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Sample records for missouri river

  1. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  2. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  3. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  4. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  5. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  6. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  7. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  8. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  9. 33 CFR 117.411 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.411 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Kansas § 117.411 Missouri River. The draws of the bridges across the Missouri River shall open on signal; except during the winter season between the...

  10. 33 CFR 117.407 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.407 Section... DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements Iowa § 117.407 Missouri River. See § 117.691, Missouri River listed under Nebraska. Kansas...

  11. 76 FR 49431 - Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-10

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee will meet...

  12. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota § 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  13. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota § 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  14. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota § 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  15. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota § 117.941 Missouri River. The draws...

  16. 33 CFR 117.941 - Missouri River.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River. 117.941 Section 117.941 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY BRIDGES DRAWBRIDGE OPERATION REGULATIONS Specific Requirements South Dakota § 117.941 Missouri River. The draws of the US81 bridge, mile 805.7 at Yankton, and...

  17. Visualization of Flow Alternatives, Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Heuser, Jeanne

    2002-01-01

    Background The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (COE) 'Missouri River Master Water Control Manual' (Master Manual) review has resulted in consideration of many flow alternatives for managing the water in the river (COE, 2001; 1998a). The purpose of this report is to present flow-management alternative model results in a way that can be easily visualized and understood. This report was updated in October 2001 to focus on the specific flow-management alternatives presented by the COE in the 'Master Manual Revised Draft Environmental Impact Statement' (RDEIS; COE, 2001). The original version (February 2000) is available by clicking here. The COE, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (FWS), Missouri River states, and Missouri River basin tribes have been participating in discussions concerning water management of the Missouri River mainstem reservoir system (MRMRS), the Missouri River Bank Stabilization and Navigation Project, and the Kansas River reservoir system since 1986. These discussions include general input to the revision of the Master Manual as well as formal consultation under Section 7 of the Endangered Species Act. In 2000, the FWS issued a Biological Opinion that prescribed changes to reservoir management on the Missouri River that were believed to be necessary to preclude jeopardy to three endangered species, the pallid sturgeon, piping plover, and interior least tern (USFWS, 2000). The combined Missouri River system is large and complex, including many reservoirs, control structures, and free-flowing reaches extending over a broad region. The ability to assess future impacts of altered management scenarios necessarily involves complex, computational models that attempt to integrate physical, chemical, biological, and economic effects. Graphical visualization of the model output is intended to improve understanding of the differences among flow-management alternatives.

  18. 77 FR 48126 - Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of meeting. SUMMARY: The Missouri River Resource Advisory Committee will meet in Helena, Montana....

  19. Aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, Barry C.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Columbia Environmental Research Center (CERC), in cooperation with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA), the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (USFWS), and the Missouri Department of Natural Resources (MDNR), has been conducting research on the aquatic macroinvertebrates of the lower Missouri River since the mid-1990s. This research was initiated in response to the need for comprehensive characterization of biological communities inhabiting aquatic habitats in large river systems that have historically been poorly studied. The USGS Status and Trends of Biological Resources Program provided partial funding for pilot studies that began in 1993 when the CERC was part of the USFWS. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide stakeholders, scientists, management, and the general public with a basic summary of results from studies conducted by the CERC since that time period.

  20. Space Radar Image of Missouri River, Glasgow, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    This is a false-color L-band image of an area near Glasgow, Missouri, centered at about 39.2 degrees north latitude and 92.8 degrees west longitude. The image was acquired by the Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar (SIR-C/X-SAR) aboard the space shuttle Endeavour on its 50th orbit on October 3, 1994. The false-color composite was made by displaying the L-band (horizontally transmitted and received) return in red; the L-band (horizontally transmitted and vertically received) return in green; and the sum of the two channels in blue. The area shown is approximately 37 kilometers by 25 kilometers (23 miles by 16 miles). The radar data, coupled with pre-flood aerial photography and satellite data and post-flood topographic and field data, are being used to evaluate changes associated with levee breaks in landforms, where deposits formed during the widespread flooding in 1993 along the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers. The distinct radar scattering properties of farmland, sand fields and scoured areas will be used to inventory floodplains along the Missouri River and determine the processes by which these areas return to preflood conditions. The image shows one such levee break near Glasgow, Missouri. In the upper center of the radar image is a region covered by several meters of sand, shown as blue regions below the bend in the river. West (left) of this dark area, a blue gap in the levee tree canopy can be seen, showing the area where the levee failed. Radar data such as these can help scientists more accurately assess the potential for future flooding in this region and how that might impact surrounding communities. Spaceborne Imaging Radar-C and X-band Synthetic Aperture Radar(SIR-C/X-SAR) is part of NASA's Mission to Planet Earth. The radars illuminate Earth with microwaves, allowing detailed observations at any time, regardless of weather or sunlight conditions. SIR-C/X-SAR uses three microwave wavelengths: L-band (24 cm), C-band (6 cm

  1. Evaluating Investment in Missouri River Restoration: The Missouri River Effects Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, R. B.; Fischenich, C. J.; Buenau, K. E.

    2014-12-01

    In excess of $700 million has been spent over the last 10 years on restoration of the Missouri River. During this time, restoration efforts have focused progressively on avoidance of jeopardy for three threatened or endangered species: interior least tern (Sternula antillarum), piping plover (Charadrius melodus), and the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). In 2013, the US Army Corps of Engineers, the US Fish and Wildlife Service, and Missouri River stakeholders (through the Missouri River Recovery Implementation Committee) commissioned an Effects Analysis (EA; Murphy and Weiland, 2011) to evaluate the effects of this effort on the three species' populations and to project effects of future restoration. The EA includes synthesis of existing abiotic and biotic scientific information relating to species population processes, distributions, and habitat needs, as well as development of conceptual and quantitative models linking river context to its management and to species' responses. The EA also includes design of the next generation of hypothesis-driven science to support adaptive management of the species and the river. The Missouri River EA faces the challenge of evaluating how management of North America's largest reservoir storage system, 600 km of non-channelized mainstem, and nearly 1,200 km of channelized mainstem contribute to species' population dynamics. To support EA needs, the US Army Corps of Engineers is developing a new generation of reservoir simulation and routing models for the Missouri River basin, coupled with components to evaluate ecological and socio-economic metrics. The EA teams are developing coordinated models relating management to functional habitats and species' responses. A particular challenge faced by the EA is communicating the very different uncertainties in population dynamics between well-documented birds and the enigmatic fish, and the implications of this disparity in decision making, implementation, and adaptive management

  2. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  3. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  4. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  5. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  6. 33 CFR 207.306 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 207.306 Section 207.306 Navigation and Navigable Waters CORPS OF ENGINEERS, DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY, DEPARTMENT OF DEFENSE NAVIGATION REGULATIONS § 207.306 Missouri River;...

  7. Controlling erosion in the Missouri River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    2012-09-01

    The most pervasive conservation concern in the vast 510,000 square mile Missouri River basin in the western United States is excessive rates of wind erosion during dry periods, though conservation efforts can help control erosion, according to a 30 August report by the U.S. Department of Agriculture's (USDA) Conservation Effects Assessment Project. During some dry years, rates of wind erosion—which include nitrogen and phosphorus losses—can be higher than 4 tons per acre on 12% and higher than 2 tons per acre on 20% of the approximately 148,000 square miles of cultivated cropland, notes the report Assessment of the Effects of Conservation Practices on Cultivated Cropland in the Missouri River Basin. Between 2003 and 2006, conservation practices, including reducing tillage and building terraces, yielded about a 75% reduction in sediment runoff and phosphorus loss and a 68% reduction in nitrogen loss, according to the report. About 15 million acres in the region—18% of cultivated cropland—are considered to have either a high or moderate level of need for conservation treatment, and efforts in those areas in particular could result in additional reductions in sediment, phosphorus, and nitrogen loss, the report states.

  8. Space Radar Image of Missouri River - TOPSAR

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This is a combined radar and topography image of an area along the Missouri River that experienced severe flooding and levee failure in the summer of 1993. The meandering course of the Missouri River is seen as the dark curving band on the left side of the image. The predominantly blue area on the left half of the image is the river's floodplain, which was completely inundated during the flood of 1993. The colors in the image represent elevations, with the low areas shown in purple, intermediate areas in blue, green and yellow, and the highest areas shown in orange. The total elevation range is 85 meters (279 feet). The higher yellow and orange area on the right side of the image shows the topography and drainage patterns typical of this part of the midwestern United States. Dark streaks and bands in the floodplain are agricultural areas that were severely damaged by levee failures during the flooding. The region enclosed by the C-shaped bend in the river in the upper part of the image is Lisbon Bottoms. A powerful outburst of water from a failed levee on the north side of Lisbon Bottoms scoured a deep channel across the fields, which shows up as purple band. As the flood waters receded, deposits of sand and silt were left behind, which now appear as dark, smooth streaks in the image. The yellow areas within the blue, near the river, are clumps of trees sitting on slightly higher ground within the floodplain. The radar 'sees' the treetops, and that is why they are so much higher (yellow) than the fields. The image was acquired by the NASA/JPL Topographic Synthetic Aperture Radar system (TOPSAR) that flew over the area aboard a DC-8 aircraft in August 1994. The elevations are obtained by a technique known as radar interferometry, in which the radar signals are transmitted by one antenna, and echoes are received by two antennas aboard the aircraft. The two sets of received signals are combined using computer processing to produce a topographic map. Similar techniques

  9. 77 FR 24147 - Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 359.4, Missouri River, Kansas City, MO

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-23

    ... SECURITY Coast Guard 33 CFR Part 117 Drawbridge Operation Regulation; Mile 359.4, Missouri River, Kansas.... Truman Railroad Drawbridge across the Missouri River, mile 359.4, at Kansas City, Missouri. The deviation... 359.4, at Kansas City, Missouri to remain in the closed-to-navigation position for two...

  10. Habitat and Hydrology Condition Indices for the Upper Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers

    EPA Science Inventory

    Habitat and hydrology indices were developed to assess the conditions in reaches of the impounded Upper Mississippi River, the Fort Peck and Garrison reaches of the Upper Missouri River, the Missouri National Recreational River, and the channelized Lower Missouri River, and the O...

  11. 75 FR 28592 - Notice of Public Scoping Meetings for the Missouri River Authorized Purposes Study, Missouri...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-21

    ... Federal Register (75 FR 19948), the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) Omaha and Kansas City Districts... the NOI in the Federal Register (75 FR 19948) on April 16, 2010 and will continue until September 20... Authorized Purposes Study, Missouri River Basin, United States AGENCY: Department of the Army, U.S....

  12. 78 FR 4136 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Missouri River Recovery...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-18

    ... Resources Development Act of 2007 (Missouri River Ecosystem Restoration Plan). That study included the... the Missouri River Recovery Management Plan, Missouri River, United States AGENCY: Department of the... Omaha Districts, intend to prepare the Missouri River Recovery Management Plan (Plan) with...

  13. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  14. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  15. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  16. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Missouri River; administration and navigation. 162.105 Section 162.105 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PORTS AND WATERWAYS SAFETY INLAND WATERWAYS NAVIGATION REGULATIONS §...

  17. Water-quality data for the Missouri River and Missouri River alluvium near Weldon Spring, St. Charles County, Missouri, 1991--92

    SciTech Connect

    Kleeschulte, M.J.

    1993-12-31

    This report contains the water-quality data collected at two cross sections across the Missouri River and from monitoring wells in the Missouri River alluvium near Defiance, Missouri. The sampling results indicate the general water composition from the Missouri River changes with different flow conditions. During low-base flow conditions, the water generally contained about equal quantities of calcium and sodium plus potassium and similar quantities of bicarbonate and sulfate. During high-base flow conditions, water from the river predominantly was a calcium bicarbonate type. During runoff conditions, the water from the river was a calcium bicarbonate type, and sulfate concentrations were larger than during high-base flow conditions but smaller than during low-base flow conditions. The total and dissolved uranium concentrations at both the upstream and downstream cross sections, as well as from the different vertical samples across the river, were similar during each sampling event. However, sodium, sulfate, nitrate, and total and dissolved uranium concentrations varied with different flow conditions. Sodium and sulfate concentrations were larger during low-base flow conditions than during high-base flow or runoff conditions, while nitrate concentrations decreased during low-base flow conditions. Both total and dissolved uranium concentrations were slightly larger during runoff events than during low-base or high-base flow conditions.

  18. Modified Streamflows 1990 Level of Irrigation : Missouri, Colorado, Peace and Slave River Basin, 1928-1989.

    SciTech Connect

    A.G. Crook Company; United States. Bonneville Power Administration

    1993-07-01

    This report presents data for monthly mean streamflows adjusted for storage change, evaporation, and irrigation, for the years 1928-1990, for the Colorado River Basin, the Missouri River Basin, the Peace River Basin, and the Slave River Basin.

  19. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers near St. Louis, Missouri, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The size of the scour holes observed at the surveyed sites likely was affected by the low to moderate flow conditions on the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers at the time of the surveys. The scour holes likely would be larger during conditions of increased flow. Artifacts of horizontal positioning errors were present in the data, but an analysis of the surveys indicated that most of the bathymetric data have a total propagated error of less than 0.33 foot.

  20. Effects of alternative Missouri River management plans on ground-water levels in the lower Missouri River flood plain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2000-01-01

    In 1998, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) proposed eight Alternative River Management Plans (ARMPs) for managing reservoir levels and water-release rates for the Missouri River. The plans include the Current Water Control Plan (CWCP), Conservation 18, 31, and 44 (C18, C31, and C44) that provide different levels of water conservation in the reservoirs during droughts, Fish and Wildlife 10, 15, and 20 (FW10, FW15, and FW20) that vary water-release rates to provide additional fish and wildlife benefits, and Mississippi River 66 (M66) that maintains a 66,000 cubic feet per second discharge at St. Louis to provide navigation support for the Mississippi River. Releases from Gavin?s Point Dam affect both the lower 1,305 kilometers of the Missouri River and ground-water levels in the lower Missouri River flood plain. Changes in the magnitude and timing of ground-water-level fluctuations in response to changes in river management could impact agriculture, urban development, and wetland hydrology along the lower Missouri River flood plain. This study compared simulated ground-water altitude and depth to ground water for the CWCP in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the Kansas City area between 1970 and 1980 with each ARMP, determined the average change in simulated ground-water level for selected river-stage flood pulses at selected distances from the river, and compared simulated flood pulse, ground-water responses with actual flood pulse, and ground-water responses measured in wells located at three sites along the lower Missouri River flood plain.For the model area, the percent total shallow ground-water area (depth to ground water less than 0.3048 meter) is similar for each ARMP because of overall similarities in river flow between ARMPs. The percent total shallow ground-water area for C18 is the most similar to CWCP followed by C31, M66, C44, FW10, FW15, and FW20. ARMPs C18, C31, C44, and M66 do not cause large changes in the percent shallow ground

  1. Groundwater monitoring plan for the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the City of Independence, Missouri, well field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, Donald H.

    2012-01-01

    Source contributions to monitoring and supply wells, contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel times, and current (2012) understanding of alluvial water quality were used to develop a groundwater monitoring plan for the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the City of Independence, Missouri well field. The plan was designed to evaluate long-term alluvial water quality and assess potential changes in, and threats to, well-field water quality. Source contributions were determined from an existing groundwater flow model in conjunction with particle-tracking analysis and verified with water-quality data collected from 1997 through 2010 from a network of 68 monitoring wells. Three conjunctive factors - well-field pumpage, Missouri River discharge, and aquifer recharge - largely determined groundwater flow and, therefore, source contributions. The predominant source of groundwater to most monitoring wells and supply wells is the Missouri River, and this was reflected, to some extent, in alluvial water quality. To provide an estimate of the maximum potential lead time available for remedial action, monitoring wells where groundwater travel times from the contributing recharge areas are less than 2 years and predominately singular sources (such as the Missouri River or the land surface) were selected for annual sampling. The sample interval of the remaining wells, which have varying travel times and intermediate mixtures of river and land-surface contributions, were staggered on a 2-, 3-, or 4-year rotation. This was done to provide data from similar contributing areas and account for inherent aquifer variability yet minimize sample redundancy.

  2. WATER QUALITY IN THE GARRISON REACH OF THE MISSOURI RIVER, ND: PRELIMINARY EMAP FINDINGS

    EPA Science Inventory

    In 2001 and 2002, summer water quality (WQ) sampling was conducted on open waters (flowing waters of the river channel) and backwaters of the Missouri River between Garrison Dam and Lake Oahe as part of the EPA's Environmental Monitoring and Assessment Program Upper Missouri Rive...

  3. 78 FR 46582 - Missouri River Energy Services; Notice of Petition for Waiver

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission Missouri River Energy Services; Notice of Petition for Waiver Take notice that on July 23, 2013, Missouri River Energy Services, on behalf of itself and its member, City of Pella, Iowa, filed a petition for waiver...

  4. 75 FR 19948 - Notice of Intent To Prepare an Environmental Impact Statement for the Missouri River Authorized...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-16

    ... the Missouri River Authorized Purposes Study, Missouri River Basin, United States AGENCY: Department... and Kansas City Districts intend to conduct the Missouri River Authorized Purposes Study (MRAPS). The study is anticipated to produce a comprehensive feasibility-type report with an integrated...

  5. Analysis of Pulsed Flow Modification Alternatives, Lower Missouri River, 2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.

    2008-01-01

    The graphical, tabular, and statistical data presented in this report resulted from analysis of alternative flow regime designs considered by a group of Missouri River managers, stakeholders, and scientists during the summer of 2005. This plenary group was charged with designing a flow regime with increased spring flow pulses to support reproduction and survival of the endangered pallid sturgeon. Environmental flow components extracted from the reference natural flow regime were used to design and assess performance of alternative flow regimes. The analysis is based on modeled flow releases from Gavins Point Dam (near Yankton, South Dakota) for nine design alternatives and two reference scenarios; the reference scenarios are the run-of-the-river and the water-control plan implemented in 2004. The alternative designs were developed by the plenary group with the goal of providing pulsed spring flows, while retaining traditional social and economic uses of the river.

  6. Flood Induced Increases in Aeolian Transport Along the Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benthem, A. J.; Strong, L.; Schenk, E.; Skalak, K.; Hupp, C. R.; Galloway, J.

    2014-12-01

    In 2011, heavy winter snow melt combined with extensive spring rains caused the Missouri River to experience the most extensive flooding since the river was dammed in the 1950s. Large sections of the river banks, islands, and floodplains experienced weeks of prolonged inundation, resulting in extensive sand deposition as up to1 km inland from the established channel. Though locally variable, deposits of up to 3m of loose sand were deposited on the floodplain and extensive areas of shrub, grasslands, and agricultural fields were completely buried or had vegetation washed away in the inundation zone. The flooding also created a number of new unvegetated islands which provide important habitat for endangered species including the Piping Plover (Charadrius melodus). These newly created sand surfaces are unconsolidated and have very little vegetation to prevent aeolian transport. Strong sustained regional winds of up to 20m/s (45mph) cause substantial sediment fluxes which modify landscape topography, shift river morphology, and increase regional dust levels. Our study monitors and quantifies the increase in aeolian transport that occurred following flooding along the Garrison Reach, a 110 km section of free flowing Missouri River in North Dakota. In 2012 and 2013 we measured sand transport and accumulation rates using Leatherman style sand traps and erosion pins to at 9 sites of varying vegetation densities. We apply these flux rates to a high resolution remote sensing vegetation map to estimate the total flux of sand for this segment of the river. We also quantify total available new sand for transport using repeat Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) coverage from before and after the flood and examine the relationship between sand deposition and the rate of reestablishment of vegetation. All of these results are used to estimate the scale of flood induced aeolian processes and predict where they may continue to influence the landscape.

  7. Development of conceptual ecological models linking management of the Missouri River to pallid sturgeon population dynamics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Parsley, Michael J.; Annis, Mandy L.; Colvin, Michael E.; Welker, Timothy L.; James, Daniel A.

    2015-01-01

    This report documents the process of developing and refining conceptual ecological models (CEMs) for linking river management to pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) population dynamics in the Missouri River. The refined CEMs are being used in the Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Effects Analysis to organize, document, and formalize an understanding of pallid sturgeon population responses to past and future management alternatives. The general form of the CEMs, represented by a population-level model and component life-stage models, was determined in workshops held in the summer of 2013. Subsequently, the Missouri River Pallid Sturgeon Effects Analysis team designed a general hierarchical structure for the component models, refined the graphical structure, and reconciled variation among the components and between models developed for the upper river (Upper Missouri & Yellowstone Rivers) and the lower river (Missouri River downstream from Gavins Point Dam). Importance scores attributed to the relations between primary biotic characteristics and survival were used to define a candidate set of working dominant hypotheses about pallid sturgeon population dynamics. These CEMs are intended to guide research and adaptive-management actions to benefit pallid sturgeon populations in the Missouri River.

  8. Phytoplankton Abundance and Contributions to Suspended Particulate Matter in the Ohio, Upper Mississippi and Missouri Rivers.

    EPA Science Inventory

    A survey of the Ohio, Missouri and Upper Mississippi Rivers revealed large (five-fold) differences in summer average chlorophyll a (CHLa). Average concentrations were highest in the Mississippi (32.3 + 1.8 µg L-1) with lower values in the Missouri (19.7 + 1.1 µg L-1) and Ohio (6...

  9. On the Trail of Lewis and Clark: A Journey up the Missouri River.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lourie, Peter

    In 1804, Lewis and Clark and a band of adventurers called the Corps of Discovery embarked on one of the great expeditions in history, the exploration of the newly purchased Louisiana Territory. Much of their time was spent on the Missouri River. Two hundred years later, four friends follow Lewis and Clark's path up the Missouri. Their journey…

  10. Ecological requirements for pallid sturgeon reproduction and recruitment in the Missouri River: annual report 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLonay, Aaron J.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Chojnacki, Kimberly A.; Annis, Mandy L.; Braaten, P. J.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Fuller, D. B.; Haas, Justin D.; Haddix, Tyler M.; Ladd, Hallie L.A.; McElroy, Brandon J.; Mestl, Gerald E.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Rhoten, Jason C.; Wildhaber, Mark L.

    2014-01-01

    The Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project is a multiyear, multiagency collaborative research framework developed to provide information to support pallid sturgeon recovery and Missouri River management decisions. The project strategy integrates field and laboratory studies of sturgeon reproductive ecology, early life history, habitat requirements, and physiology. The project scope of work is developed annually with cooperating research partners and in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Missouri River Recovery—Integrated Science Program. The research consists of several interdependent and complementary tasks that engage multiple disciplines. The research tasks in the 2011 scope of work emphasized understanding of reproductive migrations and spawning of adult sturgeon, and hatch and drift of larvae. These tasks were addressed in three hydrologically and geomorphologically distinct parts of the Missouri River Basin: the Lower Missouri River downstream from Gavins Point Dam, the Upper Missouri River downstream from Fort Peck Dam and including downstream reaches of the Milk River, and the Lower Yellowstone River. The research is designed to inform management decisions related to channel re-engineering, flow modification, and pallid sturgeon population augmentation on the Missouri River, and throughout the range of the species. Research and progress made through this project are reported to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers annually. This annual report details the research effort and progress made by the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project during 2011.

  11. Forty years of vegetation change on the Missouri River Floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W.C.; Dixon, M.D.; Scott, M.L.; Rabbe, L.; Larson, G.; Volke, M.; Werner, B.

    2012-01-01

    Comparative inventories in 1969 and 1970 and in 2008 of vegetation from 30 forest stands downstream of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota showed (a) a sharp decline in Cottonwood regeneration; (b) a strong compositional shift toward dominance by green ash; and (c) large increases in invasive understory species, such as smooth brome, reed canary grass, and Canada thistle. These changes, and others discovered during remeasurement, have been caused by a complex of factors, some related to damming (altered hydrologic and sediment regimes, delta formation, and associated wetdry cycles) and some not (diseases and expansion of invasive plants). Dominance of green ash, however, may be short lived, given the likelihood that the emerald ash borer will arrive in the Dakotas in 510 years, with potentially devastating effects. The prospects for recovery of this valuable ecosystem, rich in ecosystem goods and services and in American history, are daunting. ?? 2012 by American Institute of Biological Sciences. All rights reserved.

  12. Forty years of vegetation change on the Missouri River floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, W. Carter; Dixon, Mark D.; Scott, Michael L.; Rabbe, Lisa; Larson, Gary; Volke, Malia; Werner, Brett

    2012-01-01

    Comparative inventories in 1969 and 1970 and in 2008 of vegetation from 30 forest stands downstream of Garrison Dam on the Missouri River in central North Dakota showed (a) a sharp decline in Cottonwood regeneration; (b) a strong compositional shift toward dominance by green ash; and (c) large increases in invasive understory species, such as smooth brome, reed canary grass, and Canada thistle. These changes, and others discovered during remeasurement, have been caused by a complex of factors, some related to damming (altered hydrologic and sediment regimes, delta formation, and associated wet-dry cycles) and some not (diseases and expansion of invasive plants). Dominance of green ash, however, may be short lived, given the likelihood that the emerald ash borer will arrive in the Dakotas in 5-10 years, with potentially devastating effects. The prospects for recovery of this valuable ecosystem, rich in ecosystem goods and services and in American history, are daunting.

  13. Effects of reservoirs on flood discharges in the Kansas and the Missouri River basins, 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.

    1994-01-01

    The floods of 1993 were of historic magnitude as water in the Missouri and the Mississippi Rivers reached levels that exceeded many of the previous observed maximums. Although large parts of the flood plains of both rivers upstream from St. Louis, Missouri, were inundated, water levels would have been even higher had it not been for the large volume of runoff retained in flood-control reservoirs. Most of the total flood-control storage available upstream from St. Louis is located along the main stem and tributaries of the Missouri River; the largest concentration of reservoirs is located within the Kansas River Basin. The Kansas River Basin accounts for about l0 percent (60,000 square miles) of the drainage area of the Missouri River Basin, and reservoirs control streamflow from 85 percent (50,840 square miles) of the drainage area of the Kansas River Basin. Analyses of flood discharges in the Kansas River indicate that reservoirs reduced flooding along the Kansas and the lower Missouri Rivers. Results of analyses of the 1993 flooding, which include total basin rainfall, peak discharge, and total flood volume on the Kansas River, are compared with analyses of the 1951 flood, which had a similar total volume but a substantially larger peak discharge.

  14. Spatial Variation in the Invertebrate Macrobenthos of Three Large Missouri River Reservoirs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Benthic macroinvertebrates assemblages are useful indicators of ecological condition for aquatic systems. This study was conducted to characterize benthic communities of three large reservoirs on the Missouri River. The information collected on abundance, distribution and varia...

  15. Assessment of Least Tern and Piping Plover Habitats on the Missouri River Using Remote Sensing

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Larry L.

    2007-01-01

    The primary goal of this study is to develop a cost-effective method to inventory, map, estimate, monitor, and evaluate least tern and piping plover habitats for four segments of the Missouri River using remotely sensed imagery.

  16. 7. VIEW OF 100 kV SWITCHYARD WITH MISSOURI RIVER IN ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    7. VIEW OF 100 kV SWITCHYARD WITH MISSOURI RIVER IN THE BACKGROUND. ALONG THE LEFT SIDE FROM THE FOREGROUND ARE THE U.S. GOVERNMENT STORAGE SHED, TOOL HOUSE, THREE-STALL GARAGE, AND PARTIAL VIEW OF POWERHOUSE ADDITION. VIEW TO NORTHEAST. - Rainbow Hydroelectric Facility, On north bank of Missouri River 2 miles Northeast of Great Falls, & end of Rainbow Dam Road, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  17. Fluvial sediment of the Mississippi River at St. Louis, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jordan, Paul Robert

    1965-01-01

    An investigation of the fluvial sediment of the Mississippi River at St. Louis, Mo., was begun in 1948. Most data have been obtained only to determine the daily suspended-sediment discharge and the particle-size distribution of suspended sediment and bed material, but a few data have been obtained to study the flow resistance, the vertical distribution of sediment and velocity, and the bed-material discharge. The flow of the Mississippi River at St. Louis is made up of the flows from the Missouri River, which had an average flow of 79,860 cubic feet per second for 1897-1958 at Hermann, Mo., and from the upper Mississippi River, which had an average flow of 91,890 cubic feet per second for 1928-58 at Alton, Il. The Missouri River is partly controlled by reservoirs that had a total capacity of 90,300,000 acre-feet in 1956, and the upper Mississippi River is partly controlled by lakes and reservoirs that had a total capacity of 4,890,000 acre-feet in 1956. The flows of the Missouri and upper Mississippi Rivers have not become mixed at St. Louis; so the river has a lateral gradient of suspended-sediment concentration. The concentration near the west bank has been as much as 2,400 parts per million greater than the concentration near the east bank. Suspended-sediment discharges from April 1948 to September 1958 ranged from 4,250 to 7,010,000 tons per day and averaged 496,000 tons per day. Mean concentrations for water years decreased steadily from 1,690 parts per million in 1949 to 403 parts per million in 1956, but they increased to 756 parts per million in 1958. Effects of new reservoirs in the Missouri River basin on the concentration have been obscured by the close relation of concentration to streamflow. Measured suspended-sediment discharge through September 1958 averaged 47 percent clay, 38 percent silt, and 15 percent sand. Variations of particle size were due mainly to differences in the source areas of the sediment. Most of the bed material in the main flow

  18. Effect of Main-stem Dams on Zooplankton Communities of the Missouri River (USA)

    EPA Science Inventory

    We examined the distribution and abundance of zooplankton from 146 sites on the Missouri River and found large shifts in the dominance of major taxa between management zones of this regulated river. Crustacean zooplankton were dominant in the inter-reservoir zone of the river, an...

  19. Process and Prospects for the Designed Hydrograph, Lower Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, R. B.; Galat, D. L.; Hay, C. H.

    2005-05-01

    The flow regime of the Lower Missouri River (LMOR, Gavins Point, SD to St. Louis, MO) is being redesigned to restore elements of natural variability while maintaining project purposes such as power production, flood control, water supply, and navigation. Presently, an experimental hydrograph alteration is planned for Spring, 2006. Similar to many large, multi-purpose rivers, the ongoing design process involves negotiation among many management and stakeholder groups. The negotiated process has simplified the hydrograph into two key elements -- the spring rise and the summer low - with emphasis on the influence of these elements on three threatened or endangered species. The spring rise has been hypothesized to perform three functions: build sandbars for nesting of the interior least tern and piping plover, provide episodic connectivity with low-lying flood plain, and provide a behavioral spawning cue for the pallid sturgeon. Among these, most emphasis has been placed on the spawning cue because concerns about downstream flood hazards have limited flow magnitudes to those that are thought to be geomorphically ineffective, and channelization and incision provide little opportunity for moderate flows to connect to the flood plain. Our analysis of the natural hydrologic regime provides some insight into possible spring rise design elements, including timing, rate of rise and fall, and length of spring flow pulses. The summer low has been hypothesized to emerge sandbars for nesting and to maximize area of shallow, slow water for rearing of larval and juvenile fish. Re-engineering of the navigation channel to provide greater diversity of habitat during navigation flows has been offered as an alternative to the summer low. Our analysis indicates that re-engineering has potential to increase habitat availability substantially, but the ecological results are so-far unknown. The designed hydrograph that emerges from the multi-objective process will likely represent a

  20. Avian assemblages in the lower Missouri river floodplain

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thogmartin, W.E.; Gallagher, M.; Young, N.; Rohweder, J.J.; Durbian, F.; Knutson, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    Floodplain habitat provides important migration and breeding habitat for birds in the midwestern United States. However, few studies have examined how the avian assemblage changes with different stages of floodplain forest succession in the midwestern United States. In spring and summer from 2002 to 2004, we conducted 839 point counts in wet prairie/forbs fields, 547 point counts in early successional forests, and 434 point counts in mature forests to describe the migrating and breeding bird assemblage in the lower Missouri River floodplain. We recorded 131, 121, and 141 species in the three respective habitats, a number higher than most locations in the midwestern United States and comprising > 15% of all avian species in North America. Avian species diversity generally increased from west to east along the river, differed among land cover classes, but overlapped between seasons (migration and breeding) and years. Wet prairies were particularly important for conservation as there were 20 species of high conservation concern observed, including Dickcissels (Spiza americana). Important species for monitoring biotic integrity included the Northern Harrier (Circus cyaneus) and Bobolink (Dolichonyx oryzivorus) in wet prairie, Bell's Vireo (Vireo bellii) in early successional forest, and Northern Parula (Parula americana) and Prothonotary Warbler (Protonotaria citrea) in mature forest. ?? 2009, The Society of Wetland Scientists.

  1. UPPER MISSOURI RIVER ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (EMAP-UMR): A ROBUST DESIGN FOR A GREAT-RIVER ASSESSMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great rivers are complex, trans-border resources that are difficult to assess without bias. The U.S. EPA is using the Upper Missouri River to develop tools for biological assessments of large rivers. Our focus is to l) apply multi-density randon tessellation stratified (MD-RTS) ...

  2. 78 FR 46931 - Intent To Hold North Dakota Task Force Meeting as Established by the Missouri River Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-02

    ... improve conservation, protect recreation from sedimentation, improve water quality, improve erosion control, and protect historic and cultural sites along the Missouri River in North Dakota from...

  3. Accuracy of the Missouri River Least Tern and Piping Plover Monitoring Program: considerations for the future

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shaffer, Terry L.; Sherfy, Mark H.; Anteau, Michael J.; Stucker, Jennifer H.; Sovada, Marsha A.; Roche, Erin A.; Wiltermuth, Mark T.; Buhl, Thomas K.; Dovichin, Colin M.

    2013-01-01

    The upper Missouri River system provides nesting and foraging habitat for federally endangered least terns (Sternula antillarum; hereafter “terns”) and threatened piping plovers (Charadrius melodus; hereafter “plovers”). These species are the subject of substantial management interest on the Missouri River for several reasons. First, ecosystem recovery is a goal for management agencies that seek to maintain or restore natural functions and native biological communities for the Missouri River system. Terns and plovers are recognized as important ecosystem components that are linked with the river’s ecological functions. Second, although both species breed beyond the Missouri River system, the Missouri River is one of the principal breeding areas in the Northern Great Plains; thus, the river system is a focal area for recovery actions targeted at regional population goals. Third, a Biological Opinion for Missouri River operations established annual productivity goals for terns and plovers, and the recovery plan for each species established annual population goals. Meeting these goals is a key motivation in management decision making and implementation with regard to both species. A myriad of conservation and management interests necessitate understanding numbers, distribution, and productivity of terns and plovers on the Missouri River system. To this end, a Tern and Plover Monitoring Program (TPMP) was implemented by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (hereafter “Corps”) in 1986, and has since provided annual estimates of tern and plover numbers and productivity for five Missouri River reservoirs and four river reaches (U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 1993). The TPMP has served as the primary source of information about the status of terns and plovers on the Missouri River, and TPMP data have been used for a wide variety of purposes. In 2005, the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center (NPWRC) was tasked by the Corps to

  4. Bathymetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in Kansas City, Missouri, using a multibeam echo sounder, 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2010-01-01

    Bathymetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, on the Missouri River in the vicinity of nine bridges at seven highway crossings in Kansas City, Missouri, in March 2010. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches that ranged from 1,640 to 1,800 feet long and extending from bank to bank in the main channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans will be used by the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the condition of the bridges for stability and integrity with respect to bridge scour. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of the water or in extremely shallow water, and one pier that was surrounded by a large debris raft. A scour hole was present at every pier for which bathymetric data could be obtained. The scour hole at a given pier varied in depth relative to the upstream channel bed, depending on the presence and proximity of other piers or structures upstream from the pier in question. The surveyed channel bed at the bottom of the scour hole was between 5 and 50 feet above bedrock. At bridges with drilled shaft foundations, generally there was exposure of the upstream end of the seal course and the seal course often was undermined to some extent. At one site, the minimum elevation of the scour hole at the main channel pier was about 10 feet below the bottom of the seal course, and the sides of the drilled shafts were evident in a point cloud visualization of the data at that pier. However, drilled shafts generally penetrated 20 feet into bedrock. Undermining of the seal course was evident as a sonic 'shadow' in the point cloud visualization of several of the piers. Large dune features were present in the channel at nearly all of the surveyed sites, as were numerous smaller dunes and many ripples. Several of the sites are on or near bends in the river

  5. Sediment regime constraints on river restoration - An example from the lower missouri river

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.; Blevins, D.W.; Bitner, C.J.

    2009-01-01

    Dammed rivers are subject to changes in their flow, water-quality, and sediment regimes. Each of these changes may contribute to diminished aquatic habitat quality and quantity. Of the three factors, an altered sediment regime is a particularly unyielding challenge on many dammed rivers. The magnitude of the challenge is illustrated on the Lower Missouri River, where the largest water storage system in North America has decreased the downriver suspended-sediment load to 0.2%-17% of predamloads. In response to the altered sediment regime, the Lower Missouri River channel has incised as much as 3.5 m just downstream of Gavins Point Dam, although the bed has been stable to slightly aggrading at other locations farther downstream. Effects of channel engineering and commercial dredging are superimposed on the broad-scale adjustments to the altered sediment regime. The altered sediment regime and geomorphic adjustments constrain restoration and management opportunities. Incision and aggradation limit some objectives of flow-regime management: In incising river segments, ecologically desirable reconnection of the floodplain requires discharges that are beyond operational limits, whereas in aggrading river segments, small spring pulses may inundate or saturate low-lying farmlands. Lack of sediment in the incising river segment downstream of Gavins Point Dam also limits sustainable restoration of sand-bar habitat for bird species listed under the Endangered Species Act. Creation of new shallow-water habitat for native fi shes involves taking sediment out of floodplain storage and reintroducing most or all of it to the river, raising concerns about increased sediment, nutrient, and contaminant loads. Calculations indicate that effects of individual restoration projects are small relative to background loads, but cumulative effects may depend on sequence and locations of projects. An understanding of current and historical sediment fl uxes, and how they vary along the river

  6. Water-Quality Changes Caused by Riverbank Filtration Between the Missouri River and Three Pumping Wells of the Independence, Missouri, Well Field 2003-05

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.; Rydlund, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    Riverbank filtration substantially improves the source-water quality of the Independence, Missouri well field. Coliform bacteria, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, viruses and selected constituents were analyzed in water samples from the Missouri River, two vertical wells, and a collector well. Total coliform bacteria, Cryptosporidium, Giardia, and total culturable viruses were detected in the Missouri River, but were undetected in samples from wells. Using minimum reporting levels for non-detections in well samples, minimum log removals were 4.57 for total coliform bacteria, 1.67 for Cryptosporidium, 1.67 for Giardia, and 1.15 for total culturable virus. Ground-water flow rates between the Missouri River and wells were calculated from water temperature profiles and ranged between 1.2 and 6.7 feet per day. Log removals based on sample pairs separated by the traveltime between the Missouri River and wells were infinite for total coliform bacteria (minimum detection level equal to zero), between 0.8 and 3.5 for turbidity, between 1.5 and 2.1 for Giardia, and between 0.4 and 2.6 for total culturable viruses. Cryptosporidium was detected once in the Missouri River but no corresponding well samples were available. No clear relation was evident between changes in water quality in the Missouri River and in wells for almost all constituents. Results of analyses for organic wastewater compounds and the distribution of dissolved oxygen, specific conductance, and temperature in the Missouri River indicate water quality on the south side of the river was moderately influenced by the south bank inflows to the river upstream from the Independence well field.

  7. Catastrophic flood origin, little Missouri River valley, Montana, South Dakota, and North Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Clausen, E.N.

    1988-07-01

    Mosaics of photographically reduced topographic maps demonstrate the Little Missouri River valley was developed by gigantic floods. Catastrophic flood landforms, oriented in a northwest-southeast direction, cross the entire Little Missouri drainage basin. Field evidence, consisting of abundant flood-deposited alluvium, supports map evidence. Flood-produced landforms, cut in easily eroded claystone bedrock, appear fresh, suggesting that floods occurred late during the last glacial cycle. Sheets of water, several hundred kilometers wide, flowed in a southeast direction, parallel with a continental ice margin. Erosion lowered the regional surface from a level corresponding to the tops of the highest present-day buttes to the surface now crossed by the headwaters of the Moreau, Grand, Cannonball, Heart, and Green Rivers. Spillway trenches served to channel flow and rapidly cut headward into easily eroded claystone. These trenches include the Moreau, Grand, Cannonball, Heart, and Missouri valleys. The Missouri valley in western North Dakota became the dominant spillway as tributary trenches systematically cut off flow feeding competing spillways. Formation of the Little Missouri spillway, first as a north-trending valley, progressively cut off floodwaters flowing into the Heart, Cannonball, Grand, and Moreau spillways. The north end of the Little Missouri spillway also was cut off by a deeper east-trending spillway. Huge sheets of floodwater continued to pour across the divide west of the Little Missouri continuing to lower that surface. These floodwaters were cut off by development of the Yellowstone spillway in eastern Montana.

  8. Age, growth, and gonadal characteristics of adult bighead carp, Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, in the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schrank, S.J.; Guy, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Bighead carp were introduced into Arkansas in 1973 to improve water clarity in production ponds. Bighead carp subsequently escaped aquaculture facilities in the early 1980's and dispersed into the Mississippi and Missouri rivers. The first documentation of bighead carp reproduction in the Mississippi River system was in 1989. The population has increased in the Missouri River as is evident in their increased proportion in the commercial harvest since 1990. The effect of this exotic planktivore on native ecosystems of the U.S. has not been examined. Basic biological data on bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis in the Missouri River are needed to predict potential ecological problems and provide a foundation for manipulative studies. The objectives of this study were to assess age, growth, and gonadal characteristics of bighead carp in the Missouri River. Adult bighead carp in our sample varied from age 3 to age 7 and length varied from 475 to 1050 mm. There was a large variation in length at age, and overall bighead carp exhibited fast growth. For example, mean back-calculated length at age 3 was 556 mm. The sample was dominated by bighead carp from the 1994 year class. There was no difference in gonad development (i.e., gonadal somatic index, egg diameter) between winter and spring samples. Length of male bighead carp and GSI were not significantly correlated; however, females exhibited a positive linear relationship between length and GSI. In each ovary, egg diameter frequencies exhibited a bimodal distribution, indicating protracted spawning. Mean fecundity was 226 213, with a maximum fecundity of 769 964. Bighead carp in the Missouri River have similar life history characteristics to Asian and European populations. They have become well established in the Missouri River and it is likely that dispersal and population density will increase.

  9. Heterogeneous detection probabilities for imperiled Missouri River fishes: implications for large-river monitoring programs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, J.T.; Paukert, Craig P.; Doyle, W.J.; Hill, Tracy D.; Steffensen, K.D.; Travnichek, Vincent H.

    2012-01-01

    Occupancy modeling was used to determine (1) if detection probabilities (p) for 7 regionally imperiled Missouri River fishes (Scaphirhynchus albus, Scaphirhynchus platorynchus, Cycleptus elongatus, Sander canadensis, Macrhybopsis aestivalis, Macrhybopsis gelida, and Macrhybopsis meeki) differed among gear types (i.e. stationary gill nets, drifted trammel nets, and otter trawls), and (2) how detection probabilities were affected by habitat (i.e. pool, bar, and open water), longitudinal position (five 189 to 367 rkm long segments), sampling year (2003 to 2006), and season (July 1 to October 30 and October 31 to June 30). Adult, large-bodied fishes were best detected with gill nets (p: 0.02–0.74), but most juvenile large-bodied and all small-bodied species were best detected with otter trawls (p: 0.02–0.58). Trammel nets may be a redundant sampling gear for imperiled fishes in the lower Missouri River because most species had greater detection probabilities with gill nets or otter trawls. Detection probabilities varied with river segment for S. platorynchus, C. elongatus, and all small-bodied fishes, suggesting that changes in habitat influenced gear efficiency or abundance changes among river segments. Detection probabilities varied by habitat for adult S. albus and S. canadensis, year for juvenile S. albus, C. elongatus, and S. canadensis, and season for adult S. albus. Concentrating sampling effort on gears with the greatest detection probabilities may increase species detections to better monitor a population's response to environmental change and the effects of management actions on large-river fishes.

  10. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri and Mississippi Rivers on the periphery of Missouri, June 2014

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2015-01-01

    Previous bathymetric surveys had been done at both of the sites on the Missouri River and one of the sites on the Mississippi River examined in this study. Comparisons between bathymetric surfaces from the previous surveys during the 2011 flood and those of this study generally indicate that there was an increase in the elevation of the channel bed at these sites that likely was caused by a substantial decrease in discharge and water-surface elevation compared to the 2011 surveys. However, the scour holes observed at these sites were either the same size or larger in 2014 compared to the 2011 surveys, indicating that the flow condition is not the sole variable in the determination of the size of scour holes, and that local velocity and depth also are critical variables, as indicated by predictive pier scour equations.

  11. Conservation effects on soil quality indicators in the Missouri Salt River basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Salt River Basin in the Central Claypan Region of Missouri was selected as a benchmark watershed to assess long-term effects of conservation practices on soil quality as part of the Conservation Effects Assessment Project and the Long-Term Agroecosystem Research Network. Fifteen management syste...

  12. EVALUATION OF THE BIOLOGICAL INTEGRITY OF FLOODPLAIN WETLANDS IN THE UPPER MISSOURI RIVER BASIN (REMAP)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research and record sources of water quality information from the Upper Missouri River states (North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, Wyoming and Montana) and Tribes will be prepared to include details about water quality testing sites, parameters monitored, and methods used for ...

  13. Conservation effects on soil quality indicators in the Missouri Salt River Basin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Conservation Effects Assessment Project was initiated in 2002 to quantify the potential benefits of conservation management practices. Within the Central Claypan Region of Missouri, the Salt River Basin was selected as a benchmark watershed to assess long-term effects of conservation practices o...

  14. 76 FR 22696 - Missouri River Energy Services, Western Minnesota Municipal Power Agency; Notice of Motion To...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-22

    ...; Notice of Motion To Withdraw Filing and Request for Expedited Action On March 23, 2011, Missouri River Energy Services and Western Minnesota Municipal Power Agency (collectively, MRES/WMMPA) filed a motion to... Markets Tariff. MRES/WMMPA also request that the Commission act on this motion no later than May 1,...

  15. Restoring ecological integrity of great rivers: Historical hydrographs aid in defining reference conditions for the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galat, D.L.; Lipkin, R.

    2000-01-01

    Restoring the ecological integrity of regulated large rivers necessitates characterizing the natural flow regime. We applied 'Indicators of Hydrologic Alteration' to assess the natural range of variation of the Missouri River's flow regime at 11 locations before (1929-1948) and after (1967-1996) mainstem impoundment. The 3768 km long Missouri River was divided into three sections: upper basin least-altered from flow regulation, including the lower Yellowstone River; middle basin inter-reservoir, and lower basin channelized. Flow regulation was associated with a reduction in magnitude and duration of the annual flood pulse, an increase in magnitude and duration of annual discharge minima, a reduction in frequency of annual low-flow pulses, earlier timing of March-October low-flow pulses, and a general increase in frequency of flow reversals with a reduction in the rate of change in river flows. Hydrologic alterations were smallest at two least-altered upper-basin sites and most frequent and severe in inter-reservoir and upper-channelized river sections. The influence of reservoir operations on depressing the annual flood pulse was partially offset by tributary inflow in the lower 600 km of river. Reservoir operations could be modified to more closely approximate the 1929-1948 flow regime to establish a simulated natural riverine ecosystem. For inter-reservoir and upper channelized-river sections, we recommend periodic controlled flooding through managed reservoir releases during June and July; increased magnitude, frequency and duration of annual high-flow pulses; and increased annual rates of hydrograph rises and falls. All of the regulated Missouri River would benefit from reduced reservoir discharges during August-February, modified timing of reservoir releases and a reduced number of annual hydrograph reversals. Assessment of ecological responses to a reregulation of Missouri River flows that more closely approximates the natural flow regime should then be used

  16. Fire history of southeastern Glacier National Park: Missouri River Drainage

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barrett, Stephen W.

    1993-01-01

    information existed for GNP's east-side forests, which are dominated primarily by lodgepole pine. In fall 1992, the park initiated a study to determine the fire history of the Missouri River drainage portion of southeastern GNP. Given the known variation in pre-1900 fire patterns for lodgepole pine, this study was seen as a potentially important contribution to GNP's Fire Management Plan, and to the expanding data base of fire history studies in the region. Resource managers sought this information to assist their development of appropriate fire management strategies for the east-side forests, and the fire history data also would be a useful interactive component of the park's Geographic Information System (GIS). Primary objectives were to: 1) determine pre-1900 fire periodicities, severities, burning patterns, and post-fire succession for major forest types, and 2) document and map the forest age class mosaic, reflecting the history of stand replacing fires at the landscape level of analysis. Secondary objectives were to interpret the possible effects of modern fire suppression on area forests, and to determine fire regime patterns relative to other lodgepole pine ecosystems in the Northern Rockies.

  17. Evaluating spawning migration patterns and predicting spawning success of shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.; Holan, S.H.; Davis, G.M.; Gladish, D.W.; DeLonay, A.J.; Papoulias, D.M.; Sommerhauser, D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Approaches using telemetry, precise reproductive assessments, and surgically implanted data storage tags (DSTs) were used in combination with novel applications of analytical techniques for fish movement studies to describe patterns in migratory behavior and predict spawning success of gravid shovelnose sturgeon. From 2004 to 2007, over 300 gravid female shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) from the Lower Missouri River, that were expected to spawn in the year they were collected, were surgically implanted with transmitters and archival DSTs. Functional cluster modeling of telemetry data from the spawning season suggested two common migration patterns of gravid female shovelnose sturgeon. Fish implanted from 958 to 1181 river kilometer (rkm) from the mouth of the Missouri River (or northern portion of the Lower Missouri River within 354rkm of the lowest Missouri River dam at rkm 1305) had one migration pattern. Of fish implanted from 209 to 402rkm from the mouth of the Missouri River (or southern portion of the Lower Missouri River), half demonstrated a movement pattern similar to the northern fish while the other half demonstrated a migration pattern that covered more of the river. There was no apparent difference in migration patterns between successful and unsuccessful spawners. Multiple hypotheses exist to explain differences in migratory patterns among fish from different river reaches. Additional work is required to determine if observed differences are due to multiple adapted strategies, environmental alteration, and/or initial tagging date. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of DST data indicated that variation in depth usage patterns was consistently different between successful and unsuccessful spawners, as indicated by differences in likelihood of switching between high and low variability states. Analyses of DST data, and data collected at capture, were sufficient to predict 8 of 10 non-spawners/incomplete spawners and all 30 spawners in the

  18. Evaluating spawning migration patterns and predicting spawning success of shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.; Holan, S.H.; Davis, G.M.; Gladish, D.W.; DeLonay, A.J.; Papoulias, D.M.; Sommerhauser, D.K.

    2011-01-01

    Approaches using telemetry, precise reproductive assessments, and surgically implanted data storage tags (DSTs) were used in combination with novel applications of analytical techniques for fish movement studies to describe patterns in migratory behavior and predict spawning success of gravid shovelnose sturgeon. From 2004 to 2007, over 300 gravid female shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) from the Lower Missouri River, that were expected to spawn in the year they were collected, were surgically implanted with transmitters and archival DSTs. Functional cluster modeling of telemetry data from the spawning season suggested two common migration patterns of gravid female shovelnose sturgeon. Fish implanted from 958 to 1181 river kilometer (rkm) from the mouth of the Missouri River (or northern portion of the Lower Missouri River within 354 rkm of the lowest Missouri River dam at rkm 1305) had one migration pattern. Of fish implanted from 209 to 402 rkm from the mouth of the Missouri River (or southern portion of the Lower Missouri River), half demonstrated a movement pattern similar to the northern fish while the other half demonstrated a migration pattern that covered more of the river. There was no apparent difference in migration patterns between successful and unsuccessful spawners. Multiple hypotheses exist to explain differences in migratory patterns among fish from different river reaches. Additional work is required to determine if observed differences are due to multiple adapted strategies, environmental alteration, and/or initial tagging date. Hierarchical Bayesian modeling of DST data indicated that variation in depth usage patterns was consistently different between successful and unsuccessful spawners, as indicated by differences in likelihood of switching between high and low variability states. Analyses of DST data, and data collected at capture, were sufficient to predict 8 of 10 non-spawners/incomplete spawners and all 30 spawners in the

  19. Adaptive Management for Decision Making at the Program and Project Levels of the Missouri River Recovery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Anderson, Michael G.; Tyre, Drew; Fleming, Craig A.

    2009-02-28

    The paper, “Adaptive Management: Background for Stakeholders in the Missouri River Recovery Program,” introduced the concept of adaptive management (AM), its principles and how they relate to one-another, how AM is applied, and challenges for its implementation. This companion paper describes how the AM principles were applied to specific management actions within the Missouri River Recovery Program to facilitate understanding, decision-making, and stakeholder engagement. For context, we begin with a brief synopsis of the Missouri River Recovery Program (MRRP) and the strategy for implementing adaptive management (AM) within the program; we finish with an example of AM in action within Phase I of the MRPP.

  20. 75 FR 75999 - Lock + Hydro Friends Fund XlVI; FFP Missouri 17, LLC; Solia 3 Hydroelectric, LLC; Three Rivers...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-07

    ...; Project No. 13783-000; Project No. 13790-000] Lock + Hydro Friends Fund XlVI; FFP Missouri 17, LLC; Solia 3 Hydroelectric, LLC; Three Rivers Hydro, LLC; Hildebrand Hydro, LLC; Notice of Competing... 30, 2010. On May 18, 2010, Lock + Hydro Friends Fund XLVI, FFP Missouri 17, LLC, Solia 3 Hydro,...

  1. Hydrological alteration along the Missouri River Basin: A time series approach

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pegg, M.A.; Pierce, C.L.; Roy, A.

    2003-01-01

    Human alteration of large rivers is common-place, often resulting in significant changes in flow characteristics. We used a time series approach to examine daily mean flow data from locations throughout the main-stem Missouri River. Data from a pre-alteration period (1925-1948) were compared with a post-alteration period (1967-1996), with separate analyses conducted using either data from the entire year or restricted to the spring fish spawning period (1 April-30 June). Daily mean flows were significantly higher during the post-alteration period at all locations. Flow variability was markedly reduced during the post-alteration period as a probable result of flow regulation and climatological shifts. Daily mean flow during the spring fish spawning period was significantly lower during the post-alteration period at the most highly altered locations in the middle portion of the river, but unchanged at the least altered locations in the upper and lower portions of the river. Our data also corroborate other analyses, using alternate statistical approaches, that suggest similar changes to the Missouri River system. Our results suggest human alterations on the Missouri River, particularly in the middle portion most strongly affected by impoundments and channelization, have resulted in changes to the natural flow regime.

  2. Bromine incorporation factors for trihalomethane formation for the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rathbun, R.E.

    1996-01-01

    The bromine incorporation factor describes the distribution of the four trihalomethane compounds in the mixture formed when a natural water is chlorinated. This factor was determined for the Mississippi, Missouri, and Ohio Rivers by chlorinating water samples at three levels each of pH and free chlorine concentration. Samples were collected during the summer, fall, and spring seasons of the year at 12 sites on the Mississippi River from Minneapolis, MN, to New Orleans, LA, and on the Missouri and Ohio Rivers 1.6 kilometers upstream from their confluences with the Mississippi. The bromine incorporation factor increased as the bromide concentration increased, and decreased as the pH, initial free-chlorine and dissolved organic-carbon concentrations increased. Variation of the bromine incorporation factor with distance along the Mississippi River approximately paralleled the variation of the bromide concentration with distance along the river, with the Missouri River samples having the highest bromine incorporation factors for all combinations of pH and free-chlorine concentration.

  3. Arsenic data for streams in the uppper Missouri River Basin, Montana and Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapton, J.R.; Horpestad, A.A.

    1987-01-01

    Although large concentrations of arsenic originating from geothermal sources within Yellowstone National Park have been known to be present in the Madison River for many years, systematic monitoring throughout the upper Missouri River basin had not been done. Therefore, a monitoring network consisting of 24 stations was established for the purpose of measuring arsenic concentrations and determining arsenic discharge. Included were 5 sites on mainstems of the Madison and Missouri Rivers and 19 sites on major and some minor tributaries from Yellowstone National Park to Canyon Ferry Lake. Fifteen of the 24 stations were sampled 12 times from November 1985 to October 1986. The remaining stations were sampled twice during the year, at high flow and at low flow. Total recoverable arsenic discharge (loading) in pounds per day was calculated for each sample by multiplying total recoverable arsenic concentration by water discharge (obtained at time of sample collection) and a conversion factor. This report presents data resulting from the monitoring program. (USGS)

  4. 76 FR 4892 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XXXIX, FFP Missouri 3, LLC, Allegheny 3 Hydro, LLC, Three Rivers Hydro...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-27

    ..., Three Rivers Hydro, LLC; Notice Announcing Preliminary Permit Drawing January 20, 2011. On May 18, 2010... Missouri 3, LLC, for Project No. 13749-000, Allegheny 3 Hydro, LLC, for Project No. 13775-000, and...

  5. Pre- and post-impoundment nitrogen in the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, Dale W.; Wilkison, Donald H.; Niesen, Shelley L.

    2013-01-01

    Large water-sample sets collected from 1899 through 1902, 1907, and in the early 1950s allow comparisons of pre-impoundment and post-impoundment (1969 through 2008) nitrogen concentrations in the lower Missouri River. Although urban wastes were not large enough to detectably increase annual loads of total nitrogen at the beginning of the 20th century, carcass waste, stock-yard manure, and untreated human wastes measurably increased ammonia and organic-nitrogen concentrations during low flows. Average total-nitrogen concentrations in both periods were about 2.5 mg/l, but much of the particulate-organic nitrogen, which was the dominant form of nitrogen around 1900, has been replaced by nitrate. This change in speciation was caused by the nearly 80% decrease in suspended-sediment concentrations that occurred after impoundment, modern agriculture, drainage of riparian wetlands, and sewage treatment. Nevertheless, bioavailable nitrogen has not been low enough to limit primary production in the Missouri River since the beginning of the 20th century. Nitrate concentrations have increased more rapidly from 2000 through 2008 (5 to 12% per year), thus increasing bioavailable nitrogen delivered to the Mississippi River and affecting Gulf Coast hypoxia. The increase in nitrate concentrations with distance downstream is much greater during the post-impoundment period. If strategies to decrease total-nitrogen loads focus on particulate N, substantial decreases will be difficult because particulate nitrogen is now only 23% of total nitrogen in the Missouri River. A strategy aimed at decreasing particulates also could further exacerbate land loss along the Gulf of Mexico, which has been sediment starved since Missouri River impoundment. In contrast, strategies or benchmarks aimed at decreasing nitrate loads could substantially decrease nitrogen loadings because nitrates now constitute over half of the Missouri's nitrogen input to the Mississippi. Ongoing restoration and creation

  6. Classification of reaches in the Missouri and lower Yellowstone Rivers based on flow characteristics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pegg, M.A.; Pierce, C.L.

    2002-01-01

    Several aspects of flow have been shown to be important determinants of biological community structure and function in streams, yet direct application of this approach to large rivers has been limited. Using a multivariate approach, we grouped flow gauges into hydrologically similar units in the Missouri and lower Yellowstone Rivers and developed a model based on flow variability parameters that could be used to test hypotheses about the role of flow in determining aquatic community structure. This model could also be used for future comparisons as the hydrological regime changes. A suite of hydrological parameters for the recent, post-impoundment period (1 October 1966-30 September 1996) for each of 15 gauges along the Missouri and lower Yellowstone Rivers were initially used. Preliminary graphical exploration identified five variables for use in further multivariate analyses. Six hydrologically distinct units composed of gauges exhibiting similar flow characteristics were then identified using cluster analysis. Discriminant analyses identified the three most influential variables as flow per unit drainage area, coefficient of variation of mean annual flow, and flow constancy. One surprising result was the relative similarity of flow regimes between the two uppermost and three lowermost gauges, despite large differences in magnitude of flow and separation by roughly 3000 km. Our results synthesize, simplify and interpret the complex changes in flow occuring along the Missouri and lower Yellowstone Rivers, and provide an objective grouping for future tests of how these changes may affect biological communities. Copyright ?? 2002 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  7. The Evolution of the Lower Missouri River: National Mapping Discipline Research at Lisbon Bottom

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    U.S. Geological Survey

    2002-01-01

    Before 1800, the Missouri River was one of North America's most diverse and dynamic ecosystems. During the past 200 years, civil engineering has transformed it into a navigation system regulated by reservoirs and confined by bank stabilization and flood control structures. These modifications have reduced seasonal flow variability and sediment load and have disconnected the river from backwater, off-channel, and floodplain habitats. Flooding along the Lower Missouri River in 1993 and again in 1996 created a side-channel chute across Lisbon Bottom, a well-formed loop bottom near Glasgow, Mo. The formation and subsequent development of the chute have provided USGS scientists with a glimpse of a preregulated Missouri River. Knowledge of geologic characteristics and processes in an alluvial setting like Lisbon Bottom provides a scientific basis for floodplain management. This knowledge is also vital to a complete understanding of riverine habitat disturbance, recovery, and rehabilitation. A critical component of this knowledge is an understanding of the spatial and temporal relationships between riverine habitats and geomorphic processes.

  8. Determination of bioavailable contaminants in the lower Missouri River following the flood of 1993

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Petty, J.D.; Poulton, B.C.; Charbonneau, C.S.; Huckins, J.N.; Jones, S.B.; Cameron, J.T.; Prest, H.F.

    1998-01-01

    The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) technology was employed to determine the presence of bioavailable organochlorine pesticides (OCs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs)in the water of the main stem of the lower Missouri River and three of its tributaries. The SPMDs were deployed in 1994 following the extensive flood of 1993. Specifically, the SPMDs were deployed for 28 days at Wilson State Park, IA; Nebraska City, NE; Parkville, MO; the Kansas River in Kansas City, KS; Napoleon, MO; the Grand River; Glasgow, MO; the Missouri River upstream from the confluence of the Gasconade River; the Gasconade River, and Hermann, MO. Contaminant residues were found at all sites and at higher concentrations than found in the earlier pre-flood sampling. For example, in the present study, dieldrin was found to range from a low of 110 ng/sample in the Gasconade River to a high of 2000 ng/sample at Glasgow, while in the pre- flood sampling, dieldrin ranged from a low of 64 ng/sample at Sioux City to a high of 800 ng/sample at Glasgow. In contrast to the 1992 sampling, residues of PCBs were found at all 1994 sampling sites except the Gasconade River. Samples from Wilson State Park and the Grand River had 3100 and 2700 ng of PCBs/sample, respectively. These two concentrations are about an order of magnitude higher than the older sites and are likely indicative of point source inputs. PAHs were present in SPMD samples from three sites near Kansas City. The contaminant residues sequestered by the SPMDs represent an estimation of the bioavailable (via respiration) contaminants present in the main stem of the lower Missouri River and three of its major tributaries following an extensive flood event.The semipermeable membrane device (SPMD) technology was employed to determine the presence of bioavailable organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls, and polyaromatic hydrocarbons in the water of the main stem of the lower Missouri River and

  9. Physical and hormonal examination of Missouri River shovelnose sturgeon reproductive stage: A reference guide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.; Papoulias, D.M.; DeLonay, A.J.; Tillitt, D.E.; Bryan, J.L.; Annis, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    From May 2001 to June 2002 Wildhaber et al. (2005) conducted monthly sampling of Lower Missouri River shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) to develop methods for determination of sex and the reproductive stage of sturgeons in the field. Shovelnose sturgeon were collected from the Missouri River and ultrasonic and endoscopic imagery and blood and gonadal tissue samples were taken. The full set of data was used to develop monthly reproductive stage profiles for S. platorynchus that could be compared to data collected on pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus). This paper presents a comprehensive reference set of images, sex steroids, and vitellogenin (VTG, an egg protein precursor) data for assessing shovelnose sturgeon sex and reproductive stage. This reference set includes ultrasonic, endoscopic, histologic, and internal images of male and female gonads of shovelnose sturgeon at each reproductive stage along with complementary data on average 17-?? estradiol, 11-ketotestosterone, VTG, gonadosomatic index, and polarization index. ?? 2007 Blackwell Verlag.

  10. Ground-water data collected in the Missouri River Basin units in Kansas during 1954

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mason, B.J.; Loye, Linda

    1955-01-01

    Ground water studies in the Missouri River basin were begun by the United States Geological Survey during the fall of 1945 as a part of a program for the development of the resources of the basin by the United States Bureau of  Reclamation and other federal agencies. The studies of ground-water resources in the part of Kansas that lies within the Missouri River basin have been coordinated with the cooperative program of ground-water studies which were already being made in Kansas by the U.S Geological Survey, the Kansas State Geological Survey, the Division of Sanitation of the Kansas Board of Health and the Division of Water Resources of the Kansas State Board of Agriculture.  

  11. Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey A.; Downs, Janelle L.

    2008-11-06

    Emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) in the Missouri River Mainstem System is a critical habitat element for several federally listed bird species: the endangered interior least tern (Sterna antillarum) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). The Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River and is responsible under the Endangered Species Act (ESA) to take actions within its authorities to conserve listed species. To comply with the 2000 USFWS BiOp and the 2003 amended USFWS BiOp, the Corps has created habitats below Gavins Point Dam using mechanical means. Initial monitoring indicates that constructed sandbars provide suitable habitat features for nesting and foraging least terns and piping plovers. Terns and plovers are using constructed sandbars and successfully reproducing at or above levels stipulated in the BiOp. However, whether such positive impacts will persist cannot yet be adequately assessed at this time.

  12. Flow and form in rehabilitation of large-river ecosystems: an example from the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.; Galat, D.L.

    2006-01-01

    On large, intensively engineered rivers like the Lower Missouri, the template of the physical habitat is determined by the nearly independent interaction of channel form and flow regime. We evaluated the interaction between flow and form by modeling four combinations of modern and historical channel form and modern and historical flow regimes. The analysis used shallow, slow water (shallow-water habitat, SWH, defined as depths between 0 and 1.5 m, and current velocities between 0 and 0.75 m/s) as an indicator of habitat that has been lost on many intensively engineered rivers and one that is thought to be especially important in rearing of young fishes. Two-dimensional hydrodynamic models for modern and historical channels of the Lower Missouri River at Hermann, Missouri, indicate substantial differences between the two channels in total availability and spatial characteristics of SWH. In the modern channel, SWH is maximized at extremely low flows and in overbank flows, whereas the historical channel had substantially more SWH at all discharges and SWH increased with increasing discharge. The historical channel form produced 3-7 times the SWH area of the modern channel regardless of flow regime. The effect of flow regime is evident in increased within-year SWH variability with the natural flow regime, including significant seasonal peaks of SWH associated with spring flooding. Comparison with other reaches along the Lower Missouri River indicates that a) channel form is the dominant control of the availability of habitat even in reaches where the hydrograph is more intensively altered, and b) rehabilitation projects that move toward the historical condition can be successful in increasing topographic diversity and thereby decreasing sensitivity of the availability of habitat to flow regime. The relative efficacy of managing flow and form in creating SWH is useful information toward achieving socially acceptable rehabilitation of the ecosystem in large river systems.

  13. Ecological requirements for pallid sturgeon reproduction and recruitment in the Lower Missouri River: Annual report 2010

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLonay, Aaron J.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Chojnacki, Kimberly A.; Pherigo, Emily K.; Haas, Justin D.; Mestl, Gerald E.

    2012-01-01

    The Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project is a multiyear, multiagency collaborative research framework developed to provide information to support pallid sturgeon recovery and Missouri River management decisions. The project strategy integrates field and laboratory studies of sturgeon reproductive ecology, early life history, habitat requirements, and physiology. The project scope of work is developed annually with cooperating research partners and in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Missouri River Recovery—Integrated Science Program. The research consists of several interdependent and complementary tasks that engage multiple disciplines. The research tasks in the 2010 scope of work primarily address spawning as a probable factor limiting pallid sturgeon survival and recovery, although limited pilot studies also have been initiated to examine the requirements of early life stages. The research is designed to inform management decisions affecting channel re-engineering, flow modification, and pallid sturgeon population augmentation on the Missouri River, and throughout the range of the species. Research and progress made through this project are reported to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers annually. This annual report details the research effort and progress made by the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project during 2010.

  14. Ecological requirements for pallid sturgeon reproduction and recruitment in the Lower Missouri River: Annual report 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLonay, Aaron J.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Chojnacki, Kimberly A.; Pherigo, Emily K.; Bergthold, Casey L.; Mestl, Gerald E.

    2010-01-01

    The Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project is a multiyear, multiagency collaborative research framework developed to provide information to support pallid sturgeon recovery and Missouri River management decisions. The general Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project strategy is to integrate field and laboratory studies of sturgeon reproductive ecology, habitat requirements, and physiology to produce a predictive understanding of sturgeon population dynamics. The project scope of work is developed annually with cooperating research partners and in collaboration with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Missouri River Recovery-Integrated Science Program. The research consists of several interdependent and complementary research tasks engaging multiple disciplines that primarily address spawning as a probable limiting factor in reproduction and survival of the pallid sturgeon. The research is multifaceted and is designed to provide information needed for management decisions impacting habitat restoration, flow modification, and pallid sturgeon population augmentation on the Missouri River, and throughout the range of the species. Research activities and progress towards understanding of the species are reported to the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers annually. This annual report details the research effort and progress made by Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Project during 2009.

  15. Discrete choice modeling of shovelnose sturgeon habitat selection in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonnot, T.W.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Millspaugh, J.J.; DeLonay, A.J.; Jacobson, R.B.; Bryan, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Substantive changes to physical habitat in the Lower Missouri River, resulting from intensive management, have been implicated in the decline of pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus) and shovelnose (S. platorynchus) sturgeon. To aid in habitat rehabilitation efforts, we evaluated habitat selection of gravid, female shovelnose sturgeon during the spawning season in two sections (lower and upper) of the Lower Missouri River in 2005 and in the upper section in 2007. We fit discrete choice models within an information theoretic framework to identify selection of means and variability in three components of physical habitat. Characterizing habitat within divisions around fish better explained selection than habitat values at the fish locations. In general, female shovelnose sturgeon were negatively associated with mean velocity between them and the bank and positively associated with variability in surrounding depths. For example, in the upper section in 2005, a 0.5ms-1 decrease in velocity within 10m in the bank direction increased the relative probability of selection 70%. In the upper section fish also selected sites with surrounding structure in depth (e.g., change in relief). Differences in models between sections and years, which are reinforced by validation rates, suggest that changes in habitat due to geomorphology, hydrology, and their interactions over time need to be addressed when evaluating habitat selection. Because of the importance of variability in surrounding depths, these results support an emphasis on restoring channel complexity as an objective of habitat restoration for shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River. ?? 2011 Blackwell Verlag, Berlin.

  16. Discrete choice modeling of shovelnose sturgeon habitat selection in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bonnot, T.W.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Millspaugh, J.J.; DeLonay, A.J.; Jacobson, R.B.; Bryan, J.L.

    2011-01-01

    Substantive changes to physical habitat in the Lower Missouri River, resulting from intensive management, have been implicated in the decline of pallid (Scaphirhynchus albus) and shovelnose (S. platorynchus) sturgeon. To aid in habitat rehabilitation efforts, we evaluated habitat selection of gravid, female shovelnose sturgeon during the spawning season in two sections (lower and upper) of the Lower Missouri River in 2005 and in the upper section in 2007. We fit discrete choice models within an information theoretic framework to identify selection of means and variability in three components of physical habitat. Characterizing habitat within divisions around fish better explained selection than habitat values at the fish locations. In general, female shovelnose sturgeon were negatively associated with mean velocity between them and the bank and positively associated with variability in surrounding depths. For example, in the upper section in 2005, a 0.5 m s-1 decrease in velocity within 10 m in the bank direction increased the relative probability of selection 70%. In the upper section fish also selected sites with surrounding structure in depth (e.g., change in relief). Differences in models between sections and years, which are reinforced by validation rates, suggest that changes in habitat due to geomorphology, hydrology, and their interactions over time need to be addressed when evaluating habitat selection. Because of the importance of variability in surrounding depths, these results support an emphasis on restoring channel complexity as an objective of habitat restoration for shovelnose sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River.

  17. Characteristics of sediment transport at selected sites along the Missouri River during the high-flow conditions of 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Galloway, Joel M.; Rus, Dave L.; Alexander, Jason S.

    2013-01-01

    During 2011, many tributaries in the Missouri River Basin experienced near record peak streamflow and caused flood damage to many communities along much of the Missouri River from Montana to the confluence with the Mississippi River. The large runoff event in 2011 provided an opportunity to examine characteristics of sediment transport in the Missouri River at high-magnitude streamflow and for a long duration. The purpose of this report is to describe sediment characteristics during the 2011 high-flow conditions at six selected sites on the Missouri River, two in the middle region of the basin between Lake Sakakawea and Lake Oahe in North Dakota, and four downstream from Gavins Point Dam along the Nebraska-South Dakota and Nebraska-Iowa borders. A wider range in suspended-sediment concentration was observed in the middle segment of the Missouri River compared to sites in the lower segment. In the middle segment of the Missouri River, suspended-sediment concentrations increased and peaked as flows increased and started to plateau; however, while flows were still high and steady, suspended-sediment concentrations decreased and suspended-sediment grain sizes coarsened, indicating the decrease possibly was related to fine-sediment supply limitations. Measured bedload transport rates in the lower segment of the Missouri River (sites 3 to 6) were consistently higher than those in the middle segment (sites 1 and 2) during the high-flow conditions in 2011. The median bedload transport rate measured at site 1 was 517 tons per day and at site 2 was 1,500 tons per day. Measured bedload transport rates were highest at site 3 then decreased downstream to site 5, then increased at site 6. The median bedload transport rates were 22,100 tons per day at site 3; 5,640 tons per day at site 4; 3,930 tons per day at site 5; and 8,450 tons per day at site 6. At the two sites in the middle segment of the Missouri River, the greatest bedload was measured during the recession of the

  18. Real-Time River Channel-Bed Monitoring at the Chariton and Mississippi Rivers in Missouri, 2007-09

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rydlund, Paul H.

    2009-01-01

    Scour and depositional responses to hydrologic events have been important to the scientific community studying sediment transport as well as potential effects on bridges and other hydraulic structures within riverine systems. A river channel-bed monitor composed of a single-beam transducer was installed on a bridge crossing the Chariton River near Prairie Hill, Missouri (structure L-344) as a pilot study to evaluate channel-bed change in response to the hydrologic condition disseminated from an existing streamgage. Initial results at this location led to additional installations in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation at an upstream Chariton River streamgage location at Novinger, Missouri (structure L-534) and a Mississippi River streamgage location near Mehlville, Missouri (structures A-1850 and A-4936). In addition to stage, channel-bed elevation was collected at all locations every 15 minutes and transmitted hourly to a U.S. Geological Survey database. Bed elevation data for the Chariton River location at Novinger and the Mississippi River location near Mehlville were provided to the World Wide Web for real-time monitoring. Channel-bed data from the three locations indicated responses to hydrologic events depicted in the stage record; however, notable bedforms apparent during inter-event flows also may have affected the relation of scour and deposition to known hydrologic events. Throughout data collection periods, Chariton River locations near Prairie Hill and Novinger reflected bed changes as much as 13 feet and 5 feet. Nearly all of the bed changes correlated well with the hydrographic record at these locations. The location at the Mississippi River near Mehlville indicated a much more stable channel bed throughout the data collection period. Despite missing data resulting from damage to one of the river channel-bed monitors from ice accumulation at the upstream nose of the bridge pier early in the record, the record from the downstream

  19. Methods for Quantifying Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect

    Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Larson, Kyle B.

    2012-04-09

    As part of regulatory requirements for shallow-water habitat (SWH) restoration, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) completes periodic estimates of the quantity of SWH available throughout the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. To date, these estimates have been made by various methods that consider only the water depth criterion for SWH. The USACE has completed estimates of SWH availability based on both depth and velocity criteria at four river bends (hereafter called reference bends), encompassing approximately 8 river miles within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River. These estimates were made from the results of hydraulic modeling of water depth and velocity throughout each bend. Hydraulic modeling of additional river bends is not expected to be completed for deriving estimates of available SWH. Instead, future estimates of SWH will be based on the water depth criterion. The objective of this project, conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory for the USACE Omaha District, was to develop geographic information system methods for estimating the quantity of available SWH based on water depth only. Knowing that only a limited amount of water depth and channel geometry data would be available for all the remaining bends within the lower 752 mi of the Missouri River, the intent was to determine what information, if any, from the four reference bends could be used to develop methods for estimating SWH at the remaining bends. Specifically, we examined the relationship between cross-section channel morphology and relative differences between SWH estimates based on combined depth and velocity criteria and the depth-only criterion to determine if a correction factor could be applied to estimates of SWH based on the depth-only criterion. In developing these methods, we also explored the applicability of two commonly used geographic information system interpolation methods (TIN and ANUDEM) for estimating SWH using four different elevation data

  20. The role of floodplain restoration in mitigating flood risk, Lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Lindner, Garth; Bitner, Chance

    2009-01-01

    Recent extreme floods on the Lower Missouri River have reinvigorated public policy debate about the potential role of floodplain restoration in decreasing costs of floods and possibly increasing other ecosystem service benefits. The first step to addressing the benefits of floodplain restoration is to understand the interactions of flow, floodplain morphology, and land cover that together determine the biophysical capacity of the floodplain. In this article we address interactions between ecological restoration of floodplains and flood-risk reduction at 3 scales. At the scale of the Lower Missouri River corridor (1300 km) floodplain elevation datasets and flow models provide first-order calculations of the potential for Missouri River floodplains to store floods of varying magnitude and duration. At this same scale assessment of floodplain sand deposition from the 2011 Missouri River flood indicates the magnitude of flood damage that could potentially be limited by floodplain restoration. At the segment scale (85 km), 1-dimensional hydraulic modeling predicts substantial stage reductions with increasing area of floodplain restoration; mean stage reductions range from 0.12 to 0.66 m. This analysis also indicates that channel widening may contribute substantially to stage reductions as part of a comprehensive strategy to restore floodplain and channel habitats. Unsteady 1-dimensional flow modeling of restoration scenarios at this scale indicates that attenuation of peak discharges of an observed hydrograph from May 2007, of similar magnitude to a 10 % annual exceedance probability flood, would be minimal, ranging from 0.04 % (with 16 % floodplain restoration) to 0.13 % (with 100 % restoration). At the reach scale (15–20 km) 2-dimensional hydraulic models of alternative levee setbacks and floodplain roughness indicate complex processes and patterns of flooding including substantial variation in stage reductions across floodplains depending on topographic complexity

  1. 33 CFR 162.105 - Missouri River; administration and navigation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... on the river. (b) Navigation. During critical flood stages on any particular limited reach of the... District Commander in charge of the locality shall have the authority to declare the reach of the...

  2. Travel times, streamflow velocities, and dispersion rates in the Missouri River upstream from Canyon Ferry Lake, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whiteman, Aroscott

    2012-01-01

    In 2010, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Montana Department of Environmental Quality, initiated a dye-tracer study to determine travel times, streamflow velocities, and longitudinal dispersion rates for the Missouri River upstream from Canyon Ferry Lake. For this study, rhodamine WT (RWT) dye was injected at two locations, Missouri River Headwaters State Park in early September and Broadwater-Missouri Dam (Broadwater Dam) in late August 2010. Dye concentrations were measured at three sites downstream from each dye-injection location. The study area was a 41.2-mile reach of the Missouri River from Trident, Montana, at the confluence of the Jefferson, Madison, and Gallatin Rivers (Missouri River Headwaters) at river mile 2,319.40 downstream to the U.S. Route 12 Bridge (Townsend Bridge), river mile 2,278.23, near Townsend, Montana. Streamflows were reasonably steady and ranged from 3,070 to 3,700 cubic feet per second. Mean velocities were calculated for each subreach between measurement sites for the leading edge, peak concentration, centroid, and trailing edge at 10 percent of the peak concentration of the dye plume. Calculated velocities for the centroid of the dye plume ranged from 0.80 to 3.02 feet per second within the study reach from Missouri River Headwaters to Townsend Bridge, near Townsend. The mean velocity of the dye plume for the entire study reach, excluding the subreach between the abandoned Milwaukee Railroad bridge at Lombard, Montana (Milwaukee Bridge) and Broadwater-Missouri Dam (Broadwater Dam), was 2.87 feet per second. The velocity of the centroid of the dye plume for the subreach between Milwaukee Bridge and Broadwater Dam (Toston Reservoir) was 0.80 feet per second. The residence time for Toston Reservoir was 8.2 hours during this study. Estimated longitudinal dispersion rates of the dye plume for this study ranged from 0.72 feet per second for the subreach from Milwaukee Bridge to Broadwater Dam to 2.26 feet per second for

  3. Channel Morphodynamics in Four Reaches of the Lower Missouri River, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2009-01-01

    Channel morphodynamics in response to flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam are examined in four reaches of the Lower Missouri River. Measures include changes in channel morphology and indicators of sediment transport in four 6 kilometer long reaches located downstream from Gavins Point Dam, near Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri. Each of the four reaches was divided into 300 transects with a 20-meter spacing and surveyed during the summer in 2006 and 2007. A subset of 30 transects was randomly selected and surveyed 7-10 times in 2006-07 over a wide range of discharges including managed and natural flow events. Hydroacoustic mapping used a survey-grade echosounder and a Real Time Kinematic Global Positioning System to evaluate channel change. Acoustic Doppler current profiler measurements were used to evaluate bed-sediment velocity. Results indicate varying amounts of deposition, erosion, net change, and sediment transport in the four Lower Missouri River reaches. The Yankton reach was the most stable over monthly and annual time-frames. The Kenslers Bend and Little Sioux reaches exhibited substantial amounts of deposition and erosion, although net change was generally low in both reaches. Total, or gross geomorphic change was greatest in the Kenslers Bend reach. The Miami reach exhibited varying rates of deposition and erosion, and low net change. The Yankton, Kenslers Bend, and Miami reaches experienced net erosion during the time period that bracketed the managed May 2006 spring rise event from Gavins Point Dam.

  4. Distribution of Potential Spawning Habitat for Sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River, 2003-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Laustrup, Mark S.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Simpkins, Darin G.

    2007-01-01

    We surveyed the Lower Missouri River downstream from Gavins Point Dam near Yankton, South Dakota, to St. Louis, Missouri, during low water conditions in 2003-06 to identify and map coarse substrate deposits and bedrock exposures that might serve as spawning areas for sturgeon and other fishes. More than 330 deposits were identified, including tributary fans, bars, and habitat-enhancement projects. The location and extent of riverside bedrock exposures immediately adjacent to the channel also were mapped. Field surveys identified 48 bedrock exposures whereas the analysis of aerial orthophotographs identified an additional 65 exposures for a total of 113. Maps illustrating the distribution of deposits and their density were developed to aid researchers studying reproductive ecology of sturgeon and other lithophilic fishes.

  5. Long-term suspended sediment transport in the Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed and Salt River Basin, Missouri, USA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Since 1992, efforts have been conducted in Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed to assess sediment transport from this 72-km2 Missouri watershed located in the Salt River Basin, the Long-Term Agro-ecosystem Research site in the Central Mississippi River Basin. This effort was complemented by field...

  6. Contributing recharge areas, groundwater travel time, and groundwater water quality of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1997-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2011-01-01

    The City of Independence, Missouri, operates a well field in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Contributing recharge areas (CRA) were last determined for the well field in 1996. Since that time, eight supply wells have been installed in the area north of the Missouri River and well pumpage has changed for the older supply wells. The change in pumping has altered groundwater flow and substantially changed the character of the CRA and groundwater travel times to the supply wells. The U.S Geological Survey, in a cooperative study with the City of Independence, Missouri, simulated steady-state groundwater flow for 2007 well pumpage, average annual river stage, and average annual recharge. Particle-tracking analysis was used to determine the CRA for supply wells and monitoring wells, and the travel time from recharge areas to supply wells, recharge areas to monitoring wells, and monitoring wells to supply wells. The simulated CRA for the well field is elongated in the upstream direction and extends to both sides of the Missouri River. Groundwater flow paths and recharge areas estimated for monitoring wells indicate the origin of water to each monitoring well, the travel time of that water from the recharge area, the flow path from the vicinity of each monitoring well to a supply well, and the travel time from the monitoring well to the supply well. Monitoring wells 14a and 14b have the shortest groundwater travel time from their contributing recharge area of 0.30 years and monitoring well 29a has the longest maximum groundwater travel time from its contributing recharge area of 1,701 years. Monitoring well 22a has the shortest groundwater travel time of 0.5 day to supply well 44 and monitoring well 3b has the longest maximum travel time of 31.91 years to supply well 10. Water-quality samples from the Independence groundwater monitoring well network were collected from 1997 to 2008 by USGS personnel during ongoing annual sampling within the 10-year contributing

  7. Estimates of monthly streamflow characteristics and dominant-discharge hydrographs for selected sites in the lower Missouri and Little Missouri River basins in Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Parrett, Charles; Johnson, D.R.

    1994-01-01

    Various streamflow characteristics were estimated for water-reservation purposes for 17 sites in the lower Missouri River Basin and four sites in the Little Missouri River Basin in Montana. The characteristics were mean monthly and annual streamflow and monthly mean streamflow that is exceeded 90, 80, 50, and 20 percent of the time. In addition, dominant-discharge hydrographs were estimated for 10 of the 17 sites in the lower Missouri River Basin and for four sites in the Little Missouri River Basin. Dominant discharge was considered to be equal to the peak discharge having a recurrence interval of two years. Monthly streamflow characteristics generally were based on a common 1937-86 base period. A mixed-station record-extension program was used to estimate missing flow data for streamflow-gaging stations. Two methods were used to estimate characteristics at ungaged sites. One method was based on corre- lating discharge measurements at the estimating site with concurrent discharges at a nearby gaged site. The second method was based on using a drainage-area ratio to transfer characteristics at a gaged site to the estimating site. Dominant discharges for gaged sites were obtained from a previous flood-frequency report or by fitting a log-Pearson Type 3 probability distribution to recorded peak-flow data. A drainage-area-ratio adjustment was used to transfer dominant dis- charges from gaged sites to ungaged sites. Dominant-discharge hydrographs were determined from visual examination of recorded hydrographs having maximum daily discharges that were relatively close to the estimated dominant discharges.

  8. Location and timing of Asian carp spawning in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Deters, Joseph E.; Chapman, Duane C.; McElroy, Brandon

    2013-01-01

    We sampled for eggs of Asian carps, (bighead carp Hypophthalmichthys nobilis, silver carp H. molitrix, and grass carp Ctenopharyngodon idella) in 12 sites on the Lower Missouri River and in six tributaries from the months of May through July 2005 and May through June 2006 to examine the spatial and temporal dynamics of spawning activity. We categorized eggs into thirty developmental stages, but usually they could not be identified to species. We estimated spawning times and locations based on developmental stage, temperature dependent rate of development and water velocity. Spawning rate was higher in the daytime between 05:00 and 21:00 h than at night. Spawning was not limited to a few sites, as has been reported for the Yangtze River, where these fishes are native, but more eggs were spawned in areas of high sinuosity. We employ a sediment transport model to estimate vertical egg concentration profiles and total egg fluxes during spawning periods on the Missouri River. We did not identify substantial spawning activity within tributaries or at tributary confluences examined in this study.

  9. Toxicity and bioavailability of metals in the Missouri River adjacent to a lead refinery

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chapman, Duane C.; Allert, Ann L.; Fairchild, James F.; May, Thomas W.; Schmitt, Christopher J.; Callahan, Edward V.

    2001-01-01

    This study is an evaluation of the potential environmental impacts of contaminated groundwater from the ASARCO metals refining facility adjacent to the Missouri River in Omaha, Nebraska. Surface waters, sediments, and sediment pore waters were collected from the Burt-Izard drain, which transects the facility, and from the Missouri River adjacent to the facility. Groundwater was also collected from the facility. Waters and sediments were analyzed for inorganic contaminants, and the toxicity of the waters was evaluated with the Ceriodaphnia dubia 7-day test. Concentrations of several elemental contaminants were highly elevated in the groundwater, but not in river sediment pore waters. Lead concentrations were moderately elevated in whole sediment at one site, but lead concentrations in pore waters were low due to apparent sequestration by acid-volatile sulfides. The groundwater sample was highly toxic to C. dubia, causing 100% mortality. Even at the lowest groundwater concentration tested (6.25%) C. dubia survival was reduced; however, at that concentration, reproduction was not significantly different from upstream porewater reference samples. Sediment pore waters were not toxic, except reproduction in pore water collected from one downstream site was somewhat reduced. The decrease in reproduction could not be attributed to measured elemental contaminants.

  10. Historical trends for lead in fish, clams and sediments in the Big River of southeastern Missouri

    SciTech Connect

    Gale, N.L.; Haas, M.J.; Wixson, B.G.; Hinderberger, E.J. Jr.

    1986-01-01

    Extensive studies have been conducted over the past 6 years to determine the extent and magnitude of potential health problems due to elevated lead concentrations in fish and other aquatic organisms taken from the Big River in Missouri's Old Lead Belt. In 1980 the Missouri Department of Conservation presented preliminary data indicating accumulation of lead in edible tissue of Black Redhorse Suckers (Moxostoma duquesnei), and Longear Sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) collected at several sites along the Big River downstream of Desloge, Mo. Subsequent studies were performed to confirm those data and provide better definition of the problem. This paper presents the results of continuing studies conducted in 1985 to determine historical trends in lead content of fish, clams, and river sediments, as well as to evaluate the impact of a major erosion event caused by heavy rainfall and runoff from the tailings piles during the spring of 1985. Most recent data, together with observed historical trends, indicate that lead concentrations in sunfish generally remain below 0.3 ppm, the limit recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO) for dietary lead. However, lead concentrations in filets of suckers taken in the vicinity of eroding tailings piles often exceed the 0.3 ppm WHO limit, yet generally fall well below the 1.0 ppm limit currently recognized in the United Kingdom for permissible lead in commercial food. 13 references, 1 figure, 6 tables.

  11. Life history attributes of fishes along the latitudinal gradient of the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P.J.; Guy, C.S.

    2002-01-01

    Populations of two short-lived species (emerald shiner Notropis atherinoides and sicklefin chub Macrhybopsis meeki) and three long-lived species (freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens, river carpsucker Carpiodes carpio, and sauger Stizostedion canadense) were studied in the Missouri River to examine spatial variations in life history characteristics across a latitudinal and thermal gradient (38??47???N to 48??03???N). The life history characteristics included longevity (maximum age), the rate at which asymptotic length was approached (K from the von Bertalanffy growth equation), the mean back-calculated length at age, and growth rates during the first year of life (mm/degree-day and mm/d). The mean water temperature and number of days in the growing season averaged 1.3 times greater in the southern than in the northern latitudes, while degree-days averaged twice as great. The longevity of all species except freshwater drum increased significantly from south to north, but the relationships between maximum age and latitude were curvilinear for short-lived species and linear for long-lived species. The von Bertalanffy growth coefficient for river carpsuckers and saugers increased from north to south, as indicated by significant negative relationships between K and latitude. Mean back-calculated length at age was negatively related to latitude for freshwater drums (???age 4) and saugers (ages 1-5) but positively related to latitude for river carpsuckers (???age 6). One of the growth rates examined (mm/degree-day) increased significantly from low to high latitudes for emerald shiners, sicklefin chubs, freshwater drums, and river carpsuckers during the first growing season. The other growth rate (mm/d) increased significantly from low to high latitudes for emerald shiners but was inversely related to latitude for saugers. These results suggest that the thermal regime related to latitude influences the life history characteristics of fishes in the Missouri River.

  12. Novel single-nucleotide polymorphism markers confirm successful spawning of endangered pallid sturgeon in the upper Missouri River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Eichelberger, Jennifer S.; Braaten, P. J.; Fuller, D. B.; Krampe, Matthew S.; Heist, Edward J.

    2014-01-01

    Spawning of the federally endangered Pallid Sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus is known to occur in the upper Missouri River basin, but progeny from natural reproductive events have not been observed and recruitment to juvenile or adult life stages has not been documented in recent decades. Identification of Pallid Sturgeon progeny is confounded by the fact that Shovelnose Sturgeon S. platorynchus occurs throughout the entire range of Pallid Sturgeon and the two species are essentially indistinguishable (morphometrically and meristically) during early life stages. Moreover, free embryos of sympatric Paddlefish Polyodon spathula are very similar to the two sturgeon species. In this study, three single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) assays were employed to screen acipenseriform free embryos and larvae collected from the upper Missouri River basin in 2011, 2012, and 2013. A mitochondrial DNA SNP discriminates Paddlefish from sturgeon, and specific multilocus genotypes at two nuclear DNA SNPs occurred in 98.9% of wild adult Pallid Sturgeon but only in 3% of Shovelnose Sturgeon sampled in the upper Missouri River. Individuals identified as potential Pallid Sturgeon based on SNP genotypes were further analyzed at 19 microsatellite loci for species discrimination. Out of 1,423 free embryos collected over 3 years of sampling, 971 Paddlefish, 446 Shovelnose Sturgeon, and 6 Pallid Sturgeon were identified. Additionally, 249 Scaphirhynchus spp. benthic larvae were screened, but no Pallid Sturgeon were detected. These SNP markers provide an efficient method of screening acipenseriform early life stages for the presence of Pallid Sturgeon in the Missouri River basin. Detection of wild Pallid Sturgeon free embryos in the upper Missouri and Yellowstone rivers supports the hypothesis that the failure of wild Pallid Sturgeon to recruit to the juvenile life stage in the upper Missouri River basin is caused by early life stage mortality rather than by lack of successful spawning.

  13. Fish assemblages at engineered and natural channel structures in the lower Missouri river: implications for modified dike structures

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schloesser, J.T.; Paukert, Craig P.; Doyle, W.J.; Hill, T.; Steffensen, K.D.; Travnichek, Vincent H.

    2012-01-01

    Large rivers throughout the world have been modified by using dike structures to divert water flows to deepwater habitats to maintain navigation channels. These modifications have been implicated in the decline in habitat diversity and native fishes. However, dike structures have been modified in the Missouri River USA to increase habitat diversity to aid in the recovery of native fishes. We compared species occupancy and fish community composition at natural sandbars and at notched and un-notched rock dikes along the lower Missouri River to determine if notching dikes increases species diversity or occupancy of native fishes. Fish were collected using gill nets, trammel nets, otter trawls, and mini fyke nets throughout the lower 1212 river km of the Missouri River USA from 2003 to 2006. Few differences in species richness and diversity were evident among engineered dike structures and natural sandbars. Notching a dike structure had no effect on proportional abundance of fluvial dependents, fluvial specialists, and macrohabitat generalists. Occupancy at notched dikes increased for two species but did not differ for 17 other species (81%). Our results suggest that dike structures may provide suitable habitats for fluvial species compared with channel sand bars, but dike notching did not increase abundance or occupancy of most Missouri River fishes. Published in 2011 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Identifying and Mitigating Potential Nutrient and Sediment Hot Spots under a Future Scenario in the Missouri River Basin

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, May; Zhang, Zhonglong

    2015-09-01

    Using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT) for large-scale watershed modeling could be useful for evaluating the quality of the water in regions that are dominated by nonpoint sources in order to identify potential “hot spots” for which mitigating strategies could be further developed. An analysis of water quality under future scenarios in which changes in land use would be made to accommodate increased biofuel production was developed for the Missouri River Basin (MoRB) based on a SWAT model application. The analysis covered major agricultural crops and biofuel feedstock in the MoRB, including pasture land, hay, corn, soybeans, wheat, and switchgrass. The analysis examined, at multiple temporal and spatial scales, how nitrate, organic nitrogen, and total nitrogen; phosphorus, organic phosphorus, inorganic phosphorus, and total phosphorus; suspended sediments; and water flow (water yield) would respond to the shifts in land use that would occur under proposed future scenarios. The analysis was conducted at three geospatial scales: (1) large tributary basin scale (two: Upper MoRB and Lower MoRB); (2) regional watershed scale (seven: Upper Missouri River, Middle Missouri River, Middle Lower Missouri River, Lower Missouri River, Yellowstone River, Platte River, and Kansas River); and (3) eight-digit hydrologic unit (HUC-8) subbasin scale (307 subbasins). Results showed that subbasin-level variations were substantial. Nitrogen loadings decreased across the entire Upper MoRB, and they increased in several subbasins in the Lower MoRB. Most nitrate reductions occurred in lateral flow. Also at the subbasin level, phosphorus in organic, sediment, and soluble forms was reduced by 35%, 45%, and 65%, respectively. Suspended sediments increased in 68% of the subbasins. The water yield decreased in 62% of the subbasins. In the Kansas River watershed, the water quality improved significantly with regard to every nitrogen and phosphorus compound. The improvement was

  15. Application of the SPARROW watershed model to describe nutrient sources and transport in the Missouri River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brown, Juliane B.

    2011-01-01

    Spatially Referenced Regression On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were developed to provide spatially explicit information on local and regional total nitrogen and total phosphorus sources and transport in the Missouri River Basin. Model results provide estimates of the relative contributions from various nutrient sources and delivery factors. The models also describe instream decay and reservoir and lake attenuation of nutrients. Results aid in the prioritization of nutrient-reduction strategies by identifying major sources and delivery factors contributing to instream nutrient loads and stream reaches carrying the largest nutrient loads in the Missouri River Basin.

  16. A ROBUST DESIGN FOR THE ASSESSMENT OF A GREAT RIVER, ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING, AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM - UPPER MISSOURI RIVER (EMAP-UMR)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great Rivers and reservoirs are complex, trans-border resources that are difficult and expensive to assess, monitor and manage. EMAP-UMR is a five-year effort to develop the methodology for Great River assessments, using the Upper Missouri as a test case. A major early achievemen...

  17. Microbial Source Tracking as a Tool for TMDL Development, Little Blue River in Independence, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Christensen, Eric D.; Bushon, Rebecca N.; Brady, Amie M.G.

    2013-01-01

    The Little Blue River in Jackson County, Missouri has been listed by the Missouri Department of Natural Resources as impaired by bacteria for the protection of aquatic life and contact recreation from urban point and nonpoint sources. The Clean Water Act requires that a total maximum daily load (TMDL) for Escherichia coli (E. coli) be developed. Over a 5-year period, 108 base-flow, 87 stormflow, 48 fecal source, and 12 sewage influent samples were collected and analyzed for E. coli and Bacteroides general and host-associated microbial source tracking (MST) genetic markers. Less than half of the main-stem base-flow samples exceeded the E. coli state standard, whereas, all of the stormflow samples exceeded the standard during the recreation season (April through October). Both E. coli and MST markers were detected more frequently and at higher concentrations in stormflow samples. Only 14 percent of samples with E. coli detections greater than the Missouri state standard of 206 colonies per 100 milliliters had the human-associated Bacteroides marker as the only identified marker; therefore, Little Blue River TMDL development may require a broader scope beyond the municipal separate storm sewer system if bacteria sources are to be identified and addressed. Fecal samples showed a greater specificity with the human-associated marker than the dog- or ruminant-associated Bacteroides markers; however, false positives were at least one order of magnitude lower than true positives. MST data may be a useful tool for identifying probable sources of contamination and directing TMDL strategies.

  18. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river.

  19. A longitudinal assessment of the aquatic macroinvertebrate community in the channelized lower Missouri River.

    PubMed

    Poulton, Barry C; Wildhaber, Mark L; Charbonneau, Collette S; Fairchild, James F; Mueller, Brad G; Schmitt, Christopher J

    2003-06-01

    We conducted an aquatic macroinvertebrate assessment in the channelized reach of the lower Missouri River, and used statistical analysis of individual metrics and multimetric scores to identify community response patterns and evaluate relative biological condition. We examined longitudinal site differences that are potentially associated with water quality related factors originating from the Kansas City metropolitan area, using data from coarse rock substrate in flowing water habitats (outside river bends), and depositional mud substrate in slack water habitats (dike fields). Three sites above river mile (RM) 369 in Kansas City (Nebraska City, RM = 560; St. Joseph, RM = 530; Parkville, RM = 377) and three below (Lexington, RM = 319; Glasgow, RM = 228; Hermann, RM = 94) were sampled with rock basket artificial substrates, a qualitative kicknet method, and the Petite Ponar. We also compared the performance of the methods used. A total of 132 aquatic macroinvertebrate taxa were collected from the lower Missouri River; one third of these taxa belonged to the sensitive EPOT insect orders (Ephemeroptera, Plecoptera, Odonata, and Trichoptera). Rock baskets had the highest mean efficiency (34.1%) of the methods, and the largest number of taxa was collected by Ponar (n = 69) and kicknet (n = 69) methods. Seven of the 15 metrics calculated from rock basket data, and five of the nine metrics calculated from Ponar data showed highly significant differences (ANOVA, P < 0.001) at one or more sites below Kansas City. We observed a substantial reduction in net-spinning Trichoptera in rock habitats below Kansas City (Lexington), an increase in relative dominance of Oligochaeta in depositional habitats at the next site downstream (Glasgow), and lower relative condition scores in rock habitat at Lexington and depositional habitat at Glasgow. Collectively, these data indicate that some urban-related impacts on the aquatic macroinvertebrate community are occurring. Our results suggest

  20. ASSESSMENT OF ENERGY RESOURCE DEVELOPMENT IMPACT ON WATER QUALITY: THE BELLE FOURCHE AND LITTLE MISSOURI RIVER BASINS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Belle Fourche and Little Missouri River Basins are key areas in the Nation's search for untapped resources to supplement increasing energy demands. The basins contain vast beds of low-sulfur, strippable coal that potentially will support a large number of coal-fired powerplan...

  1. 77 FR 3241 - Intent To Hold North Dakota Task Force Meeting as Established by the Missouri River Protection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-23

    ... [Federal Register Volume 77, Number 14 (Monday, January 23, 2012)] [Notices] [Page 3241] [FR Doc... Avenue, Omaha, NE 68102-4901. Dated: January 6, 2012. Gwyn M. Jarrett, Project Manager. [FR Doc. 2012... protect Indian and non-Indian historical and cultural sites along the Missouri River from erosion....

  2. UPPER MISSOURI RIVER ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT PROGRAM (EMAP-UMR): 2000 PILOT STUDY FINDINGS AND FURTHER DIRECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The EPA Office of Research and Development's Mid-Continent Ecology Division has undertaken an EMAP study to assess the condition of selected resources of the Upper Missouri River mainstem (riverine) aquatic habitats, riparian habitats, and reservoirs. In 2000, we completed pilot ...

  3. Assessing power of large river fish monitoring programs to detect population changes: the Missouri River sturgeon example

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, M.L.; Holan, S.H.; Bryan, J.L.; Gladish, D.W.; Ellersieck, M.

    2011-01-01

    In 2003, the US Army Corps of Engineers initiated the Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program (PSPAP) to monitor pallid sturgeon and the fish community of the Missouri River. The power analysis of PSPAP presented here was conducted to guide sampling design and effort decisions. The PSPAP sampling design has a nested structure with multiple gear subsamples within a river bend. Power analyses were based on a normal linear mixed model, using a mixed cell means approach, with variance estimates from the original data. It was found that, at current effort levels, at least 20 years for pallid and 10 years for shovelnose sturgeon is needed to detect a 5% annual decline. Modified bootstrap simulations suggest power estimates from the original data are conservative due to excessive zero fish counts. In general, the approach presented is applicable to a wide array of animal monitoring programs.

  4. Shovelnose sturgeon spawning in relation to varying discharge treatments in a Missouri River tributary

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Goodman, B.J.; Guy, C.S.; Camp, S.L.; Gardner, W.M.; Kappenman, K.M.; Webb, M.A.H.

    2013-01-01

    Many lotic fish species use natural patterns of variation in discharge and temperature as spawning cues, and these natural patterns are often altered by river regulation. The effects of spring discharge and water temperature variation on the spawning of shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus have not been well documented. From 2006 through 2009, we had the opportunity to study the effects of experimental discharge levels on shovelnose sturgeon spawning in the lower Marias River, a regulated tributary to the Missouri River in Montana. In 2006, shovelnose sturgeon spawned in the Marias River in conjunction with the ascending, peak (134 m3/s) and descending portions of the spring hydrograph and water temperatures from 16°C to 19°C. In 2008, shovelnose sturgeon spawned in conjunction with the peak (118 m3/s) and descending portions of the spring hydrograph and during a prolonged period of increased discharge (28–39 m3/s), coupled with water temperatures from 11°C to 23°C in the lower Marias River. No evidence of shovelnose sturgeon spawning was documented in the lower Marias River in 2007 or 2009 when discharge remained low (14 and 20 m3/s) despite water temperatures suitable and optimal (12°C-24°C) for shovelnose sturgeon embryo development. A similar relationship between shovelnose sturgeon spawning and discharge was observed in the Teton River. These data suggest that discharge must reach a threshold level (28 m3/s) and should be coupled with water temperatures suitable (12°C-24°C) or optimal (16°C-20°C) for shovelnose sturgeon embryo development to provide a spawning cue for shovelnose sturgeon in the lower Marias River.

  5. A Holocene vegetation record from the Mississippi River Valley, southeastern Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    King, J.E.; Allen, W.H., Jr.

    1977-01-01

    Pollen preserved in a peat deposit from a large swamp, the Old Field in the Mississippi River Valley near Advance, Missouri, records radiocarbon-dated vegetation changes between 9000 and about 3000 years ago. The principal feature of both the percentage and influx pollen diagrams is the replacement of arboreal pollen, primarily Quercus, Fraxinus, and Cephalanthus, with Gramineae and NAP between 8700 and 5000 years BP. This vegetation shift is interpreted as reflecting a decrease in the extent of the Old Field swamp and its associated bottomland forest species along with the expansion of a grass-dominated herb community, as a result of a reduction in available ground water. The desiccation of the swamp during this period indicates a reduction in precipitation within the ground-water source area and a shift to a drier climate in the southern Midwest. The pollen suggests that the lowest water levels and driest climate in southeastern Missouri lasted from 8700 to 6500 years BP, at which time there is a partial reappearance of swamp species. Relatively dry conditions, however, continued until at least 5000 years BP. Although pollen influx data are lacking from the upper part of the profile, the relative pollen frequencies suggest an increase in trees after 5000 BP. The replacement of the arboreal vegetation by grasses and herbs between 8700 and 5000 years BP reflects the period of maximum expansion of the Prairie Peninsula in southeastern Missouri. The Old Field swamp provides the first pollen evidence that the vegetational changes along the southern border of the Prairie Peninsula were chronologically similar to those on the northern and northeastern margins. ?? 1977.

  6. Flood dependency of cottonwood establishment along the Missouri River, Montana, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, M.L.; Auble, G.T.; Friedman, J.M.

    1997-01-01

    Flow variability plays a central role in structuring the physical environment of riverine ecosystems. However, natural variability in flows along many rivers has been modified by water management activities. We quantified the relationship between flow and establishment of the dominant tree (plains cottonwood, Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) along one of the least hydrologically altered alluvial reaches of the Missouri River: Coal Banks Landing to Landusky, Montana. Our purpose was to refine our understanding of how local fluvial geomorphic processes condition the relationship between flow regime and cottonwood recruitment. We determined date and elevation of tree establishment and related this information to historical peak stage and discharge over a 112-yr hydrologic record. Of the excavated trees, 72% were established in the year of a flow >1400 m3/s (recurrence interval of 9.3 yr) or in the following 2 yr. Flows of this magnitude or greater create the necessary bare, moist establishment sites at an elevation high enough to allow cottonwoods to survive subsequent floods and ice jams. Almost all cottonwoods that have survived the most recent flood (1978) were established >1.2 m above the lower limit of perennial vegetation (active channel shelf). Most younger individuals were established between 0 and 1.2 m, and are unlikely to survive over the long term. Protection of riparian cottonwood forest along this National Wild and Scenic section of the Missouri River depends upon maintaining the historical magnitude, frequency, and duration of floods > 1400 m3/s. Here, a relatively narrow valley constrains lateral channel movement that could otherwise facilitate cottonwood recruitment at lower flows. Effective management of flows to promote or maintain cottonwood recruitment requires an understanding of locally dominant fluvial geomorphic processes.

  7. Rehabilitation Experiments in the Context of Adaptive Management, Lower Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobson, R. B.; Gaeuman, D. A.; Elliott, C. M.; Johnson, H. E.; Laustrup, M. S.

    2004-12-01

    Morphology of the highly engineered Lower Missouri River (Sioux City, Iowa to St. Louis, Missouri) is nearly independent of flow regime because channelization has greatly reduced opportunity for channel adjustment. Rehabilitation efforts have therefore focused on altering channel form directly rather than altering flow regime. Rehabilitation sites offer the potential for experimental studies to address geomorphic adjustments and tradeoffs in form and flow in river recovery. Implementation of experiments remains a challenge, however, because increased scientific understanding is not universally valued by all stakeholders participating in the adaptive management process. Nevertheless, some rehabilitation sites have been utilized for opportunistic geomorphic experiments. Engineered rehabilitation projects typically seek to increase diversity of habitats, with emphasis on increasing areas of shallow, slow current velocity that are much diminished from their historical extent and which are thought to be especially important to recovering ecological processes. Projects fall into two broad categories: those that increase width of the channel or diversity of habitats between the high banks, and those that create or re-create side-channel chutes. Early results from two contrasting experiments in side-channel chute development indicate that a) the experimentally uncontrolled sequence and magnitude of hydroclimatic events have a substantial effect on morphogenesis, and b) geomorphic and ecological responses are highly influenced by reach-scale spatial patterns of sediment and large-woody debris transport that determine fluxes into chutes. After less than a year of monitoring of channel-widening experiments, we have only preliminary results, but we have developed a keen appreciation for experimental approaches in an extremely dynamic and spatially diverse river. Particular challenges are developing robust, cost-effective, geomorphic performance metrics and designing

  8. Relations among habitat characteristics, exotic species, and turbid-river cyprinids in the Missouri River drainage of Wyoming

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Quist, M.C.; Hubert, W.A.; Rahel, F.J.

    2004-01-01

    We used data from 91 stream reaches in the Missouri River drainage of Wyoming to determine whether abiotic and biotic factors were related to the abundance of four cyprinid species associated with turbid-river environments: flathead chub Platygobio gracilis, sturgeon chub Macrhybopsis gelida, plains minnow Hybognathus placitus, and western silvery minnow H. argyritis. The abundance of these cyprinids was positively related to the percentage of fine substrate in a reach and inversely related to the percentage of gravel substrate, the percentage of large rocky substrate, and the abundance of exotic piscivores. Differences in substrate composition and abundance of exotic piscivores were largely explained by the presence and location of large, mainstem impoundments. Reaches without any large impoundments in their watershed had a high percentage of fine substrate, high catch rates of turbid-river cyprinids, few exotic piscivores, and little gravel or large rocky substrate. Reaches with a downstream impoundment (i.e., within 200 km) had habitat characteristics similar to those without impoundments but had few turbid-river cyprinids and many exotic piscivores. Reaches with an upstream impoundment (i.e., within 200 km) had little fine substrate, a high percentage of large rocky substrate, few turbid-river cyprinids, and many exotic piscivores. Our results suggest that impoundments have had a substantial influence on the distribution and abundance of cyprinid species adapted to hydrologically dynamic, turbid prairie streams and that conserving these species is dependent on maintaining natural flow and sediment transport regimes and on reducing habitat suitability for exotic piscivores.

  9. Flow recommendations for maintaining riparian vegetation along the Upper Missouri River, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scott, Michael L.; Auble, Gregor T.; Friedman, Jonathan M.; Ischinger, Lee S.; Eggleston, Erik D.; Wondzell, Mark A.; Shafroth, Patrick B.; Back, Jennifer T.; Jordan, Mette S.

    1993-01-01

    Montana Power Company, Inc. (MPC) submitted a final license application to the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission (FERC) on November 30, 1992. In this application, MPC proposed a plan for the protection of fish, wildlife, habitat, and water-quality resources. One concern was maintenance of woody riparian vegetation along the Missouri River, especially along the Wild and Scenic reach of the river, where the riparian forest occurs in relatively small discontinuous stands. The objectives of this project were 1) to recommend flows that would protect and enhance riparian forests along the Missouri River, and 2) to develop elements of an environmental monitoring program that could be used to assess the effectiveness of the recommended flows. Plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides subsp. monilifera) is the key structural component of riparian forests along the Missouri River. Therefore, we focused our analysis on factors affecting populations of this species. Previous work had demonstrated that the age structure of cottonwood populations is strongly influenced by aspects of flow that promote successfully establishment. In this study our approach was to determine the precise age of plains cottonwood trees growing along the Upper Missouri River and to relate years of establishment to the flow record. Our work was carried out between Coal Banks Landing and the Fred G. Robinson Bridge within the Wild and Scenic portion of the Missouri River. This segment of the river occupies a narrow valley and exhibits little channel migration. Maps and notes from the journals of Lewis and Clark (1804-1806) suggest that the present distribution and abundance of cottonwoods within the study reach is generally similar to presettlement conditions. Flows in the study reach are influenced by a number of dams and diversions, most importantly, Canyon Ferry and Tiber Dams. Although flow regulation has decreased peak flows and increased low flows, the gross seasonal pattern of flow has not been

  10. Modeling the effects of river flow on population dynamics of piping plovers (Charadrius melodus) and least terns (Sternula antillarum) nesting on the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect

    Buenau, Kate E.; Hiller, Tim L.; Tyre, Andrew J.

    2014-10-01

    Humans make extensive use of rivers and floodplains for economic benefits including agriculture, hydropower, commerce and recreation. Economic development of floodplains subsequently requires control of river levels to avoid flood damage. This process began in the Missouri River basin in the 1890s with the construction of a series of hydropower dams in Montana and escalated to new levels with the approval of the Pick-Sloan plan in the 1944 Flood Control Act. Maximizing these human uses of the river led to changes in and losses of hydrological and ecological processes, ultimately resulting in the federal listing of three fish and wildlife species under the Endangered Species Act: the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhyncus albus; 1983), the piping plover (Charadrius melodus; 1984), and the interior population of least tern (Sternula antillarum; 1985). The listing of terns and plovers did not affect river management until the United States Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) proposed to modify the governing document of the Missouri River Mainstem System, the Master Manual, a process which was completed in 2003. Although there was little disagreement over the habitat conditions that terns and plovers used for nesting, there was substantial disagreement over the amount of habitat necessary for terns and plovers to meet population recovery goals. Answering this question requires forecasting species-specific population responses to dynamic habitat affected by both human actions (reservoir management and habitat restoration) and natural variability in precipitation. Piping plovers and least terns nest along the Missouri River from Fort Peck, Montana to just north of Sioux City, Iowa (Figure 1). Both species prefer to nest on sand and fine gravel substrates with no or sparse vegetation cover (Prindiville Gaines and Ryan, 1988; Sherfy et al., 2012), such as riverine sandbars (emergent sandbar habitat; ESH). Piping plovers also nest on reservoir shorelines that lack vegetation cover

  11. Characteristics of sediment transport at selected sites along the Missouri River, 2011–12

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rus, David L.; Galloway, Joel M.; Alexander, Jason S.

    2015-01-01

    The Modified-Einstein Procedure tended to predict greater total-sediment loads when compared to measured values. These differences may be the result of sediment deficits in the Missouri River that lead to an overprediction by the Modified-Einstein Procedure, the unsampled zone above the streambed that leads to an underprediction by the suspended sampler, or general uncertainty in the sampling approach. The differences between total-sediment load obtained through measurements and that estimated from applied theoretical procedures such as the Modified-Einstein Procedure pose a challenge for reliably characterizing total-sediment transport. Though it is not clear which of the two techniques is more accurate, the general tendency of the two to be within an order of magnitude of one another may be adequate for many sediment studies.

  12. Simulation of water-quality data at selected stream sites in the Missouri River Basin, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Knapton, J.R.; Jacobson, M.A.

    1980-01-01

    Modification of sampling programs at some water-quality stations in the Missouri River basin in Montana has eleminated the means by which solute loads have been directly obtained in past years. To compensate for this loss, water-quality and streamflow data were statistically analyzed and solute loads were simulated using computer techniques. Functional relationships existing between specific conductance and solute concentration for monthly samples were used to develop linear regression models. The models were then used to simulate daily solute concentrations using daily specific conductance as the independent variable. Once simulated, the solute concentrations, in milligrams per liter, were transformed into daily solute loads, in tons, using mean daily streamflow records. Computer output was formatted into tables listing simulated mean monthly solute concentrations, in milligrams per liter, and the monthly and annual solute loads, in tons, for water years 1975-78. (USGS)

  13. Physical Aquatic Habitat Assessment, Fort Randall Segment of the Missouri River, Nebraska and South Dakota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; DeLonay, Aaron J.

    2004-01-01

    This study addressed habitat availability and use by endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) in the Fort Randall segment of the Missouri River. Physical aquatic habitat - depth, velocity, and substrate - was mapped in 15 sites in Augsust and October of 2002. Habitat assessments were compared with fish locations using radio telemetry. Results indicate that pallid sturgeon preferentially use locations in the Fort Randall segment deeper than the average available habitat, with prominent usage peaks aat 3.5-4.0 m and 6-6.5 m, compared to the modal availability at 3-3.5 m. The fish use habitats with a modal velocity of 80 cm/s; the used velocities appear to be in proportion to their availability. Fish located preferentially over sand substrate and seemed to avoid mud and submerged vegetation.

  14. Sediment yields in a thick loess region: The Missouri River basin

    SciTech Connect

    Bettis, E.A. III

    1995-12-31

    Sediment yields in the thick loess region of the Missouri River basin are among the highest in North America. The combination of high local relief, easily eroded loessal surficial deposits, entrenched stream systems, and a humid climate foster high erosion rates and sediment yields. Stratigraphic investigations in over twenty watersheds within the thick loess region have documented the magnitude of several episodes of Holocene sediment movement and storage. Spatial and temporal patterns of sediment storage vary within a given drainage basin, but are similar in like-size elements of different basins. These patterns suggest that intrinsic controls are as important a climate in the long-term behavior of this fluvial system. The magnitude and pattern of Holocene sediment accumulation during the Historic period is similar to that which occurred on at least one occasion during the prehistoric period when the landscape was little modified by human activity.

  15. Fluvial disturbance patches and cottonwood recruitment along the Upper Missouri River, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Auble, G.T.; Scott, M.L.

    1998-01-01

    The disturbance patches most suitable for seedling establishment of pioneer riparian trees are also subject to future disturbances that produce high seedling mortality. We are monitoring plains cottonwood seedling establishment and mortality along the Wild and Scenic reach of the Missouri River upstream of Fort Peck Reservoir, Montana at four sites subject to livestock grazing and four paired, ungrazed exclosures. New seedlings at these sites were largely restricted to surfaces inundated by spring and summer flows. Winter ice drives and livestock grazing are important mortality factors along the study reach. Livestock grazing reduced seedling densities, although the position of these seedlings in normal flow years means it is unlikely that they will survive future disturbance. Average values of the maximum density parameter of a Gaussian curve of seedling distribution along a hydraulic gradient of inundating discharge were 30 and 114 seedlings/m2 on ungrazed sites in 1996 and 1997, compared to 19 and 18 seedlings/m2 for grazed sites. Water-surface elevations produced by ice drives and damming in the severe winter of 1995-1996 corresponded to inundating discharges of 1,670 to 4,580 m3/s. No existing trees at the study sites occurred at inundating discharges below 1,625 m3/s. Seedlings established as a result of maximum summer flows of 827 and 1,201 m3/s in 1996 and 1997 were all below the elevation of the 10-year return flow of 1,495 m3/s. Recruitment of plains cottonwood trees along this reach of the Missouri River is strongly dependent on infrequent high flows that position moist, bare disturbed patches high enough for seedlings to establish and survive subsequent flooding and ice scour, in contrast to other reaches and streams where hydrogeomophic processes of channel meandering and narrowing produce different patterns of disturbance patches.

  16. 3-D flow and scour near a submerged wing dike: ADCP measurements on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jamieson, E.C.; Rennie, C.D.; Jacobson, R.B.; Townsend, R.D.

    2011-01-01

    Detailed mapping of bathymetry and three-dimensional water velocities using a boat-mounted single-beam sonar and acoustic Doppler current profiler (ADCP) was carried out in the vicinity of two submerged wing dikes located in the Lower Missouri River near Columbia, Missouri. During high spring flows the wing dikes become submerged, creating a unique combination of vertical flow separation and overtopping (plunging) flow conditions, causing large-scale three-dimensional turbulent flow structures to form. On three different days and for a range of discharges, sampling transects at 5 and 20 m spacing were completed, covering the area adjacent to and upstream and downstream from two different wing dikes. The objectives of this research are to evaluate whether an ADCP can identify and measure large-scale flow features such as recirculating flow and vortex shedding that develop in the vicinity of a submerged wing dike; and whether or not moving-boat (single-transect) data are sufficient for resolving complex three-dimensional flow fields. Results indicate that spatial averaging from multiple nearby single transects may be more representative of an inherently complex (temporally and spatially variable) three-dimensional flow field than repeated single transects. Results also indicate a correspondence between the location of calculated vortex cores (resolved from the interpolated three-dimensional flow field) and the nearby scour holes, providing new insight into the connections between vertically oriented coherent structures and local scour, with the unique perspective of flow and morphology in a large river. Copyright 2011 by the American Geophysical Union.

  17. Estimated flood-inundation mapping for the Lower Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, 2003-2005

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.; Rydlund, Paul H.

    2006-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, began a study in 2003 of the lower Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from Gregory Boulevard to the mouth at the Missouri River to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation in the Blue River valley from flooding on the lower Blue River and from Missouri River backwater. Much of the lower Blue River flood plain is covered by industrial development. Rapid development in the upper end of the watershed has increased the volume of runoff, and thus the discharge of flood events for the Blue River. Modifications to the channel of the Blue River began in late 1983 in response to the need for flood control. By 2004, the channel had been widened and straightened from the mouth to immediately downstream from Blue Parkway to convey a 30-year flood. A two-dimensional depth-averaged flow model was used to simulate flooding within a 2-mile study reach of the Blue River between 63rd Street and Blue Parkway. Hydraulic simulation of the study reach provided information for the design and performance of proposed hydraulic structures and channel improvements and for the production of estimated flood-inundation maps and maps representing an areal distribution of water velocity, both magnitude and direction. Flood profiles of the Blue River were developed between Gregory Boulevard and 63rd Street from stage elevations calculated from high water marks from the flood of May 19, 2004; between 63rd Street and Blue Parkway from two-dimensional hydraulic modeling conducted for this study; and between Blue Parkway and the mouth from an existing one-dimensional hydraulic model by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Twelve inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for Blue Parkway stage elevations from 750 to 772 feet. Each map is associated with National Weather Service flood-peak forecast locations at 63rd Street, Blue Parkway, Stadium Drive, U.S. Highway 40, 12th Street, and the Missouri River

  18. Nutrient Sources and Transport in the Missouri River Basin, with Emphasis on the Effects of Irrigation and Reservoirs1

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Juliane B; Sprague, Lori A; Dupree, Jean A

    2011-01-01

    Abstract SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were used to relate instream nutrient loads to sources and factors influencing the transport of nutrients in the Missouri River Basin. Agricultural inputs from fertilizer and manure were the largest nutrient sources throughout a large part of the basin, although atmospheric and urban inputs were important sources in some areas. Sediment mobilized from stream channels was a source of phosphorus in medium and larger streams. Irrigation on agricultural land was estimated to decrease the nitrogen load reaching the Mississippi River by as much as 17%, likely as a result of increased anoxia and denitrification in the soil zone. Approximately 16% of the nitrogen load and 33% of the phosphorus load that would have otherwise reached the Mississippi River was retained in reservoirs and lakes throughout the basin. Nearly half of the total attenuation occurred in the eight largest water bodies. Unlike the other major tributary basins, nearly the entire instream nutrient load leaving the outlet of the Platte and Kansas River subbasins reached the Mississippi River. Most of the larger reservoirs and lakes in the Platte River subbasin are upstream of the major sources, whereas in the Kansas River subbasin, most of the source inputs are in the southeast part of the subbasin where characteristics of the area and proximity to the Missouri River facilitate delivery of nutrients to the Mississippi River. PMID:22457581

  19. Nutrient Sources and Transport in the Missouri River Basin, with Emphasis on the Effects of Irrigation and Reservoirs.

    PubMed

    Brown, Juliane B; Sprague, Lori A; Dupree, Jean A

    2011-10-01

    SPAtially Referenced Regressions On Watershed attributes (SPARROW) models were used to relate instream nutrient loads to sources and factors influencing the transport of nutrients in the Missouri River Basin. Agricultural inputs from fertilizer and manure were the largest nutrient sources throughout a large part of the basin, although atmospheric and urban inputs were important sources in some areas. Sediment mobilized from stream channels was a source of phosphorus in medium and larger streams. Irrigation on agricultural land was estimated to decrease the nitrogen load reaching the Mississippi River by as much as 17%, likely as a result of increased anoxia and denitrification in the soil zone. Approximately 16% of the nitrogen load and 33% of the phosphorus load that would have otherwise reached the Mississippi River was retained in reservoirs and lakes throughout the basin. Nearly half of the total attenuation occurred in the eight largest water bodies. Unlike the other major tributary basins, nearly the entire instream nutrient load leaving the outlet of the Platte and Kansas River subbasins reached the Mississippi River. Most of the larger reservoirs and lakes in the Platte River subbasin are upstream of the major sources, whereas in the Kansas River subbasin, most of the source inputs are in the southeast part of the subbasin where characteristics of the area and proximity to the Missouri River facilitate delivery of nutrients to the Mississippi River. PMID:22457581

  20. Changes in Monthly Streamflow Conditions in the Missouri River Basin from 1957 to 2007

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, M. T.; Stamm, J. F.; Norton, P. A.

    2008-12-01

    Observations of 50 years of continuous record at about 200 U.S. Geological Survey gages indicate that streamflow conditions are changing in the Missouri River Basin (MRB). Trends are evident in the annual streamflow records at 81 stations using the non-parametric Kendall Tau test. Where trends are significant, they generally are upward in the eastern portions of the basin and downward in the western portions of the basin. The reduced runoff in the western basin has resulted in main-stem reservoirs on the Missouri River that have operated at much less than full capacity for most of the last decade. Lower reservoir capacities result in significant economic effects such as reduced hydropower revenues, reduced recreation opportunities, and lower basin barge traffic. A change in the timing of streamflow or seasonality merits careful examination due to the implications for reservoir management, water supply strategies, and ecological ramifications. In this study, we examine streamflow trends by month within the MRB for the period 1957 to 2007. Two data sets were examined-202 stations with 51 years of record and a subset of 81 stations that presented a significant trend in annual flow. For both data sets, the month of April has the most stations (66) with upward trends, followed by March (59), then February (44) and May (44). The month of June has the fewest stations (18) with downward trends. Similarly, for both data sets, the months of September (57) and December (56) have the most stations with downward trends. The month of August has the fewest stations with downward trends (21). There is a strong geographic clustering of stations with trend directions. For example, most stations with trends in Colorado, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, and Missouri are upward, whereas most stations with trends in Montana and Wyoming are downward. In 81 percent of the cases, more than one month exhibited a trend for a given station. The amount of water that these upward or downward

  1. Objectives, priorities, reliable knowledge, and science-based management of Missouri River interior least terns and piping plovers

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sherfy, Mark; Anteau, Michael; Shaffer, Terry; Sovada, Marsha; Stucker, Jennifer

    2011-01-01

    Supporting recovery of federally listed interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos; tern) and piping plover (Charadrius melodus; plover) populations is a desirable goal in management of the Missouri River ecosystem. Many tools are implemented in support of this goal, including habitat management, annual monitoring, directed research, and threat mitigation. Similarly, many types of data can be used to make management decisions, evaluate system responses, and prioritize research and monitoring. The ecological importance of Missouri River recovery and the conservation status of terns and plovers place a premium on efficient and effective resource use. Efficiency is improved when a single data source informs multiple high-priority decisions, whereas effectiveness is improved when decisions are informed by reliable knowledge. Seldom will a single study design be optimal for addressing all data needs, making prioritization of needs essential. Data collection motivated by well-articulated objectives and priorities has many advantages over studies in which questions and priorities are determined retrospectively. Research and monitoring for terns and plovers have generated a wealth of data that can be interpreted in a variety of ways. The validity and strength of conclusions from analyses of these data is dependent on compatibility between the study design and the question being asked. We consider issues related to collection and interpretation of biological data, and discuss their utility for enhancing the role of science in management of Missouri River terns and plovers. A team of USGS scientists at Northern Prairie Wildlife Research Center has been conducting tern and plover research on the Missouri River since 2005. The team has had many discussions about the importance of setting objectives, identifying priorities, and obtaining reliable information to answer pertinent questions about tern and plover management on this river system. The objectives of this

  2. Hydrologic and geomorphic considerations in restoration of river-floodplain connectivity in a highly altered river system, Lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Janke, Tyler P.; Skold, Jason J.

    2011-01-01

    Planning for restoration of river-floodplain systems requires understanding how often and how much of a floodplain may be inundated, and how likely the floodplain is to retain the water once flooded. These factors depend fundamentally on hydrology and geomorphology of the channel and floodplain. We discuss application of an index of river-floodplain connectivity, the Land Capability Potential Index (LCPI), to regional-scale restoration planning along 600 km of the Lower Missouri River. The LCPI integrates modeled water-surface elevations, floodplain topography, and soils to index relative wetness of floodplain patches. Geomorphic adjustment of the Lower Missouri River to impoundment and channel engineering has altered the natural relations among hydrology, geomorphology, and floodplain soils, and has resulted in a regional upstream to downstream gradient in connectivity potential. As a result, flow-regime management is limited in its capacity to restore floodplain ecosystems. The LCPI provides a tool for identifying and mapping floodplain restoration potential, accounting for the geomorphic adjustment. Using simple criteria, we illustrate the utility of LCPI-like approaches in regional planning for restoration of plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides) communities, hydrologically connected floodplain wetlands, and seasonal floodplain wetlands.

  3. Characterization and Monitoring Data for Evaluating Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat in the Missouri River Mainstem 2004-2009

    SciTech Connect

    Duberstein, Corey A.

    2011-04-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (Corps) provides the primary operational management of the Missouri River Main Stem Reservoir System. Management of the Missouri River has generally reduced peak river flows that form and maintain emergent sandbar habitat. Emergent sandbars provide non-vegetated nesting habitat for the endangered interior least tern (Sternula antillarum athalassos) and the threatened Northern Great Plains piping plover (Charadrius melodus). Since 2000, piping plover nesting habitat within the Gavins Point Reach, Garrison Reach, Lake Oahe, and Lake Sakakawea has fledged the majority of piping plovers produced along the Missouri River system. Habitats within Lewis and Clark Lake have also recently become important plover production areas. Mechanical construction of emergent sandbar habitat (ESH) within some of these reaches within the Missouri River began in 2004. Through 2009, 11 sandbar complexes had been constructed (10 in Gavins Point Reach, 1 in Lewis and Clarke Lake) totaling about 543 ac of piping plover and interior least tern nesting habitat. ESH Construction has resulted in a net gain of tern and plover nesting habitat. Both terns and plovers successfully nest and fledge young on constructed sandbars, and constructed habitats were preferred over natural habitats. Natural processes may limit the viability of constructed sandbars as nesting habitat. Continued research is needed to identify if changes in constructed sandbar engineering and management increase the length of time constructed habitats effectively function as nesting habitat. However, the transfer of information from researchers to planners through technical research reports may not be timely enough to effectively foster the feedback mechanisms of an adaptive management strategy.

  4. Contaminant evaluation of interior least tern and piping plover eggs and chicks on the Missouri River, South Dakota

    SciTech Connect

    Ruelle, R.

    1991-05-01

    The Missouri River in South Dakota is bordered by bluffs containing marine shale. Analyses of shale from these bluffs revealed that they contained maximum concentrations of 13.6 mg/kg dry weight selenium and 9.35 mg/kg dry weight cadmium. Wind and water erode the dry shale bluffs, releasing biologically available selenium to the river. Selenium also is present at relatively high concentrations in Missouri River tributary streams. The waterborne selenium is carried downstream and deposited in slack-water areas near islands and shorelines. Least tern (Sterna antillarum), a federally endangered species, and piping plover (Charadrius melodus), a federally threatened species, nest on Missouri River islands. Addled eggs of both species were collected during the 1988, 1989, and 1990 nesting seasons and were analyzed for selenium and other inorganics. The maximum concentrations (mg/kg dry weight) of selenium detected were 13.0 and 11.1 respectively in piping plover and least tern eggs. Selenium concentrations remained elevated and stable in bird eggs during all three years of the study.

  5. Biogeomorphic evolution of new Missouri River wetlands: A remote sensing approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niebur, Curt Stanley

    The Great Flood of 1993 damaged the floodplain of the Lower Missouri River when over 500 levees failed. These levee failures created large scours and deposited massive amounts of sediment on the agricultural floodplain. The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service acquired areas heavily damaged by the 1993 floods and incorporated them into the Big Muddy Fish and Wildlife Refuge. One purpose of this refuge system is to restore the Missouri River system within the refuge from its highly engineered state to a more natural form. Analysis of a combination of remote sensing data, fieldwork, and finite element flow models was used to investigate the biogeomorphic evolution of one of these new wetlands refuges, the Lisbon Bottoms/Jameson Island Refuge. Four landcover mapping techniques were used to track changes with time: (1) geomorphic mapping, (2) maximum likelihood classification of Landsat TM data, (3) a linear spectral unmixing model using Landsat TM data, and (4) polarimetric and minimum distance classification of AIRSAR radar scattering data. Research showed that a biogeomorphic feedback loop in which the flow field, geomorphology, sediment, and vegetation interactions controlled the rapid evolution of the refuge after 1993. The 1993 flood first entered the area through levee breaks, forming scour zones, sweeping away most non-woody vegetation, and leaving behind a largely uniform, sand-covered floodplain. Field and remote sensing data showed that xeric sparse vegetation species encroached on high, dry sands, whereas mesic species populated lower, wetter scours. Smaller floods after 1993 entered the levee breaks, extended the scours into chutes, and draped silt and clay over the sand, allowing vegetation to spread rapidly. Remnant levees protected most of the area from fast flows, allowing cottonwood and willow saplings to spread across the study area and dominate the landscape, except in floodplain chutes. Expansion of saplings and the absence of flooding in 1999

  6. Hydrologic and Chemical Controls of Water Quality in the Lower Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, F.; Yang, J.

    2010-12-01

    Runoff from agricultural watersheds remains a critical concern of stream water quality in the Midwest. Using NASQAN data collected by USGS for the past 15 years, hydrologic versus chemical controls of stream water quality were examined for the Lower Missouri River above Hermann, MO. Mean DO values were 10.7-9.2 mg L-1 from upstream at Yankton, SD, and Omaha, IA, to downstream at Hermann, and also at Louisville of Platte River, a major tributary converged right after Omaha. Mean atrazine concentrations were 0.04 and 0.49 μg L-1 at Yankton and Omaha, respectively, and significantly increased to 1.08 μg L-1 at Hermann. Increased atrazine at Hermann was partially due to contributions from Platte River, which has mean atrazine concentration of 1.66 μg L-1 at Louisville. Mean atrazine concentration contributed by all agricultural watersheds between Omaha and Hermann was also comparable to Platte River at 1.30 μg L-1, as calculated based on the mass balance of flow and atrazine concentrations. There were no temporal trends from 1996 to 2009 for DO, nitrate and atrazine at all of the above locations. Seasonality of DO, nitrate and atrazine concentrations was very strong at all stream locations but Yankton, with higher DO concentrations in winter and higher nitrate and atrazine concentrations in late spring and early summer. Concentrations of DO, nitrate and atrazine were not highly correlated with both stream discharge and electric conductivity, but high values of nitrate and atrazine mostly occurred at low to moderate stream discharge. This result suggests that the management of agricultural watersheds in the Midwest needs to consider not only significant storms for flood control but also moderate storms for safeguarding surface water quality, particularly in late spring and early summer.

  7. Flood-inundation mapping for the Blue River and selected tributaries in Kansas City, Missouri, and vicinity, 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Weilert, Trina E.; Kelly, Brian P.; Studley, Seth E.

    2015-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and City of Kansas City, Missouri, operate multiple streamgages along the Blue River and tributaries in and near the city. Knowledge of water level at a streamgage is difficult to translate into depth and areal extent of flooding at points distant from the streamgage. One way to address these informational gaps is to produce a library of flood-inundation maps that are referenced to the stages recorded at a streamgage. By referring to the appropriate map, emergency responders can discern the severity of flooding (depth of water and areal extent), identify roads that are or may be flooded, and make plans for notification or evacuation of residents in harm’s way for some distance upstream and downstream from the streamgage. The USGS, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, developed a library of flood-inundation maps for the Blue River and selected tributaries.

  8. Drivers and Controls of the Zebra Mussel Invasion of the Mississippi-Missouri River System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casagrandi, R.; Mari, L.; Bertuzzo, E.; Gatto, M.; Levin, S. A.; Rodriguez-Iturbe, I.; Rinaldo, A.

    2010-12-01

    The zebra mussel Dreissena polymorpha has been haunting North American inland waters for the past twenty years. Due to the huge population densities reached by local colonies and the species' unparalleled dispersal ability, the zebra mussel represents a major threat from both an ecological and an economic perspective. We propose a novel ecohydrological model for the invasion of inland waters by this alien species and test it against field data gathered within the Mississippi-Missouri river system in North America. To incorporate both hydrologic controls and anthropogenic drivers of the invasion, the proposed multi-layer network model accounts explicitly for zebra mussel demographic dynamics, hydrologic transport and dispersal due to human activities. We show that hydrologic transport alone is not sufficient to explain the spread of the species at the basin scale. We also quantify the role played by commercial navigation in promoting the initial, selective colonization of the river system and show how recreational boating may have determined the capillary penetration of the species into the water system. The role of post-establishment dispersal mechanisms and the effectiveness of possible prevention measures are also discussed in the context of model sensitivity and robustness to reparameterization.

  9. Applicability of NASQAN data for ecosystem assessments on the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, D.; Fairchild, J.

    2001-01-01

    The effectiveness of ecological restoration efforts on large developed rivers is often unknown because comprehensive ecological monitoring programs are often absent. Although Eulerian water-quality monitoring programs, such as the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) program, are more common, they are usually not designed for ecological assessment. Therefore, this paper addresses the value of NASQAN for ecological assessments on the Missouri River and identifies potential program additions and modifications to assess certain ecological changes in physical habitat, biological structure and function, and ecotoxicity. Five additional sites: The analysis of chlorophyll, mercury, ATP, potential endocrine disruptors, total trace elements, and selected total hydrophobic organics; and the hourly measurement of dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and temperature are recommended. Hourly measurements would require an entirely new operational aspect to NASQAN. However, the presence of data loggers and satellite transmitters in the gauging stations at all NASQAN sites substantially improves the feasibility of continuous water-quality monitoring. The use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to monitor dissolved bioaccumulating organics and trace elements, identification and enumeration of zooplankton, and characterization of the bioavailability of organic matter are also recommended. The effect of biological processes on the conservative assumptions that are used in flux and source determinations of NASQAN constituents are also evaluated. Organic carbon, organic nitrogen, dissolved phosphate, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen are the NASQAN constituents most vulnerable to biological processes and thus violation of conservative assumptions.

  10. Applicability of NASQAN data for ecosystem assessments on the Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blevins, Dale; Fairchild, James

    2001-05-01

    The effectiveness of ecological restoration efforts on large developed rivers is often unknown because comprehensive ecological monitoring programs are often absent. Although Eulerian water-quality monitoring programs, such as the National Stream Quality Accounting Network (NASQAN) program, are more common, they are usually not designed for ecological assessment. Therefore, this paper addresses the value of NASQAN for ecological assessments on the Missouri River and identifies potential program additions and modifications to assess certain ecological changes in physical habitat, biological structure and function, and ecotoxicity.Five additional sites; the analysis of chlorophyll, mercury, ATP, potential endocrine disruptors, total trace elements, and selected total hydrophobic organics; and the hourly measurement of dissolved oxygen, turbidity, and temperature are recommended. Hourly measurements would require an entirely new operational aspect to NASQAN. However, the presence of data loggers and satellite transmitters in the gauging stations at all NASQAN sites substantially improves the feasibility of continuous water-quality monitoring. The use of semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) to monitor dissolved bioaccumulating organics and trace elements, identification and enumeration of zooplankton, and characterization of the bioavailability of organic matter are also recommended.The effect of biological processes on the conservative assumptions that are used in flux and source determinations of NASQAN constituents are also evaluated. Organic carbon, organic nitrogen, dissolved phosphate, and dissolved inorganic nitrogen are the NASQAN constituents most vulnerable to biological processes and thus violation of conservative assumptions. Published in 2001 by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  11. Fishes of the Missouri national recreational river, South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berry, C.R., Jr.; Young, B.

    2004-01-01

    Two sections of the Missouri River, one extending 94 km downstream from Gavins Point Dam, and the other extending 62 km downstream from Fort Randall Dam, are legally designated as National Recreational Rivers. An ichthyofaunal list and fish habitat data were needed for conservation planning by states and federal agencies (e.g., National Park Service). We collected fish during three summers from four macrohabitats, using five fish collection techniques, and measured fish habitat characteristics. Temperature, conductivity, and turbidity varied little, but substrate, depth, and velocity differed among macrohabitats (e.g., depth and velocity in the channel exceeded those elsewhere; sand dominated the substrate except in silt-laden tributary mouths and backwaters). We collected 21,699 fish of 53 species and combined our survey with others to compile a list of 92 species. Common recreational species included walleye (Sander vitreum) and catfishes (Ictaluridae). Twenty nonnative species were present. Seventy-two native species have persisted, but the pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) is endangered and a few other species (e.g., native minnows) may be in decline.

  12. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River between Kansas City and St. Louis, Missouri, April-May, 2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2014-01-01

    Bathymetric and velocimetric data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, in the vicinity of 10 bridges at 9 highway crossings of the Missouri River between Lexington and Washington, Missouri, from April 22 through May 2, 2013. A multibeam echosounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 1,640 to 1,840 feet longitudinally and extending laterally across the active channel between banks and spur dikes in the Missouri River during low- to moderate-flow conditions. These bathymetric surveys indicate the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be useful to the Missouri Department of Transportation to assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour during floods. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of water or in very shallow water (less than about 6 feet). Scour holes were present at most piers for which bathymetry could be obtained, except at piers on channel banks, near or embedded in lateral or longitudinal spur dikes, and on exposed bedrock outcrops. Scour holes observed at the surveyed bridges were examined with respect to depth and shape. Although exposure of parts of foundational support elements was observed at several piers, at most sites the exposure likely can be considered minimal compared to the overall substructure that remains buried in channel-bed material; however, there were several notable exceptions where the bed material thickness between the bottom of the scour hole and bedrock was less than 6 feet. Such substantial exposure of usually buried substructural elements may warrant special observation in future flood events. Previous bathymetric surveys had been done at all of the

  13. Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at highway bridges crossing the Missouri River in and into Missouri during summer flooding, July-August 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2012-01-01

    Bathymetric and velocimetric surveys were conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Transportation, in the vicinity of 36 bridges at 27 highway crossings of the Missouri River between Brownville, Nebraska and St. Louis, Missouri, from July 13 through August 3, 2011, during a summer flood. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system was used to obtain channel-bed elevations for river reaches ranging from 1,350 to 1,860 feet and extending across the active channel of the Missouri River. These bathymetric scans provide a "snapshot" of the channel conditions at the time of the surveys and provide characteristics of scour holes that may be useful in the development of predictive guidelines or equations for scour holes. These data also may be used by the Kansas and Missouri Departments of Transportation to assess the bridges for stability and integrity issues with respect to bridge scour during floods. Bathymetric data were collected around every pier that was in water, except those at the edge of water, in extremely shallow water, or surrounded by debris rafts. Scour holes were present at most piers for which bathymetry could be obtained, except at piers on channel banks, those near or embedded in lateral or longitudinal spur dikes, and those on exposed bedrock outcrops. Scour holes observed at the surveyed bridges were examined with respect to depth and shape. Although exposure of parts of foundational support elements was observed at several piers, at most sites the exposure likely can be considered minimal compared to the overall substructure that remains buried in bed material; however, there were several notable exceptions where the bed material thickness between the bottom of the scour hole and bedrock was less than 6 feet. Such substantial exposure of usually buried substructural elements may warrant special observation in future flood events. Previous bathymetric surveys had been done at several of the sites

  14. Large dams and alluvial rivers in the Anthropocene: The impacts of the Garrison and Oahe Dams on the Upper Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Skalak, Katherine; Benthem, Adam J.; Schenk, Edward R.; Hupp, Cliff R.; Galloway, Joel M.; Nustad, Rochelle A.; Wiche, Gregg J.

    2013-01-01

    The Missouri River has had a long history of anthropogenic modification with considerable impacts on river and riparian ecology, form, and function. During the 20th century, several large dam-building efforts in the basin served the needs for irrigation, flood control, navigation, and the generation of hydroelectric power. The managed flow provided a range of uses, including recreation, fisheries, and habitat. Fifteen dams impound the main stem of the river, with hundreds more on tributaries. Though the effects of dams and reservoirs are well-documented, their impacts have been studied individually, with relatively little attention paid to their interaction along a river corridor. We examine the morphological and sedimentological changes in the Upper Missouri River between the Garrison Dam in ND (operational in 1953) and Oahe Dam in SD (operational in 1959). Through historical aerial photography, stream gage data, and cross sectional surveys, we demonstrate that the influence of the upstream dam is still a major control of river dynamics when the backwater effects of the downstream reservoir begin. In the “Anthropocene”, dams are ubiquitous on large rivers and often occur in series, similar to the Garrison Dam Segment. We propose a conceptual model of how interacting dams might affect river geomorphology, resulting in distinct and recognizable morphologic sequences that we term “Inter-Dam sequence” characteristic of major rivers in the US.

  15. Exotic plant colonization and occupancy within riparian areas of the Interior Columbia River and Upper Missouri River basins, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Al-Chokhachy, Robert K.; Ray, Andrew M.; Roper, Brett B.; Archer, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Exotic plant invasions into riparia often result in shifts in vegetative composition, altered stream function, and cascading effects to biota at multiple scales. Characterizing the distribution patterns of exotic plants is an important step in directing targeted research to identify mechanisms of invasion and potential management strategies. In this study, we employed occupancy models to examine the associations of landscape, climate, and disturbance attributes with the colonization and occupancy patterns for spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe L.), Canada thistle (Cirsium arvense L., Scop.), and cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum L.) in the riparia of headwater streams (n = 1,091) in the Interior Columbia River and Upper Missouri River Basins. We found relatively low occupancy rates for cheatgrass (0.06, SE = 0.02) and spotted knapweed (0.04, SE = 0.01), but moderate occupancy of Canada thistle (0.28, SE = 0.05); colonization rates were low across all species (<0.01). We found the distributions of spotted knapweed, Canada thistle, and cheatgrass to exhibit significant associations with both ambient climate conditions and anthropogenic and natural disturbances. We attribute the low to moderate occupancy and colonization rates to the relatively remote locations of our sample sites within headwater streams and urge consideration of means to prevent further invasions.

  16. ENVIRONMENTAL MONITORING AND ASSESSMENT OF A GREAT RIVER ECOSYSTEM: THE UPPER MISSOURI RIVER PILOT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Great River Ecosystems (GREs) are extensively modified physically, hydrologically, and chemically and are not receiving adequate protection to prevent further habitat degradation and loss of biotic integrity. In the United States, ecological monitoring and assessment of the G...

  17. Age-0 Shovelnose Sturgeon prey consumption in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gosch, N.J.C.; Miller, M.L.; Gemeinhardt, T.R; Starks, T. A.; Civiello, A.P.; Long, James M.; Bonneau, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    A lack of nutritious food during the first year of life is a hypothesized factor that may limit survival of endangered pallid sturgeonScaphirhynchus albus in the lower Missouri River (LMOR). Unfortunately, information for age-0 pallid sturgeon diets remains limited, but diet analyses for age-0 Scaphirhynchus spp. (sturgeon hereafter) have occurred. Little information, however, exists on age-0 sturgeon diets in the LMOR; thus, our primary objective was to document age-0 sturgeon diets in this system. We examined guts contents from 30 individuals, which were genetically identified as shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus, and three stomachs were empty. The remaining age-0 shovelnose sturgeon consumed chironomid larvae almost exclusively (>98% of prey items consumed). Our results were similar to studies conducted in other systems, and it appears unlikely that a lack of nutritious food was a major factor affecting the individuals captured during this study. This effort provides important information to help guide ongoing adaptive management efforts in the LMOR.

  18. Assessment of Shallow-Water Habitat Availability in Modified Dike Structures, Lower Missouri River, 2004

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Johnson, Harold E., III

    2004-01-01

    This study documented the effects of wing-dike notching on the availabilit of shallow water habitat in the Lower Missouri River. Five wing dikes were surveyed in late May 2004 after they were notched in early May as part of shallow-water habitat (SWH) rehabilitation activities undertaken by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. Surveys included high-resolution hydroacoustic depth, velocity, and substrate mapping. Relations of bottom elevations within the wing dike fields to index discharges and water-surface elevations indicate that little habitat meeting the SWH definition was created immediately following notching. This result is not unexpected, as significant geomorphic adjustment may require large flow events. Depth, velocity, and substrate measurements in the post-rehabilitation time period provide baseline data for monitoring ongoing changes. Differences in elevation and substrate were noted at all sites. Most dike fields showed substantial aggradation and replacement of mud substrate with sandier sediment, although the changes did not result in increased availability of SWH at the index discharge. It is not known how much of the elevation and substrate changes can be attributed directly to notching and how much would result from normal sediment transport variation.

  19. Preliminary appraisal of ground water in and near the ancestral Missouri River Valley, northeastern Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Levings, G.W.

    1986-01-01

    A preliminary appraisal was conducted in and near the ancestral Missouri River valley in northeastern Montana to describe the groundwater resources and to establish a data base for the area. The data base then could be used for future evaluation of possible changes in water levels or water quality. In this area, consolidated aquifers are the Upper Cretaceous Fox Hills-lower Hell Creek aquifer and the overlying Paleocene Fort Union Formation. Unconsolidated aquifers are Pleistocene terrace gravel and glacial deposits and Holocene alluvial deposits. Aquifers are recharged by precipitation, infiltration of streamflow, and possibly leakage from lakes and potholes. Groundwater moves from topographically higher areas to the ancestral valley, then along the ancestral valley to the southwest. Water is discharged from aquifers by evapotranspiration, springs and seeps, movement directly into streams and lakes, and from pumping wells. Average well yields are greatest for irrigation wells completed in outwash gravel (886 gallons/min). Eighteen wells were completed in various aquifers to monitor potential long-term changes in water levels and water quality. Measured water levels declined about 2 ft. or less during the study (1982-85). Chemical analysis of groundwater samples indicated that concentrations of some dissolved constituents exceeded U.S. Environmental Protection Agency standards for drinking water. (USGS)

  20. Occurrence of Emerging Contaminants in Water and Bed Material in the Missouri River, North Dakota, 2007

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Damschen, William C.; Lundgren, Robert F.

    2009-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Standing Rock Sioux Tribe, conducted a reconnaissance study to determine the occurrence of emerging contaminants in water and bed sediment within the Missouri River upstream and downstream from the cities of Bismarck and Mandan, North Dakota, and upstream from the city of Fort Yates, North Dakota, during September-October 2007. At each site, water samples were collected twice and bed-sediment samples were collected once. Samples were analyzed for more than 200 emerging contaminants grouped into four compound classes - wastewater compounds, human-health pharmaceutical compounds, hormones, and antibiotics. Only sulfamethoxazole, an antibiotic, was present at a concentration higher than minimum detection limits. It was detected in a water sample collected downstream from the cities of Bismarck and Mandan, and in bed-sediment samples collected at the two sites downstream from the cities of Bismarck and Mandan and upstream from Fort Yates. Sulfamethoxazole is an antibiotic commonly used for treating bacterial infections in humans and animals.

  1. Diet composition of larval and young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon in the Upper Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P. J.; Fuller, D.B.; McClenning, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining food following the transition from endogenous to exogenous feeding and during the first year of life is a critical event that strongly influences growth and survival of young-of-year fishes. For shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus, limited information is available on food habits during the first year of life. The objective of this study was to quantify diet components of shovelnose sturgeon during the transition from endogenous to exogenous feeding and during the young-of-year life stage in the North Dakota and Montana portions of the Missouri River. Young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon were sampled between early August and early September 2003. Shovelnose sturgeon initiated exogenous feeding by 16 mm, and individuals 16–140 mm fed exclusively on two macroinvertebrate orders (Diptera and Ephemeroptera). Young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon exhibited an apparently high feeding success as 99 of 100 individuals contained food in the gut. The number of organisms in the gut increased exponentially with fish length for larval Diptera (r2 = 0.73, P < 0.0001) and linearly (r2 = 0.12, P = 0.0006) for larval Ephemeroptera, but the number of Diptera pupae in the gut was not significantly related (P = 0.55) to length of young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon. The length of ingested prey was linearly related to fish length for Diptera larvae (r2 = 0.20, P = 0.002), whereas the relationship between lengths of ingested Ephemeroptera larvae and lengths of young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon was best described by a power function (r2 = 0.50, P < 0.0001). These results provide the first quantification of feeding dynamics for young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon in a natural river environment.

  2. Diet composition of larval and young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon in the Upper Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P.J.; Fuller, D.B.; McClenning, N.D.

    2007-01-01

    Obtaining food following the transition from endogenous to exogenous feeding and during the first year of life is a critical event that strongly influences growth and survival of young-of-year fishes. For shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus, limited information is available on food habits during the first year of life. The objective of this study was to quantify diet components of shovelnose sturgeon during the transition from endogenous to exogenous feeding and during the young-of-year life stage in the North Dakota and Montana portions of the Missouri River. Young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon were sampled between early August and early September 2003. Shovelnose sturgeon initiated exogenous feeding by 16 mm, and individuals 16-140 mm fed exclusively on two macroinvertebrate orders (Diptera and Ephemeroptera). Young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon exhibited an apparently high feeding success as 99 of 100 individuals contained food in the gut. The number of organisms in the gut increased exponentially with fish length for larval Diptera (r2 = 0.73, P < 0.0001) and linearly (r2 = 0.12, P = 0.0006) for larval Ephemeroptera, but the number of Diptera pupae in the gut was not significantly related (P = 0.55) to length of young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon. The length of ingested prey was linearly related to fish length for Diptera larvae (r2 = 0.20, P = 0.002), whereas the relationship between lengths of ingested Ephemeroptera larvae and lengths of young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon was best described by a power function (r2 = 0.50, P < 0.0001). These results provide the first quantification of feeding dynamics for young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon in a natural river environment. ?? 2007 Blackwell Verlag.

  3. Ground-water flow simulation and chemical and isotopic mixing equation analysis to determine source contributions to the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in the vicinity of the Independence, Missouri, well field

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    The city of Independence, Missouri, operates a well field in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer. Steady-state ground-water flow simulation, particle tracking, and the use of chemical and isotopic composition of river water, ground water, and well-field pumpage in a two-component mixing equation were used to determine the source contributions of induced inflow from the Missouri River and recharge to ground water from precipitation in well-field pumpage. Steady-state flow-budget analysis for the simulation-defined zone of contribution to the Independence well field indicates that 86.7 percent of well-field pumpage is from induced inflow from the river, and 6.7 percent is from ground-water recharge from precipitation. The 6.6 percent of flow from outside the simulation-defined zone of contribution is a measure of the uncertainty of the estimation, and occurs because model cells are too large to uniquely define the actual zone of contribution. Flow-budget calculations indicate that the largest source of water to most wells is the Missouri River. Particle-tracking techniques indicate that the Missouri River supplies 82.3 percent of the water to the Independence well field, ground-water recharge from precipitation supplies 9.7 percent, and flow from outside defined zones of contribution supplies 8.0 percent. Particle tracking was used to determine the relative amounts of source water to total well-field pumpage as a function of traveltime from the source. Well-field pumpage that traveled 1 year or less from the source was 8.8 percent, with 0.6 percent from the Missouri River, none from precipitation, and 8.2 percent between starting cells. Well-field pumpage that traveled 2 years or less from the source was 10.3 percent, with 1.8 percent from the Missouri River, 0.2 percent from precipitation, and 8.3 percent between starting cells. Well-field pumpage that traveled 5 years or less from the source was 36.5 percent, with 27.1 percent from the Missouri River, 1.1 percent

  4. Snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) as biomonitors of lead contamination of the Big River in Missouri`s Old Lead Belt

    SciTech Connect

    Overmann, S.R.; Krajicek, J.J.

    1995-04-01

    The usefulness of common snapping turtles (Chelydra serpentina) as biomonitors of lead (Pb) contamination of aquatic ecosystems was assessed. Thirty-seven snapping turtles were collected from three sites on the Big River, an Ozarkian stream contaminated with Pb mine tailings. Morphometric measurements, tissue Pb concentrations (muscle, blood, bone, carapace, brain, and liver), {delta}-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase ({delta}-ALAD) activity, hematocrit, hemoglobin, plasma glucose, osmolality, and chloride ion content were measured. The data showed no effects of Pb contamination on capture success or morphological measurements. Tissue Pb concentrations were related to capture location. Hematocrit, plasma osmolality, plasma glucose, and plasma chloride ion content were not significantly different with respect to capture location. The {delta}-ALAD activity levels were decreased in turtles taken from contaminated sites. Lead levels in the Big River do not appear to be adversely affecting the snapping turtles of the river. Chelydra serpentina is a useful species for biomonitoring of Pb-contaminated aquatic environments.

  5. Hydraulic and Substrate Maps of Reaches Used by Sturgeon (Genus Scaphirhynchus) in the Lower Missouri River, 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Johnson, Harold E., III; DeLonay, Aaron J.

    2008-01-01

    This report is a repository of reach-scale maps of hydraulic and substrate characteristics generated for the habitat-use portion of an interdisciplinary sturgeon research project on the Lower Missouri River (from Gavins Point Dam to the junction with the Mississippi River). The maps were derived from hydroacoustic data sets that were collected for the purpose of assessing physical aquatic habitat in the vicinity of locations of adult shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) and pallid sturgeon (S. albus). Hydroacoustic data sets were collected at the reach scale (mean reach length, 2.4 kilometers) in order to include the immediate vicinity of a targeted sturgeon location as well as the full range of habitat available at the bend and crossover scale. Reaches typically were surveyed on the day following the relocation of a telemetered sturgeon and at a discharge within 10 percent of the discharge on the sturgeon relocation date in order to characterize as closely as possible the channel morphology and flow-field conditions at the time that the sturgeon was present. One hundred fifty-three reaches were mapped during April-September in the years 2005 through 2007, with the majority of data collection occurring in the months of May and June (coinciding with the period of sturgeon migration and spawning in the Lower Missouri River). Interpolated maps (grid cell size, 5 meters) depict depth, generalized substrate, and depth-averaged velocity. Side-scan sonar imagery is also available for a subset of reaches. Collectively, the maps represent more than 20 percent of the length of the Lower Missouri River.

  6. Population trends, bend use relative to available habitat and within-river-bend habitat use of eight indicator species of Missouri and Lower Kansas River benthic fishes: 15 years after baseline assessment

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wildhaber, Mark L.; Yang, Wen-Hsi; Arab, Ali

    2016-01-01

    A baseline assessment of the Missouri River fish community and species-specific habitat use patterns conducted from 1996 to 1998 provided the first comprehensive analysis of Missouri River benthic fish population trends and habitat use in the Missouri and Lower Yellowstone rivers, exclusive of reservoirs, and provided the foundation for the present Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program (PSPAP). Data used in such studies are frequently zero inflated. To address this issue, the zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model was applied. This follow-up study is based on PSPAP data collected up to 15 years later along with new understanding of how habitat characteristics among and within bends affect habitat use of fish species targeted by PSPAP, including pallid sturgeon. This work demonstrated that a large-scale, large-river, PSPAP-type monitoring program can be an effective tool for assessing population trends and habitat usage of large-river fish species. Using multiple gears, PSPAP was effective in monitoring shovelnose and pallid sturgeons, sicklefin, shoal and sturgeon chubs, sand shiner, blue sucker and sauger. For all species, the relationship between environmental variables and relative abundance differed, somewhat, among river segments suggesting the importance of the overall conditions of Upper and Middle Missouri River and Lower Missouri and Kansas rivers on the habitat usage patterns exhibited. Shoal and sicklefin chubs exhibited many similar habitat usage patterns; blue sucker and shovelnose sturgeon also shared similar responses. For pallid sturgeon, the primary focus of PSPAP, relative abundance tended to increase in Upper and Middle Missouri River paralleling stocking efforts, whereas no evidence of an increasing relative abundance was found in the Lower Missouri River despite stocking.

  7. Growth rates of young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon in the Upper Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P. J.; Fuller, D.B.

    2007-01-01

    Information on growth during the larval and young-of-year life stages in natural river environments is generally lacking for most sturgeon species. In this study, methods for estimating ages and quantifying growth were developed for field-sampled larval and young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus in the upper Missouri River. First, growth was assessed by partitioning samples of young-of-year shovelnose sturgeon into cohorts, and regressing weekly increases in cohort mean length on sampling date. This method quantified relative growth because ages of the cohorts were unknown. Cohort increases in mean length among sampling dates were positively related (P < 0.05, r2 > 0.59 for all cohorts) to sampling date, and yielded growth rate estimates of 0.80–2.95 mm day−1 (2003) and 0.44–2.28 mm day−1 (2004). Highest growth rates occurred in the largest (and earliest spawned) cohorts. Second, a method was developed to estimate cohort hatch dates, thus age on date of sampling could be determined. This method included quantification of post-hatch length increases as a function of water temperature (growth capacity; mm per thermal unit, mm TU−1), and summation of mean daily water temperatures to achieve the required number of thermal units that corresponded to post-hatch lengths of shovelnose sturgeon on sampling dates. For six of seven cohorts of shovelnose sturgeon analyzed, linear growth models (r2 ≥ 0.65, P < 0.0001) or Gompertz growth models (r2 ≥ 0.83, P < 0.0001) quantified length-at-age from hatch through 55 days post-hatch (98–100 mm). Comparisons of length-at-age derived from the growth models indicated that length-at-age was greater for the earlier-hatched cohorts than later-hatched cohorts. Estimated hatch dates for different cohorts were corroborated based on the dates that newly-hatched larval shovelnose sturgeon were sampled in the drift. These results provide the first quantification of growth dynamics

  8. Red Cedar Invasion Along the Missouri River, South Dakota: Cause and Consequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, S.; Knox, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    This research evaluates drivers of and ecosystem response to red cedar (Juniperus virginiana) invasion of riparian surfaces downstream of Gavin's Point Dam on the Missouri River. Gavin's Point Dam changed the downstream geomorphology and hydrology of the river and its floodplain by reducing scouring floods and flood-deposited sediment. The native cottonwood species (Populus deltoides) favors cleared surfaces with little to no competitors to establish. Now that there are infrequent erosive floods along the riparian surfaces to remove competitor seeds and seedlings, other vegetation is able to establish. Red cedar is invading the understory of established cottonwood stands and post-dam riparian surfaces. To assess reasons and spatial patterns for the recent invasion of red cedar, a stratified random sampling of soil, tree density and frequency by species, and tree age of 14 forest stands was undertaken along 59 river kilometers of riparian habitat. Soil particle size was determined using laser diffraction and tree ages were estimated from ring counts of tree cores. As an indicator of ecosystem response to invasion, we measured organic matter content in soil collected beneath red cedar and cottonwood trees at three different depths. Of 565 red cedars, only two trees were established before the dam was built. We applied a multiple regression model of red cedar density as a function of cottonwood density and percent sand (63-1000 microns in diameter) in StatPlus© statistical software. Cottonwood density and percent sand are strongly correlated with invasion of red cedar along various riparian surfaces (n = 59, R2 = 0.42, p-values < 0.05). No significant differences exist between organic matter content of soil beneath red cedar and cottonwood trees (p-value > 0.05 for all depths). These findings suggest that the dam's minimization of downstream high-stage flows opened up new habitat for red cedar to establish. Fluvial geomorphic surfaces reflect soil type and cottonwood

  9. A velocimetric survey of the Lower Missouri River from river mile 492.38 to 290.20, July-October 2011 and July 2012

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Armstrong, Daniel J.; Wilkison, Donald H.; Norman, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Of the July 2012 synoptic velocimetric surveys, velocities near St. Joseph, Missouri, indicated no longitudinal trends in the main-channel, near-bed, near-bank, and whole-river velocities. The Kansas City and Waverly synoptic velocimetric surveys indicated a general decrease in these velocities proceeding downstream. For all 2012 surveys, near-bed velocity was closest in magnitude to Winriver II mean velocity and near-bed and whole-river velocities decreased with increasing channel area. For the entire study, variations in near-bank velocity may have been due to the influence of channel structures and their diversion of higher velocities away from the channel edges.

  10. Distribution of pesticides, PAHs, PCBs, and bioavailable metals in depositional sediments of the lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Echols, K.R.; Brumbaugh, W.G.; Orazio, C.E.; May, T.W.; Poulton, B.C.; Peterman, P.H.

    2008-01-01

    The lower Missouri River was studied to determine the distribution of selected persistent organic pollutants and bioavailable metals in depositional sediments. Nineteen sites between Omaha, Nebraska and Jefferson City, Missouri were sampled. This stretch of the river receives point-source and non-point-source inputs from industrial, urban, and agricultural activities. As part of an ecological assessment of the river, concentrations of 29 legacy organochlorine pesticides (OC pesticides), including chlordanes, DDTs, and hexachlorocyclohexanes; a select list of current-use pesticides, including trifluralin, diazinon, chlorpyrifos, and permethrin, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), divalent metals (copper, nickel, zinc, cadmium, and lead), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were determined. Concentrations (dry weight basis) of OC pesticides in the sediments were less than 1 ng/g, with the exception of the backwater sediment collected from the mouth of the Blue River in the Kansas City metropolitan area, which contained up to 20 ng/g total chlordane, 8.1 ng/g p,p???-DDE, 1.5 ng/g lindane, 4.8 ng/g dieldrin, and 3 ng/g endrin. Concentrations of chlorpyrifos and permethrin ranged from less than 1 ng/g to 5.5 ng/g and 44 ng/g, respectively. Concentrations of PCBs ranged from less than 11 ng/g to 250 ng/g, with the Blue River and Sibley sediments containing 100 and 250 ng/g total PCBs, respectively. Concentrations of total PAHs at 17 of the 19 sites ranged from 250 to 700 ng/g, whereas the Riverfront and Blue River sites in Kansas City contained 1100 ng/g and nearly 4000 ng/g, respectively. Concentrations of the metals did not vary significantly among most sites; however, the Blue River site contained elevated concentrations of zinc (104 ??g/g), cadmium (0.7 ??g/g), and lead (34 ??g/g) compared to the other sites. The moderately high concentrations of acid-volatile sulfide in the sediments suggest a low potential for metal

  11. Hydrology and cycling of nitrogen and phosphorus in Little Bean Marsh : a remnant riparian wetland along the Missouri River in Platte County, Missouri, 1996-97

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, Dale W.

    2004-01-01

    The lack of concurrent water-quality and hydrologic data on riparian wetlands in the Midwestern United States has resulted in a lack of knowledge about the water-quality functions that these wetlands provide. Therefore, Little Bean Marsh, a remnant riparian wetland along the Missouri River, was investigated in 1996 and 1997 primarily to determine the magnitude and character of selected water-quality benefits that can be produced in such a wetland and to identify critical processes that can be managed in remnant or restored riparian wetlands for amelioration of water quality. Little Bean Marsh averages 69 hectares in size, has a maximum depth of about 1 meter, and the majority of the marsh is covered by macrophytes. In 1997, 41 percent of the water received by Little Bean Marsh was from direct precipitation, 14 percent was from ground-water seepage, 30 percent from watershed runoff, and 15 percent was backflow from Bean Lake. Although, Little Bean Marsh was both a ground-water recharge and discharge area, discharge to the marsh was three times the recharge to ground water. Ground-water levels closely tracked marsh water levels indicating a strong hydraulic connection between ground water and the marsh. Reduced surface runoff and ground-water availability are stabilizing influences on marsh hydrology and probably contribute to the persistence of emergent vegetation. The rapid hydraulic connection between Little Bean Marsh and ground water indicates that the hydrologic regime of most wetlands along the lower Missouri River is largely a function of the altitude of the marsh bottom relative to the altitude of the water table. More water was lost from the marsh through evapotranspiration (59 percent) than all other pathways combined. This is partially because the transpiration process of abundant macrophytes can greatly contribute to the evapotranspiration above that lost from open water surfaces. Surface outflow accounted for 36 percent and ground-water seepage

  12. Gravel sediment routing from widespread, low-intensity landscape disturbance, Current River basin, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, R.B.; Gran, K.B.

    1999-01-01

    During the last 160 years, land-use changes in the Ozarks have had the potential to cause widespread, low-intensity delivery of excess amounts of gravel-sized sediment to stream channels. Previous studies have indicated that this excess gravel bedload is moving in wave-like forms through Ozarks drainage basins. The longitudinal, areal distribution of gravel bars along 160 km of the Current River, Missouri, was evaluated to determine the relative effects of valley-scale controls, tributary basin characteristics, and lagged sediment transport in creating areas of gravel accumulations. The longitudinal distribution of gravel-bar area shows a broad scale wave-like form with increases in gravel-bar area weakly associated with tributary junctions. Secondary peaks of gravel area with 1.8-4.1 km spacing (disturbance reaches) are superimposed on the broad form. Variations in valley width explain some, but not all, of the short-spacing variation in gravel-bar area. Among variables describing tributary drainage basin morphometry, present-day land use and geologic characteristics, only drainage area and road density relate even weakly to gravel-bar areal inventories. A simple, channel network-based sediment routing model shows that many of the features of the observed longitudinal gravel distribution can be replicated by uniform transport of sediment from widespread disturbances through a channel network. These results indicate that lagged sediment transport may have a dominant effect on the synoptic spatial distribution of gravel in Ozarks streams; present-day land uses are only weakly associated with present-day gravel inventories; and valley-scale characteristics have secondary controls on gravel accumulations in disturbance reaches.

  13. Effects of an oil spill on leafpack-inhabiting macroinvertebrates in the Chariton river, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, B.C.; Callahan, E.V.; Hurtubise, R.D.; Mueller, B.G.

    1998-01-01

    Artificial leaf packs were used to determine the effects of an oil spill on stream macroinvertebrate communities in the Chariton River, Missouri. Plastic mesh leaf retainers with approximately 10 g of leaves from five tree species were deployed at five sites (two upstream of the spill and three downstream) immediately after the spill and one year later. Four macroinvertebrate species dominating the community at upstream sites were virtually eliminated below the spill, including the stonefly Isoperla bilineata, the caddisfly Potamyia flava, the midge Thienemanniella xena, and blackfly larvae (Simulium sp.). Density of collector and shredder functional groups, and number of shredder taxa differed between upstream sites and the two furthest downstream sites during the 1990 sample period (Kruskal-Wallis w/Bonferroni paired comparisons, experiment wise error rate = 0.05). With one exception, no differences between sites were detected in the 1991-1992 sample period, indicating that the benthic community had at least partially recovered from the oil spill after one year. The odds of obtaining a sample with a small abundance of shredders (abundance < median) in 1990 was significantly greater downstream of the spill than upstream, and the odds of obtaining a sample with a small abundance of shredders at downstream sites was greater in 1990 than in 1991-1992. A similar pattern was observed in abundance and taxa richness of the collector functional group. No significant differences between the two sampling periods were detected at upstream sites. Observed effects appeared to be associated with oil sorption and substrate coating, creating conditions unsuitable for successful colonization.

  14. Limnological and fishery studies on Lake Sharpe, a main-stem Missouri River reservoir

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    June, Fred C.; Beckman, L.G.; Elrod, J.H.; O'Bryan, G.K.; Vogel, D.A.

    1987-01-01

    Lake Sharpe, the most recent of six main-stem Missouri River reservoirs to be impounded, began to fill in November 1963 and became fully operational in July 1966. At full pool it is 137 km long, and has a surface area of 22,600 ha and a volume of 2.34 km". It is operated as a flow-through power generation system that reregulates discharges from upstream Lake Oahe. Major changes in the water-management regimen during 1966-75 were increased summer discharges beginning in 1969 and increased peaking operations beginning in 1973. Lake Sharpe had a relatively short aging process because it filled rapidly, the water level remained relatively stable, and the waterexchange rate was high. Consequently, most physical, chemical, and biological characteristics were remarkably uniform during 1966–75. The temperature regimen was largely governed by inflow from Lake Oahe. Although the water mass warmed during summer, thermal stratification was generally transient, limited to the lower reservoir, and more common during periods of relatively low discharge rates in 1966–68 than in later years. Variation in turbidity was striking; the midsection of the reservoir was generally most turbid. Chemical ion composition of the water tended to be uniform; observed differences were localized and associated with tributary inflows. Phytoplankton abundance reached its highest levels during 1970–75. Composition of the zooplankton community changed during 1966–75; the abundance of cyclopoid copepods decreased and that of calanoid copepods and cladocerans increased. Total abundance varied during the 10-year period, but without apparent trend. Variation in abundance appeared to be associated with discharge rate, water temperature, and turbidity. The benthic community in 1967-68 consisted mostly of chironomid larvae, which were uniformly distributed over the length of the reservoir.

  15. Water-quality assessment of the Lower Grand River Basin, Missouri and Iowa, USA, in support of integrated conservation practices

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilkison, Donald H.; Armstrong, Daniel J.

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of agricultural conservation programmes to adequately reduce nutrient exports to receiving streams and to help limit downstream hypoxia issues remains a concern. Quantifying programme success can be difficult given that short-term basin changes may be masked by long-term water-quality shifts. We evaluated nutrient export at stream sites in the 44 months that followed a period of increased, integrated conservation implementation within the Lower Grand River Basin. These short-term responses were then compared with export that occurred in the main stem and adjacent rivers in northern Missouri over a 22-year period to better contextualize any recent changes. Results indicate that short-term (October 2010 through May 2014) total nitrogen (TN) concentrations in the Grand River were 20% less than the long-term average, and total phosphorus (TP) concentrations were 23% less. Nutrient reductions in the short term were primarily the result of the less-than-average precipitation and, consequently, streamflow that was 36% below normal. Therefore, nutrient concentrations measured in tributary streams were likely less than normal during the implementation period. Northern Missouri streamflow-normalized TN concentrations remained relatively flat or declined over the period 1991 through 2013 likely because available sources of nitrogen, determined as the sum of commercial fertilizers, available animal manures and atmospheric inputs, were typically less than crop requirement for much of that time frame. Conversely, flow-normalized stream TP concentrations increased over the past 22 years in northern Missouri streams, likely in response to many years of phosphorus inputs in excess of crop requirements. Stream nutrient changes were most pronounced during periods that coincided with the major tillage, planting and growth phases of row crops and increased streamflow. Nutrient reduction strategies targeted at the period February through June would likely have the

  16. Factors Affecting the Reproduction, Recruitment, Habitat, and Population Dynamics of Pallid Sturgeon and Shovelnose Sturgeon in the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Korschgen, Carl E., (Edited By)

    2007-01-01

    For more than a hundred years, human activities have modified the natural forces that control the Missouri River and its native fish fauna. While the ecological effects of regulation and channel engineering are understood in general, the current understanding is not sufficient to guide river restoration and management. The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) is in the third year of a multiagency research effort to determine the ecological requirements for reproduction and survival of the endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorhynchus) in the Missouri River. The multidisciplinary research strategy includes components of behavior, physiology, habitat use, habitat availability, and population modeling of all life stages. Shovelnose sturgeon are used to design the strategy because they are closely related to the pallid sturgeon and are often used as a surrogate species to develop new research tools or to examine the effects of management actions or environmental variables on sturgeon biology and habitat use. During fiscal years 2005 and 2006, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (USACE) provided funds to USGS for tasks associated with the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Program (CSRP) and for tasks associated with evaluation of the Sturgeon Response to Flow Modifications (SRFM). Because work activities of CSRP and SRFM are so integrated, we are providing information on activities that have been consolidated at the task level. These task activities represent chapters in this report.

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 7): Fulbright/Sac River Landfill, Missouri (first remedial action), September 1988. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1988-09-30

    The Fulbright and Sac River Landfills are located just north of the City of Springfield, Missouri, in a semirural area. The landfills were operated by the city for the disposal of municipal and industrial solid wastes. The site, however, could endanger human health or the environment in the future through exposure of the industrial wastes through erosion of the landfill cover. The selected remedial action for this site includes: removal of the drum and drum remnants found in the sinkhole and associated trench east of the Fulbright Landfill; sampling the removed contents to determine hazardous characteristics; proper offsite treatment or disposal.

  18. Decadal Droughts and Consequent Climate Information Needs of Stakeholders in the Missouri River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehta, V. M.; Rosenberg, N.; Mendoza, K.; Knutson, C.; Olsen, J. R.

    2011-12-01

    The Missouri River Basin (MRB) is the largest river basin in the U. S. A., and is one of the most important crop and livestock-producing regions in the world. A study of statistical associations between decadal climate variability (DCV) phenomena and hydro-meteorological (HM) variability in the MRB found that positive and negative phases of the Pacific Decadal Oscillation (PDO), the tropical Atlantic sea-surface temperature gradient variability (TAG), and the west Pacific Warm Pool temperature variability (WPWP) were significantly associated with decadal variability in precipitation and surface air temperature in the MRB, with combinations of various phases of these DCV phenomena associated with drought, flood, or neutral HM conditions. We have developed a methodology, based on hydrology and land use models, to assess whether the aforementioned DCVs directly affect the hydrology and crop yields in the MRB. The results of our research show that realistic valuses of indices of the three DCV phenomena can change water yields by as much as ±20% of average water yield in some locations; and dryland corn and spring and winter wheat yields by as much as 40-50% of average yield in some locations in the MRB. These impacts are also evident in MRB-aggregated water and crop yields. The combined and cumulative effects of these DCV phenomena on the MRB HM, water availability, and crop yields can be dramatic with important consequences for the MRB. In view of these quantified impacts of decadal droughts (and wet epochs) on water and crop yields in the MRB, we have conducted a series of related activities to assess decadal climate information (DCI) needs for decision support in water and food production sectors in the MRB. This assessment was carried out via workshops and individual meetings involving 120 representative stakeholders. In this oral presentation, the aforementioned decadal drought impacts on water and crop yields, major conclusions about users' awareness of decadal

  19. Delineation of flooding within the upper Mississippi River basin-flood of July 30, 1993, in Jefferson City and vicinity, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Terry W.

    1995-01-01

    This report provides Missouri River flood-peak elevation data and delineates the areal extent of flooding in Jefferson City and vicinity, Missouri, for July 30, 1993. The July 1993 flood is compared with the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) 100- and 500-year flood profiles. This report is one of a series of U.S. Geological Survey reports to document the flooding within the upper Mississippi River Basin in 1993 and to improve the technical base on which flood-plain management decisions can be made by other agencies.

  20. Dynamics of Plains Cottonwood ( Populus deltoides) Forests and Historical Landscape Change along Unchannelized Segments of the Missouri River, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dixon, Mark D.; Johnson, W. Carter; Scott, Michael L.; Bowen, Daniel E.; Rabbe, Lisa A.

    2012-05-01

    Construction of six large dams and reservoirs on the Missouri River over the last 50-75 years has resulted in major landscape changes and alterations in flow patterns, with implications for riparian forests dominated by plains cottonwood ( Populus deltoides). We quantified changes in land cover from 1892-1950s and the 1950s-2006 and the current extent and age structure of cottonwood forests on seven segments (two reservoir and five remnant floodplain) comprising 1127 km (53 %) of the unchannelized upper two-thirds of the Missouri River. Riparian forest area declined by 49 %; grassland 61 %; shrubland 52 %; and sandbar habitat 96 %; while agricultural cropland increased six-fold and river/reservoir surface area doubled from 1892 to 2006. Net rates of erosion and accretion declined between the 1892-1950s and 1950s-2006 periods. Accretion exceeded erosion on remnant floodplain segments, resulting in declines in active channel width, particularly in 1950s-2006. Across all study segments in 2006, most cottonwood stands (67 %) were >50 years old, 22 % were 25-50 years old, and only 10 % were <25 years old. Among stands <50 years old, the higher proportion of 25-50 year old stands represents recruitment that accompanied initial post-dam channel narrowing; while declines in sandbar and shrubland area and the low proportion of stands <25 years old suggest declines in geomorphic dynamism and limited recruitment under recent river management. Future conservation and restoration efforts should focus both on limiting further loss of remnant cottonwood stands and developing approaches to restore river dynamics and cottonwood recruitment processes.

  1. Dynamics of plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides) forests and historical landscape change along unchannelized segments of the Missouri River, USA.

    PubMed

    Dixon, Mark D; Johnson, W Carter; Scott, Michael L; Bowen, Daniel E; Rabbe, Lisa A

    2012-05-01

    Construction of six large dams and reservoirs on the Missouri River over the last 50-75 years has resulted in major landscape changes and alterations in flow patterns, with implications for riparian forests dominated by plains cottonwood (Populus deltoides). We quantified changes in land cover from 1892-1950s and the 1950s-2006 and the current extent and age structure of cottonwood forests on seven segments (two reservoir and five remnant floodplain) comprising 1127 km (53 %) of the unchannelized upper two-thirds of the Missouri River. Riparian forest area declined by 49 %; grassland 61 %; shrubland 52 %; and sandbar habitat 96 %; while agricultural cropland increased six-fold and river/reservoir surface area doubled from 1892 to 2006. Net rates of erosion and accretion declined between the 1892-1950s and 1950s-2006 periods. Accretion exceeded erosion on remnant floodplain segments, resulting in declines in active channel width, particularly in 1950s-2006. Across all study segments in 2006, most cottonwood stands (67 %) were >50 years old, 22 % were 25-50 years old, and only 10 % were <25 years old. Among stands <50 years old, the higher proportion of 25-50 year old stands represents recruitment that accompanied initial post-dam channel narrowing; while declines in sandbar and shrubland area and the low proportion of stands <25 years old suggest declines in geomorphic dynamism and limited recruitment under recent river management. Future conservation and restoration efforts should focus both on limiting further loss of remnant cottonwood stands and developing approaches to restore river dynamics and cottonwood recruitment processes. PMID:22476667

  2. Delineation of flooding within the upper Mississippi River Basin, flood of July 10 and 27, 1993, in Kansas City Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Perry, Charles A.; Clement, Ralph W.; Studley, Seth E.

    1997-01-01

    During spring and summer 1993, record flooding inundated many of the stream and river valleys in the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins. The flooding was the result of widespread and numerous intense thunderstorms that, together with saturated soils, produced large volumes of runoff. The magnitude of flooding exceeded the 100-year discharge values (1-percent chance of exceedance in any given year) at many streamflow-gaging stations in Illinois, Iowa, Kansas, Minnesota, Missouri, Nebraska, North Dakota, South Dakota, and Wisconsin. The flooding was unusual because of its long duration and widespread severe damage. The Mississippi and the Missouri Rivers were above flood stage for more than 1 month at several locations along their lengths. Millions of acres of agricultural and urban lands were inundated for weeks, and unofficial damage estimates exceeded $10 billion in the flooded States (Parrett and others, 1993),During summer 1993, large parts of Kansas City, Missouri, and Kansas City, Kansas, and vicinity were flooded from overflows of the Missouri and the Kansas Rivers and numerous smaller tributaries, This report provides flood-peak elevation data and delineates the arcalcktent of the 1993 floods in the Kansas City metropolitan area for July 10 and 27, 1993 (fig. 1A, sheet 1: B, sheet 2: C, sheet 3). The 1993 flood elevations and extent of flooding are compared with flood-plain boundaries defined by Flood Insurance Studies conducted by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) for cities and counties in the area (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 1975–95).This report is one of a series of U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) investigations that document the effects of the 1993 flooding of the upper Mississippi and the Missouri River Basins and that improve the technical base from which flood-plain management decisions can be made by other agencies.

  3. The Power to Detect Trends in Missouri River Fish Populations within the Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bryan, Janice L.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Gladish, Dan; Holan, Scott; Ellerseick, Mark

    2010-01-01

    As with all large rivers in the United States, the Missouri River has been altered, with approximately 32.5 percent of the main stem length impounded and 32.5 percent channelized. These physical alterations to the environment have had effects on the fisheries, but studies examining the effects of alterations have been localized and for short periods of time. In response to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service biological opinion, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers initiated monitoring of the fish community of the Missouri River in 2003. The goal of the Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program is to provide information to detect changes in populations and habitat preferences with time for pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) and native target species in the Missouri River Basin. To determine statistical power of the Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program, a power analysis was conducted using a normal linear mixed model with variance component estimates based on the first 3 years of data (2003 to 2005). In cases where 3 years of data were unavailable, estimates were obtained using those data. It was determined that at least 20 years of data, sampling 12 bends with 8 subsamples per bend, would be required to detect a 5 percent annual decline in most of the target fish populations. Power varied between Zones. Zone 1 (upstream from Lake Sakakawea) did not have any species/gear type combinations with adequate power, whereas Zone 3 (downstream from Gavins Point Dam) had 19 species/gear type combinations with adequate power. With a slight increase in the sampling effort to 12 subsamples per bend, the Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program has adequate power to detect declines in shovelnose sturgeon (S. platorynchus) throughout the entire Missouri River because of large catch rates. The lowest level of non-occurrence (in other words, zero catches) at the bend level for pallid sturgeon was 0.58 using otter trawls in Zone 1. Consequently, the power of the

  4. Hydrodynamic Modeling of Flood Dynamics and Restoration Potential of Lower Missouri River Floodplains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindner, G. A.

    2012-12-01

    Lower Missouri River floodplains have the potential to provide multiple ecosystem services including agricultural production, floodwater storage, nutrient processing, and provision of habitats. In this research, a 2-dimensional hydrodynamic model of a representative looped floodplain bottom of approximately 20 km is utilized to explore how floodplain inundation contributes to ecosystem benefits and costs. High resolution 2-dimensional hydrodynamic modeling provides insights into the way velocities, flood stages, residence times, and transported constituents (sediment, nutrients, and fish larvae, for example) are affected by levee geometry, floodplain vegetation patterns, and flood magnitude and duration. The utility of 2-dimensional numerical hydraulic models to represent the channel and floodplain are demonstrated at a scale relevant to understanding processes that control channel/floodplain dynamics. The sensitivity of model response to alternative land use scenarios, including levee setbacks and variable overbank roughness, is quantified using hydraulic parameters such as velocity, water level, conveyance, and residence time. The 2-dimensional models are calibrated to existing 1-dimensional modeling solutions and field measurements of water surface from 1993 and 2007 for the 2-year, 5-year, and 10-year recurrence intervals. Calibration runs with current levee configurations are matched to approximately ±0.1 meters. Simulations of alternative land use scenarios demonstrate the tradeoffs between ecological restoration and flood risk reductions. Levee setbacks with low hydraulic roughness associated with traditional row crop agriculture on the floodplains have the greatest potential for flood stage reductions, while native plant communities with higher roughness can negate the effects of the setbacks by increasing water levels due to enhanced frictional resistance. Residence times, which are presumed to be related to ecosystem services, demonstrate increasingly

  5. Factors associated with succession of abandoned agricultural lands along the Lower Missouri River, U.S.A

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thogmartin, W.E.; Gallagher, M.; Young, N.; Rohweder, J.J.; Knutson, M.G.

    2009-01-01

    The 1993 flood of the Missouri River led to the abandonment of agriculture on considerable land in the floodplain. This abandonment led to a restoration opportunity for the U.S. Federal Government, purchasing those lands being sold by farmers. Restoration of this floodplain is complicated, however, by an imperfect understanding of its past environmental and vegetative conditions. We examined environmental conditions associated with the current placement of young forests and wet prairies as a guide to the potential successional trajectory for abandoned agricultural land subject to flooding. We used Bayesian mixed-effects logistic regression to examine the effects of flood frequency, soil drainage, distance from the main channel, and elevation on whether a site was in wet prairie or in forest. Study site was included as a random effect, controlling for site-specific differences not measured in our study. We found, after controlling for the effect of site, that early-successional forest sites were closer to the river and at a lower elevation but occurred on drier soils than wet prairie. In a regulated river such as the lower Missouri River, wet prairie sites are relatively isolated from the main channel compared to early-successional forest, despite occurring on relatively moister soils. The modeled results from this study may be used to predict the potential successional fate of the acquired agricultural lands, and along with information on wildlife assemblages associated with wet prairie and forest can be used to predict potential benefit of these acquisitions to wildlife conservation. ?? 2009 Society for Ecological Restoration International.

  6. Repeated multibeam echosounder hydrographic surveys of 15 selected bridge crossings along the Missouri River from Niobrara to Rulo, Nebraska, during the flood of 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Densmore, Brenda K.; Strauch, Kellan R.

    2014-01-01

    In 2011, unprecedented flooding in the Missouri River prompted transportation agencies to increase the frequency of monitoring riverbed elevations near bridges that cross the Missouri River. Hydrographic surveys were completed in cooperation with the Nebraska Department of Roads, using a multibeam echosounder at 15 highway bridges spanning the Missouri River from Niobrara to Rulo, Nebraska during and after the extreme 2011 flood. Evidence of bed elevation change near bridge piers was documented. The greatest amount of bed elevation change during the 2011 flood documented for this study occurred at the Burt County Missouri River Bridge at Decatur, Nebraska, where scour of about 45 feet, from before flooding, occurred between a bridge abutment and pier. Of the remaining sites, highway bridges where bed elevation change near piers appeared to have exceeded 10 feet include the Abraham Lincoln Memorial Bridge at Blair, Nebr., Bellevue Bridge at Bellevue, Nebr., and Nebraska City Bridge at Nebraska City, Nebr. Hydrographic surveys at 14 of the 15 sites were completed in mid-July and again in early October or late-November 2011. Near three of the bridges, the bed elevation of locations surveyed in July increased by more than 10 feet, on average, by late October or early November 2011. Bed elevations increased between 1 and 10 feet, on average, near six bridges. Near the remaining four bridges, bed elevations decreased between 1 and 4 feet, on average, from July to late October or early November.

  7. MONITORING ASSISTANCE ON THE UPPER MISSOURI RIVER FROM FORT PECK DAM FACE TO THE NORTH DAKOTA LINE IN SUPPORT OF A TMDL FOR THIS 303(D) LISTED SEGMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    Working through a cooperative agreement of the United States Geological Survey to obtain quarterly samples for nutrients, major ions, metals (dissolved and total recoverable), and suspended sediment on the Missouri River at three different sites from the dam face to the North Dak...

  8. Discussion of "Natural hydrograph of the Missouri River near Sioux City and the least tern and piping plover" by Donald G. Jorgensen

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Catlin, D.; Jacobson, R.; Sherfy, M.; Anteau, M.; Felio, J.; Fraser, J.; Lott, C.; Shaffer, T.; Stucker, J.

    2010-01-01

    The author analyzed stream-flow data from a single gauging station to predict preengineering flooding frequency for "sandbar islands adjacent to stream gauge on the Missouri River at Sioux City." He predicted dates that sandbars would be exposed and discussed his results relative to reproduction by least terns (Sternula antillarum) and piping plovers (Charadrius melodus). His analysis predicted sandbar inundation during nesting and concluded that "successful migrations of age-zero juveniles leading to recruitment would not have resulted from the use of the sandbar islands for attempted reproduction most years in the Sioux City area." We argue that the author (1) overlooked published historical records of breeding terns and plovers on the Missouri River and nearby systems, (2) inaccurately portrayed inundation for Missouri River sandbars and the importance of high flows for forming sandbars, and (3) underestimated these species' ability to withstand periodic reproductive failures. We conclude that the data do not support the author's contention that the preengineered Missouri River was "unfriendly" to terns and plovers.

  9. Emergent Sandbar Construction for Least Terns on the Missouri River: Effects on Forage Fishes in Shallow-Water Habitats

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stucker, J.H.; Buhl, D.A.; Sherfy, M.H.

    2011-01-01

    Emergent sandbars on the Missouri River are actively managed for two listed bird species, piping plovers and interior least terns. As a plunge-diving piscivore, endangered least terns rely on ready access to appropriately sized slender-bodied fish: <52mm total length for adults and <34mm total length for young chicks. As part of a multi-agency recovery programme, aimed at enhancing nesting habitat for plovers and terns, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers mechanically created several emergent sandbars on the Missouri River. However, it was unknown whether sandbar construction is a benefit or a detriment to forage abundance for least terns. Therefore, we studied the shallowwater (<1.5 m) fish community near river and mechanically created emergent sandbars during three nesting seasons (2006-2008). We sampled every 2 weeks each year from late May to July within 15-16 areas to document the relative abundance, species richness and size classes of fish. Fish relative abundance was negatively related to depth. Catches were dominated by schooling species, including emerald shiner, sand shiner, spotfin shiner and bigmouth buffalo. Significant inter-annual differences in relative abundance were observed, with generally increasing trends in intra-seasonal relative abundance of shiners and the smallest size classes of fish (<34 mm). Significant differences in the fish communities between the sandbar types were not detected in this study. Results suggest that mechanical sandbar habitats host comparable fish communities at similar levels of relative abundance. Further analyses are required to evaluate if the levels of fish relative abundance are adequate to support least tern foraging and reproduction.

  10. Development of a channel classification to evaluate potential for cottonwood restoration, lower segments of the Middle Missouri River, South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Huhmann, Brittany L.

    2010-01-01

    This report documents development of a spatially explicit river and flood-plain classification to evaluate potential for cottonwood restoration along the Sharpe and Fort Randall segments of the Middle Missouri River. This project involved evaluating existing topographic, water-surface elevation, and soils data to determine if they were sufficient to create a classification similar to the Land Capability Potential Index (LCPI) developed by Jacobson and others (U.S. Geological Survey Scientific Investigations Report 2007-5256) and developing a geomorphically based classification to apply to evaluating restoration potential. Existing topographic, water-surface elevation, and soils data for the Middle Missouri River were not sufficient to replicate the LCPI. The 1/3-arc-second National Elevation Dataset delineated most of the topographic complexity and produced cumulative frequency distributions similar to a high-resolution 5-meter topographic dataset developed for the Lower Missouri River. However, lack of bathymetry in the National Elevation Dataset produces a potentially critical bias in evaluation of frequently flooded surfaces close to the river. High-resolution soils data alone were insufficient to replace the information content of the LCPI. In test reaches in the Lower Missouri River, soil drainage classes from the Soil Survey Geographic Database database correctly classified 0.8-98.9 percent of the flood-plain area at or below the 5-year return interval flood stage depending on state of channel incision; on average for river miles 423-811, soil drainage class correctly classified only 30.2 percent of the flood-plain area at or below the 5-year return interval flood stage. Lack of congruence between soil characteristics and present-day hydrology results from relatively rapid incision and aggradation of segments of the Missouri River resulting from impoundments and engineering. The most sparsely available data in the Middle Missouri River were water

  11. Determining Physical Fish Habitat in Large Rivers with Multibeam Sonar: An Example with Pallid Sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delonay, A. J.; McElroy, B. J.; Jacobson, R. B.; Thorsby, M. R.

    2010-12-01

    Fish in large rivers require a range of fluvial environments to complete their life cycles. Conditions in these environments often preclude the direct observation of physical habitats and how fish use them to perform vital life functions. Multibeam sonar provides excellent capability for the determination of characteristics of physical habitats in order to relate them to their biotic uses and ecological functions. The endangered pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) is a rheophilic benthic fish and one of the dominant predators in the Lower Missouri River. Within its preferred main-channel and channel-border habitats, bed topography (roughness) is a primary determinant of physical habitat for pallid sturgeon. Beyond its importance as the habitat terrain, bed topography is intimately tied to other physical characteristics: existence of flow refugia, migration pathways, magnitude of sediment flux, substrate texture, and turbulence conditions. Development of a detailed understanding of what constitutes effective spawning habitat is critical to management of the species because of concerns that habitat quantity or quality may be limiting reproduction. Here we present data collected from a spring 2010 spawning location over the duration of the spawning event. A reproductive female pallid sturgeon implanted with an acoustic transmitter was tracked 48 km to an upstream apex where the fish is presumed to have spawned. Positional data were combined with data on the fish’s ambient temperature and pressure from data storage tags implanted in the fish. The resulting depth estimates from pressure data allow for three-dimensional assessments of the sturgeon's position co-registered with multibeam bathymetric data. From the bathymetry, we estimated the topographic roughness in the vicinity of the fish by evaluating topographic variability. This roughness approximates the characteristic height of local bed forms. We also compared fish locations and multibeam bathymetry with

  12. A list of references on the occurrence, availability, and character of ground water in the Missouri River Basin

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Busch, Eldon A., (compiler)

    1950-01-01

    This compilation of ground-water references was prepared as an aid to the field men engaged in ground-water investigations in the Missouri River Basin. It is thought that an acquaintance with the available literature on the area in which a field man is working may on occasion not only save him the effort of duplicating work that has already been done in his area but that he will find the reports of other workers on the same problem both informative and challenging. It is suggested that each field man make every effort to obtain copies of the literature on his area from nearby sources before he calls on superior for help in obtained copied of the desired references. It is not presumed that this bibliography is complete. In order that it may be improved upon at a later date, the field man is requested to enter on the blank pages at the end of the listed reference all other references he may discover from time to time. Then, if the demand for a revision of the bibliography is sufficiently great, these added references can be inserted in the appropriate places. Suggestions as to an improved arrangement of the material will be welcomed by the Missouri Basin Ground-Water Headquarters Office.

  13. Ecological Requirements for Pallid Sturgeon Reproduction and Recruitment in the Lower Missouri River: A Research Synthesis 2005-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    DeLonay, Aaron J.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Papoulias, Diana M.; Simpkins, Darin G.; Wildhaber, Mark L.; Reuter, Joanna M.; Bonnot, Tom W.; Chojnacki, Kimberly A.; Korschgen, Carl E.; Mestl, Gerald E.; Mac, Michael J.

    2009-01-01

    This report provides a synthesis of results obtained between 2005 and 2008 from the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Program, an interagency collaboration between the U.S. Geological Survey, Nebraska Game and Parks Commission, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers' Missouri River Recovery - Integrated Science Program. The goal of the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Program is to improve fundamental understanding of reproductive ecology of the pallid sturgeon with the intent that improved understanding will inform river and species management decisions. Specific objectives include: *Determining movement, habitat-use, and reproductive behavior of pallid sturgeon; *Understanding reproductive physiology of pallid sturgeon and relations to environmental conditions; *Determining origin, transport, and fate of drifting pallid sturgeon larvae, and evaluating bottlenecks for recruitment of early life stages; *Quantifying availability and dynamics of aquatic habitats needed by pallid sturgeon for all life stages; and *Managing databases, integrating understanding, and publishing relevant information into the public domain. Management actions to increase reproductive success and survival of pallid sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River have been focused on flow regime, channel morphology, and propagation. Integration of 2005-08 Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Program research provides insight into linkages among flow regime, re-engineered channel morphology, and pallid sturgeon reproduction and survival. The research approach of the Comprehensive Sturgeon Research Program integrates opportunistic field studies, field-based experiments, and controlled laboratory studies. The field study plan is designed to explore the role of flow regime and associated environmental cues using two complementary approaches. An upstream-downstream approach compares sturgeon reproductive behavior between an upstream section of the Lower Missouri River with highly

  14. Seismic-reflection profiles of the New Madrid seismic zone-data along the Mississippi River near Caruthersville, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Crone, A.J.; Harding, S.T.; Russ, D.P.; Shedlock, K.M.

    1986-01-01

    Three major seismic-reflection programs have been conducted by the USGS in the New Madrid seismic zone. The first program consisted of 32 km of conventional Vibroseis profiling designed to investigate the subsurface structure associated with scarps and lineaments in northwestern Tennessee (Zoback, 1979). A second, more extensive Vibroseis program collected about 250 km of data from all parts of the New Madrid seismic zone in Missouri, Arkansas, and Tennessee (Hamilton and Zoback, 1979, 1982; Zoback and others, 1980). The profiles presented here are part of the third program that collected about 240 km of high-resolution seismic-reflection data from a boat along the Mississippi River between Osceola, Ark., and Wickliffe, Ky. (fig. 1). The data for profiles A, B, C, and D were collected between river miles 839-1/2 and 850-1/2 from near the Interstate-155 bridge to upstream of Caruthersville, Mo. (fig. 2). Profiles on this part of the river are important for three reasons: (1) they connect many of the land-based profiles on either side of the river, (2) they are near the northeast termination of a linear, 120km-long, northeast-southwest zone of seismicity that extends from northeast Arkansas to Caruthersville, Mo. (Stauder, 1982; fig. 1), and (3) they cross the southwesterly projection of the Cottonwood Grove fault (fig. 1), a fault having a substantial amount of vertical Cenozoic offset (Zoback and others, 1980).

  15. Geomorphic Classification and Assessment of Channel Dynamics in the Missouri National Recreational River, South Dakota and Nebraska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2006-01-01

    A multiscale geomorphic classification was established for the 39-mile, 59-mile, and adjacent segments of the Missouri National Recreational River administered by the National Park Service in South Dakota and Nebraska. The objective of the classification was to define naturally occurring clusters of geomorphic characteristics that would be indicative of discrete sets of geomorphic processes, with the intent that such a classification would be useful in river-management and rehabilitation decisions. The statistical classification was based on geomorphic characteristics of the river collected from 1999 orthophotography and the persistence of classified units was evaluated by comparison with similar datasets for 2003 and 2004 and by evaluating variation of bank erosion rates by geomorphic class. Changes in channel location and form were also explored using imagery and maps from 1993-2004, 1941 and 1894. The multivariate classification identified a hierarchy of naturally occurring clusters of reach-scale geomorphic characteristics. The simplest level of the hierarchy divides the river from segments into discrete reaches characterized by single and multithread channels and additional hierarchical levels established 4-part and 10-part classifications. The classification system presents a physical framework that can be applied to prioritization and design of bank stabilization projects, design of habitat rehabilitation projects, and stratification of monitoring and assessment sampling programs.

  16. Neural network modelling of sediment-discharge relationships: Pictorial analysis of six computational methodologies applied to two rivers in Missouri

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghani, N. Ab; Abrahart, R. J.; Clifford, N. J.

    2009-04-01

    Neural networks can be trained to model the sediment-discharge relationship: numerous illustrative applications exist. The standard method of reporting involves using a scatterplot of observed versus predicted records, plus a handful of global statistics, to support an assessment of model skill. This traditional approach will nevertheless result in undesirable side effects since it reinforces the 'black box' criticisms and associated demonisation that is sometimes levelled at computational intelligence solutions: no 'line-of-best-fit' is ever supplied. This paper in contrast compares and evaluates six computational methods for modelling the sediment-discharge relationship from a structural and behavioural standpoint in which the exact nature of each model is visualised for the purposes of diagnostic appraisal and scientific enlightenment. The following methods are compared: backpropagation neural network; corrected power function; simple linear regression; piecewise linear regression using an M5 Model Tree; LOWESS; and Robust LOWESS. Modelling is restricted to a consideration of bivariate relationships. The models were developed on daily river discharge and sediment concentration datasets for two rivers in Missouri: Lower Salt River and Little Black River. Each dataset was divided into two parts using different methods and each model was first calibrated on one sub-set and thereafter tested on the other. The datasets were next swapped over and the process repeated. Each model is also evaluated using statistical measures calculated in HydroTest (http://www.hydrotest.org.uk/). The need for more benchmarking exercises of a similar nature is highlighted.

  17. Demographics and chronology of a spawning aggregation of blue sucker (Cycleptus elongatus) in the Grand River, Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vokoun, Jason C.; Guerrant, Travis L.; Rabeni, Charles F.

    2003-01-01

    The blue sucker (Cycleptus elongatus) was sampled as individuals arrived, spawned, and departed from a spawning rime in the Grand River of northcentral Missouri, USA. The Grand River basin was not known to support blue sucker reproduction with few individuals ever recorded. The spawning site is unique in character for the lower river. Individuals began arriving in early April when water temperatures reached 10–12°C. Females with freely-flowing roe were sampled in late April after a large rise in river stage and concurrent lowering of the water temperature 4–5 degrees to 16.5°C. The spawning aggregation had a mean age of 15 y and ranged from 9 to 22 y based on scales that probably underestimated true ages. Males outnumbered females 5.5:1. Mean length was 659 mm for males and 721 mm for females. Females were longer at age than males and no significant age-length relationship was evident.

  18. Water yield responses to high and low spatial resolution climate change scenarios in the Missouri River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, Mark C.; Hotchkiss, Rollin H.; Mearns, Linda O.

    2003-02-01

    Water yield responses to two climate change scenarios of different spatial scales were compared for the Missouri River Basin. A coarse-resolution climate change scenario was created from runs of the Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization General Circulation Model (CSIRO GCM). The high-resolution climate change scenario was developed using runs of the Regional Climate Model RegCM, for which the GCM provided the initial and lateral boundary conditions. Water yield responses to the high- and low-resolution climate change scenarios were investigated using the Soil and Water Assessment Tool (SWAT). Basin-wide water yield increased for both GCM and RegCM scenarios but with an overall greater increase for the RegCM scenario. Significant differences in water yields were found between the GCM and RegCM climate scenarios.

  19. Drift dynamics of larval pallid sturgeon and shovelnose sturgeon in a natural side channel of the Upper Missouri River, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P.J.; Fuller, D.B.; Holte, L.D.; Lott, R.D.; Viste, W.; Brandt, T.F.; Legare, R.G.

    2008-01-01

    The drift dynamics of larval shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus (1, 2, 6, and 10 d posthatch [dph]) and pallid sturgeon S. albus (1, 2, 5, 9, 11, and 17 dph) were examined in a natural side channel of the Missouri River to quantify the vertical drift location of larvae in the water column, determine the drift velocity of larvae relative to water velocity, and simulate the cumulative distance (km) drifted by larvae during ontogenetic development. Larvae were released at the side-channel inlet and sampled at points 100, 500, 900, and 1,300 m downstream. Larvae drifted primarily near the riverbed, as 58-79% of recaptured shovelnose sturgeon and 63-89% of recaptured pallid sturgeon were sampled in the lower 0.5 m of the water column. The transition from the drifting to the benthic life stage was initiated at 6 dph (mean length, 15.6 mm) for shovelnose sturgeon and at 11-17 dph (mean length, 18.1-20.3 mm) for pallid sturgeon. Across ages, the drift rates of larval shovelnose sturgeon averaged 0.09-0.16 m/s slower than the mean water column velocity. The drift rates of pallid sturgeon were similar to or slightly slower (0.03-0.07 m/s) than the mean water column velocity for 1-11-dph larvae. Conversely, 17-dph larval pallid sturgeon dispersed downstream at a much slower rate (mean, 0.20 m/s slower than the mean water column velocity) owing to their transition to benthic habitats. Drift simulations indicated that the average larval shovelnose sturgeon may drift from 94 to 250 km and the average larval pallid sturgeon may drift from 245 to 530 km, depending on water velocity. Differences in larval drift dynamics between species provide a possible explanation for differences in recruitment between shovelnose sturgeon and pallid sturgeon in the upper Missouri River. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  20. First-year growth, condition, and size-selective winter mortality of freshwater drum in the lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P.J.; Guy, C.S.

    2004-01-01

    We compared first-year growth and relative condition (Kn) of the 1997 and 1998 year-classes of freshwater drum Aplodinotus grunniens among three sites in a 235-km reach of the channelized Missouri River and tested for the occurrence of size-selective overwinter mortality during the first winter. Prewinter mean length was 15 mm greater, mean weight was 8 g greater, and mean Kn was 5% greater at the upstream site than at the downstream site. The prewinter mean length of age-0 freshwater drum was significantly greater in 1997 (115 mm) than in 1998 (109 mm), but Kn was significantly greater in 1998 (107) than in 1997 (102). There was no evidence that density-dependent interactions influenced prewinter growth and Kn. Size-selective overwinter mortality of the smallest size-classes of freshwater drum occurred at two of three sites during the 1997-1998 winter, and K n decreased 9-15%. Size-selective overwinter mortality of the 1998 cohort of freshwater drum did not occur during the 1998-1999 winter, and K n declined 0-10%. A prolonged growing season (through early December 1998), in conjunction with less severe winter water temperature conditions, apparently minimized the incidence of size-selective overwinter mortality for the 1998 cohort of freshwater drum. We conclude that size-selective overwinter mortality of age-0 freshwater drum occurs in the lower channelized Missouri River but depends on the length of the prewinter growing season, winter duration, and the severity of winter water temperatures.

  1. Simulation of ground-water flow, contributing recharge areas, and ground-water travel time in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2004-01-01

    The Missouri River alluvial aquifer near Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, supplies all or part of the drinking water for Ft. Leavenworth; Leavenworth, Kansas; Weston, Missouri; and cooling water for the Kansas City Power and Light, Iatan Power Plant. Ground water at three sites within the alluvial aquifer near the Ft. Leavenworth well field is contaminated with trace metals and organic compounds and concerns have been raised about the potential contamination of drinking-water supplies. In 2001, the U.S. Geological Survey, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, and the U.S. Army began a study of ground-water flow in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near Ft. Leavenworth. Hydrogeologic data from 173 locations in the study area was used to construct a ground-water flow model (MODFLOW-2000) and particle-tracking program (MODPATH) to determine the direction and travel time of ground-water flow and contributing recharge areas for water-supply well fields within the alluvial aquifer. The modeled area is 28.6 kilometers by 32.6 kilometers and contains the entire study area. The model uses a uniform grid size of 100 meters by 100 meters and contains 372,944 cells in 4 layers, 286 columns, and 326 rows. The model represents the alluvial aquifer using four layers of variable thickness with no intervening confining layers. The model was calibrated to both quasi-steady-state and transient hydraulic head data collected during the study and ground-water flow was simulated for five well-pumping/river-stage scenarios. The model accuracy was calculated using the root mean square error between actual measurements of hydraulic head and model generated hydraulic head at the end of each model run. The accepted error for the model calibrations were below the maximum measurement errors. The error for the quasi-steady-state calibration was 0.82 meter; for the transient calibration it was 0.33 meter. The shape, size, and ground-water travel time within the contributing recharge area for each well or well

  2. Gonadosomatic index and fecundity of Lower Missouri and Middle Mississippi River endangered pallid sturgeon estimated using minimally invasive techniques

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Albers, J.L.; Wildhaber, M.L.; DeLonay, A.J.

    2013-01-01

    Minimally invasive, non-lethal methods of ultrasonography were used to assess sex, egg diameter, fecundity, gonad volume, and gonadosomatic index, as well as endoscopy to visually assess the reproductive stage of Scaphirhynchus albus. Estimated mean egg diameters of 2.202 ± 0.187 mm and mean fecundity of 44 531 ± 23 940 eggs were similar to previous studies using invasive techniques. Mean S. albus gonadosomatic indices (GSI) for reproductive and nonreproductive females were 16.16 and 1.26%, respectively, while reproductive and non-reproductive male GSI were 2.00 and 0.43%, respectively. There was no relationship between hybrid status or capture location and GSI. Mean fecundity was 48.5% higher than hatchery spawn estimates. Fecundity increased as fork length increased but did so more dramatically in the upper river kilometers of the Missouri River. By examining multiple fish over multiple years, the reproductive cycle periodicity for hatchery female S. albus was found to be 2-4 years and river dwelling males 1-4 years. The use of ultrasonic and endoscopic methods in combination was shown to be helpful in tracking individual gonad characteristics over multi-year reproductive cycles.

  3. Relations Among Geology, Physiography, Land Use, and Stream Habitat Conditions in the Buffalo and Current River Systems, Missouri and Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Panfil, Maria S.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2001-01-01

    This study investigated links between drainage-basin characteristics and stream habitat conditions in the Buffalo National River, Arkansas and the Ozark National Scenic Riverways, Missouri. It was designed as an associative study - the two parks were divided into their principle tributary drainage basins and then basin-scale and stream-habitat data sets were gathered and compared between them. Analyses explored the relative influence of different drainage-basin characteristics on stream habitat conditions. They also investigated whether a relation between land use and stream characteristics could be detected after accounting for geologic and physiographic differences among drainage basins. Data were collected for three spatial scales: tributary drainage basins, tributary stream reaches, and main-stem river segments of the Current and Buffalo Rivers. Tributary drainage-basin characteristics were inventoried using a Geographic Information System (GIS) and included aspects of drainage-basin physiography, geology, and land use. Reach-scale habitat surveys measured channel longitudinal and cross-sectional geometry, substrate particle size and embeddedness, and indicators of channel stability. Segment-scale aerial-photo based inventories measured gravel-bar area, an indicator of coarse sediment load, along main-stem rivers. Relations within and among data sets from each spatial scale were investigated using correlation analysis and multiple linear regression. Study basins encompassed physiographically distinct regions of the Ozarks. The Buffalo River system drains parts of the sandstone-dominated Boston Mountains and of the carbonate-dominated Springfield and Salem Plateaus. The Current River system is within the Salem Plateau. Analyses of drainage-basin variables highlighted the importance of these physiographic differences and demonstrated links among geology, physiography, and land-use patterns. Buffalo River tributaries have greater relief, steeper slopes, and more

  4. Delineation of flooding within the upper Mississippi River Basin, flood of August 1-3, 1993, in St. Louis and vicinity, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alexander, Terry W.

    1998-01-01

    A five-sheet hydrologic investigations atlas provides flood-peak elevation data and delineates the areal extent of flooding of the Missouri, the Mississippi, and the Meramec Rivers and the River des Peres in St. Louis and vicinity from August 1 through 3, 1993. The August 1993 flood is compared with the Federal Emergency Management Agency's (FEMA) 100- and 500-year flood profiles.This atlas is one of a series of USGS reports that documents the 1993 flooding in the upper Mississippi River Basin. The information presented here will improve the technical base on which flood-plain management decisions can be made.

  5. Assessment of Lower Missouri River Physical Aquatic Habitat and Its Use by Adult Sturgeon (Genus Scaphirhynchus), 2005-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reuter, Joanna M.; Jacobson, Robert B.; Elliott, Caroline M.; DeLonay, Aaron J.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents an exploratory analysis of habitat availability and use by adult Scaphirhynchus sturgeon on the Lower Missouri River from Gavins Point Dam, South Dakota, to the junction with the Mississippi River. The analysis is based on two main data sources collected from 2005 to 2007: (1) a compilation of 153 reach-scale habitat maps (mean reach length, 2.4 kilometers) derived from boat-collected hydroacoustic data and (2) a sturgeon location dataset from which 378 sturgeon telemetry locations are associated with the maps (within 7 days of the mapping and within 10 percent of the discharge). The report focuses on: (1) longitudinal patterns of geomorphic and hydraulic characteristics revealed by the collection of reach maps; (2) assessment of environmental characteristics at sturgeon locations in the context of the mapped reaches; and (3) consideration of spatial distribution of habitat conditions that sturgeon appear to select. Longitudinal patterns of geomorphology, hydraulics, and associated habitats relate strongly to the engineered state of the river. Reaches within each of the following river sections tended to share similar geomorphic, hydrologic, and hydraulic characteristics: the Minimally Engineered section (Gavins Point Dam to Sioux City, Iowa), the Upstream Channelized section (Sioux City, Iowa, to the junction with the Kansas River), and the Downstream Channelized section (Kansas River to the junction with the Mississippi River). Adult sturgeon occupy nearly the full range of available values for each continuous variable assessed: depth, depth slope, depth-averaged velocity, velocity gradient, and Froude number (a dimensionless number relating velocity to depth). However, in the context of habitat available in a reach, sturgeon tend to select some areas over others. Reproductive female shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus), in particular, were often found in parts of the reach with one or more of the following characteristics: high

  6. Social and Economic Consequences of Extreme Hydrological Regimes in Relationship to Federal Hydropower Generation on the Missouri River

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    parrish, M. A.; Otstot, R.; Moradkhani, H.

    2011-12-01

    After suffering from a ten year drought the main-stem Missouri reservoir system has now reached full capacity with flooding across a significant part of the region. Hydropower generation as a secondary purpose to both navigation and flood control is both directly and indirectly effected by these extreme hydrological regimes with sub-optimal generation timing, loss of dependable capacity, decrease in turbine efficiency, and operating in-flexibilities to buffer other renewable resources such as wind power. Hydropower operations under these extreme conditions are expected to continue with the recent SECURE Water Act Report issued by the Bureau of Reclamation predicting that the mean annual basin runoff may increase as much as 9.7% over the next fifty years. This study seeks to map the social and economic consequences of these extreme hydrologic regimes. First, using fifty years of historical generation a cumulative monthly frequency curve for each of the six federal plants on the Missouri River is developed. Then following the scenario analysis technique performed by the Department of Interior's study on the Deepwater Horizon Spill social and economic consequence chains are mapped into quartiles of the monthly frequency curves utilizing guidance from U.S Army Corps of Engineers, Bureau of Reclamation, and Western area Power Administration. Locating the placement of the monthly generation for periods of extreme hydrological conditions within the frequency curve provides an objective relationship between the extreme event and the social and economic consequences. Using this approach over the fifty year period of record provides a way to analyze the cumulative multi-year effect of drought and flood, while also providing a way to calculate the uncertainty of the consequence associated with the extreme event.

  7. Threats of habitat and water-quality degradation to mussel diversity in the Meramec River Basin, Missouri, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hinck, Jo Ellen; Ingersoll, Christopher G.; Wang, Ning; Augspurger, Tom; Barnhart, M. Christopher; McMurray, Stephen E.; Roberts, Andrew D.; Schrader, Lynn

    2011-01-01

    The Meramec River Basin in east-central Missouri is an important stronghold for native freshwater mussels (Order: Unionoida) in the United States. Whereas the basin supports more than 40 mussel species, previous studies indicate that the abundance and distribution of most species are declining. Therefore, resource managers have identified the need to prioritize threats to native mussel populations in the basin and to design a mussel monitoring program. The objective of this study was to identify threats of habitat and water-quality degradation to mussel diversity in the basin. Affected habitat parameters considered as the main threats to mussel conservation included excess sedimentation, altered stream geomorphology and flow, effects on riparian vegetation and condition, impoundments, and invasive non-native species. Evaluating water-quality parameters for conserving mussels was a main focus of this study. Mussel toxicity data for chemical contaminants were compared to national water quality criteria (NWQC) and Missouri water quality standards (MWQS). However, NWQC and MWQS have not been developed for many chemical contaminants and some MWQS may not be protective of native mussel populations. Toxicity data indicated that mussels are sensitive to ammonia, copper, temperature, certain pesticides, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products; these compounds were identified as the priority water-quality parameters for mussel conservation in the basin. Measures to conserve mussel diversity in the basin include expanding the species and life stages of mussels and the list of chemical contaminants that have been assessed, establishing a long term mussel monitoring program that measures physical and chemical parameters of high priority, conducting landscape scale modeling to predict mussel distributions, determining sublethal effects of primary contaminants of concern, deriving risk-based guidance values for mussel conservation, and assessing the effects of wastewater

  8. Altitude, age, and quality of groundwater, Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District, eastern Nebraska, 1992 to 2009

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McGuire, Virginia L.; Ryter, Derek W.; Flynn, Amanda S.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Papio-Missouri River Natural Resources District (PMRNRD), conducted this study to map the water-level altitude of 2009 within the Elkhorn River Valley, Missouri River Valley, and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers; to present the predevelopment potentiometric-surface altitude within the Dakota aquifer; and to describe the age and quality of groundwater in the five principal aquifers of the PMRNRD in eastern Nebraska using data collected from 1992 to 2009. In addition, implications of alternatives to the current PMRNRD groundwater-quality monitoring approach are discussed. In the PMRNRD, groundwater altitude, relative to National Geodetic Vertical Datum of 1929, ranged from about 1,080 feet (ft) to 1,180 ft in the Elkhorn River Valley alluvial aquifer and from about 960 ft to 1,080 ft in the Missouri River Valley and Platte River Valley alluvial aquifers. In the PMRNRD, the estimated altitude of the potentiometric surface of the Dakota aquifer, predevelopment, ranged from about 1,100 ft to 1,200 ft. To assess groundwater age and quality, groundwater samples were collected from a total of 217 wells from 1992 to 2009 for analysis of various analytes. Groundwater samples collected in the PMRNRD from 1992 to 2009 and interpreted in this report were analyzed for age-dating analytes (chlorofluorocarbons), dissolved gases, major ions, trace elements, nutrients, stable isotope ratios, pesticides and pesticide degradates, volatile organic compounds, explosives, and 222radon. Apparent groundwater age was estimated from concentrations of chlorofluorocarbons measured in samples collected in 2000. Apparent groundwater-recharge dates ranged from older than 1940 in samples from wells screened in the Missouri River Valley alluvial aquifer to the early 1980s in samples from wells screened in the Dakota aquifer. Concentrations of major ions in the most recent sample per well collected from 1992 to 2009 indicate that the

  9. Hydrologic Analysis and Two-Dimensional Simulation of Flow at State Highway 17 crossing the Gasconade River near Waynesville, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In cooperation with the Missouri Department of Transportation, the U.S. Geological Survey determined hydrologic and hydraulic parameters for the Gasconade River at the site of a proposed bridge replacement and highway realignment of State Highway 17 near Waynesville, Missouri. Information from a discontinued streamflow-gaging station on the Gasconade River near Waynesville was used to determine streamflow statistics for analysis of the 25-, 50-, 100-, and 500-year floods at the site. Analysis of the streamflow-gaging stations on the Gasconade River upstream and downstream from Waynesville indicate that flood peaks attenuate between the upstream gaging station near Hazelgreen and the Waynesville gaging station, such that the peak discharge observed on the Gasconade River near Waynesville will be equal to or only slightly greater (7 percent or less) than that observed near Hazelgreen. A flood event occurred on the Gasconade River in March 2008, and a flood measurement was obtained near the peak at State Highway 17. The elevation of high-water marks from that event indicated it was the highest measured flood on record with a measured discharge of 95,400 cubic feet per second, and a water-surface elevation of 766.18 feet near the location of the Waynesville gaging station. The measurements obtained for the March flood resulted in a shift of the original stage-discharge relation for the Waynesville gaging station, and the streamflow statistics were modified based on the new data. A two-dimensional hydrodynamic flow model was used to simulate flow conditions on the Gasconade River in the vicinity of State Highway 17. A model was developed that represents existing (2008) conditions on State Highway 17 (the 'model of existing conditions'), and was calibrated to the floods of March 20, 2008, December 4, 1982, and April 14, 1945. Modifications were made to the model of existing conditions to create a model that represents conditions along the same reach of the Gasconade

  10. Physical and chemical data on sediments deposited in the Missouri and the Mississippi River flood plains during the July through August 1993 flood

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schalk, Gregg K.; Holmes, Jr., Robert R.; Johnson, Gary P.

    1998-01-01

    Because sediments deposited by the 1993 floods on the Missouri and Mississippi rivers were thought to contain elevated concentrations of nutrients and trace elements, sediment deposits were sampled at 25 floodplain locations. The samples were analyzed for particle size, water content, volatile solids, nutrients, carbon, selected trace elements, pesticides, and semivolatile organic compounds. Preflood soil samples were analyzed for particle size only. Procedures for selecting sites, techniques developed for sampling, laboratory and analytical methods, and quality assurance methods also are described.

  11. Coupling legacy geomorphic surface facies to riparian vegetation: Assessing red cedar invasion along the Missouri River downstream of Gavins Point dam, South Dakota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greene, Samantha L.; Knox, James C.

    2014-01-01

    Floods increase fluvial complexity by eroding established surfaces and creating new alluvial surfaces. As dams regulate channel flow, fluvial complexity often decreases and the hydro-eco-geomorphology of the riparian habitat changes. Along the Missouri River, flow regulation resulted in channel incision of 1-3 m within the study area and disconnected the pre-dam floodplain from the channel. Evidence of fluvial complexity along the pre-dam Missouri River floodplain can be observed through the diverse depositional environments represented by areas of varying soil texture. This study evaluates the role of flow regulation and depositional environment along the Missouri River in the riparian invasion of red cedar downstream of Gavins Point dam, the final dam on the Missouri River. We determine whether invasion began before or after flow regulation, determine patterns of invasion using Bayesian t-tests, and construct a Bayesian multivariate linear model of invaded surfaces. We surveyed 59 plots from 14 riparian cottonwood stands for tree age, plot composition, plot stem density, and soil texture. Red cedars existed along the floodplain prior to regulation, but at a much lower density than today. We found 2 out of 565 red cedars established prior to regulation. Our interpretation of depositional environments shows that the coarser, sandy soils reflect higher energy depositional pre-dam surfaces that were geomorphically active islands and point bars prior to flow regulation and channel incision. The finer, clayey soils represent lower energy depositional pre-dam surfaces, such as swales or oxbow depressions. When determining patterns of invasion for use in a predictive statistical model, we found that red cedar primarily establishes on the higher energy depositional pre-dam surfaces. In addition, as cottonwood age and density decrease, red cedar density tends to increase. Our findings indicate that flow regulation caused hydrogeomorphic changes within the study area that

  12. Erosional and depositional patterns associated with the 1993 Missouri River floods inferred from SIR-C and TOPSAR radar data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Izenberg, N.R.; Arvidson, R. E.; Brackett, R.A.; Saatchi, S.S.; Osburn, G.R.; Dohrenwend, J.

    1996-01-01

    The Missouri River floods of 1993 caused significant and widespread damage to the floodplains between Kansas City and St. Louis. Immediately downstream of levee breaks, flood waters scoured the bottoms. As the floodwaters continued, they spread laterally and deposited massive amounts of sand as crevasse splays on top of agricultural fields. We explore the use of radar interferometry and backscatter data for quantitative estimation of scour and deposition for Jameson Island/Arrow Rock Bottoms and Lisbon Bottoms, two bottoms that were heavily damaged during the floods and subsequently abandoned. Shuttle imaging radar C (SIR-C) L band (24 cm) HH (horizontally transmitted and horizontally received) radar backscatter data acquired in October 1994 were used together with a distorted Born approximation canopy scattering model to determine that the abundance of natural leafy forbs controlled the magnitude of backscatter for former agricultural fields. Forb areal density was found to be inversely correlated with thickness of sand deposited during the floods, presumably because thick sands prevented roots from reaching nutrient rich, moist bottoms soils. Using the inverse relationship, a lower bound for the mass of sand added was found to be 6.3 million metric tons over the 17 km2 study area. Digital elevation data from topographic synthetic aperture radar (TOPSAR) C band (5.6 cm) interferometric observations acquired in August 1994 were compared to a series of elevation profiles collected on the ground. Vertical errors in TOPSAR were estimated to range from 1 to 2 m, providing enough accuracy to generate an estimate of total mass (4.7 million metric tons) removed during erosion of levees and scour of the bottoms terrains. Net accretion of material to the study areas is consistent with the geologic record of major floods where sediment-laden floodwaters crested over natural levees, initially scoured into the bottoms, and then deposited sands as crevasse splays as the flows

  13. DESIGN AND INDICATOR CONSIDERATIONS FOR A PROBABILISTIC SURVEY OF USA GREAT RIVERS: MISSOURI, MISSISSIPPI, OHIO

    EPA Science Inventory

    Great River Ecosystems (GRE) include the river channel and associated backwaters and floodplain habitats. The challenge in designing a GRE monitoring and assessment program is to choose a set of habitats, indicators, and sampling locations that reveal the ecological condition of ...

  14. Utilization of Meteorological Satellite Imagery for World-Wide Environmental Monitoring the Lower Mississippi River Flood of 1979 - Case 1. [St. Louis, Missouri

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helfert, M. R.; Mccrary, D. G.; Gray, T. I. (Principal Investigator)

    1981-01-01

    The 1979 Lower Mississippi River flood was selected as a test case of environmental disaster monitoring utilizing NOAA-n imagery. A small scale study of the St. Louis Missouri area comparing ERTS-1 (LANDSAT) and NOAA-2 imagery and flood studies using only LANDSAT imagery for mapping the Rad River of the North, and Nimbus-5 imagery for East Australia show the nonmeteorological applications of NOAA satellites. While the level of NOAA-n imagery detail is not that of a LANDSAT image, for operational environmental monitoring users the NOAA-n imagery may provide acceptable linear resolution and spectral isolation.

  15. Effects of Impoundments and Land-Cover Changes on Streamflows and Selected Fish Habitat in the Upper Osage River Basin, Missouri and Kansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Licher, Susan S.; Schalk, Gregg K.

    2007-01-01

    A study was conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the Missouri Department of Conservation to estimate the effects of existing and proposed impoundments, land-cover changes, and reported water uses on streamflows in the 5,410-square mile upper Osage River Basin. The hydrologic model Hydrologic Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF) was calibrated and validated to current (1995?2004 water years) regulation and water-use conditions, and scenarios were developed to evaluate differences for the same 10-years of record under pre-settlement, and proposed impoundment conditions. Analyses included quantification of changes in the magnitude, frequency, timing, and duration of streamflows under each simulation scenario. Streamflows from the simulations were used in conjunction with known streamflow-fish habitat relations to quantify effects of altered flows on fish-habitat area at selected Marais des Cygnes and Marmaton River locations. The cumulative effects of impoundments and land-cover changes were determined to substantially alter streamflows in the upper Osage River Basin model simulations spanning pre-settlement to proposed future conditions. The degree of streamflow alteration varied between major subbasins. Streamflows in the Marais des Cygnes River Basin were altered between pre-settlement and current conditions, primarily by major impoundments, with smaller changes expected with proposed regulation. Streamflows in the Little Osage River Basin were relatively unchanged between pre-settlement and current conditions with land-cover changes (primarily the conversion of native prairies to cultivated land) affecting flows more than the few current impoundments in this basin. The current peak flows in the Marmaton River Basin generally were higher than pre-settlement or proposed scenario peak flows. Of the three major subbasins, the Marmaton River Basin is likely to be the most affected by proposed impoundments. Declines in monthly minimum streamflows

  16. Synthesis of natural flows at selected sites in the upper Missouri River basin, Montana, 1928-89

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cary, L.E.; Parrett, Charles

    1996-01-01

    Natural monthly streamflows were synthesized for the years 1928-89 for 43 sites in the upper Missouri River Basin upstream from Fort Peck Lake in Montana. The sites are represented as nodes in a streamflow accounting model being developed by the Bureau of Reclamation. Recorded and historical flows at most sites have been affected by human activities including reservoir storage, diversions for irrigation, and municipal use. Natural flows at the sites were synthesized by eliminating the effects of these activities. Recorded data at some sites do not include the entire study period. The missing flows at these sites were estimated using a statistical procedure. The methods of synthesis varied, depending on upstream activities and information available. Recorded flows were transferred to nodes that did not have streamflow-gaging stations from the nearest station with a sufficient length of record. The flows at one node were computed as the sum of flows from three upstream tributaries. Monthly changes in reservoir storage were computed from monthend contents. The changes in storage were corrected for the effects of evaporation and precipitation using pan-evaporation and precipitation data from climate stations. Irrigation depletions and consumptive use by the three largest municipalities were computed. Synthesized natural flow at most nodes was computed by adding algebraically the upstream depletions and changes in reservoir storage to recorded or historical flow at the nodes.

  17. 2005 Annual Synthesis Report, Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program and Associated Fish Community Monitoring for the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Eric W.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2008-08-12

    Pallid sturgeon, Scaphirhynchus albus, have declined throughout the Missouri River since dam construction and inception of the Bank Stabilization and Navigation Project in 1912. Their decline likely is due to the loss and degradation of their natural habitat as a result of changes in the river’s structure and function, as well as the pallid sturgeon’s inability to adapt to these changes. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers has been working with state and federal agencies to develop and conduct a Pallid Sturgeon Monitoring and Assessment Program (Program), with the goal of recovering pallid sturgeon populations. The Program has organized the monitoring and assessment efforts into distinct geographic segments, with state and federal resource management agencies possessing primary responsibility for one or more segment. To date, the results from annual monitoring have been reported for individual Program segments. However, monitoring results have not been summarized or evaluated for larger spatial scales, encompassing more than one Program segment. This report describes a summary conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that synthesizes the 2005 sampling year monitoring results from individual segments.

  18. 2006 Annual Synthesis Report, Pallid Sturgeon Population Assessment Program and Associated Fish Community Monitoring for the Missouri River

    SciTech Connect

    Oldenburg, Eric W.; Hanrahan, Timothy P.; Harnish, Ryan A.; Bellgraph, Brian J.; Duncan, Joanne P.; Allwardt, Craig H.

    2008-08-12

    Pallid sturgeon, Scaphirhynchus albus, have declined throughout the Missouri River since dam construction and inception of the Bank Stabilization and Navigation Project in 1912. Their decline likely is due to the loss and degradation of their natural habitat as a result of changes in the river’s structure and function, as well as the pallid sturgeon’s inability to adapt to these changes. The U. S. Army Corps of Engineers has been working with state and federal agencies to develop and conduct a Pallid Sturgeon Monitoring and Assessment Program (Program), with the goal of recovering pallid sturgeon populations. The Program has organized the monitoring and assessment efforts into distinct geographic segments, with state and federal resource management agencies possessing primary responsibility for one or more segment. To date, the results from annual monitoring have been reported for individual Program segments. However, monitoring results have not been summarized or evaluated for larger spatial scales, encompassing more than one Program segment. This report describes a summary conducted by the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) that synthesizes the 2006 sampling year monitoring results from individual segments.

  19. Cumuilative Effects of Impoundments on the Hydrology of Riparian Wetlands along the Marmaton River, west-central Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Krempa, Heather M.

    2011-01-01

    The effects of proposed impoundments and resulting streamflow regulation on riparian wetlands in the Marmaton River Basin, Missouri, USA were determined using measurements and numerical simulations of wetland water budgets. Calibrated and validated Soil-Plant-Air-Water (SPAW) models were used to simulate daily water depths of four riparian wetlands for Current (model scenario of existing impoundments) and Proposed (model scenario of existing and proposed impoundments) impoundment conditions. The simulated frequency of flooding decreased 19–65% at the wetlands following the additions of proposed impoundments. The reduced flooding resulted in decreases in wetland water depths at all sites during the 10 simulated growing seasons under Proposed conditions with an average duration of continuous water-depth declines of 289 days at the upstream (most regulated) site. Downstream wetlands within the zone of least regulation had an average duration of water level decreases of about 20 days. Decreased water levels under Proposed conditions resulted in a range of 65–365 additional dry days at the study wetlands during the simulated 10-year period of Proposed conditions. The areas of the four wetlands meeting the hydrologic criteria of a formal jurisdictional wetland definition decreased ranging from zero to 31% under Proposed impoundment conditions.

  20. Estimated Flood-Inundation Mapping for the Upper Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch in Kansas City, Missouri, 2006-08

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.; Huizinga, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    In the interest of improved public safety during flooding, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the city of Kansas City, Missouri, completed a flood-inundation study of the Blue River in Kansas City, Missouri, from the U.S. Geological Survey streamflow gage at Kenneth Road to 63rd Street, of Indian Creek from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, and of Dyke Branch from the Kansas-Missouri border to its mouth, to determine the estimated extent of flood inundation at selected flood stages on the Blue River, Indian Creek, and Dyke Branch. The results of this study spatially interpolate information provided by U.S. Geological Survey gages, Kansas City Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time gages, and the National Weather Service flood-peak prediction service that comprise the Blue River flood-alert system and are a valuable tool for public officials and residents to minimize flood deaths and damage in Kansas City. To provide public access to the information presented in this report, a World Wide Web site (http://mo.water.usgs.gov/indep/kelly/blueriver) was created that displays the results of two-dimensional modeling between Hickman Mills Drive and 63rd Street, estimated flood-inundation maps for 13 flood stages, the latest gage heights, and National Weather Service stage forecasts for each forecast location within the study area. The results of a previous study of flood inundation on the Blue River from 63rd Street to the mouth also are available. In addition the full text of this report, all tables and maps are available for download (http://pubs.usgs.gov/sir/2008/5068). Thirteen flood-inundation maps were produced at 2-foot intervals for water-surface elevations from 763.8 to 787.8 feet referenced to the Blue River at the 63rd Street Automated Local Evaluation in Real Time stream gage operated by the city of Kansas City, Missouri. Each map is associated with gages at Kenneth Road, Blue Ridge Boulevard, Kansas City (at Bannister Road), U.S. Highway 71

  1. 76 FR 6612 - Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Missouri 4, LLC; Allegheny 4 Hydro, LLC; Three Rivers Hydro, LLC...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-02-07

    ...; Project No. 13782-000] Lock+ Hydro Friends Fund XL; FFP Missouri 4, LLC; Allegheny 4 Hydro, LLC; Three... drawing will serve as the tiebreaker. Based on the drawing, the order of priority is as follows: 1....

  2. Community structure of age-0 fishes in paired mainstem and created shallow-water habitats in the Lower Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Starks, T. A.; Long, James M.; Dzialowski, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Anthropogenic alterations to aquatic ecosystems have greatly reduced and homogenized riverine habitat, especially those used by larval and juvenile fishes. Creation of shallow-water habitats is used as a restoration technique in response to altered conditions in several studies globally, but only recently in the USA. In the summer of 2012, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers sampled larval and juvenile fishes at six paired sites (mainstem and constructed chute shallow-water habitats) along a section of the Missouri River between Rulo, NE and St. Louis, MO, USA. From those samples, we enumerated and identified a total of 7622 fishes representing 12 families. Community responses of fishes to created shallow-water habitats were assessed by comparisons of species richness and diversity measures between paired sites and among sampling events. Shannon entropy measures were transformed, and gamma diversity (total diversity) was partitioned into two components, alpha (within community) and beta (between community) diversity using a multiplicative decomposition method. Mantel test results suggest site location, time of sampling event and habitat type were drivers of larval and juvenile community structure. Paired t-test results indicated little to no differences in beta diversity between habitat types; however, chute habitats had significantly higher alpha and gamma diversity as well as increased abundances of Asian carp larvae when compared with mainstem shallow-water habitat. Our results not only show the importance of created shallow-water habitat in promoting stream fish diversity but also highlight the role space and time may play in future restoration and management efforts. 

  3. An evaluation of the relative quality of dike pools for benthic macroinvertebrates in the Lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Poulton, B.C.; Allert, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    A habitat-based aquatic macroinvertebrate study was initiated in the Lower Missouri River to evaluate relative quality and biological condition of dike pool habitats. Water-quality and sediment-quality parameters and macroinvertebrate assemblage structure were measured from depositional substrates at 18 sites. Sediment porewater was analysed for ammonia, sulphide, pH and oxidation-reduction potential. Whole sediments were analysed for particle-size distribution, organic carbon and contaminants. Field water-quality parameters were measured at subsurface and at the sediment-water interface. Pool area adjacent and downstream from each dike was estimated from aerial photography. Macroinvertebrate biotic condition scores were determined by integrating the following indicator response metrics: % of Ephemeroptera (mayflies), % of Oligochaeta worms, Shannon Diversity Index and total taxa richness. Regression models were developed for predicting macroinvertebrate scores based on individual water-quality and sediment-quality variables and a water/sediment-quality score that integrated all variables. Macroinvertebrate scores generated significant determination coefficients with dike pool area (R2=0.56), oxidation–reduction potential (R2=0.81) and water/sediment-quality score (R2=0.71). Dissolved oxygen saturation, oxidation-reduction potential and total ammonia in sediment porewater were most important in explaining variation in macroinvertebrate scores. The best two-variable regression models included dike pool size + the water/sediment-quality score (R2=0.84) and dike pool size + oxidation-reduction potential (R2=0.93). Results indicate that dike pool size and chemistry of sediments and overlying water can be used to evaluate dike pool quality and identify environmental conditions necessary for optimizing diversity and productivity of important aquatic macroinvertebrates. A combination of these variables could be utilized for measuring the success of habitat enhancement

  4. Quality of stormwater runoff in the Blue River basin, Missouri and Kansas, July-October 1981 and April-July 1982

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blevins, D.W.

    1986-01-01

    Stormwater-runoff sampling was done at three mainstem stations on the Blue River, Missouri, and three stations on urban tributaries. Concentrations of lead, iron, manganese, zinc, and ammonia nitrogen consistently exceeded Missouri water-quality standards. Many constituents were significantly correlated with large concentrations of suspended sediment from the agricultural areas in the upstream part of the basin. However, mean concentrations of lead increased 200% and mean concentrations of zinc increased 100% in the urban reach of Blue River for some storms. Combined sewer overflows along Brush Creek, one of the urban tributaries, caused large concentrations of nutrients, suspended sediment, metals, and 5-day biochemical oxygen demand in the initial runoff. After extended dry periods, surface flushing caused concentrations of lead and zinc to be largest during initial runoff at all three urban tributaries. However, large flushes of most constituents were not detected at the mainstem stations. The large percentage of impervious surfaces and lined channels in urban areas caused increased volumes of runoff per unit of drainage area and limited the availability of sediment to streams. Consequently, concentrations of most constituents were small, but the loads per unit of drainage area were large when compared with those in Blue River. (USGS)

  5. Characteristics of sediment data and annual suspended-sediment loads and yields for selected lower Missouri River mainstem and tributary stations, 1976-2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Heimann, David C.; Rasmussen, Patrick P.; Cline, Teri L.; Pigue, Lori M.; Wagner, Holly R.

    2010-01-01

    Suspended-sediment data from 18 selected surface-water monitoring stations in the lower Missouri River Basin downstream from Gavins Point Dam were used in the computation of annual suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads for 1976 through 2008. Three methods of suspended-sediment load determination were utilized and these included the subdivision method, regression of instantaneous turbidity with suspended-sediment concentrations at selected stations, and regression techniques using the Load Estimator (LOADEST) software. Characteristics of the suspended-sediment and streamflow data collected at the 18 monitoring stations and the tabulated annual suspended-sediment and suspended-sand loads and yields are presented.

  6. Effects of urban runoff and wastewater effluent on Wilsons Creek and James River near Springfield, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Berkas, Wayne R.

    1980-01-01

    Statistical analysis on water-quality parameters from James River upstream and downstream from the confluence of Wilsons Creek shows a significant difference for all parameters except temperature and dissolved silica at the 0.05 probability level. Regression analysis shows correlation for discharge with dissolved sodium, dissolved chloride, and dissolved potassium, and for specific conductance with dissolved chloride and dissolved sulfate at the station downstream from Wilsons Creek. This is due to the consistent quality of the effluent from the Southwest Wastewater Plant on Wilsons Creek. Water-quality monitor stations upstream and downstream from the wastewater plant indicate that the plant has a degrading effect on dissolved oxygen in Wilsons Creek and James River. The monitors also indicate that rainfall flushes momentarily poor quality water into Wilsons Creek from the urbanized Springfield area. Overall, the runoff is diluting the effluent from the wastewater plant. Rainfall and runoff stations indicate a rapid response of runoff to rainfall due to the high percentage of imperviousness and the filling or paving of sinkholes. (USGS)

  7. ERTS-1 flood hazard studies in the Mississippi River Basin. [Missouri, Mississippi, and Arkansas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rango, A.; Anderson, A. T.

    1974-01-01

    The Spring 1973 Mississippi River flood was investigated using remotely sensed data from ERTS-1. Both manual and automatic analyses of the data indicate that ERTS-1 is extremely useful as a regional tool for flood and floodplain management. The maximum error of such flood area measurements is conservatively estimated to be less than five percent. Change detection analysis indicates that the flood had major impacts on soil moisture, land pattern stability, and vegetation stress. Flood hazard identification was conducted using photointerpretation techniques in three study areas along the Mississippi River using pre-flood ERTS-1 imagery down to 1:100,000 scale. Flood prone area boundaries obtained from ERTS-1 were generally in agreement with flood hazard maps produced by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the U.S. Geological Survey although the latter are somewhat more detailed because of their larger scale. Initial results indicate that ERTS-1 digital mapping of the flood-prone areas can be performed at least 1:62,500 which is comparable to conventional flood hazard map scales.

  8. Use of NARCCAP data to characterize regional climate uncertainty in the impact of global climate change on large river fish population: Missouri River sturgeon example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, C. J.; Wildhaber, M. L.; Wikle, C. K.; Moran, E. H.; Franz, K. J.; Dey, R.

    2012-12-01

    strategies. The results from hierarchical analysis of uncertainty are used to study the relative change in weights of the endangered Missouri River pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) under a 21st century climate scenario.

  9. Hydrodynamic Simulations of Physical Aquatic Habitat Availability for Pallid Sturgeon in the Lower Missouri River, at Yankton, South Dakota, Kenslers Bend, Nebraska, Little Sioux, Iowa, and Miami, Missouri, 2006-07

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, Robert B.; Johnson, Harold E., III; Dietsch, Benjamin J.

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the sensitivity of habitat availability in the Lower Missouri River to discharge variation, with emphasis on habitats that might support spawning of the endangered pallid sturgeon. We constructed computational hydrodynamic models for four reaches that were selected because of evidence that sturgeon have spawned in them. The reaches are located at Miami, Missouri (river mile 259.6-263.5), Little Sioux, Iowa (river mile 669.6-673.5), Kenslers Bend, Nebraska (river mile 743.9-748.1), and Yankton, South Dakota reach (river mile 804.8-808.4). The models were calibrated for a range of measured flow conditions, and run for a range of discharges that might be affected by flow modifications from Gavins Point Dam. Model performance was assessed by comparing modeled and measured water velocities. A selection of derived habitat units was assessed for sensitivity to hydraulic input parameters (drag coefficient and lateral eddy viscosity). Overall, model results were minimally sensitive to varying eddy viscosity; varying lateral eddy viscosity by 20 percent resulted in maximum change in habitat units of 5.4 percent. Shallow-water habitat units were most sensitive to variation in drag coefficient with 42 percent change in unit area resulting from 20 percent change in the parameter value; however, no habitat unit value changed more than 10 percent for a 10 percent variation in drag coefficient. Sensitivity analysis provides guidance for selecting habitat metrics that maximize information content while minimizing model uncertainties. To assess model sensitivities arising from topographic variation from sediment transport on an annual time scale, we constructed separate models from two complete independent surveys in 2006 and 2007. The net topographic change was minimal at each site; the ratio of net topographic change to water volume in the reaches at 95 percent exceedance flow was less than 5 percent, indicating that on a reach

  10. Characterization of environmental cues for initiation of reproductive cycling and spawning in shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus in the Lower Missouri River, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Papoulias, D.M.; DeLonay, A.J.; Annis, M.L.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Tillitt, D.E.

    2011-01-01

    We presume that the shovelnose sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus platorynchus) has evolved to spawn in the springtime when environmental conditions are at some optimum, but this state has not yet been defined. In this study physiological readiness to spawn in shovelnose sturgeon was examined to define more closely when spawning could occur and thus identify and evaluate prevailing environmental conditions that could cue spawning during that period. Reproductive assessments of Lower Missouri River shovelnose during 4 years (2005-2008) and at two locations (Gavins Point Dam, South Dakota and Boonville, Missouri) were used to identify shovelnose sturgeon spawning periods. Initiation of the spawning period, as defined by the presence of reproductively ready fish, was a highly predictable yearly event and extended over several weeks at each reach. The spawning period occurred earlier in the lower reach than in the upper reach and environmental conditions during the periods varied between locations and among years. Shovelnose sturgeon collected during the presumed spawning periods were at varying degrees of readiness to spawn as indicated by oocyte polarization index and blood reproductive hormones. Evaluation of the influence of environmental factors on readiness to spawn using stepwise multiple regression analysis indicated photoperiod followed by temperature were the best candidate variables overall to explain the trend. However, within geographically distinct populations gravid females are not all reproductively synchronized. Assuming that this apparent asynchrony in readiness is normal and not an artifact of the disturbed Missouri River system, we infer that individual sturgeon can persist in a reproductively ready state until conditions appropriate for spawning occur. Taken together, our results lead us to hypothesize that gravid females early in the reproductive cycle (post-vitellogenesis) respond to day length, a reliable annual cue, become increasingly more ready to

  11. Flood-related mortality--Missouri, 1993.

    PubMed

    1993-12-10

    Public health surveillance documented the impact of flood-related morbidity following the floods in the midwestern United States during the summer of 1993 (1,2). Because of extensive flooding of the Missouri and Mississippi rivers and their tributaries, the Missouri Department of Health (MDH) initiated surveillance to monitor flood-related mortality. This report summarizes epidemiologic information about deaths in Missouri that resulted from riverine flooding and flash flooding during the summer and fall of 1993. PMID:8246857

  12. A strategy for collecting ground-water data and developing a ground-water model of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer, Woodbury and Monona Counties, Iowa

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Buchmiller, Robert C.

    1988-01-01

    A ground-water-flow model and plan for obtaining supporting data are proposed for a part of the Missouri River alluvial aquifer in Woodbury and Monona Counties, Iowa. The proposed model and the use of the principle of superposition will aid in the interpretation of the relation between ground water and surface water in the study area, particularly the effect of lowered river stages on water levels in the alluvial aquifer. Information on the geometry, hydraulic characteristics, and water levels in the alluvial aquifer needs to be collected for use in the model and for model calibration. A plan to obtain hydrologic and geologic information by use of exploratory test-well drilling is proposed. Also proposed is a monitoring network to obtain information on the spatial and temporal variability of water levels within the study area.

  13. Interactions between walleyes and smallmouth bass in a Missouri River reservoir with consideration of the influence of temperature and prey

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wuellner, Melissa R.; Chipps, Steven R.; Willis, David W.; Adams, Wells E., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Walleyes Sander vitreus are the most popular fish among South Dakota anglers, but smallmouth bass Micropterus dolomieu were introduced to provide new angling opportunities. Some walleye anglers have reported reductions in the quality of walleye fisheries since the introduction of smallmouth bass and attribute this to the consumption of young walleyes by smallmouth bass and competition for shared prey resources. We quantified the diets of walleyes and smallmouth bass in the lower reaches of Lake Sharpe (a Missouri River reservoir), calculated the diet overlap between the two predators, and determined whether they partitioned shared prey based on size. We also quantified walleye diets in the upper reach of the reservoir, which has a different prey base and allowed us to compare the growth rates of walleyes within Lake Sharpe. Age-0 gizzard shad Dorosoma cepedianum composed a substantial proportion of the diets of both predators, regardless of location, for most of the growing season; the patterns in shad vulnerability appeared to drive the observed patterns in diet overlap. Smallmouth bass appeared to consume a smaller size range of gizzard shad than did walleyes, which consumed a wide range. Smallmouth bass consumed Sander spp. in some months, but in very low quantities. Given that global climate change is expected to alter the population and community dynamics in Great Plains reservoirs, we also used a bioenergetics approach to predict the potential effects of limiting prey availability (specifically, the absence of gizzard shad and rainbow smelt Osmerus mordax) and increased water temperatures (as projected from global climate change models) on walleye and smallmouth bass growth. The models indicated that the absence of rainbow smelt from the diets of walleyes in upper Lake Sharpe would reduce growth but that the absence of gizzard shad would have a more marked negative effect on both predators at both locations. The models also indicated that higher

  14. An experimental test and models of drift and dispersal processes of pallid sturgeon (Scaphirhynchus albus) free embryos in the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Braaten, P.J.; Fuller, D.B.; Lott, R.D.; Ruggles, M.P.; Brandt, T.F.; Legare, R.G.; Holm, R.J.

    2012-01-01

    Free embryos of wild pallid sturgeon Scaphirhynchus albus were released in the Missouri River and captured at downstream sites through a 180-km reach of the river to examine ontogenetic drift and dispersal processes. Free embryos drifted primarily in the fastest portion of the river channel, and initial drift velocities for all age groups (mean = 0.66–0.70 m s−1) were only slightly slower than mean water column velocity (0.72 m s−1). During the multi-day long-distance drift period, drift velocities of all age groups declined an average of 9.7% day−1. Younger free embryos remained in the drift upon termination of the study; whereas, older age groups transitioned from drifting to settling during the study. Models based on growth of free embryos, drift behavior, size-related variations in drift rates, and channel hydraulic characteristics were developed to estimate cumulative distance drifted during ontogenetic development through a range of simulated water temperatures and velocity conditions. Those models indicated that the average free embryo would be expected to drift several hundred km during ontogenetic development. Empirical data and model results highlight the long-duration, long-distance drift and dispersal processes for pallid sturgeon early life stages. In addition, results provide a likely mechanism for lack of pallid sturgeon recruitment in fragmented river reaches where dams and reservoirs reduce the length of free-flowing river available for pallid sturgeon free embryos during ontogenetic development.

  15. Bathymetric and Velocimetric Survey and Assessment of Habitat for Pallid Sturgeon on the Mississippi River in the Vicinity of the Proposed Interstate 70 Bridge at St. Louis, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.; Elliott, Caroline M.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2010-01-01

    A bathymetric and velocimetry survey was conducted on the Mississippi River in the vicinity of a proposed new bridge for Interstate 70 at St. Louis, Missouri. A multibeam echo sounder mapping system and an acoustic Doppler current profiler were used to obtain channel-bed elevations and vertically averaged and near-bed velocities for a 3,545-foot (1,080-meter) long reach of the Mississippi River approximately 1,935 feet (590 meters) wide from the Illinois to Missouri banks. Data from the 2009 survey were used to determine the conditions of the benthic habitat in the vicinity of the proposed Interstate 70 bridge. The channel-bed elevations ranged from approximately 346 feet (105.46 meters) to 370 feet (112.78 meters) above the North American Vertical Datum of 1988 in a majority of the channel except for the channel banks. Large dune features up to 12.5 feet (3.81 meters) high were present in the middle of the channel, and numerous smaller dunes and many ripples as smaller features were superimposed on the larger dunes. However, it is uncertain if the large dune features present in mid-channel are long-term features or an artifact of the seasonal flooding on the Mississippi River. A substantial scour depression was present on the right descending bank (Missouri side) near the downstream end of the study area, as well as other smaller scour holes near the instream barge mooring structures on the Missouri bank. The vertically averaged velocities acquired with the acoustic Doppler current profiler ranged from approximately 2 feet per second (0.61 meters per second) along the channel margins to approximately 7.0 feet per second (2.13 meters per second) in the main channel, with an average velocity of 5.5 feet per second (1.68 meters per second) in mid-channel. The orientation of the vertically averaged velocity vectors showed flow crossing from the Illinois bank to the Missouri bank from upstream to downstream in the study area, which was confirmed by the orientation of

  16. Extending a prototype knowledge and object based image analysis model to coarser spatial resolution imagery: an example from the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Laurence L.

    2012-01-01

    A prototype knowledge- and object-based image analysis model was developed to inventory and map least tern and piping plover habitat on the Missouri River, USA. The model has been used to inventory the state of sandbars annually for 4 segments of the Missouri River since 2006 using QuickBird imagery. Interpretation of the state of sandbars is difficult when images for the segment are acquired at different river stages and different states of vegetation phenology and canopy cover. Concurrent QuickBird and RapidEye images were classified using the model and the spatial correspondence of classes in the land cover and sandbar maps were analysed for the spatial extent of the images and at nest locations for both bird species. Omission and commission errors were low for unvegetated land cover classes used for nesting by both bird species and for land cover types with continuous vegetation cover and water. Errors were larger for land cover classes characterized by a mixture of sand and vegetation. Sandbar classification decisions are made using information on land cover class proportions and disagreement between sandbar classes was resolved using fuzzy membership possibilities. Regression analysis of area for a paired sample of 47 sandbars indicated an average positive bias, 1.15 ha, for RapidEye that did not vary with sandbar size. RapidEye has potential to reduce temporal uncertainty about least tern and piping plover habitat but would not be suitable for mapping sandbar erosion, and characterization of sandbar shapes or vegetation patches at fine spatial resolution.

  17. Extending a prototype knowledge- and object-based image analysis model to coarser spatial resolution imagery: an example from the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Strong, Laurence L.

    2012-01-01

    A prototype knowledge- and object-based image analysis model was developed to inventory and map least tern and piping plover habitat on the Missouri River, USA. The model has been used to inventory the state of sandbars annually for 4 segments of the Missouri River since 2006 using QuickBird imagery. Interpretation of the state of sandbars is difficult when images for the segment are acquired at different river stages and different states of vegetation phenology and canopy cover. Concurrent QuickBird and RapidEye images were classified using the model and the spatial correspondence of classes in the land cover and sandbar maps were analysed for the spatial extent of the images and at nest locations for both bird species. Omission and commission errors were low for unvegetated land cover classes used for nesting by both bird species and for land cover types with continuous vegetation cover and water. Errors were larger for land cover classes characterized by a mixture of sand and vegetation. Sandbar classification decisions are made using information on land cover class proportions and disagreement between sandbar classes was resolved using fuzzy membership possibilities. Regression analysis of area for a paired sample of 47 sandbars indicated an average positive bias, 1.15 ha, for RapidEye that did not vary with sandbar size. RapidEye has potential to reduce temporal uncertainty about least tern and piping plover habitat but would not be suitable for mapping sandbar erosion, and characterization of sandbar shapes or vegetation patches at fine spatial resolution.

  18. Characteristics of suspended and streambed sediment within constructed chutes and the main channel at Upper Hamburg and Glovers Point Bends, Missouri River, Nebraska, 2008

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Woodward, Brenda K.; Rus, David L.

    2011-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Omaha District, as part of the Missouri River Bank Stabilization and Navigation Mitigation Project, has constructed 17 off-channel chutes along the channelized Missouri River, downstream from Sioux City, Iowa, to increase habitat diversity. To better understand characteristics of suspended and streambed sediment within these constructed chutes, the U.S. Geological Survey investigated specific aspects of chute design and function in relation to sediment characteristics including: (1) effects of inlet structures; (2) changes occurring between the inlet and the outlet of a chute; (3) effects of chutes on sediment characteristics in the main channel; and (4) differences in chute dynamics between sampled chutes. Two chutes differing in design, location, and dynamics were studied, Upper Hamburg Bend near Nebraska City, Nebr., and Glovers Point Bend near Winnebago, Nebr. Each site was characterized using five or more sampling transects (two in the chute and three to four in the main channel) designed to bracket sediment exchanges between chutes and the main channel. A sixth transect was included at the Upper Hamburg Bend study site to account for the effects of a nontarget chute having its inlet midway between the inlet and outlet of the primary chute. Representative samples of suspended and streambed sediment were collected at each transect, along with measurements of turbidity and streamflow, between June and November 2008. Four sets of samples were collected at the Glovers Point Bend study site and five sample sets were collected from the Upper Hamburg Bend study site. Results from paired t-tests and standard t-tests indicated that the inlet structure design, passing inflow only from the top of the main-channel water column, reduced the supply of coarse-grained suspended sediment entering the chutes. Statistical comparisons did not indicate differences between the inlet and outlet of either chute; however, anecdotal evidence of recent

  19. Multi-scale Factors Affecting the Distribution of the Critically Imperiled Crayfish, Orconectes williamsi, in the Upper White River Drainage of Missouri, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Westhoff, J. T.; Distefano, R. J.; Guyot, J. A.; McManus, M. G.

    2005-05-01

    Orconectes williamsi is known from only a few locations in the upper White River drainage of Missouri and Arkansas. We implemented a stratified (by stream order) random survey to sample for this crayfish in Missouri in 2003-04. Survey objectives were twofold. First, we estimated the overall proportion of stream order segments (segments of streams between points where stream order changes) in the drainage harboring O. williamsi, and then estimated the proportion of first, second and third (or larger) order stream segments harboring this crayfish. Second, we obtained means or ratio estimators (point estimates) and 95 % confidence limits (interval estimates) for 62 environmental variables and conducted overall contrasts of those estimates between segments that did and did not harbor O. williamsi. For significant overall contrasts, we then conducted contrasts partitioned by stream order. We detected O. williamsi at an overall proportion of 0.34 of 50 sampled segments, with no difference between first and second order stream segments. Variables exhibiting differences between segments that did and did not harbor O. williamsi included bankfull width:bankfull depth ratio, wetted width:wetted depth ratio, macrophyte abundance, elevation, and stream connectivity. Results will be used to drive future sampling and conservation efforts.

  20. Concentration trends for lead and calcium-normalized lead in fish fillets from the Big River, a mining-contaminated stream in southeastern Missouri USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schmitt, Christopher J.; McKee, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Lead (Pb) and calcium (Ca) concentrations were measured in fillet samples of longear sunfish (Lepomis megalotis) and redhorse suckers (Moxostoma spp.) collected in 2005–2012 from the Big River, which drains a historical mining area in southeastern Missouri and where a consumption advisory is in effect due to elevated Pb concentrations in fish. Lead tends to accumulated in Ca-rich tissues such as bone and scale. Concentrations of Pb in fish muscle are typically low, but can become elevated in fillets from Pb-contaminated sites depending in part on how much bone, scale, and skin is included in the sample. We used analysis-of-covariance to normalize Pb concentration to the geometric mean Ca concentration (415 ug/g wet weight, ww), which reduced variation between taxa, sites, and years, as was the number of samples that exceeded Missouri consumption advisory threshold (300 ng/g ww). Concentrations of Pb in 2005–2012 were lower than in the past, especially after Ca-normalization, but the consumption advisory is still warranted because concentrations were >300 ng/g ww in samples of both taxa from contaminated sites. For monitoring purposes, a simple linear regression model is proposed for estimating Ca-normalized Pb concentrations in fillets from Pb:Ca molar ratios as a way of reducing the effects of differing preparation methods on fillet Pb variation.

  1. Data Collected to Support Monitoring of Constructed Emergent Sandbar Habitat on the Missouri River Downstream from Gavins Point Dam, South Dakota and Nebraska, 2004-06

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thompson, Ryan F.; Johnson, Michaela R.; Andersen, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers has constructed emergent sandbar habitat on sections of the Missouri River bordering South Dakota and Nebraska downstream from Gavins Point Dam to create and enhance habitat for threatened and endangered bird species. Two areas near river miles 761.3 and 769.8 were selected for construction of emergent sandbar habitat. Pre- and postconstruction data were collected by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, to evaluate the success of the habitat management techniques. Data collected include pre- and postconstruction channel-geometry data (bathymetric and topographic) for areas upstream from, downstream from, and within each construction site. Water-velocity data were collected for selected parts of the site near river mile 769.8. Instruments and methods used in data collection, as well as quality-assurance and quality-control measures, are described. Geospatial channel-geometry data are presented for transects of the river channel as cross sections and as geographical information system shapefiles. Geospatial land-surface elevation data are provided for part of each site in the form of a color-shaded relief map. Geospatial water-velocity data also are provided as color-shaded maps and geographical information system shapefiles.

  2. Ground-water monitoring plan, water quality, and variability of agricultural chemicals in the Missouri River alluvial aquifer near the City of Independence, Missouri, well field, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kelly, Brian P.

    2002-01-01

    A detailed ground-water sampling plan was developed and executed for 64 monitoring wells in the city of Independence well field to characterize ground-water quality in the 10-year zone of contribution. Samples were collected from monitoring wells, combined Independence well field pumpage, and the Missouri River at St. Joseph, Missouri, from 1998 through 2000. In 328 ground-water samples from the 64 monitoring wells and combined well field pumpage samples, specific conductance values ranged from 511 to 1,690 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, pH values ranged from 6.4 to 7.7, water temperature ranged from 11.3 to 23.6 degrees Celsius, and dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 0 to 3.3 milligrams per liter. In 12 samples from the combined well field pumpage samples, specific conductance values ranged from 558 to 856 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, pH values ranged from 6.9 to 7.7, water temperature ranged from 5.8 to 22.9 degrees Celsius, and dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 0 to 2.4 milligrams per liter. In 45 Missouri River samples, specific conductance values ranged from 531 to 830 microsiemens per centimeter at 25 degrees Celsius, pH ranged from 7.2 to 8.7, water temperature ranged from 0 to 30 degrees Celsius, and dissolved oxygen concentrations ranged from 5.0 to 17.6 milligrams per liter. The secondary maximum contaminant level for sulfate in drinking water was exceeded once in samples from two monitoring wells, the maximum contaminant level (MCL) for antimony was exceeded once in a sample from one monitoring well, and the MCL for barium was exceeded once in a sample from one monitoring well. The MCL for iron was exceeded in samples from all monitoring wells except two. The MCL for manganese was exceeded in all samples from monitoring wells and combined well field pumpage. Enzyme linked immunoassay methods indicate total benzene, toluene, ethyl benzene, and xylene (BTEX) was detected in samples from five

  3. Implementation of a non-lethal biopsy punch monitoring program for mercury in smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu Lacepède, from the Eleven Point River, Missouri

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ackerson, J.R.; Schmitt, C. J.; McKee, M.J.; Brumbaugh, W.G.

    2013-01-01

    A non-lethal biopsy method for monitoring mercury (Hg) concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu; smallmouth) from the Eleven Point River in southern Missouri USA was evaluated. A biopsy punch was used to remove a muscle tissue plug from the area immediately below the anterior dorsal fin of 31 smallmouth. An additional 35 smallmouth (controls) were held identically except that no tissue plug was removed. After sampling, all fish were held in a concrete hatchery raceway for 6 weeks. Mean survival at the end of the holding period was 97 % for both groups. Smallmouth length, weight and Fulton’s condition factor at the end of the holding period were also similar between plugged and non-plugged controls, indicating that the biopsy procedure had minimal impact on growth under these conditions. Tissue plug Hg concentrations were similar to smallmouth Hg data obtained in previous years by removing the entire fillet for analysis.

  4. Implementation of a non-lethal biopsy punch monitoring program for mercury in smallmouth bass, Micropterus dolomieu Lacepède, from the Eleven Point River, Missouri.

    PubMed

    Ackerson, J R; McKee, M J; Schmitt, C J; Brumbaugh, W G

    2014-02-01

    A non-lethal biopsy method for monitoring mercury (Hg) concentrations in smallmouth bass (Micropterus dolomieu; smallmouth) from the Eleven Point River in southern Missouri USA was evaluated. A biopsy punch was used to remove a muscle tissue plug from the area immediately below the anterior dorsal fin of 31 smallmouth. An additional 35 smallmouth (controls) were held identically except that no tissue plug was removed. After sampling, all fish were held in a concrete hatchery raceway for 6 weeks. Mean survival at the end of the holding period was 97 % for both groups. Smallmouth length, weight and Fulton's condition factor at the end of the holding period were also similar between plugged and non-plugged controls, indicating that the biopsy procedure had minimal impact on growth under these conditions. Tissue plug Hg concentrations were similar to smallmouth Hg data obtained in previous years by removing the entire fillet for analysis. PMID:24196376

  5. Geomorphic change on the Missouri River during the flood of 2011: Chapter I in 2011 Floods of the Central United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Schenk, Edward R.; Skalak, Katherine J.; Benthem, Adam J.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Woodward, Brenda K.; Wiche, Gregg J.; Galloway, Joel M.; Nustad, Rochelle A.; Hupp, Cliff R.

    2014-01-01

    The 2011 flood on the Missouri River was one of the largest floods since the river became regulated by a series of high dams in the mid-20th century (greater than 150,000 cubic feet per second during the peak). The flood persisted through most of the summer, eroding river banks, adding sand to sandbars, and moving the thalweg of the channel in many places. The U.S. Geological Survey monitored and assessed the changes in two reaches of the Missouri River: the Garrison Reach in North Dakota, bounded by the Garrison Dam and the Lake Oahe Reservoir, and the Recreational Reach along the boundary of South Dakota and Nebraska bounded upstream by the Gavins Point Dam and extending downstream from Ponca, Nebraska. Historical cross-section data from the Garrison Dam closure until immediately before the flood indicate that the upper reaches of the river near the dam experienced rapid erosion, channel incision, and island/sandbar loss following the dam closure. The erosion, incision, and land loss lessened with time. Conversely, the lower reach near the Lake Oahe Reservoir slackwaters became depositional with channel in-filling and sandbar growth through time as the flow slowed upon reaching the reservoir. Preliminary post-flood results in the Garrison Reach indicate that the main channel has deepened at most cross-sections whereas sandbars and islands have grown vertically. Sandbars and the thalweg migrated within the Recreational Reach, however net scouring and aggradation was minimal. Changes in the two-dimensional area of sandbars and islands are still being assessed using high-resolution satellite imagery. A sediment balance can be constructed for the Garrison Reach using cross-sections, bathymetric data, sand traps for wind-blown material, a quasi-three-dimensional numerical model, and dating of sediment cores. Data collection and analysis for a reach-scale sediment balance and a concurrent analysis of the effects of riparian and island vegetation on sediment deposition

  6. Effects of flow dynamics on the aquatic-terrestrial transition zone (ATTZ) of lower Missouri river sandbars with implications for selected biota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tracy-Smith, Emily; Galat, David L.; Jacobson, Robert B.

    2012-01-01

    Sandbars are an important aquatic terrestrial transition zone (ATTZ) in the active channel of rivers that provide a variety of habitat conditions for riverine biota. Channelization and flow regulation in many large rivers have diminished sandbar habitats and their rehabilitation is a priority. We developed sandbar-specific models of discharge-area relationships to determine how changes in flow regime affect the area of different habitat types within the submerged sandbar ATTZ (depth) and exposed sandbar ATTZ (elevation) for a representative sample of Lower Missouri River sandbars. We defined six different structural habitat types within the sandbar ATTZ based on depth or exposed elevation ranges that are important to different biota during at least part of their annual cycle for either survival or reproduction. Scenarios included the modelled natural flow regime, current managed flow regime and two environmental flow options, all modelled within the contemporary river active channel. Thirteen point and wing-dike sandbars were evaluated under four different flow scenarios to explore the effects of flow regime on seasonal habitat availability for foraging of migratory shorebirds and wading birds, nesting of softshell turtles and nursery of riverine fishes. Managed flows provided more foraging habitat for shorebirds and wading birds and more nursery habitat for riverine fishes within the channelized reach sandbar ATTZ than the natural flow regime or modelled environmental flows. Reduced summer flows occurring under natural and environmental flow alternatives increased exposed sandbar nesting habitat for softshell turtle hatchling emergence. Results reveal how management of channelized and flow regulated large rivers could benefit from a modelling framework that couples hydrologic and geomorphic characteristics to predict habitat conditions for a variety of biota.

  7. Results of repeat bathymetric and velocimetric surveys at the Amelia Earhart Bridge on U.S. Highway 59 over the Missouri River at Atchison, Kansas, 2009-2013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Huizinga, Richard J.

    2013-01-01

    Bathymetric and velocimetric data were collected six times by the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Kansas Department of Transportation, in the vicinity of Amelia Earhart Bridge on U.S. Highway 59 over the Missouri River at Atchison, Kansas. A multibeam echosounder mapping system and an acoustic Doppler current meter were used to obtain channel-bed elevations and depth-averaged velocities for a river reach approximately 2,300 feet long and extending across the active channel of the Missouri River. The bathymetric and velocimetric surveys provide a “snapshot” of the channel conditions at the time of each survey, and document changes to the channel-bed elevations and velocities during the course of construction of a new bridge for U.S. Highway 59 downstream from the Amelia Earhart Bridge. The baseline survey in June 2009 revealed substantial scour holes existed at the railroad bridge piers upstream from and at pier 10 of the Amelia Earhart Bridge, with mostly uniform flow and velocities throughout the study reach. After the construction of a trestle and cofferdam on the left (eastern) bank downstream from the Amelia Earhart Bridge, a survey on June 2, 2010, revealed scour holes with similar size and shape as the baseline for similar flow conditions, with slightly higher velocities and a more substantial contraction of flow near the bridges than the baseline. Subsequent surveys during flooding conditions in June 2010 and July 2011 revealed substantial scour near the bridges compared to the baseline survey caused by the contraction of flow; however, the larger flood in July 2011 resulted in less scour than in June 2010, partly because the removal of the cofferdam for pier 5 of the new bridge in March 2011 diminished the contraction near the bridges. Generally, the downstream part of the study reach exhibited varying amounts of scour in all of the surveys except the last when compared to the baseline. During the final survey, velocities throughout the

  8. Zero-inflated modeling of fish catch per unit area resulting from multiple gears: Application to channel catfish and shovelnose sturgeon in the Missouri River

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arab, A.; Wildhaber, M.L.; Wikle, C.K.; Gentry, C.N.

    2008-01-01

    Fisheries studies often employ multiple gears that result in large percentages of zero values. We considered a zero-inflated Poisson (ZIP) model with random effects to address these excessive zeros. By employing a Bayesian ZIP model that simultaneously incorporates data from multiple gears to analyze data from the Missouri River, we were able to compare gears and make more year, segment, and macrohabitat comparisons than did the original data analysis. For channel catfish Ictalurus punctatus, our results rank (highest to lowest) the mean catch per unit area (CPUA) for gears (beach seine, benthic trawl, electrofishing, and drifting trammel net); years (1998 and 1997); macrohabitats (tributary mouth, connected secondary channel, nonconnected secondary channel, and bend); and river segment zones (channelized, inter-reservoir, and least-altered). For shovelnose sturgeon Scaphirhynchus platorynchus, the mean CPUA was significantly higher for benthic trawls and drifting trammel nets; 1998 and 1997; tributary mouths, bends, and connected secondary channels; and some channelized or least-altered inter-reservoir segments. One important advantage of our approach is the ability to reliably infer patterns of relative abundance by means of multiple gears without using gear efficiencies. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  9. Geohydrologic framework, ground-water hydrology, and water use in the Gasconade River basin upstream from Jerome, Missouri, including the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mugel, Douglas N.; Imes, Jeffrey L.

    2003-01-01

    The Ozark aquifer is the principal source of ground water in the Gasconade River Basin upstream from Jerome, Missouri (herein referred to as the upper Gasconade River Basin), including the Fort Leonard Wood Military Reservation (FLWMR). The Ozark aquifer is composed of, in order of increasing age, the Cotter Dolomite, Jefferson City Dolomite, Roubidoux Formation, Gasconade Dolomite, Eminence Dolomite, and Potosi Dolomite. Sedimentary strata are nearly horizontal, except along folds and collapse zones where dips can be steep. The basin is cut by numerous faults, most of which trend generally northwest-southeast. The Jefferson City Dolomite and the Cotter Dolomite generally yield little water to wells. Wells completed in the Roubidoux Formation and Gasconade Dolomite commonly yield from several tens to several hundred gallons per minute of water. The Eminence Dolomite may form a weak hydrologic barrier to vertical ground-water flow between the overlying Gasconade Dolomite and the underlying Potosi Dolomite. The Potosi Dolomite is the most permeable formation in the Ozark aquifer. Wells completed in the Potosi Dolomite may yield from several hundred to 1,000 gallons per minute of water. Water-table contours indicate several areas of high permeability karst terrain in the upper Gasconade River Basin. Ground-water levels may be as deep as 300 feet below the land surface beneath upland areas where karst features are prevalent. Although the Jefferson City Dolomite and the Roubidoux Formation are the uppermost bedrock formations in the upland areas of the FLWMR, the water table generally is deep enough to occur in the underlying Gasconade Dolomite throughout most of the FLWMR. Discharge from springs [311 ft3/s (cubic feet per second)] represented 56 percent of the August 1999 discharge of the Gasconade River at Jerome, Missouri (552 ft3/s). From 1993 through 1997, annual pumpage from all public water-supply wells in the upper Gasconade River Basin ranged from 1,820 Mgal

  10. A model-based evaluation of the impacts of urban expansion on flow variability and aquatic biodiversity in the Big River watershed in eastern Missouri (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knouft, J.; Chu, M. L.

    2013-12-01

    Natural flow regimes in aquatic systems sustain biodiversity and provide support for basic ecological processes. Nevertheless, the hydrology of aquatic systems is heavily impacted by human activities including land use changes associated with urbanization. Small increases in urban expansion can greatly increase surface runoff while decreasing infiltration. These changes in land use can also affect aquifer recharge and alter streamflow, thus impacting water quality, aquatic biodiversity, and ecosystem productivity. However, there are few studies predicting the effects of various levels of urbanization on flow regimes and the subsequent impacts of these flow alterations on ecosystem endpoints at the watershed scale. We quantified the potential effects of varying degrees of urban expansion on the discharge, velocity, and water depth in the Big River watershed in eastern Missouri using a physically-based watershed model, MIKE-SHE, and a 1D hydrodynamic river model, MIKE-11. Five land cover scenarios corresponding to increasing levels of urban expansion were used to determine the sensitivity of flow in the Big River watershed to increasing urbanization. Results indicate that the frequency of low flow events decreases as urban expansion increases, while the frequency of average and high-flow events increases as urbanization increases. We used current estimates of flow from the MIKE-SHE model to predict variation in fish species richness at 44 sites across the watershed based on standardized fish collections from each site. This model was then used with flow estimates from the urban expansion hydrological models to predict potential changes in fish species richness as urban areas increase. Responses varied among sites with some areas predicted to experience increases in species richness while others are predicted to experience decreases in species richness. Taxonomic identity of species also appeared to influence results with the number of species of Cyprinidae (minnows