to-orbiter range measurement that enables the gravity field estimation. NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, CA, manages the GRAIL project. Mission management, mission planning and sequencing, and navigation are conducted at JPL. Lockheed Martin, the flight system manufacturer, operates the orbiters from their control center in Denver, Colorado. The orbiters together have performed 28 propulsive maneuvers to reach and maintain the science phase configuration. Execution of these maneuvers, as well as the payload checkout and calibration activities, has gone smoothly due to extensive pre-launch operations planning and testing. The key to the operations success has been detailed timelines for product interchange between the operations teams and proven procedures from previous JPL/LM planetary missions. Once in science phase, GRAIL benefitted from the payload operational heritage of the GRACE mission that measures the Earth's gravity.

  15. Simultaneous measurement of the total solar irradiance and solar diameter by the PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gérard; Dewitte, Steven; Schmutz, Werner; Picard Team

    2006-01-01

    A mission dedicated to simultaneous measurements of the solar diameter, spectral, and total solar irradiance is presently in development for launch end of the year 2008 on board of a microsatellite under the responsibility of Centre National d'Etudes Spatiales. The payload will consist of an imaging telescope, three filter radiometers with in total twelve channels, and two independent absolute radiometers. The scientific aims are presented as well as the concepts and properties of the instrumentation. This mission is named PICARD after the pioneering work of Jean Picard (1620-1682) who precisely determined the solar diameter during the Maunder minimum.

  16. Nuclear emulsion measurements of the astronauts' radiation exposures on Skylab missions 2, 3, and 4

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schaefer, H. J.; Sullivan, J. J.

    1975-01-01

    On the Skylab missions, Ilford G.5 and K.2 emulsions were flown as part of passive dosimeter packs carried by the astronauts on their wrists. Due to the long mission times, latent image fading and track crowing imposed limitations on a quantitative track and grain count analysis. For Skylab 2, the complete proton energy spectrum was determined within reasonable error limits. A combined mission dose equivalent of 2,490 millirems from protons, tissue stars and neutrons was measured on Skylab 2. A stationary emulsion stack, kept in a film vault drawer on the same mission, displayed a highly structured directional distribution of the fluence of low-energy protons (enders) reflecting the local shield distribution. On the 59 and 84-day mission 3 and 4, G.5 emulsions had to be cut on the microtom to 5-7 microns for microscopic examination. Even so, the short track segments in such thin layers precluded a statistically reliable grain count analysis. However, the K.2 emulsions still allowed accurate proton ender counts without special provisions.

  17. Combined Infrared Stereo and Laser Ranging Cloud Measurements from Shuttle Mission STS-85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, R. S.; Spinhirne, J. D.; Manizade, K. F.

    2004-01-01

    Multiangle remote sensing provides a wealth of information for earth and climate monitoring, such as the ability to measure the height of cloud tops through stereoscopic imaging. As technology advances so do the options for developing spacecraft instrumentation versatile enough to meet the demands associated with multiangle measurements. One such instrument is the infrared spectral imaging radiometer, which flew as part of mission STS-85 of the space shuttle in 1997 and was the first earth- observing radiometer to incorporate an uncooled microbolometer array detector as its image sensor. Specifically, a method for computing cloud-top height with a precision of +/- 620 m from the multispectral stereo measurements acquired during this flight has been developed, and the results are compared with coincident direct laser ranging measurements from the shuttle laser altimeter. Mission STS-85 was the first space flight to combine laser ranging and thermal IR camera systems for cloud remote sensing.

  18. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). Phase B: Data capture facility definition study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Aerospace Administration (NASA) and the National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA) initiated the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) to obtain more accurate measurements of tropical rainfall then ever before. The measurements are to improve scientific understanding and knowledge of the mechanisms effecting the intra-annual and interannual variability of the Earth's climate. The TRMM is largely dependent upon the handling and processing of the data by the TRMM Ground System supporting the mission. The objective of the TRMM is to obtain three years of climatological determinations of rainfall in the tropics, culminating in data sets of 30-day average rainfall over 5-degree square areas, and associated estimates of vertical distribution of latent heat release. The scope of this study is limited to the functions performed by TRMM Data Capture Facility (TDCF). These functions include capturing the TRMM spacecraft return link data stream; processing the data in the real-time, quick-look, and routine production modes, as appropriate; and distributing real time, quick-look, and production data products to users. The following topics are addressed: (1) TRMM end-to-end system description; (2) TRMM mission operations concept; (3) baseline requirements; (4) assumptions related to mission requirements; (5) external interface; (6) TDCF architecture and design options; (7) critical issues and tradeoffs; and (8) recommendation for the final TDCF selection process.

  19. History of satellite missions and measurements of the Earth Radiation Budget (1957-1984)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, F. B.; Gruber, A.; Hunt, G. E.; Mecherikunnel, A. T.

    1986-01-01

    The history of satellite missions and their measurements of the earth radiation budget from the beginning of the space age until the present time are reviewed. The survey emphasizes the early struggle to develop instrument systems to monitor reflected shortwave and emitted long-wave exitances from the earth, and the problems associated with the interpretation of these observations from space. In some instances, valuable data sets were developed from satellite measurements whose instruments were not specifically designed for earth radiation budget observations.

  20. A novel computational framework for deducing muscle synergies from experimental joint moments

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Anantharaman; Modenese, Luca; Phillips, Andrew T. M.

    2014-01-01

    Prior experimental studies have hypothesized the existence of a “muscle synergy” based control scheme for producing limb movements and locomotion in vertebrates. Such synergies have been suggested to consist of fixed muscle grouping schemes with the co-activation of all muscles in a synergy resulting in limb movement. Quantitative representations of these groupings (termed muscle weightings) and their control signals (termed synergy controls) have traditionally been derived by the factorization of experimentally measured EMG. This study presents a novel approach for deducing these weightings and controls from inverse dynamic joint moments that are computed from an alternative set of experimental measurements—movement kinematics and kinetics. This technique was applied to joint moments for healthy human walking at 0.7 and 1.7 m/s, and two sets of “simulated” synergies were computed based on two different criteria (1) synergies were required to minimize errors between experimental and simulated joint moments in a musculoskeletal model (pure-synergy solution) (2) along with minimizing joint moment errors, synergies also minimized muscle activation levels (optimal-synergy solution). On comparing the two solutions, it was observed that the introduction of optimality requirements (optimal-synergy) to a control strategy solely aimed at reproducing the joint moments (pure-synergy) did not necessitate major changes in the muscle grouping within synergies or the temporal profiles of synergy control signals. Synergies from both the simulated solutions exhibited many similarities to EMG derived synergies from a previously published study, thus implying that the analysis of the two different types of experimental data reveals similar, underlying synergy structures. PMID:25520645

  1. Radioscience and seismic measurements for the INSIGHT mission about interior of Mars.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehant, Véronique; Asmar, Sami; Folkner, William; Lognonné, Philippe; Banerdt, Bruce; Smrekar, Suzanne; Rivoldini, Attilio; Christensen, Ulrich; Giardini, Domenico; Pike, Tom; Clinton, John; Garcia, Raphael; Johnson, Catherine; Kobayashi, Naoki; Knapmeyer-Endrun, Brigitte; Mimoun, David; Mocquet, Antoine; Panning, Mark; Tromp, Jeroen; Weber, Renee

    2015-04-01

    We shall use the X-band radio link of the future 2016 InSIGHT (Interior exploration using Seismic Investigations, Geodesy, and Heat Transport) lander on the surface of Mars with the objective to better determine the rotation and interior structure of Mars. This X-band radio link consists in two-way Doppler measurements from a direct radio-link between the Martian lander and deep space tracking stations on the Earth. On the basis of these measurements, it will be possible to monitor the lander position relative to the Earth and in turn to improve the determination of the Mars' orientation and rotation parameters (MOP), i.e. the rotation rate variations (or Length of Days LOD), the precession rate and the nutations of the rotation axis. As these MOP parameters are related to the interior of the planet, we further discuss the expected improvement in our knowledge of Mars' interior in synergy with the seismic data, which include the tidal data. We will show in particular how to determine the state, size, and composition of the Martian core. These parameters are very important for understanding the evolution of Mars.

  2. Relationship of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission to Global Change Research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    In late 2001, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission was approved as a new start by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). This new mission is motivated by a number of scientific questions that are posed over a range of space and time scales that generally fall within the discipline of the global water and energy cycle (GWEC). Recognizing that satellite rainfall datasets are now a foremost tool for understanding global climate variability out to decadal scales and beyond, for improving weather forecasting, and for producing better predictions of hydrometeorological processes including short-term hazardous flooding and seasonal fresh water resources assessment, a comprehensive and internationally sanctioned global measuring strategy has led to the GPM mission. The GPM mission plans to expand the scope of rainfall measurement through use of a multi-member satellite constellation that will be contributed by a number of world nations. This talk overviews the GPM scientific research program that has been fostered within NASA, then focuses on scientific progress that is being made in various research areas in the course of the mission formulation phase that are of interest to the global change scientific community. This latter part of the talk addresses research issues that have become central to the GPM science implementation plan concerning: (1) the rate of global water cycling through the atmosphere and surface and the relationship of precipitation variability to the sustained rate of the water cycle; (2) the relationship between climate change and cloud macrophysical- microphysical processes; and (3) the general improvement in measuring precipitation at the fundamental microphysical level that will take place during the GPM era and an explanation of how these improvements are expected to come about.

  3. Upper limb joint space modeling of stroke induced synergies using isolated and voluntary arm perturbations.

    PubMed

    Simkins, Matt; Al-Refai, Aimen H; Rosen, Jacob

    2014-05-01

    Among other diminished motor capabilities, survivors of a stroke often exhibit joint synergies. These synergies are stereotypically characterized by involuntary joint co-activation. With respect to the upper limbs, such synergies diminish coordination in reaching, pointing, and other daily tasks. The primary goal of this research is to model synergy and quantify it in a comprehensive and mathematically tractable form. A motion capture system was used to measure joint rotations from stroke survivors and control subjects. These data showed that joint synergies are nonunique and asymmetric. The model also provided a way to calculate joint combinations that result in maximum and minimum synergy. Beyond providing a more complete view of synergies, this approach could facilitate new ways to evaluate and treat stroke survivors. In particular, this approach may have applications in diagnostic and treatment algorithms for use in rehabilitation robots. PMID:23912501

  4. Synergies with the infrared

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexander, D.

    2016-06-01

    In this solicited talk I will review the synergy between XMM-Newton (and Chandra) and infrared facilities. I will focus on two key advantages from the combination of X-ray and infrared observations. First, infrared observations allow for the identification of the most heavily obscured AGNs that are weak or undetected at X-ray observations, providing a more complete census of AGN activity than from X-ray observations alone. Second, infrared observations provide constraints on the star-formation properties of the AGNs, allowing for insight into the connection between AGN activity and star formation. I will use these key advantages to discuss our progress in identifying a complete census of AGN activity and our understanding of the AGN-star formation connection. I will also review how yet greater gains can be made with future planned and proposed facilities.

  5. The Global Lightning and Sprite Measurement (GLIMS) Mission on International Space Station

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushio, Tomoo; Sato, Mitsuteru; Morimoto, Takeshi; Suzuki, Makoto; Kikuchi, Hiroshi; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Takahashi, Yukihiro; Hobara, Yasuhide; Inan, Umran; Linscott, Ivan; Sakamoto, Yuji; Ishida, Ryohei; Kikuchi, Masayuki; Yoshida, Kazuya; Kawasaki, Zen-Ichiro

    Global Lightning and sprIte MeasurementS (GLIMS) is a mission on the International Space Station (ISS) to detect and locate optical transient luminous events (TLEs) and associated lightning simultaneously from the non-sun-synchronous orbit. It is scheduled to be launched from Japan in January, 2012 as part of the multi-mission consolidated equipment on the Japanese Exposure Module (JEM). Our mission's goals are (1) to detect and locate lightning and sprites within storm scale resolution over a large region of the Earth's surface along the orbital track of the ISS without any bias, (2) to clarify the mechanism by which sprites are generated, and (3) to identify the conditions under which TLEs occur. To achieve these goals, two CMOS cameras, six Photometers, a VLF receiver and VHF interferometer with two antennas are installed at the bottom of the module to observe the TLEs, as well as causative lightning discharges at nadir direction during day and night time. Though the luminous events' so-called sprites, elves and jets have been investigated by numerous researchers all over the world based mainly on ground observations, some important problems have not been fully understood yet. These include the generation mechanisms of columniform fine structures and horizontal offset of some sprites from the parent lightning discharges. In the JEM-GLIMS mission, observations from our synchronized sensors will shed light on the unsolved problems mentioned above regarding TLEs and causative lightning discharges. In this presentation scientific background, instrumentation, and project summaries are given.

  6. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-65, Launched 8 July 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1995-01-01

    The second flight of the International Microgravity Laboratory (IML-2) payload on board the STS-65 mission was supported by three accelerometer instruments: The Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment (OARE) located close to the orbiter center of mass; the Quasi-Steady Acceleration Measurement experiment, and the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS), both in the Spacelab module. A fourth accelerometer, the Microgravity Measuring Device recorded data in the middeck in support of exercise isolation tests.Data collected by OARE and SAMS during IML-2 are displayed in this report. The OARE data represent the microgravity environment below 1 Hz. The SAMS data represent the environment in the 0.01 Hz to 100 Hz range. Variations in the environment caused by unique activities are presented. Specific events addressed are: crew activity, crew exercise, experiment component mixing activities, experiment centrifuge operations, refrigerator/freezer operations and circulation pump operations. The analyses included in this report complement analyses presented in other mission summary reports.

  7. GlobCurrent: Sentinel-3 Synergy in Action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannessen, J. A.; Chapron, B.; Collard, F.; Rio, M.-H.; Piolle, J.-F.; Quartly, G.; Shutler, J.; Escola, R.; Donlon, C.; Danielson, R.; Korosov, A.; Raj, R. P.; Kudryavtsev, V.; Roca, M.; Tournadre, J.; Larnicol, G.; Labroue, S.; Miller, P.; Nencioli, F.; Warren, M.; Hansen, M.

    2015-12-01

    The ESA Data User Element (DUE) funded GlobCurrent project (http://www.globcurrent.org) aims to: (i) advance the quantitative estimation of ocean surface currents from satellite sensor synergy; and (ii) demonstrate impact in user-led scientific, operational and commercial applications that, in turn, will improve and strengthen the uptake of satellite measurements. Today, a synergetic approach for quantitative analysis can build on high-resolution imaging radar and spectrometer data, infrared radiometer data and radar altimeter measurements. It will further integrate Sentinel-3 in combination with Sentinel-1 SAR data. From existing and past missions, it is often demonstrated that sharp gradients in the sea surface temperature (SST) field and the ocean surface chlorophyll-a distribution are spatially correlated with the sea surface roughness anomaly fields at small spatial scales, in the sub-mesocale (1-10 km) to the mesoscale (30-80 km). At the larger mesoscale range (>50 km), information derived from radar altimeters often depict the presence of coherent structures and eddies. The variability often appears largest in regions where the intense surface current regimes (>100 - 200 km) are found. These 2-dimensional structures manifested in the satellite observations represent evidence of the upper ocean (~100-200 m) dynamics. Whereas the quasi geostrophic assumption is valid for the upper ocean dynamics at the larger scale (>100 km), possible triggering mechanisms for the expressions at the mesoscale-to-sub-mesoscale may include spiraling tracers of inertial motion and the interaction of the wind-driven Ekman layer with the quasi-geostrophic current field. This latter, in turn, produces bands of downwelling (convergence) and upwelling (divergence) near fronts. A regular utilization of the sensor synergy approach with the combination of Sentinel-3 and Sentinel-1 will provide a highly valuable data set for further research and development to better relate the 2

  8. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, A.; Azarbarzin, A.; Kakar, R.; Neeck, S.

    2009-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors to provide next-generation precipitation data products for scientific research and societal applications. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and calibration reference for constellation radiometers. NASA will deploy the GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms, and JAXA will contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Partnerships are under development to include additional conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. In addition, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). As a science mission with integrated application goals, GPM is expected to (1) provide new measurement standards for precipitation estimation from space, (2) improve understanding of precipitation physics, the global water cycle variability, and freshwater availability, and (3) advance weather/climate/hydrological prediction capabilities to directly benefit the society. An overview of the GPM mission concept, program

  9. Science and Measurement Requirements for a Plant Physiology and Functional Types Mission: Measuring the Composition, Function and Health of Global Land and Coastal Ocean Ecosystems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Rogez, Francois; Green, Rob; Ungar, Steve; Knox, Robert; Asner, Greg; Muller-Karger, Frank; Bissett, Paul; Chekalyuk, Alex; Dierssen, Heidi; Gamon, John; Hook, Simon; Meister, Gerhard; Middleton, Betsy; Ollinger, Scott; Roberts, Dar; Siegel, Dave; Townsend, Phil; Saatchi, Sassan; Unstin, Susan; Turner, Woody; Wickland, Diane; Bontempi, Paula; Emanuel, Bill

    2007-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the proposed Plant Physiology and Functional Types (PPFT) Mission. The National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey, placed a critical priority on a Mission to observe distribution and changes in ecosystem functions. The PPFT satellite mission provides the essential measurements needed to assess drivers of change in biodiversity and ecosystem services that affect human welfare. The presentation reviews the science questions that the mission will be designed to answer, the science rationale, the science measurements, the mission concept, the planned instrumentation, the calibration method, and key signal to noise ratios and uniformity requirements.

  10. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.

    2010-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include microwave radiometers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the NPP, POES, JPSS, and MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more frequent sampling by an expanded constellation of microwave radiometers including operational humidity sounders over land, (3) intercalibrated microwave

  11. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: U.S. Program and Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Arthur; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir; Kakar, Ramesh; Neeck, Steven

    2010-05-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. NASA and JAXA will deploy the GPM Core Observatory carrying an advanced radar-radiometer system to serve as a physics observatory and a transfer standard for inter-calibration of constellation radiometers. The GPM Core Observatory is scheduled for launch in July 2013. In addition, NASA will provide a second radiometer to be flown on a partner-provided GPM Low-Inclination Observatory to enhance the near real-time monitoring of hurricanes and mid-latitude storms. JAXA will also contribute data from the Global Change Observation Mission-Water (GCOM-W) satellite. Additional partnerships are under development to include conical-scanning microwave imagers on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite and U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, as well as cross-track scanning humidity sounders on operational satellites such as the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite System (NPOESS) Preparatory Project (NPP), POES, NPOESS, and European MetOp satellites, which are used to improve the precipitation sampling over land. Currently, Brazil has in its national space plan for a GPM low-inclination radiometer, and data from Chinese and Russian microwave radiometers could potentially become available through international collaboration under the auspices of the Committee on Earth Observation Satellites (CEOS) and Group on Earth Observations (GEO). The current generation of global rainfall products combines observations from a network of uncoordinated satellite missions using a variety of merging techniques. GPM will provide "next-generation" precipitation data products characterized by: (1) more accurate instantaneous precipitation measurement (especially for light rain and cold-season solid precipitation), (2) more

  12. Observing System Simulations for the NASA ASCENDS Lidar CO2 Mission Concept: Substantiating Science Measurement Requirements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Stephan R.; Baker, David Frank; Schuh, Andrew E.; Abshire, James Brice; Browell, Edward V.; Michalak, Anna M.

    2012-01-01

    The NASA ASCENDS mission (Active Sensing of Carbon Emissions, Nights, Days, and Seasons) is envisioned as the next generation of dedicated, space-based CO2 observing systems, currently planned for launch in about the year 2022. Recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey, active (lidar) sensing of CO2 from space has several potentially significant advantages, in comparison to current and planned passive CO2 instruments, that promise to advance CO2 measurement capability and carbon cycle understanding into the next decade. Assessment and testing of possible lidar instrument technologies indicates that such sensors are more than feasible, however, the measurement precision and accuracy requirements remain at unprecedented levels of stringency. It is, therefore, important to quantitatively and consistently evaluate the measurement capabilities and requirements for the prospective active system in the context of advancing our knowledge of carbon flux distributions and their dependence on underlying physical processes. This amounts to establishing minimum requirements for precision, relative accuracy, spatial/temporal coverage and resolution, vertical information content, interferences, and possibly the tradeoffs among these parameters, while at the same time framing a mission that can be implemented within a constrained budget. Here, we present results of observing system simulation studies, commissioned by the ASCENDS Science Requirements Definition Team, for a range of possible mission implementation options that are intended to substantiate science measurement requirements for a laser-based CO2 space instrument.

  13. Summary of LET spectra and dose measurements on ten STS missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    A comparison of linear energy transfer (LET) spectra measurements made with plastic nuclear track detectors (PNTD's) from area passive dosimeters (APD's), was made for ten different STS missions under similar shielding. The results show that integral flux, dose rate and equivalent dose rate values follow a general increase with respect to increasing orbital inclination and altitude but that there are large variations from a simple relationship. This is to be expected since it has been shown that Shuttle attitude variations, combined with the anisotropic particle flux at the South Atlantic Anomaly (SAA), can result in differences of a factor of 2 in dose rate inside the Shuttle (Badhwar et al., 1995). Solar cycle and shielding differences also result in variations in radiation dose between STS missions. Spaceflight dosimeters from the STS missions are also being used in the development of a method for increasing LET spectra measurement accuracy by extending LET measurements to particle tracks of ranges 10-80 microns. Refinements in processing and measurement techniques for the flight PNTD's have yielded increased detection efficiencies for the short tracks when LET spectra determined by using the standard and refined methods were intercompared.

  14. Ocean Surface reconstruction from the synergy of Sentinel-3 sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez-Haro, C.; Autret, E.; Isern-Fontanet, J.; Tandeo, P.; Le Goff, C.; Garello, R.; Fablet, R.

    2015-12-01

    Along-track altimetric measurements of Sea Surface Heights (SSH) are very well suited to quantify across-track currents. However, the spatial resolution of derived 2D velocities is restricted to scales above 100-150 km and the limited number of altimeters can lead to errors in the location of currents. On the contrary, infrared measurements of Sea Surface Temperature (SST) are well suited to locate flow patterns but it is difficult to extract quantitative estimations of ocean currents. During the last years, some works began to exploit the synergy of SST and altimetry measurements in order to retrieve ocean currents. Nevertheless, all this previous works employed measurements which were near in time but not simultaneous. In that sense, Sentinel-3 is a multi-instrument mission that will circumvent this temporal limitation, providing simultaneous measurements of SST and altimetry with high-end accuracy and reliability. Our approach, based on the spectral properties of simultaneous SST and SSH observations, is tested using ENVISAT (RA, AATSR) data, since its geometry is similar to that of Sentinel-3 (SRAL, SLSTR).

  15. Drop Size Distribution Measurements Supporting the NASA Global Precipitation Measurement Mission: Infrastructure and Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, Walter A.; Carey, Lawerence D.; Gatlin, Patrick N.; Wingo, Matthew; Tokay, Ali; Wolff, David B.; Bringi, V. N.

    2011-01-01

    Global Precipitation Measurement Mission (GPM) retrieval algorithm validation requires datasets that characterize the 4-D structure, variability, and correlation properties of hydrometeor particle size distributions (PSD) and accumulations over satellite fields of view (5 -- 50 km). Key to this process is the combined use of disdrometer and polarimetric radar platforms. Here the disdrometer measurements serve as a reference for up-scaling dual-polarimetric radar observations of the PSD to the much larger volumetric sampling domain of the radar. The PSD observations thus derived provide a much larger data set for assessing DSD variability, and satellite-based precipitation retrieval algorithm assumptions, in all three spatial dimensions for a range of storm types and seasons. As one component of this effort, the GPM Ground Validation program recently acquired five 3rd generation 2D Video disdrometers as part of its Disdrometer and Radar Observations of Precipitation Facility (DROP), currently hosted in northern Alabama by the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center and the University of Alabama in Huntsville. These next-generation 2DVDs were operated and evaluated in different phases of data collection under the scanning domain of the UAH ARMOR C-band dual-polarimetric radar. During this period approximately 7500 minutes of PSD data were collected and processed to create gamma size distribution parameters using a truncated method of moments approach. After creating the gamma parameter datasets the DSDs were then used as input to T-matrix code for computation of polarimetric radar moments at C-band. The combined dataset was then analyzed with two basic objectives in mind: 1) the investigation of seasonal variability in the rain PSD parameters as observed by the 2DVDs; 2) the use of combined polarimetric moments and observed gamma distribution parameters in a functional form to retrieve PSD parameters in 4-D using the ARMOR radar for precipitation occurring in different

  16. Measurement of precipitation induced FUV emission and Geocoronal Lyman Alpha from the IMI mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mende, Stephen B.; Fuselier, S. A.; Rairden, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    This final report describes the activities of the Lockheed Martin Palo Alto Research Laboratory in studying the measurement of ion and electron precipitation induced Far Ultra-Violet (FUV) emissions and Geocoronal Lyman Alpha for the NASA Inner Magnetospheric Imager (IMI) mission. this study examined promising techniques that may allow combining several FUV instruments that would separately measure proton aurora, electron aurora, and geocoronal Lyman alpha into a single instrument operated on a spinning spacecraft. The study consisted of two parts. First, the geocoronal Lyman alpha, proton aurora, and electron aurora emissions were modeled to determine instrument requirements. Second, several promising techniques were investigated to determine if they were suitable for use in an IMI-type mission. Among the techniques investigated were the Hydrogen gas cell for eliminating cold geocoronal Lyman alpha emissions, and a coded aperture spectrometer with sufficient resolution to separate Doppler shifted Lyman alpha components.

  17. Assimilation of Precipitation Measurement Missions Microwave Radiance Observations With GEOS-5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jin, Jianjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; McCarty, Will; Akella, Santha; Gu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) Core Observatory satellite was launched in February, 2014. The GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) is a conically scanning radiometer measuring 13 channels ranging from 10 to 183 GHz and sampling between 65 S 65 N. This instrument is a successor to the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM) Microwave Imager (TMI), which has observed 9 channels at frequencies ranging 10 to 85 GHz between 40 S 40 N since 1997. This presentation outlines the base procedures developed to assimilate GMI and TMI radiances in clear-sky conditions, including quality control methods, thinning decisions, and the estimation of, observation errors. This presentation also shows the impact of these observations when they are incorporated into the GEOS-5 atmospheric data assimilation system.

  18. CLAIRE: a Canadian Small Satellite Mission for Measurement of Greenhouse Gases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sloan, James; Grant, Cordell; Germain, Stephane; Durak, Berke; McKeever, Jason; Latendresse, Vincent

    2016-07-01

    CLAIRE, a Canadian mission operated by GHGSat Inc. of Montreal, is the world's first satellite designed to measure greenhouse gas emissions from single targeted industrial facilities. Claire was launched earlier this year into a 500 km polar sun-synchronous orbit selected to provide an acceptable balance between return frequency and spatial resolution. Extensive simulations of oil & gas facilities, power plants, hydro reservoirs and even animal feedlots were used to predict the mission performance. The principal goal is to measure the emission rates of carbon dioxide and methane from selected targets with greater precision and lower cost than ground-based alternatives. CLAIRE will measure sources having surface areas less than 10 x 10 km2 with a spatial resolution better than 50 m, thereby providing industrial site operators and government regulators with the information they need to understand, manage and ultimately to reduce greenhouse gas emissions more economically. The sensor is based on a Fabry-Perot interferometer, coupled with a 2D InGaAs focal plane array operating in the short-wave infrared with a spectral resolution of about 0.1 nm. The patented, high étendue, instrument design provides signal to noise ratios that permit quantification of emission rates with accuracies adequate for most regulatory reporting thresholds. The very high spatial resolution of the density maps produced by the CLAIRE mission resolves plume shapes and emitter locations so that advanced dispersion models can derive accurate emission rates of multiple sources within the field of view. The satellite bus, provided by the University of Toronto's Space Flight Laboratory, is based on the well-characterized NEMO architecture, including hardware that has significant spaceflight heritage. The mission is currently undergoing initial test and validation measurements in preparation for commercial operation later this year.

  19. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project. VI - Spacecraft, scientific instruments, and launching rocket. Part 1 - Spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keating, Thomas; Ihara, Toshio; Miida, Sumio

    1990-01-01

    A cooperative United States/Japan study was made for one year from 1987 to 1988 regarding the feasibility of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). As part of this study a phase-A-level design of spacecraft for TRMM was developed by NASA/GSFC, and the result was documented in a feasibility study. The phase-A-level design is developed for the TRMM satellite utilizing a multimission spacecraft.

  20. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission and Vern Suomi 's Vital Role

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Kummerow, Christian

    1999-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission was a new concept of measuring rainfall over the global tropics using a combination of instruments, including the first weather radar to be flown in space. An important objective of the mission was to obtain profiles of latent heat in order to initialize large-scale circulation models and to understand the relationship between short-term climate changes in relation to rainfall variability. The idea originated in the early 1980's from scientists at the Goddard Space Flight Center/NASA who had been involved with attempts to measure rain with a passive microwave instrument on Nimbus 5 and had compared its results with rain falling in the area covered by the GATE1 radar ships. Using an imaginary satellite flying over the GATE ships, scientists showed that a satellite with an inclined orbit of 30-35 degrees could obtain monthly rainfalls with a sampling error of less than 10 percent over 5 degree by 5 degree areas. The Japanese proposed that they could build a nadir-scanning rain radar for the satellite. Vern Suomi was excited by this mission from the outset, since he recognized the great importance of adequate rainfall measurements over the tropical oceans. He was a charter member of the Science Steering Team and prepared a large part of the Report. While the mission attracted strong support in the science community, it was opposed by some of the high-level NASA management who feared its competition for funds with some much larger Earth Science satellites. Vern was able to overcome this opposition and to generate Congressional support, so that the Project finally got underway on both sides of the Pacific in 1991. The paper will discuss the design of the satellite, its data system and ground validation program. TP.NM was successfully launched in late 1997. Early results will be described. 1 GATE stands for GARP Atlantic Tropical Experiment and GARP stands for Global Atmospheric Research Program.

  1. Mission Simulation of Space Lidar Measurements for Seasonal and Regional CO2 Variations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kawa, Stephan; Collatz, G. J.; Mao, J.; Abshire, J. B.; Sun, X.; Weaver, C. J.

    2010-01-01

    Results of mission simulation studies are presented for a laser-based atmospheric [82 sounder. The simulations are based on real-time carbon cycle process modeling and data analysis. The mission concept corresponds to the Active Sensing of [82 over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) recommended by the US National Academy of Sciences Decadal Survey of Earth Science and Applications from Space. One prerequisite for meaningful quantitative sensor evaluation is realistic CO2 process modeling across a wide range of scales, i.e., does the model have representative spatial and temporal gradients? Examples of model comparison with data will be shown. Another requirement is a relatively complete description of the atmospheric and surface state, which we have obtained from meteorological data assimilation and satellite measurements from MODIS and [ALIPS0. We use radiative transfer model calculations, an instrument model with representative errors ' and a simple retrieval approach to complete the cycle from "nature" run to "pseudo-data" CO2, Several mission and instrument configuration options are examined/ and the sensitivity to key design variables is shown. We use the simulation framework to demonstrate that within reasonable technological assumptions for the system performance, relatively high measurement precision can be obtained, but errors depend strongly on environmental conditions as well as instrument specifications. Examples are also shown of how the resulting pseudo - measurements might be used to address key carbon cycle science questions.

  2. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and the Future of Rainfall Estimation from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kakar, Ramesh; Adler, Robert; Smith, Eric; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Tropical rainfall is important in the hydrological cycle and to the lives and welfare of humans. Three-fourths of the energy that drives the atmospheric wind circulation comes from the latent heat released by tropical precipitation. Recognizing the importance of rain in the tropics, NASA for the U.S.A. and NASDA for Japan have partnered in the design, construction and flight of a satellite mission to measure tropical rainfall and calculate the associated latent heat release. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched on November 27, 1997, and data from all the instruments first became available approximately 30 days after launch. Since then, much progress has been made in the calibration of the sensors, the improvement of the rainfall algorithms and applications of these results to areas such as Data Assimilation and model initialization. TRMM has reduced the uncertainty of climatological rainfall in tropics by over a factor of two, therefore establishing a standard for comparison with previous data sets and climatologies. It has documented the diurnal variation of precipitation over the oceans, showing a distinct early morning peak and this satellite mission has shown the utility of precipitation information for the improvement of numerical weather forecasts and climate modeling. This paper discusses some promising applications using TRMM data and introduces a measurement concept being discussed by NASA/NASDA and ESA for the future of rainfall estimation from space.

  3. Short and long term efficiencies of debris risk reduction measures: Application to a European LEO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, T.; Kervarc, R.; Bertrand, S.; Carle, P.; Donath, T.; Destefanis, R.; Grassi, L.; Tiboldo, F.; Schäfer, F.; Kempf, S.; Gelhaus, J.

    2015-01-01

    Recent numerical studies indicate that the low Earth orbit (LEO) debris environment has reached a point such that even if no further space launches were conducted, the Earth satellite population would remain relatively constant for only the next 50 years or so. Beyond that, the debris population would begin to increase noticeably, due to the production of collisional debris (Liou and Johnson, 2008). Measures to be enforced play thus a major role to preserve an acceptable space mission risk and ensure sustainable space activities. The identification of such measures and the quantification of their efficiency over time for LEO missions is of prime concern in the decision-making process, as it has been investigated for the last few decades by the Inter-Agency Space Debris Coordination Committee (IADC). This paper addresses the final results of a generic methodology and the characteristics of a tool developed to assess the efficiency of the risk reduction measures identified for the Sentinel-1 (S1) mission. This work is performed as part of the 34-month P2-ROTECT project (Prediction, Protection & Reduction of OrbiTal Exposure to Collision Threats), funded by the European Union within the Seventh Framework Programme. Three ways of risk reduction have been investigated, both in short and long-term, namely: better satellite protection, better conjunction prediction, and cleaner environment. According to our assumptions, the S1 mission vulnerability evaluations in the long term (from 2093 to 2100) show that full compliance to the mitigation measures leads to a situation twice safer than that induced by an active debris removal of 5 objects per year in a MASTER2009 Business-As-Usual context. Because these measures have visible risk reduction effects in the long term, complementary measures with short response time are also studied. In the short term (from 2013 to 2020), a better prediction of the conjunctions is more efficient than protecting the satellite S1 itself. By

  4. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission contributions to terrestrial hydrology and societal applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirschbaum, D.; Skofronick Jackson, G.; Huffman, G. J.

    2015-12-01

    Too much or too little rain can serve as a tipping point for triggering catastrophic flooding and landslides or widespread drought. Knowing when, where and how much rain is falling globally is vital to understanding how vulnerable areas may be more or less impacted by these disasters. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international constellation of satellites coordinated through a partnership with NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to provide next-generation global observations of rain and snow. The GPM mission centers on the deployment of a Core Observatory satellite that serves as a reference standard to unify precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational satellites. This satellite launched from Tanegashima Space Complex in Japan on January 28th, 2014 and carries advanced instruments setting a new standard for precipitation measurements from space. The GPM Core Observatory satellite measures rain and snow using two science instruments: the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The GMI captures precipitation intensities and horizontal patterns, while the DPR provides insights into the three dimensional structure of precipitating particles. Together these two instruments provide a database of measurements against which other partner satellites' microwave observations can be meaningfully compared and combined to make a global precipitation dataset. GPM has already provided unprecedented views of typhoons, extratropical systems, light rain, snow storms and extreme precipitation. Through improved measurements of precipitation globally, the GPM mission provides new insights into measuring the fluxes of Earth's water cycle. This presentation will outline new findings and advancements of GPM in understanding and modeling of Earth's water and energy cycles, improving forecasting of extreme events that cause natural hazards and disasters, and extending current

  5. Eight years of OMI measurements and what we can learn from these for the Sentinel missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levelt, Pieternel; Veefkind, Pepijn; Bhartia, Pawan; Joiner, Joanna; Taminen, Johanna; Omi Science Team

    2013-04-01

    Eight years of OMI measurements and what we can learn from these for the Sentinel missions P.F. Levelt, P. Veefkind, PK Bhartia, J. Joiner, J. Tamminen, OMI Science Team The Ozone Monitoring Instrument (OMI) is an UV/VIS nadir solar backscatter imaging spectrometer, which provides nearly global coverage in one day with a spatial resolution of 13 x 24 km2. OMI measures solar irradiance and Earth radiances in the wavelength range of 270 to 500 nm with a spectral resolution of about 0.5 nm. The OMI instrument was launched at July 15, 2004 on NASA's EOS-Aura satellite. OMI is a third party mission of ESA. OMI's unique capabilities rely in measuring tropospheric trace gases with a small footprint and daily global coverage. The unprecedented spatial resolution of the instrument revealed for the first time tropospheric pollution maps on a daily basis with urban scale resolution, and also enables research improving our understanding of air pollutants and aerosols in the interaction between air quality and climate change. The data are used for obtaining emission maps using inverse modelling or related techniques. The sentinel missions (S5p/TROPOMI and Sentinel 4 and 5) will have an even better spatial resolution than OMI. In order to exploit their capability for tropospheric research and actual monitoring of emission sources the calibration and validation of these instruments and their data products are of high importance. In this presentation new findings of OMI will be presented and what we can learn from that for the preparation of the Sentinel missions, their validation and their scientific exploitation. Also lessons learned from the NASA methodology for OMI validation will be discussed and results of validation campaigns that supported OMI validation (i.e. SAUNA, DANDELIONS, CINDI, DISCOVER AQ, etc etc) will be shown.

  6. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the ICESat Mission: Science Measurement Performance since Launch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Xiao-Li; Abshire, James B.; Riris, Haris; McGarry, Jan; Sirota, Marcos

    2004-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System is the primary space lidar on NASA's ICESat mission. Since launch in January 2003 GLAS has produced about 544 million measurements of the Earth's surface and atmosphere. It has made global measurements of the Earth's icesheets, land topography and atmosphere with unprecedented vertical resolution and accuracy. GLAS was first activated for science measurements in February 2003. Since then its operation and performance has confirmed many pre-launch expectations and exceed a few of the most optimistic expectations in vertical resolution. However GLAS also suffered an unexpected failure of its first laser, and the GLAS measurements have yielded some surprises in other areas. The talk will give a post launch assessment of the science measurement performance of the GLAS instrument, and compare the science measurements and engineering operation to pre-launch expectations. It also will address some of what has been learned from the GLAS operations and data, which may benefit future space lidar.

  7. Forest Biomass Mapping From Lidar and Radar Synergies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sun, Guoqing; Ranson, K. Jon; Guo, Z.; Zhang, Z.; Montesano, P.; Kimes, D.

    2011-01-01

    The use of lidar and radar instruments to measure forest structure attributes such as height and biomass at global scales is being considered for a future Earth Observation satellite mission, DESDynI (Deformation, Ecosystem Structure, and Dynamics of Ice). Large footprint lidar makes a direct measurement of the heights of scatterers in the illuminated footprint and can yield accurate information about the vertical profile of the canopy within lidar footprint samples. Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) is known to sense the canopy volume, especially at longer wavelengths and provides image data. Methods for biomass mapping by a combination of lidar sampling and radar mapping need to be developed. In this study, several issues in this respect were investigated using aircraft borne lidar and SAR data in Howland, Maine, USA. The stepwise regression selected the height indices rh50 and rh75 of the Laser Vegetation Imaging Sensor (LVIS) data for predicting field measured biomass with a R(exp 2) of 0.71 and RMSE of 31.33 Mg/ha. The above-ground biomass map generated from this regression model was considered to represent the true biomass of the area and used as a reference map since no better biomass map exists for the area. Random samples were taken from the biomass map and the correlation between the sampled biomass and co-located SAR signature was studied. The best models were used to extend the biomass from lidar samples into all forested areas in the study area, which mimics a procedure that could be used for the future DESDYnI Mission. It was found that depending on the data types used (quad-pol or dual-pol) the SAR data can predict the lidar biomass samples with R2 of 0.63-0.71, RMSE of 32.0-28.2 Mg/ha up to biomass levels of 200-250 Mg/ha. The mean biomass of the study area calculated from the biomass maps generated by lidar- SAR synergy 63 was within 10% of the reference biomass map derived from LVIS data. The results from this study are preliminary, but do show the

  8. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Mike; Stephen, Mark; Hasselbrack, William; Allan, Graham; Mao, Jianping; Kawa, Stephen R.; Weaver, Clark J.

    2010-01-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using new fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are required for a number of NASA Earth science missions and specifically for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve predictions on any future climate change. The ultimate goal of a CO2 remote sensing mission, such as ASCENDS, is to derive the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere in terms of mole fraction in unit of parts-per-million (ppmv) with regard to dry air. Therefore, both CO2 and the dry air number of molecules in the atmosphere are needed in deriving this quantity. O2 is a stable molecule and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere. Measuring the O2 absorption in the atmosphere can thus be used to infer the dry air number of molecules and then used to calculate CO2 concentration. With the knowledge of atmospheric water vapor, we can then estimate the total surface pressure needed for CO2 retrievals. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate 765 nm laser radiation coincident with the Oxygen A-band. Our pulsed, time gated technique uses several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to the O2 absorption line. The choice of wavelengths allows us to measure the pressure by using two adjacent O2 absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm fits the O2 lineshapes and derives the pressure. Our measurements compare favorably with a local weather monitor mounted outside our laboratory and a local weather station.

  9. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Riris, Haris; Rodriguez, Mike; Stephen, Mark; Hasselbrack, William; Allan, Graham; Mao, Jiamping,; Kawa, Stephan R.; Weaver, Clark J.

    2011-01-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using new fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote measurements of atmospheric temperature and pressure are required for a number of NASA Earth science missions and specifically for the Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. Accurate measurements of tropospheric CO2 on a global scale are very important in order to better understand its sources and sinks and to improve predictions on any future climate change. The ultimate goal of a CO2 remote sensing mission, such as ASCENDS, is to derive the CO2 concentration in the atmosphere in terms of mole fraction in unit of parts-per-million (ppmv) with regard to dry air. Therefore, both CO2 and the dry air number of molecules in the atmosphere are needed in deriving this quantity. O2 is a stable molecule and uniformly mixed in the atmosphere. Measuring the O2 absorption in the atmosphere can thus be used to infer the dry air number of molecules and then used to calculate CO2 concentration. With the knowledge of atmospheric water vapor, we can then estimate the total surface pressure needed for CO2 retrievals. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses fiber optic technology and non-linear optics to generate 765 nm laser radiation coincident with the Oxygen A-band. Our pulsed, time gated technique uses several on- and off-line wavelengths tuned to the O2 absorption line. The choice of wavelengths allows us to measure the pressure by using two adjacent O2 absorptions in the Oxygen A-band. Our retrieval algorithm fits the O2 lineshapes and derives the pressure. Our measurements compare favorably with a local weather monitor mounted outside our laboratory and a local weather station.

  10. PICARD SOL mission, a ground-based facility for long-term solar radius measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meftah, M.; Irbah, A.; Corbard, T.; Morand, F.; Thuillier, G.; Hauchecorne, A.; Ikhlef, R.; Rouze, M.; Renaud, C.; Djafer, D.; Abbaki, S.; Assus, P.; Chauvineau, B.; Cissé, E. M.; Dalaudier, F.; D'Almeida, Eric; Fodil, M.; Laclare, F.; Lesueur, P.; Lin, M.; Marcovici, J. P.; Poiet, G.

    2012-09-01

    For the last thirty years, ground time series of the solar radius have shown different variations according to different instruments. The origin of these variations may be found in the observer, the instrument, the atmosphere and the Sun. These time series show inconsistencies and conflicting results, which likely originate from instrumental effects and/or atmospheric effects. A survey of the solar radius was initiated in 1975 by F. Laclare, at the Calern site of the Observatoire de la Cˆote d'Azur (OCA). PICARD is an investigation dedicated to the simultaneous measurements of the absolute total and spectral solar irradiance, the solar radius and solar shape, and to the Sun's interior probing by the helioseismology method. The PICARD mission aims to the study of the origin of the solar variability and to the study of the relations between the Sun and the Earth's climate by using modeling. These studies will be based on measurements carried out from orbit and from the ground. PICARD SOL is the ground segment of the PICARD mission to allow a comparison of the solar radius measured in space and on ground. PICARD SOL will enable to understand the influence of the atmosphere on the measured solar radius. The PICARD Sol instrumentation consists of: SODISM II, a replica of SODISM (SOlar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper), a high resolution imaging telescope, and MISOLFA (Moniteur d'Images SOLaires Franco-Alǵerien), a seeing monitor. Additional instrumentation consists in a Sun photometer, which measures atmospheric aerosol properties, a pyranometer to measure the solar irradiance, a visible camera, and a weather station. PICARD SOL is operating since March 2011. First results from the PICARD SOL mission are briefly reported in this paper.

  11. Analysis of earth albedo effect on sun sensor measurements based on theoretical model and mission experience

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brasoveanu, Dan; Sedlak, Joseph

    1998-01-01

    Analysis of flight data from previous missions indicates that anomalous Sun sensor readings could be caused by Earth albedo interference. A previous Sun sensor study presented a detailed mathematical model of this effect. The model can be used to study the effect of both diffusive and specular reflections and to improve Sun angle determination based on perturbed Sun sensor measurements, satellite position, and an approximate knowledge of attitude. The model predicts that diffuse reflected light can cause errors of up to 10 degrees in Coarse Sun Sensor (CSS) measurements and 5 to 10 arc sec in Fine Sun Sensor (FSS) measurements, depending on spacecraft orbit and attitude. The accuracy of these sensors is affected as long as part of the illuminated Earth surface is present in the sensor field of view. Digital Sun Sensors (DSS) respond in a different manner to the Earth albedo interference. Most of the time DSS measurements are not affected, but for brief periods of time the Earth albedo can cause errors which are a multiple of the sensor least significant bit and may exceed one degree. This paper compares model predictions with Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) CSS measurements in order to validate and refine the model. Methods of reducing and mitigating the impact of Earth albedo are discussed. ne CSS sensor errors are roughly proportional to the Earth albedo coefficient. Photocells that are sensitive only to ultraviolet emissions would reduce the effective Earth albedo by up to a thousand times, virtually eliminating all errors caused by Earth albedo interference.

  12. NanoSWARM - A nano-satellite mission to measure particles and fields around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, Ian; Russell, Christopher; Pieters, Carle; Weiss, Benjamin; Halekas, Jasper; Poppe, Andrew; Larson, Davin; Lawrence, David; Elphic, Richard; Hayne, Paul; Blakely, Richard; Kim, Khan-Hyuk; Choi, Young-Jun; Jin, Ho; Hemingway, Doug; Nayak, Michael; Puig-Suari, Jordi; Jaroux, Belgacem; Warwick, Steven

    2015-04-01

    The NanoSWARM mission concept uses a fleet of cubesats around the Moon to address a number of open problems in planetary science: 1) The mechanisms of space weathering, 2) The origins of planetary magnetism, 3) The origins, distributions, and migration processes of surface water on airless bodies, and 4) The physics of small-scale magnetospheres. To accomplish these goals, NanoSWARM targets scientifically rich features on the Moon known as swirls. Swirls are high-albedo features correlated with strong magnetic fields and low surface-water. NanoSWARM cubesats will make the first near-surface (<500 m altitude) measurements of solar wind flux and magnetic fields at swirls. NanoSWARM cubesats will also perform low-altitude neutron measurements to provide key constraints on the distribution of polar hydrogen concentrations, which are important volatile sinks in the lunar water cycle. To release its cubesats, NanoSWARM uses a high-heritage mother ship in a low altitude, polar, circular orbit. NanoSWARM's results will have direct applications to the geophysics, volatile distribution, and plasma physics of numerous other bodies, in particular asteroids and the terrestrial planets. The technologies and methods used by NanoSWARM will enable many new cubesat missions in the next decade, and expand the cubesat paradigm into deep space. NanoSWARM will be proposed as a NASA Discovery mission in early 2015.

  13. NanoSWARM: A Nano-satellite Mission to Measure Particles and Fields Around the Moon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garrick-Bethell, I.

    2015-12-01

    The NanoSWARM mission concept uses a fleet of cubesats around the Moon to address a number of open problems in planetary science: 1) The mechanisms of space weathering, 2) The origins of planetary magnetism, 3) The origins, distributions, and migration processes of surface water on airless bodies, and 4) The physics of small-scale magnetospheres. To accomplish these goals, NanoSWARM targets scientifically rich features on the Moon known as swirls. Swirls are high-albedo features correlated with strong magnetic fields and low surface-water. NanoSWARM cubesats will make the first near-surface (<1 km altitude) measurements of solar wind flux and magnetic fields at swirls. NanoSWARM cubesats will also perform low-altitude neutron measurements to provide key constraints on the distribution of polar hydrogen concentrations, which are important volatile sinks in the lunar water cycle. To release its cubesats, NanoSWARM uses a high-heritage mother ship in a low altitude, polar, circular orbit. NanoSWARM's results will have direct applications to the geophysics, volatile distribution, and plasma physics of numerous other bodies, in particular asteroids and the terrestrial planets. The technologies and methods used by NanoSWARM will enable many new cubesat missions in the next decade. NanoSWARM was proposed as a NASA Discovery mission in February 2015.

  14. Water vapor and cloud water measurements over Darwin during the STEP 1987 tropical mission

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, K.K.; Proffitt, M.H. ); Chan, K.R.; Loewenstein, M.; Podolske, J.R. ); Strahan, S.E. ); Wilson, J.C. ); Kley, D. )

    1993-05-20

    The authors report results of total water, and water vapor measurements made in the upper troposphere and stratosphere during the Stratosphere-Troposphere Exchange Project (STEP) Tropical mission over Darwin, Australia. Measurements were made from an ER-2 aircraft by lyman-[alpha] hygrometers. The average lower stratosphere water vapor was 2.4 parts per million by volume (ppmv), at a potential temperature of 375 K. This level is lower than the 3 to 4 ppmv water vapor level typical of the stratosphere.

  15. Summary Report of mission acceleration measurements for STS-66. Launched November 3, 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1995-01-01

    Experiments flown in the middeck of Atlantis during the STS-66 mission were supported by the Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS). In particular, the three triaxial SAMS sensor heads collected data in support of protein crystal growth experiments. Data collected during STS-66 are reviewed in this report. The STS-66 SAMS data represent the microgravity environment in the 0.01 Hz to 10 Hz range. Variations in the environment related to differing levels of crew activity are discussed in the report. A comparison is made among times when the crew was quiet during a public affairs conference, working quietly, and exercising. These levels of activity are also compared to levels recorded by a SAMS unit in the Spacelab on Columbia during the STS-65 mission.

  16. Design and Performance of Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Super NiCd Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahmad, Anisa J.; Rao, Gopalakrishna M.; Jallice, Doris E.; Moran Vickie E.

    1999-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint mission between NASA and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan. The observatory is designed to monitor and study tropical rainfall and the associated release of energy that helps to power the global atmospheric circulation shaping both weather and climate around the globe. The spacecraft was launched from Japan on November 27,1997 via the NASDA H-2 launch vehicle. The TRMM Power Subsystem is a Peak Power Tracking system that can support the maximum TRMM load of 815 watts at the end of its three year life. The Power Subsystem consists of two 50 Ampere Hour Super NiCd batteries, Gallium Arsenide Solar Array and the Power System Electronics. This paper describes the TRMM Power Subsystem, battery design, cell and battery ground test performance, and in-orbit battery operations and performance.

  17. The Science of the Global-scale measurements of the Limb and Disk (GOLD) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, A. G.; Eastes, R.; McClintock, W. E.; Solomon, S. C.; Anderson, D. N.; Andersson, L.; Codrescu, M.; Daniell, R. E.; Harvey, J.; Krywonos, A.; Lankton, M.; Lumpe, J. D.; Richmond, A. D.; Rusch, D. W.; Siegmund, O.; Strickland, D. J.; Woods, T. N.; Lieberman, R. S.; Martinis, C. R.; Oberheide, J.; Budzien, S. A.; Dymond, K.; Eparvier, F. G.; Foroosh, H.; Aksnes, A.

    2013-12-01

    GOLD is a mission of opportunity that has been funded by NASA to fly on board a commercial communications satellite. GOLD is a far ultraviolet spectrometer that will measure the temperature, composition and electron density in the Earth's upper atmosphere from geostationary orbit. Because GOLD will remain over one location on the Earth's equator, local time and longitude effects can be separated. This geostationary perspective allows GOLD's primary science questions to be addressed in a new way: treating the thermosphere/ionosphere (TI) as a weather system. Four questions frame this mission that pertain to how the thermosphere and ionosphere (TI) respond to external forcing. Specifically the GOLD team will investigate the response of the TI to geomagnetic storms, changes in solar radiation; the effects of upwardly propagating tides on the system; and the presence and evolution of ionospheric bubbles. We will describe these scientific goals in more detail in this poster.

  18. High-resolution Ion Drift Measurements from the JOULE Sounding Rocket Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sangalli, L.; Knudsen, D. J.

    2004-12-01

    The JOULE sounding rocket mission was designed to investigate structured Joule dissipation in the auroral ionosphere. JOULE was launched March 27, 2003 from Poker Flat, Alaska, into an active substorm. The mission included two instrumented rockets and two chemical release (TMA) rockets in addition to ground-based diagnostics. One of the instrumented payloads carried a Suprathermal Ion Imager (SII) that measured 2-D (energy/angle) distributions of the core (0-8 eV) ion population at a rate of 125 images per second. In this presentation we compare bulk ion drifts derived from the SII with those inferred from DC electric fields. From differences in these two parameters we calculate the local Joule heating rate at a spatial resolution of 8 m.

  19. Operating the Dual-Orbtier GRAIL Mission to Measure the Moon's Gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beerer, Joseph G.; Havens, Glen G.

    2012-01-01

    The GRAIL mission is on track to satisfy all prime mission requirements. The performance of the orbiters and payload has been exceptional. Detailed pre-launch operations planning and validation have paid off. Prime mission timeline has been conducted almost exactly as laid out in the mission plan. Flight experience in the prime mission puts the flight team in a good position for completing the challenges of the extended mission where the science payoff is even greater

  20. On the possibility of measuring the Lense Thirring effect with a LAGEOS LAGEOS II OPTIS mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iorio, Lorenzo; Ciufolini, Ignazio; Pavlis, Erricos C.; Schiller, Stephan; Dittus, Hansjörg; Lämmerzahl, Claus

    2004-04-01

    A space mission, OPTIS, has been proposed for testing the foundations of special relativity and post-Newtonian gravitation in the field of the Earth. The constraints posed on the original OPTIS orbital geometry would allow for a rather wide range of possibilities for the final OPTIS orbital parameters. This freedom could be exploited for further tests of post-Newtonian gravity. In this paper, we wish to preliminarily investigate if it would be possible to use the orbital data from OPTIS together with those from the existing geodetic passive laser-ranged LAGEOS and LAGEOS II satellites in order to perform precise measurements of the Lense Thirring effect. With regard to this possibility, it is important to note that the drag-free technology which should be adopted for the OPTIS mission would yield a lifetime of many years for this satellite. It turns out that the best choice would probably be to adopt the same orbital configuration as the proposed LAGEOS-like LARES satellite and, for testing, select a linear combination including the nodes of LAGEOS, LAGEOS II and OPTIS and the perigee of OPTIS. The total systematic error should be of the order of 1%. The LARES orbital geometry should not be too much in conflict with the original specifications of the OPTIS mission. However, a compromise solution could also be adopted. A comparison with the new perspectives of measuring the Lense Thirring effect with the existing laser-tracked satellites opened by the new gravity models from CHAMP and, especially, GRACE is made. It turns out that an OPTIS/LARES mission would still be of great significance because the obtainable accuracy would be better than that offered by a reanalysis of the currently existing satellites.

  1. Combined Infrared Stereo and Laser Ranging Cloud Measurements from Shuttle Mission STS-85

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lancaster, Redgie S.; Spinhirne, James D.; OCStarr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Multi-angle remote sensing provides a wealth of information for earth and climate monitoring. And, as technology advances so do the options for developing instrumentation versatile enough to meet the demands associated with these types of measurements. In the current work, the multiangle measurement capability of the Infrared Spectral Imaging Radiometer is demonstrated. This instrument flew as part of mission STS-85 of the space shuttle Columbia in 1997 and was the first earth-observing radiometer to incorporate an uncooled microbolometer array detector as its image sensor. Specifically, a method for computing cloud-top height from the multi-spectral stereo measurements acquired during this flight has been developed and the results demonstrate that a vertical precision of 10.6 km was achieved. Further, the accuracy of these measurements is confirmed by comparison with coincident direct laser ranging measurements from the Shuttle Laser Altimeter. Mission STS-85 was the first space flight to combine laser ranging and thermal IR camera systems for cloud remote sensing.

  2. Measuring Earth's radiation imbalance with RAVAN: A CubeSat mission to measure the driver of global climate change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, W. H.; Dyrud, L. P.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Lorentz, S. R.; Papadakis, S.; Summers, R. A.; Smith, A. W.; Wu, D. L.; Deglau, D. M.; Arnold, S. P.

    2013-12-01

    The Earth radiation imbalance (ERI) is the single most important quantity for predicting the course of climate change over the next century. It is also the single most important metric for any geo-engineering scheme. We review the current scientific understanding of ERI and present a recently funded CubeSat mission, the Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN), that will demonstrate an affordable, accurate radiometer that directly measures Earth-leaving fluxes of total and solar-reflected radiation. Coupled with knowledge of the incoming radiation from the Sun, RAVAN directly gives ERI. The objective of RAVAN is to demonstrate that a compact spaceborne radiometer that is absolutely accurate to NIST-traceable standards can be built for low cost. The key technologies that enable a radiometer with all these attributes are: a gallium fixed-point blackbody as a built-in calibration source and a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) absorber. VACNTs are the blackest known substance, making them ideal radiometer absorbers with order-of-magnitude improvements in spectral flatness and stability over the existing art. The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory heritage 3U Multi-Mission Nanosat will host RAVAN, providing the reliability, agility, and resources needed. RAVAN will pave the way for a constellation Earth radiation budget mission that can provide the measurements needed to enable vastly superior predictions of future climate change.

  3. New Mission to Measure Global Lightning from the International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blakeslee, R. J.; Christian, H. J., Jr.; Mach, D. M.; Buechler, D. E.; Koshak, W. J.; Walker, T. D.; Bateman, M. G.; Stewart, M. F.; O'Brien, S.; Wilson, T. O.; Pavelitz, S. D.; Coker, C.

    2015-12-01

    Over the past 20 years, the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center, the University of Alabama in Huntsville, and their partners developed and demonstrated the effectiveness and value of space-based lightning observations as a remote sensing tool for Earth science research and applications, and, in the process, established a robust global lightning climatology. The observations included measurements from the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) that acquired global observations of total lightning (i.e., intracloud and cloud-to-ground discharges) from November 1997 to April 2015 between 38° N/S latitudes, and its Optical Transient Detector predecessor that acquired observation from May 1995 to April 2000 over 75° N/S latitudes. In February 2016, as an exciting follow-on to these prior missions, a space-qualified LIS built as a flight-spare for TRMM will be delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) for a 2 year or longer mission, flown as a hosted payload on the Department of Defense Space Test Program-Houston 5 (STP-H5) mission. The LIS on ISS will continue observations of the amount, rate, and radiant energy of total lightning over the Earth. More specifically, LIS measures lightning during both day and night, with storm scale resolution (~4 km), millisecond timing, and high, uniform detection efficiency, without any land-ocean bias. Lightning is a direct and most impressive response to intense atmospheric convection. ISS LIS lightning observations will continue to provide important gap-filling inputs to pressing Earth system science issues across a broad range of disciplines. This mission will also extend TRMM time series observations, expand the latitudinal coverage to 54° latitude, provide real-time lightning data to operational users, espically over data sparse oceanic regions, and enable cross-sensor observations and calibrations that includes the new GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM) and the Meteosat

  4. Summary report of mission acceleration measurements for STS-60, SPACEHAB2, launched 11 February 1994

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Delombard, Richard

    1994-01-01

    The STS-60 mission, which launched on 11 February 1994, carried seven accelerometer systems. This report describes the configuration of each of these systems, where they were located on the Orbiter and the name of a contact person for each system. The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) was one of the accelerometer systems on-board and this mission marked its eighth successful flight. Acceleration data are provided here for SAMS which flew under an agreement between the NASA Microgravity Science and Applications division and the NASA office of Advanced Concepts and Technology. Acceleration data for the other accelerometer systems are not presented here. SAMS was located in the commercial SPACEHAB laboratory, on its second flight. The SAMS system was configured with three triaxial sensor heads with filter cut-offs of 5, 10, and 50 Hz. The acceleration environment related to an experiment centrifuge, an experiment refrigerator freezer unit, a SAMS sensor head rotation, an Orbiter shudder, and payload deploy activities are discussed. In the Appendices, all of the data from SAMS Head B (10 Hz) are plotted to provide an overview of the environment during the majority of the STS-60 mission. An evaluation form is included at the end of the report to solicit users' comments about the usefulness of this series of reports.

  5. Global Precipitation Measurement. Report 2; Benefits of Partnering with GPM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stocker, Erich F.; Smith, Eric A. (Editor); Adams, W. James (Editor); Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    An important goal of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is to maximize participation by non-NASA partners both domestic and international. A consequence of this objective is the provision for NASA to provide sufficient incentives to achieve partner buy-in and commitment to the program. NASA has identified seven specific areas in which substantive incentives will be offered: (1) partners will be offered participation in governance of GPM mission science affairs including definition of data products; (2) partners will be offered use of NASA's TDRSS capability for uplink and downlink of commands and data in regards to partner provided spacecraft; (3) partners will be offered launch support for placing partner provided spacecraft in orbit conditional upon mutually agreeable co-manifest arrangements; (4) partners will be offered direct data access at the NASA-GPM server level rather than through standard data distribution channels; (5) partners will be offered the opportunity to serve as regional data archive and distribution centers for standard GPM data products; and (6) partners will be offered the option to insert their own specialized filtering and extraction software into the GPM data processing stream or to obtain specialized subsets and products over specific areas of interest (7) partners will be offered GPM developed software tools that can be run on their platforms. Each of these incentives, either individually or in combination, represents a significant advantage to partners who may wish to participate in the GPM mission.

  6. Conceptual design study for the use of COBE rocket engines on the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The objective of this conceptual design study is to verify that the Cosmic Background Explorer (COBE) Hydrazine Propulsion Subsystem (HPS) Rocket Engine Assembly (REA) will satisfy the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) requirements and to develop a preliminary thruster module design using the existing REAs. The performance of the COBE HPS 5 lbf thrusters meet the TRMM mission requirements. The preliminary design consists of a single 5 lbf REA REM which is isolation mounted to a spacecraft interface angle bracket (5 or 10 deg angle). The REM incorporates a catalyst bed heater and sensor assembly, and propellant thermal control is achieved by thermostatically controlled heaters on the thruster valves. A ROM cost of approx. $950 K has been estimated for the phase 2 program to finalize the design, fabricate, and test the hardware using mechanical thermostats for thermal control. In the event that solid state thermostats are used, the cost is estimated to be $160 K higher. A ROM cost is approx. $145 K is estimated to study the effects of using Japanese manufactured hydrazine for the TRMM mission.

  7. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Azarbarzin, Ardeshir A.; Kakar, Ramesh K.; Neeck, Steven

    2011-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is an international satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors. Building upon the success of the U.S.-Japan Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the Japan Aerospace and Exploration Agency (JAXA) will deploy in 2013 a GPM "Core" satellite carrying a KulKa-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) to establish a new reference standard for precipitation measurements from space. The combined active/passive sensor measurements will also be used to provide common database for precipitation retrievals from constellation sensors. For global coverage, GPM relies on existing satellite programs and new mission opportunities from a consortium of partners through bilateral agreements with either NASA or JAXA. Each constellation member may have its unique scientific or operational objectives but contributes microwave observations to GPM for the generation and dissemination of unified global precipitation data products. In addition to the DPR and GMI on the Core Observatory, the baseline GPM constellation consists of the following sensors: (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer- 2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-Wl satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder (SAPHIR) on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite, (4) the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA)-19, (5) MHS instruments on MetOp satellites launched by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological

  8. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission: Overview and U.S. Science Status

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Arthur Y.; Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Stocker, Erich F.

    2013-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission is a satellite mission specifically designed to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational microwave sensors provided by a consortium of international partners. NASA and JAXA will deploy a Core Observatory in 2014 to serve as a reference satellite for precipitation measurements by the constellation sensors. The GPM Core Observatory will carry a Ku/Ka-band Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) and a conical-scanning multi-channel (10-183 GHz) GPM Microwave Radiometer (GMI). The DPR, the first dual-frequency radar in space, will provide not only measurements of 3-D precipitation structures but also quantitative information on microphysical properties of precipitating particles. The DPR and GMI measurements will together provide a database that relates vertical hydrometeor profiles to multi-frequency microwave radiances over a variety of environmental conditions across the globe. This combined database will serve as a common transfer standard for improving the accuracy and consistency of precipitation retrievals from all constellation radiometers. In addition to the Core Observatory, the GPM constellation consists of (1) Special Sensor Microwave Imager/Sounder (SSMIS) instruments on the U.S. Defense Meteorological Satellite Program (DMSP) satellites, (2) the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer-2 (AMSR-2) on the GCOM-W1 satellite of JAXA, (3) the Multi-Frequency Microwave Scanning Radiometer (MADRAS) and the multi-channel microwave humidity sounder (SAPHIR) on the French-Indian Megha-Tropiques satellite, (4) the Microwave Humidity Sounder (MHS) on the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) Polar Orbiting Environmental Satellites (POES), (5) MHS instruments on MetOp satellites launched by the European Organisation for the Exploitation of Meteorological Satellites (EUMETSAT), (6) the Advanced Technology Microwave Sounder (ATMS) on the National Polar

  9. Synergy Between probes and Orbiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Young, Richard E.

    2005-01-01

    There are many ways in which the science return from a planetary mission is considerably enhanced by interactions between entry probes and a mission orbiter. Mission configuration aspects that are desirable include delivery of entry probes by the orbiter, and communication between probe and orbiter. Both of these mission aspects could greatly enhance access to key scientific sites that might not otherwise be accessible using delivery from say, a flyby, or employing direct communication from probes to Earth. Examples for Venus and Jupiter will be discussed. A second class of orbiter-probe interaction could better be termed direct probe-orbiter science collaboration. That would include, determining the global context of the entry probe sites from the orbiter, obtaining ground truth from the probe for remote sensing observations from the orbiter, observing the global and vertical distribution of key atmospheric trace species, and measuring the global and vertical distribution of clouds and winds. The importance of each of these items will be illustrated by particular examples.

  10. Pulsed Lidar for Measurement of C02 Concentrations for the ASCENDS Mission - Update

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James; Riris, Haris; Allan, Graham; Sun, Xiaoli; Mao, Jianping; Weaver, Clark; Yu, Anthony; Chen, Jeffrey; Rodriquez, Michael; Kawa, S. Randy

    2011-01-01

    We have been developing a laser-based sounding technique for the remote measurement of the tropospheric CO2 concentrations from orbit for NASA is ASCENDS mission. The mission's goals are to provide measurements of tropospheric CO2 abundance with global-coverage, a few hundred km spatial and monthly temporal resolution. These are needed to better understand CO2 fluxes and the processes that regulate CO2 storage by the land and oceans. For the lIP, we are developing and demonstrating the lidar techniques and key lidar technology that will permit measurements of the CO2 column abundance in the lower troposphere from aircraft. Our final goal is to demonstrate the key capabilities needed for a space lidar and mission approach for the ASCENDS mission. We use a pulsed lidar technique, which is much less sensitive to errors from cloud and atmospheric scattering and to noise from solar background. It allows continuous measurements of CO2 mixing ratio in the lower troposphere during day and night. Our approach uses the 1570nm CO2 band and a two-wavelength laser absorption spectrometer, which continuously measures at nadir from a circular polar orbit. It directs the narrow co-aligned laser beams from the instrument's lasers toward nadir, and measures the energy of the laser echoes reflected from land and water surfaces. It uses a pair of tunable laser transmitters, which allowing measurement of the extinction from a single selected CO2 absorption line in the 1570 nm band and from a line pair in the Oxygen A-band near 765 nm. These regions have temperature insensitive absorption lines are free from interference from other gases. The lasers pulse at 10KHz, use tunable diode seed lasers followed by laser amplifiers, and have MHz spectral widths. During the measurement the lasers are stepped across the selected lines at a kHz rate. The receiver uses a 1-m class telescope and photon sensitive detectors and measures the background light and energies of the laser echoes from the

  11. Oceanographic measurement capabilities of the NASA P-3 aircraft. [ERS-1 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mollo-Christensen, Erik; Jackson, F. C.; Walsh, E. J.; Hoge, F.

    1986-01-01

    Instrumentation on NASA P3 aircraft available to provide ground truth for ERS-1 is described. The wave sensors include the 36 GHz Surface Contour Radar (SCR), the Ku-band Radar Ocean Wave Spectrometer (ROWS), and the Airborne Oceanographic Lidar. The other sensors include a C-band scatterometer, video camera, radiation thermometer, and AXRTs. The SCR and ROWS directional spectrum measurements are discussed. When planning for an underflight mission, the limited endurance of the aircraft (6 hr) and flight cost (2.7 K$/hr) must be considered. The advantage of the redundancy afforded by the several wave instruments is another important consideration.

  12. High resolution Microwave Spectrometer Sounder (HIMSS) instrument program. Appendix: TRMM study (an instrument for NASA's tropical rainfall measuring mission)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lobl, E. (Editor)

    1991-01-01

    The TRMM (Tropical Rain Measuring Mission) Study shows the feasibility of a conically scanned, total power radiometer. The heritage of the TRMM radiometer is the Special Sensor Microwave/Imager (SSM/I) flying for the Air Force DMSP.

  13. Japanese Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission status and application of satellite-based global rainfall map

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Shimizu, Shuji; Kubota, Takuji; Yoshida, Naofumi; Oki, Riko; Kojima, Masahiro; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji

    2010-05-01

    As accuracy of satellite precipitation estimates improves and observation frequency increases, application of those data to societal benefit areas, such as weather forecasts and flood predictions, is expected, in addition to research of precipitation climatology to analyze precipitation systems. There is, however, limitation on single satellite observation in coverage and frequency. Currently, the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is scheduled under international collaboration to fulfill various user requirements that cannot be achieved by the single satellite, like the Tropical Rainfall Measurement Mission (TRMM). The GPM mission is an international mission to achieve high-accurate and high-frequent rainfall observation over a global area. GPM is composed of a TRMM-like non-sun-synchronous orbit satellite (GPM core satellite) and constellation of satellites carrying microwave radiometer instruments. The GPM core satellite carries the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR), which is being developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and microwave radiometer provided by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA). Development of DPR instrument is in good progress for scheduled launch in 2013, and DPR Critical Design Review has completed in July - September 2009. Constellation satellites, which carry a microwave imager and/or sounder, are planned to be launched around 2013 by each partner agency for its own purpose, and will contribute to extending coverage and increasing frequency. JAXA's future mission, the Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W) satellite will be one of constellation satellites. The first generation of GCOM-W satellite is scheduled to be launched in 2011, and it carries the Advanced Microwave Scanning Radiometer 2 (AMSR2), which is being developed based on the experience of the AMSR-E on EOS Aqua satellite

  14. [Analysis of Multiplatform CO (Carbon Monoxide) Measurements During Trace-P Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pougatchev, Nikita S.

    2004-01-01

    Carbon monoxide is considered mission critical (TRACE-P NRA) because it is one of the gases involved in controlling the oxidizing power of the atmosphere and, as a tracer gas, is valuable in interpreting mission data sets. Carbon monoxide exhibits interannual differences, suggesting relatively short-term imbalances in sources and sinks. Sources of CO are dominated by fossil fuel combustion, biomass burning, and the photochemical oxidation of CH4 and nonmethane hydrocarbons while reaction with OH is believed to be the major sink for atmospheric CO, with additional losses due to soil uptake. Uncertainties in the magnitude and distribution of both sources and sinks remain fairly large however, and additional data are required to refine the global budget. Seasonal changes and a northern hemispheric latitudinal gradient have been described for a variety of Pacific basin sites through long-term monitoring of surface background levels. Latitudinal variations have also recently been described at upper tropospheric altitudes over a multi-year period by. TRACE-P will provide an aircraft survey of CO over the northern Pacific in the northern spring when CO concentrations are at their seasonal maximum in the northern hemisphere (NH) and at their seasonal minimum in the southern hemisphere (SH). Previous GTE missions, Le., PEM West-B and PEM Tropics-B, ground-based, and satellite observations (MAPS, April 1994) give us a general picture of the distribution of CO over the northern Pacific during this season. Based on these measurements, background CO levels over remote ocean areas are anticipated to be in the range of 110 - 180 ppbv, while those closer to the Asian continent may rise as high as 600 ppbv. These measurements also reveal high spatial variability (both horizontal and vertical) as well as temporal variations in CO over the area planned for the TRACE-P mission. This variability is a result of multiple CO sources, the meteorological complexity of transport processes

  15. Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics carbon monoxide measurements in historical context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pougatchev, N. S.; Sachse, G. W.; Fuelberg, H. E.; Rinsland, C. P.; Chatfield, R. B.; Connors, V. S.; Jones, N. B.; Notholt, J.; Novelli, P. C.; Reichle, H. G.

    1999-11-01

    The three-dimensional (3-D) distribution of carbon monoxide (CO) over the southern Pacific during the NASA Global Tropospheric Experiment Pacific Exploratory Mission-Tropics (PEM-T) (August-October 1996) has been analyzed in comparison to other CO measurements. The following data sets have been used in the study: National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration Climate Monitoring and Diagnostic Laboratory surface level sampling; Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization aircraft measurements over Cape Grim, Tasmania; solar spectroscopic measurements at Lauder, New Zealand; and data from two spaceborne Measurement of Air Pollution From Satellite experiments. For the PEM-T mission back trajectories analysis and 3-D modeling of the CO transport have been performed. It has been demonstrated that CO measurements obtained by different in situ and remote techniques can be used to build the picture of the CO climatology over the large geographical area. The structure of the CO distribution over the western part of the southern Pacific during the austral spring is mainly controlled by emission from biomass burning in Australia and Africa and subsequent long-range transport. The prevailing westerly transport occurs in the middle and upper troposphere, whereas the marine boundary layer remains relatively clean and uniform. Barriers in the form of the Intertropical Convergence Zone and South Pacific Convergence Zone protect the equatorial area (equator to 10°S) from direct impact of biomass burning plumes from north and southwest. Consistency between the measurements taken in different years and modeling results indicates that the observed feature is a stable phenomenon. Outside the equatorial area the CO vertical distribution has a broad distinctive maximum at the altitude range 5-8 km and latitudes between 20°S and 30°S. This maximum is a stable feature, and its location indicates the area where the most intensive westerly transport occurs.

  16. Advances in Understanding Global Water Cycle with Advent of Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Eric A.; Starr, David (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Within this decade the internationally organized Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission will take an important step in creating a global precipitation observing system from space. One perspective for understanding the nature of GPM is that it will be a hierarchical system of datastreams beginning with very high caliber combined dual frequency radar/passive microwave (PMW) rain-radiometer retrievals, to high caliber PMW rain-radiometer only retrievals, and then on to blends of the former datastreams with additional lower-caliber PMW-based and IR-based rain retrievals. Within the context of the now emerging global water & energy cycle (GWEC) programs of a number of research agencies throughout the world, GPM serves as a centerpiece space mission for improving our understanding of the global water cycle from a global measurement perspective. One of the salient problems within our current understanding of the global water and energy cycle is determining whether a change in the rate of the water cycle is accompanying changes in climate, e.g., climate warming. As there are a number of ways in which to define a rate-change of the global water cycle, it is not entirely clear as to what constitutes such a determination. This paper presents an overview of the GPM Mission and how its observations can be used within the framework of the oceanic and continental water budget equations to determine whether a given perturbation in precipitation is indicative of an actual rate change in the global water cycle, consistent with required responses in water storage and/or water flux transport processes, or whether it is the natural variability of a fixed rate cycle.

  17. Validation for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: Lessons Learned and Future Plans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolff, D. B.; Amitai, E.; Marks, D. A.; Silberstein, D.; Lawrence, R. A.

    2005-05-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was launched in November 1997 and was a highly regarded and successful mission. A major component of the TRMM program was its Ground Validation (GV) program. Through dedicated research and hard work by many groups, both the GV and satellite-retrieved rain estimates have shown a convergence at key GV sites, lending credibility to the global TRMM estimates. To be sure, there are some regional differences between the various satellite estimates themselves which still need to be addressed; however, it can be said with some certainty that TRMM has provided a high-quality, long-term climatological data set for researchers that provides errors on the order of 10-20%, rather than pre-TRMM-era error estimates on the order of 50-10%. The TRMM GV program's main operational task was to provide rainfall products for four sites: Darwin, Australia; Houston, Texas; Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands; and, Melbourne, Florida. A comparison between TRMM GV (Version 5) and satellite (Version 6) rain intensity estimates is presented. The gridded satellite product (3G-68) will be compared to GV Level II rain-intensity and -type maps. The 3G-68 product represents a 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg data grid providing estimates of rain intensities from the TRMM Precipitation Radar, Microwave Imager and Combined algorithms. The comparisons will be classified according to geographical type (land, coast or ocean). The convergence of the GV and satellite estimates bodes well for expectations for the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program, but it is now well understood that providing uncertainties of the estimates is perhaps more important than convergence on its own. Further, while TRMM originally focused on monthly and climatological validation, future precipitation missions should concentrate on instantaneous validation in order to avoid inevitable and large sampling errors.

  18. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements Using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodriguez, M.; Riris, H.; Abshire, J. B.; Allan, G. R.; Stephen, M.; Hasselbrack, W.; Mao, J.

    2012-12-01

    We report on airborne atmospheric pressure measurements using fiber-based laser technology and the oxygen A-band at 765 nm. Remote atmospheric temperature and pressure measurements are needed for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions Over Nights, Days, and Seasons (ASCENDS) mission. ASCENDS will measure atmospheric CO2 dry mixing ratios on a global scale. Remote atmospheric pressure measurements are necessary to normalize ASCENDS CO2 measurements. Our work, funded by the ESTO IIP program, uses erbium doped fiber optic amplifiers and non-linear optics technology to tune laser radiation over the Oxygen A-band between 764.5 nm and 765 nm. Surface reflections are fiber-coupled from a receiver telescope to photon counting detectors. Our pulsed, time gated approach resolves ground reflections from cloud returns. This system successfully recorded O2 absorption spectra during two airborne campaigns aboard a NASA DC-8. Airborne data has been analyzed and fitted to HITRAN reference spectra based upon aircraft meteorological data. Our algorithm linearly scales the HITRAN reference until measurement errors are minimized. Atmospheric pressure changes are estimated by comparing the differential optical depth of the optimum scaled HITRAN spectra to the differential optical depth of the nominal HITRAN spectra. On flights over gradually sloping terrain, these results compare favorably with ground-based observations and predictions from computer models. Measurement uncertainty is commensurate with photon counting noise. We plan to reduce measurement uncertainty in future campaigns by improving transmitter pulse energy and increasing wavelength sweep frequency.

  19. The RAVAN CubeSat mission: Progress toward a new measurement of Earth outgoing radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Swartz, B. H.; Dyrud, L. P.; Lorentz, S. R.; Wu, D. L.; Wiscombe, W. J.; Papadakis, S.; Huang, P. M.; Smith, A.; Deglau, D.

    2014-12-01

    The Earth radiation imbalance (ERI) is the single most important quantity for predicting the course of climate change over the next century. The Radiometer Assessment using Vertically Aligned Nanotubes (RAVAN) CubeSat mission, funded by NASA's Earth Science Technology Office, will demonstrate an affordable, accurate radiometer that directly measures Earth-leaving fluxes of total and solar-reflected radiation. The objective of RAVAN is to demonstrate that a compact spaceborne radiometer that is absolutely accurate to NIST-traceable standards can be built for low cost. The key technologies that enable a radiometer with all these attributes are: a vertically aligned carbon nanotube (VACNT) absorber and a gallium fixed-point blackbody as a built-in calibration source. VACNTs are exceedingly black and spectrally flat, making them ideal radiometer absorbers. We present results from the fabrication and calibration of the RAVAN radiometer and plans for CubeSat hosting and launch. RAVAN will help enable the development of a constellation Earth radiation budget mission that can provide the measurements needed for superior predictions of future climate change.

  20. Effective dose measured with a life size human phantom in a low Earth orbit mission.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    The biggest concern about the health risk to astronauts is how large the stochastic effects (cancers and hereditary effects) of space radiation could be. The practical goal is to determine the "effective dose" precisely, which is difficult for each crew because of the complex transport processes of energetic secondary particles. The author and his colleagues thus attempted to measure an effective dose in space using a life-size human phantom torso in the STS-91 Shuttle-Mir mission, which flew at nearly the same orbit as that of the International Space Station (ISS). The effective dose for about 10-days flight was 4.1 mSv, which is about 90% of the dose equivalent (H) at the skin; the lowest H values were seen in deep, radiation-sensitive organs/tissues such as the bone marrow and colon. Succeeding measurements and model calculations show that the organ dose equivalents and effective dose in the low Earth orbit mission are highly consistent, despite the different dosimetry methodologies used to determine them. PMID:19202325

  1. Atmospheric seeing measurements obtained with MISOLFA in the framework of the PICARD Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikhlef, R.; Corbard, T.; Irbah, A.; Morand, F.; Fodil, M.; Chauvineau, B.; Assus, P.; Renaud, C.; Meftah, M.; Abbaki, S.; Borgnino, J.; Cissé, E. M.; D'Almeida, E.; Hauchecorne, A.; Laclare, F.; Lesueur, P.; Lin, M.; Martin, F.; Poiet, G.; Rouzé, M.; Thuillier, G.; Ziad, A.

    2012-09-01

    PICARD is a space mission launched in June 2010 to study mainly the geometry of the Sun. The PICARD mission has a ground program consisting mostly in four instruments based at the Calern Observatory (Observatoire de la Côte d’Azur). They allow recording simultaneous solar images and various atmospheric data from ground. The ground instruments consist in the qualification model of the PICARD space instrument (SODISM II: Solar Diameter Imager and Surface Mapper), standard sun-photometers, a pyranometer for estimating a global sky quality index, and MISOLFA a generalized daytime seeing monitor. Indeed, astrometric observations of the Sun using ground-based telescopes need an accurate modeling of optical effects induced by atmospheric turbulence. MISOLFA is founded on the observation of Angle-of-Arrival (AA) fluctuations and allows us to analyze atmospheric turbulence optical effects on measurements performed by SODISM II. It gives estimations of the coherence parameters characterizing wave-fronts degraded by the atmospheric turbulence (Fried parameter r0, size of the isoplanatic patch, the spatial coherence outer scale L0 and atmospheric correlation times). We present in this paper simulations showing how the Fried parameter infered from MISOLFA records can be used to interpret radius measurements extracted from SODISM II images. We show an example of daily and monthly evolution of r0 and present its statistics over 2 years at Calern Observatory with a global mean value of 3.5cm.

  2. Early Results from the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission in Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kachi, Misako; Kubota, Takuji; Masaki, Takeshi; Kaneko, Yuki; Kanemaru, Kaya; Oki, Riko; Iguchi, Toshio; Nakamura, Kenji; Takayabu, Yukari N.

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international collaboration to achieve highly accurate and highly frequent global precipitation observations. The GPM mission consists of the GPM Core Observatory jointly developed by U.S. and Japan and Constellation Satellites that carry microwave radiometers and provided by the GPM partner agencies. The Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) was developed by the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) and the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT), and installed on the GPM Core Observatory. The GPM Core Observatory chooses a non-sun-synchronous orbit to carry on diurnal cycle observations of rainfall from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite and was successfully launched at 3:37 a.m. on February 28, 2014 (JST), while the Constellation Satellites, including JAXA's Global Change Observation Mission (GCOM) - Water (GCOM-W1) or "SHIZUKU," are launched by each partner agency sometime around 2014 and contribute to expand observation coverage and increase observation frequency JAXA develops the DPR Level 1 algorithm, and the NASA-JAXA Joint Algorithm Team develops the DPR Level 2 and DPR-GMI combined Level2 algorithms. JAXA also develops the Global Rainfall Map (GPM-GSMaP) algorithm, which is a latest version of the Global Satellite Mapping of Precipitation (GSMaP), as national product to distribute hourly and 0.1-degree horizontal resolution rainfall map. Major improvements in the GPM-GSMaP algorithm is; 1) improvements in microwave imager algorithm based on AMSR2 precipitation standard algorithm, including new land algorithm, new coast detection scheme; 2) Development of orographic rainfall correction method for warm rainfall in coastal area (Taniguchi et al., 2012); 3) Update of database, including rainfall detection over land and land surface emission database; 4) Development of microwave sounder algorithm over land (Kida et al., 2012); and 5) Development

  3. The PICARD Mission: an investigation based on measurements dedicated to solar and climate modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuillier, Gerard; Schmutz, Werner; Dewitte, Steven

    PICARD mission is dedicated to the study of the solar activity origin using several key solar measurements. The project also includes development of the solar convective zone and climate models to evaluate the consequences for the Earth'climate of the solar activity. The measure-ments are the total and spectral solar irradiance, solar diameter, limb shape, solar asphericity, and helioseismic waves, which are key inputs for solar physics modeling. The measurements will be carried out by two absolute radiometers, sunphotometers, and a metrological imag-ing telescope onboard a microsatellite built by the French Space Agency CNES, with launch scheduled for March 2010. The radiometers are similar to the ones flown on board SOHO. The imaging telescope contains an angular reference allowing a permanent control of the instrument geometric scale, which is referred to angular stars distances. Optical distortion and flatfield of the imaging telescope are foreseen to be regularly measured. The measurements in space will have correlative measurements from ground using an identical imaging telescope, associated to the measurement of the local turbulence and aerosols localization and concentration. The op-portunity of diameter measurements by solar eclipse method will be used and finally the Solar Disk Sextant instrument will be regularly flown as an external measurement validation. An after launch activities is scheduled for three months, which consists in several instrument checks and recording of some scientific data. Given the launch date, these preliminary measurements will be shown. Images in UV, CaII line and solar photospheric continuum will be presented with some analysis of their contains. Furthermore, preliminary information concerning the radiometric and spectrometric measurements will be given.

  4. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Satellite: Assessment and Lessons Learned After Three Flight Years

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, Joanne; Einaudi, Franco (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM) is an experiment in measuring rainfall and the associated latent heat release from space. A primary goal is to help in initializing the large-scale weather and climate models for crucial improvement in location and profile of atmospheric heat release. For this, precipitation and latent heating profiles are needed. This goal requires cloud-resolving models. The basic approach was to use passive microwave and rain radar in combination to issue a limited number of products, improving the retrieval algorithms by testing during flight, so the products are updated annually. Despite a tight budget, the TRMM observatory and data system worked excellently from launch for the past three years. A basic philosophy has been to do physical validation as much as possible, in preference to empirical adjustments for algorithm improvement. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  5. Polarized Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements from the Winter of 2013 Discover-AQ Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, R.; Martins, J.; Dolgos, G.; Dubovik, O.; Ziemba, L. D.; Beyersdorf, A. J.

    2013-12-01

    the Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality (Discover-AQ) mission. This presentation will focus on the results of the PI-Neph's twelve successful science flights during this past winter's Discover-AQ mission. These flights focused primarily on vehicle traffic, agriculture and biomass burning emissions over the San Joaquin Valley in central California. PI-Neph scattering data from this mission will be analyzed with an emphasis on evaluating horizontal, vertical and temporal variation in the sampled aerosol to asses the reliability of column measurements made by remote sensing platforms in determining air quality. Measured PI-Neph phase functions during spirals over AERONET (AErosol RObotic NETwork) stations will also be compared with retrieved phase functions from AERONET. In an effort to further validate AERONET retrievals an inversion method (Dubovik et al., J. Geophys. Res., 111, D11208, doi:10.1029/2005JD006619d, 2006) similar to the AERONET inversion will be applied to PI-NEPH data to obtain size distribution estimates. These results will be compared to measurements of the same sample made by particle counters on board the aircraft.

  6. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-73, Launched October 20, 1995

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; DeLombard, Richard

    1996-01-01

    The microgravity environment of the Space Shuttle Columbia was measured during the STS-73 mission using accelerometers from five different instruments: the Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment, the Space Acceleration Measurement System, the Three-dimensional Microgravity Accelerometer, the Microgravity Measuring Device, and Suppression of Transient Accelerations by Levitation Evaluation System. The Microgravity Analysis Workstation quasi-steady environment calculation and comparison of this calculation with Orbital Acceleration Research Experiment data was used to assess how appropriate a planned attitude was expected to be for one Crystal Growth Facility experiment sample. The microgravity environment related to several different Orbiter, crew, and experiment operations is presented and interpreted in this report. Data are examined to show the effects of vernier reaction control system jet firings for Orbiter attitude control. This is compared to examples of data when no thrusters were firing, when the primary reaction control system jets were used for attitude control, and when single vernier jets were fired for test purposes. In general, vernier jets, when used for attitude control, cause accelerations in the 3 x 10(exp -4) g to 7 x 10(exp -4) g range. Primary jets used in this manner cause accelerations in the 0.01 to 0.025 g range. Other significant disturbance sources characterized are water dump operations, with Y(sub b) axis acceleration deviations of about 1 x 10(exp -6) g; payload bay door opening motion, with Y(sub o) and Z(sub o) axis accelerations of frequency 0.4 Hz; and probable Glovebox fan operations with notable frequency components at 20, 38, 43, 48, and 53 Hz. The STS-73 microgravity environment is comparable to the environments measured on earlier microgravity science missions.

  7. The number and choice of muscles impact the results of muscle synergy analyses

    PubMed Central

    Steele, Katherine M.; Tresch, Matthew C.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2013-01-01

    One theory for how humans control movement is that muscles are activated in weighted groups or synergies. Studies have shown that electromyography (EMG) from a variety of tasks can be described by a low-dimensional space thought to reflect synergies. These studies use algorithms, such as nonnegative matrix factorization, to identify synergies from EMG. Due to experimental constraints, EMG can rarely be taken from all muscles involved in a task. However, it is unclear if the choice of muscles included in the analysis impacts estimated synergies. The aim of our study was to evaluate the impact of the number and choice of muscles on synergy analyses. We used a musculoskeletal model to calculate muscle activations required to perform an isometric upper-extremity task. Synergies calculated from the activations from the musculoskeletal model were similar to a prior experimental study. To evaluate the impact of the number of muscles included in the analysis, we randomly selected subsets of between 5 and 29 muscles and compared the similarity of the synergies calculated from each subset to a master set of synergies calculated from all muscles. We determined that the structure of synergies is dependent upon the number and choice of muscles included in the analysis. When five muscles were included in the analysis, the similarity of the synergies to the master set was only 0.57 ± 0.54; however, the similarity improved to over 0.8 with more than ten muscles. We identified two methods, selecting dominant muscles from the master set or selecting muscles with the largest maximum isometric force, which significantly improved similarity to the master set and can help guide future experimental design. Analyses that included a small subset of muscles also over-estimated the variance accounted for (VAF) by the synergies compared to an analysis with all muscles. Thus, researchers should use caution using VAF to evaluate synergies when EMG is measured from a small subset of muscles

  8. CHASER: An Innovative Satellite Mission Concept to Measure the Effects of Aerosols on Clouds and Climate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renno, N.; Williams, E.; Rosenfeld, D.; Fischer, D.; Fischer, J.; Kremic, T.; Agrawal, A.; Andreae, M.; Bierbaum, R.; Blakeslee, R.; Boerner, A.; Bowles, N.; Christian, H.; Dunion, J.; Horvath, A.; Huang, X.; Khain, A.; Kinne, S.; Lemos, M.-C.; Penner, J.

    2012-04-01

    The formation of cloud droplets on aerosol particles, technically known as the activation of cloud condensation nuclei (CCN), is the fundamental process driving the interactions of aerosols with clouds and precipitation. Knowledge of these interactions is foundational to our understanding of weather and climate. The Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change (IPCC) and the Decadal Survey (NRC 2007) indicate that the uncertainty in how clouds adjust to aerosol perturbations dominates the uncertainty in the overall quantification of the radiative forcing attributable to human activities. The Clouds, Hazards, and Aerosols Survey for Earth Researchers (CHASER) mission concept responds to the IPCC and Decadal Survey concerns by studying the activation of CCN and their interactions with clouds and storms. CHASER proposes to revolutionize our understanding of the interactions of aerosols with clouds by making the first global measurements of the fundamental physical entity linking them: activated cloud condensation nuclei. The CHASER mission was conceptualized to measure all quantities necessary for determining the interactions of aerosols with clouds and storms. Measurements by current satellites allow the determination of crude profiles of cloud particle size but not of the activated CCN that seed them. CHASER uses a new technique (Freud et al. 2011; Rosenfeld et al. 2012) and high-heritage instruments to produce the first global maps of activated CCN and the properties of the clouds associated with them. CHASER measures the CCN concentration and cloud thermodynamic forcing simultaneously, allowing their effects to be distinguished. Changes in the behavior of a group of weather systems in which only one of the quantities varies (a partial derivative of the intensity with the desirable quantity) allow the determination of each effect statistically. The high uncertainties of current climate predictions limit their much-needed use in decision-making. CHASER mitigates this

  9. Operational Processing of Ground Validation Data for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kulie, Mark S.; Robinson, Mike; Marks, David A.; Ferrier, Brad S.; Rosenfeld, Danny; Wolff, David B.

    1999-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was successfully launched in November 1997. A primary goal of TRMM is to sample tropical rainfall using the first active spaceborne precipitation radar. To validate TRMM satellite observations, a comprehensive Ground Validation (GV) Program has been implemented for this mission. A key component of GV is the analysis and quality control of meteorological ground-based radar data from four primary sites: Melbourne, FL; Houston, TX; Darwin, Australia; and Kwajalein Atoll, RMI. As part of the TRMM GV effort, the Joint Center for Earth Systems Technology (JCET) at the University of Maryland, Baltimore County, has been tasked with developing and implementing an operational system to quality control (QC), archive, and provide data for subsequent rainfall product generation from the four primary GV sites. This paper provides an overview of the JCET operational environment. A description of the QC algorithm and performance, in addition to the data flow procedure between JCET and the TRNM science and Data Information System (TSDIS), are presented. The impact of quality-controlled data on higher level rainfall and reflectivity products will also be addressed, Finally, a brief description of JCET's expanded role into producing reference rainfall products will be discussed.

  10. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: Monitoring the Global Tropics for 3 Years and Beyond. 1.1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Marshall; Starr, David OC. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was launched in November 1997 as a joint U.S.-Japanese mission to advance understanding of the global energy and water cycle by providing distributions of rainfall and latent heating over the global tropics. As a part of NASA's Earth System Enterprise, TRMM seeks to understand the mechanisms through which changes in tropical rainfall influence global circulation. Additionally, a goal is to improve the ability to model these processes in order to predict global circulations and rainfall variability at monthly and longer time scales. Such understanding has implications for assessing climate processes related to El Nino/La Nina and Global Warming. TRMM has also provided unexpected and exciting new knowledge and applications in areas related to hurricane monitoring, lightning, pollution, hydrology, and other areas. This CD-ROM includes a self-contained PowerPoint presentation that provides an overview of TRMM and significant science results; a set of data movies or animation; and listings of current TRMM-related publications in the literature.

  11. Acquisition and Analysis of NASA Ames Sunphotometer Measurements during SAGE III Validation Campaigns and other Tropospheric and Stratospheric Research Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Livingston, John M.

    2004-01-01

    NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC2-1251 provided funding from April 2001 through December 2003 for Mr. John Livingston of SRI International to collaborate with NASA Ames Research Center scientists and engineers in the acquisition and analysis of airborne sunphotometer measurements during various atmospheric field studies. Mr. Livingston participated in instrument calibrations at Mauna Loa Observatory, pre-mission hardware and software preparations, acquisition and analysis of sunphotometer measurements during the missions, and post-mission analysis of data and reporting of scientific findings. The atmospheric field missions included the spring 2001 Intensive of the Asian Pacific Regional Aerosol Characterization Experiment (ACE-Asia), the Asian Dust Above Monterey-2003 (ADAM-2003) experiment, and the winter 2003 Second SAGE III Ozone Loss and Validation Experiment (SOLVE II).

  12. Advanced Soil Moisture Network Technologies; Developments in Collecting in situ Measurements for Remote Sensing Missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghaddam, M.; Silva, A. R. D.; Akbar, R.; Clewley, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Soil moisture Sensing Controller And oPtimal Estimator (SoilSCAPE) wireless sensor network has been developed to support Calibration and Validation activities (Cal/Val) for large scale soil moisture remote sensing missions (SMAP and AirMOSS). The technology developed here also readily supports small scale hydrological studies by providing sub-kilometer widespread soil moisture observations. An extensive collection of semi-sparse sensor clusters deployed throughout north-central California and southern Arizona provide near real time soil moisture measurements. Such a wireless network architecture, compared to conventional single points measurement profiles, allows for significant and expanded soil moisture sampling. The work presented here aims at discussing and highlighting novel and new technology developments which increase in situ soil moisture measurements' accuracy, reliability, and robustness with reduced data delivery latency. High efficiency and low maintenance custom hardware have been developed and in-field performance has been demonstrated for a period of three years. The SoilSCAPE technology incorporates (a) intelligent sensing to prevent erroneous measurement reporting, (b) on-board short term memory for data redundancy, (c) adaptive scheduling and sampling capabilities to enhance energy efficiency. A rapid streamlined data delivery architecture openly provides distribution of in situ measurements to SMAP and AirMOSS cal/val activities and other interested parties.

  13. Total Uncertainty in Measurements Record for Climate: Strategies from the CLARREO Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dykema, J. A.; Anderson, J.

    2010-12-01

    Questions about uncertainty in observed trends in the climate system arise from multiple sources, including instrument performance, issues of temporal and spatial sampling, and geophysical information content obtainable from measurement records. The Climate Absolute Radiance and Refractivity Observatory (CLARREO) mission is designed to provide objective, testable evidence to support uncertainty estimates associated with these various sources. In this paper, we examine the strategies planned for CLARREO to obtain the information required to achieve this objective. In the case of instrument performance, the CLARREO sensors will utilize methods for obtaining robust uncertainty estimates that have been refined throughout the natural sciences through the work of the international community of National Measurement Institutes (NMIs). The foundation of the methods developed by the NMI community is a set of measurement standards that can be reproduced over time, and across national borders and institutions, to assure an exact quantitative relationship between different measurements. These measurement standards are the International System of Units, or SI. The SI units achieve the required properties by utilizing fundamental properties of matter to define a measurement system that is independent of instruments or techniques that are specific to a particular place or time. The set of a robust set of measurement standards then forms the basis for an experimental strategy to test the uncertainty of a climate observation system based on objective techniques that can be repeated by any experimenter, anywhere in the world, at any time. This paper will look at specific examples of the physical logic underlying this framework for the CLARREO infrared instrument suite, paying special attention to the overlap between the CLARREO calibration strategies and measurement successes from other areas of natural science. The interplay of measurement uncertainty with sampling and information

  14. The HYSPIRI Decadal Survey Mission: Update on the Mission Concept and Science Objectives for Global Imaging Spectroscopy and Multi-Spectral Thermal Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Robert O.; Hook, Simon J.; Middleton, Elizabeth; Turner, Woody; Ungar, Stephen; Knox, Robert

    2012-01-01

    The NASA HyspIRI mission is planned to provide global solar reflected energy spectroscopic measurement of the terrestrial and shallow water regions of the Earth every 19 days will all measurements downlinked. In addition, HyspIRI will provide multi-spectral thermal measurements with a single band in the 4 micron region and seven bands in the 8 to 12 micron region with 5 day day/night coverage. A direct broadcast capability for measurement subsets is also planned. This HyspIRI mission is one of those designated in the 2007 National Research Council (NRC) Decadal Survey: Earth Science and Applications from Space. In the Decadal Survey, HyspIRI was recognized as relevant to a range of Earth science and science applications, including climate: "A hyperspectral sensor (e.g., FLORA) combined with a multispectral thermal sensor (e.g., SAVII) in low Earth orbit (LEO) is part of an integrated mission concept [described in Parts I and II] that is relevant to several panels, especially the climate variability panel." The HyspIRI science study group was formed in 2008 to evaluate and refine the mission concept. This group has developed a series of HyspIRI science objectives: (1) Climate: Ecosystem biochemistry, condition & feedback; spectral albedo; carbon/dust on snow/ice; biomass burning; evapotranspiration (2) Ecosystems: Global plant functional types, physiological condition, and biochemistry including agricultural lands (3) Fires: Fuel status, fire frequency, severity, emissions, and patterns of recovery globally (4) Coral reef and coastal habitats: Global composition and status (5) Volcanoes: Eruptions, emissions, regional and global impact (6) Geology and resources: Global distributions of surface mineral resources and improved understanding of geology and related hazards These objectives are achieved with the following measurement capabilities. The HyspIRI imaging spectrometer provides: full spectral coverage from 380 to 2500 at 10 nm sampling; 60 m spatial sampling

  15. Performance of the Falling Snow Retrieval Algorithms for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skofronick-Jackson, Gail; Munchak, Stephen J.; Ringerud, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Retrievals of falling snow from space represent an important data set for understanding the Earth's atmospheric, hydrological, and energy cycles, especially during climate change. Estimates of falling snow must be captured to obtain the true global precipitation water cycle, snowfall accumulations are required for hydrological studies, and without knowledge of the frozen particles in clouds one cannot adequately understand the energy and radiation budgets. While satellite-based remote sensing provides global coverage of falling snow events, the science is relatively new and retrievals are still undergoing development with challenges remaining). This work reports on the development and testing of retrieval algorithms for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission Core Satellite, launched February 2014.

  16. Long Duration Exposure Facility post-flight data as it influences the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Straka, Sharon A.

    1995-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is an earth observing satellite that will be in a low earth orbit (350 kilometers) during the next period of maximum solar activity. The TRMM observatory is expected to experience an atomic oxygen fluence of 8.9 x 10(exp 22) atoms per square centimeter. This fluence is ten times higher than the atomic oxygen impingement incident to the Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF). Other environmental concerns on TRMM include: spacecraft glow, silicon oxide contaminant build-up, severe spacecraft material degradation, and contamination deposition resulting from molecular interactions with the dense ambient atmosphere. Because of TRMM's predicted harsh environment, TRMM faces many unique material concerns and subsystem design issues. The LDEF data has influenced the design of TRMM and the TRMM material selection process.

  17. Measurements of heavy solar wind and higher energy solar particles during the Apollo 17 mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, R. M.; Zinner, E.; Maurette, M.

    1973-01-01

    The lunar surface cosmic ray experiment, consisting of sets of mica, glass, plastic, and metal foil detectors, was successfully deployed on the Apollo 17 mission. One set of detectors was exposed directly to sunlight and another set was placed in shade. Preliminary scanning of the mica detectors shows the expected registration of heavy solar wind ions in the sample exposed directly to the sun. The initial results indicate a depletion of very-heavy solar wind ions. The effect is probably not real but is caused by scanning inefficiencies. Despite the lack of any pronounced solar activity, energetic heavy particles with energies extending to 1 MeV/nucleon were observed. Equal track densities of approximately 6000 tracks/cm sq 0.5 microns in length were measured in mica samples exposed in both sunlight and shade.

  18. Open Imaging Nephelometer Scattering Measurements from the 2014 Discover-AQ Field Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa, R.; Orozco, D.; Dolgos, G.; Martins, J. V.

    2014-12-01

    After greenhouse gases, aerosols are thought to have the largest contribution to total atmospheric radiative forcing, but they are frequently cited as the single largest source of uncertainty among all anthropogenic radiative forcing components. Remote sensing allows for global measurements of aerosol properties, however validation of these measurements and the climatological assumptions used in their retrieval algorithms require high quality in situ sampling. The Laboratory for Aerosols, Clouds and Optics (LACO) at the University of Maryland Baltimore County (UMBC) has developed the Imaging Nephelometer, a novel and highly accurate instrument concept designed to significantly aid in situ optical scattering measurements. Imaging Nephelometers allow for measurements of scattering coefficient, phase function and polarized phase function over a wide angular range of 2 to 178 degrees with an angular resolution of less than half of a degree. The simple layout of these devices also permits the construction of an instrument that is compact enough to be deployed on a variety of airborne platforms. Additionally, a version of this instrument that is capable of in situ sampling in open-air, free from sample biases potentially introduced by an inlet or containment apparatus, has recently been constructed. This instrument, known as the Open Imaging NEPHelometer (OI-NEPH), was flown on the P3 aircraft in the summer of 2014 during the Colorado portion of the Discover-AQ field mission (Deriving Information on Surface Conditions from Column and Vertically Resolved Observations Relevant to Air Quality). This presentation will focus on the results of the OI-NEPH's successful science flights during this field experiment. The P3's flights during this mission focused primarily on vehicle, agriculture, biomass burning and industrial processing emissions over the Colorado Front Range. Emphasis will be placed on any observed differences in scattering properties between the measurements

  19. EGPM - The proposed European contribution to the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mugnai, A.; Egpm Mission Advisory Group

    2003-04-01

    At the beginning of January 2002, an international scientific consortium (the EGPM Science Team) constituted by numerous scientists involved in several disciplines related to precipitation, submitted to the European Space Agency (ESA) a proposal titled "EGPM: European contribution to the Global Precipitation Mission" in response to ESA's second call for proposals for Earth Explorer Opportunity Missions (EEOMs). The principle objective of the EGPM proposal was to encourage ESA to directly engage in the international organization for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission formulated by NASA and NASDA, by providing one member of the GPM constellation of satellites aimed at providing frequent global rainfall observations for an extended operations period starting in the time frame of 2007. Noteworthy, a large part of the European scientific and operational community is strongly interested in GPM. Especially, the operational community related to NWP, nowcasting and hydrological hazards would take advantage of Europe being part of the constellation, because this would guarantee direct access to real-time data. The proposed EGPM satellite should satisfy, in association with the overall GPM constellation, the following "regional" requirements: - Improve the rainfall estimation accuracy with respect to SSM/I; - Enhance the detectability of light rain and snowfall, specifically over land, as appropriate for Northern Europe and Canada and in mid-latitude oceanic perturbations; - Provide a significant contribution to the monitoring and the understanding of hazardous and flash-flood producing storms along the Mediterranean coasts; - Improve the forecast skill of global and regional NWP models through data assimilation of precipitation measurements; - Provide direct-read-out data for real-time applications, as well as global data acquisition. To this end, the scientific payload of the EGPM satellite would consist of an advanced conically scanning microwave radiometer

  20. Hurricane Floyd from SeaWinds and the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    The microwave scatterometer SeaWinds on the newly-launched QuikScat Mission observed the ocean surface winds feeding moisture into Hurricane Floyd. The moisture turns into rain, releases latent heat, and fuels the storm. The surface rain and the vertical rain profiles were observed by the TRMM Microwave Imager (TMI) and the Precipitation Radar (PR) on the Tropical Rain Measuring Mission (TRMM). The close relation between the dynamic and hydrologic parameters is visible in the image as Floyd approaches the Bahamas on 13 September 1999. In the image, wind vectors (white arrows) from SeaWinds are superimposed on the surface precipitation (color image) from TMI along the groundtracks of QuikScat and TRMM, which are approximately 78 minutes apart. After the image was taken, Hurricane Floyd turned north. Its strength and its proximity to the Atlantic Coast of the U.S. caused the largest evacuation of citizens in U.S. history. Its landfall on September 16 resulted in severe flooding and devastation in the Carolinas. Over the ocean, in situ observations in a tropical cyclone are extremely sparse, and conventional satellite data provide only cloud imagery at the top of the storm. Tropical cyclones are devastating when accompanied by strong winds and heavy rain. QuikSCAT, which was launched in June 1999, and TRMM, which was launched 18 months earlier, provide the opportunity to observe both wind and rain before landfall. The coincident measurements of surface wind and rain reveal the interplay between the dynamics and the hydrologic balances of the storm. These variables are important in understanding the structure of the storm and predicting its path. The image is part of a paper by Liu, Hu, and Yueh [Eos, Trans. of AGU, 2000, in press]. The paper shows that the surface wind divergence has strong influence in the hydrologic and energy balance in a tropical storm. The high spatial information of the scatterometer improves the estimation of the profile of moisture sink and

  1. On pressure measurement and seasonal pressure variations during the Phoenix mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taylor, Peter A.; Kahanpää, Henrik; Weng, Wensong; Akingunola, Ayodeji; Cook, Clive; Daly, Mike; Dickinson, Cameron; Harri, Ari-Matti; Hill, Darren; Hipkin, Victoria; Polkko, Jouni; Whiteway, Jim

    2010-03-01

    In situ surface pressures measured at 2 s intervals during the 150 sol Phoenix mission are presented and seasonal variations discussed. The lightweight Barocap®/Thermocap® pressure sensor system performed moderately well. However, the original data processing routine had problems because the thermal environment of the sensor was subject to more rapid variations than had been expected. Hence, the data processing routine was updated after Phoenix landed. Further evaluation and the development of a correction are needed since the temperature dependences of the Barocap sensor heads have drifted after the calibration of the sensor. The inaccuracy caused by this appears when the temperature of the unit rises above 0°C. This frequently affects data in the afternoons and precludes a full study of diurnal pressure variations at this time. Short-term fluctuations, on time scales of order 20 s are unaffected and are reported in a separate paper in this issue. Seasonal variations are not significantly affected by this problem and show general agreement with previous measurements from Mars. During the 151 sol mission the surface pressure dropped from around 860 Pa to a minimum (daily average) of 724 Pa on sol 140 (Ls 143). This local minimum occurred several sols earlier than expected based on GCM studies and Viking data. Since battery power was lost on sol 151 we are not sure if the timing of the minimum that we saw could have been advanced by a low-pressure meteorological event. On sol 95 (Ls 122), we also saw a relatively low-pressure feature. This was accompanied by a large number of vertical vortex events, characterized by short, localized (in time), low-pressure perturbations.

  2. Measurement of the PPN-beta parameter in the GAME mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchiato, Alberto; Bernardi, Gabriella; Gai, Mario

    GAME (Gamma Astrometric Measurement Experiment) is a proposal for a space mission whose main scientific goal is the estimation of the γ parameter of the Parametrized Post-Newtonian (PPN) formalism. A possible configuration as a small mission, and its possible performances for the main scientific case, has already been described in some recent papers (Gai et al. 2009, Vecchiato et al. 2009). However, simple considerations on the applicable observation strategy suggest that GAME can also provide outstanding results on other topics. We address the possible application to another classical test of General Relativity, i.e. the determination of the β parameter of the PPN formalism, or more precisely of the (2γ - β - 1) combination, by means of the reconstruction of the orbit of Mercury. The present accepted limit for this combination is |2γ - β - 1| < 10-3 (Will, 2006), while the proposed ESA Bepi-Colombo Mercury orbiter is expected to improve this limit to 3 × 10-4 after 2020. Preliminary estimations, based on the astrometric accuracy of the satellite measurements, suggest that GAME, in the baseline configuration, could reach the 10-4 -level of accuracy or better, hence calling for a more accurate evaluation which takes into account a relativistic model of the observable. The astrometric position of the planet, in fact, is influenced by the well-known light deflection effect whose lower limit, in the case of Mercury, is of the order of 10-2 arcsec, i.e. well above the expected sub-mas astrometric accuracy of GAME for bright objects. We describe the results of some simulations based on this relativistic model applied to the case of Mercury. Further work will assess in more detail the GAME performance by optimization of the observation strategy and the possible inclusion of other observational targets (high ellipticity orbit asteroids) which could improve on the overall accuracy of the estimate of the β parameter.

  3. Validation for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission: Lessons Learned and Future Plans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolff, David B.; Amitai, E.; Marks, D. A.; Silberstein, D.; Lawrence, R. J.

    2005-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) was launched in November 1997 and is a highly regarded and successful mission. A major component of the TRMM program was its Ground Validation (GV) program. Through dedicated research and hard work by many groups, both the GV and satellite-retrieved rain estimates have shown a convergence at key GV sites, lending credibility to the global TRMM estimates. To be sure, there are some regional differences between the various satellite estimates themselves, which still need to be addressed; however, it can be said with some certainty that TRMM has provided a high-quality, long-term climatological data set for researchers that provides errors on the order of 10-20%, rather than pre-TRMM era error estimates on the order of 50-100%. The TRMM GV program's main operational task is to provide rainfall products for four sites: Darwin, Australia (DARW); Houston, Texas (HSTN); Kwajalein, Republic of the Marshall Islands (KWAJ); and, Melbourne, Florida (MELB). A comparison between TRMM Ground Validation (Version 5) and Satellite (Version 6) rain intensity estimates is presented. The gridded satellite product (3668) will be compared to GV Level II rain-intensity and -type maps (2A53 and 2A54, respectively). The 3G68 product represents a 0.5 deg x 0.5 deg data grid providing estimates of rain intensities from the TRMM Precipitation Radar (PR), Microwave Imager (TMI) and Combined (COM) algorithms. The comparisons will be sub-setted according to geographical type (land, coast and ocean). The convergence of the GV and satellite estimates bodes well for expectations for the proposed Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) program and this study and others are being leveraged towards planning GV goals for GPM. A discussion of lessons learned and future plans for TRMM GV in planning for GPM will also be provided.

  4. High precision ground-based measurements of solar diameter in support of PICARD mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigismondi, Costantino

    2011-12-01

    The measurement of the solar diameter is introduced in the wider framework of solar variability and of the influences of the Sun upon the Earth's climate. Ancient eclipses and planetary transits would permit to extend the knowledge of the solar irradiance back to three centuries, through the parameter W=dLogR/dLogL. The method of Baily's beads timing during eclipses is discussed, and a significant improvement with respect to the last 40 years has been obtained by reconstructing the Limb Darkening Function's inflexion point from their light curve and the corresponding lunar valleys' profiles. The case of the Jan 15, 2010 annular eclipse has been studied in detail, as well as the last two transits of Venus. The atlas of Baily's beads, realized with worldwide contributions by IOTA members is presented along with the solar diameter during the eclipse of 2006. The transition between the photographic atlas of the lunar limb (Watts, 1963) and the laser-altimeter map made by the Kaguya lunar probe in 2009 has been followed. The other method for the accurate measurement of the solar diameter alternative to the PICARD / PICARD-sol mission is the drift-scan method used either by the solar astrolabes either by larger telescopes. The observatories of Locarno and Paris have started an observational program of the Sun with this method with encouraging results. For the first time an image motion of the whole Sun has been detected at frequencies of 1/100 Hz. This may start explain the puzzling results of the observational campaigns made in Greenwich and Rome from 1850 to 1955. The meridian line of Santa Maria degli Angeli in Rome is a giant pinhole telescope and it permits to introduce didactically almost all the arguments of classical astrometry here presented. The support to the PICARD mission continues with the analyses of the transit of Venus and the total eclipse of 2012.

  5. Atmospheric Airborne Pressure Measurements using the Oxygen A Band for the ASCENDS Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riris, H.; Rodriguez, M.

    2014-12-01

    We report on an airborne demonstration of atmospheric oxygen optical depth measurements with an Integrated Path Differential Absorption (IPDA) lidar using a fiber-based laser system and a photon counting detector. Accurate knowledge of atmospheric temperature and pressure is required for NASA's Active Sensing of CO2 Emissions over Nights, Days and Seasons (ASCENDS) space mission, and climate modeling studies. The lidar uses a doubled Erbium Doped Fiber amplifier and single photon counting detector to measure oxygen absorption at 765 nm. Our approach uses a sequence of laser pulses at increasing wavelengths that sample a pair of absorption lines in the Oxygen A-band at 764.7 nm. The O2 lines were selected after careful spectroscopic analysis to minimize the O2 line temperature dependence and the availability of the transmitter and receiver technology to maximize transmitter power, doubling efficiency, and detector sensitivity. We compare our 2013 and 2014 Oxygen IPDA lidar measurements and evaluate the impact of receiver dynamic range, transmitter stability and signal to noise ratio on the differential optical depth measurements.

  6. Power, Propulsion, and Communications for Microspacecraft Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, W. A.; Maloney, T. M.; Vanderaar, M. J.

    1998-01-01

    The development of small sized, low weight spacecraft should lead to reduced scientific mission costs by lowering fabrication and launch costs. An order of magnitude reduction in spacecraft size can be obtained by miniaturizing components. Additional reductions in spacecraft weight, size, and cost can be obtained by utilizing the synergy that exists between different spacecraft systems. The state-of-the-art of three major systems, spacecraft power, propulsion, and communications is discussed. Potential strategies to exploit the synergy between these systems and/or the payload are identified. Benefits of several of these synergies are discussed.

  7. Leveraging synergy for multiple agent infotaxis

    SciTech Connect

    Gintautas, Vadas; Hagberg, Aric A; Bettencourt, Luis M A

    2008-01-01

    Social computation, whether in the form of a search performed by a swarm of agents or the predictions of markets, often supplies remarkably good solutions to complex problems, which often elude the best experts. There is an intuition, built upon many anecdotal examples, that pervading principles are at play that allow individuals trying to solve a problem locally to aggregate their information to arrive at an outcome superior than any available to isolated parties. Here we show that the general structure of this problem can be cast in terms of information theory and derive general mathematical conditions for information sharing and coordination that lead to optimal multi-agent searches. Specifically we illustrate the problem in terms of the construction of local search algorithms for autonomous agents looking for the spatial location of a stochastic source. We explore the types of search problems -defined in terms of the properties of the source and the nature of measurements at each sensor -for which coordination among multiple searchers yields an advantage beyond that gained by having the same number of independent searchers. We assert that effective coordination corresponds to synergy and that ineffective coordination corresponds to redundancy as defined using information theory. We classify explicit types of sources in terms of their potential for synergy. We show that sources that emit uncorrelated particles based on a Poisson process, provide no opportunity for synergetic coordination while others, particularly sources that emit correlated signals, do allow for strong synergy between searchers. These general considerations are crucial for designing optimal algorithms for particular search problems in real world settings.

  8. Nearby stars to distant galaxies: TMT-ALMA synergies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheth, Kartik; Wilson, Christine

    2014-07-01

    Although they will probe very different wavelength regimes, significant synergies will exist for TMT and ALMA due to their capabilities for high angular resolution photometric and spectroscopic imaging. We illustrate this complementarity by examining a few specific science examples ranging from exoplanets, star forming disks in our Milky Way to black hole mass measurements in nearby galaxies to high redshift galaxy assemly. Since ALMA will be a relatively mature instrument by the end of TMT construction, we focus on synergies with the TMT first-light instruments as much as possible. We will also describe the current status and capabilities of ALMA and showcase some recent science results.

  9. Synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding of atmospheric temperature and minor constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, Ugo; Del Bianco, Samuele; Ceccherini, Simone; Gai, Marco; Dinelli, Bianca Maria; Castelli, Elisa; Oelhaf, Hermann; Woiwode, Wolfgang; Höpfner, Michael; Gerber, Daniel

    2016-05-01

    Synergistic exploitation of redundant and complementary information from independent observations of the same target remains a major issue in atmospheric remote sounding and increasing attention is devoted to investigate optimized or innovative methods for the combination of two or more measured data sets. This paper focuses on the synergy between middle infrared and millimeter-wave limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition and temperature and reports the results of a study conducted as part of the preparatory activities of the PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimeter-wave Emitted Radiation) mission candidate to the Core Missions of the European Space Agency (ESA) Earth Explorer 7. The activity was based on data acquired by the MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) and MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding) instruments on-board the high-altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica during the flight of the PremierEx (PREMIER Experiment) campaign on 10 March 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden, for observation of the Arctic upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The cloud coverage observed along the flight provided representative test cases to evaluate the synergy in three different scenarios: low clouds in the first part, no clouds in the central part and high tropospheric clouds at the end. The calculation of synergistic profiles of four atmospheric targets (i.e., O3, HNO3, H2O and temperature) was performed using a posteriori combination of individual retrieved profiles, i.e., Level 2 (L2) data rather than simultaneous inversion of observed radiances, i.e., Level 1 (L1) data. An innovative method of data fusion, based on the Measurement Space Solution (MSS) was applied along with the standard approach of inversion of MARSCHALS spectral radiances using MIPAS-STR retrieval products as a priori

  10. Synergy between middle infrared and millimetre-wave limb sounding of atmospheric temperature and minor constituents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cortesi, U.; Del Bianco, S.; Ceccherini, S.; Gai, M.; Dinelli, B. M.; Castelli, E.; Oelhaf, H.; Woiwode, W.; Höpfner, M.; Gerber, D.

    2015-11-01

    Synergistic exploitation of redundant and complementary information from independent observations of the same target remains a major issue in atmospheric remote-sounding and increasing attention is devoted to investigate optimised or innovative methods for the combination of two or more measured data sets. This paper is focusing on the synergy between middle infrared and millimetre-wave limb sounding measurements of atmospheric composition and temperature and reports the results of a study conducted as part of the preparatory activities of the PREMIER (Process Exploration through Measurements of Infrared and millimetre wave Emitted Radiation) mission candidate to the Core Missions of ESA Earth Explorer 7. The activity was based on data acquired by the MIPAS-STR (Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding - STRatospheric aircraft) and MARSCHALS (Millimetre-wave Airborne Receivers for Spectroscopic CHaracterisation in Atmospheric Limb Sounding) instruments onboard the high altitude research aircraft M-55 Geophysica during the flight of the PremierEx (PREMIER Experiment) campaign on 10 March 2010 from Kiruna, Sweden for observation of the Arctic upper troposphere and lower stratosphere. The cloud coverage observed along the flight provided representative test cases to evaluate the synergy in three different scenarios: low clouds in the first part, no clouds in the central part and high tropospheric clouds at the end. The calculation of synergistic profiles of four atmospheric targets (i.e., O2, HNO3, H2O and temperature) was performed using a posteriori combination of individual retrieved profiles, i.e., Level 2 (L2) data rather than simultaneous inverse processing of observed radiances, i.e., Level 1 (L1) data. An innovative method of data fusion, based on the Measurement Space Solution (MSS) was applied along with the standard approach of inverse processing of MARSCHALS spectral radiances using MIPAS-STR retrieval products as a priori information (L1

  11. Surge Pressure Mitigation in the Global Precipitation Measurement Mission Core Propulsion System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scroggins, Ashley R.; Fiebig, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an international partnership between NASA and JAXA whose Core spacecraft performs cutting-edge measurements of rainfall and snowfall worldwide and unifies data gathered by a network of precipitation measurement satellites. The Core spacecraft's propulsion system is a blowdown monopropellant system with an initial hydrazine load of 545 kg in a single composite overwrapped propellant tank. At launch, the propulsion system contained propellant in the tank and manifold tubes upstream of the latch valves, with low-pressure helium gas in the manifold tubes downstream of the latch valves. The system had a relatively high beginning-of- life pressure and long downstream manifold lines; these factors created conditions that were conducive to high surge pressures. This paper discusses the GPM project's approach to surge mitigation in the propulsion system design. The paper describes the surge testing program and results, with discussions of specific difficulties encountered. Based on the results of surge testing and pressure drop analyses, a unique configuration of cavitating venturis was chosen to mitigate surge while minimizing pressure losses during thruster maneuvers. This paper concludes with a discussion of overall lessons learned with surge pressure testing for NASA Goddard spacecraft programs.

  12. Cross-track sensor precipitation retrievals for the Global Precipitation Measurement mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Randel, David; Stocker, Erich; Kummerow, Christian

    2014-05-01

    The utilization of observations from passive microwave cross-track, or sounders, for global precipitation estimation provides a number of distinct advantages including the potential to retrieve precipitation over cold surface backgrounds and improvements in temporal sampling. As part of the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission, observations from these cross-track instruments are being incorporated into the overall retrieval framework to enable better temporal and spatial sampling, particularly over regions where surface conditions provide a challenging background against which to observe precipitation. GPM is an international satellite mission and brings together a number of different component satellites and sensors, each contributing observations capable of providing information on precipitation. The joint US-Japan core observatory was launched in early 2014 and carries the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The core observatory serves as a standard against which other sensors in the constellation are calibrated, providing a consistent observational dataset to ensure the highest quality precipitation retrievals to be made. The conically-scanning GMI provides observations from 10.65 GHz through to 166 GHz with dual polarization capabilities, and two 183 GHz channels (+-1 and +-3 GHz) with vertical polarization. The highest frequencies provide resolutions in the order of 4.4x7.3 km. 885 km swath width. The DPR operates at 35.5 GHz and 13.6 GHz with swath widths 120 and 245 km respectively, and a vertical resolution of 250 m. The higher frequency radar will provide a sensitivity down to 12 dBZ, or about 0.2 mmh-1 equivalent rainrate, particularly useful for higher latitudes where light precipitation dominates. Integration of the cross-track sensors into the overall retrieval scheme of the GPM mission is achieved through the GPROF retrieval scheme, utilizing databases based upon observational and modelled data sets

  13. The Status of NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Mission 26 Months After Launch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Gail; Huffman, George

    2016-04-01

    Water is essential to our planet Earth. Knowing when, where and how precipitation falls is crucial for understanding the linkages between the Earth's water and energy cycles and is extraordinarily important for sustaining life on our planet during climate change. The Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Core Observatory spacecraft launched February 27, 2014, is the anchor to the GPM international satellite mission to unify and advance precipitation measurements from a constellation of research and operational sensors to provide "next-generation" precipitation products [1-2]. GPM is currently a partnership between NASA and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). The unique 65o non-Sun-synchronous orbit at an altitude of 407 km for the GPM Core Observatory allows for highly sophisticated observations of precipitation in the mid-latitudes where a majority of the population lives. Indeed, the GOM Core Observatory serves as the cornerstone, as a physics observatory and a calibration reference to improve precipitation measurements by a constellation of 8 or more dedicated and operational, U.S. and international passive microwave sensors. GPM's requirements are to measure rain rates from 0.2 to 110 mm/hr and to detect and estimate falling snow. GPM has several retrieval product levels ranging from raw instrument data to Core and partner swath precipitation estimates to gridded and accumulated products and finally to multi-satellite merged products. The latter merged product, called IMERG, is available with a 5-hour latency with temporal resolution of 30 minutes and spatial resolution of 0.1o x 0.1o (~10km x 10km) grid box. Some products have a 1-hour latency for societal applications such as floods, landslides, hurricanes, blizzards, and typhoons and all have late-latency high-quality science products. The GPM mission is well on its way to providing essential data on precipitation (rain and snow) from micro to local to global scales via providing precipitation

  14. Synergy for a Strong Future FY 2008

    SciTech Connect

    Devore, L; Chrzanowski, P

    2008-11-06

    Lawrence Livermore National Security, LLC is committed to delivering the best combination of scientific research, technology development, business management, and safe, secure operations in support of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory's critical national security mission. LLNS was formed specifically to manage LLNL for the Department of Energy's National Nuclear Security Administration. LLNS consists of a team of five organizations renowned for their expertise and accomplishments throughout the U.S. nuclear weapons complex and beyond - Bechtel National, University of California, Babcock & Wilcox, Washington Division of URS Corporation, and Battelle. Bechtel is the nation's largest engineering and construction firm and a leader in project management. The University of California is the world's largest public research institution. Babcock & Wilcox and the Washington Division of URS Corporation are top nuclear facilities contractors and between them manage four of DOE's five safest sites. Battelle is a global leader in science and technology development and commercialization. The LLNS Board of Governors provides oversight for the management of the Laboratory and holds the Director and LLNS President responsible for the Laboratory's performance. The Board has seven standing committees that assist in assessing Laboratory performance and monitoring risks and internal controls. Through the Board of Governors, the Laboratory can reach back to LLNS partner organizations to help ensure that it fulfills its national security mission with excellence in scientific research, technology development, business management, and safe, secure operations. LLNS assumed management of LLNL on October 1, 2007. This report highlights LLNS accomplishments in FY2008, its first year as the Laboratory's managing contractor. It is clear that LLNS and the Laboratory have exploited numerous synergies inherent in their relationship - for example, science and engineering, mission and operations

  15. Inter-comparison of precipitation retrievals from the Global Precipitation Measurement mission constellation.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kidd, Chris; Matsui, Toshihisa; Randel, Dave; Stocker, Erich; Kummerow, Chris

    2015-04-01

    The Global Precipitation Measurement mission (GPM) is an international satellite mission that brings together a number of different component satellites and sensors, each contributing observations capable of providing information on precipitation. The joint US-Japan core observatory, launched on 27 February 2014, carries the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) and the Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR). The core observatory serves as a standard against which other sensors in the constellation are calibrated, providing a consistent observational dataset to ensure the highest quality precipitation retrievals to be made. Precipitation retrievals from the constellation of partner satellites are generated through the common framework of the Goddard-PROFiling (GPROF) scheme, and is applied to both the conically-scanning sensors and the cross-track sensors; the provision of precipitation estimates from all the constellation sensors contributing to the better-than 3-hour average temporal sampling. This study focuses upon the inter-comparison of the products from the different sensors during the first year of GPM operations; March 2014-February 2015. The two regions chosen for the inter-comparison, are the United States and Western Europe, and utilize the extensive radar networks of these regions. Statistical results were generated for instantaneous precipitation retrievals for each of the constellation sensors. Results show that overall the retrievals from the cross-track observations produce higher correlations with the surface radar data sets than the retrievals from the conically-scanning observations, although they tend to have higher root-mean squared errors. Some variation in performance between the individual types of sensors is also noted, which may be attributed to assumptions within the retrieval scheme (e.g. resolution, background fields, etc); other differences require further investigation.

  16. Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) Precipitation Data and Services for Research and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhong; Ostrenga, Dana; Teng, William; Kempler, Steven

    2012-01-01

    Precipitation is a critical component of the Earth's hydrological cycle. Launched on 27 November 1997, TRMM is a joint U.S.-Japan satellite mission to provide the first detailed and comprehensive data set of the four-dimensional distribution of rainfall and latent heating over vastly under-sampled tropical and subtropical oceans and continents (40 S - 40 N). Over the past 14 years, TRMM has been a major data source for meteorological, hydrological and other research and application activities around the world. The purpose of this short article is to inform that the NASA Goddard Earth Sciences Data and Information Services Center (GES DISC) provides TRMM archive and near-real-time precipitation data sets and services for research and applications. TRMM data consist of orbital data from TRMM instruments at the sensor s resolution, gridded data at a range of spatial and temporal resolutions, subsets, ground-based instrument data, and ancillary data. Data analysis, display, and delivery are facilitated by the following services: (1) Mirador (data search and access); (2) TOVAS (TRMM Online Visualization and Analysis System); (3) OPeNDAP (Open-source Project for a Network Data Access Protocol); (4) GrADS Data Server (GDS); and (5) Open Geospatial Consortium (OGC) Web Map Service (WMS) for the GIS community. Precipitation data application services are available to support a wide variety of applications around the world. Future plans include enhanced and new services to address data related issues from the user community. Meanwhile, the GES DISC is preparing for the Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission which is scheduled for launch in 2014.

  17. Modeling the MLT Region in Light of Measurements From the TIMED Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayr, H. G.; Mengel, J. G.; Talaat, E. R.; Porter, H. S.

    2003-12-01

    Our Numerical Spectral Model (NSM) extends from the ground up to the thermosphere and incorporates Hines' Doppler Spread Parameterization for small-scale gravity waves. This model describes in the mesosphere the major features of: (a) the equatorial oscillations (QBO and SAO), (b) the migrating as well as non-migrating tides, and (c) the planetary waves. The model also generates distinct intra-seasonal oscillations with periods around 3 months and planetary-scale inertio gravity waves with periods around 10 hours. After a review of the model and major findings, we discuss the scientific investigations to be carried out with the measurements from the TIMED mission. As part of this investigation, we shall attempt to describe the observations empirically (statistically) with vector spherical harmonics that delineate the temperature and wind fields in terms of zonal wave numbers, m = 0 to 4. The spectral formulation of the model allows us then to study the observed dynamical components and their interactions. With emphasis on the dynamics and energetics of the mesosphere, we shall compare some of our model simulations with temperature data from SABER and winds derived from TIDI measurements. We shall also present model predictions for comparison with coordinated ground-based observations.

  18. Measured and predicted pressure distributions on the AFTI/F-111 mission adaptive wing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Lannie D.; Mccain, William E.; Rose, Lucinda A.

    1988-01-01

    Flight tests have been conducted using an F-111 aircraft modified with a mission adaptive wing (MAW). The MAW has variable-camber leading and trailing edge surfaces that can change the wing camber in flight, while preserving smooth upper surface contours. This paper contains wing surface pressure measurements obtained during flight tests at Dryden Flight Research Facility of NASA Ames Research Center. Upper and lower surface steady pressure distributions were measured along four streamwise rows of static pressure orifices on the right wing for a leading-edge sweep angle of 26 deg. The airplane, wing, instrumentation, and test conditions are discussed. Steady pressure results are presented for selected wing camber deflections flown at subsonic Mach numbers up to 0.90 and an angle-of-attack range of 5 to 12 deg. The Reynolds number was 26 million, based on the mean aerodynamic chord. The MAW flight data are compared to MAW wind tunnel data, transonic aircraft technology (TACT) flight data, and predicted pressure distributions. The results provide a unique database for a smooth, variable-camber, advanced supercritical wing.

  19. Global variability of precipitation according to the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haddad, Ziad S.; Meagher, Jonathan P.; Adler, Robert F.; Smith, Eric A.; Im, Eastwood; Durden, Stephen L.

    2004-01-01

    Numerous studies have documented the effect of El Nino-Southern Oscillation (ENSO) on rainfall in many regions of the globe. The question of whether ENSO is the single most important factor in interannual rainfall variability has received less attention, mostly because the kind of data that would be required to make such an assessment were simply not available. Until 1979 the evidence linking El Nino with changes in rainfall around the world came from rain gauges measuring precipitation over land masses and a handful of islands. From 1980 until the launch of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) in November 1997 the remote sensing evidence was confined to ocean rainfall because of the very poor sensitivity of the instruments over land. In this paper we summarize the results of a principal component analysis of TRMM's 60-month (January 1998 to December 2002) global land and ocean remote-sensing record of monthly rainfall accumulations. Contrary to the first principal component of the rainfall itself, the first three indices of the anomaly are most sensitive to precipitation over the ocean rather than over the land. With the help of archived surface station data the first TRMM rain anomaly index is extended back several decades. Comparison of the extended index with the Southern Oscillation Index confirms that the first principal component of the rainfall anomaly is strongly correlated with the ENSO indices.

  20. TRMM Data from the Goddard Earth Sciences (GES) DISC DAAC: Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    Tropical rainfall affects the lives and economies of a majority of the Earth's population. Tropical rain systems, such as hurricanes, typhoons, and monsoons, are crucial to sustaining the livelihoods of those living in the tropics. Excess rainfall can cause floods and great property and crop damage, whereas too little rainfall can cause drought and crop failure. The latent heat release during the process of precipitation is a major source of energy that drives the atmospheric circulation. This latent heat can intensify weather systems, affecting weather thousands of kilometers away, thus making tropical rainfall an important indicator of atmospheric circulation and short-term climate change. The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM), jointly sponsored by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) of the United States and the National Space Development Agency (NASDA) of Japan, provides visible, infrared, and microwave observations of tropical and subtropical rain systems. The satellite observations are complemented by ground radar and rain gauge measurements to validate satellite rain estimation techniques. Goddard Space Flight Center's involvement includes the observatory, four instruments, integration and testing of the observatory, data processing and distribution, and satellite operations. TRMM has a design lifetime of three years. It is currently in its fifth year of operation. Data generated from TRMM and archived at the GES DAAC are useful not only for hydrologists, atmospheric scientists, and climatologists, but also for the health community studying infectious diseases, the ocean research community, and the agricultural community.

  1. Lidar and Mission Parameter Trade Study of Space-Based Coherent Wind Measurement Centered on NASA's 2006 GWOS Wind Mission Study Parameters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kavaya, Michael J.; Frehlich, Rod G.

    2007-01-01

    The global measurement of vertical profiles of horizontal vector winds has been highly desired for many years by NASA, NOAA and the Integrated Program Office (IPO) implementing the National Polar-orbiting Operational Environmental Satellite Systems (NPOESS). Recently the global wind mission was one of 15 missions recommended to NASA by the first ever NRC Earth Sciences Decadal Survey. Since before 1978, the most promising method to make this space-based measurement has been pulsed Doppler lidar. The favored technology and technique has evolved over the years from obtaining line-of-sight (LOS) wind profiles from a single laser shot using pulsed CO2 gas laser technology to the current plans to use both a coherent-detection and direct-detection pulsed Doppler wind lidar systems with each lidar employing multiple shot accumulation to produce an LOS wind profile. The idea of using two lidars (hybrid concept) entails coherent detection using the NASA LaRC-developed pulsed 2-micron solid state laser technology, and direct detection using pulsed Nd:YAG laser technology tripled in frequency to 355 nm wavelength.

  2. Understanding Human Motion Skill with Peak Timing Synergy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueno, Ken; Furukawa, Koichi

    The careful observation of motion phenomena is important in understanding the skillful human motion. However, this is a difficult task due to the complexities in timing when dealing with the skilful control of anatomical structures. To investigate the dexterity of human motion, we decided to concentrate on timing with respect to motion, and we have proposed a method to extract the peak timing synergy from multivariate motion data. The peak timing synergy is defined as a frequent ordered graph with time stamps, which has nodes consisting of turning points in motion waveforms. A proposed algorithm, PRESTO automatically extracts the peak timing synergy. PRESTO comprises the following 3 processes: (1) detecting peak sequences with polygonal approximation; (2) generating peak-event sequences; and (3) finding frequent peak-event sequences using a sequential pattern mining method, generalized sequential patterns (GSP). Here, we measured right arm motion during the task of cello bowing and prepared a data set of the right shoulder and arm motion. We successfully extracted the peak timing synergy on cello bowing data set using the PRESTO algorithm, which consisted of common skills among cellists and personal skill differences. To evaluate the sequential pattern mining algorithm GSP in PRESTO, we compared the peak timing synergy by using GSP algorithm and the one by using filtering by reciprocal voting (FRV) algorithm as a non time-series method. We found that the support is 95 - 100% in GSP, while 83 - 96% in FRV and that the results by GSP are better than the one by FRV in the reproducibility of human motion. Therefore we show that sequential pattern mining approach is more effective to extract the peak timing synergy than non-time series analysis approach.

  3. Assessment and Mission Planning Capability For Quantitative Aerothermodynamic Flight Measurements Using Remote Imaging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horvath, Thomas; Splinter, Scott; Daryabeigi, Kamran; Wood, William; Schwartz, Richard; Ross, Martin

    2008-01-01

    High resolution calibrated infrared imagery of vehicles during hypervelocity atmospheric entry or sustained hypersonic cruise has the potential to provide flight data on the distribution of surface temperature and the state of the airflow over the vehicle. In the early 1980 s NASA sought to obtain high spatial resolution infrared imagery of the Shuttle during entry. Despite mission execution with a technically rigorous pre-planning capability, the single airborne optical system for this attempt was considered developmental and the scientific return was marginal. In 2005 the Space Shuttle Program again sponsored an effort to obtain imagery of the Orbiter. Imaging requirements were targeted towards Shuttle ascent; companion requirements for entry did not exist. The engineering community was allowed to define observation goals and incrementally demonstrate key elements of a quantitative spatially resolved measurement capability over a series of flights. These imaging opportunities were extremely beneficial and clearly demonstrated capability to capture infrared imagery with mature and operational assets of the US Navy and the Missile Defense Agency. While successful, the usefulness of the imagery was, from an engineering perspective, limited. These limitations were mainly associated with uncertainties regarding operational aspects of data acquisition. These uncertainties, in turn, came about because of limited pre-flight mission planning capability, a poor understanding of several factors including the infrared signature of the Shuttle, optical hardware limitations, atmospheric effects and detector response characteristics. Operational details of sensor configuration such as detector integration time and tracking system algorithms were carried out ad hoc (best practices) which led to low probability of target acquisition and detector saturation. Leveraging from the qualified success during Return-to-Flight, the NASA Engineering and Safety Center sponsored an

  4. Geoscience Laser Altimeter System (GLAS) on the ICESat Mission: Initial Science Measurement Performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abshire, James B.; Sun, Xiaoli; Riris, Haris; Sirota, Marcos; McGarry, J.; Palm, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The Geoscience Laser Altimeter System is the space lidar on the NASA ICESat mission. Its design combines an altimeter with 5 cm precision with a laser pointing angle determination system and a dual wavelength cloud and aerosol lidar. GLAS measures the range to the Earth s surface with 1064 nm laser pulses. Each laser pulse produces a precision pointing measurement from the stellar reference system (SRS) and an echo pulse waveform, which permits range determination and waveform spreading analysis. The single shot ranging accuracy is < 10 cm for ice surfaces with slopes < 2 degrees. GLAS also measures atmospheric backscatter profiles at both 1064 and 532 nm. The 1064 nm measurements use an analog Si APD detector and measure the height and profile the backscatter signal from thicker clouds. The measurements at 532 nm use photon counting detectors, and will measure the vertical height distributions of optically thin clouds and aerosol layers Before launch, the measurement performance of GLAS was evaluated using a lidar test instrument called the Bench Check Equipment (BCE). The BCE was developed in parallel with GLAS and served as an inverse altimeter, inverse lidar and a stellar source simulator. It was used to simulate the range of expected optical inputs to the GLAS receiver by illuminating its telescope with simulated background light as well as laser echoes with known powers, energy levels, widths and delay times. The BCE also allowed monitoring of the transmitted laser energy, the angle measurements of the SRS, the co-alignment of the transmitted laser beam to the receiver line of sight, and performance of the flight science algorithms. Performance was evaluated during the GLAS development, before and after environmental tests, and after delivery to the spacecraft. The ICESat observatory was launched into a 94 degree inclination, 590 km altitude circular polar orbit on January 12,2003. Beginning in early February, GLAS was powered on tested in stages. Its 1064 nm

  5. The Hydrosphere State Mission (HYDROS) Soil Moisture and Freeze/Thaw Exploratory Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Entekhabi, D.; Njoku, E. G.; Houser, P. R.

    2003-12-01

    The Hydrosphere State Mission (HYDROS) is a pathfinder mission in the NASA's Earth System Pathfinder Program (ESSP). The objective of the mission is to provide exploratory measurements that constitute the first global scale measurement of Earth's soil moisture and land surface freeze/thaw conditions. The mission builds on the heritage of ground-based and airborne passive and active low-frequency microwave measurements that have demonstrated and validated the effectiveness of the measurements and associated algorithms for estimating the amount and phase (frozen or thawed) of surface soil moisture. The mission data will enable advances weather and climate prediction and in mapping processes that link the water, energy and carbon cycles. The proposed HYDROS instrument is a combined radar and radiometer system operating at 1.26 GHz (with VV, HH, and HV polarizations) and 1.41 GHz (with H, V, and U polarizations). The radar and the radiometer share the aperture of a 6-meter antenna pointing at 35° with respect to nadir. The lightweight deployable mesh antenna is rotated at 14.6 rpm to provide a constant look-angel scan swath of 1000 km. The large swath provides a global coverage of the Earth in 2 to 3 days with a temporal sampling less than 2 days at latitude above 50N. The radar measurements allow the retrieval of soil moisture at high resolution (3 to 10 km). The radiometer measurements allow retrieval of soil moisture in diverse (non-forested) landscapes with a resolution of 40 km. The mission includes combined radar/radiometer data products that will use the synergy of the two sensors to deliver enhanced quality soil moisture estimates.

  6. Mission specification for three generic mission classes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Mission specifications for three generic mission classes are generated to provide a baseline for definition and analysis of data acquisition platform system concepts. The mission specifications define compatible groupings of sensors that satisfy specific earth resources and environmental mission objectives. The driving force behind the definition of sensor groupings is mission need; platform and space transportation system constraints are of secondary importance. The three generic mission classes are: (1) low earth orbit sun-synchronous; (2) geosynchronous; and (3) non-sun-synchronous, nongeosynchronous. These missions are chosen to provide a variety of sensor complements and implementation concepts. Each mission specification relates mission categories, mission objectives, measured parameters, and candidate sensors to orbits and coverage, operations compatibility, and platform fleet size.

  7. Design and early in flight performance of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) power subsystem

    SciTech Connect

    Moran, V.E.; Flatley, T.P.; Shue, J.; Gaddy, E.M.; Manzer, D.; Hicks, E.

    1998-07-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) is a joint endeavor of the United States and Japan. The National Aeronautical and Space Administration (NASA)'s Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) in Greenbelt, Maryland built the spacecraft in-house with four US instruments and one Japanese instrument, the first space flown Precipitation Radar (PR). The TRMM Observatory was successfully launched from Tanegashima Space Center in Japan on an H-II Expendable Launch Vehicle on November 27, 1997. This paper presents an overview of the TRMM Power System including its design, testing, and in flight performance for the first 70 days. Finally, key lessons learned are presented. The TRMM power system consists of an 18.1 square meter deployed solar array fabricated by TRW with Tecstar GaAs/Ge cells, two (2) Hughes 50 Ampere-Hour (Ah) Super NiCd TM batteries, each with 22 Eagle-Picher cells, and three (3) electronics boxes designed to provide power regulation, battery charge control, and command and telemetry interface.

  8. Nondestructive examination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) reaction control subsystem (RCS) propellant tanks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Free, James M.

    1993-06-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination to determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  9. Qualification of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission Solar Array Deployment System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, Jon

    1998-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) solar arrays are placed into orbital configuration by a complex deployment system. Its two wings each comprise twin seven square solar panels located by a twelve foot articulated boom. The four spring-driven hinge lines per wing are rate-limited by viscous dampers. The wings are stowed against the spacecraft kinematically, and released by five pyrotechnically-actuated mechanisms. Since deployment failure would be catastrophic, a total of 17 deployment tests were completed to qualify the system for the worst cast launch environment. This successful testing culminated in the flawless deployment of the solar arrays on orbit, 15 minutes after launch in November 1997. The custom gravity negation system used to perform deployment testing is modular to allow its setup in several locations, including the launch site in Japan. Both platform and height can be varied, to meet the requirements of the test configuration and the test facility. Its air pad floatation system meets tight packaging requirements, allowing installation while stowed against the spacecraft without breaking any flight interfaces, and avoiding interference during motion. This system was designed concurrently with the deployment system, to facilitate its installation, to aid in the integration of the flight system to the spacecraft, while demonstrating deployment capabilities. Critical parameters for successful testing were alignment of deployment axes and tables to gravity, alignment of table seams to minimize discontinuities, and minimizing pressure drops in the air supply system. Orbital performance was similar to that predicted by ground testing.

  10. Nondestructive examination of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) reaction control subsystem (RCS) propellant tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Free, James M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper assesses the feasibility of using eddy current nondestructive examination to determine flaw sizes in completely assembled hydrazine propellant tanks. The study was performed by the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center for the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) project to help determine whether existing propellant tanks could meet the fracture analysis requirements of the current pressure vessel specification, MIL-STD-1522A and, therefore be used on the TRMM spacecraft. After evaluating several nondestructive test methods, eddy current testing was selected as the most promising method for determining flaw sizes on external and internal surfaces of completely assembled tanks. Tests were conducted to confirm the detection capability of the eddy current NDE, procedures were developed to inspect two candidate tanks, and the test support equipment was designed. The non-spherical tank eddy current NDE test program was terminated when the decision was made to procure new tanks for the TRMM propulsion subsystem. The information on the development phase of this test program is presented in this paper as a reference for future investigation on the subject.

  11. A pose and position measurement system for the Hubble Space Telescope servicing mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balch, Michael; Tandy, Dave

    2007-04-01

    As NASA develops the new space explorations systems required for the Crew Exploration Vehicle (CEV) also known as ORION, there is a growing need for hardware and algorithms to support Automated Rendezvous and Docking (AR&D) technology for both manned and unmanned flights. A new definition of space hardware is also emerging based on reconfigurable computing. Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a high processing bandwidth hardware platform based on the latest Xilinx Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) technology. This platform, called SpaceCube, incorporates the processing power of immersed PowerPC core technology with an extremely flexible I/O capability. The result is an adaptable, reconfigurable computing platform well suited for hosting computationally intensive AR&D algorithms. Advanced Optical Systems, Inc. (AOS) has developed several electro-optical sensor systems for both NASA and the Department of Defense. ULTOR ® is one such sensor technology, developed for Automatic Target Recognition (ATR) in missile guidance systems. AOS has applied ULTOR ® to target position and attitude measurements in space, commonly referred to as pose estimation. Under GSFC funding, AOS has successfully integrated ULTOR ® into the SpaceCube platform. GSFC plans to demonstrate on-station pose estimation using the integrated ULTOR ® SpaceCube system on the next shuttle mission to the service the Hubble Space Telescope.

  12. Radar Rainfall Estimation for Ground Validation Studies of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciach, Grzegorz J.; Krajewski, Witold F.; Anagnostou, Emmanouil N.; Baeck, Mary L.; Smith, James A.; McCollum, Jeffrey R.; Kruger, Anton

    1997-06-01

    This study presents a multicomponent rainfall estimation algorithm, based on weather radar and rain gauge network, that can be used as a ground-based reference in the satellite Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM). The essential steps are constructing a radar observable, its nonlinear transformation to rainfall, interpolation to rectangular grid, constructing several timescale accumulations, bias adjustment, and merging of the radar rainfall estimates and rain gauge data. Observations from a C-band radar in Darwin, Australia, and a local network of 54 rain gauges were used to calibrate and test the algorithm. A period of 25 days was selected, and the rain gauges were split into two subsamples to apply cross-validation techniques.A Z-R relationship with continuous range dependence and a temporal interpolation scheme that accounts for the advection effects is applied. An innovative methodology was used to estimate the algorithm controlling parameters. The model was globally optimized by using an objective function on the level of the final products. This is equivalent to comparing hundreds of Z-R relationships using a uniform and representative performance criterion. The algorithm performance is fairly insensitive to the parameter variations around the optimum. This suggests that the accuracy limit of the radar rainfall estimation based on power-law Z-R relationships has been reached. No improvement was achieved by using rain regime classification prior to estimation.

  13. Toward a Reliable and Valid Measure of Institutional Mission and Values Perception: The DePaul Values Inventory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferrari, Joseph R.; Cowman, Shaun E.

    2004-01-01

    Across three studies, the development of a reliable and valid measure of perceptions by students of an urban, private, faith-based teaching university's mission and values was assessed. Study 1 presented scale construction and reliability of the DePaul Values Inventory (DeVI) with undergraduates (n = 111), yielding a final 22-item rating scale…

  14. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-89: Launched January 22, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hrovat, Kenneth; McPherson, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    Support of microgravity research on the 89th flight of the Space Transportation System (STS-89) and a continued effort to characterize the acceleration environment of the Space Shuttle Orbiter and the Mir Space Station form the basis for this report. For the STS-89 mission, the Space Shuttle Endeavour was equipped with a Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) unit, which collected more than a week's worth of data. During docked operations with Mir, a second SAMS unit collected approximately a day's worth of data yielding the only set of acceleration measurements recorded simultaneously on the two spacecraft. Based on the data acquired by these SAMS units, this report serves to characterize a number of acceleration events and quantify their impact on the local nature of the accelerations experienced at the Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment location. Crew activity was shown to nearly double the median root-mean-square (RMS) acceleration level calculated below 10 Hz, while the Enhanced Orbiter Refrigerator/Freezer operating at about 22 Hz was a strong acceleration source in the vicinity of the MGM location. The MGM science requirement that the acceleration not exceed q I mg was violated numerous times during their experiment runs; however, no correlation with sample instability has been found to this point. Synchronization between the SAMS data from Endeavour and from Mir was shown to be close much of the time, but caution with respect to exact timing should be exercised when comparing these data. When orbiting as a separate vehicle prior to docking, Endeavour had prominent structural modes above 3 Hz, while Mir exhibited a cluster of modes around 1 Hz. When mated, a transition to common modes was apparent in the two SAMS data sets. This report is not a comprehensive analysis of the acceleration data, so those interested in further details should contact the Principal Investigator Microgravity Services team at the National Aeronautics and Space

  15. Wind Lidar Edge Technique Shuttle Demonstration Mission: Anemos

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leete, Stephen J.; Bundas, David J.; Martino, Anthony J.; Carnahan, Timothy M.; Zukowski, Barbara J.

    1998-01-01

    A NASA mission is planned to demonstrate the technology for a wind lidar. This will implement the direct detection edge technique. The Anemos instrument will fly on the Space Transportation System (STS), or shuttle, aboard a Hitchhiker bridge. The instrument is being managed by the Goddard Space Flight Center as an in-house build, with science leadership from the GSFC Laboratory for Atmospheres, Mesoscale Atmospheric Processes Branch. During a roughly ten-day mission, the instrument will self calibrate and adjust for launch induced mis-alignments, and perform a campaign of measurements of tropospheric winds. The mission is planned for early 2001. The instrument is being developed under the auspices of NASA's New Millennium Program, in parallel with a comparable mission being managed by the Marshall Space Flight Center. That mission, called SPARCLE, will implement the coherent technique. NASA plans to fly the two missions together on the same shuttle flight, to allow synergy of wind measurements and a direct comparison of performance.

  16. An optimum opportunity for interstellar dust measurements by the JUICE mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sterken, V. J.; Altobelli, N.; Kempf, S.; Krüger, H.; Soja, R. H.; Srama, R.; Grün, E.

    2012-09-01

    The JUpiter ICy moons Explorer (JUICE) is an ESA L-class mission concept designed to explore the Galilean satellites of the Jovian system. Although the mission science goals do not include any astronomical observations, we find by modeling the Interstellar Dust (ISD) trajectories that the planned period of the JUICE mission is optimal for in-situ observations of Interstellar Dust, due to highly increased flux levels at that time at the orbit of Jupiter. If JUICE would carry a dust detector, this could lead to exclusive highresolution mass spectra of ISD grains. Such compositional information on the ISD grains is important for understanding the origins of of solar/planetary systems, and therefore could represent a valuable addition to the core JUICE mission science.

  17. Measuring Atmospheric Carbon Dioxide from Space: The GOSAT and OCO-2 Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crisp, David

    2011-01-01

    The Japanese Greenhouse gases Observing Satellite (GOSAT) is providing new insight into atmospheric carbon dioxide trends. The NASA Orbiting Carbon Observatory-2 (OCO-2)Mission will build on this record with increased sensitivity resolution, and coverage.

  18. Simulation of Meteosat Third Generation-Lightning Imager through tropical rainfall measuring mission: Lightning Imaging Sensor data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biron, Daniele; De Leonibus, Luigi; Laquale, Paolo; Labate, Demetrio; Zauli, Francesco; Melfi, Davide

    2008-08-01

    The Centro Nazionale di Meteorologia e Climatologia Aeronautica recently hosted a fellowship sponsored by Galileo Avionica, with the intent to study and perform a simulation of Meteosat Third Generation - Lightning Imager (MTG-LI) sensor behavior through Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission - Lightning Imaging Sensor data (TRMM-LIS). For the next generation of earth observation geostationary satellite, major operating agencies are planning to insert an optical imaging mission, that continuously observes lightning pulses in the atmosphere; EUMETSAT has decided in recent years that one of the three candidate mission to be flown on MTG is LI, a Lightning Imager. MTG-LI mission has no Meteosat Second Generation heritage, but users need to evaluate the possible real time data output of the instrument to agree in inserting it on MTG payload. Authors took the expected LI design from MTG Mission Requirement Document, and reprocess real lightning dataset, acquired from space by TRMM-LIS instrument, to produce a simulated MTG-LI lightning dataset. The simulation is performed in several run, varying Minimum Detectable Energy, taking into account processing steps from event detection to final lightning information. A definition of the specific meteorological requirements is given from the potential use in meteorology of lightning final information for convection estimation and numerical cloud modeling. Study results show the range of instrument requirements relaxation which lead to minimal reduction in the final lightning information.

  19. New discoveries enabled by OMI SO2 measurements and future missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krotkov, Nickolay

    2010-05-01

    -sulfur coal in its many coal-fired power plants. Recently, China's government has instituted nationwide measures to control SO2 emissions through the adoption of flue-gas desulfurization technology (FGD) on new power plants; and even greater measures were adopted in the Beijing area in anticipation of the Olympic Games. We demonstrate that the OMI can pick up both SO2 and NO2 emissions from large point sources in northern China, where large increases in both gases were observed from 2005 to 2007, over areas with newly established power plants. The OMI SO2/NO2 ratio generally agrees with the estimated emission factors for coal-fired power plants based on a bottom-up approach. Between 2007 and 2008, OMI detected little change in NO2 but dramatic decline in SO2 over the same areas. While the almost constant NO2 levels between the two years imply steady electricity generation from the power plants, the large reduction in SO2 confirms the effectiveness of the FGD units, which likely became operational between 2007 and 2008. Further development of satellite detection and monitoring of point pollution sources requires better than 10km ground resolution. We show how planned Dutch /ESA TROPOMI and NASA GEOCape missions will advance the art of measuring point source emissions in coming decade.

  20. Space Propulsion Synergy Group ETO technology assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bray, James

    The Space Propulsion Synergy Group (SPSG), which was chartered to support long-range strategic planning, has, using a broad industry/government team, evaluated and achieved consensus on the vehicles, propulsion systems, and propulsion technologies that have the best long-term potential for achieving desired system attributes. The breakthrough that enabled broad consensus was developing criteria that are measurable a priori. The SPSG invented a dual prioritization approach that balances long-term strategic thrusts with current programmatic constraints. This enables individual program managers to make decisions based on both individual project needs and long-term strategic needs. Results indicate that an SSTO using an integrated modular engine has the best long-term potential for a 20 Klb class vehicle, and that health monitoring and control technologies are among the highest dual priority liquid rocket technologies.

  1. D/H ratio during the northern polar summer and what the Phoenix mission might measure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, David; Novak, Robert; Mumma, Michael J.

    2008-09-01

    The Phoenix polar mission will land close to 68°N, 233°E in May 2008 at Ls ~ 75 and operate 90 sols until Ls ~ 125 with possible extension to Ls ~ 142. Phoenix Meteorology (MET), Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) and Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument packages will measure the air's temperature, water vapor concentration, ice crystal concentration and the water's stable isotope ratio D/H, and the D/H for the uppermost ground ice. This paper summarizes what is known about the seasonal cycle of atmospheric D/H and makes a theoretical connection between the atmospheric ratio and that expected from the ground ice that Phoenix will sample. A simple mixed cloud stable isotope model is used to show that the seasonal progress of D/H in the polar region cannot be used alone. It is argued that the seasonal cycle in D/H is explained by their being an interplay between multilatitudinal sources or reservoirs that have a range of reservoir D/H values. These reservoirs have different sizes and seasonal response times so that they release their water contributions at different times of the spring and summer and together explain most of the seasonal D/H observed by Mumma et al. (2003) and Novak et al. (2005). Phoenix observations from its high-latitude vantage point during the summer and fall will add some atmospheric D/H values, temperature, water vapor concentration, and ice cloudiness data points that will constrain the various theoretical possibilities. The D/H of the ice recovered by Phoenix from the surface of the ground ice combined with the atmospheric D/H will suggest, whether the ground ice presently is a net receiver or supplier of water to the northern ice cap.

  2. Global Elemental Maps of the Moon Using Gamma Rays Measured by the Kaguya (SELENE) Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reedy, Robert C.; Hasebe, N.; Yamashita, N.; Karouji, Y.; Kobayashi, S.; Hareyama, M.; Hayatsu, K.; Okudaira, O.; Kobayashi, M.; d'Uston, C.; Maurice, S.; Gasnault, O.; Forni, O.; Diez, B.; Kim, K.

    2009-09-01

    The Kaguya spacecraft was in a circular polar lunar orbit from 17 October 2007 until 10 June 2009 as part of JAXA's SELENE lunar exploration program. Among the 13 instruments, an advanced gamma-ray spectrometer (GRS) studied the distributions of many elements. The gamma rays were from the decay of the naturally-radioactive elements K, Th, and U and from cosmic-ray interactions with H, O, Mg, Al, Si, Ca, Ti, Fe, and other elements. They are emitted from the top few tens of centimeters of the lunar surface. The main detector of the GRS was high-purity germanium, which was surrounded by bismuth germanate and plastic scintillators to reduce backgrounds. Gamma-ray spectra were sent to the Earth every 17 seconds (1 degree of the lunar surface) with energies from 0-12 MeV. These spectra were adjusted to a standard gain and then summed over many lunar regions. Background spectra were also determined. Over 200 gamma rays have been observed, with most being backgrounds but many being from the lunar surface, an order more gamma rays than from any previous lunar GRS missions. Elemental results have been determined for K, Th, and U. Results for K and Th are consistent with those from the GRS on Apollo and Lunar Prospector. The first lunar global maps for U have been determined. These 3 elements show strong correlations among themselves, which implies that the Moon is homogeneous in these elements over the entire Moon. Their elemental ratios agree well with those measured in lunar samples and meteorites. Preliminary maps for Fe are consistent with earlier maps. Other elements, including O, Mg, Si, Ca, and Ti, are being mapped, and their distributions vary over the lunar surface and appear consistent with previous lunar elemental results. This work was supported by JAXA, NASA, and CNRS, France.

  3. The Status of the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) after 2 Years in Orbit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kummerow, C.; Simpson, J.; Thiele, O.; Barnes, W.; Chang, A. T. C.; Stocker, E.; Adler, R. F.; Hou, A.; Kakar, R.; Wentz, F.

    1999-01-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) satellite was launched on November 27, 1997, and data from all the instruments first became available approximately 30 days after launch. Since then, much progress has been made in the calibration of the sensors, the improvement of the rainfall algorithms, in related modeling applications and in new datasets tailored specifically for these applications. This paper reports the latest results regarding the calibration of the TRMM Microwave Imager, (TMI), Precipitation Radar (PR) and Visible and Infrared Sensor (VIRS). For the TMI, a new product is in place that corrects for a still unknown source of radiation leaking in to the TMI receiver. The PR calibration has been adjusted upward slightly (by 0.6 dBZ) to better match ground reference targets, while the VIRS calibration remains largely unchanged. In addition to the instrument calibration, great strides have been made with the rainfall algorithms as well, with the new rainfall products agreeing with each other to within less than 20% over monthly zonally averaged statistics. The TRMM Science Data and Information System (TSDIS) has responded equally well by making a number of new products, including real-time and fine resolution gridded rainfall fields available to the modeling community. The TRMM Ground Validation (GV) program is also responding with improved radar calibration techniques and rainfall algorithms to provide more accurate GV products which will be further enhanced with the new multiparameter 10 cm radar being developed for TRMM validation and precipitation studies. Progress in these various areas has, in turn, led to exciting new developments in the modeling area where Data Assimilation, and Weather Forecast models are showing dramatic improvements after the assimilation of observed rainfall fields.

  4. Summary Report of Mission Acceleration Measurements for STS-79. Launched 16 Sep. 1996

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Melissa J. B.; Moskowitz, Milton E.; Hrovat, Kenneth; Reckart, Timothy A.

    1997-01-01

    The Space Acceleration Measurement System (SAMS) collected acceleration data in support of the Mechanics of Granular Materials experiment during the STS-79 Mir docking mission, September 1996. STS-79 was the first opportunity to record SAMS data on an Orbiter while it was docked to Mir. Crew exercise activities in the Atlantis middeck and the Mir base module are apparent in the data. The acceleration signals related to the Enhanced Orbiter Refrigerator Freezer had different characteristics when comparing the data recorded on Atlantis on STS-79 with the data recorded on Mir during STS-74. This is probably due, at least in part, to different transmission paths and SAMS sensor head mounting mechanisms. Data collected on Atlantis during the STS-79 docking indicate that accelerations due to vehicle and solar array structural modes from Mir transfer to Atlantis and that the structural modes of the Atlantis-Mir complex are different from those of either vehicle independently. A 0.18 Hz component of the SAMS data, present while the two vehicles were docked, was probably caused by the Mir solar arrays. Compared to Atlantis structural modes of about 3.9 and 4.9 Hz, the Atlantis-Mir complex has structural components of about 4.5 and 5.1 Hz. After docking, apparent structural modes appeared in the data at about 0.8 and 1.8 Hz. The appearance, disappearance, and change in the structural modes during the docking and undocking phases of the joint Atlantis-Mir operations indicates that the structural modes of the two spacecraft have an effect on the microgravity environment of each other. The transfer of structural and equipment related accelerations between vehicles is something that should be considered in the International Space Station era.

  5. ATLAS-2 and UARS correlative measurement opportunities during Space Shuttle mission on April 8-17, 1993

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harrison, Edwin F.; Denn, Fred M.; Gibson, Gary G.

    1993-01-01

    The second ATmospheric Laboratory for Applications and Science (ATLAS-2) mission was flown aboard the Space Shuttle Discovery from 8-17 Apr. 1993. The nighttime launch at 0529 Greenwich Mean Time provided maximum solar occultation sunrise coverage of the northern latitudes by the Atmospheric Trace Molecule Spectroscopy instrument. The ATLAS-2 Earth-viewing instruments provided a large number of measurements which were nearly coincident with observations from experiments on the Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite (UARS). Based on instrument operating schedules during the ATLAS-2 mission, simulations were performed to determine when and where correlative measurements between ATLAS and UARS instruments occurred. Results of these orbital and instrument simulations provide valuable information for the ATLAS and UARS scientists to compare measurements between various instruments on the two satellites.

  6. Airborne Polarimetric, Two-Color Laser Altimeter Measurements of Lake Ice Cover: A Pathfinder for NASA's ICESat-2 Spaceflight Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harding, David; Dabney, Philip; Valett, Susan; Yu, Anthony; Vasilyev, Aleksey; Kelly, April

    2011-01-01

    The ICESat-2 mission will continue NASA's spaceflight laser altimeter measurements of ice sheets, sea ice and vegetation using a new measurement approach: micropulse, single photon ranging at 532 nm. Differential penetration of green laser energy into snow, ice and water could introduce errors in sea ice freeboard determination used for estimation of ice thickness. Laser pulse scattering from these surface types, and resulting range biasing due to pulse broadening, is assessed using SIMPL airborne data acquired over icecovered Lake Erie. SIMPL acquires polarimetric lidar measurements at 1064 and 532 nm using the micropulse, single photon ranging measurement approach.

  7. Long Awaited Fundamental Measurement of the Martian Upper Atmosphere from the Langmuir Probe and Waves Instrument on the MAVEN Mission.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersson, Laila; Andrews, David; Ergun, Bob; Delory, Greg; Morooka, Michiko; Fowler, Chris; McEnulty, Tess; Weber, Tristan; Eriksson, Anders; Malaspina, David; Crary, Frank; Mitchell, David; McFadden, Jim; Halekas, Jasper; Larson, Davin; Connerney, Jack; Espley, Jared; Eparvies, Frank

    2015-04-01

    Electron temperature and density are critical quantities in understanding an upper atmosphere. Approximately 40 years ago, the Viking landers reached the Martian surface, measuring the first (and only) two temperature profiles during it's descent. With the MAVEN mission arriving at Mars details of the Martian ionosphere can agin be studied by a complete plasma package. This paper investigates the first few months of data from the MAVEN mission when the orbit is below 500 km and around the northern hemisphere's terminator. The fo-cus of this presentation is on the different measure-ments that the Langmuir probe and Waves (LPW) in-strument is making on the MAVEN mission. Some of the LPW highlights that will be presented: (a) the long awaited new the electron temperature profiles; (b) the structures observed on the nightside ionosphere; (c) wave-particle insteractions observed below 500 km; and (d) the observed dusty environment at Mars. This presentation is supported by measurements from the other Particle and Fileds (PF) measurements on MAVEN.

  8. How accurately can current, planned and proposed InSAR missions measure slow, long-wavelength tectonic strain? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. J.; Garthwaite, M.; Jung, H.; Shepherd, A.

    2010-12-01

    Since the launch of ERS-1 in 1991, InSAR has been widely used to measure large deformation events such as earthquakes or volcanic eruptions. In the last decade, small strains accumulating around locked crustal faults and dormant volcanic edifices have also been measured, in certain favourable conditions. In this presentation, we discuss the accuracy of current, planned and proposed InSAR missions. We quantify the main contributions to the error budget of a single interferogram at different spatial scales: atmospheric and orbital errors dominate at long wavelengths (tens of kilometres), and errors from system noise and surface incoherence at short spatial scales (tens of metres). We show that the optimum method for combining multiple interferograms to measure the average line-of-sight (LOS) deformation rate is via a weighted linear inversion of a connected network of short-interval interferograms. The LOS accuracy is strongly dependent on the mission length and satellite revisit time, as well as the spatial length scale. For example, to obtain an LOS accuracy of 1 mm/yr over 100 km requires 5 years of observation with a 13-day repeat, or 7 years for a 35-day repeat. We assess the ability of current (ERS/Envisat), planned (Sentinel-1), and proposed (SuperSAR, DesDYNI) satellite missions to measure long wavelength tectonic strain by estimating the proportion of global straining areas (as defined by the Global Strain Rate Map) where the strain rates are higher than the measurement error. The results highlight the importance of obtaining measurements in three dimensions in order to monitor all actively deforming regions. Of the planned/proposed missions, only SuperSAR (submitted to ESA’s Earth Explorer 8 call) has the ability to achieve 1 mm/yr accuracy over 100 km in all three dimensions after 5 years of observation. This is sufficient to map strain accumulating around faults that are responsible for 95% of damaging onshore earthquakes.

  9. Differences between kinematic synergies and muscle synergies during two-digit grasping

    PubMed Central

    Tagliabue, Michele; Ciancio, Anna Lisa; Brochier, Thomas; Eskiizmirliler, Selim; Maier, Marc A.

    2015-01-01

    The large number of mechanical degrees of freedom of the hand is not fully exploited during actual movements such as grasping. Usually, angular movements in various joints tend to be coupled, and EMG activities in different hand muscles tend to be correlated. The occurrence of covariation in the former was termed kinematic synergies, in the latter muscle synergies. This study addresses two questions: (i) Whether kinematic and muscle synergies can simultaneously accommodate for kinematic and kinetic constraints. (ii) If so, whether there is an interrelation between kinematic and muscle synergies. We used a reach-grasp-and-pull paradigm and recorded the hand kinematics as well as eight surface EMGs. Subjects had to either perform a precision grip or side grip and had to modify their grip force in order to displace an object against a low or high load. The analysis was subdivided into three epochs: reach, grasp-and-pull, and static hold. Principal component analysis (PCA, temporal or static) was performed separately for all three epochs, in the kinematic and in the EMG domain. PCA revealed that (i) Kinematic- and muscle-synergies can simultaneously accommodate kinematic (grip type) and kinetic task constraints (load condition). (ii) Upcoming grip and load conditions of the grasp are represented in kinematic- and muscle-synergies already during reach. Phase plane plots of the principal muscle-synergy against the principal kinematic synergy revealed (iii) that the muscle-synergy is linked (correlated, and in phase advance) to the kinematic synergy during reach and during grasp-and-pull. Furthermore (iv), pair-wise correlations of EMGs during hold suggest that muscle-synergies are (in part) implemented by coactivation of muscles through common input. Together, these results suggest that kinematic synergies have (at least in part) their origin not just in muscular activation, but in synergistic muscle activation. In short: kinematic synergies may result from muscle

  10. Verification of Satellite Rainfall Estimates from the Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission over Ground Validation Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, B. L.; Wolff, D. B.; Silberstein, D. S.; Marks, D. M.; Pippitt, J. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission's (TRMM) Ground Validation (GV) Program was originally established with the principal long-term goal of determining the random errors and systematic biases stemming from the application of the TRMM rainfall algorithms. The GV Program has been structured around two validation strategies: 1) determining the quantitative accuracy of the integrated monthly rainfall products at GV regional sites over large areas of about 500 km2 using integrated ground measurements and 2) evaluating the instantaneous satellite and GV rain rate statistics at spatio-temporal scales compatible with the satellite sensor resolution (Simpson et al. 1988, Thiele 1988). The GV Program has continued to evolve since the launch of the TRMM satellite on November 27, 1997. This presentation will discuss current GV methods of validating TRMM operational rain products in conjunction with ongoing research. The challenge facing TRMM GV has been how to best utilize rain information from the GV system to infer the random and systematic error characteristics of the satellite rain estimates. A fundamental problem of validating space-borne rain estimates is that the true mean areal rainfall is an ideal, scale-dependent parameter that cannot be directly measured. Empirical validation uses ground-based rain estimates to determine the error characteristics of the satellite-inferred rain estimates, but ground estimates also incur measurement errors and contribute to the error covariance. Furthermore, sampling errors, associated with the discrete, discontinuous temporal sampling by the rain sensors aboard the TRMM satellite, become statistically entangled in the monthly estimates. Sampling errors complicate the task of linking biases in the rain retrievals to the physics of the satellite algorithms. The TRMM Satellite Validation Office (TSVO) has made key progress towards effective satellite validation. For disentangling the sampling and retrieval errors, TSVO has developed